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UNSOCIAL MEDIA: DID THE CITY CROSS THE LINE WHILE INVESTIGATING JORDAN MILES? 06


EVENTS CAN CE

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12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

1.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AMERNET STRING QUARTET WITH PIANIST AMY WILLIAMS Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: KEN VANDERMARK / NATE WOOLEY DUO Warhol theater FREE Parking in Warhol Lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

1.30 – 7pm EXHIBITION OPENING: SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT Sponsored by UPMC FREE

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


12.03/12.10.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 49

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY NATHAN MAZUR}

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS] it was improper … that should be 06 “Ifbrought to the attention of the court even now.” — Attorney Kerry Lewis on the possibility that investigators may have improperly used social media to gather info on Jordan Miles

[VIEWS] should we be peaceful when 14 “Why our killers never are?” — Activist Jasiri X offers his perspective following the Ferguson grand-jury decision

THE REGION’S

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

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got the perfect wine for a 19 “You’ve holiday dinner party.” — Celine Roberts, on this year’s Beaujolais Nouveau

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

“Pennsylvania has some of the strictest liquor laws of any state.” — Opus One Productions’ Michele Mengel on why young musicians can’t play some venues

[SCREEN] leaves its more interesting female 32 “Itcharacters behind in favor of another wagon-full of Tommy Lee Jones grumpily sorting things out.”— Al Hoff reviews The Homesman

[ARTS] a farce about fame, fantasy and 38 “It’s failed headstands.” — Bill O’Driscoll on one of the short stories in Craig Bernier’s new collection

[LAST PAGE] gets you where you want 55 “Tenacity to go and gratitude doesn’t allow you to be angry along the way.” — Actor, producer and author Henry Winkler on the secret to career longevity

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 49 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 STUFF WE LIKE 52 N E W S

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

ROCK • COUNTRY • POP • DANCE

DECEMBER 5 // NOMaD DECEMBER 6 // LOVEBETTIE DECEMBER 12 // JIMBO & THE SOUPBONES DECEMBER 13 // BON JOURNEY DECEMBER 19 // AIMEE JANE WILLER BAND DECEMBER 20 // VELVEETA DECEMBER 26 // RADIO TOKYO DECEMBER 27 // HOUSE OF SOUL NEW YEARS EVE DECEMBER 31 // CITYSCAPE

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“MY INITIAL INSTINCT IS IT SOUNDS NOT KOSHER.”

INCOMING Re: Eve Picker is going to fill the city’s vacant lots — one tiny house at a time (Nov. 26) “I am converting a small shed (10-by-16) into a tiny house in Preston County, W.Va., and plan to build one from scratch on wheels starting in the spring of 2015. I see the Tiny House Movement as a solution to the housing issue, as well as one way to cope with climate change. The tiny house uses less energy, is more adaptable to renewables and encourages its occupants to have a smaller carbon footprint in every way.” — Web comment from “Carrie Charles Stone”

RE: For locally owned stores, holiday sales are a large part of a successful year (Nov. 26) “When you shop local stores, your money goes 100 percent into your local economy! Marketing, community involvement and professional services are all beneficiaries. I love local shop owners; they are committed to our community, in a way that national chains are rarely able or willing to support. If you love a locally owned store, bar or restaurant, please visit! We are here because of you, and it is truly our pleasure to take care of you!” — Web comment from “Lisa Slesinger”

My new #Narcoleptic superpower: slept thru 90% of a 2-hr parade 1 block over in the middle of downtown Pittsburgh. #Narcolepsy — Nov. 29 tweet from “Mila Z” (@The_ZenMistress)

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T SEEMED innocuous enough. Wearing a dark-blue tank top and backward baseball cap, Jordan Miles is raising his arms up to his head and flexing his biceps, grinning through a patchy beard and mustache. His father, grasping a cup in his left hand, is standing in the background in an identical stance. They’re posing for a photo — one Miles thought nothing of sharing on his Facebook page. But that picture’s meaning would be forever altered, eventually morphing into Exhibit 34 C: evidence that would be used to try and convince a jury that Miles was a physical threat against the three Pittsburgh police officers whom he’d accused of leaving him bruised and bloodied before falsely arresting him. That photo was just one of several taken from social media that were introduced in both of Miles’ civil trials against

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

the city and three of its officers. Some of them were profile pictures, up for grabs to anyone with an Internet connection. Not the photo with his dad. “They had to have been my [Facebook] friend to see it,” says Miles, now 22. “I was shocked that they were able to go on my page.” Whether Miles should have expected photos he posted of himself online to remain private is a complicated question — and the legality of using social media to gather evidence is constantly evolving. But documents recently obtained under the state’s right-to-know law show that the city hired outside investigators to collect information about Miles on social media in ways that could have violated ethics rules, including creating fake profiles or trying to reach him without permission from his lawyers.

The documents show that after Miles sued the city and the officers who beat and arrested him in 2010, the city hired CSI Corporate Security and Investigations to gather information about him. And while cities frequently investigate people who sue them, an invoice shows the city was billed for creating a socialmedia profile and email address not only for “monitoring of social networking profiles” but also to “connect” with Miles. “I can’t imagine they set up an email account and said, ‘Hi, we’re an investigative agency for the city and want to ask you some questions,’” says Steven Baicker-McKee, a law professor at Duquesne University with expertise in civil procedure. “It would be improper to go around a party’s lawyer to get in touch directly through some kind of socialmedia outreach.” CONTINUES ON PG. 08


CHOOSE WISELY: If you automatically enroll in the same health plan you bought last year you could be missing out.

UPMC Health Plan has some of the lowest cost plans in western Pennsylvania*. Make sure you check all your options and enroll by December 15th in order to have coverage starting January 1, 2015. Apply for federal help paying for health insurance on the Marketplace. Even if you applied last year, make sure you reapply this year. Look over the prices so you know you’re choosing the most affordable plan. Be absolutely certain that your plan provides full in-network access to the doctors and hospitals of UPMC. Enroll by December 15th for coverage that begins January 1, 2015!

The Marketplace is open. Find the plan that’s best for you today at upmchealthplan.com/coverage, call 1-855-416-8762, or contact your local producer.

*Based on plans available in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Erie, Washington, and Westmoreland counties and excludes UPMC Advantage Catastrophic plans.

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UNSOCIAL MEDIA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

CCAC Labor & Management Institute The Robert M. Mill Lecture Series Pittsburgh Labor & Management Past & Future: A Labor-Management Discussion presents

From Conflict to Collaboration

The compelling story of Golden Living (formerly Beverly Enterprises, Inc.) and the SEIU that moved from an adversarial relationship to a transformative working environment.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 t2:00 p.m. Reception to follow

Featured Panelists: Neal Bisno, President, SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania International Vice President, SEIU Scott Norton, Vice President, Labor Relations & Field Human Resources Support Services, Golden Living Matt Yarnell, Executive Vice President, SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania Lisa Williams, Executive Director, SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania Training & Education Fund

CCAC Allegheny Campus Foerster Student Service Center Auditorium 3JEHF"WFOVFt1JUUTCVSHI 1" ɧFFWFOUJTGSFFBOEPQFOUPUIFQVCMJD3FTFSWBUJPOTBSFSFRVFTUFECZ.POEBZ  %FDFNCFS $&6TBSFBWBJMBCMF'PSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPOPSUPSFHJTUFS  contact PSLaborManagement@ccac.edu'SFFQBSLJOHJTBWBJMBCMF

Presenting Partners: Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield & Peoples Natural Gas Co., LLC

CCAC Labor & Management nstitute ROBERT M. MILL LECTURE SERIES ROBERT M. MILL ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIP ACADEMIC STUDIES CERTIFICATE

Jordan Miles (foreground), with his father

Still, the documents don’t detail exactly what information was collected or whether the profile used to connect with Miles was deliberately misleading. Neither CSI nor the city would elaborate. Miles acknowledges that some of the shirtless, muscle-exing photos introduced at trial had been public-proďŹ le pictures, viewable by anyone. And he admits accepting lots of friend requests from people he didn’t know — he was inundated after his case drew national headlines. But whether the content Miles shares only with his Facebook friends should have been included at trial is debatable. Opinions differ, for instance, on whether friending someone using a fake proďŹ le on Facebook is the same as creating a fake profile to view someone’s public LinkedIn page. “That’s how granular it gets,â€? says Hanni Fakhoury, a lawyer with the non-

profit Electronic Frontier Foundation, which focuses on civil-liberties issues related to technology. For Ethan Wall, a social-media legal expert who teaches at Nova Southeastern University, in Florida, the documents are suspicious. If “an investigator is creating a fake proďŹ le to connect with Miles, [that] raises some serious red ags about whether or not the investigator may have taken steps to access Miles’ content in a way that might violate bar ethics rules.â€? EVER SINCE 2010, when

Miles was confronted by Pittsburgh ofďŹ cers David Sisak, Michael Saldutte and Richard Ewing, critical facts about what happened have been disputed. As Miles walked to his grandmother’s house on a cold January night, the ofďŹ cers claimed Miles was acting suspiciously and CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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HOLIDAY SPONSOR

A CLASSIC P ITTSBURGH TRA A DITION N

HIGHMARK HOLIDAY POPS

DECEMBER 12-14, 20 & 21

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Todd Ellison, conductor Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, Betsy Burleigh, director

Ring in the season with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Mendelssohn Choir and a highly-decorated cast of guest artists in a spectacular Pittsburgh tradition. Rejoice in your favorite carols and cherished holiday tunes like “Sleigh Ride,” “Joy to the World” and more. And be good for goodness sake, because Jolly Old St. Nick will be dropping by for a special visit.

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/pops.

14SYM291_HolidayPops_CityPaper_9.25x9.75_FINAL.indd + N E W S T A S T1

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UNSOCIAL MEDIA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

tried to flee when they hailed him. What happened next has been the subject of two federal civil lawsuits. Miles claimed the officers jumped him without identifying themselves, while the officers say they alerted Miles that they were police officers, and feared that a bulge in Miles’ jacket might be a gun, though no gun was ever recovered. No one disputes that social-media evidence was gathered to frame Miles as a threat to the police. “Jordan Miles was ripped,” Jim Wymard, Sisak’s attorney, said during the first trial. “You saw the MySpace page. He called himself Bulky J. He wanted to be bulky!” That characterization still sticks with Miles. “All I really do is work my arms because that’s the main attraction,” he says. “They were trying to paint a picture like I was some Incredible Hulk. That’s not who I am.” In August 2012, a jury found the officers innocent of malicious prosecution, but deadlocked on whether the officers erroneously arrested Miles or used excessive force. This March, a separate jury awarded Miles around $119,000 for false arrest, but said the officers did not use excessive force. An appeal from Miles is expected. It’s not clear what effect the defense’s characterization of Miles through these photos had on the jury; lawyers for the police officers said their case didn’t hinge on them. But while it’s not uncommon to introduce evidence gathered from social media, legal experts say the language on the invoice from CSI, the company that investigated Miles, could suggest two separate ethical problems. One is the use of deceptive tactics to gather information by creating a fake social-media account. The other is trying to communicate with Miles on social media without his lawyer’s permission, even if there had been no misrepresentation. The part of the invoice in question is dated Nov. 29, 2011, and states: “Create e-mail address and social media networking profile in attempt to connect with Miles.” The invoice lists others involved in the case as well as unnamed “associates” whom the company also apparently tried to reach online. “My initial instinct is it sounds not kosher,” says the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Fakhoury. “You don’t want to trick people into saying or doing things or turning over information under false pretenses,” noting the invoice does not definitively show that CSI investiga-

tors used deception. Miles says he doesn’t remember getting any suspicious emails, but he accepted plenty of friend requests from people he didn’t know because there were a lot of people “who wanted to show their sympathy for me.” But even if investigators didn’t misrepresent who they were online, just sending a friend request has been interpreted by some courts to constitute improper contact, Fakhoury says. “The idea is we don’t want people to meddle with the attorney-client relationship.” According to a formal opinion issued by the Pennsylvania Bar Association, “attorneys may not ethically contact a represented person through a social networking site […] regardless of the method of communication.” The same opinion prohibits deceptive practices including having someone else who won’t be recognized make the social-media contact — even if they are honest about who they are. In other words, it would be unethical for a lawyer to ask a friend of a friend to contact Miles in an attempt to gather information, even if there was no deception. CSI maintains its investigators did not violate ethics rules. While the company has a history of conducting investigations for the city, CEO Louis Gentile says the city isn’t a major client. City Paper reported last month that the Monaca-based company was hired to investigate an incident last summer in which a teenage girl was punched and arrested by an officer at PrideFest. CSI determined that the officer did not use excessive force. On the Miles case, Gentile says that CSI wasn’t the lead agency, but “we may have done some background.” The city paid CSI about $2,000 for services related to the Miles case, including $93.75 for social-media-related research. Asked about the company’s use of social media to investigate Miles, Gentile says his investigators would “never attempt to contact a plaintiff without a lawyer’s permission,” and that “whatever we do goes through two attorneys on staff. We don’t do anything that’s ethically dubious or illegal.” Asked about the Miles invoice, Gentile wrote in an email: “that was an attempt to track public social-media postings and any public interactions with each other.” He declined to answer specific questions about why the invoice says there was an attempt to “connect with Miles”; why the invoice distinguishes between

“DECEPTION IS ABSOLUTELY THE PROBLEM.”

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“monitoring” social media and “connect[ing]” with Miles, and whether that means his company tried to “friend” him or create a fake profile. “I believe that everyone should be perfectly transparent,” Gentile says. But “there’s a time I have to defer to the client.” The city law department, the entity that would bear ultimate responsibility for the conduct of the investigators it hired, declined to comment for this story. But according to Randy Torgerson, a private investigator of 14 years and president of the United States Association of Professional Investigators, it’s plausible that the city wasn’t directly supervising the investigators. “It’s highly possible the city did not know,” Torgerson says. “No investigator lays out the minute details of everything they’re going to do for the client.” Ignorance of specific investigative tactics, however, wouldn’t absolve lawyers involved in the case of responsibility. “An attorney can’t say, ‘I just had no idea [investigators] violated these rules,’” says Wall, a social-media legal expert

common” for investigators to friend people on social media as a way of gaining access. He doesn’t think that necessarily crosses an ethical line. “The best place to find how somebody is — is what they tell their friends, what they tell anybody else outside the courtroom.” Still, using social media while acting on behalf of a municipality to befriend someone like Miles — who had already retained a lawyer — could be different. “You’re trying to defend a government entity – you want to be beyond reproach.” IN BOTH trials, the photos were

Photo of Jordan Miles that was used in court

who has written extensively on the topic. Lawyers, he adds, are responsible for staying on top of ethics opinions that could affect their casework. In general, Torgerson says, it’s “pretty

controversial — and lawyers from two separate legal teams bristled at their use. But no one questioned whether the photos were gathered ethically. “We filed motions and argued the photos were irrelevant,” says Kerry Lewis, Miles’ lawyer in the first trial. “As far as being obtained improperly by the city, we had no information whatsoever to rely on as far as to try to have them stricken.” If investigators obtained the photos by creating a fake account, “they

didn’t tell us at the first trial,” he says. “If it was improper and it was used in a court proceeding, that should be brought to the attention of the court even now.” Joel Sansone, the lawyer who represented Miles in the second trial, sounded a similar note, saying he never knew specifically how the photos were collected. But it wasn’t just Miles’ lawyers who appeared not to know the details — Bryan Campbell and Wymard, both lawyers for the officers, also said they weren’t sure how investigators acted on social media. “There was no distinction made” about how the photos were gathered, Campbell says. He points out that some of the photos of Miles were gathered from profile pictures, something Miles acknowledged in a recent interview. “These had passed muster with four separate attorneys,” Campbell adds. “There was no objection to this at trial.” All of the lawyers involved in the case who commented for this story, including Campbell, Wymard, Sansone and Lewis, say they are unfamiliar with all of the mechanics of Facebook. For his part, Miles never seemed to make a big deal about it. He never told CONTINUES ON PG. 12

TICKETS AND SIGN UPS: All proceeds benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society $15 DONATION to Pre-Register $20 DONATIONS at Carmella’s Plates & Pints day of the crawl at 3PM 412-488-0777 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

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2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com +

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presents

PofE T the

WEEK

DEC. 4-7 This is a free and family-friendly event! Celebrate the season with cookies and pick up unique holiday gifts along the way. Hours for Cookie Stops vary by location. To receive this year’s Tour Map, sign up for our e-newsletter at lvpgh.com/cookietour or call 412.683.6488.

his lawyers that the photos might have been gathered from parts of his Facebook page that weren’t publicly available. “I wouldn’t have known to ask, [and] Jordan probably wouldn’t have known to attach enough importance to the matter,” says Sansone, Miles’ lawyer. “There would have been quite a rhubarb over that.” But impropriety could have been difficult to prove: It’s possible that investigators got the photos without using deceptive tactics or ever having sent a friend request — a friend could have simply turned them over. It’s also possible that the privacy settings on Miles’ Facebook account were more porous than he thought. Wymard, wh o r ep resented one of the officers, says that even if investigators did create an account to get Miles to accept a friend request, that wouldn’t have bothered him: “It’s an interesting investigative tactic. It’s not like opening their mail.” Wymard added that it wouldn’t constitute meaningful contact with a represented party — a violation of ethics rules — “because you’re not taking a statement from him.” The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Fakhoury disputes that. “He’s flat wrong — deception is absolutely the problem,” he says, adding, “friending a person is contact.”

The practical effect of using photos that might have been gathered unethically isn’t obvious. While violations of ethics rules could lead to anything from a reprimand to disbarment of lawyers involved in the case, experts say it’s possible a judge would have allowed the photos to be introduced as evidence. “The judge has a lot of discretion in what he’ll consider or not consider,” Wall says. “In my experience as a litigator, if someone obtains evidence by violating ethical rules, [the judge] would be well within his discretion” not to allow that evidence. In extreme cases, “You can move for a new trial and say there was misconduct,” adds Fakhoury. “But it’d be tough.” He says cases like Miles’ will only become more common, forcing lawyers and the investigators they hire to reckon with the evolving ethics of gathering information on social media. “There are only a few ethics decisions on this,” Fakhoury says. “I think you’re going to see the American Bar Association weigh in.” “That’s the grey area we’re in — in terms of social media and technology,” Wall adds. “It’s changing faster than the law can catch up. It really is the wild, wild west.”

“IT’S NOT LIKE OPENING THEIR MAIL.”

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS} Photo credit: Jeff Geissle

r

Cupcake & Cookie Do you have a sweet tooth? Does the thought of sugar plums make your mouth water? These beautiful ladies have always been together and would love to find a new home together. They would prefer a quiet home where they could curl up with their new family and watch the world go by. If you think that these lovely ladies would fit into your life. Stop in and see them today.

Call Animal Friends today!

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GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY:

www.dayauto.com 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

IDIOTBOX


We Put The “T” in Toys For Tots. On Friday, December 5th, don’t just get caught in the morning rush. Catch the holiday spirit. Bring a toy down to the Steel Plaza T station and help lift a child’s spirits for the holidays. Friday morning, December 5th from 5:30 till 9 am, Toys for Tots will be collecting new, unwrapped children’s gifts. Port Authority is proud to join with media sponsors Q92.9 FM and the United States Marine Corps in asking you to help fill a child’s heart with joy and happiness this holiday season.

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

JOIN US FOR A SCREENING OF:

Louis Sullivan: The Struggle for American Architecture Louis H. Sullivan was one of the most influential architects to come out of the Chicago School of architecture in the late 1800s. He is often called the “father of the skyscraper”, the “prophet of modern architecture” and conceived the most famous phrase ever to come out of his profession, “form follows function” (or, more accurately, “form ever follows function”). Among his most outstanding surviving works are the Auditorium Theater, the Carson, Pirie Scott department store, and the Charnley House in Chicago, the Wainwright Building and Union Trust Building in St. Louis, the Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York, and eight small “Jewel Box” banks that are among the most treasured pieces of historic architecture in the United States. After nearly a century, most of the Sullivan banks are still functioning as banks. Unfortunately, many other Sullivan buildings fell victim to urban renewal and were demolished, including the Garrick Theater in 1961, and the old Chicago Stock Exchange in 1972. Their destruction helped form the historic architectural preservation movement in Chicago. Louis Sullivan was committed to establishing an authentic, American style of architecture, free of historic imitations like the Beaux Arts style that fellow Chicagoan Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root had made wildly popular as a result of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9 • 6:00 - 8:00 PM This screening is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

Cavacini Garden Center Christmas Trees Wreaths Poinsettias Christmas Cactus Garlands ... and much more! 100 51st St / Lawrenceville

412-687-2010 Off Butler Street /Across from Goodwill

Open 7 days a week, 11am-9pm

ELPC Christmas Cathedral Concert

Christmas Eve Worshipp

December 19 8:00 PM FREE CONCERT

December 24 5:00 PM Family Service 11:00 PM Candlelight Service (Prelude Music begins at 10:30 pm)

Holiday music featuring organ & Brass Roots ensemble

1 1 6 S H I G H L A N D AV E N U E

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

[GUEST OPINION]

FERGUSON PERSPECTIVE

‘Darren Wilson isn’t an anomaly; neither is the killing of Michael Brown’ {BY JASIRI X} Black bodies being fed to the system Black American, dead or in prison Love of the murderers never the victims Dead kids can’t beg your forgiveness THE ABOVE LINES are from a song I wrote a few days after an unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown — a week away from attending college — was shot and killed by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo. As Mike lay bleeding in the street, he was given no first aid and no ambulance was called. He was left in the street, in the middle of a community that loved him, for over 4 hours. His body wasn’t even covered up. This is terrorism — a truly American form — that, sadly, my community has experienced for many years. Just a few days following Michael Brown’s murder, which was the first homic ide of the year in Ferguson, 25-yearold Kajieme Powell was shot multiple times and killed by two St. Louis police officers. Even though Kajieme possessed only a small knife, both officers opened fire. As his limp, bulletridden body lay in the street, the police officers proceeded to roll him over and handcuff him. Two months later, an off-duty St. Louis police officer shot 17 times at 18-yearold Vonderrit Myers Jr., hitting him six times in the back and killing him. The St Louis Police Department said Vonderrit had a gun, although his DNA was not on the gun they recovered at the scene. Witnesses said Vonderrit had only a sandwich and begged the officer for his life. Around the same time Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Eric Gardner was choked to death by New York police officers (captured on video); John Crawford was shot to death in a Walmart in Ohio for holding a toy gun; and Ezell Ford was shot in the back and killed by Los Angeles police officers. According to a report by the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, a black person is killed by a police officer, security guard or vigilante like George Zimmerman once every 28 hours. We’ve seen these numbers

{PHOTO COURTESY OF IMRAN FOR 1HOODMEDIA}

Jasiri X

play out in the last few days with the killing of another unarmed man, Akai Gurley, in the stairwell of his apartment building by the NYPD, and the killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice by a Cleveland police officer. Tamir had a BB gun and officers shot him seconds after approaching him in a squad car responding to a 9-1-1 call that said he had a gun that was “probably fake.” A recent study by ProPublica showed that black teens are 21 times more likely to be killed by cops than white teens. Darren Wilson isn’t an anomaly; neither is the killing of Michael Brown. It’s a fact of life you have to deal with if you are black in America. I didn’t expect Officer Wilson to be indicted. Why would I? The Pittsburgh police officers who shot and paralyzed an unarmed Leon Ford haven’t even been charged. The response of the community in Ferguson wasn’t surprising either. Why should we be peaceful when our killers never are? We’ve been peacefully protesting for the last 60 years, and we’re still being killed by police with no justice on the horizon. If we can be shot down with our hands up, maybe being peaceful isn’t the answer. Public Enemy famously stated in its seminal album It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back — “I got a right to be hostile, my people been persecuted.” Today, we have a right to be hostile, our people are being executed. Sadly, some are more concerned about our justified anger than about unarmed men, women and children being shot down by officers sworn to protect us.

“WHY SHOULD WE BE PEACEFUL WHEN OUR KILLERS NEVER ARE?”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Jasiri X is a local hip-hop artist, community activist and founding member of the antiviolence group One Hood.


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Welcome to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 4 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week. Spend the holidays with your favorite craft beer.

Named for the infamous 1969 Cuyahoga River fire that sparked the Clean Water Act of 1972, Burning River Pale Ale can be a bit unpredictable. Under his bold layers of bitter hops, there’s a softer side — a sweet, caramel backbone that he longs to share. And everyone loves a bad boy with a heart of gold.

The beginning. A classic. Our most popular beer. Its unique piney and grapefruit aromas from the use of whole-cone American hops have fascinated beer drinkers for decades and made this beer a classic.

An ale whose mysterious and unusual palate will swirl across your tongue & ask more than it answers. Brewed clandestinely & given a name whose meaning is never revealed. Why #9? Why indeed. A sort of dry, crisp, refreshing, not quite pale ale, #9 is really impossible to describe because there’s never been anything else quite like it. Malts: Pale, CrystalHops: Apollo, Cascade

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


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A TOPPING OF DRESSED FRISÉE WAS A GROWN-UP FINISH TO A CRISPY-CHICKEN SANDWICH

WE’RE 10! {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} The restaurant that’s locally famous for handing out baskets of free bacon every Tuesday is turning 10. “Some people give away pretzels and potato chips. We give away meat.” says Rodney Swartz, one of four Harris Grill owners. To celebrate, Harris Grill is joining forces with East End Brewing Company, another local institution that is celebrating the big 1-0. “We were both just hoping for the other one to make it,” says Dana Fruzynski, partner in the Harris Grill’s owners group, which took over the popular Shadyside bar and restaurant a decade ago. Now the two organizations celebrating birthdays will team up for a short-pour and small-plate pairing dinner, on Dec. 6, at East End Brewing, in Larimer. “They’ve been serving our beer since the first year we’ve been open,” says Scott Smith, owner of East End Brewing. “We do a beer dinner with them every year, and this year we decided to kick it up with a fundraiser.” Keeping the money local, the dinner will benefit Animal Rescue League and Grow Pittsburgh, two organizations also both operating in Larimer. “Expect some music, food, beer and silliness, as people come to expect from both of our companies,” Smith says. “There might even be a birthday cake if we can swing it.” Through Dec. 20, Harris Grill is also hosting Hogvent, its own take on Advent, during which patrons can win prizes. AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

See www.eastendbrewing.com/events for tickets.

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Sugar cookies, ginger snaps, pizzelles? There’s here’s only one way to find nd out which yummy my baked goods willl be available for munching on n the 15th annual al Lawrenceville Joy oy of Cookies s Tour. Show up at more than 30 venues along Butler Street (between 34 4th and 56th streets) and taste for yourself. Oh, and you might do a little shopping, too. Thu., Dec. 4-Sat., Dec. 7.

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FRES H ON TAK FAM E ILIAR {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE BISTRO IS, originally, a French

concept: a modest restaurant, possibly even in the home of a boardinghouse-keeper, serving simple, home-style meals at inexpensive prices. Setting aside the fact that cassoulet is a far cry from baked beans, it sounds almost diner-esque. LLike most things French, however, the bistro has acquired a gloss of cachet in bistr being transplanted to the U.S. Here, the bein word “bistro” connotes a restaurant that is wor informal, yes, but that serves food you’d info never make at home — food that is special, nev creative, a step above. Bistros are convivial cre meeting places, and as such, they always m serve that social lubricant, alcohol. se So it is at Bistro 9101, owned by chef Sean Minahan, whose résumé spans from S tthe Carlton, in Downtown Pittsburgh, to Walt Disney World, in Florida. Now he’s W come home to the Pittsburgh region to open his own restaurant on the suburban strip of hair salons, dry cleaners and auto-service

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

FARE {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Bacon-wrapped scallops with blue-cheese risotto, sugar snap peas and garlic-cream sauce

establishments that is Old Perry Highway. Many of these businesses, including the bistro, are in converted old houses, testifying to the changing nature of the suburban North Hills. From a restaurant in such a location, even one that calls itself a “bistro,” we might

BISTRO 9101 9101 Perry Highway, McCandless. 412-318-4871 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.midnight; Sat. 4 p.m.-midnight; Sun. 4-8 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, salads and sandwiches $6-14; entrees $17-29 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED expect the usual: wings, burgers, crab cakes, mussels, popular pasta dishes such as fettucini. And Bistro 9101 delivers, but not in quite the ways we were expecting. Chef Minahan is too experienced to offer any

clichés straight up. Instead, the wings are “pig wings,” the cakes are salmon and the burger is a bacon-cheddar brisket burger on a pretzel bun. With caramelized onions. And, instead of fries, frites (sometimes, it’s all in the lingo). Even when the ingredients were on trend — panko-coated fried chicken, pumpkin ravioli — there was a certain fussiness that reminded us why most kitchens have moved on to today’s simpler, more straightforward preparations. It takes skill to get a minimalist dish just right, but it’s really difficult to perfect every aspect of an elaborate, multi-ingredient recipe. For instance, in Jason’s duck special, the core was truly excellent: The breast meat was rosy and flavorful with crispy skin, the pumpkin ravioli were tender and richly autumnal, and the sage-cream sauce offered a unifying richness that flattered both of these elements. But a bed of spaghetti squash and wilted


spinach — charmingly plated in alternating little mounds — wasn’t so successful: The squash was under-seasoned and the spinach, disappointingly bitter. In other instances, the flavors were great, but the proportions worked against them. Pig wings — morsels of pork shank — had bold seasoning that enhanced the rich meat (although one of the four in our serving was a bit tough). The presentation, on a long platter with a wedge of tortilla between each “wing” and puddles of chimichurri, was striking without being overly showy. But the chimichurri was too scant to be much more than decoration; this was a shame because it was so bright, herbal and delicious. What we really wanted to do was mop it up in quantity with bites of pork and tortillas. “Jambalini,” a riff on jambalya in which shrimp, mussels and scallops were served over fetticini in a “spicy” tomato broth, was another qualified success. In theory, we loved this idea, which melds traditional seafood pasta — usually served in a light white-wine sauce — with the more assertive flavors of Creole cooking. But the real-

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

BEAUJOLAIS EST ARRIVÉ! Famed wine makes its annual visit

ity was not assertive, not Creole enough to fully distinguish itself from Italian cooking. We had two dishes that really came together. One was crawfish bisque, which was luxuriously thick with plenty of crawfish meat and a satisfyingly creamy texture offset by briny seafood and astringent tomato flavors. The other was the crispy-chicken sandwich. The meat was plump and juicy, the panko coating light yet crispy, and the topping of dressed frisée was a grown-up finish to a popular favorite. The accompanying frites were shoestring style, some crisp, while others were softer and chewier. Bistro 9101 offers many of the things its name suggests. Attentive, knowledgeable service in a white-tablecloth-casual setting made us feel comfortable and well taken care of, and the menu offered many — but not too many — intriguing choices. In the attempt to be a step above, however, there were sometimes missteps, while the best dishes showed a confident kitchen on a sure footing.

The holidays are here and with them, this year’s Beaujolais Nouveau vintage. The young, fruity French wine hits markets the third Thursday of every November, rung in worldwide by celebrations and tastings. I attended an event hosted by Dreadnought Wines at East Liberty’s Cloak Room. Although it lacked such historically wild antics as wine baths, hot-air balloons and carloads of revelers heading to London and Paris with newly bottled Beaujolais Nouveau, the event’s spirit held true for those who came to drink and learn. Beaujolais has been accused of making weak, mediocre wine, partly due to unfortunate geography. The region’s northern neighbor is Burgundy, a vaunted wineproducing area known for full-bodied flavors. It’s tempting to take the fruit-forward, light and slightly sweet Beaujolais wines far less seriously, but Robert McCaughey knows that its supposed weakness is its strength. “This wonderful, ripe red fruit is what makes it so wonderful with Thanksgiving meals, when there are so many different flavors on the table. It’s a crowd-pleaser,” he says. The head of Palate Partners Wine and Spirit School and 20-year beverage-industry veteran prepared a selection of Domaine Pral Beaujolais wines for the evening, ranging from a Beaujolais Nouveau — produced from field to bottle in a matter of weeks — to a rarer, aged Beaujolais Blanc, a white Chardonnay-derived wine. White Beaujolais make up only 1 percent of the region’s production. Made from the thin-skinned Gamay grape, Nouveaus are virtually free of tannins. This makes them excellent for food pairings and not overwhelming for the palate. Beaujolais is one of only two regions in the world where, by law, grapes must be handpicked. This delicate method shines through in the glass. Combine such attributes with a relatively low price and you’ve got the perfect wine for a holiday dinner party. Says McCaughey, “People want to be outside the box, and I think Beaujolais is a great way of doing that. Wine is about friendship, sharing, family and camaraderie.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Owner and executive chef Sean Minahan

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IT’S THE PERFECT WINE FOR A HOLIDAY DINNER PARTY.

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savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF

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CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to

Handle Bar and Grille {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE. 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. A motorcyclethemed venue offers mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — prepared from scratch. The menu also offers a modest South of the Border section, and the kitchen’s creativity shows in unique items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday, a roast-turkey sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. KE

Social {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE

ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely among European, American and Asian influences. LE JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-2510031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: aboveaverage sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-8228888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia


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$ 2 DRINKS

The first hit is free. Tan Lac Vien {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. At this revamped hotel, the offerings reflect a balance between time-honored dishes such as turtle soup and more modern fare, like a crabmeatstuffed quesadilla. Steak-lovers will be pleased, but adventurous burger fans should check out the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepperjack cheese. LE

Although the execution is high-end, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates. KE TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888. This Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, but also less-common dishes. The menu has a section of com tam (“broken rice”) dishes, including some topped with a fried egg; there is also a jellyfish salad with pickled carrot and daikon. Another worthy entrée was banh xeo, savory crepes filled with shrimp, sautéed pork and vegetables, or try the make-yourown summer roll option. FK

THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the casual, no-nonsense and no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian themes with diner kitsch in a SOCIAL. 6425 Penn delightful way. JF w. w w Ave., Larimer. 412-362er hcitypap g p 1234. This casual eatery WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty .com at Bakery Square offers Ave., Bloomfield. upscale pub grub: Pizzas, 412-621-0133. Eschewing sandwiches and salads have the epic list of dishes most ingredients that wouldn’t be out of Chinese-American restaurants place at the trendiest restaurants, proffer, this attractively decorated but preparations are un-fussy. store-front venue sticks to a Or be your own chef, with the modest number of basics with a checklist-style, build-your-ownfew less-typical dishes, such as salad option. For dessert, try a Singapore mai fun (a dish of custom ice-cream sandwiches. KE stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., China’s Gansu province) JF Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 for all: vegetarians, vegans and Bower Hill Road, Upper St. carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza Clair. 412-221-1232. At this with soy cheese, seitan wings, cozy, contemporary, candle-lit steak sandwiches, pierogies — cottage, the Italian- and much of it made from locally Mediterranean-inspired menu sourced ingredients. J changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., in-season ingredients. The menu Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and offers fewer than 10 entrées, 701 Warrendale Village Drive, each matched with a small Warrendale (724-933-3155). The suite of carefully selected sides. concept is original and simple: Expect quality ingredients — blending the salty, citrusy flavors dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, of Asia with the bright, spicy lamb, steak — and exquisitely flavors of Latin America. prepared meals. LF

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Thanks... for Drinking Responsibly this Holiday Season! from

R E S P O N S I B I L I T Y M AT T E R S

Happy Holidays

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

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LOCAL

AGE CAN BE AN OBSTACLE FOR YOUNG MUSICIANS IN A 21-AND-UP WORLD

BEAT

{BY BRIAN CONWAY}

LAST HUGH-RAH After shepherding 61 local bands for a year-long monthly concert series, Hugh Twyman is ready for more. Twyman — warhorse concert photographer and local music blogger — caps his free HughShows concert series at Eide’s Entertainment next Saturday with an all-day extravaganza featuring strippeddown acoustic sets from 23 local artists. “It’s going to be crazy!” says Twyman. “The bands that we have never, ever do that. Fist Fight in the Parking Lot playing acoustic! There’s Weird Paul, playing right before Slim Forsythe, playing right before townsppl. The list is great; I can’t believe it.” The series, which began as a celebration of local music in honor of 10 years of Twyman’s blog, raised hundreds of dollars worth of cash and school supplies for the Homeless Children’s Education Fund — and earned Twyman an official city proclamation for his efforts. “The whole thing about [the concert series] was having two or more bands share a stage who never play together,” says Twyman. “Host Skull played the same day as Brooke Annibale; The Lopez played with Arlo Aldo.” But the concerts don’t end there. Less than a week after the final Hughshows, there will be another: the HughShows Secret Santapalooza, a one-off charity benefit for Karl Hendricks, of Sound Cat Records, which will feature performances by seven local bands, including the likes of Grand Piano and The Harlan Twins. And in January, there’s HughShows Coda, featuring sets from just two bands: Meeting of Important People and a reunited Lohio. Additionally, Twyman hopes to release some form of live album from the HughShows series to benefit charity. (J Vega, of The Wilderness Recording Studio, ran and recorded audio at each of the shows.) After 10 years of blogging and shooting shows, Twyman is looking forward to his next endeavor. “I’m gonna still do the blog,” he says, “maybe just scale it down. My idea is maybe do a live performance/interview podcast. Maybe do a [public-access] TV show — I’ve always wanted to do that.” “When I stop having fun,” he adds, “I’m not gonna do it anymore.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HUGHSHOWS LIVE AT EIDE’S FINALE. 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., Dec. 13. Eide’s Entertainment, 1121 Penn Ave., Strip District. Free. All ages. 412-261-0900 HUGHSHOWS SECRET SANTAPALOOZA. 8 p.m. Fri., Dec. 19. Kollar Club, 3226 Jane St., South Side. $15-20. N E W S

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THE KIDS IN THE BAND

{ILLUSTRATION BY NATHAN MAZUR}

Small stages often aren’t all ages.

{BY SHAWN COOKE}

Z

ACK KEIM WOULD seem to have a

head start on the garage-rock competition. His band, The Nox Boys, has already released its debut LP on Get Hip Records, toured the East Coast and has sold out Pittsburgh venues — and he’s only 17. But that last part can sometimes be more of an obstacle than an advantage. Many of Pittsburgh’s premier small venues for ragged-edged garage punks — and any up-and-coming bands for that matter — strictly enforce an agerestriction policy. And one all-ages venue, Garfield Artworks, will reportedly be closing its doors this weekend, limiting young musicians even more. Keim has played a few shows at Garfield Artworks, and he noticed that it

became a common outlet for some of his younger musician friends. “A lot of my friends, after we started playing, they started to have shows at Garfield Artworks ... that was the only place they could play,” Keim says. Most think of 21 as the magic number for legal alcohol consumption and admittance to Rivers Casino, but to youth entrenched in local music scenes, the number may be a barrier to seeing or performing with some of their favorite artists. For Keim and The Nox Boys, whose other members are recent Fox Chapel High School graduates (aside from Bob Powers, a 1970 Fox Chapel grad), age can significantly limit their gig opportunities. “I get a lot of emails from the promoters

and club owners — I’m signed up for their mailing lists,” Keim says. “[Take] Jeff, the Brotherhood: I would really love to open for them, but they’re at Club Café. We can’t open for them, ’cause we’re underage.” Among the city’s most prominent small to mid-size venues, some (such as Club Café and Brillobox) enforce a blanket 21-and-over restriction, while others (Mr. Small’s, Altar Bar) offer designated areas for patrons under and over 21. There’s a smattering of small venues like the DIY Mr. Roboto Project and the upstairs concert room at the Smiling Moose that regularly offer all-ages shows. Garfield Artworks, an art gallery in Garfield that’s been open since the early 1990s, hosted shows regularly for the CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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THE KIDS IN THE BAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

The Nox Boys (Zack Keim, second from right)

past decade, but has no events scheduled after Rachael Sage’s show on Sun., Dec. 7. It’s been reported (including by PittPunk. com and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) that this will be the final show at Garfield Artworks. (Promoter Manny Theiner declined to comment for this story, and gallery owner Smith Hutchings could not be reached as of press time.) Pittsburgh’s age-restricted performance spaces tend to thoroughly enforce their age policies, but Keim says that his experience from touring in other states has been a bit more flexible. “We had two shows in New York City which were 21-plus, and we still played,” Keim says. “They had an underage band play, but we couldn’t bring anyone underage to the show.” New York, known for some of the most lenient liquor laws on the East Coast, legally permits minor performers in an establishment that would otherwise prohibit the sale of alcohol to them, along with permitting the consumption of alcohol on private premises with parental consent — a policy adopted by 29 states. Keim’s home state finds itself on the complete other end of the spectrum. “Pennsylvania has some of the strictest liquor laws of any state — which include super-strict policies on anything involving minors,” says Michele Mengel, promotions coordinator at Opus One Productions. According to Pennsylvania law, performers younger than 18, like Keim, can’t legally perform in establishments with a liquor license — unless they’re students

receiving instruction, are uncompensated, are under proper supervision and give notice to the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement ahead of time. But as the liquor code states, “persons over the age of eighteen (18) are permitted to perform as entertainers in licensed establishments [Id.]; whether a parent or guardian or someone over twenty-five (25) years old who qualifies as a ‘proper supervisor’ would need to also be present depends upon the situation.” Opus One, which books shows at Club Café, Mr. Small’s and Brillobox, essentially treats the 21-and-over venues as bars first and performance spaces second. Many of the all-ages policies employed by larger clubs lose their effectiveness in smaller venues. Though many local venues have implemented a segregated wristband or marker system to designate who can and cannot be served alcohol, the smaller bars would be highly inconvenienced to create such distinctions. “For a tiny place like [Club Café], we can’t separate an above-21 and an under21 area,” Mengel says. “And most of the same reasons why we can’t allow minors are the same reasons why other bars on East Carson also can’t allow minors.” But age restrictions aren’t just limited to the smaller bar-venues in Pittsburgh. On rare occasions, Opus mandates a restriction for typically all-ages venues. In September 2012, for example, Nick Lowe played a 21-and-over show — at Mr. Small’s. And in some cases, the

“SHE SAW HIM DRINKING SODA AND DOING HOMEWORK BETWEEN SETS.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


cutoff isn’t even the drinking age — last month’s Skrillex show at Stage AE was limited to concertgoers 16 and over. Given the recent negative injury and health concerns associated with big EDM festivals, the move seems like a safeguard against similar incidents occurring here, but other shows within the genre haven’t been restricted. Bassnecter and The Glitch Mob, two other electronic darlings, also played Stage AE in October — yet their shows were all ages. But according to Mengel, “it’s usually the artist’s decision to play an agerestricted show at a venue that is generally all-ages.” Despite the pretty cut-and-dried liquor code, one Pennsylvania father is actively lobbying to get the state law changed. Todd Bedard, from just outside of Harrisburg in New Cumberland, used to take his 12-year-old son, Logan, to Pete’s Olde Town Bar and Grille to perform. Logan played drums at Pete’s for local musician Shea Quinn, but state police put an end to this, and the restaurant was fined $250. After the fine, Bedard contacted his state representative, Sheryl Delozier — who also happened to see one of Logan’s performances at Pete’s — about easing the

law to allow minor performers, if they’re supervised by a parent or guardian and don’t receive compensation. Bedard says that Delozier recognized the innocent nature of Logan’s time at the establishment. “She saw the performance and understood what we were doing — saw me drinking iced tea, and him drinking soda and doing homework between sets,” Bedard says. Delozier introduced House Bill 1943, which would relax the law, this January, but it never made it out of committee during the limited fall session. Bedard plans to meet with Delozier after the holiday break to see about reintroducing the bill in 2015. Bedard stressed that he’s simply asking for consistency in the law, since his son is legally permitted to eat in Pete’s but violates the law once he gets on stage to perform. He doesn’t see how Logan’s situation should be any different from child actors performing in dinner theaters that serve alcohol — or even minors eating in a restaurant with their family. “They’re not supposed to serve my son whether he’s playing music, or whether he’s sitting with me in a restaurant,” says Bedard. “That’s not really going to change much.”

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WE KNOW

CRITICS’ PICKS

GUITARS

Demos Papadimas

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[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., DEC. 05 He’s our neighbor from just north, and a onetime Pitt student, so it’s little wonder we see Demos Papadimas pretty often around here. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go out of your way to catch the stellar songwriter from (gasp!) Cleveland or thereabouts. Tonight, he’s joined by local up-and-comers Nameless in August, who put out a solid release in this year’s Wheelhouse. They share the stage for the late show at Club Café. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

[BLUEGRASS] + SAT., DEC. 06 It’s a final hoedown of sorts tonight for one of the pioneer Netsky groups of the contemporary bluegrass scene in Pittsburgh: The Mon River Ramblers are calling it quits. The longtime local outfit (which won Best Bluegrass Band at the competition part of DelFest 2011, in Maryland) has been a bit scarce recently, and is getting together for one last hurrah, joined by some bluegrass compatriots: Shelf Life String Band, Lone Pine String Band and the Beagle Brothers. It all happens at The New Bohemian. AM 8 p.m. 887 Progress St., North Side. $10. 724-816-7944 or www.facebook.com/thenewbohemian

[METAL] + MON., DEC. 08 GWAR has managed to uphold 29 years of satirical gore. The shock-rock group formed at

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

Virginia Commonwealth University, where a dark-humored group of musicians, art students and dancers teamed up to create a band of interplanetary warriors descended from aliens, stranded in Antarctica. Critics of their deviant stage behavior can at least appreciate the stunning visual displays that GWAR employs in live performances. Last March, Dave Brockie, a.k.a. lead singer Oderus Urungus, died at age 50; Fittingly, GWAR held a Viking funeral for him with fans in Richmond. The group chose to forge on and is currently touring in support of its 13th album, Battle Maximus. You can get in on the action tonight at Mr. Small’s with Corrosion of Conformity and American Sharks. Samantha Ward 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[ELECTRONIC] + TUE., DEC. 09 Netsky, the electronic brainchild of Belgian producer Boris Daenen, is named after a persistent computer virus that, until 2006, was the most prevalent bug being sent in emails worldwide. One can assume that Daenen aims to mimic this phenomenon with his infectious DJ sets, creating liquid funk with uplifting melodies paired with heavy bass. In 2012, he began touring the world with a full band, calling it Netsky LIVE! See the group tonight with Kove at Mr. Small’s. SW 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave, Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


NEW RELEASES

DONORA HA HA HEART (ROSTRUM RECORDS) WWW.DONORAMUSIC.COM

On its third release, Donora stays hip while retaining the high-energy pop sensibility that has made it a local (and to some extent national) favorite since the band formed in the late ’00s. Even for a band that has always seemed best suited to a confetti-filled environment, Ha Ha Heart is a kind of aural explosion of glittery hearts. This is mostly a good thing: Pro-positivity, sing-along opener “I Might Have a Worry” brings to mind a less-world-music-y Tom Tom Club, as does the record’s best track, “American Cars.” The rest of the album is likely to invite comparisons to recent efforts by indie-poppers like Tegan and Sara and Jenny Lewis, and, actually, some of these songs wouldn’t sound out of place on the new Taylor album (and I mean that as a compliment). Over the span of 11 tracks, the relentless energy can start to feel a little manic. There are some breaks, though — on “Memory,” Donora showcases a knack for dreamy electro-pop, which I hope they will explore further. BY MARGARET WELSH

DONORA LISTENING PARTY/ ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE with TOWNSPPL, WAY YES. 6 p.m. Sat., Dec. 6. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

JASON DAVIS LIVE + LOUD ON LINCOLN AVENUE (SELF-RELEASED) JASONDAVIS.BANDCAMP.COM

A blistering 50 minutes of live tracks from the Pittsburgh expat now living in Utica, N.Y. The music spans from heavy stoner rock to aggressive powerpop and post-grunge; the upside is that there’s something from everyone, but the downside is that listeners with a particular sense of what kind of rock appeals to them might only like a couple tracks. The live energy is captured exceedingly well, and Davis is a talented songwriter for sure. BY ANDY MULKERIN

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An Evening of Music Photo by Greta Rybus

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 04 DECEMBER 13 8PM • $$10

Legacy Sampler Available now at Better Beer Retailers.

Max Garcia Conover Presented By

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Jason Walker. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CLUB CAFE. Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers, The Ragbirds, Big Gypsy. South Side. 412-431-4950. LAVA LOUNGE. Comfort Tech, Charm & Chain, Tandy. South Side. 412-431-5282. LEVELS. Mark Ferrari Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Shrub. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 05 abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

ALTAR BAR. Relient K. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Greg Capozzi. CD release/Christmas concert. Nameless In August, Demos Papadimas & His Band (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Kelly Zullo, Scarlet & the Harlots, Jude Benedict & the Last Drop. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. ATS, Sex-Tet-Offensive, Meet the Beatless, Elephant Gerald + the Jazz Kissingers. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LEVELS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. LOFT 1876. Jill West & Blues Attack. Beaver Falls. 724-846-9820. MARKET SQUARE. King’s Ransom. Downtown. 412-325-0151. SMILING MOOSE. Post Mortal Possession, Incinerate Creation, Mutilist. South Side. 412-431-4668. SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Mo Nelson Band. Beechview. 412-344-8700. STAGE AE. Say Anything, Saves The Day, Reggie & the Full Effect. North Side. 412-229-5483. TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Blue Moon Soup. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CLUB CAFE. Donora, Way Yes, twnsppl (Early) The Long Knives, Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Blake & Dean Trio. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FRANKIE I’S. Waiting for Ray. Washington. 724-743-3636. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Mustache Required, Crochetcatpause, The Lopez, Action Camp, Roulette Waves, Middle Children. Winter Prom VI. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. T-Tops, Cruces, Urns. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. THE KICKSTAND. Dave Iglar Band. 412-384-3080. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Yes Yes A Thousand Times Yes, Denzell, Coastal Remedy, DIVORCE. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE NEW BOHEMIAN. Mon River Ramblers, Shelf Life String Band, Lone Pine String Band, Beagle Brothers. North Side. 412-251-6058. ROCK ROOM. RadioActive, Kaleidocyde. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418.

ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & Blues Attack. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Slaves, Get Scared, Polyphia, Favorite Weapon. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Doppler Affect. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Broccoli Samurai. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 07 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Rachael Sage, Jon Wiatark. Garfield. 412-361-2262. SMILING MOOSE. Wounds, Slaves BC. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 08 MR. SMALLS THEATER. GWAR, Corrosion of Conformity, American Sharks. Millvale. 866-468-3401. TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB. Chatham Baroque. Oakland. 412-687-1788.

TUE 09 CLUB CAFE. Nora Jane Struthers & the Party Line, Lone Wolf Club. South Side. 412-431-4950.

MP 3 MONDAY JESSE MADER

SAT 06 31ST STREET PUB. SuperVinyl Release Show: The Legendary Hucklebucks, Johnny & the Razorblades. Strip District. 412-391-8334. APIS MEAD & WINERY. Gone South. Carnegie. 412-478-9172. THE BRONZE HOOD. Daniels & McClain. Robinson.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Jesse Mader; stream or download “Loud,” from the album Breath by Breath, for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


MR. SMALLS THEATER. Netsky, Kove. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. Train, Daughtry, O.A.R., Christina Perri, Matt Nathanson. Oakland. 412-648-3054.

A&Rs Tony-G & special guests. East Liberty. 412-224-9831.

Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 09

TUE 09

ALTAR BAR. Riff Raff. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

WED 10

BLUES

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Palindromes. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CLUB CAFE. Jon McLaughlin, Andy Davis. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 10

THU 04 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

DJS THU 04

FRI 05

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

MOONDOG’S. Dr. J’s Mojo Hand, Jason Born. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

FRI 05

EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms & Hard Rain, Jill Simmons & Friends, Jimmy Adler Blues Band. South Side. 412-431-4090. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic 9 Year Anniversary w/ Pandemic Pete & Joro Boro. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DRUM BAR. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Hank D. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 06

JAZZ THU 04

ANDYS. Donna Bailey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAVO. Carlton Leeper, Lito Corpuz Victoria Brady, Patrick Whitehead. Strip District. 412-610-1384. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip www. per District. 412-642-2377. pa pghcitym JAMES STREET .co GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 06

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412-231-7777. GUS’S CAFE. Pittsburgh Caribbean/International Saturdays. Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. W/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

TUE 09 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

WED 10 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 06 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. EnterNational Talent Showcase. Statement Records is providing a $10,000 promotion/production contract to the artist that puts on the best hip hop/r&b performance of the night. The winner will be selected by G Unit records head of

FRI 05 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Trio. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

SAT 06 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Jerry Lucarelli, Louis Lucarelli, Sunny Sunseri, Bob Hughes, Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Neon Swing X-perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 07 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 08 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz

ANDYS. Lilly Abreu. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Satin Hearts. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CLUB. Jerry Lucarelli, Louis Lucarelli, Sunny Sunseri, Bob Hughes w/ Peg Wilson. Downtown. 412-391-5227. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Dante’ Soulsville Project. West End. 412-458-0417.

ACOUSTIC THU 04 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

FRI 05 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. The Early Mays. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

SAT 06 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. RUMFISH GRILLE. Gina Rendina. Bridgeville. 412-914-8013.

WED 10 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 05 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY THU 04 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

SUN 07 PALACE THEATRE. Oak Ridge Boys. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

CLASSICAL FRI 05 BEETHOVENFEST: THE REVOLUTIONARY, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. two of Beethoven’s most-loved symphonies. Heinz CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

EARLY WARNINGS: HOLIDAY CONCERTS

Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

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BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. A collaboration w/ The Boys Choir of the Afro-American Music institute. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-578-8749. BEETHOVENFEST: THE REVOLUTIONARY, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. two of Beethoven’s mostloved symphonies. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. HANDEL’S MESSIAH. Shadyside Chamber Choir. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

SUN 07

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. A collaboration w/ The Boys Choir of the Afro-American Music institute. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-578-8749. BEETHOVENFEST: THE REVOLUTIONARY, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. two of Beethoven’s mostloved symphonies. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. MUSICIANS WITH A MISSION: BLUEGRASS & BROADWAY. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

{FRI., DEC. 05}

O Holy Night, presented by J’aira Pryor

Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty {THU., DEC. 11}

WYEP’s Holiday Hootenanny Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {FRI., DEC. 12-SUN., DEC. 14}

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Holiday Pops

MON 08 MASTERS OF THE BAROQUE. A joint collaboration w/ Chatham Baroque & Chamber Music Pittsburgh. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-621-2353.

TUE 09 CELTIC THUNDER W/ THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Celtic Thunder’s album “Christmas Voices” in a dynamic live music experience accentuated by the instrumentals of a full symphony orchestra along w/ other hits songs. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Holiday Hootenanny featuring Joy Ike

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY DOTTERWEICH}

SAT 06

Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown

HOLIDAY MUSIC FRI 05

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH. Lessons w/ Carols. A contemporary version of the Service of Nine Lessons w/ Carols. Uptown. 412-396-6083. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. O Holy Night. Christmas concert & food drive starring J’Aira Pryor, Spirit Mime Ministry & Praise Worship and Deliverance. THE TALLIS SCHOLARS East Liberty. 412-371-3412. W/ THE PITTSBURGH MISSIONARY SYMPHONY BRASS. TEMPLE MINISTRIES. Vocal ensemble, The Christmas Alive! . w w Tallis Scholars, in colPresented by Mission w aper p ty ci h g laboration w/ Pittsburgh p Temple Ministries & .com Symphony Brass. Closing Mission Temple singers. the concert in a shared Children’s Choir & Youth performance of a newly Choir. A tribute to veterans. commissioned work. Heinz Hall, East Liberty. 412-362-3656. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 10

FULL LIST ONLINE

OTHER MUSIC FRI 05 PALACE THEATRE. Motown Experience--Charles Franklin. A lineup of vocalists drawn from the ranks of the legendary groups like The Capitols , The Miracles & more. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 06 LEMONT. Phil & Roxy. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Dancing Queen. 724-789-7858.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

SAT 06

CALVARY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Calvary United Methodist Church Festival Choir. North Side. 412-512-0589. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, WASHINGTON. Three Rivers Ringers Hand Bell Ensemble. Washington. INGOMAR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. 412-635-7654. PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. Christmas Brasstacular. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL. “Ho ho ho w/ the WSO”. Sacred Christmas

music, popular & contemporary holiday numbers presented by the Washington Symphony Orchestra. Washington. 1-888-718-4253.

SUN 07 SAMPSON’S MILLS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Three Rivers Ringers Hand Bell Ensemble. ST. JAMES PARISH. Pittsburgh Symphony Brass. Sewickley. 412-741-6650. TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL. “Ho ho ho w/ the WSO”. Sacred Christmas music, popular & contemporary holiday numbers presented by the Washington Symphony Orchestra. Washington. 1-888-718-4253. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. O Holy Night: An Evening of Holiday Song. Presented by Marco Panuccio. Upper St. Clair. 513-317-9953.

TUE 09 PALACE THEATRE. The Latshaw Pops Christmas Memories Show. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WED 10 BRIGHTWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH. The Harmony Singers. “Jingle, Jingle Holiday”. Bethel Park. 412-835-6703.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

December 3-9 Royal Blood

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. Over 18 event. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

FRIDAY 5

A Musical Christmas Carol

THURSDAY 4

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through Dec. 21.

BUTLER STREET Lawrenceville. Free event. For more info visit lvpgh.com/cookietour. Through Dec. 7.

Start Making Sense - a Tribute to Talking Heads

The Joy of Cookies, Cookie Tour

Mike Super Magic & Illusion THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

Great Expectations CHARITY RANDALL THEATER Oakland. Tickets: picttheatre. org or 412-561-6000. Through Dec. 20.

#TurntUpThursdays 18+ College Night

SUNDAY 7

BeethovenFest: The Revolutionary HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 2:30p.m.

MONDAY 8 GWAR

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

For The Fallen Dreams

TUESDAY 9

DECEMBER 5-21 BYHAM THEATER

Riff Raff The Nutcracker BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pbt.org. Through Dec. 28.

Say Anything / Saves the Day

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

A Musical Christmas Carol

Romeo & Juliet ROCKWELL THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com or 412-392-8000. Through Dec. 14.

newbalancepittsburgh.com 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Production Photos by Matt Polk

WEDNESDAY 3

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Slaves

SATURDAY 6

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5:45p.m.

Handmade Arcade Pittsburgh’s Largest Indie Craft Fair DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Downtown. Free event. For more info visit handmadearcade.com. 11a.m.

O-Town ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Netsky LIVE MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

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OUR MAN IN HONG KONG

THE HOMESMAN EXISTS IN THE FASCINATING SPACE BETWEEN WILD AND TAME

{BY AL HOFF} Condensed, the story of Edward Snowden and his trove of top-secret NSA documents has plenty of potboiler elements: exotic locales, international journalists, code names and secret signals transmitted via Rubik’s Cube. All true, but Laura Poitras’ documentary Citizenfour adopts a more serious and, one might say, less exciting, fly-on-the-wall approach.

Edward Snowden (left) and Glenn Greenwald prep for the big reveal.

Filmmaker Poitras was among those Snowden (a.k.a. “citizenfour”) originally contacted, and it’s she and journalist Glenn Greenwald who meet up with Snowden in Hong Kong to look at the documents and lay out a strategy for publicizing them. This comprises the bulk of the film. The more interesting segments involve Snowden discussing the hows and whys of his high-risk behavior. He’s keenly aware of the consequences — “I already know how this will end for me” — and later is explicit about his public role: “I don’t want to hide on this. It’s powerful to come out and say I’m not afraid.” One of the film’s better points winds up being buried in asides and the odds and ends of other material Poitras mixes in, from Occupy to quick visits to newsrooms: that, as Snowden feared, the story quickly became about him, and not about what troubling information the documents revealed. And indeed, we now still wonder more about how Snowden is faring in Russia, than what the government is doing with its secret data collection. An irony unsolved by either Snowden’s brazen act, or this film’s recap of that week in a Hong Kong hotel room. Starts Fri., Dec. 5. AMC Loews and Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

What’s more fun and festive than sharing bad holiday movies? Tell us what cheesy jingle-bell-festooned heart-warmer starring kids, dogs, Santa, single moms, snowmen and department-store workers you love to find under the tree. Represent at @PghCityPaper, using #CPBadXmasMovies.

ON THE EDGE {BY AL HOFF}

T

HE OPENING credits to The Homesman appear over the expanses of the Nebraska Territory. Then, into the empty frame comes a lone woman, navigating a mule-drawn plow. Soon after, there are three short disturbing scenes of other pioneer women, all engaged in acts of domestic horror. Could this be a provocative exploration of the unique physical and psychic hardships faced by women on the frontier? A film to counter the romanticism of the West, with its rugged male archetypes? Alas, no. Tommy Lee Jones’ film, adapted from Glendon Swarthout’s novel, flirts with this Glen idea, idea but over the course of its journey, this not-quite-a-Western takes another path. notOut on the prairie, Mary Bee Cuddy (Hilary Swank) manages her own home(Hil stead. stea She’s 31, and apparently “too bossy and too plain” to marry. She volunteers to undertake a wagon trip of several weeks, und transporting the three aforementioned tran “crazy” women east to Iowa. “cra After the harrowing but wholly believA able bl scenes that depict the women’s breakdowns, we meet a dodgy drifter named

Another day on the prairie: Tommy Lee Jones and Hilary Swank

Briggs (Jones) via a Mack Sennett comedy: disgorged from an exploding house, wearing filthy underwear, his face creased with soot. It was here that I feared The Homesman would turn into “a movie featuring a cantankerous Tommy Lee Jones character,” and I wasn’t wrong. Through a bit of contrivance, Cuddy negotiates Briggs’ help on the journey.

THE HOMESMAN STARRING: Hilary Swank and Tommy Lee Jones DIRECTED BY: Tommy Lee Jones Starts Fri., Dec. 12.

The Homesman often shifts in tone like this, between menacing, hopeful, dark, silly, heartwarming and terrifying, with little rhyme, while the plot skips from fresh to clichéd to head-scratching. (One late-film dramatic turn made little sense.) After their shocking introduction, the mad women are mute. A few flashbacks suggest their madness may lie in the privation of the frontier and their lack of agency, but we never hear

their stories. They might as well be sad calico-covered rocks being shipped back east. The journey depicted is more day-to-day hardship than drummed-up excitement, and here Jones does make good use of the landscape to elicit the misery masked by the spare beauty: the non-stop wind, rushing across the never-ending treeless prairie, crushed by too much sky. (Of course you’d go mad.) The Homesman travels in the fascinating space between wild and tame, where rugged (even brutish) individualism was needed to break the frontier, while in its wake, order and domesticity were required to make life endurable for larger communities. It’s a dynamic space, the film suggests, not conducive to women, with their emotional complexities, thwarted desires and prescribed roles — even when such women come as strong and independent as Cuddy. I’m not here to argue whether this characterization is true, but rather to bemoan the fact that The Homesman chose to leave its more interesting female characters behind in favor of another wagon-full of Tommy Lee Jones grumpily sorting things out. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

Jingle Bell Rocks (2014)

12/4 @ 7:30pm, 12/7 @ 7:00pm, 12/9 @ 7:30pm, 12/10 @ 7:30pm - A look at 12 little-known, offbeat Christmas songs, and profiles of holiday music collectors.

NEW THIS WEEK THE BABADOOK. If, like me, you’re weary of the current round of domestic horror franchises, such as Paranormal Activity and The Conjuring, which trot out predictable spooks, scares and lazy plotting, you might find relief with this new indie Australian film from Jennifer Kent. And by “relief,” I mean a thoughtful creepiness and a story that openly suggests that plenty of what we call horror is just the awfulness of life that we won’t face. Daily life is a bit of a strain for Amelia (Essie Davis): She’s widowed, works in a senior-care home and is perpetually exhausted, frustrated and even angered by her hyperactive son, Sam (Noah Wiseman). Sam is needy, disruptive and prone to both flights of fancy and bouts of violence. Things go from bad to worse when Sam grows convinced that a monster known as “the babadook” is coming for them both. (The babadook is introduced in a lovely sequence in which a book of hand-cut illustrations seems to come to life.) Teetering on emotional collapse, Amelia starts to fear the babadook as well. But the dark heart of the story isn’t a tophatted, winged monster who might or might not exist, but the destructive, co-dependent relationship between mother and son. Each loves, fears and hates the other, and as the babadook (or the fear of it) imprisons them together in a gloomy old house, increasingly horrible things manifest.

-A- Christmas - - - - - - - - - -Story ---------------------------

CP

(1983) 12/6 @ 7:00pm & 9:30pm, 12/7 @ 3pm Ralphie has to convince his parents, his teacher, and Santa that a Red Ryder B.B. gun really is the perfect gift for the 1940s. Red Ryder B.B. gun raffle on Sunday!

Jingle Bell Rocks Bob Dorough, who penned one of the first antiChristmas holiday tunes, “Blue Xmas,” for Miles Davis. Turns out that beneath the snark, these guys (like most record hounds), are surprisingly sentimental about holiday music. They all make pretty convincing arguments that there is something affirming about even the most over-played, ill-advised or just plain weird Christmas song. Fa la la la la! (At each screening, three audience members will be picked to root through on-hand Christmas LPs and choose a song to be played.) 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 4; 7 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 9; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Dec. 10. Hollywood (AH)

-North - - - - -Way- - - - Dormont - - - - - - - - -Kids- - - -Movie ---------------12/6 @ 10:30pm A FREE family friendly movie kids will love. With crafts, and photos with live characters.

THE PYRAMID. You’d think that by now, folks would have learned not to mess around with old pyramids. But these archeologists do. And typically, they find themselves imperiled by some evil ancient entity they’ve awakened. Grégory Levasseur directs this horror film. Starts Fri., Dec. 5.

ONGOING

The Babadook Kent has a restrained hand in the director’s chair; this is a film with no silly jump-out scares and virtually no blood or gore. The pace is slower, and the vibe reminiscent of such classics as Rosemary’s Baby, where the line between monster and madness remains ambiguous. Monsters are manifestations of our fears, Babadook suggests, and what could be more terrifying to confront than the very dark places of parent-child relationships rarely acknowledged? It’s a lot more unsettling than watching another spooky kid in a nightgown wall-walk or pop out of the closet. Fri., Dec. 5, through Mon., Dec. 8. Melwood (Al Hoff) JINGLE BELL ROCKS. Filmmaker Mitchell Kezin follows his own obsession with Christmas music (his gateway disc was “The Little Boy That Santa Claus Forgot”) into an amusing round-up of holiday tunes; a cultural history of contemporary Christmas songs (from Elvis to “Back Door Santa”); and the vinyl junkies who collect the often-sneered-at music. Kezin checks in with some well-known fans, including: John Waters, musician Wayne Coyne, Run DMC and

PELICAN DREAMS. Filmmaker Judy Irving, who had a hit in 2003 with The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, turns her lens to another bird, the California brown pelican. Her doc follows the rehabilitation of a young female bird, rescued from the Golden Gate Bridge, as well as that of another injured pelican that now lives as a semi-domesticated bird. These personal tales are interwoven with more general information about the life, habits and trials of pelicans, birds whose remarkable abilities are often overshadowed by their goofy appearance. (I’m guilty: I grew up around these pelicans and considered them funnyshaped seagulls.) Despite forays into environmental issues and interviews with naturalists, the film feels longer than its subject warrants. But here’s your chance to give these oft-ignored seabirds their due. Regent Square (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Kung Fu Films: Drunken Master (the 1978 comedic kung-fu film that made a star of Jackie Chan), Dec. 3. Master of the Flying Guillotine (1976 actioner proves missing limbs are no impediment to ass-kicking), Dec. 3. Enter the Dragon (1973 classic martial-arts film starring Bruce Lee), Dec. 3-4. Fist of Fury a.k.a The Chinese Connection (1972 Bruce Lee hit), Dec. 4. Once Upon a Time in China (Jet Li stars in this 1991 bio-pic about Wong Feihung), Dec. 4. (All kung-fu films are presented in their original language, with subtitles.) World War II International Reflections: a look at the war’s impact from the perspective of nonAmericans. Hope and Glory (John Boorman’s partly autobiographical 1987 dramedy about British life on the homefront), Dec. 5-9. Europa Europa (In Nazi Germany, a Jewish boy hides his identity by joining the Hitler Youth, in Agnieszka Holland’s 1990 film), Dec. 5-11. Come and See (Elem Klimov’s 1985 film depicts the experiences of a young soldier who joins the Soviet Army), Dec. 5-8, and Dec. 10-11. Devils on the Doorstep (A Chinese villager takes in two CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

John Feightner in “Shadows of the Shield,” at Film Kitchen Japanese prisoners of war in Wen Jiang’s 2000 film), Dec. 5-7, and Dec. 9-11. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-9043225 or www.rowhousecinema.com WHITE CHRISTMAS. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye are a pair of entertainers who travel to Vermont with two singing sisters (Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen) for the holidays. Once there, the men discover the country inn is run by their old Army general, and he’s in financial straits. Looks like a big musical show might be the ticket! Besides the title song, Michael Curtiz’s 1954 film includes other Irving Berlin classics such as “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep” and “Blue Skies.” 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 4. AMC Loews. $5 A CHRISTMAS STORY. Guess what Ralphie wants for Christmas? An official Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot air rifle. Will he get it? Discover this and other small wonders of holidays past in Bob Clark’s 1983 holiday film. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 6, and 3 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7, at Hollywood. Also, 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11, at AMC Loews.

curated by Matthew Day, also screens two new works by veteran local filmmaker Mike Bonello. His 15-minute “Something in the Water” uses triple exposures and color filters for a mind-expanding 16 mm take on snow, clouds and running water, from the Youghiogheny River (and its falls-running kayakers) to the Atlantic Ocean. In “Spirit Fish” (5 min.), inveterate angler Bonello employs an underwater camera to document a palomino trout he’s seen repeatedly in Laurel Hill Creek. And Madelyn Roehrig (best known for her videos documenting people who visit Andy Warhol’s grave) offers three short works. They include “Transported Traditions,” which is built from collaged audio, plus still images from a mid-century trip to Italy. And the chilling “Darksides” (7 min.) is a sort of postmodern horror movie whose visuals are constructed entirely from still screen-grabs from a TV — wildfires, peanut-butter commercials, reality shows, Saving Private Ryan and local-news screamer headlines (“Mall Rampage”). 8 p.m. Tue., Dec. 9 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. $5. 412-682-4111 (Bill O’Driscoll)

TO HAVE AND TO HAVE NOT. A pair of crusty sea-farin’ smugglers — Humphrey Bogart and Walter Brennan — get mixed up in the French Resistance. Not such bad work with the leggy Lauren Bacall on board. Howard Hawks’ 1948 film — loosely adapted from an Ernest Hemingway tale — is the first film of a two-part, Sunday-night Bogey-and-Bacall celebration. 8 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7. Regent Square LOVE ACTUALLY. In 2003’s directorial debut from screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral), various Londoners in 10 intersecting stories pursue love throughout the Christmas season. Hugh Grant flutters, Emma Thompson frets, Rowan Atkinson looks peevish. Stop me if you’ve heard this before. The best story — Bill Nighy as a rock star making a shameless comeback bid — is the one that ironically features no romance at all. Nearly all the stories resolve exactly as you’d expect them to — with lots of ridiculously orchestrated coincidences and syrupy declarations of love. Love Actually is like that box of over-sweet chocolates: The first candy tastes OK, then you realize they all taste the same and that you don’t much like them after all. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 9. AMC Loews. $5 (AH) FILM KITCHEN. This month’s installment of the series for local and independent artists ranges from a cop-movie spoof to experimental work. The spoof is “Shadows of the Shield,” local improv troupe Hustlebot’s entry in the 48-Hour Film Project. The fast-paced, seven-minute comedy (complete with power-ballad theme song) teams an inept film crew with an undercover detective. Film Kitchen,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

The Pyramid LOLITA. In 1962, Stanley Kubrick dared to adapt Vladimir Nabokov’s scandalous novel about a middle-aged professor who has an affair with a teenage girl, a relationship that runs the gamut from exhilarating to boring to disastrous. James Mason portrays the smitten professor, Humbert Humbert; Sue Lyon is his obsession, Lolita; and the great Peter Sellers plays his nemesis, Clare Quilty. The film continues a year-long celebration of Kubrick films. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 11, and 10:15 p.m. Fri., Dec. 12. Hollywood (AH)

CP

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org


[BOOK REVIEW]

BREVITY

THERE IS EVEN A LAST SUPPER

{BY FRED SHAW} In this bustling commercial world, it wouldn’t hurt to think that haiku-like poems might add meditative moments to short attention spans. In the case of Don Wentworth, poems of few lines have been his sweet spot for decades. A senior staff librarian for Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and editor and founder of Lilliput Review, Wentworth remains a devotee and champion of lyrical brevity. Since its 1989 inception, Lilliput Review has been printed pamphlet-style, publishing several times a year in an indexcard-sized format that reflects its content: poems no longer than 10 lines. Given its quirky DIY ethos, one might assume the work inside to be lightweight. Instead, it’s a breath of fresh air compared to the sometimes stuffy poetry highlighted in glossier journals. One example from a recent issue is Pittsburgh poet Michael Wurster’s “Map”: “All your life / you looked for a map, / holding your face / in your hands / in the imitation of despair. / Afternoon in the water, / a red door opens in the sky.” It’s an arresting, contemplative image that leaves a reader wanting more. Six Gallery Press recently published Wentworth’s own second full-length book, the 220-page collection Yield to the Willow. While thicker than most collections, it rarely has more than 12 words printed on a page. In an interview with novelist Christien Gholson, Wentworth explains his love of literary minimalism as “putting together certain elements, usually nature-based, that spark a third element or revelation, in the experience of seeing/writing the haiku.” He adds, “The idea of satori in Zen is direct pointing, direct experience, and revelation … striving for transcendence.” In the lessis-more philosophy, concise form makes for unique reading. As exemplified in “America, America,” the new book has thematic moments that best utilize a pensive speaker who says, “so impatient / I can’t wait / to die / fresh snow cupped / in a torn white blossom — / orchidectomy.” It’s a cultural statement whose imagery points to the personal. The book’s subdued tone allows for the reflective nature of change and experience. When he writes, “locust tree / gone from the bus stop / how much longer / the wait,” Wentworth is asking readers to consider the transitory nature of life, and how modernity has become less concerned with direct experience, less interested in introspection. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CORRECTION

Last week’s review of L’Hôtel, at Pittsburgh Public Theater, included an incorrect closing date for the play. The show runs through Dec. 14. N E W S

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HOMING [ART REVIEW]

INSTINCTS {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{BY MICHELLE FRIED}

Lisa Lindvay’s “Dinner” (2009)

I

F CLEARLY distinguished from journal-

ism, images of human subjects that characterize their plight — be it disease, poverty or hopeless monotony — have a difficult place in contemporary photography. Critics sigh deeply, then groan about power dynamics between those who can leverage the consumption of such images and the distinct and powerless “other.” But there is one disarming caveat: What if the photographer is one of “them”? A wash of empathy paints a different picture, and the gloominess, once depicted, is actually lived experience, an intimate retelling. Artists in Close to Home, on view at the Silver Eye Photography Center, straddle this divide between the maker and the member, all in different ways. In doing so, they bring personal narrative into a universal concern: the idea that “home,” the exhibition’s overarching theme, is a human social center that is both fundamental and flawed.

Intimacy is like a temperature reading of a photographer’s relationship to her subject. Photographer Martha FlemingIves conveys an intimacy that is felt more than seen in “Red Parts Whole,” a rhythmic image installation that unsentimentally traces her sister’s struggle with mental illness. Portraits embody an unpleasant story: the “not all there” stares, a truncated

CLOSE TO HOME continues through Jan. 10. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

semi-nude torso with hands pulling on skin scarred from childbirth, radical weight fluctuations, and a clinical portrait of mother and child. While her body signifies the illness, the non-portrait photographs seem to embody her symptoms as ghostly mani-

festations: happy family snapshots except one scowling black sheep, a hopeless journal entry and, my favorite, a magazine cover reading “Farewell to the ‘Family’” as the Family Ties gang looks on, appearing, in this context, gleefully smug. End-capping this collection is a stunning belly-down nude that cuts through the moodiness with a direct gaze and smirk of omniscience and self-possession. Similarly, Lisa Lindvay’s portraits and still lifes characterize mental illness as a shadowy force in “7 years in the Making.” The framed and traditionally hung photographs portray a mother who is entirely absent; the subject instead is the effect of her illness on her family and her home. The drama of these scenes is unmistakably cultivated from a biblically inspired visual tradition, with the brother’s sultry, saintly dignity and pizza-box grease halo, and the father’s forsaken glances, his grimy CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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HOMING INSTINCTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

DECEMBER D ECEMBER 5-28, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

TICKE TICKETS E TS CALL: 412.456.6666 VISIT: PBT.ORG Groups of 8+ 412.454.9101 call: 412.4 454.9101

Artist: A Alexandre lexandre Silva Photo: L ois Greenfield Lois

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

[LIT BRIEFS]

LIT BRIEFS

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Richard Ford

bathrobes like royal draping. There is even a Last Supper: Flanked by indifferent sons eating McDonald’s on the floor in stockinged feet, the forlorn-faced dad gazes stage left, a single French fry in his unclenched hand. The two still lifes in this collection are semi-religious: a rainbow of twoliter dollar-store-brand soda lined up on a vomit-green shag carpet is a nuanced relic to inelegance. A family room turned to ruins and garbage, the only piece of furniture a beat-up pool table surrounded by trash. It’s a battle scene where all is irreversibly lost to a state of pathological bachelorhood. The opposite of warm-blooded intimacy is the chilly detachment of Andrew Hammerand’s “The New Town.” It’s several printed screen shots from a planned community’s surveillance feed — an artifact, no matter the context, that comes with built-in doom. Hammerand chooses stills of innocuous but possibly ugly scenarios, like a child being pulled by an adult; some girls playing, but their bodies chopped up by digital noise; a lonesome toddler; and a middle-aged man who just might be a serial killer. The art resides in the image curation, and it plays on illogical impulses in which we imagine ourselves the victims of crimes or captured on surveillance. Elizabeth A. Rudnick’s “Family History (Cake)” uses 4-by-5 inch snapshots of gatherings around a cake as painting surfaces. Rudnick paints out the humans, leaving a lonely, tormented cake. Finally, Cameron Gibson’s video “The Inner and Outer Vanishing Point” unrolls a desolatefeeling portrait of people doin’ stuff in Anytown, USA. All three visualize a home retold with anxiety and disconnection. A quotidian aesthetic in photography — a challenging approach, given the volume in which this style is practiced on social media — fights for attention in this exhibition. Reinhart’s skillful set of portraits and still lifes give an accurately somber and uncomplicated view of rustic Pittsburgh. And though he is sincerely inspired as a new father, Justin Visnesky’s whispery family album “In Between Days” exhales a sweetness that is misplaced. It seems that “paying due attention,” as this approach is sometimes called, wilts here as the darker, deeper tones of Close to Home leech blood from delicate everyday life. Organizers of the exhibition write: “Perhaps photography is the ideal medium to express these feelings about home because of its ability to depict complicated things, in the most straightforward way …” Because snapshots of family, or “home,” saturate our digital second lives, this exhibition is just as much a stand that photography still has potency in the category of family portraiture, and you can certainly find it here.

“It is, of course, the bouquet of large-scale home repair and re-hab. Fresh-cut lumber, clean, white PVC, the lye-sniff of Sakrete, stinging sealants, sweet tar paper, and denatured spirits. … To my nose — once practiced in these things — nothing smells of ruin as fragrantly as the first attempts at rescue.” So says Richard Ford’s once-and-present protagonist Frank Bascombe at the start of Ford’s latest novel, Let Me Be Frank With You (Ecco), set in post-Sandy New Jersey. Ford, author of novels including The Sportswriter and Independence Day, is among the nation’s most decorated writers, winner of a Pulitzer and more. And even as Bascombe’s back between hard covers, Ford returns for a rare visit to Pittsburgh. He speaks Dec. 8 at Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Lectures. Prior to Ford’s evening talk, 2014 Drue Heinz Prize winner Kent Nelson visits PAL’s free Writers LIVE series, in the adjoining Oakland Carnegie Library. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Mon., Dec. 8. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-25. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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One of Foreign Policy magazine’s “top 100 global thinkers,” geopolitical analyst and journalist Robert Kaplan uses historical perspective to discuss and predict impending conflicts and what policy should result. He visits Shady Side Academy tonight for a lecture coinciding with his latest book, Asia’s Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific. Published by Random House, Asia’s Cauldron analyzes the region that Kaplan believes will dominate future geopolitical conflict, and highlights China’s growing political sway. Danielle Fox 7:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 6. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. $10. 412-968-3040 or www.thehillman.org

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After leaving his New York City law firm to pen mystery novels on a Greek island, Pittsburgh native Jeffrey Siger visits his home turf with Sons of Sparta (Poisoned Penn Press). This sixth installment in his chief inspector Andreas Kaldis series follows the inspector’s work to Peloponnesian mountaintops, where descedants of ancient Sparta and their ancestors vendettas still thrive. Described by the New York Times as “thoughtful police procedurals set in picturesque but not untroubled Greek locales,” the series pulls from ancient and contemporary Greek society. Siger visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop tonight for a book-signing and discussion. DF 7 p.m. Fri., Dec. 5. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com


A play about ourselves in the magical imagination of Charles Dickens.

Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Adapted by Hugh Leonard Directed by Alan Stanford

December 4-20 Discount: CP5OFF

PICTTheatre.org/Macbeth | 412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

Winter Festival

Holiday Unwrapped A dance adventure for the kid in all of us. Holiday Hijinks and Revue Festive fun for the over 21. December 5, 6, 2014 The George R. White Studio, Pittsburgh Opera, 2425 Liberty Avenue TICKETS: attacktheatre.showclix.com Attack Theatre’s Season 20 is made possible in part by: The McKinney Charitable Foundation of the PNC Charitable Trusts

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF KERRY L. LOGAN}

Craig Bernier

[BOOK REVIEW]

DAILY GRINDS

Give the Gift of

Broadway!

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} TO SAY THERE’S nothing fancy about

Gift Certificates for Two

You buy the tickets; they choose the show! $60 and $100

SUMMER 2015 s At the Benedum Center

412-281-2822 s pittsburghCLO.org Visit our Holiday Booths at area malls.

U R INETOWN

MUSIC BY MARK HOLLMANN BOOK BY GREG KOTIS LYRICS BY MARK HOLLMANN AND GREG KOTIS DIRECTED AND CHOREOGRAPHED BY ZEVA BARZELL

ONE WEEK ONLY! DECEMBER 9-14 Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic director • Earl Hughes producing director

TICKETS: PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

Craig Bernier’s debut short-story collection Your Life Idyllic is neither praise nor pejorative. It’s practically a quantitative assessment. With rare exceptions, these pieces, ranging from good to excellent, are straightforwardly constructed, plainly written stories about regular people in ordinary situations. Bernier’s ability to move and surprise us is all the more impressive for it. Opening entry “Bender” sets the tone. Billy, a retired Marine in his 50s, is driving his slightly older brother, Nate, to rehab. Billy, who narrates, is bent on fixing his brother … whose best chance of getting admitted to the program is to seem as drunk as possible when he arrives. Billy works to keep control, Nate to lose it, and along the suburban route Nate keeps pointing out the expertly crafted neon signs he made in his last job, potent if ironic symbols of a better Nate who sometimes was. Bernier, who lives in Wilkinsburg, is a native of southeastern Michigan, and “Bender,” like all but one of these nine stories, is set in metro Detroit. Thanks largely to that region’s car culture and sprawling Midwestern flatness, much of the action takes place in or around motor vehicles (though, to be fair, it’s not much more than takes place in bars). Most of the stories transpire over the course of a day, or less. Bernier’s sentences are short but not obsessively so, bending and stretching

limberly for dependent clauses. More importantly, there are emotional consonances between these stories. “Just Enough Rope,” for instance, follows a guy who impulsively knocks out his shop supervisor with a fire extinguisher — one way to express frustration with his deadend life. If “Bender” explores a kind of hope against hope, “Just Enough Rope” leans hard into blue-collar resignation. That theme is best explored though in “The Weight of Stardust.” Barry, 29, is a Ford night-shift foundry worker who doesn’t really want to be there. He’s married, with a new daughter, grappling with his stalwart father’s legacy, industry downsizing and, tonight, a surprise snowstorm. The story features some of Bernier’s best writing, as on Barry’s drive home: The sky was clearing. Barry could see a low, full moon through breaks in the clouds. Radio off, he tried to concentrate on the road, but not the moon. It sat above his hood like a deluxe option that came with the Mk V. He leaned back in the bucket and got a good, clear view. He considered talking to the moon, asking it for an answer, but he stopped short thinking it would be crazy to ask the dead rock anything. The moon looked back stupid, offering only luminescence. Like much of the collection, “Weight” is largely about disasters that don’t happen but are much worried about: Is this


my heart attack? Why the busy signal at home? The story concludes on a note of acceptance. Or is it simply the death of Barry’s ambition for something more? A few stories mine a more comic vein. Yet even here, Bernier stays grounded. “Lucky Star” lets a failed rock musicianturned-farrier tell what happens when ex-Detroiter Madonna shows up at his yoga class in Nowheresville, Mich. It’s a farce about fame, fantasy and failed headstands.

YOUR LIFE IDYLLIC By Craig Bernier Black Lawrence Press, 170 pages, $14.95

“The Chief” finds another of Bernier’s hyper-responsible ex-military guys taking his divorced sister’s precocious, 7-year-old son on a Christmastime bowling outing and struggling not to blow Santa’s cover (lest “I become the guy in the story twenty years from now when the topic of finding out about Santa comes up”). The sweet, poignant story also works as a character study of a fretfully paternal guy who’s upset by seeing people inappropriately dressed for cold weather.

“Affliction” follows a divorced dad’s attempt to connect one Sunday with his own daughter — a teenager whose obsession with French comments on the narrator’s ambivalence over the FrenchCanadian heritage he’s abandoned. “Affliction” is funny and engaging, and offers a well-drawn female character in a collection where (a quibble here) all the protagonists are men. Two stories stand out for other reasons. “Culvert at the Track” concerns an unusual character: an aged, old-school Southern California horseplayer, once wealthy, lamenting bygone glamour and deciding whether to confront a bad losing streak by putting it all on a twitchy long shot. Most of Bernier’s old men are on the verge of heart attacks, and perhaps the collection over-relies on this trope, but it’s an agreeably colorful story. And then there’s “The Manual of Heavy Drinking,” an experimental 15-part piece constructed like a highfunctioning alcoholic’s how-to: “It’s understandable to soul search. Intolerable pressure may push at your temples. Shame and guilt appear and reappear. Drink through these.” Brutally ironic, it’s unlike anything else here — and also brutally effective.

Christmas at the Village Step back in time to stroll the candlelit paths of a 19th century village decorated for Christmas. Children can visit Belsnickel and make holiday crafts. Everyone can enjoy cider, soups, and desserts. Shop for gifts from a variety of vendors. Listen to musical performances from choirs from around the region.

Saturday, December 13, 2 p.m.- 9 p.m.; Sunday December 14, 2 p.m. – 7 p.m. $10 adults (12-64); $9 seniors (65+); $6 children (3-11); Friends of Old Economy Village Members, Active Duty Military, children under 3: FREE

270 Sixteenth Street, Ambridge, PA 15003 | 724-266-4500

www.oldeconomyvillage.org

DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

Can a photo capture our essence? In this first-ever photograph of DNA, we are given a glimpse of what connects all living things past, present, and future. The image seems to ask: What makes us who we are, and can it be captured in a photograph? Respond to our question with text, photos, videos, or audio files, and we'll feature your response on our website!

nowseethis.org Rosalind Franklin & Raymond Gosling, Photo 51. Courtesy King’s College, London.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

12.0412.10.14

Come visit our

Yule Haus at Nola

This holiday while visiting the Holiday Market at the Square. Enjoy Olde Worlde Favorites, Ye Olde Sweet Shoppe and Beverages to warm your tummy!

DEC. 09 Urinetown rin inet etow town

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., DEC. 04 {STAGE} PICT Classic Theatre closes its season with what Charles Dickens called his best work. In Great Expectations, adapted for the stage by Hugh Leonard, the young orphan Pip finds himself suddenly a wealthy man on the road to becoming a London gentleman. Two familiar faces at PICT — Lily Davis, a recent Point Park University graduate, and recent Pitt grad Dylan Marquis Meyers — play haughty Estella and humble Pip, respectively. The cast, directed by PICT’s Alan Stanford, also includes local favorite Mary Rawson as Miss Havisham. The first performance is tonight. Danielle Fox 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 20. Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-54. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

+ FRI., DEC. 05 {ART}

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

Born in Colombia, artist Sheila Cuellar-Shaffer draws on personal experience and paints the narrative of an immigrant’s journey through subjects like memories, photos and changing landscapes. Now based in Pittsburgh, CuellarShaffer’s latest paintings represent the human figure, mapping “one’s evolution and appropriation of a new beginning,” she says in press

materials. Her exhibit Recent Works, at 709 Penn Gallery, opens tonight with a reception. DF 5-8 p.m. 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-471-6070 or www.trustarts.org

{ART} Visual art from Latin America, and perhaps Venezuela in particular, isn’t widely exhibited in Pittsburgh. But tonight is the opening reception for Sincronia, Shaw Galleries’ group show of six

contemporary Venezuelan artists. Included are the gestural works of Jesus Perez; the figurative imagery of Freddy Paz Rincón; the drawings of Johan Galue and Alvaro Paz; work by Gustavo Paris; and the “characters, silhouettes and hidden faces” of Nerio Quintero, such as the colorful “Quetzalcoatl.” Bill O’Driscoll 5-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 10. 805 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-281-4884 or www.shawgalleries.com

{ART} Dave Klug is a nationally known illustrator, with credits ranging from Forbes magazine to Highlights — though you might know him best from his mural of local celebs at the Strip District Primanti’s. Illustrators don’t always get gallery love, but tonight, Panza Gallery opens Dave Klug & Friends, featuring fun, witty and accessible new work by Klug and three other local practitioners. Klug is joined by fellow widely published talents George Schill, Stacy Innerst and

Art by Gabe Felice

DEC. 06 Trip In / On Neon


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF AIMEE DIANDREA}

Holiday performance season begins in earnest this week, heavy on old favorites but with some new wrinkles. Fresh takes on old standbys include Bricolage’s Midnight Radio production of It’s a Wonderful Life (Dec. 4-20). Five actors tackle this radio-style stage adaptation of the film classic, with live sound effects (Downtown; $35; www.webbricolage.org). From Dec. 5-7, Resonance Works offers its first annual production of Amahl and the Night Visitors; this staging of Menotti’s beloved chamber opera about three strangers in Bethlehem features Pittsburgh favorites Daniel Teadt and Robert Frankenberry (Shadyside; $10-50; free for children under 10; www.resonanceworks.org). Attack Theatre offers the fifth year of the family-friendly dance work Holiday Unwrapped (Dec. 5-6), plus the Dec. 6 debut of Holiday Hijinks and Revue, a 21-and-over party seasoned with short performances (Strip District; $5-15; www.attacktheatre.com). Elsewhere, Music in a Great Space offers Handel’s Messiah (Dec. 6), performed by the Shadyside Chamber Choir and Chatham Baroque (Shadyside; $10-15; www.shadysidepres.org). Pittsburgh CLO stages its traditional A Musical Christmas Carol (Dec. 5-20), with a talented cast headed by Tom Atkins, as Scrooge (Downtown; $15.75-60.75; www.pittsburghclo.org). Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre reprises its circa-1900 Pittsburgh-set The Nutcracker (Dec. 5-28; Downtown; $27-107; www.pittsburghballet.org). And Shona Sharif African Dance and Drum Ensemble presents the 25th edition of Langston Hughes’ Black Nativity (Dec. 5-21), blending the Christmas story with gospel music and African dance (Oakland; $10-20; nativitypgh@gmail.com). Bill O’Driscoll

Wayno. Tonight’s reception is free. BO 6-8:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Dec. 27. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. Free. www.panzagallery.com

{DANCE} Nicolas Petrov, who founded Point Park University’s renowned dance program, went out with a bang last year by staging Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet for the school’s Conservatory Dance Company. Petrov — an internationally known dancer who also founded, in 1969, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre — is retired now. But he’s back to choreograph another production of the famed ballet adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy. The show runs for eight performances over two weekends, starting tonight; look for a review in next week’s CP. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 14. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ SAT., DEC. 06

Ave., Shadyside. Free. amnesty39@gmail.com

craft projects. BO 11 a.m.7 p.m. Downtown. Free. www.handmadearcade.com

{ART} An up-and-coming local artist opens a show of new work, with a psychic twist, at The Gallery 4. Gabe Felice offers vivid, kaleidoscopic and often surreal imagery, painting in acrylic, enamel and ink on canvas or salvaged metal or wood. His process also often partakes of extrasensory phenomenon, and the new show, Trip In / On Neon, “combin[es] the creative process with clairvoyance” to translate brain waves into two-dimensional imagery. It’ll be on the walls starting with tonight’s opening reception. BO 7-11 p.m. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-3635050 or www.thegallery4.us

+ SUN., DEC. 07 {SCREEN} It doesn’t have angels, reindeer or candy canes,

+ TUE., DEC. 09

DEC. 05 Dave Klug & Friends

{STAGE}

Art by Dave Klug

but if you’re hunting for old movies this time of year, you could do worse than To Have and Have Not. Howard Hawks’ 1944 drama (based on a Hemingway novel) stars Humphrey Bogart as a wartime charter-boat captain mixed up in the French resistance. It’s famed as the

screen debut of 19-year-old Lauren Bacall, whose scenes with Bogart crackle. Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Regent Square Theater screens the film tonight as the first installment of a Bogie-and-Bacall backto-back, continuing next week with John Huston’s classic 1948 crime drama

{MARKETPLACE} Found-object jewelery; hand-bound journals; upcycled children’s clothing; organic bath and body products; limited-edition art posters; purses made from old books — these are just some of the wares at the 11th annual Handmade Arcade. Some 150 independent craft vendors from Pittsburgh and across the country gather at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in the year’s biggest show — in fact, one of the biggest in the nation — for hand-crafted goods. There are also local DJs and live music. And the Hands-On Handmade area includes participatory art and

DEC. 06 Handmade Arcade

Key Largo. BO 8 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $9. 412-682-4111 or www.pittsburgharts.org

+ MON., DEC. 08 {ACTIVISM} From journalists jailed for doing their jobs to activists tortured (and worse) for demanding human rights, Amnesty International and its members work for justice around the globe year-round. Every December, Amnesty chapters ask communities to participate in the Write-a-thon and Human Rights Festival. Amnesty International Pittsburgh holds its own 28th annual evening of letterwriting tonight at Calvary Episcopal Church. The group supplies all necessary information about each rights case, writing materials and refreshments. (See this year’s cases at write.amnestyusa.org/ cases.) Write one letter or a dozen; someone, somewhere will be glad you did. BO 6-9 p.m. 315 Shady

In a world where water supplies have run dangerously scarce, Urinetown squirms under a ban on private toilets and a corrupt, pay-to-potty conglomerate. New York playwright Greg Kotis and composer Mark Hollman wrote the satirical musical Urinetown, which debuted in 2001 at the New York International Fringe Festival. The biting play on capitalism and toilet humor earned Urinetown nine Tonys. Starting tonight, with Zeva Barzell as director and choreographer, Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company flushes out its inhibitions for an eightshow run. DF 8 p.m. Show continues through Sun., Dec. 14. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

{WORDS} Lisa Kirchner spent several years in New York City’s storytelling scene. Now, the author of the recent memoir Hello, American Lady Creature, has returned to Pittsburgh and wants to add her out-oftown experience to the local mix. Kirchner’s Pittsburgh Story Syndicate is hosting a brand-new storytelling night at Brookline community hub Cannon Coffee. Tonight, bring your true-life five-minute story, and if your name is picked from the hat, you’ll get to tell it live. The series continues weekly. BO 6:30-7:30 p.m. 802 Brookline Blvd., Brookline. Donations accepted. www.storysyndicate.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY KENNEDY}

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS Wine & Cheese Bar

THURSDAY DEC 4/10PM

COMFORT TECH, CHARM & CHAIN, TANDY THURSDAY, DEC 11/10PM

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THE COMMON HEART, ROUND BLACK GHOSTS, COOKIE $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

The Holidays THEATER Are Officially Upon You! Come To Us For Respite, Refreshment, and our annual No X-mas Music Guarantee! ---------------------------------------------------

WED&THURS, 5-MIDNIGHT FRI,SAT&SUN 5-1 ---------------------------------------------------

5326 Butler St. Upper Lawrenceville

ACTING LIKE A MAN. A comedic puppet show based on a friend’s love life & the imprisonment of the Marquis de Sade. Sat., Dec. 6, 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 603-370-8334. AMAHL & THE NIGHT VISITORS. W/ Britten’s Ceremony of Carols. The tale of a child’s encounter w/ the three kings on their way to Bethlehem. Presented by Resonance Works. Dec. 5-6, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 7, 3 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. A BENCH IN THE SUN. A comedy by Ron Clark. Presented by The Bobcat Players. Dec. 4-6, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 7, 2 p.m. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Dickens’ classic Christmas tale. www.comtratheatre.org Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 20. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Community Theatre Players of Ben Avon present a dramatic

reading of selected scenes from the Dickens’ classic. Sat., Dec. 6, 3:15 p.m. Community Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon. ELF’ED. Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner Theater about one of Santa’s new elves who ends up receiving his last rights. Opens Nov. 8. Fri., Dec. 5, 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 19, 7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. EMMALINA SCROOGE. Why is young Emmy Scrooge such a..well..scrooge? Perhaps a visit from Charles Dickens & two ghostly sisters can persuade her to have a change of heart. Presented by the Greasepaint Players. Opens Dec. 5. Fri., Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 6, 1 & 4 p.m. Greensburg Civic Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Charles Dickens’ classic. Presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m., Tue., Dec. 9, 7 p.m., Tue., Dec. 16, 10 a.m., Wed., Dec. 17, 2 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. HAW, presented by Pohl 412-561-6000. Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Dec. 13. IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. A LIVE RADIO PLAY. The 724-746-1178. American holiday classic comes R-ACT ANNUAL HOLIDAY to life as a live 1940’s radio RADIO SHOW. 1920’s-’40’s style entertainment feat. “Three Men” broadcast. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. & “A Child Is Born”. Dec. 5-6, and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 14. 7 p.m. Merrick Art Gallery, The Theatre Factory. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. 412-374-9200. THE SANTALAND DIARIES. L’HOTEL. Sarah Bernhardt, A play by David Sedaris. Thru Jim Morrison, Oscar Wilde, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m. and Victor Hugo, Isadora Sat., Dec. 6, 2 p.m. Duncan & Gioachino South Park Theatre, Rossini meet in the Bethel Park. world premier of 412-831-8552. Ed Dixon’s comedy. www. per SMART BLOND. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and pa pghcitym Born Yesterday star .co Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Judy Holliday lays down Dec. 14. O’Reilly Theater, a series of tracks about her Downtown. 412-316-1600. rise to fame amidst the politics MURDER FOR TWO. 1 actor of the 1950s. Tue-Sun. Thru investigates the crime, the other Dec. 21. City Theatre, South Side. plays all of the suspects & they 412-431-2489. both play the piano. Wed-Sat, A STREETCAR NAMED 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. Thru DESIRE. Presented by barebones Jan. 18. Cabaret at Theater productions, Tennessee Williams’ Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. 1947 classic. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. AN OZARK COUNTRY Thru Dec. 6. New Hazlett Theater, CHRISTMAS. A salute to HEE North Side. 1-888-71-TICKET. THE GIFT OF THE ICE QUEEN. Original Gemini Theater musical Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 28. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. A TUNA CHRISTMAS. Radio personalities, Thurston Wheelis & Arles Struvie, report on the Yuletide activities of all the good folks in Tuna, Texas. Thru Nov. 6, 8 p.m., Sun., Dec. 7, 2 & 7 p.m., Wed., Dec. 10, 8 p.m. and Thru Dec. 13, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS. The tale of Amos the Mouse, whose house gets missed by Santa. Special lunch w/ Santa 12/7/14 at 12pm. Dec. 5-6, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 7, 2 p.m. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

COMEDY THU 04 COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LAUGH & LYRICS. 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-837-9826. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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VISUAL

ART

“Complicated Shadows,” by Heidi Taillefer, from The Michael Berger Foundation: A Selection of Their Private Collection, at the Christine Frechard Gallery, in Squirrel Hill

NEW THIS WEEK 709 PENN GALLERY. Recent Works by Sheila Cueller-Shaffer. Each abstract work represents a part of a narrative of an immigrant’s journey where anything can become the subject: a memory, a photo, or a change in landscape through time. Opening reception Dec. 5, 5-8pm. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2014: AIR’s 3rd Annual National Juried Exhibition. Opening reception Dec. 5, 7-9 p.m. North Side. 412-321-8664. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Boulevard Gallery’s Annual Holiday Event. Pottery, jewelry, sculptures, cards, photography, watercolor, oils, & acrylics. Opening reception Dec. 6, 6-9pm. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. 2014 Carnegie Mellon School of Art Open Studio. Meet emerging artists, tour their studios, buy art, enjoy music, food, & drink. Carnegie Mellon College of Fine Art. Oakland. 978-302-5570. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Artwork by Crystala Armagost. Opens Dec. 5th. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. GALLERIE CHIZ. Sparkle Plenty. New work by Carlos Sanchez Vegas w/ Laura Lee Junge, Chiz Turnross, & Barbara Yerace. Opening reception & benefit for Pittsburgh Community Food Bank Dec. 5, 5:30-8:30pm. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Trip In / On Neon. Work by Pittsburgh based painter & illustrator Gabe Felice. Opening reception Dec. 6, 1-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050.

IMAGEBOX. Solo Reuse Art Exhibition. Work by Martin Thomas Smyczek II. Opening reception Dec. 5, 7-10pm during Unblurred. Garfield. 412-441-0930. MATTRESS FACTORY. ARTlab. An interactive activity. Explore new ideas & fun projects w/ museum educators & artists. North Side. 412-231-3169 ex 536. MINE FACTORY. I Just Want The Paper. Opening Dec. 6, 6-10pm. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Artwork by Susan Constance, Jean McClung, John Morris, & Patrick Schmidt. Opening reception feat. portfolio sale, poetry reading, & more, Dec. 7 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. PANZA GALLERY. Dave Klug & Friends. The work of Dave Klug, George Schill, Stacy Innerst & Wayno. Opening reception Dec. 5, 6-8:30 PM. Millvale. 412-821-0959. SHAW GALLERIES. Sincronia. Work by 6 contemporary artists from Venezuela. Opening reception Dec. 5, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Becky Slemmons: Gatherings. Exploring what happens when an artist enters the religious realm, pursuing a performative project, in an environment where conformity often dominates. Downtown. 412-456-2962. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Downtown. 412-471-6070.

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AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BAR MARCO. Studio Direct. New Work by Seth Clark. Strip District. 412-471-1900. BE GALLERIES. Stranger Than Fiction. Work by Brody Burroughs. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again Storyteller: The Photographs

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FRI 05 “BEST OF THE BURGH” COMEDY SHOWCASE. Come out and see Pittsburgh’s best comedians every Friday. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 6 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DRAFT IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE DUO IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 9:30 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. YOUR LIFE: THE MUSICAL. One audience member will have his or her life story transformed into a musical theater show, as if featured on Broadway. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

& go on dates around Pittsburgh. Fill out the application. Email your submission & a recent photo. 8-10 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-290-9652. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Carnegie Trees 2014: Winter Wonders. The Hall of Architecture w/ several towering 20-foot Colorado spruce trees, each adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, (planetarium), Miniature Downtown. 412-339-0608. Railroad and Village, USS KNIGHTS OF THE Requin submarine, and more. ARCADE: EPIC D&D North Side. 412-237-3400. HOLIDAY SPECIAL. 10 p.m. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in Arcade Comedy Theater, 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 Downtown. 412-339-0608. are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. 412-464-4020 x.21. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL Shadyside. 412-404-2695. HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. COMEDY SAUCE. Up-andOpen Fridays 5-8, Saturdays coming comedians w/guests. 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. 412-223-7698. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 12 CHILDREN’S MUSEUM Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. OF PITTSBURGH. Tough Art. 412-682-9603. An annual exhibition of original, UNPLANNED interactive artworks “tough” COMEDY’S JAMBONE. enough to withstand kid Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru handling. Take a walk Jan. 26 Hambone’s, through a prism forest, Lawrenceville. create cracks on 412-681-4318. kinetic stained glass, reach for a www. per pa sky of 600 LEDs, & TUESDAY NIGHT pghcitym .co explore the inner STAND-UP. Tue, workings of an 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, intergalactic sheep. Mt. Washington. North Side. 412-322-5058. 412-592-7869. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open settlement & history of the Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 412-486-0563. The BeerHive, Strip District. FALLINGWATER. Tour the 412-904-4502. famed Frank Lloyd Wright COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by house. 724-329-8501. Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany 412-431-9908. stained-glass windows. THE DATING GAME. Presented Downtown. 412-471-3436. by Chicksburgh. Hosted by FORT PITT MUSEUM. MaVe Sami. Headliner Christina Reconstructed fort houses McNeese. Seeking fun contestants museum of Pittsburgh history who want to meet new people

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. New Art by Tom & Carol Norulak. Fine art prints, handmade silks & jewelry. Open during campus hours at the Boyce Campus Art Gallery. Monroeville. 724-327-1327. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Selections of The Michael Berger Foundation’s Private Collection. Painting & prints from the 200 piece collection. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DELANIE’S COFFEE. DOUBLE MIRROR EXHIBIT 4. Ft. local visual & performing artists. South Side. 412-927-4030. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Moving Targets. A multidisciplinary exhibition by artists Ann Rosenthal & Steffi Domike w/ Ruth FaumanFichman. Commemorating the 2014 centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon & linking it to Jewish diaspora. Duquesne Library Gallery. Closing reception Dec. 4, 6-7:30pm following Joel Greenberg book signing at the Duquesne Barnes & Noble from 3-4 p.m. & lecture at the Power Center Ballroom, 4:30-5:45 p.m. Email mpietrusza@gmail.com for information. Uptown. 412-396-6130. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449.

circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295.

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Bountiful. A group exhibition all about food. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by

MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000.

Elena Hiatt Houlihan. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art & committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created inresidence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. David Lewis & Terry Shutko. Public reception Dec. 13, 2-5 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Sometimes I See Before I Paint. Paintings by artist Nellie Lou Slagle, combining torn paper & torn print, along w/ writing and paint. South Side. 412-431-3337. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Work by Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris & Patrick Schmidt. Garfield. 412-969-7689. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Dec. 5, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881.

OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Flower Show & Light Garden Feat. a variety of festive poinsettias, showy amaryllis &

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents “Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Obsessions. Showcasing six artists from across the U.S., exploring the nature of obsession through painting, sculpture, sitespecific installation, video & performance. Ft. artists: Jeremiah Johnson, Jason Lockyer, Nathan Margoni, Mary Ivy Martin, Becky Slemmons & Laurie Trok. Downtown. 412-325-7723. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Restrike: Uncovering the Life and Work of Gertrude Quastler. Feat. the artistic styles of Gertrude Quastler from printmaking to sculpture. Oakland. 412-648-2423. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

aromatic paperwhites .14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals

depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

HOLIDAY THU 04

DECK THE HALLS. Three of Pittsburgh’s premier floral designers create arrangements on stage while discussing floral design trends & holiday inspirations. Raffle. Reservations required. 10 a.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3325.

FRI 05

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS. Craft show a live nativity, ice carving, carriage ride, & live performances. Activities, games, crafts & a visit from Santa Claus for kids. Fireworks at 8:15pm. 3-8:15 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-536-1069.

FRI 05 - SAT 06

ATTACK THEATRE’S HOLIDAY UNWRAPPED. This dance performance features Attack Theatre’s physicality & theatrical www. per wit, set to the sounds of pa pghcitym classical, jazz, & klezmer .co music. 7 p.m. and Sat., GIFTS & GREENS MARDec. 6, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. KET. Feat. an assortment of fresh, Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. aromatic specialty greens & more. 412-281-3305. Dec. 4-6 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442. THE HOLIDAY MARKET. THE BEAVER COUNTY Handmade crafts by local FESTIVAL OF TREES. A artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and wide variety of creatively Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru designed Christmas trees displayed Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, each w/ a different theme & Ross. 412-364-3622. wreaths. Visit the North Pole Café, Santa Land, the Candy Lane gift shop & enjoy the model JOY OF COOKIES COOKIE train display. Fri-Sun, 12-5 p.m. TOUR. Sample the shopkeeper’s Thru Dec. 7 Brady’s Run Park favorite cookie & explore more Lodge, Beaver Falls. than 30 diverse businesses HOLIDAY GLASS SALE + ORNAMENT MAKING. Sale, Lawrenceville has to offer. Molly’s hot glass demos & ornament Trolley will circulate throughout making. 6-9 p.m. and Sat, Sun, the business district on Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Dec. 7 Hours vary. Dec. 4-7 412-621-1616.

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L g n i l g n e u Y 7 $ y a d r u t a S y a All D 228 SOUTH HIGHLAND (REAR) 412.361.2747 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145.

[FOOD]

SAT 06 ATTACK THEATRE’S HOLIDAY HIJINKS & REVUE. Games, merriment & dance. 21+ 7 p.m. Attack Theatre, Strip District. 412-281-3305. CARNEGIE CELEBRATES THE SEASON. A full day of holiday programming in multiple locations. Cookies, crafts, stories, songs, ornamentmaking, a performance of the Nutcracker, Santa visits, tree lighting and Main St. activities. Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Carnegie’s Main St. 12-7 p.m. 412-279-5456. EASTMINSTER LIGHT UP NIGHT CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL. Live nativity, music by the Howard University Gospel Choir, more. 6 p.m. Eastminster Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. ECLECTIC LABORATORY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA & THE BRASS ROOTS. Non-Denominational, New Music Holiday Hoedown celebrating the 50th anniversary of Terry Riley’s composition “In C”. Refreshments & libations by Wigle Whiskey. 8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-608-6120. MERRY, MERRY ART MARKET. Held by South Arts. Art work for sale from Heritage Box & the Margo Barraclough Gallery. Holiday dinner. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. The Historic Schoolhouse, Bethel Park. 412-831-8156. PITTSBURGH SANTARCHY. Dress up as your favorite holiday superhero, Santa Claus, & help spread merriment to the city of Pittsburgh. 2:30 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-0235. SHOP SMALL, SHOP HANDMADE. I Made It! Market & Think Shadyside present a pop up shop ft. 20 artists each week. Above Shady Grove. Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 Shady Grove, Shadyside. 412-697-0909.

SUN 07

Canning is a great way to enjoy the summer’s garden haul long into the winter months. But canners also tend to end up with a lot of the same thing, be it tomatoes, hot-pepper jelly or pickled beets. The Pittsburgh Canning Exchange, along with Slow Food Pittsburgh, offers a solution: Take a few jars to their Canning Swap — Sunday at the Cloakroom — and trade with other home-canners. Pickle enthusiasts can submit a jar of their best batch for a pickle contest, plus there will be snacks, drinks by folks from the nearby Livermore, and music. 1:30–3:30 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7. 5972 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. $15. www.canningexchange.org. Sat., Dec. 13, 10 a.m. Thru Dec. 17 Nicholas Coffee and Teas, Downtown. 412-323-4709.

DANCE FRI 05 - SUN 07

THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. The magical dream of a little girl named Clara & her Nutcracker Prince. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 Carnegie Performing Arts Center, Carnegie. 412-279-8887. THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The classic story of Clara & her Nutcracker Prince w/ scenes from Pittsburgh. Opens Dec. 5. Sun, 12 & 4:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 7 p.m., Tue., Dec. 23, 7 p.m. and Wed., Dec. 24, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 28 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-454-9109.

NATIONALITY ROOMS PROGRAM HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. Tour the decorated Nationality Rooms, enjoy traditional dance performances, ethnic food, & crafts. 12-4 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 412-624-6000.

FUNDRAISERS

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SAT 06

HAWAIIAN CHRISTMAS IN THE HIGHLANDS. Traditional music & dance. 2 & 7:30 p.m. Ligonier Theater. 724-853-4050.

OPEN THE DOOR TO IMAGINE NATION: AN INTERACTIVE UN-GALA. An unconventional fundraiser to benefit Tickets for Kids Charities. 6-10 p.m. Inventionland, Blawnox. 412-745-5510.

WED 10 A PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR-DOWNTOWN. Tour includes a visit to two historic churches, an organ recital, & light brunch. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Wed, 10 a.m. and

SAT 06 - SUN 07 RIVERSIDE DESIGN GROUP ANNUAL HOLIDAY SALE. Feat. fine glass designs, handcrafted tableware & specialty items.

Benefits PERSAD. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 7, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Riverside Design Group Warehouse, Lawrenceville. 412-441-9786 x226.

SUN 07 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS THU 04 GREEN PARTY OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY MEETING. Monthly meeting of Allegheny area Green Party. First Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 5 Citizen Power, Squirrel Hill. 412-323-1884.

LITERARY THU 04 DANCE OF THE FURIES: WHY WHAT WE THINK ABOUT 1914 IS WRONG. Michael Neiberg, a historian & alumnus of CMU presents his new book. Giant Eagle Auditorium. 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount


Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. MELLON SQUARE: DISCOVERING A MODERN MASTERPIECE BOOK LAUNCH. Celebrate the Princeton Architectural Press release of “Mellon Square: Discovering a Modern Masterpiece” by Susan Rademacher. Presented by the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy & The Heinz Architectural Center at Carnegie Museum of Art. RSVP by phone or email. 5:45 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-682-7275 ex. 205. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SAT 06 IMAGE TO WORD W/ AUTHOR SHERRIE FLICK. Writer’s workshop. Novice & experienced writers welcome. Create short stories & poems. Group discussion & one-on-one guidance. Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m. and Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m. Thru Feb. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. LARRY IVKOVICH BOOK LAUNCH EVENT. Celebrating the release of Blood of the Daxas. Email info@ rickertandbeaglebooks.com for information. Rickert & Beagle Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444.

SUN 07 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 08 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MILLVALE MASH. Local author Cindy McKay will read her memoir “The Interruption,” Open mic performances feat. musicians, artists, storytellers & dramatists. 7:30 p.m. Millvale Library, Millvale. 412-822-7081.

TUE 09 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

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STEEL CITY SLAM. A chance to qualify for The Steel City Slam Team. For open mic, three 3-minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Thru Dec. 9 Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-363-1250.

WED 10

SHARON G. FLAKE. Author of The Luckiest Sister & Unstoppable Octobia May 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

KIDSTUFF THU 04 - WED 10

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SATURDAYS W/ THE SUGAR PLUM FAIRY. A 30-minute creative movement dance classes and story time sessions w/ a dancer in costume in collaboration w/ Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Sat, 10:30-11 a.m. Thru Dec. 13 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. THREE RIVERS RINGERS. 15-piece hand bell ensemble will feature secular, seasonal hits from Jingle Bells to Frosty the Snowman to selections from the Nutcracker Suite, paired w/ original rhythmic pieces &

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TOYS FOR TOTS

This holiday season, help get presents to needy kids around the state by joining with Pittsburgh Toys for Tots. Volunteers are needed on Dec. 10 to fill toy orders and organize toys in the warehouse. Assistance is also needed with distribution to various sites across Western Pennsylvania. Email clehberger@pittsburghcares.org or visit www.toysfortots.org for information.

BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 05 ANNUAL MEMBER HOLIDAY EVENT. Meet a penguin & a reindeer, holiday crafts & live music. 6-8 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 06 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Presented by Pittsburgh Musical Theater & the West End Community. For kids age 4-10. and Sat., Jan. 17 PMT Studios, West End. 412-539-0900. COOL YULE FAMILY FUN DAY. Stories, playful tours & holiday art-making. 12-4 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOLIDAY FOR THE BIRDS. A day of nature sponsored by the Mt. Lebanon Nature Conservancy. Make a biodegradable bird feeder, hear stories, & learn about local birds & animals w/ naturalist Verna McGinley. Please register. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-341-7303.

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a how-to demonstration. 1 & 2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. WINTER FAIR. Puppet shows, food, games, raffles, carriage rides & arts & crafts. 11 a.m. Waldorf School of Pittsburgh, Bloomfield. 412-441-5792.

TUE 09

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 10 THE FRESH BEAT BAND. 6:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

OUTSIDE SAT 06

SNOWFLAKE SHUFFLE. 5K race around the Waterfront to benefit the animals at the Western PA Humane Society. Hot cocoa & cookies at the finish line. 7:30 a.m. 412-321-4625.

TUE 09

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 04 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m.

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412-867-9586. ASIA’S CAULDRON: THE SOUTH CHINA SEA & THE END OF A STABLE PACIFIC. The Hillman Center for Performing Arts at Shady Side Academy will present a lecture by the author & geopolitical expert, Robert B. Kaplan. 7:30 p.m. Shady Side Academy, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3040. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. HANDMADE ARCADE. Independent craft fair to feature 150+ vendors selling handmade goods. Crafting, live music, DJs, & dance performances. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000. LET’S GET ORGANIZED! Worker Justice Action Academy Session presents a workshop on developing & deepening core organizing skills, putting people in motion, & building strong organizations. Feat. organizers from Fergusen, M.O. 9 a.m. Human Services Building, Downtown. 412-298-6361. MILLVALE MASHUP. Brewery tour of Penn Brewery, Grist House

FRI 05 FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE FEATURE. A creature painting & a creature movie. Fri, 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. KIDS+CREATIVITY NETWORK ASSEMBLY. Teachers, students, museum educators, library professionals & others share ideas on how to create the environments needed for innovative educational ideas to work & put new learning tools into practice. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

Brewing & Draai Laag. 11:30 a.m. Penn Brewery, North Side. 412-323-4709. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SAT 06 - SUN 07 PHOTOGRAPHY BOOK MARKET. Independent photo books, winter refreshments, offerings from publishers and artists, & gifts. Dec. 6-7, 12-6 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810.

SUN 07 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. CANNING SWAP & PICKLE CONTEST. Presented by Pittsburgh Canning Exchange CONTINUES ON PG. 48

FRI 05 - SUN 07

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Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. Meet globally-minded people from all over the world at this monthly happy hour. Registration required. First Thu of every month, 5:30-8 p.m. Thru March 5 Roland’s Seafood Grill, Strip District. 412-392-4513. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MIKE SUPER MAGIC & ILLUSION. 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

STEEL CITY CON. Toy, comic book & celebrity show w/ trivia, cosplay, costume contest & celebrity Q & A. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat., Dec. 6, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 7, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville.

SAT 06 2ND ANNUAL WORLD AIDS DAY BALL. 8 p.m. Wyndham Garden Hotel, Oakland.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

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and Slow Food Pittsburgh. Trade your home-canned food w/ other home food preservationists, submit a jar of your homemade pickles to the Pickle Contest. Food & music. 1:30-3:30 p.m. The Cloakroom, East Liberty. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL CINEMA SUNDAY - GLORIA. A story about a ‘woman of a certain age’ who gets caught up in a passionate whirlwind romance w/ a retired naval officer, whom she meets at a dance club for singles. But when she discovers the truth of their relationship, she takes matters into her own h hands & sets forth the change of a lifetime. Directed by Sebastian L Lelio, 109 min., Spanish, rated R. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 4 412-622-3151. S SUNDAY ART & FOOD M MARKET. Local artists & foodies. S Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 T The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 4 412-969-7197. T TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606.

MON 08 AMERICAN CIVIL WAR ERA: U.S. GRANT, HIS LIEUTENANTS, AND UNION NAVAL SUPPORT. An on-going series centering on the military leadership of General U.S. Grant & his lieutenants from 1861 in the Western Theater through 1865 at Appomattox. Suggested reading material on the library website. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Winter Light Garden and Flower Show, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, Oakland CRITIC: Sue Kaylor, 69, a mental-health worker from Troy, Ohio WHEN: Sat., Nov. 29 This is my first time here. I love Christmas and I love plants, so my children knew I would like this. With all the decorations outside in all the different shapes and colors, the garden was one of a kind. The kids were star-struck. I’ve never seen anything like it. The red-themed botanical room was the most spectacular thing inside. It had so many poinsettias. The Christmas tree with the big, blue lights was my favorite of the trees. There was an elderly lady sitting on a wall in front of it with, I think, her son, who was taking pictures of her. She was just 2 years old again. Sitting there, smiling. It made me want to cry. It was so touching. The magnitude of the conservatory surprised me. I’ve been in a lot of botanical gardens, and this is just magical. I wouldn’t expect to find it Pittsburgh.

TUE 09 65 ROSES SPORTS AUCTION. 6 p.m. Sheraton Station Square Hotel, Station Square. 412-321-4422. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. “EARLY GAS EXPLORATION IN THE EAST END”. Presented by Squirrel Hill Historical Society w/ speaker Joel Tarr, on the history of an energy system. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

BY DANIELLE FOX

AUDITIONS COMTRA CULTURAL CENTER.

Auditions for Alice in Wonderland. Dec. 7. Prepare a song to be sung acapella & bring a headshot/ resume. Sides will be provided at audition time. Visit www. comtratheatre.org/auditions Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. HIGHMARK FIRST NIGHT BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT PITTSBURGH’S ANNUAL GROUP. For Widows/Widowers SING-OFF. Seeking musically over 50. Second and Fourth talented students. Enter at Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. www.TrustArts.org/FirstNightPGH St. Sebastian Church, Ross. & include a link to a YouTube 412-366-1300. video of a performance ENGLISH CONVERSATION recording. Each applicant must (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount choose one song by Smokey Lebanon Public Library, Robinson, and one of their Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. own choice. Deadline: THE PITTSBURGH midnight, Dec. 12. SHOW OFFS. A MCKEESPORT meeting of jugglers LITTLE THEATER. & spinners. All levels Casting for a high welcome. Wed, school boy (age 15-17) 7:30 p.m. Union www. per pa for the role of Lucas Project, Highland Park. pghcitym .co in “The Addams 412-363-4550. Family” musical TEENS, HORMONES & running January 9-18, 2015. MOODS: UNDERSTANDING McKeesport. 412-673-1100. ADOLESCENT MENTAL THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. HEALTH. A panel discussion Open stage & vocal auditions for for parents & teachers on how spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. to recognize mental health Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. issues in teens feat. Dr. Jonathan Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan Pletcher & Familylinks therapists (preferred) or standard musical Sarah Ingram & Theresa Zurku. theater, or classical. No a’capella. 7 p.m. Upper St. Clair Accompanist provided. Resume Community & Recreation Center, & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Upper St. Clair. 412-343-7166. WEST COAST SWING Maronite Catholic Church, WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance Carnegie. 412-734-8476. lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, THE RAGE OF THE STAGE South Side. 916-287-1373. PLAYERS. Auditions for “BLOODY

WED 10

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

HELL,” A post-apocalyptic stage adaptation of “Dracula.” Call or email rageofthestage@yahoo.com for more information. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 724-292-8427.

SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. OPEN MIC. Call for performing artists, musicians & poets for Dec. 12. Thru Dec. 12. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-916-4040.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I have been insecure about the way my vagina looks for as long as I can remember. When I was young, I would fantasize about the day I would grow pubic hair long enough to cover its unsightliness. That day never came, and I was left with an enormous insecurity about it. My labia minora is oversized quite a bit. I know that this is not uncommon, but its unattractiveness holds me back from receiving oral sex. I don’t even let my long-term boyfriend go down on me because I’m afraid he’ll think it’s gross and ugly. He assures me that he doesn’t care about the way it looks, but I can’t bring myself to let him do it. Any advice that might help dispel a lifetime of genital embarrassment? MINORA IS MAJORA

“I study vulvas and vaginas, and what people think of vulvas and vaginas, so, of course, I want MIM to love hers,” said Dr. Debby Herbenick, a sex-research scientist at Indiana University and a sexual-health educator at the Kinsey Institute. Dr. Herbenick coauthored Read My Lips: A Complete Guide to the Vagina and Vulva. Along with her coauthor, Dr. Vanessa Schick, she researched what people like or dislike about vulvas and vaginas. What they learned should come as a comfort to you, MIM. “Just as many people in our study talked about loving long labia as talked about loving smaller labia,” said Herbenick. “So long labia are not universally regarded as ‘unsightly.’ In some cultures, women start pulling their labia from an early age to make their labia minora longer.” I would suggest that you get your hands on a copy of Read My Lips, MIM. Herbenick also recommends Femalia and I’ll Show You Mine, two other books that celebrate the broad diversity of vulvas. “The Vagina Monologues is another must-read,” said Herbenick, “especially the monologue about Bob. It’s about one woman who, through positive sexual experiences with a vulva-loving partner, comes to appreciate her vulva.” Which brings us to your partner, MIM. He’s into you and would like to go down on you. If you’re quoting him accurately — if he’s telling you that he doesn’t care how your vulva looks — then he’s doing “assurance” all wrong. He’s saying, “I am willing to go down on you despite the unattractiveness of your vulva,” when he needs to be saying, “Your vulva is beautiful, and I want to go down on you.” Show him this column, MIM, and after he apologizes for screwing up the assurance thing, let him go down on you already. “What would it cost MIM to allow her boyfriend to try to give her oral sex, even if just for 30 seconds?” asks Herbenick. “If she thinks she would enjoy the sensations and pleasures of oral sex if not for her genital embarrassment, why not have a glass of wine or a beer, and kick back and see if she can enjoy it even briefly?” “MIM could do it in the dark if she wants. She should breathe deeply and play music she likes,” said Herbenick. “Make it less about sex and more about exploration. She might find that she can get over her insecurities. Really! And

wouldn’t that be cool and possibly, quite literally, life-changing?” So let’s say you’ve read the books and watched the videos and attended the seminars and smoked the pot and allowed the boyfriend — also high, perhaps blindfolded — to go down on you, and you feel no differently about your vulva. What then? “If nothing helps MIM see her long labia for the national treasure they are, then yes, there’s surgery,” said Herbenick. “And while marketing for labiaplasty has mostly been a thing for the past 10 to 15 years, doctors have been doing these surgeries for ages. A few tips for MIM if she decides to go this route: Her insurance may not cover it and, yes, it can be painful (it’s surgery), and it will take several weeks to heal before she can have sex or even sit comfortably again. A challenge with vulva surgeries, of course, is a possible risk of loss of or change to sensation, and there is very little research on the long-term outcomes of these surgeries, in spite of the claims on many surgeons’ websites.” Herbenick suggests that if you opt for surgery, you look for a surgeon who has done many labiaplasties. “I’m not a fan of the way some doctors market their surgeries, but, yes, some women feel better about their genitals after getting the labia they want,” said Dr. Herbenick. “MIM should review beforeand-after photos first so she can see what kind of labia she’s likely to have afterward.” But please, MIM, Herbenick and I both want you to give books and videos and seminars a chance first. “If MIM is open to receiving vulva-loving propaganda from me, I will gladly send her a care package of books, postcards and other fun things in hopes that she might learn to love her labia,” said Herbenick. “But I’d also be among the first to send her a congratulatory card on her new labia if she decides surgery is the right option for her. After all, I’m a vulva supporter whether that person’s vulva is the one they were born with or the one they had made for themselves sometime later in life.” Follow Dr. Herbenick on Twitter @DebbyHerbenick.

“SOME SEXUAL INTERESTS AND/OR LIMITS ARE TOO COMPLICATED TO BE EXPRESSED WITH A SIMPLE TERM.”

I am a 24-year-old woman who loves everything butt — except butthole. Anal penetration and anilingus are hard limits for me, but the most sensitive erogenous zones on my body are my cheeks, crack and coin slot. But I can’t figure out a clear way to communicate this. Terms like “ass play” generally mean assHOLE play. I can’t be the only person who feels this way. Help a girl get her ass worked (but not fucked), and give me a term!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

NUTS FOR BUTTS

Some sexual interests and/or limits are too complicated to be expressed with a simple term, NFB. So you’ll have to use your words: “I love having my butt played with — cheeks, crack, coin slot — but my butthole is off-limits. Get on my ass, not in it.” On the Lovecast, Damon L. Jacobs on the PrEP controversy: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

12.03-12.10

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): With both symbolic and practical actions, Sagittarius-born Pope Francis has tried to reframe the message of the Catholic Church. He’s having public showers installed for the homeless in Vatican City. He has made moves to dismantle the Church’s bigotry toward gays. He regularly criticizes growing economic inequality, and keeps reminding politicians that there can be no peace and justice unless they take care of poor and marginalized people. He even invited iconic punk poet Patti Smith to perform at the Vatican Christmas Concert. You now have extra power to exert this kind of initiative in your own sphere, Sagittarius. Be proactive as you push for constructive transformations that will benefit all.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The limpet is an aquatic snail. When it’s scared, it escapes at a rate approaching two inches per hour. If you get flustered in the coming week, Capricorn, I suggest you flee at a speed no faster than the limpet’s. I’m making a little joke here. The truth is, if you do get into a situation that provokes anxiety, I don’t think you should leave the scene at all. Why? There are two possibilities. First, you may be under the influence of mistaken ideas or habitual responses that are causing you to be nervous about something there’s no need to be nervous about. Or second, if you are indeed in an authentic bind, you really do need to deal with it, not run away.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Science-fiction novelist Philip K. Dick has been one of my favorite authors since I discovered his work years ago. I love how he reconfigured my mind with his metaphysical riffs about politics and his prophetic questions about what’s real and what’s not. Recently I discovered he

once lived in a house that’s a few blocks from where I now live. While he was there, he wrote two of his best books. I went to the place and found it was unoccupied. That night I slept in a sleeping bag on the back porch, hoping to soak up inspiration. It worked! Afterward, I had amazing creative breakthroughs for days. I recommend a comparable ritual for you, Aquarius. Go in quest of greatness that you want to rub off on you.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do you enjoy telling people what to do? Are you always scheming to increase your influence over everyone whose life you touch? If you are a typical Pisces, the answer to those questions is no. The kind of power you are interested in is power over yourself. You mostly want to be the boss of you. Right now is a favorable time to intensify your efforts to succeed in this glorious cause. I suggest you make aggressive plans to increase your control over your own destiny.

get your yoga on!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The National Science Foundation estimates that we each think at least 12,000 thoughts per day. The vast majority of them, however, are reruns of impressions that have passed through our minds many times before. But I am pleased to report that in the coming weeks, you Aries folks are primed to be far less repetitive than normal. You have the potential to churn out a profusion of original ideas, fresh perceptions, novel fantasies and pertinent questions. Take full advantage of this opportunity. Brainstorm like a genius.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I enjoy getting spam emails with outrageous declarations that are at odds with common sense. “Eating salads makes you sick” is one of my favorites, along with “Water is worse for you than vodka” and “Smoking is healthier than exercising.” Why do I love reading these laughable claims? Well, they remind me that every day I am barraged by nonsense and delusion from the news media, the Internet, politicians, celebrities and a host of fanatics. “Smoking is healthier than exercising” is just a more extreme and obvious lie than many others that are better disguised. The moral of the story for you in the coming week: Be alert for exaggerations that clue you in to what’s going on discreetly below the surface. Watch carefully for glitches in the Matrix.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

Every one of us, including me, has blind spots about the arts of intimacy and collaboration. Every one of us suffers from unconscious habits that interfere with our ability to get and give the love we want. What are your bind spots and unconscious habits, Gemini? Ha! Trick question! They wouldn’t be blind spots and unconscious habits if you already knew about them. That’s the bad news. The good news is that in the next six weeks you can catch glimpses of these blocks, and make a good start toward reducing their power to distort your relationships.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now and then, it is in fact possible to fix malfunctioning machines by giving them a few swift kicks or authoritative whacks. This strategy is called “percussive maintenance.” In the coming days, you might be inclined to use it a lot. That’s probably OK. I suspect it’ll work even better than it usually does. There will be problems, though, if you adopt a similar approach as you try to correct glitches that are more psychological, interpersonal, and spiritual in nature. For those, I recommend sensitivity and finesse.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What feelings or subjects have you been wanting to talk about, but have not yet been able to? Are there messages you are aching to convey to

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

certain people, but can’t summon the courage to be as candid as you need to be? Can you think of any secrets you’ve been keeping for reasons that used to be good but aren’t good anymore? The time has come to relieve at least some of that tension, Leo. I suggest you smash your excuses, break down barriers and let the revelations flow. If you do, you will unleash unforeseen blessings.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1662, Dutch painter Rembrandt finished “The Oath of Claudius Civilis.” It was 18-by-18 feet, the largest painting he ever made. For a short time, it hung on a wall in Amsterdam’s Town Hall. But local burgomasters soon decided it was offensive, and returned it to the artist to be reworked. Rembrandt ultimately chopped off three-fourths of the original. What’s left is now hanging in a Stockholm museum, and the rest has been lost. Art critic Svetlana Alpers wishes the entire painting still existed, but nevertheless raves about the remaining portion, calling it “a magnificent fragment.” I urge you to think like Alpers. It’s time to celebrate your own magnificent fragments.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You now have a special talent for connecting things that have never been connected. You also have a magic touch at uniting things that should be united but can’t manage to do so under their own power. In fact, I’m inclined to believe that in the next three weeks you will be unusually lucky and adept at forging links, brokering truces, building bridges and getting opposites to attract. I won’t be surprised if you’re able to compare apples and oranges in ways that make good sense and calm everyone down.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

In 1989, Amy Tan birthed her first novel, The Joy Luck Club. Her next, The Kitchen God’s Wife, came out in 1991. Both were bestsellers. Within a few years, the student study-guide publisher CliffsNotes did with them what it has done with many masterpieces of world literature: produced condensed summaries for use by students too lazy to read all of the originals. “In spite of my initial shock,” Tan said, “I admit that I am perversely honored to be in CliffsNotes.” It was a sign of success to get the same treatment as superstar authors like Shakespeare and James Joyce. The CliffsNotes approach is currently an operative metaphor in your life, Scorpio. Try to find it in your heart to be honored, even if it’s perversely so. For the most part, trimming and shortening and compressing will be beneficial. What gifts do you want for Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, Yule and the winter solstice? Write to Buddha Claus at uaregod@comcast.net.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Now Hiring

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starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

ADOPTION

CLASSES

AUTO SERVICES

ROOMMATES

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

EAST FOR RENT

Art Gallery Director & Executive chef yearn for 1st baby to LOVE & ADORE. Expenses Paid Kathleen & John

1-800-562-8287

HEALTH SERVICES

AUTO SERVICE

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800978-6674 (AAN CAN)

Rent -A- Bay for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

Northwood Realty Services 412-521-5100 Mark cell 412-606-8134.

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

WANT TO BUY

STORAGE

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

ADOPTING YOUR BABY IS OUR DREAM!

Individual seeks short term loan. Good income. 724-583-2253

WWII ITEMS

ABC SELF STORAGE

Uniforms, Helmets, Etc. Highest Prices Paid!!!

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

Successful Musician & Exec yearn for 1st baby. Expenses Paid 1-800-997-1720 Katherine & Mike

Make up to $25/hour driving your own car.

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

SIGN UP TODAY T.UBER.COM/PGHDRIVE

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF! We are currently seeking staff for IMMEDIATE openings to support an adult 1:1 in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org or call 724-933-5100 ext.142

CAR HAULERS/OWNER OPERATORS WANTED CDL and 2 years of car hauling experience required Brand new trucks available, ask about our lease program. Contact Doug Fellows at 303-809-3976 or dfellows@supremeauto.biz.

U.S. Census Bureau is hiring

Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.

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Listed by NORTHWOOD REALTY SERVICES Office 412-521-5100 Mark Pryor (c) 412-606-8134 MARKPRYOR@NORTHWOOD.COM

Looking for co-workers of

James Young 1931-2013

Western Electric, 1957-1982 Duquesne Light Company, 1955 Blaw Knox Steel Mill, 1944-1960

• Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Boiler Replacement HVAC and Asbestos Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on December 8, 2014, at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us +

$60,000

Looking for anyone who may have worked with James Young at the following facilities:

• Pittsburgh Montessori Pre K-8 Replace Walk-in Cooler HVAC and Electrical Primes

M U S I C

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

2BR house in one of Pittsburgh’s Best neighborhoods! New roof, new furnace, new landscaping, light fixtures, dishwasher, and enclosed sun room that can be used about 7 months per year.

Attention!

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on January 6, 2015, until 2:00p.m., local prevailing time for:

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Squirrel Hill

3BR, 1BA. Beechwood Blvd across from Frick Park. $1,350/mo.

Call 412-657-5558

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

1425 Avon Pl

412-403-6069

ADOPTION

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

as an Independent Contractor with Uber.

REHEARSAL

Rehearsal Space

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Apply In Person 125 W. Station Square Drive

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

AUTO SERVICES

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-9779537 (AAN CAN)

A DO P T I O N

RESTAURANT/BAR

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! \www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

CLASSES AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads . TV . Film . Fashion 40% OFF TUITION - SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

S C R E E N

If you worked at any of the facilities listed above between 1944 and 1982, Please contact Bailey Peavy Bailey toll free at 1-855-800-1847 +

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STUDIES

CONSTIPATION?

VAGINAL DRYNESS

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

STUDIES

STUDIES

BIRTH CONTROL PATCH

ALZHEIMER DISEASE

STUDIES

Overactive Bladder? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

*Stuff We Like

412-650-6155

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available

Western Pennsylvania Model Railroad Museum Don’t miss the seasonal treat at this Gibsonia museum dedicated to depicting the region’s railroad heritage. The 40-by-100-foot display of the tracks that span from Pittsburgh to Cumberland, Md., is only made public during the holiday show, held Friday through Sunday, through Jan. 11. www.wpmrm.org

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

Root Old-Fashioned

412-624-9999

Weldin’s Wishes

Help Women Around the World Are you a woman between 45 and 65 years old? The University of Pittsburgh Center for Family Planning Research is looking for postmenopausal women who want to help women through an important research safety study of a vaginal ring to prevent HIV.

The old J.R. Weldin on Wood Street, Downtown, has consolidated a bit, and moved to the Gulf Tower, at Seventh Street and William Penn Place. Don’t worry: There’s still a wide selection of gifts, stationery and knick-knacks, as well as the resident store cat.

“Confetti Day,” by Hot Chocolate

Women will have 5 visits at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and complete 2 phone calls over approximately 5 months. Call 412-641-5496 today to see if you are eligible or visit www.birthcontrolstudies.org Eligible participants will be compensated up to $500 for their time an travel.

Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol and Smoking Research Laboratory is looking for people to participate in a three-part reseach project. To participate, you must: • Currently smoke cigarettes • Be 18-55 years old, in good health, and speak fluent English • Be willing to fill out questionnaires, and to not smoke before two sessions Earn $150 for completeing this study. For more information, call (412) 624-8975 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014

This unconventional take on a classic cocktail replaces whiskey with Art in the Age’s warmly spiced Root liquor. It’s fancy but simple: Just combine two parts Root, four dashes of Angostura bitters and one part simple syrup, and toss in a lemon twist.

This underplayed 1978 disco jam is as danceable as it is pro-lockingit-down. Come on, wedding DJs, it’s time to give this song its due!

Cathedral Reading Rooms Pop up to the reading rooms at the University of Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning. Way up on the 35th {PHOTO BY AL HOFF} floor, they’re a quiet spot to hang and scope out one of the sweetest panoramic views of the city.

Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love, by Wendy Ruderman and Barbara Laker Two bad-ass journalists tell the story of their Pulitzer Prize-winning series on police corruption for the Philadephia Daily News. As they follow a tip from a drug informant, they learn about police pay-offs, illegal raids and even sexual assault.

Toma from Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co. This all-natural, semi-hard table cheese from California has a creamy texture and a nutty flavor, and kills in grilled cheese and omelets.

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

STUDIES


SUBOXONE TREATMENT

JADE

Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Wellness Center

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

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Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

R

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Suboxone

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

• Group and Individualized Therapy

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MONROEVILLE, PA

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For more information, call 24 hours

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

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CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

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Let Us Help You Today!

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz N E W S

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Xin Sui Bodyworks

MASSAGE

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Asian 888 Massage

MASSAGE

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896 MASSAGE

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951 MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

GRAND RE-OPENING! Specializing in Roor, Hisi, Pulse, Pyrology, Hitman, Medicali, Sky

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes, Glass And Vapes Best Service, Selection and Prices in Town! 20% off Glass with this Ad 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg JANDSGLASS

J&S Glass

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.03/12.10.2014


Henry Winkler

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEXANDRA WYMAN/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM}

REALLY HAPPY DAYS

More than 30 years after The Fonz, Henry Winkler is still cruising along {INTERVIEW BY CHARLIE DEITCH} IT’S HARD TO separate Henry Winkler from his most famous character — Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli on Happy Days. But throughout a career that has spanned more than 40 years, the 69-year-old entertainer has dozens of film and television credits and has also worked as a director and producer. In addition to acting, Winkler and his writing partner, Lin Oliver, have penned 19 children’s novels featuring “Hank Zipzer: The World’s Greatest Underachiever.” The semiautobiographical tales are inspired by Winkler’s own life-long struggles with dyslexia. The actor, who will appear this weekend at the Steel City Con at the Monroeville Expo Center, took some time to chat with City Paper about The Fonz, his books and his favorite Pittsburgh food. (Sorry, Primanti’s; it’s not you this time.)

Arrested Development, Royal Pains, and yesterday I shot the final episode of Parks and Recreation. My children’s novels, I couldn’t sell them in America. I did a tour in Great Britain, and I kept talking about them and talking about them and I got a publisher and we just completed shooting the second season of Hank Zipzer for the BBC. And that’s [one of the lessons] I talk to children about: tenacity. Tenacity gets you where you want to go and gratitude doesn’t allow you to be angry along the way.

AT WHAT POINT DID YOU DECIDE TO WRITE THE HANK ZIPZER BOOKS TO GET THE MESSAGE OUT ABOUT DYSLEXIA AND LEARNING CHALLENGES? There was a lull in my acting career. I had a manager for 30 days, before the company he worked for imploded. During that time, he said, “I think you should write a children’s book about your dyslexia, for kids.” And I I KNOW THAT YOU’VE BEEN TO PITTSBURGH BEFORE. DO YOU HAVE ANY STORIES, MEMORIES OR IMPRESSIONS OF THE CITY THAT told him he was crazy. My heart sunk because I always thought I was stupid. You know, a kid will buy into what they hear. He said it to me at YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE? the beginning of our tenure together and again at the end. I was smart I came to Pittsburgh the first time 20 years ago and a friend of mine, enough to say, “You know what? I’m going to try.” He introduced an ex-Pittsburgher, said the minute you get off the plane, you me to Lin Oliver, and I never thought that what’s happening go to The Big O. So ever since then, I’ve always gone. in my life now — touring all over the world speaking to chilREAD L L THE FUIE dren — would come from what I thought was just filling YOU’RE WELL KNOWN FOR PLAYING THE FONZ, W INTERV time during a lull in my acting career. And now, ba-boom. BUT DURING AND AFTER YOUR TIME ON HAPPY DAYS, ONLINwE. DID YOU SET OUT TO ONLY PLAY DIFFERENT TYPES OF at ww per pa pghcitym YOU TALK ABOUT LULLS IN YOUR CAREER, BUT IF CHARACTERS? .co YOU LOOK IT OVER, IT SEEMS LIKE YOU’VE WORKED That’s an interesting question because in the beginning I CONTINUALLY IN THIS BUSINESS SINCE THE 1970S. was petrified about being typecast, and I did everything that In different ways I have. But I decided long ago that I wasn’t I could to beat the system. But guess what? You can’t beat the system. In Scream, I almost didn’t get to be in the movie. The director going to wait for people to call me; I just kept doing other things. And offered me the role of the principal, and the executives of the produc- then I came back, and I’m having this wonderful time as an actor tion company said, “Well, that will throw the balance of the movie off and a writer. I go to these comicons and you meet people who’d because everyone will see The Fonz.” So they let me be in the movie but you’d never meet otherwise in your life, the emotion that these they said, “We’re not going to put you in the credits.” I agreed. So then adults bring — oh my gosh. they screened the film for the public. […] When my character came on the screen, I got applause. Now all of a sudden, the same production HAVE YOU EVER BEEN ASKED TO SIGN SOMETHING JUST A LITTLE company is asking me to come and do press for the film. That story is an TOO PERSONAL? example of what I was up against, what I’m still sometimes up against. Sometimes, especially early on, I have been asked to sign body parts that I probably didn’t sign. I say, “Look, I’m flattered by the offer, but please keep your shirt on and perhaps I can interest you in a book.” YOU DIDN’T ACT FOR ABOUT 10 YEARS. ANY REGRETS FROM C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM THAT TIME? No. Although, I’m an honest guy so I have to tell you, I was sad that I just couldn’t get an acting role. But then at some point my career just STEEL CITY CON. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri., Dec. 5; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., Dec. 6; turned the corner. Now, I speak publicly, my partner and I have done and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7. Monroeville Convention Center, 29 novels, and right now I am part of four television shows including 209 Mall Blvd., Monroeville. www.steelcitycon.com N E W S

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

December 3, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 49

December 3, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 49