Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 11.26/12.03.2014

STORIED: NATIVE SON DUANE MICHALS’ BIG RETROSPECTIVE AT THE CARNEGIE 42


EVENTS CAN CE

LLE D

12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

1.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AMERNET STRING QUARTET WITH PIANIST AMY WILLIAMS Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: KEN VANDERMARK / NATE WOOLEY DUO FREE Parking in Warhol Lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

1.30 – 7pm EXHIBITION OPENING: SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT Sponsored by UPMC FREE

Exposures / A new window display and artist product series at The Warhol Store. This project provides a platform to artists—both local and international—selling limited edition works, and it showcases young, emerging artists in a way similar to how young Andy Warhol ÀUVWVRXJKWH[SRVXUHLQ1HZ<RUN&LW\ Open during museum hours or call 412.237.8303

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget you can take the T or all Downtown bus routes. For more info go to PortAuthority.org

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


11.26/12.03.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 48

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS] WS]

slowly, and then Robert 06 “Itjusttransformed took on more and more.” — Adele Biller on how her husband stopped golfing and started cooking on Thanksgiving

[VIEWS]

athletics a free pass is an 16 “Giving institutional problem and Penn State is not the only institution that suffers from it.” — Charlie Deitch on Happy Valley, a new documentary on the Penn State scandal and the state of college sports

[TASTE]

and tomatoes.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Central Diner

[MUSIC]

think any of us are prepared 28 “Ifordon’t certain things that happen in life.” — Jimmer Podrasky, formerly of The Rave-Ups, on circumstance

THE REGION’S

HOTTEST ENTERTAINMENT

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

ROCK • COUNTRY • POP • DANCE

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

“You could do worse for a heartwarming true-life story about smart people.” — Al Hoff reviews The Theory of Everything

NOVEMBER 26

METRO NOVEMBER 29 JASON CRAIG BAND DECEMBER 5 NOMaD DECEMBER 6 LOVEBETTIE NOVEMBER 28

STEEL CITY MEDIA

“It makes me feel good to see how much work I’ve done!” — Photographer Duane Michals on his new retrospective at the Carnegie Museum of Art

[LAST PAGE]

one-person n houses. 62 “They’re Or two people who really like each other.” — Eve Picker on the development of Minim Homes planned for Garfield d

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 STUFF WE LIKE 59 N E W S

+

TA S T E

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

+

M U S I C

NO BAD JU JU

SPECIAL THANKSGIVING EVE PERFORMANCE

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

42

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

souvlaki was juicy chunks of 22 “Pork seasoned meat with peppers, onion

39

{ADVERTISING}

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL (800) 848-1880 +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


INCOMING

“IT’S NOT IMPORTANT WHO DOES WHAT, BUT THAT THEY BOTH AGREE ON WHAT SHOULD BE DONE.”

Study: More Pennsylvanians with autism “getting tangled up” in criminal-justice system than ever (Nov. 19) “That is why jail diversion programs are so important too. Individuals with disabilities can be diverted to services via pre-booking to ensure they are not involved in a cycle of offenses.” — Web comment from “Carolyn”

By your pie, this holiday season, you shall be judged (Nov. 19) “My wife’s pie crust is incredible (and I’m not a crust guy, I could live without it, and as a kid wouldn’t really eat the crust that my mom or grandmothers would make). Her crust is flaky, flavorful, crisp on the outside and soft and moist on the inside, and she never uses lard.” — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

“For someone who works Downtown, ‘tomorrow is Pittsburgh’s Light Up Night’ is the most terrifying statement in the English language.”

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Lou Testoni readies his Shadyside kitchen for a holiday feast.

REWRITING A

TRADITION

DELE BILLER remembers the days

— Nov. 21 tweet from B Skrebs14 (@BSkrebs14)

“Of course it’s 64° in Pittsburgh the day I go home for thanksgiving because that makes sense.” — Nov. 24 tweet from “Jack Drake” (@drakejack)

when, on that fateful third Thursday .in November, her husband Robert used to walk through the door after his annual Turkey Bowl golf outing, sit down, eat and then watch football. That was his entire Thanksgiving Day contribution. “That’s how it used to be,” Adele says of her retired husband. “He didn’t appreciate how much work was involved.” Adele and Robert met when they were 14 and 16, respectively, and have been married since 1971. And over the years, Thanksgiving wasn’t the only time that the fulltime registered nurse had to fly solo during the holiday rush. “She did most of the shopping, but I always used to go with her,” Robert says.

“A lot of times I used to sit in the parking lot, listen to the radio or go walk around the mall and sit in the food court. I hated holiday shopping — two clerks and two thousand customers.”

Why some families are saying goodbye to Thanksgiving’s outdated gender roles {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} As she got older, Adele says she became more stressed around the holidays. She got moved to the midnight shift, and after her brother had several strokes, she

became his caretaker to keep him out of a nursing home. “It transformed slowly, and then [Robert] just took on more and more,” Adele says. And now, Robert is THE holiday man. For the past 10 Thanksgivings, he’s peeled and mashed the potatoes, ground the giblets for the stuffing, shoved the turkey in the baking bag — the “hardest part” — and cleaned everything up afterward. “I’m not going to complain, I’m his assistant,” Adele says. “It’s nice. Lucky lady, huh?” As Robert and Adele’s marriage illustrates, deeply rooted gender roles are particularly pronounced during the holiday season. Women are often stuck in the kitchen, while men sit cozy and watch CONTINUES ON PG. 08

6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


. . . . . . .

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .. . .

.

.

. . . .

.

.

.

.

Creation Stations

.

.

.

FREE Saturday Holiday Activities featuring the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Sat., November 29 • 11 am - 2 pm

. .

. .

.

• Share your Wish List with Santa & Show the Holiday Colors with Themed Face Painting!

• Be Amazed as Chris Handa brings the Magic of the Holidays to Fifth Avenue Place!

• Enjoy Designing Snow Globes & Ice Paintings

• Freeze your Memories in Time Capsules & More

• Freeze Frame & Strike a Seasonal Pose for a Fun, Keepsake Holiday Photo or Caricature!

• Snowflakes & Snowmen take Center Stage! Design your own Frosty Treasures!

• Whip Up Magical Ice Cream & Reindeer Crowns

• Join Merry Elves for Balloon Art & Face Painting

. .

FREE PARKING

FREE FIFTH AVENUE PLACE HOLLY TROLLEY

November 28 - December 24

Every Saturday, Nov. 22 - Dec. 20 & Friday, Nov. 28

Evenings (after 4 PM) & Saturdays

11 AM - 5PM

At the Fifth Avenue Place Garage with any $20 Fifth Avenue Place Purchase

Hosted by Santa’s Little Helpers, Trolleys Circle Downtown Stops every 15 Minutes

See Stores for Validations

Visit www.downtownpittsburgh.com for Stop Locations

.

. .

.

GIFT CERTIFICATE BONUS DAYS

.

.

.

.

Fifth Avenue Beanery

. .

Laurie's Hallmark Visionworks Wallace Floral Welcome Pittsburgh

.

NEW OPENINGS

.

St. Brendan’s Crossing

.

Katie’s Kandy

.

.

.. .

Buy the Perfect Present & Earn a Fifth Avenue Place Gift Certificate with Qualifying Retail Purchases

..

See Shops for Details • Limit: One per Person, Please

.

.

.

.

.

HOLIDAY HOURS

FOOD COURT Au Bon Pain Charleys Philly Steaks

.

.

. .

.

. . .

.

December 11 -13 • 11 am-Close

DINING

.

..

.

.

. Retail:

Crystal River Gems

Holiday Happenings . .

.

. . .

.

.

Sat., December 20 • 11 am - 2 pm

Avenue

Faber, Coe & Gregg

.

.

The Frozen Life

It’sSat.,a Frozen Wonderland December 13 • 11 am - 2 pm

.

.

Frozen IN Time Sat., December 6 • 11 am - 2 pm

   

SPECIALTY SHOPS

Flamers

.

Fresh Corner Sbarro

.

Wok & Grill

.

.

FIFTH AVENUE PLACE

M - F • 10 am - 6 pm Sat . • 10 am - 5 pm

Food Court: M - F • 10 am - 5 pm Sat . • 10 am - 3 pm

FIFTH & LIBERTY • DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH For further information, visit www.FifthAvenuePlacePA.com

@fifthaveplace

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


REWRITING TRADITION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

SHOP SMALL SMALL BUSINESS

SATURDAY N OVE M B E R 29

ALLIANCE OF NONPROFIT STORES Page 17

ANTHONY ARMS Page 13

CAVACINI GARDEN CENTER Page 13

COLOR BY AMBER Page 13

COOL VAPES Page 13

EASTERN H2O Page 35

NEW BALANCE PITTSBURGH Page 38

MICHAEL HERTRICH ART + FRAME Page 19

MUSIC GO ROUND Page 35

PETAGOGY Page 16

TRIM PITTSBURGH Page 19

football. But some men, like Robert, are crossing the divide and proving that traditions can change. “Thanksgiving is not going to die. We constantly reinvent how we choose to celebrate it,” says Maureen Porter, an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh who teaches in both the women’s studies program and the anthropology department. Her specialty is rituals and cross-cultural gender-equity issues. “Humans have retained and kept these [holidays] as central ways of organizing their whole year.” She says essential positions can be and have been reinvented to be effective for each family so that the holiday is not a “substantial source of sorrow” for one person who is thinking, “‘Oh geez, I have to host this whole event.’” Let’s all be thankful for that. Last year, Washington Post writer Brigid Schulte wrote an opinion piece entitled {PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY} Lou and Kathy Testoni look through Lou’s folder of Thanksgiving recipes “For women, it’s the most stressful time of the year.” She called the holiday season the “third shift” for working women, that this is their responsibility.” were his. She still does preparations, but riffing on the “second shift” — the name According to a 2006 American Psycho- on the actual day, she gets to kick back and that 1980s sociologists gave to the phenom- logical Association survey of nearly 800 watch it all happen. enon of working women who also do all of adults, nearly twice as many women as “Prior to the holiday, Kathy does a lot the household chores. men reported they would shop for food, of work,” Lou says. “I do assume responsiGranted, some research shows that cook the multi-course meal and clean up on bility for the menu, the shopping, the comen are upping their hours on the house- Thanksgiving Day. No surprise, they also re- ordination of the actual meals on Thankskeeping front, but they are still lagging be- ported feeling more stress than their male giving day.” Lou and Kathy’s house is full hind women, even as female numbers in counterparts during the holiday season. of guests the days before and after the the workforce have risen. “I talk to other moms, and we all kind holiday, so breakfast and lunch are also When it comes to the holidays, not only of go through the same things. Maybe we Lou’s responsibility. do women’s magazines put spectacular bring it on ourselves. I hate to say that,” says “I have to say that it was very difficult holiday food spreads on the covers, but a Kristin Ioannou, deputy director of Pennsyl- for me to hand this over, but once I got used quick Google search yields their advania Women Work, an organization to it after a couple years, I look forward to vice columns on how women that helps women find employ- Thanksgiving now. Before, I did not,” Kathy can plan a holiday party on ment. “I think we all want the says. “We both were raised in families W. a budget, “take a mistletoe perfect holiday. ... My hus- where the women did it.” VISIT WWR.COM PE moment,” “take a shortcut PA band’s answer would probLou says he’s enjoyed it. For a while he Y IT C PGH VIDEO to joy” and “make friends ably be, ‘Why do you have to even wrote a blog to help men gain confiTO SEE A RAPIER OF CHRIS G FOR with Frosty” by building bake and decorate so much?’ dence in the kitchen. PREPARINSGIVING snowmen with the kids. But for me the holidays The only time he’s really been tripped K N A HIS TH FOR 30. “Every magazine in the meant all of those things.” up was five years ago, when his daughter FEAST grocery aisle and every holiPauline Wallin, a psycholo- and niece went on a “vegan kick.” day special on TV reinforces gist near Harrisburg who coun“That caused some stress,” Lou says. “I the possibility of these ideals and sels women and married couples, made potatoes with milk, potatoes without reasserts that it is our responsibility says that in her practice she’s seen that milk. Have you ever seen a tofurkey?! It’s to bring these ideas to fruition,” says women tend to be more idealistic about a chemical bomb. I put my foot down and Heather Arnet, CEO of the Women and the holidays but that a middle ground said, ‘That’s the last time I’m doing that!’” Girls Foundation, an organization in is possible: “It’s not important who does Another woman who no longer cooks Pittsburgh that advocates for equal pay what, but that they both agree on what the holiday meals is Carol Rapier, who for women. “If only we were better bakers, should be done.” lives outside of Philly. As a single working chefs, crafters, decorators, gift wrappers, In their Shadyside home, Lou and mother of two boys, her philosophy is: Boys then our family would really be happy.” Kathy Testoni, who have been married 40 or girls, teach them the same things. Arnet says that because of these mes- years, developed a compromise after they “I was determined that my kids would sages, women often do a lot of “invisible” had kids. Kathy, a flight attendant of 20 learn how to take care of themselves,” stuff before the holiday: making sure beds years, says she had enough on her plate. Rapier says. “Everybody should know that.” are made, towels are clean and kids have “Lou could see that,” she says. From then Her diligence paid off. Now her son nice clothes on. on, Lou — a now-retired managing part- Chris, who’s in his 30s, cooks Thanksgiving “Men do less of this stuff, because ner at PricewaterhouseCoopers — began dinner each year for nearly 30 people, they do not feel that these magazines helping more during the holidays, and including his mother and girlfriend. and images are communicating to them eventually Thanksgiving and Christmas “I make a really outrageous amount of CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


REWRITING TRADITION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

GRAND FINALE NOV 29 | 9PM

meat. I don’t do it every year, but I often make a turkducken. Last year it ended up being 32 pounds,” Chris says. “I also usually make lamb, because my mom loves it. The problem that I have is that I end up wanting to make 17 dishes and spending a lot of money and then making a lot of food. This is seriously how I give back to the people who are really important in my life.” Carol even takes home leftovers. “It’s like the reverse thing. Usually the kid goes to the mother’s house [for holidays],” says Carol. “For me, he makes the meal, cleans up and makes goodies for me to take home. It’s perfect.” Carol says she knows men are capable, but thinks that they’re too dependent on women. At 69 years old, she says she’s witnessed this. “A lot of the men my age, it’s very sad, they’re very dependent,” Carol says. “And yet they have nobody to be dependent on, so they’re very helpless and they’re desperately looking for someone to marry, not for love but to keep their house.” What Carol taught her son is in high demand. Though working women still pick up more of the household duties than men, a Pew Research survey found that sharing household chores ranks very high in how couples describe what makes a marriage work. “I have to say, with two people working the chores in the house, it reduces the overall stress and it creates a better experience for everybody,” Lou Testoni says of the way

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT BILLER}

Adele and Robert Biller in a photobooth at the old Pittsburgh airport

he and Kathy have split things up. Meanwhile, Robert and Adele say things got easier as their daughter got older. No more marathon Christmas shopping. They do a lot of online shopping and gift cards now. When asked if her marriage improved after her husband took on holiday responsibilities, Adele said they’ve always had “a really good marriage.” “We make the best of our lives,” Adele says. “I think we’re closer through all of this, I appreciate him and he appreciates me. We’ve always been close though. We’ve been very fortunate in life.” A M U RRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

TOP PRIZE

,000 $10 CASH GUARANTEED! SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

Must have valid photo ID and be a Rush Rewards Players Club member.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


Ring In 2015 With Us!

UND ER THE BIG TOP

A MAGICAL 2015

Magicians, Caricature Artists, Live Entertainment & So Much More!

Fun House Package Located in our Banquet Room. The Greatest Party Package Includes:

SALES ARE LIMITED!

• Spectacular Dinner for Two • Main Event Includes Entertainment by: In the Mood • Overnight Accommodations at The Westin Hotel Pittsburgh • New Year’s Day Brunch Per Couple

$479

Please call 412-231-7777 or visit RIVERSCASINO.COM to purchase your package today!

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY presents

PofE T the WEEK

Photo credit: Angie Pulice

Lexus Lexus is a sweet, gentle soul who just wants to be caressed and cared for. She prefers being close to her ‘person’ and will unhesitatingly bestow licks and kisses! Because Lexus is a timid senior, she would be most comfortable in a calmer home environment with older, respectful children. She would also prefer to be the only dog in the household.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 12

For locally owned stores, holiday sales are a large part of a successful year {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} WHEN ENTREPRENEUR Thomas West

was looking for a location to open his small business, he quickly decided on East Liberty, a burgeoning neighborhood that’s been the site of increased development over the past decade. “I wanted to get into a neighborhood that everyone was talking about,” says West, who owns men’s-clothing retailer Trim Pittsburgh. “It’s up and coming. You don’t get that chance all the time.” But as development in East Liberty {PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY} has increased, some of the smaller busiShadyside Chamber of Commerce President Richard Ratner, owner of the William Penn Tavern nesses in the neighborhood have begun to dissipate as national chains like Target agrees Richard Ratner, president of the group, and some newer businesses are lookmove in. The remaining stalwarts and Shadyside Chamber of Commerce. “The ing forward to an influx of traffic. others, like West, looking to break into the nice part about the nationals is they’re “I’ve been facing challenges as a startup market, have had to adapt to get noticed. all staffed by local Shadyside residents, here,” says Adam Wolfson, an East Liberty “It can be hard to compete with the which really gives it a local flair. With native who opened his Penn Avenue busibig-box stores,” West says. “You have to their ability to advertise at a national ness, Wolfpack Electronics, which sells used find your niche. Part of the challenge small level … it becomes a draw for some of electronics, almost one year ago. “So I’m businesses here are facing is getting people these smaller businesses.” hoping stuff like Small Business Saturday is back to walking the streets. And that’s what East Liberty’s neighbor Shadyside has going to give me some [attention], for sure,” Small Business Saturday is all about. We’re traditionally seen harmony between na- he says. trying to show off what we have.” tional retailers and independent businesses. The annual event has seen great success Small Business Saturday is a nation- The neighborhood has also long been a over the years. According to the National wide event, created five years ago by local leader in Small Business Satur- Federation of Independent Business, last banking institution American day. In 2012, its efforts caught the year shoppers spent $ 5.7 billion at locally Express. It was designed to get attention of American Express, owned retailers and restaurants on Small W. holiday shoppers away from the event’s creators. Business Saturday. W W IT VIS OM malls and national chains “The unique thing about “This time of year our sales start to pick PAPER.C Y IT C H G P RE ON and into neighborhood Small Business Saturday is up,” says Vince Arabia, co-owner of Sam’s FOR MO ANCE ORT business districts. it was created by American Bostonian shoes, which has been on the THE IMP ALL S F O M “Usually when you think Express, which is one of East Liberty’s Penn Avenue shopping disS E S S E IN BUS . about East Liberty, you think the largest credit-card com- trict for more than 50 years. “I have customY IT C E IN TH of Whole Foods and Target, but panies in the world, and they ers who won’t shop anywhere else because there are a lot of little businesses see the importance of small they like to patronize small businesses. But that don’t get any attention,” says businesses as opposed to large big- anything else we can do to help is great.” West. “We want to get people to come shop, boxes and are willing to put their money Other city neighborhoods are hosting not just on the main street, but on the side where their mouth is … and really promote events for Small Business Saturday and streets. We want people to come out and it on a national level,” Ratner says. beyond. For instance, Lawrenceville will explore East Liberty.” For this year’s event, Shadyside stores host a cookie tour Dec. 4-7 to promote shops While Small Business Saturday, on will offer cookies and beverages, and in its business district. Nov. 29, is all about the little guys, West says parking will be free. Other neighborThe city is also doing its part to pronational retailers play a role in drawing hoods throughout the city are planning mote Small Business Saturday. At a board business to independent shops, especially similar promotions. meeting on Nov. 20, the Pittsburgh Parking when it comes to sustaining increased “It’s definitely a kick-off point for Authority voted to offer free parking in surconsumer traffic year round. the holiday season for us,” says Ratner. face lots for the event. Free parking in these “I think they can go hand-and-hand,” “Being a local neighborhood shopping dis- lots is also being extended to Saturdays for West says. “When you get a big store, it trict which is dominated by independent the remainder of the holiday season. brings people into the area, so if we work businesses, it really is a place where people Mayor Bill Peduto said in a recent statewith the big-box stores, it can have a can come and support their small business- ment: “Making parking free at city parking positive impact.” es in the city of Pittsburgh.” meters, lots and garages will give our small “We see a good synergy between the This will be the first year East Liberty businesses an extra boost on some of the small businesses and the large retailers,” business-owners have come together as a busiest shopping days of the year.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Add some shine to your winter wardrobe with our new holiday arrivals!

Give the perfect gift… and a little something for yourself!

Place orders by December 7th for guaranteed delivery by Christmas! Joy VanDeVelde • 412-573-9561 • www.3form.mycolorbyamber.com

Black Fr day

150+ Flavor Tasting Bar!

InsaNiTY SALE

The owners have e-Cigarette Super Storelost their minds! PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST

1

DAY

CoolVapes.com 412-358-0200 CoolVapes.com

7206ONLY McKnight Road near Ross Park Mall

Cavacini Garden Center Christmas Trees Wreaths Poinsettias Christmas Cactus Garlands ... and much more!

Holiday Gift Card Deal

100 51st St / Lawrenceville

412-687-2010

Spend $50 receive a

Off Butler Street /Across from Goodwill

$10 BONUS GIFT CARD

Open 7 days a week, 11am-9pm

Spend $100 get a

$25 BONUS GIFT CARD

Come celebrate the Repeal of Prohibition with 1947 TAVERN and PITTSBURGH COCKTAIL WEEK WEEK!!

Good on anything in the store! Guns, shooting lessons, indoor shooting range, ammo, accessories!

There will be prohibition era cocktails, a 1930’s costume contest, and live jazz music.

We’re heating things up on Verde’s Patio again with w ith our our ur SSECOND ECOND ANNUAL AN Hot Cocktails Party! Join us for hot buttered bourbon, hot spiked cider, and colonial era flips made with real loggerheads.

& SHOOTING CENTER

VISIT OUR INDOOR SHOOTING RANGE - OPEN 7 DAYS

For more details and to buy tickets visit PGHCocktailWeek.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992

S C R E E N

w w w . A N T H O N YA R M S . c o m +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


TOY STORY

WATCH THEIR FACES LIGHT UP

PAL sets fundraiser for holiday toys {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

WINTER LIGHT GARDEN AND FLOWER SHOW

Opens November 28 Let the magic of Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens enchant you as you walk in a winter wonderland Àlled with glowing lights, vibrant blooms and other wondrous sights. The only thing brighter will be the smiles on their faces.

DEC. 4-7

To plan your holiday adventure, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

This is a free and family-friendly event! Celebrate the season with cookies and pick up unique holiday gifts along the way. Hours for Cookie Stops vary by location. To receive this year’s Tour Map, sign up for our e-newsletter at lvpgh.com/cookietour or call 412.683.6488.

GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY:

For about 24 hours starting on Christmas Eve, Jimmy Cvetic plays Santa Claus. He and the “elves” of the Western Pennsylvania Police Athletic League spend that time delivering hundreds of toys to underprivileged children across the region. But before that day can come, PAL actually has to raise the money for these toys. The group will hold a holiday party on Dec. 13 at the Hollywood Theater, in Dormont, featuring a screening of The Polar Express; visits with Santa; Christmas caroling with the North Star Singers; and homemade treats by “the women of the Police Athletic League,” Cvetic says.

THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE WILL HOLD A

HOLIDAY PARTY,

FEATURING A SCREENING OF

THE POLAR EXPRESS, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sat., Dec. 13, at the Hollywood Theater, in Dormont (1449 Potomac Ave.) Donation is $10 or a $10 toy. For more information and to make reservations, call 412-298-7373.

PAL has been running the gift program for decades and the list of children needing gifts grows every year, Cvetic says. Entry to the event is a $10 donation or a $10 toy. But Cvetic (an occasional CP contributor) says a lack of funds doesn’t have to keep children away. “I’ll take $10, a toy or a good story. Every kid should be able to enjoy Christmas and this movie,” says Cvetic, who points to the film’s message of “Believe.” “Some of these kids don’t have much and we want them to believe that there are good people out there. That’s what this group is, a lot of good people working together to help these kids. None of this would be possible without the great people in this organization.” Cvetic says nonprofit groups who want to bring kids to the event should contact him at 412-298-7373, for seats available on a first-come, first-served basis. “This program, made up of dedicated, current and former police officers, started on a small scale and has just grown over the years, partly because we can’t say no to anybody,” Cvetic says. “We start early in the morning on Dec. 24 delivering these toys and sometimes don’t finish up until the next morning. “I’ve had people call me on Christmas Eve and say they need help for one reason or another and we’ve always made that happen.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


HOLIDAY SPONSOR

A CLASSIC P ITTSBURGH TRA A DITION N

HIGHMARK HOLIDAY POPS

DECEMBER 12-14, 20 & 21

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Todd Ellison, conductor Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, Betsy Burleigh, director

Ring in the season with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Mendelssohn Choir and a highly-decorated cast of guest artists in a spectacular Pittsburgh tradition. Rejoice in your favorite carols and cherished holiday tunes like “Sleigh Ride,” “Joy to the World” and more. And be good for goodness sake, because Jolly Old St. Nick will be dropping by for a special visit.

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/pops.

14SYM291_HolidayPops_CityPaper_9.25x9.75_FINAL.indd + N E W S T A S T1

E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E 11/5/14 D S

2:46 PM

15


ets

Heal t

yP th

hy

[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

ucts for He od al r P

OFFENSIVE HOLDING

Specializing in premium, natural and byproduct-free pet foods, treats and supplements.

Not much has changed in college sports since the Penn State scandal {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Visit our new, larger store on Ellsworth Ave for an expanded selection of treats, toys, beds, accessories and supplies that are perfect for holiday gift giving!

Pets P ets w elcome! welcome! Store S St tore tore or re r e Hours: Ho ours ur u rs: rs

Mon-Sat. M on-Sat Saatt. 1 Sa 10am-8pm 0aam 0 0am am-8p 8pm 8p Sun S Su un u n. 11am-4pm n. 11am 1aam 1 am-4p 4p pm Sun.

5880 Ellsworth Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15232 412-362-7387

www.petagogypgh.com

GAMES, CRAFTS, CAROLERS & PRIZES

THIS SATURDAY 4:30PM-8PM M

ELPC Christmas Cathedral Concert

®

December 24 5:00 PM Family Service 11:00 PM Candlelight Service (Prelude Music begins at 10:30 pm)

Holiday music featuring organ & Brass Roots ensemble

16

FARM

Christmas Eve Worshipp

December 19 8:00 PM FREE CONCERT

1 1 6 S H I G H L A N D AV E N U E

AX

S

FREE ADMISSION traxfarms.com

TR

SANTA ARRIVES AT 5PM

C AT H E D R A L O F H O P E . O R G

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

IN THE FINAL minutes of Amir Bar-Lev’s Happy Valley — a new documentary about the Penn State child-molestation scandal — the voice of Matt Jordan, a Penn State film professor, can be heard over footage of a throng of wild Penn State fans cheering for their team. The scene takes place during the first home football game of the 2012 season, following the conviction of the team’s former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky on 40 counts of child molestation that summer. Also in that time, several members of the university’s administration had been fired and charged criminally; long-time coach Joe Paterno was fired and died three months later of cancer; students rioted; the NCAA hit the school with a massive punishment; and a new coach, Bill O’Brien, was installed in Happy Valley. “For a year-and-a-half, people didn’t know what to do around here,” Jordan explains as dramatic music begins to play behind him. “The screaming crowd, what does it do with all that energy? It’s looking for its next symbol to attach all that energy to. And now that there is one available — like a magnet — it’s going to go there. “You’d think they’d be less ready to anoint a new king after all that happened. We all want to think we live in a better world than we do, so people avoid taking a deep look at something that’s troubling, and it’s pretty easy to do when there’s a big, shiny, loud spectacle. It’s like a conjurer’s trick.” As accurately as that statement describes what happened at Penn State University, it also describes what has happened at other times and is happening right now in the big-money world of college sports. It’s also why I can say with almost certainty that what happened at Penn State — a scandal being covered up to save the sports program — will happen again somewhere else. Giving athletics a free pass is an institutional problem and Penn State is not the only institution that suffers from it. The NCAA has a long tradition of hypocritical policies and of trying to pretend that the bad things that have happened in its organization never actually happened. Look at the Penn State scandal — Paterno was stripped of 111 wins between 1998 and 2011. That meant he was no longer the

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSIC BOX FILMS}

Detail of Joe Paterno, from the mural “Inspiration,” by Michael Pilato

winningest coach in college football, and no longer held one of the NCAA’s most prestigious records. And it’s not the first time the NCAA tried to re-write history; many teams have been forced to vacate wins for various rule infractions. In 2010, the NCAA ruled that former USC running back Reggie Bush received gifts while at the school. They stripped him of his Heisman trophy and removed his name from the record book. It’s a convenient, tidy way to rewrite history without actually correcting core behaviors. It’s true. Look around college football today. Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, one of the game’s most recognizable stars, has been at the center of several behavioral and allegedly criminal issues since his college career began just last year. A sophomore, Winston has been accused of sexual assault and shoplifting, in addition to behavioral issues. In a game last weekend, for example, he pushed a referee twice. And in that time, through all those accusations, Winston has missed exactly one game, after he stood on a table in FSU’s student center and yelled obscenities; it should be noted that that suspension came from the school, not the NCAA. He’s not likely to miss any games going forward. Penn State’s Jordan sums it up best in Happy Valley: “How can the NCAA be shocked by the reverence of football when that is the thing their advertising campaign promotes? The NCAA makes 500 million a year because of the reverence of football.” If you have a chance next week, check out Happy Valley for yourself. But don’t worry if you miss it, because on some campus somewhere in this country, the sequel is probably already being written. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Happy Valley screens Sat., Nov. 29, through Tue., Dec. 2, at the Hollywood Theater, in Dormont. See review on page 40.


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


Welcome to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 4 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week. Spend the holidays with your favorite craft beer.

Named for the naval officer and War of 1812 hero who battled the British enemy on Lake Erie, our Commodore Perry India Pale Ale has a pretty dry sense of humor.

Sometimes you want a beer, then you realize how much crap you need to do before you call it a day. This is it. Nicely dosed with Big, Round Hop Flavors and a Toasty Malt Foundation to satisfy your every need. But it still lets you stay in the game to do what needs to be done. Yup.

Serum injects the Double IPA style with a fresh dose of big hop flavor. This mediumbodied amber nectar boasts a thin tan head, big hoppy floral bouquet, slippery, luxurious mouthfeel and strong 9% abv.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking â&#x20AC;&#x153;reloadâ&#x20AC;? makes the workday go faster 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


Pittsburgh’s largest selection of men’s underwear

Socks • Swimwear • Shirts Loungewear • Activewear Shave & Beard Soap • Candles MON- FRI SAT SUN 11- 8 11- 6 12- 5 5968 Baum Blvd East Liberty • TRIMPittsburgh.com

FUNFEST

Thursday is Ladies Night

BOOK YOUR

HOLIDAY PARTY NOW!

AFTER DARK 11PM to 2AM Fri and Sat. Top 40 mix Drink specials

9PM to Midnight

Groups of 20 to 400 $25 credit if booked before December 7th!

Ladies FREE - Men $10. Top 40 mix Drink special

Please ask to speak with Tina.. Get a strike on a colored

Call Now 412-828-1100

Get a strike on a colored head pin win a prize!!!

head pin & win a prize!!!

2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com

RIVERSIDE DESIGN GROUP

PARTICIPATING VENDORS PLATES WITH PURPOSE TM Gifts that give back

VESSEL STUDIO

Modern glass art & ornaments

JULES

Annual Holiday Sale

Fashion forward apparel for him & her

WEARHAÜS

Upcycled jewelry from Riverside Design

TOFFEE TABOO

Indulgent chocolates

PERLORA

All U Can Handle accessories

COWBOYPANTS

Modern & vintage designer neckties 50% of all proceeds benefit PERSAD CENTER’S work serving the LGBTQ community INFO: persadcenter.org

Exquisite Tabletop Designs and Specialty Gifts SAT • DECEMBER 6 • 9 am - 4 pm SUN • DECEMBER 7 • 9 am - 1 pm

A rare shopping experience in the RDG warehouse. Only one weekend each year!

Stop by & shop during the Lawrenceville Cookie Tour

A BENEFIT FOR PERSAD CENTER • RDG WAREHOUSE • 3441 BUTLER STREET • PGH • 15201 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


BLACK FRIDAY ONE DAY EVENT

TOTAL PURCHASE CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER EXCLUDES BANGLE OF THE MONTH OFFER ONLY VALID 11.28.14

©2014 ALEX AND ANI, LLC

5505 WALNUT STREET | PITTSBURGH | 412.586.4006 ALEXANDANI.COM

nk ! peac y o l da B ri f

PEOPLES GAS HOLIDAY MARKET FRIDAY, NOV. 21 – TUESDAY, DEC. 23 MARKET SQUARE

NEW! KIDSPLAY HOLIDAY SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS & BLACK FRIDAY

Handcrafted & Imported Gifts Santa’s House & Photos Live Entertainment BNY Mellon Season of Lights

Noon-5pm Free Activities! Free Trolley Rides! Short Films, Improv Comedy, Crafts, Stories and more!

HOLIDAY SATURDAYS & BLACK FRIDAY, NOV. 28 Free Trolley & Carriage Rides Free Parking* Free Family Fun

*Pittsburgh Parking Authority garages only.

DOWNTOWNPITTSBURGH.COM/HOLIDAYS

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


A tribute to the British brewery that launched a US craft beer revolution Brewed Since 1758. Imported since 1978.

YoursTonight!

S TO P BY TH E SE LO C ATIO N S: SOUTH PARK CLUB HOUSE GIANT EAGLE SOUTH PARK BETHEL PARK DECEMBER 2 • TUESDAY • 8-10PM DECEMBER 5 • FRIDAY • 5-7

GIANT EAGLE NEW KENSINGTON DECEMBER 3 • WEDNESDAY • 5-7

GIANT EAGLE MARKET DISTRICT ROBINSON DECEMBER 5 • FRI DAY • 5-7

GATEWAY GRILL MONROEVILLE DECEMBER 3 • WEDNESDAY • 8-10PM

WHOLE FOODS WEXFORD DECEMBER 5 • FRIDAY • 5-7

HOUGH’S GREENFIELD DECEMBER 3 • WEDNESDAY • 7-9 FRONT DOOR TAVERN CHIPPEWA DECEMBER 4 • THURSDAY • 7-9 SHARP EDGE EMPORIUM EAST LIBERTY/SHADYSIDE DECEMBER 4 • THURSDAY • 5-7 PACKS AND DOGS MT. WASHINGTON DECEMBER 4 • THURSDAY • 5-7

Brewery of the Month Location

Birmingham Bridge Tavern South Side 2901 Sarah St., Pittsburgh, PA (412) 381-2739

ALLEGHENY 6 PACKS & DOGS CHESWICK DECEMBER 4 • THURSDAY • 7-9

+

GIANT EAGLE BETHEL PARK DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • NOON-2 GIANT EAGLE MARKET DISTRICT PINE TWP DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • NOON-2 GIANT EAGLE CRANBERRY TWP DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • NOON-2 GIANT EAGLE MARKET DISTRICT ROBINSON DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • 3-5

THE HEADKEEPER TAPAS BAR GREENSBURG DECEMBER 4 • THURSDAY • 8-10 HAL’S BOTTLE SHOP NORTH HILLS DECEMBER 5 • FRIDAY • 5-7PM

GIANT EAGLE MARKET DISTRICT SHADYSIDE DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • 3-5

GIANT EAGLE WATERFRONT, HOMESTEAD DECEMBER 5 • FRIDAY • 5-7

SHARP EDGE BISTRO DOWNTOWN DECEMBER 6 • SATURDAY • 6-8

www.birminghambridgetavern.com N E W S

ATLAS BOTTLE WORKS LAWRENCEVILLE DECEMBER 5 • FRIDAY • 8-10

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


DE

SI

the

ON

PORK SOUVLAKI WAS JUICY CHUNKS OF SEASONED MEAT WITH PEPPERS, ONION AND TOMATOES

BRUNCH OFFERINGS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Last month, the latest iteration of Justin Strong’s AVA Lounge, in North Oakland, closed its doors. But while the former Shadow Lounge owner is spending time doing consulting work and working for his family’s longtime dry-cleaning business in Homewood, he’s not out of the foodand-entertainment business; he’s also running the newly launched food service at Altar Bar, in the Strip District. Show-goers at Altar can order food from the kitchen, for now mostly concession-style stuff: nachos, fries, the old AVA Lounge “Dip Set,” featuring hummus and bean dip. And Strong is heading up a new monthly event at the venue that focuses on food, not music. So You Think You Can Brunch will bring local guest chefs into the bar’s commercial kitchen to prepare a prix fixe brunch for attendees. The first is Fernando Espejel, of Brassero Grill, but Strong says he expects to take on amateur chefs just as often as pros. “If Miss Jenkins comes to me and says she can make a pretty good brunch, I’ll say, ‘Sign up for April!’ And April’s guest is Miss Jenkins — let’s see what you can do.” It’ll all happen in Altar’s downstairs “green room” area, accessible via the side entrance. (Party like a rock star!) The $20 admission covers food and coffee or tea; bar drinks will be available for a premium. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN BRUNCH. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

the

FEED

The holiday season is in full swing, and don’t wait until ntil the last minute te

to help outt e. other people On your ur countless ess supermarket trips trips, grab some extra staples to help stock food pantries. Cash helps, too. Make it a seasonal challenge between friends, family or co-workers to raise some coin. Check out www. pittsburghfoodbank.org for more info.

22

NEW YORK-STYLE

GREEK DINER

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Surf-and-turf with lobster tail and New York strip steak

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

D

INER TRADITIONS differ regionally. In and around Pittsburgh, “diner” connotes a small, homey place specializing in big American breakfasts and simple, satisfying lunch; hot entrees (if any) are few, it probably closes by mid-afternoon and it certainly doesn’t serve alcohol. But in metro New York, diners can be counted upon to be open most of the day, if not 24 up hours, and they tend to be run by Greeks. ho As a result, dinner entrees are numerous, sometimes with elaborate Greek dishes cosom existing alongside griddled American fare. ex Central Diner, in Robinson, operates in the New York style, in a polished, contemporary building (an overhauled Eat n’ Park). po The restaurant is run by husband-and-wife Th owners Dimitri and Jennifer Takos; Jennifer ow is Greek-American, while Dimitri is from Sparta via New York City, where he helped run the Kings Plaza Diner in Brooklyn. Central isn’t open 24 hours, but will sate your hunger during most of the day and night, and its full liquor license sug-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

gests a center of gravity rather later in the day than most places slinging eggs and tuna salad. Evidence of Central’s commitment to serious cooking was a complete lamb roasting on a spit on the front patio; this is a semi-regular dinner special, yielding 20-odd servings.

CENTRAL DINER

6408 Steubenville Pike, Robinson. 412-275-3243 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 6 a.m.-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 6 a.m.-1 a.m. PRICES: Breakfast, appetizers, soups, salads and sandwiches $3-11; entrees $10-18 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED That said, there were members of our party who prize a diner breakfast above all else, so we visited at midday, the better to straddle the menu’s breakfast, lunch and dinner offerings. This meant we didn’t get to try such entrée fare as shrimp santorini (broiled with tomatoes and feta) or Rou-

manian tenderloin steak, but we did sample plentifully from both American diner classics and savory Greek specialties. The dining room, elegantly appointed with dark-stained wood and brushed stainless trim, set our expectations to casual, but high quality. On both counts, Central Diner delivered. Giant pancakes are a diner staple, but Central’s stood out for being deep brown and slightly crisp on one side, paler and more tender on the other side, and fluffy, never soggy, within. Blueberries were plentiful and plump, but their juiciness didn’t threaten the integrity of the pancake. The Mediterranean omelet — distinct from Greek and Spanish options (the latter with chorizo) — included spinach, feta and tomato, and managed the balancing act of offering plenty of flavorful filling in an egg envelope which hit that sweet spot between fluffy and firm, moist without being runny. French toast was made with enormous


slices of challah — the best choice in our book — in a slightly sweetened egg batter that fried up crisp and light. Just as good were plump sausage links, thick as kielbasa and splendidly juicy, with seasoning that was subtle but absolutely not bland. Pork souvlaki was big, juicy chunks of seasoned grilled pork with peppers, onion and tomatoes served atop a thick, fluffy pita with good, garlicky tzatztiki. Each component of this dish was well prepared, and as the pita soaked up the meat juices, it all came together in an even more satisfying whole. The accompaniment was a rice pilaf that was, improbably, the only disappointment of our meal. It was studded with peas, carrots and celery that had long since given up any flavor, and colored yellow by some spice undeserving of the name. Fortunately, the souvlaki was amply sized to satisfy, and a Greek salad — quite large for a side, and generously filled with Kalamata olives, tomatoes, red onion and feta in a simple, slightly creamy vinaigrette — was excellent.

On the RoCKs

Owner Dimitri Takos

Spanakopita is available as meal or appetizer, and the latter was plenty substantial: a large triangle pleasingly plated with olives, little mounds of shredded carrot and tomatoes. The phyllo crust was deliciously buttery, and dill notes in the filling were distinct without overwhelming the spinach. A stuffed-pepper entrée special confirmed our confidence in the kitchen. Our server’s description of it as a green bell pepper (we prefer sweet red or orange) in a “red” sauce (we pictured marinara) gave us pause. But the pepper was tender and well balanced with its savory filling of ground meat and rice; the “red” sauce turned out to be a delectable vegetable purée studded with whole pieces of carrot and sweet, soft onion; and the whole thing was served on a bed of fluffy, creamy mashed potatoes. This was diner fare at its best: savory, satisfying, and far better than anything we might throw together with such humble ingredients at home. Central Diner goes to show that while a good diner is never fussy, when it takes its food as seriously as more upscale fare, the results can be just as sublime.

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

A LAST CALL Departing columnist notes changes on local booze scene I’ve written about drinking in Pittsburgh every week for over three years, sharing stories of the scores of brewers, distillers, bartenders, sommeliers, and wine/spirits importers and distributors who contribute to this citys booze culture. My biggest takeaway: Pittsburgh is a fantastic place to get a drink. It’s thrilling to take stock of how many breweries opened since I started writing this column, and good ones too. Bars are — quite rightly — moving away from domestic mega-breweries and dedicating more taps to these terrific local beers and ciders. We’ve also gone from one distillery to four, with at least one more scheduled to open next year.

“THANK YOU, BARTENDERS, FOR EDUCATING AND INSPIRING ME.” When I moved to Pittsburgh in 2010, there weren’t a lot of places where you could get a well-crafted classic or contemporary cocktail. Now there are so many choices; when people ask me for suggestions on where to go, I need to ask them what neighborhood are they going to and what they’re in the mood for. Pittsburgh’s tight-knit bartender community is fast establishing a reputation for being as dedicated to its craft as any group of bartenders in the country. In fact, the city has enough respect among the greater bartending community that it was selected to host the first United States Bartenders Guild regional conference last year. Thank you, bartenders, for educating and inspiring me. You’re a real class act, the lot of you. I’m sure that anyone who’s been reading my column knows that for many of these bartenders, this is a lifelong career choice. Give them your respect, and give them a tip. This is my last “On the Rocks” for Pittsburgh City Paper. I’m moving on to other writing opportunities in town. As for this column, you’ve likely noticed the bylines of Drew Cranisky and Celine Roberts in recent weeks. Stick around; they’re going to do a knock-up job.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

Best Margaritas and To gh! Mexican food in the ‘burgh! r W NEtsbu Pit

o c o L o r o T El Grille & ull” “The Crazy B

Cantina

Monday & Thursday

MonDAY/WedNESDAY/SatURDAY $ 3.50 MargARITAS -----------------TACO Tuesday & Taco Thursday 99¢ tacos & 99¢ beers specials

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

2512 East Carson St. (412) 431-1100 www.eltorolocomexrestaurant.com

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALL INDIA. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600. With more than 200 items, All India’s menu is both epic and exciting, including novel choices such as Goan coconut shrimp and green jackfruit curry alongside the old denizens, chicken curry and the tandoor. Here, a thali, or combination platter, is a great option for the culinary explorer who wants the experience of multiple tastes. KF AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweetpotato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF BAR MARCO. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900. At this former firehouse-turnedrestaurant, a small but wellcurated menu makes a perfect complement to this venue’s wine and cocktail list. The tapas-inspired roster ranges from charcuterie plates and classics, like patatas bravas, to smoked-pork tamales and grilled radicchio and endive salad. KE BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of

Everyday Noodles {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4216660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF

Seviche {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GRIT & GRACE. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748. Small plates with plenty of unexpected ingredients and designed for sharing mark this Downtown venue. The menus offers updates on classics (Rueben, ramen) and eclectic Asian fusion fare to dim sum and “pork face” sandwich. Fortunately, the kitchen brings a confident approach to

a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes. KE HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tuna-and-avocado spring rolls. LE KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-6834004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of off-the-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobster-andwhite-bean purée alongside fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deep-fried gnocchi. KF KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE CONTINUES ON PG. 26


The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

Great Music!

Drink Specials!

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST

BURGERES BURRITOS* IN TH BURGH’ TACOS Y MAS!

ROTATING VEGAN SPECIALS!

ALL LUNCHES

EMAIL: ELBURROPGH@GMAIL.COM

1108 FEDERAL STREET Pittsburgh, PA 15212

*

$

8-$10

*

Monroeville eeville evi illlle le Ma Mall • 4412 Mall 412.372.5500 122 3372 722 55500 5000 15 50 1505 150 5505 05 E CCarson 05 arso ar sonn St St. • 412 4412.904.4620 41 12 9900 12 Westmoreland We eestmoreland stmo morelandd M Mall all • 724 724.830.88 724.830.8810 830 8810

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107

winghartburgers.com

HOPVENT

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

www.elburropgh.com

OAKLAND • 226 MEYRAN AVENUE

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

Good Friends, Good Food, Good Beer

Two 10 Year Anniversaries in less than twenty years!

We’re both turning ten in December! To celebrate we’re combining forces at the new East End Taproom to kick off its grand opening and to celebrate our decade-long collaboration of all things good. Join us with good friends for good food and good beer pairings in the new brewpub. Tickets include six small plates and six pours, live music, silliness, and bacon! Saturday December 6

East End Taproom

147 Julius Street at Frankstown

Get tickets at eastendbrewing.com/events N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

THE BIG BURRITO GIFT CARD EVENT NOVEMBER 17 THROUGH DECEMBER 1

$ 2 DRINKS FRI-SAT

U CALL ITS

10PM-MIDNIGHT

¢.35 Wings Purchase $100 worth of big Burrito, Eleven, Umi or Mad Mex® gift cards and we’ll reward you with $25 in bonus Holiday Burrito Buck$.

Mon

thru

FRI

FOOTBALL

For every $50 purchased, you get $10 in Holiday Burrito Buck$.

IS HERE!

Bonus cards are available online at bigburrito.com and at all big Burrito restaurants. Some limitations apply; please see web site or store for details.

Ticket & College Games

NFL SUNDAY

2328 E. E Carson St. St SOUTHSIDE 412.481.0852

Park Bruges {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} OLIVES AND PEPPERS. 6052 William Flynn Highway (Route 8), Bakerstown. 724-444-7499. This casual Italian spot that offers pizza, pasta and sandwiches as well as more refined entrees. The meat-and-cheese sandwiches are a forte, with ciabatta “panini” and hoagies options. The lasagna is enormous, its homemade noodles laden with a creamy five-cheese mix and a savory Bolognese sauce with meatballlike chunks of beef. KE PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. www.pamelasdiner.com. There are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner mini-chain: the cheery atmosphere; the oldfashioned breakfasts featuring raisin French toast, fried potatoes and corned-beef hash; and light, crispy-edged pancakes so good that President Obama had them served at the White House. J

Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE

SMILING BANANA LEAF. 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-362-3200. At this absolute jewel-box of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than Thai-inflected Chinese food. PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Grilled meat appetizers are Highland Park. 412-661beautifully seasoned, 3334. This Belgian-style and the pad Thai offers bistro offers more than a lively balance of moules (mussels), ingredients. The though those come assertively spicy . w ww per highly recommended, pumpkin curry features a p ty ci h pg in either a traditional a special variety of .com cream-wine Thai gourd. JF preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations WINGHART’S BURGER AND on French-Canadian poutine, such WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, as adding chipotle pulled pork. Downtown (412-434-5600) and Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads 1505 E. Carson St., South Side and even a burger round out (412-904-4620). Big beefy burgers, this innovative menu. KE wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this an PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. above-average bar stop, whether 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District Downtown or on Carson Street. (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Burger toppings range from Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). standard cheese and fried These two fish restaurants fill onions to arugula and truffle the gap between humble lunch oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its counter and snooty steakhouse excellent crust. JE — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. menu is casual fare such as 530 E. Bruceton Road, West sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with Mifflin. 412-650-9090. An a rotating selection of higherAlabama seafood chain claims a end dishes, particularly at the welcome northern outpost in the Downtown location. KF Pittsburgh suburbs. The menu is dominated by seafood, with a few SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., steak, burger, and chicken options, Downtown. 412-697-3120. This prepared in a Southern style — upscale Latin American-style mostly fried, and accompanied tapas restaurant specializes in by grits, gumbo, hushpuppies citrus-cured fish, while also and okra. And oysters, naturally, offering a small selection of served in a variety of ways. EK

FULL LIST ONLINE

Famo us s, BBQ R ib & Br i s k e t i a n Ve ge t art ie s! Sp e c i a l

OUR KITCHEN IS OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY 5PM

ENJOY OUR 50 SEAT DINING ROOM 11 WINES ON TAP • 11 WHISKEYS ON TAP 27 BEERS ON TAP • 170 WHISKEYS CALL FOR RESERVATIONS 1908 CARSON STREET l SOUTHSIDE l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

EERS B T F A R C 40 N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


LOCAL

BEAT

“I DON’T THINK THE WORLD NEEDED ANOTHER ROCK BAND, BUT MY SON NEEDED A FATHER.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SYNC-ING FEELING What started as a one-off tribute to a well-liked but underappreciated Beatles album a couple of years ago has morphed, inadvertently, into something of a franchise, and the latest iteration is the biggest yet: Sat., Nov. 29, Touchfaster and The Ruckus Bros. are presenting a live rendition of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, synced with The Wizard of Oz. “Honestly, we were back and forth whether we even wanted to do a third one,” says Pierce Marotto of Touchfaster, a local media-and-entertainment company. “We weren’t sure how we were going to top Thriller,” the live tribute show the group presented last October at Mr. Small’s. The Thriller show was a follow-up to an earlier show The Ruckus Bros. — a local supergroup of sorts headed up by musician Diego Byrnes — put together in which they played The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour. “We sat down and shot some ideas around on what album we could do — that was around June of this year — and somebody said, ‘Dark Side,’” Marotto recalls. “And we all just said, ‘Yep. Yep, we’re gonna do that one.’” In addition to a cast of local musicians ranging from Small’s co-owner Liz Berlin to Giuseppe Capolupo, of Gypsy and His Band of Ghosts, and Jessica Zamiska, of Velvet Heat, Touchfaster has a team of designers and animators working on visuals for the show. Rather than try to sync the live performance exactly to the movie as it runs, they’re editing the film into scenes — but it’s still no small task to pull off live. “The band will be playing to a click track, so it will be all timed,” Marotto explains. “But the same animators we worked with last year for Thriller are working with us on this, and they’ll be chopping up the movie — mostly because there’s that 45 extra minutes of the movie after the album is done. “The album itself is iconic and pretty hard to pull off, but we needed something more than just the music.”

ANOTHER

CHANCE

“WE WEREN’T SURE HOW WE WERE GOING TO TOP THRILLER.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DARK SIDE OF OZ. 6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

28

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

W

HEN HIS BAND The Rave-Ups was

at its peak popularity, you might say Jimmer Podrasky was living like something of a star — appearing with the band in Pretty in Pink and on an episode of 90210, and finding himself romantically linked with some Hollywood types. But he says it was never such a cakewalk, and when he became a single dad to his son, Chance, he dissolved the L.A.-via-Pittsburgh band. Only last year did he release a new solo record, his first since the band’s breakup. He talked to CP about taking 20 years away and about mounting a comeback, ahead of a Pittsburgh show this weekend. GROWING UP IN NATRONA HEIGHTS, WERE YOU INTO MUSIC AT A YOUNG AGE? No! Absolutely not. I started to buy music as a high schooler, but I really didn’t have the nerve to [write and play] until the college years, and especially that senior year of college, when The Rave-Ups first started. I was a late bloomer, I guess.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VERN EVANS}

From rocking out to raising a son: Jimmer Podrasky

RELATIVELY. ON THE WHOLE, THAT’S NOT THAT LATE IN LIFE TO START SOMETHING … Right, it’s not. But then you see these kids who are, like, 8 playing.

JIMMER PODRASKY AND THE REDD-UPS 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 28. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $17-22. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

ONCE THE RAVE-UPS MOVED TO LOS ANGELES, YOU HAD SOME SUCCESS AND WERE LIVING SOMETHING OF A HOLLYWOOD LIFESTYLE, RIGHT? WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO WALK AWAY? Well, a lot of things occurred that I didn’t see coming. I don’t think any of us in The Rave-Ups, particularly the Rave-Ups who made those records, ever lived a Hollywood lifestyle. We kind of lived hand-tomouth. Although we were signed to a

label, we weren’t making money, and we didn’t have any hit records. We made a living doing it, and we were happy, and then I had a son. And that seemed to change things pretty dramatically. I knew once his mom and I split up, it was going to be difficult to be a weekend father. I couldn’t do that. I don’t think the world needed another rock ’n’ roll band all that much, but my son needed a father. WHAT DID YOU END UP DOING ONCE YOU GOT OUT OF MUSIC? I became a script-reader for William Morris. I did that for many years, until William Morris was taken over by another agency, and everyone at William Morris was basically fired. Unceremoniously, I might add. WERE YOU STILL QUIETLY WRITING MUSIC ALL THAT TIME? I was always writing songs; I think the only person who knew that was my son. He CONTINUES ON PG. 30


FEATURING NEVER SEEN BEFORE

JRABBIT vs MANTIS

(DUBSTEP) (ORANGE COUNTY, CA/ATLANTA, GA)

THE AUSTRALIAN MASKED DUO

SLICE N DICE (ELECTRO HARDHOUSE) (SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA)

DR. OZI (DUBSTEP) (TORONTO, CANADA) FREAKY FLOW (DRUM N BASS) (LOS ANGELES, CA) SMARTIE ROC vs CLEVR (GHETTO BREAKS) (MADDRAVER/PITTSBURGH, PA) E-DITTY (PROGRESSIVE TRANCE) DON’T MISS THIS EXCLUSIVE FIRST APPEARANCE IN PITTSBURGH BY JRABBIT, MANTIS & THE AUSTRALIAN MASKED DUO. GET YOUR RAVE ON AND COME PARTY LIKE MADDRAVERS!

(MADDRAVER/PITTSBURGH, PA)

ERIC D (HOUSE) (2161412 COMM/PITTSBURGH, PA) Shrine (TRAP) (HARRISBURG, PA) P.DOT (TRAP) (PITTSBURGH, PA)

THE BIGGEST NYE ELECTRONIC MUSIC PARTY IS GOING DOWN FROM 8PM-4AM.

TAKING A RECENT BREAK FROM MUSIC

LIMITED EARLY BIRD TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW FOR $25 AT: maddraver-productions.ticketleap.com/midnight-maddness-jrabbit-vs-mantis/

Includes front of the line privileges, a countdown to Midnight Maddness gift bag filled with commemorative items such as a: LED Champagne glass, a miniature bottle of sparkling non-alcoholic beverage, 2015 NYE commemorative party supplies, special stage viewing and access to the VIP lounge with a jacuzzi!

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

Includes a five course sit down dinner from 5pm-7pm, a chill hour before general admission doors open from 7pm-8pm with casual live entertainment. Platinum VIP packages include everything that the Deluxe VIP Package includes except for early entry and a five course sit down dinner presented by master local chefs. Must be 18yrs of age to purchase. Deadline for RSVP is 12-15-14

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

CRAVE ENTERTAINMENT & BANQUET HALL 2405 BRADY’S RUN RD BEAVER, PA 15009

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


ANOTHER CHANCE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

and I would play a lot in the living room, but that was the extent of my playing. I wrote, and I would sit around the house and play, and sometimes he would join me, but I didn’t do it publicly for a long, long time. And I didn’t share those songs publicly for a long, long time. I wrote because I needed to write, but I wasn’t really thinking there was a means to an end there. Some of those songs ended up on this record.

ALL DAY WEDNESDAY ALL YOU CAN EAT WINGS & CHIPS

$

9.99

A SPECIAL HOLIDAY GIFT TO OUR LOYAL CUSTOMERS. Receive a complimentary

COORS LIGHT DRAFT with everyy AYCE Wingg order.

*Offer only valid the first three Wednesdays in December AT THE MT. WASHINGTON LOCATION ONLY

WWW.REDBEARDSPGH.COM

The beer that invented Light beer. $

2.75

SUNDAY FOOTBALL SPECIAL 16OZ MILLER LITE DRAFTS

NORTH STAR SPECIAL 2.00 16SUNDAYMILLERFOOTBALL LITE DRAFTS

$

OZ

Penn Monroe

LITE FOOTBALL 16 MILLER LITE DRAFTS 2.00 MONDAY

$ F O L LO W @ M 2 T H I R D 30

OZ

# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

IS YOUR SON A MUSICIAN IN HIS OWN RIGHT? He is! He’s a kid; he’s like any kid, his interests seem to fluctuate dramatically. He’s a naturally gifted guitar player. He plays a lot better than me. He hasn’t really reached a point where he is serious about it; if that occurs, I think he’ll be great, because he’s a pretty talented kid. I made a point of not pushing him — “How come you’re not practicing your guitar?” I didn’t want it to be a chore. I wanted him to be in love with music, I wanted it to be because he had a passion for it. And he goes through those periods. YOUR SOLO ALBUM AND ITS TITLE TRACK ARE CALLED “THE WOULD-BE PLANS.” THAT SOUNDS LIKE SOMETHING YOU TOOK OUT OF YOUR OWN LIFE, AND IT SOUNDS LIKE A LOT OF WHAT HAS GOVERNED YOUR TRAJECTORY HAS BEEN CIRCUMSTANCE. I don’t think any of us are prepared for certain things that happen in life. I’m no different from anybody else. I’ve had some wonderful times in my life, and I’ve had some pretty horrible times. ARE YOU TRYING TO MAKE A FULL-TIME GO OF IT AGAIN? I am living hand-to-mouth right now, and I’m lucky I have help getting back [to Pittsburgh] to do shows. The same thing happened [this past summer]; I’m lucky that people stepped up and said, ‘Whatever you make at the show, you can keep, and I’ll pay for your plane ticket.’ Stuff like that. And these are people I didn’t even know. That’s what’s kind of shocking about it. These were people who were just serious fans, who wanted it to work. To them, it was a plane flight. To me, it was a lot more. ARE YOU EXCITED TO COME BACK TO CHILLY PITTSBURGH? I think the last time I was in freezing-cold weather was for my mom’s funeral, which was in 1989. I don’t know my body is going to react! I think my blood has thinned out a lot in the past 20 years. I might have to stay inside a lot. AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

AMUCK DETONATE (SELF-RELEASED) AMUCK412.BANDCAMP.COM

Four new tracks from the local rapper, produced by Kiltervision and Amuck himself. Amuck sings almost as much as he raps here, and the tracks pull from industrial music and rock as much as from contemporary electronic music, meaning the whole thing feels fresh, but at the same time like something that would’ve made alt-rock radio in 1996. Amuck’s flow is quick, clever and sometimes toes the line between aggressive and nerdy, in a good way. A good, exhilarating listen. SQUONK OPERA PNEUMATICA (SELF-RELEASED) WWW.SQUONKOPERA.ORG

If you’re a longtime Pittsburgher, you probably have some idea of what to expect from Squonk Opera — the group’s output is kind of predictably unpredictable, and Squonk has essentially defined itself without many outside referents for more than 20 years. Pneumatica is no different: kind of a proggy rock opera with no words, sometimes heavy, sometimes airy. (And that’s by design: Pneumatica is a show about air.) Sometimes that proggy operatic-ness isn’t working in Squonk’s favor, especially since this is the audio part of a performance piece, and on CD, we’re missing the live visual element, left only with a sometimes-cheesy-sounding soundtrack, especially at its more epic, anthemic moments. But there are plenty of curious points: Hey, those are bagpipes! Are those bagpipes run through effects? I think maybe! Not a passive listen, but an interesting aural experience if you’re engaged. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


BALTIMORE SOUND {BY SAMANTHA WARD} THOUGH CUTTHROAT sports rivals, Pitts-

burgh and Baltimore have gelled in a certain sense: as musical cohorts, and as cities leading parallel musical lives. Baltimore DJ .rar Kelly explains that the current Baltimore club scene mimics what he saw Pittsburgh exuding in 2008. “Everybody works together,” he says, reflecting on his own four years living in the Steel City. “They know one another in some capacity, because they’re both small, blue-collar towns.” The limiting factors of a small city generate a vibrant underground scene with a built-in support system — because there’s no other way to survive. Normaling, a duo consisting of Kelly and his musical partner Lemz, produces insanely palatable electro, hip-hop and techno beats. The duo is one of a slew of acts performing this Fri., Nov. 28, at Belvedere’s as part of what’s dubbed the Baltimore Club Takeover. Kelly explains the upcoming showcase in one word: energy. “We know that the crowd has a good time when the musicians have a good time and …” “We have fun,” finishes Lemz. The event, presented by local promoter Obvious, will give Pittsburgh an intense taste of the Baltimore club scene, featuring artists Scottie B, TT the Artist, Mighty Mark, DDm and other current staples. Kelly is quick to compliment music fans in Pittsburgh, citing it as his favorite place to perform. “The listening audience in Pittsburgh is very open-minded,” he notes, “and is genuinely interested in the music that you play. It still has that reputation.” He and Lemz compare it to Baltimore, which is, perhaps, still learning to play well with others. Right now, they assert, “Baltimore loves Baltimore.” The goal of Normaling is to create something that’s genuine and marries the members’ unique interests. Kelly explains that their biggest influence in this regard is actually living in Baltimore. “I feel like Baltimore club music is one of the most authentic, regional sounds in America, period,” he says. The collective unit of Baltimore artists casts a spirit that rubs off on all those working within it. Part of this unit is charismatic and

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CALY THE TIGER}

Representing Baltimore: DDm

outspoken DDm, one of the first openly gay rappers in Baltimore. He labels his personality as “authentically” Baltimore: “I’m raw, I’m rough around the edges, I get right to the chase. … I don’t negotiate that when it comes to my music.” He posits that the small s i z e o f B a lt i m o r e h a s inadvertently caused the musicians there to make music that is true to their passions. He explains, “We’re not holding our breath to be the next big pop sensation.” This new community is tight, but that’s not to say it’s insular. Born from a scene made of artists working independently, this new generation has banded together to support and collaborate with each other.

“WE’RE NOT HOLDING OUR BREATH TO BE THE NEXT BIG POP SENSATION.”

BALTIMORE CLUB TAKEOVER 9:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 28. Belvedere’s, 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2555 or www.facebook.com/obviouspgh

“We understand what we’re up against,” DDm admits, “and we have to stick together — we have to have that kind of camaraderie.” Even the old-school producers are in on it; legends like Scottie B and Rod Lee are actively working with the new generation of producers. Lemz explains: “Everyone is realizing that you shine brighter through it.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31


THE POUR HOUSE

PAPA ROCKS

GENUINE PUB

CAESAR’S

ALLISION PARK

MONROEVILLE

VERONA

TURTLE CREEK

$

$

$

$

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

MULLIGANS

TAILGATORS

WEST MIFFLIN

UPTOWN

SIX PENN KITCHEN

GRANDVIEW SALOON

DOWNTOWN

MT WASHINGTON

2.25

2.50

2.00

2.50

CARSON CITY SALOON SOUTHSIDE

$

11.00

5 BOTTLE BUD LIGHT BUCKETS

JAGGERBUSH SOUTHSIDE

$

5.00

BUD LIGHT PITHCERS

$

2.50

BUD LIGHT ALUMINUM 16 OZ BOTTLES 16OZ BOTTLES

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

$

2.50

BUD LIGHT BOTTLES

$

2.50

BUD LIGHT BOTTLES

$

2.50

BUD LIGHT ALUMINUM 16OZ BOTTLES


DOWN THE ROAD LOUNGE

PARK PLACE PUB

TGI FRIDAYS

DUKES UPPER DECK

PLUM BORO

HIGHLAND PARK

WATERFRONT

HOMESTEAD

2.50

$

$

$

2.50

BUD LIGHT BOTTLES

$

3.00

BUD LIGHT BOTTLES

3.00

BUD LIGHT DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT DRAUGHTS

SMOKEYS TAVERN MILLVALE

$

2.00

BUD LIGHT BOTTLES

JAILHOUSE SALOON CORAOPOLIS

$

2.00

BUD LIGHT ALUMINUM 16OZ BOTTLES

DO DROP INN

MICKEY’S PLACE

MOONLITE LOUNGE

BARKING SHARK

NATRONA HEIGHTS

McKEES ROCKS

BROOKLINE

MILLVALE

$

$

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT 20OZ DRAUGHTS

2.00 N E W S

+

$

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

$

3.00

1.75

2.00

BUD LIGHT DRAUGHTS

BUD LIGHT ALUMINUM 16OZ BOTTLES

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

33


CRITICS’ PICKS

The Shadowboxers [ROCK] + FRI., NOV. 28

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

Tickets at www.jergels.com

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17

If recent weather has been any indication of what life in Buffalo will be like for the next few months, Sleepy Hahas might want to stay on the road — headed south — for a while. For now, the band hits the 31st Street Pub tonight in support of its Dull Days LP, from earlier this year. The group, headed up by songwriter Patrick Butler, mixes throwback garagestyle rock with some surf leanings and White Stripes-style blues. There’s some buzz building for this one, and either way, dancing to some rock music might help you burn some of those Thanksgiving calories. Different Places in SPACE, Partly Sunny and Houdini’s Psychic Theatre open. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. $8-10. 412-391-8334 or www.31stpub.com

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., NOV. 29 Five self-proclaimed “lifers” of the Pittsburgh music scene founded Wicked Chief in the summer of 2013. The quintet is finding good footing now, and released its first album, True Blue, in March. The LP is entirely self-produced, and hosts 13 tight indie-rock tracks. The band will be joined by another local, the two-piece Puzzle Pieces. You can see both bands in the late show at Club Café tonight. Samantha Ward 10 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[INDIE SOUL] + WED., DEC. 03 Sometimes in order to get started, a band

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

needs a happy mistake. The Shadowboxers are a prime example: Their first musical success, the grand prize of $3,000 at an Emory Arts Competition, was only possible due to a mistake. The then-unnamed group was not among the 10 finalists, but the committee accidently sent the band an email inviting it to perform. The group arrived at the competition, showed off its rhythmic, catchy sound and took Royal Blood home the prize. Since then, The Shadowboxers funded their first full-length album, Red Room, with a Kickstarter in 2013. Catch them tonight at Club Café with Jacob Klein. SW 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

[ROCK] + WED., DEC. 03 In recent years, whether you like it or not, Dave Grohl has ascended to the throne as America’s pre-eminent rock ’n’ roll figure. So when Grohl’s band Foo Fighters decide to take an act on the road, it’s something of a christening. That honor is coming next year for Royal Blood, recently announced as one of the opening acts for multiple dates on Foo Fighters’ summer tour. The British band released its first album to acclaim this past summer, driven by its blownout blues-rock single, “Figure It Out.” To wrap up a big 2014, the two-man band plays Altar Bar tonight. There You Are opens. AM 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-25. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com


We buy all day-every day LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

The best place for you to get the finest outdoor gear and best customer service in Pittsburgh! Top of the line ski and snowboard gear. Professionally trained and certified ski and snowboard technicians. • Skiing • Snowboarding boarding boarding • Skateboarding • Exclusive sive Apparel

• Stand S d Up U PPaddle Board • Water Skii Skiing • Wakeboar Wakeboarding

EEastern t H2O

1123 Freeport Road Pittsburgh, PA 15238 412.408.3099 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

PODRASKY and THE REDD-UPS

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP FRI 28

also performing with Jimmer

GARY JACOBS

DAVE MINÅARIK

GREG JOSEPH

ROB JAMES

FROM THE CLARKS : ROB JAMES, GREG JOSEPH, DAVE MINARIK, GARY JACOBS

with special guest

Fri.

MARK DIGNAM

NOV. 28

2 014

THE REX THEATRE 16 0 2 E a s t C a r s o n S t r e e t

s ( 4 1 2 ) 3 8 1 - 6 8 1 1

DOORS @ 7PM SHOW @ 8PMsTICKETS: $17 ADV./ $22 SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT REXTHEATRE.COM

Poster & Ads by

36

MICHAEL MORAN @ LUCK DESIGN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

31ST STREET PUB. The Sleepy Hahas, Different Places in Space, Partly Sunny, Houdini’s Psychic Theatre. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Go Go Gadjet. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Harlan Twins, Robin Vote, Shelf Life String Band. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. FIDDLERS BAR & GRILL. The Kardasz Brothers. McCandless. 412-635-2300. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LEVELS. Jason Kendall feat. Serlin & Shuvette. North Side. 412-231-7777. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Buzz Poets. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero & Jingles. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Dopapod. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SQUIRREL HILL SPORTS BAR. theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Yojimbo. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Kendell & Rick. North Side. 412-224-2827.

DJS

SUN 30

DRUM BAR. DJ NIN. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Da Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Sound of a Smirk, Cape Cod, Trace the Pattern, Scene Stage the World. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

MON 01 ALTAR BAR. The Word Alive, The Color Morale, Our Last NIght, The Dead Rabbits, Miss Fortune. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

WED 03 ALTAR BAR. Royal Blood. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. The Shadowboxers, Jacob Klein. South Side. 412-431-4950.

THU 27 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 28

SAT 29

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 29

ALTAR BAR. Misfits. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. The Hi-Frequencies; Will Simmons & the Upholsterers. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. BRILLOBOX. Good Ship Gibraltar. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Wicked Chief, Puzzle Pieces (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HARVEY WILNER’S. Random Play. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. 412-366-7468. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Wreck Loose, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts, Drowning Clowns, Tracksploitation, Velvet Heat, more. Touchfaster & Ruckus Bros. Present: Dark Side of Oz. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NIED’S HOTEL. Austin Drive Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PETER B’S. Zero Fame w/ Special Guest. 724-353-2677. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. 13 Stories. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Cherry Red Band. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

LISTEN UP! Every Wednesday on our music blog, we supply you with an audio guide to this week’s City Paper.

Listen Up! is a Spotify playlist of artists

featured in the paper and others playing Pittsburgh soon. Check it out on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.


EARLY WARNINGS

GUS’S CAFE. Pittsburgh Caribbean/International Saturdays. Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. W/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

SAT 29 CLUB CAFE. Eve Goodman. South Side. 412-431-4950. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Tim & John. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STOCKTON}

WED 03 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Mike & DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B

The New Pornographers Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

GREATER PITTSBURGH COLISEUM. Ginuwine, Spinderella. Homewood.

{SAT., APRIL 25}

Six Organs of Admittance

BLUES

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side

FRI 28 ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Ross. 412-364-8166. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Blues Open Mic. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

{TUE., AUG. 25}

Foo Fighters

First Niagara Pavilion, 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Max Garcia Conover

REGGAE

Presented By

FRI 28 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$

CLASSICAL

253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

FRI 28 Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 29

ANDYS. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan . w ww per & the Slide pa pghcitym Worldwide. .co CJ’S. Roger Humphries East Liberty. & The RH Factor. KELLY-STRAYHORN Strip District. 412-642-2377. THEATER. Roger JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Humphries, Spanky Wilson, SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. C Street Brass. East Liberty. North Side. 412-904-3335. 412-363-3000. LEMONT. Maria Sargent & Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-431-3100. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. Richie Cole BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE Saxophone Madness. SQUARE. Erin Burkett & Virgil Downtown. 412-392-2217. Walters. Downtown. 412-456-6666. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & The Satin Hearts. Downtown. SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz 412-471-9100. Band. 7 p.m. dance lesson. Kenny VILLAGE TAVERN Blake. North Side. 412-904-3335. & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell LEMONT. Mark Vennere. & Jazzsurgery. West End. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. 412-458-0417. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 27

FRI 28

SUN 30

N E W S

DECEMBER 13 8PM • $$10

WED 03

{FRI., FEB. 13}

SAT 29

JAZZ

CLUB CAFE. Jeff Miller, Joy Ike, Brooke Annibale (early). South Side. 412-431-4950.

Six Organs of Admittance

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE.32-20 Fully Loaded Blues. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MOONDOG’S. Miss Melanie & the Valley Rats, Rich Mitchell & the Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Harold Stewart & Blues Hounds. 724-433-1322. TUGBOAT’S. Craig King & King’s Ransom. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

Photo by Greta Rybus

FRI 28

TUE 02

SAT 29

An Evening of Music

ACOUSTIC

+

TA S T E

+

MON 01 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 02 SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. Richie Cole w/ Ron Wilson, Mark Perna & Vince Taglieri. Lawrenceville. 412-874-7379.

WED 03 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. Elise Rael Percussion Ensemble. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-471-9100. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Dante’ Soulsville Project. West End. 412-458-0417.

M U S I C

+

724-400-6044

IGUDESMAN & JOO: BIG NIGHTMARE MUSIC. This comical duo will join Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Music Director Manfred Honeck for a whirlwind of humor and virtuosity. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 30 IGUDESMAN & JOO: BIG NIGHTMARE MUSIC. This comical duo will join Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Music Director Manfred Honeck for a whirlwind of humor and virtuosity. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 28 LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon.

SAT 29 CLUB CAFE. A Deep Violet Cabaret w/ Eve Goodman (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. LEVELS. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Softwinds. A dinner show. Buffet at 6pm & show at 8pm. Reservations required. 412-487-6259. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

Nov 26 - Dec 2 WEDNESDAY 26 The Black Six / The River Daughters / Lindsay Rakers / Caleb Pogyor & the Talkers / Chet Vincent

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 7p.m.

Thanksgiving Eve Throwdown REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 event. Free show. 8p.m.

No Bad Ju Ju THE MEADOWS CASINO Washington. Free show. 8p.m.

The Routines PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. Over 21 show. Tickets: showclix.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 28

newbalancepittsburgh.com

Trey Anastasio Band STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Jimmer Podrasky and the Redd-Ups

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: rextheatre.com. 8p.m.

Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers

Comedian Geoff Tate

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 9p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Nov. 29.

Go Go Gadjet PSU Reunion Party

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

I Made It! Holiday Market

Misfits SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29 ALTAR BAR

admission. For more info visit traxfarms.com. 4:30p.m.

HEINZ 57 CENTER Downtown. Free event. Through Nov. 29.

James Taylor and His All-Star Band

SATURDAY 29

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 8p.m.

A Night with St. Nick

TRAX FARMS South Hills. Free

Yojimbo THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 11p.m.

Misfits

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Dark Side of Oz MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 30

IGUDESMAN & JOO: BIG Nightmare Music HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 2:30p.m.

MONDAY 17 The Word Alive

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 31 Help Us... Help Others…

This Thanksgiving help us help others and “Give Hunger the Boot.”

When you bring in ANY 3 Non-Perishable items, receive

WEXFORD

$20 OFF

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

*

WATERFRONT

YOUR TOTAL, REGULAR PRICED BOOT PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE

112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

Visit us on Black Friday & Small Business Saturday for some Amazing Savings! 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


BATTLE PREP {BY AL HOFF}

YOU COULD DO WORSE FOR A HEARTWARMING TRUE-LIFE STORY ABOUT SMART PEOPLE

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 is mostly a preamble for the events of Part 2, which viewers will have to wait an entire year to see. But fans of the franchise should check in — newbies have no hope of following the story — especially if you prefer your teen dystopias gloomy. The two earlier Hunger Games had darkness at the core, but they were wrapped up in spectacle, heroic action, humor and faaaabulous costumes.

EVERYTHING, AND THE

GIRL

Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) is a troubled soldier.

Now, our heroine Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence, again breathing life into a comic-book role) has little agency or fun left. She’s suffering PTSD, living in an underground bunker (District 13, home of the rebels) and not happy about her new role as inspirational leader in the sure-tobe epic battle against the ruling class. Director Francis Lawrence does a fair job stretching out the first half of Suzanne Collins’ book. It’s admittedly slack in spots, but then it’s always fun to see actors like Donald Sutherland, Julianne Moore, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Woody Harrelson and Jeffrey Wright liven up the drab. (Less compelling: the who-cares love triangle between Katniss and her two suitors.) And Mockingjay delivers a lot of issues du jour lite: class inequity; terrorism/ freedom-fighting and the effective PR strategies required; torture; and the perennial tension between the rights of the individual vs. the whole. Intriguing, but alas, no action or resolution until 2015. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OK, so o penguins can’t ’t fly, but they hey can SPY! PY! The heretofore unknown nknown ability of penguins to be international rnational agents of intrigue is the subject of

Penguins nguins of Madagascar adagascarr,

an animated ated comedy featuring turing those frisky feathered thered fanfavoritess from the Madagascar franchise.

{BY AL HOFF}

A

Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne), cheerfully on life’s journey

T BRITAIN’S prestigious Univer-

sity of Cambridge, in 1963, a bright young physics student named Stephen Hawking muses: If only there were an equation to explain everything in the universe. Hawking will in time come up with important and useful equations vis-à-vis theoretical physics and the creation of the universe. But there won’t be any explanation for the day-to-day side of life, buffeted by the mysterious forces of love, chance and tragedy. Such challenges are simply met, never truly understood. This tension between facts and fate forms the spine of James Marsh’s bio-pic The Theory of Everything, which recounts the professional and personal life of Hawking — from his college days to the publication of his mega-selling A Brief History of Time and his enduring “celebrity physicist” status. It all begins well: At Cambridge, the nerdy, floppy-haired Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) successfully courts a poetry student named Jane (Felicity Jones). But then he is diagnosed with a motor-neuron disorder

and given just two years to live. Hawking is advised that “the brain is not affected,” which seems doubly cruel, as he and others rightly imagine his remarkable academic gifts will be imprisoned in an inert, dying shell. The doctor explains the horror: “Your thoughts won’t change. It’s just that no one will know what they are.”

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING STARRING: Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones DIRECTED BY: James Marsh

CP APPROVED Well, those aren’t indisputable facts, after all. Hawking goes on to live many years (72 and counting); finish his dissertation; marry Jane and start a family; divorce and marry again; guest-star on The Simpsons; and he never stops communicating thoughts large and small from his ever-nimble brain. Marsh’s film is as hagiographic as expected, and has been adapted from Jane’s second, less-critical, account of her mar-

riage, Travelling to Infinity, My Life With Stephen. But throughout the film, the inspirational nature of Hawking’s life is tempered by the presence of Jane. She is as central a character as Hawking, one whose emotional, physical and professional life is deeply constrained by her husband’s demands. For a well-known story, with an admitted bias toward presenting both Hawking and Jane as strong characters who met, matched and bested life’s challenges, Theory manages to feel more quality, small-scale BBC film than manipulative, heavily scored Hollywood heart-tugger. The two good, restrained actors playing out this marriage — with its trials both extraordinary (physically caring for your husband as one would an oversized toddler) and mundane (“it’s all about you”) — also help steer the story past the lachrymose pitfalls. Ultimately, Theory is quite cheerful and sunny — oh, there are clouds, but they quickly pass. It’s not a bad movie, it’s not a great movie, but you could do worse for a heartwarming true-life story about smart people, and a pair of lead performances likely to turn up during awards season. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


FILM CAPSULES FO

AIR .CO LLOW TH E CH

CP

M

Feast your eyes on what two directors do with one script.

Directed by Shane Dawson

Directed by Anna Martemucci NOW AVAILABLE

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK HAPPY VALLEY. Amir Bar-Lev’s new documentary examines how footballcrazed State College, home of Penn State, reacted in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child-rape scandal. Bar-Lev posits, as many have, that blind adoration of the football program allowed former defensive coordinator Sandusky to commit his crimes for decades. After the program was tarnished, the community was left confused and defensive. Among those interviewed are family members of late head coach Joe Paterno, and Matt Sandusky, Sandusky’s adopted son, who said he had also been molested. Bar-Lev’s film is well shot, and he does a great job of building tension in this chronological tale, with the best scenes — those featuring the riots that followed Paterno’s firing — coming in the film’s first 20 minutes. But even if you’re tired of everything related to the Penn State scandal, Bar-Lev’s film is worth the time for the questions it raises about the limits and perils of our excessive fandom. 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29; 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 30; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Dec. 1; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 2. Hollywood (Charlie Deitch)

CP

Horrible Bosses 2

Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

For more information, call 412-246-5367.

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

HORRIBLE BOSSES 2. Having quit their jobs, the gang of disgruntled dudes (Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis and Charlie Day) hopes to launch their own business. But a financing deal falls through, and — I’ll just skip ahead here — the next best plan is to kidnap a rich kid (Chris Pine, being amusingly douchey). Sean Anders’ comedy is a pretty shameless retread of the first film — the same plot (bungled crime), same supporting characters (Jennifer Aniston, Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx) and same low-rent humor (slapstick, sex jokes). If that sounds like it will add up to the same good time for you, well, off you go! (Al Hoff) JINGLE BELL ROCKS. Filmmaker Mitchell Kezin follows his own obsession with Christmas music (his gateway disc was “The Little Boy That Santa Claus Forgot”) into an amusing round-up of holiday tunes; a cultural history of contemporary Christmas songs (from Elvis to “Back Door Santa”); and the vinyl junkies who collect the often-sneered-at music. Kezin checks in with some well-known fans, including: John Waters, musician Wayne Coyne, Run DMC and Bob Dorough, who penned one of the first antiChristmas holiday tunes, “Blue Xmas,” for Miles

Pelican Dreams Davis. Turns out that beneath the snark, these guys (like most record-hounds), are surprisingly sentimental about holiday music. They all make pretty convincing arguments that there is something affirming about even the most over-played, ill-advised or just plain weird Christmas song. Tra la la! (At each screening, three audience members will be picked to root through on-hand Christmas LPs and choose a song to be played.) 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 4; 7 p.m. Sun., Dec. 7; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 9; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Dec. 10. Hollywood (AH) MEMPHIS. Tim Sutton’s portrait of a free-floating, iconoclastic Memphis blues singer-songwriter (Willis Earl Beal) is pretty free-floating itself. Employing a languid cinema-vérité style, the narrative often feels like a dream-like documentary, as Beal mopes around rundown parts of present-day Memphis, searching for inspiration. Other unidentified people come and go — a girlfriend, some fellow musicians, a young boy — but connections rarely form. Musical interludes are started but don’t finish; church is debated, but there’s no commitment; car trips are taken, but the destinations all seem like dead ends. Sutton’s film is for those who don’t mind an evocative but very minimal exploration of the stalled creative process, as it intersects here with Memphis’ musical roots, religion, the AfricanAmerican community and a life lived just above poverty. Starts Fri., Nov. 28. Harris (AH) PELICAN DREAMS. Filmmaker Judy Irving, who had a hit in 2003 with The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, turns her lens to another bird, the California brown pelican. Her doc follows the rehabilitation of a young female bird, rescued from the Golden Gate Bridge, as well as that of another injured pelican that now lives as a semi-domesticated bird. These personal tales are interwoven with more general information about the life, habits and trials of pelicans, birds whose remarkable abilities are often overshadowed by their goofy appearance. (I’m guilty: I grew up around these pelicans and considered them funny-shaped seagulls.) Despite forays into environmental issues and interviews with naturalists, the film feels longer than its subject warrants. But here’s your chance to give these oft-ignored seabirds their due. Starts Fri., N ov. 28. Regent Square (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Time Travel: Back to the Future (the 1985 hit starring Michael J. Fox and a DeLorean), Nov. 26-27. Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (the best way to ace history class is explained in this 1989 dude-comedy), Nov. 26-27.


f a ce b o o

ink bo k . co m / p

x b a ke r yc a f e

Jingle Bell Rocks Time Bandits (Terry Gilliam’s 1981 film is a fantastical journey), Nov. 26-27. Primer (2004 indie hit, a timetravel yarn that satisfyingly defies easy explanation), Nov. 27. Kung Fu Films: Drunken Master (the 1978 comedic kung-fu film that made a star of Jackie Chan), Nov. 28-30 and Dec. 2-3. Enter the Dragon (1973 classic martial-arts film starring Bruce Lee), Nov. 28-30 and Dec. 2-4. Fist of Fury a.k.a The Chinese Connection (1972 Bruce Lee hit), Nov. 28-30, Dec. 1-2 and Dec. 4. Master of the Flying Guillotine (1976 actioner proves missing limbs are no impediment to ass-kicking), Nov. 28-30, Dec. 1 and Dec. 3. Once Upon a Time in China (Jet Li stars in this 1991 bio-pic about Wong Fei-hung), Nov. 28-30, Dec. 1 and Dec. 4. All kung-fu films are presented in their original language, with subtitles. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. Frank Capra’s beloved 1946 holiday classic, in which a harried man (Jimmy Stewart) re-discovers the simple joys of life. Tell ’em Clarence sent you. 7:30 p.m. Wed., N ov. 26. Hollywood THE WIZARD OF OZ. In Victor Fleming’s 1939 musical film, join Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her little dog, too, on their unforgettable Technicolor journey to the Land of Oz — a wondrous place that, ultimately, isn’t quite as wonderful as Kansas. 5:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29. Parkway, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. www.parkwaytheater.org. $2-3 MOMMA ROMA. Pier Paolo Pasolini’s neo-realist 1962 drama about a former prostitute who tries to go straight for the sake of her teenage son. Ann Magnani stars. In Italian, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29. Parkway, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. www.parkwaytheater.org. $3 TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP. Harry Langdon stars in this 1926 silent comedy, in which he portrays a hobo who enters a cross-country walking race. Harry Edwards directs a script co-written by Frank Capra. The screening will be accompanied by a piano score composed and performed live by Tom Roberts. 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 30. Hollywood BLOOD FIRST. In this new drama from Najaa Young, two brothers head into a life of crime, following their father’s role in the drug trade. But when an associate cooperates with the authorities, the brothers must decide whether to run, fight back or also cooperate. This locally produced film promises to examine the destructive cycle of violence which impacts some communities. 5 p.m. Sun., N ov. 30. SouthSide Works. $11

N E W S

+

THE GODFATHER. Catch one of the most enduring and influential American films of the late 20th century on the big screen, where Francis Ford Coppola’s multi-generational 1972 mafia family drama about the perversion of the American Dream writ large belongs. 6 p.m. Sun., Nov. 30. Parkway, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. www.parkwaytheater.org THE MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROL. Brian Henson directs this 1992 holiday comedy, in which the lovable puppets put their fuzzy spin on Dickens’ classic cautionary tale. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 2. AMC Loews. $5 WHITE CHRISTMAS. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye are a pair of entertainers who travel to Vermont with two singing sisters (Rosemary Clooney and VeraEllen) for the holidays. Once there, the men discover the country inn is run by their old Army general, and he’s in financial straits. Looks like a big musical show might be the ticket! Besides the title song, Michael Curtiz’s 1954 film includes other Irving Berlin classics such as “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep” and “Blue Skies.” 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 4. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)

11/26 @ 7:30pm - Make this Capra classic a holiday tradition!

-Happy - - - - - -Valley --------------------------------

(2014) 11/29 @ 2pm, 11/30 @ 7pm, 12/1 @ 7:30pm, 12/2 @ 7:30pm New documentary about the Penn State Jerry Sandusky scandal.

-Bastard - - - - - - - -Bearded - - - - - - - -Irishmen - - - - - - - - - in- - -Concert ----------

11/29 @ 7:30pm The 10th Annual George Henry Evans IV Memorial Benefit Show.

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


[BOOKS]

EACH LOOKS BACK, THE MYSTERIOUS MOMENT PREGNANT WITH POSSIBILITY

FIT AND SOBER {BY DANIELLE FOX}

TIONS INTIMATIONS [ART]

{BY HEATHER MULL}

Paying it forward: Jennifer Matesa

Jennifer Matesa’s new guide to addiction recovery doesn’t cover 12 steps. Instead, it runs a marathon on previously uncharted terrain. The Recovering Body: Physical and Spiritual Fitness for Living Clean and Sober (Hazelden) explores addiction treatment through exercise, sleep, nutrition, sexuality and meditation. Matesa, the Shadysidebased writer behind the award-winning blog Guinevere Gets Sober, says her first book is the only guide to achieving physical recovery during addiction. “[Americans] find it really dangerous to live inside our bodies,” Matesa says. “It makes us feel very weak and vulnerable, and this book is all about looking at actual disciplines that we can practice that can bring us back to living in our bodies in a way that is at least comfortable or tolerable.” Matesa lost her parents to addiction to legal substances, and detoxed from her own painkiller addiction in 2008. But moving away from drugs, Matesa had “no idea where to go or what to do.” “Addiction was not very much in the media, so there wasn’t a lot of information out there, and I was extremely ashamed of my addiction. I didn’t want to tell anybody,” says Matesa, now an adjunct writing instructor at the University of Pittsburgh. Matesa and other survivors share their stories in the book, and describe how they are reclaiming their lives through activities like mountain-climbing, yoga and Cross-fit. One pitfall is excessive exercise: Matesa calls it “varicose vanity,” where looking good means everything else is good, too. “Recovery is all about paying it forward, and passing along experiences that can be really damaging in the moment,” Matesa says. “But they turn out to be the most valuable experiences we’ve ever had because they help other people.” We also meet Mikey, a 21-year-old musician coming off heroin, whose sexual endurance deteriorated while his sexual appetite rocketed as he began caring for his body. Matesa says sexual health is largely uncovered in meetings and such recovery materials as The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous. With survivors previously wandering through the research void, Matesa’s book devotes more than 20 pages to sexuality. “A lot of times I think people don’t even have language to talk about what they are feeling,” Matesa says. “It feels like a wall too high to scale for a lot of people, and one of the goals with this book was to bring that wall down a bit so we can see over it.”

O

NE WALL OF the Carnegie Museum of Art exhibition Storyteller: The Photography of Duane Michals features a grid made of album covers from a 1983 record by a famous rock band. The display represents a glimpse into the commercial commissions that sustained Michals as an artist in New York City for nearly six decades. But Synchronicity isn’t just the title of a record by The Police; it’s also how a series of meaningful coincidences, over time, shapes our destiny and links something going on outside us to something inside. An earlier work by Michals also on display, “Chance Meeting” (1970), captures that concept in the sort of small-scale, black-and-white sequence that defines Michals’ oeuvre: In six frames, two men walk toward one another in an alley; they pass; and each looks back, the mysterious moment pregnant with possibility. Backstory and outcome are left to the viewer’s imagination. Michals, a McKeesport native, returned home for the opening of this, his first major retrospective in the U.S. in more than 20 years. In a recent interview with CP, he pondered:

As a kid, your grandparents were always old and you never think of yourself like that. But now, the barbarians are at the gate. The Hindus say a man does the business of his life and then prepares himself for his death. I was always attracted to that notion. I would like to simplify, to reduce. I

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Shroud control: Duane Michals jokingly tests a “bodybag” at the Carnegie Museum’s Hall of Architecture.

don’t know how to prepare myself for death because I’m an atheist and don’t have the same bag of tricks that religious people do. But part of the process is having this mega exhibit. It does, to a great extent, tie things up and finish business. It makes me feel good to see how much work I’ve done! At 82, Duane Michals is almost half as old as photography itself. The Carnegie clocks in at 119, and in 1946, a 14-year-old

Michals rode a streetcar from McKeesport to art classes there, learning to draw and paint. In 1958, he moved to New York City. That same year, borrowing money and a camera, he traveled to Russia for a vacation and “found his bliss” in photography. Returning to New York, and with no further photographic training, he commenced making voluminous numbers of images, breaking many accepted rules of the craft, writing on his prints, throwing the “decisive moment” out the window.


{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND DC MOORE GALLERY}

One of the six images in Duane Michals’ 1970 series “Chance Meeting”

While challenging the art world’s status how I get through life. I look at my photoquo, he earnestly shot portraits of anyone graphs as being intimate. They are about who intrigued him, from fellow Pittsburgh intimate things: dying, loss, humor, love. native Andy Warhol to his artist hero René My photographs are all whispers, whereas Magritte, in Belgium. Later, he donned a … all those others are shouting.” Indeed, because these images were wig and spoofingly cast himself as zeitcreated primarily for books, many geist artist Cindy Sherman (for the 2000 people might have never seen exhibit Who Is Sidney Sherman?) them as prints on a wall. And and mocked art-market success FOR CP’STH unlike much contemporary art, with 2001’s A Gursky Gherkin Is G N E FULL-L NE Michals’ prints are quite small, Just a Very Large Pickle. Along A DU Q&A, S many smaller than 8-by-10 the way, this Slovak son of a MICHAL . see wwwper. inches. To see the images and steelworker became one of the pa pghcitym read their handwriting, one most influential visionaries of co must step very close and observe photography’s past century. them carefully, creating a very But wind back to the early 1970s: A young American photographer named personal transaction. Ancillary exhibiLinda Benedict-Jones, living in Europe, tion Duane Michals: Collector — featuring picked up a magazine featuring Michals’ works from his private art collection — sequences and was wowed. Back in the furthers this vibe by revealing his States, she eventually began a career as a influences, including Paul Klée, Lucien curator. In 1997, while guest-curating Pitts- Freud, Chuck Close and Mark Tanzey. burgh Revealed: Photographs Since 1850, a hugely successful Carnegie Museum of Art STORYTELLER: exhibition that included eight of Michals’ works, she met the photographer at the THE PHOTOGRAPHS opening. After stints at The Frick Art & HisOF DUANE MICHALS torical Center and Silver Eye Center for Phocontinues through Feb. 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. tography, in 2008 Benedict-Jones was hired 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org by the Carnegie as its first-ever curator of photography. The Carnegie, which has colSixty-eight years after Michals sat lected Michals’ work since 1980, had plans to secure Michals’ photographic archives, drawing in the basement, this retrospecso Benedict-Jones set about the five-year tive brings him full circle to the Carnegie. There, the intertwining of his path with process of planning Storyteller. With 135 works, the exhibition’s foot- that of Benedict-Jones, who retires from print is large. However, the experience of the museum this December, conspired in viewing Storyteller is replete with a favor- a swan-song duet. Like its two creators, ite word of Michals: “Intimacy is central to Storyteller will be a tough act to follow. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


MIKE SUPER MAGIC & ILLUSION Mike advanced to the Top 12 on NBC’s America’s Got Talent, won the NBC hit TV show Phenomenon and was voted America’s Favorite Mystifier! Through spectacular illusions and his down-to-earth style and personality, Mike has pioneered a new form of magic that transcends the “trick”.

TTHURSDAY HURSDAY · DDECEMBER ECEMBER 4 · 77:30PM :330PM

VIP Meet & Greet/Show Ticket $75; Orchestra $34, $28: Loge $34; Balcony $28, $24

ow Folls! U

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

Brrooaadwayy! SENSE ABILITY B 412-281-2822 4 412 41 12 281 281 28 28 2822 22 22 {BY MICHELLE FRIED}

Give the Gift of Gi

With a 6-Show or 3-Show Season Ticket Package

December 5 - 21 Byham Theater

Pittsburgh’s own

TOM ATKINS 1/2 price tickets sponsored by

as Scrooge

½ Price Tickets for kids 3-14! $

As low as

15

.75

SUMMER 2015

At the Benedum Center

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

Romeo &Juliet

Nicolas Petrov’s

DECEMBER 5-14 RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES PRODUCING DIRECTOR

WWW.PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM

(412) 392-8000

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FINNBOGI PÉTURSSON}

Minimalist Space Disco: Finnbogi Pétursson’s “Tesla Tune”

SOMETHING ABOUT fall’s hasty passage into winter makes fire-watching a top priority — a dose of heat on the face, that anthropocentric gratification that nature is under control and available at my leisure. Hours pass, the light patterns get me subconsciously decoding chaos. My boots appear to be smoking. Exit nature, enter a gallery. Such captivating moments are also found in the light/water/sound installations of Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. His second appearance at Wood Street Galleries, and first solo exhibition in the U.S., Second/Second seems to evoke a prehistoric memory, or at least visceral fascination, somewhere deep in our human tissues.

pearing and disappearing. The sound swells, as does the subtle rattling in the chest. The noise cycles back into silence; the wall-to-wall pool becomes still, like black glass. Hollow absence becomes equally mesmerizing. “Tesla Tune.” Wood Street’s upper gallery has a completely different tone, with an installation that is heard before it’s seen. Rounding the corner, you’ll find varying sizes of PVC pipe retooled into giant resonators hung from the ceiling to knee-height, some extending the nearly the width of the gallery. What seems to be an endless cacophony of electronic burps is actually, upon closer inspection, a single tone played into each pipe in a repetitive pattern. This simplicity is maximally complicated through oscillating distortions, resulting in something music-like, best described as minimalist Space Disco played on a Casio keyboard set to “didgeridoo.” Entranced, now aurally, my mind is one giant cochlea. I feel suspended, like the pipes, trapped in a loop, listening. Judging by his titles, Pétursson likely takes company with techno/audiophiles — and the Sound Art genre is fully nestled into contemporary art’s newmedia roll call. (In 2001, he represented Iceland in the Venice Biennale.) Such intended depth is unfortunately lost on this reviewer. (Physics of sound? Here’s me snoring.) However, successful works can hold the laziest and least informed of viewers. In Second/Second, you might be captured by a force, pre-technological. Like me, just a human next to a fire.

ENTRANCED, NOW AURALLY, MY MIND IS ONE GIANT COCHLEA.

SECOND/SECOND

continues through Dec. 31. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

“Infra-Spectra.” In this installation, pulsing sound waves vibrate the diaphragms of symmetrically mounted speakers hovering just above a pool of water. Now agitating the water’s surface, the invisible sound waves take shape. Light beamed at the water reflects the waves on a white wall; the translucent, monochromatic circles undulate, concentrically widening, converging, ap-

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


The perfect gift this holiday season—a night of family and storytelling.

Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Adapted by Hugh Leonard Directed by Alan Stanford

December 4-20 Discount: CP5OFF {PHOTO COURTESY OF RAY MILES}

Tami Dixon and Patrick Jordan in barebones productions’ A Streetcar Named Desire

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RIGHT ON TIME {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

THE NAME “barebones productions” is a tad

misleading, given the sumptuous squalor in its perfect incarnation of Tennessee Williams’ classic A Streetcar Named Desire. Directed by Melissa Martin, this production of the 1947 play captures the look of post-World War II America in a seedy but pulsating neighborhood, Marigny in New Orleans, ironically named Elysian Fields. Life is lived loudly and on the edge. Into this bright, crowded slum arrives — almost ethereally drifts — a pastel Southern belle with Lillian Gish curls and swooping skirts, clashing with then-current fashion. (Thank you, costume designer Richard Parsakian.)

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

continues through Dec. 6. barebones productions at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East. $30. 888-718-4253 or www.barebonesproductions.com

Stanley Kowalski. A nearly unrecognizable Jeffrey Carpenter (Dixon’s real-life husband) credibly plays the gentle giant of an unlikely suitor, Mitch. Jenna C. Johnson’s Stella provides a contrast and mirror to Blanche, their sexual desires manifesting different dangers. Tony Ferrieri’s re-imagining of Streetcar’s environs is literally multi-layered: the wallpaper stripped off in spots as Blanche’s soul will soon be. Fight director Randy Kovitz adds some credible and scary violence to the ever-rising passions. Dave Bjornson designed the appropriate sounds, augmented by music (played live at some performances) from Joe Grushecky and John Gresh. Andrew David Ostrowski’s lighting augments the glare of Marigny while supplementing Blanche’s fading bloom. More kudos to technical director Charles “CJ” McDermott and stage manager AJ Bradshaw. Martin blends all this talent into an exciting production of a true American classic. Even on the coldest day, this show is hot. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

In one of the greatest characters ever created for a woman, Tami Dixon fans out the layers of Blanche DuBois, her quick charm masking her inner terrors, her delusions more real than the ugliness of her past. She’s a horrid person, but so appealing, in many senses of the word. The rest of the cast is also spot on. Barebones director Patrick Jordan embodies the savagery and animal stolidity of

PICTTheatre.org/Macbeth | 412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

DECEMBER 5-28, 2014 BENEDUM U M CE C CENTER EN NT TER ER

BLONDE AMBITION

TICKETS CALL: 412.456.6666 6.6666 VISIT: PBT.ORG G

THERE’S PROBABLY not a funnier five

Groups of 8+ call: 412.454.9101

{BY TED HOOVER}

minutes in the history of film than Judy Holliday playing gin in Born Yesterday. As the quintessential dizzy blonde Billie Dawn, Holliday first created this comedic masterpiece on Broadway, and then won

Artist: Alexandre Silva Photo: Lois Greenfield

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

an Oscar in 1950. She was forever typecast as a ditz (even with a reported IQ of 176), and because she died so young, at 43, she is not nearly as well known as she should be. So playwright Willy Holtzman gets a big hand for bringing her back to life with Smart Blonde, a world premiere commissioned by City Theatre. Here Holliday is in a recording studio cutting an album. As she rehearses, she moves in and out of memories which — via the magic of live theater — are acted out for us.

SMART BLONDE

continues through Dec. 21. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

From Holliday’s beginnings with Betty Comden, Adolph Green and Leonard Bernstein through her stage and film triumphs, her ordeal with the Hollywood blacklist and a couple of romantic relationships, Holtzman covers a lot of ground in this 90-minute play. Perhaps too much. It isn’t surprising to learn the Holtzman wrote a Holliday biography in 1979: This play is overloaded with incident, but without enough time to

explore any of it. Everything is here and it’s like having very talented people read you a Wikipedia entry. Since much of it is standard show-biz fare (nobody becomes star, loses husband, dies tragically), Holtzman might think about focusing on what was unique to Holliday — specifically, being a brilliant woman who hated playing dumb but was forced to do so in front of a Senate committee to escape being blacklisted. That episode seems key to what Holtzman is trying to say with the play, but it’s almost glossed over in the telling. Peter Flynn’s direction is bursting with energy and movement. Jonathan Brody and Adam Heller, a protean duo, play all the people in Holliday’s life, and Andréa Burns brings an enormous amount of charm, humor and intelligence to the title role. There’s a great story to be got from Holliday’s life and I urge Holtzman to continue with his noble quest. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

GUEST CONTROL {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

HELL, AS Sartre is famously misquoted, is other people. Even more so if they’re all celebrities. That’s part of the premise of

L’Hôtel, now enjoying its world premiere under the auspices of Pittsburgh Public Theater and its director, Ted Pappas. Ed Dixon’s new comedy is built on the “what if” of how strangers together in death would behave if they could interact. Paris’ Père Lachaise Cemetery is the final resting places of hundreds of luminaries, French and otherwise, as well as plenty of the less famous from the past two centuries. L’Hôtel selects six of Lachaise’s residents.

L’HÔTEL

continues through Dec. 8. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

L’Hôtel, directed by Pappas, looks absolutely gorgeous. Designer James Noone’s lavish hotel interior, crowned by a crystal chandelier, is truly beautiful. Just as sumptuous, David C. Woolard’s costumes complement the characters with fine detail, such as Oscar Wilde’s velvet breeches and hose of his aesthete period. If only some of those resources and concerns for the visuals had been devoted to historic research. It’s a good thing that dead people cannot sue for slander. Victor Hugo never

abandoned his daughter, who suffered from severe mental illness, not an out-ofwedlock pregnancy. While the exact cause of Jim Morrison’s death is still unknown, no one has seriously thought it suicide. The precocious and prolific Gioachino Rossini, a wit as well as the most celebrated opera composer of his time, is reduced to a buffoon, an ethnic joke. And least forgivable is the homophobic canard about gay people being anti-procreation — delivered by the father of Wilde’s beloved sons. The lightweight plot does offer some surprises, so I avoid spoilers. It is mainly an excuse for a wonderful cast to don the mantles of famous/notorious artists. Deanne Lorette thrillingly trills as Sarah Bernhardt. The imposing Sam Tsoutsouvas breathes soul and bluster into Hugo. Brent Harris dives into Wilde. Daniel Hartley plays Morrison, Tony Triano portrays Rossini and Kati Brazda is Isadora Duncan. The most captivating actor, however, portrays a not-so-simple waiter, the most rounded of the characters. Evan Zes seems to defy various laws of physics with his quick, fluid movement; his voice and face also disport a range that is absolute delight. Despite the overall fuzziness, there’s some fun to be found in L’Hôtel. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Opening Event December 3, 2014, 5:30–8 p.m. $75 Join the Carnegie Museum of Art for this popular seasonal display, brought to you by the museum's Women’s Committee. Enjoy CMOA's Hall of Architecture filled with several towering 20-foot Colorado spruce trees, each adorned with handcrafted ornaments that celebrate the beauty of winter. Visit cmoa.org/visit/holidays to purchase tickets and learn more about other holiday events.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


FOR THE WEEK OF

11.2712.04.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. BO I Made It Downtown: 2-8 p.m. Also 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29 (623 Smithfield St.). IMI Shadyside: 11 a.m.5 p.m. (5500 Walnut St.). Second Shift: Noon-6 p.m. (3401 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville; www.secondshiftcrafters.com).

Looking for the

Perfect Location

for Your Holiday Party?

{ART}

NOV. 30

Festi Festival Fest tiv ivall of Voices

+ FRI., NOV. 28 {KIDS} Need somewhere to take the kids the day after Thanksgiving? The Mattress Factory’s Family Day has art-themed fun, with a circus twist. The museum offers: a mask-making party; a buildingto-building scavenger er hunt; hot cider and popcorn; orn; and more. But the centerpiece erpiece is a workshop that lets kids build a little circus with resident dent artist Ben Sota, learning the he German wheel, juggling and d tight-wire skills. Family Day events ents are free with museum admission. Bill O’Driscoll 11 a.m.-4 .m.-4 p.m. 500 Sampsonia Way, y, North Side. $10-15 (free for or kids 6 and under). 412-231-3169 31-3169 or www.mattress.org rg

jewelry. (There’s even free parking.) Tomorrow, I Made It and Think Shadyside offer the first of four smaller weekly pop-ups, with 20 artists vending everything from print art to vegan baked goods. Also on Saturday, new outfit Second Shift Crafters (dedicated to crafters with day jobs) presents its inaugural holiday event, including some three dozen vendors, food trucks, live music and more.

{MARKETPLACE} E}

We accommodate

all occasions! WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

Black Friday also launches the local holiday craft-selling season. Today and tomorrow, roving marketplace I Made e It! For the Holidays pops ps up Downtown with more than 80 local artisans peddling handmade goods from rom clothes to candles, jam am to

NOV. 28

Eddie ddi Ifft ff

Local artist Tom Sarver is preoccupied with obsession. “I’ve been thinking about this show idea for a few years, looking for artists that exhibit a certain intensity in their work,” he says. For Obsessions, opening tonight with a reception at Space, Sarver has curated works by six artists. Pittsburgh-based contributors include cut-paper artist Laurie Trok and Becky Slemmons, whose ongoing performance work is titled “Obsessive Love.” Mary Ivy Martin (of Brooklyn) obsesses on trees and plants; Nathan Margoni (Michigan) builds oversized sculptures reimagining human anatomy; Jeremiah Johnson (Williamsport, Pa.) paints and makes prints about personal experiences; and Jason Lockyer, of Los Angeles, makes hand-drawn animations about insects. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit Jan. 25. continues through Ja Downtown. 812 Liberty Ave., Dow Free. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org www.spacepittsburgh

{COMEDY}

The Onion has called Eddie Ifft underrated one of the most unde and, for comics in America, an once, it wasn’t joking. joking On his way up, he’s released a rele Comedy special for Co Central, and a is the host ho of the popular (but pop banned ba from f iTunes for its offensive content) podcast, “Talkin’ “ Shit.” Sh He’s He toured tour internationally inter and worked w


sp otlight Aleksey Igudesman and Hyung-ki Joo hope their sketch-comedy show BIG Nightmare Music will “wake up all the sleeping, dying people” in Heinz Hall. Serious musicians underneath clown wigs, the duo watched classical concerts become “elitist, spiteful fossils.” Touring internationally, they have sought to rectify this with mops, Irish stepdance and other bizarre antics. Igudesman, a pianist from Leningrad, and Joo, a British-Korean violinist, met at a British music school and rose to fame through YouTube videos. They’ve since welcomed fans and collaborators like Billy Joel. This weekend, they make their Pittsburgh premiere with two shows, ensnaring the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in organized lunacy. Joo promises the usually refined and reserved PSO will “sing, dance, scream, shout, cry and laugh” in a wild “tour de force.” In addition to the pair’s adaptions of pop hits, like Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive,” the PSO commissioned Igudesman and Joo to compose a mash-up arrangement, “An Austrian in America,” for PSO’s very own Austrian in America, music director Manfred Honeck. The work blends popular American and Austrian tunes, and features titles like “Schubert Loves America” and “Oh My Darling Johann Strauss.” The jokesters will give a pre-concert talk, promising, as Joo says, to not “make fun of music,” but “make fun with music.” Danielle Fox 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 28. Also 2:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 30. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25.75-105.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

with names like Tommy Chong and Queen Latifah. The Pittsburgh-area native brings his dark, uncensored jokes to The Improv this week, in a stand that includes five more shows tonight through Sunday. Danielle Fox 8 and 10:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Nov. 30. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead. $17-20. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh. improv.com

{COMEDY} Presenting “An Ode to Misfits and the Outcasts,” comedians Krish Mohan, Kat Caringola, Derek Minto, Chelsea Swiethelm and Rob Speer band together tonight’s premiere of The Secondhand Sketch Show. The Arcade Comedy Theater show is a mix of live and video sketches, plus musical numbers and monologues on a theme, but hitting on a variety of cultural topics. Secondhand is produced by Mohan, who is also on a house improv team at Arcade. DF 10 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

quintet C Street Brass, from Carnegie Mellon University, will also help remember Strayhorn, an openly gay black man best known for

{COMEDY}

Sick of listening to people argue around the diningroom table about what this world’s coming to? Come listen to other people argue … onstage! Tonight, in the midst of national attention to local doings, the John McIntire {PHOTO Dangerously Live Comedy COURTESY OF BRANDON Talk Show asks whether SPANNBAUER} Pittsburgh is “truly a buzzworthy tahn.” DEC. 03 McIntire’s panelists are fashion designer University Univ Un iver ersi sity ty of Pittsburgh Tereneh Mosley, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Symphony editor John Allison Orchestra and comedian Michael Buzzelli (who’s even got “buzz” in his name). It’s all late-night at the Cabaret Theater. BO 10:30 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10 (free with same-night Cultural Trust ticket stub) his 30-year collaboration with Duke Ellington. A VIP reception precedes the annual Suite Life concert and mixer. DF 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., {SCREEN} East Liberty. $10-25 (VIP: In 1926, a small-time silent$75). 412-363-3000 or film comedian named Harry www.kelly-strayhorn.org

+ SUN., NOV. 30

Langdon vaulted into the big leagues with Tramp Tramp Tramp, in which his simpleminded on-screen character enters a cross-country hiking contest to win money to marry the girl of his dreams. The girl was played by Joan Crawford, in one of her earliest starring roles. The comedy screens today as part of the Hollywood Theater’s series Silents, Please!, its episodic antics scored live by ace local keyboardist Tom Roberts. BO 4 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

NOV. 28 Obsessions Art by Jason Lockyer

Selected choirs from the region include Rev. Deryck Tines and the Lemington Chorale, the Victory Community Outreach Choir of McKeesport, and James Johnson and the Afro American Music Institute. The guest mistress of ceremonies and vocalist at Wesley Center AME Zion Church is Bishop Yvette Flunder (pictured), who’s as well known nationally for her singing as she is for leading Oakland, Calif.’s radically inclusive City of Refuge church. The concert is presented by Family Hospice & Palliative Care. In lieu of admission, a free-will offering benefits charities including Family Hospice. BO 6 p.m. 2701 Centre Ave., Hill District. www.familyhospicepa.org

{MUSIC} Local gospel talent is joined by a national name for tonight’s Festival of Voices concert.

DEC. 03

Marcus Marc Ma rcus us Wicker Wick ick

+ SAT., NOV. 29 {MUSIC} Happy 99th birthday to Pittsburgh jazz legend Billy Strayhorn. The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, the pianist and composer’s partial namesake, celebrates tonight with birthday cake and live performances from local favorite Roger Humphries and his band, RH Factor, and guest vocalist Spanky Wilson. Brass

N E W S

+ WED., DEC. 03 {WORDS} “This isn’t a poem / about

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

some cowboy cracking up / over a blackface skit. How his cackle / sounded like a bigot’s brain / lodged inside a beating heart, thinking / out loud.” So writes Marcus Wicker in his love letter to Dave Chapelle — one of several love letters to celebrities in Wicker’s debut collection, 2013’s Maybe the Saddest Thing. Slate called the book “hip-deep in pop culture’s energy” but also a reminder of that culture’s loneliness. The award-winning poet, who teaches at University of Southern Indiana, reads tonight at Point Park University’s Writers Speakers’ Series. BO 6 p.m. Lawrence Hall, Room 200, 212 Wood St., Downtown. Free. 412-3928184 or www.pointpark.edu

{MUSIC} The students, faculty, staff and community members in the University of Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra perform for free tonight in Bellefield Hall Auditorium. Music being the “most primal source of life and the wellspring of the life-feeling,” as Danish composer Carl Nielsen put it, the orchestra’s selections include Nielsen’s Symphony No. 4, The Inextinguishable. Also on the program are Johannes Brahms’s Double Concerto, with senior cellist Eric Gratta and violinist and director Roger Zahab (pictured) as soloists. DF 8 p.m. 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-624-4126 or www.music.pitt.edu

C L A S S I F I E D S

49


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER GREAT EXPECTATIONS. A stage

Sample Straub

Wed., 11/26 4-6PM at Buddy’s Brews on Carson _______________ Sat., 11/29 3-5PM at Banksville Beer

adaption of Dickens’ classic novel. A woman hell-bent on revenge on all men snares Pip, a kindhearted boy, in her wicked web, w/ the beautiful Estella as bait. Pip is stuck fast in Miss Havisham’s web of love and deceit–will he become a gentleman & win the love of Estella? Presented by PICT. Evening shows & matinees. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 12. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. JUNIE B. IN JINGLE BELLS, BATMAN SMELLS! All of the students in Room One are happily creating the perfect holiday party. Except how is Junie B. supposed to enjoy anything when she has drawn the name of her arch nemesis, Tattletale May, for her Secret Santa Gift? Sat., Nov. 29, 11 a.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. L’HOTEL. Sarah Bernhardt, Jim Morrison, Oscar Wilde, Victor Hugo, Isadora Duncan & Gioachino Rossini meet in the world premier of Ed Dixon’s comedy. Wed-Sat,

SMART BLOND. Born Yesterday 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and star Judy Holliday lays down Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 8. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. a series of tracks about her rise to fame amidst the politics THE LION THE WITCH& THE of the 1950s. Tue-Sun. Thru WARDROBE. The story of 4 Dec. 21. City Theatre, South Side. children who are drawn into 412-431-2489. the magical world of Narina. A STREETCAR NAMED www.comtratheatre.org DESIRE. Presented by barebones Nov. 28-29. Comtra Theatre, productions, Tennessee Cranberry. 724-773-9896. Williams’ 1947 classic. MURDER FOR TWO. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., 1 actor investigates Nov. 30, 7 p.m. Thru the crime, the other Dec. 6. New Hazlett plays all of the suspects Theater, North Side. & they both play www. per pa 1-888-71-TICKET. the piano. Wed-Sat, pghcitym .co THE GIFT OF THE 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. ICE QUEEN. Original Thru Jan. 18. Cabaret at Gemini Theater musical Theater Square, Downtown. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru 412-325-6769. Dec. 28. Gemini Theater, NEWSIES. Set in New York City at Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. the turn of the century, the tale of A TUNA CHRISTMAS. Jack Kelly, a newsboy & leader of a Radio personalities, Thurston band of teenaged ‘newsies,’ who Wheelis & Arles Struvie, dreams only of a better life far report on the Yuletide activities from the hardship of the streets. of all the good folks in Tuna, Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, Texas. Sat., Nov. 29, 8 p.m., 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 30, 2 & 7 p.m., Dec. 4Thru Nov. 30. Benedum Center, Nov. 6, 8 p.m., Sun., Dec. 7, Downtown. 412-456-4800.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

2 & 7 p.m., Wed., Dec. 10, 8 p.m. and Dec. 11-13, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

COMEDY FRI 28 DAVON MAGWOOD, TOM HENRY, MITCH BARCZYKOWSKI, STOPH EDISON (LATE). 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 28 - SAT 29

GEOFF TATE. Nov. 28-29, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. THE SECONDHAND SKETCH SHOW. A mix of live and video sketches wrapped around a monthly theme, An Ode to Misfits and the Outcasts. Nov. 28-29, 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 29 THANKSGIVING IMPROV SPECTACULAR. Ft. Couples Therapy, Gestalt, Lexicana, Snark Park, Stanky ‘stangs, Ted City Yodelers, The Justin & Jerome Experience, The Writers’ Room & Yeah Those Guys. 8-10 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 01

COMEDY SAUCE. Up-andcoming comedians w/guests. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 12 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 02 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 03

BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 51

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EVENT: Bob Dylan concert,

EXHIBITS ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM.

VISUALART “Vivid Earth,” by Mark Leputa, from texture & tension, at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery, in Shadyside

NEW THIS WEEK SPACE. Obsessions. Showcasing six artists from across the U.S., exploring the nature of obsession through painting, sculpture, sitespecific installation, video & performance. Ft. artists: Jeremiah Johnson, Jason Lockyer, Nathan Margoni, Mary Ivy Martin, Becky Slemmons & Laurie Trok. Opening reception Nov. 28, 6-9pm. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Becky Slemmons: Gatherings. Exploring what happens when an artist enters the religious realm, pursuing a performative project, in an environment where conformity often dominates. Downtown. 412-456-2962. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair.

Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISAN. Simeon Larivonovoff. Russian Orthodox “Old Believers” icon painter keeping a family tradition unbroken since 1392. Food provided by Jon Beck and drinks from Red Star Kombucha. Will hang through Nov. Garfield. 412-661-0503. BAR MARCO. Studio Direct. New Work by Seth Clark. Strip District. 412-471-1900. BE GALLERIES. Kiss My Apps. Work by Andi Irwin. Stranger Than Fiction. Work by Brody Burroughs. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Shop Small at Boxheart on Nov. 29 for original artwork & gifts while enjoying holiday goodies. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care.

Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. New Art by Tom & Carol Norulak. Fine art prints, handmade silks & jewelry. Open during campus hours at the Boyce Campus Art Gallery. Monroeville. 724-327-1327. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Selections of The Michael Berger Foundation’s Private Collection. Painting & prints from the 200 piece collection. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Nocturne Moonrain. A solo exhibition of oil paintings by Lisa Marie Jakab. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DELANIE’S COFFEE. DOUBLE MIRROR EXHIBIT 4. Ft. local visual & performing artists. South Side. 412-927-4030. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Moving Targets. A multidisciplinary exhibition by artists Ann Rosenthal & CONTINUES ON PG. 52

Exposures. A window display & artist product series feat. Daniel Pillis. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Carnegie Trees 2014: Winter Wonders. The Hall of Architecture w/ several towering 20-foot Colorado spruce trees, each adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over

Heinz Hall, Downtown CRITIC: Michael Couch, 18, a college student from Burgettstown WHEN: Thu.,

Nov. 20 This was my second time seeing Bob Dylan perform. The band was lot better tonight compared to the last show, two years ago. It was great when the one guy pulled out the banjo because a lot of people don’t like to use the banjo anymore if you’re not [into] country music. Dylan playing the harmonica and the piano at his age was exciting, although, now, you don’t see him playing the guitar. Everybody wants to hear Dylan’s old stuff and how he used to play it, but, really, it’s his choice on what to play. He did play a couple of the old ones, though. His “Simple Twist of Fate” was my favorite tonight, and for “Blowing in the Wind,” it didn’t matter how he played it. You might not be able to understand all of what he says, but if you’re a Dylan fan, it shouldn’t matter. BY DANIELLE FOX

200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Winter Flower Show & Light Garden. Feat. a variety of festive poinsettias, showy amaryllis & aromatic paperwhites, illuminated glass art & evergreens glowing with thousands of LED lights. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work.

Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

HOLIDAY THU 27 - SAT 29 THE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade crafts by local artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

Wine & Cheese Bar

The Holidays Are Officially Upon You! Come To Us For Respite, Refreshment, and our annual No X-mas Music Guarantee! ---------------------------------------------------

WED&THURS, 5-MIDNIGHT FRI,SAT&SUN 5-1 ---------------------------------------------------

5326 Butler St. Upper Lawrenceville

THU 27 - SUN 30

THURSDAY DEC 4/10PM

COMFORT TECH, CHARM & CHAIN, TANDY THURSDAY, DEC 11/10PM

DAILY GRIND

THURSDAY DEC 18/10PM

THE COMMON HEART, ROUND BLACK GHOSTS, COOKIE $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

THE BEAVER COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES. A wide variety of creatively designed Christmas trees displayed each w/ a different theme & wreaths. Visit the North Pole Café, Santa Land, the Candy Lane gift shop & enjoy the model train display. 5-9 p.m. and Fri-Sun, 12-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 7 Brady’s Run Park Lodge, Beaver Falls.

FRI 28 - SAT 29 BOULEVARD GALLERY’S ANNUAL HOLIDAY EVENT. Pottery, jewelry, sculptures, cards, photography, watercolor, oils, & acrylics. Fri, Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 29 Boulevard Gallery, Verona. 412-828-1031. I MADE IT! FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Over 80 local artisans all selling handmade wares. 2-8 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 29, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Heinz 57, Downtown. LIGHT UP WEEKEND. Two day, family friendly event. Holiday card decorating, cookie decorating, family portraits, a visit from the Clauses, caroling, holiday movies, & breakfast w/ Santa. Holiday food. Nov. 28-29, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Seven Springs. 800-452-2223.

SAT 29

December 13 -14 2014

in partnership with sponsored by

for more information and a tour map go to:

highlandparkpotterytour.com 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

34TH ANNUAL WPXI HOLIDAY PARADE. Celebs, floats, marching bands, balloons, more. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Schools. 5th Ave. 9 a.m. www.pittsburghparade.com HOLIDAY MARKET & PET SANTA PHOTOS. Small Business Saturday at the Western PA Humane Society Holiday Marketplace. Holiday gifts from local craft, handmade, & animal accessory vendors. 10 a.m.3 p.m. Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, North Side. 412-321-4625. MARKETPLACE MINGLE: A COCKTAIL EVENT. Shop local vendors,dance to the tunes of DJ Selecta, dine on food from Roxanne’s Takeout & Catering, & sample specialty Naughty and Nice cocktails (in addition to BYOB). 4-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-345-3312. SECOND SHIFT CRAFTERS HOLIDAY MARKET. Ft. over 30 Pittsburgh-area crafters & artisans, local food trucks, live music,& live-art-demos. Held at 3401 Liberty Avenue. 12-6 p.m. 412-592-2249. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Steffi Domike w/ Ruth Fauman-Fichman. Commemorating the 2014 centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon & linking it to Jewish diaspora. Duquesne Library Gallery. Closing reception Dec. 4, 6-7:30 p.m. following Joel Greenberg book signing at the Duquesne Barnes & Noble from 3-4 p.m. & lecture at the Power Center Ballroom, 4:30-5:45 p.m. Email mpietrusza@gmail.com for information. Uptown. 412-396-6130. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Magic of Everyday. By Mary Hamilton. By appt. only. Shadyside. 412-241-1528. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Bountiful. A group exhibition all about food. Downtown. 412-567-8861. THE GALLERY 4. Wild Abandon. New Paintings by Jason Woolslare. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634.

JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art & committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MEXICO LINDO MERCADO Y GALERIA DE ARTESANIAS. Blood + Bones. Work by Mexican folk-art masters, remembering soldiers & civilians killed in U.S. wars in the Middle East and Mexican drug wars, plus ofrendas, honoring Nelson Mandela, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Maya Angelou, Lou Reed, more. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9984. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Sometimes I See Before I Paint. Paintings by artist Nellie Lou Slagle, combining torn paper & torn print, along w/ writing and paint. South Side. 412-431-3337. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. The Perception of Value. Work by Dee Briggs. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Work by Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris & Patrick Schmidt. Garfield. 412-969-7689. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture

&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. The Album Art of Mozelle Thompson. A retrospective of album cover art by Mozelle Thompson. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. SLIMETIME. A 90s themed art show. Ft. work by Lizzee Solomon, Jordan Patton, Brian Gonnella, Christina Lee, Phyllis Kim, Jes LaVecchia, Maggie Negrete, Siena Baldi, Jess Paul, Megan Shalonis, Steph Neary, Andy Scott, Mike Madsen, Tim Currence, Mark Toneff. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Meta/ Morphoses. New work by Brian Lang & Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents “Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. Strip District. 412-261-7003. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Restrike: Uncovering the Life and Work of Gertrude Quastler. Feat. the artistic styles of Gertrude Quastler from printmaking to sculpture. Oakland. 412-648-2423. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 52

SHOP SMALL, SHOP HANDMADE. I Made It! Market & Think Shadyside present a pop up shop ft. 20 artists each week. Above Shady Grove. Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 Shady Grove, Shadyside. 412-697-0909. SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY W/ RODNEY MCCOY. Celebrate Small Business Saturday w/ Rodney McCoy’s holiday music & hot coffee by the outdoor firepit. Giveaways & samples 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Creamy Creations, Penn Hills. 412-799-3359.

SUN 30

GREATEST GIFTS FAIR. Holiday music, stories, activities, food & fair trade gifts. 1-4 p.m. Riverview United Presbyterian, North Side. 412-321-7300.

WED 03 A PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR-DOWNTOWN. Tour includes a visit to two historic churches, an organ recital, & light brunch. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Wed, 10 a.m. and Sat., Dec. 13, 10 a.m. Thru Dec. 17 Nicholas Coffee and Teas, Downtown. 412-323-4709.

FUNDRAISERS SUN 30 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em

or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. ARTISTS & AUTHORS LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! FESTIVAL. Local artist & Practice conversational English. writers share their work. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, 1-4 p.m. Shaler North Hills Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL BOOK SIGNING W/ PHILOSOPHY READING KIM WEISS. Book release GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East & signing of “Sunrise, End Book Exchange, Sunset: 52 Weeks of Awe Bloomfield. & Gratitude”. 2 p.m. 412-224-2847. Barnes & Noble STEEL CITY SLAM. Waterworks, Aspinwall. A chance to qualify ww. r w 412-781-2321. for The Steel City Slam pape pghcitym Team. For open mic, .co three 3-minute poems. OPEN POETRY Tue, 7:45 p.m. Thru Dec. 9 WORKSHOP. Presented by Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. 412-363-1250. Those wishing to present a STORY SYNDICATE poem for discussion should STORY SLAM. Presented bring multiple copies. First Mon by Pittsburgh’s Story Syndicate. of every month, 7-10 p.m. Put your name in the hat. If Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. you’re called you get 5 minutes READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. to tell your true life story. plays from August Wilson & new 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cannon Coffee, works by up & coming playwrights. Brookline. 412-563-0202. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African CARNEGIE KNITS & American Culture, Downtown. READS. Informal knitting 412-258-2700. session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. JAPANESE CONVERSATION Carnegie Library, Oakland. CLUB. First and Third Tue of every 412-622-3151.

LITERARY SAT 29

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 01

WED 03

TUE 02

[OUTSIDE] WRITERS SPEAKERS’ SERIES FEAT. MARCUS WICKER. Author of “Maybe the Saddest Thing” will read from his most recent works. Lawrence Hall, Rm. 200. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100.

KIDSTUFF FRI 28

FAMILY DAY. A day of hands-on art activities including mask making, scavenger hunts, & circus techniques w/ Benjamin Sota. Popcorn & hot cider. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-231-3169 x 536. JUNIE B IN JINGLE BELLS, BATMAN SMELLS. When it’s time for the Secret Santa drawing, Junie B. picks the one person she’d rather not have – tattletale May. 11 a.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 28 - WED 03 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 28 - SUN 30

PENNY ARCADE. Through a series of games & prompts, enjoy a unique inventive scene suitable for children & adults of all ages. Nov. 28-30, 1 & 3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 29 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CHILDREN’S STORYTIME & AUTHOR VISIT. Authors Max and Su Tiber read from their picture book, “Awesome Animals Rock the Holidays!” & sign books. 11 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

TUE 02

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

For those willing to brave the cold, stargazing on a crisp, late-autumn night can be uniquely rewarding. Saturday, don your warmest gear for the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh’s

Bundle Up Star Party, where you’ll spy stars, galaxies, nebula, meteors and more through the Mingo Creek Observatory’s 10- and 24-inch fixed telescopes. Visitors can warm up periodically with a full evening of programs in the Richard Y. Haddad Planetarium, including sky shows, movies and a presentation on Chile’s role in astronomy and scientific discovery. 5-11 p.m. Sat., Nov. 29. 1 Shelter 10 Road, Nottingham Township. Free. 724-384-6150 or www.3ap.org

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OTHER STUFF

OUTSIDE

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE FEATURE. A creature painting & a creature movie. Fri, 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. ROCK ROOM 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXTRAVAGANZA. Bands & giveaways. 8 p.m. Rock Room, Polish Hill. 412 -683-4418.

FRI 28 - SAT 29

SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 29 BUNDLE UP STAR PARTY. View the night sky through a 24 inch Ritchey-Chretien Reflector & 10 inch Refractor telescopes. “Star of Bethlehem” movie screening. 5 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150.

TUE 02

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 03 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

FRI 28

SAT 29 A BILLY STRAYHORN BIRTHDAY BASH. A cocktail reception & tribute concert w/ jazz drummer, Roger Humphries, vocalist Spanky Wilson, & brass quintet C Street Brass. An evening of classic Strayhorn compositions & birthday cake for all. 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. GET BEHIND THE MIC W/ LEONARD DOZIER. Learn the craft of voice acting w/ Addy award winning voice actor, Leonard Dozier. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mr. Small’s North Side Recording Studio,


North Side. 1-888-600-0433. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TUGBOAT PRINTSHOP OPEN HOUSE. Open studio for holiday shopping. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat., Dec. 13, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tugboat Print Shop, Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884.

SUN 30 ALTERNATE ENDINGS (2014). In conjunction w/ the 25th Anniversary of Visual AIDS’s Day With(out) Art programming, Visual AIDS worked w/ filmmaker Tom Kalin to commission seven artists/ collaborators to create new work about the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic, focusing on the issues of today. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. FESTIVAL OF VOICES. A concert of local & national gospel artists w/ special guest Bishop Yvette Flunder. 6 p.m. Wesley Center AME Zion Church, Hill District. 412-983-8895. SUNDAY ART & FOOD MARKET. Local artists & foodies. Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606.

MON 01 SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 02 DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. HOT METAL BLUES. Blues dancing. Lessons: 8-9pm.

N E W S

Dancing: 9 pm-12am. Tue, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 23 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465.

WED 03 ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS COMTRA CULTURAL CENTER. Auditions for Alice in Wonderland. Dec. 7. Prepare a song to be sung acapella & bring a headshot/ resume. Sides will be provided at audition time. Visit www.comtratheatre. org/auditions Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896.

www.primestage.com Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. 412-445-0986. THE RAGE OF THE STAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for “BLOODY HELL,” A post-apocalyptic stage adaptation of “Dracula.” Call or emailrageofthestage @yahoo.com for more information. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 724-292-8427.

SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM The Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, in Washington, Pa., was founded in the 1950s to commemorate the streetcars which had recently been replaced by buses. It now boasts a collection of nearly 50 cars, and qualified volunteers are always needed to help with the museum’s day-to-day operations. Call 724-228-9256 or visit pa-trolley.org for information.

THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a’capella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Casting for Animal Farm, actors & musicians age 16 & older. Dec. 1-2. Prepare two contrasting contemporary pieces totaling not more than 3 minutes & 16 bars of a song to sing a Capella. One of the pieces should incorporate movement. Audition form online.

+

TA S T E

+

submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com OPEN MIC. Call for performing artists, musicians & poets for Dec. 12. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-916-4040. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-inthe-cultural-district/

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I am a bi male in my early 20s who until recently was in the closet. I have been exploring my sexuality for the past year, and I didn’t want to label myself and open a Pandora’s box of oppression in the American South before I knew who I was for sure. I learned through my exploration that I have a few kinks and I have been acting on those kinks, seeing what I am and am not into. I may have been too trusting, because someone I interacted with decided that he was having none of me. This person took it upon himself to find all the info he could about me, regarding kinks as well as my career and other aspects of my life, and compile it on a website. He then sent links to several of my friends and family members. He never gave an explanation for why he was doing this. My family has been very supportive, and the few close friends I’ve spoken to have been great. But how do I talk to other friends when I see them? My life is out in the open now. I am trying my best to roll with it and become more comfortable with myself, but it is a struggle. These people are close to me, and I value their friendship. I don’t believe they think poorly of me, but I am uncomfortable knowing that they have seen a part of me that I was trying to keep somewhat compartmentalized. How can I approach the situation without making it more uncomfortable and awkward? OUTED AND UNSURE

D&A are not of your creation. The conversations you’re going to have with friends start with this premise: You’ve been victimized by this asshole and so have they. Practice saying this: “You know more about my private life than you ever wanted to. I’m going to stuff it down the memory hole and pretend it didn’t happen. I hope you will too.” You also might want to memorize and riff on these wise words from two other people who have been similarly victimized: “I started to [make] an apology, but I don’t have anything to say I’m sorry for.” — Jennifer Lawrence “The real problem here was not me sending my pictures to someone, but rather, sending them to the WRONG someone.” — Dylan Sprouse You trusted the wrong person, OAU, and you don’t have anything to say you’re sorry for. Look people in the eye when you speak about it — when you speak briefly about it — then change the subject. Finally: Check to see if you live in a state that has laws against revenge porn. If you do, lawyer up, call the cops and press charges. I’m a straight 20-year-old woman in a relationship with a straight 30-year-old male. We have been dating for a year and living together for seven months. There is a lot of love but there has also been a lot of arguing. Our conflicts stem from issues of abuse and abandonment on his part and issues of poor selfesteem and anger on my part. We have started to go to couples counseling. About a week ago, we got in a screaming match that resulted in me slapping him. I really didn’t mean to. It just came out of my body, and I immediately regretted it. He asked me to leave the apartment, and I have been staying with my mom. We agreed to stay away from each other until our next therapy session. I guess what my question really boils down to is: Am I the female equivalent of a “wife beater”? Is there anything I can do to prove my regret and willingness to change? I love him with everything I have inside of me and I don’t want to lose him over such a stupid mistake.

“YOU TRUSTED THE WRONG PERSON AND YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING TO SAY YOU’RE SORRY FOR.”

You’re in your early 20s, OAU, which means that way back in 1998, you would’ve been all of 7 or 8 years old. So the first thing I want you to do — before you talk to anyone about what happened — is google “Bill and Monica” and then read the first few stories that pop up. Here’s the takeaway from the Bill-andMonica story: An out-of-control special prosecutor appointed to investigate the suicide of a White House aide wound up “exposing” a series of blowjobs that President Bill Clinton got from a White House intern. Problematic power differential, yes, but consenting adults just the same. Politicians and pundits and editorial boards called on Clinton to resign after the affair was made public, because the American people, they insisted, had lost all respect for Clinton. Clinton refused to resign and wound up getting impeached by a GOP-controlled Congress. But guess what? The American people weren’t pissed at Clinton. People looked at what was being done to Clinton and thought, “Jesus fucking Christ, I would hate to have my privacy invaded like that.” People’s sympathies were with Clinton. I promise you this, OAU: Everyone in your life who has seen the website where that malicious piece of shit made your private and consensual sexual conduct public had the same reaction. Their sympathies are with you. So how do you address this without making things more uncomfortable and awkward than they already are? By acknowledging the discomfort and awkwardness (D&A) that has already been created while simultaneously and subtly drawing attention to the fact that said

LOST AND CONFUSED, KNOWING I NEED GUIDANCE

Couples who wind up in counseling before their first year together is up are, in my opinion, better off being counseled singly. By which I mean to say: being counseled as singles, not as a couple. We don’t have to be perfect to date, LACKING, but we do have to be in good working order. It doesn’t sound like either of you qualifies. I think you both should address your issues in counseling — with separate counselors — for your own sakes, not for the sake of this relationship. And finally, LACKING: One slap at age 20 — one that was instantly regretted, one that the slapper has taken full responsibility for — does not a lifelong abuser make. On the Lovecast, Erika Moen and her sex-toy comics: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

11.26-12.03

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and mathematician who is sometimes called “the father of modern science.” He expressed his innovative ideas so vigorously that he offended the Catholic Church, which convicted him of heresy. For us today, he symbolizes the magnificence of rational thought. And yet Galileo also had a weird streak. For example, he gave lectures on the “Shape, Location and Size of Dante’s Inferno,” analyzing the poet’s depiction of Hell. In the course of these meticulous discourses, Galileo concluded that Satan was more than four-fifths of a mile tall. In this spirit, Sagittarius, and in accordance with current astrological omens, you are temporarily authorized to de-emphasize the constraints of reason and logic so that you may gleefully and unapologetically pursue your quirky proclivities.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): While in his early 20s, actor Robert Downey Jr. appeared in the films Less Than Zero and Weird Science. That got him semi-typecast as a member of Hollywood’s Brat Pack, a group of popular young actors and actresses who starred in coming-of-age films in the 1980s. Eager to be free of that pigeonhole, Downey performed a ritual in 1991: He dug a hole in his backyard and buried the clothes he had worn in Less Than Zero. I recommend that you carry out a comparable ceremony to help you graduate from the parts of your past that are holding you back.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

In her book Revolution From Within, Gloria Steinem offers a challenge: “Think of the times you have said: ‘I can’t write,’ ‘I can’t paint,’ ‘I can’t run,’ ‘I can’t shout,’ ‘I can’t dance,’ ‘I can’t sing.’“ That’s your first assignment, Aquarius: Think of those times. Your second assignment is to write down other “I can’t” statements you have made over the years. Assignment three is to objectively evaluate whether any of these “I can’t” statements are literally true. If you find that some of them are not literally true, your fourth assignment is to actually do them. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to transform “I can’t” into “I can.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Dogs don’t know where they begin and end,” writes Ursula K. Le Guin in her book The Wave in the Mind. They “don’t notice when they put their paws in the quiche.” Cats are different, LeGuin continues. They “know exactly where they begin and end. When they walk slowly out the door that you are holding open for them, and pause, leaving their tail just an inch or two inside the door, they know it. They know you have to keep holding the door open. ... It’s a cat’s way of maintaining relationship.” Whether you are more of a dog person or a cat person, Pisces, it is very important that you be more like a cat than a dog in the coming weeks. You must keep uppermost in your mind exactly where you begin and where you end.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): What exactly do you believe in, Aries? What’s your philosophy of life? Do you think that most people are basically good and that you can make a meaningful life for yourself if you just work hard and act kind? Do you believe that evil, shapeshifting, kitten-eating extraterrestrials have taken on human form and are impersonating political leaders who control our society? Are you like the character Crash Davis in the film Bull Durham, who believed in “high fiber, good scotch, the sweet spot, and long, slow, deep, soft, wet kisses that last three days”? Now would

be an excellent time for you to get very clear about the fundamental principles that guide your behavior. Re-commit yourself to your root beliefs — and jettison the beliefs that no longer work for you.

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20):

I have two encyclopedias of dreams, and they disagree on the symbolic meaning of mud. One book says that when you dream of mud, you may be facing a murky moral dilemma in your waking life, or are perhaps dealing with a messy temptation that threatens to compromise your integrity. The other encyclopedia suggests that when you dream of mud, it means you have received an untidy but fertile opportunity that will incite growth and creativity. I suspect that you have been dreaming of mud lately, Taurus, and that both meanings apply to you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are there certain influences you would love to bring into your life, but you can’t figure out how? Do you fantasize about getting access to new resources that would make everything better for you, but they seem to be forever out of reach? If you answered “yes,” it’s time to stop moping. I’m happy to report that you have more power than usual to reel in those desirable influences and resources. To fully capitalize on this power, be confident that you can attract what you need.

worried that expressing your full beauty would intimidate other people?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Helsinki, Finland, is growing downwards. By cutting out space in the bedrock below the city’s surface, farseeing leaders have made room to build shops, a data center, a hockey rink, a church and a swimming pool. There are also projects underway to construct 200 other underground structures. I’d like to see you start working along those lines, Virgo — at least metaphorically. Now would be an excellent time to renovate your foundations so as to accommodate your future growth.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Pantone Color Matching System presents a structured approach to identifying colors. It’s used as a standard in the printing industry. According to its system of classification, there are 104 various shades of gray. I suspect you will benefit from being equally discerning in the coming weeks. It just won’t be possible to differentiate

+

For three days, uphold your highest ideal in every little way you can imagine. Report results at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I know you’re beautiful and you know you’re beautiful. But I think you could be even more beautiful than you already are. What do you think? Have you reached the limits of how beautiful you can be? Or will you consider the possibility that there is even more beauty lying dormant within you, ready to be groomed and expressed? I encourage you to ruminate on these questions: (1) Are you hiding a complicated part of your beauty because it would be hard work to liberate it? (2) Are you afraid of some aspect of your beauty because revealing it would force you to acknowledge truths about yourself that are at odds with your self-image? (3) Are you

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I am not necessarily predicting that you will acquire a shiny new asset in time for the solstice. Nor am I glibly optimistic that you will get a raise in pay or an unexpected bonus. And I can offer only a 65 percent certainty that you will snag a new perk or catch a financial break or stumble upon a treasure. In general, though, I am pretty confident that your net worth will rise in the next four weeks. Your luck will be unusually practical. To take maximum advantage of the cosmic tendencies, focus your efforts on the one or two most promising prospects.

get your yoga on!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Should you cut back and retrench? Definitely. Should you lop off and bastardize? Definitely not. Do I recommend that you spend time editing and purifying? Yes, please. Does this mean you should censor and repress? No, thank you. Here’s my third pair of questions: Will you be wise enough to shed some of your defense mechanisms and strip away one of your lame excuses? I hope so. Should you therefore dispense with all of your psychic protections and leave yourself vulnerable to being abused? I hope not.

between the good guys and the bad guys. You’ll misunderstand situations that you try to simplify, and you’ll be brilliant if you assume there’s always more nuance and complexity to uncover. Don’t just grudgingly tolerate ambiguity, Libra. Appreciate it. Learn from it.

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

VWULSGLVWULFWVTXLUUHOKLOOQRUWKKLOOV

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

57


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

REHEARSAL

AUTO SERVICES

ROOMMATES

Rehearsal Space

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-9779537 (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

EAST FOR RENT

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

HELP WANTED

CLASSES

CLASSES

NOTICES

AUTO SERVICES

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! \www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads . TV . Film . Fashion 40% OFF TUITION - SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Northwood Realty Services 412-521-5100 Mark cell 412-606-8134.

CPRB Case #2282-13

AUTO SERVICE

STORAGE

Rent -A- Bay

ABC SELF STORAGE

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

HEALTH SERVICES

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Get Fast, Private STD TESTING. Results in 3 DAYS! Now accepting insurance. Call toll free: 855-787-2108 (Daily 6am-10pm CT)

ADOPTION

HEALTH SERVICES

A DO P T I O N

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800978-6674 (AAN CAN)

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

Art Gallery Director & Executive chef yearn for 1st baby to LOVE & ADORE. Expenses Paid Kathleen & John

as an Independent Contractor with Uber.

1-800-562-8287 HELP WANTED

Make up to $25/hour driving your own car.

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

SIGN UP TODAY T.UBER.COM/PGHDRIVE

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF! We are currently seeking staff for IMMEDIATE openings to support an adult 1:1 in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org or call 724-933-5100 ext.142

CAR HAULERS/OWNER OPERATORS WANTED CDL and 2 years of car hauling experience required Brand new trucks available, ask about our lease program. Contact Doug Fellows at 303-809-3976 or dfellows@supremeauto.biz.

U.S. Census Bureau is hiring

Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

Thursday, 12/18/14 @ 5:30 PM City Council Chambers 510 City County Building 414 Grant Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023.

CPRB PITTSBURGH

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069 WANT TO BUY

WWII ITEMS Uniforms, Helmets, Etc. Highest Prices Paid!!!

Call 412-657-5558

1425 Avon Pl

Squirrel Hill

3BR, 1BA. Beechwood Blvd across from Frick Park. $1,350/mo.

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

2BR house in one of Pittsburgh’s Best neighborhoods! New roof, new furnace, new landscaping, light fixtures, dishwasher, and enclosed sun room that can be used about 7 months per year.

$60,000 Listed by NORTHWOOD REALTY SERVICES Office 412-521-5100 Mark Pryor (c) 412-606-8134 MARKPRYOR@NORTHWOOD.COM


STUDIES

*Stuff We Like

STUDIES

412.363.1900 CTRS

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

STUDIES

STUDIES

BIRTH CONTROL

Overactive Bladder?

CALL TODAY!

412-650-6155

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

Grumpy Cat’s Worst Christmas Ever Ridiculous holiday TV movies are Santa’s gift to the couch potato, and this new one looks to be this season’s liveliest argument: Instant cheese classic? Low point in culture? Needs more dog? Premieres Sat., Nov. 29, on Lifetime.

412.363.1900 CTRS

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

SmokING STUDY Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available

{PHOTO BY MARGARET WELSH}

{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

University of Pittsburgh

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

“Flying” Fish

Bluebird Kitchen’s Organic Steel Cut Oats

The parking lot at the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, on the North Side, is an attraction on its own, with fish sculptures that swim through the sky as the wind blows.

Oatmeal has a virtuous reputation, but made with coconut milk and topped with almonds and dried fruit, these oats are a filling (and vegan!) treat. 221 Forbes Ave., Av Downtown

CTRS IS CONDUCTING CLINICAL TRIALS FOR: •CONSTIPATION •ALZHEIMER DISEASE

•GOUT •HIGH CHOLESTEROL

•BIRTH CONTROL PATCH •POST-MENOPAUSAL HOT FLASHES •VAGINAL DRYNESS

•HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/ UTERINE FIBROIDS

Mild to Moderate

Not That Kind of Girl

HBO’s Girls creator Lena Dunham tells her story, detailing confusing relationships and her early sexual experiences — both positive and negative. Every young woman can learn something from this one.

Homemade Irish cream Making the creamy, boozy concoction M ki th fresh is simply genius. Irish whiskey, heavy cream and condensed milk mixed with a few other flavors. Put it in coffee or tea, or just drink it over ice. Try recipes at www.grubstreet.com.

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures Ten Literary Evenings Hear well-known visiting writers discuss their work in the classy environs of the Carnegie Music Hall. Upcoming authors include Richard Ford, Denis Lehane and Sheri Fink (pictured), a Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist who wrote about the condition of hospitals in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. www.pittsburghlectures.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEN DESSINGER}

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

WITH HEART ATTACK OR STROKE

S C R E E N

Call 412-363-1900 for a FREE Memory Screening - INVESTIGATORS DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN, DR. G. WALKER, DR. KASDAN OUR STUDIES CHANGE REGULARLY. CALL US TO SEE IF WE HAVE A STUDY THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU. PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 412-363-1900. WWW.CTRSLLC.COM +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

59


Xin Sui Bodyworks

MASSAGE

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

60

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

MASSAGE

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896 MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR

Downtown

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951 MASSAGE

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave. Open 24 hrs./7 Days

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077


SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

JADE Wellness Center

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

412.246.8965, ext. 9

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Positive Recovery Solutions

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

NOW TAKING PATIENTS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Recovery Without Judgement™

GRAND RE-OPENING! Specializing in Roor, Hisi, Pulse, Pyrology, Hitman, Medicali, Sky

R

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Suboxone

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

Immediate Appointments Available

Acute Partial Program Individual and Group Counseling

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient

MONROEVILLE, PA

South Side Outpatient

412-380-0100

For more information, call 24 hours

www.myjadewellness.com

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com

1-888-694-9996

Help is Available!

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Let Us Help You Today!

Beaver County

Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg J&S Glass

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY +

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh South Hills

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361

N E W S

We can treat you!

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz in

20% off Glass s with this Ad d

JANDSGLASS

Pregnant?

2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922

Pittsburgh

Best Service, Selection Be ction aand Prices in Town!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

GLASS

Water Pipes, W es, Glass Andd Vapes

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

61


LESS IS MORE

Eve Picker is going to fill the city’s vacant lots — one tiny house at a time {BY ABBY MENDELSON} EVE PICKER HUNCHES over a block map of Garfield. “There are 577 vacant lots here, 181 owned by the City or the URA,” she says. “This land is not a liability. It’s an asset.” Looking at a rough swath near North Atlantic and Penn avenues, she adds, “I’m going to build three or four houses here. Ten there. Twenty maybe. I don’t know. But I am going to build these houses. The only question is where. Because the development process, especially cutting-edge development, is notoriously unpredictable.” Edgy, yes; unpredictable, yes. Both have defined Eve Picker’s real-estate life for decades now. A native Aussie, Picker trained as an architect and urban designer. She worked in Vienna, Sydney and New York, and then moved to Friendship some 30 years ago. There she found herself on the proverbial ground floor of the nascent preservation movement. All those old houses, all that adaptive re-use spit-shined and front-and-center. “It felt like coming home,” she recalls.

had at $ 350 to $ 500 per month, including principle, interest, taxes and insurance. “They’re one-person houses,” she says. “Or two people who really like each other,” she laughs, then waxes serious. “They’re going to change our cities.” In three ways: First, here, as elsewhere, tiny living spaces are a global trend. From Tokyo to Edinburgh, people are making do with smaller, modular places — often like a ship’s stateroom with amenities built in. Second, the units are highly energy-efficient, codecompliant, transformative — dotting landscapes with houses instead of weeds. Third, with the low cost of vacant land and pre-fab construction, the Minims give rise to smaller, democratized investing. “It’s very difficult to build traditional housing these days,” Picker says. “Construction costs are high. So is land. Plus we’d have to go to a bank and raise the money. But banks make financing decision based on the past. Garfield?” she shakes her

“I CAN TAKE NOTHING AND TURN IT INTO SOMETHING.” Restless, energetic, she worked all about the city, finding sows’ ears — buildings derelict and damaged, unlovely and unloved — turning them into silk purses, attractive living and work spaces. Among her award-winning successes are the Werner and Liberty Bank buildings, in East Liberty; Luna Lofts, in Oakland; Brake House, in the Strip; Liberty, Penn, and First avenue buildings, Downtown; and so on. “I found that I can take nothing and turn it into something,” she says. “Taking old buildings, transforming them into places that people want to live and work, is immensely satisfying.” In Garfield, however, she plans to work from the ground up — literally — adding to the built environment one tiny, affordable house at a time. Using prefab Minim Houses designed by Washington, D.C.based architect Brian Levy, Picker hopes to populate Garfield — and other neighborhoods — with 336-square-foot houses that settle nicely on standard 40-by-23-foot lots. Presented as what she calls a “total package,” each buyer-ready Minim features spiffy finishes, queen-sized bed, desk, kitchen and bath, storage space — even a deck and a yard. “It has everything you need — just small. All you have to bring is a couple of chairs,” Picker says, “and you’re good to go.” Even better, she says, is that this cracker-box marvel can be

head. “And Minim houses? There are no comparables here.” Instead, Picker plans to raise the initial equity — $ 750,000 or so — from scratch, looking to small investors and the Internet. Promising a good return on investment, she says, “We’ll put ourselves in the hands of a crowd who want to see more, who want to see spectacular changes. Because we want to provide both a social and financial return, it’s very important that these projects transform cities.” OK, nice, but why? Why work to transform cities? “I love cities,” she says. “I love the built environment. I’m fascinated by how cities work — and what makes them better. These houses will make cities better. “It’s amazing, isn’t it?” Picker asks. “The technology — going online, raising money electronically, democratically, incrementally. Not having to wait for a banker. Or a politician. The idea that we, the people, do have power to make change is fascinating.” She pauses. “The only question is how we can put it to good use.” Picker gestures at the map where she’ll be creating affordable houses for young people, retirees and others who previously could not afford to own a home. “I’m excited about that,” she smiles. “I’m also excited that it’s a way to rebrand a neighborhood that has so much vacant land.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.26/12.03.2014


Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

November 26, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 48

November 26, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 48