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FOOD FOR THOUGHT: CONFLICT KITCHEN REOPENS AND THE DEBATE CONTINUES 06


EVENTS 11.21 – 8pm ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN PORNO Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

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12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

1.17 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: AMERNET STRING QUARTET WITH PIANIST AMY WILLIAMS Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music FREE parking in The Warhol lot. Advance Tickets $15/$10 students; Door Tickets $20/15 students

1.21 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: KEN VANDERMARK / NATE WOOLEY DUO FREE Parking in Warhol Lot Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014


11.19/11.26.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 47

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS] think it’s anti-Semitic to believe that all 06 “IJewish people must support everything that the state of Israel does.” — CMU student Calvin Pollak on the recent controversy surrounding Conflict Kitchen

[VIEWS]

15

“How could Salk have been our greatest science hero ever, and yet go effectively unheeded about problems threatening the very foundations of civilization?” — Bill O’Driscoll on the environmental concerns of Dr. Jonas Salk

[TASTE] is beauty in an apple brandy that 19 “There tastes only of juicy apples.” — Drew Cranisky taste-tests various spirits at Pittsburgh Whiskey & Fine Spirits Festival

[MUSIC]

this project to remind me that it is 25 “IOKwant that I don’t know who I am right now.” — 19-year-old rapper Tairey on his new EP

[SCREEN]

47

“As Edward Snowden feared, the story quickly became about him.” — Al Hoff reviews Laura Poitras’ documentary Citizenfour

HOTTEST ENTERTAINMENT

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

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educational.” — Lissa Brennan on Isabella Rossellini’s Green Porno

[LAST PAGE] realized how much good beer there 71 “Iis out there, and just how limited shelf space is.” — Donnie Knight, of North Country Brewing, on lessons learned at the Great American Beer Festival

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 56 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 65 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 66 STUFF WE LIKE 69 TA S T E

RUFF CREEK NOVEMBER 26 NO BAD JU JU NOVEMBER 22

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“IT WAS REALLY NOTHING MORE THAN PALESTINIANS SPEAKING ABOUT THEIR LIVES.”

INCOMING RE: An open letter to Pennsylvania Gov.-Elect Tom Wolf (Nov. 12) Charlie Deitch’s “Election Note: An Open Letter to Pennsylvania Gov.-Elect Tom Wolf” is excellent, and I agree with most of the initiatives that the writer calls upon the new governor to attempt to enact. As Mr. Deitch notes, however, our new leader will be dealing with a Republican-controlled General Assembly. It is a body which contains a multitude of members of both parties who are not known for acting in the public interest or for governing with honor and integrity. I cannot think of any elected official that can expect tougher sledding than Tom Wolf in the four years to come. In addition to having to plug a budget that is full of holes, he has expressed the desire to restore $1 billion in education spending that he claims was “cut” by Gov. Corbett, and to go beyond that by bringing the state’s contribution to basic education from about one-third of its total cost to half, an initiative that would require billions more in spending each year. Even if he secures every bit of the 5 percent Marcellus Shale extraction tax he has reasonably proposed, it would yield, at most, $1 billion per year. His proposal to circumvent the state constitution’s provision for uniform taxation so as to take more from higher-income residents is unlikely to sail through the General Assembly, or to survive a court challenge, if it does. If Tom Wolf is able to do all that he has expressed the desire to accomplish and can remain the well-liked, admired man that he is today, it will be a miracle. There are not many such miracles in the world of American politics. — Oren Spiegler Upper Saint Clair

“Man, Burnett returns and Martin leaves the country ... somehow this is Todd Haley’s fault. #LetsGoBucs” — Nov. 17 tweet from “AJ” (@fencil83)

DINNER CONVERSATION {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Conflict Kitchen re-opened d after f death d h threats closed it earlier this month.

I

F THERE WAS ever a time to get

kosher or halal food in Pittsburgh while at the same time engaging in discussion about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, this is it. Two events planned this week are the latest development in a back-andforth that’s been ongoing since Conflict Kitchen began serving a Palestinian menu this fall. Conflict Kitchen is an art project run by Carnegie Mellon University that serves food from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict. Death threats closed the restaurant over the Nov. 8 weekend, and since then community conversations have increased, and media coverage has been global. On Nov. 18, Conflict Kitchen, hosted a Palestinian potluck dinner at the East Lib-

erty Presbyterian Church for the public to “meet, talk and break bread with Palestinians from the Pittsburgh community.” On Nov. 19 and 20, on both the Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh campuses, students will hold

As CMU’s Conflict Kitchen reopens, the discussion of Israeli-Palestinian hostilities continues {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} pop-up restaurants called “CoExistence Kitchen” to raise awareness about peace efforts between Israel and Palestine. Conflict Kitchen reopened Nov. 12 and was greeted by a line of customers.

“I think what [Conflict Kitchen does] is amazing in giving a voice to victims of conflicts who are typically silenced,” says Calvin Pollak, a Carnegie Mellon Ph.D. student in rhetoric, who visited Schenley Plaza one week ago for the re-opening of Conflict Kitchen. Pollak sat over a steaming bowl of maftoul — a Palestinian dish of chickpeas, slow-cooked chicken and couscous. Despite the long line and the swarm of media — from local reporters to the Washington Post — Pollak, who is of Jewish heritage, came out in support of the restaurant, which has received criticism for being “anti-Israeli” and anti-Semitic. “I think it’s anti-Semitic to believe that all Jewish people must support CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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DINNER CONVERSATION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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everything that the state of Israel does,” Pollak says. “Jews are just as diverse as any other cultural group.” Much of the media coverage and criticism has been over funding from the Heinz Endowments and about information pamphlets — sometimes used as togo wrappers — that the restaurant hands out with each order. It’s no surprise that Fox News ran a headline on Oct. 24 reading, “Anti-Israeli restaurant receives funding from John Kerry’s wife’s foundation.” A statement from the Jewish group B’nai B’rith International followed, asking the Heinz Endowments to publicly “disavow” its grant recipient. Heinz distanced itself in a statement but has since run a clarification defending the “right of artists and arts organizations to express their work freely and without fear of reprisal.” Locally, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ran a story on Nov. 6 focusing on the text on the food wrappers. Conflict Kitchen countered with its own statement criticizing the coverage. The wrappers include anecdotes from Palestinians that restaurant staff interviewed this summer. One quote reads, “It’s a Bedouin tradition to serve tea and coffee to guests,” while another reads, “Water, land and government services are taken away from Palestinians and given to Jewish settlers. … They are creating a refugee problem. Israel knows this. They intend for the

settlers to never leave.” “Those quotes have to be taken in the context of the conflict that’s occurring, and often the people that are saying things about their experience are traumatized by the events that are happening,” says Palestinian-American Omar Abuhejleh, owner of Allegro Hearth Bakery in Squirrel Hill and a public-interest attorney. “The problem often is that people look at those visceral reactions and rather than engaging them and talking about them, they want to silence them because they disagree.” Conflict Kitchen says the voices are “central” to their project and that highlighting people’s lives in those regions is the entire point. They’ve handed out the same types of pamphlets with past menu themes — Iranian, Venezuelan, North Korean and Cuban. The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, which has criticized Conflict Kitchen’s approach, says the problem goes deeper than pamphlets. The group says it is also troubled by Conflict Kitchen’s partnerships. “Here’s where their argument [for a Palestinian narrative] fails the litmus test,” says Gregg Roman, director of the federation’s Community Relations Council. “They’re not just offering the point of view of people they interviewed. They’re partnering with organizations and people that demonize Israel’s right to exist.”

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Throughout October, Conflict Kitchen hosted events featuring Laila El-Hadded, a blogger also known as Gaza Mom, who gave a talk and dinner; hip-hop artist Jasiri X, who introduced a screening of the film Slingshot Hip-Hop, about music in Palestinian areas; Pitt professor Ken Boas, chair of the board for Israeli Committee Against House Demolition-USA; and Pitt’s chapter of the Students for Justice in Palestine. Roman says these individuals and organizations are part of the so-called BDS movement — boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel. The Jewish Chronicle wrote that Boas’ talk at Conflict Kitchen in early October became a “wholesale condemnation of Israel.” Roman says the Jewish Federation stands behind Conflict Kitchen’s mission to promote understanding and that the death threats against the restaurant were “reckless, irresponsible and despicable.” But when it came to holding events at the restaurant, the federation says Conflict Kitchen rejected the federation’s suggestions of Palestinian guests who stood for co-existence. “There’s one thing to offer a narrative that is just a person’s point of view, but it’s another thing to take that narrative and

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turn it into a political statement,” Roman says. “That’s what they’re doing when they partner with these organizations. …We’re not trying to negate the Palestinian perspective, we’re just asking them to be honest and not to warp reality.” Conflict Kitchen co-director Dawn Weleski says they have never censored audience members and have provided a safe environment for people to speak. El-Haddad, who is based in Maryland, has responded on her blog in the wake of the criticism, saying that people have a hard time handling a stand-alone Palestinian narrative without the counterbalance of an Israeli response. “It [the pamphlet and events] was really nothing more than Palestinians speaking about their lives, and that’s the point,” ElHadded said in a phone interview. “It’s not supposed to be something edited or politically corrected or whatever.” If conversation was what Conflict Kitchen was looking for, it certainly got its wish. Meanwhile, Pittsburghers can get used to this global issue playing out in the form of food. Conflict Kitchen says it will continue serving its menu until midMarch as planned, and Abuhejleh, owner of Allegro bakery, has plans to open a new café with Palestinian fare.

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{BY REBECCA NUTTALL} LAST YEAR in the city, 1,463 gunshots

were reported to 911 — experts say that a multitude of shots are never even called in. That gunfire, says Pittsburgh City Councilor Ricky Burgess, can paralyze a neighborhood. “We talk about the homicides and we talk about the shootings, but we don’t talk about how much gunfire happens in these communities,” says Burgess, who represents many of the East End neighborhoods where neighbors often hear gunshots. “Gunfire causes shock and horror for these residents. The gunfire alone causes trauma even when there is no victim, because it makes them feel like they’re under siege.” With the help of a $1 million surveillance system, city police are hoping to soon get an accurate accounting of exactly how many shots are fired and where they are coming from in at least one Pittsburgh neighborhood. Homewood has the highest homicide rate of any neighborhood in the city and that’s the main reason Pittsburgh City Council approved Burgess’ request to bring the ShotSpotter gunfire-detection system to that neighborhood. But the new system could serve as more than a tool for solving homicides. Across the country, it’s been used to build a community’s trust with police and crack down on illegal gun trafficking ShotSpotter is a state-of-the-art acoustic surveillance system that uses sound to pinpoint the location of gunfire. In Homewood, microphone sensors will be paired with video cameras to provide real-time information to police officers. “The data goes to California, where they filter out noises and backfires and verify it’s actually gunfire, and then it’s transferred back to the municipalities,” says Burgess. “That takes 15 seconds, so in 45 seconds, the police will have it.” According to ShotSpotter maker SST Inc., gunfire incidents in 31 cities using the system were down by 20.6 percent. (That statistic compares gunfire in the first half of 2014 with the same timeframe in 2013.) Locals hope to see the same results in Homewood. “It will be a deterrent to those who are doing shootings, so it will potentially make the community safer,” says Burgess. “It will give the officers real-time data and more tools to solve crimes and provides a level of officer safety. They will also be linked to cameras, so you’ll be able to see suspects or identify their cars. Depending

where it’s at, you may be able to witness the crime directly.” The long-awaited system was first proposed in council in 2007 and 2009 before finally being approved in April 2013. To date, it still isn’t up and running, but members of the Homewood community say they learned during meetings with Mayor Bill Peduto that headway is being made on implementing the system. Now they’re eager to see the results. “I think they wouldn’t work well alone, but with the other cameras being installed, I feel criminals won’t be as bold, knowing cameras are up, and it will assist in helping get these criminals off the street,” says resident Autumn Perkins. “It could lead to a faster response from police, possibly less time for [the criminals] to get away. Homewood needs as much help as possible; it’s a war zone.” SST Inc. CEO Ralph Clark says his company is in the process of getting permission to use buildings in the neighborhood to implement the system. Soon, it will be installing sensors and training local law enforcement. “Sadly, we’ve come to learn that instances of people calling 911 when gunfire happens are [minimal]. Calls tend to happen five minutes after the event and don’t have location specificity,” Clark says. “Once officers are trained on our system, there’s going to be instances where they do save lives. “It’s also going to create a deterrent, because criminals can expect a much more rapid response.” Also, Clark says, one of the system’s greatest impacts is on community-police relationships. “In these communities that tend not to trust police, when they see this new response capability, that goes a long way toward building confidence,” says Clark. “The most impactful thing, and usually [it’s] something you can’t measure, is community confidence.” Police spokesperson Sonya Toler declined to comment on the ShotSpotter system. While Clark says keeping physical information about the system confidential is important, he says transparency in other areas is key to the system’s success. “Oftentimes, law enforcement is trained to be protective of data, but there is a value to being transparent,” Clark says. “If everyone can look at the data together and look at where problems are, that’s where you see a reduction in gun violence.”

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More Pennsylvanians with autism in contact with criminaljustice system than ever {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} LUCIANA RANDALL, of the Autism Connec-

tion of PA, estimates that nearly 10 percent of the calls for help she receives are related to people with autism getting tangled up in the criminal-justice system. So when the state recently published data that shows people with autism are getting caught in the justice system more frequently, she wasn’t surprised. “People with autism interact with the criminal-justice system quite often because of their symptoms,” says Randall, executive director of Autism Connection. She recalls a case where an autistic person thought he was just pursuing a romantic interest, but followed a girl to work and watched her for six hours without realizing how the behavior would be interpreted. “It looks like stalking,” Randall says. “Their behavior can really be misconstrued and officers can’t always tell the person has autism, so things can snowball really quickly.” According to figures released Nov. 13, the statewide rate of juvenile justice-system contact among those with autism increased from 659 contacts per 10,000 people in 2005, to 1,423 in 2011. Those numbers came as an update to the Pennsylvania Autism Census Project, and it was the first time the state had ever published data on the interactions people with autism are having with the criminaljustice system, according to Lindsay Shea, the report’s author. “The topic has been growing as an issue and we really wanted to get a first look at it,” says Shea, director of the eastern region of the ASERT Collaborative — a state-funded initiative to ensure that services for people with autism are more readily available. But the numbers included in the census are limited to people who receive support through Medicaid, a data set that could be cross-referenced with criminaljustice data. The report estimates there are 130,000 Pennsylvanians who are autistic but aren’t receiving state services and wouldn’t be included in the census, meaning their interactions with law enforcement wouldn’t be counted. And since the jails themselves often aren’t consistently tracking people with autism, it’s nearly impossible to get a full sense of the proportion of people with autism who encounter the criminal-justice system. “Initially, what we’re finding is policies can vary around how the systems do an intake,” Shea says. “In some places, there

could be an excellent and thorough focus on trying to detect a diagnosis like autism. In some other systems, that might not be the top priority.” Still, Shea and her colleagues at the ASERT Collaborative are planning a deeper dive into the criminal-justice numbers to look at what kinds of charges are being filed against people with autism and where they are geographically. One early trend she’s noticing, for instance, is what she deems to be a spike in law-enforcement contacts as people with autism enter their teens. Being able to unpack these trends could allow Shea and others to promote training efforts for those in the criminal-justice system that “could be primed to maximize impact.” And according to a survey Shea conducted that included judges, district attorneys, Children, Youth and Families workers, probation officers, correctional facility staff and lawyers, 75 percent said they had not received autism training, while 80 percent reported training needs. Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge John Zottola, for one, says judges may not always recognize autism and might hold odd behaviors against defendants. If a person with autism doesn’t express remorse, repeats what a judge says or doesn’t make eye contact — that could be misinterpreted. “In some instances, it may cause [judges] to have displeasure or become angry because they’re showing signs of disrespect. It’s human nature,” says Zottola, who is also the chair of the Mental Health and Justice Advisory Committee, part of the state Commission on Crime and Delinquency. He says one potential solution could be creating a problem-solving court specific to autism where you’re “diverting someone from the criminal-justice system and directing them toward treatment.” But Zottola says that’s just one possible option — and it would depend on whether numbers from people like Shea demonstrate a real need for it. For the time being, the Autism Connection’s Randall hopes increased focus on the issue “spurs legislators to measure the cost in lives and taxpayer money of incarcerating people with autism, when they could be better served in communitybased rehabilitative settings.” When it comes to social errors, Randall says, for “the vast majority […] there’s no excuse to have autistic people in jail.”

“THINGS CAN SNOWBALL REALLY QUICKLY.”

Photo credit: Jeff Geissler

13-years-young, Pokie has been with us since March and is still waiting for a forever home to call his own. Pokie is not your normal senior cat. He’s still got plenty of energy in him and he loves to play. Adopt Pokie or any of our senior pets this month and find out why senior pets make great friends!

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[GREEN LIGHT]

not only reining in the politically omnipotent fossil-fuel industry, but retooling everything we use fossil fuels for — and basically, that’s everything. But there’s something else going on, too: storytelling. The story of the Salk vaccine fits our culture’s favored narrative about plucky humans overcoming obstacles with scientific know-how and concentrated effort. Stories about not doing stuff — not overrunning the world with humans, not burning fossil fuel, not growing a planet-devouring economy just to grow it — don’t capture most people’s imaginations in the same way. Our preferred narrative involves technology’s supposed triumph. Perhaps that’s one reason why “geo-engineering” proposals to combat climate change — ideas like blowing tons of pollution into the stratosphere to reflect sunlight back into space — can strike many of us as plainly bonkers … yet still seem more likely than us adopting the eminently sane approach of actually reducing greenhouse emissions. “We can’t even imagine a green economy … because we’ve been bludgeoned to death over the past six years by people who were terrified by this vision,” said Crossfire host Van Jones, referring in particular to climate-deniers in the media, in Washington and at right-wing think tanks. Arguments like Salk’s, and Sachs’ — “Time is running out on a safe planet” — have appealed to our reason and sense of stewardship for decades But they haven’t sufficed. (President Obama’s new carboncutting deal with China is promising, but nonbinding.) The “green-collar economy” that Jones touted can fight both poverty and pollution by creating jobs in renewable energy and energy efficiency, but it often faces crippling political opposition. Such challenges, too, suggest we need help envisioning a sustainable future. In her provocative new book, This Changes Everything, journalist Naomi Klein argues that a safe climate is incompatible with growth-at-all-costs global capitalism. While Klein acknowledges that policymakers must get aboard, she is most hopeful about “Blockadia,” a loose global network of localized, grassroots resistance movements to everything from Canadian tar-sands mining to China’s unbreathable air. Blockadia, she writes, is about love of place, love of home. If this is a story we can use, we need to write more chapters before it’s too late.

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THE UNIVERSITY of Pittsburgh’s recent daylong event marking the centenary of Jonas Salk reminded us why there were few 20thcentury American heroes bigger than the man who discovered the polio vaccine. Yet the Jonas Salk Centenary Symposium on Sustainability, organized by Pitt’s Graduate School of Public Health, focused on one of Salk’s later concerns: how humankind might survive itself. In books like 1973’s Survival of the Wisest, Salk tackled the challenge of human population growth on a finite planet. “Man has evolved so successfully that he is now to be tested for his capacity to ‘invent’ appropriate means to limit the harmful or lethal excess of which he is capable,” he wrote. Now, all humans must acquire “the wisdom to know the difference between the constructive and the uselessly destructive and to be able to act accordingly.” World population in 1973 was about 4 billion; it’s now 7.2 billion. And problems like deforestation and overfishing have only worsened — not to mention the multifaceted threat of climate change, which wasn’t even on Salk’s radar. At Pitt, the distinguished speakers included Salk’s son, Peter Salk; economist and U.N. sustainability official Jeffrey Sachs; and former White House green-jobs adviser Van Jones. They seconded and updated Salk’s concerns, and proposed how we might answer them. But wait: How could Salk have been our greatest science hero ever, and yet (along with many other voices sounding such alarms) go effectively unheeded about problems threatening not the health of a few, but the very foundations of civilization? And why aren’t warnings from today’s scientists received any better? Partly, of course, it’s because polio scared the crap out of people. It was a clear, present and personal threat, whereas climate change — like overpopulation and other sustainability issues — strikes many Americans as slow-moving or theoretical (even though its droughts, superstorms and rising oceans already plague us). Maybe that’s why Bernard Goldstein, former dean of Pitt’s public-health school, announced that he’d had to explain the importance of sustainability to a student who asked why this Salk symposium wasn’t about Ebola instead. Moreover, climate is an unprecedented challenge. Halting climate change requires

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Welcome to Craft Beer 101. Over the next 5 weeks we will be featuring and educating you on the top craft beers of the week. Spend the holidays with your favorite craft beer.

Named for the great ship that tragically sunk in Lake Superior in 1975 with many Northeast Ohioans on board, our Edmund Fitzgerald is the dark, brooding type. One sip of this complex, flavorful porter inspires lavish bar napkin poetry and spirited closing-time soliloquies.

This was Lagunitas first seasonal way back in 1995. The recipe was formulated with malt and hops working together to balance it all out on your ‘buds so you can knock back more than one without wearing yourself out. Big on the aroma with a hoppy-sweet finish that’ll leave you wantin’ another sip.

An India Pale Lager or IPL, is a melding of varied visions of an India Pale Ale and an Amber Lager. Once poured, its light copper color delights the eyes and a citrusy hop aroma flows through the nose. Upon first sip, a smooth hop bitterness reveals itself fresh, bold and slightly spicy - before subtle hints of mild maltiness appear.

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DIVE CALLS ITS DECIDEDLY NON-TRADITIONAL QUESADILLAS “CRAZY-DILLAS”

NO-CRY PIE IDEAS {BY AL HOFF} Holiday pies used to be something grandma made, or dad pulled out of the freezer section. Now, in these artisanal times, from-scratch pies are de rigueur at any gathering, and yet another way for foodies to get judge-y, especially about your crust. A classic pie crust can be tricky, and novice pastry makers can be undone by the assorted “secrets,” such as ice water (or hot water), which shortening to use, to roll or pat, and the politics of lard. Speaking of lard, pie purists love it for the flaky pastry it delivers, but it can be tough to find. Supermarkets stash it in meat, dairy, the freezer near the chitterlings. (Asking after it once, I was directed to the kosher fridge, where the block of pig fat was unlikely to be.) Strip District Meats carries block lard. A fruit-tart-style shortbread crust (butter, flour, sugar) is easier, and if goes wrong, you can eat it as a cookie. Speaking of cookies, crumbled up fine and combined with melted butter, they make an excellent “cheater’s crust.” Graham crackers make a good base for cream-type pies, and so do ginger snaps. (Put cookies in a clean bag, and kids can help smash them with a hammer. Fun!) Consider tossing in crushed nuts (almonds, walnuts or pecans), pretzels or pine nuts for an even more flavorful crust. And honestly, it’s not a crime to purchase a pre-made pie shell. It can be your secret, and simply add more whipped cream on top to compensate. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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fresh cranberries are available in stores, even though they are delicious year-round. So clear a corner of your freezer and stock up.

Come the dead of winter, cranberries can add fresh-fruit-brightness to a variety of baked goods. Three words: cranberry upside-down cake.

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

Seared tuna sliders

BEYOND BAR FARE D

ON’T LET THE name mislead you

— although really, how could it? What are the odds that a bar named “Dive” actually is one? Dive Bar and Grille, on Butler Street near 51st, doesn’t beat those odds, but it does repeat a dining concept that originated in decidedly diveaverse Wexford in an appealing and, to us, far more accessible context. Dive does not appear to trade on the hipster obsession with old-school authenticity as much as the selection of a simple yet evocative (and vaguely on-point) name. As such, Dive knows you seek an unpretentious atmosphere and a tasty meal, but you don’t really want cheap domestic beer, pickled eggs and off-brand chips for dinner. While we were thankful for that, we were more than a little overwhelmed by the epic listing of dining options that were on offer. The menu is a veritable run-on sentence of ideas — some of them great, some

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

of them kooky, not one of them boring — for re-imagined, re-conceived and re-structured pub grub. It features sections, some of them as long as entire menus at other restaurants, dedicated to its own interpretations of sliders, quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, burgers, specialty burgers, entrees and, last but not least, “I Hate Vegetables.” That last is

DIVE BAR AND GRILLE 5147 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-408-2015 HOURS: Mon.-Sun. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: $7-19 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED structured around bowls of fries or housemade chips and an array of 30 toppings and 18 sauces ranging from turkey to jalapeño and mac-and-cheese to pesto aioli, from which you can pick and choose to create custom poutine- or nacho-like ensembles.

It may be going too far to say that these bowls are a microcosm of the menu, but the blend of classic bar-food standards with upscale ingredients and trendy touchstones like fresh mozzarella and (inevitably) a fried egg on top was evident in the creatively conceived, sometimes witty, occasionally over-the-top approach to pretty much everything at Dive. The remaining question, aside from how we’d manage to narrow our options, was whether the kitchen could manage so many preparations. Our “I Hate Vegetables” bowl, selected by our non-veggie-loving eldest offspring, made a winning first impression. The fries were deep brown and crisp but pliable enough to play well with toppings. Barbecued pulled pork was meaty and juicy, with just a hint of sauce. And while it was odd to see two slices of provolone just floating, raft-like, on top (the dish was not run under a broiler to melt them), there was enough


residual heat to soften the cheese and help it distribute through the dish. Dive calls its decidedly non-traditional quesadillas “crazy-dillas,” and Angelique did question Jason’s sanity in ordering one styled after a reuben. However, the well-balanced components, especially the tender corned beef, made this deli-Mex hybrid a surprising success. While crusty rye may be one of the best parts of a real reuben, the griddle-crisped tortilla wasn’t a bad alternative. The kitchen’s “this is so crazy it just might work” ethos was also evoked in the name of the Loco Moco, a seasoned burger patty served over a pancake-size potato croquette with shredded cheddar, bacon and a sunny-side up egg on top. This, too, was a superb recombination of classic components, the burger expertly cooked to order, the bacon salty and smoky, and, best of all, the potato croquette crispy on the outside and delectably light and creamy within.

Dive owner Clint Kuskie

Crab-cake sliders made an impressive presentation with four sandwiches served tops-off, the better to apply some of the greens piled in the middle of the platter. The cakes — a bit bready, but full of crab, not Old Bay, flavor — sat atop an Asian slaw that was bright and flavorful, marred only by too-robust shreds of carrot. Tabasco aioli was both creamy and subtly fiery. The fried-cod sandwich also looked fantastic, the portion modest but thick, the surface deeply browned and crinkly. But the batter was inexplicably bland, as if no salt whatsoever had been added. Sufficient sauce and slaw made the sandwich edible, but a good piece of battered cod should be tasty enough to stand alone, at least for a few bites. Disappointing though this was, it didn’t much dent our impression of Dive’s kitchen as a sort of freewheeling laboratory for a “what if” approach to re-imagining classic bar fare. Sure, when you take some risks, there are going to be some flops, but on the whole, Dive demonstrated that it’s got the chops to pull off most of its crazy, delicious ideas.

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

SIMPLE SPIRITS Taste trumps flash at the Whiskey Fest

The Pittsburgh Whiskey & Fine Spirits Festival, a salute to all things distilled, stampeded through Rivers Casino late last month. The annual event showcased hundreds of spirits from around the world, accompanied by shot girls, elaborate displays and an all-important buffet. Since then, I’ve had the chance to reflect on — and sleep off — everything I took in that evening. The casino was awash with new products, many of them capitalizing on America’s still-voracious appetite for flavored spirits. From coffee tequila to fiery bourbon, distilleries of all stripes are scrambling to stand out in an increasingly crowded field. But the best thing I tried wasn’t flavored, nor was it new. In fact, my favorite sip at the Whiskey Fest wasn’t whiskey at all. Just before it ran out, I snagged a taste of Calvados, a French brandy distilled from apple cider. This particular Calvados, made by Boulard and aged for 20 years in oak casks, smacked of apples, with hints of caramel and vanilla. In other words, autumn in a glass. Though Boulard hails from across the Atlantic, some of the night’s other stars came from much closer. Dad’s Hat, a whiskey distillery near Philadelphia, debuted a straight rye whiskey, the first in Pennsylvania in more than 25 years. It was spicy and full-flavored, a wonderfully meaty backbone for a Manhattan or Sazerac. Boyd & Blair brought along its award-winning vodka, which is made in Glenshaw, just minutes from the casino. Though I often find vodkas interchangeable, Boyd & Blair’s has a distinctive starchy sweetness, redolent of the local potatoes from which it’s made. The trend of flavoring spirits with everything from birthday cake to wolfberries shows no signs of stopping, of course. But sometimes, simpler is better. There is beauty in an apple brandy that tastes only of juicy apples, or a rye whiskey that explodes with the assertive earthiness of the grain itself. No flavorings — or shot girls — necessary.

MY FAVORITE SIP AT THE WHISKEY FEST WASN’T WHISKEY AT ALL.

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Best Margaritas and To gh! Mexican food in the ‘burgh! r W NEtsbu Pit

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

o c o L o r o T El Grille & ull” “The Crazy B

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Cantina

Monday & Thursday

MonDAY/WedNESDAY/SatURDAY $ 3.50 MargARITAS -----------------TACO Tuesday & Taco Thursday 99¢ tacos & 99¢ beers specials

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

2512 East Carson St. (412) 431-1100 www.eltorolocomexrestaurant.com

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

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AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and houserecipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels sprouts or rich macand-cheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nuggetlike, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen

Butcher and the Rye {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, wood-fired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-of-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mendoza Express DIJLAH RESTAURANT. 4130 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412224-2111. This Iraqi restaurant offers plenty of well-prepared Middle Eastern favorites such as falafel, hummus, kebab, shwarma, lentil and bean salads, and baklava. But it also has some more unique specialties, including “Iraq kebab,” a patty formed from chopped lamb and beef, and served simply with rice and green salad. K

FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An old-school continental menu and a well-restored train station make this restaurant a destination. The menu leans toward Italian fine dining, plus steaks and chops. But well-charred chicken Louisiana and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014


OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Reservation R Take-Out T Free Delivery F Catering C

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THE BIG BURRITO GIFT CARD EVENT

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Dine In/Take Out/Delivery

Had enough of your creepy Uncle by 5pm? Us too, so we’re opening!

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Happy Hour Pricing ALL NIGHT!

Including Elite Beers. 5pm to Close

: u n e Muan Sauce $16 l a i c e p Sh Filet w/ Spicy Szechumplings) $5 Fis

ctopus D ad $7 O ( i k a y o k Ta ab Sal Wasabi Cr chio Roll $1o0, ista vocad AhitTunuan, caucPumber tonpdpecdruwsithhedapistachio)

Cenacolo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE

(Ahi ces a erent sau three diff

h.com .osakapg om w w w t a nu enu.c online me .beyondm Find our e at www

After your big meal, join us for dessert. All of our regular desserts will be available along with a special guest… a fresh keg of Southern Tier PumKing.

onlin or order

2101 Greentree Rd Rd. (next to Applebee’s in Scott Towne Center)

Relative Relief at BZ’s from 5pm – 2am.

412-279-8811

Kitchen open late!

WWW.osakapgh.COM

DOROTHY 6

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

Blast Furnace Cafe

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

LIVE Music by The Routines at 9PM November 14th

Offering Authentic Comfort Food, Fine Spirits & Craft Beer Daily Daily Drink Specials Happy Hour: 1/2 Price Appetizers

224 East 8th Ave., Homestead

412-205-3121 DOROTHY-6-BLAST-FURNACE-CAFE.COM

Wed,Thurs,and Sun 4-10 Fri,Sat 4-11 *Bar open later Accepting Reservations,Book your Holiday Parties now 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

ALL LUNCHES

$

8-$10

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty of well-prepared sushi, including specialty maki. KE

LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. sprinkled with more authentic 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. options such as tinga (saucy 412-665-2770. The menu stewed pork) and sopes, thick offers a variety of stewed cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos meats, legumes and veggies, all excels with Americanized Mexican rich with warm spices. Order the dishes, imbuing them with sampler platters for the best authentic ingredients and variety of flavors, and preparations that recalls ask for a glass of tej, the fresh, flavorful fast a honey-based wine food as it’s prepared that is the perfect in Mexico. JF accompaniment. KE www. per pa MENDOZA EXPRESS. pghcitym o .c THAI CUISINE. 812 Mansfield Road,

FULL LIST E N O LIN

Green Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers

4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-2818881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE


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SUN:

BRUNCH @ 11 ONE BUCK CHUCK $1 Tacos All Day (Vegan or Beef / Eat-In Only)

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 $2 Well & Clique

MON:

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 1/2 OFF All Pumpkin Beers 1/2 OFF Dogz

WED:

(All Day/ Eat-In Only)

$2 OFF Select Craft Bottles Wing It Wednesdays! Char-Grilled Whole Wings

TUE:

THURS:

HOPPY HOUR

$35 Clique Bottle Service 25% Off Vegan Menu Items

$35 Clique Bottle Service 1/2 OFF Burgh’ers (All Day/ Eat-In Only)

MON-FRI 4-6 1/2 OFF Drafts

FRI:

$70 Bulleit Bottle Service

SAT:

BRUNCH @ 11 $35 Clique Bottle Service

VAPETRIK VAPE JUICE Now Available at Bar Sun Open @ 11am Mon-Thurs Open @ 4pm • Fri-

“THE HEISENBURGER” 1/2 lB Burger, Peppercorn Crusted, Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions

4717 Butler St. • Lawrenceville • 412-315-7271 • facebook.com/Gusscafe

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

FOOTBALL

IS HERE! NFL SUNDAY

Ticket & College Games

¢.35 Wings Mon

thru

FRI

$ 2 DRINKS FRI-SAT

10PM-MIDNIGHT

2328 223 328 EE. CCarson arson SSt. t SOUTHSIDE 412.481.0852


LOCAL

“I WANT THIS TO REMIND ME THAT IT IS OK THAT I DON’T KNOW WHO I AM RIGHT NOW.”

BEAT

{BY BRIAN CONWAY}

PITTPUNK RISES AGAIN It’s Saturday night at the Smiling Moose, and Adam Rahuba is talking shit on himself. “If there’s a DJ that claims to be the worst DJ in Pittsburgh — I’m worse,” he says with a laugh. Rahuba, 33, of Highland Park, might merely be using self-deprecation to deflect his anxiety over the latest in a string of recent successes. His weekly dance parties at the Moose have become a hit, and they’re only one facet of his central exploit: resurrecting Pittpunk, his longtime local-music website (www.pittpunk.com). Rahuba created Pittpunk in 1996 at the Beechview library. Over time, it expanded to become an online directory and message board for all things relevant to the local punk scene. In 1999, Rahuba started booking shows under the Pittpunk banner. “Thursday, The All-American Rejects, My Chemical Romance,” he says, ticking them off his fingers. “I have a knack for booking bands right before they blow up.” The venture lasted until 2008, when Rahuba decided he was going to, in his words, “try to become an adult.” “I took a job — I married into a job as a financial adviser, which is not my scene at all,” he explains. “I just absolutely loathed it. And then, my marriage fell apart. I moved back to town, and I saw the opportunity to reboot and start everything fresh.” Less than a year into the relaunch, Pittpunk, which Rahuba runs full time with help from his girlfriend, Laura Conrad, is a mix of standard music-blog fare — ticket giveaways, album reviews — and essays on scene culture and beyond. When some country-music fans trashed the Heinz Field parking lot last summer, Rahuba launched a widely circulated petition to, as he put it, “ban these concerts from the city until the fans learn how to act in a civilized city.” He’s also back to promoting smaller local shows. “Pittsburgh music has always been the number-one thing driving me in my life now, for 20 years,” he says, preparing to take the stage. “If I can help bands to grow, if I can help venues to start selling out, and I can keep myself not homeless, then I’m in good shape.”

Thick as thieves: Tairey (right) and Sam Conturo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

“I SAW THE OPPORTUNITY TO REBOOT AND START EVERYTHING FRESH.”

ART AND FLOW {BY MICHAEL CRANDLE}

M

OST TEENAGERS are worried about prom, college applications or keeping up with trending topics on Twitter. In a basement on the North Side two years ago, though, Tairey Perez was already creating his own trends. Not concerned with being the most popular in school, Tairey (who goes only by his first name professionally) was instead sending out emails to publications and blogs for his Belly of the Beast mixtape-release party. He had put the event together himself with help from a few friends — far from the typical high schooler. “Nobody my age [was] putting together their own release parties,” he recalls. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ART AND FLOW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

H LIDAY HITS

AVERSIONS CROWN TYRANT

MACHINE HEAD BLOODSTONE & DIAMONDS

DJ QUIK THE MIDNIGHT LIFE

OBITUARY

Now, at 19, Tairey is preparing for another release — Celestial, a new EP for which he’s holding a listening party Nov. 22. Tairey knew what he wanted to become at a very young age. When he was 3 years old, his mother made him a makeshift stage so he could perform for his teddy bears in the living room. The bug of being a performer stemmed from his father, Juan Perez, an aspiring hip-hop musician. “He would perform in front of huge crowds and tour with huge artists,” Tairey remembers. That’s when Tairey knew he wanted to be a performer. “I just feel like seeing the performance part of it inspired me to rap.” Juan didn’t force his son into the family business. He’s always been laidback in his approach to Tairey’s work — but does give his son opinions on his music. “He was like, ‘Yeah, I really like what you’re doing,’” says Tairey. “He tells me his honest opinion, but he doesn’t try to be a part of what I am doing.” At first glance it would be very easy to compare Tairey to Drake —in the content of the music and his vocal affectations. “I hate it,” Tairey says, putting his hand over his face. “That’s my biggest pet peeve ever. Wet socks and people saying ‘this sound like that’ are the two things I hate the most.”

INKED IN BLOOD

TAIREY CELESTIAL EP-RELEASE PARTY AND ART EXHIBIT 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. The Space Upstairs, 214 N. Lexington St., North Point Breeze. Free. All ages. www.taireymusic.com

RISE OF THE NORTHSTAR WELCAME

WITHIN TEMPTATION LET US BURN

LIKE E US S ON SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

While he acknowledges Drake, Lupe Fiasco and Kanye as his three favorite artists, Tairey would rather be compared to Boaz, Wiz Khalifa and Mac Miller. “I can’t relate to Drake,” he says. “I can relate to Mac because we’re from the same place.” But ultimately, he’d rather not be part of a comparison at all. “It’s like telling a … painter that their work looks like someone else’s,” he says. “Just appreciate it for what it is.” The art world plays a lot into Tairey’s background. “Growing up in Boston and being close to New York, my Mom used to always send me to museums,” he says, smiling and seeming to drift back to that stage of his life. He brought that interest directly into his new project. “For this album, we have an artist [who] painted a piece for each of the songs,” he explains. Tairey will showcase the artwork, by Delaware-based Dominique Johnson, at his listening party. Local artist Jake Martin is responsible for the album artwork itself. CONTINUES ON PG. 28

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

ON THE RECORD

with Paul Giallorenzo of GitGO

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ISA GIALLORENZO}

Paul Giallorenzo

Pianist Paul Giallorenzo plays in several projects in Chicago, which range from jazz to electronic. His quintet GitGO (short for “Get In to Get Out”) includes saxophonist Mars Williams, who likewise has a résumé that includes The Waitresses and Peter Brötzmann. Their recent album Force Majuere includes intriguing arrangements, wild blowing and even a reggae groove. IS GITGO A PHILOSOPHY AS WELL AS A BAND NAME? Yes. It’s pretty much thinking of improvisation as an ideal state or a goal. The composition is the tool to guide us into the musical journey that’s interesting and challenging. With the creation of that space, you have the freedom to explore it and express more personal notions of sound, like extended technique. YOU PLAY IN A RANGE OF GROUPS. DO THEY SHOW YOUR DIFFERENT MUSIC SIDES? My attention span is pretty short. I get stuck and I have to clear my palate, so to speak. A lot of my favorite music is not in one particular genre. I guess one of my goals is … to take elements of different things that I like — electronic music, and elements of jazz and modern classical, and more contemporary stuff like hip hop and rock, too. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE REGGAE FEEL OF “ROSCOE FAR I”? I was playing chords and it turned into [a] repetitive groove. Then the melody just appeared. The title came about when we were rehearsing. Mars was wailing on it, and it sounded like Roscoe [Mitchell, saxophonist of the Art Ensemble of Chicago]. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GITGO 8 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15-20. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net


HITS

for the

HOLIDAYS

VARIOUS

AT THE GATES

A SKELETAL DOMAIN

PUNK GOES POP, VOL. 6

AT WAR WITH REALITY

BOAZ

BRYAN FERRY

DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT

CANNIBAL CORPSE

INTUITION

BLAZE YA DEAD HOMIE GANG RAGS: REBORN

JAGGED EDGE J.E. HEARTBREAK II

Z2

AVONMORE

IRL VINYL LP! TURQUIEOSONELYSW AT THE EXCHANGE AVAILABL

JOB FOR A COWBOY

MUSHROOMHEAD

KING DIAMOND

SUN EATER

RUN THE JEWELS 2

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

LIKE E US S ON N E W S

RUN THE JEWELS

THE RIGHTEOUS & THE BUTTERFLY

DREAMS OF HORROR: BEST OF

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ART AND FLOW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

Celestial has been in the works for a while now; at press time, Tairey had not made any of the tracks available for preview. While the EP has only seven tracks, “We’re just perfecting it,” he says. “Finishing songs and listening to them for a week. Seeing what we don’t like and adding what we like. Making it the best song it could be.” “This album is as much rock and electro as it is hip hop,” he continues, glancing at friend and business partner Sam Conturo, who produced the entire project. “Once you hear the album, you will see.” Tairey and Conturo are thick as thieves, and are rarely seen without each other. Their interaction is fraternal, and funny: Tairey rips up paper napkins and throws bits into Sam’s drink mid-interview. Conturo shakes his head at Tairey and laughs. “That’s that littlebrother, little-kid stuff.” Conturo, age 20, Tairey’s friend from high school, believes that this project is one of the pair’s best collaboration. “This one, I wanted it to be the one we’ve done right.” Focusing on making a great album is something that every up-and-coming artist should value. These two just seem to get it, and to understand that it’s not only about the music, but also about marketing their brand. “We wanted to take time to make sure every visual, artwork and trailer was done right,” Tairey says with great emphasis. He really wants people to take time to listen to the project all the way through. As he looks off into space, Tairey solemnly says: “I want this project to remind me that it is OK that I don’t know who I am right now.” While Tairey is still on the rise, his talent has been spotted by at least one heavyweight in the hip-hop scene. On a Saturday night this past May, Maybach Music Group recording artist Wale tweeted, “This is the best song I’ve heard all day,” in response to Tairey’s hottest single to date, “Zodiac.” “It was a good look and it was a great feeling,” Tairey says, recalling the astonishment he felt knowing an artist like Wale would take the time to tweet about his song. “After the retweet, people started to take us serious and [started] approaching us in a different way.” Tairey knows that his time is coming and that important people are paying attention to his movement. Jenesis Magazine co-owner Brian Tolbert says, “I listened to the Bridges mixtape from FaResh Clothing and I became a fan of Tairey.” It confirms Tairey’s intuition that people are watching and catching on. “We don’t look at it as, ‘Where were you before?’” he says. “We look at it like, ‘Thank you for coming,’ and we appreciate all support at this time.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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MUSIC AND BUSINESS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} JANIS IAN rose to fame early, scoring a hit in 1967 with “Society’s Child,” written two years before when she was only 14. She had another charting (and Grammy-winning) song, “At Seventeen,” in 1975, and has since toured, recorded, started her own label and written books. She talked with CP from her Nashville home before her current tour, which comes to Carnegie Lecture Hall in Oakland as part of the Calliope folk-music society’s 2014-15 season.

1305 E. CARSON ST.

412.431.0700

PITTSBURGH GUITARS IS PROUD TO BE A LONG-TIME MARQUIS DEALER FOR C.F. MARTIN & CO.

YOU’VE BEEN TOURING SO LONG, AND SINCE YOU WERE SO YOUNG — WHAT KEEPS IT INTERESTING, IF ANYTHING? Audiences are interesting. You never know what to expect. Some days you eat the bear, and some days the bear eats you, as they say.

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YOU WERE AN EARLY PROPONENT OF STARTING YOUR OWN LABEL RATHER THAN DEPENDING ON A MAJOR. WHAT’S YOUR LEVEL OF INVOLVEMENT IN YOUR LABEL, RUDE GIRL RECORDS? In all aspects of my career at this point, it’s enormous: It’s very time-consuming and very tiring, and I’m trying to find ways around it, where I won’t have to be so involved. Because it really does take away from the work I’m supposed to be doing, which is being a songwriter.

Janis Ian

IS THERE A NEW STUDIO ALBUM IN THE CARDS FOR YOU SOON? I’m carrying an album on tour, that’s available only on tour, because there’s a song on it called “I’m Still Standing,” that I really wanted the audience to hear. And I’m talking, actually, with one of the major labels, about an album project or two. So, we’ll see where any of that goes. I don’t want to speculate on that stuff.

“IT DOES TAKE AWAY FROM THE WORK I’M SUPPOSED TO BE DOING: BEING A SONGWRITER.”

THAT SAID, ARE YOU GLAD TO BE RID OF DEALING WITH BIGGER LABELS? No, because it’s a catch-22, working with a bigger label. On the one hand, they have a certain amount of control over your work — although they’ve gotten much nicer about it over the years. On the other hand, there’s no way to get international

Be immersed in a live laser ase light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

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SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

JANIS IAN 7:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. Carnegie Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $23-39. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

distribution and have an international, well-run career as a recording artist, in my experience at least, with an independent, very small label. When it comes to a catalog like mine with 22 or 25 albums, being with a major in certain aspects makes a lot of sense.

IT’S BEEN A COUPLE OF YEARS SINCE YOUR LAST ALBUM, RIGHT? Yes — I think it got to the point where it didn’t make sense to keep making an album and making an album and making an album, so I backed off it and moved on to other projects, like narrating. I’ve had some good success there; I got a Grammy last year for that. ONE OF YOUR BIGGEST HITS WAS ABOUT THE WAY KIDS TREAT EACH OTHER, AND THE WAY ADULTS TREAT KIDS. I’M CURIOUS WHAT YOUR TAKE IS ON THE CURRENT ANTI-BULLYING MOVEMENT — HAVE YOU TAKEN AN INTEREST IN THAT? I think anytime you can stop people from being stupid, it’s always a good thing. And bullying is being stupid. Particularly for the person doing the bullying, because it doesn’t get you anywhere. Beyond that, I’ve let “At Seventeen” be used in a lot of antibullying campaign ads for free; I think it’s important to put your money where your mouth is as an artist. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014


JUST ANNOUNCED AND ON SALE

Experience the evolution of Pokémon on giant screens with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra playing your favorite themes live. Don’t miss this amazing meet-up!

SEPTEMBER SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 8:0019 P.M. • HEINZ HALL WITH THE

For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org N E W S

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Catch all the

PENS ACTION at the following locations:

MONROEVILLE

GATEWAY GRILL $2.50 Miller Lite 20oz Drafts MONROEVILLE

BELLA LUNA $2.50 Miller Lite 20oz Drafts HARRISON CITY

JOHNNYS WIFES PLACE $2.00 Miller Lite Bottles MONROEVILLE

ROSECLIFF $2.00 Miller Lite Bottles GREENSBURG

GIANNILLIS 2 $2.75 Miller Lite 20oz Drafts GREENSBURG

SCOOBYS PUB $2.75 Miller Lite Aluminum Bottles IRWIN

WOODEN NICKEL $1.75 Miller Lite Drafts IRWIN

CAFÉ SUPREME $2.00 Miller Lite Drafts NORTH VERSAILLES

HURRICANE ALLEY $2.00 Miller Lite Drafts GREENSBURG

BADGES $2.00 Miller Lite 20oz Drafts MONROEVILLE

PAPA ROCKS $3.00 Miller Lite 22oz Drafts GREENSBURG

RED BRICK LOUNGE $1.50 Miller Lite Drafts GREENSBURG

JAMISONS $1.00 Miller Lite Drafts IRWIN

ARENA SPORTS GRILL $2.50 Miller Lite 16oz Drafts 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014


PIT TSBURGH

LIGHTS UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS November 21st

NIGHT SPECIAL

F 50% OFKER

C NUTCRA S! E TICK T

VALID ON NOV. 21st ONLY!

Subject to availability | Select dates only | Zones 2-4

PROMO CODE: LIGHTUP

TICKETS: 412.456.6666|PBT.ORG

$UWLVW$OH[DQGUH6LOYD_3KRWR/RLV*UHHQÀHOG

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


We’ll warm you up! G ORI INAL

AN

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST!

2000

Y

CO

M PA

LIGHTS UP The holiday season is officially upon us as the 54th Annual Light Up Night ® takes way on

h g r u b s t t Pi SINCE

PITTSBURGH

With the lighting of the Unity Tree, the unveiling of Macy’s windows and the Zambelli Fireworks Finale, the night will be filled once again with memorable Light Up Night ® classics. Headlining this year is Joe Grushecky joined by Eddie Manion of the E Street Band on Smithfield Street at the Northwest Savings Bank Stage. Also on Smithfield, there will be food trucks this year.

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DECEMBER 3 $20 COVER Live Music! 6:00-10:30PM 6:00 0 10:30PM

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Includes 5 beer sampling tickets & 5 raffle tickets. Guest beer samplings, Chinese auction & 50/50 raffle

Not sure about the right size?

Pittsburgh’s Premier 80’s Band

THE FABULOUS BOOZE BROTHERS SHOW – band & revue

*A PORTION OF THE MONEY RAISED WILL BENEFIT THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF PENNSYLVANIA

May we suggest something in an aisle seat?

SHARE THE GIFT OF THEATRE WITH THE WHOLE FAMILY THIS HOLIDAY.

Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic director • Earl Hughes producing director

412-392-8000 WWW.PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM A D V E R T I S I N G

BARENAKED 80’S

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FOR THE

HOLIDAYS OFFICIAL TREE LIGHTING CEREMONIES City-County Building Tree Lighting 12 P.M. U.S. Steel Tower Dedication of the Crèche 12 P.M. Allegheny Courthouse Lighting 5:30 P.M. One Oxford Centre Lighting 5:45 P.M. Santa Lights BNY Mellon Season of Lights 5:45 P.M. PPG Plaza Tree Lighting 6:00 P.M. Macy’s Window Unveiling 6:45 P.M. Highmark Unity Tree Lighting with Rooftop Fireworks 7:00 P.M.

FIFTH AVENUE PLACE Fifth Avenue FREEZE 5 – 9 P.M. Pittsburgh’s very own Winter Wonderland and live ice carving shows. Family Fun & Festivities 5 – 9 P.M. Create a glow in the dark snowflake with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, enjoy holiday caroling and live performances by: Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet 4:30 – 6:30 P.M. Max Leake Trio 7 – 9 P.M. Unity Tree Lighting 7 – 7:15 P.M. (Corner of Penn Ave. & Stanwix Ave.) Join Mr. McFeely & kick off the official lighting of the historic Unity Tree.

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S U P P L E M E N T


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER

22

LIGHT UP NIGHT ®

Kick Off the Holidays at

FIFTH AVENUE PLACE

Unity Tree Lighting • 7-7:15 PM Join One of Pittsburgh’s Best Known Neighbors ~ Mr. McFeely, Thousands of Pittburghers, Majestic Bagpipers & a Splash of Fireworks to Kick Off the Official Lighting of the

Historic UNITY TREE! Presented by

Corner of Penn Avenue & Stanwix Street

Fifth Avenue FREEZE • 5-9 PM Visit Pittsburgh’s Very Own Version of the North Pole! Glistening Carvings of Ice Penguins, Snowmen, Doves & More Bring a Chill to the Air • Take Photos with our Icy Life-Sized Carving of Santa Coming Down the Chimney

• Enjoy Live Ice Carving Shows & Cool Arctic Games for the Kids Liberty Avenue

Family Fun & Festivities • 5-9 PM • Create your own Luminary with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh • Musical Performances, Airbrush Tattoos, Storytime Characters & More… Throughout Fifth Avenue Place

FIFTH & LIBERTY • DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH • www.FifthAvenuePlacePA.com A D V E R T I S I N G

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@fifthaveplace


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FREE Saturday Holiday Activities featuring the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh

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Sat., December 7 • 11 am - 2 pm

• Share your Wish List with Santa & Show the Holiday Color with Themed Face Painting!

• Be Amazed as Chris Handa brings the Magic of the Holidays to Fifth Avenue Place!

• Enjoy Designing Poinsettia Pins & Suncatchers

• Whip Up Magical Ice Cream, Spin Art & Elf Hats

Silver Spectacular

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• Brighten Up your Holiday by Making Shiny Stained Glass Ornaments & Glistening Silver Wreaths! • Join Cheerful Elves for Face Painting & Balloon Art

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COMPLIMENTARY GIFT WRAP

November 29 - December 24

December 9 - December 21

Laurie's Hallmark Visionworks Wallace Floral Welcome Pittsburgh

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SEASONAL SHOPS Adar & Mimi

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Pretzel Crazy

Evenings (after 4 PM) & Saturdays

11 AM - Close Found the Perfect Gift? Then Leave the Gift Wrapping to Us!

See Stores for Validations

See Stores for Details

GIFT CERTIFICATE BONUS DAYS

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Buy the Perfect Present & Earn a Fifth Avenue Place Gift Certificate with Qualifying Retail Purchases See Shops for Details • Limit: One per Person, Please

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HOLIDAY HOURS M - F • 10 am - 6 pm Sat . • 10 am - 5 pm

Food Court: M - F • 10 am - 5 pm Sat . • 10 am - 3 pm

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December 12 -14 • 11 am-Close

DINING

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At the Fifth Avenue Place Garage with any $20 Fifth Avenue Place Purchase

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Retail:

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Faber, Coe & Gregg

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• Create Keepsake Bead Rings & Ice Paintings then Express Holiday Memories with an Airbrush Tattoo

FREE PARKING

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• Capture the Moment with Strike A Pose Photos!

Crystal River Gems

Holiday Happenings . .

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Sat., December 21 • 11 am - 2 pm

Avenue

Fifth Avenue Beanery

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Blissful Blue

Sat., December 14 • 11 am - 2 pm

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Spiral INTO Green

Sat., November 30 • 11 am - 2 pm

Added Touch

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SPECIALTY SHOPS

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FOOD COURT Au Bon Pain

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Charley’s Grilled Subs

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Flamers

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Fresh Corner Sbarro Wok & Grill

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FIFTH AVENUE PLACE FIFTH & LIBERTY • DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH For further information, visit www.FifthAvenuePlacePA.com

A D V E R T I S I N G

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LITTLE E’S JAZZ CLUB AND RESTAURANT DINNER • DRINKS • COOL JAZZ

Go casual at Pittsburgh’s Oldest Irish Pub for dinner or a party

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY AT THE MOST UNIQUE CLUB IN PITTSBURGH

SPECIAL NEW YEAR’S EVE DINNER MENU FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL (412) 392-2217

Located above: FRIDAY NOV 21 RML JAZZ TRIO SATURDAY NOV 22 JEFF BUSH TRIO SATURDAY NOV 29 RICHIE COLE

SAXOPHONE MADNESS - HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS SHOW ALL SHOWS FROM 8 PM TO 12 DOORS OPEN 7:30 PM 949 LIBERTY AVE.

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

CALL FOR SPECIAL NEW YEAR’S EVE PACKAGES! 412-471-4243 mahoneysrestaurant.com

LITTLEESJAZZ.COM

PITTSBURGH

LIGHTS UP MACY’S

MARKET SQUARE

Holiday Window Unveiling 6 P.M. with a concert headlined by Jamie Lynn Spears.

The Holiday Market will feature vendors from Europe, Asian, African and Latin American. Children can take a picture with Santa for a donation to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Jeff Jimerson and Airborne Holiday Songfest 5 P.M. Countdown to 2014 Season of Lights with Santa 5:45 P.M. Season of Lights Show & Jeff Jimerson mini-concert 6 – 9:30 P.M. (every half hour)

PPG PLACE PLAZA AND RINK Robert Morris University Island Sports Figure Skating 4:45 P.M. CLO Mini-Stars 5 P.M. Music by Joel Lindsey 5 – 8:30 P.M. (in PPG Place food court) American Cancer Society’s Tribute of Light & Plaza Tree Lighting 5:30 – 6P.M. Magic Ice USA is donating $1 of each skate admission to the American Cancer Society.

CLEMENTE BRIDGE/ BNY MELLON NEW MUSIC STAGE Grand Piano 6 P.M.

Relocated to 5th Avenue Place

Find Unique, Authentic Irish Fashions & Gifts for all of your special Occasions! • Kilts for Ladies, Gents & Children • Mens caps & Harris Tweed jackets • Ladies Capes & Cloaks • Irish Claddagh rings, Engagement & Wedding bands • Kilt Rentals for weddings & special occasions • Irish Sausages, Rashers, Puddings & Candy

6WHXEHQYLOOH3LNH5RELQVRQ7ZS :LOOLDP3HQQ+Z\:LONLQV7ZS *ROGHQ0LOH+Z\0RQURHYLOOH 57&UDQEHUU\7ZS 3HUU\+Z\:H[IRUG 57*LEVRQLD $QG2XU'RZQWRZQ/RFDWLRQ WK$YHQXH3LWWVEXUJK

120 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh MON-FRI 10-6 • SAT 10-3 412.471.0700 • StBrendansCrossing.com A D V E R T I S I N G

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FOR THE

HOLIDAYS Donora 7 P.M. Cobra Starship 8:30 P.M.

NORTHWEST SAVINGS BANK STAGE Billy Price 6 P.M. Joe Grushecky 7 P.M. NOMaD 8:30 P.M.

EQT JAZZMASTERS STAGE/ KATZ PLAZA

Trumpeter Sean Jones with drummer Roger Humphries and RH Factor

ONE OXFORD CENTRE The Rick Gallagher Trio 5:30 – 9 P.M. Annual Tree Lighting and Santa’s Arrival 5:45 P.M. Free Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides 6 – 9 P.M. (last ride at 8:45 P.M.)

LIGHT UP YOUR NIGHT WITH A WITH

Santa’s Reindeer and Free Activities 6 – 9 P.M.

STATION SQUARE

Meet and greet with the Frozen sisters, Trio of Superheroes and an Evil Villain. Also enjoy Santa photos, dancing, train rides and the outdoor parade! 5 – 9 P.M.

BNY MELLON FIREWORKS FINALE

A Zambelli Fireworks show launched from the Warhol Bridge and synchronized to a brand new, live holiday broadcast on Q92-9. FREE PARKING SATURDAYS, NOV. 22nd THROUGH DEC. 20th! PLUS BLACK FRIDAY, NOV. 28th (Pittsburgh Parking Authority Garages only)

FEATURING FEAT FE ATUR URIN UR ING IN G THE THE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 7:00 P.M. H E I N Z H A L L • 6 0 0 P E N N AV E N U E Please join us for the kick-off of a very festive holiday season! Led by Resident Conductor Fawzi Haimor, this 45-minute concert features selections by Wagner, Mozart, Tchaikovsky and Sibelius and Ravel’s Concerto in G major—featuring Fox Chapel Area High School student Rishi Mirchandani, a piano phenom who has performed at New York’s Carnegie Hall and won a Grand Prize at the World Piano Competition! No tickets or reservations are needed. Made possible by funding from

SPECIAL OFFER

NOVEMBER 21 ONLY! - GET 50% OFF ANY FRIDAY & SATURDAY BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS OR PNC POPS! CONCERTS THROUGH JUNE 2015

Visit pittsburghsymphony.org/lightup for complete details QTECNNVJG*GKP\*CNNDQZQHĆ‚EGCV *GKP\*CNNDQZQHĆ‚EGJQWTUHQT(TK0QXCTG#/s2/

A D V E R T I S I N G

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CIGARETTES © SFNTC 4 2014

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 20 CLUB CAFE. JP Harris & the Tough Choices. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM. Bridgette Perdue. Hill District. HEINZ HALL. Bob Dylan & his Band. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Black Order, Dorsia, Pipewrench. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. SMILING MOOSE. Nick Thomas. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FRI 21 565 LIVE. The Johnny Angel All Star Jam Band. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. CLUB CAFE. Heather Kropf, Cariad Harmon (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Trout Season, Carney Stomp, the Lunatics. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295.

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Alaska (Early) JP Harris & the Muscle of Love (Alice Cooper Tough Choices, Luke Zacherl, Tribute), The Royal Shakes. The Mixus Brothers Caroline Rose, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. The Wreckids (Late). South Side. LEVELS. Pete Hewlett & 412-431-4950. Scott Anderson. North Side. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. 412-231-7777. Robinson. 412-489-5631. LINDEN GROVE. Metro. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Benny Castle Shannon. Peek, Darger, Brian DiSanto, So MOONDOG’S. From Within. Death Cannot Find Me. Garfield. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. 412-361-2262. THE PARKWAY GOOSKI’S. The Silver Thread. THEATER. James Platt, Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. The Park Plan. HAMBONE’S. The McKees Rocks. Filthy Lowdown, PITTSBURGH The Slobberknockers. WINERY. These Lions. Lawrenceville. www. per CD Release. Strip 412-681-4318. pa pghcitym District. 412-566-1000. .co HARVEY WILNER’S. RAMADA INN HOTEL AlterEgo. West Mifflin. & CONFERENCE CENTER. 412-466-1331. Street Level. Greensburg. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Paddy the Wanderer, LoFi Delphi, Tiger Maple String Band. City Steps. Dual release show. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. ALTAR BAR. Milly / Dinner Bridgeville. And A Suit, Instead Of Sleeping, KRETZLER’S. The Kardasz The Velcro Shoes. Strip District. Brothers. Ross. 412-821-1606. 412-263-2877. LEVELS. John Sarkis Trio. CLUB CAFE. Young Fox, Alberto North Side. 412-231-7777. MOONDOG’S. The Nied’s Hotel Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Random Play. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. THE PARKWAY THEATER. Matt Hires. McKees Rocks. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Dancing Queen. Greensburg. SMILING MOOSE. Forest & the Evergreens, Hear Tonight. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Wildcat! Wildcat! Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TOWN TAVERN. Ironhorse. 724-845-2430. TWIN OAKS LOUNGE. The Grid. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Jmac & Junior. North Side.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 22

*

MP 3 MONDAY

Visit NASCIGS.com or call 1-800-435-5515

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NOAH PURDY}

WRECK LOOSE

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Wreck Loose; stream or download “Only You,” the B-side of the band’s new 7-inch, for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

PROMO CODE 101013 *Plus applicable sales tax

Offer for two “1 for $2” Gift Certificates good for any Natural American Spirit cigarette product (excludes RYO pouches and 150g tins). Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Offer and website restricted to U.S. smokers 21 years of age and older. Limit one offer per person per 12 month period. Offer void in MA and where prohibited. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 06/30/15.

SUN 23 ALTAR BAR. Lagwagon. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. The Apache Relay, Good Thing. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Keith Kenny, Jeremy Csaywood, Sun Hound. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 24 CLUB CAFE. Mike Doughty. South Side. 412-431-4950.

TUE 25 SMILING MOOSE. Meghann Wright, The Green Gallows. South Side. 412-431-4668. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

WED 26

PODRASKY and THE REDD-UPS also performing with Jimmer

GARY JACOBS

DAVE MINÅARIK

GREG JOSEPH

ROB JAMES

FROM THE CLARKS : ROB JAMES, GREG JOSEPH, DAVE MINARIK, GARY JACOBS

with special guest

Fri.

MARK DIGNAM

NOV. 28

2 014

THE REX THEATRE 16 0 2 E a s t C a r s o n S t r e e t

s ( 4 1 2 ) 3 8 1 - 6 8 1 1

DOORS @ 7PM SHOW @ 8PMsTICKETS: $17 ADV./ $22 SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT REXTHEATRE.COM

Poster & Ads by

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MICHAEL MORAN @ LUCK DESIGN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

COOL SPRINGS GOLD & FAMILY RECREATION CENTER. Randy Bush. Bethel Park. 412-831-5080. FAIRWAYS LOUNGE. E Z Action. Braddock. 412-271-0506. HARD ROCK CAFE. Bill Toms & Hard Rain, Jill Simmons & Friends, Jimmy Adler Blues Band. The 9th Annual Joyce & Bill Toms Thanksgiving Benefit Concert. Station Square. 412-481-7625. MOONDOG’S. S.P.U.D.S. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Black Six, The River Daughters, Lindsay Rakers, Caleb Pogyor & the Talkers, Chet Vincent. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Routines. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but might be worth a road trip.

PHILADELPHIA {SAT., JAN. 17}

A$AP Ferg Electric Factory

DJS

COLUMBUS

THU 20 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

{TUE., JAN. 20}

Zola Jesus Skully’s

FRI 21 DRUM BAR. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Desus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

SAT 22

CLEVELAND {THU., FEB. 12}

Glen Hansard Trinity Cathedral

FRI 21 ALTAR BAR. Chris Webby. Strip District. 412-263-2877. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Wiz Khalifa, Uzi. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

JAZZ THU 20

SHELBY’S STATION. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville.

ANDYS. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAVO. Carlton Leeper, Lito Corpuz Victoria Brady, Patrick Whitehead. Strip District. 412-610-1384 CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Kinetic. CD Release. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Paul Giallorenzo’s Gitgo Quintet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 26

SAT 22

FRI 21

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. JIMMY Z’S PLACE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bellevue. 412-766-3110. NIED’S HOTEL. Angry Johnny. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

HIP HOP/R&B

MOONDOG’S. Jeff Jensen Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. FIFTH AVENUE PLACE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. LITTLE E’S. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Daniel May & Tony DePaolis. Downtown. 412-553-5235. THE SPOT, ETC. The Etta Cox Trio. Penn Hills.

THU 20

WED 26

SAT 22

LEGACY LANES. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-653-2695.

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. GUS’S CAFE. Pittsburgh Caribbean/International Saturdays. Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

TUE 25 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Wiz Khalifa, Uzi. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

SAT 22 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Wiz Khalifa, Uzi. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

BLUES THU 20 FENG JAPANESE STEAK HIBACHI & SUSHI HOUSE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Bloomfield. 412-668-8800. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 21

SUN 23


CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. LITTLE E’S. Jeff Bush Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Jane Monheit. North Side. 412-322-1773. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Tony Campbell & Jazzsurgery. West End. 412-458-0417.

SUN 23

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gift Horse, Scotch Hollow. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 22 PITTSBURGH ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. The Balmoral Classic Concert. Oakland. 412-621-2400.

SUN 23

MON 24

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, www. per OAKLAND. pa pghcitym Ortner-Marcinizyn .co Duo. Oakland. 412-622-3116.

MON 24 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 25 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker 3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 26 ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. The Dante’ Soulsville Project. West End. 412-458-0417.

ACOUSTIC THU 20

FRI 21 BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Andrew Biscay. North Side. 412-323-2924. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. CMJ & the Roots Ensemble. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Chet Vincent & Molly Alphabet. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 22

RESONANCE WORKS. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

WED 26 DAVID BENNETT & DANIEL MAY. Andys Wine Bar, Downtown. (412) 773-8884.

REGGAE FRI 21 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY

FRI 21 LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 22

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1811.

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Janis Ian. Oakland. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

FRI 21

WED 26

THU 20

RUM RUNNERS SALOON. Steeltown. Ross. 412-847-3300.

SAT 22 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. 724-265-1181. KENDREW’S. Christian Beck Band. 724-375-5959.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes SingAlong. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

An Evening of Music

WED 26 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Christian Beck Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & The New Payday Loners. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

CLASSICAL THU 20 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “Music for the Spirit” Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-835-6630. REBECCA KAUFMAN DUO. Levels, North Side. 412-231-7777.

FRI 21

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Justin Beck’s Piano Party. North Side. 412-323-2924. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Acoustic Daze. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. TOMASINO’S. Tim & John. 724-265-1166.

FREYA STRING QUARTET W/ DANIEL TEADT. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. GIOCO PROJECT. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Free community concert. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 26

SAT 22

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music for the Spirit Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic High School, Cranberry.

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Photo by Greta Rybus

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOP FARM BREWING. The Blue Eyed Bettys. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912.

SUN 23 KEVIN JONES & MICHAEL MESSINA, DUO-ORGANISTS. Music for Two Organs. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. MICHAEL MESSINA & JOHN CUMMINS. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

WORLD

FULL LIST ONLINE

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

RANDY BUSH, GABE D’ABRUZZO, BETTY RIELEY. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

+

DECEMBER 13 8PM • $$10

Tickets at www.jergels.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29

Max Garcia Conover Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

TA S T E

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Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044 M U S I C

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

Johnny Angel & The Halos Holiday Show

WEDNESDAY 19 Irving Berlin's White Christmas

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts. org. Through Nov. 23.

RIVERS CASINO North Shore. Over 21 event. Tickets: riverscasino.com or 412-231-7777. 2p.m. & 7p.m.

Bob Dylan and his Band

The Ataris: "You Call the Shots Tour"

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 8p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 21

Death by Chocolate MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER McKeesport. Tickets: mckeesportlittletheater.com or 412-673-1100. Through Nov. 23.

Four Year Strong: "Go Down in History Tour" REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Isabella Rossellini in Green Porno CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Oakland. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 20 Evita

ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL Carnegie. Tickets: stage62.org or 412-429-6262. Through Nov. 23.

The Noise Presents In This Moment:Black Widow Tour STAGE AE North Side. All ages show.

The Irving Berlin’s White Christmas 2013 National Tour Company, Photo by Kevin White

Nov 19 -25

Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Comedian Linda Belt LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 7p.m. & 10p.m.

IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19 BENEDUM CENTER

Lee Terbosic, and Mike Wysocki LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 23 234 Lagwagon

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Apache Relay CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone 8p.m.

Craig Ferguson CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 22 223 Milly / Dinner And A Suit

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 25 256 Meghann Wright / The Green Gallows

IATW presents Stand Up for Heroes Comedy Show Featuring Bill Crawford,

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

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OUR MAN IN HONG KONG

ASK YOURSELF: “DO I WANT TO SEE JEFF DANIELS CHANGE JIM CARREY’S DIAPER?”

{BY AL HOFF}

LAME AND LAMER

Condensed, the story of Edward Snowden and his trove of top-secret NSA documents has plenty of potboiler elements: exotic locales, international journalists, code names and secret signals transmitted via Rubik’s Cube. All true, but Laura Poitras’ documentary Citizenfour adopts a more serious, and one might say, less exciting, fly-on-the-wall approach.

L

ET’S TALK about Dumb and Dumber To, the Farrelly brothers’ un-asked-for sequel to their 1994

{BY AL HOFF}

hit, Dumb and Dumber: Stale and Staler. Stupid and Stupider. Critic and Critic-er. That’s right — City Paper sent two staffers to the screening, since guest critic Charlie Deitch loved the first film and was eager to see the second. But alas, the hoped-for, loved-it/hated-it lively and comprehensive analysis collapsed into a giant agreed-upon pile of Reasons Not to See This Film. AH O F F @P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

his m Carrey and n a thing. gging was eve

Forgot that Ji

There is a cat named “Butthole.” Funny, because cats

hyper-mu

Jeff Daniels’ Filmmaker Poitras was among those Snowden (a.k.a. “citizenfour”) originally contacted, and it’s she and journalist Glenn Greenwald who meet up with Snowden in Hong Kong to look at the documents and lay out a strategy for publicizing them. This comprises the bulk of the film. The more interesting segments involve Snowden discussing the hows and whys of his high-risk behavior. He’s keenly aware of the consequences — “I already know how this will end for me” — and later is explicit about his public role: “I don’t want to hide on this. It’s powerful to come out and say I’m not afraid.” One of the films’ better points winds up being buried in asides and the odds and ends of other material Poitras mixes in, from Occupy to quick visits to newsrooms: that, as Snowden feared, the story quickly became about him, and not about what troubling information the documents revealed. And indeed, we now still wonder more about how Snowden is faring in Russia, than what the government is doing with it secret data collection. An irony unsolved by either Snowden’s brazen act, or this film’s recap of that week in a Hong Kong hotel room. Starts Fri., Nov. 21. AMC Loews AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

have buttholes!

big pink bare ass.

Edward Snowden and Glenn Greenwald prep for the big reveal.

No, please, no.

rather than the jokes illuminating amusing aspect s of the characters.

,

Cameo from reality -TV has-been Mama June from He re Comes Honey Bo o-Boo.

Makes fun of: blind, , the Asian accents mentally ill, the deaf, the disabled, the severely ns. Canadia r-old Even a 10-yeae couldn’t mak s this many joke s” about “ball

Characters are written as

stupid to facilitate jokes

110 minutes lovengsa:ved the

Brevity wouldn’t ha have lessened movie, but it would it. the pain of watching

Gross-ou humor — t

how 1994

Truly alarming 1970s softrock flashback:

“Cinderellaal,”l. by Firef

.

and “nuts.”

Astonishing fact:

Six writers

Ask yourself: “Do I want to see Jeff Daniels

are credited for the script. Six!

change Jim Carrey’s diaper — twice?”

It’s a Wonderful Life From now until New Year’s Eve, it’s a sure bet this holiday film will be playing a theater (or two) in the Pittsburgh area. Get in early at the Hollywood, starting Sun., Nov. 23.

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Exhibits palpable s ense of terror

If you’re quick, you can probably get back the full price of your ticket on the strength of the

regarding women an

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d ality.

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets (2014) - 11/19 @ 7:30pm, 11/21 @ 10:30pm, 11/22 @ 9:30pm, 11/23 @ 7:00pm - The band is fascinating, the music amazing in this new film by Florian Habicht.

THREE RIVERS FILM FESTIVAL

(1960) - 11/20 @ 7:30pm, 11/21 @ 7:00pm, 11/23 @ 3:00pm - Directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Kirk Douglas.

The 33rd annual film festival runs through Sat., Nov. 22. Highlights of the final days include: Red Army, a doc about Soviet-era hockey players (9:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20; Harris); the Competitive Shorts Program (7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21, and 1:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22; Melwood); the Chilean thriller, To Kill a Man (9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21; Regent Square); and What Now? Remind Me, a Portuguese documentary from a filmmaker living with HIV (9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21, and 4:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22; Harris). Complete schedule at www.3rff.com.

-Spartacus --------------------------------------Rocky - - - - - -Horror - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Show ------------------Breakfast - - - - - - - - and- - - -a-Picture -Movie: - - - - - -It’s- - - A- -Wonderful - - - - - - - - - Life- - - -It’s- - -A- -Wonderful - - - - - - - - - -Life- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- 11/22 @ Midnight

(1946) - 11/23 @ 10:30am - get tickets by 11/20 for catered brunch!

(1946) - 11/24 @ 7:30pm, 11/25 @ 7:30pm, 11/26 @ 7:30pm - Make this Capra classic a holiday tradition. Freebies for all three screenings!

THE LOST WORLD. Harry O. Hoyt directs this 1925 silent-screen adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s fantasy tale, in which men discover a land in which prehistoric creatures still live. This restored classic will be accompanied by a live score performed by Boston’s Alloy Orchestra. 4 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. Regent Square. $5-9 THE SON OF THE SHEIK. In 1926, they lined the streets and sobbed when Rudolph Valentino’s cortege passed by. Two weeks after the silent-screen star’s untimely death, this sequel — among the first of its kind — to the steamy, sultry The Sheik was released. Come see why Rudy had them swooning the aisles, in this exotic love triangle between the sheik, his son and a dancing girl. George Fitzmaurice’s film will be accompanied by a live score performed by Boston’s Alloy Orchestra. A closing-night party follows the screening. 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. Regent Square. $15

NEW THIS WEEK HORRIBLE BOSSES 2. The gang of disgruntled dudes are back and attempting to pull off a kidnapping in order to finance a new business. Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis and Charlie Day star in this comedy; Sean Anders directs. Starts Wed., Nov. 26.

The Son of the Sheik THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING. Eddie Redmayne stars as British physicist Stephen Hawking in this bio-pic that covers his career, his crippling nerve disease and his relationship with his first wife, Jane (Felicity Jones). James Marsh directs. Starts Wed., Nov. 26.

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Robert De Niro Series: Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese’s 1976 drama about America’s dark underbelly), Nov. 19. Jackie Brown (Quentin Tarantino’s 1997 blaxploitation homage), Nov. 19-20. Wag the Dog (1997 political comedy about spinning the news), Nov. 19-20. Time Travel: Back to the Future (the 1985 hit starring Michael J. Fox and a DeLorean), Nov. 21-24, and Nov. 26-27. Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (the best way to ace history class is explained in this 1989 dudecomedy), Nov. 21-27. Time Bandits (Terry Gilliam’s 1981 film is a fantastical journey), Nov. 21-27. Primer (2004 indie hit, a time-travel yarn that satisfyingly defies easy explanation), Nov. 21, 23, 25 and 27. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com.

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY, PART 1. Francis Lawrence directs this next installment of the adaptation of the dystopian Hunger Games books. (This is part one of Book Three.) Now, Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) is done with games and is moving on to revolution. Starts Fri., Nov. 21. THE PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR. Everybody’s second-favorite characters from the Madgascar movies — after the lemurs, natch — get their own animated feature, in which they are international spies. Eric Darnell and Simon J. Smith direct. Starts Wed., Nov. 26. PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH AND SUPERMARKETS. Florian Habicht’s rock doc follows Jarvis Cocker and his mates as they prepare for their (maybe) final show in their hometown of Sheffield. It’s a reunion of sorts after close to a decade of inactivity, and, of course, the film delves a bit into their history. Artfully put together, the film is a pleasure in terms of its editing — a scene at a butcher counter, which could easily be pedestrian, feels like poetry. It stands as good viewing even if you’re only a casual fan (which can’t be said of all music documentaries). 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 19; 10:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21; 9:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22; and 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 23. Hollywood (Andy Mulkerin)

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 SEMBENE: THE FILM AND ARTS FESTIVAL. The annual series of films that celebrate Senegalese filmmaker Ousmane Sembène and explore issues relevant to the African diaspora continues through Saturday. Among the screenings: AfroPop, a collection of short films from the Caribbean (6 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20; free); Sembène’s Camp de


Pulp: A Film About Life, Death and Supermarkets Thiaroye, a 1987 docudrama about African soldiers after World War II, who are held against their will in a camp (subtitled; 6 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21; $2); and Let the Fire Burn, Jason Osder’s recent documentary which recounts the disastrous 1985 police action on the MOVE house in Philadelphia (6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22; $2). Carnegie Library of Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. www.sembenefilmfestival.org ONCE UPON THE TIME IN THE WEST. Sergio Leone’s epic 1968 Western set in the famed Monument Valley begins enigmatically, as three dubious-looking hombres hang around a railroad station. Water drips, a fly buzzes, an eyelid twitches … time hangs in the air until the sense of foreboding is answered by a hail of gunfire from a mysterious, harmonica-toting stranger. Henry Fonda, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards, Charles Bronson and Utah’s Monument Valley star in this uncompromising revenge drama, marked by the director’s idiosyncratic pacing and framing; bursts of shocking violence; and Ennio Morricone’s unusual score. This film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series, which offers patrons a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com. (AH)

CP

SPARTACUS. Bitter slave Spartacus (Kirk Douglas), trained as a gladiator, escapes and eventually leads a massive army of slaves against their Roman oppressors. Spartacus whizzes by in pure enjoyment, the many plots and subplots interweaving with real intrigue and intelligence. Some fans of the film love the warfare, the brutal

CP

gladiator matches or the surreally staged showdown with the Roman army; I loved the meat of this story, the intelligent, witty, complex Roman political games (but for the men in skirts, indistinguishable from today’s political machinations) that lent genuine drama to the action scenes. Fabulous performances by Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton and Laurence Olivier. Stanley Kubrick’s 1960 epic continues a year-long celebration of the director’s work. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 20; 7 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21; and 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 23. Hollywood (AH) HOME MOVIE DAY. Bring out your dead … media! The annual Home Movie Day is your chance to dig out those old 8 mm, Super 8 and 16 mm reels and watch them — again, or for the first time. Trained staffers will be on hand to screen your amateur cinematic treasures on vintage projectors. Check-in and inspection begin at noon; screenings begin at 1 p.m. Noon-4:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. Carnegie Main Library, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www.homemovieday.com NO SHADE: PILOT. This new dramedy from Sean Anthony follows four friends in New York City and incorporates a lot in its 22 minutes: religion, sex work, transgender issues, safe sex, disabilities and the ballroom community. This concludes the annual My People Film Series, which explores the experiences of gay men and women of color. Light refreshments will be served. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 25. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5. www.kelly-strayhorn.org ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[COMEDY]

BAD DAD

OFTEN, SHE ENACTS A MATING RITUAL

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} In 2011, before launching his acclaimed FX/FXX TV program, Totally Biased With W. Kamau Bell, W. Kamau Bell did his first standup show in Pittsburgh. Fans packed the unlikely confines of Downtown restaurant Papa J’s Centro, and Bell still calls it “one of the most fun shows that I’ve ever had in my life.” Today, Papa J’s is gone, Totally Biased is off the air, and the Berkeley, Calif.-based Bell is on tour. In advance of his Nov. 21 gig here at another nontraditional comedy venue, Garfield Artworks, the socio-political comic spoke to CP while driving from Oklahoma City to Austin, Texas, “just like Jay Z and Beyonce do it,” he notes. A longer version of this interview is at www. pghcitypaper.com.

UTAH ELECTED THE NATION’S FIRST BLACK FEMALE REPUBLICAN CONGRESSPERSON. Mia Love! I’m in that weird position where I’m still proud of her accomplishment even though I disagree with everything she probably believes. “I’m so proud of you — your politics are horrible! I couldn’t be more proud of your horrible politics!” SOME SAY THE REPUBLICAN PARTY WILL TOUT HER AS PROOF OF ITS DIVERSITY. Name me the last time that has worked for a black Republican. Somewhere there’s a room, and in that room sits Michael Steele, Allen West, Alan Keyes. Talking about, “But I was told …” Herman Cain. “But they said I was going to be …” Yeah, they sure did, didn’t they? Ben Carson, he’s actually probably going to be in that room shortly. YOU’VE GOT TWO LITTLE KIDS NOW. My oldest daughter’s 3-and-a-half, and my youngest daughter is two-and-a-half weeks old. Me being on the road right now is my first act of being a bad father. You want to knock that first bad-father thing out of the way, so they can’t remember it. I find it to be a truism that comedians always get funnier when they have children. Funny comedians also don’t have children. But any comedian that’s funny is going to be funnier with a kid. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W. KAMAU BELL 7 p.m. Garfield Artworks, 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $15. www.wkamaubell.com

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ANIMAL

MAGNETISM Funnier with kids: W. Kamau Bell {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHIAS CLAMER}

ANY THOUGHTS ON THE MID-TERM ELECTIONS? In this country, we like the pendulum to swing back and forth. After about six years, the people go, “We’re just tired of looking at ’cha.” As I get older, I try not to get caught up in that pendulum, because it can drive you a little bit crazy.

[STAGE]

What I did fur love: Isabella Rossellini suits up for Green Porno.

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

T

HE WORD “GREEN” is richly evocative. It conjures the botanical, the natural world ripe and lush. It’s fresh and clean. The word “porno” is highly suggestive. It references sexuality that goes beyond the basic primal instinct, into manipulation and profiteering. “GREEN PORNO.” The combination of these words is unexpected and unusual. They just don’t fit (something that rarely happens within either the expanse of nature or the confines of pornography). Unsure how to add them together, we veer toward one or the other, envisioning either the hedonistic celebration of the organic or the artificial recreation of the carnal. What we probably don’t imagine is a supermodel and Golden Globe-nominated actress in short films, playing a variety of insects and sea creatures.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

“If I were a ...” Thus Isabella Rossellini begins each five-minute installment of her Sundance Channel series Green Porno. Visually, the live-action episodes are more SpongeBob than National Geographic. With cartoonish set pieces and fantastical

GREEN PORNO

FEATURING ISABELLA ROSSELLINI 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $20-25. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

outfits, Rossellini defines herself as earthworm, dragonfly, whale or barnacle. She details what reproductive organs she’d possess as each, and how they’d be used to propagate the species. Often, she enacts a mating ritual.

Onscreen, Rossellini is as beautiful as ever, having gained international fame as the face of Lancôme in the early 1980s. And she’s as quirkily brave as you’d expect from the actress who leapt out of the mainstream and into the Lynchian net of Blue Velvet. In Green Porno, she’s spoken lines like, “We anchovies do everything together, even mating — in big orgies!” and “My anus would end up on top of my head … unfortunately.” She’s also the series’ director, producer and writer. “I think of myself as an environmental artist,” she told CP during a recent phone interview from the road. While she’s spent most of her career in front of the camera, her personal life has been geared toward the study of animals. At first this was self-directed, though more CONTINUES ON PG. 52


BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL

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JANUARY 20-25 • BENEDUM CENTER TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square

412-456-4800 • Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930 PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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ANIMAL MAGNETISM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

PRESENTS...

DEATH BY CHOCOLATE A comedy/farce by Paul Freed

NOVEMBER 21, 22, 23 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m. Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m.

TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

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recently she’s pursued a master’s degree in animal behavior at Hunter College. Of her love for animals, she says, “I can’t remember a time without it.” She adds, “I would have started [advanced education] earlier, but by the time this type of study got formalized I was already an adult actress and model.” Green Porno began when Sundance asked her to develop a short film for the environmental program The Green. “I have passions for both art and animals. To be able to bring them both together is miraculous.” She submitted the first three films of what would become the series, figuring that “animals don’t sell, but sex does.” Additional series have since been produced, including Seduce Me: The Spawn of Green Porno and Mammas, logically following mating with pregnancy and birth. When a friend suggested that the material could become a spoken piece, Rossellini initially balked: “I said no way. I’m non-capable. I’ve never done a monologue.” But when the opportunity arose to work with Jean Claude Carriere, screenwriter of The Unbearable Lightness of Being and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, she was in. “He’s a legend. I couldn’t resist,” she says, laughing. The result includes more in-depth investigations of animal courtships, a few costumes, some puppets, projected illustrations and an evening the New York Times says “suggests a class by a high school biology teacher who is angling for a suspension.” Now she’s toured Europe, performing in English, Italian and French. This year, she has brought the show to the United States, including shows at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and, on Nov. 21, a stop at Carnegie Music Hall, in Oakland, courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum. Rossellini says that while she enjoys stage work, touring is a little more difficult. “The part that’s a little harder is there’s lots of traveling, hotels,” says Rossellini. She feels at home at her farm in New York state, with “chickens, sheep, dogs, cats. ... I try to limit myself to two dogs. I try.” In her spare time, she raises and trains puppies to become guide dogs. Her love for animals and her work is evident in her voice, as is her longing for her own animals in particular when they’re mentioned. While the series and consequently the stage show are handled with tongue-in-cheek humor and a nonclinical approach, they’re also driven by the utmost respect for the subject. Viewing the videos is a gloriously indulgent pastime that you can also mark off as educational. Rossellini’s rendition of the material live promises to be nothing less than spectacular. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[DANCE REVIEW]

SURE STEPS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Luke Murphy’s “This Room Was All Set For Us,” part of Contemporary Choreographers {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER EATER

Emotionally powerful and thrilling was the ultimate effect of this past Sunday’s performance of Conservatory Dance Company’s Contemporary Choreographers program. The annual production showcases works by some of today’s best choreographers and talented up-and-comers. This year’s, however, began with a disappointing performance of David Morse’s “BWV 1063.” Set to vibrant music by J.S. Bach, the neoclassical ballet for 19 female dancers on pointe featured pretty (if somewhat academic) choreography, with dancers moving into and out of a variety of attractive formations. The most interesting came when rows of dancers broke from unison group choreography to deliver counterpoint movement phrases. Uneven lines and sloppy dancing, however, soured an otherwise promising ballet. The dancing improved with the premiere of 2009 Point Park graduate Luke Murphy’s “This Room Was All Set For Us.” Inspired by Jean Paul Sartre’s play No Exit, and the idea of the locked room, Murphy’s modern dance work for six dancers set to familiar songs from the 1960s and ’70s, cast a surreal spell. Confined to a small floor pattern of squares, the dancers moved through a succession of highly physical dances suggesting themes of isolation, co-dependence, relationship anxiety and suicide. Amidst fine performances by the entire cast, dancer Alexandra Chain stood out for her emotional intensity along with Ashley Zimmerman, whose solo to The Door’s “The End” was mesmerizing. Fueled by an intensely moving Arvo Part score, Troy Powell’s “Fallen Angels” produced a whirlwind of emotional dancing. Powell’s premiere work for 11 dancers was a riveting display of angelic imagery, falling bodies and emotional support. Most striking was when nine male dancers, each with a hand to his chest and gazing downward, slowly walked onstage, then launched into a fervent dance that carried them back and forth across the stage. The sequence ended with their collapse to the floor, and a heartfelt closing pas de deux by dancers Hailey Turek and Justus Whitfield. The program concluded with a triumphant bang as Ronan Koresh’s tribalistic “Standing in Tears” (2005) poured forth his signature contemporary movement style infused with Israeli folk dance. Set to hard-driving Middle Eastern music, the large group piece led by a commanding Jenna Saccurato produced a dazzling display of aggressive, fist-pumping dancing that was brilliantly crafted and danced. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Conservatory Dance Company’s CONTEMPORARY CHOREOGRAPHERS continues through Sun., Nov. 23. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $18-20. 412-3928000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com.


There’s something about this place Join today for $1 plus get a FREE one-hour fitness consult Call the JCC Membership Office 412-697-3522 • JCCPGH.org Squirrel Hill • South Hills Offer for $1 enrollment fee, a savings of $148, expires December 31, 2014.

Design a Bike Rack The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust invites Pittsburgh area artists (residents of Allegheny County) to design and develop functional bicycle racks to be located along the Penn Avenue corridor from the Convention Center (11th Street) to Stanwix Street. This second phase of the project will produce five more racks with the potential for more to follow.

Questions? Please email staggs@trustarts.org Visit trustarts.org/visualarts/bike for more information and an application.

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Leon Ziontz and Cynthia Dougherty in Stage 62’s Evita

[PLAY REVIEWS]

ANSWERED PRAYERS {BY TED HOOVER} PATRICK PALAMARA must have been sob-

bing with relief when Cynthia Dougherty, Jeff Way and Leon S. Zionts walked into auditions for Evita. Palamara’s the director of the Stage 62 production of this Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice musical and he had to have been praying for the theater gods to send him performers who could handle the roles. And the gods heardeth.

Culture Club: The Art of Collecting November 20, 5:30–9 p.m. $25, $15 members Most of us collect something—teapots, shoes, action figures, records. Why not art? With the emergence of sites like Society6 and 20x200, starting an art collection is easier than ever. Set against the backdrop of Duane Michals: Collector, a new exhibition that presents the artist’s own collection, Pittsburgh-based artists Terry Boyd and Kara Skylling, and CMOA curator Amanda Zehnder, will discuss how to start—or complement—your very own art collection. The first 100 people to register receive an original work of art by Boyd and Skylling.

cmoa.org

| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

Culture Club is sponsored by

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EVITA continues through Sun., Nov. 23. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.com

This 1979 musical ďŹ nds a ďŹ ctionalized version of Che Guevara telling the true story of Eva Duarte’s rise from illegitimate nobody to wife of Argentine president Juan Peron and, by the time of her death at 33, a near-saint. The show is a mammoth piece of stage work, featuring a sung-through score, big ensemble numbers and intimate twohander scenes, with all the attendant sets, props and costumes. And since it’s music by Lloyd Webber, you know it’s going to take powerhouse performers to make it interesting. Palamara, navigating limitations of ďŹ nancial and artistic resources, has crafted

a sturdy production: This isn’t a deďŹ nitive Evita but, on the other hand, nobody involved has done less than credible work. Angelina DeVengencie’s choreography makes good use of what’s available; costumer Patty Folmer achieves a style and period on stage; and the set and lighting design do what’s needed to get us from beginning to end. I cheer conductor Robert Stull and his orchestra for providing such a rich, textured sound and making this production seem so much bigger than it really is. And plaudits go to Robin Hawbaker and Becki Toth, the co-musical directors, who have brought out the best in both the large ensemble and Lloyd Webber’s music — neither of which could have been easy. With their beautiful voices, Ryan Patrick Kearney and Anna Gergerich are exceptional as Magaldi and the Mistress. But those are two supporting roles in a show that, when all’s said and done, is really an exercise for three actors: Dougherty as Evita, Way as Che, and Zionts as Peron. They’re such unbelievably great singers you spend most of the evening expecting at least one off note, and it never comes. Listening to them perform is like watching a high-wire act — a breathless and utterly astonishing experience. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

FACES OF WAR {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THE TROJAN WOMEN is a classic palimpsest:

re-written, re-adapted and re-translated


[COMEDY]

since 451 BCE, when Euripides copped the story from Homer’s even-moreancient Iliad. The School of Drama at Carnegie Mellon University’s latest iteration, Charles L. Mee’s Trojan Women: A Love Story, draws from several thousand years of literature and the horrors of war, with distinctly modern accents. Direct antecedents of the work (a.k.a. The Trojan Women 2.0) draw from both the Greek tragedy and Hector Berlioz’ 1856-58 opera, Les Troyens. Add more text from James Bannister’s 1781 translation, with further massage by adapters Megan Monaghan Rivas and Kate Robinson, then distill with the political/dramatic voice of director Jed Allen Harris. What follows is a one-act spectacle of declamations, pain and very occasional humor. Lex Gernon’s set presents a literally skewed vision of the destruction of a civilization in the aftermath of war. DeLisle Merrill’s costumes delineate the women before they speak a single word: the gartered vamp Helen, the girlishly innocent Polyxena, the “mad housewife” party dress for Andromache, the ripped and tortured Cassandra. Hecuba herself calls to mind Star Trek’s Deanna Troi (yes).

continues through Sat., Nov. 22. Philip Chosky Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. $28.75-33. www.drama.cmu.edu

After opening Trojan Women as a very classical-style Greek chorus in drag, men are definitely relegated to supporting — and often confusing — roles. The actresses do not merely shine, but are metaphorically on fire. Madeline Wolf sings and slithers her portrayal of the doomed seeress’ rage, after Colleen Pulawski channels a demented Doris Day/ June Cleaver clone with hidden sexual perversions. Olivia Lemmon certainly commands her matriarchal character in a most demanding role. The often anonymous “Greek chorus” comes to life when the maid, matron, crone types are “interviewed” on video to reveal modern characters and very individual personalities. Respectively, Joell Weil, Kelsey Carthew and Annie Yokom credibly transform from downtrodden slaves to high school student, stay-athome mother and sophisticated landscape architect to put real faces on war. There’s no subtlety in Trojan Women: A Love Story. All the dials are up to 11, and while unmistakably loud, it is often less clear.

{BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} Fresh off the release of his new Netflix comedy special, Wyatt Cenac: Brooklyn, Wyatt Cenac is taking his standup across the country. The Daily Show alum’s new material is sharp and sometimes personal, with bits that range from gentrification to his father’s murder. He spoke with CP in advance of his Nov. 21 stop at Club Café. There’s an expanded interview at www.pghcitypaper.com.

“A little bit of a megalomaniac”: Wyatt Cenac {PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC MICHAEL PEARSON}

TROJAN WOMEN: A LOVE STORY

GETS PERSONAL

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“AS ENCHANTING AS A FIRST SNOW” - SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER

WHAT WAS THE PROCESS LIKE FOR CREATING THE SPECIAL? I left The Daily Show and had been kind of locked up in a development process that [was] almost a purgatory-like process. You write a thing and just wait and wait and wait. So in that in-between time, I’ve been writing and performing and doing shows and got to a place where I was like, “Oh yeah, I have an hour here that I want to share.” I got a little more impatient and just felt like I’m just going to do it on my own, and hopefully there will be a market for it. THE SPECIAL HAS A REALLY PERSONAL VIBE — IT’S SHOT IN A SMALL VENUE AND YOU TALK MORE ABOUT YOUR OWN LIFE. YOU EVEN TALK ABOUT YOUR DAD’S MURDER. WAS THAT DIFFICULT TO MAKE FUNNY? There is definitely [a] challenge because you got to bring people in and you don’t want them to feel bad or weird. Or if you do, you want to be able to create that tension and then take the air out of that balloon. [Losing my dad] is a bit that I knew I didn’t want to do forever. I didn’t want to get it to a place where it just became something that I could recite by memory and it lacked any emotion behind it. YOU’VE SPLIT TIME BETWEEN WRITING FOR SHOWS LIKE KING OF THE HILL AND THE DAILY SHOW AND DEVELOPING AND PERFORMING STANDUP. ARE YOU DEVOTED MORE TO ONE OR THE OTHER? I enjoy creating, whether it’s creating my own show ideas or writing a feature script or doing standup. Writing for other people — it’s good and I guess it’s a good job, but it’s a job. You have to be able to cater for somebody else. And I think I’m probably a little bit of a megalomaniac in that it’s hard to sometimes do that.

- BOSTON HERALD

THROUGH SUNDAY! Benedum Center Box Office at Theater square trustarts.org • 412-456-4800 Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WYATT CENAC 10:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 21. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. www.clubcafelive.com +

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PNC BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA-PITTSBURGH IS A PRESENTATION OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AND BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.2011.27.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

Looking for the

Perfect Location

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. outdoors. Venues include the Clemente Bridge stage, where local favorites Grand Piano and Donora join visiting dance-pop act Cobra Starship. This Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership festival also offers free horse-drawn carriage rides from One Oxford Centre, and the inevitable climactic fireworks. BO 5-9:30 p.m. (PPG rink open until midnight). Most attractions are free. www. downtownpittsburgh.com

NOV. 21 Gatherings

for Your Holiday Party?

{ART}

{SUMMIT}

We accommodate

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

Helping trans people tell their stories is the mission of Trans*Voices, an annual summit hosted by Pittsburgh’s Garden of Peace Project that draws attendees from across the country. The four-day event begins tonight. The caucuses and workshops are supplemented by public events including Trans*Voices of Pittsburgh & Beyond. The Sat., Nov. 22, program at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater features original monologues by 13 guests, including: Lourdes Ashley Hunter, founder of the New Yorkbased Trans Women of Color Collective; Katrina Goodlett, of web radio’s Kitty Bella Show; Angelica Ross (pictured), of Chicago’s TransTech Social Enterprises; and Tiq Milan, senior media strategist at GLAAD. Summit registration is free, but tickets for the Nov. 22 show are $20-25 (free for those under age 20); a VIP Meet ’n’ Greet option includes dinner. Bill O’Driscoll Summit

continues through Sun., Nov. 23. Various locations, East Liberty area. www. gardenofpeaceproject.org

+ FRI., NOV. 21 {FESTIVAL} For 54 years running, Downtown’s had a Light Up Night. Tonight’s tree-lightings and the opening of the PPG Plaza Ice Rink are supplemented by tons of live music {PHOTO COURTESY OF DEEN VAN MEER}

+ THU., NOV. 20

Every week for 13 months, Becky Slemmons visited Pittsburgh’s temples, churches, synagogues and mosques to explore the relationship between attending worship services and attending to art. “Too different in today’s world, I suspect, for most to simultaneously take both paths,” she says. Slemmons took photographs and video, and also created a drawing during or after each of the 100 visits. She also added fabric to her white worship dress to reflect the accumulation of experiences. Her exhibit Gatherings opens tonight with a reception at 707 Penn Gallery. Danielle Fox 5:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Dec. 31. 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412471-6070 or www.trustarts.org

{DANCE} Bodiography Contemporary Ballet presents its 13th annual Multiplicity concert at the

NOV. 25

Newsies


sp otlight

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

Patrick Jordan and Melissa Martin get why Pittsburgh hasn’t seen a professional production of A Streetcar Named Desire for some 15 years: It’s a classic with a large cast — “a monster play,” says Jordan — and it’s shadowed by the iconic 1951 Marlon Brando-Vivien Leigh film version. “People who don’t know anything about theater can still yell ‘Stella!’ at you,” quips Martin. Adds Jordan, “It’s one of those plays, you could never do it, and why would you?” But Tennessee Williams is Martin’s favorite playwright; Streetcar is Jordan’s “favorite play of all time”; and his barebones productions is designed to stage work nobody else in town is. Over 11 seasons, that’s usually meant new plays. Now it means 12 performances of Williams’ 1947 masterpiece about penniless Southern belle Blanche DuBois, her sister, Stella, and Stella’s loutish husband, Stanley Kowalski, set in an ethnically diverse, working-class New Orleans. The show stars, respectively, Tami Dixon, Jenna C. Johnson and Jordan himself. Martin directs. The production includes live transitional and atmospheric music, played onstage by Joe Gruschecky (guitar and vocals) and John Gresh (keyboard), including New Orleans standards. (A few performances will use recorded music.) And as Martin says, such Streetcar themes as who qualifies as a “real American” remain fresh. “Every character, every page, every line has depth to it,” says Jordan. Bill O’Driscoll Nov. 20-Dec. 6. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $30. www.barebones.com

{COMEDY} Scottish actor, TV host, comedian and director Craig Ferguson son has come a long way since nce drumming for terrible punk k bands. A photo with George e Bush from when Ferguson spoke at the e White House Correspondents’ spondents’ Dinner verifies es his success, as well as hiss current gig as the (outgoing) oing) Late Late Show host on CBS, his Emmy nomination and his Best New Director title e from the Napa Valley Film Festival. estival. Tonight, the self-proclaimed claimed “vulgar lounge entertainer” rtainer” brings his show to the Carnegie Library of Homestead omestead Music Hall. DF 8 p.m. m. 510 E. 10 0th Ave., Munhall. all. $45-80. www.librarymusichall.com ymusichall.com

weekend brings two productions Downtown, including the latest from writers Mike Rubino and James Catullo, who introduced the comic action series Dodge Intrepid and the Pages of Time in 2005. “The Secret Gambit of the Chess Master” debuts tonight, again putting its librarian hero in cliff-hanging 1940s peril, with four actors voicing dozens of characters, at Arcade Comedy Theater. On Nov. 22 and 23, Chuck Lanigan’s ‘The Thin Man’ Comes to Pittsburgh returns to the Omni William Penn. This radio-style show transplants the classic 1934 comic detective movie to Pittsburgh; tickets include a meal, a drink and live music. BO Dodge Intrepid: 8 p.m. (811 Liberty Ave.; $5-10; www.arcadecomedytheater. com). Thin Man: 6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22, and 12:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 23 (530 William Penn Place; $50; 412-553-5000 or jkaiser@omnihotels.com).

+ SAT., NOV. 22 {MARKET} As LP sales climb and the ’80s jumpsuit

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC ROSÉ}

Byham Theater. The show, performed by dancers from Bodiography and LaRoche College, features new work by guest choreographers Greer Reed, director of Reed Dance (with “JEHOVAH JIREH, JEHOVAH NISSI, ‘JESUS’”), and Christen Weimer, a dance professor from Georgia (“Voler”). Bodiography artistic director Maria Caruso offers her choreography for the Westmoreland Choral Society’s production of Fauré’s Requiem. There’s also new work choreographed by Bodiography company artists. The shows tonight and tomorrow are presented by LaRoche, where Caruso chairs the performing arts department. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35. 412456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

Live plays performed vintageradio style are enjoying resurgence. g a resurgenc ce. This

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+ TUE., NOV. 25 {STAGE}

returns to style, it’s a fitting time for the fourth annual Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer. Franktuary and Mac & Gold food trucks and DJs appear beside more than 30 local offering clothes, sellers of housewares, vinyl, artwork housewa more. In the Teamsters and mo Union 249 building, Local Un vendors like South Side’s Highway Robbery Vintage and Red Pop Shop, a vintage housewares store started housewa by the Mixer’s founders, M participate, as does part Bloomfield arts space Bloo and espresso bar 4121 Main. DF 9 a.m.3 p.m. 4701 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. L www.pghvintagemixer.com www.pg

{MUSIC} {MUSI Behind h her ninth album, The Heart of the Matter (Emarcy), vocalist Jane Monheit jazz voca and her band visit Manchester Craftmen’s Guild for two Craftme tonight. The album’s shows to 12 tunes include her interpretations of numbers interpre by The Beatles (“Golden Slumbers/Long and Winding Slumb

{STAGE}

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compositions tell stories, and the concert’s opening piece, J.H.Schmelzer’s “Serenata con Altre Arie,” jaunts through carnival’s dances and Ash Wednesday. DF 8 p.m. 108 N. Dithridge St., Oakland. $10-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org

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Road”) and Buffy St. Marie (“Until It’s Time for You to Go”), among others. Monheit, a Grammy nominee with 13 years in the business, brings sidemen on piano, bass and drums. DF 6 and 8:30 p.m. 1815 Metropolitan St., North Side. $49.50. 412-323-4000 or www.mcgjazz.org

Ensemble Caprice performs with 17th- and 18th-century instruments. Called “imaginative, even powerful” by The New York Times, the baroque company is composed of five musicians — including founder Matthias Maute — on

Extraaaa, extraaaa: A touring version of Tony-winning musical Newsies makes its Pittsburgh debut tonight. Produced by Disney Theatrical Productions, the show was adapted in 2011 from the 1992 film, inspired by the Newsboy Strike of 1899. Directed by Tony nominee Jeff Calhoun, with a score by eight-time Academy Award-winner Alan Menken, it follows a ragged band of teenage newsies fighting for a better way of life. Evoking a time when people still faithfully paid for their news, the PNC Broadway

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHELLYNN SCHOEN}

{WORDS} The Saturday before every Thanksgiving brings Tellabration, an international storytelling event that’s marking 25 years in Pittsburgh. Tonight, local talents gather at Oakland’s Church of the Ascension to tell stories ranging from the personal to folk tales. This year’s theme is “Silver and Gold.” The event for the whole family is sponsored by StorySwap and the Three Rivers Storytelling Festival. BO 8 p.m. 4729 Ellsworth Ave., Oakland. Free (donations accepted). www.at-sciences.com

{MUSIC} It’s like oldies, but way older: Montreal’s 25-year-old

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Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer the recorder, traverso (flute), violoncello, guitar and percussion. Tonight’s program in Synod Hall, Chaconne! Voices of Eternity, employs steady harmonic progressions to evoke eternity. These

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Across America show has eight performances at the Benedum Center. DF 7:30 p.m. Show continues through Nov. 30. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $21-69. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AS YOU LIKE IT. Shakespeare’s pastoral comedy, directed by John Amplas. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. AVENUE Q. The politically incorrect Tony-winning musical which upends children’s television. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Studio Theatre, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS. A stage adaptation of the classic animated television special, where Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the other Peanuts grapple with the real meaning of Christmas. Nov. 20-21, 7:30 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 2 p.m. Grand Theatre. 412-405-8425. DEATH BY CHOCOLATE. Members of the newly renovated Meadowbrook Health Resort are dropping like flies. The clues point to a sinister box of chocolates, and the suspects include all the

outlandish characters working for the resort. Opens Nov. 7. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. DEATH BY CHOCOLATE LADIES’ NIGHT OUT. Presentation of “Death by Chocolate” by the McKeesport Little Theatre w/ hors d’oeuvres, drinks & many varieties of chocolate. Thu., Nov. 20, 6 p.m. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. EVITA. Presented by Stage 62 through special arrangement w/ the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412 429-6262. THE FANTASTICKS. The world’s longest running musical. About a boy, a girl, two fathers & a wall. Sat., Nov. 22, 7 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 2:30 p.m. The Legacy Theatre, Allison Park. 412-635-8080. FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. Presented by Stage Right Theatre

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Company. A musical theatre classic focusing on mating rituals, insects & marine life. Fri., Nov. 21, 8 p.m. celebrating its 50th anniversary. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. Nov. 21-22, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., 412-237-8300. Nov. 23, 2 p.m. Palace Theatre, L’HOTEL. Sarah Bernhardt, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Jim Morrison, Oscar Wilde, GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS. Victor Hugo, Isadora Duncan & Pulitzer Prize-winning play Gioachino Rossini meet in the by David Mamet about real estate world premier of Ed Dixon’s & the fight for the American comedy. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, Dream. Nov. 20-21, 8 p.m. and 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 8. O’Reilly Greensburg Garden and Theater, Downtown. Civic Center, Greensburg. 412-316-1600. 1-888-71-TICKET. THE MIRACLE GODSPELL. Presented WORKER. The story by Calvin Church Youth www. per of Helen Keller & her pa Group. Benefits Calvin pghcitym teacher, Anne Sullivan. .co Youth Group Mission Thu-Sat. Thru Nov. 22. Project. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, and Sat., Nov. 22, 2 & Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 21. Calvin MURDER FOR TWO. 1 actor Presbyterian Church, Zelienople. investigates the crime, the other 724-452-7560 ext. 17. ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN plays all of the suspects & they both play the piano. Wed-Sat, PORNO. A one woman show, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. Thru adapted from the Sundance Jan. 18. Cabaret at Theater Square, Channel series of the same name, Downtown. 412-325-6769. Rossellini has crafted a comical NEWSIES. Set in New York City performance-lecture w/ projected at the turn of the century, the illustrations of biodiversity while tale of Jack Kelly, a newsboy & leader of a band of teenaged ‘newsies,’ who dreams only of a better life far from the hardship of the streets. Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m. and Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 30. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. SMART BLOND. Born Yesterday star Judy Holliday lays down a series of tracks about her rise to fame amidst the politics of the 1950s. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 21. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE. Presented by barebones productions, Tennessee Williams’ 1947 classic. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun., Nov. 23, 2 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 30, 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 6. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-71-TICKET. ‘THE THIN MAN’ COMES TO PITTSBURGH LIVE RADIO. An original adaptation of the 1934 film featuring live performances by local talent. Dinner or brunch, drinks, & live period music. Reservations required. Sat., Nov. 22, 6 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 12:30 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-553-5000. WHITE CHRISTMAS. The stage adaptation of Irving Berlin’s classic film. Opening Nov. 18, 7:30pm. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 21, 8 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 23, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 20. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800.

Legacy Sampler Available now at Better Beer Retailers.

CONTINUES ON PG. 60

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“Dinner for One,” by Teréz Iacovino, from Bountiful, at Future Tenant, Downtown

VISUAL LART NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. Becky Slemmons: Gatherings. Exploring what happens when an artist enters the religious realm, pursuing a performative project, in an environment where conformity often dominates. Opening reception Nov. 21, 5:30-8pm. Downtown. 412-456-2962. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Art of Collecting. Conversation & drinks, set against the backdrop of Duane Michals: Collector. Discussions w/ artists Terry Boyd & Kara Skylling. Nov. 20, 5:30-9pm. Oakland. 412-622-3131. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Sometimes I See Before I Paint. Paintings by artist Nellie Lou Slagle, combining torn paper & torn print, along w/ writing & paint. Opening reception Nov. 21, 6-9pm. South Side. 412-431-3337. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 3 Guild Shows. 3 different shows presented at PCA: Women of Vision presents “Storytellers: Truth be Told”, Craftsmen Guild presents “Illusions” & Fiberarts Guild presents “Construct”. Opening reception Nov. 21, 5:30-9pm. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

ONGOING 937 GALLERY. The Landscape

Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Organized by The Cultural Landscape Foundation. Downtown. 412-471-6070 AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Emily Newman & the New Chelyuskinites. Modeled on the 1933-34 Russian sea expedition that trapped 111 people on arctic ice for two months after their Chelyuskin sank w/ equal parts social documentary, tableaux & oral history. Squirrel Hill. 412-697-3231. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISAN. Simeon Larivonovoff. Russian Orthodox “Old Believers” icon painter keeping a family tradition unbroken since 1392. Will

hang through Nov. Garfield. 412-661-0503. BAR MARCO. Studio Direct. New Work by Seth Clark. Strip District. 412-471-1900. BE GALLERIES. Stranger Than Fiction. Work by Brody Burroughs. Kiss My Apps. Work by Andi Irwin. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUNKERPROJECTS. Follow Through. Site specific instillation by Meg Prall. Garfield. 412-440-8422 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. New Art by Tom & Carol Norulak. Fine art prints, handmade silks & jewelry. Open during campus hours at the Boyce Campus Art Gallery. Monroeville. 724-327-1327. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Selections of The Michael Berger Foundation’s Private Collection. Painting & prints from the 200 piece collection. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Nocturne Moonrain: A Solo Exhibition by Lisa Marie Jakab. Oil paintings. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DELANIE’S COFFEE. DOUBLE MIRROR EXHIBIT 4. Ft. local visual & performing artists. South Side. 412-927-4030. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Moving Targets. A multidisciplinary exhibition by artists Ann Rosenthal CONTINUES ON PG. 61

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COMEDY THU 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 21 CRAIG FERGUSON. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. DODGE INTREPID RETRO RADIO ADVENTURE. A radio adventure series about a time traveling librarian. Ft. an original script & a cast of local actors. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN DICK WINTERS COMEDY ROAST. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

W. KAMAU BELL, ZACH SHERWIN. 6 p.m. Garfield Artworks, Garfield. 412-361-2262. WYATT CENAC, PHOEBE ROBINSON. 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

FRI 21 - SAT 22 LINDA BELT. Nov. 21-22, 7 & 10 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

coming comedians w/ guests. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. thru Jan. 12 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 25 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

SAT 22

COMIC WARS. Aaron Kleiber hosts a stand-up face-off where comics tell jokes BEERHIVE COMEDY. Open based on audience Mic. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. suggestions. BYOB. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy The BeerHive, Strip District. Theater, Downtown. 412-904-4502. 412-339-0608. COMEDY OPEN DOC DIXON, MIC. Hosted by T-ROBE, DEREK Ronald Renwick. www. per pa MINTO. 8 p.m. The Wed, 9:30 p.m. pghcitym o .c Rose Bar, McKeesport. Scarpaci’s Place, 412-751-6960. Mt. Washington. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE: 412-431-9908. EPIC D&D COMEDY JOKING OFF COMEDY ADVENTURE. Comics & CONTEST. Presented by improvisers play the classic Race to the Coffin Comedy. role playing game live on Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 stage. BYOB. 10 p.m. Arcade Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-682-1414. 412-339-0608. STAND-UP COMEDY MIKE JONES, MATT STANTON, OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. DAVID KAYE. Dinner & show. The BeerHive, Strip District. 6:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. 412-904-4502. 724-379-7100.

WED 26

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EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

COMEDY SAUCE. Up-and-

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military

The beer that invented Light beer. EVERY $

WED.

$

2.50

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MILLER LITE BOTTLES & DRAFTS 35¢ WINGS

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MILLER LITEE DRAFTS D DAY FRIDAY 3.50 ALL

$ F O L LO W @ M 2 T H I R D 60

# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: 22nd annual

Tri-State All Star Pageant, Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown CRITIC: Kalen Hendrickson, 21, a professional drag queen from West Virginia WHEN: Sun.,

Nov. 16 The Tri-State All Star pageant was the definition of drag. The evening gown [competition] was amazing. I love pageants like this because it’s a competition, and these girls come here to perform. A bar venue is comfortable, and it’s cumbersome. So, this is where you see the real talent. Being a drag queen myself, I think some people take it for granted, and think dropping to the floor in 6-inch heels is so easy. It’s not. It’s extremely hard, and takes lot of stretching. I don’t have a favorite performer tonight because all of the girls that came on stage are legends. [Pageant co-founder] Kierra Darshell is the first lady of Pittsburgh. I’m an Arizona queen originally, so being here is totally different from the pageants out there. The drag queens here have open arms, and more of the straight community is involved in the LBGT community in Pittsburgh. BY DANIELLE FOX

area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum

dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. THE TOONSEUM. Comictanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY THU 20 GIVING THANKS FOR GREAT WINE. A wine tasting, presenting good Thanksgiving pairings. Hors d’oeuvres by executive chefs Pete Phillipy & Mike Henney. Entertainment by Ross Jennings. 6:30 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-224-6302. LATSHAW POPS ORCHESTRA & HAWAIIAN DANCERS. Hawaiian Christmas show & luncheon. 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. The Chadwick, Wexford. 724-853-4050. CONTINUES ON PG. 62


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& Steffi Domike w/ Ruth Fauman-Fichman. Commemorating the 2014 centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon & linking it to Jewish diaspora. Duquesne Library Gallery. Calling before visiting suggested. Uptown. 412-396-6130. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Magic of Everyday. By Mary Hamilton. Shadyside. 412-241-1528. THE FRAME GALLERY CARNEGIE MELLON. Power Loom. Kevin Brophy & Adam Milner explore the dynamics of the self & the social, power struggles, & gender/ body politics. Squirrel Hill. 412-268-2000. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Bountiful. A group exhibition all about food. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In. Take Off Your Shoes. Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Wild Abandon. New Paintings by Jason Woolslare. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns,

N E W S

Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art & committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created inresidence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MEXICO LINDO MERCADO Y GALERIA DE ARTESANIAS. Blood + Bones. Work by Mexican folk-art masters, remembering soldiers & civilians killed in U.S. wars in the Middle East and Mexican drug wars, plus ofrendas, honoring Nelson Mandela, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Maya Angelou, Lou Reed, more. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9984. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, &

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Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. The Perception of Value. Work by Dee Briggs. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Work by Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris & Patrick Schmidt. Garfield. 412-969-7689. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. The Album Art of Mozelle Thompson. A retrospective of album cover art by Mozelle Thompson. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. SLIMETIME. A 90s themed art show. Ft. work by Lizzee Solomon, Jordan Patton, Brian Gonnella, Christina Lee, Phyllis Kim, Jes LaVecchia, Maggie Negrete, Siena Baldi, Jess Paul, Megan Shalonis, Steph Neary, Andy Scott, Mike Madsen, Tim Currence, Mark Toneff. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Meta/ Morphoses. New work by Brian Lang & Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. Strip District. 412-261-7003. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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EXCLUSIVE REPEAL DAY PARTY

This December, Labatt will pay homage to the Speakeasies of the roaring 20’s with a Repeal Day party. This party will deliver a modern day vision of what made those times and places so great. Speakeasy 2014 is a nod to the exclusivity, the people, the fashions, and the edginess of old Prohibition establishments but with a contemporary 21st century flair.

FREE SAMPLES OF LABATT PROHIBITION BOURBON BARREL AND APPLE HARVEST.

CAVO NIGHTCLUB

TICKETS ARE NOT FOR SALE!

1916 Smallman St, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

REGISTER TO WIN AT

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5th, 9PM - 1AM

THIS PARTY IS FOR THE FLAPPERS AND GANGSTERS. COME DRESSED IN YOUR BEST PROHIBITION ATTIRE! Must be 21+ with valid photo ID and a ticket is required.

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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 60

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THU 20 - SAT 22 THE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade crafts by local artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

FRI 21 54TH ANNUAL LIGHT UP NIGHT. Tree lighting, Macy’s window unveiling, live music & other entertainment throughout Downtown. Also feat. the Duquesne Light Santa Spectacular at Point State Park. Downtown. 12-7 p.m. DUQUESNE LIGHT SANTA SPECTACULAR. Booths, treats & performances by North Star Kids, East End Kids, Mark Milovats, Nick Marzock, Michele’s Dance Center & Santa! Fireworks to Music Finale at 8:45 PM. 5 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-353-1350.

FRI 21 -SAT 22 BOULEVARD GALLERY’S ANNUAL HOLIDAY EVENT. Pottery, jewelry, sculptures, cards, photography, watercolor, oils, & acrylics. Fri, Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 29 Boulevard Gallery, Verona. 412-828-1031.

SAT 22 HOLIDAY ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW / COOKIE WALK. Featuring 50+ high-quality vendors. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. St.

Brendan’s Episcopal Church, Sewickley. 412-364-5974. A PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR-DOWNTOWN. Tour includes a visit to two historic churches, an organ recital, & light brunch. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 10 a.m. Nicholas Coffee and Teas, Downtown. 412-323-4709.

FRI 21 - SAT 22

SUN 23

FRI 21 - SUN 23

MYSTICAL PSYCHIC CHRISTMAS FAIR. Readers, mediums, Reiki healers, massage & chakra balancing, vendors, & a Chinese auction. 12-5 p.m. Library Fire Hall, South Park. 724-348-8063.

MON 24 - WED 26 THE HOLIDAY MARKET. Handmade crafts by local artisans. Sat, 12-4 p.m. and Mon-Fri, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 6 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

DANCE FRI 21 POINSETTIAS & POINTE SHOES. Gardens transitioning from fall to winter & vignettes from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s rendition of The Nutcracker. Reservations required. 6 & 7:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-454-9107.

SAT 22 LUZVIMINDA, A DANCE JOURNEY THROUGH THE ISLANDS. PhilippineAmerican Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh presents 22 various folk dances, w/ performances by singer Josephine Crooks. Dinner offered w/ second tier tickets. 4 p.m. Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-373-3239. RUN//HOUSE PARTY. PearlArts Studios & Staycee Pearl dance present an evening of performance & partying w/ DJ Soy Sos. 8-10 p.m. PearlArts Studios, Point Breeze. 412-512-5088.

SUN 23

SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fast-paced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination. Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 7:30 p.m. Marshall Middle School, Wexford. 724-934-6060.

THU 20 - WED 26

If the approaching holiday season has you in a reminiscent mood, the Carnegie Library Main Branch, in Oakland, offers an opportunity to share your memories. Home Movie Day, a celebration of amateur filmmaking held annually around the world, is a chance to dig out those old standard 8 mm, Super 8 or 16 mm films and screen your family archives — something you probably haven’t done in awhile. Films will be carefully shown on vintage projectors throughout the day. Check-in and film inspection begins at noon; screening runs 1-4:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 22. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. Call 412-622-3114 or email homemovieday.pgh@comcast.net

FRI 21

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LEW BRYSON BOOK SIGNING. Presenting & signing of “Tasting Whiskey” by Lew Bryson, managing editor of Whisky Advocate magazine. 6-8 p.m. Tender Bar + Kitchen, Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

LITERARY

SAT 22

THU 20 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. NOVIOLET BULAWAYO. Author of We Need New Names. Part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. TNY PRESENTS. Ft. readers: Christina Ailor, Caitlin Crawford, Scott Silsbe, Stefanie Wielkopolan & Laura Zurowski. BYOB. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

THU 20

CONTEMPORARY CHOREOGRAPHERS. Presented by Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100.

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KIDSTUFF

BODIOGRAPHY’S MULTIPLICITY CONCERT. Presented by La Roche College. Collaborative & artistic work while exploring each choreographer’s vision & talent. Students will share the stage w/ other Bodiography dancers. Nov. 21-22, 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

IMAGE TO WORD W/ AUTHOR SHERRIE FLICK. Writer’s workshop. Novice & experienced writers welcome. Create short stories & poems. Group discussion & one-on-one guidance. Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m., Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m. and Sat, 10:15 a.m.12:15 p.m. Thru Feb. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. LEW BRYSON BOOK SIGNING. Presenting & signing of “Tasting Whiskey” by Lew Bryson, managing editor of Whiskey Advocate magazine. 12-2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796. LEW BRYSON BOOK SIGNING. Presenting & signing of “Tasting Whiskey” by Lew Bryson, managing editor of Whiskey Advocate magazine. 6-9 p.m. East End Brewing Company, Larimer. 412-537-2337. LITTLE AS LIVING BOOK RELEASE PARTY. Meghan Tutolo’s release of “Little as

Living”. Additional readings by Stephanie Brea, Lori Jakiela, Kelly Scarff &Stefanie Wielkopolan. Food & drinks. 7:30 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

SUN 23 LEW BRYSON BOOK SIGNING. Presenting & signing of “Tasting Whiskey” by Lew Bryson, managing editor of Whiskey Advocate magazine. 2-4:30 p.m. Piper’s Pub, South Side. 412-381-2797.

MON 24 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 25 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 26 PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing Yehuda Amichai’s Poems of Jerusalem & Love Poems. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-POEM.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 21 SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fastpaced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination. Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 7 p.m. Moon High School, Moon. 412-456-6666.

SAT 22 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Presented by Pittsburgh Musical Theater & the West End Community. For kids age 4-10. Sat., Dec. 6 and Sat., Jan. 17 PMT Studios, West End. 412-539-0900. FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOLIDAY PARTY DECORATIONS W/ ARTIST DANNY DEVINE. Making decorations for the BGC’s Annual Holiday Party. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. KID CITY DANCE PARTY W/ DJ KELLYMOM. Indie dance party for kids. 1-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SKINK. A dream-like story told through a series of fastpaced vignettes portraying the journey of a grumpy old man who, with the help of


friends, eventually comes to believe in his own use of imagination. Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-456-6666.

TUE 25 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE FRI 21 - SAT 22 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400

TUE 25

RENAISSANCE DANCE David Lawrence Convention GUILD. Learn a variety of Center, Downtown. 412-708-1096. dances from the 15-17th IART SILENT AUCTION. centuries. Porter Hall, Room Raising funds for Breast Cancer A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Awareness. Ft. live music w/ Liz Mellon University, Oakland. Berlin from Rusted Root & the 412-567-7512. Rachel B Band. DJ H set & dancing. TIPSY HISTORY: SUNKEN 6:30-8:45 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip WHISKEY. Hosted by The District. 412-471-1400. Heinz History Center & ODDITIES.. AFTER DARK. Wigle Whiskey, an evening Explore oddities stored away of historic storytelling in the museum’s collection. interspersed w/ whiskey Ft music performed by tasting. 6-8:30 p.m. Anello. Drinks & Wigle Whiskey, Strip hor d’oeuvres. 6-10 p.m. District. 412-224-2827. Carnegie Museum “THE UNCLAIMED of Natural History, SHORTS” FILM Oakland. www. per a p FESTIVAL. A sketch 412-622-3288. pghcitym o .c comedy film festival PUBLIC ART hosted by Pittsburgh WALKING TOUR. comedian, Joe Eberle. A public art walking tour of 7:30 p.m. Cefalo’s Banquet the Allegheny County Courthouse. Center, Carnegie. 724-222-2893. 12-1 p.m. Allegheny County WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Courthouse, Downtown. Group acupuncture & guided 412-391-2060 x237. meditation for stress-relief. Thu., DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. THE BALMORAL CLASSIC 412-927-4768. GATHERING. A celebration WEST COAST SWING. Swing of all things piping & drumming dance lessons for all levels. Thu, ft. US Junior Solo Bagpiping 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, & Solo Snare Drumming Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. Championship Competition, concert, more. Nov. 21-22 TRANS*VOICES SUMMIT 2014. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Participants will learn to develop Oakland. 412-621-2400. their own story, while learning to teach others the same skills PITTSTOP LINDY HOP. to foster activism, advocacy, & 7 dances over 3 days for dancers organizing of the community of all ages & experience levels, around these essential issues. w/ live bands. Multiple locations. Nov. 20-23 Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, Nov. 21-23 412-242-4562. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 21 - SAT 22

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 26 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 20 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EBOLA CRISIS: IS OUR REGION PREPARED? A critical discussion on the Ebola Crisis & our region’s readiness – ft. infectious disease specialists; Amesh Adalja, Dr. Carrie DeLone, Dr. Karen Hacker, Amy Hartman, moderated by Dr. Joseph Maroon. 7:30 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-443-0700. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: DRUG POLICY. Panelists Dr. Peter Luongo, Akin Adepoju, Dr. Michael Kenney, & Dr. Caroline Acker will discuss drugs, drug policy & it’s implications all over the world. RSVP online. 6:30-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu., First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com.

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FRI 21 - SUN 23

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AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. EBOLA RELIEF SYMPOSIUM. Free symposium w/ light refreshments. Register online or by email. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. FRIDAY NIGHT CREATURE FEATURE. A creature painting & a creature movie. Fri, 7-11 p.m. Thru Jan. 22 The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 412-969-7197. GIVING BACK: HOW IT HELPS YOUR BUSINESS” PANEL & VOLUNTEER FAIR. Presented by the Pittsburgh Airport Area Chamber of Commerce. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. DoubleTree Hotel Green Tree, Green Tree. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. HOPE CONCERT FOR EBOLA. Benefit concert. 6 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

AUTUMN PITTSBURGH VINTAGE MIXER. Vintage vendors, local DJs, cocktails, food trucks & lectures. 9 a.m.3 p.m. Teamsters Hall Local 249, Lawrenceville. 412-682-3700. THE BREWS & THE BEES. Tours of Hitchhiker Brewing Company in Mt. Lebanon & Apis Mead & Winery in Carnegie. 11:30 a.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-323-4709. CELESTIAL LOFT PARTY. Listing party for Tairey’s new EP. Ft. drinks, food, music, & art. 7:30 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. FREE TENNIS CLINIC. For entry level tennis players ages 4 + or players wanting to get back into the sport. 3-4 & 4-5 p.m. The Glen Creek Tennis Club, South Park. 412-833-3080. THE GREAT PITTSBURGH SPELLING BEE. For adults. All proceeds benefit local charities. 7 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 484-888-2021. INTERNATIONAL SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE LOSS DAY. A gathering of suicide loss

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survivors to comfort & gain understanding through stories of healing & hope. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hyatt House, South Side. 724-344-1183. KOREAN II. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 31 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. PITTSBURGH HOME MOVIE DAY. This annual international event invites area residents to screen treasured family archives captured on standard 8, super 8 or 16mm film. All films will be handled and projected w/ archivist-level care on finely tuned vintage projectors. Home movies from the collection of The Orgone Archive will also be screened throughout the day. 12-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. PITTSBURGH RECORD FEST #12. Buy-Sell-Trade. All types of music. Over 25 dealers. 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Belvedere’s, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108.

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SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. THREE CENTURIES OF COFFEE & CHOCOLATE IN AMERICA. Meet in Hanna’s Tavern for a sampling &a brief history of the beverages. Heartier fare & dessert included. Reservations required. 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x215. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

WED 26

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH AMNESTY CONVERSATION INTERNATIONAL (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. www. per a p ty HUMAN RIGHTS Mount Lebanon Public pghci m o .c CAFE. Weekly letter Library, Mt. Lebanon. writing event. Sun, 412-531-1912. 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Oakland. 412-683-3727. Practice conversational English. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Second and Fourth Sun of every Oakland. 412-622-3151. month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie PFLAG WASHINGTON. Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Support, education & advocacy SUNDAY ART & FOOD for the LGBTQ community, family MARKET. Local artists & foodies. & friends. Fourth Wed of every Sun, 1-5 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 month First Presbyterian Church, The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. Downtown. 412-471-3436. 412-969-7197. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. TEA CLASS & TASTING. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. History of tea, steeping techniques, All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Storing Tea, Health Benefits, Union Project, Highland Park. more. Tea samples & European 412-363-4550. cookies will be served. Reservations WEST COAST SWING required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, Hill. 412-422-1606. South Side. 916-287-1373.

SUN 23

Actually, so are all the others.

insight on each production. Light refreshments. Register online. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6070.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 24 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RESONANCE WORKS. Seasonal cocktails, food, live performances by Resonance Works artists, & video clips of our past projects. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-607-1892. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

AUDITIONS 5TH ANNUAL SING-OFF HIGHMARK PITTSBURGH FIRST NIGHT. Student must submit 1 rendition of a Motown classic & 1 song of their choosing. Entry forms & guidelines on the Highmark First Night Pittsburgh 2015 website. Deadline midnight Nov. 21.

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SUBMISSIONS 2014-2015 WALDMAN INTERNATIONAL ARTS & WRITING COMPETITION. Seeking creative writing, short film & visual arts submissions from middle & high-schoolers exploring the theme of Real Life Superheroes in the Face of Persecution. Submissions accepted through Jan 15, 2015. 412-421-1500. ARTISTS & AUTHORS FESTIVAL. Seeking local artist & writers to display their work on Nov. 29. Call for information. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH Acting in partnership with the United Way’s Money in Your Pocket Coalition for Free Tax Preparation, NHCO is looking for volunteer tax-preparers to help low-income families. Help is needed at NHCO Millvale, on Saturday mornings, and at NHCO North Boroughs, on Monday and Tuesday evenings. Volunteers should have experience doing their own taxes, but required training is provided. Visit www.swpafreetaxes.org to register.

TUE 25 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. HOT METAL BLUES. Blues dancing. Lessons: 8-9pm. Dancing: 9 pm-12am. Tue, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 23 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: NEWSIES. Hosted by Christopher Rawson, this program allows patrons to gain

(preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a cappella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Casting for Animal Farm, actors & musicians age 16 & older. Dec. 1-2. Prepare two contrasting contemporary pieces totaling not more than 3 minutes & 16 bars of a song to sing a Capella. One of the pieces should incorporate movement. Audition form online. www.primestage.com Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. 412-445-0986.

GREENSBURG CIVIC THEATRE. Auditions for Perfect Wedding. Nov. 22. Seeking men & women ages 18-50. Reserve a spot at gctheatre.org/auditions.html. Walk-ins also accepted. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan

Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/ 08/25/call-for-artists-bicycle-racksin-the-cultural-district/


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 30-year-old trans guy, on T since college, happy and comfortable with my sexuality. However, I can’t find any helpful health info on a fetish I’ve developed: I insert needles directly into my clit, maybe an inch and a half in. I’m not talking through it, like a piercing, but into it, going in at the head and moving down into the shaft. As a trans man, this is a particularly tempting practice because, well, my clit is huge and I have a constant legal supply of safe, sterile needles. Still, I want to know if I am potentially causing permanent nerve damage. I’d like to keep my clit healthy and happy for future use! If one of your connections in the medical world has a sense of this, I’d love to know. STICKING THINGS IN CLIT KNOWLEDGEABLY

P.S. Your advice is a great and positive force in my life. Thank you. OK, STICK, I worked my medical-world connections and found someone who wasn’t just qualified to answer your question, but also willing to do it on the record. “Piercing and needling, if practiced in a safe and sterile manner, can be stimulating,” said Dr. Brian Fitzsimmons, a gynecologist in Vancouver, B.C. (obgynvancouver.ca), and a clinical associate professor at the University of British Columbia. “But permanent damage with needling can occur to the sensory receptors that allow us to experience pleasure and stimulation.” So the short answer to your question, STICK, is this: Yes, you are risking permanent damage. “There may be immediate risks with needling, such as bleeding and infection, in addition to long-term side effects,” said Fitzsimmons. “And potential long-term side effects are especially concerning in regards to very sensitive areas such as the glans of the penis or the clitoris. Short-term stimulation and excitement with needling has the potential to cause permanent damage, chronic discomfort and numbing of these areas. This is something that may not be correctable — even with surgery.” Some adult pleasures come with built-in risks, and an adult does a quick risk-reward analysis before deciding whether the potential reward is worth the risk. It’s your clit, STICK, and you’ll have to weigh the risks and rewards for yourself. But you won’t find me sticking needles in my clit. “If orgasm is mediated by the clitoris or the glans of the penis in the individual,” said Fitzsimmons, “this practice can cause loss of the ability to achieve orgasm.” In other words: Anyone who requires clit/ dick-head stimulation in order to get off — and that’s pretty much everyone with a clit and/or dick head — shouldn’t be sticking needles into their clit/dick head. A final thought from Dr. Fitzsimmons: “If you’re engaging in this type of practice, it’s important not to share needles, just like with any other sex toy. The risks of transmitting infections such as HIV, hepatitis, syphilis and other STIs need to be considered. Anyone having more questions on this or experiencing complications or problems should contact their local clinic or health-care provider.”

During the Jodi Arias trial, it was suggested that Arias made up the story about her and Travis Alexander practicing bondage so there was an excuse for why a knife would be nearby. I was wondering: How common is it for knives to be used or included in bondage scenarios? DON’T UNDERSTAND BONDAGE

I thought the Jodi Arias trial was long over, but nope: Arias is in the middle of a sentencing retrial. She’s the fucking Kim Kardashian of cold-blooded murderesses. Knife play is a kink unto itself, and while most knife-play scenes include bondage (helplessness heightening the eroticized threat), only a tiny percentage of bondage scenes include knives. People into rope bondage typically keep a sturdy pair of blunt-edged scissors in their playrooms or gear bags. The scissors are for emergencies, not for play — the last thing a panicking bondage bottom who needs to be untied now wants to see coming at them is a knife. I’m dating the man of my dreams. The only sticking point: He has a 5-year-old daughter from a previous relationship who lives with him full time (the mom is out of the picture). The kid is sweet, and the three of us get along great as a “family.” I’ve introduced my boyfriend to my kinks, which include tying him up. He’s been open and enthusiastic, and has discovered a love of being submissive. But he won’t be tied up when his daughter is in the apartment. There’s a lock on his bedroom door, but he says it’s got more to do with the psychology of the situation. This isn’t a big deal now because we don’t live together. (He gets a babysitter and comes over to my place.) But he’s asked me to move in. I want to, but I’m worried about frustration or resentment down the road if this part of our sex life becomes seriously limited.

“THE LAST THING A PANICKING BONDAGE BOTTOM WANTS TO SEE COMING AT THEM IS A KNIFE.”

CAN’T LET INNOCENT CHILD KNOW

The fact that your boyfriend gets a babysitter and comes over to your place is a good sign, CLICK. It means his daughter wasn’t so traumatized by the loss/disappearance of her mother that she can’t bear to be separated from her father for an evening. But living with a small child — a small child who doesn’t take a locked door for an answer (and most don’t) — will impact your sex life. But instead of thinking of her presence as a limitation, CLICK, think of it as a challenge. And this one seems like an easily solvable challenge: Right now when you want to tie him up, he gets a sitter and comes over to your place. In the future, once you’ve moved in together, you can drop the kid off at the sitter’s house and head home for a risk-of-kid-pounding-on-the-bedroom-door-free bondage scene. The limitations on your bondage sessions will be no greater once you’re living together. And invest in some blunt-edged scissors.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

On the Lovecast, Dan joins forces with the brothers McElroy from My Brother, My Brother and Me. Swoon! Listen at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.19-11.26

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many people use the terms “cement” and “concrete” interchangeably, but they are not the same. Cement is powdery stuff that’s composed of limestone, gypsum, clay with alumino-silicate and other ingredients. It’s just one of the raw materials that is used to make concrete — usually no more than 15 percent of the total mass. The rest consists of sand, crushed stone and water. Let’s regard this as a good metaphor for you to keep in mind, Scorpio. If you want to create a durable thing that can last as long as concrete, make sure you don’t get overly preoccupied with the “cement” at the expense of the other 85 percent of the stuff you will need.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Whatever returns from oblivion returns to find a voice,” writes Louise Glück in her poem “The Wild Iris.” I think that will be a key theme for you in the coming weeks. There’s a part of you that is returning from oblivion — making its way home from the abyss — and it will be hungry to express itself when it arrives back here in your regularly scheduled life. This dazed part of you may not yet know what exactly it wants to say. But it is fertile with the unruly wisdom it has gathered while wandering. Sooner rather than later, it will discover a way to articulate its raw truths.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “There is no revenge so complete as forgiveness,” said American humorist Josh Billings. I propose that we make that your motto in the coming weeks. It’s an excellent time to liberate yourself from memories that still cause you pain — to garner major healing from past anguish and upheaval. And one of the best ways to do that will

be to let go of as much blame and rage and hatred as you possibly can. Forgiveness can be your magic spell.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Denmark has been a pioneer in developing the technology to supply its energy needs with wind power. By 2020, it expects to generate half of its electricity from wind turbines. Recently the Danish climate minister also announced his nation’s intention to phase out the use of coal as an energy source within 10 years. I would love to see you apply this kind of enlightened long-term thinking to your own personal destiny, Aquarius. Now would be an excellent time to brainstorm about the life you want to be living in 2020 and 2025. It’s also a perfect moment to outline a master plan for the next 10 years, and commit to it.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean actor Sir Michael Caine has had an illustrious career. He has won two Oscars and been nominated for the award six times in five dif-

get your yoga on!

ferent decades. But for his appearance in Jaws: The Revenge, he was nominated for the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor. He confessed that his work in that film was not his best, and yet he was happy with how much money he made doing it. “I have never seen the film,” he said, “but by all accounts it was terrible. However, I have seen the house that it built, and it is terrific.” In accordance with the astrological omens, Pisces, you have permission to engage in a comparable trade-off during the coming months.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Someone on Reddit.com posed the question, “What have you always been curious to try?” In reply, many people said they wanted to experiment with exotic varieties of sex and drugs they had never treated themselves to before. Other favorites: eating chocolate-covered bacon; piloting a plane; shoplifting; doing a standup comedy routine; hang-gliding and deep-sea diving; exploring the Darknet and the Deep Web; spontaneously taking a trip to a foreign country; turning away from modern society and joining a Buddhist monastery. What would your answer be, Aries? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to explore what you have always been curious to try. The risks will be lower than usual, and the results more likely to be interesting.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

Contrary to popular opinion, crime-fiction author Arthur Conan Doyle never once had his character Sherlock Holmes utter the statement “Elementary, my dear Watson.” For that matter, Humphrey Bogart never actually said “Play it again, Sam” in the film Casablanca. Star Trek’s Captain Kirk never used the exact phrase “Beam me up, Scotty.” Furthermore I, Rob Brezsny, have never before issued the following prophecy: “Deep sexy darkness and deep sexy brilliance are conspiring to bring you Tauruses intriguing pleasures that will educate the naive part of your soul” — until now, that is. At this juncture in the ever-twisting plot of your life story, I am most definitely saying just that.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here are some thoughts from Gemini author Fernando Pessoa: “The feelings that hurt most, the emotions that sting most, are those that are absurd — the longing for impossible things; nostalgia for what never was; the desire for what could have been; regret over not being someone else.” Can you relate, Gemini? Have you felt those feelings? Here’s the good news: In the coming weeks, you will be more free of them than you have been in a long time. What will instead predominate for you are yearnings for very possible things and contentment with what’s actually available to you. (Pessoa’s words are from The Book of Disquiet, translated by Alfred Mac Adam.)

VWULSGLVWULFWVTXLUUHOKLOOQRUWKKLOOV

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The most important thing you can do in the coming weeks is learn how to take care of yourself better. What? You say you’re too busy for that? You have too many appointments and obligations? I disagree. In my astrological opinion, there’s one task that must trump all others, and that is get smarter about how you eat, sleep, exercise, relax, heal yourself and connect with people. I can assure you that there’s a lot you don’t know about what you really need and the best ways to get what you really need. But you are ripe to become wiser in this subtle, demanding and glorious art.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Naturalist Greg Munson says that many dragonflies are great acrobats. They are the “Cirque du Soleil” performers of the animal kingdom. Not only do they eat in mid-air, they also have sex. While flying, two dragonflies will hook up and bend into a roughly circular formation to accommodate the idiosyncrasies of their reproductive organs, thereby forming a “mating pinwheel.” I don’t expect you to achieve quite that level of virtuosity in your own amorous escapades, Leo. But if you’re adventurous, you could very well enjoy experiences that resemble having sex while flying.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Born under the sign of Virgo, Yuriy Norshteyn is a Russian animator who has won numerous awards. His Tale of Tales was once voted the greatest animated film of all time. But he hasn’t finished any new films for quite a while. In fact, he has been working on the same project since 1981, indulging his perfectionism to the max. In 33 years, he has only finished 25 minutes’ worth of The Overcoat, which is based on a story by Nikolai Gogol. But I predict that he will complete this labor of love in the next eight months — just as many of you other Virgos will finally wrap up tasks you have been working on for a long time.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Every saint has a bee in his halo,” said philosopher Elbert Hubbard. Similarly, some Libras have a passive-aggressive streak hidden beneath their harmony-seeking, peace-loving persona. Are you one of them? If so, I invite you to express your darker feelings more forthrightly. You don’t have to be mean and insensitive. In fact, it’s best if you use tact and diplomacy. Just make sure you reveal the fact that there is indeed a bee in your halo. I bet you will ultimately be pleased with the consequences you stir up through your acts of courageous honesty. Is there any place in your life where you think you’re doing your best but in fact you could do better? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

Rent -A- Bay

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION Eager to adopt your newborn. Will provide secure future, forever love. Doug & Scott 877-887-5034 ex pd.

STUDIES

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

412-403-6069

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Overactive Bladder?

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

412-650-6155

412-595-8077

FAV R

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. Evening Appointments Available

To pre-qualify for the FAVOR study, you must: k C@CRUCCL?LBWC?PQMD?Ć“C k &?TC?DCTCPMD?RJC?QR {$GDMTCPWC?PQMD ?Ć“C ?RJC?QR {$ k &?TCMPKMPCMDRFCDMJJMUGLĆ“QWKNRMKQ - Cough, sore throat, headache, nasal congestion, body aches and pains, or fatigue All study-related care is provided at no cost and payment for your time and travel will be provided.

To learn more about the FAVOR study, please visit www.favorustudy.com or contact:

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR

Downtown

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

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412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave. Open 24 hrs./7 Days

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

Help Women Around the World

Local doctors are currently conducting the FAVOR medical research study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational u medication for its ability to manage symptoms of the u.

TA S T E

724-519-7896

University of Pittsburgh

Most of the time, nothing good comes from having the u. Except now. If you get the u, OR have the u already, you can help evaluate an investigational medication that may help end u symptoms more quickly.

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1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

Bodyworks SmokING STUDY Xin Sui Grand Opening

Do us a favor and share your Flu with us. Please.

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$60/hr FREE Table Shower

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

07242013

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

MASSAGE

Are you a woman between 45 and 65 years old? The University of Pittsburgh Center for Family Planning Research is looking for postmenopausal women who want to help women through an important research safety study of a vaginal ring to prevent HIV. Women will have 5 visits at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and complete 2 phone calls over approximately 5 months. Call 412-641-5496 today to see if you are eligible or visit www.birthcontrolstudies.org Eligible participants will be compensated up to $500 for their time an travel. +

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CAR HAULERS/OWNER OPERATORS WANTED CDL and 2 years of car hauling experience required Brand new trucks available, ask about our lease program. Contact Doug Fellows at 303-809-3976 or dfellows@supremeauto.biz.

BE YOUR OWN BOSS as an Independent Contractor with Uber. Make up to $25/hour driving your own car.

SIGN UP TODAY: T.UBER.COM/PGHDRIVE

Innovative Approach. Shared Vision

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF Earn extra cash for the holidays! Looking for a non-traditional schedule? Work a FT block shift! Work 2 ½ days and be a full-time employee with a once a week commute—have 4 ½ days off every week! Provide 1:1 care in our residential homes throughout the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties! -FT Block Shifts -PT Support Staff

-FT Awake Overnight -PT Awake Overnight

Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org Questions? Call a recruiter at 724-933-5100 ext. 142

Ask us about our upcoming on-the-spot interviews! 68

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

U.S. Census Bureau is hiring Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.


*Stuff We Like

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Beer Flights

Mount Washington’s Bigham Tavern offers a flight of four craft brews for $10. Stop in soon for the Weyerbacher Merry Monks.

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137 {PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Dero Bicycle Fixit Stations There are now more than a dozen of these amenities around town, each with an air pump and a variety of tools strung on cables. (This one’s by Downtown’s Century Building Bike Parking Station, on Seventh Street.) They’re like free clinics for bikes. Finder map at www.bike-pgh.org

The Knickerbocker Russell Company logo Big Nick’s adorable overalls are made completely from the “K” in the name. It’s hard not to smile when spotting the logo from along the Parkway West.

This Changes Everything In arguably the year’s most important book, author and journalist Naomi Klein contends that we can either address the desperately urgent problem of climate change or we can have global capitalism — but not both. Klein tackles everything from the dangers of unconventional fossil fuels to corporate greenwashing and geo-engineering, and sketches a democratic way forward.

A Most Wanted Man One of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s last films, and a perfect encapsulation of why we’ll miss the late actor: In this drama, Hoffman plays a worldweary, depressed spy who is undone by the tiny spark of hope and humanity that all the late nights, booze and cynicism can’t extinguish. Now on DVD

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{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Grandview Bakery This Mount Washington shop sits in the middle of the Shiloh Street main business district. This month, it’s featuring “Movember Mustache” cookies. 225 Shiloh St.

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Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

NOW TAKING PATIENTS

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

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Suboxone

Effective treatment for Opiate addiction NOW AVAILABLE at TWO PITTSBURGH LOCATIONS

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Recovery Without Judgement™

Immediate Appointments Available

Acute Partial Program Individual and Group Counseling

Outpatient Program Most Insurances and Medical Assistance Accepted

Conveniently Located on Bus Line Pittsburgh Outpatient 306 Penn Ave. (412) 436-4659

Pregnant?

South Side Outpatient

We can treat you!

For more information, call 24 hours

2100 Wharton St. (412) 481-1922

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

1-888-694-9996

www.pyramidhealthcarepa.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com 70

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.19/11.26.2014

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com


HOPPING WESTWARD Great American Beer Festival puts Pittsburgh brewers on display {BY REBECCA JOHNSON}

FOR AMERICAN craft-beer brewers and drinkers, Denver’s Great American Beer Festival is the pinnacle. The wildly popular event — held this year from Oct. 2-4, with tickets selling out in just 32 minutes — is comprised of three parts: a beer competition, with 5,507 beers entered by 1,309 breweries; a beer festival, where over 700 breweries poured their brews; and various beer-related classes. The festival is open to breweries of all sizes, and Pittsburgh and its breweries were well represented. One, Fat Heads Brewery — which is based outside of Cleveland but operates a saloon of the same name on the South Side — not only participates in the competitions, but is also a sponsor. The brewery has won a medal in each of the six years it’s participated, and this year was no different. The brewery won a gold medal for AlpenGlow, a German-style wheat ale. Even with all the beer-related hardware, the brewery’s first reason for attending GABF has nothing to do with medals.

general public. The number of sales contacts we made here is incredible.” Lowther says traveling to Denver from Pittsburgh for the festival is well worth the effort because of the contacts that can be made from one event. The owners of Zelienople’s ShuBrew took a different approach to the festival. As first-time GABF attendees, they entered four of their beers into the competition but didn’t have a tasting booth. “Maybe within five years or so,” says Erika Shumaker, who co-owns ShuBrew with her husband, Zach. “We’d also like to bring more of our staff along with us, perhaps even using [the trip] as an incentive.” Since ShuBrew is a relatively new brewery (recently celebrating its one-year anniversary), the Shumakers looked at their first trip to GABF — meeting other brewers and listening to their tips — as a learning experience. They attended many of the brewers’ seminars and picked up advice on food and beer pairings that they hope to use in their brewpub. They also spent time tasting the

IN AN INDUSTRY WHERE COMPETITION IS FIERCE, ANY CHANCE TO SHOW OFF YOUR PRODUCT IS WELCOME. “It’s the camaraderie,” says Geoff Stober, a brewery representative and general manager of the South Side saloon. “The bonds you build with other brewers in the industry, the excitement you get from watching your friends win medals. […] There are just so many good people in this industry.” Donnie Knight, sales manager of Slippery Rock’s North Country Brewing, sees the festival as a chance for smaller brewers to grow their markets. The brewery entered competitions and ran a booth so that the nearly 50,000 festival-goers could sample its beers. North Country just started canning its beers within the last year and is poised to send its product out to a wider range of distribution. “Here at GABF, we’ve served our beers to bottle-shop and bar owners from all over the country,” Knight said. “Distributors in Cleveland, Florida, even as far away as Idaho are interested in our beers.” North Country may have even opened the door to a collaboration beer with a large brewery in Colorado. In an industry where competition is fierce, any chance to show off your product is welcome. “I realized how much good beer there is out there, and just how limited shelf space is,” he said. Robbie Lowther, regional sales manager for Erie Brewing Company, agrees: “It’s a great way to get our beers out to the N E W S

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beers of medal winners in the same categories that they entered. “We wanted to see how we could improve our beers,” said Shumaker. But you don’t have to attend the show to benefit from it. Four Seasons Brewing Company, of Latrobe, has been in business for just over a year and didn’t have the funds to send any staff to GABF. It did, however, ship three of its beers to Denver to be judged. Four Seasons won a silver medal in the Oatmeal Stout category for its “Darkside of the Pint.” When asked about the financial investment to submit the beers, brewer and owner Mark Pavlik said it was “definitely worth it.” GABF medal winners typically see huge growth in the demand for those beers, as well as an increase in sales in general. Consumers might be drawn to the brewery for its medal-winning beer, but they usually stay to try other beers. And regardless of what initially drew local brewers to the GABF, most will return in 2015. “We’ll definitely be back,” said Erika Shumaker. “Definitely.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Rebecca Johnson is a Pittsburgh-based craft-beer journalist. When she’s not writing for her beer blog, beerPittsburgh.com, she can be found hunting down rarities in the beer aisle and researching ways to add square footage to her beer cellar.

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

November 19, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 47

November 19, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 47