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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 11.05/11.12.2014

OLD SCHOOL: INAUGURAL RETRO VIDEO-GAME CON COMES TO TOWN 16


EVENTS 11.7 – 5pm M . E . : THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

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OUT

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

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12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

Isabella Rossellini in Green Porno

12.29 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 29 from 10am to 5pm.

11.21 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | visit www.ticketmaster.com

The Warhol and the Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History welcome the iconic actress, performer and model, Isabella Rossellini to the Carnegie Music Hall for a special presentation of her one-woman show, Green Porno. Adapted from the Sundance Channel series of the same name, Rossellini has crafted a uniquely thoughtful, odd and comical performance-lecture with projected illustrations that celebrates biodiversity while focusing on mating rituals and insects and marine life - an imaginative tour de force that sits aptly at the intersection of art and science.

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12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND ASSISTANT CURATOR OF FILM AND VIDEO GREG PIERCE Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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N I E V O M AL I C E SP

walnut capital

THE BEST IN CITY .com LIVING


11.05/11.12.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 45

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS] been a huge public-health 06 “There’s campaign about early screening for kids with autism. But it has really oriented our social concept of autism as a little-kid disorder.” — Lindsay Shea of the Alert Collaborative on the need for services for the growing number of adults with autism

[VIEWS] Pittsburgh truly accessible for 18 “Making all isn’t just about adding curb-cuts and ramps.” — Charlie Deitch on the challenges of a truly accessible Pittsburgh

[TASTE]

23

“Try rumaniyya — an eggplant, lentil and pomegranate stew whose spices summon North Africa.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the new Palestinian fare at Conflict Kitchen

[MUSIC]

presumes that they have the 28 “That money to invest in the first place.” — Anne Mulgrave, of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, on the limited efficacy of tax incentives for music clubs and other small businesses looking to improve accessibility

[SCREEN] it’s easy for an outsider to 40 “Iseethink what’s special about Pittsburgh.”

[ARTS] may I help you’s the general 43 “How question to want to ask everyone.” — Ann Lapidus on accessibility in the arts

[LAST PAGE]

are too many people who never 63 “There recovered.” — Bill Generett, of Urban Innovation 21, on the need to revitalize all Pittsburgh neighborhoods

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 STUFF WE LIKE 60 +

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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ROCK • COUNTRY • POP • DANCE

FERRIS BUELLER’S REVENGE NOVEMBER 15 THE STICKERS

{ADMINISTRATION}

NOVEMBER 8

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE HOBBS SISTERS & KEVIN DALE

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— Colin Healey on his locally produced film Homemakers

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“IN ADULTHOOD, THE SYSTEMS REALLY DO FALL AWAY.”

INCOMING The Gathering Field reunites with a new album after a dozen years [Oct. 29] “I’ve been a Gathering Field fan since the beginning. After that, [I] have followed Bill. One year we went to see him so often my husband said he felt like a groupie! We even rode on the bike to Hartwood Acres, wound up in a thunderstorm and had an hour-plus ride home in the rain. Keep up the good work! It’s hard to find songwriters today that actually write lyrics!” — Web comment from “Still Lost” “Always will love Gathering Field! We’ve followed them for 20+ years. Great music and Bill has one of the best voices around. So glad to see them back together!” — Web comment from “Susan Williamson Marcinko”

Pittsburgh’s ‘80s funk band The Assignment gets new life from Internet interest [Oct. 29] “Great article about many years of commitment & hard work by such a talented family. Support throwback records and add The Assignment to your musical collection!” — Web comment from “Char Gandy-Applewhite”

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Cori Frazer with her emotionalsupport dog, Aiden

THE OTHER END OF THE

As more juveniles with autism become adults, can the system that supports them keep up with demand? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

“Explained the city food truck laws to seven people so far today. Two were #Pittsburgh police officers.” — Oct. 31 tweet from “PGH Taco Truck” (@PGHTacoTruck)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

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CROSS HIS 19 years, Christopher Merchant hit milestones his family was never sure he’d make. First diagnosed broadly with pervasive developmental disorder, Christopher didn’t eat or swallow properly and had trouble sitting up. “We knew there was something wrong with our second son,” says Lisa Merchant, Christopher’s mother, “because he was nothing like the first.” Christopher has since been diagnosed with a disorder on the autism spectrum. And while he’s developmentally more like an elementary-school student than a high schooler, he’s learned to read and do simple math problems, achievements his mother says were partly made possible by a range of therapies — including most recently at Upper St. Clair High School. He works three hours a day at a


job placement with a South Hills car dealership, too, where a one-on-one aide helps keep him on track. But Christopher’s interest in cars can also get him into trouble. “He loves cars,” his mother explains, but it’s “a big danger because he has no fear of them.” Sometimes, when they’re walking through a parking lot, he’ll stop to crawl under one, fascinated to see if it’s the kind with a spare tire attached underneath — or he’ll wander out into the middle of a street to get a better look. “He’s getting better; we’re working on it.” The job placement, therapies and programs he’s benefited from throughout his childhood have been largely positive, Merchant says. They’ve helped him do everything from eating solid foods (McDonald’s burgers are a favorite) to successfully verbalizing his thoughts. “It’s like learning a sport or playing an instrument: The more therapy he gets, the better he gets at it,” Merchant says. But for all the progress, there’s a looming concern. Once Christopher turns 21, he’ll no longer be guaranteed therapies for his feeding problems or speech. His one-on-one support at the dealership may no longer be funded. More pressing: There may simply be nowhere for him to go during the day. “Our biggest fear is he won’t end up with funding and he’ll end up sitting on the couch,” says Merchant. “My school district does a really good job — I’m just afraid all their good work will be for naught.” Christopher and his family aren’t alone and they’re standing at the precipice of one of the country’s biggest public-health problems: An unprecedented wave of people with autism are “aging out” of high school and it’s uncertain what their lives will look like once supports and services are no longer guaranteed by the government. Since 2005, the number of people with autism in Pennsylvania alone has more than doubled, from about 20,000 people to more than 55,000, and adults are the fastest-growing group. The number of adults (21 and older) with autism saw a 334 percent increase from 2006 to 2011. In 2013, there were 8,395 adults with autism in the state. By 2020, that number is expected to top 30,000. When people with autism are in school, “they show up every day in a place where there are teachers or one-to-one supports or an autism-support classroom where they’re getting some version of services during all those hours,” says Lindsay Shea, director of the eastern region of the ASERT Collaborative — a state-funded initiative to ensure services for people with autism are more readily available. “In adulthood, the

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systems really do fall away.” In some respects, Pennsylvania has been at the forefront of solving this particular policy problem. In 2007, the state created a Bureau of Autism Services (BAS), designed to centralize services and programs. BAS even administers its own Medicaid waiver program, the primary way people with autism get funding to continue services once they’re adults. And the state started an Adult Community Autism Program, one of the first home/community-based managed-care programs for people with autism (though it’s only available in four counties, not including Allegheny). “Pennsylvania has remained at the cutting edge of looking at the needs of the population and coming up with systemic responses,” says Nina Wall, director of BAS. Still, the programs are small compared with demand. A state report found that even though BAS has created specific programs for adults with autism, “the current funding level will serve only a fraction of the adults who will require support over the next five years.” The state’s autism-needs assessment — one of the most comprehensive in the country — found that as people with autism transition to adulthood, “the needs for supports and services often increase, although services become more difficult to access.” The Medicaid waivers that help provide funding for adults with intellectual disabilities and autism, for instance, have lists with over 15,000 people waiting for services. Christopher Merchant is one of them. And if there was more funding for autism services, it isn’t even clear which interventions might be most effective. “There’s been a huge public-health campaign about early screening for kids with autism. But it has really oriented our social concept [of] autism as a little-kid disorder,”

Shea says. “The problem is, without that same kind of knowledge base for adults, they’re kind of flying blind.” CORI FRAZER used to wonder whether

she should tell potential employers she’s autistic. “I tried to disclose once in a cover letter and I never heard back,” she says. Now she avoids mentioning it. Over the past couple months, she estimates she’s sent out a dozen job applications to every nonprofit social-service agency she can think of and “I’ve been to a lot of interviews. I don’t know what I do wrong, but I don’t get hired.” Though Frazer has been autistic her entire life, she wasn’t diagnosed until last year. “I read a lot about people being diagnosed as adults and it was like looking in a mirror,” the 23-year-old Frazer says. “I realized things I’d struggled with weren’t personal failings.” Since the diagnosis, autism has become a central part of Frazer’s life. To her, it isn’t just an explanation of why she asks any question that pops into her head — or why, at age 5, she memorized every single breed of cat recognized in the United States. She isn’t afraid to correct you if you refer to her as “a person with autism.” Instead, she prefers “autistic person” because “autism is a really big part of my identity. It isn’t something you can leave behind — I don’t need to be reminded of my personhood.” But unlike many of her autistic peers, she never benefited from the individualized education plans, therapies and other supports that many on the spectrum automatically receive. And while she was an excellent student at West Greene High School — not far from where she grew up in rural Greene CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

REPLICATING MOLDINGS IN YOUR HOME - REGIS WILL Regis Will, woodworker and owner of Vesta Home Services, will teach participants how to make short runs of molding for repair and replacement using a tool called a scratch stock. Using provided materials from the home center to students will create a profiled tool and use it to shape a molding. Participation from the audience is actively encouraged. Come learn this method and use some tools.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8 • 10:00 - 11:30 AM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

744 REBECCA AVENUE

412-471-5808

WITH THE

DECEMBER 9 • HEINZ HALL

Ring in your holiday season with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and singing sensations Celtic Thunder at Heinz >vœÀ̅iˆÀwÀÃ̇iÛiÀÃޓ«…œ˜Þ̜ÕÀti>ÌÕÀˆ˜}ÌÀ>`ˆÌˆœ˜> V>ÀœÃ]“œ`iÀ˜…œˆ`>Þv>ۜÀˆÌiÃ>˜`È}˜>ÌÕÀi iÌˆV/…Õ˜`iÀ ܘ}ψŽiºÀi>˜`½Ã >]»̅iwÛi܏œˆÃÌÃœv iÌˆV/…Õ˜`iÀ — Keith Harkin, Neil Byrne, Ryan Kelly, Colm Keegan and ““iÌÌ "½>˜œ˜ p «iÀvœÀ“ˆ˜} ܈̅ ̅i ܜÀ`‡V>Ãà musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra promise a ˜ˆ}…Ì̜Ài“i“LiÀt

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For tickets call 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org Download the Layar app and scan this ad to see much more!

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County — once she got to the University of Pittsburgh, the routine she’d mastered was gone. “I was just completely out of sync,” Frazer recalls. “I’d get really absorbed in a special interest and not eat or sleep or shower.” She says she loved the freedom — and liked living closer to her boyfriend, whom she’s still dating. But she’d also spend hours on end playing Pokémon. Frazer managed to graduate with a degree in social work — barely. She struggled through a number of setbacks, including the realization as soon as she got to campus that she has prosopagnosia, or an impaired ability to recognize faces, which made it difficult to make friends. After her brother was killed in a car crash, she was unable to complete that semester’s coursework. Now, she’s hoping to find a job before applying to grad school for social work next year — and has applied for services from the state to help her. Heather Conroy, a clinical social worker who privately works with and coaches autistic adults, explains that people with autism may need help preparing for job interviews because they’re filled with behavioral questions that are difficult to interpret. Take the common question: “‘Why would I hire you over someone else?” A person with autism might say, “Well I don’t know, I haven’t met them,” Conroy says. “[An autistic person’s] experience of this question is the literal language; your experience is ‘sell yourself.’” And because autism may be an entirely invisible disability to an employer, “There is this expected level of [social] competency,” Conroy says, even if it’s irrelevant to the job. To help overcome some of these problems, Frazer applied for a job counselor through the state’s Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in the hopes of finding someone who can help her overcome the perception that she “come[s] off as withdrawn in interviews.” In the meantime, she’s starting a Pittsburgh chapter of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, a Washington, D.C.-based organization she hopes to work for one day. But like many with autism, Frazer is waiting. She applied for a counselor three months ago; it isn’t clear when she’ll get one.

he’s on a waiting list to see if he’ll get state funding so he can continue services like the one-on-one job coach he currently has. “There are cases where family members have lost their jobs because they can’t leave their kids home alone,” explains Lisa Tesler, policy coordinator for the PA Waiting List Campaign. “It’s a very significant problem.” The fight to provide appropriate services for people with autism once they’re adults largely centers on Medicaid waiver programs. “Prior to 1981, your only option was to receive supports and services through an institutional setting,” Tesler explains. The waivers were designed to give states a way of supporting services with the “same level of support in your home or community,” while avoiding institutionalization. Until 2008, there was no specific waiver program for adults with autism. Instead, people with autism had to rely partly on two intellectual-disability waiver programs — the Person/Family Directed Support Waiver (P/ FDS), which provides up to $ 30,000 per year, and the Consolidated Waiver, which has no funding limit. (On average, participants in the consolidated program received about $ 108,000 worth of services last fiscal year, and the waiver is generally used by people with more costly residential/grouphome placements.) “In Pennsylvania, and many other states, there wasn’t a queue for people to get in if they weren’t [intellectually disabled],” explains Wall, the director of the state’s autism bureau. That’s partly why the state created an Adult Autism Waiver. It can allow certain services to continue and is available to anyone with autism regardless of IQ; nearly half of children diagnosed with autism have normal or high IQs. The autism waiver “is pretty unique and seems to work well for adults who are living with families and don’t need 24-hour supervision or support,” says David Gates, a lawyer with the Pennsylvania Health Law Project. And while enrollment in the Adult Autism Waiver has increased every year since 2008 — and the legislature has authorized 100 more slots — it only served 424 people last fiscal year and has an “interest list” with 1,177 people. The intellectual-disability waivers — available to people with autism with lower IQs — serve a combined 28,248 people and have a waiting list of about 14,000.

“AUTISM IS A REALLY BIG PART OF MY IDENTITY”

is waiting, too. Though he’s been happy at school and working at the car dealership,

CHRISTOPHER MERCHANT

CONTINUES ON PG. 12


TITLE SPONSOR

NEXT AT HEINZ HALL WE ARE NOT ALONE.

IGUDESMAN AND JOO: BIG NIGHTMARE MUSIC November 28 & 30

CONDUCTOR: Manfred Honeck VIOLIN: Aleksey Igudesman (Debut) PIANO: Hyung-ki Joo (Debut) Igudesman and Joo expand their duo show to a full orchestra presentation featuring uproarious sketches and stunning solos. BNY Mellon Grand Classics

BEETHOVENFEST: THE REVOLUTIONARY December 5 -7

CONDUCTOR: Manfred Honeck Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Opus 67 Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major, Opus 92

SC C I-F F I S PEC C TA ACU U LA AR

BNY Mellon Grand Classics

HOSTED E BY GEORGE TAKEI

HIGHMARK HOLIDAY POPS

NO OVEMBER 14-16

December 12-14 & 20-21 CONDUCTOR: Todd Ellison DIRECTOR: Betsy Burleigh Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh

CONDUCTOR Jack Everly

VOCALIST Kristen Plumley

WAGNER’S “GOOD FRIDAY SPELL”

DIRECTOR, Betsy Burleigh Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh

January 23 & 25

Experience an out-of-this-world concert conducted by the world-renowned Jack Everly and featuring music from 2001: A Space Odyssey, Star Trek, E.T., Close Encounters of the Third Kind and more. This extraterrestrial journey through the music of classic Sci-Fi TV and movies comes complete with special effects and costume changes.

CONDUCTOR: James Gaffigan PIANO: Gabriela Montero Bates: White Lies for Lomax (Pittsburgh Symphony Premiere) Ravel: Concerto in G major for Piano and Orchestra Wagner: ”Good Friday Spell” from Parsifal Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 5 in D major, Opus 107, “Reformation” BNY Mellon Grand Classics

For tickets and times: 412.392.4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org 14SYM277_SciFi_CP_9.25x9.75_FINAL.indd + 1 N E W S

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

“It’s a national problem and there are advocates at the federal level to make home and community services for everyone who has Medicaid,” says the Waiting List Campaign’s Tesler. “But it’s expensive — that’s really what it comes down to.” It’s also complicated. People with autism don’t just have to navigate one social-service system, the Health Law Project’s Gates explains, and “There’s some confusion about which service system to choose. There are pros and cons to each, and each has its own eligibility rules, intake procedures, service providers and services.” Tesler adds that for parents of children with autism, “I have to understand Medicaid rules, I have to understand Medicaid law, I have to understand [the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation’s] rules, I have to understand Social Security … I have to find doctors in my community. Trying to coordinate everything is a real challenge.” Lisa Merchant is optimistic Christopher will get off the P/FDS waiting list by the time he’s 21 — and for now, the odds look good. The legislature has created enough P/ FDS waiver slots to meet the demand of current high school graduates, Tesler says, though it won’t reduce the overall number of people on the waiting list. Creating those slots for high school graduates is also a “year-by-year decision. There’s no assurance to families that there will be [funding],” Tesler says.

For Merchant, though, getting her son off the intellectual-disability waiver waiting list isn’t an abstract policy problem. When Christopher Merchant turns 21, getting waiver funding could affect his — and his parents’ — ability to keep their jobs. The waiver “would allow transportation to and from his place of employment and it would pay for an aide to go with him and help him,” Merchant explains. “If we don’t get off the waiting list, basically he’ll have no services.” The autism bureau’s Wall acknowledges being on a waiting list creates a lot of uncertainty among parents. “It’s a really hard thing when you have families who call and they have a 20- [or] 21-year-old son or daughter and they are rightly concerned about the future. I don’t have an answer.” But Wall adds that there’s a benefit to having a relatively small autism waiver for the moment: “While our programs are small, [we’re] going to improve them,” she says. Not everyone with autism will need a waiver, she adds, and the bureau is making strides in serving as a hub for parents and offering novel programs like the Adult Autism Waiver. For now, Lisa Merchant isn’t panicking. She’s confident their family will be able to figure something out if Christopher doesn’t get funding. But the stakes are high: “I just want him to have a place to go in the morning he’s happy to go to. […] To have a purpose.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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Bring in this ad to receive 25% OFF one item. Offer valid at participating stores until 11/30/14. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs or Traveler’s Finds. One coupon per customer per day.

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URBAN CHALLENGES

Traversing the city can be tough for those with disabilities {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} FOR SQUIRREL HILL resident Paul O’Hanlon,

presents

PofE T the WEEK

Photo credit: Linda Mitzel

Angel This sweet soul is patiently waiting for a calm, loving home in which she can spend her golden years. Angel envisions herself lounging in front of a TV or sitting on a porch watching the traffic go by. She enjoys riding in the car and is a well behaved passenger. Angel appears to get along with other dogs and may not mind sharing a home with cats. Because she is an older girl, we recommend that Angel live in a home with children over ten who will respect her space.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 14

traversing city streets in the winter months comes with an extra set of challenges. A trip over Pittsburgh’s crumbling sidewalks and pothole-ridden streets carries added danger when these same streets and sidewalks are covered with snow and ice. “Winter is long in Pittsburgh,” says O’Hanlon, who uses a wheelchair. “It has a way of keeping me in the house, because if people don’t shovel their walks, I just can’t get around.” Of the many barriers to accessibility in the city, snow is one the city can control. The city’s snow-removal ordinance requires property owners to clear their sidewalks of snow and ice within 24 hours, and residents can be fined if they don’t comply. Other challenges, though, are more difficult to address. In a city like Pittsburgh, with its outdated infrastructure, increasing accessibility is often a game of catch-up that requires upgrading existing structures and systems, many of which fall outside of the city’s jurisdiction. As a member of the City-County Task Force on Disabilities, O’Hanlon has been working on these issues for more than a decade. “When we started, Downtown had almost no curb cuts on the sidewalks, so there’s been an enormous change since then, but there’s always more work to do,” says O’Hanlon. “One of the things we’re stuck with from our historical legacy is we have lots of buildings and streets that were built before accessibility was a consideration.” One of the greatest challenges to accessibility in Pittsburgh cited both by the task force and respondents to a recent accessibility survey is businesses with one-step barriers. “When you go to some neighborhoods, for example Bloomfield, there’s a high concentration of businesses that have what we call a one-step barrier,” O’Hanlon says. “That one step at the entryway is enough of a step that I can’t get up it with my wheelchair.” Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, business owners must remove physical barriers that are achievable “without much difficulty or expense.” But ensuring private businesses comply doesn’t fall under the purview of the city, and complaints must be made to the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. “The city is not in the position to enforce ADA. All we can do is advise,” says city ADA coordinator Richard Meritzer.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

“We are not in a position to enforce any of the federal laws.” What the city can do is implement programs like its One-Step Project, which helps expedite and streamline the process of renovating buildings. The city helps by pre-approving renovation plans and waiving city fees. “I think we’ve taken nice steps so far, but it still seems like we haven’t changed many of those businesses from having one-step barriers to no-step barriers,” says O’Hanlon. “We’re not helping fund those renovations and maybe we should.” Chris Noschese, another member of the task force, believes the city could help increase accessibility if the ADA office kept records of which buildings don’t meet accessibility requirements. “I’m not talking about penalizing businesses and companies,” says Noschese. “I just think it would be better for someone buying an old building to know that there is an ADA issue there. Owners have been leaving it alone and leaving it up to buyers to bring these buildings up to date and up to code.” Another way the city has helped increase building accessibility is by passing a visitability ordinance, which provides a tax writeoff for newly constructed homes built without a step in the entry way. Homeowners can also get a write-off for renovating their homes to make them more accessible. “If you look around at most homes in your neighborhood, it seems that virtually every house in Pittsburgh has steps leading into it,” O’Hanlon says. “Most of the people I’m friends with, I can’t go into their homes. So much of what we do as a society happens in our homes, so for people with mobility impairments, that’s kind of isolating.” But even though the city’s visitability ordinance was passed in 2004, the actual Residential Visitability Tax Credit Program wasn’t rolled out until 2008. Today, the city’s ADA compliance officer works to ensure more people are taking advantage of the program. While progress has been made in making the city and county more physically ac-

cessible, O’Hanlon says inaccessibility persists, especially for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or blind. The task force’s latest mission is to increase accessibility at the airport. “At the airport, there are so many announcements, so much is happening that’s audible, there’s not a good equivalent system for people who are deaf and hard of hearing,” O’Hanlon says. “Lots of people talk about missing gate reassignments.” While city government can’t address all of the area’s accessibility issues, the $ 30 million 2015 capital budget does present an opportunity for advocates to increase accessibility in city infrastructure. In a survey of 50 individuals conducted by the Accessibility Meetup group, respondents listed increased handicap parking, smooth sidewalks, maintained curb cuts and audible traffic lights as ways funding could be used to improve accessibility. “A lot of people had comments about intersections and sidewalks, which present different challenges and dangers to people depending on their disabilities,” says Gabe McMorland, one of the Accessibility Meetup’s founders. “The difference between the things we should be spending money on and the amount of money the city has is staggering. There’s a sense of urgency about everything. These things might seem low on the list, but I think if sidewalk conditions are affecting someone’s ability to get somewhere, then that’s important.” In addition to championing for accessibility projects in the capital budget, the Accessibility Meetup is also working to make accessibility in Pittsburgh a top priority. Instead of having accessibility be an afterthought, advocates want accessibility to be a fixture in every new development throughout the city. “It’s pretty common to talk about how environmentally sustainable something is,” says McMorland. “So, we just want that same kind of broad awareness for accessibility. Whenever someone’s designing a building or a city streetscape, then it’s got to be accessible.”

“ONE OF THE THINGS WE’RE STUCK WITH FROM OUR HISTORICAL LEGACY IS WE HAVE LOTS OF BUILDINGS AND STREETS THAT WERE BUILT BEFORE ACCESSIBILITY WAS A CONSIDERATION.”

RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Penn State Greater Allegheny 11 th Annua l

A

T ll

a h

z z a J t ’s

Scholarship Benefit Saturday, November 8 7: 00 p.m. | Student Community Center

ga.psu.edu | 412-675-9180

ONE NIGHT ONLY!

THREE ACTORS voice the dozens of characters

A FOLEY ARTIST creates all the sound effectss

G R A T

A PIANIST

plays a cinematic score

RT A E ET

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14 BYHAM THEATER

H

BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

TRUSTARTS.ORG 412-456-6666

WHILE MORE THAN INDIVIDUAL FULL-COLORR

1250 COMIC BOOK PANELSS tell a hilarious Sci-Fi Adventure

GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

story from an enormous Movie Screen N E W S

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GAME ON

Video-game nostalgia on tap for inaugural Retro Gaming Expo {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} JAMES DEIGHAN has a serious addiction to

quite possibly the worst video game to ever appear on a gaming system. “‘Shaq Fu!’” yells an excited Deighan, naming the video game that he’s compelled to collect even though it’s universally hated by just about every gamer who’s had the misfortune to play it since its introduction in 1994. “I have about 80 ‘Shaq Fus,’ and people keep buying me more. “Everyone hates it. There are people in the gaming industry whose goal is to destroy every copy. But it’s campy. It has Shaq as a ninja, which is ridiculous. “In fact, do you want to play ‘Shaq Fu’ right now?” Pass. But it’s the existence of gamers like Deighan, 28, with his uncontrollable urge to buy and protect copies of “Shaq Fu,” that have led him and his best friend and business partner, Matt Jurcic, 33, to launch the inaugural Pittsburgh Retro Gaming Expo, taking place Nov. 15 at the Pittsburgh Irish Center, in Squirrel Hill. The event will bring together collectors of vintage games under one roof to play, buy and celebrate retro video-game culture. Deighan and Jurcic run 8-bit Evolution, a retro-video-game company that restores, modifies and resells vintage video-game systems and game cartridges, including the original Nintendo, Sega Genesis, Gameboy, Dreamcast and everything in between. Basically, they take a vintage gaming system — a beaten-up mid-1980s Nintendo, for example — and turn it into a playable piece of art. “There’s really nothing like this in Pittsburgh,” says Deighan says. “We

{PHOTO COURTESY OF 8-BIT EVOLUTION}

James Deighan, left, and Matt Jurcic are producing the city’s first Retro Gaming Expo.

wanted to have something that was video-game-specific. “This is a great opportunity to get in and build on the Pittsburgh infrastructure of retro-gaming enthusiasts.” Deighan and Jurcic say the culture of retro gaming is spurred by modern video games and systems. A parent “may see their kid playing the new Super Mario Brothers game and that brings back memories of the games they used to play,” Deighan says. Jurcic says he got involved in collecting by watching videos of classic games on YouTube and now has his own retro-gaming YouTube channel. The pair has been talking about starting a gaming convention for years, but only decided in August to host the event. “We really put this together fast considering that some of these conventions can take a year to plan,” Jurcic says. “We’ve talked about it for while, but in August, James said, ‘We’re doing this,’ and I real-

“WE’RE LIKE VIDEO-GAME GYPSIES.”

ized, “Oh shit, we’re doing this.’” The event will feature several stations with free game play, along with free or low-cost gaming tournaments and contests like a Super Smash Bros Melee. There will also be free pinball machines provided by Lawrenceville’s Kickback Café and vendors selling vintage video games, art and memorabilia. Live music throughout the day will be provided by three bands: Dethlehem, Klaymore and The Existential Gentlemen.

PITTSBURGH RETRO GAMING EXPO 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15. Pittsburgh Irish Center, 6886 Forward Ave., Squirrel Hill. $10. www.pittsburghretrogaming.com

“We wanted to have a fun event where people who are like-minded could get together,” Deighan says. Being like-minded is how Jurcic and Deighan got together in the first place; they met while buying and selling games.

Jurcic says the pair got into vintage gaming as a business because, as collectors, they were buying games at a premium and realized “we could do this and do it better.” “If you have a massive video-game collection, you either have to be rich or be buying things, keeping what you need and selling off other stuff just to keep buying,” Jurcic says. “We’re like video-game gypsies,” adds Deighan. “Yeah, like video-game nomads,” replies Jurcic. “More like video-game Vikings,” counters Deighan. While you might not be a gamer on this level, Deighan says the event is not just for hard-core gamers and collectors. “We wanted to have an event [where] people who might be interested could see what retro gaming is all about and get their feet wet,” he says. “People get bitten by the bug when they see how excited you get over this community.” Jurcic says while his children play modern games, they still bond over playing the games he played as a child. “My kids love the old stuff,” Jurcic says. “My son began playing ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ on Sega Genesis when he was 3 years old. You only had to use one button to play and the graphics are still cool today. “It holds up well. Not every retro game does, but a lot of them do.” While Jurcic and Deighan both play modern games as well, they still play their old systems and games, often setting goals to make the game more challenging, like finishing on one life or seeing how many extra lives they can accrue. “I think at the root of it, a lot of people play video games because it’s a ton of small accomplishments,” Deighan says. “You play to beat a level, or for a high score, or for an Xbox achievement. It’s a series of little rewards and achievements that keep people coming back.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Late Night COSMIC BOWLING 11PM to 2AM Fri and Sat. Top 40 mix Drink specials

Get a strike on a colored head pin win a prize!!! 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

BOOK YOUR

HOLIDAY PARTY NOW! Groups of 20 to 400 $25 credit if booked before Thanksgiving

Thursday is Ladies Night 9PM to Midnight

Ladies FREE - Men $10. Top 40 mix Drink special Get a strike on a colored head pin & win a prize!!!

2525 FREEPORT OR ROAD ROAD, HARMARV HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com


IGUDESMAN & JOO:

BIG NIGHTMARE

MUSIC HEINZ HALL

NOVEMBER 28 & 30

Often compared to comedy legends Victor Borge and Dudley Moore, Igudesman E ÂœÂœÂ˝Ăƒ Ă•ÂŤĂ€Âœ>Ă€ÂˆÂœĂ•Ăƒ ĂƒÂŽiĂŒVÂ…iĂƒ `Ă€>Ăœ iĂ›iĂ€ĂžÂœÂ˜i ÂˆÂ˜ĂŒÂœ ĂŒÂ…i >VĂŒ] vĂ€ÂœÂ“ ĂŒÂ…i wĂ€ĂƒĂŒ Ă›ÂˆÂœÂ?ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒ ĂŒÂœ ĂŒÂ…i last percussionist! From mashups of classical masterpieces and famous pop songs to breathtaking solos of legendary concertos as well as their own compositions, Igudesman & Joo use the entire orchestra to bring their creativity to life — with results that are as much fun for the orchestra as they are for the audience!

For F or ttickets ickets ccall a 412.392.4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org

DOWNLOAD THE LAYAR APP AND SCAN THIS AD TO SEE MUCH MORE!

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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

ABLE TO HELP

A temporary disability reveals that common courtesy goes a long way {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} SOMETIMES WE don’t realize the dayto-day struggles of others until we find ourselves in the same predicament. I grew up with a disabled father, who battled multiple sclerosis for nearly 30 years before passing away in 2000. I saw early on how difficult the simplest tasks — like buttoning a shirt or tying a shoe — could be. He spent many years in and out of wheelchairs or walking with a cane. At a very early age, I helped out where I could. But what I remember most is how other people went out of their way to help. My dad always walked or wheeled himself around town, and never worried about getting stuck or stranded. “If I need help, someone will help me,” he’d tell my mom as he’d take off on one of his walks. Countless times a stranger’s car would pull up in front of our house and my dad would get out. He didn’t have the strength to walk back home and someone, whether he knew them or not, would always give him a lift. Strangers would often help lift my dad’s wheelchair over a curb or give up their seats for him. And those gestures — like giving up your seat for an elderly person or pregnant woman — were natural for people. But times have changed. I realize this not only because of my father, but also because of my own experiences with mobility issues. On Labor Day 2013, I ruptured my right Achilles tendon, had it surgically repaired and spent months in a boot — at times unable to bear any weight on the leg. I used crutches, a walker and, at times, a gadget known as a knee scooter — a device like a child’s kick scooter, with a platform to support the injured leg. It took five months of rehab to get the leg working properly. Then, in July of this year, I ruptured the left Achilles tendon — the sort of serial rupture that my orthopedic surgeon assured me happens “more often than you think.” After surgery and the first round of physical therapy, I’m once again walking without a boot and continuing with rehab. That’s the plus side of my experience — my mobility issues were temporary. But I now realize that people living with disabilities today aren’t experiencing the

The knee scooter mobility device

level of kindness and respect that allowed my father to live the life he wanted. For several months after my first injury, I relied on public transportation to get to and from work. I would ride a bus to the Heinz Field T stop and then kick my scooter from the Wood Street Station to my office a few blocks away. Too often, I stood on the bus or train — one leg on the floor and one leg on my scooter — holding on for dear life. One evening during rush hour, I tried to board a packed train at Wood Street. People ran around me to board the car first. Not only was I not offered a seat, I couldn’t get my scooter on the train. The doors closed several times on my leg before I yelled like a maniac, put my head down and drove my way into the herd. In the past 14 months, I’ve had many experiences like that, and I’ve also often seen it happening to others — people for whom living with and traversing our city with a disability is a major part of their lives. For these folks, dealing with inconsiderate commuters on a bus or trying to get from point A to point B in a wheelchair on a sidewalk that is barely fit to walk on is a daily struggle. It’s our job as a community to respectfully lend a hand when needed. The person might not want your seat or need a hand up on the sidewalk, but it’s important to ask. It’s also important, if you see poor infrastructure like a broken sidewalk, to report it to the mayor’s 311 line so it can be addressed. Making Pittsburgh truly accessible for all isn’t just about adding curb-cuts and ramps. It’s about common courtesy, offering a hand and, most importantly, watching out for each other.

“IT’S OUR JOB AS A COMMUNITY TO RESPECTFULLY LEND A HAND WHEN NEEDED.”

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


JOHNNY ANGEL

& THE HALOS H O L I D AY

S H O W

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20 2PM & 7PM | Banquet Room Tickets only $22! Enjoy all your holiday favorites along with some great classics! Purchase tickets at RIVERSCASINO.COM or the Rivers Gift Shop. For more information call 412-231-7777.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

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blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


Save your energy. Take the bus or T. Next time you’re headed to Consol Energy Center, consider transit. Steel Plaza T Station is a short walk and 61 and 71 routes have stops nearby. Hop on board, we’ll get you there.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


DE

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ON

ENORMOUS, GRILLED WINGS WERE INFUSED WITH WONDERFUL SMOKY FLAVOR

TAKE-AWAYS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Conflict Kitchen’s latest menu is “Palestinian Take-Out.” Sample familiar Middle Eastern fare like baba ghanoush, or try: the Palestinian national dish, musakhan (toasted flatbread with chicken, onion and sumac); rumaniyya (an eggplant, lentil and pomegranate stew whose spices summon North Africa); or maftoul, a couscous dish with chicken that’s this Schenley Plaza kiosk’s top seller since the menu launched on Oct. 6. For dessert, there’s harissa, a dense, honeysweet semolina and yogurt cake. Conflict Kitchen, founded in 2010, serves cuisine from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict; co-founder Jon Rubin cites the billions in U.S. military aid to Israel. Rubin, a Carnegie Mellon art professor, and Conflict Kitchen chef Robert Sayres designed the menu after visiting the West Bank last summer. Palestinian Take-Out is the Kitchen’s most popular iteration yet, with up to 350 customers a day, says Rubin. Regulars include Hadeel Salameh, a U.S.-born Pitt senior whose parents are from Palestine, and who visits relatives there often. “It’s delicious,” she says of the menu. “It tastes like Palestine.” Palestinian Take-Out has generated controversy over its supplementary programming, including big, fold-out food wrappers featuring interviews with Palestinians on topics ranging from food to the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories. Other programs include The Foreigner, a weekly session with a “human avatar” who channels a live phone chat between patrons and someone in Palestine. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

11 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. 221 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.conflictkitchen.org

the

FEED

Love juice? Then it might ht be worth the drive ve north to Wexford for the inaugural

Pittsburgh Juice e Fest. Local juicers andd vendors d will be on hand, and you get to be the judge: Attendees get a tasting glass, and every vote counts. Who’s got the “meanest green juice,” the best smoothie? 11 a.m.3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 15. Pure Athletex Sportsplex, 119 Neely School Road. Wexford. For more information and tickets ($10 in advance), see www.getorganicallysocial.com.

SOUTH SIDE SMOKE

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

N THE FACE of it, the replacement of the South Side’s venerable 17th Street Café with a new barbecue place isn’t that remarkable. There’s been plenty of turnover in the South Side dining scene in recent years, and even established restaurants are far from immune. But 17th Street Café did not go out of business; it was re-conceived with a new concept by the same owners, a fact that speaks to more than an older restaurant quietly closing. The opening of South Side Barbecue Company highlights several current trends in the Pittsburgh dining scene: the fading of old Pittsburgh tastes, the detailed exploration of particular cuisines and, of course, the rise of food trucks as incubators for new experiments in local dining. The night we visited, 17th Street was crowded with three food trucks: one from South Side Barbecue Company itself and two associated with nearby Nakama. Moreover, a mere half-block away was Cambodican, the bricks-and-mortar successor to one of the city’s first really well-

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Memphis nachos

known trucks. SSBBQ also started with a truck, the so-called CarnivoreMobile. Once its reputation and clientele seemed secure, owners Pat and Mike Joyce shut down the 17th Street Cafe, which they had run with a traditional Pittsburgh menu (fried zucchini, wedding soup, pasta and steak) for over a decade, and rededicated the restaurant to barbecue.

SOUTH SIDE BARBECUE COMPANY 75 S. 17th St. South Side. 412-381-4566 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: $7-21 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Of course, barbecue itself is not a new trend, but until recently the local offerings were mostly pretty mediocre: meat smoked and then slathered in thick, sweet sauce that hid the merits of the beef, pork or chicken. With the rise of a new food cul-

ture and the arrival of more transplants from barbecue-centric regions, we’ve seen a number of more authentic barbecue joints open up, many offering a smorgasbord of sauce styles. But the Joyce brothers have staked out a firm preference for simplicity by offering just two sauces — hot or “not.” We found both versions excellent, the hot fiery but not punishing, the “not” mild but not bland. Neither one was cloyingly sweet or overly thick: They coated, but didn’t smother, the meat. Which was a good thing, because the meat, for the most part, was excellent. Wings — enormous ones, grilled — were infused with wonderful smoky flavor, and their ample size offered enough meat to stand up to the sauce. St. Louis-style ribs were served at that sweet spot where they released from the bone but still retained some meaty chew, and the kitchen finished them with just enough sauce to flavor the meat. (More sauce is available on the table.) Chicken could also be had pulled, but the smoke was less apparent in that form. The pulled pork could also have stood a bit more CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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SOUTH SIDE SMOKE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

meat itself, which had been shredded just right to provide tenderness interspersed with occasional larger, meatier chunks. Served on a big, brioche-like roll with North Carolina slaw, it made for an excellent sandwich, or “sammy,” in the menu’s parlance. The one failed meat, alas, was brisket. Inexplicably, it was gray, sliced thin like deli meat, and neither moist nor flavorful. Sides were a mixed bag. The aforementioned North Carolina slaw was a crisp and vinegary mix of finely chopped cabbage and carrots with a more complex profile than a lot of one-note vinegar slaws. Baked beans, in a relatively thin, tomato-forward sauce, were smoky, a touch spicy and not at all sweet (which is a good thing in our book). But the cornbread had the moist, dense crumb of pound cake, and while Jason thought it was better than the sweet, muffiny stuff that is so prevalent in Pittsburgh, Angelique couldn’t get past that texture. Meanwhile, it was a bit hard to judge the pepper-jack mac-and-cheese in the bottom of the bar-b-cone, but our impression was solidly middle-of-the-road.

Owner Pat Joyce with the pulled-pork bar-b-cone

Bar-b-cone? After hearing what it was, we had to order one: a waffle cone filled with a layered sundae of mac-and-cheese, pulled pork and North Carolina slaw, all topped with sauce. The individual ingredients were good and in combination, they were great, but we found the cone an unnecessary stunt. The layered construction within favored eating the ingredients one at a time; the sweetness of the cone itself was more suited to its traditional filling of ice cream than to savory barbecue; and its waffly crispness quickly became unappealingly soggy. The 17th Street Cafe had its day, but we applaud the Joyces for realizing that today belongs to regional and international cuisines, interpreted with a balance of innovation and authenticity. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

DOING FLAVORS Local brewer also tempts patrons with his food

Brandon McCarthy, head brewer at Rock Bottom Pittsburgh, credits his dad’s good taste — and some youthful boldness — for getting him where he is today. “When everyone else was stealing Miller Lights from their dad, I was stealing Victory and Dogfish Head,” he says. After a stint apprenticing at Church Brew Works, McCarthy has worked at Rock Bottom Restaurant and Brewery for more than six years (the past twoand-a-half as head brewer). He’s intent on turning his branch of the brewpub chain into a producer of creative, tasty beers worthy of local respect. Having “a corporate thing attached to our name” is a struggle, he acknowledges. Although many of us are eager to support the smaller operations in town, being part of a chain — Rock Bottom has 34 locations across the United States — has certain advantages for an intrepid brewer. With a bigger budget, he says, “I probably have more creative freedom than a lot of other brewers in the city.” “My only creative constraint is, I know I have to please our clientele,” he says. “I have to have something for people that come in not knowing we are a brewery and wanting a Coors Light.” So McCarthy, an avid home cook, decided that one way to introduce his more conservative clientele to new flavors is to cook for them. “Flavor is a holistic theme in my life. It’s not just beer or just food. I’ve always been a flavor-driven person,” he says. Once a month, for the “Brewer’s Happy Hour,” McCarthy cooks a meal to match with one of his seasonal beers. October featured a pumpkin soup enhanced with maple and curry, laced with the brewery’s pumpkin beer, and garnished with toasted walnuts and gorgonzola. He’s still working on the menu for the next happy hour, on Wed., Nov. 12. He says that a fruited, spiced bone-marrow spread will likely be served.

“IT’S NOT JUST BEER OR JUST FOOD. I’VE ALWAYS BEEN A FLAVORDRIVEN PERSON.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROCK BOTTOM RESTAURANT AND BREWERY. 171 Bridge St., West Homestead. 412-464-2739 or www.rockbottom.com


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-904-3451.A casual Southern California-style taqueria offers a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J KUSUKA INDONESIAN CUISINE. Ponsi Plaza, 13380 Lincoln Highway, North Huntingdon. 724-382-4968. At this humble Indonesian restaurant, diners will find fare that has been influenced by China, India and the Middle East, but still remains distinctive. The menu spans appetizers like the crispy street-food pancake martabak and fish cakes to entrees such as Javanese fried noodles and spicy curry-like stews. J

NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-3816000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/steakhouse,

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Waffles, INCaffeinated {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knifewielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412-321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF

THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookish-themed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying upto-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF

savor authentic flavors

NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. This modern take on the traditional Jewish deli makes the argument that such Eastern European cuisine deserves to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball soup, egg creams, blintzes and classic deli sandwiches, including one made with “Montreal meat,” a sort of Canadian hybrid of corned beef and pastrami. JF

10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

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2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

now open 7 days a week!

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

OFF THE HOOK. 98 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale. 724-719-2877. This fine-dining fish restaurant features a menu almost exclusively from the sea; even the pastas are seafood-centric. The fresh-fish section has a variety of suggested preparations, from classic (almondine) to modern (finished with chimichurri). Off the Hook also offers a fresh-oyster bar, expertly curated wine selection and impeccable service. LE

Nu Modern Jewish Bistro

OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. 412-281-6595. You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE

NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www. noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky atmosphere, Noodlehead offers an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few “snacks,” among them fried chicken and steamed buns with pork belly. The freshly

PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge

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Saturday & Sunday

prepared dishes are garnished with fresh herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF

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1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

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SUN:

BRUNCH @ 11 ONE BUCK CHUCK $1 Tacos All Day (Vegan or Beef / Eat-In Only)

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 $2 Well & Clique

MON:

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 1/2 OFF All Pumpkin Beers 1/2 OFF Dogz

WED:

(All Day/ Eat-In Only)

$2 OFF Select Craft Bottles Wing It Wednesdays! Char-Grilled Whole Wings

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$35 Clique Bottle Service 1/2 OFF Burgh’ers

Osteria 2350 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

(All Day/ Eat-In Only)

on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE

HOPPY HOUR

THURS:

$35 Clique Bottle Service 25% Off Vegan Menu Items

MON-FRI 4-6 1/2 OFF Drafts

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776-7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and tender within. Add in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as mac-and-cheese or baked beans. JF

FRI:

$70 Bulleit Bottle Service

SAT:

BRUNCH @ 11 $35 Clique Bottle Service

VAPETRIK VAPE JUICE Now Available at Bar Sun Open @ 11am Mon-Thurs Open @ 4pm • Fri-

“THE HEISENBURGER” 1/2 lB Burger, Peppercorn Crusted, Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions

4717 Butler St. • Lawrenceville • 412-315-7271 • facebook.com/Gusscafe

DOROTHY66 DOROTHY B last Furnace Blast FurnaceCafe Cafe Grand Opening p g November ber 14thh LIVE Music by The Routines at 9PM

140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com facebook: www.facebook.com/bzbarandgrill Twitter: @BZsPGH

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Offering Authentic Comfort Food, Fine Spirits & Craft Beer Daily Daily Drink Specials Happy Hour: 1/2 Price Appetizers 224 East 8th A ve., Homestead

DOROTHY-6-BLAST-FURNACE-CAFE.COM Wed,Thurs,and Sun 4-10 Fri,Sat 4-11*Bar open later

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Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE chinapalace-shadyside.com

PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-8724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latke-like shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF

seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412-364-6622. Located on the verdant edge of North Park, Tomato Pie is more than a pizzeria. It offers other simple Italian specialties including pasta and sandwiches, and the chef uses plenty of fresh herbs grown on the premises. FJ

TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT. 11655 Frankstown Road, Penn Hills. 412-242-0188. Most of the myriad sushi rolls on offer center on just a handful of raw options, rounded out with traditional cooked ingredients such as eel and shrimp. The menu offers the full gamut of maki, from classics www. per a p like cucumber or pghcitym .co tuna to truly original creations, some of them just short of gimmickry. KF

FULL LIST E N O LIN

STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE

STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-3695380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though

VERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-404-8487. The menu here isn’t straight Mexican, but presents some traditional items, including tableside-prepared guacamole and grilled corn-on-the-cob, with reconceived classics, invented, fusion-y dishes like tacos with roasted sweet potatoes, fried chickpeas and Mexican-style tzatziki. There is also an extensive tequila list and a patio for warm-weather dining. KE WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson St., South Side (412-301-1763). The fresh-made waffles here are a marvelous foil for sweet and savory toppings. Sweet options include the Funky Monkey (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut butter and chocolate sauce). The Breakfast Magic has bacon, cheddar and green onions inside, topped with a fried egg and sour cream. Or customize your waffles with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J


OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

EERS B T F A R C 40 N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side�

The ďŹ rst Thai restaurant in Pittsburgh

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

and 25 years later, still serving the best, most authentic Thai food.

The ďŹ rst hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars�

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

Monday to Thursday: Happy Hour 5 to 7PM ΨϯŽžĞĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?ĆŒÄ‚ĹŒĆ? $4 Well Drinks ĂŜĚĆŒÄ‚ĹŒÄžÄžĆŒĆ? ΨϹ^ĞůĞÄ?ĆštĹ?ŜĞĆ?

Saturday, Sunday and Monday:

$24.99 Game Day Feast /ĹśÄ?ůƾĚĞĆ?Ä‚ŽŜĞͲƚŽƉƉĹ?ĹśĹ? ϭϲÍ&#x;WĹ?njnjĂ͕ÄšĹ˝ÇŒÄžĹśÇ Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ć? ĂŜĚÄ?ĆŒÄžÄ‚ÄšĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?ĹŹĆ?͘ ĎąÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒΨϭϏĹ˝Ĺ˝ĆŒĆ?>ĆšÍ˜ĆľÄ?ŏĞƚĆ? (Sun and Mon) ĎąÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒΨϭϏƾĚ>ĆšÍ˜ĆľÄ?ŏĞƚĆ? (Saturday)

Tuesday: Ladies Day

&ĆŒĹ?ĚĂLJĆ?Í—d/&ÍŠ

ΨϹDÄ‚ĆŒĆ&#x;ĹśĹ?Í›Ć? ,ĂůĨWĆŒĹ?Ä?ĞĚƉƉĞĆ&#x;ÇŒÄžĆŒĆ? ,ĂůĨWĆŒĹ?Ä?ĞĚŽƊůĞĆ?ŽĨ Wine

dĹšĹ?ŜŏůƾĞ/ƚ͛Ć?&ĆŒĹ?ĚĂLJ͊ ΨϹůƾĞ>ĞžĹ?Ğƾdž͛Ć? ΨϹůƾĞDŽŽŜĆŒÄ‚ĹŒĆ? džƚĞŜĚĞĚ,ĂƉƉLJ,Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒĂŜĚ >Ĺ?ǀĞĹśĆšÄžĆŒĆšÄ‚Ĺ?ĹśĹľÄžĹśĆšÍ˜ ,ĂƉƉLJ,Ĺ˝ĆľĆŒϰͲϳĆ‰Í˜ĹľÍ˜ ΨϯŽžĞĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?ĆŒÄ‚ĹŒĆ?ͲΨϰ tĞůůĆŒĹ?ŜŏĆ?ĂŜĚĆŒÄ‚ĹŒ ÄžÄžĆŒĆ?ͲΨϹ^ĞůĞÄ?ĆštĹ?ŜĞĆ?

Wednesday: >'dĆŒĹ?Ç€Ĺ?Ä‚ŚĂůůĞŜĹ?Äž Î¨Í˜ĎąĎŹtĹ?ĹśĹ?Ć? ΨϹĎŽĎŻĹ˝ÇŒÍ˜ƾĚ>ĆšÍ˜ĆŒÄ‚ĹŒ ΨϹ^ŚŽÄ?ĹŹsŽĚŏĂ^ŚŽƚĆ?

SATURDAY LUNCH SPECIALS COMING SOON! ASIAN RICE AND NOODLE BOWLS.

Thursday: ŽůůĞĹ?ÄžEĹ?Ĺ?Śƚ ,ĂůĨWĆŒĹ?Ä?ĞĚWĹ?njnjĂĆ? ΨϹ:Ä‚Ĺ?ÄžĆŒĹľÄžĹ?Ć?ĆšÄžĆŒ $5 32 oz. Coors Lt. 'ĂžĞĂLJWĹ?ĆšÄ?ĹšÄžĆŒĆ?

&)&4(!6%.5%s",5% 7 7 7 " , 5 % , ) . % ' 2 ) , , %  # / 777&!#%"//+#/-",5%,).%'2),,% N E W S

TAKE OUT AVAILABLE AT ALL LOCATIONS.

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Shadyside

Fox Chapel

(near Banana Republic)

(Across from Waterworks Mall)

(In the Pine Tree Shoppes)

5528 WALNUT ST. (412) 687-8586

1034 FREEPORT RD. (412) 784-8980

12009 PERRY HWY. (724) 935-8866

GAME DAY, EVENT & REGULAR VALET AVAILABLE

For info and menu highlights:

www.thaiplacerestaurant.com

GAME DAY & EVENT VALET SERVICE: $25')&46/5#(%2s2%'5,!2 VALET SERVICE: $9/$4 GIFT VOUCHER M U S I C

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LOCAL

“IN REALITY, A LOT OF MUSIC VENUES ARE PROBABLY NOT FULLY ACCESSIBLE.”

BEAT

{BY SAMANTHA WARD}

NEW KIND OF INSTRUMENT “Hybrid Instrument Building” is perhaps one of the most challenging and experimental interdisciplinary courses offered in the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University. The syllabus of this course broadly defines an “instrument” as an object that amplifies your intentions. “Hybrid” is defined as all that exists between digital and physical, real and virtual, hardware and software. The instructor, Ali Momeni, explains: “It’s really in-between places that we’re trying to work with.” Momeni studied physics and music at Swarthmore College, and later completed a doctoral degree in music composition, improvisation and performance with the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies at the University of California, Berkeley. He’s been in the Pittsburgh area for three years now. His semester-long course challenges students to develop their own hybrid instruments, beginning with rapid, weeklong building exercises in the first half of the course, then allowing students to build a portfolio-ready project during the second half of the semester. Students range from undergraduate to graduate, engineers to artists and computer scientists. About half the students who take the course create instruments in the traditional sense. The other half he describes as “system builders,” who work with integrated software platforms or perhaps mobile media systems, creating wireless systems for homes and buildings. Students have created musical projects that work with controlled feedback, ambience, resonance, and overdubbing over overdubbing. Momeni chuckles about this: “My colleague Suzie Silver always says, ‘Every generation has to rediscover psychedelia,’ and it always comes out in this class. … I get a lot of inclinations that are in the direction of the American minimalist school — that whole intellectual hippie American music from the West Coast.” Currently, the class is fairly isolated within the Carnegie Mellon campus, though Momeni believes that when the course moves into the curriculum for the graduate emerging-media program in a couple of years, it may open up more interaction with the greater Pittsburgh community. Though as he gestures around the CMU Art Fabrication studio, the walls lined with small boxes of tools, wires, arduinos and past projects, he admits: “There’s enough to do [just] in this room.”

STUDENTS RANGE FROM ENGINEERS TO ARTISTS AND COMPUTER SCIENTISTS.

EXPANDING THE AUDIENCE

{BY BY ANDY MULKERIN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Gabriel M McMorland cMo M rla l nd d is is a m musician usiicia cian i n and accessibility advocate.

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ABRIEL MCMORLAND has been

going to see — and play — live music since he was a teenager — often in smaller, less traditional venues, as his tastes skew toward punk rock. But his relationship with live shows is different than many: McMorland lost most of his sight at age 19 (due to what he calls “a genetic time-bomb”). As a bass player, a fan of left-of-center bands and an advocate for accessibility (he co-founded the Pittsburgh Accessibility Meetup group), he finds a lot of his interests converging at music venues, and not always in a good way. CONTINUES ON PG. 30


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“In reality, a lot of music venues are probably not fully accessible” for patrons with disabilities, including limited mobility, he says. “But a lot of those problems are sort of structural or architectural, and would be very expensive to fix.” That’s the sort of issue faced by Eric Stern, owner of Brillobox: The small Bloomfield venue is up to code, Stern says, but it’s less than ideal in terms of accessibility. Bands play on the second floor, and a long, narrow staircase is the only way to get there. “I don’t even know what would be possible” in terms of structural improvements to the building, Stern says, due to “the sheer cost.” Right now, he says, patrons who use wheelchairs certainly aren’t prohibited from the second floor, but need to make arrangements to have friends carry them up the stairs. “In general,” Stern says, “we try to make this as friendly and accessible across the board as possible. We try to help as much as we can” when a patron calls ahead with accessibility questions, or arrives and needs assistance. McMorland doesn’t look at the problem as lying simply with the owners of small venues. “The question is, what can be done to help them?” he says. “What can be done as a city? I’m inter-

ested in seeing what people who help fund more inclusive arts and culture [think] — how can that be done in a way that helps the actual venues where this stuff happens?” “This stuff,” in this case, is the lessmainstream music scene. While big venues like arenas and concert halls, which host a variety of events, often have many options for patrons with disabilities, smaller venues are caught in a bind. Many are in older buildings, with odd setups. (The Smiling Moose is another local venue where bands play on the second floor.) And while some arts nonprofits are able to secure foundation grants to help improve accessibility, that money is generally not available to music venues, which are often for-profit bars. While there are tax breaks available for businesses upgrading to be more disability-friendly, says Anne Mulgrave, manager of grants and accessibility of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, that only goes so far. “That presumes that they have the money to invest in the first place,” she says. Another issue, says Mulgrave, is that owners of clubs and other small businesses often aren’t clear on what they can do to improve accessibility and what

resources are available to them. “The biggest issue is that nobody understands the [Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA],” she says, “and there’s nowhere they can turn for information. They don’t want to call the city, because they’re afraid they’ll turn their enforcement on them. The Mid-Atlantic ADA Center … was created by the Department of Education and is entirely educational — they can call and be completely honest about their situation and the Department of Justice isn’t going to come after them. But nobody does that, because they don’t know it exists, or they’re still afraid — they don’t trust.” Ben Penigar, of Grey Area Productions, says when his company took over the mid-sized Rex Theater on the South Side five years ago, there were costs involved in making the venue more accessible. Part of that stemmed from a change in zoning, he explains; the Rex had been zoned as a sit-down movie theater, and Grey Area changed it to an open-floor venue. During renovations, they added ramps and built out a restroom to be accessible. “That was one of the surprises” that came up when the company took over the theater, he admits. “We were already at the venue when we found out about everything we had to do.” But, he says, the cost was worth it for a number of reasons. The accessible restroom also serves as a family restroom, and Penigar says patrons with mobility issues or other disabilities get in touch on a weekly basis to make accessibility arrangements. Beyond the big structural changes, McMorland says, there are small, easy adjustments that venues and organizations of all kinds can make in order to be more accessible. One simple step that goes a long way is simply communicating clearly. “Something that never would have occurred to me until I started having a disability is that it’s really helpful to post, everywhere possible — on your website, on your flier if there’s room, on your ticketing page — post, ‘We want to make this accessible. Please let us know how we can do that.’ And give a phone number. If you think about all of the different things someone has to spend their time contacting in a day to make sure they can participate — the grocery store, to the bus stop, to the library … it’s not just your venue; it’s their entire day.”

Some larger arts groups and venues, like the Pittsburgh Symphony, have an accessibility information page, easily found via their website’s home page. Most local music venues don’t, or if they do have information available, it’s not immediately apparent from the venue’s main page. Mulgrave’s advice on accessibility information for music venues is the same she gives to other groups. “The best thing to do is to come out and say, ‘This is exactly what to expect when you’re here.’ Because people get angry when they show up to a place with certain expectations and they’re not met. They just need the information to make a decision. The advice a lot of people have gotten in the past, if they’re not 100 percent accessible, is ‘Don’t admit it.’ What I say is … the best way to build goodwill is to describe exactly what your accessibility is.” And another aspect of live-music events that can affect the quality of the experience for patrons with disabilities is one that’s common to any public place: The concert-goers themselves. Most venues with accessible seating only have it in one spot, notes Josie Badger, an ethicist and accessibility advocate who uses a motorized wheelchair. “In venues that have lawn seating, say, it’s usually in the back — where the drunk people all end up. And you always end up being a support for someone.” “And you always end up behind the people who want to stand,” she adds. “Some people try to sit so they don’t block your view, but then everyone else is standing, so they can’t see, and they end up standing back up.” Ultimately, says McMorland, arts groups have been making great strides in accessible programming. But there’s still plenty of room for improvement, and smaller venues are one place where that’s clear. “The goal isn’t [just] to have opportunities that are accessible,” he says. “The goal is to make everything accessible. That means Gooski’s and Brillobox and Cattivo — bars where people actually go to see bands, or maybe start a band, to play for their friends and strangers — not just being a passive consumer in this one stream of programming that’s available to you. Which is good and wellmeaning, but it’s beyond that: You have to give people all the options everyone else has, and make it so they can create their own music if they want to.”

“THE GOAL IS TO MAKE EVERYTHING ACCESSIBLE.”

A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

THE ARMADILLOS NEVERTHELESS (WILD KINDNESS)

The reigning winner of CP’s Best Of Pittsburgh reader’s poll in the “AltFolk/Alt-Country Band” category, The Armadillos last hit us with new music about two years ago; this full-length comes with a new label association, with now-officiallysprawling Wild Kindness Records. It’s 11 tracks of old-timey folk such as has become The Armadillos’ signature; much of it is light-hearted and clever writing, but at times the band takes on bigger political and social issues. The Armadillos have proven themselves a formidable live act over the years, and Nevertheless is at its best when that energy is captured: “House on a Hill” is one of the highlights, an upbeat track that features sweet harmonies. Similarly, the minor-key anthem “Big Branch Mine,” quick-paced but dark in its theme, is representative of the band’s cohesion and pep. The political theme that starts with the first track, “Times New Roman,” and emerges now and then throughout, is largely working-class, highlighting the plights of teachers, miners, musicians and others through a common thread of being overworked and underpaid. (The political tune “FDR” might seem to fit this theme as well, but really, it’s mostly about how he brought back alcohol, which is another major theme herein.) More good stuff from The Armadillos following the idiom of old American folk; it may not be innovative, exactly, but it’s sweet and satisfying, with enjoyable wordplay throughout.

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THE ARMADILLOS CD RELEASE with ELLIOTT SUSSMAN, THE TURPENTINERS. 9 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net N E W S

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& P I T T S B U R G H F I L M M A K E R S P R E S E N T:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


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THOUGH AVI Zahner-Isenberg is currently touring in support of his second album, he makes it plain that he considers his music, and really his whole life, a work in progress. At 23, he’s the mastermind and primary songwriter of Avi Buffalo, a music project with its name gleaned from ZahnerIsenbergs’ childhood predilection for spicy chicken wings. On its face, it might seem like a silly moniker. But listen hard enough to Avi Buffalo’s latest, At Best Cuckold, and you might find in that name a metaphor for Avi Buffalo’s particular, peculiar take on pop music.

AVI BUFFALO

WITH WAYNE BECK 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 11. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

1 1 6 S H IGHL AND AV EN U E C AT H E D R A L O F H O P E . O R G

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Zahner-Isenberg is learning more every day. He’s doing it in public, and he’s willing to take the heat if it means homing in on new and interesting flavors. If

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

they originate from time-tested ingredients and methods, all the better. In the search for his creative identity, ZahnerIsenberg plays with everything, up to and including timbres, cadences, arrangements. Is that Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard on album-opener “So What”? No; it’s Avi trying something. That tone of gleeful experimentation colors all of Avi Buffalo’s output. Amidst the here-thengone immediacy of contemporary music, ZahnerIsenberg is in an extremely coveted position. At first, the fluidity of identity he is exploring might seem flippant, or even recklessly naïve. But really, it’s a refreshingly fearless move from an artist who isn’t even sure whether this is what he wants to do with himself in the long term. Avi Buffalo is a vehicle to bring focus to otherwise ambiguous goals. “I don’t like to do anything unless I understand why I’m doing it or what goes into it,” he says. “I try to get as

much experience as I can and dive in.” In the three years between Avi Buffalo’s self-titled debut and At Best Cuckold, that’s exactly what he did, going deep on some of the music that resonated with him. “I was really obsessed with Neil Young’s Chrome Dreams, and that started to inform how I wanted to write songs,” Zahner-Isenberg says. “I also took some classes in recording for a couple months, but then I dropped out because I’ve already been recording for years now, so I just started working more on recordings at home.” It’s a tactile approach that unfolds at its own pace. Rushed results are less genuine. As he sings on the album, “Can’t be too responsible / Once again, I’m charting distant lands.” The result of that probing period, At Best Cuckold, has the sweep and trappings of the best bedroom pop just about lined up. Tellingly, though, it skirts the notion of straightforward balladry in favor of quirk and quip. The lyrics, which could be placeholders that worked just well enough to keep, or could simply be insular to the point of inscrutability, often seem at odds with the dense, polished instrumentation. In most cases, they are silly enough to charm, playing the earnestness against the absurdity, as when he refers to himself as “a cheeseball on fire,” on “Memories of You.” Elsewhere on the album, on “Think It’s Gonna Happen Again,” the same components yield a different result, one that glimmers with icy pathos. “A couple nights ago / I ran over two dogs, then I ate them after,” he sings. No one is more aware of the fleeting nature of the opportunity that Avi Buffalo represents than Zahner-Isenberg himself. He’s determined to make his moment as enjoyable and as meaningful as possible. “I care a lot more about making sure that I feel good about what I’m putting out in the world,” he says, “because I always feel like it always might be your last chance no matter how it does in the world. So I would just say, ‘Fuck it,’ and throw that in there. [I wanted to] let it be real and intense like that, even if it created a weird perception.” Whether his future takes the form of Avi Buffalo or not, Zahner-Isenberg seems confident that his trajectory will produce beneficial results, so long as he keeps the focus on the exploration and the education. “After doing one record, then another record, there’s a lot of different things that I’m constantly thinking about incorporating. I definitely know that I just want to make a lot of music. I’d love to learn more about music in really fundamental way and just keep the search going.”

IN THE SEARCH FOR HIS CREATIVE IDENTITY, ZAHNER-ISENBERG PLAYS WITH EVERYTHING.

I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS The Barr Brothers

[HIP HOP] + THU., NOV. 06 The radio’s not what it used to be, but some folks are finding creative ways to keep the spirit of the old airwaves alive: Take, for example, PR7X. The “pirate radio” Internet service (at www.pr7x.com), kicking off in grand style with a live broadcast from Howlers tonight, features hip hop and R&B, and some notable personalities, including program director DJ Nuke Knocka and DJ Dan Dabber. The live show tonight also includes live performances from Hubbs, Shad Ali, Soul Dean, MaVe Sami and the Get Down Gang. Rob Chilldren and Nuke Knocka head up the DJ crew for the night. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-682-0320 or www.pr7x.com

[INDUSTRIAL] + SAT., NOV. 08 Goths of a certain age around here remember with fondness Ceremony, a weekly DJ night ht — first at Club Laga, then for a time e at the old Pegasus club Downtown. wn. Founded in 1997 by a group of then-college-radio n-college-radio DJs, Ceremony withstood hstood the test of time, supplying goth h and industrial every week until it wrapped up in 2008. Tonight at Cattivo, tivo, witness a onenight-only reunion nion of the old bunch: Eight former Ceremony eremony DJs take over, and it’s bound ound to be crowded. Also included: local vendors, with products including ding jewelry, body art and more. AM 8 p.m. m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. nceville. $7-8. 412-687-2157 2157 or www.cattivo.biz iz

[HIP HOP] + TUE., NOV. 11 Clean-cut and cute but insistent on casting sting himself as the rebellious youth, Bay Area a rapper G-Eazy has established ablished a profile as an up-and-coming p-and-coming performer popular pular with the college set.. His songs are largely about seducing educing you

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or your girlfriend/wife/daughter, overcoming the odds and generally enjoying life. Who can argue with that, really? He comes to Xtaza Nightclub tonight with some other California hip-hop acts: E-40, IAMSU! and Jay Ant. AM 6 p.m. 1620 Smallman St., Strip District. $22-25. All ages. 412-720-1396 or www.xtazapgh.com

[INDIE ROCK] + WED., NOV. 12 The Barr Brothers began a career in Boston, playing as an improv-based trio called The Slip. It wasn’t until the three musicians (two of whom are actual brothers named Barr) moved to Montreal and heard their neighbor, Sarah Page, playing harp through the walls of their apartment that the band was formed. The group released its self-titled EP, Beggar in the Morning, in 2011, to critical acclaim for its powerful folk melodies. Now, the band is back with Sleeping Operator, an album that welcomes a wider variety of instrumentation. inst Tonight, The Barr Brothers play The Andy Warhol Museum. S Samantha Ward d 8 p.m. 117 Sandus Sandusky St., North 412-237-8300 Side. $12-15. All ages. 41 or www.thewarhol.org

[POST-PUNK] + THU., NOV. 13 Bear Handss was born from this distress: Fueled by a tumultuous tumultuou time in his love life, Dylan R Rau called in friend Ted Feldman and Feld Brooklyn musicians Val mus Loper and T.J. T.J Orscher G-Eazy to put together 2007’s toget Golden EP; P since then the band has h toured with Vampire Vamp Weekend, Passion Pit and MGMT, and released releas two full-lengths, full-length Burning Bush Supper Supp Club, in 2010, and Distraction, in 2014. Catch Catc Bear Hands at an intimate show intim at Cattivo with o tonight t Junior Prom and Total Slacker. SW 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12-14. Lawrencev All ages. 412-687-2157 or 412-6 www.cattivo.biz www.cattivo.bi

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 06 ALTAR BAR. State Champs Heart to Heart, Front Porch Step, Brigades. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BYHAM THEATER. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CATTIVO. Life Leone. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Jon Dee Graham, Mike June, Mark Williams. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Spoonboy, Two Hand Fools, Close Talker, Emilyn Brodsky, Worlds Scariest Police Chases, DIVORCE. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Break Science, Manic Focus, Space Jesus. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. REX THEATER. Twiddle. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. American Authors, Oh Honey, The Mowgli’s. North Side. 412-229-5483.

Camp, Fake Species. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Gov’t Mule. North Side. 412-229-5483. THRILL MILL. Days N Daze, Endless Mike, Brook Pridemore, We The Heathens, Cousin Boneless, Chattel Tail. East Liberty. 412-706-1643. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jakobs Ferry Stragglers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 08 31ST STREET PUB. Fatality, Hellwitch, Parking Lot Whiskey, Haunt for the Wretched. Strip District. 412-391-8334. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Dr. J’s Mojo Hand. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. BROTHERS GRIMM. The Grid. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Justin Hayward. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. The Deceptions, The Chad Sipes Stereo (Early) Vibe & Direct, Escape Pod (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950.

MP 3 MONDAY

FRI 07

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

PADDY THE WANDERER

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAYME JENNINGS}

ALTAR BAR. Born Of Osiris, Thy Art Is Murder, Betraying The Martyrs, Within The Ruins, Erra, The Adventures of Bear Grylls. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. CLUB CAFE. Lydia Loveless, Alex Vucelich, As Ladders. South Side. 412-431-4950. FRIDAY FAITH CAFE. Shepherd’s Voice. Washington. 724-222-1563. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Noise Nothing Release Party, Onward Progress, US, Banshee Eliminator. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LEVELS. The Lava Game Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. PALACE THEATRE. Don McLean. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARK HOUSE. Andre Costello & the Cool Miners. North Side. 412-224-2273. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Jasmine Tate & Friends. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Shannon & the Merger. Greensburg. 724-836-6060. THE SHOP. T-Tops, Cyrus Gold, The Cunks. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Restorations, The Smith Street Band, Roger Harvey & The Wild Life Action

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Leftover Blue. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Larry Belli Trio. 724-265-1181. GOOSKI’S. Del Rios, Monolith Wielder, Outlander. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Ben Dumm & The East Side Band, Mickey & The SnakeOil Boys, The Legendary Hucklebucks. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KENDREW’S. Gone South. 724-375-5959. LAWRENCEVILLE VFW. Daniels & McClain. Lawrenceville. 412 781-7232. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. King’s Ransom. 724-265-9950. MILLERSTOWN INN. The Dave Iglar Band. 724-445-2157. NIED’S HOTEL. The Nied’s Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PALACE INN. Zero Fame. 724-843-2110. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-836-6060.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Paddy the Wanderer, celebrating the release of a new album, The Mastery of Space, later this month with a Nov. 22 show at Howlers. Sample a track off that album, “Worldwide,” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


REX THEATER. The Budos Band. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Empires, Cold Fronts. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. The Gathering Field. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Armadillos, The Turpentiners, Elliot Sussman. Armadillos CD release. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Buckle Downs. North Side.

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Hank D. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

SUN 09

BRILLOBOX. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CATTIVO. Ceremony Reunion. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

BELVEDERE’S. Wolvhammer, Mortals, Molasses Barge. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Matthew Mayfield, Emily Hearn, Justin Endler. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Velocicopter, Dumplings, Roulette Waves, The Baker’s Basment. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 10 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. TTNG, Mylets, Emma Ruth Rundle, Plusmanyothers. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Avi Diamond. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 08

FULL LIST ONLINE

www. per pa pghcitym .co

TUE 11

CLUB CAFE. Avi Buffalo, Wayne Beck. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lampshades. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Modern Baseball, Knuckle Puck, Crying, Somos. South Side. 412-381-6811.

WED 12 ALTAR BAR. Yann Tiersen. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. The Barr Brothers. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Billy Castle. Lawrenceville. 231-499-0081. CLUB CAFE. Futurebirds, Dan Getkins & the Masters of American Music, Honza from Butterbirds. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Edhochuli, Family, Slaves BC. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Werks, Zoogma, Walter Wadsworth. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. The Pimps of Joytime. South Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 06 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

SAT 08 565 LIVE. The Satin Hearts. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. THE BRONZE HOOD. Sweaty Betty. Robinson. 412-787-7240. MOONDOG’S. The Nied’s Hotel Band, Shot O’ Soul, Heidi & the Hellcats, the Miss Freddye Blues Band. Stand Up for Homeless Veterans Benefit. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Angel Blue & The Prophets Band. Lawrenceville. 412-667-1000. PLUM AMERICAN LEGION. The Witchdoctors. Verona. 412-795-9112. VERDETTO’S. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. North Side. 412-231-3004.

WED 12 THE MODERN CAFE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. North Side. 412-321-4550.

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. North Side. 412-323-2924.

TUE 11

MOONDOG’S. The Monday Blues Review. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SYRIA SHRINERS PAVILION. The Igniters, Shot O’ Soul. 724-274-7000. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

JAZZ

WED 12

THU 06

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEVELS. Kevin Howard Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Tom Roberts. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 06 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. PR7X “Live”. Bloomfield. 412-294-9996.

FRI 07

FRI 07 DELANIE’S COFFEE. SV, KNife, Miggs. South Side. 412-927-4030.

SAT 08 LEVELS. Darryl & Kim Askew. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 09 MR. SMALLS THEATER. RL Grime, Branchez, Tommy Kruise. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

TUE 11 XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. G-Eazy, E-40, IAMSU!, Jay Ant. Strip District.

BLUES THU 06 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 07

FRI 07

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic w/ Raya Brass Band. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DRUM BAR. DJ Nugget. North Side. 412-231-7777.

IRON CREEK BAR & GRILLE. Anderson-Vosel. Bridgeville. KOPPER KETTLE. Steamshovel Full of Blues. Washington. 724-225-5221.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Cremonise. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Buster Williams Quartet, The Sonny Fortune Quartet. North Side. 412-322-1773.

Mullaney

E L D D I F & P R A H Irish Pub

SAT 08 ANDYS. Travlin’. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Mr. Funkin’ for Jamaica, Tom Browne. North Side. 412-904-3335. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Tania Grubbs, TRAVELIN’. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted

GUINNESS OYSTER FESTIVAL 11TH ANNUAL

• NOVEMBER 8TH SATURDAY FROM NOON UNTIL CLOSE Delicious Menu of Oyster Delicacies including 1/2 Shell, Fried, Stew and Oyster Po’ Boy Sandwich, plus Peel ‘n Eat Shrimp. Live Music by Tim and John, The Unknown String Band, The Skipper Johnson Band, plus much more...

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CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

PODRASKY and THE REDD-UPS

SUN 09 EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip.

MON 10

also performing with Jimmer

FROM THE CLARKS : ROB JAMES, GREG JOSEPH, DAVE MINARIK, GARY JACOBS

CLEVELAND, OHIO

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

{FRI., DEC. 05}

ROB JAMES

TUE 11

Corrections House

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Ortner-Marcinizyn Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ The Dylan Ryan Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Grog Shop

PHILADELPHIA {TUE., JAN. 13}

GREG JOSEPH

WED 12

Sam Smith

ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414.

The Liacouras Center

WASHINGTON, D.C.

GARY JACOBS

DAVE MINÅARIK

ACOUSTIC THU 06

{WED., JAN. 14}

The Vaselines

ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Ryan Ayers w/ Aaron Lefebvre. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny & Jeff. 724-733-4453. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

Rock and Roll Hotel

SAT 08 KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. The Flow Band. 724-728-0222.

COUNTRY THU 06

SAT 08

with special guest

MARK DIGNAM

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Antje Duvekot w/ Brooke Annibale. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 12

Fri.

NOV. 28

2 014

THE REX THEATRE 16 0 2 E a s t C a r s o n S t r e e t

s ( 4 1 2 ) 3 8 1 - 6 8 1 1

DOORS @ 7PM SHOW @ 8PMsTICKETS: $17 ADV./ $22 SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT REXTHEATRE.COM

Poster & Ads by

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MICHAEL MORAN @ LUCK DESIGN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181. HEINZ HALL. Kenny Loggins. Downtown. 212-260-7576. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Mavens. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 07 LATITUDE 360. The Ultimate Aldean Experience (Jason Aldean Tribute). North Fayette. www. per 412-693-5555. pa pghcitym .co NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & The Stillhouse Pickers. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 08 SYNOD HALL. Huun Huur Tu, Alash Ensemble. Tuvan throat singers. Oakland. 412-361-2262.

REGGAE FRI 07 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

CLASSICAL SAT 08 CMU WIND ENSEMBLE. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Upper St. Clair Theater, Upper St. Clair. 412-279-4030.

SUN 09 MARY BETH BENNETT -

ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-4951.

MON 10 PACIFICA QUARTET W/ DAVID HARDING. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 07 PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. American Heroes. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. ST. PAUL CATHEDRAL. The Boys & Girls Choir of Harlem. Oakland. 412-621-4951.

SAT 08 LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. PARKWAY JEWISH CENTER. Steven Greenman, Klezmer Violinist. Penn Hills. 412-823-4338.

MON 10 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Jarrod Spector. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

WED 12 MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Matt Mason. Shadyside. 412-381-5105.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

November 5 - 11 WEDNESDAY 5

trustarts.org. 8p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Built To Amaze CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800745-3000. Through Nov. 9.

THURSDAY 6 Kenny Loggins with His Band

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 7:30p.m.

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets:

Masters of Illusion

American Authors

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Break Science

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. With special guests Manic Focus & Space Jesus. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 7

Love Letters

HENRY HEYMANN THEATRE Oakland. 412-624-PLAY. Tickets: play.pitt.edu.

412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Brothers in Blue Toys for Tots Benefit feat. SourMash

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. Through Nov. 16.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: JERRY METELLUS

SUNBEARS!

Comedian Dean Napolitano

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Nov. 8.

Brian Regan SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8 HEINZ HALL

SATURDAY 85

Gov’t Mule

Through Nov. 9.

Born of Osiris “Tomorrow We Die Alive Tour”

Brian Regan

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: livenation.com. 8p.m.

Empires

Royal Ballet of Cambodia

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

BYHAM THEATER Downtown.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

OTELLO

SUNDAY 96 Hannibal Buress

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

MONDAY 10 Jarrod Spector

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 11

Modern Baseball REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

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OPENING NIGHT {BY AL HOFF}

“IT’S EASY FOR AN OUTSIDER TO SEE WHAT’S SPECIAL ABOUT PITTSBURGH.”

The 33rd annual Three Rivers Film Festival, presented by Pittsburgh Filmmakers, opens Fri., Nov. 7, with four new films and a party. First-nighters can choose between: Foxcatcher, Bennett Miller’s docudrama about a 1996 murder at John duPont’s wrestling camp (7 p.m. Regent Square, Edgewood; sold out); The Overnighters, Jesse Moss’ devastating documentary about a small North Dakota town overwhelmed by gas-industry job-seekers (7:15 p.m. Harris Theater, Downtown); the locally produced comedy Homemakers (see preview at right); and Goodbye to Language, an “experimental cinema poem” from French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard, presented in 3-D (7:15 p.m. Waterworks Cinema, Aspinwall). Filmmakers’ Oakland facility will host the post-screening opening-night party, with food, drink and music ($5 with ticket; $10 walk-in).

HOME MOVIE

The Overnighters

The festival continues through Nov. 22, with 64 films and programs, spanning sneak previews (The Imitation Game, Escobar), microcinema presentations, world cinema, films made by Pittsburghers, documentaries, Polish films, animation, family-friendly features and even a 30th-anniversary screening of Spinal Tap. Plus the Boston Alloy Orchestra returns to provide live accompaniment to two silent films: The Lost World (with dinosaurs) and The Son of the Sheik (with Rudy Valentino), on Nov. 22.

Foxcatcher

Tickets are available in advance at www.showclix.com. Most regular screenings are $9; opening- and closingnight films are $15. A six-ticket pass to regular screenings is available for $50, and may be purchased at the theaters or Filmmakers’ offices. To purchase tickets and to view the complete festival schedule, see www.3rff.com. Some of the first-week films are previewed on the following pages. Follow CP’s Blogh for continuing coverage of the film festival at www.pghcitypaper. com/blogh.

{BY AL HOFF}

W

HEN A free-spirited, shambolic,

punky young woman named Irene inherits a run-down empty house in Pittsburgh, will it be another thing she destroys in the name of edginess, or will she settle down and adopt a new, more stable identity? This tension forms the heart of writerdirector Colin Healey’s debut feature comedy, Homemakers, making its Pittsburgh premiere Fri., Nov. 7, at the Three Rivers Film Festival. Healey, originally from “a little maple-syrup town in western Massachusetts,” moved to Pittsburgh in 2010, and immediately found inspiration. Speaking on the phone from his current home in New York, Healey explains, “I fell in love with the city visually. … It’s amazing to see a city constructed of hills and houses, hills and houses. Every hill and street has these nooks and crannies; the houses are patchwork, like collage. And so many of the houses are empty. A picture of Pittsburgh is full of stories, because of that tension: Who was in this house, where did they go, who did they leave behind, and are they coming back?”

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN POWELL}

This house is smoking: Jack Culbertson and Rachel McKeon, in Homemakers

From this fascination came Homemakers, shot in Pittsburgh (primarily Bloomfield), during the summer of 2012. Healey used a number of local actors, including Rachel McKeon as Irene, and as well as Jack Culbertson, Harry O’Toole and Sheila McKenna. (The messed-up house Irene moves into came courtesy of Steve Frankowski, of the nearby Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, with the stipulation that, after filming, the art department helped him gut it.)

HOMEMAKERS DIRECTED BY: Colin Healey 7:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7. Melwood

CP APPROVED Healey says he strove to explore how creative people (or people who need to present as creative) struggle with maintaining that identity when given the opportunity to become more settled. “I was also interested in breaking down the hipster trope of the ‘manic pixie dream girl punk singer’ idea. In the first third of the

movie, Irene is embodying that, and you wonder if the movie — and she — really believes in that. “But as hipsterdom gets older, what starts as the ironic appropriation of cheap beer and homemaking [changes] when you get the opportunity to decide — like Irene — whether to earnestly like these things. And that line was really interesting.” Homemakers premiered at the Independent Film Festival at Boston, where it won the audience award, and Healey has several other festival screenings lined up. He’ll return to Pittsburgh, with actress McKeon, for the Friday screening, and will do a Q&A after the film. Perhaps he’ll elaborate on how Pittsburgh is so uniquely awesome that it may well resist gentrification. “I think it’s easy for an outsider to see what’s special about Pittsburgh,” Healey says, “and that’s really what I wanted to capture in the movie. Pittsburgh is totally weird and back-alley, this intersection of the Midwest, Appalachia and Northeast — it’s amazing. And until the city buys into that weirdness, it’s never gonna blow up.” A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


into today’s Brazil. In Portuguese, with subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9, and 9 p.m. Mon., Nov. 10. Waterworks (BO)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL HOMEMAKERS. Filmed mostly in Pittsburgh, Colin Healey’s comedy depicts a wild child (a fierce and fearless Rachel McKeon) who flirts with settling down after inheriting a ramshackle house in Bloomfield. It’s loosely plotted (a bit mumblecore-ish), but beneath the chaos Healey makes some cogent points about identity, growing up and forming community. 7:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7. Melwood. $15 (Al Hoff)

CP

THE OVERNIGHTERS. North Dakota’s oil and gas fields have made the small prairie hamlet of Williston a modern-day boomtown. But as thousands of workers — mostly men from the South and the West — pour in, hoping to snag high-paying manual-labor jobs, there’s nowhere to house them. Thus, Jay Reinke, a local pastor, institutes a program to put the “overnighters” up in the church, to the discomfort of neighbors and church members. That sounds vaguely heartwarming, but Jesse Moss’ documentary instead casts light on deep cracks in the American Dream, as well as the disconnect between how we see ourselves and how we really are. Moss profiles a few of the workers — stories that begin in hardship, and are briefly buoyed by hope, before ending badly. But the workers are a feint — the heart of The Overnighters is pastor Reinke, and his story, gradually revealed as the battle against the town chips away at his cheery, calm exterior, is a shattering journey into the soul. Most accounts of the renewed oil-and-gas industry focus on the environmental costs or the economic benefits, but few examine the effect on a community and the individuals within it. The Overnights uncovers nothing that didn’t exist before or was lying dormant, but it took the boom to bring such desperation, ugliness and heartbreak to the surface. 7:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7. Harris (AH)

CP

THE HUMAN SCALE. With their highrises, their highways and their desolate public spaces, the modernist architects and planners of the 1960s all but killed real city life — and the rapidly urbanizing developing world of today is following suit. Filmmaker Andreas M. Dalsgaard says it needn’t be so, and looks to pioneering Danish architect Jan Gehl (and various academics and government officials) to point the way. The film surveys efforts in Denmark, Australia and New York City to undo bad design. (Did you know stretches of Broadway have been successfully closed to auto traffic?) And it visits a Chinese mega-city and the world’s fastest-growing city, Dhaka, Bangladesh, to show how good planning can help the poor while improving street life — enabling our humanity rather than hindering it. The fast-paced 76-minute film wraps in Christchurch, New Zealand, where a massive earthquake provides an opportunity to remake the city center for people — assuming business interests don’t upend a democratically crafted plan. 4:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8 (Melwood) and 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 13 (Harris). (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

MARIE’S STORY. Jean-Pierre Ameris’ film tells the “based-on-true-events” story of Marie, a young girl born deaf and blind in late-19thcentury France, and Sister Marguerite, the nun who feels it’s her vocation to help her. Marie

N E W S

MAGICIAN. At 90 minutes, this consideration of Orson Welles’ life, work and legacy is necessarily a gloss, from the boy-wonder days of theater, War of the Worlds and Citizen Kane to his wanderings in Hollywood’s hinterlands and final years as a corpulent if stentorian TV pitchman. Still, veteran documentarian Chuck Workman competently remakes the case for Welles’ singular cinematic genius, drawing on talking heads including biographer Simon Callow, film historian James Naremore, critic Elvis Mitchell, Welles pal Peter Bogdanovich and Welles’ longtime companion Oja Kadar. Perhaps most fascinating is Workman’s take on Welles as what director Richard Linklater calls “the patron saint of indie filmmakers.” After Hollywood shunned him, Welles took to Europe and spent decades tirelessly gleaning the resources to complete works like Chimes at Midnight, the Shakespearean drama that some (including Welles) consider his finest achievement — even though, characteristically enough, legal troubles have kept it out of distribution for decades. 8 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9 (Regent Square) and 6:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 11 (Waterworks). (BO)

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The Human Scale comes to Marguerite’s school for deaf girls as all but a lost cause; there’s a lot of struggling, and then, of course, the two turn a corner. It’s a lot of The Miracle Worker, but in French; Marguerite’s health problems are the variable that bring the story special meaning. Inspiring and thought-provoking, if sluggish at times. In French, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8 (Regent Square) and 4:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 12 (Waterworks) (Andy Mulkerin) SUPERNOVA. Physics and teenage ennui collide in this offbeat but lyrical coming-of-age story about a young Dutch girl, living with her cranky family at a blind curve along a rural road. A thread of dark comedy running through Tamar van den Dop’s film finds the family fervently hoping for another car crash to liven up their lives. In Dutch, with subtitles. 4:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9, and 9 p.m. Tue., Nov. 11. Waterworks (AH) STOP THE POUNDING HEART. In perhaps the quietest and least-dramatic coming-of-age film you’ll ever see, teenage Sarah, a member of a large, devout, farm-based Christian family in rural Texas, questions whether she wants the life prescribed for her. In this docudrama, unusually, Sarah and her extended family play themselves; Robert Minervini’s camera simply hangs out with them, as well as with Sarah’s neighbors, a more modern family whose sons dream of bull-riding. Introspective, and for the patient. 4:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9, and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 12. Harris (AH)

ONCE UPON A TIME, VERONICA. Marcelo Gomes’ portrait of a young woman in contemporary Brazil is a study in lightly masked depression. Veronica is young, beautiful and a newly fledged psychiatrist. But her beloved father, whom she lives with, is ailing, and her job at an overcrowded city hospital is a series of futile encounters with the poor and the addled. Worse for her, she feels herself incapable of love — though she vents her frustrations through copious sex, which Gomes portrays intimately. The film is framed partly as Veronica’s audio journal, in which she casts herself as her own patient. It’s a poignant device, and Hermila Guedes is strong in the title role. The film’s resolution hinges on something of a deus ex machina, but if nothing else, Veronica fascinates as a detailed glimpse

CP

NEW BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP. It’s the perfect pitch: Gaslight meets Memento with a splash of Gone Girl. So goes this tale of a woman (Nicole Kidman) who wakes up every morning with no memory, and begins to suspect that the man (Colin Firth) who claims to be her long-time husband might be hiding something. If only she could remember … and that nice doctor (Mark Cross) is helping out. Yet despite a good cast and a delicious marriage-thriller premise, CONTINUES ON PG. 42

‘‘BRILLIANT ON SO MANY LEVELS.’’ BETSY SHARKEY,

‘‘SENSATIONAL! NOT QUITE LIKE ANYTHING YOU’VE SEEN AT THE MOVIES.” STEVEN J. SNYDER,

‘‘MICHAEL KEATON SOARS.’’ LOU LUMENICK,

The Princess Bride (1987) - 11/5 @ 7:30pm

-Björk: - - - - - Biophilia - - - - - - - - -Live- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Magical - - - - - - -Universe --------------------------------Moving - - - - - - Mountains ---------------------------------American - - - - - - - - -Bear ------------------------------

Rob Reiner directs this modern day classic.

(2014) - 11/6 @ 7:30pm, 11/7 @ 10:00pm, 11/8 @ 10:00pm, 11/9 @ 4:00pm A remarkable, multi-media document of Björk’s visually dazzling Volta tour. (2014) - 11/7 @ 7:30pm, 11/8 @ 3:00pm, 11/9 @ 2:00pm, 11/12 @ 7:30pm A strange and inspiring portrait of Al Carbee, an 88 year old eccentric artist. (2014) - 11/9 @ 7:00pm The true story of one woman’s heroic struggle to save her community. With the filmmakers in attendance.

(2014) - 11/10 @ 7:30pm Armed with nothing but curiosity and a camera, playful couple Sarah and Greg travel the country relying on strangers for a home each night. With the filmmakers in attendance.

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WEST HOMESTEAD Carmike Galleria 6 The Manor Theatre AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (412) 531-5551 (412) 422-7729 (888) AMC-4FUN

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Rowan Joffe’s adaptation of S.J. Watson’s novel fails to get a good grip. Maybe it’s the generic suburban London setting, or the baroque plot that starts to feel more half-baked as it unfolds, but what should have been a nervy, twisty thriller felt perfunctory. Save this one for home viewing. (AH)

Wave classic), Nov. 7-10 and Nov. 12-13. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. ANDREAS VOIGT FILMS. As part of a series of films chosen to mark the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, German filmmaker Andreas Voigt visits the University of Pittsburgh and presents two of his documentaries. The 1989 film Liepzig in the Fall (5:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7, G-24 Cathedral of Learning) chronicles that city in the turbulent times that immediately preceded the fall of the wall. In 1991’s Last Year — Titanic (5:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8, 324 Cathedral of Learning), Voigt follows five citizens of the city during the transition period (1989-90) when East Germany was dissolved and incorporated into a reunited state with West Germany. Both films will be followed by refreshments and a discussion with director Voigt. In German, with subtitles. Pitt campus, Oakland. 412-648-2614. Free

BIG HERO 6. Short version: Some scientifically minded young adults — plus one health-care robot — create various tools in order to defeat a villain (also a scientist), in this digitally animated family action-adventure from Disney-Pixar. (Don Hall and Chris Williams direct.) As expected, the animation is top-notch, and the film moves at a good clip. The action takes place in the near future, in the U.S.Japanese hybrid city of San Fransokyo, which offers lots of visual flair. (What about that 1980s fear that the Japanese would take over America?) Kids should enjoy Big Hero 6: It has bright colors, soaring flying scenes and a huggable (toy-ready) robot. Adults may be amazed at how pro-STEM this “cartoon” is; it’s like a stealth campaign to get boys and girls to embrace the exhilarating disciplines of chemistry, robotics and engineering. It makes a nice change of pace from princesses, songs and talking animals. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., Nov. 7 (AH)

CP

BJORK BIOPHILIA LIVE. Nick Fenton and Peter Strickland’s new film captures the Icelandic singer and songwriter Bjork on tour for her 2011 Biophila LP. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 6; 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7; 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8; and 4 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9. Hollywood THE BLUE ROOM. In a small town, a family man (Mathieu Amalric) engages in a series of assignations with a woman (Stéphanie Cléau), also married, and their affair precipitates a number of increasingly unfortunate events. Amalric directs this lean tale of sexual obsession and unforeseen consequences in a jigsaw fashion, shifting back and forth in time, and from several perspectives. It’s a slow-burner, but the slow reveal of background and characters keeps the intrigue viable. For instance, the cops are involved, but has there even been a crime? Alas, the mystery is better than the solution, and the film’s conclusion — more of a psychological a-ha than a judicial wrap-up — fails to satisfy as it should. In French, with subtitles. AMC Loews (AH)

Laggies and frequently insightful. The three leads all deliver engaging and believable performances, though it’s hard to salvage some of the rom-com clichés that bog down the final reel. But don’t let the eye-rolling ending stop you from enjoying this fun little character study. Starts Fri., Nov. 7 (AH) MAGICAL UNIVERSE. Almost by accident, New York filmmaker Jeremy Workman and his girlfriend discover Al Carbee, a semi-reclusive octogenarian living in a small town in Maine, who has filled his house (and other structures) with a lifetime of artwork. Carbee is fascinated with Barbie dolls, and much of his art incorporates the dolls into wistful and fanciful dioramas. Workman strikes up a friendship with Carbee, and his new documentary explores Carbee’s life, his art and, on a deeper level, what it means to be creative with or without public exposure and feedback. A must for fans of outsider

CP

But in writer-director Dan Gilroy’s thriller-slashcharacter-study-slash-media-harangue, Bloom is a true creature of the night. He’s a sociopath, without boundaries, and the real horror isn’t the violence of car crashes or knifings, but how easily Bloom molds himself for an acceptable presentation. Here, Gyllenhaal transforms his seemingly unthreatening sad-sweet puppy-dog looks into something pretty creepy. The film’s third act gets pulpy, and while the action is thrilling, the story suffers from a lack of credibility. Gilroy also makes heavy-handed points about the shallowness and amorality of television news (even spelling out some critiques), and this clunkiness trips up the film’s better, hazy ride-along nightmare vibe. Still, it’s an entertaining, bubbling mix of black comedy, car chases and bad behavior — plus Gyllenhaal’s freaky, unblinking lemur eyes staring right through you. (AH)

MOVING MOUNTAINS. This new docudrama from Jeanie M. Clark depicts the struggle of Trish Bragg (Theresa Russell), a West Virginia coal-miner’s wife who fought back against the coal company after a deep well destroyed the community’s water wells. Clark and Bragg will host a Q&A after the screening. 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9. Hollywood AMERICAN BEAR: AN ADVENTURE IN THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS. Filmmakers Sarah Sellman and Greg Gano set out on a 60-day car journey across America, with the goal of asking strangers for help, specifically a place to sleep for the night. Along the way they document the refusals (many); their evolving thoughts about the project (how important are factors like their race,

ON ANY SUNDAY: THE NEXT CHAPTER. Dana Brown directs this new follow-up to the classic 1971 motorcycle doc, On Any Sunday, directed by his father, Bruce Brown. This time out, get your motor running with MotoGP riders, freestyle motorcrossers, custom motorbike designers and more. Starts Fri., Nov. 7 WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL? Shion Sono’s new mash-up comedy about an amateur film crew trying to document a gang war incorporates elements of gangster, slapstick and even rom-com. In Japanese, with subtitles. Starts Thu., Nov. 13. Hollywood

REPERTORY Big Hero 6 INTERSTELLAR. In the near future, things are a mess on Earth, but the discovery of a wormhole might lead to a solution. It’s a tough call for some scientists in Christopher Nolan’s new space-time thriller, starring Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway. LAGGIES. At nearly 30, Megan (Keira Knightley) is emotionally careless and still treading water in suburban Seattle. But a chance encounter with Annika (Chloe Grace Moretz), a teenager looking for an older female in her life, provides the impetus for Megan to finally grow up. Or perhaps not, since Megan really digs regressing back to teen-age hangout behavior, though her adult side is intrigued by Annika’s acerbic dad (Sam Rockwell). Lynn Shelton’s double-header coming-of-age tale is sweet, funny

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art, as well as a sweet tale of two seemingly disparate artists — Workman and Carbee — who find their creative outputs intertwined. Workman will visit for a Q&A after the Wed., Nov. 12, screening. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7; 3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8; 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 9; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 12. Hollywood (AH) NIGHTCRAWLER. Louis Bloom (Jake Gyllenhaal) is a loner who covers up his lack of people skills with a glib conversational style. After seeing some freelance cameramen capture footage for local if-itbleeds-it-leads TV-news shows, Bloom gets into the business himself. At first, his keen eye, smooth talking and even emotional detachment make him a perfect fit to be a nightcrawler, keyed to the police scanner hoping to be first on the scene.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Documentary Week: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai (2008 film about the African environmentalist and Nobel Prize winner), Nov. 5. Nas: Time Is Illmatic (about the making of Illmatic, Nas’ 1994 debut LP; Pittsburgh premiere), Nov. 5-6. I Am Trying to Break Your Heart (2002 film about the band Wilco), Nov. 6. Urbanized (Gary Hustwit’s 2011 look at urban planning), Nov. 6. Introduction to French Cinema: Irma Vep (Olivier Assayas’ 1996 film-within-a-film about filmmaking), Nov. 7-11. Breathless (Jean-Luc Godard’s 1960 French New Wave classic about a thief and his American girlfriend), Nov. 7-9, Nov. 11 and Nov. 13. A Prophet (2009 crime drama about a French-Algerian youth who rises to power in prison), Nov. 7-9 and Nov. 11-12. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir’s 1939 class critique wrapped in a comedy of manners), Nov. 7-10 and Nov. 12-13. The 400 Blows (Francois Truffaut’s 1959 tale of a troubled youth, another French New

American Bear age, appearance?); and the surprising variety of people who do invite the couple into their homes. Hosts range from an Iraq war vet-turned-healer and Native Americans on a reservation to a family of 12 who still find room for two more, and a group of young Southern guys jokingly eager to prove they do own shoes. The shaggy but engaging doc is part travelogue and part exploration of human nature. The filmmakers will do a Q&A after the screening. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 10. Hollywood (AH) OUT IN THE NIGHT. In 2006, a group of AfricanAmerican lesbians were threatened by a man in the street. They fought back but wound up in court charged, convicted and labeled “killer lesbians.” Blair Dorosh-Walther’s new documentary examines the case. The film screens as part of this year’s My People Film Series, which looks at the experiences of gay men and women of color. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 11. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5. www.kelly-strayhorn.org


[ART]

“IT JUST MAKES A DIFFERENCE KNOWING WHAT’S GOING ON.”

STEREO FILE

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WELL PLAYED: PAUL’S VINYL RECORDS continues through Sun., Nov. 9. 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org N E W S

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Record time: Paul Rosenblatt shares his LP collection

Letting someone rummage through your music collection is like baring your neck — exposing your Spears next to your Smiths, and revealing all sorts of questionable tastes. Paul Rosenblatt made an interactive art installation out of doing just that. Then, he invited the entire city. Rosenblatt, the principal of Springboard Design, opened Well Played, Paul’s Vinyl Records at 707 Penn Gallery in September, as part of the Pittsburgh Biennial. The storefront space is filled with roughly 15,000 used records, which he urges you to rake through and pass to the in-house DJ. A live stream on his website displays audio and video of these transactions, and visitors can ask the DJ to play one of the 925 records listed online. “The thing that interests me — and this is where the title of the show comes from — is that all of these records were well played and well loved, and at some point, they were discarded,” Rosenblatt says. “For me, the beauty of this show is it picks up where that left off, in a way.” Rosenblatt, 55, grew up in a family of music-lovers, inheriting his obsession as a “blood defect.” The architect also ran a popular, now-defunct music blog, “Vinyl Record Architect.” A couple years back, Rosenblatt asked the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Murray Horne about turning his personal 2,000album collection into an art installation. Rather than have Rosenblatt use his own LPs, Horne gave him a budget and told him to “blow the whole thing on records.” Some 15,000 cheap but eclectic albums from Jerry’s Records later, the collection isn’t his, but still feels personal. Rosenblatt’s art hangs above the racks, and he comments on the albums through blurbs on selected pieces. “It is sort of like the experience of going into a record store with someone else you know and have them whisper in your ear and tell you about something you came across,” Rosenblatt says. On Nov. 8 and Nov. 9, Rosenblatt plans to hold a closing party and sell the house, unloading the records at “ridiculously cheap prices.” “We get to pause and think about who owned these records before and what they were doing and where did they live and why did they get rid of them,” Rosenblatt says. “Then, put these back into that cycle.”

{PHOTO BY DANIELLE FOX}

{BY DANIELLE FOX}

OPENING DOORS [ACCESS]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Marty Mathews (left) examines a costume as she and Maurice Johnston take a Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre “sensory seminar” with the PBT’s Alyssa Herzog Melby.

I

N THE EARLY 1970s, Marty Mathews was a recent graduate of Carnegie Mellon, where she studied piano. Mathews is blind from birth. So whenever she attended a play, the self-described “culture vulture” arrived hoping that one of her seatmates would read her the program. Today, that’s less of a problem: Many theater companies offer programs in Braille, or online versions accessible with audio readers. But arts groups, advocates for the disabled and disabled people themselves continue pushing for other forms of increased accessibility — including those that make disabled patrons feel not simply accounted for, but actually welcome. Mathews, for instance, hasn’t seen much dance, but she’s a Tchaikovsky fan and wanted more. So 90 minutes before October’s Sunday matinee of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s The Sleeping Beauty, she and a friend joined PBT’s Alyssa Herzog Melby in a cozy Benedum Center lounge for a “sensory seminar.” Melby, PBT’s director of education and community engagement, produced the

Lilac Fairy’s costume, and Mathews felt the tutu’s layered tulle; she discovered that it sticks out, rather than laying flat, like a typical skirt. She inspected props, including the witch’s devious means of pricking the princess’s finger: “I didn’t know that’s what a spindle looked like.” Mathews also examined two doll-sized, jointed wooden artist’s models that Melby used to demonstrate ballet moves. And Melby coached her through acting out Carabosse’s sinister pantomime cursing the princess, including an evil, belly-shaking laugh. Following the half-hour seminar, Mathews quipped, “Now I’m gonna be in the ballet, right?” “I like to touch things that I wouldn’t normally get to touch,” says Mathews, a retired computer programmer who’s also done pre-performance “touch tours” of sets at local theaters. Also helpful was the live audio description that Melby and volunteer MaryAnn Graziano did for Sleeping Beauty, outlining the action through headsets for a handful of visually impaired patrons. The PBT’s audio-description program

began in December 2012, one in a new, citywide wave of access initiatives. For a visually impaired person, the benefits of audio description are obvious. As Mathews says, “It just makes a difference knowing what’s going on.” THE MODERN era of arts accessibility dates

to the American Sign Language performances some theaters offered in the 1970s. Following the federal Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, wheelchair access to public venues of all sorts became standard. But if you were blind, deaf or faced other sensory or cognitive challenges, the new ramps and elevators got you only so far. For visually impaired patrons in Pittsburgh, at least, a breakthrough came in 2003, when Pittsburgh Opera began offering audio description at one performance of each production. Today, the service draws up to 70 listeners per production. City Theatre followed suit two years later, and now averages 20 audio-description patrons per selected performance. Such early efforts were seeded by grants CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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OPENING DOORS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

from the Pittsburgh-based FISA Foundation, and it was FISA that sparked the current surge in arts accessibility here. In 2011, FISA and the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council began offering accessibility workshops for arts groups. Since then, things have moved quickly. With FISA support, more local arts administrators began attending the annual Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability conference, a professional network affiliated with the Kennedy Center, a national leader in arts access. By 2013, both Melby and a team from the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust (which owns the Benedum Center, the Byham Theater and other Downtown venues) had won LEAD awards as emerging leaders. Three years ago, the only sensory accommodation the Trust regularly offered was ASL at selected performances of touring Broadway shows. Now, says Trust director of accessibility Vanessa Braun, there are also large-print programs, audio description and closed captioning on hand-held devices at selected shows and on request (given sufficient notice). One accessibility frontier involves audience members on the autism spectrum, who might be especially sensitive to light and sound, or who might behave in ways unacceptable in traditional theater settings. In September 2013, the Benedum Center became just the third venue nationally to host a “sensoryfriendly” performance of Disney’s The Lion King. And that December, the PBT hosted the nation’s first sensory-friendly performance of holiday favorite The Nutcracker. In these shows, the house lights were dimmed only halfway, and lighting and sound effects (like Mufasa’s roar) that might alarm some patrons were softened or eliminated. More important, though, was the “relaxed-rules” atmosphere that made it OK for patrons to talk during scenes, or even get up and walk around. Nearly 2,400 people with autism, their family members and caretakers, attended that Lion King. Braun says many families reported that it was the first time they’d taken their autistic child to a live show. Jim Walter, of Shaler, enjoyed that Lion King with his wife, his older daughter and Lily, then age 7, who is autistic. “The stress of managing her behavior throughout the performance was relieved,” says Walter.

The Andy Warhol Museum is planning sensory-friendly days. Starting next year, moreover, the salestax-funded Allegheny Regional Asset District, with its $ 91 million budget, will require each of the arts groups and other cultural assets it supports to designate an accessibility coordinator, so that potential patrons will know whom to contact for help. And this year, ARAD set aside $ 500,000 in grant money for accessibility projects and unrelated “connections” (i.e., merging of operations). So far, only about $234,000 of the funds have been successfully applied for, to fund things like audio guides, accessibility training for staff and even “virtual tours” of physically inaccessible spaces. Pittsburgh in fact is known nationally for how its arts groups cooperate to promote accessibility. “They really work this as a community,” says Betty Siegel, director of accessibility at the Kennedy Center. But plenty of work remains. For instance, Joyce Driben, a longtime arts patron who is blind from birth, says that the Carnegie Museum of Art offers no audio descriptions of its exhibits. And unlike museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she says, the Carnegie lacks tactile resources, like touchable replicas of 3-D artworks. Carnegie Museum of Art spokesperson Jonathan Gaugler responds that the museum has some tactile displays in its decorative-art exhibit. And he notes that there is a Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh initiative to explore adding tactile displays; the Warhol, in fact, has been testing tactile versions of 2-D works like Warhol’s soup cans and self-portraits it plans to have on display by the end of 2015. Still, advocates for the disabled say accessibility isn’t just about gear (though things like a new automatic door-opener at Downtown’s Theater Square Box Office certainly help). It’s also a mindset. “Access is really more than compliance [with laws]. It’s making people feel welcome and valued,” says Anne Mulgrave, GPAC’s manager of grants and accessibility. She recalls fielding stories from hearing-impaired concert patrons frustrated by 40-minute delays waits for assisted-listening devices: “People with disabilities felt like they were problems, and they wouldn’t show up.” “If you care, that’s the biggest first step,” says Ann Lapidus, who became blind as an adult and now consults informally with arts groups. “How may I help you’s the general question to want to ask everyone.” Or as Mulgrave puts it, “Accessibility is just good customer service.”

“THEY REALLY WORK THIS AS A COMMUNITY.”

ACCESSIBILITY ISSUES are only becoming more prominent. The PBT plans another sensory-friendly Nutcracker, and then, in February, Beauty and the Beast. The Pittsburgh Symphony just announced its first sensory-friendly concert, next June, and

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014


TICKETS GOING FAST!

[DANCE]

FLOATING

Verdi’s Shakespearean masterpiece Tickets $12+

With roots tracing to the seventh century, The Royal Ballet of Cambodia is a unique link to Southeast Asia’s temple dances and mythic tales, as handed down for generations. With their rich, ornate costuming and headdresses, the dancers appear like ancient museum statues come to life. After seeing the company on a rare tour to France in 1906, sculptor Auguste Rodin declared, “I contemplated them in ecstasy.” The company of dancers, singers and musicians makes its Pittsburgh debut Nov. 7 at the Byham Theater in Stars of The Royal Ballet of Cambodia, part of the Cohen & Grigsby Trust Present series. Choreographed by Her Royal Highness Princess Norodom Buppha Devi — a former principal dancer with the company — the program showcases the company’s finest principal dancers in scenes recounting tales of good and evil, princes and princesses and mythological battles, in the Khmer classical dance style. With similarities to Indian classical dance, the Khmer style is characterized by intricate hand and foot movements performed at a slow, mesmerizing pace in which the dancers appear to float about the stage. Unlike continually evolving Western dance forms (from ballet and modern to hip hop), the Khmer style, and that of The Royal Ballet of Cambodia, has sought to maintain its traditional purity. It seeks to deliver the same hypnotic dance experience that it has for centuries. Also owing to tradition, female dancers perform both male and female roles, the dancers are barefoot, and the costumes have no buttons, hooks or clasps. The dancers are wrapped and sewn into them. Perhaps the most striking aspect of this style, however, are the dancers’ hand gestures (describing nature, flowers and fruit), characterized by outstretched open palms and fingers that appear unnaturally bent backward. It’s a skill that “takes a long time to master,” said principal dancer Chamroeuntola Chap by phone from Albuquerque, N.M., where the company was performing. Chap, who entered the Royal Ballet’s Phnom Penh school when she was 7, says “the first three years were spent just learning how to stretch the fingers, legs and body.” That training included classes in which her bent-back fingers were wrapped with cotton to soften her joints; a procedure she described as painful but one that ultimately adds to the beauty of the ancient art form.

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design.

Royal Ballet of Cambodia dancers {PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMY KEAT}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

“ [OTELLO] drew the viewer into the spell that only opera, with its marriage of aural and visual elements, can create” - Music in Cincinnati

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THE ROYAL BALLET OF CAMBODIA 8 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-45. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

STRANGE CASE {BY COLETTE NEWBY}

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

DEATH BY CHOCOLATE A comedy/farce by Paul Freed

NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

CONT EMPO RARY CHORE OGRA PHERS.

Featuring choreography by Luke Murphy, David Morse, Ronin Koresh and Troy Powell

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NOVEMBER 14–23 RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES PRODUCING DIRECTOR

WWW.PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

(412) 392-8000

PRIME STAGE Theatre’s production of The

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — the premiere of Bruce Hall’s adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel — is a fun little horror show with delightful set design. I’m perplexed why the show is running in November, after the Halloween joie de macabre is dead and buried. Although in fairness, Halloween is one of those seasons, like Easter, where “dead and buried” is least likely to mean what you think. If you’re reading this in 2014, you know the plot: Nice guy takes drug that turns him into an unrecognizable jerk, lives double life, ends up regretting that even his “good” side knowingly took a drug that made him murder people. The story survives in contemporary incarnations like The Nutty Professor and most werewolf movies. Adaptations of Jekyll are many and popular. Let’s consider what distinguishes this one:

DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE continues through Sun., Nov. 9. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheney Square East, North Side. $20. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

(1) No Jerry Lewis. I like Prime Stage already. (2) The joy of Jekyll is seeing the carnivalesque contortions of the lead performing two roles at once. The main characters’ ability to talk to himselves is crucial and if done poorly can sabotage an entire production; Willem Dafoe couldn’t do it in Spider-Man, and he had the magic of Dutch angles. Fortunately, Andrew Miller’s Jekyll and Hyde do very, very well. For that alone, Miller deserves a shelf of awards. (3) The production design is impeccable. Karl Jacobson’s set is gorgeous and director Michael McKelvey uses the whole New Hazlett Theater to terrific effect. Costume/ prop designer Kim Brown won my admiration by employing my favorite weird fashion item and giving almost every woman on stage a terrifyingly silly bustle. Unfortunately, the show’s not flawless. The second act is distressingly eager to conclude itself, with one of the most hurried final scenes I’ve seen in a while. I suppose it’s hard to expand scenes in a

{PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCA ANTAL MUTSCHLER}

Andrew Miller in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde at Prime Stage

plot where none of the characters wants to see each other. Still, some time to elaborate on things would have been appreciated, especially as the beginning of the second act involved some subterfuge with a forged letter that I could not make sense of without looking up the original book. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

PAIR JAM {BY TED HOOVER}

THE BEGINNING couldn’t have been

more disheartening. At the start of Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret’s local premiere of Murder for Two, two men come out and begin plowing their way through the exposition. Joe Kinosian and Ian Lowe throw themselves into delivering the backstory, characters, plot and theatrical style of this two-character musical comedy about the murder of a famous novelist and the suspects involved.

IT’S A FUN LITTLE HORROR SHOW.

MURDER FOR TWO continues through Jan. 18. The Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $39.75-44.75. 412-325-6766 or www.clocabaret.com

Exposition is always the hardest part of any show. Nonetheless, my heart sank as Kinosian and Lowe waded through what seemed like a lot of necessary, if plodding, detail and, worse, a lot of un-


necessary detail. Much of it was landing with a thud and most of the jokes were garnering, at best, a tepid response. Though performed in an intermissionfree 90 minutes, the night was suddenly stretching out before us more like lukewarm taffy. I’m not sure when, and really even how, it began to change. Slowly a connection developed between actor and material, and actor and audience. It became clear that this musical comedy (book by Kinosian and Kellen Blair) — which premiered in Chicago, in 2011 — wasn’t a yuk-filled gag-fest, but a sly and wry character study. Lowe plays Officer Marcus, there to solve the crime, and Kinosian is the handful of shady characters suspected of murder. And together they are the “orchestra”: One plays the piano (music by Kinosian, lyrics by Blair) while the other sings, though sometimes they both play and sing at the same time. The evening really takes off when you finally understand that Murder for Two, directed by Scott Schwartz, is actually a work in miniature: intensely crafted, but almost microscopic in detail. Big musical-comedy gestures and style are nowhere to be seen. Instead we have

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CLO CABARET}

They done it: Joe Kinosian (left) and Ian Lowe in CLO Cabaret’s Murder for Two

THE BOYS & GIRLS CHOIR OF HARLEM

two enormously gifted actors fashioning exquisitely precise performances. Lowe’s police officer is the charming, solid center of the show, providing the steadfast foundation for Kinosian’s perfectly pitched characterizations of the suspects. Once you enter fully into the world of Murder for Two, the evening becomes an enchanting, if not entrancing, example of the near limitless possibilities afford by two powerhouse performers and one piano.

FRIDAY // NOVEMBER 7 // 7:30 P.M. ST. PAUL CATHEDRAL CORNER OF FIFTH & CRAIG STREET GENERAL $ ADMISSION

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www.showclix.com • 1-888-718-4253 For group discounts contact janderson@hillhouse.org or 412-392-4474.

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nowseethis.org Unveiling of White House Christmas Decorations, 2013. AP Images / Charles Dharapak

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.0611.13.14

Live Music Rick Matt

WEDNESDAY | NOVEMBER 5 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Gresh’s Gris Gris

FRIDAY | NOVEMBER 7 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VINCE AGWADA

SATURDAY | NOVEMBER 8 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RML JAZZ

WEDNESDAY | NOVEMBER 12 | 8PM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CHARLES WALLACE

FRIDAY | NOVEMBER 14 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BILLY THE KID & THE REGULATORS SATURDAY | NOVEMBER 15 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE SATIN HEARTS

WEDNESDAY | NOVEMBER 19 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

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NOV. 10

American Bear: An Adventure in the Kindness of Strangers

+ THU., NOV. 06 {STAGE} University of Pittsburgh Stages presents the Broadway hit that boasts songs like “The Internet Is for Porn” as well as three Tony awards: Avenue Q. Jeff Whitty’s 2003 musical about an English major trying to succeed in New York City features a student cast handling its signature puppets. Jeff Marx and Robert Lopez, of Frozen and Book of Mormon fame, provide the music. Local stage favorite Bria Walker directs the show, which marks the grand reopening of Pitt’s Studio Theatre after an extensive renovation. Danielle Fox 8 p.m. Show continues through Nov. 23. Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

{MUSIC} Ryan Ayers plays guitar a little differently — with the technique of a classical guitarist, but on a steelstringed instrument and with pop and indie song forms. Tunes like the lovely “Island Moonshine” have won him fans including Andy Summers, formerly of The Police. The Los Angeles-based Ayers — whose gigs include lead guitarist for Prince protégé Andy Allo — visits Acoustic Music Works for a solo show tonight. Local guitarist Aaron Lefebvre

opens. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. 2142 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. $8. 412-422-0710 or www.acousticmusicworks.com

+ FRI., NOV. 07 {ART} It’s a busy night at Unblurred. The Penn Avenue art crawl includes 4121 Main, a new event and exhibit space that opens with art by Thommy Conroy. New shows also open at ModernFormations, Garfield Artworks, Pittsburgh Glass

by Fortified Phonetx, Kanayo King, and Commonwealth Family; and the Roboto Project hosts ’90s-themed group show SLIMETIME. BO 711 p.m. 4100-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/Friendship. Free. www.pennavenue.org

{DANCE} Noted State College-based dancer-choreographer André Koslowski spent part of a summer residency at the KellyStrayhorn Theater developing A Cantankerous Wiegenlied. The haunting work (its title

NOV. 08

In the h B Blink li k of a Decade {PHOTO COURTESY OF CASSIE K. RUSNAK}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Center and more, including the Mozelle Thompson albumart show at Most Wanted Fine Art (previewed in last week’s CP). Artisan has traditional icon paintings by Simeon Larivonovoff; Daily Bread and Refresh PGH offer urban art by Durty Art, plus live hip hop

including the German word for “lullaby”) is a series of solos by Koslowski and three other dancers on a set suggesting a trashed landscape. TanzTheater André Koslowski returns for two performances of the finished full-length piece, tonight and


sp otlight Richard McMillan and Anne Louise Bannon met 25 years ago, during a Three Rivers Shakespeare Festival production of Hamlet. McMillan, a noted Canadian actor, played the lead, and Bannon, a Pitt student, understudied Ophelia. Eventually the two performers married. And though they lived in Toronto, McMillan frequently returned to work for the Shakespeare Festival — where he was a keystone performer — and City Theatre, the Pittsburgh Playhouse and elsewhere. “It’s become our second home,” says McMillan. “I feel like a Pittsburgher.” Recently, after learning that McMillan had terminal thyroid cancer, Attilio “Buck” Favorini — who’d recruited McMillan for the Shakespeare Fest — suggested that McMillan and Bannon do another show here. “I thought there should be an opportunity for Pittsburgh to say thank you for all Rick’s great work,” says Favorini, founder and longtime head of Pitt’s theater department. Thus the three performances of Love Letters, A.R. Gurney’s 1989 two-hander depicting the half-century relationship between two life-long friends, as told through their missives. The show’s a perennial fave of both audiences and name actors. The University of Pittsburgh Stages production, at the intimate Henry Heymann Theatre, is an all-volunteer show; all proceeds will benefit a new fund, named for McMillan, to support undergraduate theater students at Pitt. Bill O’Driscoll Fri., Nov. 7-Sun., Nov. 9. Stephen Foster Memorial Theater, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35 (Nov. 9 reception: $100). 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

+ SAT., NOV. 08 {ART} When the Lawrenceville Artists’ Studio Tour began, 10 years ago, it featured 10 artists. This year’s anniversary tour features 30 artists from soap-makers to photographers — just one indication of how the neighborhood’s so dramatically changed. Stops this year include Radiant Hall — a newer space accommodating more than 15 artists — and the studio of tour-founder Ron Donoughe, who’ll unveil his 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods project, which includes oil paintings from his visits to each of the city’s ’hoods. The tour is free. BO 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Lawrenceville. Free. www.facebook.com/ LawrencevilleArtistsStudioTour

2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 16. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $12-179. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org

{DANCE} Forget the dancing tigers; bring on the BMX bikers. Tonight, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust hosts 360 ALLSTARS, an international urban circus, to the Byham Theater. Australia’s Onyx Productions reinvents the conventional circus with contemporary performances. A Roue Cyr (circus wheel) artist plays ringmaster; breakdancers replace acrobats; and basketball freestylers redefine jumping through hoops. Other performances include Hungary’s Peter Sore, a twotime world-champion BMX flatlander, and music from drummer and show director Gene Peterson and vocal-loop artist Sam Perry. DF 8 p.m. 101 Sixth Ave., Downtown. $25-45. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{COMEDY} {OPERA}

Gather round, listen … and

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NOV. 06

Avenue Q A

bring your own beer. Local storyteller Kyle Longsdorf imparts true tales at Arcade Comedy Theater’s monthly Hootenanny show, where comedians will then warp his words into a night of multiple-scene improvisation.

This month’s special guest is Longsdorf, a member of the Steel City Improv Theater group Yeah, Those Guys. Longsdorf also hosts Arcade’s weekly Sunday-night show Bonus Stage. DF 8 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-339-0608 or www. arcadecomedytheater.com

and more. Admission includes complimentary cocktails. BO 8 p.m.-midnight. $10-15. 214 N. Lexington St., North Point Breeze. www.pillowproject.org

+ SUN., NOV. 09 {COMEDY} While many people hadn’t heard of comedian Hannibal Buress until he ignited controversy by referring to Bill Cosby as a rapist during a show last month in Philadelphia, he’s been a favorite on the comedy circuit for years. Buress, who performs tonight at the Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead, covers everything from porn to video games and annoying girlfriends: “She said, ‘What would you do if I stayed out until 3 in the morning?’ Me? I’d play video games and celebrate your absence.” Charlie Deitch 8 p.m. 510 East 10th Ave., Munhall. $29.50. www.librarymusichall.com.

{DANCE}

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Pittsburgh Opera hasn’t staged Otello since 1990, but its season-opening production of Verdi’s masterpiece has a powerhouse cast. Worldrenowned tenor Carl Tanner — a hit in the Met’s 2012 Aida — sings the role of Shakespeare’s jealous Moor. Award-winning soprano Danielle Pastin (a former Pittsburgh Opera resident artist) is Desdemona, and internationally known baritone Anthony MichaelsMoore essays Iago. Kristine McIntyre directs, and music director Antony Walker conducts the opera’s orchestra and chorus. The show is sung in Italian (naturalmente!), with English texts projected above the stage. BO 8 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 7; 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 14, and

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF VINCENT NOE}

tomorrow. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8. 5931 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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In its decade on earth, choreographer Pearlann Porter’s Pillow Project has carved a niche in the local arts scene, from its early, large-scale multimedia shows to its jazz- and poetry-inflected happenings and other more intimate productions. Tonight, the still-vibrant company marks its decennial with In the Blink of a Decade. The party and show at Pillow headquarters, The Space Upstairs, unites many local performers and musicians who got their start or collaborated with the group, for performance recreations

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Winner of the 2012 American Documentary Film Pitch Competition, American Bear: An Adventure in the Kindness of Strangers follows filmmakers Sarah Sellman and Greg Grano as they take on 30 states in 60 days. The pair critically explores American compassion by relying on strangers to house them each night. They meet souls like the daughter of the last Cheyenne warrior woman, and Chicago youths facing new forms of segregation. Seeking to further foster kindness, Sellman and Grano visit the Hollywood Theater tonight for a screening and Q&A session. DF 7:30 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

+ TUE., NOV. 11 {ART} Steffi Domike and Ann Rosenthal’s exhibit Moving Targets links the 1914 extinction of passenger pigeons with Jewish diaspora through collages, wood-box paintings and maps. “Our exhibition parallels the plight of the passenger pigeon with that of our mothers’ families, piecing together the fragmented stories and forced migrations of both pigeons and Jews,” says Rosenthal in press materials. The exhibit, at the Duquesne University library, includes a “Passenger Pigeon Portrait Gallery” from 14 guest artists. The exhibit opens with tonight’s reception, artist talk and guided tour. DF 5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Dec. 6. 600 Forbes Ave., Uptown. Free. 412396-6130 or www.atrart.net

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER A CANTANKEROUS WIEGENLIED. TanzTheater André Koslowski returns for a full presentation of this performance, following the work-in-progress presentation in June 2013. Opens Nov. 7. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. AS YOU LIKE IT. Shakespeare’s pastoral comedy, directed by John Amplas. Preview Nov. 6, 8pm. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL. A night of dirty stand-up comedy, ft. Alex Grubarb, Lou Misiano, & Shannon Norman. BYOB Sat., Nov. 8, 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DEATH BY CHOCOLATE. Members of the newly renovated Meadowbrook Health Resort are dropping like flies. The clues point to a sinister box of chocolates, and the suspects include all the outlandish characters working for the resort.

Opens Nov. 7. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. ELF’ED. Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner Theater about one of Santa’s new elves who ends up receiving his last rights. Opens Nov. 8. Sat., Nov. 8, 7 p.m., Sat., Nov. 15, 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 5, 7 p.m., Fri., Dec. 19, 7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 20, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. THE GAME SHOW MURDERS. An interactive murder mystery which takes place during the taping of the popular TV game show “Stump the Stars.” Thru Nov. 8, 8 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. LOST IN YONKERS. Neil Simon’s coming of age story about a highly dysfunctional family. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Thru Nov. 9, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. THE MIRACLE WORKER. The story of Helen Keller & her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Thu-Sat

FULL LIST ONLINE

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FRI 07

COMEDY THU 06

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 16. BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. 724-745-6300. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. OTELLO. Verdi’s opera based on Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. Shakespeare’s play. Sat., Nov. 8, 412-251-0097. 8 p.m., Tue., Nov. 11, 7 p.m., PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, Fri., Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Nov. 16, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-325-6769. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. STRANGE CASE OF Thu, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Presented by Prime Stage. Costume contest Oct. 31st. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, JOHN CAPARULO. 2:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 9. 8 p.m., Fri., Nov. 7, New Hazlett Theater, 8 & 10:30 p.m., Sat., North Side. Nov. 8, 7 & 9:30 p.m. TWELFTH NIGHT www. per pa and Sun., Nov. 9, 7 p.m. pghcitym OR WHAT YOU WILL. o .c The Improv, Waterfront. Presented by Steel 412-462-5233. City Shakespeare Center. Multiple locations. 6pm hors d’oeuvres, 7pm DAHRI FERKS. A surreal, improv show. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 15. comedy mystery. BYOB. 8 p.m. 412-931-4624. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. GENE COLLIER & SEAN COLLIER. Ft. writer Gene Collier & DVE Morning Show contributor, Sean COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED Collier. BYOB. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MIKE JONES, BILL BORONKAY, DAVID KAY. Appetizers, BYOB. Benefits Arnold Volunteer Engine Co #2 Fire Department. 8 p.m. Arnold Volunteer Engine Co. 2 Social Hall. 412-920-5653.

FRI 07 - SAT 08 DEAN NAPOLITANO. Nov. 7-8, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 08 AMISH MONKEYS. A series of outrageous sketches & games based on audience suggestion. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. THE AMISH MONKEYS. Improvisational comedy troupe. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. BRIAN REGAN. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. JOHN KNIGHT, MATT STANTON, AUGGIE COOK. Dinner included w/ donation. Doors 5:30, show 7:00pm 7 p.m. Sub Alpine Club. 412-920-5653. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY! Traditional icon painting, by Simeon Larivonovoff, from Old Believers, at Artisan, in Garfield Gonnella, Christina Lee, Phyllis Kim, Jes LaVecchia, Maggie Negrete, Siena Baldi, Jess Paul, Megan Shalonis, Steph Neary, Andy Scott, Mike Madsen, Tim Currence, Mark Toneff. Opening reception Nov. 7, 6-9pm. Bloomfield. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Emerge/Evolve. Ft. selected works from Emerge 2014, Bullseye Glass Company’s eighth biennial kiln-glass exhibition for emerging artists, & work by three past Emerge finalists. Opening reception Nov. 7. 6-9pm. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SAXONBURGH AREA ARTISTS COOPERATIVE. “Daily Ritual: The Ceramic Cup”. Opening reception Nov.8. 6:30pm. How regional ceramic artists interpret and use the daily cup. Coffee tasting by Saxonburg Coffee Co. and and wine tasting by Rustic Acres Winery. Saxonburg. 724-422-0851.

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NEW THIS WEEK 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley. Commissioned photographs of significant landscapes across the nation & abroad. Opening reception 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. ARTISAN. Simeon Larivonovoff. Opening Nov. 7. Russian Orthodox “Old Believers” icon painter keeping a family tradition unbroken since 1392. Food provided by Jon Beck and drinks from Red Star Kombucha. Garfield. 412-661-0503. BUNKERPROJECTS. Follow Through. Site specific instillation by Meg Prall. Opening reception Nov. 7, 7-9 p.m. Garfield. BOOM CONCEPTS. MGR Youth Empowerment Artist Exhibition. Work by MGR teaching artists. Opening Nov 7. 6-9pm. Garfield. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Nocturne Moonrain. A solo exhibition of oil paintings by Lisa Marie Jakab. Opening reception Nov. 7, 6-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. DELANIE’S COFFEE. DOUBLE MIRROR EXHIBIT 4. Ft. local visual and performing artists. Opening reception Nov. 8, 7pm. BYOB & live music. South Side. 412-927-4030. THE FRAME GALLERY CARNEGIE MELLON. Power Loom. Kevin Brophy & Adam Milner explore the dynamics of the self & the social, power struggles, & gender/ body politics. Reception Nov. 14, 6-8pm. Squirrel Hill. 412-268-2000. THE GALLERY 4. Wild Abandon. New Paintings by Jason Woolslare. Opening reception Nov. 6, 7-11 p.m.

Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GREATER PITTSBURGH COLISEUM. M . e . :this hood. Work by Staycee Pearl. The first installation in a series called M . e . Morphing environments, a series of works demonstrating changing communities. The piece :this hood is a multimedia installation documenting the changes in Homewood. Homewood. 412-237-8300. IMAGEBOX. Crickets. New Work by Jim Storch. Opening reception Nov. 7, 7-10pm. Garfield. 412-441-0930. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Being Good. Documenting three Pittsburghers who are using their art,& committing their resources, to improving distressed neighborhoods in the city: Vanessa German, photographed by Lynn Johnson; Bill Strickland, photographed by Scott Goldsmith; and Randy Gilson, photographed by Brian Cohen. Opening Reception Nov. 6th. 6-8pm. North Side. 412-322-1773. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Everything At Once. Work by Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris & Patrick Schmidt. Opening Nov. 7, 7-10pm. Garfield. 412-969-7689. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. The Album Art of Mozelle Thompson. A retrospective of album cover art by Mozelle Thompson. Receptions Nov. 7, 6-11 p.m. & Nov. 8, noon-6 p.m. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. SLIMETIME. A 90s themed art show. Ft. work by Lizzee Solomon, Jordan Patton, Brian

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Rebuilt Connections. Multi-media pieces w/ photography, found objects, thread & painting techniques that capture a unique Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Suzanne Colvin: Recent Work. Place-based abstract works. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five

THURSDAY NOV 6/10PM

FIVEUNDER, AUGUST RUINS THURSDAY NOV 13/10PM

SCENE STAGE THE WORLD, SEMI SUPER VILLAINS, THE FILTHY LOWDOWN THURSDAY NOV 20/10PM AMRCNDREAMING $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

The beer that invented Light beer. ALL DAY EVERY DAY!

LITE PITCHERS 7.00 MILLER

$

Penn Monroe LITE 16oz DRAFTS 2.00 MILLER

MONDAY FOOTBALL SPECIAL

$

WEDNESDAY SDA AY WING DAY

$

ILLER LITE 2.50 MMILLER

BOTTLES & DRAFTS

CONTINUES ON PG. 53

F O L LO W @ M 2 T H I R D N E W S

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Tony Sands Productions presents . . .

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

LEGENDARY WID, JOHN KENSILL, DAN BROWN. Donation includes dinner. Doors 6pm, show 8pm.Benefits Highland Competition Cheerleading. 8 p.m. Patterson Hall, Natrona Heights. 412-920-5653.

A MUST-SEE SHOW!

Rat Pack Together Again

A thrilling night of great music and song. Experience Frank, Dean, and Sammy — the Rat Pack — performed with a wonderful mix of song, comedy, sketches, and brilliant musical arrangement. A sensory experience you don’t want to miss - the music that inspired and thrilled an entire generation! Rat Pack Together Again brings these characters to life and make them vibrant. For more information, visit www.ratpacktogetheragain.com

SATURDAY Nov-15-8-pm Carnegie Homestead Hall 510 East 10th Ave Munhall PA For tickets: call-877-987-6487 or go online to www.librarymusichall.com

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

412.326.5964

SUN 09 HANNIBAL BURESS. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225.

MON 10 COMEDY SAUCE. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 23 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 11 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 12 BEERHIVE COMEDY. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Wed, 8 p.m. Thru March 25 The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar,

4504 BUTLER STREET

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Frida at Microscopic Opera, at Chatham University, Shadyside

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and

CRITIC: Ashley Buchinger, 30, a customer-care advocate from Swissvale WHEN: Sun.,

Nov. 02 I feel like an artist, especially a Mexican female artist who was so avant-garde for the 1900s, being the focus is pretty special. I wouldn’t really have anticipated a bisexual female artist would be on anyone’s radar still, because people tend to just dismiss them as arty types, but her art is obviously a big deal and pretty important. This was my first full Microscopic Opera production. I kind of just expected it to be the same old thing. I used to work for the Pittsburgh Opera, Downtown, and I would catch a couple of those. Though those are lovely, and I hope they are around forever, they’re just pretty straightforward and standard. I thought this was awesome. I loved the screen. I thought the music was great. I loved the camera they used on stage for the backdrop. All of that was perfect. Haunting, but also weirdly charming. BY DANIELLE FOX

outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking

role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Flower Show 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West SCARRIE THE MUSICAL. View. 412-931-4425. This spin on a cult classic casts PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG Carrie as a senior at Allderdice AQUARIUM. Home to High School. Thu-Sat, 9 p.m. 4,000 animals, including Thru Nov. 8 Bricolage, Downtown. many endangered 412-471-0999. species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON CLEVER INDEED HOMESTEAD. A HOLIDAY TRUNK Reverence for Life. . www per SHOW. Shop with a p Photos and artifacts ty ci pgh m 20+ local artisans .co of her life & work. & vintage vendors Springdale. 724-274-5459. while sipping on cocktails RIVERS OF STEEL & enjoy holiday music. 2-8 p.m. NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Circuit Center and Ballroom, Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. South Side. 412-445-0206. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s ROYAL BALLET OF CAMBODIA. Lost Steamboat: Treasures of 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 412-456-6666. 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & 360 ALLSTARS. Feat. a cast of a national hub for the steamboat world class athletes, dancers & building industry in the midmusicians. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, 19th century. From Slavery to Downtown. 412-456-6666. Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s

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cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. Keen 2013. Photographs by Xenia Guthrie. Monroeville. 412-371-8651. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Once upon a time. Pittsburgh. Paintings by Fritz Keck. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Group Show. Work by Ron Nigro, Kathi DePasse, Cristina Saucedo (Pastilla), Mary Mason. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Spectator. Work by photographer April Friges. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Magic of Everyday. By Mary Hamilton. By appt. only. Shadyside. 412-241-1528. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In . Take Off Your Shoes .Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488.

FUNDRAISERS THU 06 - SUN 09 NCJW DESIGNER DAYS. Deals on gently worn designer & brand name clothing, shoes, & accessories. Proceeds benefit NCJW Pittsburgh Section’s community service programs. 12-8 p.m., Fri.,

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GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. North Side. 412-322-1773. MASER GALLERIES. Hessam Abrishami. Almost 40 works by the world-renowned artist. Shadyside. 412-687-0885. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MEXICO LINDO MERCADO Y GALERIA DE ARTESANIAS. Blood + Bones. Work by Mexican folk-art masters, remembering soldiers & civilians killed in U.S. wars in the Middle East and Mexican drug wars, plus ofrendas, honoring Nelson Mandela, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Maya Angelou, Lou Reed, more. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9984.

Nov. 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat., Nov. 8, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 9, 12-4 p.m. Home Consignments, Swissvale. 412-421-6118.

vendor shopping, raffles, light appetizers, a grand prize giveaway and adoptable pets. 7-9 p.m. Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, North Side. 412-321-4625.

FRI 07 TAILS ON THE CATWALK. Benefits The Western PA Humane Society. Ft. a fashion show,

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MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. The Perception of Value. Work by Dee Briggs. Homewood. 412-370-6916. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Meta/ Morphoses. New work by Brian Lang & Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Nov. 7, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisan-crafted mugs, cups and tumblers by 50 artists from across America. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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blackjack, bingo, putting challenge, tarot card readings & hors d’oeuvres. 6-10 p.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 412-348-2588.

SAT 08

SUN 09 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. RUN 4 FOREVER 5K. Harmar Pavillion. Benefits foster children. www.everychildinc.org/run4forever 9 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WED 12 4TH ANNUAL TURKEY TOAST. Benefits Every Child’s Thanksgiving Program. Guest Bartender Brandon Hudson of WPXI, raffles, music & art exhibit. 5:30-7:30 p.m. BoxHeart Gallery, Bloomfield. 412-665-0600.

PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 10 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MILLVALE MASH. An open mic event offering musicians, artists, storytellers & dramatists a chance to showcase their talents. Ft. local author, Mike Connell. 7:30 p.m. Grist House Brewing, Millvale. 412-447-1442.

TUE 11 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

POLITICS THU 06 THE NSA SURVELLIANCE PROGRAM- A NECESSARY EVIL OR GOVERNMENT GONE TOO FAR? Presented by Zittrain Forum on Law & Public Policy, giving opposing points of view on this controversial & current public debate. 8:30 a.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 412-402-6641.

KIDSTUFF THU 06 - WED 12 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 07 DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS. Learn to make papel picado, (cut tissue paper art), craft your own bone masks, more. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 08 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LANTERNS & THE LIGHT WITHIN US ALL COMMUNITY FREE DAY. Free admission, lantern making activities, community resource faire, CONTINUES ON PG. 54

SUN 09 WAR IN IRAQ & SYRIA AGAINST ISIS. Join the Thomas Merton Center Antiwar Committee as we discuss the new war in Iraq & Syria against the Islamic State. 1:30-3 p.m. Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-365-0519.

LITERARY THU 06 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

FRI 07 LIANE NORMAN, ANGELE ELLIS, DIANE KERR. MadFridays Reading Series. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030.

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HughShows LIVE @ EIDE’S blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

SATURDAY NOV. 8 1-5PM

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

performances, more. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. Ft. crafting & collaboration stations & an improv show inspired by audience suggestions. Second Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Thru Jan. 10 Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

TUE 11

THE MIKE MEDVED BAND PAIRDOWN ORANGE MAMMOTH WRECK LOOSE A free monthly family-friendly Pittsburgh music series. Please consider bringing a new school supply item to donate to the Homeless Children’s Education Fund

Eide’s Entertainment 1121 Penn Avenue

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 12 YOUTH GROW: WINTER WREATHS. Celebrate winter w/ festive wreaths using locally sourced pine, holly & mistletoe. 4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 07 - SAT 08 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

OTHER STUFF THU 06 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ALVIN CAREY: A WESTMORELAND COUNTY HERO. Speaker Ralph Bennett discusses the career highlights of this World War II Medal of Honor recipient. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 24-532-1935 x210. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

Music Hall. 412-368-5225. OUTSKIRTS OF THE STRIP NEIGHBORHOOD CELEBRATION. Hosted by Michael Lotenero Art + Design, Zerrer’s Antiques, & Framezilla w/ desserts supplied by Dulcinea & wine by Pittsburgh Winery! 6-9 p.m. Michael Lotenero Art + Design, Strip District. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SAYLÉ BICYCLE SERVICE LAUNCH PARTY. Kick off our new venture, Sayle Bicycle Service with light snacks, a fall cocktail, & beer from Rivertowne Brewing. 7 p.m. Banker Supply Co,, East Liberty. 412-203-4200. STEPHEN PARKER, EXPERT IN TRADING ETHICS. Parker, a business development executive at the IEX Group, discusses the

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PITTSBURGH BOTANIC GARDEN

The first phase of the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden is completed, which means that 60 of the 460 acres of abandoned mining land in Oakdale have been transformed into walkable nature trails. There is an immediate need for volunteers to fill a variety of positions, including visitor receptionist, greeter and trail monitor. For more information, call Joyce DiNardo at 412-444-4464 x231 or visit www.pittsburghbotanicgarden.org.

SAT 08 BOUNTY FALL FEST & FALL FEAST 5K RELAY. Arts and crafts, C&RC Plunge w/ the Pumpkins, cider tasting, baking contest, s’more Making, apple sling shots, hikes, geocaching, live music, food truck vendors. Festivities start at 11am. 5K relay at 9:30am. 9:30 & 11 a.m.-4 p.m. BoyceMayview Park, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1099.

Over 600 Beer choices to mix & match Eight rotating Seasonal Tap handles. Vienna all beef & Smith's natural casing Dogs New expanded menu including Subs & Salads Free Lunch Delivery Monday - Friday till 3pm.

GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. Meet globally-minded people from all over the world at this monthly happy hour. Registration required. First Thu of every month, 5:30-8 p.m. Thru March 5 Roland’s Seafood Grill, Strip District. 412-392-4513. HOW TO START A BUSINESS USING A TO Z DATABASES WEBINAR. Experts from A to Z Databases will demonstrate BUILDING A BACKYARD ways entrepreneurs & businesses HABITAT. Learn what can utilize data from the you need to do to attract library, business A to Z wildlife to your yard. Databases to start and Basics of gardening grow their business. with native plants. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Mt. Lebanon Nature Library, Downtown. www. per Conservancy’s 412-281-7141. pa pghcitym .co annual meeting and INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S refreshments will be ASSOCIATION OF served. 2 p.m. Mount PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural Lebanon Public Library, club of American/international Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, JESUS IS___. TOUR. W/Judah 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Smith. 7 p.m. Amplify Church. Oakland. 412-477-4677. 412-793-1600. MASTERS OF ILLUSION. Illusionists,comedy magicians, WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. exotic animals, colorful Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed birds, dancers, more. 8 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. Carnegie Library Of Homestead 412-963-6100.

SUN 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 11

201 Shiloh Street Mt. Washington www.packsanddogs.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

WED 12

technology-driven world of modern stock trading. 3-4:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh Law Building, Oakland. 412-648-1413. STORM & WASTE WATER CONCERNS IN PITTSBURGH. Solutions to our aging sewer and water lines & ways to handle storm water without overloading our waste water treatment plants. Discussion led by League of Women Voters. 12:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-760-9642. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WOMEN’S HEALTH CONVERSATIONS. A day of education, empowerment, & entertainment. 8:30 a.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-406-8117.

THU 06 - SUN 09 BUILT TO AMAZE! The 143rd edition of the Greatest Show On Earth. Surprise & wonder delights audiences w/ over the top feats of strength, agility & courage. Presented by Ringling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 9 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000.


[LITERARY]

FRI 07 BUILT TO AMAZE! The 143rd edition of the Greatest Show On Earth. Surprise & wonder delights audiences w/ over the top feats of strength, agility & courage. Presented by Ringling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 9 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. First Fri of every month, 7-11 p.m. Thru Nov. 7 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. WOMEN, PSYCHOANALYSIS, AND FILM. Viewing & discussion w/ filmmaker, Michelle Citron, psychoanalyst Christine Fischetti, & author & Professor of Film Studies, Jane Feuer, looking at gender, identity, & the mother/daughter dyad. Sanger Hall. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-661-4224.

FRI 07 - SUN 09 NOT QUITE PITTSBURGH JUGGLING FESTIVAL VII. Open juggling, lessons for beginners, workshops, juggling games, more. Nov. 7-9 Quaker Valley Middle School, Sewickley. 724-643-5378.

SAT 08 10TH ANNUAL LAWRENCEVILLE ARTISTS’ STUDIO TOUR. Tours of 30+ artist studios in 14 different locations across Lawrenceville. Pittsburgh-made, original artwork for sale. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. GADGET LAB. Talk with a member of our Techsperts team of tech-savvy librarians to learn how to download and stream free eBooks, eAudio, eVideo, movies, television shows, digital magazines, music & more. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

Fall of a Sparrow

BY LIANE ELLISON NORMAN

Friday late afternoon Driving down 5th to Oakland cars streaming for exits impatient to get to home/gym/bar. Bad-tempered traffic competing irritable running through almost red lights.

At the edge of vision a sparrow takes off from the sidewalk, doesn’t get enough height to clear jousting traffic collides with a car crumples head torqued sideways.

ST. URSULA PARISH CRAFT & VENDOR FAIR. Handmade arts & crafts. Refreshments. 9 a.m.2 p.m. St. Ursula School, Allison Park. 412-654-4721. STEEL CITY SQUARE DANCE. Second Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 8 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-254-4074. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. UFO BIGFOOT CONFERENCE. Saturday speakers & lunch. 8:30 a.m. Westmoreland County Community College, Youngwood. 724-836-1266. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. ZENTANGLE FOR BEGINNERS. Sue Schneider will lead introductory zentangle class. A simple technique of pattern drawing that is relaxing, meditative, intriguing, & fun. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES $4 TOP SHELF DRINKS & $2.25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVE EVERY NIGHT

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1/2ISOSIFONF ADM

OPEN LATE ! CALL FOR A FREE RIDE Thursday 7pm-2am Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

clubcontroversy.com

SAT 08 - SUN 09

Liane Ellison Norman appears with Angele Ellis and Diane Kerr at Delanie’s Coffee as part of the Carlow University-sponsored

MadFridays Reading Series. 7 p.m., Fri., Nov. 7. 1737 E. Carson St., South Side. Call 412-927-4030 or email sargesonkm@gmail.com for information.

KOREAN II. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 31 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SHADES OF GRAY DURING THE HOLOCAUST: STORIES OF RESISTANCE, SURVIVAL & COMPASSION. Keynote Presentation: Rachel Korazim, Holocaust Scholar. 7:30 p.m. Community Day School, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-1100.

SINISTER DREAM PRODUCTIONS 10TH ANNIVERSARY LIVE PODCAST EVENT & PREMIERE PERFORMANCE. 2 live podcasts and a premiere. Dream-O-Lodean Theatre: A old timey radioplay style comedy podcast. Sinister DreamCast: Our flagship nerdy general discussion podcast & Azazel: Suspense, exorcism, thriller!Q&A with the cast and crew. 6:30 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-417-2741. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. Presented by SCORE Pittsburgh. Covering small business planning, recordkeeping, taxes, financing, marketing & legal aspects. Breakfast included. 8 a.m.1 p.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 ext. 130. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108.

WEIHNACHTSMARKT. Juried regional vendors present a marketplace in the tradition of Germany’s famed Christmas markets. Nov. 8-9 Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341.

ALWAYS 1/2 OFF ADMISSION FOR SERVICE MEMBERS AND VETERANS WITH ID

SUN 09 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. COLORS & BOTTLES. Painting class. 1 p.m. Baltimore House, Pleasant Hills. INCENDIES: A TURBULENT RETURN TO BEGINNINGS IN THE TRANSGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF DESTRUCTIVE AGGRESSION. Viewing & panel discussion, presented by the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center. 1-4 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-661-4224. PITTSBURGH BELLYDANCE FESTIVAL. Workshops, lectures, vendors, performances & one the most prestigious East Coast bellydance competitions, the “Belly off in the Burgh”. Register online or call. Nov. 9-8 Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-980-3345. PITTSBURGH POLISH FESTIVAL 2014. Ft. Polish folk music, dance, arts & crafts & food. Funds raised will help support a Summer

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CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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1635 West Carson St. 412-471-5764

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[BELLYDANCE] Abroad Scholarship Program. 12-5 p.m. Cathedral of Learning, Oakland. 814-969-5940. THE ST. ANDREWS SOCIETY PRESENTS “SCOTLAND.”. Learn about Scotland past & present. Please plan to stay & socialize while enjoying Scottish tea & sweets. 2 p.m. Epiphany Catholic Church, Uptown. 412-471-0257. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606.

MON 10 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. COFFEE W/ THE CURATOR: TELLING THE STORY OF THE STORYTELLER. w/ Linda Benedict-Jones, curator of photography, in CMOA Theater. Light breakfast included. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. COLORS & BOTTLES. Painting class. 6:30 p.m. Elrama Tavern. 412-384-3630. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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SAHAJA MEDITATION. Dimple meditation techniques, which BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT will improve your physical, GROUP. For Widows/Widowers emotional, psychological, social, over 50. Second and Fourth and spiritual health Mon, Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 5 St. Sebastian Church, Ross. Mount Lebanon Public Library, 412-366-1300. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BEST PRACTICES IN SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. DEMENTIA CARE. Learning Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing to Give Care without the Fight. follows. No partner needed. Designed for family & professional Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace caregivers who want to move Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. from “dealing with” dementia 412-683-5670. related behaviors to SPELLING BEE WITH creating a positive and DAVE AND KUMAR. partnering experience Mon Lava Lounge, for the person in South Side. need of care. Main . w ww per 412-431-5282. Campus: Science a p ty ci h g p Hall. Register online. .com 8 a.m.-4:15 p.m. BOUNDARIES & SELF Westmoreland County CARE. Fourth and Second Community College, Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Youngwood. 724-834-5720. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. DETROIT STYLE URBAN 412-366-1300. BALLROOM DANCE. HOT METAL BLUES. Blues 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hodancing. Lessons: 8-9pm. sanna House, Wilkinsburg. Dancing: 9 pm-12am. Tue, 8 p.m. 412-242-4345. Thru Dec. 23 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). 412-681-7465. Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon SQUIRREL HILL’S MANSIONS. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Ft. speaker Melanie Gutowski 412-531-1912. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. conversational English. Wed, VETERANS DAY CEREMONY. 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Keynote Speaker: Brigadier Oakland. 412-622-3151. General Lawrence T. Luba. PAINTING PARTY. 6:30 p.m. 11 a.m. National Cemetery of Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. the Alleghenies, Canonsburg.

WED 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 11

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

THE PITTSBURGH CHRISTMAS CAROL TOUR - NORTHSIDE. 12 p.m. Calvary United Methodist Church, North Side. 412-323-4709. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SUSANNE ORTNER TRIO. Susanne Ortner, David Benett, & Daniel May will perform a musical soiree of classics, Klezmer, and jazz, including Jewish-inflected classical pieces, renditions of Gershwintunes, & traditional Klezmer pieces. 7 p.m.Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS 12 PEERS THEATER. Seeking equity & non-equity actors for their upcoming 2015 Season. Nov. 14-15. Email sfisher@12peerstheater.org to schedule an appointment. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. 5TH ANNUAL SING-OFF HIGHMARK PITTSBURGH FIRST NIGHT. Student must submit 1 rendition of a Motown classic & 1 song of their choosing. Entry forms & guidelines on the Highmark First Night Pittsburgh 2015 website. Deadline midnight Nov. 21. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for “LunchLady Cabaret.” Nov. 9-10. Come prepared with a 2-minute comedic monologue & 32 bars of uptempo Broadway/pop song (bring sheet music) McKeesport. 412-673-1100. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a’capella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. PRIME STAGE. Auditions for Animal Farm. Nov. 10-11. Seeking Actors/musicians/singers ages 16-adult. Thru Nov. 11. 724-773-0700. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR CABARET. “Let’s Duet Together: Duets and More from

The Belly Off only sounds like a weight-loss scheme. In the context of Pittsburgh’s lively bellydancing scene, it’s actually a competition for impromptu dancing to a live band. And the Belly Off is merely the centerpiece of the Pittsburgh

Bellydance Festival, a three-day program of workshops, lectures, vendors and performances at Pittsburgh Dance Center that draws dancers from around the country. The Nov. 7 Belly Off is followed by Nov. 8’s featured Showcase of the Stars performances. Fri., Nov. 7-Sun., Nov. 9. 4765 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $12-15. www.pghbellydancefestival.com the Great American Songbook”. Prepare 2 minutes of a song (memorized) from the Great American Songbook era. By appt only. Nov. 12. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722. SPLIT STAGE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Hair, Nov. 16-17. Prepare 2 32 bar cuts in contrasting styles. There will be a mandatory “movement call”. Email splitstage@ gmail.com for an appointment. Newlonsburg Presbyterian Church. 724-327-0061.

SUBMISSIONS BLAST FURNACE. Call for submissions: volume 4, issue 4. Seeking poems w/ theme of resolutions, as well as original poetry outside of this theme. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems, or an audio recording of yourself reciting your poetry (send only 1 file attachment no more than 2 minutes) blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit. Deadline Dec 15. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking

submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-inthe-cultural-district/ THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Is this even Dan? Probably not, probably an assistant, but maybe this will eventually get to him. I have a spanking fetish. I love to be spanked. I live in Oakland, Calif., so San Francisco is 10 minutes away. Seems like I’m in one of the best places in the country to have a kink, but I’m having a hard time figuring out where I can find a spanking community. I know there are BDSM clubs, but is there another way I can connect with spanking people? Any suggestions or resources? SINCERELY PANICKED AND NEEDING KNOWLEDGEABLE MENTORSHIP, EDIFICATION

This is Dan, SPANKME. I read all my own mail. And I found someone for you — all by my lonesome — who is more qualified than I to answer your question. “This lady sounds like she needs to be severely punished,” Jillian Keenan joked when she read your email. “I’d love to help her get what she deserves!” Keenan is a very serious journalist who writes about very serious subjects — climate change, economic policy, nuclear proliferation — but she’s also a very serious spanking fetishist. She came out about her kink in a Modern Love column in the New York Times (“Finding the Courage to Reveal a Fetish,” Nov. 9, 2012), and she’s written a series of pieces about kink, consent and stigma for Slate and other publications. So, SPANKME, where can you find your kink community? Where everybody finds their kink communities these days: online. “FetLife.com has profiles of more than 300,000 spanking fetishists, including several groups specifically for people in the Bay Area,” said Keenan. “FetLife is a good way to chat with people online and ease into the scene. On FetLife, she can also learn about where local spanking enthusiasts go for parties and munches.” Munches are informal get-togethers where kinksters meet to talk, not to play. You might connect with a potential playmate at a munch, but you won’t be pressured to play right away. “When she starts to meet potential playmates, the most important thing I can recommend is to be as detailed and honest as possible,” said Keenan. “What are her fantasies? Does she want to be spanked with a hand, hairbrush, belt, paddle or something else? Does she want to call her partner ‘sir’ or ‘ma’am’? Would she prefer a punitive dynamic, or does she fantasize about erotic spankings? Is she excited by any of our kink’s side dishes, like standing in a corner, writing lines, being scolded or getting her mouth washed out with soap? What implements, activities, words or pain thresholds are absolutely off-limits? Such specific details can feel embarrassing at first, but if she talks about them honestly with a potential partner, it’s much more likely that she’ll find a good match and have a great experience!” If you find yourself talking with someone who refuses to meet prior to playing, SPANKME, they’re not a responsible or trustworthy kinkster. “But great dominants are not rare,” said Keenan. “It won’t take long to find someone

else — someone with whom she’ll feel safe. And no matter what she and a potential partner agree on before a scene, she can always change her mind later if something feels uncomfortable. And there is absolutely no shame in using a safe word. So pick a fun one!” Follow Jillian Keenan on Twitter at @jilliankeenan. My brother and I married two incredible women. Our wives were good friends before we started dating them. My brother has always been my best friend, so the four of us spend a lot of time together. Recently, a couple of drinks turned into a bunch, and then my wife and sister-in-law started making out. Then they fucked. It was the hottest thing I’ve ever seen. We ended up pairing off with our respective partners and having sex in the same room. The next morning, the same thing happened again and now my wife tells me that she and her friend would like to date each other. The group sessions would continue. (But no wife-swapping.) Everyone seems on board. I knew my wife was bi before we married, and we’ve talked before about her having a girlfriend, so I’m fine with that part. It’s hot and it feels safe since we all trust each other. I guess my question is: Is this a terrible idea? Is it creepy and/or incestuous to watch your brother fuck his wife? Does this sound like a setup for the messiest breakup ever, or does something like this ever work out long-term?

“IF THINGS GET MESSY, YOU AND YOUR BROTHER ARE GOING TO FIND YOURSELF IN POSITIONS THAT MAKE REVERSE COWGIRL BLEACHED ANAL HANDSTAND LOOK EASY.”

BROTHERS RESPECTFULLY AROUSED HUMPING SPOUSES

The exact same things that make this arrangement feel so safe and so logical — your wives were friends before you and your brother married them, the four of you were tight before your wives started fucking each other — will turn this into a screaming nightmare should things go south. If things get messy, you and your brother are going to find yourself in positions that make Reverse Cowgirl Bleached Anal Handstand look easy. Because you’re all so close. But the train has already left the station, BRAHS: Your wives are doing each other, and they’d like to date each other, and you and your brother want to keep watching your wives fuck and then fucking your respective wives in front of each other. I would advise you all to get together for nonalcoholic beverages and for everyone to promise that you will be mature, reasonable and forgiving adults if/when this comes to an end. As for the incest and long-term angles: Watching your brother fuck someone strikes me as creepy, BRAHS, but it doesn’t meet the legal definition of incest. So Yahtzee for you. And while I haven’t heard of an arrangement like this working out over the long term, BRAHS, I’ve also never heard of an arrangement like this. Some things you expect to work out don’t, and some things you don’t expect to work out do. Good luck, gang. This week on the Lovecast, it’s Dan Savage and RuPaul! Listen at savagelovecast.com.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.05-11.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Near the end of the 19th century, an American named Annie Londonderry became the first woman to ride a bicycle around the world. It was a brave and brazen act for an era when women still couldn’t vote and paved roads were rare. Her 15-month journey took her through countries that would be risky for a single woman on a bike to travel through today, like Egypt and Yemen. What made her adventure even more remarkable was that she didn’t know how to ride a bike until two days before she departed. I’d love to see you plan a daring exploit like that, Scorpio —even if you do not yet have a certain skill you will need to succeed.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): P.G. Wodehouse wrote more than 90 books, as well as numerous plays, musical comedies and film scripts. When he died at age 93, he was working on another novel. He did not suffer from writer’s block. And yet his process was far from effortless. He rarely churned out perfection on his first attempt. “I have never written a novel,” he testified, “without doing 40,000 words or more and finding they were all wrong and going back and starting again.” The way I see your immediate future, Sagittarius, is that you will be creating your own version of those 40,000 wrong words. And that’s OK. It’s not a problem. You can’t get to the really good stuff without slogging through this practice run.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s a favorable time for you to meditate intensely on the subject of friendship. I urge you to take inventory of all the relevant issues. Here are a few questions to ask yourself. How good of a friend are you to the people you want to have as your

friends? What capacities do you cultivate in your effort to build and maintain vigorous alliances? Do you have a clear sense of what qualities you seek in your cohorts and colleagues? Are you discerning in the way you choose your compatriots, or do you sometimes end up in associations with people you don’t truly enjoy and don’t have much in common with? If you discover any laziness or ignorance in your approach to the art of friendship, make the necessary fixes.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Before the invention of the printing press, books in Europe were handmade. Medieval monks spent long hours copying these texts, often adding illustrations in the margins. There’s an odd scene that persistently appears in these illuminated manuscripts: knights fighting snails. Scholars don’t agree on why this theme is so popular or what it means. One theory is that the snail symbolizes the “slow-moving tedium of daily life,” which can be destructive to our hopes and dreams — similar to the way that literal snails may devour garden

get your yoga on! give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

plants. In accordance with the cosmic omens, I am bestowing a knighthood on you, Aquarius, so you will be inspired to rise up and defeat your own metaphorical version of the snail.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): To be in righteous alignment with cosmic forces, keep the Halloween spirit alive for another week. You have a license to play with your image and experiment with your identity. Interesting changes will unfold as you expand your notion of who you are and rebel cheerfully against your own status quo. To get started, try this exercise. Imagine that your gangsta name is Butt-Jugglin Smuggla. Your pirate name is Scallywagger Hornslasher. Your sexworker name is Saucy Loaf. Your Mexican-wrestler name is Ojo Último (Ultimate Eye). Your rock-starfrom-the-future name is Cashmere Hammer. Or make up your own variations.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Shape-shifting is a common theme in fairy tales, says cultural historian Marina Warner in her book From the Beast to the Blonde. “A rusty lamp turns into an all-powerful talisman,” for example. “A humble pestle and mortar become the winged vehicle of the fairy enchantress,” or a slovenly beggar wearing a dirty donkey skin transforms into a radiant princess. I foresee metaphorically similar events happening in your life sometime soon, Aries. Maybe they are already underway. Don’t underestimate the magic that is possible.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The technical scientific term for what happens when you get a headache from eating too much ice cream too fast is sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia. I urge you to be on guard against such an occurrence in the coming week. You should also watch out for other phenomena that fit the description of being too-much-and-too-fast-of-agood-thing. On the other hand, you shouldn’t worry at all about slowly getting just the right amount of a good thing. If you enjoy your pleasures with grace and moderation, you’ll be fine.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Pregreening” is a term for what impatient drivers do as they are waiting at a red light. They partly take their foot off the brake, allowing their car to creep forward, in the hope of establishing some momentum before the light changes to green. I advise you to avoid this type of behavior in the coming week, Gemini — both the literal and the metaphorical variety. Pregreening might make sense by, say, Nov. 15 or 16. But for now, relax and abide.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (17701827) was one of the greats. His influence on the evolution of Western music has been titanic, and

VWULSGLVWULFWVTXLUUHOKLOOQRUWKKLOOV

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.05/11.12.2014

many of his best compositions are still played today. He was prodigious, too, producing over 350 works. One of the secrets to his high level of energy seems to have been his relationship with coffee. It was an indispensable part of his diet. He was fastidious in its preparation, counting out exactly 60 coffee beans for each cup. I recommend that you summon a similar attention to detail in the coming days. It will be an excellent time to marshal your creative energy and cultivate your lust for life. You will get the best results if you are precise and consistent and focused in your approach.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): By the time we have become young adults, most of us don’t remember much about our lives from before the age of 5. As we grow into middle age, more and more childhood memories drop away. Vague impressions and hazy feelings may remain. A few special moments keep burning brightly. But the early events that shaped us are mostly gone. Having said that, I want to alert you to the fact that you are in a phase when you could recover whole swaths of lost memories, both from your formative years and later. Take advantage of this rare window of opportunity to reconnect with your past.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Photographer Joel Leindecker can kick himself in the head 127 times in one minute. Guinness World Records affirms that his achievement is unmatched. I’m begging you not to try to top his mark any time soon. In fact, I’m pleading with you not to commit any act of mayhem, chaos or unkindness against yourself — even if it it’s done for entertainment purposes. In my view, it’s crucial for you to concentrate on caressing yourself, treating yourself nicely and caring for yourself with ingenious tenderness in the coming weeks.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The writing of letters is becoming a lost art. Few people have a long enough attention span to sit down and compose a relaxed, thoughtful report on what they have been doing and thinking. Meanwhile, the number of vigorous, far-reaching conversations is waning, too. Instead, many of us tend to emit and absorb short bursts of information at frequent intervals. But I invite you to rebel against this trend in the coming weeks. Judging from the astrological omens, I believe you would stir up some quietly revolutionary developments by slowing down and deepening the way you communicate with those you care about. You may be amazed by how much richer your experience of intimacy will become. Is there a place in your life where you’re skilled at bending but not breaking? Brag about it! Truthrooster@gmail.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

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THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA., 15213, on November 18, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for Service Contracts at various schools for:

Transporting students in Allegheny, Butler, Westmoreland and Armstrong Counties. Hiring at a location near you visit us at www.wlroenigk.com

• Elevators and Vertical Transportation Mechanical Prime

Come be a part of our family

• HVAC Water Treatment Plumbing Prime • Fire Extinguishers and Fire Hoses General Prime

Now Hiring School Bus Drivers and 9 Passenger School Bus Drivers Apply online at www.monarktrans.com 1-888-317-4144 HIRING NOW! Black Lick, PA Mercer, PA • CDL Frac Equipment Operator • CDL Nitrogen Equipment Operator • CDL Cement Equipment Operator • CDL Wireline Equipment Operator • Mechanic • Crane Operator Apply on-line at www.nabors.com/careers • Select Field Opportunities or DOT Opportunities (CDL Jobs) • Under Rig Work Locations, select USA-NORTHEAST

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on October 27, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

Nabors offers Competitive Pay, Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance & 401K. EOE/M/F/V/D

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{PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

*Stuff We Like

Wilson’s B-B-Q This unprepossessing, family-owned storefront has been serving great wood-fired barbecue (mostly take-out, though there’s a table inside) for more than a half-century. The ribs are savory, the chicken is tender, and don’t forget the sides: The potato salad ranks among the best in town. 700 N. Taylor Ave., North Side. 412-322-7427

Happy Valley This six-episode British crime series is set in gloomy Yorkshire, in a former industrial town now plagued with drugs and shiftless types. Depicts police work from a rare perspective, that of a tough-but-sensitive middle-aged woman juggling the twin stresses of being a cop and tending to her dysfunctional family. On Netflix.

The Climbing Wall Industrial-themed grave markers Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville.

Cooler temperatures don’t mean the end of recreational activity. For more than 20 years, this facility with 14,000 square feet of climbing has provided indoor access to rockclimbing. 7501 Penn Ave., North Point Breeze. www.theclimbingwall.net

If You Near-perfect traditional country songs from the godfather of modern honky-tonk, Dale Watson. Recorded at Sun Studios, in Memphis, all six cuts — from “Sayonara Sucka” to “I’ll See You Never” — deal with that time-honored country-music tradition of telling someone to fuck off.

How to Build a Girl In early 1990s Britain, a lumpy working-class teenage girl from the sticks re-invents herself as a sharp-tongued music critic and “Lady Sex Adventurer,” in Caitlin Moran’s funny and insightful coming-of-age novel.

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EXPERIENCED SALES PROFESSIONAL to join the Sales Team Candidate should have: • 5 YEARS OF MEDIA SALES EXPERIENCE TO QUALIFY FOR THE POSITION OF SELLING PRINT, WEB AND RADIO • DIGITAL EXPERIENCE A PLUS

EMAIL RESUMES TO: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. Steel City Media is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS Urban Innovation 21 working toward innovation and growth in all neighborhoods {BY ABBY MENDELSON} “I USED TO RIDE my bicycle on these streets,” Bill Generett says, glancing out the car window. In Homewood, driving down Penn and Frankstown and Lang, he sees shuttered stores and weedchoked lots. Buildings cowering behind boarded windows and wire fences. “I remember when it was vibrant,” he recalls. “The first time I came back, I cried.” Passing some Better Block kids armed for clean-up, Generett sees a neighborhood disguised as a clear-cut, slow-growth forest. Virtually unchanged for decades, Homewood’s stuck in reverse. “People here are very proud,” he says. “Homewood’s fighting back.” So is he. William Generett Jr., possessor of a gilt-edged education and a blue-chip résumé, is the son of a physician and a bank vice president. Born and raised in nearby Point Breeze, he was educated at Shady Side Academy, Morehouse College and Emory Law. As a young man, he practiced law in Atlanta, married, taught English in Japan, settled down in Washington, D.C. He seemed set for life.

“We had to create strategies to make that connection,” he says. “To find creative ways to make sure that folks are included.” Calling his efforts Urban Innovation 21, he attracted some 20 companies to open facilities in Uptown and the Hill — neighborhoods strategically placed between Oakland and Downtown. “When you blend borders,” he says, “when you create an ecosystem, residents benefit.” They did — immediately. Not only through internships and jobs, but also by building on resources — training, capital, economic opportunity. In a relatively short period of time, Generett saw employment rise and ancillary industries begin to flower, including security services, construction firms, landscaping contractors, and so on. “It’s been transformative,” he says. Turning his sights on Homewood, Generett found it a tougher nut to crack. With neither the cachet nor the proximity of the Hill, Homewood has been easy to bypass, ignore or simply overlook. No longer. Generett stops the car in a gravel parking lot at 7800 Susquehanna St., an immense former Westinghouse facility. Five stories

“THERE ARE TOO MANY PEOPLE WHO NEVER RECOVERED.” Then the world interceded. One way or another, Washington was a city under siege. Living a mile from the Pentagon, he saw the smoke rise on 9/11. Then, the anthrax scare. The Virginia sniper scare. By 2004 it was time to come home. What he found was a Pittsburgh different from the one he had left in the ’80s, a place paralyzed by the collapse of Big Steel. “What I discovered was two worlds,” Generett recalls. “One world was doing well economically,” he nods. “One was not.” “Oh, there was a lot of social-service support,” Generett allows. “But that’s not enough to ensure economic vitality,” he shakes his head, “to transform neighborhoods like Homewood. We have to teach people how to fish. We have to teach people how to make money.” “How do we build that?” he found himself asking. “How do we build an entrepreneurial spirit? Especially in communities where that entrepreneurial spirit died?” Deciding to do “whatever I could to close the gap,” Generett set out “to make Pittsburgh the most livable city for all of us.” Looking at such underserved communities as the Hill, Homewood, and the North Side, he worked to connect the new economies — health care, manufacturing, energy, emerging technologies — with impacted communities.

high, red brick with outsized windows and a line of truck bays, it’s ripe for adaptive reuse as an Innovation Center. Already lined up, he says proudly, are a high-end cabinet maker, a construction firm and various business incubators. “It’s coming to life,” Generett says. “We’re really excited. “I love Pittsburgh,” he adds. “This city fought back — fought to diversify our economy; to come out of the ashes. I’m happy and proud to see that economic transformation. But we still have these tremendous gaps. There are too many people who never recovered.” He pauses. “For all the things we’re doing well, we’re still an Act 47 city. There’s still an enormous amount of poverty — too many groups who are not connected.” Generett gets back in his car. “The beauty of Pittsburgh is our neighborhoods,” he says, “all our neighborhoods. The danger is that they’re too insular. They don’t see their role. They don’t see a place they can play in this world. “We all have to see beyond geography,” he adds. “Unfortunately, there’s no road map.” He turns a corner. Barely out of Homewood, the new Bakery Square complex — high-tech jobs, high-end retail, high-cost condominiums — springs into view. Generett nods. “We’ve got a lot of work to do.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

November 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 45

November 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 45