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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 10.29/11.05.2014

STREET BOX: MEET THE 10 FINALISTS IN CITY PAPER’S ARTBOX CONTEST 16


EVENTS 10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.7 – 5pm M . E . :THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

11.21 – 8pm ISABELLA ROSSELLINI IN GREEN PORNO Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

12.5 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 — TOO MUCH JOHNSON Warhol theater Tickets $10

12.12 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: 13 MOST WANTED MEN, WITH JOHN GIORNO AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS, MILTON FINE CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL}

10.29/11.05.2014 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 44

[NEWS] need to step up the punishments. 06 “You If you’re going to abuse animals you don’t need to have them.” — State Rep. Dom Costa on the state’s weak animal-protection laws

[VIEWS] seems to have strayed far from 12 “Komen its original mission. It now seems to be a marketing firm specializing in pinkwashing.” — Author and breast-cancer survivor Carol Peterson on the Susan G. Komen Check out Foundation in the 10 finalists ird City Paper’s th [TASTE] annual ArtBox “A slice of chocolate contest peanut-butter pie pleased 16 all palates.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Randita’s Organic Vegan Café

22

[MUSIC]

a lot of ways, Atlantic managed to 28 “In stall any progress we were making. And we let it, really.” — Bill Deasy of the newly reunited Gathering Field on the band’s flirtation with success in the ’90s

[SCREEN] funny, fast-paced and a welcome 39 “Brash, return to the A-list for Michael Keaton.” — Al Hoff on Birdman

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

STEEL CITY MEDIA

42

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“I remember we had an art show in our garage and even the principal came.” — Greta Griffin on her brother Mozelle Thompson’s early artistic success

[LAST PAGE] when she was doing chemo and 63 “Even felt horrible, my mom had an incredible sense of humor. Attitude is everything. Not just with this, but with every struggle.” — Artist Penny See on her mother’s struggle with breast cancer and her inspiration for the upcoming Art Bra fundraiser

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 STUFF WE LIKE 61 N E W S

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“THE ONLY THING I CAN DO IS MAKE SURE THIS DOESN’T HAPPEN AGAIN.”

INCOMING Tom Wolf has Tom Corbett and the GOP’s gubernatorial legacy on the run (Oct. 22) “Republicans promise less government. They currently control all three branches of Pennsylvania government. But they didn’t get rid of the state stores. It’s a similar story in Texas, where Republicans have controlled all three branches of state government for more than 20 years and all they’ve done is make government bigger, pass new laws and increase government spending.” — Web comment from “Jimmyev”

Talking poetry with Cass McCombs (Oct. 22) “I think Big Wheel blows Wits End and Humor Risk completely out of the water. It’s the best kind of sprawling double record, punctuated with great pop songs and imbued with confidence, even when it heads out into untested waters (“Everything Has to Be Just So”).” — Web comment from “Matt”

Zoning Board rejects arts corridor AutoZone proposal on former Babyland site (Oct. 20, online only) “Why would a community desperate for new businesses and opportunities want to be a pain in the ass for a developer with good intentions?” — Web comment from Craig Biertempfel

“84 and 85 points scored in the two games played at Heinz Field this weekend. What the tough, hard-nosed city of Pittsburgh demands, folks.” — Oct. 26 tweet from “DJ Gallo” (@DJGalloEtc.)

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Veterinarian Becky Morrow, left, and animal activist Margo Cicci with several rescue cats

PAUSE FOR CONCERN M

ARGO CICCI vividly remembers

the visits she made in August to a Mount Lebanon house where more than 80 cats were left behind after their owner was evicted. A strong stench emanated from the home, and she found cats in traps left unattended for hours at a time. “The tenant was evicted and when she left, she left close to a hundred cats in the duplex,” Cicci says. “When I went down, there were cats in traps outside, uncovered in the pouring down rain. They were so scared.” Cicci — a member of the Pittsburgh Feral Cat Movement, an animal-protection group — learned more about the situation over the next few days. The house’s landlord had hired Big Daddy Wildlife Removal, a private company, to remove the cats. Cicci was told by the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

landlord that the trapping company was working with a humane officer from local no-kill shelter Animal Friends to determine which cats could be saved. “We were told that as the cats were trapped, they were going to Animal Friends, that they were going there to be

Cruelty case highlights problems in state’s animal-protection statutes {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} evaluated and decisions would be made at that point,” Cicci says. “We felt more comfortable with what was happening because we figured they must be working with this trapping company to make

sure the cats that are friendly and need medical attention are going to get that.” But a week later, Cicci learned that most of the cats were dead. According to Animal Friends, 10 of the 82 cats found at the home were rescued. The rest were euthanized. “It’s horrible to think that they all died,” says Cicci. “There is a problem that a humane agent was out here and only removed a few cats. They allowed a third party to do the trapping and remove the cats. And as far as we know, no charges have been filed against the owner of the cats. That’s what we’re upset about.” According to the Humane Society of the United States, nearly 250,000 animals each year are victims of animal hoarding. But despite the frequency of cases like the one in Mount Lebanon, animal shelters and judicial systems have a


hard time handling hoarding situations. Shelters are often already filled to capacity and unable to deal with a large influx of animals at one time. Local authorities often learn of hoarding situations only when they’ve reached a critical level and the animals are already too far gone. And in general, laws aren’t in place to regulate cat ownership, leaving these animals to fend for themselves. “Hoarding situations are very, very challenging because in most cases the animals are very sick,” says Kristen Lane, director of marketing and communications at the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society. “If a hoarder has 30 or 40 cats, of course those cats are going to infect each other. So in a hoarding case there is probably going to be a lot of euthanizations, because the cats are going to be very sick.” “We’ve seen a number of these hoarding cases throughout the region,” says Animal Friends spokesperson Kathleen Beaver. “And that’s what’s so difficult is when it gets to the point where you have 30, 40, 80 cats, you know these cats are probably not in the best of health, probably not as socialized as they can be and shelters run out of options really quickly.”

2014 – 2015

IN THE MOUNT Lebanon case, local police

were notified of the situation and contacted Animal Friends to follow up on the case and ultimately decide whether to file charges against the owner of the cats. “An agreement was made with Animal Friends that any of the cats that were in good enough health or could be adopted, those cats were turned over to Animal Friends,” says Aaron Lauth, deputy chief of the Mount Lebanon department. “And the ones that were not, unfortunately, had to be euthanized, and then it was up to the humane officer — seeing the condition of the animals taken out by the private service — to file charges.” Cicci and fellow cat activist Becky Morrow, a veterinarian, contend that Animal Friends did not adequately inspect the health of the animals at the home. Based on their own interactions with the animals that were in cages when they arrived, Cicci and Morrow say that many of the cats were friendly and socialized, not feral. “They looked fairly healthy,” says Morrow. “In hoarding scenarios, the first thing and the most prevalent thing we worry about is upper-respiratory

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PAUSE FOR CONCERN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

infections, loss of eyes. And we didn’t see any of that.” Morrow also worries about Animal Friends’ ability to file charges against the cat-owner. “This was a clear-cut cruelty case,” says Morrow. “The evidence in a case like this is going to be the cats. There’s a chain of custody that needs to be followed, so by sending the cats out to Big Daddy, they broke the chain of custody. You can’t use those cats as evidence now. They not only didn’t charge her, but really damaged their own case if they would try to charge her.” Animal Friends says it was actually first alerted to the situation in Mount Lebanon in March 2013. At the time, the group was unable to investigate further because it could not obtain a warrant to search the home, and there was no evidence of animal cruelty on the outside of the house. When Animal Friends humane officer Kathy Hecker revisited the site in August, after the cat-owner had been evicted, she was immediately able to collect enough evidence to file charges, and Animal Friends says it plans to do so in the future. “We essentially did what we would do in any situation like this,” says Joanne Moore, Animal Friends’ director of outreach and therapeutic programming. “It needs to be understood that the landlord had made all of these arrangements. He was looking for trap and removal. He did not indicate that he wanted investigation.” “When the landlord contracted with [the private trapping company], the offer we put out there to them is we can take any that aren’t medically compromised, that are kittens, that are manageable,” says Animal Friends spokesperson Beaver. “We weren’t there making some of these decisions, it was really Big Daddy making some of these decisions.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARGO CICCI}

Three of the cats removed from a home in Mount Lebanon

Big Daddy did not respond to requests for comment. Animal Friends has two years to file charges, but if charges aren’t filed, Cicci and Morrow worry the cats’ owner and others like her will continue hoarding in the future, leading to the death of many more cats. “Our big thing is that this woman left with five to 10 cats. She clearly has a problem that needs addressed, and hoarding has a 100 percent chance of relapse if you don’t get serious intervention,” Cicci says. “I’ve second-guessed everything I did, but the only thing I can do is make sure this doesn’t happen again.”

cats, it’s really common for them to have a disease that’s contagious. In most cases, cats in hoarding situations have not been protected from any disease,” says Janice Barnard, program director at the Animal Rescue League of Western Pennsylvania. “In some cases, they’ll have a humane agent and a veterinarian go on site to make a determination and they’ll decide the cats aren’t adoptable. And that’s pretty common.” But situations like this often don’t get the same attention as animal-cruelty cases involving dogs, like pit-bull fighting. And there aren’t the same laws in place to regulate cat ownership as there are for dogs. For instance, cats do not have to be licensed. “Cats are absolutely a secondary

“A SOCIETY IS MEASURED BY THE WAY IT TAKES CARE OF CREATURES WHO CAN’T TAKE CARE OF THEMSELVES.”

UNFORTUNATELY, the situation in Mount Lebanon is a common one. “When you have an overcrowding of

citizen. I hate saying people don’t value them as much, because we definitely do here,” Barnard says. “I’ve seen cases where they throw the book at [hoarders] the first time, and other cases where the person keeps coming back over and over and over again.” Like a lot of municipalities, Mount Lebanon doesn’t have a limit on the number of animals a person can own, so law-enforcement officials often can’t intervene until animals are in clear danger. “The laws in Pennsylvania related to animals don’t have much teeth,” says Barnard. “People are demanding that animal-related laws have more bite to them.” But local legislators are working to strengthen animal-cruelty laws. In 2013, state Rep. Dom Costa introduced legislation that would increase penalties for animal cruelty. “A society is measured by the way it takes care of creatures who can’t take CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PAUSE FOR CONCERN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

care of themselves,” says Costa. “You need to step up the punishments. If you’re going to abuse animals, you don’t need to have them.” He’s also considering creating a statewide statute to limit the number of animals a person can own. “Ordinances are allowed to limit the number of pets you have, so I think we’re going to have to look at a state statute,” Costa says. “The hoarders, I believe in their heart they mean well, but there needs to more penalties. Prior to the last 10 years, the movement toward protecting cats hasn’t been as visible and I think people are starting to generate a lot more attention. We need to put more money behind enforcement.” But others say these laws do little to address animal cruelty in hoarding situations because the people involved are suffering from a mental illness. “There are lots and lots of laws on the books, but they’re only for people who are willing to abide by them. It’s a human and animal tragedy combined,” says Patti Strand, president of the National Animal Interest Alliance. “Every jurisdiction has all kinds of laws on the books that are never enforced. This is not going to be a high priority compared to monitoring previous rapists. There’s only

so many dollars.” And even if laws are available in jurisdictions to penalize hoarders, there are ethical considerations involved in prosecuting someone with a mental illness. “What do you do when you’re dealing with a person that has a mental disorder? It’s unusual when a hoarder is prosecuted,” Strand says. “It’s just a very peculiar, weird, sad, tragic situation. You recognize at some point that you’re not looking at someone who’s being willfully cruel.” As for the criticism Animal Friends has received in this case, Strand says its handling of the case was common when it comes to hoarding situations “By the time you recognize something is going on, you’re probably going to have some animals that are in bad shape already,” Strand says. “Often if they are euthanizing the excess, it’s because there isn’t space in the local shelters. They’re going to retain the cats that have the best chance of a successful adoption, which would not be the feral cats. “They’re making decisions that may look cold to the outside world, but that are reasonable when you’re trying to do the best job you can with limited resources and a limited community to adopt.”

“IT’S HORRIBLE TO THINK THAT THEY ALL DIED.”

RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

WHEN PINK STINKS

The questionable partnerships of the Komen Foundation {BY CAROL PETERSON} IT’S OCTOBER, the month we associate with trick-or-treaters dressed as monsters and pop-culture icons, days getting shorter, and pink ribbons adorning all sorts of things we can buy — shoes, cleaning products, food containers, booze, you name it. The pink ribbons are brought to you by Susan G. Komen for the Cure, founded in 1982 by Nancy Brinker, whose sister, Susan Komen, had recently died of breast cancer at age 36. Since its founding, Komen (originally the Susan G. Komen Foundation) has become synonymous with the quest to eradicate breast cancer through its ubiquitous pink ribbons and the annual Races for the Cure held in many cities. But for a growing number of observers, the foundation looks more like part of the problem than a means to a cure for a disfiguring, sometimes-fatal disease that according to federal statistics, strikes 1 in 8 women. Komen licenses the right to apply pink ribbons to the products of for-profit companies. Some of those products, however, contain carcinogens, or carcinogens are involved in the manufacturing process. Examples include: plastic water bottles containing the chemical BPA; manufacturers of automobiles, whose exhaust contains carcinogens; and fast-food giant Kentucky Fried Chicken, whose partnership with Komen ended after considerable public criticism. Komen licensed a perfume, “Promise Me,” that contained four chemicals that scientists believe are involved in causing cancer. Just a few weeks ago, naturalgas-industry supplier Baker Hughes announced it had teamed with Komen to sell pink drill bits for fracking, a process that uses chemicals that are known carcinogens. Purchasing the use of Komen’s pink ribbon to place on products associated with carcinogens has become known as “pinkwashing.” That practice was the subject of the 2011 film Pink Ribbons, Inc., which helped spread the news of Komen’s questionable practices. In 2012, Komen made the ethical and political error of discontinuing Planned Parenthood funding used to provide lowincome women with mammograms. That decision was reversed after public outcry, but not before further attention was drawn to Komen’s pinkwashing practices. More concerning is that all the billions that Komen has raised in its 32 years (most recently, Komen took in $339 million in 2012-13) haven’t found a cure or a means

of prevention for breast cancer. In 2014, nearly 300,000 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and about 40,000 will die from the disease. Meanwhile, Nancy Brinker’s salary in 2013 was $684,717, well above what’s typical for nonprofit executives. Komen seems to have tacitly acknowledged that its emphasis on a cure may be misplaced. In recent years, it has promoted breast-cancer “awareness” and optimism for patients ranging from the newly diagnosed to those who are terminally ill. The language of breast-cancer patients’ “fight” against the disease deflects responsibility away from 32 years of not finding a cure, while subtly placing the onus on women with breast cancer. If a patient dies, is it because she didn’t fight hard enough? What if, instead, the system failed her? What if Komen hasn’t looked for the cure in the right places because doing so would be expensive, inconvenient or embarrassing? While Brinker’s intentions were surely laudable when she established the charity, Komen seems to have strayed far from its original mission. It now seems to be a marketing firm specializing in pinkwashing. There are those who argue that more women die of heart disease than breast cancer. Unlike heart disease, which many may avoid through diet and lifestyle, breast cancer is not so easy to sidestep. Obesity is a factor, as are early menstruation and genetic predisposition. But many women with breast cancer have few or no risk factors. The environmental factors are the elephant in the room. Far too often, environmental factors can be linked to companies that sport that pink ribbon. Pink ribbons are a smokescreen that can distract consumers (and most purchasing decisions are made by women) from what may really be going on. Komen has claimed mea culpa so many times, but how can a nonprofit that claims it is dedicated to stopping breast cancer get behind such blatant offenders as KFC and the fracking industry? The millions of people who give to Komen expect that it knows better than to allow cancer-causing businesses to pinkwash their business practices.

“THE FOUNDATION LOOKS MORE LIKE PART OF THE PROBLEM THAN A MEANS TO A CURE.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Carol Peterson is a Pittsburgh-based author and historian who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010.


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This is an ALL AGES event! Tickets are just $35 and VIPS are only $60! So get your tickets now at www.cravebanquethall.com or www.dancingskeletons.net

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blogh.pghcitypaper.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014


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Are you interested in a research study of a new investigational birth control patch?

BOXED UP

Vote in City Paper’s third annual ArtBox contest On a normal Wednesday, you’d be hard-pressed to find our normally black City Paper boxes decorated with much more than our logo, a stray piece of gum and the occasional scribbled profanity. But in our selfless efforts to make our city even more beautiful than it already is, we are happy to present our third annual ArtBox project, sponsored by the Hill House Association’s Kaufmann Center. We asked local artists to submit ideas to turn our everyday newspaper boxes into real-life works of art. We selected the work of 10 finalists, and now their decorated boxes are on streets around town. Now we’re asking readers to vote for their favorite. The winning artist — announced in our Dec. 3 issue — will receive $500. Online, you can find an interactive map with the location of each box, and vote for your favorite until Nov. 21. Visit www.pghcitypaper.com/artbox.

If you are:

• Sexually active and willing to try a different method of birth control; or • Interested in being in a study for a method of birth control that is non-invasive ... then you may be eligible to join the SECURE Study - a clinical study of a new birth control patch. We are recruiting women to join a large clinical research study of a contraceptive patch. The patch contains the same type of hormones that are in many birth control pills. The patch is designed to be flexible and is applied onto the skin, just once a week. To join the study you must: • Be sexually active at least once a month • Need to use birth control • Not wish to become pregnant for at least 1 year • Be able to use the patch as your only form of birth control for at least 1 year

Chuck Amok, Carrick / Age: 40

Not everyone who wants to join will be able to. Several joining criteria must also be met. It is your choice whether to join, and even if you do join, you can leave the study at any time. {PHOTOS BY DAN THOMPSON}

Contraceptive patches and all study check-ups will be provided at no cost to you. If you would like to learn more, please call us at:

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

201 South Highland Avenue, Suite 102 Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-363-1900 • INQUIRY@CTRSLLC.com

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# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

Lately I have been very inspired by my heritage. We have family in Mexico and I’ve gotten to visit a few times. I am so inspired by the colorful painting, vivid personality and friendliness of the culture. I love all the hand-painted tiles everywhere, the religious icons and the skeletons. I am truly drawn to the holiday Dia de los Muertos [Day of the Dead]. The vibrant artwork, bold lines, flowers and embracing our own eventuality speaks to me. I hope people will feel a sense of merriment and whimsy when they see my Mexican Dia de los Muertos folklórico dancers.

Tony Cavalline, e, Lawrenceville / Age: 32 Growing up in a more rural area, there ere ut was something a bit magical for me about gh. driving into the city on visits to Pittsburgh. es This cityscape was inspired by my memories tic of that experience, and a more simplistic he and fantastical way of looking at the world. I used a lot of textured materials to eal invoke the tactile and somewhat surreal ho that people ple qualitiess of memory. I hope seeing it will join me in ng, remembering, nt, for a moment, ore that more ld. magical world.


Abby Diamond, Friendship / Age: 24 Inspiration for the design: I think of Pittsburgh as a place of thriving creativity and rich, natural beauty. The cityscape is filled with accessible public art, especially stained glass, murals and mosaics. The surrounding [area], in addition, is home to amazing wildlife, and some of the most unique birds in the Three Rivers region. I have enormous love for these two fields and decided to combine them when coming up with imagery for the ArtBox design. When people see my ArtBox, I hope it reminds them to look for birds, pay attention to stained glass and remember of the wealth of beauty around us.

Friday, Oct. 31 – Halloween night! | 7 – 11 pm Ghost stories from Wigle Whiskey, mixology lessons, DQDHULDODFUREDWLFSHUIRUPDQFHIRXUçRRUVRIKDQGVRQ VFLHQFHH[KLELWVDFDVKEDUDQGORWVPRUHÓDGXOWVRQO\ CarnegieScienceCenter.org Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

Kat K at McLaug McLaughlin, Regent R egent Squa Square / Age: 28 I lo love Pittsburgh’s skyline, and when co oming up with th coming the design somehow tthe th e Emerald City p popped into mind. The rest just kind of ha happened. Once I drew the flying m monkey, I knew I had something. When I make a piece of art, I don’t have a hidden message to uncover. I make a art for people to enjoy w I enjoy making it. That’s why stree art; it’s not for art street afici aficionados eating hors d’oe d’oeuvres. I make art for ever everyday people who norm normally don’t stop to appr appreciate art. If I made some someone stop and smile, then I did something right.

CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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BOXED UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

Kent Miller, Harmony / Age: 30 I wanted a unique, eye-catching design with the theme of opposites: fantasy and reality, solid and liquid, up and down. In my work, I’m always interested in bold compositions, and I had fun juxtaposing such different elements against each other. My work also tends to be playful, so I enjoyed placing the fantasy figures around the box, especially the dragon and the giant ape. I hoped for a design that would make people smile when they see it, but also think.

INTRODUCING OUR NEWEST DOCTOR UPMC CancerCenter is pleased to welcome our newest doctor. Seah H. Lim, MD, PhD, FRCP (Lond.), FRCPath. Medical Oncologist/Hematologist Board-certified in internal medicine and hematology, Dr. Lim specializes in stem cell transplantation, hematological malignancies, hematopathology, and general hematology. He received his medical degree from Aberdeen University and completed his residency at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, both in Scotland. Dr. Lim completed his fellowship at Cambridge University in the U.K.

To schedule an appointment, or for more information, call 412-647-2811 or visit UPMCCancerCenter.com. Hillman Cancer Center Mario Lemieux Center for Blood Cancers 5115 Centre Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15232

UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute is a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

Juliet Phillip Phillips, Lawrenceville / Age: 23 The design for this box is centered around a silly and strange wo world in which newspapers take the form of ev everything, from a bird in the sky to those mountains off in the distance. The chara characters who inhabit this funny place are ent entirely obsessed with Paperr even sleeping under its City Paper, page while camping! I hope pages that people will find themselves ench enchanted and amused by this kooky world!


Socially Active.

Sara Eve Rivera, Oakland / Age: 27

FULLY WELCOMING

A Great Place to be.

Traditionally, mandalas are spiritual representations of microcosms. This mandala is a tribute to life in the rolling hills, rivers and valleys of our home. I incorporated iconic imagery not only of Pittsburgh, but of Pennsylvania. The state flower, the mountain laurel, is central to the design. Surrounding the mountain laurel, I arranged Pennsylvania keystones that represent life and passages of time through the blink of the eye. On the outer edge of this mandala are the emblematic yellow bridges, hills and rivers of Pittsburgh. I hope people see an expression for the love [of] Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania as a whole.

presents

PofE T the

1 1 6 S H I G H L A N D AVE N U E C AT H E D R A L O F H O P E . O R G

WEEK

Photo by Jeff Geissler

Christopher Schmidt, Regent Square / Age: 47

Ricky

I wanted to use art to transform the box and have it be an interactive experience. Once the idea hit me of turning the gate of the box into the maw of some horrid creature, I suppose there was no turning back. You have to reach down the gullet of this sort of ugly, yet adorable gargoyle that very badly wants your approval, despite just having eaten a whole stack of this week’s City Paper, yet again. Like the City Paper itself, it’s a little transgressive, but mostly harmless. More than anything, I really hope kids like it.

Ricky is a very playful bunny. She is curious and likes to explore her surroundings. She especially enjoys pushing her favorite ball around her pen, but will also lay quietly to be petted. Ricky has excellent litter habits and would make a great first bunny for any family.

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BOXED UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Andy Scott, Lawrenceville / Age: 26 The imagery I chose for my ArtBox design comes from the influence I get from the city of Pittsburgh. So much about our city has influenced my work over the years, and this design really combines many of my favorite things about the city. Themes that you’ll find on the box consist of parking-chair pride, good food, architecture and the eerily strong connection that binds together Pittsburgh sports/industry to its people. This box is truly intended to be enjoyed by the residents who have a romantic affinity for our city and region.

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30 • 6 -7:30 PM Architectural History Lecture: Ornament and Crime Join us for the last of a three-part lecture series by PHLF Historical Collections Director Albert M. Tannler as he discusses ornament and crime in architecture. The title for this lecture comes from a lecture given by Austrian architect Adolf Loos in 1910 and 1913 and first published as an article in French in 1920. Loos’ initial criticism was directed at Art Nouveau and Secessionist architects who lavishly embellished “articles in daily use” during the first decade of the 20th century. It was not a criticism of all architectural ornament per se, but as one Loos scholar noted, “In Paris, it was received as a purist manifesto that demanded the total suppression of ornament.” Indeed, in 1924 Loos wrote: “I never thought like the purists who pushed this reasoning to the absurd, that ornament should be systematically abolished.” All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

412-471-5808

I love Pittsburgh architecture, and the way the city grew however it wanted or felt it needed to at the time. Everything I painted on the box comes from a different view or neighborhood. When looking at the box, you might even see your house or a building from your community. I hope that evokes a sense of pride for Pittsburgh and maybe gives you a warm tingling feeling about the place you live.


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A SLICE OF CHOCOLATE PEANUT-BUTTER PIE PLEASED ALL PALATES

HOLA LOMITO {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} For the past 16 months, the Lomito Truck has been rolling out Paraguayan street food to customers across the region. But on Sat., Nov. 1, owners Hoon Kim and Damon Dlubak will officially open the doors of Lomito’s sit-down restaurant in Bloomfield. The restaurant has been going through a soft opening for the past few weeks at the site of Kim’s former sushi restaurant, Fukuda. The new spot is cozy and comfortable, with a halfdozen tables plus additional seating at the counter. Like the truck, the shop’s signature dish is the lomito, a sirloin-steak sandwich. Also like the mobile operation, the most popular offering is the Lomito Completo. It offers: a generous portion of sirloin, topped with provolone, ham, lettuce, tomato, a fried egg and chimichurri sauce. A Lomito Simple eschews the egg; the Lomita Manchito adds ham, avocado and bacon; and the vegetariano substitutes grilled peppers and onions for the steak. For an extra $3, diners can add a beverage, such as fresh-squeezed lemonade, and either a side of Havana corn-on-the-cob or feijoada (rice and beans). But the real star here is the sandwich. Eating a Lomito Completo is a two-handed, 12-napkin affair. The runny egg mixes with the chimichurri to make a classic steak sandwich taste exotic and decadent. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. MondayFriday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. (additional hours coming soon). 412-444-7022. www.lomitotruck.com or @LomitoTruck

the

FEED

Fall doesn’t smell only of fake pumpkin. When the weather turns cold, try your hand at stews and soup incorporating the fragrant Asian spice mix,

“five-spice powder.” It’s a bland moniker, but this blend of star anise, cloves, cinnamon, pepper and fennel seeds is anything but — a heady, sweet/spicy/ peppery aroma that conjures warmth and comfort.

HAPPY TO BE VEGAN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

VISITOR recently asked us if Pittsburgh has a distinctive local food. This gave us pause, because in some ways, our city is most strongly associated with the foods brought here by its immigrants: kielbasa, pierogies, haluski. But those are more home (and church-festival) cooking than restaurant fare, and not invented in Pittsburgh. Then there’s steak “Pittsburgh rare,” like the steelworkers supposedly cooked it on the iron furnaces of the mills. But you don’t see that very often. And, of course, the whole fries-on-sandwiches thing — but is that distinctive to Pittsburgh, or to the one local establishment that has defined that supposed tradition? Whatever you think about this, none of these options is — not to put too fine a point on it — remotely vegan, unlike our visitor. Fortunately, there are more venues than ever in our meat-and-potatoes region that acknowledge, celebrate even, vegetarian and vegan choices — and there’s about to be one more. Randita’s Organic Vegan Cafe will soon

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

“Pepper-steak” tempeh with mashed potatoes and local organic peppers

open a restaurant in Aspinwall, but because it is the time of year for scenic drives through the countryside, we sought its original location in Saxonburg, a charming town founded by Brooklyn Bridge designer John Roebling about 180 years ago. Some of Roebling’s idealistic immigrant spirit seems

RANDITA’S ORGANIC VEGAN CAFE 210 W. Main St., Saxonburg. 724-822-8677. Second location coming soon to 207 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; weekend dinners Fri.-Sat. 5-9 p.m. PRICES: $4-8 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED to have persisted in Saxonburg, where Randita’s neighbors on Main Street include a yoga/wellness center, an artists’ co-op, and a shop offering herbs, fair-trade items and homemade teas. We found Randita’s to be attractively appointed with deep-red walls, an exhibit of

nature photography and magazine-worthy flower arrangements on every table. More modern and sophisticated than the hippie health-food restaurants of yore, Randita’s exuded warmth and welcome. The cafe is mostly a lunch-only place, with dinner specials on Fridays and Saturdays, and its menu was accordingly brief. But it spanned the vegan range, from faux meats like seitan “sausage,” and meat replacements like tofu, to meat-free classics like a hummus wrap and West African sweet-potato and peanut soup. It was easy to find good choices. Our first few items belonged to the category of Vegan Without Apology: Only the most uncompromising carnivore would think they could be improved by animal products. The house salad was a beguiling, autumnal mix of greens, grilled carrots and zucchini, diced apple, dried cranberries, toasted pumpkin seeds and croutons. With sweet, savory, earthy and nutty flavors in magnificent balance and the addition of a delicious lemon-tahini dressing, this filling salad easily belied any notion that a CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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HAPPY TO BE VEGAN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

vegan diet might be bland or unsatisfying. The brilliant orange sweet-potato soup was thick and rich, with chunks of sweet potato and a topping of cilantro and peanuts. The hummus wrap — in an excellent whole-wheat tortilla, and thick with fresh spinach — was studded with chunks of crisp cucumber and bright grape tomato, but the standout innovation was chewy, sweet bits of fig. The hummus itself was smooth, creamy and mildly flavored to defer to dressings like fruity Caribbean or the creamy-yet-tangy lemon-tahini. The wrap also came with one of the most charming garnishes we’ve ever seen: a single spinach leaf, topped with a dollop of hummus and one dice each of cucumber, tomato and fig. It was like a meal for a fairy.

On the RoCKs

{BY DREW CRANISKY}

AGAINST THE GRAIN

A new brewery is growing without gluten A friend of mine once said that all gluten-free beers taste like stamps. He was only half joking. Required to avoid beer’s traditional starchy backbones, a lot of brewers end up with something thin, acrid or just oddly off. Enter Aurochs Brewing. Founded in 2012 by high school friends Doug Foster and Ryan Bove, Aurochs doesn’t just toss off a gluten-free brew to cash in on a trend — it’s front and center in the whole operation. Foster and Bove, both glutenfree for medical reasons, spent nearly two years learning about ingredients and testing recipes before opening to the public this August. All that R & D is paying off. Aurochs — named after a famed species of wild cattle driven extinct, in part, by the expansion of wheat and barley farming — consistently sells out of their rotating selection of brews, which use quinoa and malted millet in place of more common grains. After being open for just nine weeks, Aurochs recently closed for a weekend to scale up, more than doubling its current production. Though the new batches will still be small, as Foster said, “you’ve got to crawl before you can walk before you can run.” And in its new 7,000-square-foot home, in Emsworth, Aurochs will indeed have plenty of room to run. As Foster showed me around the space, a former warehouse for a car dealership, he pointed out where the rows of mash tuns and fermenters will eventually go. “We’re chomping at the bit to brew more and more,” he explained. For now, the beer is available only at the brewery, which is open Thursday and Friday evenings and Saturday afternoons (or until the kegs all kick). Oh, and about that beer? Bove poured me a taste of their amber ale, which was crisp, lightly malty and very, very sessionable. And blessedly free from stamps.

“WE’RE CHOMPING AT THE BIT TO BREW MORE AND MORE.” Chocolate peanut-butter pie with graham-cracker crust

Our vegan friend observed that veggie burgers are a good test of vegan/vegetarian cooking: so easy to get wrong, so hard to get perfect. Randita’s bean-grain blend was well balanced, moist and rich, but, like all too many veggie burgers, too loose to hold together once bitten. It didn’t help that the bun, in the absence of yeast, was a bit too hearty for such a delicate patty. A mildly creamy, chunky cole slaw was simple but effective as both accompaniment and condiment, brightening the otherwise slightly dense proceedings. We could have done without the ketchup. We’d brought our skeptical kids, but Randita’s has seen this before and easily won them over with off-menu servings of simple, firm fried tofu for one, and a “pizza” — really more of a quesadilla — for the other. A tender whole-wheat tortilla contained thin layers of sweet, simple tomato sauce and one of those creamy vegan “cheeses” that is a perfect substitute for things like ricotta. Finally, a slice of chocolate peanutbutter pie pleased all palates. We may be omnivores, but dining at Randita’s presents no dilemma. We can’t wait until its new location brings its superb vegan cuisine even closer to home. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Aurochs Brewing Co., 8321 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. www.aurochsbrewing.com


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-845-1844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic fine-dining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-940-7777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several applebased dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

Yama Sushi {PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL} pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sienna Sulla Piazza DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfastand-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide.

Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-and-true breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

savor authentic flavors SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 9PM-CLOSE

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$250 Cash & Prizes Best Costume/Sexiest Costume plus numerous other Prizes and Giveaways For Costumes (Prizes Awarded at 12:30AM)

Monster Drink Specials $4 Devil’s Cut & Jacob’s Ghost Cocktails • $4 Tequila Punch Shots $5 Espolon Margaritas • $4 Victory Hop Devil Drafts

Mexican Cuisine Specials DJ Spinning from 10PM-Close 2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

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THE PINES TAVERN. 5018 Bakerstown Road, Gibsonia. 724-625-3252. A longtime commitment to seasonal and locally sourced food (including on-site gardens and beehives) spans the menu here. The restaurant’s casual elegance is suitable for drinks with friends or a celebration meal. And the fare ranges from pub grub, like burgers and meatloaf, to complex entrée plates, complete with wine and beer suggestions. KE

your-own entrée option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few meat options) can be combined with interesting sauces, starches and vegetables to create a custom dinner, whether your tastes run to truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-281-6888. This fine-dining spot brings an elegantly casual, European vibe to the renovated Market Square, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE

TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east of town may not be where one POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, would expect to find refined Cajun and Creole cuisine, but Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar that’s exactly what this and restaurant delivers clubhouse restaurant top-notch pub grub, plus offers. The menu offers a well-curated beer Louisiana bayou classics menu. Among the such as shrimp, grits, offerings: the Buffalo, gumbo and blackened N.Y. classic sandwich, www. per fish in an authentic and pa roast beef on weck, pghcitym .co well-prepared manner. a Germanic roll with In a nod to Pittsburgh, caraway seeds; and steaks and Italian pasta mac-and-cheese, made dishes are also offered. LE with Buffalo hot sauce. Wellprepared burgers, wings, fish and THAI COTTAGE. 1109 S. chips, and sandwiches round out Braddock Ave., Regent Square. the menu. KE 412-241-8424. This Regent Square restaurant distinguishes itself with THE PUB CHIP SHOP. 1830 E. its appealing ambience, excellent Carson St., South Side. 412-381service and superb renditions of 2447. This storefront venue offers classic Thai cuisine: complexly British-style quick fare, from fish textured, with flavors balanced and chips and meat pies, to doner gloriously among sweet, salty and kebabs and pasties. Pastry pies brightly tangy notes. A good stop include traditional (meat, Stilton) for the popular appetizers, soups, but also more modern fillings like curries and stir-fried entrees. KF chicken curry and vegan vindaloo. Beer-battered haddock pairs well YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams with housemade sauces and thick Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724-591fresh-cut fries. JF 5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 cooking without hibachi theatrics Washington Pike, Bridgeville. or other culinary influences. 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers Besides the wide sushi selection and a modern yet comfortable take tempura offerings, try squid salad on seafood, offering distinctive or entrees incorporating udon, appetizers and a few signature Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF entrées. There is also a build-

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The Pines Tavern {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

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LOCAL

“IN MY BRAIN OR IN MY HEART OR SOMETHING, I’D BEEN STOCKPILING SONGS.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

NEW ASSIGNMENT

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more on The Assignment, see www. facebook.com/theassignmentband. For more on the gallery: www.facebook.com/ AlleghenyCity.

28

A TIME TO GATHER Still jammin’: Kim and Bill Gandy

Bill and Kim Gandy are North Siders through and through: He grew up in Northview Heights, she in Spring Hill, they met at Perry High in the mid-’80s, played in a band together and eventually got married. They moved to Connecticut in 1996 “to try to start a normal life,” Bill explains — “but the music just kept coming back.” They’ve been in music in one form or another since, as promoters, players and producers; they moved to Indiana for a time, then back to Pittsburgh five years ago. But they hadn’t thought much about their group from their early days on the North Side, The Assignment, until just a couple weeks ago. “My son and I were talking,” explains Bill. “I was talking about professionalism in our band. You know how parents do that — talking about professionalism in our day. And he said, ‘Well, what’s the name of one of your songs?’ And I said, ‘Jammin’ to the Beat.’ So he types it in [to Google], and it appeared everywhere! The first 20 posts — about The Assignment, ‘Jammin’ to the Beat.’” It seems The Assignment, unbeknownst to Bill and Kim or any of the other musicians who were in and out of the band during its four-year run, had taken on a new life via the web. At the time, The Assignment got a little ink in Right On! and Billboard, but never broken out in a big way. In recent years, though, music blogs specializing in ’80s electroboogie have written about the band and its lead single as a lost classic (and shared the track as an MP3). One seller on Discogs. com had a copy of “Jammin’ to the Beat” on vinyl priced at $40. The Gandys are still figuring out how to handle the newfound interest in their old, Minneapolis-sound-inspired music. They might re-press the single; in the meantime, their current project is the Allegheny City Historic Gallery. They’re working with Pittsburgh City Councilor Darlene Harris to open a gallery of collected historical photos from the North Side, to occupy a space on East Ohio Street.

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

I

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

The Gathering Field: clockwise from top left, Clark Slater, Bill Deasy, Ray DeFade, Dave Brown, Eric Riebling, John Burgh

T WASN’T A long, drawn-out process that led to one of the city’s most popular rock bands of the ’90s reuniting. Quite the opposite: The Gathering Field’s new start came to frontman Bill Deasy on the spur of the moment. “I was flipping through the channels and I saw Pearl Jam, I think — a rerun of Saturday Night Live or something, a live performance on some show,” he recalls. “They were just jamming, they were just so into it, and I kind of missed — there’s something about the band you come up with, it’s a true democracy, it’s a different dynamic. I’ve hired people [as a solo artist] and gotten very close to that, but it’s just not the same. “I’m sort of impulsive. Suddenly, that’s what had to happen.” The Gathering Field had come up in mid’90s Pittsburgh, a rung below Rusted Root and The Clarks on the ladder to mainstream fame. Like both of those groups, the band

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

signed to a major label (in this case, Atlantic, in 1996), and had a couple of regional radio hits — the dreamy “Lost in America” and riff-heavy alt-rock tune “Rhapsody in Blue.” “It was magic right then — [“Lost in America”] just lit up Pittsburgh,” Deasy says. “I’d hear people whistling it, who I didn’t know.”

THE GATHERING FIELD 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $15. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

But The Gathering Field never quite became a national sensation. “That record came out, and pretty early after it came out nationally, you could see the writing on the wall,” he says. “You didn’t always want to read it, but basically —

Matchbox 20 came out at that same time, and no one knew who they were either, but everywhere you went, you’d see Matchbox 20 displays at the record store. They were the other rock band that was coming out right then, and they got all the attention. “In a lot of ways, Atlantic managed to stall any progress we were making. And we let it, really. We never embraced the Dave Matthews model of being your own business, which, in hindsight, we should have more.” After a lengthy denouement, the band broke up for good in 2002. Deasy went on with a solo career, releasing a half-dozen albums, getting local and national TV-placement deals and writing songs on a contract basis. (He also, in recent years, has been in charge of booking Allegheny County’s concerts in the parks.) It was last year, after more than a decade away from the band, that Deasy


announced The Gathering Field would be getting back together — not just for a oneoff show, as they’d done a few times, but to record new material. “I was sort of excited about it,” says drummer Ray DeFade, who had left the band even before the final breakup, and was replaced for a time by Joe Zelek. “I’d sort of gotten away from playing — this band was definitely the highlight of my career.” (DeFade also plays jazz, and had been in a number of other combos around town.) Also part of the reunited lineup: original guitarist Dave Brown and bassist Eric Riebling; organist John Burgh (who often played with the band during its primary run); and, newly added to the lineup, Clark Slater, formerly of Push. “I didn’t know this — I just put out a [solo] record a year ago, that I really love — but I feel like, in my brain or in my heart or something, I’d been stockpiling songs, unbeknownst to me,” Deasy says. “Because as soon as we decided to do this, I was in this weird, clear writing place. I realized I had lost a certain part of my voice that only they can help me use.” The new album, Wild Journey, has something of a concept behind it: In fact, Deasy says, to an extent it picks up some of the themes of the old Gathering Field body of work. “The first song I wrote for the album is called ‘Not Ready Yet,” Deasy explains. “It was an exercise to see what I could do with this project: I took the character from ‘Lost in America,’ who was kind of a poseur. Kind of a drifter, poseur. He wasn’t a super admirable character. I took him ahead 10, 12 years, and I imagined him still kind of stuck in this place of invulnerability but shallowness. There’s a lot of me in that: I’m sort of stuck in this shut-off place. So I took that character and put him on the cusp of changing, shifting, then a lot of the songs sprung out of that.” But if the songwriting mojo has come rushing back, Deasy admits that the landscape has changed considerably since The Gathering Field was last a force. “It’s a little too soon to say” how the band’s old fan base has held up, Deasy says. “Those reunion gigs we’d do, people seemed to still be there. A lot of those folks are like me — people who used to go to Nick’s Fat City every Thursday and get drunk, they have lives now. But I’m pretty optimistic that they’re still out there. “Radio isn’t the force that it once was. A couple of our songs are on WDVE and WYEP right now, but I don’t know if that can be the tool that it once was for us. But I feel like there’s potential for a new dynamic — and the good thing is, our lives aren’t riding on it. We’re not touring, playing seven nights a week in every state.” AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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WE KNOW

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

PODRASKY and THE REDD-UPS

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED!

also performing with Jimmer

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MICHAEL MORAN @ LUCK DESIGN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

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BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

A new full-length — the first in over five years — from the local garage-rock outfit. Superb songwriting informs the entire 13-track spread, which ranges from abrasive postgrunge to updated takes on classic pop songwriting. A fuzzy guitar tone and so-what vocal style tie the whole thing together tidily; this is a band that knows, and lives, its aesthetic. This record would’ve fit with the mid-’90s zeitgeist of nihilistic slacker indie rock, but it’s just as lively — and fitting — in 2014. Great release! thelampshadespgh.bandcamp.com

SURFACE LEVEL RECORDS SAMPLER VOL. 1 (SURFACE LEVEL)

A collection of tracks from local hip-hop artists associated with Surface Level: The Fortified Phonetx crew and others. The tracks span the past few years, but were all unreleased until last month. This is a community on the rise — a smart, arty take on rap with antecedents in both the golden age and backpacker hip hop. Proseed and Connect both provide some of the highlights of this one, but it’s all worth a good listen, especially since it’s free. surfacelevel.bandcamp.com

THE HILLS AND THE RIVERS THE WORLD (SELF-RELEASED)

A contemporary vibe and instrumentation from folk traditions from around the world color this fulllength release from the local band. Banjos, fiddles, djembe — a complex mix, especially with the charming and naïve vocals reminiscent of any number of twee folk-punk bands. Neo-hippie, sure, but it all adds up to something unique and well worth a listen. thehillsandtherivers.bandcamp.com AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


{SPALDING PHOTO COURTESY OF CARLOS PERICAS, LOVANO COURTESY OF JIMMY KATZ, ALLEN COURTESY OF DEAN C. JONES}

Pitt Jazz Seminar artists, from left: Esperanza Spalding, Joe Lovano, Pitt jazz-studies director Geri Allen

KEY CHANGES {BY MIKE SHANLEY} LAST NOVEMBER, the 43rd Annual Pitt Jazz

Seminar concert served as a tribute to Nathan Davis. The saxophonist launched the event and made it an annual tradition of lectures and events, which culminate in a concert where internationally renowned jazz musicians capture the lively feeling of classic blowing sessions. Davis retired as director of jazz studies during the previous summer, and pianist Geri Allen took the position and led the concert. The first tune the group played was a Davis composition called “If.” While previous concerts came out of the gate with an upbeat hard-bop tune that gave everyone some blowing room, this was different. It opened with a slow, almost swampy feeling, continuing for nearly 20 action-packed minutes. Had there been a bass clarinet among the 12 musicians onstage, it would’ve sounded like an outtake from Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew, the dense, groove-based album that merged jazz with electronics and paved the way for fusion. Even as the performance was saluting Nathan Davis, it was also moving forward under Allen’s direction. Speaking by phone, Allen says she wasn’t trying to break from the Pitt Jazz tradition. “The piece of music that I picked for us to start out with … accommodated different points of view,” she says. “It really opened up the landscape for us to be expressive in our own way. My interest is really to acknowledge and celebrate Dr. Davis, and also do what people have come to expect: Have a good time on the stage and with the audience that’s been so loyal and a part of the journey for 44 years.” This year’s concert includes drummer

Terri Lyne Carrington and bassist Esperanza Spalding, who play in the ACS Trio with Allen. Spalding got an extra bit of notoriety when she won the 2011 Grammy for Best New Artist, a first for a jazz musician. Completing the lineup are saxophonists Tia Fuller (who has released her own jazz albums in addition to touring with Beyoncé) and Joe Lovano (a jazz-seminar veteran), trombonist Clifton Anderson and the vocal group Afro Blue. Having four female instrumentalists on the bill emphasizes the greater role women have in the music. But Allen sees them as part of the bigger picture. “I called these women together because I know that they’re some of the most important musicians of our time,” she says. “And that’s my interest: to bring in a diverse perspective on jazz. Terri Lyne is a leader, in the same way that Esperanza is, and Tia is. As well as Joe. All of these musicians are major leaders in their own right.”

“THESE WOMEN ARE SOME OF THE MOST IMPORTANT MUSICIANS OF OUR TIME.”

44TH ANNUAL PITT JAZZ SEMINAR AND CONCERT Events run Wed., Oct. 29-Sat., Nov. 1. Concert 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25. All ages. 412-624-4187 or www.music.pitt.edu/jazz-sem

Hailing from Detroit, Allen attended Pitt in the ’80s, receiving her master’s degree in ethnomusicology before moving on to New York, where she made her name as a bandleader. Her time here gave her a good perspective on the city’s jazz history and its supporters. “I have really great respect for the legacy that Pittsburgh represents. It’s really far-reaching, and of course we’re reverential to that,” she says. “So I’m looking forward to celebrating that in a variety of ways.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARLENE MARINO}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Blonde Redhead [DJ] + FRI., OCT. 31 Sure, there are 101 costume parties you could be attending tonight, but maybe a better bet is to hit up Round Corner Cantina for a top-notch DJ party instead. Yes, OK, people will probably be dressed up there, too … it’s a free country. The focus is on the music, though: New York City-based Brenmar, a DJ and producer who’s toured the world, headlines, with favorite locals Edgar Um and Bamboo warming things up. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10 after 10 p.m. 412-904-2279 or www.roundcornercantina.com

Sounds, with Communion Records, in 2014. Catch the band with Landlady tonight at the Rex Theater. This music can make anything with a pulse dance, so get ready to groove. Samantha Ward 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[NOISE ROCK] + SAT., NOV. 01

If the band Blonde Redhead were a person, she would have just become eligible to legally drink. The group was formed when Japanese art students Kazu Makino and Maki Takahashi randomly met twin brothers [JAZZ] + SAT., NOV. 01 Simone and Amedeo Pace in a New York It’s jazz on an autumn day at the Heinz History Italian restaurant. After this coincidental Center today, as the formation, the group’s Smithsonian-affiliated chaotic rock intrigued Rubblebucket museum holds an Sonic Youth drummer event called Places of Steve Shelley enough Invention: Pittsburgh to produce and Jazz, 1920-1970. The release its debut event puts together album on his label in guest speakers, 1994. Takahashi has live music and since left the group, film, as well as an but Blonde Redhead interactive element has produced nine using tablet albums in the past computers; notables 21 years. The band like Nelson Harrison will undoubtedly be and MCG Jazz’s playing new material Renée Govanucci from 2014’s Barragán will be on hand as tonight at Mr. Small’s {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ} part of the program. Theatre. SW 8 p.m. New History 400 Lincoln Ave, Center-produced Millvale. $17. All ages. videos on Pittsburgh’s jazz history will premiere 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com as well. AM 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Event free with museum [EXPERIMENTAL] + MON., NOV. 03 admission ($6-15). All ages. 412-454-6000 or Don’t expect easy-to-digest listening from www.heinzhistorycenter.org Timeghost: The Providence-based electronic experimentalist deals in repetition, noise and [INDIE POP] + SAT., NOV. 01 a mix of minimalism and harshness. The Rubblebucket was formed from a couple parts project of Adam Morosky, Timeghost has a of John Brown’s Body: Trumpeter Alex Toth new LP due out on the storied Providence and vocalist/sax player Kalmia Traver parted label Load (best known for its Lightning Bolt ways with the reggae group of that name in releases), and makes an appearance tonight 2007. The indie-dance duo quickly released at Bunker Projects. Also playing: New York its debut, Rose’s Dream, under the name electronic musician and performer Bernard Rubblebucket Orchestra. Afterward the band Herman, and locals Cutups, Joey Molinaro, dropped the “orchestra” from its name but Simpatico Ripens and Wreck League. AM increased in personnel. Since then, it’s released 8 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5-10 three more full-lengths, most recently Survival donation. www.joeymolinaro.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} CLAIRTON AMERICAN LEGION. SMILING MOOSE. TEAM, Hear Tonight Chaotic Simplicity, Daniels & McClain. Clairton. Lythem, pipewrench. South Side. 412-400-1141. 412-431-4668. CLUB CAFE. Joe Ely (Early) Charlie CLUB CAFE. Mutual Benefit, STAGE AE. Fifth Harmony, Jake Hustle & the Grifters, Kyle Lawson Suno Deko, Eric Oliver. South Side. Miller, Megan Trainor. North Side. (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-431-4950. 412-229-5483. ELWOOD’S PUB. Marshall Street GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Seez TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE ‘Rents. 724-265-1181. Mics, Cubbiebear, The Dads, RESTAURANT. Sputzy. Bridgeville. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. AA Arm. Garfield. 412-361-2262. 412-221-5202. Wildhoney, City Steps, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. TWISTED THISTLE. Mantique. Bloomfield. Casino Bulldogs. Bloomfield. Lenny Smith Trio. 412-682-0320. 412-682-0320. 724-236-0450. JERGEL’S RHYTHM PALACE THEATRE. The Beach GRILLE. Totally . w w Boys. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. w 80s. Warrendale. paper PITTSBURGH WINERY. The pghcitym ALTAR BAR. The Ready 724-799-8333. .co Mulligan Brothers. Strip District. Set, Metro Station, MOONDOG’S. The 412-566-1000. Against The Current, The Anti-Psychotics. Blawnox. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Reverend Downtown Fiction. Strip District. 412-828-2040. Peyton’s Big Damn Band. 412-263-2877. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Foxy Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Gone South. Shazam, Shaky Shrines, SycAmour. Pleasant Hills. Millvale. 866-468-3401. BATES HARDCORE GYM. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Gene The 31ST STREET PUB. Continental, Passage Between, Rhin, Werwolf. Strip District. 412-566-1000. Recollections, & Triangle & The Sablowskis, Downtown Rejects. RAMADA INN HOTEL & Rhino. Oakland. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CONFERENCE CENTER. No Bad BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE ALTAR BAR. RAC, The Knocks. Juju. Greensburg. TAVERN. Weird Paul Rock Strip District. 412-263-2877. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. Band, Mortis. Bloomfield. 412-487-6259. CENTER CLUB. JD & the Freebirds. 412-682-8611. BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Brian Collins w/ Robbie Wilson. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Danny Schmidt & Darlingside. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. Steelesque, Jake Breiding (Early) The YJJ’s, Suite Mary, Stationary Pebbles (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Graham Denmon. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Mike Adams at His Honest Weight, The City Steps, The Lampshades. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Camp Element. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. The Fabulous Gunslingers. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. A Feast Of All Saints. Fangs of the Panda as The Jam, members of Aydin, Kalon, The Fuckies, & Adult Field Trip as The Jesus Lizard, Mirrors Are Black as The Misfits, more. Bring a non perishable food Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from bank donation. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. a local band. This week’s offering comes LATITUDE 360. Tricky Dick & from Remainders, whose debut EP comes out The Cover-Ups. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. next month; stream or download “ THE MCKEESPORT PALISADES. ,” an exclusive premiere, on Sound Servant, Shotgun Jack, The River Rattz. Costume contest. our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. McKeesport. 412-672-2001.

ROCK/POP THU 30

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 01

FRI 31

MP 3 MONDAY {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN MACHAROLA}

REMAINDERS

You’ll Make

Some Fine Exits

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

Legacy Sampler Available now at Better Beer Retailers.

412.326.5964

4504 BUTLER STREET

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

WE’LL CUT YOU.

MOONDOG’S. theCAUSE. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. Homewood. 412-969-0260. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night 17 Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. - Halloween Party. South Side. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Blonde 412-431-5282. Redhead, Luke Temple. Millvale. LINDEN GROVE. DJ Bugger. 866-468-3401. Castle Shannon. PETER B’S. Antz Marching (DMB Tribute). 724-353-2677. THE R BAR. The Flow Band. EL TORO LOCO. DJ Juan Diego. Dormont. 412-948-0882. free giveaways, salsa, guest DJs. RAMADA INN HOTEL & South Side. 412-431-1100. CONFERENCE CENTER. Fonic. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, Greensburg. DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REX THEATER. Rubblebucket, ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Landlady. South Side. South Side. 412-431-2825. 412-381-6811. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ SALATINO’S RIVERHOUSE CAFE. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. King’s Ransom. 724-565-5700. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. SMILING MOOSE. Sinkane, Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. Helado Negro. South Side. South Side. 412-720-5647. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chrome Moses, The CATTIVO. Illusions. Greens, The Semi Super w/ Funerals & Arvin Villians. Lawrenceville. www. per Clay. Lawrenceville. pa 412-682-0177. pghcitym .co 412-687-2157. WIGLE WHISKEY DIESEL. DJ CK. South BARREL HOUSE. Rachel B, Side. 412-431-8800. IV, Billy Castle. North Side. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. CATTIVO. The Plot in You, 412-481-7227. Barrier, Cane Hill, As Dreams Fade, WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel A Feral Palace. Lawrenceville. City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. 412-687-2157. Oakland. 412-874-4582. CLUB CAFE. David Bazan + Passenger String Quartet, David Dondero. South Side. 412-431-4950. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TwoStep Tuesdays feat. Groove Pharmacy. ALTAR BAR. For All Those Sleeping North Side. 412-323-2924. Capture, The Crown Ice Nine Kills, Palisades, Myka Relocate, Youth In THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Revolt. Strip District. 412-263-2877. Mike & DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. CLUB CAFE. Rhett Miller. South 412-682-6414. Side. 412-431-4950. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. chill. House music. aDesusParty. Stepdad, Sphynx, Glimpse Trio. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Chadwick Stokes, Ark Life. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Weedeater, Full of SMILING MOOSE. SonReal. South Hell, Lazer/Wulf, Urns. South Side. Side. 412-431-4668. 412-381-6811.

FRI 31

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 01

SUN 02

TUE 04

MON 03

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! TICKETS AT WWW.JERGELS.COM 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

HughShows LIVE @ EIDE’S SATURDAY NOV. 8 1-5PM

UPCOMING SHOWS

724.799.8333

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

WED 05

HIP HOP/R&B SUN 02

TUE 04

THU NOV 20

THE MIKE MEDVED BAND PAIRDOWN ORANGE MAMMOTH WRECK LOOSE A free monthly family-friendly Pittsburgh music series.

WED DEC 17

Please consider bringing a new school supply item to donate to the Homeless Children’s Education Fund

Eide’s Entertainment 1121 Penn Avenue

BRILLOBOX. PUP, Chumped, Typefighter. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Suzzy Roche & Lucy Wainwright Roche. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Rah Rah. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 05 CLUB CAFE. Jay Nash, Josh Day, Henry Skerritt. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. St. Paul & the Broken Bones, Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. SUNBEARS! South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 30 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

TUE 04 STAGE AE. Jeezy. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 05 REX THEATER. Keys & Krates, gLAdiator, Thugli. South Side. 412-381-6811. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Sidewalk Chalk, Tracksploitation, Blak Rapp Madusa, Stillborn Identity. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BLUES THU 30 MOONDOG’S. Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 31 TEQUILA JUNCTION. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Beechview. 412-207-9545. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bruce Katz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.


EARLY WARNINGS

SUN 02 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. David Mahler - Open Wide: Explorations for Two or More Voices. Oakland. 412-622-3116.

Lemuria

WED 05

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN RUSSELL}

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 31 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY SAT 01 HAMBONE’S. Samantha Harlow, Kayla Schureman, Jane West, Jenn Gooch. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

{TUE., DEC. 16}

Lemuria Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side

GOOSKI’S. Catherine Irwin, Hellwood, Polish Hillbillies. Polish Hill. 347-642-0810.

Jason Isbell Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall

CLASSICAL

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

SAT 01

MON 03

CHRISTINA’S. Shot O’ Soul. 412-672-5750. ELLIOTT’S BBQ & STEAKHOUSE. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. Pleasant Hills. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

PABLO AMORÓS, PIANIST. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Rachmaninoff’s The Isle of the Dead. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 04

SAT 01

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

FRI 31 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Contemporary Dynamic. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Just Ahead Jazz Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

SAT 01 CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. LITTLE E’S. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters, Tremendous Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Velvet Heat. CD release. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

N E W S

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session Jam. North Side. 412-904-3335. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 05 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. CAFE IO. Dave Brosky. Playing the Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414.

ACOUSTIC THU 30 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

SAT 01 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TUGBOAT’S. Guitar Zack & Misaligned Mind. Halloween event with food, drinks, costume contest. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

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NOVEMBER 1

FRI 31

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Rachmaninoff’s The Isle of the Dead. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Tchaikovsky Festival. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

jazz

TH

ANNUAL

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Lone Pine Bluegrass Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

Cold War Kids

THU 30

44

TUE 04

{TUE., MARCH 17}

Terri Lyne Carrington

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

SUN 02

{MON., FEB. 09}

JAZZ

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

8 P.M. • CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL

DRUMS

Esperanza Spalding BASS

Joe Lovano TENOR SAXOPHONE

Tia Fuller ALTO SAXOPHONE

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE WILLIAM PITT UNION (WPU) BOX OFFICE AND ONLINE AT MUSIC.PITT.EDU/TICKETS. THE WPU BOX OFFICE IS OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY, 9 A.M. – 4:45 P.M. $25 GENERAL ADMISSION IN ADVANCE, $30 GENERAL ADMISSION AT THE DOOR, $10 STUDENT TICKETS IN ADVANCE AND AT THE DOOR (A VALID

Clifton Anderson TROMBONE

Afro Blue

STUDENT ID IS REQUIRED TO PICK UP STUDENT TICKETS)

VOCAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Jazz Seminars: Oct. 2 7 – Nov. 1

FO R LO CAT I O N S : M U S I C. P I T T. E D U/JA ZZ-S E M

Geri Allen PIANO

SUN 02 CHORAL CELEBRATION OF ALL SAINTS. Luigi Cherubini’s Requiem in C Minor. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Rachmaninoff’s The Isle of the Dead. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC THU 30 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Tom Roberts Charlie Chaplin Silent Picture Show. Charlie Chaplin films scored by Tom Roberts. Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

SAT 01 TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Dancing Queen. 724-789-7858.

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What to do Oct 29

-

Insane Clown Posse

XTAZA NIGHTCLUB Strip District. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Aaron Carter HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 30 Murder For Two

Mutual Benefit CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Foxy Shazam MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 9p.m.

MONDAY 35

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Gene the Werewolf PITTSBURGH WINERY Strip District. Over 21 show. Tickets: showclix.com. 9p.m.

Dia De Los Muertos EMILIANOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT & BAR Multiple Locations. A Celebration of those we love. Free event. 4:30p.m.

Comedian Billy Ray Bauer (as heard on the Bob & Tom Show) LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Nov. 1.

SATURDAY 13

Chadwick Stokes

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 46

Ty Dolla $ign Presents: The “In Too Deep Tour” ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Lone Pine Bluegrass Duo

SUNDAY 24 The Capitol Steps

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 4p.m.

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. Free event. 8p.m.

Jeezy - Seen It All Tour

Michael Clark Company

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. RAC “Something Classic Tour” 412-456-6666. Tickets: ALTAR BAR Strip District. trustarts.org/dance. 8p.m.

Blonde Redhead

Sinkane / Helado Negro

PHOTO CREDIT: MIKE REYNA

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. 7:30p.m. Through Jan. 18.

FRIDAY 31

IN PITTSBURGH

Nov 4

WEDNESDAY 29

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

SonReal

The Capitol Steps

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2 BYHAM THEATER

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

From Denmark to the USA!

Gordon’s is your passport to waterproof comfort! TRACE WOMENS SAUNTER WOMENS

at the Waterfront BENDIX MENS

DARREN MENS

108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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“YOU ARE A MOVIE STAR — YOU ARE A GOD.”

BACK ON THE JOB {BY AL HOFF} In David Leitch and Chad Stahelski’s stylishly produced actioner John Wick, revenge is a dish best served to one or two that quickly turns into an open-door, all-you-can-kill buffet. Wick (Keanu Reeves) is a retired hitman (nickname: “Boogeyman,” but in Russian, which sounds even more bad-ass), who quite naturally unpacks his weapons when a couple of young punks jack his vintage Mustang and kill his dog. And not just any dog, but the puppy his recently deceased wife had delivered after her funeral! But one of those dog-murdering punks is the worthless scion of a New York City Russian gangster, Viggo (Michael Nyqvist), and that causes a mess. To save his son, Viggo puts a bounty on Wick’s head, initiating a 48-hour free-for-all of battling hitmen and one hitwoman.

IN-FLIGHT MOVIE {BY AL HOFF} Puppy love: Keanu Reeves

The tender-eyed should be warned that John Wick is very violent. But those who can sit through bloody garottings and gruesome headshots will find a betterthan-average bang-bang action flick. Wick is moody and taciturn, so Reeves is a fine fit, and he’s surrounded by caliber actors who know how to deliver junky fare with panache: Willem Dafoe, Ian McShane, John Leguizamo, Lance Reddick, Dean Winters and Game of Throne’s Alfie Allen as the doomed dog-killer. And despite the dark material, the film is sprinkled with plenty of sardonic lines; even Reeves gets a few laughs with his minimal but deadpan retorts. (Nyquist gets a big laugh simply saying “Oh.”) I liked the conceit that the film contained no good guys — everything occurs in a substrata of New York that is inhabited only by professional criminals; they even have their own high-class nightclub and hotel, with strict rules of conduct. As in any classic myth, Wick — who, being retired, is the only civilian — must journey into this nether region to right wrongs, and maybe — maybe — make it back out on the other side. In English, and some Russian, with subtitles.

Me and my shadow: Riggan (Michael Keaton) and Birdman

A

MAN, SITTING cross-legged in only underpants, floats in midair. A raspy disembodied voice says, “We don’t belong in this shithole.” The man is Riggan, the place is the dressing room at a New York theater, and the haranguing voice is that of “Birdman,” a movie-franchise superhero played by Riggan decades ago. Now, Riggan (Michael Keaton) is hoping to regain his mojo with a stage adaptation of Raymond Carver’s story “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love”; he’s writer, director, star and bank. But during final rehearsals things are shambolic, particularly with his method-y co-star (Edward Norton, being hilarious method-y); his other two co-stars — Naomi Watts and Andrea Riseborough — aren’t happy; nor are his daughter (Emma Stone) and ex-wife (Amy Ryan). It might actually take a superhero to get this careening project on track. Riggan’s existential crises form the heart of Birdman, (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), the darkly funny, oddball film from Alejandro González Iñárritu.

Birdman is a kinetic mash-up of backstage comedy, character study, fantasy, domestic melodrama, an homage to art and artists, and a freewheeling critique of all of the above, plus jabs at Hollywood, superheroes, audiences and critics.

BIRDMAN DIRECTED BY: Alejandro González Iñárritu STARRING: Michael Keaton, Edward Norton, Naomi Watts STARTS: Fri., Oct. 31

CP APPROVED Like the actor he portrays here, Keaton also walked away from a caped-superhero franchise, and never again achieved the same level of stardom. Viewers of a certain age will factor this in as another of the film’s meta-layers and in-jokes. Iñárritu (Amores Perros) has shown a penchant for nonlinear narratives. In contrast, Birdman unfolds in linear chunks of real time, supported by continuous shots that run up and down stairs, in and out of

dressing rooms, on stage and out the fireexit door. Characters intersect with these long shots in a seemingly chaotic fashion that is, in execution, rigid choreography. (The all-drumming score by Antonio Sanchez adds to the fluid but rhythmic nature of the story.) Though Birdman embraces the doneto-death travails of the misunderstood artist, it supplies a less-sympathetic counter with narcissistic echo chamber that is “Birdman,” or Riggan as an entitled alphamale. “You are a movie star — you are a god,” Birdman counsels. Even Riggan’s selfawareness is self-serving. Thus, Birdman doesn’t offer much heart, unless you’re as enamored of Riggan as he is of himself. As such, opinions may vary on how the story concludes, with cynics and sentimentalists squaring off. If it all sounds a bit pretentious, fear not: Though it’s a fair criticism depending on your tolerance for self-referential art about art, Birdman is never less than entertaining — brash, funny, fast-paced and a welcome return to the A-list for Keaton.

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BJORK BIOPHILIA LIVE. Nick Fenton and Peter Strickland’s new film captures the Icelandic singer and songwriter Bjork on tour for her 2011 Biophila LP. Starts Thu., Nov. 6. Hollywood HORNS. After his girlfriend is murdered, suspicion falls on Ig (Daniel Radcliffe). He claims he didn’t do it, and sets out to prove it. Along the way, he gets drunk a lot and grows a set of devil horns (!), which prove to be a useful detecting tool. Alexandre Aja’s dark-comedy-mystery hybrid is adapted from Joe Hill’s novel, and finds the Harry Potter actor taking yet another step away from his iconic kiddie role for darker adult fare. (Though Horns does pair Radcliffe with a lot of snakes, and you know that just makes one pine for the old Potter-Voldemort days.) But about those horns — their presence causes a bizarre reaction in others: They instantly confess their worst thoughts and twisted desires. Unable to remove the horns, Ig uses his odd new growth to gather clues about the murder. (For instance, rather than fabricate an alibi, those involved are now eager to brag about what naughty things they did that night.) The story takes place in an area of Washington state one might consider Twin Peaks territory — old diners, logging chutes, a treehouse hidden in the woods — and leavens the murder mystery with a fair amount of humor. (Surely the chance for a devilish in-joke is the only reason Ig drives an AMC Gremlin.) At nearly two hours, the film is too long, especially after the fun of the horns-inspired confessions runs out. The true villain isn’t much of a surprise, and there’s a rather long denouement that compromises the film’s earlier, zippier pace. Starts Fri., Oct. 31. AMC Loews (Al Hoff) NIGHTCRAWLER. Jake Gyllenhaal stars in this thriller about a man who gets caught up in the world of freelance crime journalism. Dan Gilroy directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 31.

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Row House of Horrors: Cabin in The Woods (twisty scary fun from Joss

Bjork Biophilia Live Whedon), Oct. 30. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (original 1974 version), Oct. 30. Hostel (2005’s reason to avoid Eastern Europe), Oct. 30. Nosferatu (F.W. Murnau’s creepy Dracula-inspired 1922 silent film), Oct. 30-31. House on Haunted Hill (1959 Vincent Price classic), Oct. 31. Vampyr (Carl Dreyer’s atmospheric 1932 vampire film), Oct. 31. The Last Man on Earth (1964 film in which Vincent Price is the last man alive), Oct. 31. Carnival of Souls (1962 slow-burner set at the Great Salt Lake), Oct. 31. Documentary Week: Nas: Time Is Illmatic (about the making of Illmatic, Nas’ 1994 debut LP; Pittsburgh premiere), Nov. 1-3, and Nov. 5-6. Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai (2008 film about the African environmentalist and Nobel Prize winner), Nov. 1-2, and Nov. 4-5. A Film About Coffee (a look at specialty coffee; Pittsburgh premiere), Nov.1-2, and Nov. 4. I Am Trying to Break Your Heart (2002 film about the band Wilco), Nov. 1-4 and Nov. 6. Urbanized (Gary Hustwit’s 2011 look at urban planning), Nov. 1, 2, 3, and Nov. 6. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5-9. 412-9043225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. HALLOWEEN. The original is still the best: Bite your knuckles as Jamie Lee Curtis takes the worst babysitting job ever, in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29; 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 30; and 8 and 10:15 p.m. Fri., Oct. 31. Hollywood NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. Some dead creep called Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is haunting the dreams of teens in Wes Craven’s 1984 screamfest. A cheapie in its day, Nightmare is now ranked among the best of the early-1980s teen-slasher genre. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29. AMC Loews. $5 MY LIFE AS A DOG. A 12-year-old boy relocates to a small village to live with his uncle, in Lasse Hallstrom’s 1985 coming-of-age story. In Swedish, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Oct. 29. Melwood. $2

Halloween (1978) - 10/29 @ 7:30pm, 10/30 @ 7:30pm, 10/31 @ 8:00pm & 10:15pm - Newly restored and remastered John Carpenter classic!

-The- - - Princess - - - - - - - - -Bride ---------------------------The- - - Wild- - - - -Bunch ------------------------------(1987) - 11/1 @ 3:00pm, 11/2 @ 3:00pm, 11/3 @ 7:30pm, 11/5 @ 7:30pm - Directed by Rob Reiner (1968) - 11/1 @ 7:00pm, 11/2 @ 7:00pm, 11/4 @ 7:30pm Directed by Sam Peckinpah, starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine

-Five- - - -Fingers - - - - - - -of- - Death --------------------------

(1972) - 11/1 @ 10:15pm Shaw Brothers kung-fu classic

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

REEL ABILITIES. The second annual film festival showcasing films about the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities closes with Stand Clear of the Closing Door, in which a 13-year-old boy with autism escapes into the labyrinth of the New York City subway system. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 30. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5-10. www.jfilmpgh.org PARKWAY FILMS. For Halloween chills, it’s the original 1978 Halloween (6:30 p.m.), followed by 1984’s ectoplasm comedy Ghostbusters (8:30 p.m.; meet-and-greet with Steel City Ghostbusters before the screening). At 10:30 p.m., catch Trick R’ Treat, Bryan Singer’s 2007 ensemble horror thriller. Fri., Oct. 31. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $2-3. 412-766-1668 GHOSTBUSTERS. It’s been 30 years since this crisis broke, but it seems we’re still no safer from pesky ectoplasm. Well, you know who to call! This popular 1984 comedy from Ivan Reitman, starring Bill Murray,


‘‘DARING, DEVASTATING, HOWLINGLY FUNNY.’’ -PETER TRAVERS, ROLLING STONE

‘‘GRAND, SPECTACULAR, STA R- POWERED

C I N E M A.”

-ROBBIE COLLIN, THE TELEGRAPH

‘‘A TRIUMPH ON EVERY CREATIVE LEVEL.’’ -PETER DEBRUGE, VARIETY

Horns Dan Ackroyd and Harold Ramis, explains it all. Fri., Oct. 31, and Sat. Nov. 1. Regent Square PRINCESS BRIDE. Rob Reiner’s 1987 film CP THE is that rare bird — a film to delight children and adults alike, an upbeat fairy tale with romance, comedy, swordplay and deliciously quotable lines. (“Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”) And what a cast: Cary Elwes, Robin Wright Penn, Mandy Pantinkin, Billy Crystal, Peter Falk, Wallace Shawn, Christopher Guest and professional wrestler Andre the Giant. William Goldman wrote the clever script. 3 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1; 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 2; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Nov. 3; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 5. Hollywood (AH) THE WILD BUNCH. Sam Peckinpah’s 1969 landmark film upends every romantic notion about the Old West, starting with its opening shot of kids torturing insects. William Holden heads up a gang of outlaws (including Ernest Borgnine) on the run from a botched robbery. On his trail is reluctant bounty hunter Robert Ryan. In this Vietnam-era twilight Western, honor is moot; the land is harsh; encroaching civilization is corrupt; victories are Pyrrhic; and there are no more noble heroes, just men who die last. 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1; 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 2; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Nov. 4. Hollywood (AH)

CP

FLOOD TIDE. Todd Chandler’s new feature film is about a group of artists and musicians from a

small post-industrial town who set off on a river journey after one of their friends dies. Though a fictional story, the film is a collaboration with the artist Swoon, whose Swimming Cities of the Switchback Seas project involved artists floating giant sculptures on the Hudson River, and performing along the way. The film will be preceded by short films from Chandler, who will also perform a live score along with Marshall LaCount. 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. Mattress Factory, 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. www.floodtidefilm.com. $8-12

‘‘MICHAEL

KEATON SOARS

IN ALEJANDRO G. IÑÁRRITU’S BRILLIANTLY DIRECTED DARK COMEDY.” -TODD MCCARTHY, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“A P H E N O M E N A L F I L M. THE ENTIRE CAST IS OUTSTANDING.’’

FIVE FINGERS OF DEATH. This 1972 kung-fu film from Chang-hwa Chung stars Lo Lieh as a martialarts student who is fortunate enough to learn the “iron fist” fighting technique. 10:15 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. Hollywood

-JESSICA KIANG, INDIEWIRE.COM

PEEWEE’S BIG ADVENTURE. When man-boy Pee-Wee Herman’s bike is stolen, he sets forth on a cross-country odyssey to find it. A wise lady trucker; the basement of the Alamo; giant dinosaurs; and a “Tequila”-filled biker bar are just a few of the oddities our hero encounters in Tim Burton’s exuberant, offbeat 1985 road movie. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 5. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

CP

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Stand Clear of the Closing Doors Thursday October 30, 2014 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS

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[DANCE]

THE DESIGNS WERE ADVANCED FOR AN ERA WHEN MANY ALBUM COVERS WERE HOKEY PHOTOS OF SMILING SINGERS

NEW EXTREMES {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY performs come, been and gone 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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[ART]

Benjamin Warbis of Michael Clark Company {PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE WALTERS.}

A one-time ballet prodigy, “beautiful boy” and heroin addict, Scottish dancer/choreographer Michael Clark created a Warholesque persona for himself in the 1980s. A cultural celebrity and iconoclast, Clark traded a promising mainstream dance career for one influenced by punk, with a desire to shock audiences with sexual content, gender-bending and provocative social messages. Clark’s globe-trotting, London-based troupe, the Michael Clark Company, makes its Pittsburgh debut in come, been and gone, on Nov. 1, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Dance Council. “I think the shock factor is worn off,” says company dancer Benjamin Warbis, by phone from Portland, where the company was performing. “That was 30 years ago, and a lot of people have done it since.” Over the decades, the 52-year-old Clark’s ballets, like his films with Charles Atlas, have evolved from shocking to awe-inspiring. They now concentrate less on narrative and nudity and more on production value and solid technical dancing. The movement aesthetic blends ballet, Merce Cunningham technique and a smattering of traditional Scottish dance. While Clark might have mellowed a bit, his drive seems to have remained the same. In 2013, he told a Financial Times reporter, “Extreme is good for me. Fast: slow. Big: small. I’m not really interested in the middle ground.” In the critically acclaimed multimedia production come, been and gone, you get a little of the old Clark, a little of the new, in one sophisticated package. The two-hour program (in which Clark makes a cameo appearance) features three abstract ballets. The first is a revamped version of 1986’s “Swamp,” set to music by Wire and Bruce Gilbert. The second features reinterpretations of earlier choreography set to songs by Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground that Warbis describes as “trippy, exciting and aerobic.” The third, created in 2009, is danced primarily to David Bowie hits. Warbis is literally the poster boy for the company’s current tour, appearing shirtless, in tight silver pants with a microphone in his mouth. The dancer and model is at once the new face of the company and a reminder of a rebellious young Clark. Of the photo, Warbis says: “You’ll see the costume and the microphone in the work, but not in my mouth.” What audiences will experience, says Warbis, is great visuals, risk-taking choreography and rock ’n’ roll.

(UN)COVER(ED) ARTIST {BY NICK KEPPLER}

A

S FIXATIONS often do for record

collectors, J. Malls’ obsession began with just one disc. Sifting through the stacks at Jerry’s Records in Squirrel Hill, Malls found an album of Martin Luther King speeches. Sixties-era MLK spoken-word records are common, but the art on this one stood out. It was an ink drawing of King, his mouth mid-remark, his arm outstretched. In the white space cattycorner to him, a crowd marched, as if King were conjuring them, genie-like. Also unique: The record sleeve included a brief bio of its artist, Mozelle Thompson, who was raised in Pittsburgh. “I have an interest in local music, local artists [and] this diaspora of Pittsburgh creative people,” says Malls, who is also a DJ. “I wanted to discover more about this guy.” The fruits of Malls’ nearly two-year quest will be on display at Most Wanted Fine Art gallery, which in November will exhibit some of the 90 Thompson-designed album covers Malls has collected. Ranging from jazz and blues to country, classical and theatrical, the designs show stun-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

On the record: J. Malls poses in Jerry’s Records with some of his collection of vintage album covers by Pittsburgh native Mozelle Thompson.

ning colors and expressive figures from a deceased, forgotten artist whose work once went up against the iconic cover of The Beatles’ Revolver for a graphic-design Grammy. In unearthing Thompson’s work, Malls also uncovered a story of racial strife and self-destruction.

THE ALBUM ART OF MOZELLE THOMPSON Fri., Nov. 7, through Sun., Nov. 30. (Opening receptions: 6-11 p.m. Fri., Nov. 7, and noon-6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 8.) Most Wanted Fine Art, 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-328-4737 or www.most-wantedfineart.com

Mozelle Thompson was born in the Hill District in 1926 to an African-American family, one of eight children. The family later moved to Garfield. As a teenager, he was taught by Jean Thuborn, the resident watercolor artist and art teacher at Peabody High School (now Barack Obama Academy). Thompson’s early efforts were much heralded in the community. “I remember we had a[n art] show in

our garage and even the principal came,” says Thompson’s younger sister, Greta Griffin, currently of Wilkinsburg. Thompson also began winning national contests for young artists. A 1944 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article, reporting on a $200 prize he’d won, claimed Thompson was “said to be one of the most promising young artists in the country.” Most stories about the young Thompson quoted Thuborn. “It’s was almost like she was his publicist,” says Malls. Art seemed to be Thompson’s ticket to a better life. He attended the Parsons School of Design, in New York, on scholarship and studied in Paris. He returned to Pittsburgh to work as a window-display designer at the Downtown Gimbels, but soon was back in New York, working as a freelance illustrator. From 1953 to 1969, Thompson designed book covers, children’s books, posters of Broadway shows and at least 100 album covers, for discs by artists including Lightnin’ Hopkins, Cab Calloway, Hank Williams, Ella Fitzgerald and Elvis Presley. Malls sought Thompson’s signature in


[BOOKS]

GUN CLUB {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Author Michael Zimecki {PHOTO BY MICHAEL ZIMECKI}

stacks of records. (Thompson always signed lios including scores of record covers. But his work.) Most of his work was for one of in the ’60s, as Warhol’s career accelerated, the country’s largest record companies, Thompson’s stalled. One likely reason RCA, a relationship that apparently started was race. Charles Thompson recalls his brother ilwith his sleeve for a ’53 recording of Gershlustrating a well-received poster for a Broadwin’s Porgy and Bess. Thompson’s most common medium way show. This led to a meeting with anothwas painting, and he often illustrated the er group of producers. They had one look at lush fantasy worlds evoked by theater and Thompson, a bespectacled black man, and classical pieces. His cover for a recording of said, “Mr. Thompson, we can’t hire you.” Thompson also didn’t network as other Mendelssohn’s compositions inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a swirl of im- commercial artists did. “He’d always dread agery, with a donkey-headed man in a getting asked to lunch,” says Charles forest, and fairies hidden beneath leaves and Thompson. “If the executives who’d hired flowers. His sleeve for an Arabian Nights- him found out that he was black, they’d stop themed musical shows Aladdin on his hiring him or they’d start giving him much magic carpet and a fire-haired genie levi- less money.” Though neither sibling remembers tating above a story-book Middle Eastern cityscape, glittering in white, pink and gold. Thompson working in the civil-rights Thompson also did simpler designs; movement, his final work synchs with it: his illustration for a Hank Williams com- He provided covers for Buddah Records’ “Black America” spoken-word sepilation shows the singer hunched ries, including the MLK album, over his guitar, the background and illustrated a children’s in blue as if to evoke his book based on the lyrics lonesome tone. of “Lift Every Voice and The work that garSing,” the gospel anthem nered a Grammy nomiadopted by the civilnation was also minirights movement. malistic, for a Chicago The latter was his Symphony recording final completed project. of Charles Ives works. In 1969, Thompson someIt was a caricature of the Mozelle Thompson how exited the window composer’s face looming {PHOTO COURTESY OF GRETA GRIFFIN} of his Manhattan seventhover a question mark (for his floor apartment and died from composition The Unanswered the fall. Police ruled it a suicide, but Question) and a Revolution-era U.S. Griffin says she and her parents were not flag (for his Variations on America). Whether opulent or nuanced, the de- convinced. “We couldn’t see him doing signs were artistically advanced, especially that,” she says. Charles Thompson says that his brother for an era in which many album covers were hokey photos of smiling singers. “I’d was “tired of being taken advantage of in put him among the best people working a world that would never appreciate him. at that time,” says Malls. The Most Wanted Sometimes, he had trouble paying for rent, exhibit, in Thompson’s old neighborhood, for food.” Also, a long-time male companion, with whom Mozelle Thompson shared the brings his art back home. Greta Griffin recalls her brother having a apartment, had left for California, leaving comfortable lifestyle: “He was making good him distraught. “Still, I don’t think he would money; he was always well dressed.” She have done it if he hadn’t been drinking,” remembers him as the older brother who says Charles Thompson. The Black America series includes a visited for the summer and bought her nice speech by author James Baldwin, whose new clothes for the upcoming school year. But his younger brother, Charles Thomp- fiction often depicted talented black men son, recalls Mozelle’s career differently. “He who go far in a white man’s world only to was always struggling for money, and it succumb to internal anxiety (including bothered him,” says Thompson, currently of one who leaps to his death in New York). Long Island. “He’d get a big job, $200 or $300, Thompson drew the cover, showing six freeand then he’d spend it all. He had no consis- floating ink drawings of Baldwin’s head, his eyes wise and his smile sly. tent income. He was a struggling artist.” The record begins: “It seems to me that To a point, Thompson’s story mirrors that of Pittsburgh’s most famous artistic the artist’s struggle for his integrity is a ex-pat — Andy Warhol, born two years kind of metaphor, must be considered as a after him. Both were raised in working- metaphor, for the struggle that is universal class households, excelled in art as children, and daily of all human beings on the face studied it in college, fled to New York to of this terrifying globe to get to become pursue design careers and begat portfo- human beings.”

Michael Zimecki’s novel Death Sentences (Crime Wave Press) might be a little too real for some Pittsburghers. His fictional narrator draws heavily on the story of Richard Poplawski, who in 2009 shocked the city when he killed three Pittsburgh police officers responding to a call at his home in Stanton Heights. Death Sentences takes the form of death-row writings by Peter “Pop” Popovich, like Poplawski an unemployed young gun collector who posted racist diatribes on whitesupremacist web sites. Popovich chronicles his past in the third person, as when describing the beginning of his “politicization”: “He started with a book he picked up at a gun show in Monroeville that was given to him by some guy who was looking to sell him a handgun, then got all jacked off when he found out Pop was just 18.” Zimecki grew up in the 1960s, in a South Side mill family, studied writing at Pitt and Carnegie Mellon and taught English (among other jobs) before getting his law degree in 1994. The compellingly written Death Sentences (available locally at Amazing Books) isn’t “true crime”; Zimecki says most characters are drawn from his own experience. But while his portrait of Popovich is not unsympathetic — the killer’s turbulent upbringing, his meager job prospects — Zimecki says he wrote the novel largely to comment on American gun culture and the unintended consequences of what he calls “the rightwing noise machine.” “I think in our culture there’s some denial about the motivation of people like Poplawski,” said Zimecki in an interview. “This was a guy that was pretty politically motivated. They may have been misguided politics, but politics had a lot to do with what he did. He talked from the beginning, when Obama was elected, that he’s gonna take away his guns, and when the police came to the door, I think the fear that was in his mind was that at last what he feared had come true.” Zimecki had Popovich write about himself in the third person because “It allowed me to get inside his head — but then to jump back outside the story.”’ Does Zimecki, a left-leaning East Ender, feel like he can really enter the mind of someone like Popovich? He thinks so, and says that it’s cynical to think that you can’t empathize with fellow humans: “I think understanding is a good in and of itself, whether it brings you closer to people or not.”

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The Palace Theatre Highlights!

PalacePA

Oct 30 Thu 7:30PM Latshaw Productions presents The Beach Boys Nov 1 Sat 7:30PM Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra presents Tchaikovsky Festival Nov 2 Sun 4PM Break The Floor Productions: Shaping Sound Nov 7 Fri 8PM Elko Concerts presents Don McLean Nov 8 Sat 7:30PM River City Brass presents American Heroes ACE FREHLEY Nov 15 Sat 8PM Elko Concerts presents Ace Frehley Nov 21/22 Fr/Sa 7:30PM Stage Right presents Fiddler on the Roof Nov 23 Sun 2PM Stage Right presents Fiddler on the Roof Nov 28 Fri 11AM Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells! Dec 4 Thu 7:30PM WCT presents Mike Super Magic & Illusion Dec 5 Fri 2&7:30PM Latshaw Productions: The Motown Experience Dec 6 Sat 7:30PM River City Brass: Christmas Brasstacular MIKE SUPER Dec 7 Sun 2&7PM Latshaw: Oak Ridge Boys Christmas Night Out Dec 9 Tue 2&7:30PM Latshaw: Latshaw Pops’ Christmas Memories Dec 13 Sat 2&7PM WSO presents The Nutcracker Ballet Dec 14 Sun 2PM WSO presents The Nutcracker Ballet Dec 18 Thu 7:30PM Westmoreland Cultural Trust: A Christmas Carol Dec 19 Fri 7:30PM Zodiac Productions: Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. Dec 20 Sat 7:30PM WSO presents Home for the Holidays ______________ 2015 EVENTS ______________ THE OAK RIDG E BOYS Jan 23/24 Fr/Sa 8PM Westmoreland Cultural Trust: Get The Led Out Jan 30 Fri 8PM Elko Concerts: Dave Mason’s 7UDI¿F-DP Feb 12 Thu 7:30PM WCT presents A Band Called Honalee Feb 14 Sat 7:30PM Latshaw: Jay/Americans & Brooklyn Bridge Feb 22 Sun 7PM WCT presents PFX: The Pink Floyd Experience Mar 6 Fri 8PM Elko: Jefferson Starship Performs & Celebrates MURPHY JR. Music of Jefferson Airplane 50th Anniversary LANDAU EUGENE Mar 15 Sun 7:30PM Elko Concerts presents Michael Bolton

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY SAT, NOV 1 ST 2014 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER WATCH: TrustArts.org/MichaelClark

Featuring the music of DAVID BOWIE and IGGY POP

expect to be jolted out of your seats – British Theatre Guide

TICKETS START AT $19 TrustArts.org/dance • 412.456.6666 Program contains partial nudity. In partnership with the British Council. Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICK MOORE}

Clockwise from top right: Joseph Martinez, Emily Swora, Ricardo Villa-Roger and Everett Lowe in Througline’s The Last Days of Judas Iscariot

[PLAY REVIEWS]

TRIALS {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} WHEN EXAMINING betrayal, what is the

appropriate punishment for the man who double-crossed one of history’s most revered figures? In the bowels of purgatory, this is the question that two attorneys debate in the case of Judas Iscariot. From Pontius Pilate to Sigmund Freud, a slew of famous witnesses offer perspectives on Judas’ guilt and innocence. Meanwhile, the lawyers cope with a cantankerous judge on heaven’s wait-list and a ragtag jury that includes a flighty angel, a comatose patient and a beer-swilling Southern boy who doesn’t know he’s dead.

THE LAST DAYS OF JUDAS ISCARIOT

continues through Sat., Nov. 1. Throughline Theatre Company at the Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 888-718-4253 or www.throughlinetheatre.org

Originally produced at the off-Broadway Public Theater in 2005, with Philip Seymour Hoffman at the helm, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot is a challenging piece that permits no pat answers yet poses innumerable philosophical quandaries. Throughline Theatre’s season-closing show is the play’s Pittsburgh premiere. Kaitlin Kerr and Liam Macik share directing credit, and their dedication to playwright Stephen

Adly Guirgis’ work imbues the production with an emotional core that never wavers. Under Kerr and Macik’s direction, the 16-person cast is collectively strong. In particular, Ursula Asmus Sears is subdued yet riveting as the hard-nosed defense lawyer, while Parag S. Gohel provides a needed bit of comic relief as the manic prosecutor, even though by the last scenes his cartoonish antics verge on tiresome. Relegated to a solitary hell on one side of the stage, Judas speaks only in flashbacks and in the presence of the one he betrayed. Consequently, he is at once an omnipresent force and a guest star in the play that bears his name. While this unusual choice works in favor of the overall story, Casey Cunningham’s turn as the nuanced yet tempestuous Judas is so strong that it leaves a distinct sense that in this instance, less might not be more. With a three-hour running time, this is no lunchtime sermon. But for those with the fortitude to endure a messy exploration into the life — and death — of Christianity’s most maligned traitor, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot is one production for the ages. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CARRIE ON {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} COULD THIS be a hit today: a tale tapping into the wish-fulfillment of practically every American teenager to trash the


high school, the town and everybody who ever crossed him/her? Alas, in this century, children have been arrested for voicing or even suggesting such a fantasy. But in the innocence of the 1970s (ironic violin music), Carrie was indeed a monster success of good ole clean-fun horror. Bricolage Production Co. takes Carrie’s campiness and adolescent horror several steps further with its Midnight Radio modiďŹ cation: SCarrie the Musical. Unlike most “WBRC Radioâ€? productions, SCarrie is a mostly self-contained one-act, with few “commercialâ€? breaks and limited audience participation. It’s more of a staged reading with an energetic multicasted ensemble — except that the title role is always in character and always in costume. And it’s a guy.

SCARRIE THE MUSICAL continues through Nov. 8. Bricolage Productions, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $35. 412-471-0999 or www.bricolagepgh.org

Background check: Stephen King’s ďŹ rst published novel (1974) about a telekinetic teenager became one of 1976’s biggest ďŹ lms, directed by Brian DePalma. Both now recognized geniuses, right? Their “cult classicâ€? spawned many imitators, sequels and remakes, and more than one musical, before Bricolage’s producing artistic director Tami Dixon adapted and Pittsburghized Carrie for this most recent homage, with original music by Joel Abbott, updated from his 2002 version. Matt M. Morrow directs a nighperfect cast with a nicely complementing band, led by music director Jason Coll. An unabashedly mustachioed Connor McCanlus credibly tackles Carrie’s fragility, vulnerability and rage, with more comedy than terror. Kristiann Menotiades nearly stops the show as both the wacko mother belting out “Eve Was Weak,â€? and as the more maternal sympathetic coach winning over the frightened girl with “You Can Trust Me.â€? Andrew Swackhamer jumps with both feet into the role of good-girl-boyfriend who dances with Carrie, even channeling a bit of John Travolta (who played the bad-girl-boyfriend in the iconic movie). Hayley Nielsen (good girl), Julianne Avolio (bad girl) and Quinn Patrick Shannon (thug boyfriend and clueless “newsâ€?caster) complete the show with sound effects, special effects, vocal effects, etc. effects. Bricolage’s Midnight Radio series promises fun, sputteringly bad taste and head-slapping humor. SCarrie delivers it all. And I won’t spoil the inside joke.

{BY COLETTE NEWBY}

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W Y E P & T h e P i t t s b u r g h C u l t u r a l Tr u s t p r e s e n t

QUEENS OF THE BLUES is a comic fantasy

told through blues and gospel music, receiving its world premiere courtesy of New Horizon Theater. The characters are all ďŹ gures from the history of the blues (including God, who never cut a record but is thanked in the liner notes of many albums). Kevin Brown plays Thomas Dorsey, credited as the father of gospel music, who dwells in heaven, singing in honor of the Lord. God sends him to purgatory to convince some blues idols to convert to praising the Lord. The play, by Joe Plummer and Sanetta Y. Gipson, never really elaborates on this premise. But it’s an excuse for everyone to sing at each other and explain their parts in the development of the most inuential genre in American music. It feels a little blasphemous to have the blues sung over synthesized MIDI arrangements. But in a show where God doubles as a literal backup dancer, it’s probably wise to cast aside the idea of blasphemy. This is a show where Etta James’ spirit lurks in limbo until she overcomes her emotional problems through the healing power of song — squeamishness is out of place. It’s as if The Blues Brothers didn’t star one white man whose public persona revolved around drug abuse and another white man who tells anyone who’ll listen about his earnest belief in UFOs. And I say this as someone who watches The Blues Brothers about once a month.

continues through Sun., Nov 2. Maker Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $20. 412-431-0773 or www.newhorizontheater.org

Queens of the Blues, directed by Plummer, should be singled out for special praise for Stephanie Akers’ portrayal of Ma Rainey. The show depicts the “mother of the blues,â€? and one of the ďŹ rst American performers to openly sing about lesbianism, without ever feeling like it’s winking at the audience and begging you to be impressed by the allegedly cosmopolitan sight of a human being treated like a human. The performances are all fantastic; all of the singers are extremely talented and I can’t remember any joke that didn’t pull at least a dad-pun smile. If you can handle the idea of Etta James being sung over a MIDI track, Queens of the Blues does proud the idea of a musical.

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with special guest

JIMBO AND THE SOUPBONES

QUEENS OF THE BLUES

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 8PM • BYHAM THEATER TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square

412-456-6666 • Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.3011.06.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Live Music

NOV. 01

Sweaty Betty

Flood Tide

Wednesday, Oct.required 29 r e n n i D 6:30pm $55 reservations B ee r with

Paired with Threadless IPA Sweet & Spicy Shrimp, Thai Salad, Curry Aioli

–Second Course–

Paired with Chimera Hardcore Ale Country Boudin, Pineapple BBQ Sauce, Cajun Slaw, Fresh Baguette

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Paired with Secret Stache Stout Flat Iron Steak Kabob, Coffe Crusted, Vanilla Scented, Auna Potato, Grilled Rapini

–Fourth Course–

Paired with Fascist Pig Ale Almond Cake, Creole Cream Cheese Frosting, Banana Filling, Sazerac Sauce

Friday, October 31st MUSIC by Neon Swing Face Painting Tarot Card Reader

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+ THU. OCT. 30 {ART} Henry Clay Frick would be pleased to see touring exhibition Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal come to the Frick Art & Historical Center: Frick owned one of the American impressionist painter’s early works, “Going for a Drive.” The exhibit, which opens today, spans five decades of Curran’s career, with 60 paintings displaying his broken brushstrokes and sunny palette. It includes “Going for a Drive,” as well as Curran’s famous works “Lotus Lilies” and “On the Heights.” Danielle Fox 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Feb. 1. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

{OPERA} Leave the opera glasses home for contemporary chamber-opera group Microscopic Opera’s intimate performance of Frida, at Chatham University’s Eddy Theater. Gregory Lehane directs a staging of this 1991 account of the life of Frida Kahlo. The Washington Post called composer Robert Xavier Rodriguez’s score “romantically dramatic.” Argentinean mezzo-soprano Raquel Winnica Young plays the iconic Mexican painter for Microscopic, with bass-baritone Sean Donaldson as her

husband, Diego Rivera. The live orchestra is guided by music director Robert Frankenberry. DF 8 p.m. Show continues through Sun., Nov. 2. Chatham University, Woodland Road, Shadyside. $15-25. www.microscopicopera.org

+ FRI., OCT. 31 {PARTY} Carnegie Science Center teams with craft distillery Wigle Whiskey for a 21+ Spirits and Spirits night that beats pilfering your kid’s candy

bag. Learn how to make Frankenstein-green slime or the perfect rum cocktail with a mixology lesson from Maggie’s Farm Rum and Independent Brewing Company. Iron City Aerial will soar without brooms during an aerial silk performance, and you’re encouraged to come in costume to tour the cash bar and exhibits like SpacePlace, RoboWorld and Zap! Surgery. DF 7 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $10-15. 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

NOV. 01 Blood l d+B Bones


MainEvent Art by Duane Michals

In the 1960s, when Duane Michals was emerging as a photographer, the medium was essentially reality-based, from Ansel Adams’ epic landscapes to the street shooting of Garry Winogrand. What Michals started doing — telling made-up stories like “Death Comes to the Old Lady” in serial images, often with double- and triple exposures, and hand-inscribed with titles or poems — simply wasn’t done, says Linda Benedict-Jones: “Everything he did went against the grain.” Benedict-Jones, the Carnegie Museum of Art’s curator of photography, has organized the McKeesport-born, New York-based pioneer’s largest show ever. The retrospective Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals is the world-renowned artist’s first major North American museum exhibition since 1998. The exhibit, drawn from the Carnegie’s own vast collection of Michals’ work and from museums internationally, goes beyond his groundbreaking 1970s works (like the accompanying 1972 self-portrait). It also includes his commercial images, ranging from ad spreads and celebrity portraiture to the album cover for The Police’s Synchonicity (or rather, covers: There were 36 variations, and the museum is asking patrons whether they own any of the seven the museum lacks.) Storyteller even includes previously unexhibited painting-on-photography works. A companion exhibit, Duane Michals: Collector, samples the artist’s eclectic private art collection. During Storyteller’s run, Michals, 83, will visit for events including Nov. 1’s opening-day book-signing. Bill O’Driscoll Noon-5 p.m. (Book-signing: 1-3 p.m.). Exhibit continues through Feb. 16. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Way, North Side. $8-12 (sliding scale). www.floodtidefilm.com

{FESTIVAL}

{ART}

Frolicking skeletons and gaily colored skulls help Mexico Lindo Mercado y Galeria mark its 10th Dia de los Muertos with Blood + Bones. The exhibition, including work by Mexican folk-art masters, remembers soldiers and civilians killed in U.S. wars in the Middle East and Mexican drug wars. Ofrendas, or altars, honor other notable deaths — from Nelson Mandela and Gabriel Garcia Márquez to Maya Angelou and Lou Reed — and let visitors write notes to their own lost loved ones. Candle-lit open houses tonight and tomorrow include Mexican hot chocolate, coffee and sugar-skull cookies. Bill O’Driscoll 5-8 p.m. Also 5-8 p.m. Sun., Nov. 2. Exhibit continues through Nov. 29. 2027 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. www.mexicolindo.biz

Some artists reject information overload; Jason Woolslare embraces it, at least the visual kind. In his colorful, popart-derived paintings of cowboys, robots, songbirds

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LUX CAMENA}

+ SAT., NOV. 01

{SCREEN} Street-art master Swoon’s art project Swimming Cities of Switchback Sea sent seven giant floating sculptures down the Hudson, with the crews stopping to perform along the way. Footage from that trip informs Flood Tide, Todd Chandler’s feature-length fiction narrative about a group of struggling artists and musicians taking a similar journey after their friend Maya dies. Chandler premieres the film locally tonight, at the Mattress Factory. Beforehand, a program of Chandler’s shorts will be scored live by Chandler and Marshall LaCount, both of the band Dark Dark Dark. BO 7 p.m. 500 Sampsonia

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Timbeleza, plus belly-dancer Janim and tunes by DJ Pandemic. The food and spirits are from local purveyors. BO 9 p.m.-midnight (7:30 p.m. VIP). 623 Smithfield St., Downtown. $50 ($25 discount for ages 21-29); $125 VIP. www.pghdowntowncdc.org

+ TUE., NOV. 04 {WORDS}

Consider this your informal invitation to Steel City Slam’s housewarming party in its new venue, East Liberty’s Capri NOV. 04 Pizza and bar. Steel City Pittsburgh’s only registered poetry slam Slam previously met at AVA Bar & Lounge, where a 21-plus rule excluded minors. Now, the slams are all-ages, and occur weekly rather than monthly. At tonight’s first slam in the new digs, wandering poets and demolition derbies, are encouraged to stop in. Woolslare says he strives to Sign-ups are capped at depict “layers of past, present eight competing poets, eight and future experiences.” The open-mic poets and one artist and educator has built a “sacrificial poet.” DF 8 p.m. strong reputation locally; his 6001 Penn Ave., East Liberty. latest show of new work, Wild Abandon, opens with tonight’s reception at The Gallery 4. BO 7-11 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 29. 206 S. Highland Ave., Art by Alex Shadyside. Free. 412-363-5050 Mitchell or www.thegallery4.com

Free. 814-229-3393 or www. facebook.com/steelcityslam

{SCREEN} Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s My People film series opens its sixth year tonight with a social in Alloy Studios. My People uses film, performance and discussion to explore the lives of LGBT people of color and raise awareness of LGBT resources in the city. Inspired by the life of jazz legend Billy Strayhorn, the social will preview this year’s four films: Out in the Night, No Shade, Barrio Boy and Hector: Lost Souls with Switchblades. DF 7 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Admission is paywhat-you-can. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

Exotic animals beyond penguins will occupy the CONSOL Energy Center this week, as Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus makes its annual visit. Ringmaster and cowboy Andre McClain (pictured) leads Built to Amaze! from atop his faithful steed, Comanche. The

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circus showcases performers from 17 countries, including new acts like acclaimed comedic animal-presenters Alex and Irina Emelin, of Russia. Joining them are 95 show animals and the new Tower Tumblers, a troupe

of Ukrainian aerial athletes trained to navigate a translucent three-story tower. DF 7 p.m. Performances continue through Nov. 9. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $10-115. 412-804-7904 or www.ringling.com

sp otlight

Who doesn’t enjoy a good ghost story this time of year? Combine those stories with creepy dance and you get Manifestations II: Ambitions Running Cold. The 90-minute production at the 99-seat The Maker Theater — Geeksdanz’s sequel to last season’s Manifestations — features storyteller Stas Ziolkowski. He will spin original and classic spine-tinglers including W.W. Jacobs’ “The Monkey’s Paw,” about a mysterious, wish-granting totem; a tale of a ghostly biker gang; and a version of Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Four dancers including Geeksdanz artistic director Ellen Deutsch will enhance the experience with choreography developed by tapping into the dancers’ own fears. Deutsch believes this approach will result in more authentic movement to accompany the chilling stories. The PG-13 Manifestations II is set to a blood-curdling cinematic soundscape by various composers, taken from the Oddio Overplay album Calling All Fiends, and features atmospheric lighting and other surprises. Steve Sucato 7and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $15. www.geeksdanz.org

It’s no mere Halloween party: Bacchanalia is advertised as a “masquerade ball,” which sounds like you’d better step up your game. The Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corp.’s party — in the Heinz 57 building! — includes live music by the Pittsburgh Samba Group and street-samba batucada

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Ringling li B li Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus

{CIRCUS}

{PARTY}

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 10X10X10. Annual festival of 10 minute plays. Thru Nov. 2, 8 p.m. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-325-7037. ANNIE. That musical about the loveable orphan w/ the hard knock life. Thru Oct. 30, 7:30 p.m., Thru Nov. 1, 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 2, 1 & 6 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. CRIMES OF THE HEART. Beth Henley’s dark comedy of sisters raised in a dysfunctional family who reunite following a tragic event. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. EDGAR ALLAN POE: TALES OF THE GROTESQUE. Poe begins a conversation with a familiar stranger that both reveals and changes his views on poetry, love, and death. Play by Eric W. Cook. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. Succop Theater, Butler Community College, Butler. 724-284-8505.

EVENING OF MYSTERY W/ DR. CYRIL WECHT. On Prime Stage’s set of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Wed., Nov. 5, 6-9 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. THE GAME SHOW MURDERS. An interactive murder mystery which takes place during the taping of the popular TV game show “Stump the Stars.” Thru Nov. 1, 8 p.m. and Thru Nov. 8, 8 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. THE GLASS MENAGERIE. A brand-new production of Tennessee Williams’ classic play. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 2. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. HORRORPOCALYPSE. Doors 9:30, Show 10. Variety Hour theatre experience celebrating the American Horror Film. Thu., Oct. 30, 9:30 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE LAST DAYS OF JUDAS ISCARIOT. In a courtroom in Purgatory, an upstart defense attorney files an appeal to

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

redeem the soul of Christianity’s aging Irish cattle farmer, written by the Pulitzer, Oscar, & most notorious sinner. Presented Tony-winning author of Doubt by Throughline Theater. Thu-Sat, & Moonstruck. Tue-Sun. Thru 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. The Grey Nov. 2. City Theatre, South Side. Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-431-2489. 412-586-7744. QUEENS OF THE BLUES. A world LOST IN YONKERS. Neil premiere presented by New Simon’s coming of age story Horizons Pittsburgh. Thu-Sat, about a highly dysfunctional 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. family. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 2. The Maker and Thru Nov. 9, Theater, Shadyside. 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 8. 412-431-0773. The Theatre Factory. . w ww per THE SMALL ROOM 412-374-9200. a p ty ci pgh m AT THE TOP OF LOVE, LOSS & WHAT .co THE STAIRS. Carole I WORE. Nora Ephron’s Frechette’s play about work about the existential Grace, who has stumbled into state of having nothing to wear. a fairy-tale marriage complete Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. with her own Prince Charming & Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. resplendent mansion, but finds 724-745-6300. herself drawn to the mysterious NIGHT OF THE SINGING room her husband has forbidden DEAD. Musical comedy w/ her to enter. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru local musicians and media Nov. 1. Off the Wall Theater, personalities channeling Carnegie. 724-873-3576. non-living legends. Thu, Fri, STRANGE CASE OF DR. 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31. Rex Theater, JEKYLL & MR. HYDE. Presented South Side. 412-431-0700. by Prime Stage. Costume contest OUTSIDE MULLINGAR. A Oct. 31st. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and comedy about Tony Reilly, an Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 9. New Hazlett Theater, North Side.

COMEDY THU 30 COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 30 - NOV 02 RED GRANT. 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 31, 10:30 p.m., Sat., Nov. 1, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 2, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 31 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE BRIGHTNESS DARKLY. Halloween-themed sketch comedy show from The Big Deal. Features a music improv set by The High Scores. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DOES THIS HOLD UP: LIVE PODCAST. Ft. Jeff Konkle. This Halloween edition analyzes CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. The definitive retrospective & largest-ever presentation of this innovative artist’s work. Opens Nov. 1. Oakland. 412-622-3131. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Group Show. Work by Ron Nigro, Kathi DePasse, Cristina Saucedo (Pastilla), Mary Mason. Opening reception Nov. 2, 2-5 p.m. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Magic of Everyday. By Mary Hamilton. Opening Nov. 2nd. By appt. only. Shadyside. 412-241-1528. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Charles Courtney Curran: Seeking the Ideal. Work by French-trained American artist, known for his sparkling canvases of women in gardens & other outdoor settings. Opening celebration Oct. 29, 6-8 p.m. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. THE GALLERY 4. Wild Abandon. New Paintings by Jason Woolslare. Opening reception Sep. 6, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists 4. Group show. Saturdays through Dec. 5, or by appointment. Garfield. 412-924-0634. PANZA GALLERY. Meta/ Morphoses. New work by Brian Lang & Susan Sparks. Opening reception Nov. 1, 6-8:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photos in Jewelry. An exhibit showcasing exquisite samples of photographic

jewelry, popularized in the 1800s. Opens Nov. 1. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. The Enduring Skull. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Suzanne Colvin: Recent Work. Place-based abstract works. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUNKERPROJECTS. Somewhere Over The_. A solo show by resident artist,

Shikieth. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. Keen 2013. Photographs by Xenia Guthrie. Monroeville. 412-371-8651. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Once upon a time. Pittsburgh. Paintings by Fritz Keck. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. When the Space Shuttle Was. Photos of space shuttle & astronauts press conferences. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Super Citizens. Art made by adults with disabilities. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In. Take Off Your Shoes. Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Something Alien: An ART Show by two people who don’t belong. New Works by Nick & Noell Romeo, feat. 3D digital renderings, music, photography, fractal generations, sculpture, & oil pastels. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772.

DO

THE

“Ramparts,” by Suzanne Colvin, from her show of recent work at Be Galleries, in Lawrenceville

BLUE

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

“Nightmare on Elm Street”. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

EVENT: Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh and InterPride’s

Nightmare on Hellsworth, Shadyside CRITIC: Corey Martin, 36, a TV-news

FRI 31 - NOV 01

October 31st, 5PM-1AM

THURSDAY OCT 30/10PM

EMO NIGHT 17

TREATS AND PRIZES • NO COVER

THURSDAY NOV 6/10PM

Classic Vampire Movies and Classic Metal all night long!

FIVEUNDER, AUGUST RUINS

DRINK SPECIALS SERVED BY VAMPIRE STAFF

Hell Night October 30th DJ Miss Mungo spinning 8-midnight

THURSDAY NOV 13/10PM

SCENE STAGE THE WORLD, SEMI SUPER VILLAINS, THE FILTHY LOWDOWN $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY

5326 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-252-2337

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

BILLY RAY BAUER. Oct. 31Nov. 1, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

producer from Hampton Township (pictured with Confetti Gunn)

SAT 01

WHEN: Sat.,

DAVID KAYE, MATT STANTON, LISA DAPPRICH. Benefits Allegheny Ridge Runners Snowmobile Club. Doors 6:30pm Show: 8pm. 6:30 p.m. The Atrium, New Castle. 412-920-5653. THE DEATH SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DINNER WITH THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MIKE JONES, MIKE WYSOCKI, DAN BROWN. Benefits Chartiers Houston Boys Basketball Boosters. 7 p.m. Mt. Pleasant Twp. Fire Hall. 412-920-5653. YANNIS PAPPIS, MR. PANOS, MAURICA. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225.

SUN 02 THE CAPITOL STEPS. 4 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

It’s a block party with music, dancing, a lot of friendly people, some drinking. I think everything is fantastic. There were a lot of superheroes, and a lot less clowns that I expected. I came out with my boyfriend, Confetti Gunn. I’m a ringmaster. She’s a clown, a scary clown. I think there is this perception that Pittsburgh doesn’t really have this gay scene. I mean we aren’t known like Chelsea or the Castro, but I didn’t really know what was going on until we started dating and going out on the weekends. There is a lot of stuff here, and I think that’s truly wonderful. We caught a couple of Steve Grant’s songs. Honestly, I didn’t know much about him before tonight. I knew his one song, “All American Boy,” but obviously him being the first-ever out, gay country singer, that’s a big deal. BY DANIELLE FOX

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s UNPLANNED COMEDY’S industrial heritage. Tarentum. JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru 724-224-7666. Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. AUGUST WILSON CENTER 412-681-4318. FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, TUESDAY NIGHT film & oral history narratives to STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. explore communities, cultures, Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. & innovations. Downtown. 412-592-7869. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of BEST OF THE automatic roll-played BURGH COMEDY musical instruments SHOWCASE. Ft. Aaron and music boxes in a www. per a p Kleiber, David Kaye, mansion setting. pghcitym o .c Tom Henry,Tommy Call for appointment. Kupiec. 8 p.m. Buckhead O’Hara. 412-782-4231. Saloon, Station Square. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. 412-232-3101. Preserved materials reflecting COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by the industrial heritage of Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Southwestern PA. Homestead. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-464-4020. 412-431-9908. CARNEGIE SCIENCE JOKING OFF COMEDY CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl CONTEST. Presented by Race to Digital Dome (planetarium), the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Miniature Railroad and Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Village, USS Requin submarine, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. and more. North Side. PIPE DOWN HIPSTER. presented 412-237-3400. by ChicksBurgh Comedy. 8-10 p.m. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 412-682-0320. are extremely rare examples STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN of pre World War II ironMIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. Strip District. 412-904-4502.

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FULL LIST ONLINE

COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501.


KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256.

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Flower Show 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425.

graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. North Side. 412-322-1773. MASER GALLERIES. Hessam Abrishami. Almost 40 works by the world-renowned artist. Shadyside. 412-687-0885. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow.

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photosand artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459.

North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Close to Home. 7 artists use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place w/ deep emotional connections. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. CRAFTED: A Celebration of the Handmade. Artisancrafted mugs, cups and tumblers

North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots.

RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Places of Invention: Pittsburgh Jazz, 1920-1970. Special guest speakers; Dan Holland,

Renée Govanucci, Dr. Nelson Harrison, & short films,live jazz music provided by the AfroAmerican Music. 412-454-6314. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for

by 50 artists from across America. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Pairing artwork with artisan food and drink by Bar Marco. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An African-American Art Exhibition,. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY

If you’re the type to eschew animal products (or even if you indulge in the occasional cheeseburger), there’s a lot to enjoy at the Pittsburgh

Vegan Festival: Fall Edition. Saturday at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the North Hills, the festival features a full day of entertainment and information, from belly dancing and live music to guest speakers and kids’ activities. There will also be a wide array of local vendors — including the Vegan Goddess, Root System Juice Company, Vegan Pittsburgh and Apothecary Muse — selling edible and non-edible vegan products. Noon-8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 1. 2359 W. Ingomar Road., Franklin Park. $3. Visit www.pittsburghbellydance.com for information.

THU 30 THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW LIVE. 7 & 11 p.m. Cavo, Strip District.

THU 30 - SAT 01

HALLOWEEN SWING DANCE. W/ The James Street Swing All-Stars! Costume Contest. 7 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335. MAHONEY’S TOGA HALLOWEEN PARTY. Mahoney’s, Downtown. 412-471-4243.

HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE & THE VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 1 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. 412-823-4813. HAUNTED LIBRARY. Wed, Thu, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTY. Nov. 1, 2-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 30 DJ, costume contest, prizes. Carnegie Library, Carrick. 9 p.m. The Clubhouse, Gibsonia. 412-882-3897. THE “BIG TIME” HALLOWEEN SCARRIE THE MUSICAL. PARTY. Costume contest, This spin on a cult classic music, food, prizes, more. casts Carrie as a senior 8 p.m. 565 LIVE, at Allderdice High Bellevue. 412-522-7556. School. Thu-Sat, 9 p.m. DAY OF THE Thru Nov. 8 Bricolage, DEAD ROLLER Downtown. www. per DERBY. 6 p.m. pa 412-471-0999. pghcitym .co Neville Roller ZOMBIES OF THE Drome, Neville Island. CORN. Zombie shoot & 412-264-9856. corn maze. Thu-Sat. Thru FALL SPRUCE UP: DEAD MAN’S Nov. 1 Three Rivers Paintball & HOLLOW. Join Allegheny Land Airsoft, Zelienople. Trust in collecting litter, painting over graffiti & removing invasive plants. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 6TH ANNUAL SALSA 724-787-3585. SPOOKTACULAR. Costume HAUNTED LIBRARY. Wed, contest & prizes w/ DJ Jeff Shirey. Thu, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. Nov. 1, 2-4 p.m. Thru Oct. 30 Carnegie Library, Carrick. THE HALLOWEEN 412-882-3897. SPOOKSHOW. w/ Under A A NIGHT AT THE COTTON Nightmare, The Bloody Seamen, CLUB MASQUERADE PARTY. & The Existential Gentlemen. 8 p.m. Sahara Temple, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Cattivo, Braddock. 412-916-7347. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

SAT 01

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 31

DANCE SAT 01 MANIFESTATIONS II: AMBITIONS RUNNING COLD. Ft. ghost stories told live by our storyteller Stas’ Ziolkowski, Manifestations II melds dance, music & story. 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY. Program by the British dance iconoclast feat. the music of David Bowie & Iggy Pop. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SUN 02 SHAPING SOUND. Mash-up of dance styles & musical genres presented by Break the Floor. 4 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FUNDRAISERS THU 30 WINES UNDER GLASS GALA. Masquerade themed event feat. food, wines & lively entertainment. 7:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6915.

SAT 01 THE CRUSH: PINK EDITION CHARITY FASHION SHOW. Benefits Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh. DJ, live music CONTINUES ON PG. 54


Come out and enjoy Yuengling Black &Tan on draft Friday, October 31st at one of these locations.. Around Back Lower Burrell Hangar 4.7.3 Butler Snack N Pack Butler Gorillo’s Butler Mike’s Place Leetsdale Perrytowne Draft House McCandless Silvioni’s Ross J Clark’s Ross Baruni Baden Boots Brackenridge Italian Village Pizza Fox Chapel Gator’s Grille Glenshaw Adrian’s Pizza Gibsonia Allegheny 6 Packs & Dogs Cheswick Merante Brothers /Bar Antonio Canonsburg

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Pittsburgh Bottleshop Bridgeville Carson City Saloon South Side Twelve on Carson South Side Packs & Dogs Mt. Washington Roland’s Strip District Albert’s Lounge Dormont Cain’s Saloon Dormont Pub in the Park Swisshelm Park Churchill Haus Churchill Monhan’s Bar & Grill Penn Hills Murphy’s Tap Room Regent Square Belvedere’s Ultra Dive Lawrenceville

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Carnivore’s Oakmont Rivertowne Pub North Huntingdon

Hough’s Tap Room Greenfield Dad’s Pub & Grub Monroeville Mineo’s Pizza House Squirrel Hill The Rock Room Polish Hill Dee’s Café South Side Graziano’s Pizza Lawrenceville Birmingham Bridge Tavern South Side

Social Bakery Square Smokin Joe’s Saloon South Side Rugger’s Pub South Side Wexford Ale House Wexford

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performances. 6 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-467-6373. GLOBAL LINKS DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION. Food, cocktails, art & entertainment. 8 p.m. Global Links, Green Tree. 412-361-3424 x203. NOE’S NIGHT OF LIGHT. Benefits the Pediatric Specialty Hospital at The Children’s Home of Pittsburgh & Lemieux Family Center. Emcee Rick Sebak. Drinks, silent auction, raffle, live Entertainment by the Kenny Blake Group. 6 p.m. DiSalvo’s Station Restaurant, Latrobe. 412-441-4884.

HALLOWEEN

NOVEMBER

COSTUME CONTEST!

COSTUME PARTY!

SPON MILLER LITE SAILOR JERRYS RUM

MOONSHINE SPIRITS

FRI 31

UR 30 WED 29 TH COSTUME

HALLOWEEN TRIVIA!

YUENGLING AND MINI-BEERS SPECIAL

KAROAKE!

3OLIVES PROMO & COORS LIGHT SPECIAL

SAT 1

SPOOKTACULAR PRIZES ARE ITEMS STILLERS TICKETS SERED BY SPON CASH PENS JERSEY & BUD LIGHT & SERED BY

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

SUN 02 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. PITTSBURGH GRANDVIEW LIONS PANCAKE BREAKFAST. benefits the Lions Club 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sullivan Hall, Mt. Washington. PITTSBURGH KIDNEY WALK. 7:30 am registration, 9am start. Benefits National Kidney Foundation. 7:30 a.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-261-4115.

TUE 04 FOOD TRUCKS SUPPORT INGOMAR ELEMENTARY. 20% of proceeds benefit Ingomar Elementary. Nakama, Miss Meatball, PGH Crepes. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Ingomar Elementary School, Wexford. 412-721-1002.

POLITICS SAT 01

Over 600 Beer choices to mix & match Eight rotating Seasonal Tap handles. Vienna all beef & Smith's natural casing Dogs New expanded menu including Subs & Salads Free Lunch Delivery Monday - Friday till 3pm. 201 Shiloh Street Mt. Washington

www.packsanddogs.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

ANOTHER WORLD IS NECESSARY: GETTING ORGANIZED TO CHANGE THE WORLD. ft. speakers Mike Gonzalez, Helen Gerhardt, Carl Redwood, Danna Cascone, Mel Packer, & Russ Fedorka 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Oakland. 412-621-2400.

WED 05 THE DAY AFTER: POST ELECTION ANALYSIS. Ft. Melissa Daniels & Kate Giammarise. Bring your lunch and listen as local experts break down election results. Beverages and dessert. Mellon Living Room. 12-1:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

LITERARY THU 30 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh

Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

SAT 01 THE BRENTWOOD ANTHOLOGY LAUNCH EVENT. Launch of poetry collection by Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange workshop members. 7:30 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIVING IN AWE! Author and speaker, Shelli Prindle, author. Lunch included. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. DoubleTree Monroeville, Monroeville. 412-373-7300.

SUN 02 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 03

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 05

BIG READ IN PITTSBURGH CLOSING CELEBRATON. Come celebrate Fahrenheit 451 and all of the activities that have centered around the book. Enjoy speakers and performances, including musical performances by the Afro American Music Institute’s Boys’ Choir. Reception will follow. www. per 6:30-8:30 p.m. pa pghcitym Carnegie Library, .co Oakland. (412) 469-6301. BOOK SIGNING W/ ANN MAH. Author of “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” 5 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Helen Faye Rosenblum review “Lucky Us” by Amy Bloom. 10:30 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

FULL LIST ONLINE

BOOK LAUNCH FOR “EASIEST IF I HAD A GUN”. Ft. author Michael Gerhard Martin and the launch of our new imprint, Alleyway Books. Craig Bernier, Sheila Squillante, and Rachel Mennies Goodmanson. 5-8 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

TUE 04 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

KIDSTUFF THU 30 - WED 05 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 31 HALLOWEEN CONCERT W/ THE WRECKIDS. 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 01 FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m.


SUN: Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. GREENKIDS:TREE-MENDOUS! Come meet a few of the Frick’s hundreds of trees, large and small, & create a beautiful tree of your own to take home 11 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

TUE 04 CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 05 BUILT TO AMAZE! The 143rd edition of the Greatest Show On Earth. Surprise & wonder delights audiences with over the top feats of strength, agility & courage. Presented by Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 9 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000. WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE FRI 31 - SAT 01 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 01 MARATHON ON THE MOUNTAIN. 8 a.m. Seven Springs. 800-452-2223. WAGMAN MID-AUTUMN NOVEMBER STAR PARTY. www.3ap.org 6:20 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SUN 02 FRICK PARK ORIENTEERING. Find flags using topographic map & compass. Frick Park Falls Ravine Shelter. 10 a.m. Frick Park, Regent Square. NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY. Improve your photography skills and develop an eye for subjects and their environment. Taught by Doris Dumrauf, an award-winning wildlife photographer. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 04 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue,

3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 05 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. WWII & MT. LEBANON. Historian Todd DePastino will give the history of Mt. Lebanon in World War II. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. 412-563-1941.

OTHER STUFF THU 30 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TEACHER OPEN HOUSE. Previews of exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks, art making, discussion activities, & classroom resources. Teachers may receive Act 48 credit hours and information about school partnership opportunities. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 30 - FRI 31 THE SHALE EXCHANGE WORKSHOP: EMERGING

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

EVERY CHILD INC On Nov. 9, Every Child Inc., which provides foster care and adoption services, among other programs, is hosting its Run 4 Forever 5K and 1-mile fun run/walk in honor of National Adoption Month. Volunteers are needed to help with registration, water stations, children’s activities and other aspects of the event. Call 412-665-0600 or email ewelte@everychildinc.org for information.

CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh @gmail.com. PITTSBURGH: WHISKEY REBELLION, PROHIBITION & THE RESTORATION OF A PITTSBURGH TRADITION. Presentation by Meredith Grelli, co-founder of Wiggle Whiskey. 7 p.m. Peters Township Public Library. 724-941-9430. POP GENERATION. Educational tours & complimentary refreshments for ages 65+. Last Thu of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL. Pgh Disabilities Film Festival. Multiple locations. JFilmPgh.org 7 p.m.

TECHNOLOGIES & BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES. Presented by the Gas Technology Institute. Thru Oct. 31 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-642-1800.

FRI 31 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. A social, traditional American dance. No partner needed, beginners welcome, lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

SAT 01 2ND ANNUAL PITTSBURGH SNEAKER CONVENTION. Buy/Sell/ Trade event. Live music w/ DJ Fast Eddie, food, drinks,

BRUNCH @ 11 ONE BUCK CHUCK $1 Tacos All Day

contests & giveaways 1-6 p.m. Pittsburgh Obama 6-12, East Liberty. 412-622-5980. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi. com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. EAGLES AT THE FRONT: A NATIONAL AVIARY BUS TOUR. 1-of-a-kind tour & eagle watching experience. Rain date Nov. 8. 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. KOREAN II. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 31 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. NATIVE PLANT AND SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE. National experts and local gardeners join for a day of discussions & lectures. Ft. speakers: Rick Darke, Doug Tallamy, John Totten. Reservations required. 8:30 a.m.-2:45 p.m. William Pitt Union, Oakland. 412-441-4442, ext. 3925. SATURDAY DANCE SOCIAL FOR SENIORS. Dance social for age 60 and up. DJ, light refreshments. Community & Recreation Center. 2-4 p.m. BoyceMayview Park, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1099. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SCRABBLE TOURNAMENT. Pre-registration and NASPA membership required to participate. 9 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 04

DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HOT METAL BLUES. Blues HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. dancing. Lessons: 8-9pm. Weekly letter writing event. Dancing: 9 pm-12am. Tue, Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 23 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-683-3727. Oakland. 412-681-7465. BOARD GAME NIGHT. MT. LEBANON Third and First Sun of CONVERSATION SALON. every month, 6 p.m. Brew Discuss current events w/ on Broadway, Beechview. friends & neighbors. 412-437-8676. For seniors. First Tue CHINESE II. First of every month, and Third Sun 10 a.m. Mount of every month, Lebanon Public 2-3 p.m. Carnegie w. w w Library, Mt. Lebanon. Library, Oakland. er hcitypap g p 412-531-1912. 412-622-3151. .com MY PEOPLE FILM COLORS & BOTTLES. SERIES KICKOFF Painting class. 1-4 p.m. SOCIAL. Preview of the films Mulligan’s Sports Bar & performances slated for & Grill, West Mifflin. My People & an opportunity 412-461-8000. to learn about the resources TEA CLASS & TASTING. and organizations available History of tea, steeping for LGBTQIA Pittsburghers. techniques, Storing Tea, 7:30 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Health Benefits, more. Friendship. 412-363-3000. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, BUILT TO AMAZE! The 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 143rd edition of the Greatest Margaret’s Fine Imports, Show On Earth. Surprise & Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. wonder delights audiences WISHCRAFT: HOW with over the top feats of TO GET WHAT YOU strength, agility & courage. REALLY WANT. Support group Presented by Ringling Bros. for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. and Barnum & Bailey. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 9 Consol 412-371-1707. Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000. COLORS & BOTTLES. Painting MEDIATHON: HACK class. 6:30 p.m. Luke Wholey’s THE NEWS! Come w/ ideas, Wild Alaskan Grille, assemble a team, & spend Strip District. 412-904-4509. the day creating the best DETROIT STYLE URBAN piece(s) of media you can BALLROOM DANCE. that, in 2 minutes or less, 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. promotes the news business. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. www.mediathon.org PNC Park, 412-242-4345. North Side. 412-323-5000. ENGLISH CONVERSATION MORNING SPANISH (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. LITERATURE & Mount Lebanon Public Library, CONVERSATION. Mon, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Practice conversational English. 412-531-1912. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. Oakland. 412-622-3151. First and Third Mon of THE NEW LONGEVITY every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. SUMMIT. “Transforming the Carnegie Library, Oakland. Stereotype of Aging”. Demos, 412-622-3151. meet local celebrities, political SAHAJA MEDITATION. representatives & speakers. Dimple meditation techniques, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Rivers Casino, which will improve your North Side. 412-231-7777. physical, emotional, THE PITTSBURGH SHOW psychological, social, and OFFS. A meeting of jugglers spiritual health Mon, & spinners. All levels 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 5 welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-531-1912. 412-363-4550. SCOTTISH COUNTRY SPANISH II. Geared toward DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., those who already have a social dancing follows. No basic understanding of Spanish partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. & are interested in increasing and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal proficiency. First and Third Wed Church, Mt. Washington. of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. 412-683-5670. Carnegie Library, Oakland. SPELLING BEE WITH 412-622-3151. DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon

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TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS

MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MON RIVER ARTS. Seeking male actors age 20s-30s for stage adaptation of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Email monriverarts@gmail.com or call for information. 412-405-8425. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Open stage & vocal auditions for spring 2015 show “The Mikado”. Dec. 15 & Dec.17, 7:30-9pm. Prepare a song; Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred) or standard musical theater, or classical. No a’capella. Accompanist provided. Resume & head shot. Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. SPLIT STAGE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Hair, Nov. 16-17. Prepare 2 32 bar cuts in contrasting styles. There will be a mandatory “movement call”. Email splitstage@gmail.com for an appointment. Newlonsburg Presbyterian Church. 724-327-0061.

SUBMISSIONS

THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Ongoing. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts. org/2014/08/25/call-forartists-bicycle-racks-in-thecultural-district/


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My son is 15 going on 16, and he’s been experimenting with masturbation. At the moment, I pretty much just think fine, whatever, he’s a teenager, there’s very little I can do about it. So long as he doesn’t get porn-obsessed and start letting his grades slip, it’s fine. The issue is that, a few months ago, his younger sister found one of her tampons in the garbage, and it was covered with poop. She brought it up to me and my wife, and we didn’t think much of it — until a couple of months ago, when my wife discovered, again, a used, shitty tampon in the garbage. We had a talk with our son and told him that we understand he is maturing sexually and we don’t care how he explores his sexuality. However, we also don’t want to find shitty tampons or whatever else in the garbage. Then, a couple of days ago, we were going to bed and we heard a noise coming from his bathroom. We checked it out and found his toothbrush in the sink, butt-end being rinsed with the water running full blast for who knows how long (he was downstairs). We asked him why he was doing that, and he said the cat had pissed on his toothbrush. We think his story is bullshit, as although the cat does piss on the floor, the cat has never peed on a counter before. We are fine with him exploring his sexuality, but at the same time, we don’t want to find tidbits of what he’s doing out in the open. As I’ve explained to him, he needs to do a better job of hiding it, because if a friend had come over and found a shitty tampon in the garbage can, what would they think? However, it looks like shaming him to hide it better might be the only way. What are your thoughts on this? Are we in the wrong here?

to him about it, POPS, I would’ve advised you to go with this: “Don’t leave the water running in your sink.” Your son would’ve figured that you saw the toothbrush, figured that you figured it had been in his ass, and never made that mistake again. (Just as he’s never made the tampon mistake again.) But you made the mistake of asking your son for an explanation (“Why are you doing that?”) in a context where (1) your son isn’t going to tell you the truth (“The cat pissed on it, Pops!”), and (2) you can’t handle the truth (“I was fucking myself in the ass with it, Pops!”). Zooming out for a second: A boy who’s almost 16 isn’t “experimenting with masturbation.” He’s perfecting his technique. And we can deduce from the tampons and toothbrushes that your son likes assplay. That’s not a problem. Inconsideration used to be a problem (disposing of shitty tampons where his family members might find them), but he’s knocked that off, right? So the only remaining problem is that he’s putting things in his ass that aren’t designed for assplay. If you don’t want your son abusing any cucumbers or mixing spoons or Oscar statuettes that might be lying around your house — and if you don’t want to have to rush him to an emergency room in a few months to retrieve something that gets stuck in his ass — consider purchasing a few ass-appropriate toys for him, i.e., one or two small silicone butt plugs with flared bases. He’ll be mortified when you give them to him, POPS, but no more mortified than you were when you found those shitty tampons. Buying sex toys for kids is a hurdle most parents can’t clear. If it’s not something you can do, then you’ll have to turn a blind eye to any toothbrushes you might find in sinks over the next few years. You’ll also want to thoroughly wash cucumbers before consuming them.

“BUYING SEX TOYS FOR KIDS IS A HURDLE MOST PARENTS CAN’T CLEAR.”

PERPLEXED OVER PROGENY’S SEXUALITY

You haven’t found any more shit-covered tampons in the trash since you spoke to your son about it months ago, POPS, so either he’s doing a better job of hiding those shit-covered tampons — he’s honoring his father and mother — or he’s not putting his sister’s tampons up his ass anymore. And your concern for the delicate sensibilities of your friends is a bit of a reach. A true friend wouldn’t paw through the trash in your bathroom, and anyone who did dig through the trash in your bathroom deserves to find not just one shit-smeared tampon, but a handful. As for the toothbrush, POPS, it wasn’t left “out in the open.” You found it in the sink in his bathroom. You discovered it because he stupidly left the water running full blast, it’s true, but it wasn’t out in the open in a shared communal space. If you had texted me the moment you found the toothbrush, I would’ve immediately texted you back and advised you to turn the water off and refrain from asking your son about the toothbrush. If you had to say something

Say your boyfriend has a spanking fetish, and he spanks other women with one particular belt — but not you, because you don’t like it, but you’re OK with him making dates to spank others — and he wears that particular belt all the time, even though you’ve asked him not to. What’s going on here? ASS SPARED, FEELINGS HURT

Equal parts inconsideration (on his part) and insecurity (on your part) are combining to create unnecessary drama. If spanking is so central to his identity that he has to wear his spanking belt every day, you may be the wrong girlfriend for him. If seeing an easyto-overlook reminder of his fetish leaves you this hurt, you’re less OK with those spanking dates than you pretend to be, ASFH, and he may be the wrong boyfriend for you.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

On this week’s Savage Lovecast, Dan chats with writer Katha Pollitt about reframing attitudes about abortion: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.29-11.05

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In AMC’s famous TV drama, a high-school chemistry teacher responds to his awful luck by turning to a life of crime. The show’s title, Breaking Bad, refers to what happens when a good person cracks and veers over to the dark side. So then what does “breaking good” mean? Urbandictionary.com defines it like this: “When a criminal, junkie or gang-banger gets sweet and sparkly, going to church, volunteering at soup kitchens and picking the kids up from school.” I’m concerned that you are at risk of undergoing a similar conversion, Scorpio. You seem so nice and kind and mild lately. I guess that’s fine as long as you don’t lose your edge. Halloween costume suggestion: a criminal with a halo, a sweet and sparkly gang-banger or a Buddhist-monk junkie.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’ve got two possible remedies for your emotional congestion. You might also want to make these two remedies part of your Halloween shtick. The first remedy is captured by the English word “lalochezia.” It refers to a catharsis that comes from uttering profane language. The second remedy is contained in the word “tarantism.” It means an urge to dance manically as a way to relieve melancholy. For your Halloween disguise, you could be a wildly dancing obscenity-spouter.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You are at a point in your astrological cycle when you deserve to rake in the rewards that you have been working hard to earn. I expect you to be a magnet for gifts and blessings. The favors and compliments you have doled out will be returned to you. For all the strings you have pulled on behalf of others’ dreams, strings will now be pulled for you. Halloween costume suggestion: a beaming kid hauling around a red wagon full of

brightly wrapped presents.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Two physicists in Massachusetts are working on technology that will allow people to shoot laser beams out of their eyes. For Halloween, I suggest that you pretend you have already acquired this superpower. It’s time for you to be brash and jaunty as you radiate your influence with more confidence. I want to see you summon reserves of charismatic clout you haven’t dared to call on before. Costume suggestion: The X-Men mutant named Cyclops or the legendary Native American creature known as the thunderbird, which emits lightning from its eyes.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The African nation of Swaziland has passed a law prohibiting witches from flying their broomsticks any higher than 150 meters above ground. That will a big problem for Piscean witches. There is currently an astrological mandate for them to swoop and glide and soar as high and

get your yoga on!

free as they want to. The same is metaphorically true for all Piscean non-witches everywhere. This is your time to swoop and glide and soar as high and free as you want to. Halloween costume suggestion: high-flying witch, a winged angel, the Silver Surfer or a mythic bird like the Garuda.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

now. May she inspire you to nurture beauty and power in those you love. May she motivate you to be adroit as you perform your duties in service to the future. May the mystery of her name rouse you to find the sacred portal that ushers you to your next big gift. Halloween costume suggestion: a sacred portal, a divine gateway, an amazing door.

If you live in Gaza, you don’t have easy access to Kentucky Fried Chicken. The closest KFC restaurant is 35 miles away, in the Egyptian city of El-Arish. But there was a time when you could pay smugglers to bring it to you via one of the underground tunnels that linked Egypt to Gaza. Each delivery took four hours and required the help of two taxis, a hand cart and a motorbike. (Alas, Egypt destroyed most of the tunnels in early 2014.) I recommend, Aries, that you be as determined and resourceful to make your longed-for connections as the KFC lovers in Gaza were. Halloween costume suggestion: smuggler, bootlegger, drug-dealer, black-marketeer.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

It’s urgent that you expand your options. Your freedom of choice can’t lead you to where you need to go until you have more possibilities to choose from. In fact, you’re better off not making a decision until you have a wider selection. To playfully drive home this point to your subconscious mind, I suggest that this Halloween you consider disguising yourself as a slime mold. This unusual creature comes in more than 500 different genders, at least 13 of which must collaborate to reproduce. Here’s a photo: bit.ly/yellowslime.

Our evolutionary ancestors Homo erectus loved to eat delicious antelope brains. The fossil evidence is all over their old stomping grounds in East Africa. Scientists say that this delicacy, so rich in nutrients, helped our forbears build bigger, stronger brains themselves. These days it’s harder but not impossible to make animal brains part of your diet. The Chinese and Koreans eat pig brains, and some European cuisines include beef brains. I’m confident, however, that your own brain will be functioning better than ever in the coming weeks, even if you don’t partake of this exotic dish. Be sure to take advantage of your enhanced intelligence. Solve tough riddles! Think big thoughts! Halloween costume suggestion: a brain-eating Homo erectus.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the animated sci-fi TV sitcom Futurama, Leela is the mutant captain of a spaceship. In one episode, she develops an odd boil on her hindquarters. It has a face and can sing. The actor who provides the vocals for the animated boil’s outpouring of song is Gemini comedian Craig Ferguson, whose main gig is serving as host of a latenight TV talk show on CBS. Telling you this tale is my way of suggesting that you consider going outside your usual niche, as Craig Ferguson did, to offer your talents in a different context. Halloween costume suggestion: Kim Kardashian as a nurse wearing Ebola protective gear; science educator Neil deGrasse Tyson as a male stripper; a cat wearing a dog costume or vice versa.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Native American hero Sitting Bull (1831-1890) was a renowned Lakota chief and holy man. He led his people in their resistance to the U.S. occupation of their land. How did he become so strong and wise? In large part through the efforts of his doting mother, whose name was HerHoly-Door. Let’s install her as your exemplar for

This is one of those rare times when it’s OK for you to just throw out the dirty dishes that you are too lazy to wash. It’s also permissible to hide from a difficult person, spend money on a supposedly foolish indulgence, eat a bowl of ice cream for breakfast, binge-watch a TV show that provokes six months’ worth of emotions in a few hours and lie in bed for an extra hour fantasizing about sex with a forbidden partner. Don’t make any of these things habits, of course. But for now, it’s probably healthy to allow them. Halloween costume suggestion: total slacker.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The egromenious hilarity of psychadisical melarmy, whether rooted in a lissome stretch or a lusty wobble, soon defisterates into crabolious stompability. So why not be graffenbent?” So said Noah’s ex-wife Joan of Arc in her interview with St. Crocodile magazine. Heed Joan’s advice, please, Libra. Be proactively saximonious. I’M KIDDING! Everything I just said was nonsense. I hope you didn’t assume it was erudite wisdom full of big words you couldn’t understand. In offering it to you, I was hoping to immunize you against the babble and hype and artifice that may soon roll your way. Halloween costume suggestion: a skeptic armed with a shock-proof bullshit-detector. (For inspiration, check out these visuals: http://bit.ly/bsdetector.) What Halloween costume would help you activate a secret or dormant part of your potential? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Strip District 1615-B Penn Ave. Pgh, Pa 15222 412-281-0989 Call for Appointment

&dĂŌĞƌŶŽŽŶͬǁĞĞŬĞŶĚʹΨϭϬ͘ϯϬͬŚƌнďĞŶĞĮƚƐ &dŽǀĞƌŶŝŐŚƚʹΨϵ͘ϳϵͬŚƌнďĞŶĞĮƚƐ ^ƵďƐƟƚƵƚĞʹΨϵ͘ϱϰͬŚƌ;ŇĞdžŝďůĞŚŽƵƌƐͿ ƐƐŝƐƚĂĚƵůƚƐǁŝƚŚĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚĂůĚŝƐĂďŝůŝƟĞƐǁŝƚŚ ĚĂŝůLJůŝǀŝŶŐŝŶĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJŚŽŵĞƐƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚ ůůĞŐŚĞŶLJŽƵŶƚLJ͘

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

full-time shipper/receiver. Benefits, vacation, health coverage. E-mail resume to jobs@kruman.com

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

STORAGE

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

REHEARSAL

ABC SELF STORAGE

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

ADOPTION

SOUTH FOR RENT

ADOPTION

S. Side Slopes

Adventurous, Creative, Bilingual, Financially Secure Couple, Travel, Music, LOVE awaits 1st baby. Expenses Paid Erin & George

Uniq. 1BR, comp. renov, a/c, eat-in kit, d/w, fully eq. laund, priv off-st park. $675+e

1-800-354-2608

412-657-5558

STUDIES

STUDIES

CONSTIPATION?

GOUT?

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

START YOUR CAREER AT THE TOP! We are growing and now hiring experienced roofing technicians with residential, commercial, and sheet metal experience! Full Benefits Available. Questions or to Apply: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application or Submit your resume via -email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884

NOW HIRING FOR DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF! We are currently seeking staff for IMMEDIATE openings to support an adult 1:1 in the Greater Pittsburgh Area and surrounding counties. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle. Local travel is required. We offer competitive wage rates, full medical, vision & dental coverage, life insurance, 401k, and excellent paid time off! Please complete an online application through our website at www.invisionhs.org or call 724-933-5166

Hiring at a location near you visit us at www.wlroenigk.com Come be a part of our family

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

STUDIES

STUDIES

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

Now Hiring

HIRING NOW! Black Lick, PA Mercer, PA • CDL Frac Equipment Operator • CDL Nitrogen Equipment Operator • CDL Cement Equipment Operator • CDL Wireline Equipment Operator • Mechanic • Crane Operator Apply on-line at www.nabors.com/careers • Select Field Opportunities or DOT Opportunities (CDL Jobs) • Under Rig Work Locations, select USA-NORTHEAST Nabors offers Competitive Pay, Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance & 401K. EOE/M/F/V/D

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,ŽŵĞĂŶĚŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ^ƵƉƉŽƌƚƐ Ψϭϭ͘ϴϯͬŚƌʹŇĞdžŝďůĞŚŽƵƌƐ WƌŽǀŝĚĞϭ͗ϭƐƵƉƉŽƌƚƚŽŝŶĚŝǀŝĚƵĂůƐǁŝƚŚĚĞǀĞůͲ ŽƉŵĞŶƚĂůĚŝƐĂďŝůŝƟĞƐƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚůůĞŐŚĞŶLJ ŽƵŶƚLJ͘ƐƐŝƐƚǁŝƚŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJĂĐƟǀŝƟĞƐ͕ĚĂŝůLJ ůŝǀŝŶŐƐŬŝůůƐ͕ĂŶĚŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞͬŵĂŝŶƚĂŝŶŝŶĚŝǀŝĚƵĂů͛Ɛ ĂďŝůŝƚLJƚŽůŝǀĞŝŶĚĞƉĞŶĚĞŶƚůLJ͘

ZĞƋƵŝƌĞŵĞŶƚƐŝŶĐůƵĚĞ

412-403-6069

Lincoln Heritage

School Bus Drivers and 9 Passenger School Bus Drivers Apply online at www.monarktrans.com 1-888-317-4144

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

VAGINAL ALZHEIMER’S DRYNESS? DISEASE?

Transporting students in Allegheny, Butler, Westmoreland and Armstrong Counties.

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

sĂůŝĚĚƌŝǀĞƌ͛ƐůŝĐĞŶƐĞ͕ĨŽƌϭнLJĞĂƌƐ ůŝŐŝďŝůŝƚLJĨŽƌĐƚϯϯͬϯϰĐůĞĂƌĂŶĐĞ WƌĞͲĞŵƉůŽLJŵĞŶƚĚƌƵŐƐĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐ EOE

Forward résumé to: ϮϬϬZŽĞƐƐůĞƌZŽĂĚ͕WŝƩƐďƵƌŐŚ͕WϭϱϮϮϬ dĞů͘ϰϭϮͲϯϰϰͲϯϲϰϬͮ&ĂdžϰϭϮͲϰϰϬͲϬϭϴϯ ĐĂƌĞĞƌƐΛŵĂŝŶƐƚĂLJůŝĨĞƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͘ŽƌŐ ŽƌĂƉƉůLJŽŶůŝŶĞŵĂŝŶƐƚĂLJůŝĨĞƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͘ŽƌŐ

Senior Director - Search Merkle Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA) Manage and develop clients’ Search Marketing Programs. Use knowledge of client organization and marketing objectives to determine client needs and best methods to meet them, communicate to client the value of Merkle’s services, and develop project plans for services to be provided. Identify and capitalize on opportunities to grow client business with Merkle. Manage team of Paid Search Account Managers. Ensure client satisfaction and retention. Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or closely related field plus 2 years of experience in any position with responsibility for brand or digital marketing. Experience must include team leadership (managing at least 3 employees) and work with SEM software (e.g. Tableau, Hitwise, or Google Adwords), Search Engine Optimization, and MS Excel. Employer may require drug testing/screening, background checks, and reference checks. If interested, apply online at

Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com

www.merkleinc.com/careers, Job Code EC-1021

www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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SUBOXONE TREATMENT

*Stuff We Like

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

412.246.8965, ext. 9

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

Currently in its third season on IFC, Comedy Bang Bang owes a huge debt to Pee-wee’s Playhouse. Scott Aukerman (formerly of Mr. Show) hosts this absurdist talk show, interviewing comedians like Patton Oswalt and Casey Wilson. so

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Positive Recovery Solutions

{PHOTO COURTESY OF IFC TV}

TV: Comedy Bang Bang

JADE

Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Friday Night Football Random urn Formerly of the Greenfield Bridge, according to the sign, this decorative limestone urn now sits nestled in a small garden by Station Square.

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100

The Steelers suck, but that doesn’t mean there’s still not great football to see. After the regular high school football season wraps up, there’s the WPIAL playoffs and plenty of great rivalry games to choose from.

Recovery Without Judgement

www.myjadewellness.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

Ginger Soother Cold-and-flu season means drinking lots of liquids. The Ginger People’s Ginger Soother — made with ginger, honey and lemon juice — can be served hot or cold, and makes a nice alternative to the usual tea-andorange-juice blitz. www.gingerpeople.com

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

WYEP’s Roots and Rhythm

Gosia’s Pierogies Made in Latrobe and available at numerous local specialty-food stores. As good as any dumpling in town. www.gosiaspierogies.com

If your spirit animal is Tom Waits and banjos make you dance, tune in every Sunday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. for two hours of radio you won’t hear anywhere else in town. Recent playlists include Shovels & Rope, Big Mama Thornton and Rodriguez. 91.3 FM

If you’re the type who would read Morrissey’s autobiography, you probably already have your copy. But even for a non-super-fan, this is a fascinating read, striking a balance between drama, snark and self-deprecation as only Moz can.

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Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Autobiography by Morrissey

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Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

Aming’s Massage Therapy

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pregnant? We can treat you!

Asian/European Girl

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

MASSAGE

STAR

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Superior Chinese Massage

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.29/11.05.2014

MASSAGE

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137


JJUGS. KNOBS. Boobies. Titties. There are more than

100 slang words for a woman’s breasts in the English 1 llanguage. These descriptive words and a few others ffeature prominently in Amalgamation Art’s upcoming show — turning bras into art to raise u money for breast-cancer awareness. m “Breast cancer is an epidemic,” says Penny See, one of the local artists behind the show. “The likeo llihood of either yourself or a family member to be affected by this is astonishingly high.” a For See, that family member was her mother, who defeated the disease once, but succumbed to it w when her cancer later returned. w “I lost my mom to breast cancer,” See says. “It’s sso incredibly important for people to be aware not only of mammograms, but in my mom’s particular o ssituation her cancer had come back.” The show features 20 bras ranging in style ffrom the beaded and feathered “Mardi Bra” to ““Knobs” — a wire-cage bra that is one of See’s ffavorites. See’s contribution, “Boo Bees,” is a pair of ssmiling honey bees. “The reason I’m doing something light-hearted and fun is because throughout her entire journey, a even when she was doing chemo and felt horrible, e my mom had an incredible sense of humor,” m

Sylvia Stambaugh models “Hello Titty”

Jennifer Wilson models “Mardi Bra”

UPLIFTING EXPERIENCE Artists use humor, creativity to raise breast cancer awareness {BY REBECCA NUTTALL / PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO} OMBO} See says. “She walked through it with so much h grace it was amazing. Attitude is everything. Not just st with this, but with every struggle. “If you face it with a sense of humor it’s easier.” sier.” The bras will be auctioned off during a silent auction on Nov. 1, and proceeds will be donated onated to Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The bras can be viewed at the Shadyside shop or online at www. amalgamation-art.com. While See acknowledges the controversy sy surrounding the Komen foundation, she says her er support for it was cemented after she participated d in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day — a walk where participants cipants cover 60 miles in three days. “On one of the evenings, they recognized nized a 70-year-old woman that had walked in several veral of the events,” See says. “They donated $25,000 00 to a hospital in Houston where she was from om for mammograms for people who were uninsured. ured. I knew from that moment that I would continue inue to fund-raise and that I would support them.”

Bea Reisterer models “Blouse Bunnies”

Penny See models “Boo Bees”

R NU T TAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE E R ..C COM

An open house and silent auction for Amalgamation Art’s Bra Fundraiser will be held Sat., Nov. 1, from noon to 6 p.m., at 252 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-1071 1071

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OCTOBER 2 – NOVEMBER 29 Every Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday

Everyone is a GUARANTEED winner! Earn, Spin and Win! Progressive meter starts at $1,000 and will increase $1 dollar with every spin, up to $15,000!

Saturday Drawings

TOP PRIZE

$10,000 CASH

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

Must have valid ID and be a Rush Rewards Players Club member.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 29, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 44

October 29, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 44