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EVENTS 10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.7 – 5pm M . E . :THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVɉ JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

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[PULLOUT] people have spoken! See if your 33 The favorites made it into City Paper’s 2014 Best of Pittsburgh Readers’ Poll.

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national Democratic Party brand is 06 “The just in really terrible shape in Appalachia.” — Political analyst Kyle Kondik on why tea-party Congressman Keith Rothfus will likely win re-election in November

[VIEWS] think it starts with the people. 14 “IPeople have to demand the change.”

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— Filmmaker Kirsi Jansa on the route to finding solutions to environmental issues

[TASTE] crispy spring roll was artfully served 18 “The in a martini glass.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Sukhothai Bistro

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up on Television and Suicide.” 24 “I—grew Dean Wareham on why he asked Tom Verlaine and Martin Rev to help him score Warhol films

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AN ALL NEW WAY TO WIN • THROUGH OCT 31

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS] feel like they fit together in 80 “They a generational cohort.” — Nadine Wasserman on some of the works in Artists in Residence, at the Mattress Factory

[LAST PAGE] a true model for what I’d love 102 “That’s to see happen across the country — people fighting back.” — Author Bob Herbert on how to fix America

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 84 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 94 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 95 STUFF WE LIKE 99 +

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“KEITH ROTHFUS IS A LOCK ON HIS SEAT.”

INCOMING RE: State police documents show intelligence-sharing network between law enforcement and Marcellus Shale drillers (Oct. 8) “This is not merely about spying; it is about the harassing of activists and the criminalization of dissent. In a sense, this isn’t even about fracking — it’s about what kind of nation we think we live in, and the one we want to live in. […] There is no other appropriate description for this other than intimidation. […] I have a message for MSOCC: You will NOT intimidate me with your surveillance, [… or] your efforts to criminalize the exercise of my First Amendment rights. In fact, you accomplish nothing here but galvanizing my resolve to organize, to write and to photograph your debauchery.” — Web comment from “Wendy Lynne Lee” “So, if I make a comment here, is some little man going to take out a little notebook and keep track?” — Web comment from “Jack Wolf”

RE: An amendment to Pittsburgh’s panhandling ordinance should remind us how wrong it was in the first place (Oct. 8) “Regulating time, place and manner of speech is a legitimate concern where public safety and/or well-being may be at issue. There are panhandlers we all know and like, and to whom we regularly give money. […] And many of us give time and money and other things to folks in organizations who will feed and clothe those in need. “But you are bigger than I, bigger than my mom, bigger than my highschool girl cousin, and I suspect that, unlike the three of us, you do not carry your parking money in a purse separate from your body, through which you must fish in order to get out the change needed. You don’t extract and open up a wallet holding all your important cards which also clearly shows that you are not putting your last dollar into that parking meter. The person panhandling is not breathing down your neck, you do not feel vulnerable. “… Aggressive panhandling as an issue is somewhat akin to (though quite different from) ‘no means no,’ and once a panhandler is told ‘no,’ she/he should go to the next person. And that should be somewhere other than where people are taking out their money.” — Web comment from “Audrey Glickman”

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SILENT VOTE One of the country’s most conservative congressmen is in a contested race for a second term — so how come nobody seems to care? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

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EA-PARTY Congressman Keith Rothfus is trying to escape the Shannopin Country Club, wrestling with a door handle that won’t budge. He has just finished blasting the Affordable Care Act and “bureaucratic elites in Washington, D.C., who think they know best what kind of light bulb you should have in your house.” “The American people,” Rothfus tells local members of the National Aging in Place Council, “are hungry for a government that understands it’s the hardworking taxpayer who pays the salaries of people in government. You have to be customer-service-focused. You have to listen.” His remarks — like his TV ads — don’t include a single mention that he’s running for re-election. Even after the speech, he’s not interested in talking with a reporter about his voting record or re-election bid — deflecting questions without slowing his stride toward the exit. “I’ve got a daughter at home who I have to go buy sneakers for. It’s a commitment I made three days ago,” Rothfus says. But the double-doors leading out to the parking lot won’t open, and he and his

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

In the running for 12th Congressional District: Keith Rothfus

aide are tugging at them loudly enough to draw attention from the receptionist. She gestures toward the leftmost door, which, after a few seconds, gives way. Rothfus walks briskly across the parking lot, his aide insisting a formal interview request must be made. (City Paper made several requests for an interview with Rothfus both before and after the event; no interview was offered.) He offers only short, staccato answers before

disappearing into a car. “Every race is a tough race,” he says. “My voting record will speak for itself. I’ve supported a lot of bipartisan legislation.” Rothfus does have an almost twoyear congressional voting record that includes controversial votes to keep the federal government shut down and against $10 billion in disaster relief in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. But the way this race has taken shape CONTINUES ON PG. 09


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SILENT VOTE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

since his uncontested primary this past spring, neither he — nor his record — will have to do much talking. That’s a big change from just two years ago, when Rothfus defeated incumbent Democrat Mark Critz by about 3 percentage points — becoming the first Republican to hold the seat since 1974. The race was a bloodbath that attracted roughly $10 million in outside spending (reportedly the most of any U.S. House race that year) and flooded the district with negative ads. This time, though, the airwaves in the 12th Congressional District are virtually silent. The national parties, which dumped around $4.3 million into the district in 2012, have pulled out. So have the SuperPACs. Rothfus’ challenger, Erin McClelland, is just about the only one talking about Rothfus publicly. A New Kensington Democrat who has never held political office, she’s quick to say Rothfus’ far-right ideology doesn’t represent the more centrist district. But while McClelland and her volunteers are knocking on doors, she hasn’t been able to close a substantial fundraising gap. As this issue was going to press, McClelland had raised just $244,660 compared to Rothfus’ $1.76 million war chest. To make matters worse, the media has hardly touched the race, leaving an outgunned McClelland with few cost-effective options to reach the roughly 700,000 people in the district. “Keith Rothfus is a lock on his seat,” says Bill Green, a Republican strategist, “as is every single congressman in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania” So how did the Pennsylvania 12th, a Democratic stronghold that was among the most competitive congressional districts in the nation two years ago, seemingly become a slam dunk for a teaparty Republican?

was previously occupied by centerright Democrat Jason Altmire, and is more conservative than the 12th at the presidential level. In 2008, for example, 49.8 percent of the 12th District went to Obama. But if the 12th District had absorbed the 4th back in 2008, only 45.2 percent of the district would have voted for the President. “They redrew the 12th in a way that it would be won by Republicans — that was the goal of the Republicans in Harrisburg, and that was successful,” Kondik says. The new district includes all of Beaver County and parts of Allegheny, Cambria, Lawrence, Somerset and Westmoreland counties — extending from Ellwood City in the north, south into northern Allegheny County and all the way to Johnstown in the east. “Democrats really didn’t hold that seat; it’s a new seat,” says Don Friedman, a Democratic consultant. “Their goal was to give [Democratic Congressman] Mike Doyle as many Democrats as they could,” since his district already covers liberal strongholds in Pittsburgh. But redistricting only tells part of the story: In 2012, Democratic incumbent Mark Critz, another moderate, lost to Rothfus by just 3 percentagepoints — after the lines were redrawn. And in the old 4th District (the more conservative area that was largely pushed into the 12th), in 2010, Democratic incumbent Jason Altmire fended off a challenge from Rothfus, narrowly beating him by 1.6 percentage points. The 12th District “should never be written off,” argues Mike Mikus, a former Altmire and Critz campaign manager. “It got a little tougher, but in the right year, this seat can be won.” Mikus, who now works for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Wolf’s Fresh Start PAC, says the top of the ticket might dictate how competitive the district is. In an off-year election with an unpopular president, it will be an uphill battle for Democrats, Mikus says. “Part of it is that the national Democratic Party brand is just in really terrible shape in Appalachia,” agrees the University of Virginia’s Kondik, who says 52 out of 62 U.S. House seats that contain at least one Appalachian county are held by Republicans. “I don’t think McClelland was a top-

“IN A FAIRER RACE WHERE ERIN MCCLELLAND ISN’T AT SUCH A FINANCIAL DISADVANTAGE, I THINK SHE’D BE AN EXCELLENT CANDIDATE”

A KEY PART of the answer is the way the

district’s boundaries changed after the 2010 census, according to Kyle Kondik. He’s a Cleveland native who follows Rust Belt politics and is the managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a website that offers analysis on elections across the country through the University of Virginia Center for Politics. The 12th was redrawn to absorb most of the 4th Congressional District, which

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SILENT VOTE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

O EDEN HALL CAMPUS O SPECIAL EVENTS

tier recruit for the Democrats and I don’t think the Democrats prioritized this race nationally. The people in that district are probably more economically populist than [Rothfus], but at the same time the district now votes pretty strongly for Republicans at the presidential level.” Even the ultra-conservative Club for Growth, which endorsed Rothfus and spent $317,000 in his successful race against Critz, isn’t worried about the race. “In general, we typically try to avoid supporting incumbents” because they tend to have a fundraising advantage, says Club for Growth spokesman Barney Keller. Still, he says, “I don’t think [anyone] rates this race as competitive.”

Still, like Altmire and Critz, McClelland is trying to stake out conservative territory to win a district she describes as “blue-collar to the core.” She criticizes Obama’s efforts to curb emissions from coal plants and says she’s not sure if she would have voted for the Affordable Care Act. She says she wants to “eradicate” abortion, but doesn’t support a legal ban. On other issues — like LGBT rights, taxes on the wealthiest 1 percent and raising the minimum wage — she’s more progressive. “She is pretty pro-business,” says Tony May, a public-affairs consultant for Triad Strategies and former Democratic campaign consultant. “In a fairer race where she isn’t at such a financial disadvantage, I think she’d be an excellent candidate.” Ask McClelland why she’s running, and it’s Rothfus’ record — not those policy positions — that she talks about first. She points to his votes against the Violence Against Women Act and re-opening the federal government during the shutdown. She hammers him hardest on his vote against relief for victims of Superstorm Sandy, a bill he voted against because, as he said at the time, “Congress should have worked to find a way to pay for this now.” “Nihilism and destruction from

“NIHILISM AND DESTRUCTION FROM WITHIN: THAT’S HIS POLICY AGENDA.”

THE FIRST question Erin McClelland gets at the Ellwood City Oktoberfest is about guns … and it comes from Dave Gallocher, a man who says he “usually has an arsenal on him.” Without missing a beat — and between beer tastings — McClelland offers her almost unequivocal support of gun rights. She says she strongly supports the Second Amendment and is in favor of “leaving people alone.” Gallocher nods in approval, but later says he probably couldn’t be persuaded to vote for a Democrat: “I’m a get-offyour-ass-and-work kind of person.”

{BY MATT BORS}

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IDIOTBOX


within: That’s his policy agenda,” McClelland says. Green, the GOP strategist, offered a different characterization. “I don’t think Keith is a conservativedown-your-throat guy,” he says, noting that historically, the district has elected conservative politicians. Former Democratic campaign consultant May agrees that while Rothfus might be on the more conservative end of his party, “he’s an intelligent guy and he’s careful about the way he speaks out so he’s not publicly offensive.” That’s in contrast with tea-partiers like Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert, “who believes in birther issues and [the] feasibility of building a wall that will keep out any foreign-born people,” May says. And because Rothfus isn’t more vocal on positions that might be on the fringes of public opinion, “the media doesn’t call attention to his votes [even though] these tend to be issues that split the district,” May adds. On his vote against ending the government shutdown, for instance, neither the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette nor Tribune-Review reported in the body of their stories that he voted “no.” “He hasn’t talked much about his

record at all,” echoes David Martin, a financial consultant in attendance at the Rothfus event who lives in the 4th Congressional District, but whose business is based in the 12th. “We’re hoping that people start to move to the middle.” But with $46,125 cash on hand at press time, McClelland doesn’t have the money to build name recognition as a moderate Democrat or run TV ads about Rothfus’ record (and none of Rothfus’ ads to date mention McClelland). “We have a lot of fundraising challenges, and they’re challenges that any first-time female candidate would have,” says McClelland campaign manager Marios Kritiotis. “We’d love to get on TV, but we need to be realistic with what we have.” But even though observers like Kondik aren’t expecting a close race, he says the district shouldn’t be written off down the road — especially once Obama’s unpopularity isn’t a factor. “You’d have to be delusional to think race doesn’t have to do with it, especially with a black president in the White House,” he says. “The Clinton brand is certainly better in Appalachia than the Obama brand. I think it could be competitive in the future.” AZI MMERMAN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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BILL DELIVERED Advocates hope city’s legislation is just a first step in workplace rights for pregnant women {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} DURING A PREGNANCY, doctors often ad-

vise women to stay hydrated and spend less time on their feet. But in most workplaces across Pennsylvania, a pregnant woman could be fired for following her doctor’s orders. “[W]hen an employer denies a pregnant employee’s request for an accommodation, she is faced with an alarming and untenable choice: Continue working under conditions that are hazardous to her health and her pregnancy, or leave her job and livelihood,” says Tara Pfeifer, staff attorney for the nonprofit Women’s Law Project. “Given that women are the primary or solo breadwinner in 40 percent of all households, it is clear that when pregnant women are forced out [of] a job, entire families pay the price.” Last week, Pittsburgh City Council unanimously passed legislation to expand workplace protections for pregnant city employees. While the legislation only protects a small segment of the Pittsburgh community — city employees and employees of contractors doing business with the city — it could lead to similar protections at the state level, and a push for a larger conversation about issues facing working mothers. “This piece of legislation is a great example of how a number of workplace policies will need to be improved as women make up more of the majority of the workforce,” says Heather Arnet, CEO of the Women and Girls Foundation. According to Pittsburgh City Councilor Dan Gilman, who sponsored the local

legislation, 75 percent of working women will become pregnant at some point in their lives. His legislation, co-sponsored by Councilor Deb Gross, will require the city and employers with $250,000 or more in city contracts to make “reasonable accommodations” for pregnant workers. “The number of complaints being filed by women across Pennsylvania was on the rise,” Gilman says. “I hope it sends a message to pregnant women that they have rights in the workplace.” Required reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers can include: providing access to drinking water, allowing unpaid breaks, and other adjustments to work responsibilities — such as allowing a worker to sit when she would otherwise stand — that might present a health risk. A separate piece of legislation will also set up lactation rooms in city offices for women who are breast-feeding. The legislation benefits more than 800 city workers, but Gilman says there’s no way to tell how many contract employees will benefit. The requirements only apply to employees during work done under city contracts. “It’s a piece of the puzzle in the conversation that women don’t have to choose between their economic vitality and the health of themselves and their baby,” says Gilman.

Despite Gilman’s legislation, pregnancy still puts women at risk financially because many employers do not provide paid maternity leave for mothers. “I’m the mom of a 15-month-old, and I think everyone is talking about how hard it is to juggle having a family with a full-time work commitment,” says Julie Zaebst, project manager for the Clara Bell Duvall Reproductive Freedom Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. “I hope this legislation also leads employers to think about what other ways they can make things easier for women, and paid maternity leave is certainly a part of that.” The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 requires companies to grant up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for new mothers. Employees can choose to use sick days and vacation time to alleviate the financial hardship of lost wages, but in many cases these days aren’t enough to account for the entire maternity leave. According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, the United States has the “least generous” parental-leave policies among 21 high-income countries. France, Spain, Germany, Sweden and Norway are the top five. “What I’d like to see more of is paid maternity leave like every other developed nation,” says Arnet. “For most fami-

“I HOPE IT SENDS A MESSAGE TO PREGNANT WOMEN THAT THEY HAVE RIGHTS IN THE WORKPLACE.”

lies, it’s completely prohibitive to take unpaid leave and there’s no other developed nation that expects that of families.” In Pennsylvania, some employers do offer short-term disability leave, which allows employees to maintain two-thirds of their earnings while off work. Disability leave can be used by mothers to supplement their income while on maternity leave. But this option isn’t available to all working women and there are limits to the leave. Before local lawmakers can set their sights on paid maternity leave, the state must pass its own version of legislation providing “reasonable accommodations” for pregnant employees. The state legislation, unveiled as part of the Pennsylvania Agenda for Women’s Health package, was proposed in December 2013. “We thought this would be a great first step before moving on to addressing other issues facing women in the workplace,” says state Sen. Matt Smith (D-Mount Lebanon), one of the bill’s sponsors. While there has been no vocal opposition to the measure, it’s yet to move forward. The bill has been awaiting a committee hearing since February. “The frustrating thing is this has bipartisan support. I’d like to see it move faster through the process,” Smith says. “I’ll continue to push on this issue because I think it’s important to all of us in Pennsylvania to make sure we’re providing the opportunity to work for anyone who wants to.” RN UT TA L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[GREEN LIGHT]

SUSTAINING IDEALS Documentary series focuses on environmental solutions, not problems {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} IN EXPLAINING how we should solve en-

vironmental problems, writers, scholars and activists face many challenges. One of the toughest is that it’s much easier for, say, fossil-fuel companies to scare people about a hypothetical “green” future (“You’ll freeze in the dark!”) than it is to persuade people to help create an environmentally sustainable society. As Patricia DeMarco, an environmental scholar at Carnegie Mellon and Chatham universities, puts it: “When people are looking toward the future, they have trouble envisioning what success looks like.” Kirsi Jansa wants to help. Jansa, a Pittsburgh-based journalist and filmmaker, is best known for Gas Rush Stories, a series of short documentaries about Western Pennsylvania’s shale-gas boom. Between 2010 and 2013, she completed 14 original episodes, shown in public screenings and online, and noted on the New York Times’ environmental blog. Jansa wanted to document how the Marcellus Shale experience affected a range of people, from farmers whose land was being drilled on to a drilling-wastewater recycling company. But eventually, faced with extreme polarization around drilling, she decided we needed to talk less about environmental problems and more about solutions. Her new video series is Sustainability Pioneers. With funding from the Heinz Endowments and the Pittsburgh Foundation’s Fisher Fund, she’s profiling people — mostly locals — who are already cutting their resource consumption and transitioning to renewable energy. Yes, episode one documents the toll our region’s air quality (dirtied largely by coal-fired power plants) takes on one 10-year-old boy. But it also cites CMU engineering and public-policy professor Ines Azevedo, who says that the economic benefits of moving to renewables — in environment, climate and health — would far outweigh the cost of the transition. The second 10-minute episode gets hands-on. Jansa profiles Windstax, a company that makes vertical wind turbines that founder Ron Gdovic says produce electricity in urban settings where bladed turbines wouldn’t work. (Gdovic is shown installing one on the roof of the Pittsburgh Public Market, in the Strip.) Washington County homeowner George Tracy has a 40-

A Windstax turbine on a Strip District rooftop

foot Windstax turbine on his rural lot, and uses geothermal energy to heat and cool his home. Jansa also interviews folks from Scalo Solar, a local firm that integrates solar panels into roofing. Sustainability Pioneers is produced in collaboration with DeMarco and CMU’s Institute for Green Science. Jansa plans at least 10 episodes, to be shown online and in person, at schools, churches and nonprofit groups. Future installments will go as far afield as Saerbeck, a small German town that uses wind, solar and biogas to produce more energy than it consumes. But Jansa mostly stays local: One planned episode focuses on Monaca, a Beaver County borough that’s won awards for its sustainability projects. For instance, Monaca has outfitted its street lights with longer-lasting, energysaving LED bulbs, and installed a new meter-reading and leak-detection system that saves the town’s water authority at least 100,000 gallons a day. Borough manager Mario Leone Jr. attended last week’s premiere public screening, at Carnegie Mellon. He says such infrastructure projects are smart financially as well as environmentally: They pay back in a matter of years, even months. Switching traffic signals to LEDs, he says, “We saved $5,000 a year just in maintenance.” Make no mistake: Jansa and her colleagues understand the gravity of the climate crisis. At the Oct. 7 premiere, Institute for Green Science head Terry Collins said that the environmental sustainability of humans on earth is “the most serious question that has ever faced us.” But, Collins added, we know how to do better: “It’s not a technical problem. It’s a people problem.” Collins calls it a crisis of leadership. Jansa says, “I think it starts with the people. … People have to demand the change.” In any case, “Selling the problem can lead to paralysis,” Stan Kabala, of Duquesne University’s Center for Environmental Research and Education, says in episode two. “Selling the solution can lead to inspiration and hope.” Learn more about Sustainability Pioneers (and donate) at www.sustainability pioneers.com. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014


proudly presents

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FALL FLOWER SHOW Opens October 18

Come see our garden railroads and the bold, beautiful colors of autumn at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Follow our miniature trains as they travel around and through displays of chrysanthemums and other harvest-inspired blooms.

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THE CRISPY SPRING ROLL WAS ARTFULLY SERVED IN A MARTINI GLASS

SMALL IS BIG {BY ANDY MULKERIN} While eating locally and cooking slowly have come into vogue recently, Suzanne Cope’s new book, Small Batch: Pickles, Cheese, Chocolate, Spirits and the Return of Artisanal Foods, looks to connect the new foodies with their heritage. Cope’s grandmother is from Clarion, where she lived on a dairy farm, and her relatives own Cope’s Corn, a Lancasterbased producer of dried sweet corn. But it wasn’t until college that she began cooking, and only after she moved to Boston that she got involved in foodgardening. The writer, now a Brooklyndwelling Manhattan College writing professor, began studying food culture in earnest while working on her MFA and Ph.D. “I thought about these four industries and I found that they all had a similar narrative,” Cope notes. “They had this very clearly defined [homemade] or small-batch past, then they were all mass-produced for similar reasons around the same time, the earlyto-mid-1900s. … But people have been coming back to the original, or more original, more authentic version of these in the past decade or so.” Cope reads from her book on Thu., Oct. 23, at Wigle Whiskey’s Barrelhouse; the Acquired Taste Reading Series event also features writers John Wells, Alicia Selvadeo and Jessica Vozel, and music from Cope’s husband, Steve Mayone, and local band Southside American. Read more from our interview with Cope on our Blogh, at www.pghcitypaper.com. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

6 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. Wigle Whiskey Barrelhouse, 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. Free. www.facebook.com/ Acq.Taste

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FEED

Pittsburgh loves it some pierogis, and that’s why the second annual Pittsburgh

Pierogi Fest jumped up to a bigger venue. Expect music, pierogi-themed gear for sale, kids’ activities and posing with the Pittsburgh Pirates pierogis. And naturally, plenty of pierogis from local restaurants, chefs and purveyors to purchase and eat. Noon-5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18. Stage AE, North Side. $12.50. www.pghpierogifest.com 18

THAI BISTRO {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

QUIRREL HILL has a lot of, if not ex-

actly hole-in-the-wall venues, then small storefronts well-suited to modest establishments specializing in the take-out, snacks and treats trade. Turnover in these spaces is usually marked by superficial changes in décor, but recently, a new Thai restaurant upped the ante, transforming a drab, cramped storefront we used to walk right on by into an enticingly cozy sit-down “bistro.” Inside Sukhothai — named after the ancient capital of a Magna Carta-era empire, and unrelated to two previous local restaurants by that name — a graphic black-andwhite color scheme simplifies and unifies both wall and table décor. Balanced, even restrained, compositions of bric-a-brac made for an effect more curated than cluttered. Polished metals and mirrors glimmered softly in the low light of an autumn evening, lending credence to the restaurant’s subtitle, “The Art of Thai Cuisine.” The menu featured a largely typical assortment of curries and rice and noodle dishes, peppered with a few more intrigu-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

Similan Island dish

ing preparations among the chef’s specials and entrée lists. Two eponymous dishes — an appetizer roll and the “Wild Sukhothai” entrée — especially caught our attention. The Sukhothai roll, a crispy spring roll, was artfully served in a martini glass, halved with cut sides up so that the exceptionally colorful fillings were on display. The ingredients — shrimp and pork, cabbage

SUKHOTHAI BISTRO 5813 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8989 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $4-10; entrees $10-19 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED and carrots — were standard, yet the roll, freshly made in house, was well above average, even truly excellent. The accompanying sweet-and-sour plum sauce was thin and light, not heavy and gloppy, adding verve without obscuring the very good fillings. Satay and crispy tofu, cubed and skew-

ered, were similarly simple but perfectly cooked: the former charred yet juicy, the latter fluffy and light within the crisped fried coating. The satay’s peanut sauce was fine, but the sweet-and-sour peanut sauce that came with the tofu was light and bright, studded with diced peanut to provide earthiness and crunch. Deep-fried, marinated “chicken wings cha cha” weren’t as spicy as their name suggested, but their distinctive spice profile was a lot more interesting than the so-called Thai chili wings that have started popping up at bars. Translucent, crisp fried basil leaves added beauty, flavor and textural interest. The kitchen’s art certainly came to the fore with pineapple fried rice, where the signature ingredient arrived as a quarter fruit, core intact, its edible chunks cut and arrayed to be plucked out one at a time from this sort of pineapple basket. The rest of the dish was straightforward, with corn and tomatoes striking us as slightly odd, New World inclusions. The best thing about it was the texture of the rice itself, chewy


with crusty edges, but never hard or dry, and not a hint of grease. Of Sukhothai’s six noodle offerings, many are closer to soups than to plates of Asian-flavored pasta. We picked kaw soi, promising crispy and soft noodles “floated” in a curry sauce. The texture and flavor array was actually even more complex, almost akin to Vietnamese pho: the fried noodles, pungent diced red onion and short-cut green beans were each crisp and crunchy in their own fashion, contrasting with a substantial ballast of tender sliced chicken breast and soft rice noodles, all bathed in a spicy, creamy sauce brightened with lime. Like the far more overexposed pad Thai, this dish encapsulated the symphonic harmony of disparate flavors and textures for which Thai cooking is famous. Despite declaring it “too spicy,” our first-grader kept coming back for more.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HERE’S TO BOURBON An honor for Butcher and the Rye and local bartenders take a field trip One of my favorite things about autumn is that it’s the perfect time to transition from bright summertime cocktails to sturdy brown spirits. I prefer Scotch and Irish whiskies, but Pittsburgh is quite clearly a bourbon town, and that’s just fine. Butcher and the Rye got a nice first-anniversary present when trade publication The Bourbon Review named the Downtown establishment one of America’s 60 Best Bourbon Bars. It’s a well-deserved nod: Butcher’s dramatic whiskey wall now has nearly 250 bottles of bourbon (plus 300 bottles of other whiskies), including some rare and indulgent finds, such as Four Roses 125th Anniversary and Elijah Craig 18-year.

“IT’S DIFFERENT TO SEE IT FIRSTHAND.”

Roti scallop, a chef’s special, was also satisfying, with plump scallops nestled in a dish of green curry with eggplant, red pepper and wedges of flaky roti flatbread. Cucumber salad wasn’t the typical style, floating in a bowl of sweet-tart dressing with peanuts and onion, but rather a carefully arranged bowl of cucumber straws, lightly dressed and popping with garlic flavor. By contrast, the irresistibly-named Wild Sukhothai was a complete flop. The promised crispy chicken was soggy in a “spicy sauce” that wasn’t very spicy, but was all too reminiscent of a Chinese-style sweetand-sour. But this was a glaring exception to a meal that was otherwise notably, even artfully, consistent in quality. Sukhothai broadens the Thai dining scene in Pittsburgh by merging the traditional flavors and preparations of Thailand with modern European bistro aspirations.

Still, Butcher isn’t the only bourbon game in town. Acacia, on East Carson Street; 1947 Tavern, in Shadyside; and Harvard & Highland, in East Liberty, are just a few of the other places for a great sip of the aged corn juice. Bourbon choices seem like they’re expanding everywhere, and bartenders are getting more educated. Eleven members of the Pittsburgh chapter of the United States Bartenders Guild just took a whirlwind, 48-hour tour of the region of Kentucky where most of the country’s bourbon is produced. “It was good to get up close and personal with the actual distilling process. You can read about it in books, but it’s different to see it firsthand,” says 1947 Tavern bartender Chris Matrozza. The group visited the Four Roses, Woodford Reserve, Wild Turkey, Maker’s Mark and Jim Beam distilleries. They also stopped at the Independent Stave Company. “That [barrel-making] might be one of the most painstaking and challenging jobs that could be down there,” says Matrozza. Matrozza say that the big takeaway from the trip was the deeper knowledge of bourbon culture he and the other USBG bartenders acquired. And that’s bound to be a good thing for Pittsburgh bar-goers.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Owners Cris Jungsuwan and John Wilojamapa

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 9PM-CLOSE

onsite artist face-painting sugar skulls for guests

$250 Cash & Prizes Best Costume/Sexiest Costume plus numerous other Prizes and Giveaways For Costumes (Prizes Awarded at 12:30AM)

Monster Drink Specials $4 Devil’s Cut & Jacob’s Ghost Cocktails • $4 Tequila Punch Shots $5 Espolon Margaritas • $4 Victory Hop Devil Drafts

Mexican Cuisine Specials DJ Spinning from 10PM-Close

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

APSARA CAFÉ. 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664. This storefront restaurant offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection, with a menu balanced between unfamiliar and familiar dishes. For less common fare, try Cambodian puffed rice squares, or saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick, warmly spiced coconut-milk sauce. KF

CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

ATRIA’S. Multiple locations. www. atrias.com. A local chain, Atria’s locations offer distinctly different atmospheres but the same quality steaks, chops and pasta menu. Suburban spots are for quiet casual dining while the North Side location is pure sports pub. Regardless of the ambience, the sherry crab bisque and the pasta fra diablo are superb. kE

EERS B T F A R C 40 N TAP! O NS 24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111

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862 WESTERN AVE. 412-321-4550 themoderncafe.com

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

BIRYANI. 4063 William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-8561105. Here, an Indo-American menu offers fresh takes on burgers, fries and chicken, in addition to a few traditional Indian dishes. There are intriguing variations of sandwich wraps (made with naan bread), and there’s a burger made with ground lamb, served with mint-garlic yogurt sauce and “Asian” cabbage slaw. KF

Nola on the Square {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE DAPHNE. 5811 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-1130. Outside seating is a plus here, but the well-prepared Turkish food is a year-round asset. The menu is familiar — hummus, falafel, gyros, shish kebab — but the execution is notable and the flavors rich. Lamb features as sausages, chops and a burger, and grilled chicken breast doesn’t get much better than Daphne’s shish kebab. KF

BOHÈM BISTRO. 530 Northpointe Circle, Seven Fields. 724-7416015. This charming North Hills venue offers sophisticated comfort food and peasant fare, designed to be shared in a casual atmosphere. Deviled eggs, pulled pork, roast chicken, mac-and-cheese and a selection of items available as tartines, crepes or flatbreads. Yes, a croque madame can be a superbly presented as a flatbread. KE THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-338-9100. This dark, clubby restaurant excels at VIP service, and offers a menu highlighted by steaks, chops and seafood, with sophisticated but straightforward preparations such as crab cakes with added lobster, or steak encrusted in Kona coffee beans. Also, the Grille employs its own butcher (for cutting and dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the

venue is known for its revered pub fries and the classic wiener with kraut (plus plenty of beer to wash it down). But don’t miss the pizza, with a top-notch crust. D’s continues to raise the preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty comfort food to an art. JE DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-3901111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and wood-grilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-2622920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

Biryani {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DINETTE. 5996 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thincrust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666. This established

HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffet-style restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard Chinese-American fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus CONTINUES ON PG. 22


OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Reservation R Take-Out T Free Delivery F Catering C

Ramen Bar

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

Daily Saloon Specials

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

Happy Hours

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Tuesday BURGER NIGHT

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Squirrel Hill 5874 1/2 Forbes Ave. AM PM Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

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Wednesday WING NIGHT

CALL (412) 521-5138 521-5899

Great Music!

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412-421-9529 412-421-2238

RESERVATION • TAKE-OUT FREE DELIVERY • CATERING

$6 Long Island Iced Tea All day till Midnight $4 Stuffed Pretzel & $6 Buffalo Chicken Dip 11am - 11pm

Saturday

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Dine In/Take Out/Delivery

: u n e Muan Sauce $16 l a i c e p Sh Filet w/ Spicy Szechumplings) $5 Fis

ctopus D ad $7 O ( i k a y o k Ta ab Sal Wasabi Cr chio Roll $1o0, ista vocad AhitTunuan, caucPumber tonpdpecdruwsithhedapistachio) (Ahi ces a erent sau three diff

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

NFL SUNDAY

Tuesday

Ticket & College Games

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¢.35 Wings

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________ Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

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Daphne {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely among European, American and Asian influences. LE J.W. HALL’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD INN. 2284 Broadhead Road, Aliquippa. 724-375-6860. This old-fashioned, family-style steakhouse offers a satisfying, well-executed menu of surf-andturf favorites, including broiled shrimp appetizer, langostinos and prime rib. The menu’s emphasis on steak and seafood rises to special occasions, while plenty of pasta dishes, sandwiches and pub-style appetizers accommodate regulars. LE

Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant, but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The less-typical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE

LA PALAPA. 1925 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7015 or 412-586-4943. Among OISHII BENTO. 119 the basic offerings at Oakland Ave., Oakland. this bright, colorful 412-687-3335. Bamboo storefront Mexican www. per walls and a low counter restaurant — a p pghcitym with colorful cloth tamales, nachos, tacos, .co cubes for seating denote enchiladas — there is a place for moderately other less familiar fare, priced Japanese food, including such as a squid and shrimp sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean salad. And the staple dishes excel dishes for variety and spice; those with the inclusion of expertly seeking a little heat might consider cooked meats, which are moist bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF and flavorful. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

LULA. 515 Broad St., Sewickley. 412-749-1200. Seating at this informal tapas bar is lounge-style indoors, and in warm weather, along the sidewalk at café tables. The menu, which also offers a few entrees, is eclectic, and suggestive of Mediterranean cafés, with plenty of seafood, cured meats, cheeses and seasonal produce. Portions are adequate for sharing, if you can bear to part with, say, asparagus spears wrapped in ham. KE MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey St., North Side. 412-322-6535. A welcoming neighborhood bar with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an

THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF


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LOCAL

BEAT

“PEOPLE ASK IF I ENJOY DOING FILM-SCORING. IT’S FUN WHEN THE FILM IS GOOD!”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

PEDALS TO THE METAL Inspired largely by the frequent record swaps held around the city — and at least partly by the documentary Fuzz: The Sound That Revolutionized the World — local musician and visual artist Craig Freeman has put together a new-to-town event. The Pittsburgh Effects Pedal Swap, to be held this Saturday, will give local effects-pedal enthusiasts their very own venue to nerd out. The event, though never before held here, has a simple premise: “[Imagine] a room full of people thinking about pedals and talking about pedals,” Freeman says. Freeman, of local heavy-psych trio Lost Realms, credits the Internet with what seems to be an ever-growing interest in pedals among users, collectors and DIY pedal-builders. As with any other niche hobby, the web allows people to show off their collections to other builders and musicians around the world. Plus, “it’s rare to see a guitarist who doesn’t use pedals these days,” he says. “The whole modern psych scene right now is really heavily based on how unique you can get your music to sound through pedals.” The event, held at The Shop, will feature a handful of vendors, including locals like Phosphene Audio and DevilDog Audio Arts, as well as folks from the internationally known, Akron-based EarthQuaker Devices. Since building pedals often goes hand-in-hand with building things like amps and synthesizers, Freeman expects that other homemade gear will be available as well. “Anyone can bring a pedal that they want to sell or trade,” he says. “It’s basically just casual: people hanging out.” Since pedals are generally not manufactured in large quantities, Freeman explains, they tend to hold their value, which makes finding the one you want especially exciting. As for what local and small-scale makers have to offer, Freeman says, that they generally fall into two categories: “the ones who are cloning pedals that you could never find or afford even if you could find them, and [those] making all-new pedals with sounds you’ve never heard before.” Freeman recommends getting there early if you’re on the lookout for something specific. “Like most collection markets, people usually know what they have. It’s not like going through an old garage and finding some great toy you’ve always wanted.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH EFFECTS PEDAL SWAP. Noon-7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18. The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $1. www.facebook. com/events/556639841102216/

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SCORING ANDY

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

S

IX YEARS AGO, Dean Wareham spent some quality time here in Pittsburgh: The Andy Warhol Museum, under the umbrella of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts, commissioned Wareham and his wife and bandmate Britta Phillips to write a series of songs to accompany some of Andy Warhol’s “screen test” films. Since then, he’s toured that show (called 13 Most Beautiful) over 80 dates on multiple continents, done a tour playing the music of his old band Galaxie 500, and released his first-ever solo album. But something brought him back to Warhol. “I think we realized together that there was more to explore,” says Ben Harrison, curator of performing arts at the Warhol. “But in talking to them, I don’t think they wanted to do 13 Most Beautiful Part Two.” “I wasn’t that excited about that; I felt like that would just be repeating itself,” says Wareham. “There are 500 screen tests; we could easily come up with 13 more of them. So we were tossing it back and forth awhile — then the museum discovered all

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

{BRADFORD COX PHOTO COURTESY OF LOCKETT PUNDT; TOM VERLAINE PHOTO COURTESY OF STEFANO GIOVANINI}

Stills from recently uncovered Warhol films (center); musicians, clockwise from upper left: Dean Wareham, Bradford Cox, Eleanor Friedberger, Tom Verlaine

these films no one had seen before.” The films are early Warhol works: only a few minutes apiece, like the screen tests, but unlike those films, not all just portraits. They were uncovered and digitized as part of a larger digitization effort. On Fri., Oct. 17, 15 of those films will make their

EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS FEATURING TOM VERLAINE, MARTIN REV, DEAN WAREHAM, ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER, BRADFORD COX 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 17. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $20-25. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

public debut as part of Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films, a live-music program curated by Wareham. It’s a joint program of the Warhol Museum, the Brooklyn Academy of Music and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance, and performances will take place in Brooklyn and Los Angeles as well.

While 13 Most Beautiful was a project of Dean and Britta, for Exposed, Wareham has brought in reinforcements. He and four other artists will each score three films apiece. (Phillips, Wareham says, has been working on a solo album, and the two have also been working together on scoring a Noah Baumbach film.) Tom Verlaine of Television, Martin Rev of Suicide, Eleanor Friedberger of The Fiery Furnaces and Bradford Cox of Deerhunter are all contributing work to the program, and will play live at the premiere event, at the Carnegie Music Hall. “Dean is a commissioned artist for this project, but also guest curator,” explains Harrison. “I suggested he come up with maybe four other writers and composers he’s been inspired by, that he has an affinity to, that could come onto this project. “The very first four people he thought of, right off the top, said yes.” “I picked people I would want to see,” says Wareham. “I guess it was kind of selfish. I grew up on Television and Suicide, so CONTINUES ON PG. 26


SCORING ANDY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

I wanted to get Tom Verlaine and Martin Rev involved, and they both said yes very quickly. … Eleanor Friedberger, I’d seen in concert a few times recently, and she’s a great performer. Bradford Cox, I’m a fan of Deerhunter and Atlas Sound, and I’ve seen him perform solo.” Besides 13 Most Beautiful, Wareham and Phillips have done film-scoring work in the past, including for Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale. “People ask if I enjoy doing film-scoring, which Britta and I have done,” Wareham says. “I always say, ‘It’s fun when the film is good!’ When you get to work with a great director, even though this director happens to be dead …” The films themselves have similarities to the screen-test films from the previous project, but present different challenges. “They were filmed around the same time, from ’63 through ’66,” says Harrison. “So we refer to them as early Warhol film, much like the screen tests. They are different in that they’re not part of a serial project. The screen tests are this conceptual series; you shoot them all the same way. These [newly discovered films] are highly kinetic, some of them; there’s a lot of movement in them. We’re been referring to most of them as home movies: You get these casual, personal, what Geralyn [Huxley], our film curator, calls ‘actualities.’” “A couple of them are screen tests — there’s a Donovan screen test,” says Wareham. “And there’s an Edie Sedgwick screen test, which is in color; that’s exciting. The other screen tests were all black-and-white, so seeing this in color, it’s an eye-opener. “There’s one very early one of Warhol himself with Taylor Mead, doing a little pantomime at Warhol’s apartment; that’s from 1963. There’s a film of Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg and other Beat poets sitting around the Factory, which is really unexpected.” “What you can tell is that he was experimenting with his 16mm Bolex camera, probably the same camera he shot the screen tests [with],” says Harrison. “They’re not edited; much like most of Warhol’s films, they’re just a reel of Bolex film, put it in a camera, and run it to the end. They’re a similar length to the screen tests; most, like the screen tests, are projected in slow motion. So, in real time, it would’ve been two-and-a-half minutes to shoot the films; [most] run about four minutes.” “A lot of people back then, and probably people now, were like, ‘Warhol didn’t know how to make films,’” says Wareham. “Well, maybe so, but when you look at them now, they’re pretty interesting. Yeah, maybe it’s just people looking at the cameras — but he did it, and he did it 500 times, and that’s what makes it fascinating.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

ON THE RECORD with Ben Horowitz of The Gaslight Anthem {BY ZACH BRENDZA}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAMELA LITTKY}

Top billing: The Gaslight Anthem (Ben Horowitz, right)

Before The Gaslight Anthem heads to Europe in support of its latest album Get Hurt, the group will play a sold-out Stage AE this Friday. Drummer Ben Horowitz called in to talk about the state of the band. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THE UNCERTAIN PERIOD OF THE BAND BETWEEN HANDWRITTEN AND GET HURT? HOW CLOSE DID IT COME TO GASLIGHT ENDING? There was definitely a real point of, ‘What the hell is going on? What are we doing?’ kind of thing. Sort of a re-evaluation of the place where we’re at. And that was caused musically, and by people’s lives. There was just a lot going on. It made for a pretty funky period of the band. YOU’VE TOURED WITH AGAINST ME! BEFORE, WHEN THAT BAND WAS HEADLINING. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH THEM? They’ve been one of my favorite bands for a lot of years. In a way, we sort of owe what we do to them, because we were not even main support on that tour; we were the first out of three. … In those days, we had never played these big stages and big shows before. For us to be able to play after them is insane to me. It almost feels disrespectful. [Laughs] But that’s just where it is now. Who knows? Maybe one day we’ll be opening for them again. YOU ARE TOURING THROUGH THE REST OF THE YEAR. WHAT’S IN STORE FOR GASLIGHT NEXT YEAR AND IN THE FUTURE? We’re messing around with some ideas already [for a new record]. The second we’re done with a record, we move on pretty fast and want to start thinking about what’s next. We’re already starting to tinker with some ideas in the future musically. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM with AGAINST ME! 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 17. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. Sold out.


Available on Android and iPhone

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Stop in and try your hand at our old-school pinball & arcade games!

Pittsburgh’s Indie Video Game Store

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Taking it to the next level: Boaz

PUTTING IN THE WORK

and they forgot this kid had worked his ass off. It takes a lot of hard work and consistency, and solidifying yourself as an artist if this is something you wanna do as a career.

{BY ANDY MULKERIN} BOAZ IS A veteran of the local hip-hop

WYEP_BACKSTAGE_CP_quarterFINAL.ai

1

10/10/14

8:29 AM

scene, having developed his voice while growing up in Larimer, and through selfreleased several records. On Tue., Oct 21, his first full-length on Rostrum Records, Intuition, comes out, and this weekend, he hosts a listening party and release show on consecutive nights locally. He talked with CP about the new label, the new record, and getting serious about his music. Read more of our interview on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com. HOW DOES BEING WITH THIS LABEL CHANGE THINGS? I think it’s a good move for both of us. It’s a very organic label, we’re from the same city, and right now we’ve just got a good grip on the scene of hip hop. Being in a position to get my music into places it hasn’t been heard before. It feels like I’m being reintroduced to the game in a whole new manner. SOME PEOPLE IN THE HIP-HOP SCENE LOCALLY FELT REALLY HOPEFUL WHEN WIZ AND THEN MAC BLEW UP, THEN FELT A LULL — DO YOU THINK THERE IS A CHANCE FOR PITTSBURGH TO RE-EMERGE NATIONALLY WITH SOMEBODY NEW? Most certainly. I think we’ve always had that international feel to us. Being from Pittsburgh, we just had to realize we were hip hop. It doesn’t have that much of a pulse outside of what we do. The louder our voices become, the bigger the spotlight has been nationally. I think it’s all about timing, and knowing what you really want. I think people get misconstrued with superstardom — I think that was the big misconception with Wiz’s success. Everybody smelled success,

PEOPLE IN OTHER CITIES MIGHT THINK OF THOSE GUYS AS THE FACE OF PITTSBURGH HIP HOP — WHAT DO YOU THINK THEY’LL SEE IN YOU? WHAT SETS YOU APART? I think it doesn’t put them in a particular place; it just solidifies our city in terms of its versatility of culture. What they portray for the city is quite different than what I’m giving you. It’s just a real solidification of that urban scene, hip hop at its core, its essence. It’s a good look for them, because it shows you they’ve put that spotlight on the city, for people to look into it.

BOAZ: INTUITION LISTENING PARTY 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 17. Daily Bread, 5450 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. www.dailybreadpa.com

INTUTION RELEASE PARTY 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18. Club Ivy, 108 19th St., Strip District. $10-20. www.ivypgh.com

SOME ARTISTS BREAK WHEN THEY’RE YOUNG AND JUST STARTING OUT; YOU’VE BEEN AT IT FOR ALMOST A DECADE NOW. HOW DOES THAT AFFECT YOU AS AN ARTIST? It’s funny: I’ve been doing this for a decade or so, but just as of recently have I been working hard. Focusing, telling myself what I wanted to do. For some time, it was more of a hobby than a career; it was just something we’d done to pass the time. Until fans and people in the city started telling me I had to believe in myself a little more, “You’re pretty talented.” It’s really hit home to me how hard you have to work to be a successful artist in this industry. It’s just been a learning experience. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014


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CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DEREK MCNELLY}

Empire! Empire! (I Was a Lonely Estate)

[GARAGE ROCK] + THU., OCT. 16 The Forty Nineteens are a Los Angeles band, but there’s a way-back Pittsburgh connection: Before this band, and before his days in The Leonards and Mary’s Danish, drummer Nick Zeigler hailed from Beaver County. His current band makes it back to his hometown a couple times a year, and tonight it plays at the Hard Rock Café, bringing a timeless brand of pop-inflected garage rock. The East Enders and Charm & Chain open. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $8-10. All ages. 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

pop. In 2013, Garbus remixed two of Yoko Ono’s songs to raise money for a Hurricane Sandy charity, and a subsequent trip to Haiti provided inspiration for the band’s 2014 album, Nikki Nack. Check the pair out tonight at Mr. Small’s with opener James Tillman. Samantha Ward 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[FOLK] + TUE., OCT. 21

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG SEYMOUR}

The Stray Birds won’t be wandering away too far when visiting Pittsburgh. The group comes from Lancaster, Pa., where the members united via the local music scene. This quietly powerful [PUNK] + Americana music will SAT., OCT. 18 wow you with its Despite its unwieldy tight harmonies and name and a lineup relaxing tunes. Two that likely couldn’t years after its critically fit all in one van, The acclaimed self-titled World Is a Beautiful album, the trio is due Place and I Am No The Stray Birds to release its next Longer Afraid to full-length today and Die is riding a wave will surely be playing of popularity lately. a sampling tonight The Connecticut at Club Café. The eight-piece(!) recently release of Best released a new EP, Medicine marks the Between Bodies, beginning of a nationwide tour throughout on which it continues its work in the vein of the rest of the year and into 2015. SW 7 p.m. late-’90s emo-punk (replete with Kinsella-ish 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or vocals at times). The hard-touring band comes www.clubcafelive.com to Cattivo tonight along with a full bill: The Hotelier, Rozwell Kid, Posture & the Grizzly and [EMO] + TUE., OCT. 21 Brightside, four groups that combined have a As the recent crop of emo-tinged indie name that’s shorter than the headlining band’s. bands goes, Empire! Empire! (I Was a Lonely AM 5:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12Estate) is tops; the husband-and-wife duo has 14. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz been around since not long after the first wave of emo ended, and recently put out [INDIE POP] + SAT., OCT. 18 its second full-length, You Will Eventually Be tUnE-yArDs is complex: The music is difficult Forgotten. (It comes with an accompanying to make, and the band name is hard to spell. graphic novel.) The band’s current tour is Creator Merrill Garbus spent two years crafting with Count Your Lucky Stars labelmates her intricate 2008 debut album, Bird-Brains, Freethrow, and tonight’s appearance at The which sold more than $1,000 worth of payMr. Roboto Project also includes notable locals what-you-want downloads in a short time, Sup, Muscles? and Brightside. AM 7 p.m. before reissues by Marriage Records and then 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. 4AD. Since then, she’s added bassist Nate www.therobotoproject.org Brennner and put a humanitarian spin on the


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Southside • Wexford West • Mifflin • Duryea 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


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Best of

2014

PITTSBURGH Every year at this time, our readers tell us about their favorite Pittsburgh things. Sometimes they celebrate the same things they loved last year, and sometimes they find new things to adore. And of all the best-of-the-best winners noted here, and the friendly arguments sure to follow, there is one undeniable truth: Pittsburghers love Rick Sebak. After all, he is the iconic local filmmaker who helped spark our Kennywood Memories and stoke our love of Things That Aren’t There Anymore. During our photo shoots, he drew a crowd everywhere he went. Our readers honored Sebak in two categories in this special issue, and we’re not surprised: He matches the respect for a Steelers win, an Andrew McCutchen long ball and a great locally crafted beer, while tapping this town’s affection for parking chairs, a chipped-chopped-ham sandwich, fireworks and a wedding cookie table. Quite frankly, Rick Sebak is the best, so it’s only fitting that he’s your tour guide for this year’s Best of Pittsburgh.

contents +

Food Drink 05 Culture+Nightlife 15 Goods+Services 27 People+Places 37

CHARLIE DEITCH, EDITOR

ON THE COVER: Best Media Personality winner Rick Sebak poses with fans wearing shirts made by Commonwealth Press. ABOVE: Dave & Andy’s owner Andy Hardie, with Sebak, in his Oakland shop. This issue’s Rick Sebak photos were taken by Heather Mull.

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FOOD+DRINK

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Best OF

bons, an American flag pinned to rustic paint-chipped walls, and décor that puts one in mind of grandpa’s hunting lodge. All the while, sound waves of loud conversations and Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Tuesday’s Gone” compete for attention with smells of juicy meats and macand-cheese. “Some of the best times I’ve ever had were at hole-in-the-wall, BYOB-types of places with groups of friends,” says Butcher owner and chef Richard DeShantz. While Butcher and the Rye is certainly not BYOB (and who would want to when you have your choice of several agedwhiskey flights, signature cocktails and craft beer?), DeShantz’s mission when he opened the place last year was to combine top-notch cuisine and a drink-driven menu with a relaxed atmosphere. “I wanted to do something else after Meat and Potatoes,” DeShantz explains, referring to the nearby gastropub he opened in 2011. “The whole idea for me is having a comfortable style, something not pretentious and really strongly about balance. I want people to get a new treat with every bite. When they’re eating at Butcher, I want them to look up and see a local artist’s work or a neat decoration.”

FOOD+DRINK BEST NEW RESTAURANT

BUTCHER AND THE RYE

SEE T STORY A RIGHT

212 Sixth St., Downtown 412-391-2752 or www.butcherandtherye.com • • • • • • • •

“Downtown dining” was once long on sophistication, but short on innovation. No longer: All three of this year’s top new restaurants are based there, with the winner distinguished by the inventive, protein-forward menu of Richard DeShantz. And Butcher’s cocktail program, pioneered by Maggie Meskey, has already been honored by the James Beard Foundation. _________ 2nd: Ten Penny, Downtown 3rd: Grit & Grace, Downtown

BEST CHEF

KEVIN SOUSA, MULTIPLE RESTAURANTS

“EVERYTHING IS GROWING. IT’S A GREAT TIME TO BE A CHEF.”

www.sousapgh.com • • • • • • • •

The reigning king of Pittsburgh cuisine, Sousa has been at the top of the game since the local foodie renaissance began. This year’s big feat: raising over $300,000 via Kickstarter for Superior Motors, a restaurant complex planned for Braddock. _________ 2nd: Justin Severino, Cure, Lawrenceville 3rd: Keith Fuller, Root 174, Regent Square

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Another night of food, booze and fun at Butcher and the Rye

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

BUTCHER AND THE RYE

TAJ MAHAL 7795 McKnight Road, North Hills 412-364-1760 or www.tajmahalinc.com

212 Sixth St., Downtown 412-391-2752 or www.butcherandtherye.com {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

• • • • • • • •

To make sure their Indian cuisine is authentic, the chefs at Taj Mahal make their own yogurt and cheese fresh daily. The best way to sample the best this readers’ favorite has to offer is to try the expansive lunch or dinner buffets, replete with dozens CONTINUES ON PG. 07

S

ITTING ALONG Sixth Street at a café table, Joseph Watson and his wife, Kristine, finish up a small plate of pork belly and cauliflower. As she describes textures and flavors, he takes a big swig from a tumbler with ice. When asked if there’s bourbon in there, he simply looks

up and says, “There won’t be shortly.” This is Butcher and the Rye on a Saturday night in Downtown Pittsburgh — chosen by City Paper readers as the city’s Best New Restaurant. A walk inside reveals a towering, backlit bar featuring more than 350 bour-

“Butcher is just a little more farm-totable, a little more concentrated on ambiance. It’s meant to be fun,” DeShantz says. At a round table under an antler chandelier and warm candlelight, the Katz family from Philadelphia sat with small plates emptied of what had been mac-and-cheese, pig candy, Caesar salad and marrow, and were eagerly awaiting their entrees — Wagyu flank steaks and ribs. “Food, restaurants overall, are getting better,” explained Melissa Katz, a former restaurant reviewer. The family was in town visiting their son, Tanner, who attends Pitt. “I think people care more about what they’re eating and what’s local.” Meanwhile, chef DeShantz is gearing up to open another concept restaurant next door to Butcher, called Tako, which will serve street foods from around the world. “I’ve been a chef for years. Even when I opened Nine on Nine, everything was different here. People were different. But everything is growing,” he says. “I mean, look at Downtown tonight. People are out now. It’s a great time to be a chef.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Best OF FOOD+DRINK

NA KA MA

MONDAY - FRIDAY from 5-7

1/2 off Appetizers $1 off Drafts & $1 off Mixed Well Drinks (in the bar only)

Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar

Happy Hour Just Got Happier! Now 2 Locations... {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Contemporary American Restaurant Meat and Potatoes

of appetizers, entrees and desserts. For less than $9 for lunch and $12 for dinner, you can’t go wrong. _________ 2nd: Tamarind, Cranberry and Green Tree 3rd: All India, Oakland

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT

NAKAMA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR 1611 E. Carson St., South Side 412-381-6000 or www.eatatnakama.com • • • • • • • •

There is no better spot to watch the South Side careen by than from a window seat at Nakama. Add to the experience freshly prepared sushi; an extensive selection of appetizers; steak and fish entrees; and perhaps a signature martini or draft beer, and it’s no wonder this spot is popular every night of the week. _________

wood-fired pizza and an array of Italian classics, such as lasagna and scratch-made pappardelle with braised rabbit. There are also vegetarian options like spinach ravioli and the tagliatelle with a fresh mushroom ragu. _________

WEXFORD PLAZA 10636 Perry Highway 724-638-SAKE(5149)

SOUTH SIDE 1611 East Carson Street 412-381-6000

like us nakama

follow us nakamasushi

eatatnakama.com

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PITTSBURGH SECRET

BAYERNOF MUSEUM

Reason: Strange place, super interesting, nobody knows about it. BEST THAI RESTAURANT

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN

3801 Butler St, Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com

Our Award Winning Location:

2nd: Girasole, Shadyside 3rd: Dish Osteria and Bar, South Side

2nd: Umi, Shadyside 3rd: Little Tokyo, South Side and Mount Lebanon

PICCOLO FORNO

Our New Location:

856 Western Ave., North Side (412-321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424) www.nickysthaikitchen.com

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Inspired by the bakery — Il Piccolo Forno — that his parents operated for years in the Strip District, Domenic Branduzzi opened Piccolo Forno in 2005. The specialties include

Nicky’s offer two in-town locations to satisfy your craving for freshly prepared Thai food. Set in a house, the Western Avenue spot is cozy and homey; in season, patrons can dine CONTINUES ON PG. 08

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF

FOOD+DRINK in the leafy back garden. But for lunchtime or pre-theater dining, the Cultural District spot is perfect for pad Thai or spicy curry. _________ 2nd: Thai Me Up, South Side 3rd: Thai Cuisine, Bloomfield

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

SESAME INN Multiple locations www.sesameinn.com • • • • • • • •

A longtime favorite of City Paper readers, Sesame Inn offers an extensive menu of traditional Chinese cuisine, from General Tso’s to Peking duck, as well as a selection of Thai dishes and, at three of their four locations, sushi. A comfortable atmosphere — and copious choices for meat-eaters and vegetarians alike — make this a great spot for family gatherings. _________ 2nd: China Palace, Shadyside 3rd: Tai Pei, Aspinwall {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

BEST MIDDLE-EASTERN RESTAURANT

Comin’ in hot: Bigham waitress Nikki Rockey, with a fresh plate of wings

ALI BABA BEST WINGS

404 S. Craig St., Oakland 412-682-2829 or www.alibabapittsburgh.com

BIGHAM TAVERN

• • • • • • • •

For more than four decades, Ali Baba has been providing Pittsburghers with a wide variety of Middle Eastern cuisine, right in the heart of Oakland. The economically priced lunches are popular with college students, while the dinner menu offers entrees, including soups, meat kebabs, fish and a vegetarian special. Finish up with a sweet farina cake. _________ 2nd: Kassab’s Restaurant, South Side 3rd: Casbah, Shadyside

BEST MEXICAN/LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

MAD MEX Multiple locations www.madmex.com • • • • • • • •

Mahi mahi taco, chicken mole burrito, whole-wheat tortillas. Call it Mexican fusion if you like, but Mad Mex’s spin on tacos, burritos and the like, incorporating Californian, Southwestern and Asian influences, CONTINUES ON PG. 09

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321 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-431-9613 or www.bighamtavern.com {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

A

T LUNCHTIME on a Wednesday, Bigham Tavern is starting to fill up. The Mount Washington eatery isn’t exactly well-placed for foot traffic: “It’s a kind of long walk from the Mon Incline, and a hilly walk from the Duquesne,” notes co-owner Amelia Yoder. And from a block or two away, the venue almost looks like just another house in the mostly residential neighborhood. But those who are hip to Bigham (and that’s a growing crowd) know: It’s wing night. Wednesday’s wing night — a slight misnomer, since it starts when the barrestaurant opens, at 11 a.m. — is a tradition inherited from the previous occupant of the Bigham Street building, Kaib’s. It was one of a few holdovers kept by the current owners when they took over four years ago. (The ownership group consists of West End lawyers Joey Rewis and Brad Yoder, their wives, Jessica Rewis and Amelia Yoder, and Terry Malsch.)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

“Happy hour was always 5 to 7 at Kaib’s, and wing night was Wednesday, and it was important that they kept that,” says Sarah Wilderman, Bigham’s marketing director. “One thing about Bigham Tavern is, our regulars — they basically think they own the bar,” she adds with a laugh. While wing night was always popular, it’s risen to the next level in recent years. And it’s little wonder: While there’s a big menu of sauce options (which is crucial), the real key to Bigham’s chicken-wing domination is the wings themselves. Crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, they’d be a treat served plain. The “BT original” sauce is the most popular, says Wilderman — mild with just enough kick, it’s a winner. With flavor choices from garlic-parm

to bourbon, Bigham goes for variety in its sauces — but those who seek heat won’t be disappointed. “For a long time, we’ve had our atomic sauce, which … is a balance of heat and flavor. We had some requests, though, so we came up with ‘cluckin’ hot,’ which is a spin on the atomic with pureed habañeros.” Despite being tucked away, Bigham isn’t that far a hike for wing fans. Even at noon, the regulars are taking their spots at the bar, and others are walking out with dozens of wings to go. And by evening, forget about it. “I tell folks to get here before 5,” says Amelia Yoder. After that, the wait for a table can approach or even exceed an hour. And more people in the seats means more wings in the fryer: Just a few weeks ago, Bigham broke its previous record for number of wings served in a day, with a total of 5,732 wings on one Wednesday. But it’s not just the chickens that make wing night special. “It’s pretty great to go on a wing night, because you can see basically every regular in one day,” says Wilderman. “We see our entire neighborhood on Wednesday.”

“WE SEE OUR ENTIRE NEIGHBORHOOD ON WEDNESDAY.”

A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Best OF FOOD+DRINK is entering its third decade of popularity locally. And why can’t a carnitas enchilada share a table with the Thanksgiving-meal “Gobblerito” burrito? _________ 2nd: Casa Reyna, Strip District 3rd: Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville

BEST CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN RESTAURANT

MEAT AND POTATOES 649 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-325-7007 or www.meatandpotatoespgh.com • • • • • • • •

Here, “meat and potatoes” is no shorthand for ordinary. Not when the meats take the form of pastrami-crusted duck breast, pork pozole, bone marrow or a 34-ounce rib-eye for two. This is traditional American fare raised to the tippy-top, presented in a sophisticated but casual space, and well matched with fine craft cocktails. _________ 2nd: Eleven, Strip District 3rd: Ten Penny, Downtown

BEST STEAKHOUSE

HYDE PARK PRIME STEAKHOUSE 247 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-222-4014 or www.hydeparkrestaurants.com • • • • • • • •

There aren’t too many steakhouses where you can walk in wearing jeans and a Pirates T-shirt and enjoy a rib-eye that’s been dry-aged for 50 days. And that purposefully versatile vibe isn’t this chain’s only Pittsburgh touch: Drop in for a “Hines Ward” filet mignon or “Steak Crosby” New York strip. _________

iterations of this upscale restaurant offer the same high-quality seafood, flown in from around the globe. With specialties like Chilean sea bass and mako shark, and daily fresh-fish options, there are always old and new reasons to return to this culinary destination. _________ 2nd: Off the Hook, Warrendale 3rd: Penn Avenue Fish Company, Downtown and Strip District

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL TOWN PARADE

ASPINWALL BOROUGH

Reason: During the Memorial Day parade, all the kids tag along at the back of the parade with bicycles decorated with red, white and blue streamers and balloons. BEST SUSHI

NAKAMA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR 1611 E. Carson St., South Side 412-381-6000 or www.eatatnakama.com • • • • • • • •

2nd: The Capital Grille, Downtown 3rd: Morton’s The Steakhouse, Downtown

This perennial “Best of” honoree grabs diners’ attention with the knife-wielding displays of its chefs. But the sushi at this decade-old South Side landmark proves that, beneath the flash and dazzle of its tableside theatrics, there’s a commitment to the choice fresh seafood and deliberate preparation sushi requires. _________

BEST SEAFOOD

2nd: Umi, Shadyside 3rd: Penn Avenue Fish Company, Downtown and Strip District

MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO

BEST BURGER

1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-481-4414) and 705 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530) www.montereybayfishgrotto.com

BURGATORY

• • • • • • • •

Eating out is a religious experience at this restaurant known for its all-natural, hormone-free beef

Tourists love the Mount Washington location for the view, but both

Multiple locations www.burgatorybar.com • • • • • • • •

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF FOOD+DRINK G ORI INAL

AN

gh r u b s t t i P 000 INCE 2

S

M

make for the perfect quick bite. Follow @PghTacoTruck on Twitter to keep track of its whereabouts. _________

2nd: Winghart’s Whiskey and Burger Bar, Multiple locations 3rd: BRGR, East Liberty and Cranberry

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

PAN

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE 2128 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-521-9864) and 713a Washington Road, Mount Lebanon (412-344-9467) www.mineospizza.com • • • • • • • •

LOCALLY

OWNED & OPERATED FAIR TRADE • LOCAL PRODUCTS • FREE WIFI COFFEE ROASTED LOCAL EVERY WEEK

visit us online at www.CrazyMocha.com

You may ask: “Why even have a ‘best pizza’ category when Mineo’s always wins?” But you may as well ask the birds why they sing to every sunrise, or ask your Uncle Stan why he always talks about how hot it was working in the mills. Some things are rituals. And a pizza at Mineo’s is one of them. _________ 2nd: Fiori’s Pizzaria, Beechview and McMurray 3rd: Pizza Sola, East Liberty

BEST WINGS

BIGHAM TAVERN

SEE N STORY O PG. 08

321 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-431-9313 or www.bighamtavern.com • • • • • • • •

Wing night starts early and ends late at this Mount Washington watering hole (whose menu is big and getting bigger). And by the end of every Wednesday, thousands of tenderinside, crispy-outside wings have been devoured by townies and visitors alike. _________ 2nd: Fat Heads Saloon, South Side 3rd: Birmingham Bridge Tavern, South Side

BEST TACO

PGH TACO TRUCK www.pghtacotruck.com • • • • • • • •

PGH Taco Truck was born when food blogger James Rich made the potentially crazy decision to buy a food truck on the Internet. And it’s lucky for us that he did: With a range of traditional and less-traditional menu options, the truck’s offerings

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

2nd: Las Palmas, multiple locations 3rd: Mad Mex, multiple locations

CRAZY MOCHA Multiple locations www.crazymocha.com • • • • • • • •

BEST PIZZA

Y

CO

burgers. But there’s more here than just the traditional cheeseburger. Burgatory offers a selection of crab, bison, chicken and elk burgers, all of which can be stacked with a list of toppings too long to mention. Don’t miss the sinfully delicious milkshakes. _________

Since launching in 2000, this locally owned chain holds its own against the nationally known heavies, partly by allowing each of its 30 locations to express an idiosyncratic style. And if you’re wondering what’s up with the goat logo, it all goes back to a coffeeorigin myth involving an Ethiopian’s oddly energetic herd of goats. _________ 2nd: Espresso a Mano, Lawrenceville 3rd: Big Dog Coffee, South Side

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST KARAOKE SHOW

BAREOKE AT THE TENNYSON LODGE

Reason: Affordable drinks, naked women, and you singing “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” BEST DESSERTS

OAKMONT BAKERY 531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com • • • • • • • •

Patrons keep coming back for the almond torte, the tiered cakes, the chocolate dipping station and the cupcakes — 30-some kinds, including specialties like Elvis in Oakmont (banana-mousse filling, peanut-butter frosting). But fans speak perhaps most wonderingly of the signature, über-decadent Oakmonter: layers of cheesecake, chocolate cake and chocolate fudge icing, all studded with candy. _________ 2nd: Gaby et Jules, Squirrel Hill 3rd: La Gourmandine Bakery, Lawrenceville and Mount Lebanon


Award Winning Thai Cuisine

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisinee to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out. {PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Best Bread Mancini’s Bakery

BEST BAKERY

BEST BREAD

OAKMONT BAKERY

MANCINI’S BAKERY

531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com

Multiple locations www.mancinisbakery.com

• • • • • • • •

The history of Mancini’s is a classic American-dream story. Founded in McKees Rocks in 1926 by James Mancini, an Italian immigrant, it now produces thousands of loaves a day, supplying restaurants and stores all over the city. And since the McKees Rocks bakery is open 24/7, no one in the region need ever go without fresh-baked bread. _________

Oakmont Bakery, founded in 1988, is huge, with expansive showcases displaying: dozens of doughnut possibilities, from Maple Bacon to “doughsants”; full lines of pastries, pies and cookies; danishes; dolces; 24 types of bagel; and breads from baguettes to rolls, sourdough to cinnamon-raisin. Not forgetting the in-house café. But it’s so popular that you should expect a line anyway. _________ 2nd: Prantl’s Bakery, Shadyside and Downtown 3rd: La Gourmandine Bakery, Lawrenceville and Mount Lebanon

BEST FROZEN TREATS

DAVE AND ANDY’S 207 Atwood St., Oakland 412-681-9906

• • • • • • • •

2nd: Allegro Hearth Bakery, Squirrel Hill 3rd: Breadworks, North Side

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH

GRAND CONCOURSE 100 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square 412-261-1717 or www.muer.com/grand-concourse • • • • • • • •

Many ice-cream shops boast lots of frills and gimmicks, but not Dave and Andy’s. There, a no-nonsense vibe puts all the focus right where it should be: on fresh, homemade ice cream, sorbet and yogurt. The in-house waffle cone is always the way to go; don’t miss the tiny M&M at the bottom. _________

This city has its share of fancy restaurants, but there’s something regal, traditional and fancy about having brunch at the Grand Concourse. The buffet tables are full of upscale fare to fit all tastes and appetites. There’s an omelet bar with eggs, French toast and pancakes, and the fresh donuts are always a favorite. _________

2nd: The Milkshake Factory, South Side 3rd: Mercurio’s, Shadyside

2nd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown 3rd: The Zenith, South Side

• • • • • • • •

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day

——— NORTHSIDE ——— 856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B. LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS : Monday - Thursday 5pm - 9pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10pm; Sunday 4pm - 9pm

——— DOWNTOWN ——— 903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424) Full Bar with Thai Beer, Thai inspired cocktails, a variety of Sake, and more! DOWNTOWN HAPPY HOURS Monday - Wednesday 5pm - 7pm LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS : Monday - Thursday 5pm - 10pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10:30pm; Sunday 4pm-9pm

www.nickysthaikitchen.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF

FOOD+DRINK BEST DOWNTOWN LUNCH SPOT

TEN PENNY

SEE T STORY A RIGHT

960 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-318-8000 or www.tenpennypgh.com • • • • • • • •

Convenient to the convention center, the Cultural District and Pittsburgh’s business district, Ten Penny is a good pick for lunch fare (or even an early pre-show meal). The expansive menu at this “casual upscale” restaurant is sure to satisfy all. Don’t skip the meatballs, which come smothered in tangy marinara, topped with a creamy dollop of whipped ricotta. _________ 2nd: NOLA on the Square, Downtown 3rd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown

BEST BYOB DINING

PICCOLO FORNO

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

The airy Ten Penny dining room is a great spot for lunch Downtown.

3801 Butler St, Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com • • • • • • • •

While some restaurants may be BYOB simply because they lack a liquor license, at Piccolo Forno it’s been part of the concept Domenic Branduzzi envisioned when he opened the doors in 2005. The restaurant concentrates on the food and the atmosphere, and lets customers play the role of sommelier, bringing their own libations to pair with the meal. _________ 2nd: Noodlehead, Shadyside 3rd: e2, Highland Park

BEST OUTDOOR DINING

HARRIS GRILL 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-362-5273 or www.harrisgrill.com • • • • • • • •

Long before outdoor dining became a thing, the front patio at the Harris Grill was the place to be. Perfectly perched just above Ellsworth Avenue for optimum people-watching, how easy to while away the afternoon or evening with craft beer, cocktails and hilariously named food (“The CONTINUES ON PG. 13

12

BEST DOWNTOWN LUNCH SPOT

TEN PENNY

960 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-318-8000 or www.tenpennypgh.com {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

T

WO YEARS AGO, when a business associate asked Adam DeSimone if he was interested in a property across the street from the convention center, he shrugged it off. “We wanted to wait until the area ripened a little bit more,” says DeSimone, a founder of the AMPED Group, the force behind Diesel, Steel Cactus, Dominic’s Famous Deli and Bottle Shop, Skybar, Delanie’s Coffee and Local Bar + Kitchen. But the second time he got the offer, his real-estate instincts kicked in. With new residential development Downtown and bars and restaurants flourishing around the Cultural District, DeSimone thought the property was worth the risk. “Half the battle is positioning your business where you have built-in traffic,” he says. Enter Ten Penny, a gorgeous 150-seat brunch, lunch and dinner spot whose menu ranges from a standard club sandwich to pomegranate-molasses-glazed salmon.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

Open since December, it’s a space with dozens of interesting little design touches, from incandescent light bulbs that dangle from the ceiling to wooden tables, whose height can be adjusted by hand crank. Just outside, an eight-foot sculpture made of individual 3-D-printed nails bears its name — a nod to its 10th and Penn location and the ten-penny nails contractors found embedded in the old ceiling of the day-care center that preceded it. In warmer months, 100 feet of collapsible windows give the already expansive dining room the feel of a breezy outdoor café. And in the center of the space, floor-to-ceiling shelves of olive oil, pasta and salt give way to a 30-seat bar, which features 48 drafts, plus cocktails and an extensive wine list. “We basically designed the concept

around the location in the city,” DeSimone explains. “We wanted to make sure we didn’t go too far left or too far right.” The menu is designed to accomodate — and the restaurant does a brisk business at lunch, serving up favorites like the “mega meatball.” It’s the size of a baseball and set on a cast-iron skillet, covered in marinara thick enough to eat with a fork (and you’ll want to), then topped with a dollop of ricotta and garnished with basil. The porcini ravioli is also worth a try. Smothered in a gravy reduction and topped with pieces of thick-cut bacon and goat cheese, its richness makes this otherwise smallish dish more than satisfying. And while an appetizer and entrée is plenty of food, desserts like the crème brûlée trio (vanilla bean, chocolate mocha and maple bacon) or the warm cranberry-apple tartlet are worth the bustedbutton after-effect. The restaurant isn’t finished growing, either: In the works is a downstairs special-event space with a “speakeasy” vibe, which could seat 60 for a meal or serve up to 150 for cocktails. “It’s been terrific,” DeSimone says of the adventure of starting the restaurant. “I couldn’t ask for anything better.”

THE MEGA MEATBALL IS THE SIZE OF A BASEBALL AND SET ON A CAST-IRON SKILLET, TOPPED WITH A DOLLOP OF RICOTTA.

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Best OF FOOD+DRINK Garden Weasel,” “Thanksgiving in Blawnox”). _________

Sharp Edge boasts one of the largest selections of Belgian beers in the state. _________

2nd: Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville 3rd: Double Wide Grill, South Side and Mars

2nd: Fat Heads Saloon, South Side 3rd: The Urban Tap, South Side

Thai Me Up

Squirrel Hill

FULL SERVICE BAR NOW OPEN 2128 Murray Ave.

521-9864 521-2053

You’re bound to like it

Dine In Take Out Catering Party Trays Available

Mt. Lebanon

713A Washington Rd.

344-9467 344-9468

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST BEST LOCAL BEER

SONOMA GRILLE

EAST END BREWING CO.

947 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-697-1336 or www.thesonomagrille.com

147 Julius St., Larimer; and Pittsburgh

Wine hasn’t had quite the foodie cachet of artisanal cocktails or craft beers in recent years, but a well-curated wine list defies trends — and Sonoma Grille has long been the most celebrated wine bar in town. This list has something for everyone, from $6-a-glass zinfandel to $2,900-a-bottle cabernet. _________

Public Market, 2401 Penn Ave., Strip District www.eastendbrewing.com • • • • • • • •

Founded in 2004, East End is still draft-only — available at select bars, its own brewery and Pittsburgh Public Market. But the inventiveness and quality of flagship brews like the hearty Big Hop and flavorful Fat Gary Nut Brown Ale — plus small-batch bottled treats like Gratitude Barleywine — keep fans lined up for growlers and pintfuls. _________ 2nd: Penn Brewery, Troy Hill 3rd: Church Brew Works, Lawrenceville

BEST LATE-NIGHT MENU

• • • • • • • •

JESSE POOLE VAN SWOLL, CITY THEATRE

BEST RESTAURANT BEER LIST

SHARP EDGE Multiple locations www.sharpedgebeer.com • • • • • • • •

At the flagship Friendship location alone, there are nearly 70 beers on tap and more than 300 bottles, and a day almost never goes by without a new malted beverage added to the rotation. The specialty here, though, isn’t just variety:

412-488-8893 or 412-488-7170 118 S. 23 St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 www.thaimeuppittsburgh.com

SUN-THUR 11:00 AM - 1:00 AM & FRI-SAT 11:00 AM - 2:00 AM

We FedEx Pizzas anywhere in the U.S.

www.mineospizza.com

BYOB

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

Multiple locations www.madmex.com

2nd: Primanti Bros., multiple locations 3rd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown

PASTAS • PIZZA • HOAGIES PARTY TRAYS & MORE

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND

MAD MEX Late-night dining options have never been extensive here, but in a realm of grab-and-go, Mad Mex is a welcoming sit-down outpost for hearty burritos, tacos, enchiladas, salads and nachos, plus draft beers and margaritas to wash it all down. For you penny-pinching night owls, the original Oakland location offers a selection of half-off items from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. _________

VOTED BEST PIZZA IN PITTSBURGH FOR OVER 37 YEARS

2nd: Eleven, Strip District 3rd: Allegheny Wine Mixer, Lawrenceville

BEST SHOP FOREMAN IN PITTSBURGH

• • • • • • • •

Hours: Monday - Friday 11:00 am – 9:30 pm Saturday Noon – 9:30 pm

Reason: He goes above and beyond to make every production happen.

TUES.-THURS. 11am - 10pm FRI.-SAT. 11am - 11pm SUN.-MON. - closed ß

3801 Butler St • Lawenceville

412-622-0111 www.piccolo-forno.com Follow us:

@piccoloforno

@piccolofornopgh

BEST LOCALLY MADE WINE OR SPIRIT

WIGLE WHISKEY 2401 Smallman St., Strip District; and 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side 412-224-2827 or www.wiglewhiskey.com • • • • • • • •

“American whiskey was born in Pittsburgh,” boasts this home-grown distillery, which has committed itself to carrying on the tradition. And readers clearly believe Wigle has succeeded, with its selection of organic and white whiskeys. Offerings also include bitters, gins and honey. And if you’d like to make your own spirits, Wigle also sell aging kits. _________ 2nd: Pittsburgh Winery, Strip District 3rd: Maggie’s Farm Rum, Strip District

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES! Delivery Hours 11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE chinapalace-shadyside.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF FOOD+DRINK authentic middle eastern food

g Celebratin in rs a e y 42 h! Pittsburg

Specializing in:

Shish Kebab Vegetarian - Vegan Daily Specials Modest Prices

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Best Juice/Smoothie Bar Pittsburgh Juice Company

404 South Craig Street Oakland • 412.682.2829

BEST FOOD TRUCK

PGH TACO TRUCK

www.alibabapittsburgh.com

www.pghtacotruck.com • • • • • • • •

It’s Not Cold Outside

...Yet

Enjoy Outdoor Dining With Us While You Can Shiloh GrilL 123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000

theShilohGrill.com

Harris GrilL 5747 Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside

412.362.5273

HarrisGrill.com

Celebrating 10 Big Years of Harris Grill 2004-2014 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

It’s hard to screw up a taco, which is what makes finding a really great taco so delightful. Delicious and filling (each one weighs between a third and a half a of a pound), the truck’s menu changes slightly from day to day. Recent offerings have included spicy jerk chicken with avocadolime cream and vegan chorizo with pineapple salsa. _________ 2nd: BRGR, www.brgrpgh.com 3rd: Franktuary, www.franktuary.com

BEST JUICE/SMOOTHIE BAR

PITTSBURGH JUICE COMPANY 3418 Penn Ave, Lawrenceville 412-586-5060 or www.pittsburghjuicecompany.com

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL POLITICIAN

STATE REP. ED GAINEY

Reason: He cares about his district and his community, and is always accessible and present. BEST FOOD FESTIVAL

THE GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL AT SAINT NICHOLAS 419 S. Dithridge St., Oakland 412-682-3866 or www.stnickspgh.org

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Siblings Naomi and Zeb Homison launched this juice bar last year, using cold-pressed juices exclusively to preserves nutrients and enzymes. Carrot-apple-ginger, coconut water, cacao blast and a half-dozen others are on offer here. The Juice Company adjoins Zeb Homison’s yoga studio, but we figure a bottle of the juice works off enough karma for starters. _________

At this popular multi-day festival held every May, attendees will find all the favorite Greek dishes, from traditional salads and moussaka to lamb skewers and grape leaves, plus excellent baklava. Plenty of lessfamiliar fare such as soutzoukakia (fried kebab-like meatballs) is also worth a try. Take a break from eating and enjoy the music and dancing. _________

2nd: Embody Natural Health, Wexford 3rd: Amazing Café, South Side

2nd: Rib Festival at Heinz Field, North Side 3rd: Little Italy Days, Bloomfield


CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE BEST POP-ROCK BAND BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN TAKE RICK SEBAK OUT ON THE TOWN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF

city’s best bartender. “His attentiveness is always going to make his customers feel very comfortable, and will keep anyone coming back,” says Neff, a fellow bartender. “I’ve been a bartender for 12 years at some of the best bars and restaurants in the city, and I couldn’t imagine who would deserve this award more.” Walter credits his success to lessons learned from managers and bartenders he’s worked with over the years. He has more than 10 years of experience as a bartender, but says he’s actually been involved in the industry since he was 15. His experience comes in handy at a popular place like Cavo, where weekend crowds flood the bar. He’s learned to juggle difficult drink orders and heavy traffic while making sure no guest feels ignored. “Richie is an excellent bartender; his customer service is second to none,” says Michael Holbrook, Cavo’s head of security. “When you add that to his quick service, there is no question why he is Pittsburgh’s best bartender. Cavo loves having him as part of their staff.”

CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE BEST LOCAL THEATRE COMPANY

CITY THEATRE 1300 Bingham St., South Side 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org • • • • • • • •

City Theatre’s unique in town: It’s a big, established company that stages all new work, including commissioned world premieres, by both up-andcoming playwrights and names like Daniel Beaty, Jessica Dickey and Christopher Durang. Enter City’s converted church (or its adjacent studio theatre) and you’re likely in for a polished and satisfying evening of theater. _________ 2nd: Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown 3rd: Bricolage Productions, Downtown

BEST GALLERY FOR LOCAL ARTISTS

MOST WANTED FINE ART

“MOST DRINKS TASTE THE SAME EVERYWHERE — IT’S THE EXPERIENCE THAT BRINGS PEOPLE BACK.”

SEE N STORY O PG. 20

5015 Penn Ave., Garfield, and 143 W. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead 412-328-4737 or www.most-wantedfineart.com • • • • • • • •

This busy hub on the Penn Avenue arts corridor showcases local talent year-round, and ups the ante with its big annual open-call show. Owners Jason and Nina Sauer are known for their commitment to art as a community-building enterprise; local artists have even more exhibition space at the gallery’s new satellite location at the Waterfront. _________

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Pleased to serve you: Richie Walter, of Cavo

2nd: SPACE Gallery, Downtown 3rd: ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield

BEST BARTENDER

RICHIE WALTER, CAVO

BEST DANCE COMPANY

1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-610-1384

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE 2900 Liberty Ave., Strip District 412-454-9107 or www.pbt.org • • • • • • • •

PBT’s 45th season is a characteristic blend of classics like The Sleeping Beauty and the Pittsburgh premieres of both a new full-length Beauty and the Beast and works by CONTINUES ON PG. 18

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

T

HE FIRST THING patrons notice about Cavo bartender Richie Walter is his smile. “He’s not only easy on the eyes, but it’s truthfully impossible not to think he’s charming,” says Christie Neff, a Cavo regular and friend of Walter. “He makes every

guest feel like they are at a neighborhood bar and have known him for years.” Walter’s reputation is well known throughout Pittsburgh — so much so he’s been invited to guest-bartend at venues around the city — so it’s no surprise that City Paper readers selected him as the

Speed is a necessity in Walter’s line of work, but his prompt service isn’t the only reason he’s earned acclaim in the city’s nightlife circles. He goes out of his way to connect with patrons by welcoming newcomers and always remembering his regulars’ favorite drinks. (The weirdest drink he’s ever made for a patron: a white Zinfandel blended with ice and served in a large soda glass.) “In order to be successful, you have to have repeat business and regular customers,” Walter explains. “While most drinks taste the same everywhere, it’s the experience that brings people back. I focus the most on making sure the customer feels comfortable and appreciated. I try to be humorous yet attentive to their needs.” Walter isn’t just in it for the tips. His regulars and those who have worked with him say they can tell his personality is genuine. And Walter says his favorite part of the job is getting to meet so many “nice and unique individuals.” “I want each customer to remember me every time they leave my bar. That’s my goal each day,” he says. “I want each patron to walk out and say, ‘Wow, what a nice bartender — very attentive and polite. He even remembered my drink. … I’m definitely coming back.’” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Connecting People’s Resources with People’s Needs

1200 Galveston Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15233 ‡www.brothersbrother.org

PISTELLA DISTRIBUTING 5514 Penn Avenue “East End” (412) 361-0915 10am-9pm Mon-Fri • 9am-9pm Saturday • 12pm-5pm Sunday

19

$

24/12 oz. Bottles

.99

+TAX

Stop By Pistella Distributing and grab Yuengling Black & Tan for a freakishly fun Halloween Party!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE

TAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT

Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

7795 McKnight Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 • 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com

Birth control {PHOTO COURTESY OF HARTFORD STAGE/T. CHARLES ERICKSON}

Best Local Theatre Company City Theatre / Daniel Beauty’s Breath and Imagination

is Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

contemporary masters like Mark Morris. The acclaimed company is also known for its special annual Pittsburgh-themed production of The Nutcracker every December. _________

1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA

2nd: Attack Theatre, Strip District 3rd: Texture Contemporary Ballet, various venues

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST BRIDGE

SMITHFIELD STREET BRIDGE Reason: It’s the most beautiful!

BEST LITERARY EVENT

THE MOTH Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side, and the Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown www.themoth.org • • • • • • • •

The nationally known, New York-based public-radio show and

podcast for true stories, told live by the people who lived them, has two local stage incarnations. Both the monthly StorySLAMs, at the Rex, and the annual touring program at the Byham routinely pack the house, which speaks volumes about the continued popularity of an ancient art form. _________ 2nd: Free Snake Poems About Snakes, Garfield 3rd: City of Asylum/ Pittsburgh, North Side

BEST STAGE PRODUCTION

WICKED PNC Broadway Across America • • • • • • • •

Back by popular demand, the Tony Award-winning Wicked played last winter to sold-out audiences. The Broadway musical presents a new take on a classic story — The Wizard of Oz, as told from the point of view of the witches. In Pittsburgh, the exceptional vocal range of the cast and extravagant set design made this show shine. _________ 2nd: Once, PNC Broadway Across America 3rd: Evita, Pittsburgh CLO CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Artists: Nurlan Abougaliev and Gabrielle Thurlow; Photo:Duane Rieder

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF

CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE BEST POP-ROCK BAND (THAT’S NOT THE CLARKS)

BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN bastardbeardedirishmen.com • • • • • • • •

This rock band with an Irish flair has come a long way since playing the produce aisle in Giant Eagle back in 2008. Now the group can be found playing amped-up Irish classics, as well as their own tunes, year-round across the region. And this past spring, the Irishmen released their second record, Rise of the Bastard. _________ 2nd: Wreck Loose 3rd: Meeting of

Important People

BEST METAL BAND

DETHLEHEM

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Art about town: Most Wanted’s Jason and Nina Sauer

dethlehem.bandcamp.com • • • • • • • •

It seemed novel at first. It seemed like a joke. A metal band where the members dress up as knights and make Dungeons & Dragons references? Could they sustain it? The answer is apparently yes, as Dethlehem is celebrating its second consecutive — and third total — Best Metal Band title. _________ 2nd: Lady Beast 3rd: Carousel

BEST JAZZ/ BLUES BAND OR PERFORMER

JILL WEST & BLUES ATTACK • • • • • • • •

A longtime staple of the local blues scene, this hard-working, hard-playing band couldn’t have a more fitting name. Even on her own, West could command an audience’s full attention with her soulful, tough-as-nails vocals. But paired with a swaggering, rollicking backing band like Blues Attack? She’s a force to be reckoned with. _________ 2nd: Phat Man Dee 3rd: Sean Jones CONTINUES ON PG. 21

BEST GALLERY FOR LOCAL ARTISTS

MOST WANTED FINE ART 5015 Penn Ave., Garfield, and 143 W. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead 412-328-4737 or www.most-wantedfineart.com {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

W

ELCOME TO Jason and Nina Sauer’s gallery, Most Wanted Fine Art. Jason’s the burly guy in horn-rimmed glasses and denim overalls, blonde hair buzzed short. The Mercer County native served six years in the Army, studied art in college and taught trade skills at a school for court-adjudicated youths; unlike most art-gallery owners, he also wrecks cars in demolition derbies. He launched Most Wanted in 2007. With its brightly colored, frequently repainted façade and rusticlooking wood flooring, the storefront gallery and performance space in Garfield quickly became a hot spot. Even on a Penn Avenue corridor that specializes in local talent, Most Wanted stands out, both during the monthly Unblurred gallery crawls and throughout the year. A big reason is Jason Sauer’s commitment to building community. That mission only starts with the fact that of the couple hundred artists he’s exhibited in the gallery’s

monthly shows, 90 percent have been local, he estimates. Another calling card is the gallery’s annual open-call show, for which he hangs works from any artist, salon-style. “I make sure there’s space, because there’s a lot of demand,” says Sauer. “I make sure there’s a time that everybody gets to show at Most Wanted once a year.” Most Wanted also: runs a basement gallery for up-and-coming talent; helps stage an annual street festival built around art cars; and organizes ad hoc shows at restaurants, theaters and other venues, some to support causes like the Healthy Artists healthcare initiative. “They’ve really stuck with it and they’re very supportive of local artists,” says Juliana Morris, executive director of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, which has held shows at Most Wanted. “It’s always a fun show there.” The gallery also regularly hosts literary

readings and CD-release parties. Sauer, who has a graduate degree in printmaking, even annually exhibits his own work — mixedmedia paintings that incorporate scraps from his demo-derby wrecks, as well as more traditional landscapes and nudes. And in April, Most Wanted opened a spin-off gallery in The Waterfront shopping district, in West Homestead. Though he’s lived elsewhere and has traveled extensively in the U.S., Sauer says he prefers Pittsburgh because its art community is not driven by money or sales. “It’s driven by personal desire, and I like that a lot,” he says. Jason and Nina Sauer live over the gallery with their son, Rowdy Floyd, 2; together they run both the gallery and a contracting business that Jason Sauer says funds the arts side of things. Even that enterprise has a community-building component: Through a program operated with Goodwill of Southwestern Pennsylvania, Most Wanted General Contracting is staffed by young, recently released convicts whom Jason Sauer trains in trade skills while renovating local homes. It’s the gallery, however, that is his passion. “Every time I get to do Most Wanted stuff, that’s my life,” he says. “We try to include everybody.”

“I MAKE SURE THERE’S SPACE, BECAUSE THERE’S A LOT OF DEMAND.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Best OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE BEST ALT-FOLK/ ALT-COUNTRY BAND

October 11 – November 2, 2014

THE ARMADILLOS thearmadillos.bandcamp.com • • • • • • • •

Repeat winners The Armadillos have what it takes to keep ’em coming back: sweet vocals, rhythms pounded out on an upright bass, and songs of love, longing and drinking. And in November, the quartet hasa new album coming out, following up 2012’s Better Off a Stranger. _________ 2nd: The Hills and the Rivers 3rd: The Beagle Brothers

BEST LOCAL HIP-HOP PERFORMER TO BE THE NEXT WIZ KHALIFA

A BROADWAY COMEDY FROM THE PULITZER, OSCAR,® AND TONY®-WINNING AUTHOR OF DOUBT AND MOONSTRUCK

MAC MILLER www.macmillerswebsite.com • • • • • • • •

The one-time teen sensation from Point Breeze now spends most of his time in California, but still supports Pittsburgh artists through his label and other ventures. And he’s nothing if not prolific: It seems he and his alter egos, Delusional Thomas and Larry Lovestein, have something new to release every few months. _________

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Local Hip-Hop Performer Mac Miller

2nd: Kellee Maize 3rd: Jasiri X

performance space and a more intimate club setting. Its calendar also reflects that versatility: Just this year, it’s hosted everyone from Counting Crows to Chvrches and from Tyler the Creator to Swedish metal band Ghost. _________

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND

2nd: Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale 3rd: The Altar Bar, Strip District

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST CLOUD

THAT ONE OVER THERE

Reason: Isn’t it obvious? It’s awesome. And it sort of looks like a cat. Or not. BEST LOCAL MUSIC VENUE

STAGE AE 400 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com • • • • • • • •

Stage AE is tough to beat, in part because it’s actually several venues in one, with indoor and outdoor

BEST NEW BAR

TWELVE 1222 Carson St., South Side 412-742-4024 or www.twelvepgh.com • • • • • • • •

If you’re looking for Twelve, in Pittsburgh parlance, just go to where Rumshakers used to be. Stop in for weeknight half-off drafts specials or the free Sunday-night buffet. And stay tuned as Twelve moves toward its new identity: part whisky emporium (with at least 50 varieties) and part barbecue joint. _________ 2nd: Butcher and the Rye, Downtown 3rd: BZ Bar and Grill, North Side

BY

JOHN PATRICK

SHANLEY DIRECTED BY TRACY BRIGDEN

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE

2015

Penguins & Paws Calendar! Calendar will feature members of the Pittsburgh Penguins® organization with some adoptable animals from the Animal Rescue League Shelter and Wildlife Center. Calendars will be available and ship mid-November. Just visit our website at www.animalrescue.org/penscalendar or

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUANE RIEDER}

Best Dance Company Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre / Yoshiaki Nakano in The Sleeping Beauty

contact Ann Yeager at 412-345-0346 or ayeager@animalrescue.org. y g

Only * ach e $

20

Proceeds from the calendar benefit the Animal Rescue League Shelter and Wildlife Center.

BEST SPORTS BAR

BUFFALO BLUES

SEE N STORY O PG. 24

216 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside 412-362-5837 or www.buffalobluespittsburgh.com

isn’t your thing, drop in on a happy hour or check out the weekly darts and poker nights. _________ 2nd: Cattivo, Lawrenceville 3rd: Blue Moon, Lawrenceville

• • • • • • • •

It’s a toss-up whether to talk about the food or the game-day atmosphere of this Shadyside sports bar. The wings — all-you-can-eat on Wednesdays — come in a variety of tasty sauces, and the barbecue ribs are exceptional. Add in more than 30 draft beers, plus all the games you care to watch, and that’s a recipe for success. _________ 2nd: Jerome Bettis’ Grille 36, North Side 3rd: Local Bar + Kitchen, South Side

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST GRAFFITI

GOOSKI’S LADIES’ ROOM

Reason: If you wanted to, you could sit in there all day and read the walls.

BEST LGBT BAR

* Plus shipping and handling. $5.95 per order in the United States, $19.95 in Canada and $24.95 in other countries.

5801 VIDEO LOUNGE AND CAFÉ 5801 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-661-5600 or www.5801videolounge.com

BEST COCKTAIL LIST

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN

• • • • • • • •

4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com

With three bars on three floors, 5801 can handle a crowd. Its expansive outdoor deck with plenty of seating gives the place a roomier feel even on busy Friday and Saturday nights. And if a weekend bar atmosphere

Booze is taken to another level at this historic-bank-turned-bar; an expert staff curates a seasonal cocktail list, and can make just about any drink you ask for. If you ask for a rum-and-Coke,

• • • • • • • •

CONTINUES ON PG. 25

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


On the move? For over 50 years, Port Authority has helped commuters get where they need to go. Today, more than 215,000 daily riders use Port Authority bus, light rail, incline and paratransit service. If you haven’t considered public transportation in the past, try it today. It’s much faster, cheaper, more convenient and more environmentally-friendly than driving. Save time. More than a dozen express routes use Port Authority’s three exclusive busways and the HOV lanes. Also, the T provides rapid service to Downtown Pittsburgh, the North Shore and southern communities. Save money. Save hundreds of dollars annually by purchasing discounted Port Authority passes. Save energy. Your energy! Port Authority ConnectCards offer an easy and more convenient way to pay fares. Save the environment. Port Authority has 32 eco-friendly hybrid electric buses to help improve the air we breathe. Go to onthemove.portauthority.org to receive more information and a special offer.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

There is a place for all fans at Buffalo Blues.

BEST SPORTS BAR

BUFFALO BLUES

216 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside 412-362-5837 or www.buffalobluespittsburgh.com {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

I

F THERE’S A PLACE where Pittsburgh Steelers and Cleveland Browns fans could potentially join hands and sing “Kumbaya,” it just might be Buffalo Blues in Shadyside. “It’s non-judgmental and inclusive,” says Edward Verdream, a Shadyside resident for 10 years. He sat in a pack of Steelers fans who had been there for the Oct. 5 victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars. Over at the bar, a group of Cincinnati Bengals fans waited to see their team take on New England on Sunday Night Football. “We were asking friends that lived here, ‘Where we can watch the Bengals?’ They said, ‘Nowhere, really,’” says Emily van Treeck, a Cincinnati native on a rotation in Pittsburgh for her job. “Then we discovered Buffalo Blues. It’s really cool here because people watch other teams.” “At any other Pittsburgh bar, you’d probably get cabbage thrown at you for rooting for the Bengals,” adds her friend and

co-worker Grift Krennbrink, in between sips of his beer and bites of boneless spicy garlic wings. What started as a blues bar in the mid’90s is now one of the city’s most popular sports bars. “We hosted the Jerome Bettis Show one year, and that’s what really propelled us as a sports bar,” owner Michael DiFiore explains. The name never changed, and neither did the menu. Wings and barbeque have always been the “marquee items,” and specials include Wednesday’s all-you-can-eat wings. Buffalo Blues also has 32 beers on tap and nearly a hundred more in bottles. But back in the old days, the place had only 16 TVs. There are now more than 30. “Because we’re here in Shadyside and we’re close to universities and hospitals, we’ve become the place people come to on

Sundays to watch their teams,” Difiore says. “We make sure that every game is on. You can be an Oakland Raiders fan, and you can come to Buffalo Blues.” Rivalries heighten during college-football games on Saturdays, though. “When big games happen involving Penn State, Ohio State or Notre Dame, we’ll section them off and it’s kind of a constant cheering battle,” bartender Matt Jackson says. Not too far from the bartender sat Kelly Watkins, a San Francisco native garbed in 49ers gear who now lives in Squirrel Hill. With a close game — Kansas City 17, San Francisco 22 — she waited until a commercial to talk. “My team is playing here, and I was here last week to watch them, too,” Watkins says. “Plus they have a really good veggie burger, and I appreciate that.” Over in a corner booth, a group of guys in both Steelers and Eagles garb sat together. “At least I get one TV for my Eagles game,” says Rafiq Payne, a Philly native living in Stanton Heights. “Burn that,” a friend quietly mumbled about Payne’s green jersey. Even in a place where all fans are welcome, sports rivalries live on.

“IT’S REALLY COOL HERE BECAUSE PEOPLE WATCH OTHER TEAMS.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Best OF

CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE though, they might just try to sell you on something a little more original. _________ 2nd: Acacia, South Side 3rd: Olive or Twist, Downtown

BEST BARTENDER SEE N STORY O PG. 16

RICHIE WALTER, CAVO • • • • • • • •

While Cavo hasn’t been open as long as other Pittsburgh hot spots, bartender Richie Walter has quickly become a hometown favorite. With more than a decade of experience, Walter says that being able to connect with patrons is the “most important part of the job.” His efficiency and winning smile are one reason guests flock to Cavo. _________ 2nd: Joel Hollies, Hough’s 3rd: Angela Rebeiro,

Local Bar + Kitchen

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST CITIZENS

EVERYONE WHO SUPPORTED MAYOR BILL PEDUTO Reason: When he won, we all won. BEST STRIP CLUB

CHEERLEADERS GENTLEMEN’S CLUB 3100 Liberty Ave., Strip District 412-281-3110 or www.cheerleaderspittsburgh.com • • • • • • • •

Something of a sports-bar/ strip-joint hybrid, this upscale gentlemen’s club offers a comfortable, low-key atmosphere: If you’ve never been to a strip club, this might be a good place CONTINUES ON PG. 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF CULTURE+NIGHTLIFE

ear Socks Shirts Activewear Swimwear Beard & Shave Soap Candles 5968 Baum Blvd. East Liberty www.trimpittsburgh.com 412-512-2828

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Best New Bar Twelve

PISTELLA DISTRIBUTING 5514 Penn Avenue “East End” (412) 361-0915

to start. Offering an extensive food menu and daily drink specials, it also features private booths, party packages and high-profile guest dancers. _________ 2nd: Blush, Downtown 3rd: Club Erotica, McKees Rocks

10am-9pm Mon-Fri • 9am-9pm Saturday • 12pm-5pm Sunday

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

BEST MONTHLY/ WEEKLY DJ NIGHT

BEST UP-AND-COMING COMMUNITY

PANDEMIC, BRILLOBOX

Reason: Because there is a lot happening on the other side of the tracks! BEST CLUB

Brooklyn Brewery

Pumpkin Ale 26

$

CAVO

.99+TAX

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

while supplies last

2nd: Diesel Club Lounge, South Side 3rd: Cruze Bar, Strip District

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

HOMESTEAD

24/12 oz. Bottles

extravagant experience to Pittsburgh’s nightlife. In addition to décor the owners liken to “an underground lair,” the dance club brings in international acts, and hosts some of the most novel events in the city, including drag shows, burlesque and acrobatics. _________

1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-610-1384 or www.cavopgh.com • • • • • • • •

Since opening last year, Cavo has brought a more elegant and

• • • • • • • •

Almost nine years in, Pandemic Pete can still pack the house, and with good reason. Where else can you get down to Middle Eastern hip hop, Balkan beats, Romanian reggaeton and other dance music from around the globe? Happening the first Friday of each month, the dance night also consistently features local, national and international guest DJs. _________ 2nd: Third Thursday Twerk-Off, Cruze Bar 3rd: Emo Night, Lava Lounge


GOODS+SERVICES

BEST DAY SPA SEWICKLEY SPA GIVES RICK SEBAK THE ROYAL TREATMENT PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF +

GOODS SERVICES BEST LOCAL BOOKSTORE

AMAZING BOOKS

SEE N STORY O PG. 32

929 Liberty Ave., Downtown (412-471-1899) and 2030 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-436-5535) www.amazingbookspgh.com • • • • • • • •

A bookstore named “Amazing” is giving itself a lot to live up to, but owner Eric Ackland has been delivering to otherwise underserved shoppers in Downtown and Squirrel Hill. Local writers get upfront display — Amazing also carries locally made greeting cards — and just behind is a dazzling array of titles in every genre. And brace yourselves: A third location may be in the offing. _________ 2nd: East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield 3rd: Caliban Books, Oakland

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY MUSIC

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE

All aboard! The Just Ducky tour heads into the river.

1210 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-8800 or www.davesmusicmine.com

BEST CITY TOUR

JUST DUCKY TOURS

• • • • • • • •

Pittsburgh is known for its old vinyl shops, but Dave’s, in the heart of the South Side, sells new records alongside the gently used. If you’re still thrilled by Tuesday release days, this is the place to find indie rock, pop and all manner of other music as it hits the shelves. _________ 2nd: Jerry’s Records, Squirrel Hill 3rd: The Exchange, multiple locations

BEST PLACE TO BUY MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

PITTSBURGH GUITARS 1305 E. Carson St., South Side 412-431-0700 or www.pittsburghguitars.com • • • • • • • •

Looking for a new Strat? How about a vintage Martin acoustic? Chances are the friendly folks at this musician-owned and -staffed storefront can help you out — with cherry six-strings, basses, amps and more, even the odd uke or banjo. CONTINUES ON PG. 29

125 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square 412-402-3825 or www. justduckytours.com {BY AL HOFF}

“Q

UACK, quack, quack!” A ride with Just Ducky Tours means visitors truly get their duck on: quacking, traveling over land, quacking, taking to the river and more quacking. But unlike local waterfowl, who live and quack in a state of ignorant bliss, Just Ducky riders will learn a lot about Pittsburgh. The tour takes place in an amphibious World War II-era DUKW nicknamed “duck.” Visitors load up into the open, but canopied, carrier — like its namesake, the duck tour runs rain or shine — and head out from Station Square. Tours can vary depending on events such as a baseball game, but generally the duck spins around Downtown, crosses the Allegheny on a bridge, rolls along the riverfront path and goes for a swim in the river. According to the tour guide, the first rule of riding the duck is: “You have to have fun.” At Just Ducky, they’re not kidding. Expect to quack — a lot (quacks aimed at folks on the sidewalks and bleated just for kicks

numbered over 60). The informative tour is heavily laced with humor, from puns, Pittsburghese, irreverent digs at passing landmarks and misrepresenting the county jail as a nice riverside hotel (“room, meals, gym”). The tour guide did warn us: “These jokes are fowl, if you’re not down with them.” “We’re quacking up,” replied the game — sorry — tourist behind me. But the hour-long tour also conveys plenty of useful and interesting information, sure to keep a visitor intrigued with our town. The history of Downtown and its various buildings. The Cultural District and all the arts. Pittsburgh’s great sports teams. The confluence and our unique waterways. (Oh, did somebody just mention the mysterious fourth river?) Fun takeaways included learning about the Mr. Yuk sticker, Pittsburgh’s first movie theater

and the region’s other favorite birds, the Hays bald-eagle family. In fact, while acknowledging Pittsburgh’s smoky and polluted past, the tour also emphasizes the city’s more recent and laudable environmental achievements, from parks and green buildings to fishfriendly waterways. And speaking of the rivers, truly the highlight of the tour is when the vehicle simply drives into the river. It seems to defy everything one knows about safe travel, and the shifting sensation from traveling in a heavy vehicle along a bumpy road to gently floating is quite thrilling. The driver — now a “captain” — explained how the DUKW works, where the wheels go and so on, but it is all rather magical. Once on the river, lucky passengers can take a turn at piloting the duck, and this is a Facebook photo-op that most of your friends can’t touch. For out-of-towners or locals, Just Ducky offers a lot on one ticket: an open-air tour of historical neighborhoods, a boat ride, a crazy-quilt of facts and funnies, and a chance to unleash your inner duck on unsuspecting pedestrians. “Quack, quack, quack!”

JUST DUCKY OFFERS A CHANCE TO UNLEASH YOUR INNER DUCK ON UNSUSPECTING PEDESTRIANS.

A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Best OF GOODS+SERVICES Whether for sales, repairs or lessons, this indie shop’s lasted 35 years for a reason. _________

BEST LOCAL FASHION BOUTIQUE

2nd: Pianos N Stuff Music, Blawnox 3rd: Backstage Guitars, Lawrenceville

3629 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-621-6400 or pavementpittsburgh.com

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY FURNITURE

Though celebrated for its well-curated shoe selection, this boutique packs big variety into its storefront. The dresses, coats, sweaters, hats, scarves, jewelry and more range from cute and fun to elegant (or all three at once). The quirkily rustic décor complements wares by both national brands and local designers, leaning toward the indie and the U.S.-made. _________

PAVEMENT • • • • • • • •

LEVIN FURNITURE Multiple locations 800-262-5200 or www.levinfurniture.com • • • • • • • •

Whether you’re in the market for a classy table lamp or a comfy new recliner, this perennial “Best Of” winner is the place to go for no-nonsense furniture shopping. Sam Levin founded the first store in rural Mount Pleasant in 1920. Nowadays, there are 24 locations, including several specializing in mattresses. _________

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND

BEST LOCAL PLACE TO BUY VINTAGE CLOTHING

BEST KICKBALL TOURNAMENT

5850 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside 412-361-3368 • • • • • • • •

You never know what might be on the racks at Eons. Merchandise at this longtime Shadyside retailer covers decades of fashion history, with wares dating back to the 1800s. The selection includes both functional and fabulous clothing and accessories for men and women, making it the perfect spot to find either a new outfit or this year’s Halloween costume. _________ 2nd: Avalon Exchange, Squirrel Hill 3rd: Clothes Minded, Bloomfield

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

LITTLES SHOES 5850 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-521-3530 or www.littlesshoes.com • • • • • • • •

A landmark on Forbes Avenue, Littles has been around for decades and helped generations of Pittsburghers find the right fit. In a world of Zappos and DSWs, it’s nice to sit back and let a real shoe professional take care of you now and then. _________ 2nd: Gordon Shoes, Homestead 3rd: Ten Toes, Shadyside

5850 Forbes Ave. | Squirrel Hill Monday–Saturday | 9:30am–9pm Sunday | Noon–5pm | 412.521.3530

KICKBALL FOR HOPE

Reason: It’s a blast, in its 12th year and has raised more than $100,000 for charity. BEST LOCAL JEWELRY STORE

ORR’S JEWELERS 5857 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-421-6777) and 532 Beaver St., Sewickley (412-741-8080) www.orrsrocks.com • • • • • • • •

BEST LOCAL SHOE STORE

Shop Local

2nd: Figleaf, South Side 3rd: Jupe Boutique, Lawrenceville

2nd: Perlora, South Side 3rd: IKEA, Robinson Township

EONS FASHION ANTIQUE

“Pittsburgh’s Only Shop-in-Shop”

A lot has changed since its founding by Bill Orr in 1952. The store has more than tripled in size since moving from its original Midland, Pa. location. And while you’ll still see classics like diamond stud earrings, engagement rings and diamond bracelets, you’ll also find trendier yellowgold pieces, ear climbers and statement rings. _________ 2nd: Henne Jewelers, Shadyside 3rd: South Hills Jewelers, Bethel Park CONTINUES ON PG. 30

44¢ WINGS & $2.25 COORS LIGHT DRAFTS DURING ALL STEELERS GAMES

HAPPY HOUR MON THRU FRI 5-7PM

$5 APPETIZERS & DRINK SPECIALS

NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES! 321 Bigham Street • Mt Washington 412.431.9313 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF GOODS+SERVICES

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Local Fashion Boutique Pavement / Employee Heather Manning models some of the wares.

ess n it f d n a e c n a d e v a h e W classes for everyone!

4765 LIBERTY AVENUE ★ BLOOMFIELD, PA 15224 ★ 412.681.0111

BEST DAY SPA

SEWICKLEY SPA 337 Beaver St, Sewickley 412-741-4240 or www.sewickleyspa.com

them, at least for a little while. _________ 2nd: Esspa Kozmetika, Aspinwall 3rd: Metamorphosis, Lawrenceville

• • • • • • • •

More than 40 treatments — massages, seaweed wraps, facials, and more — await customers at this long-established readers’ favorite. It’s all housed in a Victorian-era home amid the finery of Sewickley, long a getaway community for Pittsburgh’s elite. Here’s your chance to be treated like one of

BEST HAIR SALON

SALON IVY

SEE N STORY O PG. 34

1213 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-4489 or www.salonivy.net • • • • • • • •

Finding a trustworthy hairstylist can be daunting, but the stylists at Salon Ivy CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


GUARANTEED LOWEST MATTRESS PRICES FIRM QUEEN SETS Starting at just

198

$ Nobody beats our mattress prices!

LEVIN MATTRESS levinfurniture.com • levinmattress.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF +

a story, but they wanted to do more than entertain. They had a real moral ambition.” The same could be said of Ackland himself. Consistent with his Jewish beliefs, Amazing closes Friday evening and all day Saturday to honor the Sabbath. Closing on one of the week’s busiest shopping days “is a challenge,” Ackland admits. “But I like the message it sends: that there’s something more important than commerce.” For Ackland, after all, books offer another form of refuge from modern life: “I can’t be interrupted by an email when I’m reading a book.” And if it weren’t for people taking holidays off, he might not be in business at all. On a wintry day in 2013, “I was [Downtown] dealing with some bureaucracy at the DMV,” recalls Ackland, a Philadelphia native who came to Pittsburgh by way of New York City. “I’d finally gotten my paperwork together, and it was closed for Martin Luther King Day.” But he spotted a nearby bookstore — then known as Awesome Books — and went in.

GOODS SERVICES are up to the task. Since opening in 2012, popular demand has already necessitated a move to a larger space. Offering a wide range of services for men and women at affordable prices, the Ivy team aims to help you look and feel your best. _________ 2nd: Studio Booth, Shadyside 3rd: Pageboy Salon & Boutique, Lawrenceville

BEST BICYCLE SHOP

THICK BIKES 1408 Bingham St., South Side 412-390-3590 or www.thickbikes.com • • • • • • • •

Its modest repair garage has grown over the years into a full-service bike shop with an urban edge, with new and used cycles (and parts) of all types and gear, from U-locks to messenger bags. But you’ll really love the service at this bike-centric joint: Whether it’s a tune-up or an overhaul, the Thick Bikes crew just wants you out riding. _________

“I LOVE BOOKS, AND I LOVE BOOKSTORES. THE OPPORTUNITY JUST PRESENTED ITSELF.”

2nd: Iron City Bikes, Oakland and Lawrenceville 3rd: Kindred Cycles, Strip District

BEST YOGA STUDIO

AMAZING YOGA Multiple locations www.amazingyoga.net • • • • • • • •

With locations in Shadyside, Wexford and South Side, Amazing Yoga offers heated power vinyasa in a peaceful, supportive environment. Its first-timer deal — 7 days for $7 — is a great opportunity to see if this yoga stuff is for you. Grab a mat and prepare to get a little sweaty. You’re sure to leave feeling — well — amazing. _________

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

A window into reading: Amazing Books’ owner Eric Ackland

2nd: South Hills Power Yoga, Dormont and Peters Township 3rd: Yoga Flow, multiple locations

BEST TATTOO ARTIST

BYRON LEE, NEVERENDING INK TATTOOS 1100 Muldowney Ave., Lincoln Place 412-721-0166 or www.neverendingink.biz • • • • • • • •

Quiet Lincoln Place doesn’t have the concentration of tattoo shops you’ll CONTINUES ON PG. 33

BEST LOCAL BOOKSTORE

AMAZING BOOKS

929 Liberty Ave., Downtown (412-471-1899) and 2030 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-436-5535). www.amazingbookspgh.com {BY CHRIS POTTER}

B

OTH THE Downtown and Squirrel Hill locations of Amazing Books boast ample collections of literary fiction, work by local authors and a solid section of history and religious texts. If only the owner had more time to peruse them. “These days I barely read anymore,”

sighs 42-year-old Eric Ackland, who launched the store in 2013. But when he finds the time, “I’m a big 19th-century guy — Tolstoy, Victor Hugo, George Eliot.” While he digests plenty of contemporary work as well, Ackland says, the authors of the 1800s “knew how to tell

Behind the counter was Bob Ziller, an artist who co-owned the store and a Garfield location with his wife, Laura Jean McLaughlin. Ziller and Ackland began talking, and it emerged that Ziller and McLaughlin wanted to get back to pursuing art full time. A month later Ackland, who’d worked in book-retailing before, found himself owning a freshly renamed bookstore. “I love books, and I love bookstores,” Ackland says. “The opportunity just presented itself.” The Garfield location returned to its previous use as McLaughlin’s gallery and studio space. But earlier this year, Ackland opened a new store in Squirrel Hill, which was still mourning the 2009 closing of a Barnes & Noble. “Almost every day,” Ackland says, “people in Squirrel Hill thank me: ‘We needed this for so long.’” Ackland is mulling a potential third location, and harbors other ambitions as well. He’s planning to convert the Squirrel Hill store’s basement into space for writing seminars led by local instructors. “It’ll be MFA-quality without the MFA,” he says. Such plans, and the demands of stocking two retail locations and keeping up with Internet sales, keep Ackland hopping: He jokes about printing up T-shirts that read “Highly Blessed and Highly Stressed.” But if buying a bookstore was a leap of faith, Ackland seems to have landed on his feet. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Best OF GOODS+SERVICES find in, say, Lawrenceville or South Side. But City Paper readers are willing to make the trip to Neverending Ink, where Byron Lee inks lettering and luminously colored graphic work with equal mastery. _________ 2nd: Jason Angst, Artisan Tattoo 3rd: Justun Palenscar, In the Blood

and take a furry friend home, Animal Friends can help. It houses homeless cats, dogs and rabbits, while providing future owners with the tools they need to be successful parents. At Animal Friends’ facility, there is even a veterinary clinic and pet-therapy suite. _________ 2nd: Animal Rescue League, Larimer 3rd: Western Pa. Humane Society, North Side

BEST BODY PIERCING SHOP

HOT ROD BODY PIERCING COMPANY

BEST PLACE TO BUY HEALTH FOOD

95 S. 16th St., South Side (412-431-6077) and 115 Oakland Ave., Oakland (412-687-4320) www.hotrodpiercingcompany.com

WHOLE FOODS 5880 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-441-7960) and 10576 Perry Hwy., Wexford (724-940-6100) www.wholefoodsmarket.com

• • • • • • • •

If you’ve got a body part crying out for a piece of jewelry, there’s a good chance the crew at Hot Rod Body Piercing Company can help. They offer body jewelry in many styles and a variety of materials, including stainless steel, 18-karat gold, titanium and even Pyrex glass. Whether it’s a nose ring or something a little more personal, they’ll get you pierced. _________ 2nd: Tattoo Noir, Bloomfield 3rd: Artisan Piercing Boutique, Garfield

When you’re looking to fill your fridge with organic, gluten- or GMO-free ingredients, Whole Foods is the place to do it. Even though it’s a national chain, you’ll still find plenty of locallysourced produce. And if your culinary skills leave something to be desired, the store’s prepared foods section is always handy. _________ 2nd: East End Food Co-Op, Point Breeze 3rd: Trader Joe’s, East Liberty and Upper St. Clair

SMOKER FRIENDLY • • • • • • • •

There’s no question the trend toward “vaping” is reflected at Smoker Friendly: Every store now has a vape tasting station. But you can still find traditional products like pipe or rolling tobacco, plus a wide variety of cigarettes. If you’re into cigars, check out the Downtown location, which has over 500 varieties and its own cigar lounge. _________ 2nd: Steel City Vapors, Castle Shannon and Monroeville 3rd: Leaf & Bean, Strip District

DIY CATEGORY BEST OF CATEGORIES, AND “

WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PLACE TO EAT UNTIL YOU HATE YOURSELF

TEXAS DE BRAZIL Reason: They literally walk around and ask if you want filet wrapped in bacon. BEST THRIFT SHOP

BEST PLACE TO ADOPT A PET

ANIMAL FRIENDS 562 Camp Horne Road, Avonworth 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org • • • • • • • •

If you’d like to stop looking at the billions of cute animal pictures online,

FULL SERVICE SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO Hair Services • Miami-style Nail Bar • Skin Care

• • • • • • • •

BEST PLACE TO BUY SMOKES OR VAPE Multiple locations www.smokerfriendly.com

ORGANIC SALON, SPA AND WELLNESS STUDIO

GOODWILL INDUSTRIES Multiple locations www.goodwillswpa.org

Massage • Sauna • Body Treatments Yoga Studio • Wellness Coaching • Bridal Parties Able to accommodate large groups 5112 BUTLER ST LAWRENCEVILLE 412.781.1262 SPAPGH.COM

BUY ONE GET ONE

50% OFF ALL BASKETS Now through Mon, Oct 20 Whether you’re giving, gathering, storing or sharing, we have the perfect basket. Discount applied to item of equal or lesser value. Artisans have been paid in full.

5824 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh Mon 10–6, Tue 10–8, Wed 10–6 Thu 10-8, Fri-Sat 10-6 412-421-2160 pittsburgh.tenthousandvillages.com

• • • • • • • •

Pittsburgh is lucky to have a pretty active market for thrift stores, and this year City Paper readers chose Goodwill as their favorite. The inventory is as CONTINUES ON PG. 34

Bring in this ad to receive 25% OFF one item. Offer valid at participating stores 10/21/14 through 10/31/14. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs or Traveler’s Finds. One coupon per customer per day. 1001487

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF +

GOODS SERVICES varied and diverse as the people who shop there. Two things are certain: You’ll always find a bargain, and your money and your donated items are going toward a good cause. _________ 2nd: Red, White and Blue Thrift Store, Brookline and Bellevue 3rd: Salvation Army, multiple locations

BEST CAR DEALER

ROHRICH AUTOMOTIVE Multiple locations 412-344-6012 or www.rohrich.com • • • • • • • •

Bentley, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Honda, Lexus, Mazda, Scion, Toyota — Rohrich carries them all. For the past 75 years, this family-owned car dealership has been providing reliable service to the Pittsburgh community with a stress-free carbuying experience. With locations throughout the Pittsburgh area, Rohrich sells new and pre-owned vehicles and likely has something for every consumer. _________

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

In style: Salon Ivy co-owner Chelsea Bruce-McCrommon (front right)

BEST HAIR SALON

2nd: Day Automotive Group, multiple locations 3rd: #1 Cochran, multiple locations

SALON IVY

1213 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-4488 or www.salonivy.net

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE KIDS FOR THE AFTERNOON

PITTSBURGH ZOO AND PPG AQUARIUM One Wild Place, Highland Park 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org • • • • • • • •

Lions and tigers and bears aren’t just sports teams — show the kids the real, living deal at the Pittsburgh Zoo. The Highland Park facility has all the kids’ favorite animals, plus more exotic creatures such as the Komodo dragon, African springbok, naked mole rat and a giant Pacific octopus. Plus penguins — the waddling, non-skating sort. _________ 2nd: Children’s Museum, North Side 3rd: Carnegie Science Center, North Side CONTINUES ON PG. 36

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

“I

WOULD SIT in any one of these girls’ chairs and let them do my hair,” says Chelsea BruceMcCrommon, referencing the seven women who join her on the staff at Salon Ivy. Bruce-McCrommon and co-owner Bethany Novak opened the salon just three years ago. After six months in operation, the response to their efforts was so positive that they had to move to a larger location on the South Side. The staff of stylists quickly grew from the original four (including both co-owners) to the current eight. The women work collaboratively rather than competitively, and their ensemble nature helps earn the loyalty of patrons. “We have been clients since they opened their doors at the first location,” says South Side resident Amy Murphy, who visits regularly with her daughter Victoria. “Chelsea is very talented and really listens to what the client wants. All of the girls are really phenomenal people.”

“All of the girls” also have a combined total of decades of experience in salons across the city, much of it in the South Side community, working with all types of aesthetics. The result is a philosophy geared less toward exclusivity, and more toward inclusion. “We love that we are a multicultural salon,” say BruceMcCrommon. “We cater to a diverse population and we love how it reflects who all of us are. We might have a full mohawk taking place in one chair and a roller set in the other.” The staff also includes hair stylists Sarah Greco, Shannon McGinley, Carmen Brown, Maureen Nyalka and Megan Eiler, and makeup stylist Jasmine Coleman. “We all get along really well, in a way that’s rare with a group of eight women,” Novak says. The camaraderie that exists

among the employees is infused with a sense of well-being that’s passed on to the customer. “I really enjoy the vibe of the salon,” says Becky Bauer, who followed stylist Greco when she moved to Salon Ivy from her previous salon. “When Sarah was on maternity leave, I had two other stylists, and they both did an excellent job at maintaining what Sarah had originally done. I really felt like they cared about me, as a client.” “We pride ourselves on teamwork,” Bruce-McCrommon states. “We can bounce ideas off of each other, we can ask each other for help. I believe people respect that. We all know each other’s clients. Half the time we end up in one huge conversation with five women in chairs and five other women behind them.” While all stylists are constantly learning more about their craft through workshops and classes, there’s no plan to change what’s proven to be a winning formula. “This is a chill spot where women and men can just relax and get their hair done,” says BruceMcCrommon. “That’s what we’re always going to be.”

“WE CATER TO A DIVERSE POPULATION AND WE LOVE HOW IT REFLECTS WHO ALL OF US ARE.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014


Ov er 40 Ye ars in Etn a

East End Food Co-op 7516 Meade Street Pittsburgh, PA 15208 (412) 242-3598

196 BUTLER STREET, ETNA

Daily Hours: 8 AM - 9 PM

412-781-9837 State Inspection & Emission • Full Mechanical Services Alignments • Tires • Batteries • GAS • OIL • KEROSENE

FOR VALUABLE COUPONS: KRESSSERVICE.COM

Survive our

vampire! The greatest laser tag challenge of all time!

g Oct 13th. Games startin s October 13- 31. $7 per person, run

win a prize If your the last one to survive you *Call (412)828-1100 to schedule your challenge.

www.eastendfood.coop

open to everyone, every day

40 Bowling Lanes Laser Arena 50 Arcade Games Full Service Cafe Full Service Lounge Pool Room

BIRTHDAY PARTY CAPITAL OF THE WORLD!

2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com UNFESTCENTER

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF GOODS+SERVICES

PITTSBURGH www.pittsburgh.colormemine.com 5887 Forbes Avenue, 15217 412-421-2909 SOUTH HILLS www.southhill.colormemine.com 301 South Hills Village, 15241 412-854-1074

CELEBRATE MARRIAGE EQUALITY Wedding Showcase

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Place To Buy Musical Instruments Pittsburgh Guitars / Owner John Bechtold (center) with employees Scott Johnson and Sam Matthews

BEST CITY TOUR

JUST DUCKY TOURS

SEE N STORY O PG. 28

125 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square 412-402-3825 or www.justduckytours.com • • • • • • • •

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 9th 1-4

HEINZ HISTORY CENTER

A wedding show featuring the top wedding vendors in the Pittsburgh area & all vendors are LGBT friendly!

See Pittsburgh — by land and by river — while riding in a World War II-era amphibious vehicle known as a DUKW, a.k.a. duck. This fun and informative tour navigates Downtown, the North Side and a river or two, as lively guides keep up a steady stream of history, factoids, Pittsburgh pride and groan-inducing bird puns. _________ 2nd: Gateway Clipper, Station Square 3rd: Segway in Paradise, Station Square

BEST LOCAL FUNDRAISER

B*TCHES BALL, ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE www.animalrescue.org • • • • • • • •

REGISTER ~ CELEBRATEMARRIAGEEQUALITYPA.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

It sounds like the worst party invite ever — help dogs and cats get neutered while you enjoy

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST INTERSECTION OF YOUNG AND OLD PEOPLE

PITTSBURGH BANJO CLUB AT THE NORTH SIDE ELKS

Reason: Elders, baby boomers, millennials and children meet weekly for music, drinks and fun fellowship. cocktails — but Animal Rescue League’s annual B*tches Ball is both a great time and a great cause. Held to coincide with World Spay Day, it features a drag show, music and nibbles. Mark your calendar for next year’s ball in February. _________ 2nd: The Dirty Ball, Attack Theatre 3rd: Urban Garden Party, Mattress Factory


PEOPLE+PLACES MAKING PITTSBURGH’S TELEVISION SCREENS LOOK EXTRA SHARP: BEST LOCAL MEDIA PERSONALITIES RICK SEBAK AND WTAE CHANNEL 4’S SALLY WIGGIN AND WENDY BELL PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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Best OF +

MORE BIKE LANES

Olivia Ngoki

BEST NEWS FOR CYCLISTS

on

PEOPLE PLACES

• • • • • • • •

Last year the best news for cyclists was new bike lanes. This year, guess what? More bike lanes! This summer, the city began installing protected bike lanes, the first of their kind in Pittsburgh. Eventually, the bike lanes will run along Penn Avenue, in the Strip District, and Saline Street, in Greenfield, as well as Schenley Park. _________

Zumyra Burford and

Omar Norry

2nd: Bill Peduto 3rd: BikePGH

PROTECTED BIKE LANES

ell Andrew Bosw

an Nancy

on

e Garris

d Georg

BEST PEDUTO ADMINISTRATION INITIATIVE

BEST LOCAL PLACE TO TAKE A SELFIE

• • • • • • • •

Yes, automobile drivers, we can hear you wailing about the inconvenience of traffic changes on Penn Avenue, Downtown. But Peduto’s support of cyclists — one part of his commitment to fitness and providing a more flexible transportation grid — has distinguished his term so far. If he cruises to re-election three years from now, it may be on a 10-speed. _________

MOUNT WASHINGTON na , Shay wick arcelin n Joel Mez, Laura Ko Mend

{COMPILED BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

2nd: Pothole fix 3rd: Support of

MARIO LEMIEUX • • • • • • • •

Alex Ma

BEST LIVING PITTSBURGH ROLE MODEL

tonis

Uber and Lyft

Maybe some voters picked Mario in hopes that the active-duty Penguins would take his harddriving example closer to heart — especially during the playoffs. But Lemieux’s contributions to Pittsburgh go beyond hockey. His Mario Lemieux Foundation provides vital funding for cancer research and hospital facilities for sick children. _________ 2nd: Rick Sebak 3rd: Charlie Batch

Jin Feng an

CONTINUES ON PG. 39

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

d Mark Lo

Russo

Olivia

Nance


Best OF PEOPLE+PLACES BEST MEDIA PERSONALITY

RICK SEBAK • • • • • • • •

It’s pretty hard to think about Rick Sebak and not think about Kennywood Park. For most of us, his 1988 documentary Kennywood Memories was our introduction to this one-of-a-kind local filmmaker-slashcelebrity. Since then, he’s made nearly 40 films and has become one of the city’s best-loved sons, drawing a crowd nearly everywhere he goes. _________

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Best Local Sports Moment Pirates in the Playoffs / Fans celebrate last year’s wild-card game win on the Roberto Clemente Bridge.

2nd: Sally Wiggin 3rd: Wendy Bell

BEST LOCAL SPORTS MOMENT

DIY CATEGORY “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST SPICY BEAN DIP

KAYA

Reason: OMG, I just want to slather it all over my body.

PIRATES IN THE PLAYOFFS • • • • • • • •

The Bucs’ first playoff appearance in more than 20 years became one of the most talked-about stories in all of baseball, and the Oct. 1, 2013, wild-card game against the Reds was possibly the most electric atmosphere in the history of Pittsburgh sports, rivaling previously untouchable Steelers levels of excitement. _________ 2nd: Dan Bylsma getting fired 3rd: “Cueto” chant

BEST PLACE TO HAVE A GAY WEDDING

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland 412-622-6914 or phipps.conservatory.org • • • • • • • •

BEST LOCAL PLACE TO TAKE A SELFIE

SEE PHOTOS ON PG. 38

MOUNT WASHINGTON

Phipps Conservatory is probably one of the best places in the city to have any wedding. Not only are the event spaces beautiful, but you don’t have to drive around town looking for great spots to take your pictures. Phipps offers three different locations for weddings, and even has several options to accommodate the reception. _________

If we must selfie, let’s head to Mount Washington, because a great background helps any selfie. (And confidentially, it makes it less about you.) From Mount Washington, the solo shutterbug can pose before the epic sweep of three rivers, two stadiums, one city center and numerous bridges. Click! _________

2nd: Anywhere 3rd: Mount Washington

2nd: Point State Park, Downtown 3rd: PNC Park, North Side

• • • • • • • •

Frugal Cottage The

Where you will find antiques, vintage & shabby chic home goods.

3rd Anniversary Sale OCTOBER 16TH - 19TH THURS.– SAT. 10AM-5PM; SUN. NOON-5PM

1306 EVERGREEN AVENUE

MILLVALE PA 15209 PH: 412-822-7370 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2014

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2014 4

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2014 4

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*36 MONTH LEASE. 12,000 MILES / YEAR. TAX AND STATE FEES ADDITIONAL.

2020 W. LIBERTY AVENUE, PITTSBURGH 15226 PHONE: 412.344.6012

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We buy TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

all day-every day

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

ROCK/POP THU 16 BYHAM THEATER. Anthony Jeselnik. Downtown. 412-456-6666. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Marino Erwin. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GET HIP RECORDINGS. Paul Collins. North Side. 412-231-4766. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Fledglings, Couches, I Am a Sea Creature, Big Spoon Little Spoon. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Dead Signal Chasers, Code Whiskey, Common Nightmare. South Side. 412-431-5282. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. REX THEATER. Cabinet. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 17 31ST STREET PUB. King Parrot, Child Bite, Fantasy Crime,

RAMADA INN HOTEL Haunt for the Wretched. Strip & CONFERENCE CENTER. District. 412-391-8334. Gashouse Annie with Abilene ALTAR BAR. Fit For A King, Band. Greensburg. Being As An Ocean Gideon, REX THEATER. Scott Bradlee’s Wolves At The Gate, Capsize, Postmodern Jukebox. South Side. Sleeping Under Fire. Strip District. 412-381-6811. 412-263-2877. THE SHOP. Hobbs Angel of Death, CLUB CAFE. Ryan Montbleau, Sathanas, Kurnugia, Sam Biles. Tall Heights (Early) The Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. Daily Grind, The Neffs SMILING MOOSE. (Late). South Side. Houdini’s Psychic Theatre, 412-431-4950. Different Places in Time, HOWLERS COYOTE The Homeless Gospel CAFE. Gangwish, ww. r w Choir, Endless Mike, Ape!, The Cunks, pe ghcitypa p Swiss Army, Darger, Urns. Bloomfield. .com LRAD. South Side. 412-682-0320. 412-431-4668. LATITUDE 360. Nightlife. STAGE AE. The Gaslight Anthem, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. Against Me!, Cory Branan. LINDEN GROVE. Metro. North Side. 412-229-5483. Castle Shannon. TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & MR. SMALLS THEATER. Finch, McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626. Maps & Atlases, Wounds, Helen THUNDERBIRD CAFE. King Fez, Earth. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Working Breed. Lawrenceville. PALACE THEATRE. Robin Trower. 412-682-0177. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. WASHINGTON COMMUNITY PITTSBURGH WINERY. ARTS AND CULTURAL CENTER. Brownie Mary. Strip District. Circles & Squares, Chameleon Rose. 412-566-1000. Washington. 724-222-1475.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

SAT 18 31ST STREET PUB. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BUCKHEAD SALOON. The Lava Game. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CATTIVO. The World Is A Beautiful Place And I Am No Longer Afraid To Die The Hotelier, Rozwell Kid, Posture & The Grizzly. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Cheap Girls, Beach Slang, Signals Midwest, Lee Corey Oswald (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Flashlights, The Spectres, Yrs. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARVEY WILNER’S. River Trail. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Calamity Cubes, Appleseed Collective, Ian Fitzgerald, Zach Schmidt. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. Elysium. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. Mercedez. LOWER BURRELL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. Daniels & McClain. 724-339-9611. MR. SMALLS THEATER. tUnE-yArDs. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OAKMONT TAVERN. Lucky Me. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. Judas Priest, Steel Panther. Oakland. 412-648-3054.

MP 3 MONDAY THE REDLINES

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from The Redlines; stream or download

“What’s Life Without” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

Tickets at www.jergels.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23

CONTINUES ON PG. 74

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 73

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

SUN 19

Architectural History:

Demonstration Workshop:

Some observations on 20th-Century Architecture in Pittsburgh

Designing Spaces through Creative Reuse.

Thursday, October 16 @ 6-7:30 pm

Pittsburgh artist and sculptor James Shipman will utilize his 30 years of experience to demonstrate how to create unique spaces through a hands-on demonstration workshop, which will touch on how to build a wall using repurposed cinder blocks, simple hand tools, and techniques.

Join us for the first of three architectural history lectures by PHLF Historical Collections Director Albert M. Tannler, as he presents an illustrated talk on interesting discoveries made about Pittsburgh’s buildings, architects, craftsmen, and clients.

Saturday October 18 @ 10-11:30 am

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

DEMOLITION ITION & HAULING BEFORE

AFTER

DP #1 Since 2009

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FREE ESTIMATES 412-853-0064 DP7DAYS.COM

GARAGES, MOBILE HOMES, DECKS, PATIOS, KITCHENS, CONCRETE STEPS, BATHROOMS, BEDROOMS AND MORE.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Chalk Outlines. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Cherry Red. Greensburg. REX THEATER. Todd Snider, Elizabeth Cook. South Side. 412-381-6811. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Totally 80s. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SMILING MOOSE. A Lovely Crisis: American Idiot Tribute Show (early) August Ruins, Alter The Design (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Chris Denem. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Busy Being Awesome. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555.

ALTAR BAR. Through the Roots, The Supervillains, The Steppas. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BELVEDERE’S. The Goddamn Gallows, Juicy Karkass, Mikey & The Snake Oil Boys, The Hills & The Rivers. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Jeff The Brotherhood, Diarrhea Planet, Shaky Shrines. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Glenn Tilbrook. Station Square. 412-481-7625. STAGE AE. King Diamond, Jess & the Ancient Ones. North Side. 412-229-5483.

MON 20 31ST STREET PUB. Shonen Knife, The Lopez, Boiled Denim. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Sondre Lerche. Strip District. 412-263-2877. SMILING MOOSE. The Felix Cupla, Aviator, Rescuer. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 21 CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Sam Lee. Oakland. 412-268-2105. CLUB CAFE. The Stray Birds, Jordie Lane. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Empire! Empire! (I Was a Lonely Estate), Free Throw, Brightside, Sup, Muscles?, Homies. Bloomfield. REX THEATER. Terrapin Flyer Ft. Melvin Seals & Mark Karan. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. Skrillex, Big Gigantic, GTA, Valentino Khan. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 22 ALTAR BAR. New Found Glory We Are The In Crowd, Fireworks, Red City Radio. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

BRILLOBOX. Schwarz, Abdu Ali, KILBOURNE. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Rocco DeLuca, Soko. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lettuce, Exmag. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

DJS THU 16 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE CLOAKROOM. Pete Butta. Hip-Hop, house, everything in between. East Liberty. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 17

Fortified Phonetx. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

BLUES THU 16 MOONDOG’S. The Ben Miller Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 17 TEQUILA JUNCTION. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Beechview. 412-207-9545.

SAT 18 ARTHUR MURRAY WEXFORD. The Satin Hearts. Wexford. BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. LEAF & BEAN. Bill Toms. Strip District. 412-434-1480. MOONDOG’S. Maria Muldaur. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PUZZLER’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. McKeesport.

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Desus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. ANDYS. Tania RUSTY BARREL Grubbs. Downtown. SALOON. Pittsburgh 412-773-8884. DJ Company. CJ’S. Roger Top 40. South Side. Humphries & The RH 412-720-5647. www. per a p Factor. Strip District. pghcitym .co 412-642-2377. SETON HILL UNIVERSITY BRILLOBOX. PERFORMING ARTS SOUNDCRASH: Pandemic CENTER. RML Jazz. Greensburg. vs Titletown. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack ANDYS. Daniel May, Tony Movements, DJ White Lyon. De Paolis, Tom Wendt Kenia. Homewood. 412-657-2279. Downtown. 412-773-8884. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. THE CORNER. Roger Barbour 412-431-8800. Jazz Trio. Oakland. IVY. Pete Butta. Strip District. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Joe Negri & Daniel May. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. Downtown. 412-553-5235. 412-431-5282. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. ANDYS. Maureen Budway. 412-781-6771. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday South Side. 412-431-2825. Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-642-2377. 412-481-7227. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. Night Halloween Party. South Side. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY 412-431-4668. AT SAND HILL. RML Jazz. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel 724-547-6500. City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Oakland. 412-874-4582. Tony Campbell Jazz Surgery Band, The Roby “Supersax” Edwards Band. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. East Liberty. 412-657-2279. Stranger Convention. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. EAST END COOPERATIVE East Liberty. 412-362-6001. MINISTRY COMMUNITY HOUSE. Carolyn Perteete, Ronni Weiss, Stacy Lucas. East Liberty. 412-738-8267. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. Grayskul, Goldini Bagwell, 412-553-5235. Asphate, Simple Steven,

JAZZ

THU 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 18

FRI 17

SAT 18

SUN 19

WED 22

SUN 19

HIP HOP/R&B WED 22


An Evening of Music

CLASSICAL SAT 18 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Music for string band by Heinrich Biber, Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, Johann Hermann Schein & Antonio Bertali. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-621-6204.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

SUN 19 THE BRASS ROOTS. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253. CHATHAM BAROQUE. A Musical Banquet: music for string band by Heinrich Biber, Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, Johann Hermann Schein & Antonio Bertali Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. EAST WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. JAMES D. HICKS, ORGANIST. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. TENOR SHAWN MLYNEK. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

CLEVELAND {SAT., NOV. 15}

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart House of Blues

PHILADELPHIA {FRI., NOV. 21}

Pegi Young & the Survivors Tin Angel

DAVID BENNETT AND DANIEL MAY. Andys Wine Bar, Downtown. (412) 773-8884.

{FRI., JAN. 09}

OCTOBER 24: 8PM

Jacob Jeffries w/Heidi Jacobs

WE’LL CUT YOU.

abkmusic.com/coh-events events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

THU 16

Bryce Jordan Center

Murph Dogg • “Conduit” • 2014 Image on paper

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Bluegrass Scramble. Strip District.

MON 20

Downtown. 412-255-0525.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

SUN 19

TUE 21 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 22 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC

FRI 17

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 22 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SUN 19 OLD ST. LUKE’S. Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra. Scott. 412-851-9212.

FRI 17 PULASKI CLUB - LODGE 152. Bill Couch, Moose Tracks. West End. 412-921-9410. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Acoustic Daze. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SAT 18 BADO’S PIZZA GRILL AND ALE HOUSE. Lenny & Jeff. Mt. Lebanon. HAMBONE’S. Acoustic Punk Rock Sing-along w/ Robbie Lester. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants.

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REGGAE FRI 17 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

THU 16 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

TA S T E

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films. Tom Verlaine, Martin Rev, Dean Wareham, Eleanor Friedberger, Bradford Cox. North Side. 412-237-8300. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra PNC Pops. Heroes & Villains. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 18 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. The Duhks. Oakland. ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM. Big Band Blast w/ River City Brass Band. Hill District. HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra PNC Pops. Heroes & Villains. Downtown. 412-392-4900. KEYSTONE OAKS HIGH SCHOOL. Tony Thomas, organist. Dormont. 412-241-8108.

SUN 19

COUNTRY

+

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

Presented By

OTHER MUSIC

Cher

412.326.5964

thecenterofharmony.com/

WED 22

STATE COLLEGE, PA.

4504 BUTLER STREET

+

HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra PNC Pops. Heroes & Villains. Downtown. 412-392-4900. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Kathleen McCann, Michael Flaherty, Maddie Arnold & Friends. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

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What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

October 15 - 21 WEDNESDAY 15

FRIDAY 17

SUNDAY 19

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

ROCKWELL THEATRE Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com or 412-392-8000. Through Oct. 26.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 2p.m. & 5p.m.

THURSDAY 16

Heroes and Villains

DORO

Young Frankenstein GEYER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Scottdale. 724-8870887. Tickets: geyerpac.com. Through Oct. 19.

The People's Temple SMILING MOOSE South Side. 411-481-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Anthony Jeselnik BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. All ages show. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

“21”

Yo Gabba Gabba

MONDAY 20

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Oct. 19.

Judas Priest: Redeemer of Souls Tour 2014 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18 PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER

Finch

Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 18.

The Gaslight Anthem with Against Me! and Cory Branan

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 18

4300 Blocktoberfest!

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

4300 BUTLER STREET Lawrenceville. Free event. 11a.m.

Zoo Boo PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG

AQUARIUM Highland Park. Free Tillman. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866with general admission. For 468-3401. 9p.m. more info visit pittsburghzoo. org. Through Oct. 26.

Grand and Glorious

Death to False Music Tour SMILING MOOSE South Side. 411-481-4668. With special guest The Felix Culpa. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 21 An evening with David Sedaris

Here Come the Mummies BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. 8p.m.

Judas Priest: Redeemer of Souls Tour 2014

Skrillex

tUnE-yArDs

PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER Oakland. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. With special guests James

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Best in Shoe

off our Store

at the Waterfront Congratulations s

to the Best of Pittsburgh Winners! rs! Continue Putting Your Best Foot Forward 76

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes


IT LOOKS LIKE A LEGAL THRILLER BUT IT’S A MALE MELODRAMA

WAR WEARY {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} One thing to like about Fury: Unlike every second movie these days, this World War II film doesn’t claim to be “based on a true story.” But while being a fiction might promise plenty of room for insight, Fury adds little to our understanding of World War II, or of war in general.

Into battle with “Wardaddy” (Brad Pitt)

David Ayer’s film follows a battlehardened American army sergeant nicknamed “Wardaddy” (Brad Pitt) as he leads his five-man Sherman tank crew through the last days of the war, all deep in Nazi territory. If he’s a little bit Ahab — a scarred survivor, fanatic for killing Germans — our Ishmael is Norman Ellison (Logan Lerman), a greenhorn intimidated nearly as much by his grizzled fellow soldiers as by the Nazis. Fury (that’s the tank’s name) is competently acted, the battle scenes gripping enough, the glimpses of gore sufficiently harrowing. But as written and directed by Ayer (who scripted Training Day), this is really a male-bonding film, and it’s filled with familiar characters (the Bible-quoter, the redneck mother) and predictable character arcs. Worst of all, though, is the soundtrack, whose swelling choruses and valorizing grandiosity leaves no emotion uncued. It’s as hamfisted as anything we’d expect from a “true story.” Starts Fri., Oct. 17. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE EXPEDITION TO THE END OF THE WORLD Daniel Dencik directs this adventure documentary, both an exploration (via boat) of a remote part of Greenland and an examination (via talk and art) of what it means to be human. In English, and Danish, with subtitles. Sun., Oct. 19, and Tue., Oct. 21-Thu., Oct. 23. Harris

OUT OF ORDER {BY AL HOFF}

T

Drinkin’ and thinkin’: Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall

HE TWO-WORD title is the leanest

thing about David Dobkin’s overstuffed film. It’s as if the writers bought every dusty marked-downto-move plot at the Genre Store and rolled them up into one 141-minute sentimental ball. He may have saved some money, but viewers sure aren’t gonna save any time. Some ads for The Judge make it look like a legal thriller, but it’s primarily a male melodrama. Oh sure, the handsome courtroom is there to uncover the truth — the truth about a troubled father-son relationship, that is. Hank Palmer (Robert Downey Jr.) is a preening big-city lawyer who says things like “innocent people can’t afford me.” When his (sainted) mother dies, Hank returns to his small Indiana town for the funeral, and shares the awkward company of his estranged family: dad and longtime judge (Robert Duvall) and his two brothers (Vincent D’Onofrio and Jeremy Strong). Hank’s escape is thwarted when his

dad is arrested for a hit-and-run and needs a decent defense attorney. Apparently the only one in town is a vomiting, antique-loving goober played by Dax Shepard, who is no match for the out-oftown prosecutor, portrayed by a reptilian Billy Bob Thornton, in a tight threepiece suit.

THE JUDGE STARRING: Robert Downey Jr., Robert Duvall, Vera Farmiga, Vincent D’Onofrio DIRECTED BY: David Dobkin

The re-education of son and the defense of dad takes mucho time, with shouting matches, unstartling revelations, detours into history and Hank’s reunion with his high school girlfriend, Sam (Vera Farmiga). The script bends over backward to portray Sam as a strong independent woman (she owns things!), but alas, her role here is to help Hank self-actualize.

The Judge willfully careens between mystery, soap opera and comedy. (There’s even a tornado, during which there is also a huge family fight.) Munching through this stuffed casserole are some good actors, who do find occasional moments of meaning and grace. But the script prefers Downey to be a snarky motor-mouth and Duvall to be grumpy and taciturn, and it rarely gives either actor an opportunity to drop their character’s signature shield and do more nuanced work. The film is ultimately everything you’d expect from a TV movie, but with better actors. To recap: You can’t (or can) go home again. Nothing is as true as your first love. Family matters. Integrity beats money and the truth beats dodging jail. If only my father loved me. Things are better at the lake house. Pie matters. Courtrooms are for revealing big emotional secrets. Jerky people hurt, too. Ssssh, somebody has c-a-n-c-e-r. And you can always count on a small-town diner to be playing your favorite 1970s country songs. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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HALLOWEEN COSTUMES SIZE SMALL TO 3X/4X • HALLOWEEN WIGS • • HOSIERY • HATS • • FINGER CYMBALS • • CAPES • MAKE-UP • AND MORE LARGEST SIZE SELECTION OF BRAS 32A-50N

11604 KELEKET DRIVE PENN HILLS • 412-243-5214

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE BEST OF ME. Oh, Nicholas Sparks, will the world ever tire of your soft-Southern-rain, tinged-with-tragedy romantic melodramas? Michael Hoffman directs this latest adaptation, and it’s a double-header: two romances for the price of one! Former high school sweethearts (Michelle Monaghan and James Marsden) return to their hometown for a funeral. This will-they-or-won’t-they is intercut with the tale of how their relationship developed as teens: She’s a rich girl, he’s white trash, but each comes from ridiculously caricatured families, so they’ve got that in common. For fans of novelist Sparks, it’s all here: the hero with a secret, the charming cottages, a “shocking” death, canoodling in water and ridiculous contrivance … um, I mean, fateful events. Starts Fri., Oct. 17 (Al Hoff) THE BOOK OF LIFE. This digitally animated comedy from Jorge R. Gutierrez is packed wallto-wall with gorgeous, colorful imagery, much of it set in Mexican folkloric lands of the dead. (There might be a million sugar skulls in this film.) Amid a sprawling cast, reluctant young bullfighter Manolo (voice of Diego Luna) must undertake a quest and face down fears to become the man he should be, and ensure the worlds of the living and the dead are properly aligned.

Housebound blood-spurting, well-integrated humor and a comprehensive exploration of the term “housebound.” 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16; 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 19; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 21. Hollywood (AH) MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN. Jason Reitman directs this ensemble dramedy about how everpresent social media affects the lives of teenagers and their parents. Starring Ansel Elgort, Rosemarie DeWitt and many devices. Starts Fri., Oct. 17. PRIDE. In 1984, British gay-rights campaigners lend their support to striking coal miners, in Matthew Warchus’ new dramedy. Bill Nighy, Imelda Staunton and Dominic West star. Starts Fri., Oct. 17. Manor

REPERTORY

The Book of Life The story, with its roots in folk tales about life, death and life-after-death, has potential, and it makes novel transitions between the two realms, even broaching complicated ideas about how memory can transcend death. But its charms were frequently derailed by juvenile humor (two poop jokes in the first couple of minutes), soundtrack-ready pop songs and witless dialogue. The voice of Ice Cube has a small role, and he gets in another “good day” joke — because what kiddie film doesn’t need a reference to a song about gang violence, weed and hook-up sex from 1993? Maybe we do all live on in various afterworlds, but some pop-culture references just need to die. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Oct. 17 (AH) HOUSEBOUND. After a bungled robbery, Kylie (Morgana O’Reilly) is sentenced to house arrest at her childhood home, a place her chatty mom (Rima Te Wiata) thinks is haunted. Kylie ignores her mom, per usual, but the weird sounds, power failures and spooky things that do seem to be happening catch her attention. Gerard Johnstone’s horror comedy (a New Zealand import) has much to recommend it: a plot full of twists, a take-charge female lead, the requisite jump-out scares, the odd bit of

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ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Woody Allen Week: The Front (1976 comedy about blacklisted writers during the Cold War), Oct 15-16. Manhattan (Allen’s blackand-white 1979 love letter to the island of Manhattan), Oct. 15-16. Sleeper (1973 sci-fi comedy about a hippie in the future), Oct. 15-16. Zombie Week: White Zombie (1932 voodoo classic starring Bela Lugosi), Oct. 17, 19, 20, 21 and Oct. 23. Night of the Living Dead (George Romero’s 1968 classic that practically created the modern zombie genre), Oct. 17-18 and Oct. 20. ParaNorman (animated spooky 2012 comedy about a boy who can talk to the dead), Oct. 17- 23. Army of Darkness (Sam Raimi’s 1992 wrap-up of the Evil Dead trilogy, set in the Middle Ages), Oct. 17-20 and Oct. 22. Shaun of the Dead (2004 U.K. comedy mixing romance, comedy and zombies), Oct. 17-19, Oct. 21 and Oct. 23. Planet Terror (2007 Robert Rodriguez’s homage to grindhouse horror), Oct. 17-19 and Oct. 22. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. PATHS OF GLORY. Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 World War I drama, vividly shot in a clean, black-and-white documentary style and starring Kirk Douglas, remains a powerful piece of filmmaking and has rightfully taken its place in the canon of great anti-war films. Continues a year-long celebration of Kubrick films. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15. Hollywood (AH)

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THE EXORCIST. Here’s a classic horror film worth seeing in the theater, if only for full immersion in Mike Oldfield’s creepy soundtrack. Time has quelled many of the shocks of William Friedkin’s 1973 film, but the subject matter — a 12-year-old girl potentially possessed by the devil — is still pretty unsettling. Plus, you can’t really be sure the good guys have triumphed. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

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BARBARA. Christian Petzold directs this meditative, character-driven thriller about one woman’s life in a small town in 1980s East Germany. The 2012 film continues a series of German films, keyed to the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In German, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16. Cathedral of Learning (Room 324), University of Pittsburgh campus, Oakland. Free. 412-648-2614

Paths of Glory (1957) - 10/15 @ 7:30pm

Directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Kirk Douglas. -----------------------------------------------------------Housebound (2014) – 10/16 @ 7:30pm, 10/19 @ 7:00pm, 10/21 @ 7:30pm Comedy/Horror from New Zealand. ------------------------------------------------------------

THE GREAT SILENCE. Sergio Corbucci directs this 1968 Western in which a mute gunslinger faces off against a gang of bounty hunters. Look for future arthouse star Klaus Kinski. This film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series, which offers patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@ yahoo.com. POLTERGEIST. In Tobe Hoper’s 1982 thriller, a family is initially amused by the presence of ghosts in the home … until somebody disappears. The 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18, Poltergeist screening is the Hollywood’s Halloween party, and tickets ($15-20) include Poltergeist, drinks, snacks, a costume contest and the late-night screening of Rocky Horror Picture Show. 2 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18, and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22. Hollywood SECRET CINEMA: TOON TIME EDITION. A fundraising, family-friendly evening of food, beverages, cartoon-themed art, raffle, DJ Zombo and of course, short animated films and one “secret” animated feature. 9 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.) Fri., Oct. 17. Hollywood. $20 (benefits Children’s Hospital Foundation and the Hollywood) PARKWAY HORROR FILMS. The month of Halloween brings plenty of classic horror. On Sat., Oct. 18, catch Gremlins (4:30 p.m.), 1978’s Dawn of the Dead (6:30 p.m.) and Zombie (1979), at 9 p.m. On Sun., Oct. 19, it’s a Monster Mash Marathon, beginning at 2 p.m.: Dracula, The Wolf Man, Frankenstein, Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man, Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein and The Invisible Man. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3; marathon $6/$3 (kids) BRASSLANDS. Every year in a tiny village in Serbia, half a million people gather for an international musical competition between brass bands that play Balkan music. This somewhat shaggy documentary, filmed by a collaborative known as the Meerkat Media Collective, is your ticket to the show. In English, and Serbian, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 18. SouthSide Works (Al Hoff)

Secret Cinema Toon Time Edition

The Best of Me screening each weekend through October. On Sun., Oct. 19, it’s “Women of the New Ukrainian Cinema,” a program of short narrative and documentary films (5:30 p.m.). And at 7 p.m., Lubomyr Levytsky will present his drama Shadows of Unforgotten Ancestors, about students helping Carpathian magicians. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $8. 412-364-2794 or www.ucowpa.org. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN. Mel Brooks’ loving spoof of the classic film Frankenstein features Gene Wilder as Dr. Franken-STEEN, Teri Garr as his comely assistant, Peter Boyle as the creature and the incomparable Madeline Kahn as the doctor’s taffeta-clad fiancée. The 1974 film continues a month-long, Sundaynight series of comic horror films. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 19 (Regent Square); also, 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22 (AMC Loews) REEL ABILITIES. The second annual film festival showcasing films about the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities runs through Wed., Oct. 30. The opening film, Jenni Gold’s recent documentary CinemAbility looks at how Hollywood has portrayed people with different abilities, from silent films to today’s wildly popular X-Men franchise. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 22. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $10-20. www.jfilmpgh.org FARGO. In the Coen brothers’ Oscar-winning 1996

dark comedy (and affectionate send-up of the upper Midwest), a pregnant, down-to-earth cop (Frances McDormand) calmly sorts out a kidnap-murder case, you betcha. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. Melwood BRADDOCK, AMERICA. Braddock is the focus of Jean Loic Portron and Gabrielle Kessler’s recent full-length documentary, which uses the history of the once-lively mill town to examine larger issues around de-industrialization. The pair did extensive interviews with local residents, who shared how the town’s shifting fortunes have impacted them and the community. But as the title suggests, the filmmakers also cast Braddock as the representative of towns in similar situations worldwide. Concludes a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412831-3871 or www.battleofhomesteadfoundation. org. Free

10/17 @ 7:00pm Family-friendly secret movie, music, food and more! -----------------------------------------------------------Poltergeist (1982) 10/18 @ 2:00pm, 10/22 @ 7:30pm -----------------------------------------------------------Hollywood Halloween Party - 10/18 @ 7:00pm Spooky shorts, Poltergeist screening, food and drinks. -----------------------------------------------------------Rocky Horror Picture Show - 10/18 @ Midnight -----------------------------------------------------------Silents, Please! Featuring Nosferatu (1922) 10/19 @ 4:00pm Live original score performed by the Andrew Alden Ensemble. ------------------------------------------------------------

Breakfast & A Movie Featuring Rear Window

(1954) - 10/19 @ 10:30am Hitchcock thriller, purchase tickets by 10/16 for catered brunch. -----------------------------------------------------------Rear Window (1954) - 10/20 @ 7:30pm Hitchcock thriller starring Jimmy Stewart and Grace Kelly.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

BLACKENSTEIN. This 1973 exploitation horror feature from William A. Levey cashes in on both the Mary Shelley classic about a rebuilt man and the 1972 hit Blacula. Eddie is an injured AfricanAmerican Vietnam vet whose experimental medical treatments cause him to go on cannibalistic rampages and develop a squared-off Afro resembling the head of Boris Karloff’s creature. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 23. Hollywood. $5

REAR WINDOW. The convalescing photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies (Jimmy Stewart) is an involuntary but enthusiastic couch-potato prototype: Bored to distraction, he needs to spy on his Greenwich Village neighbors. So while Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller is a characteristically terrific entertainment, it’s also a witty, probing look at spectatorship and voyeurism centered on a man who wants to see without being seen, and what happens once that’s no longer possible. 10:30 a.m. Sun., Oct. 19, and 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 20. Hollywood (Bill O’Driscoll)

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NOSFERATU. F.W. Murnau’s 1922 silent classic offers a Dracula retelling. The vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. With his anguished face and unwieldy talons, Schreck’s Orlock evokes both pity and horror, and combined with Murnau’s stylish direction, this landmark film offers unforgettable tableaux, such as Orlock’s ascension from the ship’s hold. With live musical accompaniment from The Andrew Alden Ensemble, an electronic chamber-music group visiting from Boston. 4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 19. Hollywood

Real People. Real Stories. Really Good Films.

HOVERLA UKRAINIAN-AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. The month-long film festival continues with films

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[BOOK REVIEW]

“SO I TALK AND TALK AND WORK TO TRY AND FILL THE EMPTINESS.”

ROAD SCHOLAR {BY FRED SHAW} While the long literary tradition of wanderlust spans from Gilgamesh and The Odyssey to On the Road and beyond, the journey typically finishes with the hero’s transformation. The speaker in Jason Baldinger’s newest poetry collection, The Lower Forty-Eight (Six Gallery Press), usually ends up in a bar. Even so, the book employs its down-to-earth tone honestly as the reader follows along on a ride that touches all of the continental U.S. Baldinger, a Pittsburgh resident and itinerant worker of odd jobs, is plainspoken in these poems, blending aspects of reportage, ode and elegy into 109 pages imbued with the ghost of a restless Kerouac. And while he pays respect to the Beats, there is something universal about the road-trip adventure touched upon here: boredom, unexpected thrills and friendship. The Lower Forty-Eight is more than homage, though, as he references this country’s troubled history through mentions of abolitionist John Brown, Civil War battles and the Indian Trail of Tears. This is best represented in “Another Stupid Fucking White Man,” when Baldinger writes, “At Wounded Knee, / Pine Ridge Reservation has bled more than once. / Red Cloud’s grandchildren burn sage, prepare for ceremony. / I am out of place. / Another stupid fucking white man amazed by walls / painted in history, / steeped in the blood / of the American Indian Movement.” It’s a reminder that for all the invocations of tourist traps and roadside markers, this nation’s past is so often molded from tragedy and ignorance. Baldinger’s straightforwardness makes no attempt to excuse horrific events. Travel can also be reductionist, distilling life to basic human needs: food, drink and recreation. The theme echoes throughout the The Lower Forty-Eight, best summed up in “These Days of Heaven”: “In Bradenton, it’s a typical night. / Redneck princesses in high heels and Daisy Dukes / serve Cuban sandwiches in dive delis. / Everyone drinks Highlife on picnic benches outside. / Across the street, a ballgame, / prayers accompany first pitch. Star-Spangled Banner. / Home team loss followed by fireworks.” It’s a quintessential portrait he balances by later asking, “You have found America, / now can you find your soul?” It’s a complicated inquiry our society perhaps too often tries to resolve through patriotism or crass commercialism. While Baldinger’s lines sometimes lack compression and musicality, The Lower Forty-Eight embraces the trials of travel and the necessary questions that follow. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CORRECTION The article about ScareHouse in last week’s issue misidentified its address. The seasonal haunted house is located in Etna.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATTRESS FACTORY}

Small alll tow town: Ryder town: R der Henry’s Ryd Henry’ Hen ry’s “Diaspora” (detail)

BEMUSED AND BEWILDERED [ART REVIEW] [A

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

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HE MATTRESS Factory’s leg of the

Pittsburgh Biennial, Artists in Residence, includes five distinct installations, by Pittsburgh-based artists Danny Bracken, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, John Peña and Ben Sota. While the exhibition has no specific theme, there are noticeable differences between the four installations at the Mattress Factory’s main building and the one in the museum’s annex, on Monterey Street. The pieces at the main building are linked by a sense of whimsy mixed with melancholy. They feel like they fit together in a generational cohort. Incorporating aspects like interactivity, technology, activism, mundanity and sci-fi fantasy, the pieces combine to present an exuberant and accessible vibe. They are not frivolous or upbeat, but rather convey a thoughtful and earnest angst. Not resigned, but bemused and bewildered by the beauty and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

pain of life itself. Take, for instance, Peña’s thought bubbles. Though derived from cartoons, these are not the two-dimensional variety that encase dialogue or thoughts attributed to characters in a comic cell. Instead they are three-dimensional — crafted from plaster

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE continues through spring 2015. Mattress Factory, 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

and extruded foam, bulky and hefty both physically and psychically. On one is written: “So I talk and talk and work to try and fill the emptiness.” Addressing our basic instinct to reach out to other humans, the statement conjures thoughts about the use and overuse of language to counter-

act our befuddlement and loneliness. By using the cartoon bubble, Peña also seems to make reference to texting and the now ubiquitous bubble icon. Peña’s other sculpture, while smaller, carries an equally forlorn message: “Sometimes I just don’t know how to be in the world.” Peña’s sculptures are bolstered by a jumble of wooden 2-by-4’s, a basic element of construction. The lumber both buttresses and anchors the balloons. In his artist statement, Peña says: “When manifested in the physical world … words can be so light and yet so heavy that they need to be braced in order to remain in the world.” It is not insignificant that Peña uses a tool originally born of print media but later adapted to 21st-century technology. Cartoon zines and graphic novels have gained renewed interest as part of a DIY and retro resurgence that is similarly employed by the other artists in the main space.


BROTHERHOOD {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[DANCE]

Dancer and choreographer Anthony Williams {PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNA MALGUINA}

Sota’s “Damn everything but the circus” is an extension of his work as founder and artistic director of the Zany Umbrella Circus, which he describes as a “socially conscious street theater/circus company that exists to strengthen communities through education and folk artistry.” Visitors enter Sota’s installation through a turnstile and a circus-tent-type entrance underneath an old-timey hand-lettered banner that reads “Extra Ordinary Experiences Inside!” You have the option of donning a handmade mask before entering. Once inside, you can try your hand at a variety of circus skills using implements such as a performance wheel, a balancing ball, a clown bike and a tightrope. Somber circus music accompanied by strings of lights that slowly flash on and off set a mood that is definitively more Old World traveling carnival than Cirque du Soleil. Like Sota and Peña, Henry is clearly enamored of handcraft. His “Diaspora” is a fantastical miniature megacity with little satellite islands supporting their own buildings floating around it. Henry calls it a “transition zone between the earthbound city and outer-space habitation.” He has placed glowing miniature towers on poles nearby that represent a “suburban expanse” that then transitions to the cosmos, where a variety of spaceships as “self-contained biospheres” dangle. Henry’s city, while static, is so intricate that it begs comparison to Chris Burden’s kinetic sculpture “Metropolis II,” just without the frenetic motion. In the basement of the main building are works by Bracken. While he uses the most technology, he still captures the same sense of wonderment that imbues the other installations. Using natural components like grass, stone and water, he explores the boundaries of experience. The most successful pieces here are “Is Always,” a video projection that uses a circle of real grass on one side and a circular video projection of a grass lawn on the other, and “What Does it Mean?,” a rainbow recreated indoors with light and water that takes its title from a viral YouTube video of a double rainbow captured by an ecstatic Yosemitebear Vasquez. Meanwhile, Montgomery’s “Body Memory Architecture” fills the house on Monterey Street with handmade objects, works on paper, words and stencils. It is far more enigmatic and rarefied than the other four installations and has a definite feminist aesthetic that, while soulful, feels derivative of artists like Eva Hesse, Ann Hamilton and Elizabeth Newman. Montgomery’s installation feels very much like its own show. But taken as a whole, Artists in Residence captures that wistful but animated mood that comes from creative discovery.

TA S T E

Beyond simply entertaining audiences, concert dance is an important means of self-expression for its creators and performers. Some artists employ dance as a forum to air their thoughts and feelings on issues important to them. In Loving Black, Oct. 17 at The Alloy Studios, local dancer and choreographer Anthony Williams uses dance to advance his own views on the complicated attitudes surrounding love and friendship between African-American men. Loving Black is the latest in the KellyStrayhorn Theater’s Fresh Works series. The 30-minute work-in-progress reflects Williams’ personal perceptions of the African-American male, along with ideas about self-love gleaned from the writings of Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, James Baldwin and others. Williams, 27, is a Chicago native who trained and performed with Ballet Chicago and Deeply Rooted Dance Theatre before moving to Pittsburgh to join the nowdisbanded August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble. He’s currently a freelance dance artist and resident teaching artist at the Kelly-Strayhorn. Loving Black, a multimedia work, is set to a mix of original music created by Jovan Sharp: spoken word, jazz and funk. Williams says the piece takes something as simple as the way African-American males greet each other with a handshake instead of a hug and examines it through the lens of hip-hop culture and history via slavery’s lingering effect on how AfricanAmerican males behave in social situations. Williams says that slavery conditioned African Americans to believe they were less worthy as human beings, and that this demoralization carries over into today. “There are other things men of color do that can be viewed as self-hate,” says Williams. “We don’t always view women as equals.” Williams says the work also references a divide within the black community. Some African Americans, he says, want to distance themselves from their ethnicity in their personal appearance, while others are ridiculed for not being “black enough.” Williams means to engage his audience in the complexity of past and present representations of black male identities and attitudes. Beyond that, he says he wants Loving Black’s cast of four men of color, including himself, to be positive role models for the Pittsburgh dance community, where he feels professional African-American male dancers are currently underrepresented. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FRESH WORKS: ANTHONY WILLIAMS’ LOVING BLACK 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 17. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10-15. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org +

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER}

Fisher Neal and Lynne Wintersteller in The Glass Menagerie, at the Pittsburgh Public Theater

[PLAY REVIEWS]

HANDLE WITH CARE {BY TED HOOVER}

THE BOYS & GIRLS CHOIR OF HARLEM FRIDAY // NOVEMBER 7 // 7:30 P.M. ST. PAUL CATHEDRAL CORNER OF FIFTH & CRAIG STREET GENERAL $ ADMISSION

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www.showclix.com • 1-888-718-4253 For group discounts contact janderson@hillhouse.org or 412-392-4474.

WHEN I WAS in high school, I bought a subscription to the premiere season of Pittsburgh Public Theater. Its first production was of Tennessee Williams’ heartshattering classic The Glass Menagerie. Here we are 40 years later, and as the Public marks the anniversary with a new production of Menagerie, there I sat watching it again … not as a fresh-faced kid, but as the legendary cultural tastemaker I’ve become.

THE GLASS MENAGERIE continues through Nov. 2. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

On the whole, I have to say the Public has aged far better than me. By now, I hope we all agree that Menagerie is the greatest American drama ever written. Williams turned a life of suffering and heartbreak into a work of unspeakable beauty. We’re in the rundown St. Louis tenement flat of Amanda Wingfield and her children, Tom and Laura. Each exists in

emotional torment, clinging together in refuge from a world certain to destroy; yet the tighter they cling, the more likely they are to destroy each other. Later a fourth character enters, the Gentleman Caller, who precipitates that destruction. Director Pam Berlin, I’m happy to say, doesn’t resort to ego-fueled directorial tricks or gimmicks; she approaches the play squarely and allows Williams’ beauty to shine through. I will say that, curiously, she shies from the harrowing stakes central to the work; much of the desperation and subtext lay inactivated. This is especially clear with Fisher Neal, who informs his portrayal of Tom with a certain jaunty cheerfulness and remains an unaffected visitor in his own life. Writing a poem seems implausible, if not impossible, for this Tom. Lynne Wintersteller attacks the role of Amanda with tremendous energy and speed, though I’m not sure we are ever shown that Amanda is unconsciously driven to be the crushing force she is. Only the painfully bruised Cathryn Wake, as Laura, gives a sense of the hidden life each character retreats to in crisis. But I should say that I’ve never seen a “perfect” Menagerie; I’m not sure it’s even possible. What I hope for is a chance to hear once again Williams’ glorious song of sorrow, and I’m happy to say this production provides that opportunity. Happy 40th! I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW HORIZON THEATER, INC.

Presents The World Premiere of

QUEENS

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

OF THE BLUES

Written by Sanetta Y. Gipson and Joe Plummer Directed by Joe Plummer

Oct. 23rd - Nov. 2nd, 2014

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Thurs, Fri, Sat at 7:30PM • Sat, Sun at 3PM

No evening performance on Nov. 1 Two performances on Nov. 2 Maker Theater (Steel City Improv) 5950 Ellsworth Avenue On street parking available.

Tickets: $15, $20. Group Rates Available To Purchase Tickets: newhorizontheater@yahoo.com or call (412)431- 0773

CTRS IS CONDUCTING CLINICAL TRIALS FOR: • CONSTIPATION • GOUT • ALZHEIMER DISEASE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

David Whalen and Gayle Pazerski in Macbeth, at PICT Classic Theatre

HANDS OF FATE {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} MURDER, MAYHEM and witchcraft: Is there a more Halloween-appropriate play from Shakespeare than Macbeth? PICT Classic Theatre pulls out all the stops for this incarnation of the proverbial Scottish play, remaining faithful enough to please purists while adding a tinge of avant-garde sensibilities.

MACBETH continues through Oct. 25. Stephen Foster Memorial Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave. Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 x207 or www.picttheatre.org

This is a show that triumphs or falls based on the title character, and in that regard, PICT’s Macbeth does not disappoint. David Whalen, as the eponymous king, is a sight to behold. While there are a number of strong turns among the supporting players, Whalen commands the stage in a way that eclipses those around him. His textured performance runs the gamut from joy to guilt to the inevitable megalomania, yet at no point does he waver from the core of his conflicted character. The relationship between Macbeth and Gayle Pazerski’s Lady Macbeth com-

mences on a strong, almost playful note, but ultimately, director Alan Stanford chooses not to focus too tightly on the nuances of the couple’s rapport. In some ways, this is a shame because, if cultivated, the natural chemistry between Whalen and Pazerski could have contributed an even deeper level of tragedy to the performance. But when half your characters are slaughtered by curtain call, there’s probably more than enough misfortune to go around. Despite the strength of the cast, the production is not without its limitations. Although an interesting stylistic choice, the slow-motion battle sequences become a bit tedious, especially by the final act. Likewise, the gloomy lighting and omnipresent fog imbue the stage with a deeper sense of dread, but a few key moments are at times difficult to see. Michael Montgomery’s c o s t u m e d e s i g n t a ke s several unusual risks: eschewing all forms of footwear and cladding Karen Baum’s witch goddess Hecate in a get-up that would look at home in a ’90s goth club. Still, these are the little touches that set this staging of Macbeth apart from other Shakespeare productions. Although a tried-and-true interpretation tends to placate audiences, a modern edge is what makes it unforgettable.

Mild to Moderate

• BIRTH CONTROL PATCH

• HIGH CHOLESTEROL WITH HEART ATTACK OR STROKE • HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/ UTERINE FIBROIDS

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN, DR. G. WALKER WWW.CTRSLLC.COM OUR STUDIES CHANGE REGULARLY. CALL US TO SEE IF WE HAVE A STUDY THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU. PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION 412-363-1900.

DAVID WHALEN, AS THE EPONYMOUS KING, IS A SIGHT TO BEHOLD.

BE THE FIRST! Cocktail Hour • Appetizers • Raffles & Auction VIP $75 • General Admission $60 • 412-823-8272 www.ccfa.org/chapters/wpawv

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

OCT. 18 The Duhks hk

+ THU., OCT. 16 {STAGE} In Day Room Window, local playwright and director Bonnie Cohen tells the stories of nine adolescent girls incarcerated as adults. The independent production, opening tonight at the New Hazlett Theater, is born from her experience practicing drama therapy in a women’s prison. Cohen, whose stage experience dates back 40 years, hopes the show w will influence public attitudes and policies on child incarceration. ration. Her cast features local cal theater veterans Debra Gordon, John Gresh, David vid Santiago and Jennifer ennifer Tober as well as Pitt and Point Park ark students. Danielle elle Fox 7:30 p.m. Show how continues until Oct. 25. 6 Allegheny heny Square East, North Side. $10-18. -18. 412-320-5842 orr www.dayroom window.com

boasts a long career tackling political and ethical issues, including a stint at an anti-government newspaper in South Africa. His acclaimed book King Leopold’s Ghost chronicles the Belgian king’s genocide in the Congo in the 1880s, a situation which spurred heroic humanitarian efforts. Hochschild, who lives in San Francisco, also writes for Mother Jones and The New Yorker. Tonight, he visits the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium as part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. DF F 8:30 p.m. 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. www. writing. pitt.edu

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

Five-time New York Times Notable Book author Adam Hochschild

{WORDS} Named one of Rolling Stone’s best comedy podcasts, storytelling show Risk! Live stops in Pittsburgh with creator and host Kevin Allison. Risk guests have included comedy big shots Sarah Silverman, Margaret Cho and Michael Ian Black. In Pittsburgh, Allison and local storytellers Justin Channell, Stacy Keene, David Montgomery and Andy Mo Picarro will get personal Pic with revealing stories they wit previously tried to bury in pre their subconscious. Steel City the Improv presents the touring Im show in The Maker Theater. sho On Saturday, Allison will lead storytelling workshops. DF sto p.m. Maker Theater, 7p 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 595 $20. www.risk-show.com $20

{STAGE} {S

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JJohn ohn h Hodgman

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BEX FINCH}

Al Steriopoulos grew up Alki in Pittsburgh and went on to a career in music, notably as a conductor on Broadway and a off-Broadway. But now he’s written and n composed his first musical, co and a it harks to his Pittsburgh roots: 21 recounts the oftenro turbulent life and tragic death tu of Roberto Clemente, the


sp otlight

Pirates’ Hall of Fame outfielder and humanitarian. The world premiere, staged by Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company, is directed by veteran actor and director Richard Sabellico. Tonight’s opening night for the show, which focuses on Clemente’s relationship with the women in his life, including his mother, his wife and his sister Anairis. “This is not a show about baseball,” Steriopoulos has said. “This is a show about love, about honor, about integrity, about respect.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Show continues through Oct. 26. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburgh playhouse.com

Botanical Gardens’ Fall Flower Show celebrates the changing hues of harvest season with bounties of chrysanthemums in red, purple and other rich colors — a Phipps staple since 1983. Phipps’ chrysanthemums range from cascades of blooms and dramatic single buds to tentacle-like florets and other intriguing displays of blossoms. Model-railroad displays run

West End theater. Today’s the final performance of October’s installment, Jungle Book Kids. The hour-long event includes the show, a meet-and-greet with the cast, and a treat from local businesses. And it’s free for kids. BO Noon-1 p.m. 327 S. Main St., West End. Free ($3 for adults). 412-539-0900 or www.pittsburghmusicals.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL G. WIEGMAN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

As a college student, Khet Mar (pictured) participated in the Burmese liberation movement. For distributing her political poems, Khet spent a year in jail, where she was tortured; after her release, her writings were censored by the military dictatorship. In 2009, she became a writer in residence at City of Asylum/Pittsburgh — the third of five writers persecuted in their home countries whom the group has sheltered to date. (North Side-based COAP, headed by Henry Reese, provides residents a stipend and health care for two years, and free housing for up to four.) Khet spent three years here with her husband and two sons; she says via email that she was for the first time free to write her short stories, essays and poems. (Her work has since been published in Myanmar/Burma, too.) Khet now works as a broadcaster and translator for Radio Free Asia in Washington, D.C. On Oct. 18, COAP marks its 10th anniversary with Exiled Voices 2014. The free event includes readings by all five COAP residents of writings that got them persecuted. Joining Khet are famed dissident Chinese poet Huang Xiang (who now lives in New Jersey); Salvadoran novelist Horacio Castellanos Moya (now teaching at the University of Iowa); and current residents Israel Centeno (Venezuela) and Yaghoub Yadali (Iran). The readings will be assisted by local talent including poet Toi Derricotte and Quantum Theatre’s Karla Boos. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

{MUSIC}

The Duhks are back. The eclectic and rootsy Winnipegbased band comes off a two-year hiatus with three new musicians joining founder Leonard Podolak and returning vocalist Jessee Havey. New album Beyond {PHOTO BY the Blue (produced HEATHER MULL} by Mike Merenda and Ruth Unger of The Mammals) furthers the group’s blend of old-time, OCT. 17 French-Canadian The S Small ll R Room and Celtic music with {STAGE} at the Top of contemporary sounds, French-Canadian playthe Stairs from waltzes to Afro-Cuban wright Carole Fréchette’s rhythms The band employs The Small Room at the Top everything from lap steel, of the Stairs is a modern take fiddles and banjos to drums besides the autumn foliage. on Charles Perrault’s folk tale and electric guitars. The Duhks There’s also a Discover “Bluebeard.” The 2012 play (say it “ducks”) hit Carnegie Beekeeping showcase of — Off the Wall Productions’s Lecture Hall tonight courtesy bee-friendly plants and season-opener — finds Grace of Calliope. BO 7:30 p.m. beekeeping tools. The (Daina Michelle Griffith) 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. show, designed by Phipps drawn to the one room in $23-39. 412-361-1915 or display horticulturist Laura their 28-room mansion that www.calliopehouse.org Schoch, opens today. DF her new husband Henry (Ken 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Show Bolden) forbade her to enter. continues through Nov. 9. But ringing voices and One Schenley Park, Oakland. curiosity beckon. Ingrid $11-15. 412-622-6914 or Sonnichsen directs the play’s {TALK} Pittsburgh premiere. DF 8 p.m. www.phipps.conservatory.org Among the many things Show continues through Americans needlessly send {STAGE} Nov. 1. 25 W. Main Street, to landfills, one of the most Looking for affordable fun Carnegie. $5-35. 724-873-3576 egregious is food: We for kids? Pittsburgh Musical or www.insideoffthewall.com Theater offers Tales and Treats. reportedly discard 40 percent of the food we buy. It’s These Saturday-afternoon especially wasteful because productions of classic kids’ even food you don’t tales, targeted at ages 4-10, eat needn’t be uselessly are performed by PMT’s {EXHIBIT} entombed; it can become student actors in the group’s Phipps Conservatory and

OCT. 18 Fall Flower l Show

compost. (That’s fertilizer, son.) Learn how decomposition can work for you — and your garden — even on a porch or in a small urban backyard, in DIY Backyard Composting. The free class at the East End Food Co-op is taught by Travis Leivo, a composting pro from Shadyside Worms. BO 6:30 p.m. 7516 Meade St., Point Breeze. Free. Reservations at 412-242-3598

{SHOWCASE} RAW Pittsburgh holds its latest monthly showcase for artists in everything from visual art, film and fashion to the performing arts. Tonight, Pittsburgh’s iteration of the national RAW Artists network fills Xtaza Nightclub (formerly Club Zoo) with artists displaying their creations and live music and dance on stage. It’s a festivallike atmosphere; Kellee Maize {PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN FILIO}

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hosts, and the soundtrack’s by DJ duo Tracksploitation. BO 7 p.m.-midnight. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $15-20 (21 and up). www. rawartists.org/pittsburgh

+ THU., OCT. 23 {COMEDY} John Hodgman returns to Pittsburgh with new comedy material and the spectacles that earned him his role as “the person wearing glasses” in a number of hit TV shows. Hodgman was a New York-based journalist before he wrote a book of fabricated trivia, The Areas of My Expertise. His made-up facts earned him a spot on The Daily Show With Jon Stewart as, what else, the Resident Expert. Hodgman has also played “the PC” in a series of TV ads for Apple computers, gotten his own Netflix special and done two main-stage appearances at TED conferences. He’s at the Rex Theater tonight. DF 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $25. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

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premiere of a 1-man play written & performed by spoken word artist & national slam poet Leslie Ezra Smith. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 19. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. AN EVEING WITH POE. Feat. 2 of Poe’s most famous short stories: The Raven & The Tell-Tale Heart. Oct. 17-18, 7:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. THE GLASS MENAGERIE. A brand-new production of Tennessee Williams’ classic play. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 28. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. GRAND & GLORIOUS. Works from Rigoletto, Pagliacci, Norma, La forza del destino, Cavalleria Rusticana, more. Presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Sat., Oct. 18, 8 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-281-0912, x 213. I AM ARTIST. Scenes, monologues, & spoken word

poetry written by the members of Alumni Theater Company, w/ dances choreographed by Staycee Pearl, more. Oct. 17-18, 7 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. LITTLE WOMEN: THE MUSICAL. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 26. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-561-5511. LOVE, LOSS & WHAT I WORE. Nora Ephron’s work about the existential state of having nothing to wear. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. MACBETH. Presented by Shakespeare in South Park. Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 26. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8553. MACBETH. Something wicked this way comes. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Thru Oct. 19, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 25. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-PLAY. MURDER BY MAGIC. Interactive Murder Mystery. Sat., Oct. 18, 9 p.m. South Park Club House,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

South Park. 724-344-2069. 8 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 19. Andrew Carnegie OUTSIDE MULLINGAR. A comedy Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. about Tony Reilly, an aging Irish 412-734-8476. cattle farmer, written by the SPANK! THE FIFTY SHADES Pulitzer, Oscar, & Tony-winning PARODY. Comedy, musical author of Doubt & Moonstruck. numbers, more. Oct. 17-18, 8 p.m. Tue-Sun. Thru Nov. 2. City Theatre, Byham Theater, Downtown. South Side. 412-431-2489. 412-456-6666. THE PAJAMA PARTY MURDERS: MYSTERY DINNER CRUISE. Wed., Oct. 22, 6:30 p.m. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 724-344-2069. THE SMALL ROOM AT THE BEST BUDS OF COMEDY TOP OF THE STAIRS. TOUR. Headliner Sally Carole Frechette’s play Brooks with a Sam Evans, about Grace, who has Alex Stone, Mike stumbled into a fairyCronin, & Cam tale marriage complete O’Connor. 8 p.m. www. per with her own Prince a p Arcade Comedy pghcitym Charming & resplendent .co Theater, Downtown. mansion, but finds herself 412-339-0608. drawn to the mysterious COMEDY OPEN MIC room her husband has forbidden HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, her to enter. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Oct. 19-26, 3 p.m. Thru Nov. 1. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. 724-873-3576. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. THE SORCERER. Gilbert & 412-251-0097. Sullivan’s play presented by the PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, Pittsburgh Savoyards. Thu-Sat, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY THU 16

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER BOOK OF EZRA. The world

THU 16 - SAT 18 GREG FITZSIMMONS. 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 17, 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 18, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 17 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. CHRIS LEV, CHRIS LEVKULICH, MATT LIGHT, JEFF KONKLE W/ HOST AARON KLEIBER. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY & CLASSICS W/ MATT WOLFIE & TODD NEFF”. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. COMIC WARS. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. RISK LIVE. Kevin Allison’s award-winning storytelling show. 7 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CONTINUES ON PG. 88


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

VISUALART

THURSDAY OCT 16/10PM

DEAD SIGNAL CHASERS, CODE WHISKEY, COMMON NIGHTMARE From Postmortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots, at Photo Antiquities, on the North Side

NEW THIS WEEK BE GALLERIES. Suzanne Colvin: Recent Work. Placebased abstract works. Opening reception Oct. 18, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. THE CENTER FOR WOMEN. The Pittsburgh 10. Pop-Up exhibit feat. new works by artists Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Kathi DePasse, Joel Kranich, Helen Naimark, Lilli Nieland, Jane Ogren, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, David Sparks & Susan Sparks. Benefits The Center for Women. Oct. 19, 3-7 p.m. Squirrel Hill. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Once upon a time. Pittsburgh. Paintings by Fritz Keck. Opening reception Oct. 18, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. GALLERIE CHIZ. Fly On In. Take Off Your Shoes. Have a Seat! Mixed media by Michael Bestwick, Bill Miller, & Ron Nigro. Opening reception Oct. 17, 5:308 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. RAW Pittsburgh presents: Axis. 40+ Visual Artists, photographers, musicians, fashion designers, jewelry designers & hair designers. Oct. 22, 7 p.m.midnight. Strip District. 412-689-2802.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 720 RECORDS. Sara Eve Rivera. Work by local visual & tattoo artist. Closing reception Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent

collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League. Group show. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUNKERPROJECTS. Somewhere Over The_. A solo show by resident artist, Shikieth. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CCAC BOYCE CAMPUS. Keen 2013. Photographs by Xenia Guthrie. Monroeville. 412-371-8651. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. When the Space Shuttle Was. Photos of space shuttle & astronauts press conferences. Lawrenceville. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804.

EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Jurored by John Carson, head of the School of Art at CMU. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Something Alien: An ART Show by two people who don’t belong. New Works by Nick & Noell Romeo, feat. 3D digital renderings, music, photography, fractal generations, sculpture, & oil pastels. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772.

THURSDAY OCT 23/10PM

THE HELLBOUND COMEDY TOUR “4 comics and a band”

THURSDAY OCT 30/10PM

EMO NIGHT 17 TFabulous Art Elizabeth, PA

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Every Wednesday: Trivia Night FriDAY, OCT 17th:

Sailor Jerry’s “Stillers” Ticket Giveaway. $3 Sailor JerrY SHOTS Final Week for “Voice of SouthSide” Karaoke-ThursDAY!

ThursDAy, OCT 16th: Malibu Promotion Check out our facebook PAGE for upcoming Halloween Events! JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

HOUSE TEAM MEGAMIX: CHANGE MACHINE & WARP ZONE. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOE BRONZI, LIZ RUSSO, DAVID KAYE. 7:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. 724-379-7100. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE: D&D COMEDY. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. USS IMPROVISE. An improvised sci-fi comedy. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 20 UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 21 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 22 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

CONTINUED FROM PG. 87

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. rare examples of pre World War II Feat. imagery, film & oral history iron-making technology. Rankin. narratives to explore communities, 412-464-4020 x.21. cultures, & innovations. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours Downtown. 412-258-2700. with costumed guides featuring BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large this restored stagecoach stop. collection of automatic roll-played 724-238-4983. musical instruments and music CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. boxes in a mansion setting. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Call for appointment. O’Hara. Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards 412-782-4231. from the International Hall of BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. Preserved materials reflecting DEPRECIATION LANDS the industrial heritage MUSEUM. Small living of Southwestern PA. history museum Homestead. celebrating the 412-464-4020. settlement and history CARNEGIE of the Depreciation MUSEUM OF www. per Lands. Allison Park. NATURAL HISTORY. pa pghcitym 412-486-0563. RACE: Are We So .co FALLINGWATER. Tour Different? Text, the famed Frank Lloyd photographs, interactive Wright house. 724-329-8501. audiovisual components, & FIRST PRESBYTERIAN related artifacts challenge CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany perceptions about race. Oakland. stained-glass windows. 412-622-3131. Downtown. 412-471-3436. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome FORT PITT MUSEUM. (planetarium), Miniature Reconstructed fort houses Railroad and Village, USS Requin museum of Pittsburgh history submarine, and more. North Side. circa French & Indian War 412-237-3400. and American Revolution.

FULL LIST ONLINE

Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Pittsburgh Society of Artists 49th Annual Juried Member Exhibition. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley

Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story

McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. 68th Annual International Aqueous Exhibit. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society’s annual group show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An African-American Art Exhibition,. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Fall Flower show through Nov. 9th. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. CONTINUES ON PG. 90

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HYPNOTIC ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS:

5pm-5am at the new Crave Entertainment & Banquet Hall 2405 Brady’s Run Rd Beaver, Pa Featuring Live Music by: The Legendary Aphrodite, Frankie Bones, Queen of Bass Baby Anne, Trap & Twerk Producer Danny Diggz, Exclusive 3D Horror Show by DJ KOS A $1000+iPad Air for 1st place Best Costume, Haunted Maze, Scare Theater, Indoor & Outdoor Entertainment, Laser & Light Show, Magicians, Face Painters, Psychics, Vendors. Experience concert quality sound, lighting & fantastic haunted decor from local renown artists!

This is an ALL AGES event! Tickets are just $35 and VIPS are only $60! So get your tickets now at www.cravebanquethall.com or www.dancingskeletons.net

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[TALK] RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY THU 16 - SAT 18 ZOMBIES OF THE CORN. Zombie shoot & corn maze. Thu-Sat. Thru Nov. 1 Three Rivers Paintball & Airsoft, Zelienople.

FRI 17 - SAT 18 GHOST WALK. Oct. 17-18 YWCA of Westmoreland County, Greensburg. 724-837-1851. TRAIL OF TERROR. Benefits Pitcher Skatepark Project. www. pghtrailofterror.com Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 25 Carnegie Park, Carnegie. 724-228-9267.

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Downtown. 412-281-0912. CIRQUE: AFTER HOURS AT THE LIBRARY. Live music, magical entertainment, drinks, carnival-inspired treats, more. 7-10 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

SAT 18

Bill Nye and Ken Ham’s Creationism vs. Evolution debate earlier this year didn’t change many minds, but it did illuminate the depth of the perceived divide between science and religion. Michael Dowd — speaking Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the South Hills — takes a reconciliatory approach, arguing that the two concepts are not mutually exclusive. As a pastor, evolutionary theologian and author of Thank God for Evolution (which has received endorsements from six Nobel Prize-winning scientists), the continually-touring Dowd offers provocative ideas for people of all political and religious viewpoints. 6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 19. 1240 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-561-6277 or www.sunnyhill.org

EVERY VOICE! BENEFIT. Hors d’oeuvres, desserts & music from performers Klezlectic. Benefits the Pittsburgh School for the Choral Arts & Pittsburgh community music education. 7-10 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-267-7707. HALLOWEEN BOO & BREW. DJ, raffle, light appetizers, beer, & costume prizes. Benefits Plum Punishers Baseball Team 8 p.m. Zanders Sports Bar & Night Club, Monroeville. 724-387-2444. A NIGHT OF WINE & RABBITS. Wine, auction, music by Cello Fury. 6-10 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-580-6068. RACE FOR PACE. 5 mile run/walk, 1 mile dog walk, 1 mile fun walk. Benefits Pace School. 9 p.m. Pace School, Forest Hills. 412-342-4302. THE SPIRIT RUN. 1k fun walk to benefit the Emmaus Community of Pittsburgh 10 a.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. 412-381-0277. ST. BARNABAS CHARITIES FASHION GALA. Fashion event feat. 40 specialty retailers & artisans. 11 a.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5521.

SUN 19 FRI 17 - SUN 19 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE & THE VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 1 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. 412-823-4813.

SAT 18 MASQUERADE PARTY AT THE LIBRARY. 7 p.m. Bridgeville Public Library, Bridgeville. 412-221-3737.

SUN 19 LIVE READING OF PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 6 p.m. Row House Cinema, Lawrenceville. SCAREHOUSE UNMASKED! A BEHIND-THE-SCENES PITTSBURGH SCAREHOUSE TOUR. Meet at 2:45 PM at 25 W Station Square Dr. Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 26 Station Square, Station Square. 412-323-4709.

WED 22 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE & THE VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Wed-Sun. Thru Nov. 1 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. 412-823-4813.

DANCE FRI 17 FRESH WORKS @ THE ALLOY STUDIOS: ANTHONY WILLIAMS. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! AMACHI HACHI PACHI. Spoken Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. word performance by Leslie “Ezra” Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. Smith, presentation created by 412-361-3022. Amachi’s youth Ambassadors, THE PITTSBURGH 10: POP-UP dancing, hors d’oeuvres, more. ART EXHIBIT. Featuring new 6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the works by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. Hirsch-Brody, Kathi DePasse, Joel BANTAM NIGHT. Appetizers, Kranich, Helen Naimark, Lilli music, drink specials, more. Nieland, Jane Ogren, Phiris (Kathy) Benefits the Pittsburgh Curling Sickels, David Sparks & Susan Club. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Sparks. Benefits The Center for Barrel House, North Side. Women 3-7 p.m. The Center for HIGH-ENERGY HOE DOWN. Women, Squirrel Hill. Fiddling, banjo-playing, SAVORING SEWICKLEY. foot stomping. Signature dishes Benefits Conservation presented as small Consultants, Inc. plates by favorite local Mayernik Center. restaurants. 6 p.m. www. per 5:30-9:30 p.m. pa Sewickley Public Library, pghcitym Avonworth Community .co Sewickley. 412-741-6920. Park, Ohio Township. 412-773-7163. OAKLAND CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL’S LEADING LADIES GALA. 50s themed fundraiser. GLOBAL CHALLENGES All proceeds benefit Oakland & LOCAL IMPACTS: Catholic High School. 6 p.m. WOMEN’S HEALTH. 6:30-8 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Union Project, Highland Park. Downtown. 412-682-6797. 412-363-4550.

FUNDRAISERS THU 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

POLITICS

THU 16

FRI 17

WED 22

60TH ANNUAL DIAMOND HORSESHOE BALL: A NIGHT OF ILLUMINATE DISCOVERY. Cocktail reception, performances by the Pittsburgh Opera Resident Artists, auctions, dancing, more. 6 p.m. Omni William Penn,

A NIGHT OUT WITH THE WOMEN ON CITY COUNCIL. Deborah Gross, Darlene M. Harris, Theresa Kail- Smith, and Natalia Rudiak will share their experiences in office and on the campaign trail. Wine and cheese reception.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

6-8 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

LITERARY

environmental designer from Lawrenceville WHEN: Thu.,

SUN 19

Oct. 09,

SKIPPYJON JONES. Theatreworks USA’s play, based on the book by Judy Schachner. 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. YO GABBA GABBA! LIVE! MUSIC IS AWESOME! 2 & 5 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

PechaKucha Night Pittsburgh

ADAM HOCHSCHILD. Author of King Leopold’s Ghost 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-6508. BOOK SIGNING W/ CAROLINE CARLSON. Author of “The Very Nearly Honorable League of Pirates” 6 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS .. Ben Gwin, Wendy Scott, Sarah E. Adkins. Thu., Oct. 16, 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

Vol. 19, Downtown CRITIC: Hans Nielsen, 26, a

The event’s format is refreshing because you are not going to be bored by a long, drawn-out, dry presentation. [The presenters] go through their slides with very, very brief introductions, but it’s good because it gets the ball rolling. It forces someone who might not be that good at presenting and engaging to kind of speed up their process and move it along. Personally, I really liked the motorcycle story. I’m kind of a motorhead, so it really appealed to me. But it was interesting to hear the one about the lampposts. She was able to elaborate on and make so many connections in her life to these different characteristics of lampposts. It’s exciting to hear people tell their stories, and I feel like it takes a lot of courage to get up there and come up with something to say that’s meaningful to you, but maybe doesn’t have an outside directive.

THU 16 - SAT 18 FRIENDS OF SOUTH PARK TOWNSHIP BOOK SALE. Oct. 1618 South Hills Community Center, South Park. 412-833-5585.

FRI 17 MARIAN SZCZEPANSKI. Discussing her bood, Playing St. Barbara 7 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-536-1216. POET MICHAEL WURSTER & GUITARIST BILL WEINER. 7:30 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118.

SAT 18 CONVERSATIONS & CONNECTIONS CONFERENCE. Keynote by Roxane Gay, w/ panelists Sheryl St. Germain, Joy Katz, Sherrie Flick, Jeffrey Condran & Tom William. 8:30 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 814-880-1377. EXILED VOICES: CELEBRATING CITY OF ASYLUM’S 10TH ANNIVERSARY. Readings by Huang Xiang, Horacio Castellanos Moya, Khet Mar, Israel Centeno, & Yaghoub Yadali. 8 p.m. Alphabet City Tent, North Side. 412-323-0278. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

BY DANIELLE FOX

MON 20 COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. JODI PICOULT. Part of the Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

TUE 21 ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. Communication, leadership & public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. DAVID SEDARIS. 8 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 22

SUN 19 MICHAEL DOWD. Author of “Thank God for Evolution.” 6 p.m. Sunnyhill Unitarian Universalist Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-561-6277.

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PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing The Border Kingdom by D. Nurkse. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7663.

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FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. Sat, 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. FIDDLESTICKS FAMILY CONCERT. 10 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. GENEALOGY DAY. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

EVENT: AIA Pittsburgh’s

THU 16

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KIDSTUFF PINOCCHIO. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 19 New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437.

THU 16 - WED 22 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physicsof-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 17 - SUN 19 PIXEL ANIMATION. Discover how many patterns, pictures & interesting movements you can create using only black & white squares. Oct. 17-19 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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MON 20 MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Scientific activities for early learners ages 2–6. Mon, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Thru Oct. 27 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

MON 20 - WED 22 EXPLORING CROSS STITCH. Practice motor skills, work on your counting, create a unique design or just explore materials through this relaxing process. Oct. 20-22 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME LECTURES: MUSIC 101. Jeffrey Turner, Principal Bass: “Bass is Beautiful” 12:30 p.m. Heinz Hall,

THU 16 - TUE 21 REEL Q: PITTSBURGH LGBT FILM FESTIVAL. A celebration of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered writers, directors, actors & their work. Various films CONTINUES ON PG. 92

TUE 21

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Downtown. 412-392-4900. REGENT THEATRE CENTENNIAL BIRTHDAY RECEPTION. Hors d’oeuvres, toasts, & mingling with KST’s friends old & new. 5-7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. ST. CLAIR LECTURE: WAS THE WHISKEY REBELLION REALLY ABOUT WHISKEY? Talk by Terry Bouton, author of “Taming Democracy: ‘The People,’ the Founders, & the Troubled Ending of the American Revolution” 7:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE FRI 17 - SAT 18 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 18 19TH ANNUAL FINEVIEW STEP-A-THON. Begins at Howard Street, close to the historic pumping station. 8:30 p.m. 412-322-7257. FALL CRAWL. A scenic stroll on the Yough Trail. Mon Yough Trail, Elizabeth Township. 1:30 p.m. 41-751-5389. THE SPIRIT RUN. 5k Race & 1k Fun Walk 10 a.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. 412-381-0277.

TUE 21 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 22 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed

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[WORDS] & showtimes. Thru Oct. 21 Harris Theater, Downtown. 412-682-4111.

FRI 17 2014 ODYSSEY DAY. Event to educate fleet managers, municipalities, corporations, & others about alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CCAC West Hills Center. 412-735-4114. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. THE SECOND STEP: DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN. Presented by the Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence. 7:30 a.m. Mervis Hall at Pitt, Oakland. 412-648-1544.

FRI 17 - SAT 18 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 18

Halloween PThursday, arty 5th Annual

October 23rd XXX FEATURE ENTERTAINER RUBBER DOLL Guest DJs: DJ Mad Mike, DJ X & DJ magic Mike Costume Contest $300 cash Prize At Midnight 3100 Liberty Avenue • Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-281-3110

cheerleaderspittsburgh.com

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BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. “BRASSLANDS” SCREENING. Followed by dinner & traditional music & kolo dancing at the American Serbian Club of Pittsburgh, 2524 Sarah St., South Side. 5 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-381-7335. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA W/ THE ARTIST & JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. KNOW YOUR GMOS. Presentations & a participatory panel discussion feat. Chef Trevett Hooper, East End Food Co-op General Manger Justin Pizzella, & Director of Research &

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HUGH HAMRICK}

As touring literary types go, few visit Pittsburgh as reliably as David Sedaris. The best-selling humorist, author and self-admitted Fitbit addict lives in rural England, and his most recent book is Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls. He brings his sardonic wit and clever storytelling here every year, this time to the Carnegie Music Hall. 8 p.m. Tue., Oct. 21. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $29.50-49.50. 877-435-9849 or www.ticketfly.com

Development for NuGo Nutrition SPANISH CONVERSATION Bryan Petrak. Connan Room, GROUP. Friendly, informal. CMU. 6:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Mellon At the Starbucks inside Target. University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ East Liberty. 412-362-6108. MARKET. Sat, 12:30-4 p.m. Thru SWING CITY. Learn & practice Oct. 25 Allegheny Valley Bank swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Parking Lot, Lawrenceville. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. OUTERBRIDGE: CLOCKWORK 412-759-1569. MYSTERIES. Join this Canadian “A TOAST TO THE magic duo as they race the clock COMMUNITY” WINE TASTING. w/ the help of a Victorian time Wine & craft beers, food, door machine. Hillman Center for prizes, music by Kevin Howard Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. Jazz Quartet, more. Presented by 412-968-3040. Ohio Valley Hospital. 5:30 p.m. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Doubletree Pittsburgh Airport, Lessons 7-8 p.m., social Moon. 412-777-6313. dancing follows. No WIGLE WHISKEY partner needed. Mon, BARRELHOUSE 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & Grace Episcopal Church, 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey w. w w Mt. Washington. Barrel House, North er hcitypap g p 412-683-5670. Side. 412-224-2827. .com SHIPWRECKS: THE WILDCARD 5TH SCIENCE & HISTORY OF ANNIVERSARY PARTY. UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY. Free coffee, tote bags, in-store An interactive panel discussion scavenger hunt, & artist happy feat. local archaeology experts & hour. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Wildcard, historians. 11 a.m. Senator John Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. ALL ABOUT THE KRAUT. Make Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, your own sauerkraut, workshop 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public on the basics of fermentation. Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 2-3:30 p.m. Wilkins School

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 19


Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. IRISH PLACE NAMES IN PENNSYLVANIA. Talk by Peter Gilmore. 2 p.m. Epiphany Catholic Church, Uptown. 412-471-0257. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. Reservations required. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. TECHNICAL STORYTELLING FOR IT PROFESSIONALS W/ KEVIN ALLISON & REMY PORTER. Workshop to help IT professionals communicate technical info in a memorable, crystal-clear way. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-223-7183. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707. “THE WONDERS OF THE PANTHEON”. Lecture by MONDO ITALIANO. 3:30 p.m. Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

MON 20 COFFEE W/ THE CURATOR: LOOK AGAIN. Illustrated talk w/ curator Rachel Delphia, The Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design, in CMOA Theater. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE WOODY PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 21 ANNUAL CELEBRATE DIVERSITY UNITY RALLY. www.ywcawes tmoreland.org 5:30 p.m. St. Clair Park, Greensburg. 734-834-9390.

Theater, Dormont. 412-344-1245. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL. Pgh Disabilities Film Festival. 7 p.m., Sun., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. and Thu., Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

YES, YOU CAN DANCE Yes, You Can Dance aims to improve the well-being of individuals with special needs, senior citizens and those with degenerative diseases through community dances and classes. Volunteer dance mentors are needed to partner with students as part of the Special Needs Ballroom program. No experience required. The next training session is Sat., Oct. 19, at noon, at Steel City Ballroom in Mount Lebanon. Call 412-999-3998 or visit www.yesyoucandance.org.

BITTERS PACK RELEASE PARTY. Food/cocktail pairings, bitters making demo. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. KITCHEN TIPS & TECHNIQUES. Master the fundamentals of food prep including proper knife handling, kitchen setup, more. Reservations required. 6 p.m. Notion, East Liberty. 412-361-1188.

WED 22 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. DIY BACKYARD COMPOSTING. Composting professional Travis Leivo discusses different methods that can be used in a variety of urban settings, from backyards to porches. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. PGH 48 HOUR HORROR FILM PROJECT. 6-10 p.m. Hollywood

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TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS THE HERITAGE PLAYERS.

see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking artists for the upcoming craft show, The Holiday Market. Submissions are subject to screening by the North Hills Art Center, & can be delivered Nov. 3-8 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration deadline Oct. 27. Ross. 412-364-3622. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-in-thecultural-district/ . PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Fall new member screening, Oct. 19. Drop between 12:30-1:00pm. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last 2 years. $20.00 application fee. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com.

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Auditions for their Holiday Spectacular Family Variety Show. Oct. 26-27. Call or visit www.bphp. org. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MON RIVER ARTS. Seeking male actors age 20s-30s for stage adaptation of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Email monriverarts@ gmail.com or call for information. 412-405-8425.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

Four years ago, I met a man on a “married but looking” website. We exchanged fantasies, which included wanting to have threesomes and a D/s relationship. He was 19 years my senior. I was 42 at the time. For three years, we met twice a week for drinks or sex. The sex was amazing. We had several threesomes. One year ago, we separated from our spouses. We have lived together now for four months. It isn’t what I imagined: the merging of kids and dogs, a D/s relationship turning vanilla. And due to some health issues, he can perform only once a week. And now the real problem: His desire to bring another woman into our relationship borders on obsession. He searches daily on several websites for that “elusive woman” to become “our friend and lover.” He truly seems to be searching for a woman for a regular threesome. The problem is that I am questioning whether I want another woman in our life. I asked him why he is so obsessed with finding someone, and he simply said that it would be “fun and hot.” Since he is much older than most men on these sites, women tend to pass him over. I have this fervent wish that he doesn’t find someone. So do I sit back and hope that he doesn’t find another woman, or should I be upfront with him and tell him that I’m not interested in threesomes anymore? JUST WANTS TO BE MONOGAMOUS

then it’s monogamy you should ask for — but keep your mind, your options and those lines of communication all open. I’m a middle-aged, fat and happy gay man. My partner has a best friend, and they share everything — including our bed. Most weekends, we tromp through town together, watch TV together, and share waking and sleeping moments together. Recently I referred to us as “poly and in a triad,” and I was shocked by my partner’s response. He claims that we aren’t a triad; I say that if we’re sharing home, heart and bed, we’re in a poly relationship. Sign me … HONEST ACCIDENTALLY POLY PERSON, YEP

Being poly means being open to or being in more than one romantic relationship — concurrent committed relationships — and what you’ve described sounds pretty poly to me. Perhaps it’s the triad designation that makes your partner uncomfortable. That particular label implies that you’re all equal partners — not just equally attracted to each other and in love with each other, but equals on the emotional, social and financial fronts as well. Your partner may regard his best friend as fun to have around, but not an equal partner, and not someone he is responsible to/for in the same way you two are responsible for each other. Or maybe your partner regards his best friend as his boyfriend, not yours, and while he’s happy to share his boyfriend with you sexually, he’s not into the idea that you might be in love with his boyfriend and vice versa, so the “triad” label irks him.

YOUR PARTNER MAY REGARD HIS BEST FRIEND AS FUN TO HAVE AROUND, BUT NOT AN EQUAL PARTNER.

Ask yourself which conversation will be more difficult: A. After a frustrating and protracted search, your boyfriend finally manages to find a woman who’s interested in being your “friend and lover,” JWTBM. At that point, you tell him you’re no longer interested in a third, regular or otherwise, and he needn’t have bothered. B. You tell your boyfriend today — now — that you’re not interested in bringing a third into the relationship, regular or otherwise. It’s the same conversation either way, JWTBM: You’re gonna have to tell him you’re not interested. Don’t count on him dying before he manages to find someone; he may be too old for the women on the websites he’s haunting now, but sooner or later, either he’ll find his way to a website where his age isn’t an issue, or a bi woman into older men will stumble over one of the ads he already has up. He may be disappointed now to learn that you’re not interested in a third anymore, JWTBM, but he’s less likely to be breakup-level angry/hurt if you don’t stand there silently while he wastes time searching for a third. And who knows? An honest and open conversation about the state of your relationship might ignite an interest in a third. Would you feel differently about a third if it turned out she wasn’t for him (so nothing to be jealous about), but for you? He’s getting older, he has health issues, and he might want someone else around so that you won’t leave him to get your needs met. It’s also possible that a third would reignite the D/s dynamics that you miss. I’m not telling you that you have to agree to the third — if it’s monogamy you want,

I’m a married 28-year-old male. My partner and I are conflicted over the level of openness in our relationship. She describes herself as “post-mononormative.” I consider myself GGG. While I know that she wants me to be her life companion, she has expressed a need for novel experiences that may not include me. Should I have polyamorous relationships of my own? Or should I focus on cultivating shared erotic experiences with my partner? And do her transgressions mean that the boundaries we’ve set are not explicit or generous enough? NON-NORMATIVE PROBLEMS

I don’t think retaliatory polyamory is healthy or sustainable. And while you can focus on cultivating shared erotic experiences, NNP, your partner has made it clear that she needs — and intends to have — novel experiences that don’t include you. I think you’re confused, NNP, and your confusion stems from the fact that your partner is negotiating with you about her nonnegotiable terms. She’s going to do who and what she wants whether you like it or not, and she’s going to hide behind “post-mononormative” labels and claims that conversations were misinterpreted if that’s what it takes. Accept her terms or divorce her ass, but stop deluding yourself. Don’t miss the Savage Lovecast LIVE from Vancouver, B.C.! Listen at savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.15-10.22

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1936, Libran author F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote about the “crack-up” he had experienced years earlier. It included this tough realization: “I had been only a mediocre caretaker of most of the things left in my hands, even my talent.” Let’s use this as a seed for your oracle. Have you been a good caretaker of your talent? Have you been a good caretaker for other things you are responsible for? Look within yourself and take inventory. If there’s anything lacking, now is an excellent time to raise your game. If you’re doing pretty well, reward yourself.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On a late summer day in 1666, scientist Isaac Newton was sitting under an apple tree in his mother’s garden in Lincolnshire, England. An apple fell off a branch and plummeted to the ground. A halfcentury later, he told his biographer that this incident inspired him to formulate the theory of gravity. Fast forward to the year 2010. Astronaut Piers Sellers got on the space shuttle Atlantis carrying a piece of Newton’s apple tree. He took it with him as he escaped Earth’s gravity on his trip to the International Space Station. By my reading of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you undertake a comparable gesture or ritual, Scorpio. With a flourish, update your relationship with an important point of origin.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Most birds don’t sing unless they are up high: either flying or perched somewhere off the ground. One species that isn’t subject to this limitation is the turnstone, a brightly mottled shorebird. As it strolls around beaches in search of food, it croons a tune that the Cornell Lab of Ornithology calls “a short, rattling chuckle.” In the coming weeks, this creature deserves to be your mascot — or your power animal, as they say in New Age circles. Why? I doubt that you will be soaring. You won’t be gazing down at the human comedy from a detached location high above the fray. But I expect you will be well-grounded and good-humored — holding your own with poise amidst the roughand-tumble. As you ramble, sing freely!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s discuss that thing you are eyeing and coveting and fantasizing about. My operative theory is that you can enjoy it without actually having it for your own. In fact, I think it will be best if you do enjoy it without possessing it. There’s an odd magic at play here. If this desired thing becomes a fixed part of your life, it may interfere with you attracting two future experiences that I regard as more essential to your development. My advice is to avoid getting attached to the pretty good X-factor so as to encourage the arrival and full bloom of two stellar X-factors.

adventure, some one picture that is the image of his secret life,” said Irish poet William Butler Yeats. I invite you to identify that numinous presence, Pisces. And then I urge you to celebrate and cultivate it. Give special attention to it and pay tribute to it and shower love on it. Why? Because now is an excellent time to recognize how important your secret life is to you — and to make it come more fully alive than it has ever been.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): New York City’s Diamond District is home to over 2,000 businesses that buy and sell jewelry. Throughout the years, many people have lost bits of treasure here. Valuable bits of gold and gems have fallen off broken necklaces, earrings, watches and other accessories. Now an enterprising man named Raffi Stepnanian is cashing in. Using tweezers and a butter knife, he mines for the rich pickings that are packed in the mud of sidewalk cracks and gutters. “The percentage of gold out here on the street is greater than the amount of gold you would find in a mine,” he says. I’d love to see you get inspired by his efforts, Aries. Dig for treasure in unlikely places where no one else would deign to look.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1987, a college freshman named Mike Hayes was having trouble paying for his education at the University of Illinois. He appealed for help to the famous newspaper columnist Bob Greene, who asked each of his many readers to send Hayes a penny. The response was tidal. Although most of the ensuing donations were small, they added up to over $28,000 — enough for Hayes to finance his degree. I encourage you to take a comparable approach in the coming weeks, Taurus: Ask for a little from a lot of different sources.

“Problems that remain persistently insoluble should always be suspected as questions asked in the wrong way,” said philosopher Alan Watts. You have either recently made a personal discovery proving that this is true, or else you will soon do so. The brain-scrambling, heart-whirling events of recent weeks have blessed you with a host of shiny new questions. They are vibrant replacements for the tired old questions that have kept at least one of your oldest dilemmas locked in place.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“There is for everyone some one scene, some one

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You can’t give what you don’t have. Here’s a corollary: You can sort of half-give what you halfhave, but that may lead to messy complications and turn out to be worse than giving nothing at all. So here’s what I recommend: Devote yourself to acquiring a full supply of what you want to give. Be motivated by the frustration you feel at

not being able to give it yet. Call on your stymied generosity to be the driving force that inspires you to get the missing magic. When you’ve finally got it, give it.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I suspect that one of your allies or loved ones will get caught in his or her own trap. The way you respond will be crucial for how the rest of the story plays out. On the one hand, you shouldn’t climb into the trap with them and get tangled up in the snarl. On the other hand, it won’t serve your long-term interests to be cold and unhelpful. So what’s the best strategy? First, empathize with their pain, but don’t make it your own. Second, tell the blunt truth in the kindest tone possible. Third, offer a circumscribed type of support that won’t compromise your freedom or integrity. Fantasize about ways you could make money from doing what you love to do. Report results! FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The word “abracadabra” is a spell that stage magicians utter at the climax of their tricks: the catalyst that supposedly makes a rabbit materialize from a hat or an assistant disappear in a puff of smoke. There’s no real sorcery. It’s an illusion perpetrated by the magician’s hocus-pocus. But “abracadabra” has a less well-known history as an incantation used by real magicians to generate authentic wizardry. It can be traced back to Gnostic magi of the second century. They and their successors believed that merely speaking the word aloud evokes a potency not otherwise available. I invite you to experiment with this possibility, Gemini. Say “abracadabra” to boost your confidence and enhance your derring-do. You already have more power than usual to change things that have been resistant to change, and intoning some playfully ferocious “abracadabras” may put your efforts over the top.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

ed as the father of modern philosophy and the founder of rationalism. His famous catchphrase is a centerpiece of the Western intellectual tradition: “I think, therefore I am.” Here’s what I find amusing and alarming about the man: He read almost nothing besides the Bible and the work of Catholic theologian Thomas Aquinas. He said that classic literature was a waste of time. Is that who we want at the heart of our approach to understanding reality? I say no. In accordance with the astrological omens, I authorize you to instead adopt one or both of the following formulas: “I feel, therefore I am” or “I dream, therefore I am.”

The 17th-century writer Rene Descartes is regard-

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

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CASH for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS & STOP SMOKING ITEMS! Free Shipping, Best Prices, 24hr Payment. Hablamos Espanol. Call 888-440-4001 www.TestStripSearch.com. (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

Wilkinsburg/Blackridge 1445 Cresson St. 3BR Twhs, eq. kit, w/w, no pets, lg bkyd w/fence, sec sys $850/mo.

In the Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: GD-1412056. In re: Petition of Nkinde Ambalo Mwakatapanya, for change of name to Nkinde Ambalo. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed Monday, October 20, 2014, at 9:45 a.m. as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Bldg., Pittsburgh, PA 15219, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for.

GENERAL

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLASSES

Local company looking for a

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Look! Attention Sports Fans: Call for your FREE Pick today from our expert handicappers. No Strings Attached! 21+ Call: 888-513-5639 (AAN CAN)

full-time shipper/receiver. Benefits, vacation, health coverage.

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

E-mail resume to jobs@kruman.com

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

DRIVER

312 Forbes Ave. Renovated 2BR apt, new HVAC, equip. kit, w/d, h/w flrs, located in heart of Downtown. $1,700/mo.+utils. Beynon & Co. 412-261-3640

412-243-8722 or 412-973-4347

HELP WANTED

REHEARSAL

CLASSES

STORAGE

ADOPTION

STUDIES

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE

ADOPTION:

BIRTH CONTROL

Immediate opening for a FT Driver at residential vocational training facility for young adults. Must have high school diploma or GED, as well as a valid CDL, with class B license with passenger, air brake endorsement. Please apply online at https://Jobs.csdis.com (job code 0426). For additional info, please visit www. careersystems.com. Please upload resume. EOE Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran.

Lincoln Heritage

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

START YOUR CAREER AT THE TOP! We are growing and now hiring experienced roofing technicians with residential, commercial, and sheet metal experience! Full Benefits Available. Questions or to Apply: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application or Submit your resume via -email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Adoring family, successful interior designer, LOVE & LAUGHTER await 1st baby. Expenses Paid 1-800-379-8418 Maria

AUTO SERVICE

ADOPTION

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

Rent -A- Bay

ADOPT

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

A loving, financially secure, safe happy home awaits your newborn.

412-403-6069

1-877-492-8811

Expenses Paid Karen

Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

NOW HIRING Customer Service Oriented Drivers

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility.

We are proud to offer paid training, benefits, and paid time off in a rewarding team environment To qualify, you must be at least 21 years of age, have a valid driver license, 3 years of experience, have a safe driving record and be able to pass a background check and pre-employment drug test. We operate days, evenings, and Saturdays. Split shifts are currently available. To Apply, Please visit a First Transit location nearest you at: • 2439 West Pike Street, Houston PA For more information call

724-746-4342

DREGISTERED NURSESDNURSES AIDS DALLIED HEALTHCARE WORKERS DRESPIRATORY THERAPISTS

STUDIES

Caring Help for Addiction

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

DRIVERS

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

• 4780 Library Road, Bethel Park PA For more information call

412-833-3300 • 101 Old Frankstown Road, Plum Borough PA. For more information call 412-793-9046 Resumes can be faxed to

855-McNeely (855-626-3359) www.mcneelystaffing.com

412-835-4240 Equal Opportunity Employer

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CITY FOR RENT

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9 U.S. Census Bureau is hiring Field Representatives in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties for the American Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07 to $15.68 per hour. Please call (800) 563.6499 for more information and to be scheduled for testing. The Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides reasonable accommodations to applicants with disabilities.


*Stuff We Like

1277 Cedar Blvd Mt. Lebanon $ 169,900

Pole2Polls A yarn-bombing campaign aimed at voter engagement. Instructions online for how to help: Make and hang your own mini-banner and, of course, vote. www.pole2polls.com

99 Watt St. Coraopolis $ 350,000

2806 Philadelphia Dormont $129,900

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN COLOMBO}

Call George E. Lucas Today! 412-771-8400

Looking for a Building for Your Business?

House of the Dead

If you have thought about purchasing a building or renting a storefront, the WCDC showcases listings of property for sale and rent in downtown Wilkinsburg.

The Walking Dead is back on TV, and that’s the perfect excuse to visit this Lawrenceville shop for all your zombie-fandom needs: clothing, toys, books and even onesies for that lucky baby. 4110 Butler St.

The Wilkinsburg CDC can help. For more information visit www.wilkinsburgcdc.org/real-estate

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Schramm Farm and Orchards Arbus Bonus at the Carnegie Museum of Art Artist Pierre Leguillon’s complete collection of iconic photographer Diane Arbus’ little-seen magazine work — 200-plus framed glossy pages of feature work, celebrity portraits and even fashion spreads — fascinates. The show runs into December. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland

Help is Available!

Each corner of the region has its on-the-farm market; this one is on the edge of Penn Township, in Westmoreland County. Pumpkinpatch season is always festive, and fresh, local cider beats the store-brand stuff by leaps and bounds. 1002 Blank Road, Penn Township. 724-744-7320 or www.schrammfarms.com

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Babe: The Legend Comes to Life As baseball season winds down, check out Robert W. Creamer’s classic bio, which is warts-and-all but somehow leaves Ruth’s myth intact. It’s the book’s 40th anniversary — and the centennial of the Babe’s own first professional ballgame.

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

The month of widely available mini candy bars N E W S

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

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JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

GET HELP NOW

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

1-800-243-1001

www.glenbeigh.com

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014

Recovery Without Judgement™


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

Aming’s Massage Therapy

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Asian/European Girl

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

MASSAGE

STAR

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Superior Chinese Massage

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

MASSAGE

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Asian 888 Massage

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Grandng Openi

R A D I O PROMOTIONS A S S I S TA N T N E E D E D Organized, reliable, professional person is needed part time for a busy Radio Promotions Department in downtown Pittsburgh. Candidate must be able to work day and evenings, both weekdays and weekends when needed. Duties include in office work and on-site. Candidate must posess excellent writing and communication skills, with a degree in Marketing/ Communications or related field. Ability to handle multiple tasks efficiently and meet deadlines is a must. Web experience a plus. Must have valid drivers license and SPOTLESS driving record.

email: vwolfe@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media 650 Smithfield Street - Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Pregnant? We can treat you!

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

NO PHONE CALLS.

EOE

TIGER SPA GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com N E W S

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TA S T E

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

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Bob Herbert: “The great mass of the people … I think they feel essentially powerless.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHEILA GRIFFEN}

IF THE PEOPLE LEAD

The former New York Times columnist talks about what’s wrong with America — and how to fix it {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} HEARD OF MERCEDES GORDEN? How about Dan Berschinski? In 2007, Gorden was among those grievously injured when a bridge over the Mississippi River in Minnesota suddenly collapsed. In 2009, Berschinski, a U.S. army lieutenant, lost both legs — and nearly his life — to an IED while on patrol in Afghanistan. Gorden and Berschinski are among those former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert profiles in his new book, Losing Our Way: An Intimate Portrait of a Troubled America (Doubleday). In two decades as Times columnist, Herbert was that rare syndicated pundit dedicated not to Beltway politics or ideological scuffles, but everyday matters like poverty, employment and education. Herbert retired his column in 2011 and is now a distinguished senior fellow at liberal think tank Demos. In the well-reported Losing Our Way, he scorches America’s leaders for their folly and failures on the nation’s decaying infrastructure, its endless wars, our public schools and the economy, especially jobs. And he urges ordinary Americans to get organized and fight back. Herbert’s book launch last week, in Pittsburgh, was hosted by Yinzercation, the locally-based public-education activist group he profiles in Losing Our Way. Before his talk, he sat down with CP.

have seen is that rather than look out for the best interest of ordinary working men and women in America, public officials have formed an alliance with the corporate elite, the financial elite, to look out for their best interest. And the result, I think, is that the great mass of the people … I think they feel essentially powerless. I think they assume — in many cases correctly — that they go unheard. WHAT ABOUT VOTING? I think voting is absolutely essential, and I wish the percentages of people voting were much higher. That said, I think it’s not enough. I think people need to become more civically engaged. One of the reasons I’ve spent so much time in the book on what’s happened with parents fighting back in Pittsburgh, is that’s what I think is a true model for what I’d love to see happen across the country — people fighting back. CAN’T PROTEST MOVEMENTS FEEL FUTILE TOO? The civil-rights movement, people weren’t paying much attention to that in the beginning. I remember the women’s movement, when I was a young man, the feminists were laughed at, they were ridiculed in the

“THE IMPORTANT THING IS TO BE ORGANIZED AND TO STAY WITH IT.” popular press. And yet they stayed at it. And they changed the way life WHAT DO YOU MEAN IN LOSING OUR WAY BY THE PHRASE is lived by women in this country. The gay-rights movement was not “OUR NATIONAL PENCHANT FOR SELF-DESTRUCTION”? The big challenges facing the country are not a secret to anyone. But taken seriously in the beginning. So it is possible to get traction even we’ve been unwilling for the most part to engage those challenges in any when there [are] only a small number of activists in the beginning. The kind of serious way. And in fact we do things that work against us. Sept. important thing is to be organized and to stay with it. 11, 2001, was obviously a tragedy, but that was 13 years ago. We’re still in WHAT DETERMINES WHETHER PEOPLE ACTUALLY Afghanistan and we’ve re-engaged in Iraq. That cannot be helpful FIGHT BACK? in terms of addressing our domestic issues. For an Leadership is so important at all levels. You need someIn terms of public education, the children who are d expande this one to step forward and make a compelling case who has doing the poorest in our schools are the children who f o version iew, these almost mysterious leadership qualities. Because are the poorest. They come from the most economically interv w. what happens is, it emerges that there are issues that deprived families. And yet we will not address the issue of see ww per a pghcityp people care about, but that they may not know what to do poverty in any kind of constructive or systematic way. .com about those issues. And if you get some of these leaders — We know that infrastructure is critical to our way of life. in this case, I met [Yinzercation founders] Jessie Ramey and And we know that it’s old and in many cases decrepit. And yet Kathy Newman, but obviously there were a lot of people who we won’t often even do the fundamental basic maintenance that’s required to keep the infrastructure in good repair, let alone rebuild were important to this education movement in Pennsylvania. But these were folks who were able to make the case to ordinary people, the infrastructure. “Look, this is what’s going on, these are the problems that we’re facing, but here’s what we can do about it.” [Editor’s note: Newman is an WHAT’S BEHIND THAT NEGLIGENCE? I think that it’s essentially just a breakdown in leadership. What we occasional CP contributor.] D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.15/10.22.2014


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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 15, 2014  

Best of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 42

October 15, 2014  

Best of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 42