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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 10.08/10.15.2014

GENE THERAPY: THE BAD GENES REUNITE AFTER 17 YEARS 24


EVENTS 10.10 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 THE UNKNOWN Warhol theater A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Michael Johnsen in collaboration with Jessica Marcrum. Tickets $10

Dean Wareham

Bradford Cox

Eleanor Friedberger 10.12 – 10am-5pm RADical DAY 2014 FREE admission

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

Martin Rev

Tom Verlaine 10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films 10.17 – 8pm

11.7 – 5pm M . E . :THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

In celebration of the museum’s 20th anniversary, The Warhol presents the world premiere of Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films in partnership with The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. This new performance is comprised of 15 short, newly digitized and publically unseen Warhol films along with five songwriter-composers performing newly composed music for the films. The roster includes Dean Wareham, Bradford Cox, Eleanor Friedberger, Martin Rev, and Tom Verlaine. Co-commissioned with The Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 2014 Next Wave Festival and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. Guest music curator, Dean Wareham. Digital transfer of Warhol films courtesy of Media Sponsor:

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11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014


INCOMING Re: Gone Girl: Gillian Flynn’s best-seller fares cheesier on screen than it did on the page (Oct. 1) “Why do hipsters in Pittsburgh have to pretend they’re cooler than people in other cities, like they hold the zeitgeist?” — Facebook comment from “Ray McLaughlin”

Re: Final weekend for Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival (Sept. 26, online only) “Wrong about it being a great place to use Monty Python dialogue. Two years ago, I told the guy that was heckling me from atop a castle that I was going to fart in his general direction. He looked at me like I was a lunatic.” — Web comment from “Me”

Hey @billpeduto Let me guess ... this game is my fault too ... Just like everything else right?? #wewonlastyear #stopraisingtaxes — Oct. 1 tweet from former mayor Luke Ravenstahl (@luke_ravenstahl) following the Pirates’ playoff loss

Life is better when @luke_ravenstahl has a few beers loosens up and uses Twitter! — Oct. 1 tweet from parody account “Mr. PedutoHead” (@mrpedutohead)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

“THEY’RE USING THE STATE POLICE TO TRY TO SILENCE US.”

TO PROTECT AND TO SERVE State police documents show intelligence-sharing network between law enforcement and Marcellus Shale drillers {BY ADAM FEDERMAN}

A

NTI-FRACKING activists protesting a natural-

gas conference in Philadelphia last fall were being monitored by a private security company that sent a photo of a demonstrator to the Pennsylvania State Police, according to an email obtained by Pittsburgh City Paper. A few months earlier, at another industry-led conference, state trooper Michael Hutson delivered a presentation on environmental extremism and acts of vandalism across Pennsylvania’s booming Marcellus Shale natural-gas reserves. He showed photographs of several anti-fracking groups in Pennsylvania, including Shadbush Environmental Justice Collective protesters demonstrating at an active well site in Lawrence County, in Western Pennsylvania. That same Pennsylvania state trooper visited the home of anti-fracking activist Wendy Lee, a Bloomsburg University philosophy professor, to question her about photos she took of a natural-gas compressor station in Lycoming County. Remarkably, the trooper earlier had crossed state lines and traveled to New York to visit Jeremy Alderson, publisher of the No Frack Almanac, at his home outside Ithaca, N.Y., to accuse him of trespassing to obtain photos of the same compressor station. The photo, presentation and house visits are part of a little-known intelligence-sharing network that brings together law enforcement, including the FBI, Homeland Security, the oil and gas industry, and private security firms. Established in late 2011 or early 2012, the Marcellus Shale Operators’ Crime Committee (MSOCC) is a group of “professionals with a law-enforcement background who are interested in developing working relationships and networking on intelligence issues,” according to an email sent to group members by James Hansel, regional security manager for Anadarko Petroleum.


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A trooper with Pennsylvania State Police went to New York to question the editor of this anti-fracking website.

The MSOCC has taken a keen interest in environmental activists and anti-fracking groups, according to documents obtained through a state Right to Know request. The collaboration raises questions about the increasingly close ties between law enforcement and the natural-gas industry in Pennsylvania, and whether law enforcement has violated the civil liberties of protesters and environmental groups in its effort to protect the state’s most controversial industry. The production of natural gas in the Marcellus Shale, a formation that underlies several states, is a multi-billion-dollar industry that has grown dramatically over the past four years. In Pennsylvania alone, there are now more than 7,000 active wells. The “Shale Insight” conference, held at the Philadelphia Convention Center in September 2013, brought together industry leaders, politicians and media figures for two days of networking and panel discussions. Opponents of fracking — or hydraulic fracturing, the controversial technique of injecting water, chemicals and sand deep underground to break apart the shale and release gas — staged their own teach-in just down the street. But the activists intent on watchdogging the industry were themselves being spied on. According to documents obtained by City Paper, the Pennsylvania State Police

Criminal Intelligence Center received an update from a private security firm, Global Security Corp., about protest activity near the convention center. On Sept. 25, Don Peters, a former state trooper who now works for the Oklahomabased security firm, sent the Criminal Intelligence Center “a photo of the only citizen I can see at the moment exercising their right of protest (located at the main/Broad St. entrance of the convention center.)” The email was sent to Douglas Jackson, an intelligence analyst with the Pennsylvania State Police, and Trooper Hutson, a member of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force in Williamsport. The Pennsylvania State Police declined to comment on the email or to confirm even an informal relationship with Global Security Corp. “We do not have a policy regarding contracts with security firms — as we do not contract with such firms,” Maria Finn, a State Police spokesperson, wrote in an email. Global Security CEO Bill McClure confirmed that Peters works for his company, which has clients in the energy sector. He also added that the company occasionally seeks assistance from law enforcement — most of its employees have law-enforcement backgrounds — but only when needed. “We have not been hired by the

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{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Natural gas operations near Maggie Henry’s Lawrence County farm have been the site of protests by the Shadbush Environmental Justice Collective.

www.theatreorgans.com/PATOS Photo by Linda Mitzel Photography.

Pennsylvania state police,” he said. “They’re self-sufficient.” The state police may not contract with private security firms, as Finn says. But state police do appear to have received intelligence, in this case of a citizen exercising his First Amendment rights, from one such firm. FOUR YEARS ago, the Pennsylvania Office

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

of Homeland Security was embarrassed by revelations that it had hired a private security company to monitor citizens, including anti-fracking activists. The fact that the intelligence-gathering program had been approved by OHS — apparently without the knowledge of then-Gov. Ed Rendell — was chalked up to a lack of oversight. In the aftermath, James Powers, head of the OHS, resigned. During a day-long hearing into the program, local and state police presented themselves as defenders of the Constitution and criticized the OHS’s actions, which they said yielded little valuable intelligence. (One officer compared the intelligence bulletins to reading the National Enquirer). “This is one of the problems you have when you contract intelligence work to amateurs,” the state police commissioner testified. Police also made the case that tracking criminal activity, without trampling on First Amendment rights, was the job of the state police. But it is now the state police who are collaborating with the oil and gas industry, and continuing to keep a close eye on anti-fracking groups and activists, largely

through the efforts of the Marcellus Shale Oilfield Crime Committee. MSOCC was initiated by Anadarko Petroleum’s James Hansel, a former state trooper, to bring together industry representatives, law enforcement and prosecutors to develop a “network of intelligence sharing.” In a January 2012 email to group members, Hansel said MSOCC was seeking the participation of “law-enforcement officers assigned a position relating to intelligence and prosecutors at the county, state and federal level.” Today, the group sends intelligence updates to more than 150 recipients, including all of the major drilling companies in the Marcellus Shale, representatives of the FBI, state Homeland Security, and state and local law enforcement. In a separate email introducing himself to Hansel in February 2013, Jackson, the state-police analyst who received the Philly protest intelligence from Global Security Corp., wrote, “Please let me know if I can be of any assistance and any Marcellus Shale items you send me would be much appreciated.” Court documents show Hansel once worked with state police trooper Hutson, who made the home visits to anti-fracking activists. Hutson has been tracking crime in the Marcellus Shale, and is an active member of the MSOCC network. On Feb. 14 of this year, Hutson showed up at Professor Lee’s home in Bloomsburg to ask about photos she took of property owned by PVR Partners (now Regency Energy Partners), which operates the Barto compressor station in Lycoming County. CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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Lee writes frequently and often indignantly on the subject of fracking and has posted thousands of photos of wells, drilling rigs and compressor stations to her Flickr photo-sharing page. Lee responded that she had visited the site in question and taken photos, but that she had not trespassed. In fact, the Barto compressor station was one stop on a walking tour she had done numerous times to teach students about the impacts of shale-gas development. On the day these photos were taken, she was accompanied by Alderson, the New York-based activist who had published his daughter’s images of the same compressor station in his No Frack Almanac. Lee believes the real reason for Hutson’s visit was not to investigate a potential crime but to intimidate her, and to fish for information on fellow activists and environmental groups in the region. As she wrote on her blog later that day, “He wanted to know about the activists in the anti-fracking movement — and whether or not ‘they’ commit acts of vandalism and/or violence. He wanted me to give him names of ‘bad apples.’” Indeed, it is a subject that Hutson has explored before. In July 2013, he gave a presentation before the industry-led occupational-safety group Steps of PA. The PowerPoint presentation, which was leaked to the press, starts off with a discussion of domestic terrorism and so-called environmental extremism before moving to an overview of antifracking groups active in the Marcellus Shale. The final third of the presentation was devoted to a discussion of several acts of vandalism that have taken place on or near drilling sites — none of which, to be clear, have been linked to environmental organizations. The incidents included “suspicious charred debris” found near two well pads; two improvised explosive devices (IEDs) discovered on an access road leading to a storage well in Erie County in February 2013; a shooting at a Shell well pad involving a “white Ford pickup”; and a pipe bomb found near a well pad in Elk County. In an October 2013 article about the incidents, posted on the Harrisburg PatriotNews’ website, PennLive.com, Hutson conceded that, “We don’t know the intent” of those involved, and even said that none of the acts of vandalism appeared to be the work of environmental activists. The organizations mentioned in Hutson’s presentation range from the mainstream Power Shift to more militant groups like Marcellus Earth First!, Shad-

bush Environmental Justice Collective and Appalachia Resist! The Shadbush Collective, based in Southwestern Pennsylvania, combines outreach and education with direct-action campaigns. Hutson’s presentation included two photos of the group staging a protest at a well site near an organic pig farm in Lawrence County owned by Maggie Henry. In one photo, Henry wears a sign around her neck reading, “Protect Farms for Our Future.” Protesters locked themselves to a giant papier-mâché pig, blocking access to a well site in an effort to draw attention to the potential impact of shale-gas development on Pennsylvania’s largest industry, agriculture. Shadbush Collective organizer Patrick Young says Hutson’s presentation was a “pretty classic attempt to criminalize dissent” by failing to distinguish between different kinds of activism. “What Hutson is doing is irresponsible because it creates the perception among law enforcement, industry and the general public that engaging in public protest is somehow nefarious,” he said. “When you criminalize dissent it’s an incredible tool for shutting up your enemies.” Hutson does not conduct interviews with the media, according to Finn, the Pennsylvania State Police spokesperson. But she insisted that Hutson’s presentation made “no connection” between “the groups mentioned and the IED incidents, nor was it presented in that manner.” Finn said Hutson simply was responding to questions about activist groups in Pennsylvania and in the Marcellus Region. Based on the slides, which include provocative language about environmental terrorism followed by grainy images of protesters with bandanas covering their faces, it is hard to believe that some sort of connection, tacit or otherwise, was not being made between eco-terrorism, the acts of vandalism and peaceful anti-fracking activists in the Marcellus Shale. Hutson ended his presentation by making the case that information-sharing was a key part of any investigation, and said that documents and information are being shared between state police, MSOCC and the FBI’s Oil and Natural Gas Crime Issues Special Interest Group (USONG). According to a 2012 FBI report, USONG “allows for secured communications between the oil and natural gas sector and law enforcement at all levels.” A month after the Steps of PA presentation, Hutson appeared with Anadarko Petroleum’s Hansel at a Marcellus Oil and Gas Security Workshop sponsored by the

“HE WANTED ME TO GIVE HIM NAMES OF ‘BAD APPLES.’”

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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TO PROTECT AND TO SERVE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

American Petroleum Institute. The title of their talk was “Combating Crimes Affecting Energy Exploration and Production.” A public-records request for the presentation was denied on the grounds that it is the exclusive property of Anadarko Petroleum. Hansel signed an affidavit stating that he had drafted and presented the material himself “with a representative of the Pennsylvania State Police providing comment on specific issues. ... The PowerPoint presentation is exclusively my work product and belongs to Anadarko.” In an emailed statement responding to questions about the presentation, an Anadarko spokesperson wrote: “It is our company’s policy that we do not discuss security measures.” Even as corporations and law enforcement become less transparent—declining to discuss security measures and withholding documents because they are deemed private property — the flow of information through formal and informal networks in the energy sector has expanded greatly. The revolving door between law enforcement, the oil and gas industry, and private security firms helps keep the information moving. And organizations like MSOCC provide ways for industry and law enforcement to deepen their connections. Witold Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, says the documents obtained by City Paper raise troubling questions about police conduct and civil liberties. If police are

indeed using information obtained from private security firms like the Global Security Corp., he says, it “poses a threat to basic freedoms and raises questions about why they’re devoting limited resources to tracking activists.” He says the legality of such information-sharing is unclear, and notes that police often receive intelligence from a variety of sources, including informants and the private sector. Regarding the photo of the protester at the Shale Insight conference in Philadelphia, Walczak said more information is necessary. In particular, what was the basis for the surveillance? And how is the information being used? At least one thing is certain: The “intelligence-sharing network” created by MSOCC and facilitated by the nation’s most powerful law-enforcement agencies is still in its early days. This has activists, including Wendy Lee, worried. “They’re really trying to go after us,” she says. “And they’re using the state police to try to silence us. We are an obstacle to the endless profits of this industry and that’s really what this is about.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Editor’s Note: This article was published jointly by Pittsburgh City Paper and Philadelphia City Paper. Adam Federman is a contributing editor for Earth Island Journal and the recipient of a Polk Grant for investigative reporting. You can find more of his work at www.adamfederman.com.

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

BEGGING FOR CHANGE

An amendment to the city’s panhandling ordinance reminds us how wrong it was in the first place {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} BACK IN 2006 when the city of Pittsburgh

decided to crack down on “aggressive panhandling,” I really struggled to see the point. Despite coming from a small town, I have never felt hassled by people who approach me on the street for money. If I have some extra to give, I gladly hand it over. If I don’t, I politely inform them of that and keep on my way. But I can honestly say at no time in my adult life have I ever felt threatened or even bothered by the practice. But for some people, the thought of being asked for money on the street angers them. To them, a person asking for a dollar for food, or bus fare, or “a bottle of vodka, because shit, it’s my birthday” (true story) is either begging because they’re too lazy to get a job or is begging because it is their job. We’ve all heard the urban legend about our uncle’s neighbor’s wife’s brother who gave a guy a dollar on the street corner, and then later saw the guy getting behind the wheel of a BMW. The city of Pittsburgh first caved into these ridiculous generalities when it enacted legislation that severely limited panhandling in the city. The law described selective criteria that made it illegal for anyone to engage in “aggressive panhandling.” Among them, the law listed several “captive audience areas” where panhandling was prohibited, including: outside dining areas; admission lines for events like a play or sporting event; near a “fooddispensing street vendor”; within 10 feet of a bus stop; or near a “a place of religious assembly.” The two most ironic of these prohibitions are panhandling near a street vendor — which has also been mostly regulated out of the city by draconian food-truck legislation — and asking for cash near church. God knows the last thing organized religion needs is somebody tipping into the weekly tithes before the church can. The city’s law was back in the news last week when a Pittsburgh City Council committee approved an amendment that would prohibit panhandling within 25 feet of any of the city’s automated parking meters. By the time this issue

hits the streets, it will likely be approved. Will it make much difference? It could. The parking boxes are located on every block in highly-traveled areas — locations that would be attractive to panhandlers. Add that to the number of restrictions already in place, and you’ll need a tape measure and a licensed surveyor just to ask for a quarter. Last year, a federal appeals court in Michigan struck down that state’s panhandling laws as a violation of free speech. Courts have allowed very narrow aggressive panhandling laws to stand, but have generally ruled that the act of begging or asking for money is protected speech. But despite that, a Pittsburgh panhandler can be cited, fined or — depending on how many previous offenses they have — jailed, just for asking another person for money. But that’s nothing new around here. The city’s panhandling law is as egregiously classist and antisocial now as it was in 2006. There’s a silver lining, however. This change to the law shouldn’t go unchallenged. The re-emergence of the city’s panhandling issue should be used as an opportunity to re-examine the statute in light of court rulings that have occurred since 2006. The no-beg barriers around certain areas create a de facto ban on panhandling, and if city council wants to widen that area, then it should be forced to show why that’s necessary and to prove that such restrictions don’t violate free speech. You can call it panhandling if you want to, but speech is at the heart of this issue. The interaction in this scenario is simply a conversation between two people. One person might be asking another person for money, but they’re just talking. In any other social setting we wouldn’t dream of trying to stop two people from speaking to one another. In this instance, however, the question being asked makes some people uncomfortable for one reason or another and that is what led to this prohibition To allow city council to further widen this law without challenge would be akin to giving them a handout — a practice they obviously have a problem with.

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Camp Kilarunna

Friends and families have been coming out for 35 years to Allen’s Haunted Hayride and Carnival. Tickets include the 30 minute hayride on a tractor-drawnwagon and unlimited carnival rides. For an extra charge. reserve a campfire site. Bring your own food and beverages. Sit back and enjoy a night in the country. www.allenshayrides.com

Camp Kilarunna is a fully immersive horror weekend and 5k. Enjoy our beautiful campground all day Saturday, then see if you can make it out of the woods alive during our terrifying 5k. Survivors party until dawn thanks to Clique Vodka and Straub Beer. Have you got what it takes? www.campkilarunna.com

Cheeseman - Fright Farm The tractors are warmed up and the ghosts and ghouls have arrived to put a chill in the night air. Be warned this is a physically demanding attraction that will assault

your senses with intense audio and visual effects. Your heart will quicken and your skin will crawl... As always, parking is free and your admission price includes all of our attractions and activities. www.cheesemanfarm.com

Fear Forest 4 terrifying attractions rain or shine – we have covered wagons. The only drive through vortex tunnel in the region. Located behind the Dairy Queen in Lordstown, OH. Open Fri-Sun Now through November 1st. Visit www.fearforest.com for more information.

loween scare! Featuring an indoor trail over ½ mile long and new in 2014 – 3D walkthrough attraction! Open every weekend in October and Thursday nights! Each Thursday is for our Charity Riders with all proceeds going to Riders For Their Benefits. Parking is free. www.freddyshaunts.net

Fright Farm Fright Farm – 25 years of fear! Fright Farm is Pennsylvania’s Premier professional Haunted Attraction, with 5 distinct attractions; Dead

Freddy’s Haunts Come to Freddy’s Haunts for your Hal-

Monongahela Area Historical Society

SPOOK-TACULAR ATTRACTIONS

PITTSBURGH’S ONLY HAUNTED BALL RIDE RIDE INTERACTIVE PAINTBALL

GHOSTWALKS:

October 10th ,11th , 17th , 18th

SHOOT LIVE ZOMBIES!

A tour featuring haunting tales from some of Monongahela’s historic homes. Tickets: $10

VIP GHOSTWALKS:

October O Oc tob r 2nd 2 - November 2nd Thursday - Sunday: 7:00-12:30am $20.00 - Includes 50 rounds 500 Huntington Ave. Emsworth, PA 15202 (412) 327-2078 www.pghzombieoutbreak.com

October 11th & 18th

A tour that ends with hors d’oeurves and refreshments in one of Monongahela’s historic homes. The history and hauntings of this home are pre ted byy the presented t curren current rennt residents! re ! Tickets: Tic s: $25 $ 5 Sponsored By: Washington County Tourism Grant

For tickets or more information i f ti callll 724-258-2377or 724 258 2377 2377or visit i it

www.monongahelahistoricalsociety.com

Survive our

40 Bowling Lanes Laser Arena 50 Arcade Games Full Service Cafe Full Service Lounge Pool Room

vampire! The greatest laser tag challenge of all time!

g Oct 13th. Games startin s October 13- 31. $7 per person, run

win a prize If your the last one to survive you *Call (412)828-1100 to schedule your challenge. N E W S

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BIRTHDAY PARTY CAPITAL OF THE WORLD!

2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com UNFESTCENTER +

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Freddy’s Haunt s New for 2 014

3 walkthD rou

Attractio gh n!

Sept 19-21, 26-28, Oct 2-5, 9-12, 16-19, 23-26 & Nov 1 192 Mc Cune R d. • Aliquippa 724 -65 0 - 0 0 5 0 or 724 -417-4 0 71 www.fr e ddyshaunt s.ne t

Huston’s Haunted Hollow

End Hayride, Hallow Grounds, Frightmare Mansion, PARANOIA, and Terror Maze! So come on out and join the many people who have made Fright Farm an annual Halloween season tradition. For more information visit: www.frightfarm.com

Fun Fest Center Survive our Vampire starting October 13th. October 30 Witches night 9pm to midnight girls absolutely free . Men $10 Costume contest with prizes for top 3. drink specials. Oct ober31st Halloween party 7pm to midnight costume contest prizes for the top 3. drink specials Sat 11-1 kids costume party 9:30 to noon games prizes for top costumes only $7:50 per person. funfestcenter.com

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Monongahela Area Historical Society Monongahela Area Historical Society presents Ghostwalks, a tour featuring haunting tales from some of Monongahela’s historic homes. Tickets start at only $10 and VIP packages are available for

HAUNTED HILLS ALLEN’S

Hayrides HAYRIDE Haunted 35th

OCT. 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, AND NOV. 1

Open Every

Weekend in October! FREE FRE FR EE P EE PARKING ARKING AR ARKI K NG G

$15 ADMISSION INCLUDES 1 HAYRIDE & UNLIMITED CARNIVAL RIDES • RESERVE CAMPFIRE NOW

Open: 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE - ALL FREE!

Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both

412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com See website for $3 OFF Coupon

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) North Versailles, PA 15137

$2 O FF Online ticket purchases CP2014

This is Huston’s Haunted Hollow’s 18th year

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL

Located minutes from the Pa Turnpike, Somerset Exit 110 on Route 281 south Just about 1 hour from downtown Pgh

PROMO CODE:

Huston’s Haunted Hollow

and d tthe h

126 Woodland Rd, Rockwood, Pa 15557 (814) 926-3133 • hauntedhollow.net

Also Featuring: Haunted Boarding House, Twisted Barn in 4D, Haunted Hayride, Toxic Swamp Walk, Dead End Cornæeld

Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (15th Annual); N. Versailles, PA. Journey through the woods at our two haunted attractions by wagon or foot for a factor of fright and fear. Karaoke/DJ, live bands; Benefits the Autism Society of Pittsburgh. For more info visit: hauntedhillshayride.com / 412823-4813; Facebook: Haunted Hills Hayride

of fear! Featuring a haunted boarding house, twisted barn in 4D, haunted hayride, toxic swamp walk, dead end cornfield and more! Once you are done getting scared, hang out, enjoy our food and drink concessions, live performances, and bonfires. Come aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh’s deepest, darkest secrets. We reveal the legends of those that still haunt the streets seeking revenge! www.hauntedhollow.net

Open at 7:30 every Thurs, Fri, Sat in October

18th Year of Fear!

Performances every Friday & Saturday in October

Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail

1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart

Group rates & private campfire sites available

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

FREE PA R K IN G!

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

For most people the hayride lasts 30 minutes, for others, it lasts a lifetime! 2430 4 PITTSBURGH PIT ITTS TSSBURG BURGH H ROA RO ROAD OAD • SSMOCK MOCK MO CK PPAA 15480 4 724.677.2589 • www.AllensHayrides.com


OCTOBER IN PORTERSVILLE, PA purchase. For dates and more info visit www.monongahelahistoricalsociety.com. Sponsored by Washington County Tourism Grant.

Pittsburgh Zombie Outbreak Pittsburgh’s only haunted interactive paintball ride! Open Thursdays through Sundays in Oct. 2nd – Nov. 2nd. Jump into one of our Zombie Extermination Vehicles to be transported through zombie infested hospital grounds where you will fight off the infected in order to stop a global pandemic and make it out alive! pghzombieoutbreak.com

ScareHouse Writer/director Guillermo del Toro says

ScareHouse is “fantastic and beautiful!” Regularly named as one of America’s scariest haunted houses by Travel Channel. Shorter wait when you purchase tickets online from scarehouse.com Free parking and shuttle service at Pittsburgh Zoo. Pittsburgh’s Ultimate Haunted House is open on select dates in October. scarehouse.com

HAUNTED HAYRIDES AT DARK

Zombies of the Corn Stop zombies now! Come to Zombies of the Corn weekends in October, and board our zombie battle wagons stocked with glow in the dark ammo! Don’t worry zombies will try and board your wagon but they can’t shoot back! Included is a walk through our 11,000 sq. foot zombie compound- if you dare! Bonfires, ghost story tellers and Halloween movies on the big screen! zombiesofthecorn.com

Off US Rt. 19 on Cheeseman Rd. Near McConnell’s Mill for futher directions, call 724-368-3233

www.cheesemanfarm.com

pITtsburgh’s ulTImATe HAuNTED hOUse

Happy Haunting! N E W S

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ConnectCard gets you connected to great deals. Port Authority is giving you another reason to get connected. At hundreds of area merchants, use your ConnectCard to get exclusive deals. Find a directory of our ConnectRewards retailer partners online or in print throughout our system and start reaping the rewards of ConnectRewards.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014


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THE NAME EVOKES THE FARM-TO-TABLE ETHOS THAT THE KITCHEN SUPPORTS

HANDY TOOLS {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} For many city-dwellers, the prospect of urban gardening sounds nice on paper … until you realize your apartment’s linen closet is a terrible place to store compost and shovels. But local urban-agriculture nonprofit Grow Pittsburgh is trying to solve that problem using principles of the sharing economy. “I’m at community gardens all the time where people are like, ‘How do I start this at my house?’” says Jessica McNally, Grow Pittsburgh’s communitygarden coordinator. “It seems silly for one person to buy a tiller for hundreds of dollars when it can be shared amongst many. A lot of the community gardens we work with don’t have the funds to purchase a tiller when they only use it once or twice.” The idea is simple: Starting Oct. 3, anyone with a Grow Pittsburgh membership (starting at $40, with discounts for people with lower incomes) can use the organization’s “tool lending library” in Larimer to borrow anything from trowels and hand tools to larger items like tillers and weed whackers. Compost, mulch and straw will also be available. “We’ve tossed around the idea for a while now. We got an awesome [$24,000 anonymous] grant to start the project [and it] came together really quickly,” McNally says. And while the focus of the program is on tool-borrowing, McNally stresses that the hope is to create a community vibe “more like a co-op.”

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

147 Putnam St., Larimer. Open Fridays 3 p.m. to dusk and Saturdays noon-5 p.m. through November.

the

FEED

The Ps have ve it in the month onth of October: tober: The 10th month is designated d as Pasta Month, Pork Month, Popcorn Poppin’ Month and Pickled Peppers Month. Also — you may have noticed — it’s Pumpkin Month. Pick one to celebrate, or go big Chopped-style and make a dish incorporating it all.

T

{PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

Crispy pork belly with caramelized apples, pickled beets, whole-grain mustard and apple-cider gastrique

GREAT AMERICAN HE NAME OF Eighty Acres Kitchen

and Bar — and its address, on the lonesome-sounding New Texas Road — might lead you to picture it down a winding country lane, surrounded by rolling fields or, perhaps, dappled woodland. Actually, it’s just off the Golden Mile Highway on the outskirts of Monroeville, surrounded by auto-parts stores and fastfood outlets. Chef/owner Don Winkie named the restaurant after his parents’ farm in Kansas, evoking the idea of the farm-to-table ethos that the kitchen, with its local and seasonal emphasis, supports. The rustic-chic dining room is right there, too, with broad, painted pine planks on the walls and an uncluttered smattering of antique decor. Chalkboards displaying daily specials and little vases of fresh flowers on every table serve as

grace notes, underscoring the messages of warm welcome and freshly prepared food. It’s a sophisticated yet comfortable setting for Eighty Acres’ offerings of straightforward, contemporary American

EIGHTY ACRES KITCHEN AND BAR

1910 New Texas Road, Plum. 724-519-7304 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat. 4-11 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. PRICES: Small plates and salads $5-13; entrees $12-25 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED cuisine. Most dishes involve a classic main ingredient — salmon, say, or pork chops — set off by just one or two distinctive flourishes, such as piquillo chimichurri in

the first case or pineapple salsa in the second. This is a confident approach whose success comes down to flavor and execution. Working this way, a chef must have the discernment to make combinations both surprising and salutary, and the skill to cook such lightly adorned ingredients to perfection. The first item we ordered, shrimp corn dogs, presented the first challenge: Could the kitchen really pull off such an absurd combination of delicate and coarse? Yes — with flying colors. Four skewers featured plump, sweet jumbo shrimp coated in a batter that was light like a good spoon bread, yet which fried up deep brown just like at the state fair. A remoulade flecked with roasted pimientos offset the shrimp with its own rich tang. Crispy Brussels sprouts were not really very crispy, but we forgave them CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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GREAT AMERICAN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

because their preparation, boosted by the unlikely trio of Parmesan, white anchovies and lime aioli, was so wonderful. The anchovies were not fishy, but provided deep bursts of umami, while the nutty cheese and tart, creamy aioli rounded out the flavor so that it seemed to hit every taste receptor. Housemade ricotta gnocchi made for a mac-and-cheese that transcended nostalgia and approached the sublime. The gnocchi were fluffy but not insubstantial; the ricotta in them extended the cheesy goodness of the aged-cheddar bechamel sauce into the dumplings’ very heart. With so many good-looking “snacks,” starters and salads, it can be tempting to compile an a la carte dinner from smaller plates, and Angelique did just that. Her mussels with butter beans, herb-roasted tomatoes and a basil pesto was a deliriously satisfying dish. The big, creamy beans added textural variety, and juice from the tomatoes melded deliciously into the herbal pesto broth. A grilled baguette slice mopped up any broth that was left after the succulent shellfish and beans were gone. A fried goat-cheese salad took its name from two balls of goat cheese fried in a crispy coating. These were as good as they sound, though the combination of pesto creme fraiche and balsamic reduction on the accompanying field greens was a little too candy-sweet for our tastes. Jason went bigger, with the flat-iron steak entrée. The steak was exquisite — served in slices, its flesh pink within yet well charred on the outside — and a small side of creamed spinach was a simple delight, as was a finely diced mushroom tapenade. But the roasted Yukon potatoes were uniformly, inexplicably underdone. It was a shocking oversight by a kitchen that, until that point, had proven nearly flawless. A buffalo burger with fries showed that potatoes might the Achilles’ heel of Eighty Acres, as the hand-cut fries were fully cooked, but only just; they were perfectly pale and, accordingly, bland. The burger itself was good, if a bit lean, as buffalo can be. Dill-pickle aioli was a clever condiment, subtle but effective, but the big ciabatta-style bun was awkwardly oversized and a bit doughy. And yet: We found Eighty Acres to prepare some of the best American food in the city or its suburbs. Along with excellent service and a sophisticated, but not stuffy, atmosphere, this makes Eighty Acres equally suited to after-work drinks or a special occasion meal. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

MAKING THE ROUNDS

A new pocket guide tours you through local booze-makers It’s the perfect time of year to gather some friends and hit the trails. Sure, you could lace up your hiking boots and tread a nature trail … or you could celebrate Pittsburgh booze-producers by following the new Allegheny Libation Trail. Thirteen distilleries, wineries and breweries near the Allegheny River are featured in a handy pocket guide that was the brainchild of Arsenal Cider House’s Bill Larkin. The establishments include: Arsenal Cider House; Church Brew Works; Draai Laag Brewing Company; East End Brewing (Pittsburgh Public Market stall); Grist House Brewing; Hop Farm Brewing; Maggie’s Farm Rum; Milkman Brewing; Penn Brewery; Pittsburgh Winery; R Wine Cellar; Roundabout Brewery; and Wigle Whiskey.

“IT’S GREAT FOR LIBATION TOURISM.” “It seemed like a no-brainer that we should do something like this,” says Maggie’s Farm Rum Distillery owner Tim Russell. The group’s cooperative spirit suggests that the craft fermentation and distillation businesses in Pittsburgh are on confident footing. That’s especially exciting considering that most of these businesses are less than 5 years old. “It strengthens the market as a whole. We’re all getting some exposure. People are visiting a lot of us in the same day,” says Matt Gouwens, owner of Hop Farm Brewing Company. Russell says that people are planning a day out based on the guide. He says that most distillery visitors are local to either the city or the region. “It’s nice to see so many people from around here organizing their day around this,” he says. For his part, Gouwens says he’s seeing out-of-towners who seek out some of the city’s finest brews and spirits. “People will come into one of our places because they’ve heard of our business and then they learn about all these other manufacturers,” he says, adding, “It’s great for libation tourism.” Whether for locals or tourists, the new guide seems to be doing the trick. “I have a stack of guides on the bar and I restock it every couple of days,” says Russell. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to

savor authentic flavors TAILGATE AT MODERN CAFE BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER FOOTBALL GAMES. ENJOY AN AWARD WINNING SANDWICH AND CHOOSE FROM 140 DIFFERENT BEERS!

HAPPY HOUR

1/2 Off all Drafts & $2 Off Munchies Mon-Th 5-7 and Fr/Sat 4:30-7:30

Vallozzi’s Pittsburgh {PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL} elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterraneaninspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE

KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE

OPEN DAILY•11AM - 1:30AM 2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

862 WESTERN AVE.

now open 7 days a week!

themoderncafe.com

st

LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE

Eden {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-344-4123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE

412-321-4550

MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-481-4414) and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to endless preparations and dressings, the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE

1st Floor Restaurant

(American Menu Specializing in Burgers)

2nd Floor Bar & Night Club

Live Bands & DJ’s

EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT! FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10 - AIRBORNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11 - LIVE DJ FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17 - DANCING QUEEN SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18 - LIVE DJ

We’ve Got Your Football Ticket! EVERY SUNDAY ENJOY $5 Bloody Mary Bar $2.50 Coors Light $5 Hot Dog/ Nacho Bar Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300

PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

FOOTBALL IS HERE! NFL SUNDAY

ALL LUNCHES

$

$

7- 9

MON TUE-THU FRI SUN

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB D

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM

946 Penn Ave Located in Downtown’s Cultural District

Daily Saloon Specials Happy Hours

Monday - Friday 5pm - 7pm Late Night Ladies Night 9-11 $1.00 off ALL Drinks

Monday

$5 Margaritas all day till midnight • $6 Quesadilla 4 - 9pm

Tuesday BURGER NIGHT

$2 off ALL Burgers 4 - 9pm $3 Miller Lite Draft All day till Midnight

Wednesday WING NIGHT

Wings .50 each 4pm - 9pm $3 Yuengling Draft All day till Midnight

Thursday LADIES NIGHT $6 Chicken Artichoke Dip 4pm - 9pm $5 glass House Wine All day till Midnight Friday KARAOKE $6 MARTINIS All day till midnight well brands only 1/2 OFF SPECIAL Appetizers 5-7pm KARAOKE Staring “Rock’n Ray the DJ” 10pm - 2am Saturday

$6 Long Island Iced Tea All day till Midnight $4 Stuffed Pretzel & $6 Buffalo Chicken Dip 11am - 11pm 412-765-3270 www.augusthenrys.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

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Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

Ticket & College Games

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

$ DRINKS

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

FRI-SAT

10PM-MIDNIGHT

2328 EE. Cars Carson son St St. SOUTHSIDE 412.481.0852

Wednesday Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

Gia Visto {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} to be had in old-fashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d expect, such as greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF

international seasonings, and a mix-n-match, create-your-own section for mixed grill. KE SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF

SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current fine-dining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) www. per and Southern comfort STATION STREET. pa pghcitym (chicken with black6290 Broad St., East .co eyed peas and greens, Liberty. 412-365-2121. watermelon salad). LE A neighborhood hotdog joint with exotically SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth dressed dogs, including: chili Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/ cheese (with curds), Hawaii 412-362-6198. Here, the local (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, Big Burrito group offers two sweetbreads and “devil” (egg different menus in the same salad, Tabasco and potato chips). building. Soba offers pan-Asian Also offers tacos. JF fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. in a minimalist yet elegant 412-394-3400. The venerable restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese Italian restaurant from menu, meanwhile, focuses on Greensburg now has a Downtown sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial outpost. In this elegant space, finalist in City Paper’s “Best of some classic dishes are updated; a Pittsburgh” issue. LE few favorites, like turtle soup are retained; and the fresh mozzarella SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn bar deserves to become a classic. Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. Try the distinctive pizza, with a The menu here groups food and layered, cracker-like crust. LE selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South summaries as “jammy” and Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique “muscular,” encouraging an décor you can buy and a massive, entirely new approach to convivial Sunday brunch make food selection. The restaurant’s this a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. offerings include tapas, hearty For the tea snob, the multi-page meat dishes with an array of list is not to be missed. FJ

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LOCAL

“WE WERE GOING TO MAKE MUSIC THAT WOULD CHALLENGE THE PUNK KIDS.”

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

BRINGING BACK THE BATS Sure, he wrote The Mysteries of Pittsburgh and later won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. But to me, Michael Chabon will always be known, initially, as the guy who used to sing in The Bats. Not to denigrate his other accomplishments, but that band — Pittsburgh’s The Bats, not the band from New Zealand or anyplace else — left a strong impression on these ears. In the summer of 1984, the Electric Banana started having Sunday-night all-ages shows. One night in July, the bill featured The Bats. Unlike the hardcore bands that usually played each week, the band’s songs were slower and edgy, especially one where bassist Lee Skirboll beat a two-chord riff into the ground for over five minutes. He and guitarists Sam Matthews and Ruth Ann Schmidt all took turns singing too, in what seemed like a rare egalitarian approach. It turns out Chabon had fronted the band at its debut a few months earlier, before leaving town. He also recorded a four-song demo with The Bats, which Mind Cure Records has just released for the first time. Sounding light-years better than my third-generation cassette dub, the record captures the excitement of a band that’s starting to gel. The talk-sung lyrics of “Wild West” explode with stream-of-consciousness imagery. “Yesterday Does Not Rule” sounds almost anthemic, with its unironic “bah bah bah” refrain. “What Time Is It,” the aforementioned two-chord assault, still hits hard, even if enjoying it means I’ve succumbed to the song’s cynical message. Chabon wasn’t the strongest singer — imagine a more nasal version of Buzzcocks’ Pete Shelley — but punk rock was never about that. He has the delivery. Drummer Mark “Magee” Miller keeps the band tight, and Matthews delivers some great yowling leads. The EP comes with a download of both the demo and an audio recording of the fabled live show with Chabon. It’s clear from the raw recording that the author-to-be was a natural performer, but what really makes it memorable is the force of the band. Perhaps you had to be there, but this music still shoots sparks 30 years later. Order The Bats EP: www.mindcure records.com.

CHABON WASN’T THE STRONGEST SINGER, BUT PUNK ROCK WAS NEVER ABOUT THAT.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Bad Genes in 1996: from left, Sean Whelan, Scott Quay, Dan Barnhil

IT’S

IN

I

N THE ’90S, Pittsburgh music had its

moments: In the mainstream “altrock” world, Rusted Root hit it big, and The Clarks and The Gathering Field flirted with national audiences. In the punk world, Aus-Rotten back-patches were on denim vests worldwide, and Anti-Flag slowly rose to become the global force it is today. Then there were The Bad Genes, who, early on, released a 7-inch split with Anti-Flag — surely they felt like they were next, right? “I think it was a foregone conclusion that we would never have any success doing this,” says singer Scott Quay. “We were just doing it for the love. When [the ’90s wave of] ‘punk’ broke and bands like Rancid started making it big, it did open doors for a lot of bands, but I don’t think we were that kind of band.” The punk-meets-rock band went down in local legend, though it didn’t reach the levels of fame some other bands of the era did. (“We did a split with AntiFlag — that’s how The Bad Genes come up on the Internet all the time,” says Quay. “People searching for Anti-Flag. That’s our most valuable record.”) The group was operational from 1992 through 1996; after its breakup, the members split, some sooner and some later, ending up

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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THE GENES

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

in far-flung places like California (Quay) and Germany (bassist Sean Whelan). The four-piece’s first gig in over 17 years will happen this weekend, when the members reunite for a show at Belvedere’s. In the early ’90s, the band rose from the ashes of Necracedia, the band Quay and Whelan had formed in Altoona. Necracedia had been a hardcore punk band; The Bad Genes changed it up. “[Sean and I] wanted to do more rock ’n’ roll stuff,” Quay says. “So we started The Bad Genes, originally with Curt Biondich and Steve Hill.” Dan Barnhill soon became the permanent guitarist, and the band went through a slew of drummers.

THE BAD GENES

WITH SURROUNDED BY IGNORANCE, THE SICKS 9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10. Belvedere’s Ultra-Dive, 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8. 412-687-2555

“I think we were really feeling the limitations of the hardcore punk stuff we were doing with Necracedia,” Quay says. “I was listening to lots of roots rock ’n’ roll; I remember before the last Necracedia show in Pittsburgh, I was in my apartment listening to Elvis records. Then I had to go

do this screaming in key for these people beating the crap out of each other like animals. … I remember I was really down about it. I wore an Elvis T-shirt to that show; that was my little joke to myself.” The Bad Genes became a unique presence locally: more complex than much of the three-chord street punk that was big at the time, but louder and more abrasive than more middle-of-the-road rock. Quay’s lyrics were political, but more abstract than the tack he’d taken in Necracedia. “I tried to write lyrics that were sort of poetic and open for interpretation,” Quay says. “With Necracedia, I got to where the lyrics got self-referential. About the punk scene and stuff. That’s when you realize someone who’s not part of your little world can’t appreciate it; it’s not universal. And in some ways we were antagonizing the punk audience, in the same way we as punks had antagonized what we had viewed as a ‘straight’ audience.” “[Scott’s] sale to me, when I first joined the band,” interjects guitarist Barnhill, “was that we were going to make music that would challenge the punk kids as to their punkness, by not playing punk music — because at that time I think the punk scene had a really fashion element, at least in Pittsburgh, where you flew your CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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IT’S IN THE GENES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

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colors in a very narrow lane, typically, fashion-wise. The idea, musically, was to reach back more — [Scott] had the Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran thing going on.” Early rock singer Gene Vincent — and not biology — is where The Bad Genes got their name, in fact. “What it refers to is, Gene Vincent basically had two images: This crooner image, for a song like “Woman Love” or “Be-Bop-a-Lula”; they’d have this image of him cradling a flathead mic, in a suit. Then for his rock ’n’ roll record, they’d have him like Marlon Brando: leather jacket, on a motorcycle. So I was talking to Sean about how I just wanted to have the ‘bad’ Gene Vincent image: We were just gonna be the bad Genes.” Through a few 7-inches and a fulllength (“Falafel in Kreuzberg,” out of print but available to stream on Bandcamp now), the band occupied its own unique space locally, a bit more serious than the drunkpunk bands, but drunker than the straightedge political bands — and got out of town, as far as Europe on one tour. In 1996, The Bad Genes broke up, citing the general difficulty of keeping a band together as the members turn into grown-ups and find other pursuits. Toward the end, Barnhill was sidelined for a time with appendicitis, and when the band planned one last hurrah in 1997, it was drummer Ted Tarka who was in the hospital, canceling the show. Besides a few songs at Whelan’s wedding, the band hasn’t played together since — but Tarka (best known for his work with The Mud City Manglers) got the ball rolling for the reunion when Skull Fest organizer Dusty Hanna asked about it when planning this year’s festival. “We couldn’t get everyone in for that, but once I got it in my head, I kept working on it,” says Tarka. “If Dusty hadn’t asked me, we wouldn’t be here doing this.” The Belvedere’s show also features Surrounded by Ignorance, an Altoona band that features The Bad Genes’ old mates from the band The Insignificant, and The Sicks, featuring former members of Aus-Rotten. The band promises a couple of new songs, developed in recent years via filesharing. A popular-demand reunion that crosses continents isn’t bad for a band that, by its own accord, never made it big because it didn’t quite fit any of the standard styles. Though maybe there was a little more to it. “In Columbus, Ohio, someone from Atlantic Records handed one or two of us business cards and said to give him a call,” recalls Barnhill. “And [Scott] said, ‘What do you think, I just fell off the turnip truck?’ and threw the card back at him.” “Well, there you go,” says Quay with a laugh. “That’s why we didn’t get a record deal!” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

UNPLUGGED AND OBSCURE {BY IAN THOMAS} Jumping into the world of J Mascis, in or out of Dinosaur Jr., might seem like an intimidating prospect. After all, he’s in his fourth decade of a prolific, sprawling career. Newcomers who manage to press beyond the quizzical album covers (which often feature sad-eyed cartoon beasts of fur and horn adrift in mossy, smog-choked dystopias) are rewarded with lyrics that are equally difficult to parse: pronoun-laden diatribes that seek to catalog every awkward encounter Mascis has ever endured, without the courtesy of context or specifics.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN LAPRIORE}

Opaque appeal: J Mascis

He is beholden to instinct above all. He is not above singing in an offputting falsetto, or sandwiching a blistering guitar solo, between two blistering solos. And while Mascis’ visceral style of play has contributed greatly to his status as an iconoclast, his profound aloofness has played a part that cannot be easily discounted. Spend some time in Mascis’ orbit, though, and it becomes apparent that while this insularity is a barrier to entry, it is also the whole of his appeal, regardless of whether the entry point is the first album from Dinosaur Jr., Dinosaur, or this new solo offering, Tied to a Star. With no real jumping-on point, the listener has no choice but to take the leap and hang on tight. Mascis takes a quiet tack on Tied to a Star, continuing in the vein of his 2012 album Several Shades of Why. There is no shortage of his characteristically cryptic lyrical missives, but they are rendered tender by the largely acoustic backdrop. While Tied to a Star offers a few token nods to the fuzz and grit of Dinosaur Jr. (as on the song “Stumble”), the bulk of it is bright, crisp and bittersweetly autumnal. As always, it’s unclear where Mascis is coming from with any of it, but it arrived just in time. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

J MASCIS with LULUC. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $49.50. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


CALIFORNIA ’BURGHER {BY ANDY MULKERIN} PATRICK JOSEPH grew up in Pittsburgh, cut his teeth playing shows at local venues and then left for Los Angeles. The singersongwriter makes a living there as a musician, splitting his time between contract commercial work and a solo career; his new album, Moon King, was just released. He’s on a tour that brings him to Club Café this Saturday, then finds him back in town opening for The Clarks next Saturday at Jergel’s. He spoke with CP via phone about his trajectory after Pittsburgh.

WHEN DID YOU LEAVE FOR L.A., AND WHY? This was 2008, I was only about 20 at the time. I decided to try to find a new audience for my music, try to make more of a financial living doing it. I was trying to find ways to get my music heard in film, television, maybe try to get on tours with like-minded singer-songwriters. It worked out really well — I miss Pittsburgh, I love Pittsburgh and I love to visit, but Los Angeles is nice. WHAT’S DAY-TO-DAY LIFE LIKE FOR YOU AS A FULL-TIME MUSICIAN? I have my own studio in Burbank that I work out of, and I do a lot of TV — a show needs a song, a movie needs a song, stuff like that. That’s my day-today: It’s split between planning my solo career and tour schedule and recording my album, but also doing that work. Exercising my brain musically still, but making money just doing music.

Stand up and tell ’em you’re from Pittsburgh: Patrick Joseph

that benefits you. I originally got into that world because some of my solo songs were getting placed into shows, like The Office or Gossip Girl. HOW HAS SIMPLY BEING IN THAT CITY AFFECTED YOU AS A SONGWRITER? The competition is great over here. Anytime I go play a show or even a showcase, a songwriter club out here or something — I’m lucky to be friends with a lot of great songwriters out here, and it’s fun seeing my friends doing what I’m doing, but it’s also inspiring. It kind of makes you want to be better.

“I THINK BEING FROM PITTSBURGH GAVE ME A GROUNDED, DOWN-TO-EARTH PERSONALITY.”

WAS THAT HARD TO BREAK INTO? Yeah — it takes a long time to meet the right people and get into that, because everybody wants to be doing that. Persistence, too: There’s

PATRICK JOSEPH

WITH CRYSTAL LEE MORGAN 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

a lot of rejection that comes with it, and a lot of failure, you’re trying to break the ice. You have a good attitude, you keep trying and trying, and you finally get a break; somebody recognizes that you’re able to do something that can benefit them and

TO WHAT EXTENT DOES YOUR TIME COMING UP IN PITTSBURGH STILL INFORM WHAT YOU DO? I think being from Pittsburgh gave me a grounded, down-to-earth personality, and I think that’s refreshing to people out here, when they meet somebody from Pittsburgh — somebody who’s not just looking to get ahead, or use people. I genuinely like to meet these people and hang out, and I like to think people think of me as a friend, not just competition. People always say when they visit Pittsburgh, it’s such a friendly place; I like to think I carry that and represent that out here. I’m proud that I’m out here; I still identify as being from Pittsburgh. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS The Early Mays

{PHOTO COURTESY OF POLLY WHITEHORN}

[FOLK] + SAT., OCT. 11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ZEN SEKIZAWA}

[SOUL] + SAT., OCT. 11

It’s survived a change of venue, and at this point lasted longer than either of its direct predecessors — the old Soulcialism party at the South Side’s White Eagle and the later Vipers Soul Club — and now it’s time for Title Town to celebrate. The monthly, vinyl-only dance night, hosted by DJs Gordy G and J Malls, started at Shadow Lounge and moved to its current venue, Brillobox, when Shadow closed last year. Tonight is the soul-and-funk party’s fifth-anniversary edition, where Gordy and J are joined by guest DJs Jordan K and Derek White. AM 8 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5-7. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[SYNTH POP] + SUN., OCT. 12 Once described as “bright-eyed and bushytailed,” Gardens & Villa has finally been properly jaded by the arduous journey that is a life in the music industry. The Santa Barbara, Calif.-based synth-pop group recently released its second album, Dunes, with Secretly Canadian. The dancey, dreamy album reflects the three years that have passed since the band’s first release: It’s tighter and more complex, recorded with Tim Goldsworthy in a converted locksmith’s building in Michigan.

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You can see the five-piece tonight in the comfortably close quarters of Club Café with opener Sandy Alex G. Samantha Ward 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[INDIE POP] + MON., OCT. 13

Pittsburgh’s

Perhaps best known for their dance moves on treadmills, the members of OK Go have continued to produce off-kilter pop music and compellingly complex videos to accompany it since “Here We Go Again” graced YouTube in 2006 and won a Grammy in 2007. Since forming in 1998, OK Go OK Go has become known for engaging in collaborations that push the boundaries of interdisciplinary creativity, a feat that can be seen in “The Writing’s on the Wall,” a video that took over 50 people to create. OK Go is set to release a fourth full-length album, Hungry Ghosts, on Oct. 14, and you can catch the group tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre. We’re pretty sure the oddball group will pull out some interesting surprises for the crowd. SW 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave, Millvale. $16. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

As local folk music goes, The Early Mays are a bit of a supergroup: The trio consists of Judith Avers, Ellen Gozion and Emily Pinkerton, all well known in their own rights. Together, they literally make beautiful music — a play on the Appalachian folk all three are steeped in, with close vocal harmonies, and guitar, banjo and fiddle work. Tonight, they release their self-titled first album, full of beautiful tunes, if not exactly party rock. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. St. Andrew Lutheran Church, 304 Morewood Ave., Shadyside. $10-15. All ages. www. theearlymays.com

UPCOMING SHOWS

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., OCT. 14 As the driving force behind Outer Spaces, Cara Beth Satalino hits a musical sweet spot, writing songs that feel fresh and emotionally familiar. Between stripped-down instrumentation, hooky Breeders-esque harmonies and candid lyrics, the (mostly) Baltimore-based three-piece sounds pretty but rarely cute: Imagine your most rational, sympathetic friend writing songs for Fleetwood Mac, then recording them with Rilo Kiley. The band will be at Brillobox tonight, opening for Surfer Blood and Eternal Summers — do yourself a favor and show up on time. Margaret Welsh 9:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 14. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $15. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 10.8 Thu 10.9 Fri 10.10 Sat 10.11 Sun 10.12

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CAR CRUISE FINALE & JUNCTION PA // rock // 8 pm STRAIGHT ON–HEART TRIBUTE // Ticketed Event // 8 pm show DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s dance // 9 pm DONNIE IRIS & THE CRUISERS // Ticketed Event // 9 pm show STEELERS VS. BROWNS (A) // 1 pm Hermie Granati & Bryan Cole Duo immediately following! A R T S

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5968 Baum Blvd. East Liberty www.trimpittsburgh.com 412-512-2828

Ov er 40 Ye ars in Etn a

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 09

CLUB CAFE. Sons Of Bill, Israel Nash. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Spirits & the Melchizedek Children, I Am A Sea Creature, Negative Waves. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

FRI 10

196 BUTLER STREET, ETNA

412-781-9837 State Inspection & Emission • Full Mechanical Services Alignments • Tires • Batteries • GAS • OIL • KEROSENE

FOR VALUABLE COUPONS: KRESSSERVICE.COM

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Memphis Hill. “Backwards Beginnings” record release party. Oakland. 412-904-3400. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Lac La Belle, Robin Vote, The River Out Back. Strip District. BELVEDERE’S. The Bad Genes, The S/cks, Surrounded by Ignorance. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Brandi Carlile. Oakland. CLUB CAFE. Mirah, Death Vessel (Early) Good Ship Gibraltar, Comfort Tech, Paint31 (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Ten Foot Polecats, Cannibal Ramblers. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Black Tar Profit, Iron Gavel, Slaves BC. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320 LINDEN GROVE. Nightlife. Castle Shannon. PARK HOUSE. Rick Malis & the Mavens. North Side. 412-224-2273. REX THEATER. Black 47. South Side. 412-381-6811. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. STAGE AE. STS9 (Sound Tribe Sector 9). North Side. 412-229-5483.

SAT 11

ALTAR BAR. Stray From The Path Counterparts, Expire, My Ticket Home, Restoration, Killing Thing. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BENEDUM CENTER. Jason Mraz, Raining Jane. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CHRISTINA’S. Lucky Me. 412-672-5750. CLUB CAFE. Patrick Joseph & His Band, Crystal Lee Morgan (Early) Wine & Spirit, The Highland Brothers Band, The Vindys (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Verdict. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Dead River, Bunny Five Coat, The Bestevers. South Side. 412-431-4090. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Adventure, Nao Line, 8 Cylinder,

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The Sexbots. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. The Lampshades, Drug Lust, Mantiques. The Lampshades record release show. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Max House & the Percolators. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Carney Stomp. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar Band. 412-384-3080. KOLLAR CLUB. Jack Stanizzo & Paul Lowe. South Side. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Cmmon Nightmare, Dead Signal Chasers, Turnpike Gardens, Under Indictment. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SEVEN SPRINGS. Totally 80s. 814-352-7777. SMILING MOOSE. Firestarter, Post Season Deadiron, Homicide

Black, Sunless Sky, Curse the Wicked, Dead Iron. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Fit For Rivals. North Side. 412-229-5483. TEAMSTER TEMPLE. Nied’s Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Birds of Chicago. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 12

BENEDUM CENTER. Jackson Brown. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BRILLOBOX. Motopony, The Family Crest. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Gardens & Villa, Sandy Alex G. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Bike Cops, Kisser, Blod Maud, Fake Grave. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

MP 3 MONDAY THE VAN ALLEN BELT

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY JOHANSON}

ar Socks Shirts Activewear Swimwear Beard & Shave Soap Candles

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local band. This week’s offering comes from The Van Allen Belt; stream or download “Different Storm” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


MON 13

MR. SMALLS THEATER. OK Go, Cutups, Keeb$. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

TUE 14

RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

SAT 11

BELVEDERE’S. TRL // PGH. Jx4 & ADAM C. Lawrenceville. ALTAR BAR. Mayday Parade 412-687-2555. Tonight Alive, Major League, BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & PVRIS. Strip District. 412-263-2877. Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild BRILLOBOX. Surfer Blood, R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Eternal Summers, Outer Spaces. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack CLUB CAFE. Minus The Movements, DJ White Lyon. Bear, O’Brother. South Side. Homewood. 412-657-2279. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. 412-431-8800. Matt Weston, Carbon LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Mirage, Marateek. Josey. Top 40 Dance Garfield. 412-361-2262. Night. South Side. HEINZ HALL. The 412-431-5282. Australian Pink Floyd www. per a p ty ROWDY BUCK. pghci m Show. Downtown. .co Top 40 Dance. South 412-392-4900. Side. 412-431-2825. MR. SMALLS THEATER. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. mewithoutYou, The Appleseed 412-481-7227. Cast. Millvale. 866-468-3401. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel PALACE THEATRE. Huey City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Lewis & The News. Greensburg. Oakland. 412-874-4582. 724-836-8000. REX THEATER. Boombox. South Side. 412-381-6811. SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. SMILING MOOSE. Foxing East Liberty. 412-657-2279. Nai Harvest, Kittyhawk, Skull Kid. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ SMI. Black Francis. Lawrenceville. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. 412-682-0177. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. 31ST STREET PUB. The Grayces, Devil’s Cut. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. DORO, Lady Beast, Leeja Stark. Strip District. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Proud 412-263-2877. to be Local - Live Mixtape Edition. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. The Gothees. Goth-n-Bowl. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. J Mascis. South Side. XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. Insane 412-431-4950. Clown Posse. Strip District. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. CarrieNation & The Speakeasy. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. ALTAR BAR. Aer, Dizzy Wright. SMILING MOOSE. Crooked Strip District. 412-263-2877. Cobras, The Hex Bombs, The Sablowskis. South Side. 412-431-4668. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Blake w/ STAGE AE. Bassnectar, Kill Rich Jones & Black Matt, Middle Paris, Son Of Kick. North Side. Name Danger, Hail Mary, Stillborn 412-229-5483. Identity, Doomshark. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 12

WED 15

WED 15

HIP HOP/R&B

An Evening of Music

TUGBOAT’S. Tim Woods Band. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992. VERDETTO’S. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. North Side.

SUN 12

ANDYS. Billy Price & the Lost Minds. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

WED 15

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. B.B. King. 412-368-5225.

JAZZ THU 09

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

OCTOBER 24: 8PM

Jacob Jeffries

FRI 10

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Bob Mintzer R & Big Band. North Side. 412-322-1773. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly Downtown. 412-553-5235.

w/Heidi Jacobs

DJS

THU 09

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 10

BRILLOBOX. LAZERCRUNK feat. Distal, Cutups & Keeb$. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Noetic. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

N E W S

WE’LL CUT YOU.

abkmusic.com/coh-events

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

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BLUES THU 9

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FRI 10

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Corey Dennison, Johnny Angel. North Side. 412-322-1850. LEVELS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. MOONDOG’S. The Nighthawks. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 11

MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. The BoHogs. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

SUN 12

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHUCK GRANT}

THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. LITTLE E’S. Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 412-233-9800.

Nikki Lane

MON 13

{FRI., NOV. 14}

Nikki Lane

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square

WED 15

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

{FRI., NOV. 14}

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side

ACOUSTIC

{FRI., NOV. 20-SAT., NOV. 21}

Wiz Khalifa

THU 09

ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Peter Walker, Pairdown, David Shelow. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 10

ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181. PITTSBURGH WINERY. James Hart, Hallie Pritts, Chet Vincent. Songwriters in the Cellar hosted by Paul Luc. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 11

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

REGGAE FRI 10

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

CLASSICAL FRI 10

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY OLIVE OR TWIST. ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, The Vagrants. Downtown. Downtown. 412-392-4900. 412-255-0525. PITTSBURGH WINERY. 10 String Symphony. THE PITTSBURGH Strip District. CAMERATA. 412-566-1000. Reinventing the SEVEN SPRINGS. Renaissance. East ww. r w e Julie Jean White. Liberty Presbyterian pap pghcitym 814-352-7777. .co Church, East Liberty. ST. ANDREW’S 412-441-3800. LUTHERAN CHURCH. PITTSBURGH The Early Mays. Shadyside. PHILHARMONIC. Sisters of St. 412-682-3342. Francis, Millvale. 412-821-2200. TRAX FARMS. Shelf Life String PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Band. 412-835-3246. ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SERGEY SCHEPKIN. TRAX FARMS. Shelf Life String Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. Band. 412-835-3246. 412-622-3131. WASHINGTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “Something ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE Wicked” Trinity High School, #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Washington. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam CARNEGIE MELLON w/ The Shelf Life String Band. PHILHARMONIC. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 11

SUN 12

WED 15

SUN 12

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SOUTH HILLS BRASS. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

MON 13

BEETHOVEN ON THE BLUFF: ARCHDUKE TRIO/DIABELLI VARIATIONS. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080. JI. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 10

LATITUDE 360. No Bad Juju. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 11

KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Anqwenique Wingfield, Yona Harvey, Daniel Bernard Roumain. The NO BOUNDaries Project. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LATITUDE 360. Dancing Queen. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. Dimestore Halo. Emsworth. 412-761-6700.

SUN 12

HAMBONE’S. Steel City Ukulele Club Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 15

PALACE THEATRE. Engelbert Humperdinck. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.


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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

October 8 - 14 WEDNESDAY 84

Holy Ghost Tent Revival CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Grand Piano. Over 21 event. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 95 Macbeth

CHARITY RANDALL THEATRE Oakland. 412-561-6000. Tickets: picttheatre.org/ macbeth. Through Oct. 25.

Eric Himan ECLIPSE LOUNGE Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. Free event. 8pm.

Spuyten Duyvil THE ROOTS CELLAR, PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS Shadyside. Tickets: calliopehouse.org or 412-361-1915. 7:30p.m.

Poetry.com PGH & Friends HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. Tickets: poetryandcomedypgh. eventbrite.com or 412-867-0826. 8p.m.

pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Oct. 12.

412-456-6666. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 11

OK GO

Aspen / Santa Fe Ballet BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org/dance. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 10 David Gray

Outside Mullingar

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: livenation.com. 8p.m.

CITY THEATER MAINSTAGE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through Nov. 2.

Kenny Blake Jazz

Eric Church

ECLIPSE LOUNGE Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. Free event. Every Friday. 6pm.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. With special guests Dwight Yoakam & more. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

29th Annual Reel Q Film Festival HARRIS THEATER Downtown. Tickets: reelq.org. Through Oct. 18.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 14 Fleetwood Mac

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

The Australian Pink Floyd Show HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 7p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. Tickets: ticketweb. BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m. Tickets: livenation.com or

Jackson Browne

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets:

MONDAY 13

Mewithoutyou

SUNDAY 12

Fleetwood Mac

Spanish Strings

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33


52 TUESDAYS IS SENSITIVE AND RAW, FUNNY AND BITTERSWEET

HAUNTED HOUSE {BY AL HOFF} In a small New Mexico town, a handsome stranger (Dan Stevens) comes knocking on the Petersons’ door. He says he’s David, that he served with their dead son in Afghanistan, and that he’s dropping by as requested. The family is touched, and invites David to stay. Why not? He’s polite, clean-cut and helpful, as adept at commiserating with dad about work stress as he is at helping teenage Luke combat bullies at school. But alone in the bedroom, David’s eyes go dead, and it’s increasingly clear his intentions are other than stated. Oh, and people start getting hurt and dying …

A GAY TIME Dan Stevens soldiers on.

Director Adam Wingard (You’re Next) has some fun with The Guest, an entertaining piece of pulp that effortlessly shifts between normally hackneyed genres — family melodrama, secret military plot, slasher horror, even high school comedy — making them feel fresh. Stevens (Downton Abbey’s late “Matthew”) seamlessly transitions between the likable and the disturbing Davids, and Maika Monroe makes a game foil as the one cynical family member not entirely charmed by the new houseguest. The Guest starts and builds slowly, but take heart that the final reel satisfies many of one’s grindhouse needs. Also, props to Wingard for setting this story in October, where virtually every scene has death’s-head grace notes, in the form of perfectly acceptable Halloween décor such as carved pumpkins and skeletons. Boo! Starts Fri., Oct. 10. AMC Loews AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Get your spook ok on ht every Saturday night at midnight, at the Manor Theater, in Squirrel Hill: Oct. 12, the devil-worship thriller Rosemary’s Baby y; aunted Oct. 19, the haunted hotel of The Shining ning g; Oct. 25 iss really Friday the 13th; and

Night of the d wraps Living Dead onth on up the month Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 1..

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HE 29TH ANNUAL Pittsburgh Inter-

national Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, now known as Reel Q, runs Fri., Oct. 10, through Oct. 18. It features: 13 narrative and documentary films, three programs of shorts and openingand closing-night parties. The opening-night film is Blackbird ((7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10), a coming-out dramedy from Patrik-Ian Polk that also d explores issues of faith, family and e what Romeo and Juliet would be like if w JJuliet were a man. Julian Walker porttrays a small-town Mississippi teen who’s both deeply religious and deeply w attracted to men; his conflicting desires a are often expressed in beautifully sung a gospel tunes while he fantasizes about g encounters with hot guys. Mo’Nique e and Isaiah Washington co-star as his a estranged parents. e Andrea Myerson directs the hour-long doc Letter to Anita (4:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11; d preceded by the short “In the Overlap”), p

From top left, clockwise: 52 Weeks, Blackbird, Letter to Anita and Appropriate Behavior

about the surprising effect Anita Bryant’s anti-gay campaign in the 1970s had on one Florida woman and even the national gay-rights movement. Spoiler alert: Ms. Bryant likely helped the gay cause. There’s plenty of sardonic humor in Desiree Akhavan’s comedy Appropriate Behavior (7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11), in which the director portrays a feisty IranianAmerican bisexual who can’t come out to her immigrant family. Akhavan is an appealing lead, and expect plenty of sly jokes about Brooklyn bohemia. Gender, sexuality, family, coming out, growing up and the advance of time are among the themes of 52 Tuesdays (7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16), Sophie Hyde’s impressive melodrama about a teenage Australian girl (Tilda Cobham-Hervey), who suddenly discovers her mother (Del Herbert-Jane) is transitioning to a man. Hyde shot weekly over a year, and the visible temporal passage is among the film’s strengths, in addition to great performances. The work is

sensitive and raw, funny and bittersweet. Also screening during the festival: The family comedy Eat With Me, with George Takei; women in love, friendship and maybe more (Tru Love and BFFs); the Dutch comedy 20 Lies, 4 Parents and a Little Egg; the Swedish gender exploration Something Must Break; the drag ’80s high school send-up First Period; Out in the Night, a doc about the self-defense case of the New Jersey 4; The Circle, a docudrama about a long-running gay paper in Europe; and Shorts Programs for men and women. ReelQ wraps up with a screening of the Brazilian coming-of-age film The Way He Looks, followed by a party. All films screen at the Harris Theater, Downtown. Single tickets are $9. Opening night is $ 15 and includes after-party at Bricolage. Closing night is $ 15 for film and party at ToonSeum. Passes and student discounts are also available. See www.reelQ.org for complete schedule and more information. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014


Woody Allen Week: The Front (1976 comedy about blacklisted writers during the Cold War), Oct. 10-11 and Oct 15-16. Manhattan (Allen’s 1979 black-and-white love story for the island of Manhattan), Oct., 10-11 and Oct. 12-16. Sleeper (1973 sci-fi comedy about a hippie in the future), Oct. 10-12 and Oct. 15-16. Hannah and Her Sisters (domestic dramedy from 1986), Oct. 10-14. Vicky Cristina Barcelona (infidelity abroad in this 2008 film starring Penelope Cruz), Oct. 10-14. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

ADDICTED. Adapted from Zane’s novel, Bille Woodruff’s melodrama recounts a disastrous affair. Starts Fri., Oct. 10. ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY. You know, when everything goes wrong! Miguel Arteta’s comedy is adapted from Judith Viorst’s best-selling children’s book. Ed Oxenbould is Alex, and Jennifer Garner and Steve Carrell are his harried parents. Starts Fri., Oct. 10. ANNABELLE. Remember that freaky doll “Annabelle” from last year’s The Conjuring? John R. Leonetti’s horror thriller fills in her backstory in this prequel, set in Los Angeles in 1970. The very pregnant Mia (Annabelle Wallis) is given a doll that then proceeds to haunt the family. That’s it, really, filled out with jump-out scares; nods to Rosemary’s Baby, The Exorcist and Helter Skelter; and one supernatural playing of “Cherish.” The film has some effective scenes that ratchet up the tension (a close-up of fingers near a hammering sewing machine needle is worse than any shadowy demon), and I appreciate how Leonetti lets some scenes breathe. But overall, Annabelle needs a better and more coherent narrative. The story gives short shrift to another and more obvious source — the deep anxiety and psychological turmoil potentially faced by a new mother. (A better movie could have dialed back the we-see-it-too reality of the demon doll, and made Mia’s beliefs more subjective, and possibly rooted in her own anxieties.) For an origin story, who or what or why “Annabelle” is is unclear, and this movie is simply tacked onto The Conjuring in a clunky epilogue. And beware: Annabelle’s prologue could be the teaser for the inevitable sequel to this prequel. (Al Hoff) DEAD SNOW 2: RED VS. DEAD. The zombie Nazis are back, so expect more bloody severed limbs littering the pristine snow. Tommy Wirkola directs this horror comedy. In English, and Norwegian and German, with subtitles. 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10; 9:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 11; 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 13; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 10. Hollywood THE GREEN P R I N C E . Nadav Shirman’s documentary about the troubled relations between Israel and Palestine during the late 1990s and early 2000s is primarily composed of footage of two men, each seated

The Green Prince

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NOSFERATU. F.W. Murnau’s 1922 silent classic offers a Dracula retelling. The vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. With his anguished face and unwieldy talons, Schreck’s Orlock evokes both pity and horror, and combined with Murnau’s stylish direction, this landmark film offers unforgettable tableaux, such as Orlock’s ascension from the ship’s hold. Still creepy nearly 100 years later. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 8. AMC Loews. $5

Annabelle in a medium shot but filmed separately, simply relating their shared story. But it’s a fascinating narrative, troubling in its truth even as it resembles an improbably plotted airport thriller. Mosab Hassan Yousef grows up in the Palestinian West Bank, the son of a well-known Hamas leader. At 17, he is arrested by the Israelis, and through the ministrations of Shin Bet handler Gonen Ben Yitzhak, Yousef becomes an Israeli informant. Returned to Ramallah, Yousef works closely with his father, including through the first intifada, in which the increasing violence and retribution on both sides makes his double-agency particularly hazardous. At 90 minutes, Prince feels stretched, and without an on-screen interrogator, some provocative questions go unanswered, while other segments feel perfunctory. While it’s an interesting tale with obvious repercussions for these two men in their shared endeavor, its novelty doesn’t shed any new light on the still-ongoing conflict. In English, and some Arabic, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 10. Manor (AH) HOUSEBOUND. After being sentenced to her childhood home for house arrest, a woman starts to wonder whether the house might be haunted, as her mother claims it is. Gerard Johnstone directs this new horror-comedy from New Zealand. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16; 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 19; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 21. Hollywood THE JUDGE. A big-city attorney (Robert Downey Jr.) returns to his small hometown to defend his estranged dad (Robert Duvall) in a murder case. David Dobkin directs this drama. Starts Fri., Oct. 10. KILL THE MESSENGER. “National security and crack cocaine in the same sentence — does that not sound strange to you?” Michael Cuesta’s provocative docudrama about Gary Webb asks and answers this question. Webb was a journalist at the San Jose Mercury News who in the 1990s uncovered a connection between secret CIA funding of the Nicaraguan Contras in the mid-’80s and the explosion of crack cocaine, particularly in America’s cities. Jeremy Renner gives a good portrayal of Webb, a man whose impulses cause him to double down on a career-making, then career-destroying, story. There is also a nice slate of fun actors in small roles and cameos: Michael Sheen, Ray Liotta, Andy Garcia, Tim Blake Nelson and Michael K. Williams. The first two-thirds of the film at times recalls the investigative-journalist-uncovers-conspiracy paranoiathrillers of the 1970s, intercut with archival news footage. The film loses its footing once Webb’s reporting comes under attack, and Webb’s role grows more passive, as he becomes the story rather than chasing one. Watching journalists snipe about editing isn’t generally compelling. Likewise the film struggles with how to resolve the story’s central mystery regarding CIA

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actions in both the 1980s and after Webb’s story is published. There’s an “answer” of sorts, but it’s on the Möbius Strip of Truth that are CIA statements, which creates only a vaguely satisfying ending. Perhaps the film is best summed up by a bit of on-the-nose dialogue from one of Webb’s deep government sources: “Some secrets are just too true to tell.” Starts Fri., Oct. 10 (AH)

Kill the Messenger MY OLD LADY. The peculiar French real-estate deal known as a viager is the catalyst for Israel Horovitz’s dramedy about life, love, forgiveness and, well, fabulous Parisian apartments. It’s complicated, but suffice to say that when a dissolute American (Kevin Kline) turns up in Paris to sell the fabulous flat he inherited from his father, he ends up moving in with the current residents, a feisty old lady (Maggie Smith) and her daughter (Kristen Scott Thomas). Over the course of sparring, misunderstandings and several bottles of fairly good wine, secrets are revealed and alliances broken and re-formed. At times, Lady betrays its stage origins (Horovitz wrote and adapted his own play), and fans of similar hothouse parlor dramas won’t find much new in the plotting. But Smith can make a gourmet meal out of any corn-dogfilled script, and all her scenes are a delight. Starts Fri., Oct. 10. Regent Square (AH)

TALES OF POE. This new film anthology tackles three Edgar Allan Poe stories: “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Cask of Amontillado” and “Dreams.” 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10. Hollywood THE UN KN OWN . Lon Chaney stars in Tod Browning’s 1927 silent drama, which takes place in a circus. Chaney portrays an armless knife-thrower (a deformity he is faking in order to elude the law). He also pines for his pretty young partner (Joan Crawford), who has a fear of men’s arms, and is thus rejecting the love of a relatively decent strongman. Then, shocking things happen. Fans of twisted melodramas shouldn’t miss this screening, the second in a fall series of restored silents, Unseen Treasures from the George Eastman House. Michael Johnson and Jessica Marcrum will perform a live score with electronics and voice. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. $10. www.warhol.org DON ’T LOOK N OW. After the accidental death of their child, a couple (Julie Christie, Donald Sutherland) come to Venice for a change, and for Sutherland to help restore a church, in Nicholas Roeg’s 1973 psychological thriller. Haunted by guilt, neither seems to find much solace: Christie becomes convinced that a blind Englishwoman can communicate with her dead child, and Sutherland — after a near-death experience of his own — grows obsessed with a phantom figure in a red coat similar to his child’s. A masterpiece

REPERTORY

ROW HOUSE CIN EMA. Robin Williams Tribute ($1 for every ticket sold will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Pittsburgh chapter): The World According to Garp (1982 adaptation of the John Irving novel), Oct. 8. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (Terry Gilliam’s 1998 fantastical rendering of the notable baron), Oct. 8. Hook (Avast! 1991 re-telling of Peter Pan), Oct. 8-9. Good Will Hunting (academic, inspirational 1997 dramedy, co-starring Matt Damon), Oct 9. The Birdcage (Williams and Nathan Lane own a drag club in this 1996 comedy), Oct. 9.

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Two Faces of January (2014)

-Dead - - - - -Snow - - - - - -2:- - -Read - - - - - Vs.- - - -Dead ----------------Tales - - - - - of- - -Poe- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Grease - - - - - - -Sing-a-Long --------------------------------Paths - - - - - -of- - Glory ------------------------------10/8 @ 7:30pm, 10/9 @ 7:30pm 10/11 @ 7:00pm Thriller starring Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst.

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

of enigmatic cinema, unsettling throughout, that makes typically romantic Venice look cold and creepy — a foreboding, secretive city of twists and dead ends. 9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10, and 6:30 and 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11. Melwood

presents the episode; the show airs locally on PCTV. And the Oct. 14 program includes Matthew Veltri’s comic short “How to Interview a Vampire.” 8 p.m. Tue., Oct. 14 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room. $5. (Bill O’Driscoll)

GREASE SIN G-ALON G. You already know that “Grease is the word,” but what about the rest of them? In this new sing-along version of the 1978 hit movie musical (itself adapted from a Broadway show), all the words you need appear magically on screen. Other than that, it’s the movie you remember, in all its color-saturated, fantasy-’50s glory, where high school is for sock-hops, drive-in movies, shop class and falling in love again with that perky Australian girl. Directed by Randal Kleiser, the film stars John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John at their dreamiest. “Tell me more, tell me more …” 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12. Hollywood

THE EXORCIST. Here’s a classic horror film worth seeing in the theater, if only for full immersion in Mike Oldfield’s creepy soundtrack. Time has quelled many of the shocks of William Friedkin’s 1973 film, but the subject matter — a 12-year-old girl potentially possessed by the devil — is still pretty unsettling. Plus, you can’t really be sure the good guys have triumphed. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

HOVERLA UKRAIN IAN -AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. The month-long film festival continues with films screening each weekend through October. Ihor Chajka’s documentary The Island of Crimea will be accompanied by Andriy Rozhen’s short film “Letter From the Past.” 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412364-2794 or www.ucowpa.org. $8 PATHS OF GLORY. Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 World War I drama, vividly shot in a clean, black-andwhite documentary style, remains a powerful piece of filmmaking and has rightfully taken its place in the canon of great anti-war films. After an ambitious general (Adolphe Menjou) sends his men to certain death, his colonel (Kirk Douglas) refuses to lead his troops out of the trenches to follow. The general retaliates by charging three of the colonel’s men with desertion. Douglas leads an impassioned, if ultimately unsuccessful, defense at their trial. Continues a yearlong celebration of Kubrick films. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12, and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 15. (AH)

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Dominic Rodriguez’s “Fursonas” at Film Kitchen WHATEVER HAPPEN ED TO BABY JAN E? In Robert Aldrich’s dark, campy classic from 1962, two aging sisters are trapped in hell together, sharing a rundown Hollywood mansion and hatin’ on each other. Joan Crawford plays it pretty straight, but Bette Davis has a field day prancing about as decrepit former child star, Baby Jane. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of comic horror films. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12. Regent Square FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent artists hosts an evening of mostly Halloweenthemed shorts. Highlights include “Fursonas,” Dominic Rodriguez’s empathetic — in fact, rather cuddly — documentary about furries. A couple dogs, a couple foxes, a raccoon: The humans inside

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

the costumes tell why they love being animal characters and convening at events like the annual Pittsburgh-hosted Anthrocon. “I like to think like I’m a dog and look at the world with canine-type of eyes,” says “Boomer.” Rodriguez also offers three quirkily unsettling short promos for We Are Monsters, each introducing a main character from this planned feature-length horror film. Rodriguez’s work is presented by producer Olivia Vaughn, who also presents John Skip Volscko’s “Blue in Green,” a deliberately paced but well-acted slice-of-life about a young couple on a road trip. Film Kitchen, curated by Matthew Day, also premieres an episode from season 2 of “The Weakness,” a contemporary-set, indie-style cable series (shot in black and white) about vampires. Creator and star Lauren Zito

BARBARA. Christian Petzold directs this meditative, character-driven thriller about one woman’s life in a small town in 1980s East Germany. The 2012 film continues a series of German films, keyed to the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In German, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16. Cathedral of Learning (Room 324), University of Pittsburgh campus, Oakland. Free. 412-648-2614 THE GREAT SILEN CE. Sergio Corbucci directs this 1968 Western in which a mute gunslinger faces off against a gang of bounty hunters. Look for future arthouse star Klaus Kinski. This film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series, which offers patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-7661668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com. ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[HORROR]

THOROUGHLY INGRAINED IS OUR LINNAEUS-LIKE NEED TO CLASSIFY

WHO SCARES? {BY KATIE PUGH}

[EXHIBIT REVIEW]

Cellar-dweller: another denizen of The Basement {PHOTO COURTESY OF RACELLYN SCHOEN, © UNDEAD PRODUCTIONS}

Heavy darkness, thick air. A black bag over your head. Shrieking, moaning, growling. Then, you’re pulled into a room by a hand at your throat, and you’re the one screaming. It’s just a normal night in ScareHouse’s haunted attraction known as The Basement. This marks the second year for The Basement, a uniquely terrifying experience. The rules are simple. Adults only. All patrons must sign a waiver. There’s no touching the actors, but they can — and will — touch you. And that’s with hoods, electricity and restraints (to name a few). The mind behind The Basement is sociologist Margee Kerr, who has a Ph.D. and knows how to scare with it. “The Basement is based on what research tells us humans’ biggest fears are today,” Kerr explains. “It very much is meant to tap into deeper issues that are uncomfortable and unusual. “The Basement has a very clear goal: to invite customers to experience scary, different, interactive, immersive and unusual scenarios in a consensual and safe environment with the hope that it will teach them something they didn’t know about themselves, and allow them to experience all the benefits of safe and thrilling activities.” Compared to similar events in other cities, Kerr believes The Basement stands out. “From a design perspective, too, we’re much more elaborate and our actors are much more theatrical. … They are crazy talented.” Horror is one thing, but for many, the line between adult content and full contact is another. “I notice that many customers will interpret scenes through a sexual lens, even though there is no sexual content,” says Kerr. “It is just the act of a stranger being close physically and touching us that we read as sexual. Others will interpret that as scary, others as uncomfortable — it’s all in the individuals … what they are bringing to the scene.” Besides, if you can’t take it, there’s always the safe word. If The Basement is too intense, the traditional ScareHouse experience remains. This Millvale institution has attracted the attention of Legendary Entertainment, the stomping grounds of filmmakers Guillermo Del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim) and Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen). Creative director Scott Simmons says that the company is working with ScareHouse on content for the main haunt this year. Both the main haunt and The Basement do sell out, so the brave should book ahead at www.ScareHouse.com.

COLORING IT IN {PHOTO COURTESY OF AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION AND SCIENCE MUSEUM OF MINNESOTA}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

W

“What are you?”: A photo from RACE, of college students wearing T-shirts printed with racial categories they would have been assigned in three different censuses

ITHOUT THINKING about it

much, Americans have long considered race a matter of biology — something as scientifically real as gravity. So if the exhibition RACE: Are We So Different? did nothing beyond demolishing the idea that “race” originates anywhere but in power and prejudice, it would still serve a valuable purpose. But this touring multimedia exhibit by the American Anthropological Association and the Science Museum of Minnesota does much more. In a city as riven with racial divisions and racial inequality as Pittsburgh, its stop at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History is essential viewing. You’ll learn, for instance, that until the 1600s — long after the trans-Atlantic slave trade began — Europeans had no concept of race; social hiearchies were based on religion and wealth. “Race was not found in nature but made by people in power,” reads some of this sprawling but accessible show’s copious text. “Racial classification

provided a way to justify privilege and oppression by making inequality appear to be the result of natural differences.” Those “natural differences,” of course, were ever only skin deep. If the pigments that divide us are adaptive responses to how hard the sun shines at different latitudes, everything else about us is identical. Until 100,000 years ago, after all, everyone was African — and most human genes remain a subset of African genes.

RACE: ARE WE SO DIFFERENT?

continues through Oct. 27. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemnh.org

In the British colonies, however, landholders wanted to keep indentured servants and slaves from uniting. RACE dates the first legal use of the term “white” to

1691, in a Virginia law prohibiting marriage between whites and people of other races “for prevention of that abominable mixture and spurious issue.” It was spurious science, however, that helped sustain the ruling order. By the mid18th century, Swedish (Swedish!) taxonomy pioneer Carolus Linnaeus was busy classifying humans into four distinct races. He helpfully added that Europeans were “gentle, acute and inventive” while Africans were “crafty, indolent, negligent.” (“Racism,” says historian Robin D.G. Kelley in one video interview shown in Race, “isn’t about how you look. It’s about how people assign meaning to how you look.”) Infamous practices like skull studies and eugenics followed, as did Jim Crow and other regimes comprising America’s wretched history of legalized oppression. All this has made race real, if only as a social classification; now, we can’t imagine America without it. RACE also explores what this means today. In displays and videos CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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COLORING IT IN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

Macbeth By William Shakespeare Directed by Alan Stanford

October 9-25 A delight for Shakespeare purists, and Games of Thrones Fans alike.

Discount: CP5OFF Don’t miss Thursday, October 30, 2014 picttheatre.org/gala

PICTTheatre.org/Macbeth | 412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

[DANCE]

TOUREOGRAPHY {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs “Beautiful Mistake.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF ROSALIE O’CONNER}

Your ticket includes the whole seat, but we’ll keep you on the edge.

that draw on everything from health statistics and the insights of writers and scholars to kids’ experiences in high school, RACE tells how racism plays out: in poverty, unemployment, unequal justice and the “tracking” of schoolchildren. (Many displays also encourage visitors to write comments for others to read, and these are often worth perusing.) And thoroughly ingrained is our Linnaeus-like need to classify: As artist Kip Fulbeck makes clear in his Hapa Project portrait series of people of partial Asian or Pacific Islander ancestry, asking someone “What are you?” denies that person’s humanity in a particularly thoughtless way. The Carnegie’s incarnation of RACE has Pittsburgh-specific elements. One updates the Pittsburgh Courier’s 1961 person-inthe-street series “Pittsburghers Speak Up.” Emulating journalist George Barbour and famed photographer Teenie Harris, Lynne Hayes-Freeland and Nikkia Hall asked, “Do you think race relations are improving or worsening in Pittsburgh?” The images rotate out; in those displayed when I visited, some African-American respondents in 1961 (in the midst of the civil-rights era) qualifiedly saw improvement. Most queried today did not. As text elsewhere in RACE notes, “The legacy of white privilege still runs far ahead of efforts to compensate for it.” “White privilege” — that’s an important concept this exhibit embraces. It starts with the idea, still rejected by many whites, that white people even have a race (socially speaking). Understanding white privilege also means understanding that racism doesn’t just disadvantage other people — it also benefits you, even if your ancestors never owned slaves, or “came to this country with nothing.” RACE in Pittsburgh also includes the Carnegie’s partial reprise of We Humans, its own mid-1950s exhibit that became a traveling educational tool. Unlike RACE, We Humans didn’t unmask race as human invention, like money or religion; it merely guided people away from prejudice. When text from We Humans says, “Separation makes races,” we understand that the 1950s copywriters were referencing the phenomenon of skin color. Now we know that what really makes race is social separation, and that this complicates things even more. One display in RACE asks visitors, “How does race affect you at school?” One handwritten answer is from Kayla, a young woman of Puerto Rican and Dominican ancestry whose penciled answer reads: “Don’t tell me my color doesn’t matter, or that you don’t see color. I see color and I [heart] it. I want you to love it too.”

The last time Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performed in Pittsburgh, four years ago, the company was just becoming a staple on the U.S. touring circuit. Now, having built its stalwart reputation on new contemporarydance works by world-class choreographers, the small troupe of 11 dancers makes its long-anticipated return to the Byham Theater to kick off Pittsburgh Dance Council’s new season. The Oct. 11 program features three commissioned ballets, beginning with Norbert de la Cruz III’s “Square None” (2012). ASFB artistic director Tom Mossbrucker says that at a 2011 performance by Juilliard dance students, he was taken by a work choreographed by de la Cruz. That led to the commission for “Square None,” which Mossbrucker describes as “thoughtful and pensive.” Set to a variety of music including Aphex Twin, the ballet explores themes of youth and naiveté. Next, the company will perform Spanish choreographer Cayetano Soto’s “Beautiful Mistake” (2013). Mossbrucker says the movement is very aggressive and staccato, and the mood one of dark emotions. Mossbrucker says some audiences might see similarities of movement vocabulary between “Square None,” “Beautiful Mistake” and the final work on the program, Nicolo Fonte’s “The Heart(s)pace” (2014). But each actually possesses a very different dynamic and feel, he says. Company dancer Samantha Klanac Campanile also sees the works as distinct. She describes “The Heart(s)pace” as “very much about community and opening your heart.” “For me, of the seven ballets I have performed of his [Fonte’s], it’s the most enjoyable to dance,” says the 31-year-old native of Buffalo, N.Y., who’s in her 14th season with ASFB. Campanile says she especially enjoys touring back East because it gives her a chance to connect with family who travel to see her dance. But she admits that being on tour half the year has its pluses and minuses. “It’s a huge perk of the job to experience different places, but it’s hard to stay in shape on tour, and you don’t feel as good as when you are in your normal home routine,” she says. Area dance fans, however, can be pleased ASFB’s tour is making another stop here, bringing with it the high level of dance we have come to expect from the company. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET 8 p.m., Sat., Oct. 11. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org


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[PLAY REVIEWS]

SONS RISING {BY TYLER PLOSIA}

IF YOU EXPERIENCE Book of Ezra moment to moment, it might seem like an unmysterious show — but considered in its entirety, the writing is more enigmatic. Written and performed by Leslie “Ezra” Smith, this compelling new solo work opens Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre’s 12th season. Performance poet and actor Smith (Ezra is his stage name) reveals that the show — composed primarily of autobiographical anecdotes — was created for his teenage son. Smith had a distant relationship with his father, and he’s wary of replicating that estrangement.

THE BOOK OF EZRA

continues through Oct. 25. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN}

Mitchell Edward and Johari Mackey in Seven Guitars at Carnegie Mellon

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

Fatherly anxiety is echoed by the incorporation of “They Reminisce Over You (T.R.O.Y.),” by hip-hop duo Pete Rock and CL Smooth. The script even borrows a few lines from the song: “Took me from a boy to a man / So I always had a father / When my biological didn’t bother.” In a reflexive and subtle turn, Ezra explains that he often felt hip hop filled the void his father left. He uses hip hop to transition into another theme: blackness

in America. “Will my son be the next Trayvon Martin?” he wonders. “The next Michael Brown?” The litany of racial violence could go on, but it doesn’t need to. There are more than enough examples from every generation, and Smith simply wants to remind us how little has changed. The acting is alternately understated and amplified, but the emotional content of the character is never unclear. Smith recounts the space shuttle Challenger’s explosion with unselfconscious tears; getting a cute girl’s phone number elicits a triumphant dance. Director Mark Clayton Southers’ blocking and pacing both underscore the tone. Throughout, Smith breaks out short slam poems (practicing for a competition, he claims). These interjections might be jarring if they weren’t so rhythmic and kinetic. Most importantly, they’re reminders that Book of Ezra is not one thing. It’s not just a dynamic performance. It’s also a stage memoir fraught with vulnerability. And it’s a letter from father to son about growing up black in America. I can’t claim to synopsize it completely — and Ezra has the faith not to answer every question Ezra asks. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

EPIC BLUES {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

THE SCHOOL of Drama at Carnegie Mellon

University jumps into its second century


with both feet in an exciting yet moving production of August Wilson’s Seven Guitars. The 1996 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award-winner for best play — it was nominated for the Pulitzer, Tony and Drama Desk as well — blends poetry, anger, hope, despair and more relevance than most Americans would like to admit. It’s 1948 in Wilson’s Hill District. Yes, there’s actually a guitar or two, but it’s the seven characters who are being played: by the Fates, the Man, and even Wilson using their voices to realize the blues. Fill in your own interpretation. Despite whatever efforts go into one’s ambition, doom is inevitable. The show begins with the funeral of its hero. The backstory paints in the details of futility.

SEVEN GUITARS

continues through Oct. 11. Philip Chosky Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. $28.75. www.drama.cmu.edu

But don’t imagine this a cheerless story. Director Cameron Knight seamlessly blends music, movement and stunning visuals with Wilson’s words. If there’s a flaw in this production, it’s not worth noticing. The contributions from the talented design/tech team add up to a greater whole. Dan Daly’s set of a Hill District backyard is richly layered yet still evokes urban claustrophobia and decay — sideby-side with a garden. Jamie Gross’ costumes capture the time and accentuate each character’s personality (especially, oh my, for the seductive Ruby). Choreographer Tomé Cousin provides the right swings to their steps. Lighting and sound (designed by Will Gossett and Almeda Beynon, respectively) work without being noticeable. Applause also to stage manager Tina Shackleford, dramaturge Rachel Abrams and voice/speech coach Janet Madelle Feindel. There are no minor characters in Seven Guitars. Each contributes to the harmonies and themes of the ensemble; each has notable solos. The CMU actors capture the voices and rhythms as well as (and often better than) professionals I’ve seen: Mitchell Edwards as the guitarist Floyd “Schoolboy” Barton; Jean Floradin and Erron Crawford as his sidemen Canewell and Red Carter; Johari Mackey as his lady, Vera; Harron Alexander as the shaman-like Hedley; and Alexis Floyd as the sultry Ruby. August Wilson is known for his long plays, but Seven Guitars’ near-three hours flies by at CMU.

GIRLS, INTERRRUPTED {BY TED HOOVER}

IN A CASE of unfortunate synchronicity, University of Pittsburgh Stages presents Diana Son’s Stop Kiss — in which two women meet, fall in love and then get attacked — shortly after news hit about that gay-bashing in Philadelphia. Son’s 1998 play, which just about everyone wishes would be a museum piece by now, proves anything but. Yet Stop Kiss is hardly an issue-du-jour play. Son went out of her way to make this a theatrical experience. In the first scene, Sara and Callie meet; the next scene is on the night of the attack, as a police officer takes Sara’s statement. Then we’re at Sara and Callie’s second meeting, and then watching what occurs after the police scene … and so on. Son’s toggling back and forth lets her collide wildly contrasting mood and content. The play’s ultimate journey is Sara’s (she must admit her love for Callie), and in both time frames she’s being driven to do just that. For some reason, Son is ridiculously coy about the women’s sexual identity. In 1998, it might have been just this side of playable, but 16 years later the women seem slightly stupid and curiously isolated.

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continues through Thu., Oct. 12. Henry Heymann Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

Brittany Coyne directs a very strong Pitt student cast, with remarkably layered performances from Leenie Baker, as Sara, and Kieran Peleaux, as George. And Lucy Clabby plays Callie with an abundance of relentless cheeriness. Coyne takes advantage of all the drama Son has provided, and the production is filled with many moving moments. The downside to Son’s schematic is that very soon a sort of monotony creeps in: happy scene, sad scene, happy scene, sad scene. Coyne overemphasizes this with blackouts — as opposed to crossfades — and some very, very fussy setpiece business. Do we need a blackout just to bring on a chair, only to have another blackout to take it off and another to bring it on … and so on? This approach continually pulls us out of the otherwise sturdy and effective production that Coyne has created.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.0910.16.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

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OCT. 11

Pittsburgh Society of Artists’ Juried Member Exhibition

+ THU., OCT. 09 {TALK} His life might not be Almost Famous material, but Alex Ross is among the country’s pre-eminent music writers: Music critic for The New Yorker for nearly 20 years, Ross is the go-to authority on contemporary composers and the current state of classical, and sometimes even pop, music. Tonight, he visits Carnegie Mellon to speak on a topic that should hold the attention of the arts-meets-technology crowd there — “Phonographic Music: Composers and the Early Era of Reproduction.” The lecture is free. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. McConomy Auditorium, University Center, CMU campus, Oakland. 412-268-7176 or www.cmu. edu/hss/humanities-center/

atmospheric production that Stanford says will be true to the text, though not to the fashions of Shakespeare’s era. Danielle Fox 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 25. Charity Randall Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $7-54. 412-5616000 or www.picttheatre.org

{STAGE} Tonight at the Byham Theater, six famous fictional detectives

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

+ FRI., OCT. 10 {ART} Since resigning as director of The Andy Warhol Museum, in 2010, Tom Sokolowski’s been

OCT. 11

SpaceO SpaceOut! Spac O

{STAGE} “Between the joys of summer and before the bleakness of winter is the perfect time to enjoy Shakespeare,” touts PICT Classic Theatre’s Alan Stanford in press materials. PICT’s artistic and executive director directs a Halloweenseason run of Macbeth starting tonight. David Whalen, perhaps Pittsburgh’s busiest stage actor, returns for his ninth PICT season to play the Scottish king. Gayle Pazerski plays Lady Macbeth in an

confront one cloudy Western Pennsylvania metropolis and its seemingly intractable mysteries. It’s Off the Record, the annual musical satire in which reporters and editors from the Pittsburgh PostGazette, local stage talent and other celebrities lampoon Pittsburgh news and newsmakers for a good cause. The 14th edition, Mysteries of Pittsburgh!, is emceed by Ken Rice and benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Expect mention of Sally Kalson: The feisty and popular longtime P-G columnist, who over the years played a key role in Off the Record, recently died of ovarian cancer. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. (6:30 p.m. hors d’oeuvres and cash bar). 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25-75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RIC EVANS}


{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALICE DUFOUR-FERONCE}

sp otlight Moroccan-based dancer/choreographer Hind Benali’s new work, Identity, began as a solo journey of self-discovery after the deaths of her two grandmothers in the same year. Both were of Algerian decent, and both lived with her. “All the traditional parts of my identity came from them,” Benali said recently by telephone from Washington, D.C., where the company was performing the work. “The question then became, … would I end up leaving tradition behind?” The hour-long work, presented by the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater and performed by Benali and her troupe Fleur d’Orange at The Alloy Studios, grew when Benali asked Franco-Moroccan hip-hop dancer Soufiane Karim and composer/musician Mohcine Imrharn to create their own journeys of self-discovery. The resulting contemporary-dance work in three parts, performed to recorded and live music by Imrharn, traces a path from ancestry and tradition through contemporary Moroccan culture, religion and gender politics. Adding to the texture, lyrical calligraphy by Moroccan artist Yacine Fadhil will be projected on the stage and dancers. “There is an evolution in the work that starts with something calm and beautiful and ends up with internal conflict,” says Benali. “We are split in two as Moroccans, we want to stick to our traditions, but we also want to be, like everyone does, free.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10, and 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

OCT. 10

Asssoci Associated ciatted d Artists A of Pittsburgh Art by PJ Zimmerlink

{MUSIC} The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra hosts Israeli conductor Omer Meir Wellber and Spanish guitar phenom Pablo Sáinz Villegas in their Pittsburgh debuts in a program titled “Spanish Strings.” Sáinz Villegas, praised by The New York Times for his “beautifully rounded guitar tone,” performs Joaquin Rodrigo’s “Concierto de Aranjuez for Guitar and Orchestra.” The program begins with Debussy’s “Petite Suite” and ends with Wellber leading Tchaikovsky’s virtuosic Manfred Symphony. DF 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25.75105.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{WORDS} “A gangster gone wild running

N E W S

through the Badlands / Cactus and sand of Death Valley / Goes gushy at a cheap motor court / Over a crippled blond girl with big blues.” So goes the High Sierra portion of an

type” as a novelist, cryptomemoirist or longtime head of Pitt’s graduate writing program (where he mentored, among others, Michael Chabon). In retirement, Kinder writes poems; tonight’s moviethemed dual-release event for debut collections Yellow and Imagination Motel (Speed and Briscoe), at ModernFormations Gallery, features guest readers including Jimmy Cvetic, Dave Newman and Taylor Greishober. BO 8 p.m. 4919 Penn OCT. 16 Ave., Garfield. $5. Anthony www.lowghostpress. Jeselnik blogspot.com

+ SAT., OCT. 11 {EXHIBIT}

epic poem about old movies featured in All That Yellow, a new collection on Low Ghost Press by Chuck Kinder. You might know the self-described “aging hillbilly-hippie poet-

+

TA S T E

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Introduced in 1965, by Wham-O, the spectacularly bouncy Super Ball wowed the kids. It especially impressed Pittsburgh native artist and filmmaker Henry J. Simonds, whose International Sphaeralogical Society joined the Children’s Museum of

M U S I C

+

Pittsburgh to create the interactive exhibit Bounce! Starting today, the show (based on Simonds’ gallery show Super-Ball) lets you: Use a machine to activate hundreds of Super Balls at once; make Super Ball art; play Super Ball games; and see how high you can bounce one of these hyperkinetic wonders. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-14 (free for kids under 2). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

{STAGE} City Theatre opens its season with Outside Mullingar, the new romantic comedy from Pulitzer-, Oscar- and Tonywinning author John Patrick Shanley. The play introduces Anthony, an aging, Irish cattle farmer threatening to rebuke his son’s inheritance, and his pining neighbor, Rosemary, who peeks a freckled nose into the family feud. Longtime City Theatre artistic director Tracy Brigden directs the production, which features Ron Menzel, Mary Rawson, Noble Shropshire and Megan Byrne. DF 5:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 2. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-56. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

A R T S

To celebrate 75 years of planetarium stargazing and the launch of Buhl Academy, the Carnegie Science Center hosts an astronomy weekend. The late Pittsburgh philanthropist Henry Buhl Jr. established The Buhl Foundation, which led to the planetarium and

+ THU., OCT. 16 {COMEDY} “I just read the biography of the guy who invented Super Mario Brothers,” says Anthony Jeselnik. “Do you that when he was a kid, people used to laugh at him when he would kill turtles with a hammer?”

OCT. 11

Congratulations to the awardwinners in the Pittsburgh Society of Artists’ 49th Annual Juried Member Exhibition: Cristina Saucedo, Dale Schmitt, Janice Schuler and Wes Smith. Their pieces — and 53 other artists’ works selected for the exhibit at Panza Gallery — reflect mediums including photography, watercolor and collage. Juror Paul Rosenblatt, an artist and owner of Springboard Design, presents the awards before tonight’s opening reception. DF 6 p.m.

+

{FESTIVAL}

Sun., Oct. 12. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $11.9518.95. 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

Bounce!

{ART}

S C R E E N

Exhibit continues through Oct. 28. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. Free. 412-821-0959 or www.pittsburghsociety ofartists.org

{MAGE COURTESY OF HENRY SIMONDS}

relatively quiet on the local arts scene. But tonight, the ever-opinionated Sokolowski, now an independent curator and consultant, is back in action. Sokolowski selected five of the most innovative artists from the ranks of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh for this short-run show at The Mine Factory. The show, with work by Mark Franchino, Brenda Roger, Elizabeth Amber Rudnick, Bill Wade and PJ Zimmerlink, opens with tonight’s reception. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 25. 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. Free. www.aapgh.org

the center’s predecessor, the Institute of Popular Science. Now the foundation’s academy will create an astronomy education program for local students. The Science Center’s SpaceOut! weekend includes recognition of an asteroid named “Henrybuhl” and a shower of events, including talks from local astronomer, opportunities for safe solar observing and sundial-making. DF 10 a.m.4 p.m. Also 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

+

E V E N T S

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The comic with the face of a choir boy … who just boobytrapped the pastor’s cassock … made his name on Comedy Central roasts, and with comedy talk show The Jeselnik Offensive. His national standup tour brings the Upper St. Clair native with a deliciously twisted sensibility back home tonight to his biggest venue here yet, the Byham Theater. BO 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $27.50. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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THEATER BOOK OF EZRA. The world premiere of a 1-man play written & performed by spoken word artist & national slam poet Leslie Ezra Smith. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 19. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. DEARLY DEPARTED. When the patriarch of a Southern red-neck family drops dead, hilarious mayhem ensues. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 12. Baldwin Community United Methodist Church. 412-881-1002. DIVIDING THE ESTATE. A comedy about Stella Gordon, matriarch of a 100-year-old Texas estate, who steadfastly refuses to sell & divide, despite her family’s declining wealth & financial crisis. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 11. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has

THE PAJAMA PARTY discovered for the plastic products. MURDERS. Interactive Murder Includes audience participation, Mystery Dinner Theater. Sat., giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, Oct. 11, 7 p.m. and Fri., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Crown Plaza Hotel, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret Green Tree. 724-344-2069. at Theater Square, Downtown. THE SORCERER. Gilbert & 412-456-6666. Sullivan’s play presented by THE GLASS MENAGERIE. the Pittsburgh Savoyards. A brand-new production Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, of Tennessee Williams’ 2:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 19. classic play. Wed-Sat, Andrew Carnegie 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Free Library Music and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Hall, Carnegie. Oct. 28. O’Reilly www. per 412-734-8476. Theater, Downtown. a p pghcitym SOUVENIR. The 412-316-1600. .co story of Florence I AM A CAMERA. Foster Jenkins, eccentric Presented by Duquesne’s wealthy socialite whose utter Red Masquers. Thu-Sat. inability to carry a tune never Thru Oct. 11. Peter Mills prevented her from holding Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), recitals at the Ritz Carlton or Uptown. 412-396-6429. selling out Carnegie Hall. OUTSIDE MULLINGAR. A Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. comedy about Tony Reilly, Thru Oct. 12. Pittsburgh an aging Irish cattle farmer, Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. written by the Pulitzer, Oscar, STOP KISS. Sara arrives in & Tony-winning author of New York teach 3rd grade in Doubt & Moonstruck. Tue-Sun. the Bronx & befriends Callie, a Thru Nov. 2. City Theatre, NY native. Romance builds to South Side. 412-431-2489.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

one fateful kiss. The fallout reverberates through Sara & Callie’s lives, changing them in ways they did not expect. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland.

COMEDY THU 09

COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 10

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. PARRIS KNIGHT. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: CLASS SHOW, MAKE NICE BOOM & MONDO! W/ MICHAEL SHURINA “THE BARBER OF LARRYVILLE. 8 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

FRI 10 - SAT 11

SHERYL UNDERWOOD. 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 11, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 11

AMISH MONKEYS. Improvisational comedy troupe. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. ARCADE HOOTENANNY. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. YOUR LIFE: THE MUSICAL. An improvised musical based on the life of an audience volunteer. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

SUN:

BRUNCH @ 11 ONE BUCK CHUCK $1 Tacos All Day

“Tide,” by Lisa Cahill, from BREAKUP, at James Gallery, in the West End

(Vegan or Beef / Eat-In Only)

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK

BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Work in various mediums by a diverse group of artists, in time for holiday gift-giving. Opens Oct.14. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. JAMES GALLERY. BREAKUP. A group exhibition of pixels, particles & fragments. Opening reception Oct. 10, 6-9 p.m. West End. 412-922-9800. PANZA GALLERY. Pittsburgh Society of Artists 49th Annual Juried Member Exhibition. Opening reception Oct. 11, 6-8:30 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING

709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 720 RECORDS. Sara Eve Rivera. Work by local visual & tattoo artist. Closing reception Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection.

Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Industrial Opulence. Photographs by Gabe Szafranski. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League. Group show. Verona. 412-828-1031. BUNKERPROJECTS. Somewhere Over The_. A solo show by resident artist, Shikieth. Closing reception Oct. 19. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225.

DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Jurored by John Carson, head of the School of Art at CMU. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Something Alien: An ART Show by two people who don’t belong. New Works by Nick & Noell Romeo, feat. 3D digital renderings, music, photography, fractal generations, sculpture, & oil pastels. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 $2 Well & Clique

MON:

WED:

THURSDAY OCT 9/10PM

AMRCNDREAMING THURSDAY OCT 16/10PM

DEAD SIGNAL CHASERS, CODE WHISKEY, COMMON NIGHTMARE

TA S T E

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M U S I C

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TUE:

THURS:

HOPPY HOUR

$35 Clique Bottle Service 1/2 OFF Burgh’ers (All Day/ Eat-In Only)

MON-FRI 4-6 1/2 OFF Drafts

FRI:

$70 Bulleit Bottle Service

THURSDAY OCT 23/10PM

SAT:

THE HELLBOUND COMEDY TOUR

BRUNCH @ 11 $35 Clique Bottle Service

“4 comics and a band” $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

VAPETRIK VAPE JUICE Now Available at Bar FOR LUNCH! OPEN DAILY @ 11AM

“THE HEISENBURGER” 1/2 lB Burger, Peppercorn Crusted, Blue Cheese, Caramelized Onions

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(All Day/ Eat-In Only)

$2 OFF Select Craft Bottles Wing It Wednesdays! Char-Grilled Whole Wings $35 Clique Bottle Service 25% Off Vegan Menu Items

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

N E W S

Late Nite Happy Hour 9-11 1/2 OFF All Pumpkin Beers 1/2 OFF Dogz

S C R E E N

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# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H E V E N T S

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

MON 13

UNPLANNED COMEDY’S JAMBONE. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 14

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 15

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 15 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER

FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Maitreya Loving Kindness Tour. Exhibition of the historical Buddha’s relics. On view Oct. 10, 6-8pm, Oct, 11, 10am-7pm, Oct. 12, 10am-5pm. Shadyside. 412-365-1100. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany

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VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial.

Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881.

stained-glass windows. exhibits. Includes displays, Downtown. 412-471-3436. walking tours, gift shop, FORT PITT MUSEUM. picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Reconstructed fort houses Washington. 724-228-9256. museum of Pittsburgh history PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & circa French & Indian War BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor and American Revolution. rooms & 3 outdoor gardens Downtown. 412-281-9285. feature exotic plants and floral FRICK ART & HISTORICAL displays from around the world. CENTER. Ongoing: tours Oakland. 412-622-6914. of Clayton, the Frick estate, PINBALL PERFECTION. with classes & programs Pinball museum & players club. for all ages. Point Breeze. West View. 412-931-4425. 412-371-0600. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG KENTUCK KNOB. Tour AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 the other Frank Lloyd animals, including many Wright house. 724-329-8501. endangered species. Highland KERR MEMORIAL Park. 412-665-3639. MUSEUM. Tours of a RACHEL CARSON restored 19th-century, HOMESTEAD. A middle-class home. Reverence for Life. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. Photos and artifacts MCGINLEY HOUSE of her life & . w ww per & MCCULLY LOG work. Springdale. a p ty ci h pg HOUSE. Historic homes 724-274-5459. .com open for tours, lectures RIVERS OF STEEL and more. Monroeville. NATIONAL HERITAGE 412-373-7794. AREA. Exhibits on the NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Homestead Mill. Steel industry more than 600 birds from over and community artifacts 200 species. With classes, lectures, from 1881-1986. Homestead. demos and more. North Side. 412-464-4020. 412-323-7235. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s rooms helping to tell the story Lost Steamboat: Treasures of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. nearly 2,000 once-hidden 412-624-6000. treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. important role as a Gateway This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion to the West & a national hub site features log house, for the steamboat building blacksmith shop & gardens. industry in the mid-19th century. South Park. 412-835-1554. From Slavery to Freedom. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in MUSEUM. Trolley rides and the anti-slavery movement.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

FULL LIST ONLINE

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. QUIET STORM GALLERY. Cafe Con Leche Pop-Up Gallery. Various events to celebrate Latino Heritage Month. www.cafeconlechepgh. com. Garfield. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works

Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. THE TOONSEUM. Comic-tanium: The Super Materials of the Superheroes. See how Batman, Iron Man, Captain America, & other comic characters use real-world minerals, metals, & materials science & engineering to boost their powers & save their worlds. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. 68th Annual International Aqueous Exhibit. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society’s annual group show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An AfricanAmerican Art Exhibition,. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

HOLIDAY FRI 10 - SUN 12

MONSTER BASH. Non-stop classic horror films on a big screen, over 200 vendor tables of collectibles, special guests including Bill Cardille. Oct. 10-12 Four Points Sheraton Pittsburgh Airport, Coraopolis. 724-695-0002. ZOMBIES OF THE CORN. Zombie shoot & corn maze. Thu-Sat. Thru Nov. 1 Three Rivers Paintball & Airsoft, Zelienople.

FESTIVALS THU 09 - SUN 12

PLEIN AIR MT. LEBANON 2014: A NEIGHBORHOOD CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS. Various events every day, centered around outdoor painting. www.mtlebopartnership.org Thru Oct. 12

SAT 11

ROCKTOBER FEST. Feat. local & regional craft & microbrews, music by local bands. 12-3 & 4-7 p.m. Kelly Automotive Park, Butler. WILKINS SCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTER ECO-FEST. Free clothing exchange & sporting goods swap, food, live music, more. 10 a.m.2 p.m. Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

DANCE THU 09 - FRI 10

ARE YOU STILL THERE? Attack Theatre presents a world premiere dance performance featuring original, live music by Ian Green.

Thru Oct. 10 Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, Homewood. 412-281-3305.

FRI 10 - SAT 11

IDENTITY. Hind Benali, creative director of Fleur d’Orange, explores her past & African roots while addressing the culture, history, & gender politics of Morocco. Oct. 10-11, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321.

SAT 11

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET. Presenting Beautiful Mistake, a piece by Spanish choreographer Cayetano Soto. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SUN 12

NRITYA SANGAM: A UNIQUE CONFLUENCE OF KATHAK & BHARATANATYAM. Indian classical dance. 4 p.m. South Fayette Middle School. 412-221-4542. SUNDAYSERIES. Gia T. Presents international music/dance ensemble & STAYCEE PEARL dance project. 2 p.m. PointBreezeway, Point Breeze. 412-335-5293.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 10

80S, 90S, & TODAY FUNDRAISER PARTY. Benefits P.S.W.A.G., Pennsylvania’s Southwestern Athletic Games, an athletic league intended to create safer spaces for queer & trans individuals. 9 p.m. There Ultra Lounge, Downtown. 412-642-4435. BAILAMOS! A SALSA CHARITY NIGHT. Instruction & dance performances, auction, more. Benefits programs of Lifestone Church. 7:30 p.m. Lifestone Church, South Side. 412-488-8160.

SAT 11

2014 WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S. act.alz.org/ pittsburgh2014 8 a.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-261-5040. FRIENDS OF THE LAWRENCEVILLE LIBRARY ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL & ART AUCTION. Silent auction, food, drink, live music by Amoeba Knievel, Truth & Rites, Pittsburgh Trombone Project. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Lawrenceville. 412-682-3668. HDSA HOOP-A-THON. Free throw competition, kids activities, music, more. Benefits the Huntington’s Disease Society of America. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Keystone Oaks High School, Dormont. 412-337-7790.

SUN 12

2ND ANNUAL PITTSBURGH SCOPE IT OUT 5K RUN/WALK. Benefits colorectal cancer research at The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. 1 South 26th St, South Side. www.scopeitout5k. com 9 a.m. Benefits colorectal cancer research at The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

1 South 26th St, South Side. www.scopeitout5k.com 9 a.m. BACK OF THE HOUSE. Pittsburgh Chefs throw down their favorite dishes w/ no rules, no menu, no judging. Supports YouthPlaces job training for the Food Service industry. 2-7 p.m. YouthPlaces, North Side. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. UNDER THE UMBRELLA TREE SCREENING. Premier of the documentary directed by Dormont film producer Leonard A Lies. Benefits the Bright Kids Uganda Organization. 6-9 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

EVENT: Café Con Leche, a pop-up event in Friendship CRITIC: Jorge Rivero, 37, an interventional painmanagement physician from Mount Lebanon WHEN: Fri.,

It was a event full of fun music and food. There were some sweets. There was some typical fried yucca, which was actually very nice. The [Latin American folkloric dances] are very typical dances from these cultures. Obviously, there is depth to them, and these performances just touch the tip of the iceberg. There are so many more variations. I think the touching of the surface for anyone who doesn’t know the dances makes it a great exhibit for them to dive a little bit into the culture. Coming from NYC, Pittsburgh is a city that has a very particular culture. It’s not one culture, I shouldn’t say that, but it’s very typical. There are a lot of cultures that aren’t represented in Pittsburgh at least in the front pages of the paper. I’m here with my wife and my kids. We just wanted to show them something different.

POLITICS THU 09

BOB HERBERT. Discussing his book, Losing Our Way: An Intimate Portrait of a Troubled America. McConomy Auditorium. Thu., Oct. 9, 5 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 09

3 POEMS BY .. POETRY DISCUSSION GROUP. Discussing Alice Notely. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. POETRY.COM PGH & FRIENDS. A night of poetry, comedy & Neo-Soul. 8 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-867-0826. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 10

CHUCK KINDER, TAYLOR GRIESHOBER, DAVE NEWMAN, JIMMY CVETIC, SCOTT SILSBE. Celebrating the releases of Kinder’s poetry collections, All That Yellow & Imagination Hotel. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

N E W S

Oct. 03

BY DANIELLE FOX

ELLEN MCGRATH SMITH & JOAN E. BAUER. MadFridays Reading Series. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 11

CELEBRATING U.S. 1 WORKSHEETS. Pittsburgh Poets read their work. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 13

GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 14

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 15

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First

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and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Rabbi Aaron Bisno will review “My Promised Land: The Triumph & Tragedy of Israel” by Ari Shavit. 10:30 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

KIDSTUFF THU 09 - SAT 11

BALLET HISPANO CLASSICO. Thru Oct. 11 Quiet Storm Gallery, Garfield. 412-403-7357.

THU 09 - WED 15

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 10 - SUN 12

PINOCCHIO. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 19 New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437.

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SAT 11

TUE 14

FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. 6 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE COMEDY SHOW. Crafts & comedy for kids K-6. Second Sat of every month, 1 p.m. Thru Dec. 13 Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. RADICAL DAY: GHOST STORIES WORKSHOP. Hear storyteller Alison K. Babusci share spine-tingling & hauntingly funny tales. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-471-6079.

CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FILMMAKER RODRIGO DORFMAN. Free film screening & discussion. 6:30 p.m. Graduate School of Public Heath, Pitt, Oakland. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 15

BYO FRIEND SUP TOUR. Wed, 5 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 09

SAT 11 - SUN 12

PETER PAN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 12 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SAT 11 - WED 15

BOUNCE. An interactive exhibit celebrating the world’s most amazing ball. Experience how it moves, how it looks & the story of how it came to be. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 13

MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Scientific activities for early learners ages 2–6. Mon, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 27 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 14

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ALEX ROSS: “PHONOGRAPH MUSIC: COMPOSERS & THE EARLY ERA OF REPRODUCTION. Talk by the New Yorker critic. 7 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. ANTWI AKOM. Part of the Green Building Alliance’s Inspire Speakers Series. 6 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

CONTINUES ON PG. 48

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE SAT 11

DATE NIGHT SUPVENTURE FOR 2. Sat, 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport. 412-720-5058. MINGO CREEK OCTOBER STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. www.3ap.org 5:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. OCTOBER MOONRISE STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. www.3ap.org 7:10 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SAT 11 - SUN 12

SPACE OUT ASTRONOMY WEEKEND. Explore space through hands-on activities, contests, special guests, & interactive tables. Oct. 11-12 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

CHATLINE TM

SUN 12

TOUR DE MT. LEBANON. 12-mile or 24-mile course through residential neighborhoods, commercial districts, major parks. www.mtlebopartnership.org. 7 p.m.

S C R E E N

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A R T S

412.566.1861 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com +

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Teligence/18+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


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OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA EDUCATORS FOR AWARENESS, C COMPASSION & EMPATHY ((WE-PEACE) MEETING. Second T Thu of every month, 7-8:30 p p.m. Thru Nov. 13 Shambhala M Meditation Center, Highland Park. 4 412-345-1759.

FRI 10 F

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second A a and Third Fri of every month a and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. GOOD FRIDAYS. 1/2-price regular museum admission & a cash bar. Fri, 5-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PURPLE IS THE NEW PINK. Awareness materials, food, prizes,

COMING NEXT:

[EXHIBITS] giveaways, & more. Presented by the Center for Victims. 11 a.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

FRI 10 - SAT 11

HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 10 - SAT 11

OAKLAND FOREVER. Celebration of Oakland’s 175th Anniversary. Live music & performances, art & photography exhibits, lectures & symposiums, outdoor activities, family fun, historical retrospectives Oct. 10-11 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275.

SAT 11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DANA LISSY}

This weekend, Chatham University hosts the

Maitreya Loving Kindness Tour,

BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. a traveling exhibit of relics of the historical Buddha www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, Shakyamuni and 40 other Buddhist masters from around 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, the world, including the “ringsel” crystals believed to Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY embody a master’s spiritual qualities after death. The MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Dalai Lama himself has provided several ancient and Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 sacred items for the tour, which was founded 412-708-1277. CREATIVITY BOUND ART in 2001 in hopes of allowing people from all walks of WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. life to experience Buddhist teachings, from both spiritual Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. and historical perspectives. 6-8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 10; 10 a.m.412-688-0417. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 11; and 10 a.m. -5 p.m., Sun. Oct. 12. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. James Laughlin Music Hall, Woodland Road, Shadyside. Begins outside of Monongahela Free. 412-365-1286 or www.maitreyarelictour.com Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. KST CENTENNIAL COMMUNITY MOURNING CUSTOMS. attractions, hands-on-petting zoo, DAY. Performances & activities. Presentation by Judi Hendrickson pet adoptions, more. 10 a.m.Be part of the KST’s Capsule 15206: & Jeanne Finstein. 1 p.m. Andrew 7 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 12, 10 a.m.a legacy project that invites you Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, 5 p.m. Monroeville Convention to preserve your East Liberty Carnegie. 412-276-3456. Center, Monroeville. experience by contributing to a SMALL BUSINESS BASICS time capsule that will be buried WORKSHOP. Presented by SCORE under KST. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Pittsburgh. 8 p.m. PNC YMCA, AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Downtown. 412-395-6560 x.130. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Liberty. 412-363-3000. SPANISH CONVERSATION Weekly letter writing event. Sun, THE NO BOUNDARIES PROJECT: GROUP. Friendly, informal. At 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. ON THE EDGE OF NIGHT. the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 412-683-3727. Collaboration by vocalist 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second Anqwenique Wingfield, composer 412-362-6108. and Third Sun of every month, Daniel Bernard Roumain & poet STEEL CITY SQUARE DANCE. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Yona Harvey. 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Music from the Rootsters feat. 412-622-3151. Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Bruce Jacobs. 7 p.m. The New CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: Bohemian, North Side. Second Second and Fourth Sun of every ALLEGHENY CEMETERY. 12 p.m. Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Thru month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville. Nov. 8 Bayardstown Social Club, Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. 412-391-2060 x.237. Strip District. 412-254-4074. OCTOBER BUSINESS FAIR. Free SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. SWING CITY. Learn & admission, free samples, demos & Lessons 7-8 p.m., social practice swing dancing estimates. 2-5 p.m. Union Project, dancing follows. No skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Highland Park. 412-363-4550. partner needed. Mon, Wightman School, TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Squirrel Hill. tea, steeping techniques, Storing Grace Episcopal Church, . w ww per 412-759-1569. Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea Mt. Washington. a p ty ci pgh m THE PITTSBURGH samples & European cookies will be 412-683-5670. .co RECORD & CD served. Reservations required. Sun, SECOND SATURDAY CONVENTION XXXIX. 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 25 Margaret’s Fine ART WORKSHOPS. Classes LPs, CDs, imports, posters, Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. in jewelry making, painting, memorabilia, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. cartooning, puppet making, Crown Plaza Hotel, Green Tree. quilting, more. Second Sat of every 412-331-5021. REEL Q: PITTSBURGH LGBT month Trust Arts Education Center, WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE FILM FESTIVAL. A celebration Downtown. 412-471-6079. TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and SECOND SATURDAY AT THE Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. transgendered writers, directors, SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ 412-224-2827. actors & their work. Various films various musical, literary & artistic & showtimes. Oct. 12-21 Harris performances. Second Sat of every Theater, Downtown. 412-682-4111. month Spinning Plate Gallery, THE PITTSBURGH FAMILY PET Friendship. 412-441-0194. SHOW. Pet vendors, educational & SECOND SATURDAY CIVIL entertaining performances, special BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A WAR SERIES: 19TH CENTURY

SUN 12

CIGAR PARTY

October 15

TASHA REIGN October 24 & 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 12 - WED 15

PITTSBURGH 3100 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-281-3110

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SAT 11 - SUN 12

cheerleaderspittsburgh.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

MON 13


support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. EATPGH’S SINGLE MINGLE. Cocktails, activities, food trucks, more. 6-8 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. “JERUSALEM” FILM SCREENING & INTER-FAITH PANEL DISCUSSION. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. UNDERSTANDING GLUTEN FREE. Workshop w/ wellness coach & Wild Foods Advocate, Faith Starr. Registration requested. 7 p.m. Upper St. Clair Township Library, Upper St. Clair. 412-219-1156.

TUE 14

AUGUST WILSON, A PITTSBURGH LIFE. Talk by Chris Rawson, Senior Theater Critic, Post-Gazette. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. BUILDING A MORE RESILIENT PITTSBURGH: A COMMUNITY FORUM ON CLIMATE CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES. Cohen University Center. 6 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. MEXICAN WAR STREETS HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. A self-guided tour of homes & gardens throughout this historic neighborhood. www.mexican warstreets.org 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mexican War Streets, North Side. ORGANIC ON A BUDGET. A workshop covering the basics of making organic affordable. Call to reserve a spot. 7:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598.

WED 15

DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. HEALTH & WELLNESS FAIR. 15 health-related stations & activities including flu shots, zumba, blood pressure screenings, more. Presented by the Duquesne University’s Mylan School of

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Pharmacy. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS GEMINI THEATER COMPANY. Auditions for The Gift of the Ice Queen. Oct. 13-14. Casting adults & students. Prepare 1-2 minutes of a song to sing a cappella. Actors will also be asked to do cold readings from the production. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. GREENSBURG CIVIC THEATRE’S GREASEPAINT PLAYERS. Auditions for Christmas show, Emmalina Scrooge. Oct. 11. Roles are available for ages 8 & up. Cold readings from the script. www. gctheatre.org/auditions.html Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757.

Mikado” by Gilbert & Sullivan. Performance dates: March 6 - 15, 2015. Resumes & letters accepted through Oct 15.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking

Celebrating 20 Years!

performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking artists for the upcoming craft show, The Holiday Market. Submissions are subject to screening by the North Hills Art Center, & can be delivered Nov. 3-8 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration deadline Oct. 27. Ross. 412-364-3622. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission

Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

2 for 1 Tuesdays

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

(412) 771-8872

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION

The Alzheimer’s Association Greater Pittsburgh Chapter is seeking volunteers to assist with its biggest annual fundraising event, the Pittsburgh Walk to End Alzheimer’s, happening Oct. 11 at Heinz Field. Folks are needed to help with all aspects of the walk, including registration, water stations, setup and clean-up. Email Melissa Roberts at mlroberts@alz.org for information. JUDE POHL PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for their 2015 season. Oct. 11. Seeking male & female performers (teen & above)for roles in musicals & murder mysteries. Singers & non-singers welcome. Singers should prepare 2 songs. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. MILDRED MILLER INTERNATIONAL VOICE COMPETITION. Presented by the Opera Theater of Pittsburgh and the Gailliot Family Foundation. Applications for singers 18-35 are open through Wed, Oct. 10 via Yaptracker.com MON RIVER ARTS. Seeking male actors age 20s-30s for stage adaptation of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Email monriverarts@ gmail.com or call for information. 412-405-8425. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Seeking a Stage Director for “The

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information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-in-thecultural-district/ PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Fall new member screening, Oct. 19. Drop between 12:30-1:00pm. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last 2 years. $20.00 application fee. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 15. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to www.silvereye.org/ f15apply/. Email jzipay@silvereye. org for information

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I’m 25, I’m a virgin, and I find it quite difficult to relate with girls. My main problem is I can’t accept my sexuality. I’m into fetish SM. But it seems like there are two parts of me. The first part of me wants to lick women’s feet and be humiliated. The second part of me can’t accept the first part and only wants to love and be loved by a girl. I would say there was nothing wrong if I could just lick feet to get the relationship a bit more “spicy,” but the problem is that I think I can’t excite myself the “traditional way.” I had a few girlfriends in the past, and when it was the time to penetrate, I got instantly limp. I’m going to a therapist now. In my past, there were issues with parents who divorced in a horrible way and a violent father. My therapist said there is an Oedipus complex and I could be freed if we work on this. So this is why I hope going away from home will make things get better. I want to have sons with my future loved woman and, finally, to have sex. Fetishists are considered perverted and are mocked in the country where I live, so it’s really difficult to find girls interested in this stuff to try to explore. FETISHIST EXPOSES EROTIC TROUBLES

can take comfort in the fact that there’s no proven link between abuse and kinks. The violence you witnessed/suffered at home as a child may be an unpleasant coincidence, not a root cause and it shouldn’t prevent you from reconciling the two parts of your adult self — the guy who wants a woman to love him and the guy who wants a woman to order him to lick her feet. And here’s how you’re going to do that: You’re going to get online and find the kink personal ads in your country, and you’re going to post ads and respond to ads. I know kink personals exist where you live, FEET, because I managed to find some in two minutes. If the fetish scene in your country isn’t big enough, or if you’re worried about exposure, get your ass to London or Berlin and explore the booming hetero fetish scenes in those cities. A business relationship with a pro-Domme is unlikely to blossom into love, FEET, but a few sessions with a pro-Domme you like — and who likes you back — will help you see that affection and SM can go together. Finally, FEET, I don’t know what your financial/work situation looks like, but spending a few months in a city with a large kink community could be a transformative experience. Throw yourself into the kink scene, go to the munches and parties, and you’ll meet kinksters who are open, unashamed and capable of loving their partners even as they humiliate or are humiliated by them, a.k.a. “role models.”

IF YOU’RE WILLING TO SACRIFICE THIS FRIENDSHIP FOR A CHANCE AT YOUR FRIEND’S GIRL, THEN YOU DON’T VALUE THE FRIENDSHIP.

You can accept your sexuality, FEET, but for a host of reasons — shame and fear being the likeliest culprits — you refuse to. And where has your refusal gotten you? You haven’t freed yourself from your harmless and common kinks. By choosing to view your desire for kink and your desire for love as mutually exclusive — someone can love you or they can humiliate you, but they can’t love and humiliate you — you have succeeded in creating a crippling case of performance anxiety. And now you’re working with a Freudian therapist — they still make those? — who believes kinks can be cured with couch time and moving vans. Your therapist is wrong. Jesse Bering is a research psychologist, a science writer, the author of Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us, and one of my go-to guest experts. Here’s what he told the dad of a teenager with a far rarer kink than yours: “If it’s true that Pokémon lights this boy’s fire … there’s not much [this dad] can do about his son’s ‘pathetic’ orientation. By age 17, his son’s singular erotic profile is pretty much fixed, like it or not. … Nobody knows why some people are more prone to developing unusual patterns of attraction than others. But whether it’s a penchant for Pokémon, feet, underwear or spiders, the best available evidence suggests that some people — mostly males — have a genetic predisposition for being ‘sexually imprinted’ during development.” So, FEET, at some point during your sexual development, you imprinted on feet and erotic humiliation. You can pathologize your kinks by viewing them as rooted in the violence you were exposed to as a child, or you

I’m a 23-year-old straight boy from Italy, and my problem is a friend and his girlfriend. They have been dating for two years, but she confided to me that she repeatedly cheated on him with a girl. She is bisexual. Also, I like her. Later, she told me she’s considering breaking up with my friend, and I told her I wished she would break up with him to date me. My questions are three. Is it wrong not to tell a friend he’s been cheated on? Is it more wrong to ask your friend’s girlfriend to dump him to get her? And how could I trust her? ITALIAN BOY IN A MESS

1. If you didn’t have an ulterior motive — if you didn’t want this girl — then you should tell your friend. But you have an ulterior motive, IBIAM, so you should keep your mouth shut. 2. All’s fair in love and war, and blah blah blah. But let’s say this girl dumped your friend and started dating you. That would mean the end of the friendship, right? If you’re willing to sacrifice this friendship for a chance at your friend’s girl, IBIAM, then you don’t value the friendship. So you should end the friendship whether or not you get the girl. 3. You can’t trust her any more than your friend can trust you. On this week’s Savage Lovecast, Dan chats with comedian Cameron Esposito: savage lovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.08-10.15

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I am naughtiest of all,” wrote poet Emily Dickinson in a playful letter to Maggie Maher, dated October 1882. In accordance with the astrological omens, I authorize you to let that same declaration fly frequently from your own lips in the coming week. Feel free to invoke other variations on the theme of naughtiness, as well: “I am exploring the frontiers of naughtiness,” for example, or “You need to be naughtier” (said to a person you’d like to get naughty with), or “Being naughty is my current spiritual practice.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“There’s a way not to be broken that takes brokenness to find it,” writes Naomi Shihab Nye in her poem “Cinco de Mayo.” I suspect this describes your situation right now. The bad news is that you are feeling a bit broken. The good news is that this is a special kind of brokenness — a brokenness that contains a valuable secret you have never been ready to learn before now. Allow yourself to feel the full intensity of the brokenness, and you will discover a way to never be broken like this again.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

destitute, still honing his craft, his self-confidence was low. His breakthrough work was Carrie, about a teenage girl who develops telekinetic powers. But when he was first writing that manuscript on his old manual typewriter, he got so discouraged that he threw his first draft in the trash can. Luckily for him, his wife retrieved it and convinced him to keep plugging away. Eventually he finished, and later sold the paperback rights for $400,000. I hope you have an ally who will go digging in your garbage to fish out the good stuff you unwisely discard. Or maybe this horoscope will convince you not to scrap it in the first place.

In a competitive game show on Japanese TV, 13 people had slabs of meat tied to their foreheads. They then poked their heads up from below, through holes in the floor of an elevated platform, where a hungry lizard was stalking around. But not one of the contestants stuck around when the lizard came to nibble the meat; they all ducked down out of their holes and fled to safety. That was probably wise, although it meant that the prize went unclaimed. Now I’m wondering, Sagittarius, about what might happen if a similar event were staged in your neighborhood. I suspect there’s a chance you would will yourself to stand calmly as the lizard feasted on the meat just inches from your eyes. As much as I admire that kind of poised courage, I want you to know that there are better ways to express it. Be on the lookout for noble challenges with goals that are truly worthy of you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Director Michael Bay makes big, loud, fast, melodramatic action films, including Armageddon, Pearl Harbor and the four Transformers movies. The critics hate him, but he’s unfazed. “I make movies for teenage boys,” he says. “Oh, dear, what a crime,” he adds sarcastically. I love that stance. He knows what he’s good at, and makes no apologies for doing it. I recommend that you cop some of that attitude right now.

In her poem “Advice to Myself,” Louise Erdrich speaks of the human heart as “that place you don’t even think of cleaning out. That closet stuffed with savage mementos.” I invite you to use her observations as a prod, Taurus. Now is an excellent time to purge the savage mementos from your heart, and clean the whole place up as best as you can. You don’t have to get all OCD about it. There’s no need to scour and scrub until everything’s spotless. Even a half-hearted effort will set in motion promising transformations in your love life.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

While walking in San Francisco, I passed the Pacific Heights Health Club. The sign out front said, “Birthday suits tailored here.” It was a witty reference to the idea that working out at a gym helps people get their naked bodies in good shape. I’d like to interpret the sign’s message in a different way, and apply it to you. The time is right for you to get back in touch with your raw, original self and give it the care and the fuel and the treats it has been missing. Who did you start out to be? What does your soul’s blueprint say about who you must become? Home in on your source code and boost its signal.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Horror novelist Stephen King has sold more than 350 million books. But when he was young and

Situation No. 1: If you meet resistance or doubt, say this: “Ha! This diversion can’t slow me down, because I am in possession of an invisible magical sword!” And then brandish a few charismatic swipes of your sword to prove that you mean business. Situation No. 2: If angst and worry are preventing your allies from synchronizing their assets with yours, say this: “Begone, dread! For with the power of my wicked crazy songs, I am the destroyer of fear.” And then sing your wicked crazy songs. Situation No. 3: If you’re finding it hard to discern the difference between useless, ugly monsters and useful, beautiful monsters, say this: “I am a useful, beautiful monster!” Your kind will flock to your side.

ankles. Or at least that was the case until last week. For two days, with the help of a rake, I cleared many of those bothersome obstacles off the trail. It took several hours, but now the way is smoother. My eyes are free to enjoy the sights that aren’t so close to the ground. I recommend that you do similar work. Stop tolerating inconveniences and irritations that hobble you. Get your foundations in shape to serve you better.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was ahead of his time. He created the genre of the detective story and mastered the art of Gothic horror tales. According to the Internet Movie Database, 240 films have referenced themes from his work. British writer Aldous Huxley wasn’t a fan of Poe, though. He said Poe was “too poetical — the equivalent of wearing a diamond ring on every finger.” Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect you might be at risk to lapse into a diamondring-on-every-finger phase yourself, Leo. While I am all in favor of you unveiling more of your radi-

ant beauty, I’m hoping you won’t go too far. How about wearing diamond rings on just four of your fingers?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Republican Jody Hice is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Georgia’s 10th Congressional district. To bolster his authority, he repeats quotes by revered figures from American history. One of his favorites has been a gem from the sixth U.S. President, John Quincy Adams: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” The only problem is, those words were actually written by country singer Dolly Parton, not by Adams. Don’t get fooled by a comparable case of mistaken identity, Virgo. Be on the alert for unwarranted substitutions and problematic switcheroos. Be a staunch fact-checker. Insist on verification. What’s the most amazing feat you ever pulled off? What will you do for your next amazing feat? Truthrooster@gmail.com

get your yoga on!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

I hope you will learn more in the next eight months than you have ever before learned in a comparable period. I hope you will make a list of all the subjects you would love to study and all the skills you would love to master, and then devise a plan to gather the educational experiences with which you will reinvent yourself. I hope you will turn your curiosity on full-blast and go in quest of revelations and insights and epiphanies, smashing through the limits of your understanding as you explore the frontiers of sweet knowledge.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Three times a week, I take a hike along a rough path through an oak forest. I say it’s rough because it’s strewn with loose rocks. If I don’t survey the ground as I move, I’m constantly turning my

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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NOW HIRING Seeking competitive individuals with leadership qualities. Management opportunities available. Full training provided, no exp. nec. 412-458-0058

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Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

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AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Immediate opening for a FT Driver at residential vocational training facility for young adults. Must have high school diploma or GED, as well as a valid CDL, with class B license with passenger, air brake endorsement. Please apply online at https://Jobs.csdis.com (job code 0426). For additional info, please visit www. careersystems.com. Please upload resume. EOE Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran.

Lincoln Heritage

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

START YOUR CAREER AT THE TOP! We are growing and now hiring experienced roofing technicians with residential, commercial, and sheet metal experience! Full Benefits Available. Questions or to Apply: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application or Submit your resume via -email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884

DRIVERS

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

NOW HIRING Customer Service Oriented Drivers We are proud to offer paid training, benefits, and paid time off in a rewarding team environment To qualify, you must be at least 21 years of age, have a valid driver license, 3 years of experience, have a safe driving record and be able to pass a background check and pre-employment drug test. We operate days, evenings, and Saturdays. Split shifts are currently available. To Apply, Please visit a First Transit location nearest you at: • 2439 West Pike Street, Houston PA For more information call

724-746-4342

DREGISTERED NURSESDNURSES AIDS DALLIED HEALTHCARE WORKERS DRESPIRATORY THERAPISTS

• 4780 Library Road, Bethel Park PA For more information call

412-833-3300 • 101 Old Frankstown Road, Plum Borough PA. For more information call 412-793-9046

ADOPT

A loving, financially secure, safe happy home awaits your newborn.

412-835-4240 Equal Opportunity Employer

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

LIN’S Hair Massage Studio

and

Cut, Color Curly Perm Japanese Straight Perm Facial

Massage

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PREHEARING CONFERENCES CPRB Cases #27-14-P & #282-13

1-877-492-8811

Strip District 1615-B Penn Ave. Pgh, Pa 15222 412-281-0989 Call for Appointment

AUTO SERVICES

ADOPTION

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CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

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ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023.

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for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

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Expenses Paid Karen

R A D I O PROMOTIONS A S S I S TA N T N E E D E D Organized, reliable, professional person is needed part time for a busy Radio Promotions Department in downtown Pittsburgh. Candidate must be able to work day and evenings, both weekdays and weekends when needed. Duties include in office work and on-site. Candidate must posess excellent writing and communication skills, with a degree in Marketing/ Communications or related field. Ability to handle multiple tasks efficiently and meet deadlines is a must. Web experience a plus. Must have valid drivers license and SPOTLESS driving record.

email: vwolfe@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media 650 Smithfield Street - Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Resumes can be faxed to

855-McNeely (855-626-3359) www.mcneelystaffing.com

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(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Adoring family, successful interior designer, LOVE & LAUGHTER await 1st baby. Expenses Paid 1-800-379-8418 Maria

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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BIRTH CONTROL CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Tuesday, 10/28/14 @ 5:00 PM The Kingsley Association 6435 Frankstown Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206

IS NOW HIRING! We are local small business looking for enthusiastic, Hard working candidates to join our team of cleaning professionals to keep up with our increasing demand. The candidate will need to be able to Work as a team as well as individual and Adopt our company credo of customer centric values: “We aim to please by any means” Compensation to be based on experience. Drivers license required.

Please call Johnnie Bryant, owner at 412-538-7850 for more information

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9


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Demolition of Station Square entertainment warehouse New housing is planned for this site, on which a low-slung Carson Street complex of dance barns is being demolished. Ordinarily, we’d worry that tearing down buildings means diluting the city’s character, but in this case … bu

Pitt Women’s Volleyball

Recovery Without Judgement™

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

There’s plenty of talk about Pitt’s football team this time of year, but it’s not the only game in town. The Panthers’ volleyball program has an impressive record, and will be playing at the Fitzgerald Field House until mid-November.

Help is Available!

And the Band Played On With infectious disease back in the news, reach for Randy Shilts’ epic 1987 masterpiece documenting the onset of the AIDS crisis, including various government and community failures that led to a devastating public-health disaster. Thoroughly reported and with a point of view.

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Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

AppalAsia This Pittsburgh-based trio specializes in a trans-Pacific blending of American and Chinese folk music (and groan-inducing puns). The dulcimer and banjo are joined by the erhu, a kind of two-stringed upright fiddle, and the resulting music offers both the pleasure of hearing divergent traditions side-by-side … and of hearing them unexpectedly harmonize.

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Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Bean Thru Drive-through Coffeeshop Skip the fast-food joints during your morning commute and pull up to this tiny log cabin instead. There’s a window on each side, and you talk to a real person, not a machine. The coffee is top-notch — Commonplace Coffee Roasters — and each cup comes topped with a chocolatecovered espresso bean. 4221 Ohio River Blvd., Bellevue

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MASSAGE

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$60/hr FREE Table Shower

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.08/10.15.2014

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DO TELL

NPR’s Peter Sagal on Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me’s return trip to Pittsburgh {BY KATHY NEWMAN} FOR JUST THE second time in the show’s nearly 16-year history, National Public Radio’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me is coming to Pittsburgh, on Oct. 16. The program began in January 1998 as a Chicago-based comedy news-quiz show. Current host Peter Sagal, a frequent panelist, began hosting duties a few months later and has been at the helm ever since. Now with one of public radio’s largest audiences (more than four million listeners per week), Sagal argues the show began to get much better, and more popular, when it started taping in front of a live audience in 2005. In a chat with City Paper, Sagal sounds off on the beauty of Pittsburgh and why Americans like their news with a side of laughs.

IN 2011, YOU TOLD A WAIT WAIT ... DON’T TELL ME CONTESTANT THAT PITTSBURGH WAS LIKE “OZ WITH A BAD BASEBALL TEAM. IT’S AMAZING HOW BEAUTIFUL IT IS.” WHEN WAS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO PITTSBURGH? I had never been to Pittsburgh [until the show’s 2008 taping]. Nor had I ever seen anything that would properly depict its appearance. When I first drove into Pittsburgh, we went through that tunnel, and we saw the city at the corner of three rivers for the first time, and then wow! I

I’VE NOTICED THAT A LOT OF MY FRIENDS’ CHILDREN ARE EXCITED ABOUT ATTENDING THIS UPCOMING SHOW IN PITTSBURGH. There is a juvenile quality to the humor on our show. The kids who like our show are particularly the dorky kids. And I get that, because I was a dorky kid. One of the things I loved when I was a kid was being able to enter the adult world and feel welcome. We welcome the dorky kids to our audience with fart and poop jokes. We’re not sitting around like they do on CNN and talking about the imminent threat of ISIS. We’re joking about the fact that we’re at war against this group and we don’t even know what to call it. AMERICANS — ESPECIALLY EDUCATED, YOUNGER AMERICANS — SEEM TO GRAVITATE TOWARD NEWS-COMEDY SHOWS LIKE BILL MAHER, JON STEWART OR JOHN OLIVER. THESE ARE SHOWS THAT SEAMLESSLY BLEND COMEDY WITH REAL INVESTIGATIVE NEWS REPORTING. DO YOU SEE YOURSELVES AS PART OF THIS TREND? We try not to have angry rants, like you might see on Bill Maher. We can get laughs insulting things that our audience doesn’t like, but I don’t like doing that. Instead, we honestly try to give people a break from 24/7 hate. We are noncombatants in this rhetorical war

“THE KIDS WHO LIKE OUR SHOW ARE PARTICULARLY THE DORKY KIDS.” thought, “My God, this place is beautiful!” On the morning of the taping, I went for a run around the riverfront, and I went by the Steelers stadium, the Pirates stadium, etc., and I was just blown away by the beauty. I compared it to Oz, I think, because Pittsburgh was like this gleaming city that just seemed to come out of nowhere. WAIT WAIT … DON’T TELL ME IS A SHOW FOR NERDS, FOR NEWS GEEKS. BUT NOW YOU ARE ONE OF NPR’S MOST POPULAR SHOWS. IS THERE ANYTHING ODD ABOUT BEING ALTERNATIVE AND POPULAR? ARE YOU LIKE AN INDIE BAND THAT CROSSED OVER? We’re public radio. We ain’t never going to be cool. Ira Glass, the host of This American Life, has tested the limits of this thesis, but still, public radio is not cool. Here’s an example. What is one of the hot TV shows of the moment? Homeland. I can tell you eight things about Homeland. Why? Because it’s on TV. TV has a place in our culture that radio will never have. There is very little reaching over into the culture at large. Public radio is a niche thing. N E W S

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between right and left. A lot of our stuff is just silly. We talk about the Canadian who was caught at the border with turtles in his pants — 51 turtles, to be exact. Or the beauty queen whose talent was dressing a deer. Do you remember the idea of “Two Minutes of Hate” from George Orwell’s novel 1984? [In the novel, this is a time every day that you are supposed to watch a film portraying your enemies and then express hatred for them.] We are a vacation from this way of thinking. George Orwell would probably be surprised, not at the fact that his idea of “Two Minutes of Hate” had come true, but that it had become so profitable. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me tapes live at 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 16. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $ 29.25-124.25. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org // The Pittsburgh show will air at 11 a.m. Sat., Oct. 18, and 11 a.m. Sun., Oct. 19, on WESA 90.5 FM and online at: www.npr.org/ programs/wait-wait-dont-tell-me/.

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 8, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 41

October 8, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 41