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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 10.01/10.08.2014

FUZZY MATH: CORBETT’S EDUCATION FUNDING HASN’T ADDED UP FOR PGH SCHOOLS 06


EVENTS 10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

10.10 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 THE UNKNOWN Warhol theater Tickets $10

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.7 – 5pm M . E . :THIS HOOD – THE HOMEWOOD ARTIST RESIDENCY OPENING & COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum (Homewood) FREE

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Idiot Box (detail), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVŃ?JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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BIG CHANGES ARE COMING!

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

LAST WEEK to take advantage of our wildly popular TACOTASTIC TUESDAYS and $5 CLASSIC BURRITO FRIDAYS. CATCH THEM WHILE YOU CAN. AND WAIT `TIL YOU SEE WHAT WE DO NEXT!

{ART} {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS]

know what we’ve lost.” — Nina 06 “We Esposito-Visgitis, president of the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers, on education cuts under Gov. Tom Corbett

[VIEWS]

too easy for lawmakers to rely 16 “It’s solely on their own opinions and

moral compasses and vote no because they have no real sense of the stakes involved.” — Charlie Deitch on a pending medical-marijuana legislation

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

not just about the eggs. It’s also 25 “It’s about the experience.” — Jenn Tompkins on her Rent the Chicken business

[MUSIC]

is like an annual influx of all of the 30 “VIA nerd shit that I love.” — DJ and producer Mr. Owl on the music-and-art festival taking place this week

[SCREEN]

worked well in print doesn’t fare 40 “What as well acted out on a big shiny screen.” — Al Hoff on David Fincher’s new thriller Gone Girl

[ARTS]

44

“He exhibits his strength through his vulnerability.” — Yah Lioness Borne on fellow spoken-word artist Leslie “Ezra” Smith

[LAST PAGE]

hop and basketball were part of 63 “Hip the same culture in my childhood. Rap

is what led me to basketball, rather than the other way around.” — Director Brett Kashmere on his new documentary From Deep

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 50 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 STUFF WE LIKE 61 N E W S

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{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“ASK ANY TEACHER, THEY WOULD UNDOUBTEDLY SAY THEY’VE BEEN CUT.”

INCOMING RE: The expanded East Liberty state store might augur further improvements (Sept. 24) “One needs to ask why it has taken two and three years to remodel stores if they are doing it in the most efficient way possible? Of course, at the current rate all the stores won’t get done for over 50 years, which is longer than it took to move from counter stores to self service (36 years) or to decide to finally take credit cards (15 years). If you want real modernization, you want total privatization.” — Web comment from “Albert Brooks”

SCHOOLYARD FIGHT

“The political coalition against privatization includes more than just allies of the union. For example, it also includes representatives of rural areas where private entities either would not locate a store at all, or would only locate a store with less selection and higher prices. In that sense, the statestore system is subsidizing those rural areas, and their local representatives do not want to give up those subsidies. — Web comment from “Brian Tucker-Hill”

RE: Pittsburgh New Works Festival (Sept. 24) “I saw program D, probably on a different night from the reviewer, and I thought the two main actors, father and son, in ‘The Field’ were remarkable, as was Mark Yochum. The direction of ‘Sleeping Aide’ visually contrasted the writhing, restless (and sexy) young woman with the nearly unmoving older man, to good effect.” — Web Comment from “Arlene”

RE: Clashing over carbon (Sept. 24) “We all share a deep concern that our government is not doing enough to protect the health and welfare of Pennsylvanians. These EPA proposals represent only a fraction of what needs [to be] done to prevent utter catastrophe. Indeed, climate change is now irreversible, and we can only hope that emissions cuts will prevent it from making a grim situation even worse. It’s a gift for polluters and represents the bare minimum that should be done. Polluters should take it while the offer is still there. They may not be so lucky after the next climate calamity hits.” — Web comment from “Jack Wolf”

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OR SEVERAL months, commercials for Gov. Tom Corbett’s and Tom Wolf ’s ca mpaig n s have made starkly different claims about the governor’s record on education spending. “He’s increased spending in the education department — $1.5 billion from where it was when he took office,” says Corbett’s wife, Sue, in an April 2014 video. “The facts speak for themselves. Tom Corbett cut a billion dollars from our schools,” counters the voiceover on a Wolffor-governor ad from September 2014.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

Each video provides its own sources for the claim. But if you ask teachers in Pittsburgh Public Schools whether Cor-

Corbett, Wolf spar over the Gov.’s history of education funding {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} bett cut funding to public education, they don’t need to look at charts or watch commercials to give you an answer.

“I’ve had this debate with people and if you would ask any teacher, they would undoubtedly say they’ve been cut,” says Nina Esposito-Visgitis, president of the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers. “We know what we’ve lost. “The level of personnel in the schools has been drastically cut.” Wolf and his supporters blame Corbett for the funding reduction. The governor’s campaign and supporters blame the federal government. But the undisputable fact in Pittsburgh is that the amount of funding the district receives CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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from the state today is lower than it was before Corbett took office. “I think part of the reason people are so angry now, is that was one of [Corbett’s] campaign promises, to make education better. In the city, I know you couldn’t find a teacher who says he has,” Esposito-Visgitis says. “It’s become less about education and less about quality and more about pinching every penny. The fact that education has become about the bottom dollar is maddening to me. “It’s not about the kids.” In the 2010-2011 fiscal year, Pittsburgh Public Schools received $207 million in state funding. The following year, when Corbett took office, the district received $182 million. And Pittsburgh’s allocation has never returned to pre-Corbett levels. In the most recent budget, for 20142015, the district received $184 million. “The amount of money the school districts got from the state for what we call classroom programs was cut pretty significantly,” says Sharon Ward, executive director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center. “While education [funding] did go up after the first year, in terms of funding in the classrooms it’s still lower then it was in 2010.” For its part, the Corbett campaign says the governor’s decision to cut education was forced by a large budget deficit and the expiration of federal stimulus dollars for education. “There were a lot of tough decisions to be made in 2011 when the governor took office,” says Billy Pittman, Corbett’s campaign press secretary. “We had a $4.6 billion budget deficit.” In 2010-2011, Pittsburgh’s budget was supplemented with $18 million in federal stimulus money for basic education funding. Corbett’s first budget (2011-2012) did not use stimulus funds for education, but did increase the state’s contribution to basic education funding by $8 million. Still, that year, Pittsburgh only received $152 million for basic education funding — $10 million less than the year before. “The first year that the governor was in office, he took action that resulted in very significant cuts to the basic education funding line and he made cuts to state-funded programs,” Ward says. “Those two areas were almost $900 million in reductions.”

Pittman counters that state funding for basic education was actually cut under former Gov. Ed Rendell. “What happened is the state’s investment in our public schools was cut during the Rendell years. It was replaced by stimulus funding,” Pittman says. “[The stimulus] basically set the schools up for failure by using funding that was never going to return.” However, that first year, Pittsburgh also lost $9.3 million for charter-school reimbursement (a category eliminated completely by Corbett), $3.3 million in block grants and $2.4 million in education assistance — roughly $15 million in state cuts unrelated to stimulus funds. “The bottom line is, regardless where the money was coming from, there was $1 billion cut,” says Jeffrey Sheridan, Wolf’s press secretary. “[Corbett] used stimulus money in his first budget and he still cut education. That $1 billion that was cut came from the classroom.” According to the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, Corbett actually did use stimulus funds to supplement other segments of his budget, including the Department of Corrections. Only 50 percent of Corbett’s initial cuts to education in 2011 were due to the expiration of federal stimulus dollars, Ward says. “The governor always said the [funding was from] ‘federal stimulus dollars, my hands were tied,’ but all of the federal stimulus money that was in the corrections budget was replaced by state funds,” Ward says. “That policy did not apply to public education. They just cut the funding and did not replace [it].” While opponents have talked about Corbett’s $1 billion in education cuts, the governor has claimed that he actually raised education funding by $1.5 billion. According to Corbett’s campaign, his commitment of $10 billion for education is an all-time high in the state’s education funding. “When moms and dads saw the hugely adverse impact on their kids and their property taxes, [Corbett’s] story was first, ‘I didn’t cut money, the federal government took money away,’” says Katie McGinty, a former Democratic candidate for governor and current head of Fresh Start Pa. — a political action committee set up by Wolf. “And then when that dog wasn’t hunting, his story became, ‘Well, actually we increased money.’” But the Corbett campaign’s claim is

“THE FACT THAT EDUCATION HAS BECOME ABOUT THE BOTTOM DOLLAR IS MADDENING TO ME.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


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difference in trying to teach a class of 35 kids versus 27 is night and day. It definitely serves as a challenge.” The cuts have also affected extracurricular programs; among the impacts were cuts to middle-school baseball and softball programs. The district has also had to lay off support staff, including teaching assistants. “Several hundreds of paraprofessionals have been laid off in the past four years,” says Dugan. “And those men and women are invaluable in the classroom.” Despite his disapproval of Corbett’s cuts, Dugan says the governor’s contribution to the state education pension fund is impor-

tant. Still, he says, it shouldn’t detract from classroom spending. “The governor would obviously like to see more of the funding go to the classroom,” says the Corbett campaign’s Pittman. “That’s why he’s been on the road talking about pension reform. “The fact is, we have an obligation; the state for several years has avoided making payments to our pension costs.” Dugan says the governor should have looked for alternatives to ensure funding for education across the board. One of his suggestions, also mentioned frequently by the Wolf campaign, is to levy an extraction tax on Marcellus Shale drilling. But, says Pittman, “You’re talking about taking money away from those localities and directing it into Harrisburg’s coffers. There’s no guarantee of where it goes.” He adds, “You’ve got an industry that is creating growth across the commonwealth, investing dollars into local communities.” But without an increase in revenue, Corbett’s opponents say education funding will continue to suffer where students need it most, in classroom spending. “It’s not an either, or proposition,” Dugan says. “The decision isn’t do we fund this or that, it’s where do we get the revenue to invest in education.”

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ON THE RECORD with STATE SEN. JIM FERLO

RELATIONSHIPS WITH WOMEN. WHAT WAS THAT PROCESS OF DISCOVERY LIKE FOR YOU? I don’t know that I can really explain it. I grew up with a large Italian family; I guess it was never a big deal about people’s personal situation, to be quite honest with you. Somewhere along the line, I became more attracted to men and it was not a big deal with me. In fact, I went to a party with a friend — a date, I’d guess you call it — but I ended up going home with a guy. I don’t know, I can’t explain it. There’s an old saying in the gay community: “Don’t fight the feeling.” It just seemed natural to me.

Longtime legislator opens up about coming out {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} IN THE CLOSING months of his 11-year career as a state senator, Allegheny County Democrat Jim Ferlo announced publicly for the first time that he is gay. The Sept. 23 announcement came in the middle of a press conference pushing for expanded hate-crimes legislation to cover LGBT people. It earned Ferlo the distinction of being the state’s first openly gay state senator and one of just three openly gay state legislators, drawing national media attention. City Paper spoke with Ferlo about his decision to come out and the legacy he’s leaving behind.

YOU GOT YOUR START IN POLITICS ON PITTSBURGH CITY COUNCIL IN 1987, WHERE YOU SERVED TWO TERMS AS ITS PRESIDENT. BRUCE KRAUS, THE CURRENT COUNCIL PRESIDENT, IS OPENLY GAY. COULD YOU HAVE IMAGINED BEING AN OUT, GAY POLITICAL LEADER ALL THOSE YEARS AGO? I think I could imagine it. Many people in the Pittsburgh community obviously have been out front — and I’ve been progressive on civil-rights and social-justice causes since my teenage years. I don’t think there’s any secret [about my sexual orientation]. I’ve never denied it. I never felt I needed to [come out] until yesterday, when I put a billboard on my head. The context of me leaving office; in the context of the moving eloquence that many people spoke yesterday in relation to hate crimes; in the context of many folks, younger folks, and others across the state who may not always talk about their victimization — I just thought it was the right context.

DID BEING A PUBLIC OFFICIAL WHO WASN’T OFFICIALLY OUT COST YOU PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS? I don’t think there’s any question about that. I’ve been married to the political left since the ’60s. I always talk about having been arrested 20 times or more for civil rights, anti-war, union demonstrations. I’m proud of that activism and heritage.

Pa. Sen. Jim Ferlo

kind of spoke, as I often do, from my own personal emotional viewpoint and I just wanted to speak up. … I felt a responsibility. I guess I underestimated the stage. When you’re a local elected official it’s one thing. Being at the capitol, being a state senator, I guess maybe I didn’t fully understand the bully pulpit that represents. DID YOU EVER WORRY THAT IF BEING GAY WERE A PUBLIC PART OF YOUR PERSONA, IT WOULD BE HARD TO NEGOTIATE WITH THE MORE CONSERVATIVE MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE? No, I don’t think so. I just don’t think that necessarily needs to be the first calling card [on] an issue. [But] when you’re 62 years old and you’re not married, that’s some perception that people think about. [Laughs.] The way I felt to be most effective — I’m not criticizing anybody who was more open — I’ve raised lots of money, I’ve legislatively dealt with issues and always been out front on LGBT community issues. It’s not like I ever ran from it.

“I JUST WANTED TO SPEAK UP.”

YOU GOT HITS ON THE HUFFINGTON POST, GAWKER AND BUZZFEED, AMONG OTHER NATIONAL OUTLETS. WERE YOU EXPECTING ANY OF THAT? No, I guess I was somewhat nonchalant about it. I was concerned about how I would phrase things — and that’s why I didn’t think about it, to be quite honest with you. I didn’t want to have a canned comment. I paused and I just

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

YOU MENTIONED IN THE PRESS CONFERENCE THAT YOU DISCOVERED YOUR HOMOSEXUALITY IN YOUR TWENTIES AFTER HAVING FULFILLING

YOU’VE PUSHED EXPANDED HATECRIMES LEGISLATION FOR LGBT PEOPLE SINCE 2003, BUT THERE ISN’T A WHOLE LOT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE THAT SUGGESTS TOUGHENING SENTENCES ON PEOPLE VIA HATE-CRIMES LEGISLATION DOES A LOT TO DETER BAD BEHAVIOR. WHAT’S YOUR RESPONSE TO THAT? I think there’s some truth to that, unfortunately. I think to some extent you want the law on the books to give the added element for a prosecutor who utilizes that law appropriately — similar to the situation in Philadelphia [in which a gay couple was beaten there Sept. 11]. Yes, you could have a criminal charge, [but] having the hate crime being the motivating factor, I think that elevates it a lot, not only in terms of the crimes code, but also in terms of the culture and sensibilities of the community-at-large. It’s almost like the history of the inappropriateness and racist nature of many people’s use of the n-word. You have to change culture. DO YOU HAVE ANY SENSE OF WHAT ITS CHANCES OF PASSAGE ARE? I don’t know. We only have a few session days left. Unfortunately, with the days remaining, it would go to the House and I think we know that death-knell response from [Republican] Mr. [Daryl] Metcalfe, who chairs the state government committee. A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Editor’s note: The interview has been edited for space and clarity.


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


There’s something about this place

Join today for $1 Call the JCC Membership Office 412-697-3522 • JCCPGH.org Squirrel Hill • South Hills Offer for $1 enrollment fee, a savings of $148, expires December 31, 2014.

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[PITTSBURGH LEFT]

DRUG INTERDICTION

Will legislators let time run out on the state’s proposed medical-marijuana law? {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

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sat quietly in her wheelchair, gazing forward as her mother, Heather Shuker, and others talked about the importance of the Pennsylvania legislature passing medicalmarijuana legislation this fall. In fact, some people might not have even noticed Hannah sitting at this past August’s public meeting in the Bradford Woods Community Church. But what they couldn’t miss was the vision of her on the church’s video screen, wearing a white T-shirt and pink helmet, crashing to the ground, moaning, wailing, crying, trembling. Her mother made the video capturing Hannah’s seizures so people could see what intractable epilepsy has done to her daughter and thousands of children like her across the state. The condition causes hundreds of seizures — as many as 300 a week for Hannah — that can’t be controlled by medication. However, there has been strong anecdotal evidence that cannabidiol, an extract from the marijuana plant, can be helpful to children like Hannah. Medical marijuana has also been shown to help fight symptoms of other medical conditions including PTSD and Parkinson’s, and to help with pain management in cancer patients. Medical marijuana has long had its legislative supporters in the state, but it wasn’t until Lebanon County Republican Mike Folmer got involved that supporters began seeing a real likelihood of the bill being approved. A slightly watered-down version of the bill passed the Senate last week, and in August, Democratic state Sen. Daylin Leach told City Paper that he believed the bill could pass the House with enough votes to withstand Gov. Tom Corbett’s likely veto. But before a vote can ever happen, the bill must first be brought to the House floor. And Allegheny County Republican Mike Turzai, the House Majority Leader, isn’t a particular fan of the bill. He has said on more than one occasion that he wouldn’t support it. In the GOP-controlled House, it’s Turzai’s call whether to bring the bill up for a vote. He and his spokesman, Steve Miskin, have said that any legalization efforts should come from the federal level instead. (This is that rare instance in which a Republican isn’t rushing to point to states’ rights.) But since the bill passed the Senate, there has been some conversation indicating

that Turzai is at least willing to consider assigning it to a committee for a hearing. (CP reached out to Turzai, but hadn’t received a reply by press time.) The problem with more hearings, however, is the time it’s costing vulnerable patients across the commonwealth. By her mother’s count, Hannah Pallas has between 100 and 300 seizures every week. The state House has just five legislative days left — four in October and one in mid-November, after the election, where no votes are likely to be taken — before breaking until early January. And if the House doesn’t consider the bill now, the entire process must begin again in the new year. At minimum, that’s about 12 weeks before the bill can be considered again — or roughly 3,600 unnecessary seizures for Hannah Pallas. Hannah’s own doctors have submitted letters of recommendation indicating that the drug could help the child. And one of those doctors, pediatrician Lidia CorminiTurzai, is married to the legislator who can keep this ball rolling. Watch the video (which is posted on www.pghcitypaper.com) and see if it doesn’t affect your thinking on the issue. Stories like Pallas’ have changed the minds of others. According to a Sept. 16 report from WESA 90.5 FM, House Republican Mike Vereb said it was a video like Pallas’ that opened his eyes: “As a father of three, I cannot simply look into the eyes of these kids and see that suffering without wanting to help.” Ironically, that’s the problem: It’s too easy for lawmakers to rely solely on their own opinions and moral compasses, and vote no because they have no real sense of the stakes involved. If Mike Turzai, or any other legislator in the Pennsylvania House, plans to block this bill from a fair vote, he shouldn’t do it from a chamber in Harrisburg. He should be forced to watch the video of Hannah Pallas falling to the ground from her seizures, and then tell her face-to-face that he’s blocking her from a drug that could potentially save her life because it goes against his principles. Maybe then, for once, those in the moral majority would realize that their personal beliefs aren’t any more important than anyone else’s. And that, in this case, they’re worth a whole lot less.

SOME LAWMAKERS HAVE NO REAL SENSE OF THE STAKES INVOLVED

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


Save your energy. Take the bus or T. Next time you’re headed to Consol Energy Center, consider transit. Steel Plaza T Station is a short walk and 61 and 71 routes have stops nearby. Hop on board, we’ll get you there.

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TEAGAN PRESLEY

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS NIGHT AT THE BYHAM

Presents:

AT ADAM & EVE STORE

Autographs and Photos SAT., OCTOBER 18, 2-6 pm 7775 McKnight Rd.

AT BLUSH OCTOBER 16-18 10:30 PM

Special Preview Performance of Off the Record XIV: Mysteries of Pittsburgh!

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 at 8:00pm

135 9th St., Downtown

adamevepittsburgh.com

Win “Dinner with Teagan”, text TEAGAN to 81018

Now in its 14th year, Off the Record is an annual musical comedy spoof of Pittsburgh news and newsmakers. This hilarious performance is written, staged and performed by Pittsburgh celebrities and those who regularly report the news, including the Newspaper Guild and SAG-AFTRA (professional film, radio and TV performers).

TICKETS: $25 Regular Ticket • $50 VIP Ticket* *Exclusive VIP event at Alihan’s Mediterranean Cuisine (124 6th Street) from 6:00-7:30pm including hors d’oeuvres, two drink tickets, live music, raffles and networking. To learn more and purchase tickets: http://trustarts.culturaldistrict.org/production/43310 or search “Big Brothers Big Sisters Night at the Byham

are we so different?

FINAL WEEKS See the exhibition that examines the complex issues of race and racism in the US through the lenses of science and society.

you’ll never see race the same way again.

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A project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

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One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


31 Sports Bar-Grille 31 Sports Bar-Grille brings sports back to Bridgeville. Join us any day of the week for great food and drink specials, a friendly, fun atmosphere, and live entertainment. Catch all the Pens, Steeler, & Pirate games at 31! Celebrate as our team scores and we light it up

food and beverages. Sit back and enjoy a night in the country. www.allenshayrides.com

and sound the horn! www.31sportsbargrille.com

Allen’s Haunted Hayride and Carnival

Camp Kilarunna

Friends and families have been coming out for 35 years to Allen’s Haunted Hayride and Carnival. Tickets include the 30 minute hayride on a tractor-drawnwagon and unlimited carnival rides. For an extra charge. reserve a campfire site. Bring your own

Camp Kilarunna is a fully immersive horror weekend and 5k. Enjoy our beautiful campground all day Saturday, then see if you can make it out of the woods alive during our terrifying 5k. Survivors party until dawn thanks to Clique Vodka and Straub Beer. Have you

got what it takes? www.campkilarunna.com

Cheeseman - Fright Farm The tractors are warmed up and the ghosts and ghouls have arrived to put a chill in the night air. Be warned this is a physically

Monongahela Area Historical Society

SPOOK-TACULAR ATTRACTIONS

PITTSBURGH’S ONLY HAUNTED ERACTIVE E PAINTBALL PAINTBALL RIDE RIDE INTERACTIVE

GHOSTWALKS:

October 10th ,11th , 17th , 18th

SHOOT LIVE ZOMBIES!

A tour featuring haunting tales from some of Monongahela’s historic homes. Tickets: $10

VIP GHOSTWALKS:

October O Oc tobe b r 2nd 2n nd - N November 2nd Thursday - Sunday: 7:00-12:30am $20.00 - Includes 50 rounds 500 Huntington Ave. Emsworth, PA 15202 (412) 327-2078 www.pghzombieoutbreak.com

October 11th & 18th

A tour that ends with hors d’oeurves and refreshments in one of Monongahela’s historic homes. The history and hauntings of this home are p sented byy the pre presented tth curren current rent residents! resid ! Tickets: T $255 Sponsored By: Washington County Tourism Grant

For tickets or more iinformation f ti callll 724-258-2377or 724 258 2377 2377or visit i it

www.monongahelahistoricalsociety.com

Survive our

40 Bowling Lanes Laser Arena 50 Arcade Games Full Service Cafe Full Service Lounge Pool Room

vampire! The greatest laser tag challenge of all time! Teams of 10-20 2 games

$7 per person, runs October 13- 31.

win a prize If your the last one to survive you *Call (412)828-1100 to schedule your challenge. N E W S

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BIRTHDAY PARTY CAPITAL OF THE WORLD!

2525 FREEPORT ROAD, HARMARVILLE • www.FUNFESTCENTER.com UNFESTCENTER +

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demanding attraction that will assault your senses with intense audio and visual effects. Your heart will quicken and your skin will crawl... As always, parking is free and your admission price includes all of our attractions and activities. www.cheesemanfarm.com

Look for more scary attractions coming October 8!

Huston’s Haunted Hollow

Freddy’s Haunts Come to Freddy’s Haunts for your Halloween scare! Featuring an indoor trail over ½ mile long and new in 2014 – 3D walkthrough attraction! Open

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Survive our Vampire starting Oct 13th. Oct 30 Witches night 9pm to midnight girls absolutely free . Men $10 Costume contest with prizes for top 3. drink specials. Oct 31st Halloween party 7pm to midnight costume contest prizes for the top 3. drink spe-

HAUNTED HILLS ALLEN’S

Hayrides HAYRIDE Haunted 35th

OCT. 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, AND NOV. 1

Annual

Open Every

Weekend in October! FREE FRE FR EE P EE PARKING ARKING AR ARKI K NG G

$15 ADMISSION INCLUDES 1 HAYRIDE & UNLIMITED CARNIVAL RIDES • RESERVE CAMPFIRE NOW

Open: 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE - ALL FREE!

Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both

412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com See website for $3 OFF Coupon

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) North Versailles, PA 15137

$2 O FF Online ticket purchases CP2014

Fright Farm – 25 years of fear! Fright Farm is Pennsylvania’s Premier professional Haunted Attraction, with 5 distinct attractions; Dead End Hayride, Hallow Grounds, Frightmare Mansion, PARANOIA, and Terror Maze! So

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL

Located minutes from the Pa Turnpike, Somerset Exit 110 on Route 281 south Just about 1 hour from downtown Pgh

PROMO CODE:

Fun Fest Center

Fright Farm

and d tthe h

126 Woodland Rd, Rockwood, Pa 15557 (814) 926-3133 • hauntedhollow.net

Also Featuring: Haunted Boarding House, Twisted Barn in 4D, Haunted Hayride, Toxic Swamp Walk, Dead End Cornæeld

come on out and join the many people who have made Fright Farm an annual Halloween season tradition. For more information visit: www.frightfarm.com

Open at 7:30 every Thurs, Fri, Sat in October

18th Year of Fear!

Performances every Friday & Saturday in October

every weekend in October and Thursday nights! Each Thursday is for our Charity Riders with all proceeds going to Riders For Their Benefits. Parking is free. www.freddyshaunts.net

1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart

Group rates & private campfire sites available

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

FREE PA R K IN G!

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

For most people the hayride lasts 30 minutes, for others, it lasts a lifetime! 22430 24 430 PPITTSBURGH ITTS IT TSBBURG TS BURGH H ROA RO ROAD OAD AD • SSMOCK MOCK MO C PPAA 15 CK 15480 480 480 724.677.2589 • www.AllensHayrides.com


cials Sat 11-1 kids costume party 9:30 to noon games prizes for top costumes only $7:50 per person. funfestcenter.com

or foot for a factor of fright and fear. Karaoke/DJ, live bands; Benefits the Autism Society of Pittsburgh. For more info visit: hauntedhillshayride.com / 412-823-4813; Facebook: Haunted Hills Hayride

Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail

Huston’s Haunted Hollow

Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (15th Annual); N. Versailles, PA. Journey through the woods at our two haunted attractions by wagon

This is Huston’s Haunted Hollow’s 18th year of fear! Featuring a haunted boarding house, twisted barn in 4D, haunted hayride, toxic swamp walk, dead end cornfield and more! Once you are

done getting scared, hang out, enjoy our food and drink concessions, live performances, and bonfires. Come aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh’s deepest, darkest secrets. We reveal the legends of those that still haunt the streets seeking revenge! www.hauntedhollow.net

Monongahela Area Historical Society Monongahela Area Historical Society presents Ghostwalks, a tour featuring haunting tales

Freddy’s Haunt s New for 2 014

3D

walkthrou Attractio gh n!

Sept 19-21, 26-28, Oct 2-5, 9-12, 16-19, 23-26 & Nov 1 192 Mc Cune R d. • Aliquippa 724 -65 0 - 0 0 5 0 or 724 -417-4 0 71 www.fr eeddyshaunt ddyshaunt s.ne t

OCTOBER IN PORTERSVILLE, PA

HAUNTED HAYRIDES AT DARK Off US Rt. 19 on Cheeseman Rd. Near McConnell’s Mill for futher directions, call 724-368-3233

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from some of Monongahela’s historic homes. Tickets start at only $10 and VIP packages are available for purchase. For dates and more info visit www. monongahelahistoricalsociety. com. Sponsored by Washington County Tourism Grant. monongahelahistoricalsociety.com

Pittsburgh Zombie Outbreak Pittsburgh’s only haunted interactive paintball ride! Open Thursdays through Sundays in Oct. 2nd

– Nov. 2nd. Jump into one of our Zombie Extermination Vehicles to be transported through zombie infested hospital grounds where you will fight off the infected in order to stop a global pandemic and make it out alive! pghzombieoutbreak.com

Terror Trolley Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays in October and November 1st at 7:00pm and 9:00pm. Tours depart from Station Square. Join us if you dare!

mollystrolleyspittsburgh.com

ScareHouse Writer/director Guillermo del Toro says ScareHouse is “fantastic and beautiful!” Regularly named as one of America’s scariest haunted houses by Travel Channel. Shorter wait when you purchase tickets online from scarehouse.com Free parking and shuttle service at Pittsburgh Zoo. Pittsburgh’s Ultimate Haunted House is open on select dates in October. scarehouse.com

Zombies of the Corn Stop zombies now! Come to Zombies of the Corn weekends in October, and board our zombie battle wagons stocked with glow in the dark ammo! Don’t worry zombies will try and board your wagon but they can’t shoot back! Included is a walk through our 11,000 sq. foot zombie compoundif you dare! Bonfires, ghost story tellers and Halloween movies on the big screen! zombiesofthecorn.com

pITtsburgh’s ulTImATe HAuNTED hOUse Halloween Party with THE CELLAR BLUES BAND Fri Oct 31 9pm Delicious Oktoberfest menu every Fri/Sat in Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct

LIVE ON 31 STAGE:

4 10pm DOORS TRIBUTE BAND 11 10pm FINALLY FREE 18 10pm TOTALLY 80’s 25 10pm THE CLINTONES ***NOMAD *** NOMAD SAT NOV 15**** 15****

Team Trivia Sun’s @ 7pm, PJ/DJ Karaoke Wed’s @ 9pm, DJ Adam Th @ 9:30pm, & DJ Phunkphonic Fri’s @ 10pm

1020 Washington Pike • Bridgeville

31sportsbargrille.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

NO LONG LINES WHEN YOU BUY ONLINE! SCAREHOUSE.COM


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SANDWICHES START WITH TEXAS-TOAST-THICK SLABS OF EXCELLENT BREAD

CHICKENS TO GO {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Husband and wife Phil and Jenn Tompkins have found a way to bring farm-fresh eggs closer to local kitchens. Their company Rent the Chicken does just that: It lets you rent a chicken coop, complete with birds, for your own backyard. “We were realizing people wanted a food source closer to their table,” explains Jenn Tompkins. Rent the Chicken had a soft opening last fall, but didn’t start the first full rental season until this spring. “We had three times the amount of renters as we were expecting,” Tompkins says. Depending on their eggs needs, renters can choose to house either two or four chickens; the cost for the sixmonth season is $350 for two chickens or $550 for four.. Each rental comes with a chicken coop and six months worth of food. For an additional $50, renters can upgrade to non-GMO or organic food. Two chickens will produce eight to 14 eggs per week, while four will produce 16 to 28 eggs per week “It’s not just about the eggs,” says Tompkins. “It’s also about the experience.” “We make it so people can try out having backyard chickens,” Tompkins says. In fact, renters who take to sharing their space with chickens can opt to adopt their rental birds. Currently, rental packages include free delivery within 50 miles of the 16229 ZIP code, in Freeport. Deposits are now being taken for the spring 2015 season. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

724-305-0782 or www.rentthechicken.com

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FEED

Melt 6 tbsp. butter. Combine 1½ cup flour, ¾ cup sugar, 1 tsp. cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1½ tsp. baking powder. r. Mix in two eggs, gs the butter, 1 tsp. vanilla and a splash of milk. Add 4-6 peeled and chopped apples. Dump batter in greased 8-by-8 pan; bake at 350 F for 45-60 minutes until golden. Great way to use up sad apples, and say, “Welcome, fall!”

GRILLEDCHEESE STOP {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE GASTROPUB concept — a menu

of upscaled pub grub to accompany a curated selection of microbrews on draft — is relatively recent, but its coincidence with the foodie revolution has created a juggernaut in the casual-dining market. Indeed, the field has become so crowded that merely designating potatoes as “handcut” and replacing American cheese with sheep’s-milk Fontina is no longer enough. For a new gastropub to stand out, it needs, if not a gimmick, at least an angle. The Yard in Shadyside clearly understands this, positioning itself as Pittsburgh’s go-to for grilled-cheese sandwiches. So simple, yet so susceptible to the salutary effects of more and better ingredients, grilled cheese is such a perfect candidate for the Cinderella treatment, we’re surprised it hasn’t happened sooner. At The Yard, this starts with Texas-toastthick slabs of excellent bread from local Allegro Hearth bakery. At least a dozen kinds of cheese and many more filling combinations vie for your palate, including eggs, sausage, crabmeat, several varieties of ba-

“Cheesy Capresey” with tomato soup and fries

con and, because this is Pittsburgh, even pierogies, fries and pasta. The sandwich with the fewest fillings (the “simple Jack”) has three, while most average four or five and few top out at six. A few combos aren’t even especially cheese-forward, and one sandwich — a variation on another kid favorite, peanut butter and jelly — has no cheese at all.

THE YARD

736 Bellefonte St., Shadyside. 412-709-6351 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 3 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sat.-Sun. 10 a.m.-1 a.m. PRICES: Soups, salads, starters and sides $4-14; sandwiches, burgers and flatbreads $9-14; entrees $14-16 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED We couldn’t possibly try them all, so we sampled the one that most tickled our fancy on the night we visited — an intriguing yet comparatively straightforward setup of cheddar, fried green tomatoes, smoked hickory bacon, roasted red-pepper mayo and let-

tuce. The latter seemed like an unnecessary afterthought, since the tomatoes provided ample vegetal presence. They were not battered and fried, as traditional fried green tomatoes are, but rather softened and gently warmed in an oiled skillet; in the context of the sandwich, this worked fine, as it let the bacon and toast take on the role of textural resistance. All of the ingredients were of high quality and in satisfying proportion to one another, and a cup of tomato soup served alongside was a sweet, simple accompaniment. Our only quibble was that the sandwich was so thick, it was actually uncomfortable to eat. On to bar food. A pound of medium-size wings retained some crispness beneath the sauce, a mild Buffalo that was full-flavored with a little bit of kick. The list of sauces wasn’t overlong, but it covered all the bases, with jerk rub, garlic parmesan, honey sriracha and sweet Thai chili. The Yard’s poutine served as a reminder that trends lead to imitators. In this case, the curds that define poutine were supplanted by melted floes of “homemade beer CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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GRILLED-CHEESE STOP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

cheese.” To be clear, it was delicious, as was a deep, rich and slightly sweet gravy made with microbrewed stout, but it wasn’t meaningfully poutine-like. However, the fries deserve their own mention. The Yard cuts them into broad spirals that, at their best, were light and crispy with lots of surface area for deep browning. However, the non-uniform shape led to uneven cooking and too much variation in quality. Sliders come in two forms: pulled pork with spicy sriracha slaw, for which Jason can vouch from a prior visit, and traditional sliders made with a house blend of beef and topped with, among other things, house-made mayo. All too many sliders dry out and toughen, as the window for perfect cooking is, like the patties themselves, so small. But these were excellent, beefy and moist, and along with ripe plum tomatoes and brioche buns, made for a pretty convincing burger.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HOPPY DAYS

Wigle Whiskey celerates with Wet Hoptoberfest Hops, the flowers of beautiful vines that grow like beanstalks, are used to flavor and aromatize beer. However, whiskey — which is more or less distilled beer — is traditionally made with an unhopped brew. Leave it to the restless minds at Wigle Whiskey to wonder, “What if we added the hops back?” They added the hops back and are set to release Hopped, the distillery’s third installment of its Wigle Whims series. It’s a wheat whiskey vapor-infused with Centennial, Cascade and Newport hops from Soergel Orchards, in Wexford.

“IT’S GOING TO BE A BIG CELEBRATION OF ALL THINGS HOPS-RELATED.”

Instead of pizza, The Yard offers flatbread, shaped long and narrow. Prosciutto and diced shrimp, arrayed atop buffalo mozzarella, red onion and greens, were savory and sweet, but the best part may have been the crust, which was New York thin and seemed to be baked in an oiled pan or sheet, because the bottom was crisp and bubbly like a good Roman pizza, but lighter because it’s thinner. Finally, we tried pierogies and kielbasa, one of The Yard’s five “supper” entrees. What could have been a mere sop to local tradition got as much love as everything else on the menu. The excellent pierogies, thin slices of kielbasa fried crisp, and caramelized onions studded with pork belly offered another complement to the sauerkraut, savory-sweet and soft against the bright crispness of the cabbage. Though the bar is frequently packed with drinkers, you don’t need a buzz on to enjoy a meal at The Yard.

“We make spirits that are regionally specific. Since hops grow in this area, and it’s a seasonal product, it fit really well into our portfolio,” says Wigle events coordinator Jill Steiner. Meanwhile, in an unrelated project, social-enterprise organization GTECH is preparing to celebrate a successful second year of its Hops on Lots program. “We wanted to find a creative way to reuse vacant land,” says GTECH’s Sara Innamorato. “This region historically has grown hops. We thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be cool to try to grow them again here, not just to reclaim a vacant lot but also to add some economic value to a vacant space?’” This year, GTECH harvested 40 pounds of hops, mostly Centennial and Cascade varieties. They donated 10 pounds to homebrewer John Creasey, of Garfield Community Farm (where the hops are grown), and the rest to East End Brewing. With all the hops happening, it’s time for a hoppening party. So GTECH and Wigle are teaming up for Wet Hoptoberfest, on Oct. 3 at Wigle’s North Side Whiskey Garden (www.wiglewhiskey. com). It costs $35, which will get you: three 8-ounce pours of East End beer wet-hopped with GTECH’s hops; an early crack at sampling Wigle’s hopped whiskey; and some food from Marty’s Market. Noah Petronic, who grows hops at Soergel and advised GTECH for its hop lot, will be on hand to talk about growing hops. “It’s going to be a big celebration of all things hops-related,” says Wigle’s Steiner.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Executive chef Adam O’Hare and owner David Ondik

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE

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CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE

Gourmet Pizzas, Wings, Soups, Salads, Hoagies, Burgers, Gyros, Calzones, Strombolis, Wedgies & Specialty Pastas

CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF

Most Popular Items: Cheesy Breadsticks, Buffalo Chicken Pizza & Calzone, Pep Rolls & Walnut Salad

GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushilike rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stirfry) to spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF

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Serving food at the Garage Door Saloon Next Door! 28

CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slowroasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from

Curry On Murray {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Kous Kous Café

KOUS KOUS CAFÉ. 665 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-563-5687. This small Moroccan restaurant mostly eschews clichés like kebab and falafel, instead offering sophisticated preparations such as lamb osso bucco and salmon in sharmoula. Worthy starters include harira (meat and lentil soup), eggplant zaalouk (similar to ratatouille) and grilled sardines. KF

LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegarmarinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this fine-dining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE MAURAMORI CAFÉ. 5202 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-408-3160. This café-style breakfast-lunch spot serves, as expected, bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, burgers and fries. This is still down-home cooking, but better-quality ingredients (applewood-smoked bacon) are emphasized, and care that goes into their assemblage (hand-formed burger patties). J MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF


TAILGATE AT MODERN CAFE BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER FOOTBALL GAMES. ENJOY AN AWARD WINNING SANDWICH AND CHOOSE FROM 140 DIFFERENT BEERS!

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James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412-441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF

should check out the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepper-jack cheese. LE TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888. This Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, but also less-common dishes. The menu has a section of com tam (“broken rice”) dishes, including some topped with a fried egg; there is also a jellyfish salad with pickled carrot and daikon. Another worthy entrée was banh xeo, savory crepes filled with shrimp, sautéed pork and vegetables, or try the make-yourown summer roll option. FK TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular Bloomfield institution, set in an old neighborhood corner bar, has built its reputation on enormous wood-fired hamburgers: choice meat, ground in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, and, on busy weekends, diners line up to get in. KE

VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-2598945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, www. per featuring elegantly pa pghcitym simple preparations .co THE RED RING. of elemental, straight1015 Forbes Ave., forward ingredients, such Uptown. 412-396-3550. This as roasted mushrooms with Duquesne University venue is a gorgonzola or scallops with decided cut above student dining. blood-orange sauce. Flavorings The dining room is spacious, with such as lemon, garlic and a handsome fieldstone bar. The fennel reflect the kitchen’s fare is contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection Mediterranean heritage. LE of internationally inflected WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower classics like chipotle barbecue Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221pork tenderloin and blackened 1232. At this cozy, contemporary, chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches candle-lit cottage, the Italianlike a side dish of “chef’s grains” and Mediterranean-inspired complete the picture. KE menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver in-season ingredients. The menu St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. At this revamped hotel, the offerings offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small reflect a balance between timesuite of carefully selected sides. honored dishes such as turtle Expect quality ingredients — soup and more modern fare, like dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, a crabmeat-stuffed quesadilla. lamb, steak — and exquisitely Steak-lovers will be pleased, prepared meals. LF but adventurous burger fans

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Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300

part of the NPL Restaurant Group

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LOCAL

VIA OFFERS CUTTING-EDGE TALENT WHILE ITS PRINCIPLES OF ENHANCING THE COMMUNITY REMAIN INTACT

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

CLOSE TO THE EDGE

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MUSIC ON THE EDGE presents MERIDIAN ARTS ENSEMBLE. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. Bellefield Auditorium, Bellefield Avenue at Fillmore Street, Oakland. $10-20. All ages. www.music.pitt.edu/mote

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BOOK GLOBAL,

STAY LOCAL

Meridian Arts Ensemble

Pittsburgh has never seen a festival of microtonal music. That probably doesn’t come as a big surprise to you, if you even know what microtonal music is. But it’s the kind of thing Pitt’s Mathew Rosenblum is into — and that’s why Music on the Edge, the Pitt-affiliated program he and Eric Moe run, is staging one this year. In late February, the series will hold a three-day event called Beyond: Microtonal Music Festival. It’s just one of a number of novel happenings that comprise the series’ 201415 season, which starts this weekend. Microtonal music uses tones between the well-known notes of the scale that we’re used to. It sometimes uses novel instruments, too. Mantra Percussion, for example, will perform a piece at the festival using six 2-by-4 pieces of lumber. (They do carry their instruments with them from show to show, says Rosenblum; they don’t just stop at Lowe’s in every town on their agenda.) The festival will also feature discussion sessions with experts on microtonal music, from Frank J. Oteri of NewMusicBox magazine to composers like Charles Corey. “At one point, it was a whole fringe subfield, wacky,” says Rosenblum, a noted composer who works with microtones. “Then people like Sonic Youth started using junk guitars and retuning things, and Lamont Young, and all of a sudden it became assimilated into music in an interesting way. It’s really part of a general language of new music.” “In a way, you can almost think of it as a world-music thing,” notes MOTE’s Jessica Hohman, “because Asian music uses many more tones than Western music does. It’s just normal over there: In India, even when they sing, they use all these tones that we never use.” The MOTE season’s kickoff, Fri., Oct. 3, is a performance by Meridian Arts Ensemble, a Buffalo-based brass band, a configuration not seen often in new-music circles. “These guys have been around for a while, and [new music] is all they do,” Rosenblum explains. In recent years, MOTE hadn’t seen any brass groups. “We hadn’t found the right fit,” he says. “But these guys approached us, and they fit really well with what we do.”

{BY KATE MAGOC}

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE JAROCK}

Paul Fleetwood (foreground) and Aaron Clark are two of many Pittsburgh-affiliated musicians playing this year’s VIA Festival.

OW IN ITS fifth year, the VIA Music

& New Media Festival has grown into an internationally recognized event and creative collective. This year, the innovative music and arts festival joined forces with the International Cities of Advanced Sound, putting Pittsburgh on a map that includes events like Montréal’s Mutek, Seattle’s Decibel and Manchester’s Future Everything Festival, among others. Not only has the group behind VIA had the honor of learning from some of the world’s top names in about curating music experience, but it has expanded to encompass two cities, with festival events happening concurrently in Chicago this year for the first time. Throughout its history, VIA has altered the faces of Pittsburgh’s music and arts scenes. The lineup still offers an array of cutting-edge talent that might be mysterious to some (though it’s expanded to include everything from hip hop to hardcore to indie rock), the crew’s core principles of enhancing the local community has remained intact. This year particularly, VIA

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

joins forces with nearly every prominent local promoter. Some have even ended up on the lineup themselves. One such promoter-artist, Mr. Owl, got involved by way of a showcase he’s hosting Fri., Oct. 3. “I had the night anyway” for a monthly hip-hop event called Enforcery, he explains, “and I was starting to ramp up — I got somebody coming in from Austin, Texas, and somebody coming in from New York City. And I was flying them in, so it was like a big to-do.

MORE ON VIA’S LINEUP Page 32

“And [I heard] that it was the same night as the Lawrenceville art crawl of VIA. So I hit [the organizers] up and was like, ‘Hey guys, this is what I’m doing, do you want to be cooperative about it?’ And they said, ‘Hell yes, that sounds awesome.’ It was a really nice surprise that they said yes.” While partnerships like the one with

Mr. Owl were always part of VIA’s goals, the number of these local connections seems to have ramped up considerably for 2014. Being included this year in ICAS has raised VIA’s profile both globally and locally. VIA’s left-of-center bookings has had an effect on Pittsburgh’s own talent. “For me, VIA is kind of an excuse to be weirder than you can be at an average party,” says Mr. Owl. “That’s what I would really emphasize. [It’s] kind of like a platform for more intellectually challenging music than what you can get here in Pittsburgh on an average weekend. And my breadand-butter is experimental hip-hop-instrumentals-meets-weird-electronics. So VIA is like an annual influx of all of the nerd shit that I love.” Paul Fleetwood, a native Pittsburgher, also joins the VIA lineup as an artist for the first time this year after moving to Denver a year ago to lend his efforts to the Great American Techno Festival. Fleetwood was not only instrumental in the genesis of VIA, but also co-founded the Pittsburgh techno collective Humanaut, as well as the wildly CONTINUES ON PG. 32


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BOOK GLOBAL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

popular after-hours party, Hot Mass, along with fellow VIA artist Aaron Clark. “My music-scene experience in Pittsburgh has primarily been in the electronic partition, and I really [didn’t notice] until after VIA occurred how sharp that partition was,” Fleetwood explains via email. “VIA has made a direct impact in bridging multiple musical cliques and scenes in Pittsburgh. “Right now there is an unprecedented level of balance and unity in Pittsburgh’s art and music scenes, since I have been involved. This is significant progress. It would be unfair not to mention VIA as being a direct contribution to this.” The Hot Mass after-party that Fleetwood and Clark initially founded will be playing an important role in this year’s VIA fest. Both DJs are slotted to play the VIA edition of Hot Mass on Friday during the week of the fest. Clark will also be playing the Honcho event at VIA on Saturday — a gay-centric party that he runs along with DJs Clark Price and Edgar Um, who is also part of the VIA collective along with Aaron Clark. Clearly, it’s a family affair. Hot Mass has had a similar ethos to VIA as different promoters each curate a Saturday night throughout the year. While it’s famous for being a site for latenight antics as chronicled earlier this year in a Vice article titled “The Secret Techno Sex Parties of Pittsburgh,” the party has also offered some of the most forwardthinking club music that Pittsburgh has seen to date. There’s no doubt that VIA’s sense of community factored into the ideals of Hot Mass. When asked if he thinks VIA has altered the course of the music scene here, VIA artist and Hot Mass regular Chase Smith said he believes it has. While a local addition to the VIA lineup — he joins Fleetwood for the Friday-night afterparty, which also features Kentuckybased electronic producer Ellie Herring — Smith has also garnered notoriety abroad for his productions. Having had tracks charted by London-based techno luminary Erol Alkan and been invited to play parties across Europe as well as in New York City, Smith brings a unique perspective to the scene. “I think it has [changed]. Like everybody says, it’s a pretty small city, so if you go to Hot Mass or something, you will never hear a night of just one style of techno,” Smith explains. “It will always be sort of across the board. I feel like that’s a trait of people who make music here. Even [longtime local electronic musician Shawn Rudiman] who has such a distinctive style, he still makes a wide range of techno music.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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VIA HIGHLIGHTS The VIA Festival once again mixes top-level musical talent, multimedia arts and educational events in its program this year. For a full list of events and performers, visit www.via2014.com; here are some highlights:

WED., OCT. 01: Dan’l Boon and Mark McGuire at The Shop, 4314 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Real Estate at Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. MikeQ, Normaling, Badboxes at Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. THU., OCT. 02: Deafheaven, Liturgy, Slices at Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side.

FRI., OCT. 03: All-day music conference featuring free discussions and workshops, including Ableton demos, at Studio for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University. Code Orange album-release show at Cattivo. Osunlade at Round Corner Cantina, 3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Bee vs. Moth, Jeremy Bible at Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Prof. Logik, Man of the Down at Belvedere’s, 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Hot Mass at Club Pittsburgh, 1139 Penn Ave., Strip District. SAT., OCT. 04: Zebra Katz, Blue Hawaii, L-Vis 1990, Traxman, Cakes da Killa, Cities Aviv, Diode Milliampere, Troxum at Union Trust Building, 501 Grant St., Downtown. Little People, Yppa, Headphone Activist at Rex Theater. Honcho presents JD Samson at Club Pittsburgh.

SUN., OCT. 05: Steve Gunn, Circuit Des Yeux, Mary Lattimore/Jeff Zeigler Duo at Thunderbird Café. More on the art and film elements of VIA in Short List (page 51), Film (page 42) and Last Page (page 63).


NEW RELEASES

THE REDLINES THE REDLINES (SWADE RECORDS)

Power pop meets roots rock on The Redlines’ debut full-length. All catchy stuff, much of it echoing in form some of the best Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers material from the late ’70s. At their finest moments, the vocals here are reminiscent of Craig Finn; at weaker moments, they feel a bit overdone. The almost-surf-rock of “Tragic Refugee” is less successful than the twangy heartland rock of much of the rest of the album. Nice guitar work, good songwriting (plus a choice Howlin’ Wolf cover.) BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE REDLINES CD RELEASE. 9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. Howlers Coyote Café, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320

ANDRÉ COSTELLO & THE COOL MINORS THE RATTLING ARCADE WILD KINDNESS RECORDS

Listening to The Rattling Arcade, it’s tempting to indulge in a game of Guess What’s in André Costello’s Record Collection. You’re likely to pick up shades of Nashville Skylineera Dylan (“She Took My Hand”), Tom Petty (“Motorways”) and early Grateful Dead (“Places”). But despite some of the seemingly obvious influences, the Cool Minors manage to avoid sounding plagiaristic, and this catchy collection of well-produced, classic roots rock is infused with a nice indie-rock sensibility: think Grizzly Bear jamming with Crazy Horse. BY MARGARET WELSH

ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS CD RELEASE. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $8-10. All ages. 412-237-8300 N E W S

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF HIYORI MINATO}

Say Watt? Il Sogno del Marinaio (Mike Watt, left)

KEEPING AN OPEN EAR {BY IAN THOMAS} BASSIST MIKE WATT’S prolific career began

in his early adolescence, when D. Boon fell from a tree as Watt was passing through the area. Strangers to one another, the two struck up a conversation, which led to a friendship. That friendship eventually escalated to the formation of the hugely influential punk band Minutemen. Watt is attuned to the fact that his role in Minutemen was seeded in chance encounter. When D. Boon died tragically in an automobile accident, forcing the dissolution of Minutemen, the lesson Watt learned was to remain open to the artistic opportunities that present themselves, and to extend a helping hand where he could. It’s a simple philosophy, but Watt embraces it with monastic dedication and, as a result, has found himself collaborating with artists as diverse as Iggy Pop, visual artist Raymond Pettibon, Sonic Youth and J Mascis. Watt keeps his lines of communication more open than most artists of his stature. So he is often sent material by artists seeking feedback and desirous of sharing their music with Watt as he has shared his with them over the years. As an outlet for this wealth of largely under-the-radar material, Watt created the Watt from Pedro Show, currently available as a podcast; on it, Watt plays an eclectic mix of material he’s received, along with anything else that excites him. “I think one of the things I’ve learned is that if I’ve got my mind open enough, everyone’s got something to teach me,” Watt says. For many new artists, Watt’s encouragement is enough to get them over the initial intimidation and rejection implicit in starting out. “Mr. Watt hit me up in the MySpace days,” recalls Tom Fec, known for

his work with Black Moth Super Rainbow and as the solo artist Tobacco. “He’s the guy I think of to remind me why I do what I do when all the noise around me is making me cynical. … I wouldn’t be surprised if he understands my music better than I do.” Il Sogno del Marinaio, Watt’s current endeavor, began when guitarist Stefan Pilia reached out to Watt, following a stint supporting him while Watt was touring Europe with his second opera. After working with Watt on tour, Pilia’s initial intimidation at Watt’s reputation as a punk-rock legend diminished. “I immediately felt a strong sense of familiarity with him. I knew about his history, but as soon as I met him, his humanity just overwhelmed his history,” Pilia explains. Now touring in support of a second album, Canto Secondo, Il Sogno del Marinaio’s songs are in keeping with band’s nautically themed name, as sprawling as the seas themselves, yet steered as tightly as the ships that cross them.

IL SOGNO DEL MARINAIO

(FEATURING MIKE WATT) WITH THE SICKS 9 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $15. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

For Watt’s part, he seems to have chosen the artist’s life as a vehicle for human interaction. “I’m not a musician; I got into playing bass to be with D. Boon. So my first motivation for music was to be with my friend,” Watt says. He is clearly honored to be afforded such chances and feels a responsibility to honor each one that presents itself to the utmost. “I only do as much as I can handle. The worst thing in the world is having to tell someone ‘no,’” Watt says. “If you are going to do something for someone, you can’t do it half-assed,” he continues. “I try to look at it as the ‘O’ word, opportunity, not the ‘B’ word, burden.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


CALLIOPE ROOTS CELLAR

“They’re the hottest new band in folk music… and one of the best.”—Legendary DJ Gene Shay

Spuyten Duvil

FEATURING:

Thursday, October 9, 7:30 p.m.

NO ORTHW WIND | YOUNG STTU SH HARO ON DALY | TENACITT Y | OCT. 9 | 8PM THURSDAY T

The Roots Cellar, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside

HOSTED BY

MIKE DEAN

SPECIAL PERFORMANCES BY: QUEEN RELLA, GREGG BLAKK, DIZ THE GENTLEMAN, MIKE SMALLS OF SAPIO SENSES, NEO SOUL SINGER, MARIE ELISABETH & COMEDIAN TONNOCHI B. ADMISSION: $12 IN ADVANCE PURCHASE TICKETS AT

WWW.POETRYANDCOMEDYPGH.EVENTBRITE.COM OM OR CALL

412.867.0826 230 W. STATION SQUARE DRIVE PITTSBURGH

POETRY.COMPGH – WHERE POETRY MEETS COMEDY!

For tickets: www.calliopehouse.org 412-361-1915

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live music, great wine

Puss n Boots

all day-every day

PITTSBURGH WINERY

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

LIVE IN THE CELLAR

Oct. 3

Crystal Bright and the Silver Hands Oct. 4 Good Brother Earl Oct. 5 Galactic Cowboy Orchestra 7PM Oct. 10 Songwriters in the Cellar Hosted by Paul Luc with James Hart (Harlan Twins), Hallie Pritts (Boca Chica) and Chet Vincent (of Chet Vincent and the Big Bend).

Oct. 11 10 String Symphony Oct. 17 Brownie Mary SOLD OUT! Oct. 18 The Chalk Outlines Oct. 24 Silencio Oct. 25 Clinton Clegg presents The Commonheart + guests Lone Wolf Club and Joanna Lowe Oct. 28 Hannah Aldridge with Kayla Schureman 7PM Oct. 30 The Mulligan Brothers Oct. 31 Gene the Werewolf Nov. 1 Velvet Heat CD Release Nov. 7 Jasmine Tate and Friends Nov. 8 Tania Grubbs and TRAVLIN’ Nov. 13 David Childers Nov. 15 Grape Stomp Noon-3pm Nov. 15 Cello Fury Nov. 21 These Lions CD Release Nov. 26 The Routines Nov. 28 Buzz Poets SOLD OUT! Nov. 29 Women’s Center & Shelter Benefit with Neids Hotel Band Dec. 13 Songwriters in the Cellar

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

z z a J y l e v Li ! g n i w S d an

Jazz organist Tony Thomas returns to Pittsburgh with his swinging, exciting brand of theatre organ stylings that audiences love. Don’t miss Tony’s jazzy approach to the Keystone Oaks Wurlitzer. Wurlitzer. Saturday, October Saturday October 18th at 2PM at Keystone Oaks Auditorium in Dormont

Tickets

Order on-line: www.showclix.com/event/tonythomas $15 in advance, $20 at the door Students & Kids free

Bill Deasy, Rachel McCartney, and Brian Webb

Visit www.pghwinery.com for tickets and info Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+ 2815 PENN AVENUE, PITTSBURGH PA 15222

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICHARD BALLARD}

We buy

CRITICS’ PICKS

[ROCK] + THU., OCT. 02

Not many have the bona fides of Peter Case: In the music craft for 40 years now, he’s been a rocker (in bands like The Nerves, with Paul Collins, and The Plimsouls) and a solo singersongwriter. At age 60, he still tours regularly, despite having had heart surgery five years ago. The songwriter’s songwriter won’t slow down, and he appears tonight at Club Café for his first Pittsburgh appearance in a couple of years; locals The Damaged Pies open. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m 56 S. 12th St., South Side. Pujol $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[ALT-COUNTRY] + SAT., OCT. 04 Norah Jones. Great; now that we have your attention, take a closer look at Puss n Boots, a side project of Jones’, with Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper (once of Ryan Adams and the Cardinals). Though established in 2008, it wasn’t until 2013 that the trio signed with Blue Note and then, another year later, released its first album, No Fools, No Fun. The influence of Jones on this album is strong, but don’t go expecting to hear “Sunrise” — you’re in for a lot more than that. Catch them at Mr. Small’s tonight to witness an installment of their first official tour. Samantha Ward 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[PUNK] + SUN., OCT. 05

www.theatreorgans.com/PATOS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

While Daniel Pujol — who simply calls his band Pujol — released his second full-length on Saddle Creek, Kludge, this year, he couldn’t

help but revisit his last album too. The result: a full-length reboot of United States of Being called Re-United States of Being, issued by Saddle Creek for Cassette Store Day. Some of the songs have traveled through several phases — like “Black Rabbit,” released as a demo years ago, recorded with Jack White for a single on Third Man, re-recorded for USB and now re-re-recorded for RUSB. Who said garage-punkers weren’t perfectionists? Tonight, he finally brings his renowned live show to Pittsburgh, after a few false starts and cancellations over the years; the band plays {PHOTO The Mr. Roboto Project COURTESY OF JAMIE along with longtime GOODSELL} favorite Screaming Females, from New Jersey. Locals Preppers open. AM 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www. therobotoproject.org

[ELECTRONIC] + TUE., OCT. 07

Porter Robinson began producing music at the age of 12, inspired by video-gaming music like that from Dance Dance Revolution, and reached international success by the time he was 18. Now, at 22, he has released his first full-length album, Worlds, via Astralwerks. Even if the name is unfamiliar, you know his music: He coproduced Zedd’s hit, “Clarity,” and has worked with the likes of Avicii, Deadmau5 and Lady Gaga. Come to Stage AE tonight to check him out with openers Giraffage and Lemaitre and try not to feel too poorly about how far you had come by age 22. SW 8 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 02 31ST STREET PUB. Cyanotic, Rabid Whole, Stoneburner. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Peter Case, The Damaged Pies. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Terminate, Abysme, EFV. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Rents, Jasper Lewis. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 03 ALTAR BAR. Butcher Babies. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. André Costello & the Cool Minors. North Side. 412-237-8300. CATTIVO. Code Orange, Twitching Tongues, Angel Dust, Hounds of Hate, Eternal Sleep. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Middle Children, Playfully Yours, 8Cylinder (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Sean K Preston & The Loaded Pistols. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Smokin’ Section, Street Level. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Demos PapaDimas, Ben Sweet, Southside American. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

LATITUDE 360. Totally 80’s. GREATER PITTSBURGH MASONIC CENTER. Eagles North Fayette. 412-693-5555. Tribute Band. Ross. 412-931-1996. LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. HAMBONE’S. Charlie Wheeler The Dave Iglar Band. Bethel Park. Band & the Buckledowns. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jude Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Benedict & The Last Drop, Jeremy Caywood & The Way Of Life, Grey’s HEY ANDY’S. Fungus. 724-258-4755. Fool, Morgan Erina, Jesse Young & HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Zack Weiss. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Redlines, Coronado, Southside PITTSBURGH WINERY. Crystal American. Bloomfield. Bright & the Silver Hands. Strip 412-682-0320. District. 412-566-1000. LATITUDE 360. Shake Shake RAMADA INN HOTEL & Shake Shake Shake Shake. CONFERENCE CENTER. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. Jeff Jimerson w/ Airbourne. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Puss Greensburg. n Boots feat. Norah Jones, SMILING MOOSE. Sasha Dobson, Catherine Scars On 45, Broken Popper, Van Hayride. Anchor A Sound Of Millvale. 866-468-3401. Thunder, MindMaze, . www per PITTSBURGH WINERY. Lies Inc. South Side. a p ty ci pgh m Good Brother Earl. Strip 412-431-4668. .co District. 412-566-1000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. RAMADA INN HOTEL Bee Vs. Moth, Buffalo & CONFERENCE CENTER. Stance, Telequanta. Totally 80s. Greensburg. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Waiting for Ray. Ross. 412-364-8166. 31ST STREET PUB. Six Speed SALATINO’S RIVERHOUSE CAFE. Kill, Bill Jasper, The Bestevers, The Dave Iglar Band. 724-565-5700. Bobby Baseball Bat. Strip District. SMILING MOOSE. Turnover 412-391-8334. Light Years, Malfunction, THE BRONZE HOOD. Daniels & Mute, Harbours. South Side. McClain. Robinson. 412-431-4668. CLUB CAFE. Joe Grushecky THUNDERBIRD CAFE. & the Houserockers. South Side. Grievous Angels. Lawrenceville. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Blake & Dean 412-682-0177. WESTWOOD GOLF CLUB. Stache Trio. Robinson. 412-489-5631. Band. West Mifflin. 412-462-9555.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 04

SUN 05

MP 3 MONDAY {PHOTO COURTESY OF GREGORY NEISER}

TROXUM

BRILLOBOX. Electric Six, The Soft White Sixties. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. City Rain. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. PUJOL, Screaming Females. Bloomfield. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Galactic Cowboys. Strip District. 412-566-1000. STAGE AE. Timeflies, Kap Slap, Down With Webster. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Steve Gunn, Circuit Des Yeux, Mary Lattimore & Jeff Ziegler. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 06 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Linda Eder. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from space-synth artist Troxum, who plays the VIA Festival this weekend. Stream or download “Laniakea,” from his forthcoming Gaia Lesson album, on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

TUE 07 ALTAR BAR. Bayside, I Am The Avalanche, Seaway. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. il sogno del marinaio w/ mike watt, The Sicks. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

CLUB CAFE. Steve Poltz, Todd Edwards. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Fauntleroys feat. Alejandro Escovedo. Station Square. 412-481-7625. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Cherub, Ghost Beach, Gibbz. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

4504 BUTLER STREET

412.326.5964

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

WE’LL CUT YOU.

WED 08 ALTAR BAR. Suffocation, Kataklysm, Jungle Rot, Pyrexia, Internal Bleeding, No Reason To Live, Victims of Contagion. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Holy Ghost Tent Revival, Grand Piano. South Side. 412-431-4950. REX THEATER. The New Mastersounds The New Mastersounds. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Buke & Gase. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Heavy Glow, Sun Hound. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon, Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

SAT 04

BOURBON TASTING ––– Friday, October 3rd ––– WILD TURKEY 81-101-101 RYE RUSSELL’S RESERVE 10 YEAR.

8-10pm - Cheers! 412-918-1215 8 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-657-2279. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. REX THEATER. Little People, Yppah, Headphone Activist. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

SUN 05 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lil Dicky, DJ Omega, Headphone Activist. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

SUN 05 HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 08 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

MORGANTOWN, W.VA. {WED., NOV. 12}

Melissa Etheridge WVU Creative Arts Center

WORLD SUN 05

COLUMBUS

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Gena y Pena. Oakland. 412-622-3116.

{FRI., FEB. 27}

Hozier

THU 02

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Hank D. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

FREE

SAT 04

DJS

FRI 03

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

of The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

REGGAE

Newport Music Hall

WED 08

FRI 03

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 07 CATTIVO. MC Chris, MC Lars. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

BLUES THU 02 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 03

TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

FRI 03 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY THU 02 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

SAT 04

ANDYS. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. DOC & TINA. Elwood’s Pub. 412-642-2377. 724-265-1181. THE CLOAKROOM. Hill Jordan & the Slide Worldwide. East Liberty. THE PITTSBURGH FIRST UNITARIAN CAMERATA. St. CHURCH. Martin Andrew’s Episcopal Spitznagel & Bryan Church, Highland Park. Wright. Tricky Fingers: www. per pa 412-421-5884. An Evening of Ragtime, pghcitym .co Stride, & Jazz Piano. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. NANCY ALLEN, HARP. LITTLE E’S. Jenny Wilson Trio. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. Downtown. 412-392-2217. 412-268-2383.

CLASSICAL FRI 03

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 05

SAT 04

SUN 05

ELLIOTT’S BBQ & STEAKHOUSE. The Blue Bombers w/ Patrick the Singer. Pleasant Hills. INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. King’s Ransom. NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THE R BAR. The Eldorado Kings. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SPEAL’S TAVERN. John Farley. 724-433-1322.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

JAZZ THU 02 ANDYS. James McClellan. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

SAT 04

OTHER MUSIC FRI 03

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Mamdrones, Ferdinand the Bull. Harmony. 724-400-6044. LINDEN GROVE. Mercedez. Castle Shannon.

WED 08

SAT 04

MON 06

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo & Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC THU 02 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank

COMFORT INN, RIDC PARK. The Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus. Blawnox. PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Dancing Queen. 724-789-7858.

TUE 07 LIGONIER THEATER. Hawaii In The Highlands. 724-238-6514.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

October 1 - 7 WEDNESDAY 10

Matthew Perryman Jones / Andrew Combs HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 21

Drue Heinz Literature Prize Readings NATIONAL AVIARY AUDITORIUM North Side. Featuring David Guterson & Kent Nelson. Free event. For more info call 412-323-7235. 6:30p.m.

PRONG SMILING MOOSE South Side. 411-481-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 32

Are You Still There?

SUNDAY 54

SOUND SERIES: André Costello and The Cool Minors

THE PITTSBURGH COLISEUM Homewood. 412-281-3305. Tickets: attacktheatre.com. Through Oct. 10.

WARHOL THEATER North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 43 ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SPRINGS PA. 814-442-4594. Tickets: springspa.org. 9a.m. Through Oct. 4.

dogtoberFEST 2014 Tim and Eric & Dr. Steve Brule

UNDER THE BRIDGE AT THE WATERFRONT Homestead. Free event. For more info visit carmaa-petadoption.com or 412-780-6095. 11a.m.

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND Munhall. Over 16 show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 8p.m.

Deafheaven

Code Orange Kids

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4 UNDER THE BRIDGE AT THE WATERFRONT

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

TUESDAY 76 Bayside

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests I Am the Avalanche & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Cherub

River City Brass presents Legends

dogtoberFEST 2014

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Timeflies

MXPX 57th Annual Springs Folk Festival

Lil Dicky

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes N E W S

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WAR TORN {BY AL HOFF} It’s hardly news that war is not good for children (or anybody else, for that matter), but János Szász’s The Notebook casts a particularly cold eye on its effect. During the waning days of World War II in Hungary, 12-year-old twin boys are sent to live with their estranged grandmother in a small village. Villagers call Granny (Piroska Molnár) “the witch,” and her abuse is just the beginning of the horrors the boys confront. But together, they train themselves to withstand both physical and emotional deprivation, growing hardened, calculating and semi-feral, well past the point of normal humanity — just as everyone they encounter is physically or morally deformed.

WHAT WORKED WELL IN PRINT DOESN’T FARE AS WELL ACTED OUT ON A BIG SHINY SCREEN

STORYBOOK

MARRIAGE

Twin terrors: László Gyémánt and András Gyémánt

CP APPROVED

The Notebook is well acted — the twins played by real-life brothers are particularly adept at spooky twinness — and handsomely filmed in an intentionally washed-out palette. But The Notebook is not especially emotionally engaging — it’s often like watching a slightly exaggerated fictionalization of a behavioral study, one in which subjects remain intentionally unnamed (“The Mother,” “Harelip,” “Officer”). Intertwined with this is mordant fabulism in which no sooner do the lads appreciate something or someone, then it is destroyed or perishes. By the final reel, this grim fatality sets up the final “punchline,” the inevitable brutal conclusion to their survival strategy. In Hungarian and some German, with subtitles. Starts Fri.,, Oct Oct. 13. Square 3 Regent ege t Squa e AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Join Australian musician-actoran-actorwriter-etc. Nick Cave as the milestone of 20,000 00 Days on Earth has him reflecting, during ring one 24-hour period, riod, on his life and ongoing ngoing creative process.. Iain Forsyth and Jane ane Pollard direct this his docu-profile. Thu., hu., Oct. 2-Sun., Oct. t. 5, and Tue., Oct. 7. Hollywood, Dormont

{BY AL HOFF}

“T

HE PRIMAL question of any

marriage — what have we done to each other?” Let’s just say few marriages go as epically wrong as that of the Dunnes, once breezy Brooklyn bohos and now grumbling along in a small Missouri town. And on their fifth wedding anniversary — a date formerly marked by playful treasure hunts — Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) goes missing and the police are giving her husband Nick (Ben Affleck) the benefit of their suspicions. The zillions of fans of Gillian Flynn’s best-selling novel Gone Girl will be thrilled to learn that David Fincher’s movie adaptation is very faithful to the page; Flynn herself penned the screenplay. All the twists and turns are intact, as is the book’s dual narrative structure, in which Nick shows us the present and Amy’s diary fills in the past. Conversely, what worked well in print doesn’t fare as well acted out on a big shiny screen, leaving Gone Girl the movie a qualified success. Outrageous storytell-

Separated: Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) doesn’t know what’s become of his wife.

ing — even of the prosaic bad-marriage variety — is easier to digest slowly when sunning lazily by the pool or staying up late compulsively riding another shocking-twist high. But compressed into twoplus hours of wham-bam scenes and play-acted by fine but not great actors, the inherent pulpiness of Gone Girl belies the film’s straight-faced seriousness.

GONE GIRL STARRING: Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike DIRECTED BY: David Fincher Starts Fri., Oct. 3

Maybe it should have been campier? Its antecedents include the psycho-sexual relationship thrillers of the 1980s (has it really been nearly three decades since Glenn Close hurt that bunny?), as well as that decade’s anxiety about status vis-à-vis jobs and houses. (“Want to test your marriage’s weak spots?” Amy Dunne asks: “Add one recession and subtract two jobs.”) More recent influences tap the media’s

round-the-clock obsession with missing blonde women (Missy Pyle portrays what could be charitably called a Nancy Grace caricature) and the importance of “branding” the crime early, whether you’re the victim or the suspect. Director Fincher made his bones directing unnerving dark dramas, such as Se7en, Fight Club and Zodiac — works that thrum with tension and paranoia — but doings here are perfunctory despite Gone Girl’s teasing of murder and psychopathology. That said, the book’s fans should have fun with this read-aloud, as well as the advantage of supplying background information missing from the story’s later acts. If you’re new to Gone Girl, your enjoyment will likely be plotted on the Continuum of Lifetime Movies which spirals deliriously from Ripped From Real Life And Sort of Meaningful to Insanely Plotted But I Can’t Stop Watching. If your tastes lean toward the latter camp — and there’s no shame in that — get a ticket to Gone Girl, and get it early before all the plot twists go public. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


VIGGO

FILM CAPSULES CP

OSCAR

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‘‘DELICIOUSLY

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

DISHES OUT THE SHIVERY, SEXY SUSPENSE

NEW ANNABELLE. Remember that freaky doll “Annabelle” from last year’s The Conjuring? John R. Leonetti’s horror thriller fills in her backstory in this prequel. Spoiler alert: The doll lives! Starts Fri., Oct. 3.

OF A HITCHCOCK THRILLER.’’

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FINDING FELA. Alex Gibney’s two-hour Fela Kuti documentary is both about the originator of Afrobeat music himself and about Bill T. Jones’s smash Broadway musical, Fela! In less capable hands, it could have been too much, but Gibney navigates Fela and Fela! deftly, using each to inform the other. While there are a few of the stock talking heads to connect nonpartisans to the subject (Paul McCartney, the omnipresent Questlove), the film relies mostly on Kuti’s close associates (and many offspring), and on Jones and his partners as they stage the musical. Gibney doesn’t deify, exploring Kuti’s problematic relationship with women in general and with his dozens of wives. The film also depicts the irony of a man who didn’t take the African AIDS epidemic seriously — and who believed he’d live another century at least — dying in his 50s of AIDS. But in the end, Gibney paints a sympathetic picture of a larger-than-life figure — clashes with police, colorful jumpsuits, half-hour-long songs — whose defining relationship was with his mother. Harris (Andy Mulkerin)

KIRSTEN

MORTENSEN DUNST

– Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

‘‘SHIVERING

AND SATISFYING with a superb cast.”

– Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Finding Fela set in a sunny European tourist spot, in which seemingly perfectly nice people do perfectly ghastly things. (You may not be surprised to learn that the film has been adapted from a Patricia Highsmith novel.) Here, in 1962 Athens, a young American tour guide, Rydal (Oscar Isaac), has a chance encounter with a well-to-do American couple, Chester (Viggo Mortensen), and his much-younger wife, Colette (Kirsten Dunst). But this felicitous meeting runs afoul of a murder, and now, stuck with one another for the sake of alibis, the three flee the city for the islands. Needless to say, all the ouzo in Crete can’t smooth over this increasingly toxic and dangerous three-way. January lacks the verve and zippy tension one expects from a master of the form such as Hitchcock — this is Amini’s directorial debut — but it’s still an entertaining enough diversion. The actors underplay the melodrama, and everybody wears the hell out of the period costumes. A handsome man in a crisply cut linen suit — you could almost forgive him any crime. Fri., Oct. 3, through Mon., Oct. 6; also Oct. 8-9. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

She Said Boom (2012 documentary about early ’80s feminist art-punk band Fifth Column; screens as part of VIA), 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. Killing Rob Teare (local independent comedy-action-sci-fi film), 7 and 9 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

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NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. Arguably, George Romero’s locally-produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter launched American filmmakers’ late20th-century fascination with zombies. Romero’s depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: no heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. To celebrate the film’s release 46 years ago, the screening will be preceded by a panel discussion featuring cast and crew members. Discussion at 6:30 p.m.; film at 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

++++

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A SMART BLAST FROM THE PAST.’’

– Dave Calhoun, TIME OUT NEW YORK

‘‘TANTALIZING. THE TWISTS ARE SPINE-TINGLING.” – Betsey Sharkey, LOS ANGELES TIMES

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REPERTORY Two Faces of January 2014 SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL SHORTS PROGRAM. This 94-minute touring program brings eight live-action short films to theaters: “Afronauts” (can Zambians beat the U.S. to the moon?); “The Cut” (father-daughter relationship; from Canada); “Dawn” (portrait of teenage girl, directed by Rose McGowan); “I’m a Mitzvah” (man spends a night with a deceased friend); “I Think This Is the Closest to How the Footage Looked” (a man tries to recreate a lost memory; from Israel); “Love. Love. Love.” (nonfiction work from Russia); “MeTube: August Sings Carmen ‘Habanera’” (a pastiche from YouTube featuring interpretations of Carmen’s most well-known tune); and “Verbatim” (a film about law and a photocopier; all dialogue comes from a real deposition filed in Ohio). Starts Fri., Oct. 3. Harris TWO FACES OF JANUARY. Hossein Amini’s new period drama invokes the films of Alfred Hitchcock — a psychological crime thriller,

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ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Coen Brothers Festival: True Grit (2010 revenge Western starring Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges), Oct. 1. Blood Simple (1984 crime thriller that introduced Joel and Ethan Coen), Oct. 1-2. The Hudsucker Proxy (Tim Robbins invents the Hula Hoop in this 1994 comedy), Oct. 1-2. Miller’s Crossing (1990 period gangster flick with Gabriel Byrne), Oct. 2. Fargo (black comedy set in snowy North Dakota), Oct. 2. Robin Williams Tribute ($1 for every ticket sold will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Pittsburgh chapter): The Birdcage (Williams and Nathan Lane own a drag club, in this 1996 comedy), Oct. 3-5, and Oct. 9. The World According to Garp (1982 adaptation of the John Irving novel), Oct. 3-8. Good Will Hunting (academic inspirational 1997 dramedy, co-starring Matt Damon), Oct. 3-5, Oct 7 and 9. Hook (Avast! 1991 re-telling of Peter Pan), Oct. 4-5 and Oct. 8-9. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (Terry Gilliam’s 1998 fantastical rendering of the notable baron), Oct. 4-5 and Oct. 7-8. Surprise Robin Williams film, 7:15 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. Also playing: From Deep (basketball and hip hop doc; screens as part of VIA), 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2.

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The Zero Theorem (2014) - 10/1 @ 7:30pm

-20,000 - - - - - - -Days - - - - - on- - - Earth ------------------------Go- - -Digital - - - - - - -Party -----------------------------

THE TWO FACES OF JANUARY -Two- - - -Faces - - - - - - of- - -January -------------------------Directed by Terry Gilliam

(2014) - 10/2 @ 7:30pm, 10/3 @ 10pm, 10/4 @ 7:00pm & 10:00pm, 10/5 @ 3:00pm, 10/7 @ 7:30pm - Biopic celebrates one day in the life of writer/musician Nick Cave.

- 10/5 @ 6:00pm - Party with us to celebrate our new digital projector. Free music, popcorn, and soda. Free for Kickstarter donors. $10 general public includes screening of Two Faces of January.

(2014) - 10/3 @ 7:30pm, 10/4 @ 4:00pm, 10/6 @ 7:30pm, 10/8 @ 7:30pm Thriller starring Viggo Mortenson, Kirsten Dunst and Oscar Isaac.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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DORMONT Hollywood Theatre (412) 563-0368 FRI, MON, WED & THU: 7:30 PM SAT: 4:00 PM

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

From Deep WINGS OF DESIRE. Wim Wenders’ 1987 drama depicts two angels who watch over Berlin, one of whom (Bruno Ganz) has fallen in love with a trapeze artist. The film continues a series of German films, keyed to the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In German, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. Cathedral of Learning (Room 324), University of Pittsburgh campus, Oakland. Free. 412-648-2614

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FROM DEEP. Local filmmaker Brett Kashmere’s new docu-essay uses basketball as a lens to examine not only the various forms of the sport (from street ball to global brand Michael Jordan), but also its influence on music, fashion and broader culture. Told in three chapters, the film recounts the history of basketball, both as a professional sport and a street game, and the crossfertilization of the two forms. Also in the mix, the sport’s racial history, from non-pro, but still popular and gifted teams like the Harlem Globetrotters, to the NBA’s more recent attempts to make the game seem “less black,” as well as its cultural representation in films. Kashmere also charts the birth and rise of hip hop, and outlays a case for how the music and the sport intertwine to form a lasting and mutually beneficial partnership. But basketball is not only a rarefied sport for pros, as Kashmere depicts with kinetic footage shot during street games, accompanied by a voiceover from John Edgar Wideman’s “Hoop Roots: Playground Basketball, Love and Race.” From Deep will certainly entertain fans of basketball, but its focus is larger, examining provocative topics such as race, money and the process of cultural appropriation. For more about the film, see “Ballin’,” a Q&A with Kashmere on page 63, or check out a longer version of the interview at www.pghcitypaper.com. The film screens as part of the VIA music festival. To be followed by a discussion with the director and other guests. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. Rowhouse Cinema, Lawrenceville. $8. Advance tickets at www.ticketfly. com/event/668549 (AH) THE ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL TOURING PROGRAM. You won’t know beforehand exactly what you might see in this collection of independent short films, but if past years’ programs are any guide, odds are the offerings will be pretty good. This is the 52nd annual outing of the festival’s touring program, which compiles prize-winning shorts — animation, narrative, experimental and documentary — into two two-hour programs. As part of the RADical weekend, the price is certainly right: free. 7:30 p.m. (Program A) and 9:15 p.m. (Program B), Fri., Oct. 3. Also, 7:30 p.m. (Program B) and 9:15 p.m. (Program A), Sat., Oct. 4. Melwood. Free

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS. Sharon Tate stars in Roman Polanski’s 1967 send-up of baroque European vampire films. The film opens a month-long, Sundaynight series of comic horror films. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. Regent Square SUSTAINABILITY PIONEERS. A series of short documentaries from Kirsi Jansa (Gas Rush Stories) about people and organizations pursuing using renewable energy and other sustainable strategies. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7 (Mellon Institute, CMU campus, Oakland; free), and 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 8 (Melwood; $10). www.sustainabilitypioneers.com

Night of the Living Dead NOSFERATU. F.W. Murnau’s 1922 silent classic offers a Dracula retelling. The vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. With his anguished face and unwieldy talons, Schreck’s Orlock evokes both pity and horror, and combined with Murnau’s stylish direction, this landmark film offers unforgettable tableaux, such as Orlock’s ascension from the ship’s hold. Still creepy nearly 100 years later. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 8. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org


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[COMEDY]

“HE GETS THE AUDIENCE RILED UP. HE GOES THERE.”

GOLDEN BRULE {BY MARGARET WELSH}

JOHN C. REILLY’S AWKWARD, CLUELESS DR. STEVE BRULE BEGAN AS AN AWESOME SHOW CHARACTER. HOW DID HE BECOME SO PROMINENT? When we started working together and he was in the Tim and Eric offices, he called our environment “comedy anarchy.” He just couldn’t believe that there were no studio executives there, that [it was all] these young kids from art school making stuff with no supervision. He was like, “I want to get into that.” People freak out when they see Dr. Steve Brule on stage; I mean, he’s a huge movie star but he’s so engrossed in the character. He never breaks character. The [live] show is almost too funny; people are truly exhausted by the time [it’s over]. And that’s awesome. BEDTIME STORIES HAS A STRONG TWILIGHT ZONE VIBE. DOES A PARTICULAR EPISODE OF THAT SHOW STICK WITH YOU? There was one episode where a guy woke up and no one was left on earth. Not a soul. And that to me was the scariest feeling of being lonely, the idea that nothing’s left. Those feelings are what we’re trying to get across in these shows. Things like David Lynch and The Shining, those really beautiful dark stories. But we’re trying to put a little comedy spin on them. I HAD TO LOOK AWAY FROM THE EPISODE ABOUT THE PLASTIC SURGEON WHO REMOVES TOES … We didn’t realize how visceral that would be. It’s just plastic toes and some, like, blood tubes. The point wasn’t really to make people grossed out but, like, “Oh this is a weird universe in which it’s just common plastic surgery.” I mean, in our world, people get butt implants. We’re not that far off from a concept of, “Toes are gross, let’s get rid of them.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TIM AND ERIC & DR. STEVE BRULE 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $37.50. 412-622-3131 or www.timanderic.com

CORRECTION

In last week’s art review of Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds, at The Gallery 4, the exhibit’s closing date was incorrect. The show runs through Oct. 25.

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Like a Broadway show: Eric Wareheim

Eric Wareheim and Tim Heidecker — of the innovatively bizarre Adult Swim hit Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! — bring their live show Tim and Eric & Dr. Steve Brule to Pittsburgh. Wareheim, who spoke to City Paper from the road, promises skits, audience participation, singing and dancing: “It’s like a Broadway show!” The tour also promotes the dark new series Tim & Eric’s Bedtime Stories. A longer version of this interview is at www.pghcitypaper.com.

[STAGE]

TALKING

BOOK

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

W

HEN LESLIE SMITH was 3, his

mom moved back to Pittsburgh; his parents split up and his father, also named Leslie Smith, headed to California. A few years later, when Smith was in third grade, his teacher at East Hills Elementary announced a penpal project. Smith asked her, “Would it be OK if I wrote to my dad instead of a stranger?” Smith says his letters brought his dad back into the lives of he and his younger sister — fitfully, at first, culminating when he was 15 in a brief attempt to live with his father. For years afterward, Smith and his dad didn’t even speak. Now Smith, at 37 long one of Pittsburgh’s top spoken-word artists, has his own 15-year-old son. And in his first full-length solo stage show, he tries to explain his life — the life of a black man growing up in Pittsburgh — to the boy

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

Leslie “Ezra” Smith

in a way Smith himself never experienced, in stories and poems. The Book of Ezra premieres Oct. 4 at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Co. “What I was asking my dad to do with me,” he says, “is what I’m attempting to do with this.”

THE BOOK OF EZRA at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. Oct. 4-25. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-25. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

THE SECOND Friday of each month you’ll find Leslie “Ezra” Smith onstage at the Hill House Kaufmann Center, in the Hill District. He’s the affable host of Eargasm, the performance-poetry and open-mic series he launched four years ago. In August, the networking-and-arts event drew 40 attendees, mostly in their 20s and 30s.

Before introducing that evening’s openmic poets, Smith performed his bittersweet but hopeful piece “Her Smile.” Its lines include, “I still see my mistakes as my identity” and “I’ve been hugged and forgotten, over and over, mostly by me.” The crowd enthuses over Smith and the other performers, mostly locals but including notable featured guests like Chicago-based poetry-slam champion Phenomenon the Poet. More than an entertainer, between acts Smith also exhorts the crowd to do “something positive” with their lives, “something to pass on to the next generation. They cold because you cold.” As a teenager growing up mostly in Homewood and Larimer, Smith searched for a cultural identity. A hip-hop fan and rapper from childhood, he got into Bob Marley, Public Enemy, the Nation of Islam; he quit going to church. When his CONTINUES ON PG. 46


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Creative classes open to teens and adults.

Offer ends

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* Courses are shorter in duration than our degree programs, are noncredit bearing, and do not transfer into any degree program offered. ** Offer ends October 31, 2014. Offer can be changed or discontinued at any time. 50% discount is automatically applied to the cost of the course during registration and will be applied to all courses registered for. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. 420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 © 2014 The Art Institutes International LLC. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu. 062414

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TALKING BOOK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 44

mom grew frustrated by his teenage rebellion, he’d say, “Send me to my dad.” One day, she did. In San Gabriel, Calif., Smith says, he argued with his dad, too; the elder Leslie Smith, a born-again Christian who worked in building security, eventually kicked him out, and Smith wound up living briefly in a Nation of Islam house in South Central Los Angeles. There, he dressed sharp, and sold The Final Call and bean pies on the street. By the time he returned to Westinghouse High School, months later, his life experiences had given him a voice. He discovered performance poetry and worked at it (along the way embracing the alternate name “Ezra”). Local actress and performance poet Kim El says that when she first saw Smith perform, in 2002, she thought he might be from New York. “When I found out he was just a regular guy from Homewood, it really impressed me with his power and professionalism,” says El, who became close friends with Smith. “He gets the audience riled up. He goes there.” “He exhibits his strength through his vulnerability,” says Yah Lioness Borne, another top local performance poet. “You see him do a performance and you want

to talk with him about it, as a human being, afterward.” For several years, starting in 2002, Smith co-hosted the popular spokenword open-mic nights at Shadow Lounge. “He’s one of those artists you always root for,” says Shadow Lounge’s former owner, Justin Strong. (The venue closed last year.) Since 2003, Smith’s also been a stage actor, with professional credits at Pittsburgh Playwrights, New Horizons Theater and now-defunct Kuntu Repertory Theatre. Away from the stage, he just started a new job as site coordinator for the K-5 after-school program at Pittsburgh Concord, in Carrick. But it was through stage work that he met Mark Clayton Southers, the Playwrights founder and artistic director who helped him develop The Book of Ezra. “I knew he’s a survivor of a lot of things emotionally,” says Southers, who has directed Smith in works including August Wilson’s King Hedley, and who’s also directing Book of Ezra. “I wanted him to tell his story to enlighten folks

and to see how he became a poet.” THE 80-MINUTE show is built from poet-

ry and personal storytelling about what Smith calls “defining moments” in his life. It opens with Smith drawing lines between young, unarmed African-American men recently gunned down in the street — Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown — and his own son, Amaru Williams: “Will my son be the next one shot on his way home from the store?” Smith is acutely aware that for the first 10 years of his son’s life, “I really wasn’t there as consistently as I should have been.” He notes that none of his friends growing up had fathers at home, either. He adds, “It makes me feel like I almost began to create a cycle of men not being there.” Amaru and Smith’s daugher, Zuri Smith, live with their mother; Amaru attends Pittsburgh’s High School for the Creative and Performing Arts. But while Smith says he’s making up for lost time as a father, he wishes he had more to fall back on: “Sometimes I wish I would have had some talks with my dad — I’m

“I JUST IMAGINE, WHAT IF MY DAD WROTE HIS STORY OUT FOR ME?”

not blaming him, but I think it would have been helpful for me to understand, ‘What does a man go through in these situations?’” “I just imagine,” he says, “what if my dad wrote his story out for me?” Smith now lives in Perry Hilltop with his girlfriend and her two young children. He says he’s slowly improving his relationship with his own father, who’s now a social worker: “I think I’m beginning to humanize him, instead of just, ‘the dad that wasn’t there, the dad that wasn’t there.’” Book of Ezra covers a lot of ground. On a stage augmented by images on a widescreen TV, Smith tells stories as diverse as: his reaction, as a fourth-grader and aspiring astronaut, to the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger; the day that stealing cigarettes made him an actor; and how he was once assaulted by a former middle-school classmate because he now lived in the wrong neighborhood. But if the show ranges wide, its mission is focused. In The Book of Ezra, Smith asks, “How am I going to prepare my son for a world that seems not to value his life?” Then he answers himself: “I got to get it together for him. He deserves that.” D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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nowseethis.org © Kenneth Josephson. Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


See the summer blockbuster of 1606 like never before. Macbeth By William Shakespeare Directed by Alan Stanford

October 9-25 A delight for Shakespeare purists, and Games of Thrones Fans alike.

Discount: CP5OFF

Don’t miss

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN COHEN}

Attack Theatre’s Dane Toney

{BY STEVE SUCATO} IT WAS 1994, and movies like Speed and

Pulp Fiction were packing theaters; a Chicago law professor named Barack Obama had yet to run for state senate. And in Pittsburgh, two former Dance Alloy dancers formed a new company that would indelibly change Pittsburgh’s dance landscape. Combining athletic modern dance, original live music, multimedia and interdisciplinary art forms, Attack Theatre, led by co-artistic directors Peter Kope and Michele de la Reza, became one of the city’s most innovative and popular dance troupes. To launch its 20th season, the company premieres Are You Still There?, with six performances Oct. 3-10 at The Pittsburgh Coliseum, in Homewood.

ATTACK THEATRE PERFORMS

ARE YOU STILL THERE? Oct. 3-10. The Pittsburgh Coliseum, 7310 Frankstown Ave., Homewood. $10-40. 888-718-4253 or www.attacktheatre.com

“It feels like it has spanned a lifetime but at the same time it still feels exciting, with so much more for the company to explore,” says de la Reza. One thing that abides, says longtime company member Dane Toney, is

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PICTTheatre.org/Macbeth | 412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

Drue Heinz Literature Prize  READINGS 

David Guterson, JUDGE Author,

Photo by Tom Collicott

STILL HERE

Attack’s collaborative spirit. “Peter and Michele really rely on the dancers’ perspective, and at times the audience’s, in shaping the dance works,” he says. That collaborative spirit is reflected in Are You Still There?, which features guest dancers James Johnson and Brittanie Brown, both graduates of The Juilliard School. Their presence represents a new dynamic for the company, which de la Reza says is reflected in longer and livelier dance sequences. (Attack is without longtime company member Liz Chang, who recently left to pursue a nursing career.) The 85-minute, narrative-less Are You Still There? is co-choreographed and directed by de la Reza and Kope. The work explores the mechanisms that connect us and asks whether you can still have a strong connection with someone in spite of real or perceived barriers of distance and time. Set to a mix of recorded and live original music performed by a four-piece ensemble that de la Reza describes as having a “funk, soul and R&B vibe,” the work takes advantage of the vast space of the Coliseum, a former trolleyrepair station and roller rink. The set includes dozens of old corded telephones hung in the space, and two large movable walls that are used as barriers between the dancers and serve to shift the audience’s perspective. After two decades, Attack Theatre itself is still here, and perhaps better than ever.

Snow Falling on Cedars

Kent Nelson, WINNER David Guterson

Photo by Julio Mulero

[DANCE]

Thursday, October 30, 2014 picttheatre.org/gala

Kent Nelson

Author,

The Spirit Bird: Stories

Thursday, October 2, 2014 6:30 p.m. Reception, 7:00 p.m. Readings National Aviary Auditorium Allegheny Commons West 700 Arch St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212 For more information: 412-323-7235

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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Are You Still There? October 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 2014 | 8:00 p.m. The Pittsburgh Coliseum | 7310 Frankstown Avenue in Homewood For more information Tickets www.attacktheatre.com or 412.281.3305 www.attacktheatre.com/ayst Attack Theatre’s Season 20 is made possible in part by: The McKinney Charitable Foundation of the PNC Charitable Trusts

Illustration by David Pohl @ House of Pingting

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Note-worthy: Jill Keating and Jeff Howell in The REP’s Souvenir

[PLAY REVIEWS]

SING-ULAR {BY COLETTE NEWBY} SOUVENIR IS the natural end of the revue

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

SAT, OCT 11 TH 2014 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER WATCH: TrustArts.org/AspenSantaFe

simply breathtaking – Chicago Sun Times

style of musical popularized by Mamma Mia and Rock of Ages, taking as its source music a fusion of European opera and dance-hall jazz. But this story about a phenomenally bad singer is something more special than a musical. The narrator of this 2006 comedy by Stephen Temperley, now at The REP in a production directed by Tomé Cousin, is Cosme McMoon. During the jazz age, he was a twentysomething pianist in New York; now he’s looking back from decades in the future.

SOUVENIR continues through Oct. 12. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

TICKETS START AT $19 TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666 Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

But the show’s centerpiece is Florence Foster Jenkins, played by Jill Keating as a wealthy, dotty socialite who hires Cosme to accompany her recitals. The punchline: Jenkins is completely, utterly tone-deaf and actively resists the idea of tempo as emotionally sterile. I suppose that’s not the punchline on its own; every note she sings wrings that same gag, and it never runs dry. Crucially, like anything so-bad-it’s-good that’s worth your time (such as the prose

of Amanda McKittrick Ros), there’s an element of sincerity. Florence Foster Jenkins was a real human (whose birth name, at least according to Wikipedia, was Narcissa) who really was astonishingly bad at singing and who made it to Carnegie Hall on the strength of irony and her pianist, Cosme. Many of the vocal peculiarities on exhibit are straight from surviving recordings, and Keating is to be commended for making such bad sounds so charming. Meanwhile, it’s extremely impressive to see Jeff Howell bounce between McMoon’s detached, latter-day Noel Coward persona and youthfully exuberant straight man (in the comedic sense, anyway) — while playing piano for nearly half of the show. Howell’s character shifts are always smooth and agreeable. Souvenir, however, is more than simply another show for people who’ve run out of friends to introduce to The Room or Plan 9 From Outer Space, or who’ve memorized every episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000. It’s also about the voyeuristic confusion that makes outsider artists like, say, David Liebe Hart, so fascinating. If you ever feel guilty about laughing at people who try and try and just can’t make it, this is as close to a respectful gawk as I’ve seen. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

WHAT YOU WILL {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} SET IN THE 1980s, Dividing the Estate

might sound like a recipe for a boring


DIVIDING THE ESTATE

THE BASICS

Yet for all of Stella’s indomitability, she fears for the future of the land that she and her father toiled so long to establish. After witnessing the deterioration of her beloved servant Doug (the pitch-perfect Jomo Ray), Stella realizes that her way of life is drifting away from her and that she must soon cede power to her progeny: the austere Lucille (Carol Ann Schussler), the hard-drinking Lewis (Art DeConciliis) and the spoiled Mary Jo (Mary Liz Meyer). This sense of pathos focuses an otherwise raucous story and transforms Dividing the Estate from a simple comedy into an insightful yarn about the nature of family and togetherness. Although Dividing the Estate premiered 25 years ago, the play didn’t reach Broadway until 2008. The gap might seem conspicuous, but considering the theme of characters living beyond their means before losing it all, this is a story that might well resonate with a 21st-century audience. Because after all, an estate might not remain intact, but family is forever. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

{BY DAVID BERGER}

continues through Oct. 11. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

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CLINICAL TRIALS

[ART REVIEW]

Stephen Gleasner’s “Aqua Plysphere”

reading-of-the-will circa the Reagan years. But other than a few stray leg-warmers and talk of those arcane devices known as computers, this uncompromising comedy is as modern as they come. This offbeat tale is far from playwright Horton Foote’s best work; that distinction arguably belongs to Foote’s Academy Award-winning screenplay for To Kill a Mockingbird. Still, this 1989 play about a dysfunctional family vying for a piece of a Texas property has its own set of charms. While the buoyant humor maintains a rapid-fire pace, there is more than gluttony and privilege hidden beneath the seething dialogue. Director Sunny Disney Fitchett makes the most of the diverse cast, allowing each member of the ensemble to shine — from Eric Leslie’s beleaguered grandson named Son to Ashlea Reed’s ambitious domestic servant, Cathleen. But this is a story that draws its strength from the power of a matriarch. As Stella Gordon, the feisty mother of three grown children and a cache of grandchildren, Janet Robb dominates her every scene, making mincemeat of her character’s greedy, entitled offspring.

TA S T E

The best art moves people. In some cases, it reveals the truth about the human condition; in others, it elucidates the spirit/matter conflict; and, in others still, it tells a story. Each approach is present in the Gallerie Chiz exhibit Breathtakingly Basic. The show contrasts the works of Susan Middleman and Stephen Gleasner. Middleman uses oil sticks to paint monument-sized “pictures of home,” while Gleasner creates much smaller, highly finished art objects employing the most basic of materials. The tensions of human existence are reflected in Middleman’s work. Love and hate, melancholy, devotion and the joy of being a woman are among her subjects. Viewers can identify with raw cocktailparty scenes, people yearning for love, isolated individuals á la Hopper, and the spiritual distance between people. There is sensuous expression as well as a conscious primitivizing of figures. The Pittsburghbased artist has a great sense of design with jazzy patterns, rhythmical striped lines and gaudy colors. Figures are often distorted to emphasize composition, while the artist relies on local color and position for perspective. Titles are offbeat: “A kiss is just a kiss according to the dog.” Middleman writes that she wants the public to interpret for itself the stories she suggests. Gleasner’s art is more about the mastery of machine and technique, creativity responding to the rules of the mind and material. The work, in the form of finely finished vessels and glossy, striated spheres, incorporates plywood and denim. The plywood is nearly diaphanous and seamless, its grains dyed with mellow golds, greens and blues. The curled and folded denim evinces a natural beauty. Gleasner is obsessed with “cutting through layers,” a metaphor for his life. The work also offers insights into the interplay between spirit and matter. The Maine-based artist writes in an email that he “wants people to feel something,” and he achieves this with his lathe and these lesser respected materials. This exhibit’s triumph lies in the contrast between the respective mediums and the works’ sizes. In Middleman, we feel a vicarious pleasure as we observe and react to the honest body language and personalities of her pictures. In Gleasner, the color harmonies are stunning and invoke mystery about how he accomplishes the effects. The exhibit’s simplicity evokes a view of what is interior, but with which most people can resonate.

Currentlyy conducting g clinical trials in the following areas: CONSTIPATION VAGINAL DRYNESS GOUT ECZEMA (ATOPIC DERMATITIS) HIGH CHOLESTEROL HEALTHY SUBJECTS WITH HEART ATTACK PAP SMEAR STUDY OR STROKE Do you have a medical HEAVY & FREQUENT condition which is not listed? MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/ UTERINE FIBROIDS Give us a call. BIRTH CONTROL PATCH Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. MILD TO MODERATE ALZHEIMER DISEASE Please call 412-363-1900 for more information. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

www.CTRSLLC.com

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BREATHTAKINGLY BASIC continues through Oct. 11. Gallerie Chiz, 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com +

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.0210.09.14

Rick Matt

WEDNESDAY | OCTOBER 1 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Gresh’s Gris Gris

FRIDAY | OCTOBER 3 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Neon Swing X-Perience

SATURDAY | OCTOBER 4 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Satin Hearts

WEDNESDAY | OCTOBER 8 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

billy the kid & the regulators

FRIDAY | OCTOBER 10 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vince Agwada

SATURDAY | OCTOBER 11 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

roger barbour

WEDNESDAY | OCTOBER 15 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

reaction on the street in this play by Diana Son. Stop Kiss was screamingly popular during its original offBroadway staging, in 1998. Pitt senior Brittany Coyne directs a production that opens tonight; the cast of six undergraduates includes Leenie Baker, as Sara, and Lucy Clabby, as Callie. DF 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 12. Henry Heymann Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $12-25. 412-6247529 or www.play.pitt.edu

{FREE STUFF}

It’s the first of RADical Days’ two biggest weekends, with offerings of free exhibits and performances from the Allegheny Regional Asset District. This afternoon, attractions include an open rehearsal for Attack Theatre’s new dance show, in Homewood. On Sat., Oct. 4, there’s free admission to the National Aviary and more. Sunday, it’s free entry to the Carnegie Science Center, the Children’s Museum, and a Pittsburgh Opera Rising Stars performance. RADical Days continues through Nov. 9. Bill O’Driscoll Full details at www.radworkshere.org

{WORDS}

Pittsburgh’s Moth StorySLAM — our version of the popular New York-based storytelling series — has been a hit from day one. Tonight it’s turning 3, and you can celebrate at the Rex Theater with host Alan Olifson and whichever 10 patrons get their names pulled from a hat as the evening’s storytellers. Working without notes, the tellers perform for judges selected from the audience to compete in Pittsburgh’s annual Moth GrandSLAM. Arrive early: Most tickets are held for sale at the door, and these things sell out quickly. BO 8 p.m. $8 ($16 in advance). 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. www.themoth.org

{STAGE}

Pittsburgh Public Theater’s 40th -anniversary “Season of Legends” fittingly begins with the first play the troupe ever produced. The Glass Menagerie moves through one fragile family’s story: a domineering mother, frustrated son and sickly sister to be joined by a gentleman caller, or so the mother hopes. Directed by Pamela Berlin, the seasoned cast in Tennessee Williams’ classic includes New York-based actor Fisher Neal and Glee co-star Cathryn Wake. Danielle Fox 8 p.m.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHEILA GRIFFEN}

Live Music

+ THU., OCT. 02

OCT. 09 Bob Herbert Continues through Nov. 2. 621 Penn Ave, Downtown. $15.75-56. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

{STAGE}

University of Pittsburgh Stages’ season-opener, Stop Kiss, follows the lives and relationships of New York City twentysomethings Callie and Sara. A simple kiss between them triggers a violent

+ SAT., OCT. 04 {ART} So parents, you think you have a little Degas at the breakfast table? Try the scamp out at ArtKids: Draw Like Degas. This installment of the monthly Frick Art Museum program is inspired by a Degas works-on-paper exhibition. The show closes tomorrow, but this free, family-friendly drop-in program gets kids ages 4-8 in the gallery with a sketchbook and helps them turn squiggles and such into art. The session includes a

OCT. 02

Stop Kiss

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VINCENT NOE}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.


{IMAGE COURTESY OF MSHR (BRENNA MURPHY & BIRCH COOPER)}

sp otlight

Though VIA is known for its cutting-edge musical offerings (see page 30), the five-year-old festival increasingly touts its visual-art component. This year, the big viz-art day is Sat., Oct. 4 (7 p.m.-2 a.m.). In Downtown’s Union Trust Building, five featured artists from Chicago-based video label Undervolt & Co. — Johnny Woods, Sabrina Ratte, Yoshihide Sodeoka, MSHR (Brenna Murphy and Birch Cooper) and Jennifer Juniper Stratford — will pair off with musical artists like Blue Hawaii and Cakes da Killa to create visuals live to accompany their sets. (Expect the bracingly weird and the artfully trippy.) There’s also a separate preview screening of a new 30-minute collection of shorts by 10 selected artists with ties to both VIA and Pittsburgh, including Institute for New Feeling, Scott Andrew, Di-ay Battad, Dadpranks and Audra Wist. Elsewhere on the premises, you’ll find: an original virtual-reality experience (in a 30-foot-tall bubble) crafted by ASMR NPC; PEEK’s site-specific digital sculptures, revealed in empty rooms on an Easter-egg hunt enabled by iPads and smartphones; “virtual life-drawing” sessions, with Second Life avatars for models; and a chance to sample unreleased indie video games. VIA also includes a free Oct. 2 lecture by Undervolt artists; film screenings; an exhibition at Bunker Projects that opens with an Oct. 3 reception; and much more. Bill O’Driscoll Festival continues through Sun., Oct. 5. Various venues. Event passes: $8-20; weekend pass: $70. www.via2014.com

tour and a take-home project, and no advance registration is required. BO 11-11:45 a.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

+ SUN., OCT. 05 {MUSIC}

{COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATE R}

The Mendelssohn Choir opens its 106th season with Faith and Fate: Beethoven & Brahms, as well as a change of routine: Instead of the choir performing as a guest of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, today, at East Liberty Presbyterian Church, the PSO is the choir’s orchestra. Conducted by Betsy Burleigh, the program honors the late Raphael Frühbeck de Burgos. Burgos was a frequent PSO guest conductor known for his interpretations of Beethoven and Brahms. DF 3 p.m. 116 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. $10-30. 412-480-4321 or www.themendelssohn.org

+ MON., OCT. 06 {WORDS} Sure, you know about Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Edison — both figures Simon Winchester covers in his new book, The Men Who United the States (Harper), which explores the gradual creation of “one nation, indivisible.” But how about Thomas Hutchins, the first Geographer of the United States? Or John Stevens, inventor of the steam locomotive, or Morris Llewellyn Cooke, who ran the

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New Deal’s Rural Electrification Administration? Hear tales of unsung uniters tonight, when the acclaimed author of The Professor and the Madman visits Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Lectures. BO 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

discussions and more. DF 6:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-469-6301 or www.ccac.edu

OCT. 07 Sustainability Pioneers

{SCREEN}

Kirsi Jansa, a locally based documentarian known nationally for Gas Rush Stories, her series on shale gas, is back with Sustainability Pioneers. Rather than focus on environmental problems, this series of short documentaries — produced in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute for Green Science — profiles people who are already moving from a fossil-fuel-based economy to one based on renewable energy and sustainable living. Tonight’s premiere screening is at CMU. 2 . 0gerie A screening tomorrow T night, at Pittsburgh OCena Filmmakers, is followed by M s a panel discussion, “How as Gl Begin Energy Transition.” to B e h T BO 7 p.m. (Mellon Institute, CMU campus, Oakland; free). Also 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 8 (Melwood Screening Room, Oakland; $10). www. sustainabilitypioneers.com {WORDS} The Community College of Allegheny County opens the book on The Big Read in Pittsburgh, a month-long initiative to promote literacy {COMEDY} and community engagement. Christina McNeese writes This year, CCAC and its that she created ChicksBurgh community partners, local Comedy “to fight back against school districts and other stereotyping and prejudice in organizations focus on the comedy world … about Fahrenheit 451. Ray Bradbury’s female, minority and gay/ classic imagines a future lesbian comedians.” But she where books are outlawed also created it to be funny. The and burned. Jonathan R. Eller, monthly showcase for comics director of the Indianapolis from Pittsburgh and Ohio — Center for Ray Bradbury tonight’s installment is called Studies, speaks at today’s “Knock, Knock, Fuck You” kickoff at the Carnegie Lecture — returns to Howlers Coyote Hall, followed throughout Café. The line-up includes the month by contests, book Jennifer Chandler, Blair Parker,

+ TUE., OCT. 07

Olivia Grace Traini, Howie D. Mac and Brandon Johnson. BO 8 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-290-9652

survive as a society, sustainability has to be for everyone. Antwi Akom, a San Francisco State University sociology professor who has often lost high school students he teaches to gun violence or jail, promotes “shareable cities” — using technology and other tools to connect poor people and people of color to resources. Tonight, at the Hill House

+ THU., OCT. 09 {TALK} Environmental sustainability is often considered a perk for the rich. But if we’re going to

+ WED., OCT. 08

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Kaufmann Center, Akom launches the Green Building Alliance’s Inspire Speakers Series season alongside Grant Ervin, sustainability manager for the City of Pittsburgh. BO 6 p.m. (5 p.m. reception). 1835 Centre Ave., Hill District. $30. www.go-gba.org

{TALK} The education activists of Yinzercation host the national launch of Bob Herbert’s new book, Losing Our Way: An Intimate Portrait of a Troubled America (Doubleday). Herbert, a former New York Times columnist, traveled the country to highlight Americans still floundering after the recession. He devotes three chapters to these Pittsburgh parents fighting politicians over education. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Tony Norman will moderate tonight’s discussion and Q&A with Herbert at Carnegie Mellon University’s McConomy Auditorium. DF 5 p.m. CMU campus, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www. yinzercation.wordpress.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

October 3,4 & 5 Enjoy

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premiere of a 1-man play written & performed by spoken word artist & national slam poet Leslie Ezra Smith. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 19. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. THE BOOK OF MORMON. Musical comedy by Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-456-6666. CELIBACY. A new play presented by APA Theatre Company. Email APATC@comcast. net for reservations. Thru Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m. Olde Main Building, Latrobe. DEARLY DEPARTED. When the patriarch of a Southern red-neck family drops dead, hilarious mayhem ensues. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 12. Baldwin Community United Methodist Church, . 412-881-1002. DIVIDING THE ESTATE. A comedy

about Stella Gordon, matriarch of a 100-year-old Texas estate, who steadfastly refuses to sell & divide, despite her family’s declining wealth & financial crisis. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 11. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has discovered for the plastic products. Includes audience participation, giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. FUNNY,YOU DON’T LOOK LIKE A GRANDMOTHER. A humorous, heartwarming musical look at modern grandmothers. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 4. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE GLASS MENAGERIE. A brand-new production of Ten-

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

nessee Williams’ classic play. WedTHE PAJAMA PARTY MURDERS. Interactive Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Murder Mystery Dinner Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 28. O’Reilly Theater. Sat., Oct. 4, 7 p.m. Theater, Downtown. Gaetano’s Restaurant, 412-316-1600. Dormont. 412-343-6640. I AM A CAMERA. Presented SOUVENIR. The story of by Duquesne’s Red Masquers. Florence Foster Jenkins, Thu-Sat. Thru Oct. 11. eccentric wealthy Peter Mills Theater socialite whose utter (Duquesne, Rockwell inability to carry a Hall), Uptown. tune never prevented 412-396-6429. her from holding www. per MURDER WITH a p recitals at the Ritz pghcitym MUMMIES. An .co Carlton or selling out original murder mystery Carnegie Hall. Thu-Sat, presented by R-ACT 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Theatre Productions. Oct. 3-4. Oct. 12. Pittsburgh Playhouse, The Avenue Theater. Oakland. 412-392-8000. 724-775-6844.

FULL LIST ONLINE

NUNSENSE. The Little Sisters of Hoboken hold a fundraiser to raise money to bury sisters accidentally poisoned by the convent cook. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. OLIVER! THE MUSICAL. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER BOOK OF EZRA. The world

COMEDY THU 02 COMEDY OPEN MIC HOSTED BY DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. DANNY PALUMBO. 9 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 02 - SUN 05

OWEN BENJAMIN. 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 3, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Oct. 4, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 5, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 03 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. DINNER WITH THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. TIM AND ERIC & DR. STEVE BRULE. 8 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SAT 04 BILL BENDEN, MATT STANTON, DAN BROWN. Haiti CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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An Evening of Music

VISUAL

ART

OCTOBER 3

The

Mamadrones w/Ferdinand the Bull & special guest The Weedrags “Dessert,” by Jonelle Summerfield, from her new show at Gallery on 43rd Street, in Lawrenceville

NEW THIS WEEK BOULEVARD GALLERY. East Suburban Art League. Group show. Opening reception Oct. 4, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. New Work by Jonelle Summerfield. Opening reception Oct. 3, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Something Alien: An ART Show by two people who don’t belong. New Works by Nick & Noell Romeo, feat. 3D digital renderings, music, photography, fractal generations, sculpture, & oil pastels. Garfield. 412-361-2262. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artist IV. Multi-media group exhibition. Part of the Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Oct. 3., 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Oct. 3, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. 68th Annual International Aqueous Exhibit. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society’s annual group show. Opening reception Oct. 4, 5-8 p.m. Friendship. 412-441-0194.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Mostly Trucks. Photographs by Jim Miller. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 720 RECORDS. Sara Eve Rivera. Work by local visual & tattoo

artist. Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Industrial Opulence. Photographs by Gabe Szafranski. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804.

EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Jurored by John Carson, head of the School of Art at CMU. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Tectonica. Solo exhibition by Paul Chidester. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 52

Clean Water Project 3rd Annual Funny Fundraiser 7 p.m. Bower Hill Community Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-341-0291. BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DARRYL RHOADS, BILL BORONKAY, DAVID KAYE. Charleroi Boys Soccer Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 7:30 p.m. Monessen VFD, . 724-544-4997. JESSICA KIRSON. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-667-9029. MIKE WYSOCKI. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

TUE 07 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 08 “BEST OF THE BURGH” COMEDY SHOWCASE. Ray Zawodni, Derek Minto, Jesse Irvin, James J. Hamilton, Mark David & Tommy Kupiec. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. CHICKSBURGH COMEDY PRESENTS: KNOCK, KNOCK:F*CK YOU. 8 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome

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HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. The Jazz Series. A collection of paintings by Elena Hiatt Houlihan. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by

Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. Part & Parcel. Paintings by Peter Mandradjieff. Email pmandradjieff@gmail.com for appointment. Homewood. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200.

(planetarium), Miniature FRICK FINE ARTS BUILDING. Railroad and Village, USS Requin Reconfiguring Disciplines: submarine, and more. North Side. Fragments of an Encyclopedia. 412-237-3400. Exhibit of historic encyclopedias CARRIE FURNACE. Built in & volumes. Oakland. 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour are extremely rare examples this Tudor mansion and stable of pre World War II ironcomplex, and enjoy hikes making technology. Rankin. and outdoor activities in the 412-464-4020 x.21. surrounding park. Allison Park. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL 412-767-9200. HISTORY. Explore the KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the complex interplay between other Frank Lloyd Wright culture, nature and house. 724-329-8501. biotechnology. KERR MEMORIAL Open Fridays 5-8, MUSEUM. Tours of Saturdays 12-4 & a restored 19thSundays 12-4. Garfield. century, middle-class . w w w 412-223-7698. home. Oakmont. aper p ty ci h g p COMPASS INN. 412-826-9295. .com Demos and tours with MARIDON MUSEUM. costumed guides featuring Collection includes this restored stagecoach stop. jade and ivory statues from 724-238-4983. China and Japan, as well as DEPRECIATION LANDS Meissen porcelain. Butler. MUSEUM. Small living 724-282-0123. history museum celebrating the MCGINLEY HOUSE & settlement and history of the MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Historic homes open for tours, 412-486-0563. lectures and more. Monroeville. FALLINGWATER. Tour the 412-373-7794. famed Frank Lloyd Wright NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to house. 724-329-8501. more than 600 birds from over FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 200 species. With classes, lectures, CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany demos and more. North Side. stained-glass windows. 412-323-7235. Downtown. 412-471-3436. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 FRICK ART & HISTORICAL rooms helping to tell the story CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Pittsburgh’s immigrant of Clayton, the Frick estate, past. University of Pittsburgh. with classes & programs Oakland. 412-624-6000. for all ages. Point Breeze. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church 412-371-0600. features 1823 pipe organ,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. QUIET STORM GALLERY. Cafe Con Leche Pop-Up Gallery. Various events to celebrate Latino Heritage Month. www.cafeconlechepgh. com. Garfield. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201.

Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. 412-454-6000. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An AfricanAmerican Art Exhibition. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504.

dance performance featuring original, live music by Ian Green. Oct. 3-4 and Oct. 7-10 Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, Homewood. 412-281-3305.

TUE 07 - WED 08 ARE YOU STILL THERE? Attack Theatre presents a world premiere dance performance featuring original, live music by Ian Green. Oct. 3-4 and Oct. 7-10 Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, Homewood. 412-281-3305.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 03 2ND ANNUAL WET HOPTOBER. Tour, tastings, auction, more. Proceeds go toward sustaining GTECH’s creatively reused vacant spaces. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-361-2099. CASEY’S CLUBHOUSE & MIRACLE LEAGUE GOLF OUTING. Benefits Casey’s Clubhouse. 10:30 a.m. Hickory Heights Golf Club, Bridgeville. 724-986-9378.

FRI 03 - SAT 04

HARVEST FAIR. Furniture, jewelry, baked goods, clothing, books, toys, linens, household items. All proceeds go to local & international charities. 6:30-8:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 4, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Fox Chapel. 412-963-8243.

SAT 04 2ND ANNUAL BEARDS FOR BEASTS 1/10K & BEARD & MUSTACHE COMPETITION. Vendors from businesses & nonprofits, a parade, a DJ, and celebrity judges. Benefits the Animal Rescue League & the Proper Pit Bull. Email steelcitybeards@gmail.com for information. Rivers Casino, North Side. 412-231-7777. DOGTOBERFEST. Over 20 breed-specific rescues & shelters join will showcase their adoptable animals, plus Pooch Pride Costume parade, Dog-Owner Lookalike & costume contests, entertainment, more. The Waterfront, Homestead. 11 a.m. 412-780-6095.

SUN 05

DANCE PLUS. An evening of live music (saxophone, piano, African Drums) & classic, modern, and contemporary dance. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Bring food item to donate. 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. TASTE OF AFRICA. Food, wine, dancing, more. Benefits the Cameroon Football Development Program. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

FRI 03 - SAT 04

WED 08

DANCE FRI 03

ARE YOU STILL THERE? Attack Theatre presents a world premiere

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS NIGHT AT THE BYHAM. Feat.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Off the Record, an annual musical comedy spoof of Pittsburgh news & newsmakers. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. GLOBAL PEACE BUILDING FOUNDATION AUTUMN FUNDRAISER. Entertainment will be provided by area youth members of Pittsburgh Dancing Classrooms, a partner of GPBF. 6-8 p.m. Allegheny HYP Club, Downtown. 412-563-6207.

EVENT: Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Gallery Crawl 10th Anniversary, Downtown CRITIC: Maryann Moore, 60, a

LITERARY

respiratory therapist from Pittsburgh

THU 02

WHEN: Fri., Sept. 26

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

I wanted to come out just because I hadn’t been to one of these in a while. It’s like a special night. It’s the 10th anniversary. I love [Noel Quintana and the Latin Crew], definitely a really good, local salsa band. I saw another band that was really good: Les Nubians, the French girls. They were kind of like a French jazz-fusion type of thing. I also got to see the African[-inspired] quilts [Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It]. There’s so much to do. It reminds me of a New Year’s celebration. The crawl is like a small version of that: all the dancing, all the stuff going on. Everything’s open. How alive the Downtown is and how active the nightlife is. I think it’s the new Pittsburgh. It’s fantastic. Some of these people are going up to a bar. I’m just staying here. Why go anywhere else? BY DANIELLE FOX

SAT 04 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUN 05 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 06

JOEL OSTEEN. Signing of his new book, You Can, You Will. 6:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Settlers Ridge, Robinson. LEARNING LANGUAGE THE MEANDERING WAY: THREE INSTANCES TO PONDER. Lecture by Shirley Brice Heath. 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. SIMON WINCHESTER. Author of The Men Who United the States.

Part of the Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. THE STORY COLLIDER: REACTIONS. 5 Carnegie Mellon students share the true, personal stories behind their research. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811.

TUE 07 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 02 - WED 08

BALLET HISPANO CLASSICO. Thru Oct. 11 Quiet Storm Gallery, Garfield. 412-403-7357. TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 04 ARTKIDS: DRAW LIKE DEGAS. Program inspired by the exhibition Edgar Degas: The Private ImpressionistWorks on Paper by the Artist & His Circle, feat. family-friendly arts activities. 11-11:45 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. BRING IT DANCE OFF. A battle to crown the best dance group in Pittsburgh. Geared for kids ages 4–17. 6 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 04 - SUN 05

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

PETER PAN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 12 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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[STORYTELLING]

Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

MON 06 MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Scientific activities for early learners ages 2–6. Mon, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 27 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

FRI 03 - SAT 04 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

TUE 07

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

SAT 04

OUTSIDE FRI 03- SAT 04

SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 04 KUNKLE PARK PUBLIC STARGAZING PARTY. Weather permitting. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. www.3ap.org 7:30 p.m. Kunkle Park, Washington. PITTSBURGH STEPTREK. Self-guided “Urban Hike” through one of Pittsburgh’s most unique neighborhoods. 12-4 p.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. 412-246-9090.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

TUE 07

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 08 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 02

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com 56

Teligence/18+

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EASTERN NUTRITION. Talk by Debbie Hardin, licensed acupuncturist. 6:30 p.m. Nuin Center, Highland Park.

It’s easy to regard science — and scientific discovery — as something outside the messy realm of human drama and emotion. The Story Collider, based in New York City, seeks to change that perception, letting scientists and researchers share how science has affected them on a personal, emotional level. On Monday, Story Collider sets up at the Rex Theater, in collaboration with CMU student group Public Communication for Researchers. Expect an evening of amusing and moving stories, told by folks in fields ranging from engineering to computational biology (including computationalbiology grad student Vrushali Fangal, pictured). 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET THE ARTIST: CORY BONNET & THE ART OF PRESERVATION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 03 FROM PITTSBURGH TO FERGUSON: HIP HOP &

THE CRIMINALIZATION OF BLACK YOUTH. 1Hood Media hosts a conversation about the portrayal of Black youth, Hip Hop’s responsibility in this issue, & the militarization of local law enforcement as they mobilize against Black youth. 7:30 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. GARFIELD NIGHT MARKET. Feat. local vendors. Part of Unblurred. N. Pacific Ave. between Penn & Dearborn, Garfield. First Fri of every month, 6-10 p.m. Thru Oct. 3 412-354-1174. MANUFACTURING DAY W/ MADE RIGHT HERE. 3-5 p.m. TechShop, East Liberty. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist

BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CHILI COOK-OFF. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Westwood Golf Club, West Mifflin. 412-462-9555. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. “I HAVE A GREAT IDEA” BUSINESS WORKSHOP. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Pittsburgh Airport Area Chamber of Commerce, Moon. 412-264-6270. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 05 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Oct. 5 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BLESSING OF THE PETS. In celebration of the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi. 2 p.m. St. John Fisher Church. 412-241-4722. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.


Carnegie Library, Homewood, Writing Workshop. Homewood. 412-242-3598. afterhappyhourreview.com FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Submit your film, 10 minutes Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory or less. Screenings held on the & Botanical Garden, Oakland. second Thursday of every month. 412-622-6914. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Greensburg. 724-219-0804. Practice conversational English. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. original essays about literature, NATURE’S NIGHT OUT. music, TV or film, & also Event to celebrate local essays generally about non-profit the Outdoor Pittsburgh. To see some CAFÉ SCIENTIFIQUE: TREE Classroom’s 10th examples, visit www. GENETIC DIVERSITY. Talk by birthday. 6-8:30 p.m. newyinzer.com & Cynthia Morton, of the Carnegie Bar Marco, Strip view the current Museum of Natural History. District. 412-471-1900. issue. Email all Carnegie Science Center, THE PITTSBURGH North Side. 412-237-3400. SHOW OFFS. A pitches, submissions www. per a p MORNING SPANISH meeting of jugglers & inquiries to pghcitym o .c LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. & spinners. All levels newyinzer@gmail.com. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. NORTH HILLS ART Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Union Project, Highland Park. CENTER. Seeking artists 412-531-1912. 412-363-4550. for the upcoming craft show, RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First WEST COAST SWING The Holiday Market. Submissions and Third Mon of every month, WEDNESDAYS. Swing are subject to screening by 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. the North Hills Art Center, & Oakland. 412-622-3151. The Library, South Side. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. 916-287-1373. can be delivered Nov. 3-8 Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. follows. No partner needed. Registration deadline Oct. 27. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622. Ongoing auditions for actors Grace Episcopal Church, PITTSBURGH CULTURAL ages 18+ for murder mystery Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TRUST. Seeking artists in shows performed in the SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE Allegheny County to design & Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, develop functional bicycle MILDRED MILLER South Side. 412-431-5282. INTERNATIONAL VOICE racks to be located along COMPETITION. Presented Penn Ave., Downtown. DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. by the Opera Theater of Submission information & First Tue of every month Pittsburgh and the Gailliot requirements at pressroom. Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. Family Foundation. Applications trustarts.org/2014/08/25/call412-251-0097. for singers 18-35 are open for-artists-bicycle-racks-inthe-cultural-district/ PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Fall new member screening, Oct. 19. You don’t have to be computer-savvy to help locally Drop between 12:30-1:00pm. based Computer Reach provide refurbished computers Applicants must submit 3 to needy schools, community centers and libraries around gallery-ready art pieces that the world. At Computer Recycling Fridays — held weekly are exclusively created by the from 9:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. at 214 N. Lexington St., in applicant & made within the last Point Breeze — volunteers work on both technical and 2 years. $20.00 application fee. non-technical projects, and training is provided. Email Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, info@computereach.com or visit www.computereach.com Shadyside. 412-361-0873. for information. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION through Wed, Oct. 10 via wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com SALON. Discuss current events w/ Yaptracker.com. SIDEWALL. Seeking artists friends & neighbors. For seniors. MON RIVER ARTS. Seeking First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. male actors age 20s-30s for stage for a public mural exhibition Mount Lebanon Public Library, adaptation of A Charlie Brown in Bloomfield. Submit artist Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Christmas. Email monriverarts@ statement, proposal for mural, gmail.com or call for information. & 3-5 images of past work to 412-405-8425. sidewall.project@gmail.com from BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT Sept. 1-Oct. 3. More information GROUP. For Widows/Widowers can be found at sidewallproject. over 50. Second and Fourth THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking wordpress.com Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. performers & artists to participate St. Sebastian Church, Ross. in First Fridays - Art in a Box. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR 412-366-1300. For more information, email PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking DETROIT STYLE URBAN thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. submissions for Fellowship 15. BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. 412-403-7357. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY Statement in PDF format, a Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking biography/CV in PDF format, & EXPLORING FAIR TRADE. submissions in all genres for work sample to www.silvereye. Talk by Tim McGrail of Equal fledgling literary magazine org/f15apply/. Email jzipay@ Exchange. Presented by the curated by members of the silvereye.org for information. East End Food Co-op. 6:30 p.m. Hour After Happy Hour HUMAN TRAFFICKING: PITTSBURGH FIGHTS BACK. 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. ITALIAN HERITAGE DAY. Sample Italian foods, learn basic Italian vocabulary, build a family tree, more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

A straight male friend practices sounding and has for years. I am pretty sure he does other things that he isn’t telling anyone about — not even his wife. He has some medical questions about sounding. I am a pediatric nurse, so he brought his concerns to me, but the questions are totally outside my area of expertise. Nothing emergencyroom-worthy is going on, but he needs answers and refuses to speak with his regular M.D. about sounding. I am wondering how to find an M.D. in his area who would be knowledgeable and nonjudgmental.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

NEEDS USEFUL REFERRAL SOON

The National Coalition for Sexual Freedom maintains a “Kink Aware Professionals Directory” on its website: ncsfreedom.org. The doctors, counselors, lawyers, real-estate agents, etc. aren’t vetted by the NCSF, so inclusion on the list isn’t a recommendation. But it would be a good place for your friend to start looking for an irregular M.D. In the meantime, I asked a doc for some thoughts about the risks and rewards of sounding. “Sounding refers to the insertion of foreign bodies into the urethra,” said Dr. Stephen H. King, a board-certified urologist. “Under controlled medical conditions, urethral sounds, which are typically curved and sterilized metallic or plastic rods, are gently inserted into the urethra (pee hole) in order to dilate a stricture (narrowing) that blocks the flow of urine out of the bladder. The lining of the urethra is typically very sensitive and delicate, and this procedure can be quite uncomfortable for most people.” But not everyone with a metallic or plastic rod sticking out of their urethra right now is experiencing discomfort. “Some people, likely a significant minority, derive sexual pleasure from urethral stimulation,” said King. “This includes both men and women. Sounders have been known to insert a wide variety of objects, including but not limited to catheters, tubes, beads, pencils, batteries, drill bits and even the head of a decapitated snake. Yes, the latter has been reported.” I think we all need a moment to process that last detail. Someone found the head of a decapitated snake — or someone found a snake and decapitated it — and thought: “You know what? I’m going to stick this in my urethra.” OK! On to your question, NURS: Your friend is a self-sounder and has been for years. So just how dangerous is sounding? “Some sounders end up in emergency rooms to remove a stuck object, leading to interesting X-rays and many good party conversations for us urologists,” said King. “But there is very limited medical literature on this topic beyond mostly case studies. However, one recent survey study associated recreational sounding with general high-risk behaviors and increased risk of STIs. Additional complications can include bleeding, infection, urethral stricture, perforation and erectile dysfunction. Some of these issues may cause long-term impairments or require surgical correction.” So while shoving a metal rod into your urethra is more dangerous than not shoving a metal rod into your urethra, it’s not as dangerous as the limited medical literature would seem to suggest.

“My guess is there are many people who sound without significant problems,” said King. “If performed in a very clean (ideally sterile) fashion with minimal trauma to the urethral lining, sounding may be relatively safe. The sounder, however, should be aware of these risks.” My friend’s boyfriend has a virginity fetish. Particularly the part where the girl bleeds a bit. Arguments that “breaking the hymen” is mythical bullshit haven’t swayed his fetish. His birthday is coming up, and she’d love to surprise him with some virginity bleeds. It won’t be a regular thing, so she’s OK with a bit of pain and discomfort. And it won’t be during her period, so that obvious solution is out. She asked for my advice — I’m the local sex guru — but this one has me stumped.

SOMEONE FOUND THE HEAD OF A DECAPITATED SNAKE AND THOUGHT: “YOU KNOW WHAT? I’M GOING TO STICK THIS IN MY URETHRA.”

HAPPY HYMEN HUNTING

Good news, HHH! Your friend doesn’t have to endure pain and discomfort to treat her boyfriend to a few “virginity bleeds” on his birthday. “An artificial hymen also known as artificial virginity kit (and popularly referred to as a Chinese hymen or fake hymen) is a type of prosthetic membrane created for the purpose of simulating an intact human hymen,” reads the highly disturbing copy at HymenShop.net. “Insert the artificial hymen into your vagina carefully. ... When your lover penetrates, it will ooze out a liquid that appears like blood. … Add in a few moans and groans and you will pass through undetectable!” As creepy as the boyfriend’s fetish might seem, the fact that some women need to “pass” themselves off as virgins on their wedding nights is far, far creepier than a woman using one to indulge her boyfriend’s kink. I’m a 29-year-old gay man. I recently ended a 10-year relationship that was vanilla and lackluster sexually. I’m now thrilled to be exploring sex with a new boyfriend who is GGG and as kinky as I am. The issue is that my boyfriend wants me to hit him and give him a bloody nose during sex. While this sounds hot, it worries me because he was abused as a child, and I’m afraid this might trigger something negative for him. What do you think? JUST A LOVE TAP

I think you should shove a couple of artificial hymens up your boyfriend’s nose and hit him just hard enough to break them, JALT, because punching someone in the face is dangerous. You could break his nose, for starters, and you could kill him, for finishers. But if this is something he simply must experience, and if he’ll find someone else to do it to him if you won’t, here are a couple of questions you need to ask him first: Has he done this before? If so, did it bring back unpleasant memories of his abuse? And does he have health insurance? But, honestly, I think you should go with the artificial hymens. On this week’s Lovecast, Dan and Ann Landers’s daughter face off on tantric sex: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.01-10.08

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When Jimmy Fallon was a senior in high school, he received a weird graduation gift: a troll doll, one of those plastic figurines with frizzy, brightly colored hair. Around the same time, his mother urged him to enter an upcoming comedy contest at a nearby club. Jimmy decided that would be fun. He worked up a routine in which he imitated various celebrities auditioning to become a spokesperson for troll dolls. With the doll by his side, he won the contest, launching his career as a comedian. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life: an odd blessing or unexpected gift that inspires you to express one of your talents on a higher level.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear So-Called Astrologer: Your horoscopes are worse than useless. Mostly they are crammed with philosophical and poetic crap that doesn’t apply to my daily life. Please cut way back on the fancy metaphors. Just let me know if there is money or love or trouble coming my way — like what regular horoscopes say! — Skeptical Scorpio.” Dear Skeptical: In my astrological opinion, you and your fellow Scorpios will soon feel the kind of pressure you just directed at me. People will ask you to be different from what you actually are. My advice? Do not acquiesce to them.

ceptual artist Jenny Holzer. From her hundreds of pithy quotes, I have selected six that offer the exact wisdom you need most right now. Your job is to weave them all together into a symphonic whole. 1. “It’s crucial to have an active fantasy life.” 2. “Ensure that your life stays in flux.” 3. “I have every kind of thought, and that is no embarrassment.” 4. “Animalism is perfectly healthy.” 5. “Finding extreme pleasure will make you a better person if you’re careful about what thrills you.” 6. “Listen when your body talks.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Tomatoes are a staple of Italian cuisine now, but there weren’t any tomatoes in Europe until the 16th century, when Spanish explorers brought them from Central and South America. Likewise, Malaysia has become a major producer of rubber, but it had no rubber trees until seeds were smuggled out of Brazil in the 19th century. And bananas are currently a major crop in Ecuador thanks to 16th-century Portuguese sailors, who transported them from West Africa. I foresee the possibility of comparable cross-fertilizations happening for you in the coming months, Sagittarius. Do you have your eye on any remote resources you’d like to bring back home?

As I hike through the wilderness at dusk, the crickets always seem to be humming in the distance. No matter where I go, their sound is farther off, never right up close to me. How can that be? Do they move away from me as I approach? I doubt it. I sense no leaping insects in the underbrush. Here’s how this pertains to you: My relationship with the crickets’ song is similar to a certain mystery in your life. There’s an experience that calls to you but forever seems just out of reach. You think you’re drawing nearer, about to touch it and be in its midst, but it inevitably eludes you. Now here’s the good news: A change is coming for you. It will be like what would happen if I suddenly found myself intimately surrounded by hundreds of chirping crickets.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Years ago, you experienced an event that was so overwhelming you could not fully deal with it, let alone understand it. All this time it has been simmering and smoldering in the depths of your unconscious mind, emitting ghostly steam and smoke even as it has remained difficult for you to integrate. But I predict that will change in the coming months. You will finally find a way to bring it into your conscious awareness and explore it with courage and grace. Of course it will be scary for you to do so. But I assure you that the fear is a residue from your old confusion, not a sign of real danger. To achieve maximum liberation, begin your quest soon.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In June 2012, a U.S. Senator introduced a bill that would require all members of Congress to actually read or listen to a reading of any bill before they voted on it. The proposal has been in limbo ever since, and it’s unlikely it will ever be treated seriously. This is confusing to me. Shouldn’t it be a fundamental requirement that all lawmakers p know what’s in the laws theyy pass? Don’t make

a similar error, Leo. Understand exactly what you are getting into, whether it’s a new agreement, an interesting invitation or a tempting opportunity. Be thoroughly informed.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Oliver Evans (1755-1819) was a prolific Virgo inventor who came up with brilliant ideas for steam engines, urban gas lighting, refrigeration and automated machines. He made a radical prediction: “The time will come when people will travel in stages moved by steam engines, almost as fast as birds fly, 15 or 20 miles an hour.” We may be surprised that a visionary innovator like Evans dramatically minimized the future’s possibilities. In the same way, I suspect that later in your life, you might laugh at how much you are underestimating your potentials right now. In telling you this, I’m hoping you will stop underestimating. Make nonsense noises for a minute straight every day this week. Report results to Truthrooster@ g gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

In three years, you will comprehend truths about yourself and your life that you don’t have the capacity to grasp now. By then, past events that have been confusing to you will make sense. You’ll know what their purpose was and why they occurred. Can you wait that long? If you’d rather not, I have an idea: Do a meditation in which you visualize yourself as you will be three years from today. Imagine asking your future self to tell you what he or she has discovered. The revelations may take a while to start rolling in, but I predict that a whole series of insights will have arrived by this time next week.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

This is prime time to do things that aren’t exactly easy and relaxing, but that on the other hand aren’t actually painful. Examples: Extend peace offerings to adversaries. Seek reconciliation with valuable resources from which you have been separated and potential allies from whom you have become alienated. Try out new games you would eventually like to be good at, but aren’t yet. Get a better read on interesting people you don’t understand very well. Catch my drift, Aquarius? For now, at least, leaving your comfort zone is likely to be invigorating, not arduous.

The journey that awaits you is succinct but epic. It will last a relatively short time but take months to fully understand. You may feel natural and ordinary as you go through it, even as you are being rather heroic. Prepare as best as you can, but keep in mind that no amount of preparation will get you completely ready for the spontaneous moves you’ll be called on to perform. Don’t be nervous! I bet you will receive help from an unexpected source. Feelings of déjà-vu may crop up and provide a sense of familiarity — even though none of what occurs will have any precedents.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Your oracle is built around the epigrams of con-

about one in every 10,000. Most commercial pearls come from farmed oysters whose pearls have been induced by human intervention. As you might expect, the natural jewel is regarded as far more precious. Let’s use these facts as metaphors while we speculate about your fate in the next eight months. I believe you will acquire or generate a beautiful new source of value for yourself. There’s a small chance you will stumble upon a treasure equivalent to the wild pearl. But I suggest you take the more secure route: working hard to create a treasure that’s like a cultivated pearl.

In the wild, very few oysters produce pearls —

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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JADE

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The Band: Live at the Academy of Music, 1971 If you’re confused about why The Band is so revered so many years on, skip the studio recordings and go straight to this live boxed set, released last fall: This is The Band at its best.

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This psychological literary thriller from Marisha Pessl incorporates multimedia to tell the story of a journalist working to uncover the secret life of a horror-movie director.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.01/10.08.2014

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BALLIN’

Brett Kashmere’s new film From Deep examines basketball, race, hip hop and popular culture {BY AL HOFF} THE PROVOCATIVE new docu-essay From Deep — Pittsburgh-based director Brett Kashmere likens it to a mixtape, combining professional basketball, street ball, hip hop, fashion, race and popular culture — makes its Pittsburgh premiere this week. Kashmere talked to CP via email about some of the issues of race t and an basketball that the film raises. A longer version of this is at www.pghcitypaper.com. thi interview i

WHAT PROMPTED YOU TO TACKLE THIS TOPIC? Growing up in a small Saskatchewan town, I was captivated by big cities and urban aesthetics, urban culture and by America, particularly sports and politics. [Via cable TV], I watched a lot of Detroit local news and d Detroit sports as a kid. That experience definitely ely shaped my initial impression and understanding ding of the U.S. and gave me a window into contempoorary American social and cultural politics, not to mention racial discourse. This time period was bracketed by the heyday of the great “Bad Boy” Pistons teams and the University of Michigan Fab Five teams, which were the first to embody hip-hop aesthetics in their on-court fashion and style of play. […] Hip hop h and basketball were part of the same culture in my childhood. Rap is what led me to basketball, rather than the other way around. That personal narrative is what drives From Deep. I’ve long been interested in the intersection of sports, identity, nationality and fandom. OTHER OTH PRO SPORTS HAVE HAD TROUBLED RACIAL PASTS. IS THERE SOMETHING UNIQUE ABOUT PA BASKETBALL’S JOURNEY? Basketball has this history of incredible barnstorming teams — the Harlem Globetrotters and the Renaissance Big Five in particular — that traveled the U.S. in the first half of the 1900s and helped redefine the game. They had to operate this way because they were “too black” and too good for any of the th existing (white) leagues, but they still competed against and usually beat all-white teams in what would aga have been considered exhibition contests. This is a little different than what was happening in the world of professional baseball, which had clearly delineated leagues for white and black players. HOW DOES NCAA BASKETBALL COMPARE WITH THE NBA? Although college basketball is now a huge commercial enterprise, there here is still a certain nostalgia associated with it which is pervasive and nd very symbolically powerful. Since college players are “unpaid,” they are deemed to be playing for the love of the game, rather than a paycheck, and thus it’s popularly considered a purer form. […] But I think in terms of race and its place in the popular culture, there are a lot of similarities between NCAA basketball and the NBA. It’s only since the 1980s that the NBA has been more popular than college ball, and that’s largely the result of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird entering the league in 1979, along with ABA starss like Dr. J, who were, of course, pitted against each other as a reducc-

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tive, black vs. white stylistic counterparts in marketing eting and commercials. THE RECENT CONTROVERSIES OVER THE L.A. CLIPPERS’ DONALD STERLING’S COMMENTS, AND BRUCE LEVENSON OF THE ATLANTA HAWKS’ EMAIL THAT THE GAME HAD GROWN TOO BLACK AND WAS DISCOURAGING WHITE FANDOM, SHOW THAT THERE ARE STILL FLASHPOINTS FOR THE NBA AROUND RACE, PERCEPTION AND BOTTOM LINE. I think the situations with Sterling and Levenson point to the fact that race is still one of the NBA’s central topics, maybe the central topic. If anything, those incidents strengthen and support many of the arguments I make in From Deep. At the ownership and executive levels, the NBA is a mostly white club. […] Players have been accruing more power with each generation, c through the strengthening of its players’ union, the strategic use of thr free agency, increased league revenues, new media platforms, mara keting keti savvy, etc, and the power dynamics of the NBA are changing to refl re ect this. […] Players are becoming (slightly) more politicized on the subject of race, and that’s an encouraging sign. It would be great to see the rest of the league follow suit. THESE DAYS THERE IS SO MUCH CORPORATE BRANDING. I make the point in From Deep that the rise of Michael Jordan as the world’s first corporate-branded athlete was a major turning point in the commercialization of basketball. His famous line — “Republicans buy shoes, too” — when asked why he refused to endorse an African-American n candidate who was running against Jesse Helms in his home ome state, says it all. NBA stars are remarkably well marketed and styled. That is something the NBA does better than any other professional sports league in North America. I think the synthesis of hip hop and basketball, originating in the early 1980s with songs like Kurtis Blow’s “Basketball” and Run-DMC’s “My Adidas,” has had a big influence on all of this — the fact that sneakers and athletic gear were embraced d by rap stars early on gave those things a lot of street reet credibility, which continues to persist. YET, UNLIKE OTHER PRO SPORTS, BASKETBALL IS AN ANYTIMEANYWHERE-ANYBODY GAME. One of the goals I had was to present both sides of the sport: the entertainment spectacle and the everyday game (or pastime). And to capture some of the specificities of playground ball that don’t usually show up in the movies: the distinctive nature of each neighborhood court, the sodist cial environments, the different mixtures of people, to demonstrate a glimpse of the amazing diversity and de variety of how and where the game is played.

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7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. Rowhouse Cinema, 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8. Advance tickets at www. ticketfly.com/event/668549. The screening will be followed by a discussion with Kashmere, hip-hop f artist and activist Jasiri X and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette a sportswriter Mike White. spo

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 1, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 40

October 1, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 40