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BARELY REGISTERING: IS PA. FAILING SOME POTENTIAL VOTERS? 06


Unseen Treasures from George Eastman House

EVENTS 10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

Friday, September 26, 8pm, 2014

Harry Langdon in Tramp Tramp Tramp

Tramp Tramp Tramp

USA, 1926.

DIRECTED BY HARRY EDWARDS.

Newly restored, 35mm archival print, black and white, 62 minutes, silent. Starring Harry Langdon, Joan Crawford, Edwards Davis, Tom Murray, Alec B. Francis, Brooks Benedict, Carlton Griffin.

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Tom Roberts (piano). 10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

Friday, October 10, 8pm, 2014

Lon Chaney in The Unknown

The Unknown

USA, 1927.

DIRECTED BY TOD BROWNING.

Newly restored, 35mm archival print, black and white, 49 minutes, silent. Starring Lon Chaney, Norman Kerry, Joan Crawford, Nick De Ruiz, John George, Frank Lanning. A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Michael Johnsen (electronics) in collaboration with Jessica Marcrum (voice).

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Friday, December 5, 8pm, 2014

Arlene Francis in Too Much Johnson

Too Much Johnson

USA, 1938.

DIRECTED BY MERCURY THEATRE/ ORSON WELLES.

Newly restored, 35mm archival print, black and white, 66 minutes, silent. Starring Joseph Cotten, Virginia Nicholson, Edgar Barrier, Arlene Francis, Ruth Ford, Mary Wickes, Eustace Wyatt, Guy Kingsley.

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Lenny Young (oboe, electronics) in collaboration with Jeff Berman (percussion) and Tracey Mortimer (bass).

All films will be shown in recently restored 35mm prints courtesy of George Eastman House.

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All films begin at 8pm. Tickets $10. Limited seating. Call 412.237.8300 or visit www.warhol.org

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Film prints from the collection of George Eastman House. Film images courtesy of George Eastman House Motion Picture Department Collection.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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“It’s not like the NVRA is brand new — they’ve been under this obligation for over a decade and they don’t have good data and they don’t have good systems.” — Ken Regal of Just Harvest on the state’s handling of the National Voter Registration Act

[VIEWS]

however, argue that the Clean 14 “Critics, Power Plan would be more flexible if it provided … fewer options.” — Bill O’Driscoll on Pennsylvania’s baffling issues with the EPA’s plan to cut carbon emissions

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most Hollywood ensemble 45 “Like dramedies, this one doesn’t trust its

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audience.” — Harry Kloman on This Is Where I Leave You

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works constitute a consumable 48 “The spectrum of sculptural brights and shinies; of delicates and masses; of ideas versus craft.” — Michelle Fried on Pittsburgh Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center

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like saying son of a bitch; but 71 “Not more like spitting out, Dusty old balls dragger.” — Poet Jimmy Cvetic on the nuances of swearing

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 54 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 64 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 65 STUFF WE LIKE 69 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“MOST DISABILITY Y SERVICES ARE TOO MANY LAYERS LA ACCOUNTABILITY DOWN FROM THE STATE’S ACCOUNTABILITY.”

RE: Trust Issues: A divisive bill fails in Allegheny County Council, by the grace of God (Sept. 17) The history of this slogan begins with an intent to broadcast to future archaeologists, long after the United States is dead (from the Civil War), that we were a Christian Nation, not “heathens” [letter by Rev. Wilkerson to the Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon P. Chase]. Teddy Roosevelt thought having the slogan on money was offensive, almost sacrilegious, and wanted to remove it when the coins were redesigned. Instead, the clergy lobbied Congress and got it made into a law. They felt it important to continue to broadcast our Christianity. The history continues during the Cold War, when the USSR was declaring Atheism for All and making it extremely difficult or painful for its citizens to practice any religion. The American clergy (white Protestant, for the most part) wanted to be sure America would continue our image as a Christian Nation. The Almighty even found himself in the Pledge of Allegiance. I don’t know whether He takes sides, but I’m pretty sure he’s not a citizen of any country. … Now we see the slogan used as a wedge. At a time when organizations such as the American Family Association … want the slogan posted everywhere so that it may further claim a national religion, we are seeing the same organizations arguing against many basic civil rights … There is nothing “patriotic” about this slogan. It does not mention our country, our principles of freedom, liberty and independence, our plurality and self-determination, our unity and proud system of government … … Even if the slogan had not been meant to divide, it does, and the intent of those pushing it divides much further. I am no atheist, and also find religious reasons — from a few religious traditions — not to post this. But this is secular, and I am very sincere that all religion must be kept out of our government. — Web comment from “Audrey Glickman” n”

Don’t everybody leave the house empty for too long. Or else we’ll come back and find it’s been turned into a Halloween store.

{ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

UNREGISTERED

VOTERS

The federal government requires the state to ask social-service clients if they want to register to vote; so how come so many are left out in the cold? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

P

AUL O’HANLON calls it his “A-ha!” moment.

It came around 2002, just as he was starting work as a voting-rights lawyer and learning about the National Voter Registration Act, a law designed to expand access to the ballot box by requiring places like DMVs, welfare offices and disability agencies to double as voter-registration centers. The question the law requires these agencies to ask is simple: “If you are not registered to vote where you live now, would you like to register to vote here today?” “As a person with a disability … I wasn’t seeing anybody asking the mandatory question,” recalls O’Hanlon, who works for the Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania. “I sort of realized that’s never happened to me.” At first, he thought, maybe it was just an anomaly — thatt tthese were isolated incidents, or he just didn’t remember th being asked the voter-registration question. But he started sifting through state data and found a pattern he describes today as “alarming”: Thousands of people who receive disability services may never be asked if they want to register to vote. And even among those the state can prove have been asked, only a small proportion appear to ever actually be registered by those agencies. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

— Sept. 22 tweet from “Pittsburgh Dad” (@Pittsburgh_Dad)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

USING ART IN PLACEMAKING Have you ever wanted to commission a unique element for your home or office, like a stained glass window, bike rack, railing, or piece of furniture? The Landmarks Preservation Resource Center and the Office of Public Art, present a workshop on how to commission artists and/how to create enticing art spaces for your house or business. This discussion will focus on the process of hiring an artist and will specifically delve into the intricacies of design, budgeting, and contract negotiation relying on the experiences of an artist and a homeowner that recently completed one such collaboration. This workshop is free and open to the public. Come learn and interact with artists and creators of unique spaces and also see the growing restorative art composition on the exterior walls of the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, where longtime Pittsburgh artist and sculptor James Shipman is using artifacts and pieces of the former Manchester Bridge (1915-1970) to adorn the exterior of the building.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 • 10:00 - 11:30 AM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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UNREGISTERED VOTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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O’Hanlon isn’t the first to accuse the state of failing to ask people receiving public assistance if they want to register to vote — and the problem doesn’t just affect people with disabilities. The state appears to be unable to completely account for why people receiving different forms of public assistance — and who do not “decline” to be registered — never actually make it onto the rolls. The state, meanwhile, largely maintains that any appearance thatt people aren’t being asked whether they hey want to register can be chalked ed up to a data-collection system m that is still in the process of moddernizing. The state also points to recent signs of progress: Voter registrations i t ti generated by state-run welfare offices (known interchangeably as county assistance offices) have increased more than four-fold in the past year alone. SOON AFTER Congress enacted the NVRA, in 1993, Pennsylvania resisted, securing a spot in the group of states initially targeted by the U.S. Department of Justice for refusing to adhere to the law. And two years ago, the state found itself challenged again, this time by the Pittsburgh-based Black Political Empowerment Project, which was the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit that contended the state “failed to ensure that all clients […] are provided with a voter-preference form, a voter-registration application form, and assistance in completing a voter-registration application form.” “Before we filed the lawsuit, for all intents and purposes, there was almost no voter registration going on at the county assistance offices” in Pennsylvania, explains Sarah Brannon, on, who oversees Washington, D.C..based Project Vote’s efforts att getting states to comply with the NVRA. That posed a particularly troubling civil-rights problem, since the people relying on publicassistance agencies to help them register to vote are more likely to be more transient and cut off from levers of power in the first place, says Ken Regal, executive director of Just Harvest, a local nonprofit that gets some state funding to help connect people to food assistance. “The principle of the NVRA is that when people are interacting with the government, that’s the time to connect them to the relevance of voting,” Regal says.

The state appeared eager to settle the BPEP lawsuit: A month after it was filed, the state entered into a settlement agreement promising better compliance with the law. The effects of that agreement were felt almost immediately. In 2011, the year before the lawsuit was filed, 5,498 people were registered to vote through county assistance offices, where millions of people each year receive services ranging from supplemental nutrition aid to medical m assistance. By 2013, the most recent a year for which data was available, y 47,028 people were registered to vote by those same county assistance offices, out of roughly 3.9 i t million registration offers made there. “We have definitely seen a significant uptick,” Brannon says, noting that while disability-service agencies were not included in the settlement agreement, “we’ve seen that when one agency improves compliance, it can trickle down to others.” So far, though, that doesn’t appear to be happening, at least for disability agencies. In fact, with 514 total registrations, 2013 represented the lowest rate of registrations by disability agencies since 2009. And it’s not just that so few people seem to be getting registered. By O’Hanlon’s count, hundreds of thousands of people aren’t even being asked by disability agencies whether they want to register in the first place. While he estimates that roughly a million people benefited from statefunded disability services, state data show that in 2013, just 77,438 people were asked whether they wanted to be registered to vote. vote hat , O ’ H a nlo n s u rm i s e s , T hat, with a disability means “a person p could wait 12 years to receive a single offer to register to vote.”

“OUR UNDERSTANDING IS THAT COMPLIANCE IS SPOTTY AT BEST.”

THE FACT that disability agencies were d not included in the th 2012 litigation might help explain why they fared worse than the county assistance offices in registering people to vote. But it’s likely not the only reason. “My impression is that most disability services are too many layers down from the state’s accountability,” Regal adds. He notes that Just Harvest contracts with the state to help provide public assistance. But he couldn’t say for sure whether there was a provision in the contract that requires he participate in voter-


registration efforts. “When DPW or the Department of Health enters into a contract with a private company to outsource some of its functions, they’re supposed to delegate to the contractor its NVRA duties,” says Ben Geffen, a lawyer at the Public Interest Law Center in Philadelphia. “Our understanding is that compliance is spotty at best.” The Department of Public Welfare, which runs county assistance offices, did not respond to numerous phone calls and emails seeking comment over a nearly week-long period. Jonathan Marks, commismmissioner for the Bureau off Commissions, Elections and Legislation — and who helps oversee e data collection on state compliance with the NVRA — th th says much of the concern over the state’s compliance with the NVRA can be attributed to data-collection systems that don’t tell the full story. “I think we’ve demonstrated … that a lot of this is about tracking — and has been all along,” Marks says, noting that it’s possible voter registrations by publicassistance agencies have been historically undercounted. For one, Marks explains, the state has

long relied on generic voter-registration forms, which he says can be traced to specific public-assistance agencies only if they are funneled directly by those agencies to the county elections office. And because an increasing number of people can apply for services like Medicaid and food stamps without ever showing up at a welfare office, many of those registration applications have gone out by mail, potentially bypassing the state’s ability to count them. Since 2009, Marks says, the state has moved toward coded forms, which are more mo easily traced to specific agencies. But they’re not automatic cally distributed (the agencies c have to request them), likely meaning the data is still distorted. “In some counties, old ti ld forms were still circulating out there,” he says. And asked why the rates of disability service providers registering people to vote tend to hover in the triple digits, he said “there’s some overlap” between county assistance offices and disability providers. One person might get services from both and therefore have already been asked about voter registration, for instance, while others might be children or otherwise ineligible to vote. CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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UNREGISTERED VOTERS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

Asked about those who fall through the cracks, Marks says, “I don’t think we’ve dismissed the possibility that people are being missed, but I don’t think that’s a significant proportion.” O’Hanlon acknowledges Marks could be right, but he counters that if the state did offer more people voting-regisg-registration opportunities than the data show, “they don’t appear to be in a position to prove that.”

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O’HANLON’S CONCERN over the data released this past June isn’t n’t just over the comparatively weak ak registrations collected by disability agencies. He also points to statistics that show a large number of what he calls “lost voters”: people who were presumably offered an opportunity to register, since they did not decline to be registered, but somehow never made it onto the rolls. Under the NVRA, if you do not decline to be registered to vote, you are still essentially treated as if you want to register. For instance, of the 2.7 million people who either said “yes” or did not decline when asked by county assistance offices if they would like to register to vote, only 47,028 were actually registered to vote. “When I look at the lost voters, it makes me think maybe we’re only seeing a fraction of the improvement we should be seeing,” O’Hanlon says. Among disability service providers,

meanwhile, 8,039 did not decline to be registered to vote last year. But that generated just 514 registrations. For his part, Marks explains that many of those lost voters did not explicitly p y say y they y wanted to register to vote. And many of them were likely never asked whether they wanted wh to vote by a human being, so it’s poss possible they just ignored the question and were q not interested in registering, Marks adds. But Richard Weishaupt, a lawyer at Weish Community Legal Se Services in Philadelphia, says the state shouldn’t just assume people aren’t registering because they don’t want to. “People go to those offices often under a great deal of stress,” he says, “and they’re not thinking primarily about their voter registration at the moment,” making it more important to affirmatively help people register. Regal agrees — though he notes that hoping for good political will toward people on public assistance might be a lofty expectation. “If you could register online, like you can pay your taxes online and like you can do your banking […] then it would be easy and we wouldn’t have these problems,” he says. “These are the people who went to court to protect voter ID. How eager is the state government to help people register to vote?”

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SHOT IN THE ARM Jewish Healthcare Foundation raising HPV awareness {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} SINCE THE vaccine for human papillo-

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vaccinated until age 21. “When you think of it collectively, cancer is the disease that creates the most fear in people,” says Dr. Alan Finkelstein, a member of the JHF’s advisory committee. “So the idea that we have a vaccine that can prevent that is kind of the holy grail of medicine.” But according to a 2013 Centers for Disease Control report, fewer than 38 percent of adolescent girls have received the full HPV vaccine. The number is even lower for adolescent boys, at 14 percent. “The goal of the campaign is to increase uptake,” Gottlieb says. “HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections.” A CDC study found that HPV vaccination rates are low for two main reasons: Parents don’t know about the vaccine, and not enough physicians are recommending it. But the reasons parents have for not vaccinating their children vary depending on the sex of the child. For parents of girls, the No. 1 reason was lack of knowledge. Approximately 14 percent of respondents said they were worried about the safety and possible side effects of the vaccine. And 11 percent said their daughters were not sexually active. “There’s a general level of discomfort because we know HPV is transmitted through sexual contact and we get in a position where parents are not willing to consider the sexuality of their 10- or 12-year-old,” Finkelstein says. “They may think, ‘Something like that couldn’t happen to my child.’” For parents of boys, the top two reasons given for not vaccinating their children were that the vaccine was not recommended and that it was not needed or necessary. Increasing the vaccination rate among boys is a main focus of the JHF campaign. “The connection between HPV and cervical cancer has been clear for longer than connections between HPV and cancers that are associated with boys,” says Finkelstein. “Once it became clear that HPV was the cause of many of those, it became more obvious it was important to immunize boys.” The JHF is also seeking to increase vaccinations among vulnerable populations like African-American women, who are less likely to be vaccinated and more likely to die from cervical cancer. In 2013, Duke Medicine’s Dr. Adriana Vidal and her colleagues released the results of a study focusing on HPV rates in this population. “The motivation was: Even though the screening for cervical cancer is similar for African-American and white women,

there is a difference between incidence and mortality, so we wanted to find out why there was a disparity,” Vidal says. While the study made a number of findings regarding incidence and mortality, it also found that black women are more likely to be infected with less common strains of HPV. They are more likely to acquire strains of HPV not covered by current HPV vaccines. “African-American women were less likely to be infected with HPV strains 16 and 18,” which are covered by the vaccine, Vidal says. “We’re not saying, ‘No, the vaccines are not good for them,’ but we’re saying there should be more attention for strains beyond 16 and 18.” A new vaccine is currently undergoing a round of clinical trials. It will protect against nine strains of HPV, including two of those most common among black women. As another part of its campaign, the JHF has formed a group of grandmothers to do community outreach in an effort to break down some of the stigma associated with talking to children about sexually transmitted infections. One participant, Sheila Fine, says she recently talked to her grandchildren about the HPV vaccine on a family vacation. “We shouldn’t be afraid to talk about this,” Fine said at a recent meeting of the grandmothers group. “We’re talking about saving lives.” Despite progress on the issue, there is still a segment of the American population that is against vaccines, believing they are harmful to children. Organizations like A Shot of Truth, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that questions whether there is a link between childhood vaccines and autism, say the dangers of the HPV vaccine outweigh the documented benefits. But according to Gottlieb, an eight-year CDC study of 1 million individuals who have been vaccinated found only one major side effect: post-injection syncope, or fainting. A Shot of Truth also questions the efficacy of the HPV vaccine in preventing cancer. “A myth reported consistently by the media is the HPV vaccine is a ‘cancerprevention vaccine,’” says the campaign. “There has never been any scientific data to qualify this statement, as the vaccine was never studied long enough to show it indeed prevents cancer.” Gottlieb disagrees. “It’s a very safe vaccine,” Gottlieb says. “We’re saying there’s a vaccine that prevents cancer. Why wouldn’t you get it for your child?” RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first national plan for reducing carbon-dioxide emissions from coalburning power plants. The Clean Power Plan would require each state to submit a plan for cutting emissions about 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. That would be a noteworthy down payment on reining in climate change, and it would also lessen other harmful pollution, like particulates. But while the EPA claimed its authority under the federal Clean Air Act, officials in states like Pennsylvania are working to weaken and delay the plan. On Sept. 9, for instance, Tom Corbett and 14 other Republican governors wrote to President Obama to oppose the Clean Power Plan. They contend that the EPA overshot its powers under the Clean Air Act. The signatories’ arguments resemble those of the 12 states that in August actually sued the EPA over the Clean Power Plan. While Pennsylvania was not among those plaintiffs (which include Alabama, Indiana and Wyoming), it’s notable that most states in both groups critical of the plan are big coalproducers or coal-burners. In a study issued last week by the group PennEnvironment, researchers reported that only Texas and California — respectively, two and three times as populous as Pennsylvania — emit more carbon pollution from power plants than the Keystone State. A key argument of states opposing the Clean Power Plan is that the EPA doesn’t give them enough flexibility in crafting their plans. This seems curious, because the EPA has touted the plan as permitting great flexibility in cutting emissions. States can: Make power plants more efficient; embrace fuel sources that are less carbonintensive; persuade homes and businesses to simply use less electricity; or employ some combination of the three. Critics, however, argue that the Clean Power Plan would be more flexible if it provided … fewer options. Huh? Well, these states claim the EPA is allowed to require pollution cuts only at the power plants themselves — not via such “outside-the-fence” initiatives as alternativeenergy sources or by getting people to use less electricity. For the Corbett administration’s part, Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Morgan Wagner explains

in an email that “the energy produced or saved” through outside-the-fence projects doesn’t really count as emissions reductions; instead, it “only avoids an emissions increase” (emphasis added), and therefore falls outside the Clean Air Act. So, writes Wagner, EPA’s proposal is inflexible because it “creat[es] emission standards that are impossible to meet without implementing these ‘outside the fence’ measures.” In other words, EPA, we can meet your goal for cutting carbon emissions if only you don’t make us cut carbon emissions so much. Yet two paragraphs later, Wagner acknowledges that Pennsylvania already has programs promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency, and ranks these programs among “actions taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions” in the commonwealth. So are such measures “reductions” or not? Yes, says the EPA. In an email, the agency says the Clean Air Act requires it “to identify the ‘best system of emission reduction … adequately demonstrated’ available to limit pollution.” And “[t]he best and most effective system for reducing carbon pollution doesn’t look just at the power plants themselves, but at the whole power system.” The Clean Power Plan has other critics in Pennsylvania. In July, the state House of Representatives approved H.B. 2354, a bill requiring the state legislature to approve the DEP’s carbon-reduction plan before the Clean Power Plan-averse DEP submits it to the EPA. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Pam Snyder (D-Waynesburg), says reducing our use of coal could economically devastate districts like hers and threaten America’s “energy independence.” Burning coal for electricity accounts for about one-third of U.S. greenhouse-gas emissions, and mostly market forces (including cheap natural gas) have already shrunken coal’s market share. But Snyder says, “to eliminate something in the energy portfolio is wrong.” Critics like PennEnvironment field director Adam Garber contend that requiring the legislature to vote on the DEP’s plan could delay it so much that EPA would step in and impose a “one-size-fits-all” plan on Pennsylvania. (Snyder counters that a provision in her bill would prevent that.) At press time, H.B. 2354 was still awaiting action by a Senate committee. In any case, it won’t be the last effort to privilege coal over climate.

CLEAN POWER PLAN CRITICS SEEK TO PRIVILEGE COAL OVER CLIMATE.

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014


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For information Call: (724) 872-1670 N E W S

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THE POTATO PANCAKES HAD A TEXTURE THAT WAS ROBUST AND GOLDEN BROWN

WHILE YOU WAIT {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Downtown lunch spot Sal’s City Deli is known for its burgers and Reubens. So you might be surprised by owner Mike Tarquinio’s new venture just around the corner: Simple Ingredients, a takeout lunch counter specializing in light, fresh and healthful fare like salads and wraps. In the tiny but brightly day-lit storefront, the six signature salads, four wraps and a build-your-own-salad option are made to order while you watch. “There’s an inherent quality factor in seeing somebody make exactly what you want fresh,” says Tarquinio. Everything from the lettuce to the 15 chef-made dressings is made or procured fresh daily, he says. There’s also a from-scratch soup daily; come fall, there’ll be two soups each day, with fresh-pressed smoothies also planned. The super-foods salad was hearty, with grilled salmon, baby spinach, kale, tomato, red onion, broccoli, edamame and almonds, topped with a piquant tomato-basil vinaigrette. Other patron favorites so far include the chicken-salad wrap (with cranberries and almonds) and the Southwest grilled-chicken salad (including black beans, sweet corn, avocado and tortilla strips). Salads cost between $8.99-9.49, wraps $6.99-7.49. Simple Ingredients opened just after Labor Day; it serves 11 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. Even with its lone sidewalk table, it’s already successful enough that Tarquinio is planning more outlets Downtown. He thinks he knows why people like it: “The made-to-order thing has really opened my eyes.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-4341122 or www.simpleingredientspgh.com

the

FEED

Here’s a fall festival you can share with TV stars!

Freedom Farms, the King family-run operation depicted in the reality show Farm Kings, will be getting its fall fun on each weekend in October, from 10 a.m-5 p.m. Hay rides, pumpkins (picking, painting, chunkin), corn maze, apple cider, doughnuts, BBQ and more. $5 covers hay ride and mazes. Route 8, north of Gibsonia. www.freedomfarmspa.com

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DINER

DONE RIGHT {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

SK ANGELIQUE’S father, a German who retired to his homeland after .living for 30-some years abroad, what he misses most about the United States, and he’ll tell you: the diners. There is a sense in which diners match food to appetite better than any other kind of restaurant. Fine-dining establishments dazzle with ambience and pamper with service; trendy bistros focus on an of-the-moment alchemy of decor and attitude; chains rely on their battery of consultants to create just the right branded experience. But diners serve all anyone really wants, most of the time: basic, familiar food, cooked well and served fast, hot and preferably cheap. Maybe this is why periodic efforts to create “upscale” diners tend to fizzle pretty quickly. We certainly weren’t expecting a red carpet when we visited Cole Cafe on Mount Royal Boulevard, in Glenshaw. Located in a modest strip mall next to the local middle school, Cole Cafe is there to serve good grub to locals, not artisanal fare to foodies. But that’s not to say Cole puts no effort into creating a pleasant dining room.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

Santa Fe omelet

Beyond the lottery counter by the front door, colorful ceramic mugs held patrons’ coffee on the counter, each booth had its own framed photograph of Ireland, and a bright-red back wall was festooned with diner lingo in cheerful typefaces: EGGS, POTATO PANCAKES.

COLE CAFE 1718 Mount Royal Blvd., Glenshaw. 412-486-5513 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sun. 6:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. PRICES: $2-10 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED The combined breakfast-lunch menu leans toward the former: There are many types of egg dishes (including both threeegg omelets and, listed separately, bellybuster three-egg omelets; the distinction seems to be in the number of filings); the obligatory array of griddled breads and cakes served with syrup; and a selection of mixed grills, which in this context means a

scrambled mess (in a good way) of proteins, veggies, eggs and home fries. The potato-pancake breakfast was an easy choice thanks to the promise of homemade latkes (we should probably take our cue from Cole’s Irish theme and call them by their Irish name, boxties, instead). The cakes delivered with a texture that was robust and golden brown, without a hint of grease, on the outside, and finely shredded on the inside. Whatever you call them, they were truly an excellent example of the type. Accompanying eggs-over-medium were properly cooked to order, and the sausage patty stood out for being firm and juicy, with a nice little hint of spice. French toast and pancakes don’t need much tarting up to be tempting, but Cole puts forth extra effort with selections like peanut-butter-chocolate-chip flapjacks. That crossed the line from breakfast into dessert territory for us, but we did try the cinnamon French toast, made with thick slabs of cinnamon-swirl bread. They were eggy, cinnamon-y, buttery and good. Hash browns were croquette-style, with good


potato flavor and a satisfying contrast of crispy and creamy textures. The combo of chorizo, banana peppers, pepper jack and salsa in “The Grill’s on Fire” mixed grill promised more stimulation than a cup of coffee to get the morning going. Alas, execution fell short here, mostly due to a hesitant hand with the heat. There was sufficient cheese, but its flavor was mild, and the banana peppers, despite their peak-season abundance in the markets, were scanty at best. There also wasn’t much more than a dollop of salsa atop the whole hefty plate of scrambled stuff. The dish had a solid line-up of ingredients, but the proportions needed work to make it light a fire under us. The real disappointment in this order was the home fries, which were mostly lacking in the crackling brown edges that practically define the dish, and which were cut in such widely varying sizes that some chunks were barely cooked through.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

ELBOW ROOM An expanded state store here augurs further improvements

We let a burger be the last word. The menu emphasizes Cole’s big (one-third of a pound), fresh and lean burgers, and ours was cooked the right way, loosely formed so that the meat didn’t toughen and the edges crisped a little on the griddle. Even better was a big bun, grill-toasted and closer to a kaiser roll than to a mediocre, generic burger bun. Here was a good example of how a humble but capable diner doesn’t need pedigreed ingredients, trendy preparations or a focus group to be good: a classic American burger, done right without busting your gut or gutting your wallet, for a modest $5. Cole Cafe earned our regard, not by being anything special per se, but rather by exemplifying the appeal of a typical diner in nearly every way.

East Liberty is now home to the largest Fine Wine and Good Spirits store in the state. The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board refurbished and expanded its existing store to more than 35 percent of its previous size. At 17,674 square feet, the shop (off South Highland Avenue, in the Eastside development near Whole Foods) now has plenty of space to store and sell booze. It’s bright and airy, designed similarly to last year’s remodel of the Wexford and Monroeville stores. While the East Liberty store already had a large collection of spirits, PLCB spokesperson Stacy Kriedeman says via email that the renovated store’s selection of luxury wine and spirits has been further expanded. One shopper, Liz Mackenzie, said that while she liked the remodel, “There still aren’t enough South African wines for me.” As much as I dig the new look in East Liberty, I’d really love to see some of the smaller, totally outdated state stores developed into curated boutiques. Wouldn’t it be cool, for example, to see Store 0209, in Central Lawrenceville remodeled from its current 1980s Soviet Union aesthetic? Because it’s the only liquor store in the neighborhood, the state would need to stock affordable wine and spirits, too. But it would be nice to see an expanded line of Amrut alongside the Old Crow. Kriedeman writes that the PLCB is “in the process of rebranding all of our retail locations. However, we’re doing it in the most efficient way possible. As leases come up, we do an analysis to determine if the store should be expanded, consolidated with another store, relocated or closed.” Kriedeman says that 60 stores have been remodeled so far. The next Premium Collection store to open in Western Pennsylvania will be Oct. 16, in Murrysville. And some fine-tuning — such as fixtures for better storing high-end wine — are in the works for already-remodeled stores. Now someone please get Ms. Mackenzie — and me — more South African wines.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“THERE STILL AREN’T ENOUGH SOUTH AFRICAN WINES FOR ME.”

“Chicken Imposter” sandwich

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALL INDIA. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600. With more than 200 items, All India’s menu is both epic and exciting, including novel choices such as Goan coconut shrimp and green jackfruit curry alongside the old denizens, chicken curry and the tandoor. Here, a thali, or combination platter, is a great option for the culinary explorer who wants the experience of multiple tastes. KF BAR MARCO. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900. At this former firehouseturned-restaurant, a small but well-curated menu makes a perfect complement to this venue’s wine and cocktail list. The tapas-inspired roster ranges from charcuterie plates and classics, like patatas bravas, to smoked-pork tamales and grilled radicchio and endive salad. KE BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

Grit & Grace {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF

BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but

All India {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE

GATTO CYCLE DINER. Wood Street and Seventh Avenue, Tarentum. 724-224-0500. This lovingly restored 1949 vintage diner, now appended to a motorcycle shop, serves breakfast, sandwiches and burgers, all re-named in honor of motorbikes. Nitro chili gets its kick from onions, hot sauce and sliced jalapenos; the Bar-B-Q Glide sandwich is topped with bacon, barbecue sauce and cheddar; and the Sportster is a delicious tuna melt. J GRIT & GRACE. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748. Small plates with plenty of unexpected ingredients and designed for sharing mark this Downtown venue. The menus offers updates on classics (Rueben, ramen) and eclectic Asian fusion fare to dim sum and “pork face” sandwich. Fortunately, the kitchen brings a confident approach to a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes. KE HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE. 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. A motorcyclethemed venue offers mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — prepared from scratch. The menu also offers a modest South of the Border section, and the kitchen’s creativity shows in unique items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday, a roast-turkey sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. KE KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-683-4004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of off-the-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobsterCONTINUES ON PG. 22


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Bob’s Diner {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and-white-bean purée alongside fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deepfried gnocchi. KF LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE

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SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J

PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. www.pamelasdiner.com. There are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner miniTAMARI. 3519 Butler St., chain: the cheery atmosphere; Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) the old-fashioned breakfasts and 701 Warrendale Village featuring raisin French toast, fried Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). potatoes and corned-beef hash; The concept is original and and light, crispy-edged simple: blending the pancakes so good that salty, citrusy flavors of President Obama had Asia with the bright, them served at the spicy flavors of Latin White House. J America. Although . w ww per the execution is a p ty ci h pg PARK BRUGES. 5801 high-end, individual .com Bryant St., Highland dishes are quite Park. 412-661-3334. This reasonably priced, with Belgian-style bistro offers more lots of small plates. KE than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty in either a traditional creamAve., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. wine preparation or spicy Creole. Located in a narrow former Rather than frites, try variations lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the on French-Canadian poutine, such casual, no-nonsense and no-frills as adding chipotle pulled pork. member of Pittsburgh’s Thai Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads restaurant club. The prices are and even a burger round out this on the low end, but the food innovative menu. KE quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian REYNA RESTAURANTE themes with diner kitsch in a MEXICANO. 2031 Penn Ave., delightful way. JF Strip District. 412-904-1242. The city’s oldest Mexican grocery WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., brings a serious, sit-down Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. exploration of moles, rellenos Eschewing the epic list of and other mainstays of Mexico’s dishes most Chinese-American regional cuisines. There are tacos restaurants proffer, this (albeit Mexican-style), but the attractively decorated storemore adventurous should check front venue sticks to a modest out more fare such as tamal number of basics with a few Oaxaqueno (lime-soaked corn less-typical dishes, such as dough filled with chicken in Singapore mai fun (a dish of Oaxaca mole sauce, wrapped in stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha a banana leaf) or a relleno made (a meat-and-vegetable dish from with ancho chiles. EK China’s Gansu province) JF

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862 WESTERN AVE. MODERN C A F E 412-321-4550 NORTHSIDE themoderncafe.com


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LOCAL

“WE WANT TO MAKE THE HEAVIEST RECORD OF THIS YEAR, AND THE WEIRDEST.”

BEAT

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

SOUNDS OF SILENTS

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SILENTS, PLEASE! screening of The General. 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28. Hollywood Theater, 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. All ages. 412-563-0368 or www.thehollywooddormont.org

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BREAKING Tom Roberts {PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK KEPPLER}

Tom Roberts can ramble about the sublime intricacies of Charlie Chaplin films, like he’s Quentin Tarantino taking an interviewer through a lengthy aside about Italian action movies or Kevin Smith presenting his latest epiphany about Return of the Jedi. Take, for instance, 1916’s The Pawn Shop. “Everyone in the film is a stereotype,” explains Roberts, a musician and piano teacher who performs original scores to such silent movies as part of the Hollywood Theater’s Silents, Please! series. “There’s the Orthodox Jewish owner, his hot daughter, an uptight accountant and a sneaky thief.” Playing a shop employee, Chaplin “shows up late and when the boss tells him he’s late, he checks his [pocket] watch against the wall calendar.” From there, hijinks ensue, of course. His geeky enthusiasm for all things from the silent era has led Roberts to organize Silents, Please!, which, as of this Sunday’s showing of 1926’s The General, starring Buster Keaton, will have brought eight programs of live musicians and silent films to the Hollywood Theater (a movie house that actually dates back to the silent era). Andrew Greene, a ragtime expert, accompanies the train-themed film. At another show, composer Ben Opie teamed up with the spacey Sound/Unsound Trio for a slate of films that utilized primitive special effects. Putting a band in the pulpit was common in the silent era and has made a comeback. Daryl Fleming, who has brought his ragtime/folk-rock band The Public Domain to perform his score to the 1928 Louise Brooks film Beggars of Life at Silents, Please!, has also played to early movies at the Warhol and the George Eastman House, a photography museum in Rochester, N.Y. “It’s fun, and it’s not like you have to be John Williams to do it,” says Fleming. “You just have to have a good knowledge of music from that era and roll with it. Sometimes, I will throw in ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’ and stuff like that.” Roberts says the performances have enticed a wide audience, from retirees to young hipsters. “I get a lot of compliments from twentysomething women with tattoos and asymmetrical haircuts,” he adds, “who tell me that Buster Keaton is the hottest man they’ve ever seen.”

THE CODE {BY MARGARET WELSH}

F

OR THOSE who have followed Code Orange over the past few years, the most immediately noticeable thing about the band’s new record — I Am King, released earlier this month — is also probably the last thing the members are interested in talking about: that is, the conspicuous absence of the word “kids” from the group’s name. Some bands with ageoriented names make adjustments as time wears on (like the Young Rascals), and some don’t (Youth of Today). But for Pittsburghbased Code Orange, the name change had nothing to do with the transition from teens to twentysomethings. “People were like, ‘Oh, they’re grown up,’ or whatever. It didn’t have anything to do with that,” explains drummer and vocalist Jami Morgan. “We weren’t even certain we were going to change the name until I saw the response.” Everyone seemed to have an opinion on the subject, whether they were fans of the band or not. “At that point it was like, ‘Well, now it’s called fucking Orange,’ whatever.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

They do what they want: Code Orange (from left: Eric Balderose, Jami Morgan, Reba Meyers, Joe Goldman)

The “Kids” could return on the next record or it could not, but as arbitrary as Morgan might make the change out to be, it’s indicative of the band members’ core value: that is, continuing to do whatever they want, regardless of whether it makes sense to anyone else. “That’s what it’s supposed to be about,” Morgan says. “We wanted to show that we would shake it up any time.”

CODE ORANGE RELEASE SHOW

WITH TWITCHING TONGUES, ANGEL DUST, HOUNDS OF HATE AND ETERNAL SLEEP 6 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.druskyent.com

I last spoke with Jami in 2010, when he was 17. Then, Code Orange Kids — who by that point had already been together for more than three years — played shows

constantly, opening locally for major acts like Municipal Waste and Nekromantix. Their post-graduation plan was to move to Philadelphia together and generally devote themselves to their music. “I hear about these bands who are offered big tours and they don’t do it because someone has to work,” Morgan said at the time. “I would give up anything to do that.” And then — as so rarely happens with five-year plans — things went almost exactly as anticipated. The four moved to Philly — Morgan, guitarist/singer Reba Meyers and bassist Joe Goldman enrolled in college, and guitarist Eric Balderose came along to keep the band together. A few months later, they were back in Pittsburgh (school didn’t work out), but in the interim they had carved out a home in the Philly hardcore scene. Following a series of self-released EPs, they put Cycles out on Mayfly Records. The record eventually caught the attention of Deathwish Inc. (the label co-founded by hardcore elder statesman Jacob Bannon), which released CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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BREAKING THE CODE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

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the band’s debut full-length, Love Is Love/ Return to Dust, in 2012. Where that first full-length was a summation of Code Orange’s early recordings, I Am King was a chance to branch out. “It’s very different from other stuff we’ve done,” says Morgan, “but also very different from what a lot of other people are doing right now.” While some members of the scene draw a distinct line between “arty” extreme music and what might be called (pejoratively or not) “ignorant hardcore,” Morgan says, “We like both. I like music that you can just fucking mosh to. I also like weird music. We want to do both. We want to make the heaviest record of this year, and we also want to make the weirdest record of this year.” And indeed, I Am King, which debuted at No. 96 on the Billboard Top 200 and at No. 1 on the Billboard vinyl charts, is heavy and weird. It’s also, judging from Morgan’s personal accounts as well as general Internet chatter, fairly polarizing. “When [Deathwish co-founder Tre McCarthy] heard it, he said, ‘Well, it’s much better than the other record, but people are going to say its numetal,’” Morgan recalls. “And I was like, ‘I don’t fucking care what people say!’” Code Orange has hardly abandoned its more traditional hardcore roots, but I Am King is a dense record. It draws as much from dark shoegazey bands like The Jesus and Mary Chain and the ’90s alternative rock of Alice in Chains and Smashing Pumpkins as it does from ’90s/early-2000s metalcore bands like Disembodied and Buried Alive. Visceral, mosh-ready breakdowns are tempered with grainy, ethereal vocals and sludgy instrumentation. And, since Morgan, Meyers and Goldman are also members of popular lo-fi outfit Adventures, it’s unsurprising that shades of indie rock have ended up in the mix as well. Is it nu-metal? Well, yeah, a little. But it’s been almost 20 years since Deftones released Adrenaline: In terms of eternal return, the music world might be due. Regardless, this record — from the title onward — is an audacious move, executed with extreme confidence. Which, of course, is something that Code Orange has never lacked. “It’s the only way to matter in 2014,” Morgan says. “There’s an idea behind [the record]; there’s a vibe behind it. Yet there are going to be tons of people criticizing and shitting on it. I knew what I wanted the record to be about. I wanted the music to represent that, I wanted the title to represent that, I wanted us calling it Code Orange to represent that. We are going to do whatever we want. We’re [the ones] who have been together since we were 14. We’ve been friends. And I trust what my friends think.”

Four tracks of decent bluegrass music from the local fourpiece. The band’s uniqueness stems from its use of a cello as a fourth instrument (complementing the guitar, banjo and bass). The songs are well written; the cello is great when it augments the sound like a fiddle would, but when it plays bass lines, it seems a little redundant. The recording is a little underwhelming, which leads to some issues with vocals and general balance, but the talent underlying the album, along with the novel setup, indicates that this could be a band that goes far. Nice first EP.

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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

THE VAN ALLEN BELT HEAVEN ON A BRANCH (NONSTOP EVERYTHING RECORDS)

In recent years, The Van Allen Belt’s local notoriety has just begun to approach proportionality to the band’s talent and work ethic. The prolific, hard-touring psychpop outfit has a new full-length of characteristically deconstructed, spliced and reconstructed tunes, with clever melodies supporting Tamar Kamin’s rich, beautiful voice. Some are well-built, lengthy soundscapes, others quirky, short takes (like “This Is the Best Shower I Have Ever Taken”). There’s no reason the Animal-Collective-and-Black Moth crowd shouldn’t eat this one up. THE VAN ALLEN BELT CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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Soaking up the last of summer: Ennui’s Jim Doutrich

BREWING NEW SOUNDS {BY BRIAN CONWAY} IN THE BACK room at Constellation Coffee, in Lawrenceville, before settling in to discuss his new album, Telepathic Beat, Jim Doutrich advocates the benefits of pour-over coffee. “This Chemex, it’s a longer drip, and it absorbs differently,” he says. “Everything is measured out. [The barista] has it on a scale, so everything is, like, very calculated, and then you get a precise cup of coffee.” For its part, the album, being released under the name Ennui, took about two years to percolate into its final form. Talk about precision. “Some days I spend hours and hours and hours on one little sound,” says Doutrich. “I try to work as much as I can, but as much as I try to control the song, I let it go where it needs to go. It sort of takes its own course. Despite the fact that you think you’re controlling it, the song will turn into what it needs to turn into.” Telepathic Beat, which comes out Sept. 23, on Mush Records, was mixed in Brooklyn with producer Al Carlson (Oneohtrix Point Never, Autre Ne Veut). Its emotional center is “Summer of Love,” seven sun-drenched minutes of spiraling synths and Doutrich’s dreamy vocals that should push back autumn for at least a couple of weeks. Doutrich cites acts on vanguard electronic label Warp as his main influence, especially Scottish electronic duo Boards of Canada. “If I’m influenced by a song, or a group, it’s the initial idea,” says Doutrich. “But as I work on the song more and more, I defi-

nitely start to block influences out. “Whether it sounds better or not, I just want my songs to have this unique quality to them.” For now, Doutrich is working on translating the album for a live setting. He has enlisted neighbor and friend Ryan Hizer, formerly of the Morgantown band Librarians, to join him onstage. Before the show, they’ll decamp for two weeks of rehearsal at a nearby studio rented by friends in another local band, Mariage Blanc, in anticipation of Ennui’s first live show in its current incarnation. If the stage name sounds familiar, it is because Ennui is also the name of Doutrich’s former band, which was most recently a duo of him and Sam McUmber. Late in 2011, after the two released the synth-rock album Formation of Tides, the former roommates began to work on what would become the basis for Telepathic Beat.

ENNUI

WITH YXU 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. SPACE, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5. All ages. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

“He was there for a while,” says Doutrich about McUmber, “and he was there for all the initial ideas, all the initial structure of the songs. But there’s only so much two people can do when you’re not rehearsing. You’re just sitting in front of a computer working on parts.” McUmber has listened to his friend’s new album, and he calls the finished product “pretty great.” “I think there are some really beautiful, ethereal sounds,” he says, “and you can hear a lot of diverse influences in the music; I was proud to be a small part of it.”

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Batteries Accessories

[HIP HOP] + THU., SEPT. 25

Dessa, a.k.a. Dessa Darling of Detroit’s Doomtree hip-hop collective, got her start as a spoken-word artist in the Minneapolis scene. She released her first solo album in 2005, and has since produced three more LPs, as well as four books of her written work. Dessa’s poetic sensibility transforms into eerie lyricism and narratives, most recently showcased on her 2013 album Parts of Speech. She forges seamless transitions between rap and song that land somewhere in the realm of a musical spokenword performance. You’ll find her along with alternative hip-hop group Why? tonight at Altar Bar. Samantha Ward 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., The Strip. $13-15. All ages. 412Dessa 206-9719 or www. thealtarbar.com

[ALT-FOLK] + THU., SEPT. 25 Good vibes and a good cause pervade tonight at Cattivo, where Music Night on Jupiter and the Gay and Lesbian Community Center have teamed up to present a show headlined by Joe Stevens. The singer-songwriter, now performing solo, grew to notoriety fronting the band Coyote Grace. Also playing tonight are Brooklyn’s Great Caesar and Boston’s Night Lights. A portion of the proceeds goes to Cathy’s Closet, a personal-care pantry run by the GLCC. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., SEPT. 27

The Afghan Whigs have come out with their first all-new album in 16 years, Do to the Beast, as well as a revamped version of their 1993 album Gentleman. From its origins in ’80s garage punk, the Cincinnati band quickly rose to become one of the most critically-acclaimed alternative rock groups of the ’90s. Greg Dulli

The Afghan Whigs

and company have a tenure in the music scene, perhaps making it either disconcerting or absolutely amazing to hear the influence of a 16-year hiatus on a familiar sound. You have the chance to relive some of that revamped ’90s rock tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre. SW 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $30. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[NEO-SOUL] + TUE., SEPT. 30

Canadian chanteuse Jill Barber started her career as a singer-songwriter with a guitar, then morphed into a torch singer with a classic sound and full s orchestration. On her orchestra latest, Fool’s Foo Gold, the strings are still there, but more horns pop in, giving givin some of her songs more of a soul feel. feel She and her he band are charming live, and land in what might be the city’s best venue for such an act — the cocktail-room atmosphere of Club Café — a tonight. Heather Kropf opens. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $13. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF KAI BENSON}

Mods Tanks

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PIPER FERGUSON}

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[BALKAN BRASS] + WED., OCT. 01 Brass-band music, inspired by traditions from everywhere from Latin America to Eastern Europe, has been more and more visible locally lately — and tonight, fans get the chance to see one of the masters at work. Boban Marković has long been one of the leading names in Serbian brass-band music, and he appears with his Boban i Marko Marković Orkestar tonight at the Rex Theater, in a show put on by The Consortium, Pandemic and VIA. The band is led by Boban and his son, Marko; stranger things have happened, but chances are you won’t get another chance to see this act here in town. Lungs Face Feet and the Pandemic DJs open. AM 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16-20. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jude Benedict & The Last Drop, 31ST STREET PUB. First in Space, Jeremy Caywood & The Way Scratch N Sniffs, The Lebowskis, of Life, LoFi Delphi, Graydon Westerberg. Strip District. ALTAR BAR. WHY?, Dessa. James & Laura Spink. Bloomfield. 412-391-8334. Strip District. 412-263-2877. 412-682-0320. ALTAR BAR. Adventure CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Rock for RAMADA INN HOTEL & Club, Go Go Gadjet. Strip CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero Human Rights w/ Wil Seabrook. District. 412-263-2877. & Jingles. Greensburg. Shadyside. 412-365-1100. AMBRIDGE SONS OF ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. CLUB CAFE. Marc Scibilia, ITALY. Cindy & Dave. Capsized. 412-487-6259. The Bros. Landreth. South Side. Ambridge. SPACE. YXU, 412-431-4950. BAYARDSTOWN Ennui. Downtown. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Bishop www. per SOCIAL CLUB. Charlie 412-325-7723. pa Allen, Scott Fry Experience. pghcitym Hustle & the Grifters. TEDDY’S. .co Garfield. 412-361-2262. The Dude Abides. The Dave Iglar Band. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Strip District. North Huntingdon. Urban Pioneers, Waylon Speed. BRILLOBOX. The Van Allen Belt, 724-863-8180. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Gangwish, Two Muffin Rabbit. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Cloud MR. SMALLS THEATER. St. Lucia, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Nothings, Shaky Shrines. Joywave. Millvale. 866-468-3401. CLUB CAFE. The Billy Price Oakland. 412-648-7990. RIVERS CASINO. Lovebettie. Band (Early) KHeeS, City Steps, North Side. 610-962-1600. Naked Spirit (Late). South Side. SMILING MOOSE. The Silks, Me 412-431-4950. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Toos, Carney Stomp, Depths of Gone South. Pleasant Hills. HAMBONE’S. Chuck Owston, A Winter. South Side. 412-431-4668. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE Company of Knaves, Carnival of THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Big Leg TAVERN. Outsideinside, Souls, Gypsy Ribbon, Ryan Taylor. Molasses Barge, Fist Fight In Emma, Shelf Life String Band. 23rd Annual Celtic Harvest Festival. The Parking Lot. Bloomfield. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. 412-682-8611. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Lava Game. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CLUB CAFE. Melinda Colaizzi (Early) Blackbird Bullet, Anello (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. 724-265-1181. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Moon Bounce, Kazimier, Weird Paul, Tulpa, Idle Minds. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Cellular Chaos, Microwaves, The Cunks, Joey Molinaro. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. The Employers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Afghan Whigs, Joseph Arthur. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The El Rays. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Icarus The Owl, Hail The Sun. South Side. 412-431-4668. SONNY’S TAVERN. Shaky Shrines. Each Monday, we bring you a new MP3 Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Pete Bush from a local band. This week’s offering & the Hoi Polloi, Working Breed. comes from The Feel-Good Revolution; Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TUGBOAT’S. The Distractions. stream or download East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992. on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. TWIN OAKS LOUNGE. The GRID.

FRI 26

ROCK/POP THU 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 27

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPH COZZA}

THE FEEL-GOOD REVOLUTION

“A Song for Sarah”

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

SUN 28 ALTAR BAR. My Brightest Diamond. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Erasure. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Dom Flemons w/ Grace & Tony. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Dick Diver, The City Buses. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARD ROCK CAFE. Eliot Lewis, Nik C & The Blue Tops. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dr. Smoke, Hessian, Blood of Kings, Carousel. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Hardproof, Matthew Tembo. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 30 ALTAR BAR. Periphery, The Contortionist, Intervals, Toothgrinder. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Jill Barber, Heather Kropf. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Bombadil. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Mail The Horse, Union Rye, Sun Hound. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Marc Broussard, Mingo Fishtrap, Andy Suzuki. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. The Last Bison. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Vanessa Campagna, Chris Higbee, Kelsey Friday, Etta Cox, Maddie Georgi, Scott Blasey of The Clarks, more. 10th Annual Voices Carry: Concert Fundraiser Benefiting Auberle. North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 01 ALTAR BAR. Real Estate. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. FREEMAN, Arc Iris. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Charlie Parr, Jordan McLaughlin. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Joshua Wilkins Black. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Boban I Marko Markovic Orkestar, Lungs Face Feet. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. DRGN KING. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Les Racquet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 25 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

EARLY WARNINGS Local album-release shows

{FRI., OCT. 03}

André Costello and the Cool Minors, The Rattling Arcade The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side {SAT., OCT. 04}

The Redlines, The Redlines Howlers, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield {FRI., NOV. 14}

Paddy the Wanderer, The Mastery of Space Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville

FRI 26 MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647.

SAT 27 CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-657-2279. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

Mike & DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 26 CULTURAL DISTRICT. Les Nubians. Part of the 10th anniversary Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 01 XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. Insane Clown Posse, Mushroomhead, Da Mafia 6ix, Madchild, Jellyroll. Strip District.

BLUES FRI 26 THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. MOONDOG’S. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SUN 28

SAT 27

SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. Monaca. 724-728-7200.

WED 01 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha

CONTINUES ON PG. 43

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014


Decisions for the future

FALL 2014 A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


EDUCATION

GUIDE DECISIONS FOR THE FUTURE

This section is here to help you discover the right school for you. Searching for a college, university or trade school takes a lot of work, but luckily these next few pages do all the work for you.

A D V E R T I S I N G

IUP INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 1011 SOUTH DRIVE, INDIANA, PA 15705 www.iup.edu • 724-357-2230

Current Enrollment: 14,400 Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Tuition: $6,428 School Type: Public

Regular Application Deadline: May 1 Distance from downtown Pittsburgh: 60 miles

Most popular majors: Communications Media, Criminology, Psychology, Nursing, Business Awards & recognitions: Princeton Review’s Best Colleges; U.S. News and World Report’s “Best Colleges”; Forbes magazine’s “America’s Best Colleges”; Washington Monthly’s college ranking based on contributions to society; President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll; GI Jobs magazine’s “Military Friendly Schools,” faculty in Princeton Review’s Best 300 Professors; RateMyProfessor “Top 10 Best Professors”; Dr. Donald Asher’s Cool Colleges for the Hyper-Intelligent, Self-Directed, Late Blooming and Just Plain Different; Consumer Digest’s “Best Values in Public Colleges and Universities” Campus life description: IUP has a diverse population – 14,400 students coming from 48 states and 70 different countries. Students can live in new, modern, suite-style residence halls with living-learning communities ranging from women in science to nursing and allied health. With more than 100 clubs and organizations, intercollegiate and intramural athletics for sports from the traditional to recreational, and a robust Greek community, IUP offers something for every interest. Honor fraternities and organizations provide opportunities for leadership development and recognition of academic excellence at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

S U P P L E M E N T


MOUNT ALOYSIUS MOUNT ALOYSIUS COLLEGE

7373 ADMIRAL PEARY HIGHWAY, CRESSON, PA 16630 www.mtaloy.edu • 888-823-2220 Current Enrollment: 2,500 Student Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Tuition: $18,808 School Type: Private, Liberal Arts and Sciences

Most popular majors: Nursing, Business, Criminology Percentage of students receiving need-based ÄUHUJPHSHPK! 94%

Awards & recognitions: College of Distinction, Top Ranked in the North by US News & World Report, Military Friendly College, the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference, (AMCC) Dean’s Cup Award for Community Service. Mount Aloysius is fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. All nursing and health studies programs are fully accredited by their professional accrediting bodies, including the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, the Commission on Accreditation for Programs of Diagnostic Medical Sonography, the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, the American Association of Medical Assistants, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation for Programs of Surgical Technology. Campus life description: Student activities play a distinctive role in personal growth. At Mount Aloysius College, there are approximately 100 organized clubs, groups, honor societies, and an intramural sports program. Activities include a student newspaper, residence hall associations, student government, cheerleading, dance team, scholarship-funded theater and choir programs, and a student activities planning board. Mount Aloysius fun includes social events, intramural sports, athletic events, comedians, live music, theater, educational events, campus forums and awesome guest lectures. There are 14 Division III NCAA sports at Mount Aloysius College.

A D V E R T I S I N G

CHATHAM CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

WOODLAND ROAD, PITTSBURGH, PA 15232 chatham.edu • 412-365-1100 Current Enrollment: 2,170 Student Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Tuition: $16,117 per term School Type: 4-Year Private, Not-for-Profit Percentage of students receiving need-based ÄUHUJPHSHPK! 65% Most popular majors: Biology, Nursing, Psychology, Creative Writing, Interior Architecture Awards & recognitions: Highest ranked Regional North University in U.S. News & World Report in Western PA; listed in Sierra magazine’s top 25 “cool schools”; listed in Princeton Review’s Green College Guide four years in a row. Campus life description: Campus life at Chatham University unfolds on three of the most unique locations in the nation. Our Shadyside Campus comprises Woodland Road, a nationally-recognized arboretum lined with shady pathways and historic buildings; and Chatham Eastside, right around the corner from bustling Bakery Square and Google’s Pittsburgh offices. And our Eden Hall Campus, located on 388 acres just north of Pittsburgh, is home to the Falk School of Sustainability and the world’s first academic community built from the ground up for the study and practice of sustainable living.

S U P P L E M E N T


O EDEN HALL CAMPUS O SPECIAL EVENTS

AIP THE ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH 420 BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES PITTSBURGH, PA 15219 www.artinstitutes.edu/pittsburgh 412-263-6600

Current Enrollment: 1,122 Student Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Tuition: $487/Credit Hour School Type: Private

Percentage of students receiving need-based Ă„UHUJPHSHPK! 83%

Most popular majors: Culinary, Graphic Design, Digital Filmmaking & Video Production, Game Art & Design, Fashion Design, Photography, Interior Design, Media Arts & Animation Awards & recognitions: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is accredited by the Middle States Commission on High Education (MSCHE). The Interior Design program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). The Culinary program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation

an evening e e g with th

October 17 and 18 at 7:30 p.m. Eden Hall Campus, Richland, PA Tickets $10 at chatham.edu/poe Featuring two of Edgar Allan Poe’s most famous short stories, The Raven and The Tell-Tale Heart. This high tech performance will keep you on the edge of your seat.

A D V E R T I S I N G

Campus life description: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh has been serving students, alumni and employers since 1921. Our mission is to provide and education in design, media arts and culinary that prepare students for individual and professional success. We offer 16 Bachelor of Science degrees, eight Associate of Science degrees, five diplomas and 10 certificate programs.

S U P P L E M E N T


LEARN. CREATE. INSPIRE.

DESIGN

MEDIA ARTS

FASHION

CULINARY

TAKE THE FIRST STEP IN PURSUING YOUR CREATIVE PASSION.

CONTACT US TO GET STARTED. ARTINSTITUTES.EDU/PITTSBURGH 800.275.2470 Lock in your tuition through 2015 with our Tuition Freeze Initiative*

420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1301 *All existing or new students enrolled up to or for the August 21, 2014 class start, regardless of the number of credits, can freeze their tuition rates through the end of 2015. If a student withdraws following the August 21, 2014 start and decides to return at a later date, he or she may not be eligible for the continued tuition freeze through December 31, 2015. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


ALL-STATE

PITT CGS

ALL-STATE CAREER SCHOOL

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH COLLEGE OF GENERAL STUDIES

1200 LEBANON ROAD, WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 www.allstatecareer.edu • 412-823-1818 Most popular majors: CDL Class A and B, Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Welding Technician

1400 WESLEY W. POSVAR HALL, 230 SOUTH BOUQUET ST., PITTSBURGH, PA 15260 cgs.pitt.edu • 412-624-6600 Current Enrollment: 1,037 Student Faculty Ratio: 14:1 School Type: Public

Academic programs offered: 12 Majors, 13 Certificates

Most popular majors: Natural Sciences (includes pre-med track), Administration of Justice, and Media & Professional Communications Percentage of students transferring college credit from previous institution: 79% 7LYJLU[HNLVMZ[\KLU[ZYLJLP]PUNULLKIHZLKÄUHUJPHSHPK! Pitt students receive over $162 million in need-based financial aid Awards & recognitions: Pitt has been ranked as the top value in Pennsylvania nine consecutive times in The Kiplinger 100: Best Value in Public Colleges Campus life description: For more than 50 years, CGS has been addressing the unique needs of students who are busy with work, family, and other obligations. We support adult learners, transfer students, veterans, and others who want the personalized attention of a small academic community, and the competitive advantage of a degree from a world-renowned university. CGS provides flexible course formats — including online and hybrid courses—and convenient evening and weekend classes. Even our academic success programs, career development seminars, and free tutoring sessions are held in the evenings to help even the busiest students succeed.

We’re what’s next. START OR COMPLETE YOUR DEGREE. CHANGE OR ADVANCE YOUR CAREER.

Join us for an

OPEN HOUSE October 15, 4-7 p.m. cgs.pitt.edu/OpenHouse/cp

LEAH SWANZY, CGS graduate, natural sciences, health services, managing health programs and projects certificate

“The flexibility of my CGS courses allowed me to apply my studies immediately. I could learn about health care management in class one evening and see it in action working at the hospital the next day.”

DAVID RIVERA, CGS student, legal studies

“My first legal studies instructor had more than 30 years of experience working in the field yet made the subject approachable. He gave me confidence to continue my studies, even when it was challenging to balance school with my full-time job.”

412-624-6600

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

MICHELE WILLIAMS, former CGS student, public service

“Returning to school after many years can be intimidating. But CGS supported me every step of the way, from ensuring that all my previous credits transferred to providing services that helped me to achieve my academic goals on a realistic timeline.”


Career Education

SETON HILL SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

SETON HILL DRIVE, GREENSBURG, PA 15601 www.setonhill.edu • 1-800-826-6234 or 724-838-4281 Current Enrollment: 2,400 Student Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Tuition: $30,280 + $1,000 fees (undergraduate) School Type: Private, Catholic, Liberal Arts University

Most popular majors: Business, Visual & Performing Arts, Health Sciences Percentage of students receiving need-based ÄUHUJPHSHPK! 95%

Awards & recognitions: Apple Distinguished School; U.S. News & World Report: Best Regional College (North), Best Value, Best College for Veterans, Best Grad School Physician Assistant, Best Online Graduate Education Programs; Princeton Review: A Best Northeastern College; Forbes: One of America’s Top Colleges

GET RE AL

FROM SETON HILL YOU CAN SEE YOUR FUTURE Seton Hill’s 94% career/graduate school placement rate is a result of the university’s commitment to graduating students with an understanding of where they are headed (and why), and with the knowledge, contacts and resources to get them there. Faculty advisors and Career and Professional Development Center staff are committed to supporting students throughout their education, and beyond. The graduates of this Catholic liberal arts university are, in the words of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, “fit for the world.” Recent alumni include a sports management major who went to the Super Bowl with the Seattle Seahawks; a biology major who is at the forefront of cancer research; and a student veteran who majored in business and now helps other returning veterans find employment to match their skills and experience.

From Seton Hill, you can see your future. And things are looking UP.

That job isn’t going to fall into your lap.

All that stuff you wish you had – the career you want, the things you want, the life you want – you have to take action if you want to make them real, and Everest Institute can help! Make your goals real with our career education.

Make it REAL. Make it Everest.

1-888-293-0570 www.EverestLearn.com

t%BZBOEFWFOJOHDMBTTFT t'JOBODJBMBJEBWBJMBCMFGPSUIPTFXIPRVBMJGZ t$BSFFSQMBDFNFOUBTTJTUBODFBWBJMBCMFGPSHSBEVBUFT t"DDSFEJUFE.FNCFS "$*$4

Since 1840 The school is in the Kossman Building.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website at www.everest.edu/disclosures.

SETON HILL’S VISUAL &

PERFORMING ARTS CENTERS

A TOP ACT

IN EVERY WAY.

The lights shine brightly on Greensburg’s arts corridor, featuring Seton Hill’s world-class Performing Arts Center and new Dance and Visual Arts Center (opening in fall 2015). Ready to see why there’s no grander place to live and learn the arts? Register for our October 19 Open House at

setonhill.edu/visit. A D V E R T I S I N G

PITTSBURGH

S U P P L E M E N T


STOP LOOKING AND START DRIVING!

CDL DRIVER TRAINING Also Offering Welding Technician & HVACR

CCAC COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY

FOUR CAMPUSES AND FOUR CENTERS, LOCATED AS FOLLOWS: ALLEGHENY CAMPUS (NORTH SHORE) BOYCE CAMPUS (MONROEVILLE) NORTH CAMPUS (MCCANDLESS) SOUTH CAMPUS (WEST MIFFLIN) BRADDOCK HILLS CENTER HOMEWOOD-BRUSHTON CENTER WASHINGTON COUNTY CENTER WEST HILLS CENTER ccac.edu • 412-237-3100 Current Enrollment: CCAC annually educates more than 30,000 credit students Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 School Type: Public

Tuition: $104.75 per credit (plus applicable fees) for Allegheny County residents. Flat rate tuition of $1,571.25 for 12–18 credits for Allegheny County residents.

Most popular majors: Nursing, General Studies, Liberal Arts, Business, Criminal Justice and Criminology, Psychology, Early Education and Child Development 7LYJLU[HNLVMZ[\KLU[ZYLJLP]PUNULLKIHZLKĂ„UHUJPHSHPK! CCAC students receive more than $50 million in ďŹ nancial aid, making it easier for them to attend college. CCAC students are eligible for scholarships, work-study employment and grant funds, in addition to student loans. Campus life description: CCAC provides nearly 100 clubs and organizations, four honor societies, intercollegiate and intramural sports, cultural events and student government leadership positions, providing CCAC students the opportunity to pursue interests outside the classroom. Bio: CCAC provides a ďŹ rst-rate education at an institution that has an exceptional reputation for providing quality instruction at an accessible, affordable cost. Every year thousands of students make CCAC their college of ďŹ rst choice. Here’s why: Transfer Opportunities CCAC students have transferred credits to 462 colleges and universities and the college currently has articulation agreements in 125 programs. Savings—College Made Affordable CCAC students save $19,000 over the cost of public four-year colleges and universities and $54,000 over the cost of private four-year colleges and universities — all by spending their first two years at CCAC.

Flexible Class Schedules Financial Aid Available for those who Qualify Career Placement Assistance for all Graduates ACCSC Accredited

     

WWW.ALLSTATECAREER.EDU

1-800-TRAIN-18

What is a CCAC education worth? Individuals who earn a credit-bearing certificate or associate degree are better able to get jobs at family-sustaining wages with benefits and advancement opportunities. In fact, statistics show that individuals who earn a certificate or degree can earn 32 to 42 percent more than high school graduates, according to the US Census Bureau. This means that you could earn an additional $400,000* in your lifetime — all as a result of having completed your CCAC education. Expanded Learning Options No matter how busy a student’s schedule is, CCAC provides exible learning options. From the convenience of eight campus and center locations to thousands of online learning options — CCAC gives students access to 24/7 education. Eight degrees and seven certiďŹ cates can be completed entirely online and numerous other programs can be completed mostly online.

For consumer information visit www.allstatecareer.edu A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


CCAC offers: lÐÐSQ@MREDQÐOQNFQ@LR lÐ QSHBTK@SHNMÐ@FQDDLDMSR HMÐÐOQNFQ@LR lÐ%K@SÐQ@SDÐSTHSHNMÐNEÐ    Ð lÐ.MKHMDÐÐNM B@LOTRÐ BNTQRDR mÐBQDCHSRÐOKTRÐEDDR Ð KKDFGDMXÐ"NTMSXÐQDRHCDMSRÐ

ccac.edu

OUR GOAL IS YOUR

SUCCESS.

412.237.3100

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


CARLOW

PITT-BRADFORD

CARLOW UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT BRADFORD

3333 FIFTH AVE., PITTSBURGH PA 15213 www.carlow.edu • 412-578-6059 Current Enrollment: 2,300 Student Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Tuition: $25,956 School Type: Private

Percentage of students receiving need-based ÄUHUJPHSHPK! 90%

300 CAMPUS DRIVE, BRADFORD, PA, 16701 www.upb.pitt.edu • 800-872-1787 Current Enrollment: 1,535 Student Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Tuition: $12,452 per year for PA residents

School Type: Public Percentage of students receiving need-based ÄUHUJPHSHPK! More than 90%

Most popular majors: Biology, Psychology, Nursing, Art Awards & recognitions: Listed among the Top 20 BestBang-for-the-Buck Private Colleges by Washington Monthly Campus life description: Carlow’s main campus overlooks Oakland, the region’s academic, cultural and medical center. The private, 17-acre self-enclosed campus features seven tranquil gardens, a waterfall and several art installations. Coming in fall 2015 – a new University Commons, complete with lounge and study areas, café, art gallery and state-of-the-art computer labs. Carlow University: Transforming Lives. Transforming Our World for 85 Years. Carlow University is a private, Catholic, masters comprehensive University offering excellent professional and liberal arts programs.

Most popular majors: Athletic Training, Biology, Business Management, Criminal Justice, Education and Nursing Awards & recognitions: The Princeton Review named Pitt-Bradford one of the best colleges in the Northeast for the 11th consecutive year in August 2014. TheBestColleges.org named it one of the 10 best regional campuses in the United States in 2013. Pitt-Bradford is also recognized by The Princeton Review as one of 150 Best Value Colleges in the United States in 2012.

Listed among the Top 20 Best-bang-for-the-buck Private Colleges by Washington Monthly, Carlow will provide you with more than just an education. You will be prepared not just for a career for when you graduate, but for the newest emerging careers and opportunities. Your Carlow experience will guide you in building connections — though alumni, faculty, internships, and programs — that will last a lifetime. Carlow offers more than 50 undergraduate majors and certificate programs within fields of study such as art, accounting, biology, business, criminal justice, education, nursing and many more. Transferring to Carlow is seamless, with up to 88 credits accepted from other institutions. Graduate programs include master’s degrees in business, counseling, creative writing, education, fraud and forensics, and nursing, and two professional doctoral programs, the Psy.D. degree in counseling psychology and the D.N.P. degree in nursing. At Carlow, students can take volunteerism to a new level, exercise their civic responsibility, and increase their understanding of social issues and problems by working on various service-learning projects: a unique feature of a Carlow education. Outside the classroom environment, students have the opportunity to explore a wide range of internship opportunities available in Pittsburgh’s corporate community, its many health care institutions, non-profit organizations, and an abundance of arts organizations. Carlow is affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and the United States Collegiate Athletics Association (USCAA), which provides opportunities for post-season competition and national recognition for athletic and academic achievements.

A D V E R T I S I N G

Campus life description: Pitt-Bradford is a safe, friendly institution for students who want to earn the world-renowned University of Pittsburgh degree in a personalized environment. Students can choose from 37 bachelor’s degrees, five associate degrees and more than 50 minors, concentrations and pre-professional programs. Students can gain real-world experience through internships, undergraduate research and study-abroad opportunities. But it’s not all work and no play on campus. At Pitt-Bradford, students have more than 50 clubs and organizations from which to choose in addition to varsity and intramural athletics and access to many outdoor activities such as hiking, skiing, fishing, spelunking, white-water rafting and horseback riding.

S U P P L E M E N T


Pitt-Bradford grads get good jobs.

“ The ability to contact

A t Pitt-Bradford, you can earn

professors and have

a degree from the University of Pittsburgh that will help you get a good job, just like Trent did.

personal feedback was

And, with our many scholarships, your education will be more affordable than you think.

a great experience. I wasn’t just a student. I was an individual.”

you can go

beyond

Trent Johnson ’14 Software validation specialist www.upb.pitt.edu

Cook MyoSite Inc. in Pittsburgh

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


NEW! ACCELERATED PROGRAMS Save time and money by working on your graduate degree as an undergraduate student. i BA/BS to MBA Business Administration i BA/BS to MS in Fraud and Forensics iBA/BS to MS in Professional Counseling i BA to MEd with certification in Special Education i RN-BSN to MS in Nursing

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL 2015:

RESPIRATORY CARE* *The respiratory care program is currently not authorized to enroll students and Carlow University is currently in the process of seeking CoARC accreditation for the program. However Carlow University can provide no assurances that accreditation will be granted by the CoARC.

iNEW! MEN’S BASKETBALL Conference winning soccer, softball, volleyball, basketball, and cross country

i11:1 STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO A private, liberal arts university education at an affordable price

iNOW OFFERING

COMING FALL 2015: UNIVERSITY COMMONS!

CRIMINAL JUSTICE! 50+ majors and certificate programs

CARLOW.EDU | 412.578.6000 | 3333 FIFTH AVENUE | PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. TIKI BAR. The Satin Hearts. Washington. 412-508-0200.

HAMBONE’S. Jeremy Caywood, Morgan Erina, Zack Weiss. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

JAZZ

WED 01

THU 25 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

FRI 26

WORLD

SAT 27 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Menard Presents Broadway’s Other Steves…. Celebrating Stephen Flaherty & Stephen Schwartz. Benefit for the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. Carnegie. 412-276-3456, x.8. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. No Bad Juju. Greensburg. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. Guaracha. paper pghcitym 412-773-8884. Lawrenceville. .co FUTURE TENANT. 412-682-0177. Stranger Convention. Downtown. 412-325-7037. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Maria DOBRA TEA. Moran/Masudi. Sargent. Mt. Washington. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Erin Burkett w/ Virgil Walters. Downtown. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, 412-392-2217. OAKLAND. Pittsburgh Taiko.

SAT 27

SUN 28

Oakland. 412-622-3116.

SUN 28 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 29 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

ACOUSTIC THU 25 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Ellis Paul. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

SAT 27 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Kim & Reggie Harris. Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

OTHER MUSIC LEVELS. Pete Hewlett & Scott Anderson. North Side. 412-231-7777. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon.

FULL FRI 26 LIST E THUNDERBIRD IN CAFE. Karikatura, ONwLww.

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Reggie Watkins. CD release show. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Eddie Brookshire Quartet. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Patti Austin. North Side. 412-322-0800. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

CHATHAM BAROQUE. Andys, Downtown. 412-773-8884.

FRI 26

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 27

WED 01

REGGAE

Eliot Lewis with Special Guest

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

Nik C & The Blue Tops

4504 BUTLER STREET

live

at hard rock cafe AT STATION SQUARE Sun, Sept 28th at 8PM Get Tickets at showclix.com/event/ ELIOTLEWISHRC2014

412.326.5964

WE’LL CUT YOU.

WED 01

THU 25

THE CHADWICK. Viva Las Vegas w/ the Latshaw Pops Orchestra. Wexford. 724-853-4050.

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

$12 AT THE DOOR

FRI 26 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

An Evening of Music

SAT 27 STAGE AE. Matisyahu, Radical Something. North Side. 412-229-5483.

COUNTRY THU 25 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. 724-265-1181.

SAT 27 COLLIER COMMUNITY PARK. The Swon Brothers. HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, The Mavens, The Beagle Brothers. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

CLASSICAL SAT 27

OCTOBER 3

The

Mamadrones w/Ferdinand the Bull & special guest The Weedrags Presented By

NEWBERRY CONSORT. Rosas das Rosas:Cantigas de Santa Maria. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-361-2048.

abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/

SUN 28 LYRIC FEST. Afternoon of Italian Arias & Art Songs Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044 N E W S

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do September 24 - 30 WEDNESDAY 24

FRIDAY 26

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER East Liberty. Tickets: textureballet.org. Through Sept. 28.

Lionize / American Sharks SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 25 WHY? & Dessa

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

St. Lucia MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 9p.m.

George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic

Synergy

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 27

Souvenir

Hail the Sun

STUDIO THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com or 412-392-8000. Through October 12.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

The Chain (Fleetwood Mac Tribute Band)

Gallery Crawl MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. Free event. For more info visit trustarts. org/crawl. 5:30p.m.

Adventure Club ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 18 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 STAGE AE

PHOTO CREDIT: WILLIAM THOREN

Under the Streetlamp and Gentleman’s Rule

IN PITTSBURGH

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Matisyahu STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Afghan Whigs MR. SMALLS THEATRE

newbalancepittsburgh.com Millvale. 412-481-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 28

My Brightest Diamond ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 30

The Wiggles: Ready, Steady, Wiggle! Tour BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 6:30p.m.

Periphery ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Marc Broussard REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

COMFORT KEEPS YOU MOVING. WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

PUSH YOURSELF FURTHER WITH THE VERSATILITY AND COMFORT OF THE WOMEN’S 711 FITNESS TRAINER. 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


THE MOVIE CLUNKS ALONG ON THE CHARM OF ITS ACTORS

NO HIDING PLACE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} If the choirs in Terry Gilliam’s The Zero Theorem are ruined, they’re anything but bare. The church inhabited by Qohen Leth (Christoph Waltz) in a dystopic, near-future London is crammed with books, debris, religious statuary and the computers on which Leth labors for a giant corporation on an elusive mathematical formula to prove that the universe is without meaning. Leth is in existential crisis: He refers to himself as “we”; his job (which resembles a video game) is Sisyphean; and he has spent decades awaiting an all-important phone call that will magically make everything clear.

CHILL OUT

Doing the math: Christoph Walz

CP APPROVED

This darkly screwball fantasia, written by Pat Rushin, inevitably recalls Gilliam’s Brazil, down to Leth’s desperate escapes into fantasy — here via virtual reality rather than daydreams. But that difference is telling: Oppressed by ubiquitous commerce rather than Brazil’s Orwellian bureaucracy, Leth is sapped even of imagination, no less hope. Strong turns by Melanie Thierry (as a gamesome call girl), Lucas Hedges (as a teenage computer savant) and Tilda Swinton conspire with Waltz’s poignantly understated neuroticism and Gilliam’s rapturously overstuffed visuals to support the unlikely plot. But Zero Theorem might be Gilliam’s bleakest vision yet, of a world where joy has been made purely synthetic. Wed., Sept. 24-Tue., Sept. 30 (no shows Fri., Sept. 26 or Mon. Sept. 29). Hollywood DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FINDING G FELA New from documentarian Alex Gibney (Enron) is this profile of Nigerian musician Fela Anikulapo Kuti, which focuses on the Afrobeat music he created and its use as a Pan-African n rallying force and d a political tool. ol. Starts Sat., Sept. 27 at Harris. is.

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

T

Family goes better with drinks: from left, Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver and Corey Stoller

HIS IS WHERE I Leave You opens

by declaring itself “A Shawn Levy Film,” so let’s start there. What was it on the résumé of the director of Night at the Museum and the Pink Panther remake that led someone to believe he could handle a story about the complex relationships of a large dysfunctional family attending the funeral of its patriarch? The family in the film, based on a novel by Jonathan Tropper (who wrote the screenplay), is named Altman, which is mildly ironic: The great director Robert Altman set the bar for this kind of panoramic cinema. Levy, like Altman, began as a TV director, and it seems he still is: He can’t handle more than two or three people in the frame at once, and his movie has no rhythm or style. It clunks along on the charm of its actors, a strategy that would work better if he knew how to direct them.

The premise is simple: Dad, an “atheist Jew,” has died, and his last wish was for his family to sit shiva. His non-Jewish wife (Jane Fonda), a shrink who penned a tellall about her sex life and her kids, insists they honor his wish. So three brothers and a sister, who of course have issues, agree

THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU DIRECTED BY: Shawn Levy STARRING: Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver, Corey Stoller, Jane Fonda

to do it. The outcome is familiar: Everyone regrets something, secrets get revealed, people smoke dope, everyone fights and hugs, and will the word “penis” ever cease to be funny? It’s like The Big Chill, only with no idealism to lose. Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver and Corey Stoll play the sibs, and they’re

pretty much on their own. Bateman does appealing melancholy well with the right material. The affable Driver is equal parts quirk and quark (a particle we’ve never seen but know exists). Stoll is a malleable character actor in a miserably written role. Fey, who’s preternaturally meta, seems like she’s watching the movie rather than appearing in it. Only Fonda, who has grown more relaxed in mature roles, and a poignant Timothy Olyphant, hold our attention worthily. The last 10 minutes of Levy’s cacophony are so warm and fuzzy that my eyes began to itch. But of course, we knew that would happen: You can’t fill a multiplex with a story about people who end up hating each other. Like most Hollywood ensemble dramedies, this one doesn’t trust its audience. The consequence is a middling trifle that’s usually about as funny, original, insightful and intelligent as a penis. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

personal growth, so don’t expect a lot of plot. Do look for two great performances from Hader and Wiig, who dial back their comic chops to hit the bittersweet dramatic notes their sad, fake-happy, damaged and repressed characters demand. Starts Fri., Sept. 26. Manor (AH)

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

REPERTORY

CP

THE BOXTROLLS. The moral of this new stop-motion-animated film from Portland, Ore.-based studio Laika (Coraline, Paranorman) is pretty standard: Don’t judge a book by its cover. But the delivery of that message involves an engaging and quick-paced story featuring charming, relatable characters. The tale revolves around a human baby named Eggs, raised underground by a group of misunderstood “monsters” called Boxtrolls. (They wear cardboard boxes and their names come from the label on the outside of the box, such as Eggs, Fish, Shoe.) The trolls are becoming extinct, hunted by exterminator Archibald Snatcher, voiced by a devilishly good Ben Kingsley. Eggs sets out to save his family and ends up learning about his own past. Boxtrolls is helped immeasurably by avoiding the tired tropes offered by most animated features, such as a sharp-tongued sidekick, a romantic interest, a horrible song and sexual innuendo for the parents. This is a great film regardless of the medium and might even go down as one of the year’s best. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri. Sept. 26. (Charlie Deitch) THE EQUALIZER. Denzel Washington stars as the titular righter-of-wrongs in Antoine Fuqua’s update of the 1980s television show. Starts Fri., Sept. 26.

CP

LOVE IS STRANGE. Indie filmmaker Ira Sachs creates finely observed relationship

The Boxtrolls dramas (Forty Shades of Blue, Keep the Lights On) in which life’s disruptions are characterized not by dramatic blow-outs but by small everyday scenes that slowly build to heartbreaking clarity. Here, a loss of a job leads to a drop in finances which forces Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina) to give up their Manhattan apartment. After nearly four decades together, the pair is also physically separated, forced by the city’s brutal real-estate market to seek temporary shelter apart: Ben bunks down with his nephew’s squabbling family and George gets a couch with former neighbors, two young gay cops who stay up late. It’s awkward for everybody, but especially hard on the two older men, who in the process see their dignity, identity and intimacy gradually eroded away. With marvelous performances from Molina and Lithgow, and a sly ending that re-orders all that has come before. Starts Fri., Sept. 26. Manor (Al Hoff)

bill hader

kristen wiig CRITICS’ PICK

“smart and really funny. their chemistry is

infectious.”

CP

THE MAZE RUNNER. This latest installment in the trend of turning young-adult sciencefiction books into movies follows Thomas (Dylan O’Brien), a teenage boy who wakes up in a metal box with no memory of how he got there or who he is. After emerging, he finds himself trapped in a glade surrounded on all sides by a towering maze. The glade is inhabited by other teenage boys, also suffering from amnesia. The maze appears to be their only form of escape, but it also holds untold dangers, and those trapped in it at night are never seen again. This movie is only the first in a planned trilogy, but director Wes Ball’s adaptation makes for a thrilling journey, even if by the end, viewers are left with more questions than they had at the start. (Rebecca Nuttall)

CP

THE SKELETON TWINS. A pair of longestranged twins — Milo (Bill Hader) and Maggie (Kristen Wiig) — are reunited through justmissed tragedy in Craig Johnson’s indie dramedy. Maggie is contemplating suicide when she gets the call that Milo has been hospitalized in Los Angeles following his attempt. She invites him back to their small New York hometown to stay with her and her husband (Owen Wilson). There, the two siblings — once close, now variously emotionally messed up — fumble toward reconciliation and a lasting support system. The subject matter is serious, though the film is leavened by one epically bad ’80s song and Milo and Maggie’s acerbic wit. (That is, the viewer is amused while each siblings suffers the other’s well-aimed barbs.) It’s a film about

“a wonderful delight!” The Zero Theorem

(2014) - 9/24 @ 7:30pm, 9/25 @ 7:30pm, 9/27 @ 7:30pm & 9:30pm, 9/28 @ 7:00pm, 9/30 @ 7:30pm, 10/1 @ 7:30pm - Directed by Terry Gilliam and starring Christoph Waltz.

-Horror - - - - - - Realm - - - - - - -Presents: - - - - - - - - - -Creepshow ----------------The- - - -Rocky - - - - - - Horror - - - - - - - -Picture - - - - - - - -Show -------------Silents - - - - - - -Please! - - - - - - - -The- - - -General -------------------(1982) - 9/26 @ 7:30pm - John Amplas in person, silent auction, and more!

- 9/27 @ Midnight

(1926) starring Buster Keaton, with live music by Andrew Greene of the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra.

select engagements PITTSBURGH Manor Theatre start friday, september 26 The (412) 422-7729 46

WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Katherine Hepburn Retrospective: Adam’s Rib (Hepburn and Tracy battle of the sexes), Sept. 24-25. The African Queen (Bogart and Hepburn on African adventure), Sept. 24-25. Summertime (1955 romance set in Venice), Sept. 24-25. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967 dramedy was last pairing of Hepburn and Spencer Tracy), Sept. 25. The Philadelphia Story (marriage comedy with Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart), Sept. 25. Coen Brothers Festival: Miller’s Crossing (1990 period gangster flick with Gabriel Byrne), Sept. 26-29 and Oct. 2. Fargo (black comedy set in snowy North Dakota), Sept. 26-30 and Oct. 2. True Grit (2010 revenge Western starring Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges), Sept. 26-29 and Oct. 1. Blood Simple (1984 crime thriller that introduced Joel and Ethan Coen), Sept. 26-28, Sept. 30, and Oct. 1-2. The Hudsucker Proxy (Tim Robbins invents the Hula Hoop in this 1994 comedy), Sept. 26-28, Sept 30 and Oct. 1-2. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

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SHAUN OF THE DEAD. London slackers defend themselves from zombies in writer/star Simon Pegg and director Edgar Wright’s remarkable debut feature: This is an original zombie movie, an original zombie parody, and an original romantic comedy, all in one film. But at its heart, Shaun succeeds because it is very much its own film: Its romance is romantic, its comedy hilarious, and its horror, if not actually frightening, at least lovingly and effectively executed. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 24. AMC Loews. $5 (Justin Hopper) 10 DAYS THAT UNEXPECTEDLY CHANGED AMERICA: THE HOMESTEAD STRIKE. Martin Sheen narrates this 2006 History Channel documentary about the infamous 1892 strike, a work that has since been presented as definitive. After the screening, Steffi Domike, of the United Steel Workers and producer of The River Ran Red, will discuss the film’s inaccuracies and lead a discussion. Continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www.battleofhomestead foundation.org. Free BLOOD SIMPLE. This genre-twisting 1984 neo-noir of cheating spouses and tricky dicks, written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, was among a batch of well-received, early-’80s indie features that signaled a new generation of filmmakers. In the ensuing quarter-century, the Coens have held fast to their iconoclastic style, while delivering a variety of hits and misses spanning multiple genres (though favoring dark crime stories and screwball comedies). 7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25. Melwood (AH) ROOT HOG OR DIE. A new film from Dan Stafford about zine-maker and indie-comics artist John Porcellino, best known for his “King-Cat Series.” Porcellino is scheduled to appear, and the evening includes a reception, film screening, Q&A and a booksigning. 8 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25 (7 p.m. meet-and-greet). Harris. $7-8 CREEPSHOW. Director George Romero and writer Stephen King teamed up in 1982 to deliver this compendium of vignettes based on old horror comics. There’s one good creepy gag with Ted Danson’s head, a beach and a VCR, but then there’s an interminable tale starring a badly mugging King. A fundraiser for Horror Realm; actors from film expected to attend. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. Hollywood


TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP. Harry Langdon stars in this 1926 silent comedy, in which he portrays a hobo who enters a cross-country walking race. Harry Edwards directs a script co-written by Frank Capra. The film screens as part of the Unseen Treasures from George Eastman House series, and with a piano score composed and performed live by Tom Roberts. 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org. $10

Based on a novel, it’s still uniquely Truffaut, vivid with the breathless energy of the emerging New Wave, but in the end, as still and beautiful as a mountain lake. Is art the work of the artist, or a convergence of divine accidents? Midway through Jules and Jim, the “poisoned kiss” begs the question. And how could someone like Jeanne Moreau just happen? As Catherine, the center of the film’s love triangle between the eponymous friends, she’s literally cast in stone, an icon even before we see her in the flesh. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Tue., Sept. 30. Melwood. $2 (Harry Kloman)

CP

EL TOPO. Alejandro Jodorowsky’s wild, strikingly photographed independent production stars himself as a bearded, blackleather-clad gunman on a spiritual quest: After avenging a massacre, and abandoning his young son to some monks, he becomes obsessed with finding and defeating four “gun masters” scattered about the desert, a mission leading to his rebirth and redemption. At minimum, this 1970 cult classic is an exemplary, lysergically bent period piece. Jodorowsky steals unabashedly from contemporary sexploitation flicks, kung-fu movies, the Old Testament and the Crucifixion … not to mention Fellini, Freaks and a literally incendiary form of anti-war protest. Though El Topo is at times derivative, self-indulgent and pretentious, there’s real power in Jodorowsky’s eccentric vision. In Spanish, with subtitles. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. Harris (Bill O’Driscoll) MALENA. Giuseppe Tornatore’s 2000 romantic comedy set against the events of World War II and starring Monica Belucci continues a series of foreign films. In Italian, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., Sept. 27. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 AFTER HOURS. “Scorsese Summer School” continues with this 1985 comedy in which Griffin Dunne wanders through Manhattan’s arty, kooky late-late-night scene. Scorsese’s filmmaking techniques to be discussed afterward. 9:15 p.m.

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Love Is Strange Sat., Sept. 27. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 THE GENERAL. In this silent comedy masterpiece, the hapless, expressionless Buster Keaton portrays a Civil War-era train engineer whose locomotive, The General, is hijacked by Yankees. Keaton co-directed and co-wrote this 1927 film with Clyde Bruckman, as well as performing all his own stunts. With live musical accompaniment by Andrew Greene, of the Percherine Ragtime Society Orchestra. 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28. Hollywood SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER. Adapted from a Tennessee Williams one-act by the author and Gore Vidal, Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s gothic 1959

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melodrama finds debutant Elizabeth Taylor severely traumatized after a European holiday with her cousin turns bad. Her aunt, Katherine Hepburn, wants her lobomotomized, but first offers psychiatrist Montgomery Clift a million dollars if he can “cure” her. Taylor’s recovered memories of what happened “suddenly, last summer …” provide quite the jolt, though the film soft-pedals the horrors described in Williams’ original text. The film concludes a month-long series of films about addiction and recovery. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28. Regent Square (AH)

CP

JULES AND JIM. François Truffaut’s immeasurably sad 1962 film is difficult to watch a second or third time, so painful is its fatal romanticism.

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NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. Arguably, George Romero’s locally produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter launched American filmmakers’ late20th-century fascination with zombies. Romero’s depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: no heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. To celebrate the film’s release 46 years ago, the screening will be preceded bu a panel discussion featuring cast and crew members. Discussion at 6:30 p.m.; film at 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. AMC Loews. $5 (AH) FROM DEEP. Local filmmaker Brett Kashmere’s new experimental documentary uses basketball as a lens to examine not only the various forms of the sport (from street ball to Michael Jordan), but also its influence on music, fashion and broader culture. Screens as part of the VIA music festival. To be followed by a discussion with the director and other guests. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. Rowhouse Cinema, Lawrenceville. $8. Advance tickets at www.ticketfly.com/event/668549 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[ART REVIEW]

BOYLE’S TINY, SEE-MY-GUTS MACHINES MAKE WEE SOUNDS

PROTECTORS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ANCIENT GODS & HIDDEN WORLDS continues through Sept. 27. The Gallery 4, 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

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GLASS ACTS [ART REVIEW]

Peaceable kingdom: Hannah Grace Clark’s “Mountain Gardener”

Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds: Allegorical Paintings by Hannah Grace Clark offers entrance into a land of magic and enchantment, an exploration of nature as the guardian of nature, rich with comfort and fierce with love. Using muted blues, soft lilacs and subdued greens, Pittsburgh-based Clark leads us into lush forests dense with pines and tranquil lakes embraced by mountains, all populated by creatures with hearts as colossal as their frames. Monumental bears stand submerged in placid ponds, the tops of their heads rising out of the water as miniature islands, their limbs beneath coddling docile whales. A giant tortoise lumbers through a village (bearing a remarkable likeness to the South Side Slopes) of cottages, trees and staircases, his shell bearing a handful of residents. An antlered creature cradles baby mountains lightly within curled talons. It’s a collection of gentle giants, stoic guardians and centered watchers. While there’s always a seemingly capable or at least caring protector, with it is the implied need for one. That suggests a threat. But no menace, whether from within or without, is ever apparent. At the edges of the forests, no armies lurk, and no monsters spring forth from the depths of lakes. The beasts themselves are absent ill intent, as Clark avoids the artistic trend of spiking the sweet with toxins. She declines to place a hint of froth at the corner of a smile, or to corrupt a doe eye with a mad glint. In most of these works, the eyes of the animals are closed, heads bent slightly forward and down, visages blank of readable expression. As viewer, one could hang a mantle of melancholy on the shoulders of these placid behemoths as easily as crown them with a halo of serenity. But if upon entering the gallery one begins viewing the exhibit on the left, and travels clockwise (suggested for the flow of narrative), the final piece, “I Have Loved the Stars Too Fondly to Be Fearful of the Night” offers assurance with beauty and absolute joy. Amid a stand of spindly, leafless trees, the round moon high above, a bear and deer hold lanterns glowing a luminescent gold. The sense of peaceful contentment is palpable and contagious, sending viewers on their way filled with its goodness.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATHAN J. SHAULIS}

{BY MICHELLE FRIED}

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HE PITTSBURGH Biennial and the Pittsburgh Glass Center host 12 artists who collectively reveal that glass, despite its reputation as rigid and intimidating, is flexible with the right chemistry — and not just through the restructuring of molecules. With the non-glassworking community in mind for this exhibition, executive director and curator Heather McElwee features the PGC’s cross-pollinating residency program, Idea Furnace. The residency, dating to 2012, connects local glass artists with Pittsburgh artists who have never worked with glass. “We selected the artists to represent a wide variety of stages in their careers, material and type of work,” McElwee writes. “We looked for artists ... whose work we admired and would translate interestingly into glass.” Back in January, McElwee pitched the residency to seven selected artists: They’d create new work using glass, and learn the process to create it, all within six months. The results would be part of the Biennial’s eight-venue roll-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

Chirp: Jeremy Boyle’s “Untitled (Glass Birds)”

out. The artists included: Robert Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Juliet Pusateri, Will Schlough and Kara Skylling. They were paired with trained glass artists and instructors affiliated with PGC, including Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Ashley McFarland, Travis Rohrbaugh and Margaret Spacapan.

PITTSBURGH BIENNIAL AT PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER continues through Oct. 26. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-365-2145 or www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

The final works in the Hodge Gallery constitute a consumable spectrum of sculptural brights and shinies; of delicates and masses; of ideas versus craft. At once, the varied sensibilities in form and approach emphasize the exhibition’s larger purpose of collaboration and experimentation — that relationships created in the process supersede any cohesion between

the final works. But in-cohesion can itself have magnetism. Playfulness with material and idea occupy the non-glass artists, what with their admirable beginner’s enthusiasm. And the seasoned glass artists — probably because they know their medium is willed by mercurial chemistry — tend to favor precision and formalism. One pairing involves glass artist Ashley McFarland and Artists Image Resource co-founder Robert Beckman. An aspiration toward perfection is found in McFarland’s tiny jewel-like cubes, “Every Day but Two.” So clear and pristine, a spec of dust intrudes its surface. However, Beckman’s text-andportrait assemblages are best viewed, at first, from a distance. Like a barrage of skillful accidents, Beckman’s “Words and Pictures” are experiments in layered printmaking in glass, making glass secondary to his established art practice. Vanessa German integrates glass elements more easily with her politicallycharged doll sculptures. Like found-object storytellers, one doll is unmistakably CONTINUES ON PG. 49


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gs re nin ’ e v we r e d e n u h in t p. A y of o r u y t la ni on an egu , or mu gers r f m e p a u n th co hy ive m tee . Sign y half ograp t a a t o cre ne fro offer u’ll p , ph ur o y o n o r y y g r i o up nd es ct ve ing s to e trodu rses* a ding d 0%. n e nd e5 ou op clu t in ’re weeke swee ional c eas in nd sav e W ar a A at on ith cre ses in iting. d e w n r a t t s r i i a l c ng ew red doi nonc k into reativ , o c new . So lo , and * s t * fee ary ar in cul

u d i.e

Creative classes open to teens and adults.

Offer ends

OCT 31 N E W S

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* Courses are shorter in duration than our degree programs, are noncredit bearing, and do not transfer into any degree program offered. ** Offer ends October 31, 2014. Offer can be changed or discontinued at any time. 50% discount is automatically applied to the cost of the course during registration and will be applied to all courses registered for. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. 420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 © 2014 The Art Institutes International LLC. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu. 062414

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 READINGS 

David Guterson, JUDGE Photo by Tom Collicott

Author,

Snow Falling on Cedars

Kent Nelson, WINNER

Photo by Julio Mulero

David Guterson

Kent Nelson

Author,

The Spirit Bird: Stories

Thursday, October 2, 2014 6:30 p.m. Reception, 7:00 p.m. Readings National Aviary Auditorium Allegheny Commons West 700 Arch St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212 For more information: 412-323-7235

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Are You Still There? October 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 2014 | 8:00 p.m. The Pittsburgh Coliseum | 7310 Frankstown Avenue in Homewood For more information Tickets www.attacktheatre.com or 412.281.3305 www.attacktheatre.com/ayst Attack Theatre’s Season 20 is made possible in part by: The McKinney Charitable Foundation of the PNC Charitable Trusts

Illustration by David Pohl @ House of Pingting

relaying a narrative of violent death. Its tears of glass are overflowing and bulbous, becoming tumorous, even parasitic. Others have textured hair or dreadlocks made of glass and they glisten, sumptuously. Glass simulating some other substance is a popular device in this exhibition, notably Will Schlough’s simple but darling “Bubble Mower,” a found-object lawnmower that blows bubbles from its top. Sorry to spoil the fun — it’s iridized glass, not bubbles! Schlough was paired with Forck, whose blown-glass sphere, cone and prism are suspended above a prepped drawing surface — a Drawing 101 sculptural trompe l’oeil. (Is that a visual double-negative?) “Geometric Sketches” mimics in glass the character of charcoal with a swirling of grey just below the matte surface of each shape, achieving a lush hand-drawn effect. The most entertaining simulacra are Juliet Pusateri’s “museum piece”: a glassencased, hand-blown goblet on a pedestal next to an oil painting of the same goblet. As with Joseph Kosuth’s famous conceptual artwork “One and Three Chairs,” my knock-off Gucci (it’s a “Nucci”), or the woman who recently faked an entire trip to Asia thanks to the frontal-ism of Facebook, the question about authenticity is both relevant and confounding: Is that really blown glass, or bargain-bin Home Goods? What does this say about production and labor, honesty and authorship? Glass as an art material can be both utilitarian and impractical, as illustrated by the paired works of Jeremy Boyle and glass artist Travis Rohrbaugh. Boyle’s kinetic installation “Untitled (Glass Birds)” forces glass into a nonsensical functional role despite its resistance. (Read his statement if you ever wondered how to tediously drill through plate glass.) Boyle’s tiny, see-myguts machines make wee sounds, while the only glass element is substrate on which the circuitry is wired. Though visually undetectable, the chirping sounds seem to be that of something scratching on glass, or at least my brain is completing that circuit. Meanwhile, frighteningly delicate, Rohrbaugh’s model airplanes capitalize on glass’ beauty while simultaneously spotlighting its fragility. He states: “It is wonderful to consider the time invested in an object that can only make one flight.” Though “form follows function” is a layman’s understanding of glass, this exhibition illustrates that artists new to the medium who don’t accept that notion will go to lengths to expand its potential. With Idea Furnace, the PGC has leveraged its assets — local talent and a well-equipped glass studio — to exchange and create new, salable works. It’s a pretty hot idea. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

[EXHIBIT REVIEW]

MICROCOSMOS {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

Outlawed for candor: Diderot and D’Alembert’s Encyclopédie

Drue Heinz Literature Prize

GLASS ACTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

Pitt’s Frick Fine Arts Building, a tasteful Florentine villa, is small compared to the hulking Carnegie Institute or the soaring Cathedral of Learning, both nearby. But right now, everything in the world is on display in its University Art Gallery. Well, not everything, but rather Reconfiguring Disciplines: Fragments of an Encyclopedia. The exhibit’s historic encyclopedias and similar volumes are intended to illuminate a particular field, or even all the world. Sebastian C. Adams’s Chronological Chart of Ancient, Modern and Biblical History, from 1876, is exemplary. The combination of timelines and illustrated images is a yard wide, but unrolls to nearly 30 feet. The precise attempt to correlate the era’s archaeological artifacts and classical historians with names and events from the Christian Bible — all of “world history” — is overwhelmingly detailed; you could almost miss how the United States emerges from biblical rather than European history. That contrasts with how Diderot and D’Alembert’s 28-volume Encyclopédie (1772), shown here through its remarkably detailed copper engravings, was initially outlawed for the candor of its political and philosophical critiques of both church and state. One pleasure is how the show juxtaposes disciplines and eras. For example, Cowpers’ The Anatomie of Human Bodies (1698), with its still-shocking illustrations of flayed corpses, is displayed near Cellarius’ Harmonia macrocosmica (1660), by which the author aims to illustrate the universe on large, two-page spreads of swirling celestial diagrams. Cesare Cesariano’s 1521 version of the Vitruvian Man, less evocative than Leonardo’s famous iteration, but remarkably authentic, makes the logical connection. In the same room, images from the Hubble telescope are projected on one screen in seeming real time, while abstract photographs of scientific principles by 20thcentury modernist Berenice Abbott, such as waves and sine curves, emerge on others. You may presume that humanity is the center of the universe, but your understanding of the cosmos will depend entirely on your means of measurement and illustration. Working with gallery curator Isabelle Chartier, faculty and graduate students from Pitt’s Department of the History of Art and History of Architecture (where I have studied and taught) assembled the show with rare and valuable but underappreciated books borrowed from nearby libraries and other repositories. The result is both a scholarly achievement and a popularly satisfying visual treat. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RECONFIGURING DISCIPLINES: FRAGMENTS OF AN ENCYCLOPEDIA continues through Oct. 5. Frick Fine Arts Building, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-648-2423 or www.haa.pitt.edu


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1. Wood Street Galleries

8. Trust Arts Education Center

18. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

28. Dream Cream Ice Cream

601 Wood Street

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

539 Liberty Avenue

fünf: Celebrating Five Years of Art on the Walls

September Dreamer Gabriel Ash and the KG Dynasty Contemporary Dance Company perform throughout the District. Final performance at 8pm.

SECOND/SECOND | Finnbogi Peterson Iceland’s master of Light and Sound returns to Wood Street Galleries with newly commissioned installations.

2. SPACE

Wordplay: True Stories with a Live Soundtrack. Music by Keebs. Performances at 6:30, 7:30, 8:30pm Third and Fourth Floors

812 Liberty Avenue

Public Record: Pittsburgh Biennial Participating Artists: Carolina Loyola-Garcia, Susanne Slavick, Matt Biederman (with Aljosa Abrahamsberg, Marko Peljhan, Brian Springer), Caroline Record, Paul Rosenblatt, Martha Rial, Rafael Abreu-Canedo, Paolo Pedercini. Love, absurdity, surveillance, gaming and identity are exposed in this multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Music by DJ Weeping. Purchase treats from Pop Stop and Simpatico. MAP OF LOVE A Project by Carolina Loyola-Garcia Choreography by Beth Corning Performed by Cara Freidheim and Harris Ferris Two characters will find each other and do a live movement performance in the village of New Friendship. Performance at 7:30pm.

AIA Pittsburgh’s 2014 Design Exhibition

9. Harris Theater

As Best I Can Remember | Travis Mitzel Sculptures around the Cultural District, in no particular place.

809 Liberty Avenue

21. Fall Night Market *Open until 11pm

811 Liberty Avenue

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

32. Renaissance Hotel

Pop in for some laughs.

Presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership.

Live Performance by Carla Bianco, 5 to 7pm.

11. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

22. 709 Penn Gallery

33. Braddock’s

Park Journeys Ambassadors High school students from Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild.

3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery

Fall 14 Student artwork and Sounds of Steel!

Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

107 Sixth Street

Deconstructed dishes to completed plate.

crawl after dark Official Biennial After Party and Music SPACE series, 10pm, $5 Live Music by YXU and Ennui Live Music by Maureen Budway 8pm-12am, No Cover Jazz at Andy’s, Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Salsa Fridays 10pm Free Lesson, 10:30pm to 1:30am Dancing with DJ Jeff Shirey No Cover, Cash Bar Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

Live music by Erik Lawrence, 5:30 to 7:30pm Industrial Opulence | Gabe Szafranski

Pittsburgh Filmmakers Presents El Topo – Digitally restored

26. O’Reilly Theater

9:30pm, $5 Admission Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Avenue

SUMMER WORK | CAPA Visual Art Students

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Karaoke Throwdown

17. Future Tenant

27. PNC Legacy Project

10:15pm, 18+, $5 Admission, BYOB Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

600 Liberty Avenue

Tectonica | Paul Chidester Live Music by Stranger Convention, 7:30 to 9:30pm.

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136 Sixth Street NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE

Stop by the O’Reilly Theater and take a celebratory #selfie for Pittsburgh Public Theater’s 40th birthday.

111 Ninth Street

819 Penn Avenue

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31. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

655 Penn Avenue

621 Penn Avenue

16. CAPA Gallery

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show

SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

7th St. and Penn Avenue

25. Backstage Bar

*Open until 9pm 914 Penn Avenue

Atmosphera | Jerry Cajko

Public Record: Pittsburgh Biennial Well Played: Paul’s Vinyl Records | Paul Rosenblatt

15. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

Artistic Integrity: Baron Batch Curated by Sean Beauford Music by Pete Butta and Music by Socrates.

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

805 Liberty Avenue

23. 707 Penn Gallery

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Exhibition by Scott Applecubed Fine Art Photo Gallery Live Music by Tony Campbell and Jazzsurgery

14. Tonic

7. Shaw Galleries

Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It | Tina Brewer

Live Music by Noel Quintana and The Latin Crew, 6 to 9:30pm Co-hosted by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Latin American Cultural Union. ¡HOLA PITTSBURGH! is a public private partnership established to improve the diversity of Pittsburgh.

717 Liberty Avenue

Painted with Coffee and Tea LIVE DEMONSTRATION | Gerard Tonti

709 Penn Avenue

24. Katz Plaza

A Life Through My Lens | Participants of “Still Feel Like Going On” photo project.

140 Sixth Street

107 Sixth Street

707 Penn Avenue

12. 820 Liberty Avenue 13. 937 Liberty Avenue

801 Liberty Avenue

Meet Your Makers Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

10. Arcade Comedy Theater

Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh | Leslie Ansley

6. Crazy Mocha

20. 10 Year Anniversary Celebration

208 Sixth Street

Archives | Group Photography Show

Tiny Harris Gallery

610 Wood Street

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

29. Boutique 208

30. Olive or Twist

3. Urban League

5. Tito Way

Free Yoga Classes: 6 to 6:30pm or 7 to 7:30pm Pre-register: info@bendyoga.com

Celebrate TEN YEARS of Gallery Crawls in the Cultural District Music by Nate da Phat Barber, 5:30 to 8pm. Live Music by Les Nubians, 8pm. Les Nubians are an Afropean, Urban, R&B Grammynominated duo composed of sisters Hélène and Célia Faussart from Paris, France. They have become one of the most successful French-language musical groups in the U.S.

Pittsburgh Filmmakers will screen selected highlights from the 2014 Film Kitchen Contest on a loop. 5:30 to 9pm The Complaints N’at Choir, sang a composition of Pittsburgh complaints as part of the 2014 Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. Film by Curtis Reaves. Screening at 7:30pm.

Carnegie Library Button-making and Books

4. Social Status

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

8th Street

212 Ninth Street

t Around the District

19. Bend Yoga

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The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating Black History Month.

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Pittsburgh’s Best KARAOKE 10pm to 2am, No Cover August Henry’s, 946 Penn Avenue

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You can feel it. A connection to something that’s bigger than you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of thinking and seeing your community. And of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at work, in the car, and you may even support us (thank you if you do). We’re WYEP.

Celebrating 40 Years of Music, Arts and Community.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

Kelsey Bartman (seated), Alan Obuzor and Brynn Vogel of Texture Contemporary Ballet

[DANCE]

ESPRIT DE CORPS

wyep.org

{BY STEVE SUCATO} YOU COULD SAY the title of Texture Con-

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

SAT, OCT 11 TH 2014 • 8 PM • BYHAM THEATER WATCH: TrustArts.org/AspenSantaFe

simply breathtaking – Chicago Sun Times

TICKETS START AT $19 TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666 Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

temporary Ballet’s latest program, Synergy, also names what has made the three-yearold troupe a success. The combined efforts of artistic director Alan Obuzor, associate artistic director Kelsey Bartman and an array of energetic dancers and choreographers have consistently produced programs whose total effect has exceeded the sum of their individual contributions. This Sept. 26-28 program, mixing new and existing works, will also be the company’s first mainstage appearance at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. And as usual for Texture, it will be a jam-packed showcase, with nine ballets by five different choreographers. Choreographed in 2010 for a Dancers Trust program, former Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre principal dancer Erin Halloran and Obuzor’s pas de deux “I Know,” with music by Fiona Apple, will be a company premiere. So will Bartman’s “Cognitive Closure,” a duet she created for herself and Obuzor for No Name Players’ SWAN Day, this past March. Set to music by Max Richter, the duet begins with a contemplative solo by Bartman; Obuzor interrupts and then begins influencing her inner world. “Broken Swan,” recent Point Park University grad Oscar Carillo’s second work for Texture, is a take on Swan Lake’s fa-

mous “Dance of the Little Swans.” The eight-minute quartet asks what would happen if the normally cheerful, bonded and in-unison cygnets were suddenly separated and in pain? Company dancer Alexandra Tiso offers two ballets. “These Pips Are No Dead Hoofers” is a lighthearted and jazzy piece for six dancers, set to the music of Duke Ellington. The premiere of her fourth work for the company, “Efficacy,” finds its inspiration “in a person’s energy being affected by the energy of others,” says Tiso.

TEXTURES CONTEMPORARY BALLET PERFORMS

SYNERGY

8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26; 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 27; and 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $20-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

Bartman adds two more. “Writing on the Wall,” created this past July, is set to music by composer Bryan McMasters. And the premiere of “Une journée dans la vie,” a 12-minute ballet for the full company of 11, is set to music by Ravel. Bartman describes it as “something classical for our very classically trained dancers.” Rounding things out is the premiere of Obuzor’s “Unchanging Change.” The 15-minute ballet in three sections, set to music by rapper Macklemore and composer Richter, and a poem by Andrea Gibson, explores individualism within a society. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

STAGING GROUNDS {BY TYLER PLOSIA} THE PITTSBURGH New Works Festival

presents a series of evening-length programs of three world-premiere oneacts each, produced by local troupes. Following are reviews of the concluding pair of programs, C and D.

Program C. Opening play “The Other Half,” by Garry Michael Kluger, is ostensibly about three friends deciding which outfit to dress a recently deceased friend in for her viewing. In actuality, it’s about the difficulty of being in a private lesbian relationship, and how that difficulty has changed (or hasn’t) over time. The Thoreau NM production, directed by Lance-Eric Skapura, takes a bit too long to get where it’s going, and once it gets there, it’s little more than a monologue with interruptions. But it’s a well-crafted, occasionally powerful monologue. Louise Fox is a scenestealer as Phyllis. It’s a shame her tertiary character serves mainly to spur on the monologist’s speech, because every line Fox delivers is received like good physical comedy: with surprise and delight. At first, “The Academy of Superheroes,” by Tom Cavanaugh, is about precisely what it sounds like. A group of superheroes hone their powers — and interpersonal relationships — within the walls of the theater. The Actors Civic Theater production, directed by James Critchfield, is children’s theater for adults, and like any conventional superhero tale, it aims to crowd-please more than engage intellectually. This has the potential to backfire (it mostly does). Fourteen-yearold Sundiata Rice nearly saves the day as

N E W S

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW CRITCHFIELD}

Bruce Cocker and Shay Port in “Close Your Eyes,” by James Harmon Brown, produced by CCAC South for the Pittsburgh New Works Festival

the Doctor. “Some of you might be wondering how someone so young got this position,” Rice says. “It’s because I have the highest IQ.” If acting were a measure of intelligence, he just might be right. A twist at play’s end is a too-late attempt at meaningfulness.

PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL continues through Sun., Sept. 28. Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St, Carnegie. $12-15. 412-944-2639 or www.pittsburghnewworks.org

reiter, the play initially deals with death in a familiar fashion: by normalizing the dialogue about it. Miranda (Shay Port), the dying, and Jake (Bruce Crocker), her long-lost ex-husband, skirt the gravity of the topic with familiar ease. They treat “cancer as a nuisance and death as a punchline,” as Jake says, for as long as they can manage. But soon the gravity creeps in, and mortality is addressed head-on, including a preemptive eulogy.

“THE OTHER HALF” FEATURES A POWERFUL, WELL-CRAFTED MONOLOGUE.

Program D. There’s an unwritten rule in playwriting: Don’t make death too central to your story. Some adhere to this as an axiom. But CCAC South Campus’s production of “Close Your Eyes,” by James Harmon Brown, defies this injunction until it all but disappears. Directed by Lora Oxen-

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Like Program C, Program D opens with a show about three comrades mourning the death of a friend. The similarities don’t end there: Both “The Other Half” and Program D’s “Scattered,” directed by Naomi Grodin for Baldwin Players, comment on queer-

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ness, and both manifest the dead onstage. But here, F.J. Hartland’s characters exist in a tolerant world. It’s an accepting liberal wilderness where the grieving happens to be gay, but they’re not mourning the tragic close of a closeted life. Joel Ambrose moves comfortably through a range of emotions as Logan. And Carrie Lee Martz dons the charming intonation of a Southern belle as June. She isn’t a debutante, but instead an endearingly unaffected “fag hag” (as another character calls her) who speaks for the deceased when his absence becomes palpable. Hamilton Kreeger’s “Sleeping Aide” benefits from its simplistic setup: Man and woman chat in bed in the middle of the night. In this case the man is Ted (Mark Yochum), a sleepless widower, and the woman is Emma (Ruthy Stapleton), an escort 40 years Ted’s junior. Joe Eberle’s direction, for Stage Right, turns Ted into a whiny one, a sex-shunning insomniac who wants nothing but a shut-eyed vixen at his side. It’s a male fantasy story, and not in a mocking way. But Stapleton has a naturalistic listlessness as Emma, and she manages to pull the show along. As the Program D finale, “The Field” is the festival’s closing play. It’s also among its most unfortunate inclusions. Set where Field of Dreams was shot, the play, like the film, revolves around the troubled relationship between father and son. There are borrowed lines — “hey dad ... wanna have a catch?” — and a not-so-brief synopsis of the source material. This Theatre Factory production might sound like the stuff of playful postmodernist theater. But under the direction of Scott P. Calhoon, “The Field” is too earnest in its derivativeness to be mistaken for ironic.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.2510.02.14

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., SEPT. 25 {FESTIVAL}

Serving a comfortable, casual, affordable lunch DAILY FROM 11AM-3PM

To celebrate Latino Heritage month, Café Con Leche PopUp Gallery looks to infuse your lunch breaks with a bit of Latino American zest. From noon-4 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, in Friendship’s old Quiet Storm space, healthconscious Latin food vendor SaludPGH accompanies the gallery’s locally sourced, Latin American art with Caribbean and Pan-Latin dishes. The celebrations continue with free events like today’s interactive Latino LGBT history lesson (4-6 p.m.) and Sept. 28’s Chilean Independence Day party. Hispanic dance courses, a bhangra workshop and figuredrawing lessons round out the month. Danielle Fox Gallery continues through Oct. 10. 5430 Penn Ave., Friendship. Prices vary. 412-626-7350 or www.cafeconlechepgh.com

SEPT. 30

Osama Alomar

played by Pittsburgh favorite Jeff Howell. Point Park alum and internationally recognized theatrical artist Tomé Cousin directs. DF 8 p.m. Show continues through Oct. 12. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave, Oakland. $15-27. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

Montreal native lives in Easton, Pa., and teaches at Lafayette College. DF 8 p.m. Mellon Board Room, Chatham campus, Shadyside. Free. 412-365-1140 or www.chatham.com

+ FRI., SEPT. 26 {ART}

Mixed e Grill d, rice or

Art by Peter Mandradjieff

SEPT. 26

Part artt and and Parcel Par arce ce

side salavegetable, stir fry rotein choice of p {STAGE}

www.thesonomagrille.com

(412) 697-1336

WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

The REP’s season continues with the local premiere of Stephen Temperley’s 2006 comedy Souvenir, based on the true story of operatic disaster and delight Florence Foster Jenkins. Jenkins, played by Jill Keatin, was a wealthy mid-century New York socialite and diva whose pipes were more rusted than golden. But she was beloved, and her story is told through the eyes of accompanist Cosme McMoon,

{WORDS} Novelist and short-story writer Alix Ohlin visits Chatham University tonight as this year’s Melanie Brown Lecturer. Ohlin’s recent works include acclaimed novel Inside, which unravels four character’s decisions as it explores the dynamics of intertwining lives. Ohlin’s work has appeared in Best New American Voices, Best American Short Stories and Best American Nonrequired Reading. The

Janis Burley Wilson and Murray Horne’s crazy idea to hold a quarterly art crawl Downtown seems to have paid off: A decade after the first one proposed by these Pittsburgh Cultural Trust staffers, the free crawls still draw thousands into the Cultural District for art shows, live music and more. Tonight’s 10th-anniversary Gallery Crawl features two big openings. SPACE and 707 Penn Gallery debut Public Record, a multimedia group show about “love, absurdity, surveillance, gaming and identity” that’s part of the Pittsburgh Biennial. Meanwhile, Wood Street Galleries offers Second/Second, featuring two sound and light installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. There’s also live storytelling, live comedy, film and more — including the headliner concert by international Afropean R&B act Les Nubians (pictured), at the Trust’s Eighth Street space. Late-night, afterCrawl events (some of them ticketed) include film, comedy, karaoke and the Biennial after-party at SPACE, with live music by YXU and Ennui. Bill


sp otlight

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BLAINE SIEGEL}

The seventh edition of the LightLab performance series takes place Sept. 27 at Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery. The series, co-curated by musician David Bernabo and dancer/choreographer Taylor Knight, fosters what Bernabo calls “more progressive dance, music, film and performance art pieces.” This 45-minute all-dance edition, part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial, includes dancer/choreographer Jil Stifel’s new work-in-progress solo “my dna,” from her upcoming evening-length show Why Not Here? Set to a soundscape by Bernabo, with set design by Blaine Siegel that includes a costume bull’s head that Stifel dons, the solo examines “the human desire to travel and seek out the unknown and how our more base or animal nature relates to this yearning,” she says. Also on the program is a reworking of Knight and Anna Thompson’s 2013 duet “memory 3,” set to music by the pair. According to Taylor, the piece is an examination of itself as if it were caught in a continuous loop: What would time and repetition do to it? Rounding out the program is Maree ReMalia | merrygogo’s latest duet, “guttural/proximal.” It’s danced by ReMalia and Bernabo (who also did the sound); ReMalia says it’s a response to her recent visit to Israel and the military operations there that left her “brimming with emotion and internal conflict.” Steve Sucato 6 p.m. Sat., Sept. 27. CMU campus, Oakland. Admission is pay-what-you-can. 412-268-3618 or www.cmu.edu/millergallery

O’Driscoll 5:30-10 p.m., plus after-hours events. Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

{ART}

Brooklyn-based painter Peter Mandradjieff returns to his native city with a solo exhibit, Part and Parcel. Each of the abstract paintings represents an investigation of aerial perspective and informal gesture. Mandradjieff earned a degree in fine arts from Carnegie Mellon University before studying at Columbia. Part and Parcel opens in the Mine Factory gallery with tonight’s reception. DF 7 p.m. Continues through Oct. 3. 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. Free. 917-592-1860 or www.petermandradjieff.net

+ SAT., SEPT. 27

in the Strip, with rock bands Real Estate and Regal Degal. The official kickoff party, at Lawrenceville’s Cattivo, features New York-based superstar DJ Mike Q and Pittsburgh indieelectronic outfit Badboxes. BO Times and prices vary. VIA continues through Oct. 5. www.via2014.com

continue through Jan. 4. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

{MUSIC} It’s a different sort of R&B: Pittsburgh Renaissance & Baroque’s season opener with Chicago-based touring group The Newberry Consort. Pittsburgh R&B strives to bring medieval to early classical music to new audiences. Violinist David Douglass and soprano Ellen Hargis direct tonight’s show in Synod Hall, which highlights 14thcentury Spanish music. The night samples the “Cantigas de Santa Maria (Canticles of Holy Mary),” 420 GalicianPortuguese musical poems honoring the Virgin Mary. Four members of the Pittsburgh Camerata, a Renaissance vocal group, join the five-piece

The N Newberry b Consort Consort for the evening. DF 8 p.m. 125 N. Craig St., Oakland. $10-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org

{ZINES} In its fourth year, the Pittsburgh Zine Fair keeps growing. A week of run-up events continue with tonight’s Zine Mixer, at Bunker Projects.

{ART} The Andy Warhol Museum opens two splashy new shows today. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair explores the scandal surrounding the World’s Fair commissioning a then-newly famous Warhol for the façade of the New York State Pavilion — only to get his renderings of mug shots of criminals. The works were painted over, but Warhol’s own recreations from later that same year anchor this touring show, created by the Warhol Museum and the Queens Museum. Another native son gets his (over)due in Chuck Connelly: My America. This key figure among the New York-based neo-expressionist painters of the 1980s was born in Pittsburgh; he’s now based in Philly, but this — surprisingly, his first solo museum show — continues the Pittsburgh Biennial. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibits

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tonight on the North Side. BO 7:30 p.m. 330 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. Reservations requested at 412-323-0278 or www. cityofasylumpittsburgh.org.

The casual meet-and-greet for artists and the public includes readings. Tomorrow comes the region’s top showcase for DIY publications, at the Union Project. The event, sponsored by the Mr. Roboto Project and the Carnegie Library Zine Collection, complements its artist/vendors with hands-on stuff and DJs. There is even free child care. BO Mixer: 8-11 p.m. (5106 Penn Ave., Garfield; $5 suggested donation). Fair: 2-8 p.m. (801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park; free). www.pghzinefair.com

Colorado-based Kent Nelson captured this year’s Drue Heinz Literature Prize with his shortstory collection The Spirit Bird. Fittingly, the University of Pittsburgh Press hosts his reading tonight somewhere

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Syria’s in the news, but there’s more to that nation, and culture, than civil war. Osama Alomar, a Damascus native now living in Chicago, is an acclaimed writer of very short fiction. While no less than flash-fiction master Lydia Davis has praised his “magical imaginative creations,” Alomar sees his work as harkening to the ancient Arab tradition of very short stories incorporating elements of poetry, philosophy and folk tales. City of Asylum hosts Alomar (and his translator) for a free reading from his new collection, Fullblood Arabian (New Directions),

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with plenty of wing room: The National Aviary. According to the publisher’s website, the collection’s spirit bird is a metaphor for what we lose, hope for and have yet to uncover about ourselves. Nelson, who’s written numerous works of fiction and poetry, is an avid birder. His work has been featured in The Best American Short Stories and other collections. DF 7 p.m. (6:30 p.m. reception). 700 Arch St., North Side. Free. 412-3832456 or www.upress.pitt.edu

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER THE ADDAMS FAMILY.

FREE IRISH WHISKEY/ BOURBON TASTING ––– Friday, September 26th ––– TULLAMORE DEW- 12 YEARPHOENIX- BOWMAN BROTHERS SMALL BATCH - SINGLE BARREL

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JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. Agatha Christie ‘whodunnit’ genre. Thu-Sat and Sun. Thru NUNSENSE. The Little Sisters Sept. 28. Apple Hill Playhouse. of Hoboken hold a fund raiser 724-468-5050. to raise money to bury sisters SOUVENIR. The story of accidentally poisoned by the Florence Foster Jenkins, convent cook. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. eccentric wealthy socialite and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. The whose utter inability to carry Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. a tune never prevented her OKLAHOMA. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. from holding recitals and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru at the Ritz Carlton Sept. 28. McKeesport or selling out Little Theater, Carnegie Hall. McKeesport. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. 412-673-1100. . w ww per and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru OLIVER! THE a p ty ci pgh m Oct. 12. Pittsburgh MUSICAL. Thu-Sat, .co Playhouse, Oakland. 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. 412-392-8000. Thru Oct. 5. Strand Theater, SQUABBLES. A cautionary Zelienople. 724-742-0400. tale of what happens when PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS parents move in w/ their FESTIVAL. Premiering The children. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Other Half, The Academy Of Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. Apple Super Heroes, Close Your Eyes, Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. Scattered, Sleeping Aide, SR. GERTRUDE’S GUIDE The Field. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 28. TO HEAVEN .. AVOIDING Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. EXCOMMUNICATION AT 412-944-2639. ALL COSTS. Dinner theater. SECONDARY CAUSE OF Sept. 26-27, 6:30 p.m. DEATH. The 2nd in the ‘Inspector Crowne Plaza Hotel, Pratt’ trilogy of spoofs of the Bethel Park. 724-746-1178.

FULL LIST ONLINE

COMEDY {BY ERIC LIDJI}

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Based on the classic TV show & movie. Presented by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. Grand Theatre. 412-405-8425. AS YOU LIKE IT. Presented by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. www.pittsburghshakespeare.com Sat., Sept. 27, 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 28, 2 p.m. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. BLEACHER BUMS. A bunch of Chicago Cubs fans make wagers w/ each other while watching a game at Wrigley Field on a summer afternoon. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. THE BOOK OF MORMON. Musical comedy by Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

CELIBACY. A new play presented by APA Theatre Company. Email APATC@ comcast.net for reservations. Oct. 1-4, 7:30 p.m. Olde Main Building, Latrobe. A CONDO TO KILL FOR. Interactive Murder Mystery Dinner Theater. Sat., Sept. 27, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has discovered for the plastic products. Includes audience participation, giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. FUNNY,YOU DON’T LOOK LIKE A GRANDMOTHER. A humorous, heartwarming musical look at modern grandmothers. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. South Park Theatre,

THU 25 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LIGHTS OUT W/ MATT LIGHT. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 26 ANDY PICARRO, MATT LIGHT, JESSIE IRVIN, NORLEX BELMA, JOHN RALICH. 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-235-7284. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. LAST FRIDAYS W/ DAVON MAGWOOD. Feat. a rotating cast of comedians. Last Fri of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 26 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-251-6058. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award CONTINUES ON PG. 58

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol & the 1964 World’s Fair. Warhol’s enlarged mug shots from an NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Chuck Connelly: My America. Part of the Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial. Opens Sep. 26. North Side. 412-237-8300. CULTURAL DISTRICT. 10th Anniversary Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Art, live bands, DJs, dance, comedy, film, & participatory activities. Sep. 26, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MINE FACTORY. Part & Parcel. Paintings by Peter Mandradjieff. Opening reception Sep. 26, 7-9 p.m. or email pmandradjieff@gmail.com for appointment. Homewood. SPACE. Public Record: Pittsburgh 2014 Biennial at SPACE. A 9-person multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Curated by Murray Horne. Opening Sept. 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. AIA Pittsburgh Presents Design Exhibition. Part of the Pittsburgh Cultural

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Work by Megan Shalonis, from Home Made at Crazy Mocha, in Bloomfield Trust Gallery Crawl, Sep. 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Second/Second. Light & sound installations by Icelandic artist Finnbogi Pétursson. Opening reception 5:30-9 p.m.

Downtown. 412-471-5605.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Mostly Trucks. Photographs by Jim Miller. Greensburg. 724-205-9033.

709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 720 RECORDS. Sara Eve Rivera. Work by local visual & tattoo

artist. Closing reception Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Industrial Opulence. Photographs by Gabe Szafranski. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. A Tribute to Henry Fiore. Work by LeaAnn Grill, Nancy Bernheisel, Denise Gemellas, & Cynthia Saal. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture CONTINUES ON PG. 59

THURSDAY SEPT 25/10PM

DAILY GRIND THURSDAY OCT 2/10PM

BRAZILIAN WAX THURSDAY OCT 16/10PM

DEAD SIGNAL CHASERS $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

SECOND/SECOND FINNBOGI PETURSSON WOOD STREET GALLERIES 09.26–12.31.14 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, September 26th, 5:30–10pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of:

…arth, 2010; Unsound, Krakow, Poland

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winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Knights of the Arcade,

FRI 26 -SAT 27 MO’NIQUE. 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 27, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown CRITIC: Robert Warren, 29,

SAT 27 JOE BRONZI, MATT STANTON, LISA DAPPRICH. Assumption Alive Young Adults Ministry Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Assumption Church Bellevue, Bellevue. 412-766-4046. MIKEY MASON, SEAN COLLIER, RAY ZAWODNI. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. MO’NIQUE. 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 27, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

TUE 30 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

Available At: Bellevue Beer Duffy’s Pop & Beer Warehouse

WED 01 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 1 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

a retail worker from Greenfield WHEN: Fri.,

Sept. 19 This is the third or fourth time that I’ve been to Knights of the Arcade. They do it every month, and it’s always a really fun time. But the reason that I started coming was because it is Dungeons & Dragons-themed, so I thought it might be interesting. I do play D&D, but honestly, most of the jokes do boil down to pop-culture references, so I think that it’s something that would be accessible for most people even if they’re not familiar with the game Dungeons & Dragons. [The comedians] are all very witty. They are quick on their feet. Even when they kind of struggle, the rest of them will end up making a joke out of them kind of falling on their faces. As a D&D player, rolling with the punches and coming up with amusing things and results for critical fumbles is always entertaining for me.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards The works of Timothy Kelley from the International Hall of & other regional & US artists Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. on display. Sculpture, oil & DEPRECIATION LANDS acrylic paintings, mixed MUSEUM. Small living history media, found objects, more. museum celebrating the North Side. 724-797-3302. settlement and history AUGUST WILSON of the Depreciation CENTER FOR AFRICAN Lands. Allison Park. AMERICAN CULTURE. 412-486-0563. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, . w ww per FALLINGWATER. Renew, Remix. Feat. a p ty ci h pg Tour the famed imagery, film & oral .com Frank Lloyd Wright history narratives to house. 724-329-8501. explore communities, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN cultures, & innovations. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany Downtown. 412-258-2700. stained-glass windows. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Downtown. 412-471-3436. Preserved materials reflecting FORT PITT MUSEUM. the industrial heritage of Reconstructed fort houses Southwestern PA. Homestead. museum of Pittsburgh history 412-464-4020. circa French & Indian War CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF and American Revolution. NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Downtown. 412-281-9285. Are We So Different? Text, FRICK ART & HISTORICAL photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & CENTER. Ongoing: tours of related artifacts challenge Clayton, the Frick estate, with perceptions about race. classes & programs for all ages. Oakland. 412-622-3131. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

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HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays

enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

SPECIAL THU 25 - SUN 28 PITTSBURGH FASHION WEEK. Various locations. Thru Sept. 28

SAT 27 2014 WOMEN’S WALK FOR PEACE. March & event feat. sign-making & cookout, community dialogue, performance by Kindred the Family Soul, more. Starts at Bethany House in Northview Hights, ends in West Park. 10 a.m. 412-321-5527.

FESTIVALS SAT 27 - SUN 28 AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: 2-DAY MEDIA FESTIVAL. Black Radical Imagination film series, curated by Amir George, screening of A Band Called Death, Pearlann Porter, Christiane D, & Autumn Knight, more. Sept. 27-28 Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. BEN AVON FALL FESTIVAL. Kids games, local artisans & more. Church Ave. business district. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

DANCE FRI 26 - SUN 28 SYNERGY. A blend of classical


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in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. By appointment. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Tectonica. Solo exhibition by Paul Chidester. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds. Allegorical paintings by Hannah Grace Clark. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772.

ballet, modern, & contemporary dance presented by Texture Contemporary Ballet. Sept. 26-27, 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 28, 3 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SAT 27 XPRESS GIRLS. Vegas style burlesque troupe. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 607-368-3837.

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Oakland. 412-268-2434. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Behind the Platen. Showcase of letterpress work done by shops & individuals in the Western Pennsylvania/ Eastern Ohio area. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex

FUNDRAISERS FRI 26 ART ON FIRE CELEBRATION & AUCTION. Benefit for Pittsburgh Glass Center. 6 p.m. American Eagle Outfitters Headquarters, South Side. CURE SMA GALA: SULLY’S WISH. Benefits FSMA. www.fsma.org 6:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh,

Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ROOTED: New Works by Di-ay Battad. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Rae Gold Retrospective Sale. Hand dying wool, silk, felt, & knit garments. Through Sept. 27. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. NO OUTLET. New work by Elizabeth Amber Rudnick. Friendship. 551-427-6655. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An African-American Art Exhibition,. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Ephemeral Self. Work by Julia Betts. By appointment. unsmokeartspace.com. Braddock.

North Side. 412-322-5058. ICANDY PGH SUPPORTS ALZHEIMERS ASSOC. Pittsburgh’s Best GLBTQ Dance Party feat. DJ H. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400.

SAT 27 GATSBY GALA. Champagne & hors d’oeuvres, local celebrity guests & live entertainment.

Benefits the Make a Wish Foundation. 5-9 p.m. Cavo, Strip District. HOT PINK PITTSBURGH. Feat. musical cabaret w/ Master of Ceremonies: MS. Eda Bagel. Benefits Adagio Health. 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-253-8165. KIDS’ CHANCE OF PA 5/10K WALK/RUN. Benefits Kids’ Chance Scholarships. 12:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 610-970-9143. MOVING DAY. The National Parkinson Foundation Western PA’s annual fundraising walk/run event. Highland Park Reservoir. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 412-837-2542. VENDOR & CRAFT SHOW. Over 60 vendors. Benefits Gymsport Gems. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Castle Shannon Volunteer Fire Dept., Castle Shannon. 412-884-7913.

SUN 28 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

MON 29 GOLF FORE FAMILIES. Cocktails, silent auction, dinner, program & prizes. Benefits Providence Family Support Center. 10 a.m. Wildwood Golf Club, Allison Park. 412-766-3860 x.325.

LITERARY THU 25 ALIX OHLIN. Lecture w/ author of Signs & Wonders. 8 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. LUCIE BROCK-BRODIO. Part of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

FRI 26 SARAH SHOTLAND. Author of Junkette. 8 p.m. Boom CONTINUES ON PG. 61

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

Concepts, Garfield. YIELD TO THE WILLOW BOOK LAUNCH. Feat. Don Wentworth, w/ Jason Baldinger, Kris Collins, Karen Lillis, Angele Ellis, Scott Silsbe, Gwen, Kevin Finn & Bob Ziller. 7:30 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

SAT 27 READING TO BENEFIT FOR KARL HENDRICKS II. Feat. Jason Baldinger, Kris Collins, Jerome Crooks, Lori Jakiela, Jeff Martin, John Menesini, Dave Newman, Bob Pajich, & Scott Silsbe. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. ZINE FAIR MIXER. Feat. Nils “Balls” Hanzcar, Juan Fernandez, Catherine Conley of Steer Queer, Maggie Lynn Negrete, Thom Delair, Erin Oh, Natty Soltesz, & Kelly Thomas. 7:30 p.m. BUNKERprojects, Garfield.

SUN 28 4TH ANNUAL ZINE FAIR. Feat. Mr. Roboto Project & Carnegie Library Zine collections, hands-on activities, vendors, local djs. 2-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

TUE 30 PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. SALON READING: OSAMA ALOMAR. An evening of short stories w/ Syrian poet Osama Alomar. 7 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. 412-321-2190. SARAH SHOTLAND & SHEILA SQUILLANTE. Part of the Fall 2014 Written/Spoken Reading Series. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

WED 01 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 25 HEALTHY SMILE DAYS: FREE DENTAL SCREENINGS. Provided by the Dental Society of Western PA. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 25 - SUN 28 THE NEST. Discover the mystery of a creature who has made its nest in the museum. The creature’s story comes to life through hands-on art making activities & an interactive performance. Thru Sept. 28, 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THE WIGGLES. 6:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. 412-456-6666. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SKYWATCH. Learn about BALLET HISPANO CLASSICO. globular clusters, nebulas & Thru Oct. 11 Quiet Storm planets by seeing them w/ Gallery, Garfield. 412-403-7357. your own eyes. On clear nights, TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna visitors are invited to come to Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, SkyWatch to get up-close and Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah personal with amazing Konick’s kinetic stainedcelestial objects. Fri, glass work, Lindsay Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Packer’s walk-though Carnegie Science physics-of-light Center, North Side. installation & Stephanie 412-237-3400. Ross’ immersive LED www. per pa environment. Ongoing pghcitym .co Children’s Museum of DATE NIGHT Pittsburgh, North Side. SUPVENTURE FOR 2. 412-322-5058. Sat, 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. SLEEPING BEAUTY THE 412-720-5058. MUSICAL. Presented by Stage WAGMAN SEPTEMBER Right. Sept. 26-27, 7:30 p.m. STAR PARTY. 7:10 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 28, 2 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Palace Theatre, Greensburg. Tarentum. 724-224-2510. 724-836-8000.

THU 25 - WED 01

OUTSIDE

FRI 26 - SAT 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 27

FRI 26 - SUN 28

SUN 28

SAT 27 KIDS/FAMILY FRIENDLY OPEN MIC. 3 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. KIDZ BOP KIDS. 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 27 - SUN 28 PETER PAN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 12 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. RAMP EXPLORATION. Create Rube Goldberg-style contraptions using ramps, tubes & balls in a collaborative installation in MAKESHOP. Sept. 27-28, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 29 BONJOUR LES AMIS. Stories & fun in French. Ages 2-5. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru Sept. 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Scientific activities for early learners ages 2–6. Mon, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 27 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 30 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. TUESDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

CROQUET IN THE PARK. 1-5 p.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 412-963-6100. FALL SYCAMORE ISLAND MUSHROOM WALK. 2 p.m. Steel City Rowing Club, Verona.

TUE 30 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 01 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 25 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BALLROOM DANCE & WINE TASTING. Beginner lesson & tasting. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition & environmental factors that affect growth & development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon

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CONTINUES ON PG. 62

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 61

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Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DAVE RAMSEY’S LEGACY JOURNEY LIVE! Author of The Total Money Makeover 7 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@ gmail.com. MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Fourth Thu of every month, 12 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. POP GENERATION. A program exclusively for adults, age 65+ feat. educational tours & complimentary refreshments. Last Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Dec. 25 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. Educational tours & complimentary refreshments for ages 65+. Last Thu of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PRESERVING THE HERBAL HARVEST. 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries.

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Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 26 21+ NIGHTS: STARRY NIGHTS. All 4 floors of the Science Center open, for grown-ups only. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. HONEY ADDICT LAUNCH PARTY MIXER. Celebration for the local blog feat. refreshments, performances by local artist, more. 8 p.m. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. PGH ABIDES : AN EVENING OF ALL THINGS DUDE. Movie screening feat. music by Charlie Hustle & The Grifters 5 p.m. Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-251-6058.

FRI 26 - SAT 27 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 26 - SUN 28 PENN BREWERY OKTOBERFEST. German beer, food, & live entertainment. Fri-Sun. Thru Sept. 28 Penn Brewery, North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 27 2ND ANNUAL WILKINSBURG HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. Presented by the Wilkinsburg Community Development Corporation. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mifflin Avenue United Methodist Church, Regent Square. 412-727-7855. 36TH ANNUAL POW WOW. Singing, drumming, dancing, arts, crafts, museum & Native foods. 12-7 p.m. Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center, Fox Chapel. 412-292-7683. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. COMPOSTING: REDUCING FOOD WASTE TO CREATE A SUSTAINABLE FOOD FUTURE. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417.

Art by Marilena Pistoi

As a wise man once said, “Every rose has its thorn.” And, as the new exhibit at Carnegie Mellon’s Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation shows, so does every thistle, teasel, berry bramble, stinging nettle and cactus. (OK, technically, they’re not ALL thorns.)

Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines and Prickles features rare books, prints, paintings, drawings and other depictions of various charmingly defensive plant life, ranging from scientific illustration — as of citrus medica (pictured) — to more impressionistic representations. Exhibit continues through Dec. 18. 4909 Frew St., CMU campus, Oakland. Call 412-268-2434 or visit huntbot.andrew. cmu.edu for more information.

FALL CRAFT SHOW. Hand-crafted items, Chinese auction, more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. East Union Presbyterian Church. 412-767-5750. GARDEN RESOURCE CENTER GRAND OPENING. Food, kids’ activities, an ‘ask the gardener booth’, a garden tool repair station, more. 12 p.m. Garden Resource Center, East Liberty. 412-362-4769 x. 114. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. MESSAGE CARRIERS RALLY FOR RECOVERY. www.mcofpa.org 9 a.m. Frick Park, Regent Square. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. RISE ABOVE THE WATERS: HARMONY’S IVAN FLOOD

COMMEMORATION. Art, photos, music, food, creek fun, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WORKSHOP: COMMISSIONING ARTISTS FOR RESIDENTIAL & SMALL COMMERCIAL PROJECTS. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Landmarks Housing Resource Center, Wilkinsburg. 412-391-2060 x237.

SUN 28 AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by


experimental black filmmakers. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Oct. 5 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DIRECT PROJECTIONS W/ COREY ESCOTO. Escotolead workshop on manipulating transparent, translucent, opaque found materials, projections, & Polaroid film techniques. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. HOW TO REACH A SNEETCH. James Clarke, CEO of The Why? Movement, leads a discussion on psychology- & sociology-inspired dos & don’ts for communicating with people who seem to hold ignorant or prejudicial views on race. Call to register by Sep 25. 2-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. THE NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. Pop-up marketplace feat. vintage & handcrafted items, local food, more. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 2300 Penn Ave, Strip District. SUNDAY ASSEMBLY PITTSBURGH LAUNCH. Kickoff event for this “godless congregation that celebrates life.” 10-11 a.m. The New Bohemian, North Side. 412-294-3178. WORLD CULTURES MASTER CLASS. Learn Irish Step Dancing w/ Liz Shovlin Grinko, Drumming & Rhythms of the World w/ Charles Hall, & African Dance w/ Desiree Lee. 2-4 p.m. CLO Academy, Downtown.

MON 29

Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. SLOVAK LANGUAGE LESSONS. Registration required. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-2990.

WED 01 EAVESDROPPING ON AMERICA’S CONVERSATION ON RACE W/ MICHELE NORRIS. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

ASSEMBLE

With Make and Takes, Assemble takes arts and technology programs beyond its Garfield home base, providing fun, hands-on educational activities at community events. The nonprofit is currently seeking volunteers to assist the program director in a variety of capacities, including event set-up and supervising kids as they work on projects. Call 412-432-9127 or email info@assemblepgh.org.

ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. www. per a p ty 412-422-1606. pghci m .co WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

TUE 30 THE BIG BANG & THEN SOME: A LAYPERSON’S PERSPECTIVE. Tue, 7:30-9 p.m. Thru Sept. 30

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MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE WOODY PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. 7-9 p.m. and Mon., Oct. 20, 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com ILLUMINATIUON - THE ART OF THE PUMPKIN. Seeking pumpkin carvers, painters, decorators for upcoming exhibit. Only non-Halloween themed

SUBMISSIONS ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 28. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org. FrameHouse, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357.

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pumpkins will be accepted. Submit application at www.themerrickartgallery.org Merrick Art Gallery, New Brighton. 724-846-1130. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts. org/2014/08/25/call-for-artistsbicycle-racks-in-the-cultural-district/ PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Fall new member screening, Oct. 19. Drop between 12:30-1:00pm. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last 2 years. $20.00 application fee. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SIDEWALL. Seeking artists for a public mural exhibition in Bloomfield. Submit artist statement, proposal for mural, & 3-5 images of past work to sidewall.project@gmail.com from Sept. 1-Oct. 3. More information can be found at sidewallproject. wordpress.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 15. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to www.silvereye.org/ f15apply/. Email jzipay@silvereye. org for information.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

I’m a 28-year-old pan-curious married guy from the Midwest about to move to San Francisco. I’ve been with my wife for 10 years (married four), and we’ve started to explore being monogamish. I am also re-exploring my bi attractions. I’ve been thinking a lot about the opportunities for reinvention that our cross-country move might provide. My wife is GGG and fully supportive, but I still feel apprehensive about getting back out there. After 10 years of monogamy, I am worried that my sex knowledge is the sex that works for my wife and me. And there’s the fact that I am very new to guys, with just one short-term M/M relationship and one terrible hookup under my belt. Any tips for bolstering one’s confidence and making new sexual encounters as fun and unawkward as possible? Is there a resource for dating, hookups, culture? I know the basics of safe-sex practices, but I know little of clubs, kink parties, Growlr/ Tinder, etc. I want to slut it up in SF, but I don’t know where to start. NEWBIE (NEW BI?) SLUT

something else.” To learn more about Kinky Salon, go to kinkysalon.com. Polly Superstar is the author of the new memoir Polly: Sex Culture Revolutionary (sexculturerevolutionary.com). Follow her on Twitter @pollysuperstar. My wife and I are in an open relationship. It started because my wife found flirtatious text messages I sent to a coworker. She confronted me calmly and said she knew our sexual relationship hadn’t been great. She was not that interested in sex, as she’d gained about 50 pounds. I was still attracted to her, but I was rejected half the time. The other half, we had good sex, but nothing new or interesting. She said she was willing to try an open relationship. I had a year-long relationship with my coworker that ended when my wife and I moved. During that time, my wife never had a sexual experience with anyone else, but she started losing weight and we started having better and more frequent sex. Now I’m not looking for anything on the side. But she has embarked on sexual relationships with several people, including threesomes with her best friend and best friend’s husband, a neighbor and a coworker. I know I sound like an asshole, but I am insanely jealous. I feel like she’s getting to know our new city by sleeping with everyone in the neighborhood. Four partners in two months seems crazy to me. Do I deal with this by ending our agreement to share information about outside partners? Or do I tell her I don’t want an open relationship anymore, which seems like a dick move considering my past long-term relationship and the newness of her explorations?

“NOT EVERYONE IN AN OPEN RELATIONSHIP IS COMFORTABLE BEING OUT ABOUT IT.”

“My first piece of advice for anyone opening up their relationship is to take things slow,” said Polly Superstar, cofounder and hostess of Kinky Salon, a pansexual, pan-kink, pan-everything party/space/institution in San Francisco. “Why jump off a cliff when you can take the stairs? However supportive his wife is of his new adventures, it’s likely to bring up some unexpected emotions, so just take it one step at a time, communicate clearly and be patient with each other.” And while your feelings and your wife’s feelings are paramount — you are each other’s primary partners, in poly parlance — the other people you hook up with have limbic systems of their own. Too many people stroll into their first sex club or kink party expecting to find a room full of human Fleshlights at their disposal and are shocked to find a room full of other human beings with desires, preferences and limits of their own. As for messing around with men … “After 10 years of monogamy with a woman, it’s not surprising he’s apprehensive about having sex with men,” said Superstar. “That’s totally normal! But I don’t believe that sexual confidence with new partners is the key to great hookups. He should just be himself and be real. Accepting that new sexual encounters can be awkward is the first step in making them less so.” Superstar took the words right out of my mouth: Acknowledging and embracing the awkwardness is the only way to get past it. Pretending you aren’t feeling awkward when you are makes you seem more awkward. So practice saying, “I’m new at this, I’m a little nervous and I’m feeling a little awkward.” Good people will make an effort to put you at ease. Shitty people will do you the favor of wandering off. But whether you want to explore with men or women, NNBS, Superstar — who has something of a bias — recommends sex parties. “They’re a great place to explore because there’s no commitment,” said Superstar. “You can meet someone, make out, fool around for a bit, and if you’re not feeling it, you can go do

OTHER PEOPLE EXCLUDED NOW

It sounds like you and the wife had different ideas about what your open relationship would look like. What you were doing with your former coworker sounds like poly-style openness — you had an ongoing emotional and sexual relationship — while what your wife is doing with her best friend, her best friend’s husband, the neighbor and her coworker sounds more like fuck-whoever-you-want openness. Reading between the lines, OPEN, it seems that what really bothers you about your wife’s explorations — “sleeping with everyone in the neighborhood” — is the potential for gossip. Not everyone in an open relationship is comfortable being out about it; some people who aren’t sexually monogamous nevertheless wish to be socially monogamous, i.e., perceived to be monogamous, because they fear being judged or even discriminated against. Or perhaps the issue is this: If people know your wife is sleeping around but don’t know about the open relationship, you may look like a foolish and fooled husband. Those are legitimate concerns, and your wife needs to take your feelings into consideration, and you two need to reopen negotiations. On this week’s Lovecast, how to find ethically made porn: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

09.24-10.01

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I am a seed about to break,” wrote Sylvia Plath in her poem “Three Women.” That’s how I see you right now, Libra. You are teeming with the buoyant energy that throbs when a seed is ready to sprout. You have been biding your time, gathering the nourishment you need, waiting for the right circumstances to burst open with your new flavor. And now that nervous, hopeful, ecstatic moment is about to arrive. Be brave!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The English verb “cicurate” is defined as “to tame or domesticate” or “to make mild or innocuous.” But it once had an additional sense: “to reclaim from wildness.” It was derived from the Latin word cicurare, which meant “to bring back from madness, to draw out of the wilderness.” For your purposes, Scorpio, we will make cicurate your theme, but concentrate on these definitions: “to reclaim from wildness, to bring back from madness, to draw out of the wilderness.” In the coming weeks, you will be exploring rough, luxuriant areas of unknown territory. You will be wrangling with primitive, sometimes turbulent energy. I urge you to extract the raw vitality you find there, and harness it to serve your daily rhythm and your long-term goals.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “You can exert no influence if you are not susceptible to influence,” said psychologist Carl Jung. Extrapolating from that idea, we can hypothesize that the more willing and able you are to be influenced, the greater your influence might be. Let’s make this your key theme in the coming weeks. It will be an excellent time to increase your clout, wield more authority, and claim more of a say in the creation of your shared environments. For best results, you should open your mind, be very receptive and listen well.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Congratulations, Capricorn. Your current dilemmas are more useful and interesting than any that you have had for a long time. If you can even partially solve them, the changes you set in motion will improve your entire life, not just the circumstances they immediately affect. Of the several dividends you may reap, one of my favorites is this: You could liberate yourself from a messed-up kind of beauty and become available for a more soothing and delightful kind. Here’s another potential benefit: You may transform yourself in ways that will help you attract more useful and interesting dilemmas in the future.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Alan Moore is the British author who wrote the graphic novels Watchmen and V for Vendetta. He is now nearing completion of Jerusalem, a novel he has been working on for six years. It will be more than a million words long, almost double the size of Tolstoy’s War and Peace, and 200,000 words bigger than the Bible. “Any editor worth their salt would tell me to cut two-thirds of this book,” Moore told the New Statesman, “but that’s not going to happen.” Referring to the author of Moby Dick, Moore adds, “I doubt that Herman Melville had an editor. If he had, that editor would have told him to get rid of all that boring stuff about whaling: ‘Cut to the chase, Herman.’” Let’s make Moore and Melville your role models in the coming week, Aquarius. You have permis-

sion to sprawl, ramble and expand. Do NOT cut to the chase.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For a long time, an Illinois writer named ArLynn Leiber Presser didn’t go out much. She had 325 friends on Facebook and was content to get her social needs met in the virtual realm. But then she embarked on a year-long project in which she sought face-to-face meetings with all of her online buddies. The experiment yielded sometimes complicated but mostly interesting results. It took her to 51 cities around the world. I suggest we make her your inspirational role model for the coming weeks, Pisces. In at least one way, it’s time for you to move out of your imagination and into the real world. You’re primed to turn fantasies into actions, dreams into practical pursuits.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s no secret. The wealthy one percent of the population has been getting progressively wealthier. Meanwhile, the poor are becoming steadily poorer. I’m worried there is a metaphorically similar trend in your life. Am I right? If so, please do all you can to reverse it. Borrow energy from the rich and abundant parts of your life so as to lift up the neglected and under-endowed parts. Here’s one example of how you could proceed: For a while, be less concerned with people who think you’re a star, and give more attention to those who accept and love your shadow side.

ism who helped transform photography into an art form. In 1986 he was invited to Palermo, Sicily, to accept a prize for his work. The hotel he stayed in seemed oddly familiar to him, although he didn’t understand why. It was only later he discovered that the hotel had been the place at which his mother and father stayed on their honeymoon. It was where he was conceived. I foresee a comparable development on the horizon for you, Cancerian: a return to origins, perhaps inadvertent; an evocative encounter with your roots; a reunification with an influence that helped make you who you are today.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): With expert execution, musician Ben Lee can play 15 notes per second on his violin. Superstar eater Pete Czerwinski needs just 34 seconds to devour a 12-inch pizza. When Jerry Miculek is holding his rifle, he can get off eight crack shots at four targets in a little more than one second. While upside-down, Aichi Ono is capable of doing 135 perfect head spins in a minute. I don’t expect you to be quite so lightning-fast and utterly flawless as these people

in the coming weeks, Leo, but I do think you will be unusually quick and skillful. For the foreseeable future, speed and efficiency are your specialties.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): As the makeup artist for the film Dallas Buyers Club, Robin Mathews had a daunting task. During the 23 days of shooting, she had to constantly transform lead actors Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto so that they appeared either deathly ill or relatively healthy. Sometimes she had to switch them back and forth five times a day. She was so skillful in accomplishing this feat that she won the Academy Award for Best Makeup and Hairstyling. Her budget? A meager $250. The film was a shoestring indie production. I’m naming her your inspirational role model for the next few weeks, Virgo. I believe that you, too, can create magic without a wealth of resources. What’s your favorite excuse? Try not to say it or think it during the coming week. Report results to Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I choose a lazy person to do a hard job,” says Bill Gates, the world’s second-richest man, “because a lazy person will find an easy way to do it.” That’s good counsel for you right now, Taurus. You’d be wise to get in touch with your inner lazy bum. Let the slacker within you uncover the least stressful way to accomplish your difficult task. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, there is no need for you to suffer and strain as you deal with your dilemma.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you don’t identify and express your conscious desires, your unconscious desires will dominate your life. I will say that again in different language, because it’s crucial you understand the principle. You’ve got to be very clear about what you really want, and install a shining vision of what you really want at the core of your everyday life. If you don’t do that, you will end up being controlled by your habits and old programming. So be imperious, Gemini. Define your dearest, strongest longing, and be ruthlessly devoted to it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004) was an influential French photographer, a pioneer of photojournal-

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Start your career at the Top! Burns & Scalo Roofing specializes in all aspects of roofing, including commercial and residential roofing, sheet metal/ metal wall panels, repair and maintenance, waterproofing, and green renewable services such as solar and vegetative roofing. We are seeking Experienced Roofing Technicians. These positions will work directly on our commercial and residential job sites.

JOB QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE: · Reliable transportation is a must (includes Pittsburgh and surrounding areas). · 2 Years roofing experience with commercial and/or residential applications · Ability to lift 75 pounds, stand/walk, pull, bend over, work on knees regularly, work at heights, use ladders, and tolerate work outdoors at varying temperatures · Possess Customer Care focus and have ability to communicate effectively with people from diverse backgrounds · Permissible background check including clean drug screen and references · Strongly Preferred: Valid Driver’s License and personal transportation · Experience with Smart Phones or running a job site a plus Full Benefits Available: Includes Paid vacation and holidays, comprehensive medical benefits, retirement plan with company match, and other supplemental benefits.

QUESTIONS OR TO APPLY: Visit http://www.burns-scalo.com/roofing/index.php/our-company/careers to print an application OR Submit your resume via - email: jobs@burns-scalo.com Mail to: Burns & Scalo Roofing- Human Resources, 22 Rutgers Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 Call Human Resources - (412) 458-3884 Walk in’s are welcome to complete an application. Burns & Scalo is an EEO (Veterans, Disabled, Women/Minorities) and Military Friendly Employer, and has a GI Bill Approved OTJ Apprenticeship Program for Veterans.

Driver Immediate opening for a fulltime Driver at residential vocational training facility for young adults. Must have high school diploma or GED, as well as a valid CDL, with class B license with passenger, air brake endorsement. The ability to deal positively with young adults necessary. Please apply online at https://Jobs.csdis.com (job code 0426). For additional information, please visit www.careersystems.com. Please upload resume. Equal Opportunity Employer Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran. CSD makes reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities to apply for employment. Contact the HR department at hr.pittsburgh@jobcorps.org to request a reasonable accommodation.

ROLL INTO A WINNING CAREER.

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Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM to apply.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

855-McNeely (855-626-3359) www.mcneelystaffing.com

BEST OF PENNSYLVANIA

4

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be willing to submit to a pre-employment drug test and background check. Must be 18 or older to apply. Candidates under 21 must call 412-566-4390 before arrival. Must be able to acquire state licensing. Rivers Casino is an equal is an equal opportunity employer.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014


DRIVERS Customer Service Oriented For First Transit Drivers it’s not just about getting

To qualify, you must be at least 21 years of age, have a

people from place to place, it’s about getting them there

valid driver license, 3 years of experience, have a safe

safely. If you are a safe and friendly driver with good

driving record and be able to pass a background check

attendance and customer service skills, this is the right

and pre-employment drug test. We operate days, evenings,

job for you! We would be happy to have you join our

and Saturdays. Split shifts are currently available.

team of professionals.

To Apply, Please visit a First Transit location nearest you at: We are proud to offer: • • • • •

• 2439 West Pike Street, Houston PA. For more information call 724-746-4342

Paid Training Health Insurance Paid Time Off Opportunity for Advancement A Rewarding Job in a Team Environment

• 4780 Library Road, Bethel Park PA. For more information call 412-833-3300 • 101 Old Frankstown Road, Plum Borough PA. For more information call 412-793-9046 Resumes can be faxed to 412-835-4240

Equal Opportunity Employer

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ADOPTION

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS

ADOPTION: Jewelery Designer & TV Journalist yearn for 1st baby to LOVE & CHERISH Expenses Paid 1-800-933-1975 Meryl & David

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189 HELP WANTED

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

NOW HIRING

NOW HIRING Seeking competitive individuals with leadership qualities. Management opportunities available. Full training provided, no exp. nec. 412-458-0058

AUTO SERVICES

CLASSES

ADOPTION

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads. TV. Film. Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

AUTO SERVICE

CLASSES

STUDIES

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Rent -A- Bay

Look! Attention Sports Fans: Call for your FREE Pick today from our expert handicappers. No Strings Attached! 21+ Call: 888-513-5639 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

GENERAL FOR SALE

REHEARSAL

CLASSES

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

IS NOW HIRING! We are local small business looking for enthusiastic, Hard working candidates to join our team of cleaning professionals to keep up with our increasing demand. The candidate will need to be able to Work as a team as well as individual and Adopt our company credo of customer centric values: “We aim to please by any means” Compensation to be based on experience. Drivers license required.

Please call Johnnie Bryant, owner at 412-538-7850 for more information

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

R A D I O PROMOTIONS A S S I S TA N T N E E D E D Organized, reliable, professional person is needed part time for a busy Radio Promotions Department in downtown Pittsburgh. Candidate must be able to work day and evenings, both weekdays and weekends when needed. Duties include in office work and on-site. Candidate must posess excellent writing and communication skills, with a degree in Marketing/ Communications or related field. Ability to handle multiple tasks efficiently and meet deadlines is a must. Web experience a plus. Must have valid drivers license and SPOTLESS driving record.

email: vwolfe@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media 650 Smithfield Street - Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222

www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

NO PHONE CALLS.

EOE

BIRTH CONTROL CALL TODAY!

NOTICES

EAST FOR RENT

STORAGE

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD

Highland Park 2nd Flr, 4RM w/eq kit, prvt entr, bathroom, $700+e Call 412-661-6343

Guardian Storage

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE CPRB Case #208-13 Thursday, 10/9/14 @ 5:30 PM City Council Chambers 510 City County Building 414 Grant Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available

3 Locations Shadyside • Oakland • Strip District

412-208-4625 GuardianStorage.com

ROOMMATES

STORAGE

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023.

CPRB PITTSBURGH

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

R A D I O PROMOTIONS I N T E R N S N E E D E D IMMEDIATELY INTERNS NEEDED(Fall Semester) for busy promotions department at Steel City Media (WRRK/WLTJ). Internship is non paid and must be taken for college credit. DUTIES INCLUDE: On site at events and concerts, office work, on-air writing, video hosting/ editing and more. INTERESTED? Send a resume to: andrewb@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer.

Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a

MULTIMEDIA reporter Pittsburgh City Paper is seeking a talented, full-time reporter who knows how to find and tell stories across several platforms. The ideal candidate will be comfortable writing a 3,000-word feature for print as well as producing compelling multimedia content for our online edition. Applicants should have a background in print journalism and video production, and be proficient in blog-writing and with social media. We’re looking for writers with knowledge of our city — reporters who know how to find the stories that no one else is telling. To apply, email a resume, cover letter and work samples to Charlie Deitch, editor, at cdeitch@pghcitypaper.com. No phone calls please. • Pittsburgh City Paper is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


JADE

Positive Recovery Solutions

*Stuff We Like

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

Balsamic Vinegar in Oh Yeah! Ice Cream

It sounds gross, but trust us: Try it with the Irish cream. 232 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Roger Humphries {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Jam Sessions at CJ’s

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Recovery Without Judgement™

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Check out local talent at this Strip District club, at 29th and Penn. Every Thursday at 8 p.m. is a jam session with legendary drummer Roger Humphries, who hasn’t missed a set in a little more than a decade. www.cjsinthestrip.com

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

GET HELP NOW

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 1-800-243-1001

Sworkit Need to add a little structure to your exercise regimen? Download this app — there are free and fancier pay versions. Then, select a focus (including strength training, cardio and yoga) and the amount of time you have (5 to 60 minutes), and Sworkit guides you through a customized workout.

Well-wishing manhole covers

C Chameleon Cold-Brew Coffee Concentrate C Co Cold-brewed coffee is all the rage, but if you don’t feel like making your own, pick up a bottle of this tasty readylik made stuff. Dilute it with water or milk, or go crazy and m mix it in with booze, ice cream or your morning smoothie. m

Son of Stedeford’s

Cut Me Loose

The venerable North Side record shop, now run by the prior owner’s son, has taken over a new storefront. Video games sit alongside vintage LPs, but don’t miss the basement, where well-indexed 45s are ripe for pawing through. 417 E. Ohio St., North Side

Pittsburgh native Leah Vincent’s memoir tells the story of growing up as part of an ultraOrthodox Jewish community, and her rather harrowing journey out of it. A fascinating and relatable read.

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www.glenbeigh.com

www.myjadewellness.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Asian 888 Massage

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Therapy

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pregnant? We can treat you!

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951 MASSAGE

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave. Asian/European Girl

MASSAGE

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

724-519-7896

412-441-1185

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com 70

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Grandng Openi

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.24/10.01.2014

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm 1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2 McKees Rocks

412-777-7171

TIGER SPA

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111


G N I R A E SW

VETIC}

IMMY C

M BY J {A POE

I like to swear And swearing should be as natural as breathing. Normal as shaking a fist to heaven. Not like saying son of a bitch but more like spitting out Dusty old balls dragger Bell’s Palsy kisser Flamingo fornicator One eye monkey beater Paper bag full of Shinola Chrome dome stuck where the sun doesn’t shine Wet pants of a coward Wart on a witch’s ass Boil on the milk nipple Turd on a wedding cake Bunions on the sore feet of a four in the morning streetwalker Baboon sore blue butt Bowl of liver and turnips Pension of the ass wipe of the king Hung by the nuts from a tall oak tree Eternal soft-on Young blue balls stuck to a block of dry ice Hunchback lover Club foot up the tight ass of opportunity Stuttering with a mouth full of monkey poop Nose picker in school Booger eater Snot snort Bicycle seat licker of a virgin

Taking a steaming dump over a cold bear trap Sinner locked outside of a church Defense attorney caught trying to tell the truth Wet jockstraps in a loser’s locker room Toilet in the bus terminal Camel toe kisser Enema bag squeezer Dushie dude in a pink suit Double crease shiny silk pants liar Politician on rusty roller skates Telling on a nun Finger up the prostate Fist up where it doesn’t belong Game of hamster hide and seek Saggy tits of an old bull … And soap in my dirty filthy mouth if I don’t say Hot twaty of a tweety scorned. Now I realize this is nothing like Stopping in the Woods on a Snowy Evening Or How Do I Love Thee Let Me Count The Ways … But you got to realize I’ve pulled stinkers out of the Ohio River And cut the rope of the hanged. Thank you very much. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 24, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 39

September 24, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 39