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HEAD OF STEAM: PITTSBURGH SCHOOLS PONDER NEW EDUCATIONAL MODEL 06


EVENTS 9.26 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP Warhol theater Tickets $10

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

10.10 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 THE UNKNOWN Warhol theater Tickets $10

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Isabella Rossellini in Green Porno

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.21 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | visit www.ticketmaster.com

The Warhol and the Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History welcome the iconic actress, performer and model, Isabella Rossellini to the Carnegie Music Hall for a special presentation of her one-woman show, Green Porno. Adapted from the Sundance Channel series of the same name, Rossellini has crafted a uniquely thoughtful, odd and comical performance-lecture with projected illustrations that celebrates biodiversity while focusing on mating rituals and insects and marine life - an imaginative tour de force that sits aptly at the intersection of art and science.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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OCTOBER 01 - 05 DAN’L BOONE with Mark McGuire, Giant Claw, White Reeves October 01 / 8:00PM / The Shop $12 advance - $15 door

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

with Edgar Um, Aaron Clark October 04 / 11:55PM / Hot Mass $15 door

STEVE GUNN

with Circuit Des Yeux, Lattimore & Zeigler Duo October 05 / 8:00PM / Thunderbird Cafe $10 advance - $15 door

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{EDITORIAL}

09.17/09.24.2014

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 38

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns DANIELLE FOX, SAMANTHA WARD

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS] bringing in STEAM we can draw 06 “By families to Woolslair but we can also bring more families into the district.” — Parent Valerie Allman on the benefits of turning Woolslair School into a STEAM magnet school

[VIEWS]

invocations of the American spirit 14 “As go, you could do a lot worse than, ‘People, we got to get over before we go under.’” — Chris Potter on truly inspiring national mottos.

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

17

“Our appetizer course suggested a wellrounded kitchen at the top of its game.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Jade Grille

[MUSIC] still had the American-flag Speedo on, 22 “He and I was like, ‘Who’s that guy? Wow!’” — Phat Man Dee on the night she met now-husband Tommy Amoeba

[SCREEN]

“To an outsider, this looks like total

— ER doc in Code Black, a doc 31 chaos.” about a busy city hospital

[LAST PAGE]

not a good time for books that are 55 “It’s well written.” — Braddock Avenue Books cofounder Robert Peluso on the challenges of 21st-century publishing

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 49 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 STUFF WE LIKE 52 +

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO STEEL CITY MEDIA

“There is an unsettlingly familiar feeling to this combination of incendiary rhetoric about race, political division, threats of secession and firearms.” — Charles Rosenblum on the 19th-century milieu of Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

TA S T E

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“THIS MODEL IS NOT JUST ATTRACTIVE; IT IS CRITICAL TO ADVANCE OUR STUDENTS’ SKILLS.”

More routes added to PAT’s real-time bus tracking system (Sept. 11, online only) “That’s great for folks in the city who have a bus showing up every 20 [minutes], but try adding the suburbs first! [The route] 1 and the P10 are often caught in traffic, you wait and [have] no idea what’s up. Buses that run every hour only need more focus from PAT. You take our tax dollars too. Speed up suburbia tracking please!” — Web comment from “Fang’s Friend”

Corbett ads making little dent in Wolf’s lead (Sept. 10) “In a time when abrupt climate change is obvious, and the science pretty clear, the comment, “Tom knows that coal is a vital part of Pennsylvania’s energy portfolio” is out of touch with the growing number of people who understand that fossil fuels, including fracking, is a march to folly and collapse.” — Web comment from “Jack Wolf”

Will Pittsburgh’s new police chief be able to restore trust in the department? (Sept. 10)

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Woolslair parents believe a STEAM magnet program could save their school. Pictured from left: (front) Barb Squires, Valerie Allman and daughter Lily, Tommy Jeter, Jaline Cunningham and son Jaivin, (back) Donna Harper, Bertha Weimer, Christine Jankowski

“Thanks so much for this timeline to everyone who helped to write the featured news stories and to connect the dots.” — Web comment from “Helen Gerhardt”

“‘I was going to vote for Tom Wolf but changed my mind when I heard an ex-porn star was in one of his commercials.’ -- No one.” — Sept. 8 tweet from Philadelphia Daily News reporter Will Bunch (@will_bunch) on the controversy surrounding an actor in a Tom Wolf campaign ad who had done a horror film

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GAINING STEAM W

OOLSLAIR ELEMENTARY school parent Jaline Cunningham was an early supporter of a proposal to turn her child’s school into a science, technology, engineering, arts and math magnet school — also known as a STEAM school. But after seeing the model employed in the South Fayette School District over the summer, she says the benefits of STEAM curriculum became even more apparent. “I was originally like, ‘Oh yeah, that would be nice,’” Cunningham says. “But when I saw it in action I realized my kids would be able to learn so much better.” Now the STEAM magnet proposal is being considered by Pittsburgh Public Schools administrators. Supporters believe it could be brought to the school board for a vote at this month’s legisla-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

tive meeting, on Sept. 23. But first the district must find funding to implement and sustain the model. “Like every good idea, it costs,” says Superintendent Linda Lane.

Parents, teachers pushing for new curriculum at city’s Woolslair School {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} There are other factors to consider. The magnet proposal was originally created to attract more families to Woolslair; the school — which sits on the border of Lawrenceville and Bloomfield — was nearly closed last year due to poor enrollment. Some worry that while

the school’s student body could increase, it might shift enrollment issues to other district schools. “If all we do is pull kids out of other Pittsburgh public schools, we’ve just moved the problem,” Lane says. “But if we can attract kids [from outside the district] that would be a more positive thing.” According to the proposal submitted by a group of Woolslair parents and teachers, the STEAM model is an interdisciplinary approach to education that aims to help students understand how subjects “relate in the real world.” Instead of relying on memorization and testing, the curriculum is project-based. “One example is a project where children design a city. If you want to have a bridge, that would be engineering. When you do design to make it aesthetically CONTINUES ON PG. 08


GAINING STEAM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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pleasing, you’re bringing in the arts,” says Woolslair teacher Kathy Michelotti. “It’s integrated, instead of isolated, skills because that’s how we use skills in real life as adults.” Michelotti was among the parents and teachers who visited the nearby suburban South Fayette School District over the summer to see how teachers are using the STEAM model. “They’re actually planting gardens and measuring things,” says Cunningham. “It’s not like here, where the kids cut out the paper ruler and measure the picture of lettuce. They’re actually pulling out the lettuce and measuring the roots of the lettuce. And that’s an everyday part of their curriculum.” South Fayette doesn’t have one STEAM-specific school, but has instead implemented the model throughout the district. “This model is not just attractive; it is critical to advance our students’ skills to keep them globally competitive,” says South Fayette Superintendent Bille Rondinelli.

“IF ALL WE DO IS PULL KIDS OUT OF OTHER PITTSBURGH PUBLIC SCHOOLS, WE’VE JUST MOVED THE PROBLEM.”

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While Rondinelli provided anecdotal examples of how STEAM has contributed to achievement throughout his district, she says there’s no way to know whether the model has increased enrollment there. However, Woolslair’s STEAM supporters tout South Fayette’s title as the fastest growing district in the state, according to the Pennsylvania Association of School Business Officials, as proof of the model’s success. “By bringing in STEAM we can draw families to Woolslair, but we can also bring more families into the district, so we can maybe even save the district,” says Valerie Allman, another Woolslair parent. “We’re hoping it’s going to increase our enrollment by drawing people back to Woolslair that maybe have made other choices, such as charter schools or maybe a different magnet program or private schools,” Michelotti says. In order to integrate STEAM education into the South Fayette district, Rondinelli sought funding from a variety of sources. “We have been able to secure grants to offset some of the costs for specific projects, such as the Grable Grant, STEAM grants offered through the [Allegheny Intermediate Unit], The Sprout Fund, and others,” Rondinelli says. “… Much [of it] is not costly; it involves redesigning the curriculum and incorporating innovation and connected learning concepts and strategies.” It would cost $150,000 to implement the model, but while the initial costs are high, the Woolslair group says it would not cost the district a lot to sustain. Startup costs mostly include upgraded technology such as laptops, which would be used for projects like programming robots. The district would also have to fund a STEAM teacher coordinator. “Knowing the financial situation the district is in, I think we can do it with not a lot of money in the big scheme of things,” Michelotti says. “We’re hoping to get some money granted to us. There are a lot of grants out there. STEAM is an idea that a lot of people are looking to fund right now.” Recently, the Allegheny Intermediate Unit distributed grants for STEAM education funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum and Grable foundations. For the 2014-2015 school year, $500,000 was given to 25 school districts in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Greene, Washington and

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

CONTINUES ON PG.10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014


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GAINING STEAM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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panies around the nation begin to emphasize the importance of employees who are creative, this is a great way to pull out creativity and allow kids to show their creativity. All learning is so much easier when the kids are interested.” However, Lane is not as confident that local foundations and other grantmaking agencies will be willing to fund the implementation of a model at a single school with such a small student population. “The big challenge is the money has to come from somewhere,” Lane says. “The small number of children involved isn’t highly likely to attract grants. Foundations are going to be interested in having a larger impact than just 100 children.” While members of the parent group believed the district was delaying magnet registration for the 2015-2016 school year until next month to permit inclusion of the proposed Woolslair STEAM school, magnet registration began on Sept. 15. And as of press time, the Woolslair proposal has not been included in the agenda for the board’s Sept. 23 meeting. As the Woolslair group awaits the district’s decision, its members have already been working to begin integrating STEAM into the school. Woolslair secured a $15,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Education to start an after-school program that will begin in October. RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Westmoreland counties. Pittsburgh Public Schools was not among those awarded. But according to the group championing the Woolslair proposal, Superintendent Lane has been in talks with the Grable and Pittsburgh foundations to secure funding for the STEAM magnet. “The superintendent is speaking to foundations to secure funding, but for more than just Woolslair,” says district spokesperson Ebony Pugh. “The STEAM model, proposed by the community for Woolslair, is among that discussion.” The Woolslair group hopes the school board will approve the proposal at its legislative meeting this month. But while the proposal was submitted to the district in August, it has yet to appear on board’s agenda, even though several board members, including Regina Holley, who represents Woolslair, have vocally supported the plan. “This is the way of the future,” says school director Carolyn Klug. “This is what kids need to be productive and I think it’s a good opportunity for our children. I haven’t heard anything negative about it.” While Superintendent Lane cautions against viewing the magnet proposal as a solution to prevent school closings, she agrees STEAM would be beneficial to district students. “We just have to get kids out of their seats doing things,” Lane says. “As com-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

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WITHOUT FURTHER REVIEW City officials say force used in Pride arrest was not excessive; should the public take them at their word? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} WHEN PITTSBURGH police officer Souroth

Chatterji arrested 19-year-old Ariel Lawther at the city’s annual LGBT Pride festival June 15, he pulled her by the neck and hair out of a crowd and punched her several times before detaining her. Video that surfaced of the incident quickly made it the first high-profile case of potential police misconduct under Mayor Bill Peduto’s watch — and within 24 hours Peduto had promised, “We will work diligently to make sure that justice is not delayed and that we will be able to proceed over the next month to find out exactly what happened, and to take the proper action.” Eighty-one days after the incident, Peduto released a statement from the city’s top lawyer exonerating Chatterji, while offering few details about the basis for the decision. “Objective reviews of the entirety of the evidence may not always reveal what one video, one photograph, or one statement might reveal alone,” solicitor Lourdes Sanchez-Ridge wrote in a statement released late in the day on Fri., Sept. 5. “A final report by the Office of Municipal Investigations, including an analysis completed by an independent consultant, has determined that the officer involved did not use excessive force.” Police-accountability experts say the city might be making the right call by exonerating Chatterji, since use-of-force cases are extremely fact-specific. But some are wondering why the city has refused to disclose even basic information about why it exonerated Chatterji, who declined to comment for this story. “People have too much experience with the city than to trust leaders when they say, ‘Trust us,’” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the Pennsylvania American Civil Liberties Union. “This is when you need transparency — not on the daily calendar,” referring to the daily schedule Peduto publishes. One way the city could be more transparent, Walczak says, is to produce ad-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

Images from a YouTube video of Pittsburgh Police Officer Souroth Chatterji arresting Pride attendee Ariel Lawther following a disputed altercation between the pair

ditional video footage that police-union attorney Bryan Campbell says helped exonerate Chatterji. According to Campbell, the video — shot from a nearby PNC Bank branch — resolved conflicting witness accounts about whether Lawther physically assaulted an antigay protester before Chatterji arrested her. “It was pretty clear from the film, at least, that the young lady assaulted one of these preachers and the officers tried to take her into custody for that,” Campbell says. But so far, the city is not making that video available to the public. Mayoral spokesman Tim McNulty said that OMI, the city’s internal review mechanism, does not release details of internal investigations, even after they are completed. He would not say whether the policy was based on any law or provision of the city’s contract with the Fraternal Order of Police. The Peduto administration has also refused to say why it decided to use an unnamed “independent agency” to review the incident, or why it plans to require “third-party analysis in all excessive force investigations,” instead of relying solely on OMI. McNulty said the city would not name the agency because “the law department and OMI do not release the names of witnesses or interviews done in investigations,” and because the city considers the agency to be “like a witness.” That stance worries the ACLU’s Walczak, who argues the public can’t possibly assess the validity of an investigation conducted anonymously. “If it’s the Acme Plumbing Company, it’s probably not worth a lot,” he says. “I’m not aware of any legal reason

“PEOPLE HAVE TOO MUCH EXPERIENCE WITH THE CITY THAN TO TRUST LEADERS WHEN THEY SAY ‘TRUST US.’”

why they can’t release additional information,” Walczak adds. “It’s not like you could compromise some ongoing part of the investigation.” Other police departments are less reluctant to release details of internal investigations — including that of Madison, Wis., where Cameron McLay, the city’s new chief, served as a police captain. Within three hours of a call from City Paper, Madison police made available an internal investigator and captain who supervises the division in charge of releasing public information. “During an investigation we don’t typically release anything,” says Madison police Capt. Sue Williams, who cautions that differences in local and state law make it impossible to compare policies exactly. But “once the investigation is closed — especially if it’s a high-interest story — we try to release some information so our public knows what’s going on. It’s constantly a balancing test.” Madison’s police department is more likely to disclose information related to investigations that sustain charges of wrongdoing, as opposed to investigations that result in exonerations, Williams says. But after a 2012 incident where an officer fatally shot an unarmed robbery suspect, the department decided to release video of a witness interview conducted during the investigation to convince the public the department made the right call. “The decision has to be as transparent as possible,” Williams says, “so we can foster […] trust in our community.” In Pittsburgh, though, the police union’s Campbell doesn’t think more disclosure is likely. “It’s either confidential or not confidential and I think […] for these investigations to be effective in the long run, it can’t be a public thing,” Campbell says. “You can’t cut the baby in half.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


ICONIC PITTSBURGH COMES TO INDIANA, PA:

Governor’s Awards for the Arts September 28 4:00 pm | IUP Performing Arts Center The Andy Warhol Museum, Arts Innovation Award; Robert Qualters, Artist of the Year; and honorees from Philadelphia, Johnstown and Indiana

Open to the Public | Reserve Free Tickets

PAGovArtsAwards2014.org

World Premiere! Part 4 of The Invisible Photograph documentary series

Discarded: Joachim Schmid and the Anti-Museum September 19, 2014 Join us as we explore the anti-museum compiled by German artist Joachim Schmid from over 1,000 discarded images retrieved from flea markets and city streets. 6:30 p.m. Screening of Discarded with Joachim Schmid and Arthur Ou, creative director of The Invisible Photograph documentary series. 7:30–9 p.m. Post-screening party with the creators and stars of Discarded, featuring custom cocktails and a photo swap—so don’t forget to bring a photo! $10 in advance/$15 at the door

The Invisible Photograph, a project of the Hillman Photography Initiative, is a five-part documentary series investigating the expansive realm of photographic production, distribution, and consumption by way of the hidden side of photography.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

A divisive bill fails in Allegheny County Council, by the grace of God {BY CHRIS POTTER}

IF YOU THINK about it, “In God We Trust” might be one of the most agnostic sayings of all time. If we trust God that much, after all, why do we feel obliged to say so? Putting that motto on the nation’s pocket change is a bit like loaning your friend $5 … and then calling him 15 times a day, just to tell him how sure you are that he’ll pay you back. It’s hard not to see the same sort of insecurity at work over in Allegheny County Council, which last week narrowly rejected a bid to graft a plaque reading “In God We Trust” onto the wall of the Gold Room, where council meetings are held. The measure’s original sponsor, South Hills Republican Sue Means, insisted this wasn’t a religious message — that it was just a nod to American tradition. County Council also proposed adding the non-religious “E Pluribus Unum” and the Pennsylvania state motto — which, as every schoolkid knows, is “Virtue, Liberty and Independence.” One wonders how the vote would have gone had council added lyrics from James Brown’s “Funky President (People It’s Bad)”? As invocations of the American spirit go, you could do a lot worse than, “People, we got to get over before we go under.” Sadly, County Executive Rich Fitzgerald preempted that possibility by announcing plans to veto the bill. Putting up the plaque would be “disrespecting other religions and beliefs by promoting one above all others,” Fitzgerald warned. Council promptly fell into line and rejected the plaque. But Fitzgerald’s opposition prompted Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Ruth Ann Dailey, among others, to snipe that “In God We Trust” doesn’t actually specify which God we’re trusting. Which may be true, but begs the question of why Christians — ranging from Dailey to groups like the Pennsylvania Pastors Network — are the only ones complaining about its absence. Actually, the plaque really might not be a Christian statement, in the sense that Christ might not have approved of it. Jesus had little patience for those who made a show of their own religios-

ity. (“[W]hen thou prayest,” the Gospel of Matthew quotes him saying, “thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the … corners of the streets.”) Sparing us this religious display might be the most Christian thing Allegheny County Council could do. That’s not how plaque supporters see it, of course. The American Family Association of Pennsylvania likened plaque opposition to the 9/11 terror attacks: “We were attacked physically on September 11, 2001,” it screeched, “[but] our basic beliefs are also under attack by those who are attempting … to create a God-less America.” Meanwhile in a statement, Pennsylvania Pastors Network President Sam Rohrer accused county officials of “becoming vehicles for persecution of those who understand the role God has had in our nation.” As acts of persecution go, not putting up a plaque falls a little short of, say, the Spanish Inquisition. But at a time when gay marriage is legal even in Pennsylvania, this might be where one strain of Christianity is headed. Deprived of the ability to dictate morality to the rest of us, they demand special recognition for themselves — and feel aggrieved when they don’t get it. A plaque seems so important to these Christians, one suspects, because they can see the writing on the wall. The words “In God We Trust” might be benign (unless you’re an atheist), but the impetus to put them up is clearly political. The bright side for Christians is this: If they feel oppressed inside the county’s Gold Room, they can always walk outside and go around the corner. There’s still a copy of the Ten Commandments bolted alongside the Courthouse’s Fifth Avenue entrance. (Unbelievers tried to remove the plaque more than a decade ago, but a federal judge allowed it to remain.) Christians can gaze at it longingly, without even having to pretend to care about the comfort of Hindus or Buddhists. Of course, by the time December rolls around, the plaque-worshippers might well be left in the cold. But then if that’s what God has in store for them, who are we to question it?

A PLAQUE SEEMS SO IMPORTANT TO SOME CHRISTIANS, ONE SUSPECTS, BECAUSE THEY CAN SEE THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014


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REFINED CHINESE DINING THAT HEWS TO AN ORGANIC-LOCAL-SUSTAINABLE ETHOS

MILK RUN {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} When most people donate to their local food bank or food pantry, going to the canned-goods cupboard is almost an automatic response. But these organizations need much more than nonperishables. They also accept fresh produce and a commodity that most people don’t think of — milk. “Milk is one of the most requested products at food banks,” says Althea Zanecosky, a registered dietician and spokeswoman for the Philadelphia-based Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association. “They have the refrigerators, but a lot of times there’s just no milk in them.” The organization and others across the country are working with nonprofit Feeding America for the Great American Milk Drive. A $5 donation at www.milklife.com/give provides a gallon of milk from a local participating dairy to a participating food bank near your zip code through next April. “Most people don’t donate milk because it’s a hard thing to give,” says Zanecosky. “This drive allows you to go online, donate and the work is done for you. “When you look at the number of children who are food-insecure and in a difficult situation, their need for a high-quality protein is vital. At 25 cents per glass, milk is cost-effective way to get that to them.” The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank serves 325,520 people suffering from food insecurity, according to Feeding America. Food insecurity touches about 1.8 million Pennsylvanians. As this issue was going to press, nearly 2,000 gallons of milk had been donated statewide. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FEED

September is Local Food Month at the East End Food Co-op, and the celebration continues with a Local Foods Sampling Session, on Wed., Sept. 24. Participants include Healcrest Urban Farm, Clarion River Organics, Cherish Creamery and Pastitio. 7 p.m. 7516 Meade St., Point Breeze. www. eastendfood.coop

FRESH APPRO ACH {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

C

HINESE FOOD — broadly conceived —

was among the first foreign cuisines to be adapted to the tastes of the American dining public. But in Pittsburgh, anyway, its sophistication has lagged behind the cuisines of other nations which have gained popularity more recently; while local restaurants now explore the regional cooking of Italy, India and several other European and Asian countries, Chinese restaurants have remained largely stuck in tired reruns of kung pao chicken and beef in brown sauce. But now, an exciting development stands to revive the local Chinese-food scene: the arrival of hand-pulled noodles. Not only are these tender yet robust noodles themselves superior to any that come in a package, but they also seem to inspire dishes of an equally fresh and delicious nature. Jade Grille, situated in a former bank (complete with an intimate little dining room in the vault) along Mount Lebanon’s Washington Road, is not primarily a noodle house. But the promise of fresh noodles has-

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Avalanche roll and soup dumplings

tened our desire to visit. Other sections of the menu intrigued us, too, such as the openflame skewers. These were not big kebabs, but diminutive twigs of bamboo holding together just a few carefully considered morsels. With sushi and stir-fries comprising the remainder of Jade Grille’s offerings, we wondered which items were the specialties of the kitchen, and which — if any — might be subject to the rote production of the familiar.

JADE GRILLE 670 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-531-6666 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. noon-9:30 p.m. PRICES: Small plates, soups and skewers $4-12; sushi plates and entrees $10-28 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Our appetizer course suggested a wellrounded kitchen at the top of its game. Modestly named “steamed dumplings” were, in fact, highly esteemed soup dumplings. These dim-sum treats, brought to the table in their bamboo steaming basket, each con-

tained a succulent meatball enveloped in a rich burst of its own broth. The velvety wrappers contributed both to the dumplings’ varied texture and harmonious flavor. Sichuan dumplings, bathed in deepvermilion chili sauce, were an altogether different experience, but just as delicious in their slippery, spicy savoriness. Dan dan noodles, a common street food only recently appearing on local menus, put Jade Grille’s fresh hand-pulled noodles center stage, augmented with chili oil, crisped bits of pork and bright scallions. Then came our skewer of three quail eggs wrapped in bacon. Bacon and eggs, that classic American big-breakfast combo, was here transformed into an exquisite delicacy. The hard-boiled eggs, each a modest mouthful, remained tender, with slightly creamy yolks, thanks to the protection of the bacon, while each small segment of pork retained its meaty chew despite edges crisped delectably over the flame. The sushi list was long on maki but short on nigiri and sashimi; we ordered an assorted nigiri platter whose components CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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FRESH APPROACH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

weren’t specified on the menu. The reason for both of these factors is an excellent one: Beyond staples like tuna and salmon, the sushi bar stocks only small amounts of whichever fresh fish is available that day. The assortment was thus comprised of a complete sampling of the day’s offerings, which during our visit included red snapper, yellowtail, fatty salmon and succulent, slightly fishy (it’s supposed to be) mackerel. All were excellent. For a cooked entrée, Angelique was curious about the “cumin style” stir-fry, which the menu described in one inscrutable sentence. Did it have a sauce? Our server wasn’t sure, so, as is standard in this situation, she returned to the kitchen to ask. We were impressed when the chef himself came to our table to address our question. The cumin-style lamb turned out to be marinated and dry-rubbed with a cumin spice mixture, then stir-fried with coarsely cut onions, peppers (chili and bell) and tomatoes. The meat was meltingly tender and the flavors of this dish wonderfully warm and assertively spicy.

Bian Ba stretches dough into noodles, handmade to order.

Jason returned to the allure of handpulled noodles with his order of beef lo mein. It had great texture and tasty beef, but the flavor was a bit lacking in high notes; a splash of black vinegar would have been welcome. The house fried-rice dish was a surprising amalgam of shrimp, scallops, pineapple and raisins that really worked, thanks in large part to seafood that was plump and sweet and rice that was firm and not at all greasy. Less than two months after opening, Jade Grille immediately takes a place among the upper echelon of Chinese restaurants in Pittsburgh. It hews to an organic-local-sustainable ethos, and is priced accordingly. But for Chinese dining that is fresh (in both quality and approach) and refined, Jade Grille is worth it. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BRANCHING OUT ‘Cider garden’ just one way Arsenal Cider is growing When Bill Larkin, the owner of Lawrenceville’s Arsenal Cider House, decided to host BBQ master Justin “Hootie” Blakey for a cookout last year, a neighbor complained that Larkin didn’t have the necessary permits. That prompted Larkin to realize that adding outdoor space would help grow business, so he purchased the adjoining lot from a medicalsupply business and began work on the city’s first cider garden. “It took a few months to get all the politics sorted out, but once we had a permit, we built this out in two months,” he says. In the interest of being a good neighbor, Larkin even included in the design a large gate that opens to allow light to flood into an adjacent garden. Now, up to 265 fans of Arsenal Cider can spread out at tables, standing bars, and even bring their own picnic baskets and blankets anytime the cider house is open. Larkin says that Saturday afternoons will feature a regular rotation of music — and often food. Fridays and Sundays will likely also have entertainment in the future. The garden is just one of a number of ways the Lawrenceville cidery is maturing. Larkin recently purchased a super-fancy filtration machine which, he says, “is going to really speed up production.” That’s a good thing, because he’s already poured 12,000 gallons of cider this year … and that’s before reaching his busiest season (now through Christmas). By comparison, Arsenal served 10,000 gallons total last year. Larkin also has a bottling machine, so expect bottles of Arsenal Cider sometime in the not-too-distant future. “People just really seem to like what we’re doing,” he says. As for the garden, the upcoming change of season isn’t going to slow it down. “We’ll keep it open as long as people want to sit out here,” Larkin says. In fact, his wife Michelle adds, “Someone suggested we serve hot cider and have Santa out in the snow.”

“PEOPLE JUST REALLY SEEM TO LIKE WHAT WE’RE DOING.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

300 39th St., Lawrenceville. 412-260-6968 or www.arsenalciderhouse.com


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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweet-potato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-3912752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and house-recipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels sprouts or rich mac-and-cheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves

Southern Hospitality {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} up Peruvian-style, wood-fired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-ofthe-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tunaand-avocado spring rolls. LE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

OLIVES AND PEPPERS. 6052 William Flynn Highway (Route 8), Bakerstown. 724-444-7499. This casual Italian spot that offers pizza, pasta and sandwiches as well as more refined entrees. The meat-and-cheese sandwiches are a forte, with ciabatta “panini” and hoagies options. The lasagna is enormous, its homemade noodles laden with a creamy five-cheese mix and a savory Bolognese sauce with meatballlike chunks of beef. KE PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). These two fish restaurants fill the gap between humble lunch counter and snooty steakhouse — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of higher-end dishes, particularly at the Downtown location. KF PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF

Wintzell’s Oyster House KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbeaninspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety


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Tuesday BURGER NIGHT

Winghart’s Burger and Whiskey Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese groundpork dishes. JF SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citrus-cured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE

THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF

VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring SMILING BANANA rolls, such as whole . w w w LEAF. 5901 Bryant quail with lemon er hcitypap g p St., Highland Park. leaves and herbs, and .com 412-362-3200. At this ground-shrimp patties absolute jewel-box of a on sugar-cane skewers. JF restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than WINGHART’S BURGER AND Thai-inflected Chinese food. WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Grilled meat appetizers are Downtown (412-434-5600) and beautifully seasoned, and the 1505 E. Carson St., South Side pad Thai offers a lively balance of (412-904-4620). Big beefy ingredients. The assertively spicy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a pumpkin curry features a special selection of whiskeys make this variety of Thai gourd. JF an above-average bar stop, whether Downtown or on Carson SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY. Street. Burger toppings range Edgewood Towne Center, 1763 from standard cheese and fried S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. 412onions to arugula and truffle 518-9556. The pork-free menu at oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its this soul-food restaurant focuses excellent crust. JE on fried chicken and fish, along with beef ribs, turkey and burgers, WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. plus an extensive selection of 530 E. Bruceton Road, West appetizers and sides. Good picks Mifflin. 412-650-9090. An are the hash browns, the fried Alabama seafood chain claims a wings with sweet-hot mumbo welcome northern outpost in the sauce, savory black-eyed peas and Pittsburgh suburbs. The menu is greens with smoked turkey. JF dominated by seafood, with a few steak, burger, and chicken options, SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight prepared in a Southern style — Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. mostly fried, and accompanied This North Hills restaurant offers by grits, gumbo, hushpuppies a full range of Japanese cuisine and okra. And oysters, naturally, beyond sushi that is more served in a variety of ways. EK

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$2 off ALL Burgers 4 - 9pm $3 Miller Lite Draft All day till Midnight

representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty of well-prepared sushi, including specialty maki. KE

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Wings .50 each 4pm - 9pm $3 Yuengling Draft All day till Midnight

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412-521-8989 • www.sukhothaibistro.com 5813 Forbes Avenue, Pgh., PA 15217 Take-Out Available M U S I C

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LOCAL

BEAT

PHAT MAN DEE AND TOMMY AMOEBA HAVE BEEN MARRIED A DECADE AND ARE LOCAL LEGENDS

{BY BRIAN CONWAY}

KEEPING MARLEY’S MEMORY After 35 years, Bob Marley’s final concert may finally live forever in Downtown Pittsburgh. On Sept. 23, 1980, the reggae superstar spoke his final words onstage, to an exultant, sold-out crowd at Pittsburgh’s Stanley Theater. “If you keep it up like this we’ll have to come here every year,” he said. “Every week, every month!” But Marley and the rest of his band, The Wailers, knew that was impossible. Two days prior, Marley collapsed during a run in Central Park. Cancer had metastasized throughout his body. Within eight months he would perish at age 36; the Pittsburgh show would be his last. “It was a really tense evening,” recalls Rich Engler, who promoted the show with DiCesare Engler Productions. “The band and entourage were on pins and needles all night, thinking [Marley] would have a seizure or would go into some sort of fainting spell onstage. They were very nervous and Rita [Marley’s wife and member of the Wailers] herself didn’t want him to even go on. And here it turned out to be spectacular.” Despite the performance’s renown — it was extensively bootlegged before getting an official release in 2011 — no commemorative plaque or marker hangs at the Stanley (which was renamed the Benedum Center in 1987). But that might soon change. Engler, who produced a 30th anniversary show at the Benedum in 2010, featuring Rita Marley and several of Bob Marley’s children, is in talks for a similar event next year: “Another celebration of his life,” Engler calls it. And, he believes, an ideal occasion to install a plaque to commemorate Marley’s final concert. Gene Ciavarra, vice president of operations at the Benedum, says that the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, which owns the Benedum, supports the idea. “Whenever that show happens, we want to do a plaque,” says Ciavarra. Engler, however, stresses that nothing has been finalized yet. “Whenever you put a show together like that, there’s a lot of planning, a lot of different moving pieces to it. And, it’s gonna take some time; I’ve been working on it for a year already. “I’m praying that we’re able to do it in 2015.”

“WHENEVER THAT SHOW HAPPENS, WE WANT TO DO A PLAQUE.”

MARRIED with ALBUMS {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

I

T WAS A CLASSIC tale of boy-who-

dresses-up-as-a-caterpillar-and-yells meets girl-who-swallows-glass, that day back in 2000 when Phat Man Dee first encountered Tommy Amoeba. “It was a Thanksgiving Infectious Variety Show, at the Oakland Beehive,” Man Dee recalls. “Tommy was actually dressed in a pilgrim costume, and his friend was dressed in a turkey costume. The pilgrim costume covered the front half of him, and only to mid-thigh. He was marching back and forth like a Greek-chorus kind of thing in between acts for no apparent reason. He had a fake rifle and he and the turkey guy walked back and forth. “Later, he came back out and he had divested himself of most of the pilgrim outfit, but he still had the American-flag

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

I got you, babe: Tommy Amoeba and Phat Man Dee

Speedo on, and he had the guy with the turkey costume with him, and he was engaged in the act of faux-copulation. And I was like, ‘Who’s that guy? Wow!’” Now, 14 years later, Man Dee (born Mandy Kivowitz) and Tommy (Thomas Delfaver) have been married over a decade

PHAT MAN DEE AND THE CULTURAL DISTRICT and TOMMY AMOEBA DUAL CD RELEASE WITH LIZ BERLIN, LILITH DEVILLE, MIDDLE CHILDREN, PITTSBURGH COMPLAINTS N’AT CHOIR, GEÑA 7 p.m. Wed., Sept. 24. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. Free. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

and are basically local music-and-performance legends: She’s well-known as a jazz singer and general personality, and he’s known equally for his band, Amoeba Knievel, and for being that guy who goes to rock shows and yells “Aaaaahhhhhh!” instead of applauding. Man Dee has two albums under her belt and is preparing for the release, on Wed., Sept. 24, of her latest, Hey Phat Chick, with her band, The Cultural District. Tommy has a new album, too — his first, after over a decade with Amoeba Knievel. Amoeba Knievel had recorded a handful of songs over a period of a few years, but none of those have yet seen the light of day. The batch of tunes on This Is Only A Test, though, came out of a session at Mr. Small’s studios, which Tommy booked as part of a deal in which Man Dee had helped CONTINUES ON PG. 24


NEW RELEASES

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

PALERMO STONE THE 2ND COMING (R.A.R.E. NATION)

New concept album from the local rapper. Stone alternates between documenting anger, disappointment and fear — and apocalyptic thought — and hope and positive thought. (“There is no good and evil / There’s only power and those too weak to seek it / You see, I’m half good and half bad,” he says in “Milk & Honey.”) Recorded at MCM Studios, the beats are largely minimal and chill, using lots of conventional-instrument sounds; plenty of food for thought here, as we’ve come to expect from Stone.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

Saturday, November 29

BY ANDY MULKERIN

GENERAL PUBLIC ON SALE

GRANDPA EGG PRAYING MANTIS (SELF-RELEASED)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 AT 10 AM

Grandpa Egg’s second release is a twisting, tumbling narrative about a praying mantis named Pellapetisimo and a host of other meadow-dwellers. Self-described as psych-folk, it’s clearly a concept album, but don’t be surprised if it takes a few listens to grasp exactly what songwriter Jeb Morris is communicating. It’s reminiscent of Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger with regard to its recurrent themes; stylistically, it plays more like a Lemony Snickett novel. A very good offering from the recent Nashville transplant.

AT TICKETMASTER PRESALE TICKETS VISIT CITIPRIVATEPASS.COM ‘TIL THURDAY AT 10 PM!

BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT

: A BEAVER PRODUCTION :

PETE BUSH AND THE HOI POLLOI A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO THE END (SELF-RELEASED)

New seven-track EP from the songwriter and his band: catchy pop songs that show off Bush’s impressive vocal range and sense of fun, tempered by a few more emotional ballads. The whole thing sounds impressive from the start, with masterful recording done at Red Caiman Studios. Nods to jazz complexity and upbeat funky pop leave this one somewhere between Ben Folds Five and maybe what Jason Mraz would do if he didn’t do that embarrassing rapping thing he does. BY ANDY MULKERIN

PETE BUSH AND THE HOI POLLOI CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 27. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net N E W S

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MARRIED WITH ALBUMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

with a New Year’s show and was compensated with studio time. (Both artists’ new albums were recorded there, with engineer Larry Luther.) “This [recording session] kind of leapfrogged over [the older one] because this one was ready and mastered more quickly,” Tommy notes. That explains some of the surprises inherent — like the absence of “The Ballad of Tommy Amoeba,” an Amoeba Knievel classic that serves as Tommy’s de facto theme song, and explains the story of “the lowest form of life,” as he refers to himself. (After he developed the nickname, which came before his music career started, he says he told his mother, who responded, “Great — my son, the lowest form of life!”) Amoeba Knievel’s music is generally relatively simple punk and New Wavestyle rock, infused with a barrage of popculture and sci-fi references and a healthy dose of absurd humor. Tommy put together a page on the Amoeba Knievel website on which references are hyperlinked to their antecedents — everything from the Wikipedia page for James T. Kirk to a YouTube video of an Indigo Girls song, and information on plenty of science-fiction stories. It’s a sort of annotated Amoeba. While Man Dee has been a musician since her early days growing up around the area (spending time in Meadville, Altoona and Squirrel Hill, among other locales), Tommy came to music late — he never studied an instrument as a kid, and simply writes words and melodies off the top of his head. He doesn’t play an instrument in Amoeba Knievel, but then, if he did, how would he cram himself into his signature caterpillar suit, or wear puppets on both hands, or wrap the audience in caution tape, as he’s wont to do? Man Dee, for her part, grew up playing cello (she still plays) and always sang, though it wasn’t always her primary art. She dropped out of Allegheny College after a couple of years. (“I was partying too much in college. I knew enough French to get by. I knew enough art to make some art. I knew enough music to make some music. Why am I paying $25,000 a year to just party?” she says.) She toured the country in the late ’90s with two alternative-circus acts, the Bindlestiff Family Roadshow and Circus Redickuless. “I was so enthralled by this idea of variety entertainment,” she says. “It wasn’t just music, it wasn’t just spoken-word, and it wasn’t pretentious performance art. It was just some real whacked-out stuff.

“I had Zoe Collins from Threadneedle Street make me a half-man, half-woman costume, and I learned little songs to sing to myself, and I had to have a skill, so [Dave Apocalypse] taught me how to eat glass. And he also made me change my name, because apparently The Sister-Master of the Fist-Masticating Arts, which used to be my performance name, has no stick-to-it-iveness. You can’t remember Sister-Mister of the Fist-Masticating Arts as easily as Mista Sista Phat Man Dee, so that became my name.” Man Dee became a jazz singer in the early 2000s, at the same time her relationship with Tommy was developing. (They married in the summer of 2002 atop a huge pink-elephant float on Carson Street. Six months or so later, they ended up on Judge Joe Brown, suing some friends who were supposed to deliver the elephant to them later, at Burning Man, but couldn’t find them and burned it instead.) In 2002, she also released her first album, Life Just Goes On, with a number of songs written by collaborators (including Tommy Amoeba), and a few standards. In 2007 came her second full-length, Torch of Blue, with a few she wrote herself, and a few written by locals like Christiane D., Colter Harper and John Purse. The new album, Hey Phat Chick, features tunes like the title track, which has become her theme song, and “Why Wait?” — which she says she wrote because she found herself writing too many songs for friends after they passed away. There are also some interpretations: “You Are Special,” the Mr. Rogers song, for example, and a couple of French-language songs, taking advantage of her major at Allegheny. The choice to release the two albums with a joint show came partly out of convenience: Both albums were coming out around the same time anyway, and Man Dee was reserving Mr. Small’s through the Creative Life Support program, which, among other things, runs regular “Revival Series” shows in which local bands play the Small’s stage without charging admission. But it’s also somewhat sentimental: The two have rarely shared the stage for full sets by both of their bands on one night. “We are married,” says Man Dee, who adds, “people keep calling us some kind of weirdo iconic couple because we got married on the pink elephant. Yeah, it’s true: We want to be Pittsburgh’s freakydeaky Sonny and Cher!”

IF HE PLAYED AN INSTRUMENT, HOW WOULD HE FIT INTO HIS CATERPILLAR SUIT?

AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

TWO M’S OF JAZZ {BY MIKE SHANLEY} TROMBONIST Reggie Watkins has logged numerous miles with everyone from the late trumpeter Maynard Ferguson to singer-songwriter Jason Mraz. In addition to gigs with The Temptations, the West Virginia native and longtime Pittsburgher was part of Aretha Franklin’s horn section at her Ohio State Fair performance this year. Not surprisingly, his second album, One for Miles, One for Maynard, draws on an array of styles while paying homage. “I wanted to acknowledge my influences,” Watkins says. “Maynard being somebody I played with and spent so much time with, and Miles Davis, who I’ve listened to incessantly for years. And I wanted to tie it together knowing that those two are thought of as very different kinds of musicians.” While some such projects might simply celebrate diversity for diversity’s sake, the album works to present a whole picture of Watkins and his music. Ferguson, who was known for his skill in the upper register of the trumpet, toured incessantly with his midsized Big Bop Nouveau Band. He found many band members in Pittsburgh, so when he was looking for trombone players, Watkins got a call. He not only fit in with the band, but within a year the trombonist also became its musical

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SIENNA WATKINS}

Back in Pittsburgh: Trombonist Reggie Watkins

This solidified thoughts Watkins had from a young age. “He had a big influence on me, but I think it validated where I was already coming from,” he says. “It was my tendency to be able to appreciate everything — as a listener, not just from an analytical standpoint.” To pay tribute to “Boss,” Watkins reimagines the trumpeter’s “Chala Nata” on the new CD. Originally based on an India raga, complete with sitars, it gets rearranged for guitar, giving it a Spaghetti-western feel, before it kicks into a backbeat worthy of James Brown, complete with turntable scratching. In addition, the piece retains its jazz pedigree with a five-piece horn section. “Shhh,” from Miles Davis’ early electric period, has the moodiness of the original with a more modern groove. The album also features several originals by Watkins and saxophonist Matt Parker, who, like drummer David Throckmorton and saxophonist Rick Matt, also played in the Nouveau band. Watkins, who lived in Austin, Texas for a few years, plans to keep Pittsburgh as his home base when he’s not on the road. “I really missed the music climate here in terms of my affiliation with the jazz base,” he says. “When I was living in Austin, I was coming back here from time to time and hitting the studio to make this record with the same rhythm section. I didn’t want to separate myself from the scene, because it means a lot to me.”

“THOSE TWO ARE THOUGHT OF AS VERY DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSICIANS.”

REGGIE WATKINS CD RELEASE 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 27. James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, 422 Foreland St., North Side. $10. 412-904-3335 or www.jamesstreetgastropub.com

director. Known to everyone as “Boss,” Ferguson was an encouraging leader. “He was like a grandfather type, but he treated all of us as peers. Even your first day in the band, he had a way of making you feel comfortable: ‘Okay, relax, play,’” Watkins says. Though Ferguson got his start with jazz, he wasn’t afraid to cross over into pop territory and incorporate influences from other countries.

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


CRITICS’ PICKS

COMING INTO THEIR OWN

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFFREY DUPUIS}

{BY MARK MANGINI} Fresh off the heels of its second West Coast tour, local electro-punk duo The Lopez (made up of Steph and Jesse Flati) releases its first full-length album, Travel Fast, on cassette (and download) next week via Machine Age Records. The 12 songs clock in at about 37 minutes; the band has expanded its format choice to give its sound the breadth to show the strengths and flexibilities the musicians have gained through gigging relentlessly around town and on the road. Once, a valid description of the band was: “Kind of like Kathleen Hanna fronting The Vaselines.” While this made enough sense at the time, after Travel Fast, there are no proper analogies. The Lopez now sounds distinctly like itself, letting the dissonance and harmony exist side by side, with beautiful melodies sitting between driving beats and sheaths of abstract feedback. Couple this with a firm DIY ethos that includes funding and booking its own tours, recordings and releases, and add a killer live show. What does it all add up to? Who cares? The Lopez should be the biggest punk-rock band on the planet,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARRET JONES}

Beyond compare: The Lopez

but probably never will. While the mainstream sucks on its Perfect Pussy, Pittsburgh’s underground has The Lopez and is better off for it. The band’s release show Sat., Sept. 20, at Thunderbird Café, is also a CD-release show for longtime local favorite Lord Grunge, and a cassette/zine release for South Seas Sneak. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE LOPEZ with LORD GRUNGE, HEIGHT, EZE JACKSON, SOUTH SEAS SNEAK. 9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

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To see for yourself how much fun our Playground Can Be. 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

New Orleans Suspects [HIP HOP] + THU., SEPT. 18 Hip hop has always been associated with strong messages of social change and holding those in power accountable. As strong as that tradition is here in the U.S., it’s even more apparent in Cuba, where popular culture is largely censored. Raudel Collazo is one of the biggest names in underground hip hop in Havana, and was featured in the 2012 documentary Awakening, itself censored at that year’s Havana-based Young Filmmakers Exhibition. Tonight, Collazo performs at the Alphabet City Tent run by City of Asylum, the North Side sanctuary for persecuted writers; another Cuban rapper, David D. Omni, plays as well. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. Reservations suggested. All ages. 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

[PUNK] + SAT., SEPT. 20 Barons is a newer band with some not-so-new faces — some stretch back through 15 years of local punk. Former Teddy Duchamp’s Army/ Voice in the Wire personnel Mike Rock and Zack Furness head up the band, which releases eleases its first 7-inch with a show tonight att the Murderroom (Commonwealth Commonwealth Press’s warehouse). The band is rounded ounded out by Arum Rae Corey Cameron, {PHOTO COURTESY Jon on Barker and OF DOMINIC NEITZ} Nick DeAngelo (of of Grand Piano); think hink old-school pop punk (Weston and nd the like). The new record is part of a set et of tracks recorded with engineer D. James Goodwin; it’s being issued ssued on Underground Communique (The Methadones, Vacation Bible School). Tonight show how also features New

Orleans band Pears and locals Remainders and Latecomer. AM 6 p.m. 7 S. 23rd St., South Side. $6. All ages. xbaronsx.tumblr.com

[POP] + MON., SEPT. 22 Arum Rae popped up a few years back with Too Young to Sing the Blues, a country-blues-rock album that showcased her strong voice and unique take on traditional American music. To anyone whose main entrée into her work was that album, this year’s EP Warranted Queen came as something of a surprise: Its backbone is synthetic beats, synthesizers and vocal effects. It’s a big, brave switch that’s helped define the Austin native (and Brooklyn resident) as a singular artist, not defined by genre. Tonight, she plays Hard Rock Café. AM 8 p.m. 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $10-12. All ages. 412-481-7625 or www.hardrock.com

[R&B] + WED., SEPT. 24 It might be the most important New Orleans band you’ve never heard of — because the members of New Orleans Suspectss are usually in the background. Session and touring players for the likes of Professor Longhair and the Neville Brothers, the members of the band got together in 2011, and are preparing for the release of a new album, Ouroboros, s next month. Tonight, they play the Rex Theater, putting together rock, blues, zydeco and jazz into the complete New Orleans package. Commonheart opens. AM M 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-18. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 18 31ST STREET PUB. Bad Jacks, Crooked Cobras, Filthy Low Down. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. TEEN, Islands. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Justin Currie, The Mastersons. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. So Cow, Shark?, OUTSIDEINSIDE. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Polar Scout, Penny Mouth, Alex Vucelich & The Sweet Medicine Band, Coronado. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. AMRCNDREAMING, Across State Lines, Jon Bindley. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Justin Townes Earle, American Aquarium, Essential Machine. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. The Bronx Wanderers. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RIVERS CASINO. Joe Materkowski. North Side. 610-962-1600. SMILING MOOSE. Sucre. South Side. 412-431-4668.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forysythe, Hellwood, Love Letters. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE VENUE AT HARMONY RIDGE,. Angel Blue & The Prophets Band. Ambridge. 724-266-5559.

FRI 19

The Filthy Low Down. South Side. 412-439-5706. STAGE AE. The Harlan Twins, Satin Gum, Kid Durango. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. George Porter, Jr. & Runnin’ Pardners. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 20

31ST STREET PUB. Volcano Dogs, BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Thundervest, Danger Signs, King’s Ransom. Fox Senior Citizen, Border Chapel. 412-963-0640. Patrol. Strip District. BALTIMORE 412-391-8334. HOUSE. Churchview BAYARDSTOWN Saints. Pleasant Hills. www. per SOCIAL CLUB. a p ty 412-653-9332. pghci m The Bloody Seamen. .co THE CARRICK INN. Strip District. Code Whiskey. Carrick. CLUB CAFE. Glass Animals, 412-884-9939. Rome Fortune. South Side. CLUB CAFE. Milvin & 412-431-4950. the Etnoids, The Homeless FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Gospel Choir (Late). South Side. Guy Klucevsek, Susanne Ortner, 412-431-4950. John Marcinizyn. Shadyside. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA 412-361-2262. & MUSIC HALL. The Whisky THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. LOCAL. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. Rebellion, NeverWake. McKees Rocks. 412-508-0984. LINDEN GROVE. Metro. GOOSKI’S. Murder For Girls, Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. No Movement, Rogue Signals. MOONDOG’S. The Next Doors Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. (Doors tribute). Blawnox. HAMBONE’S. Henry Bachorski. 412-828-2040. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. RUM RUNNERS SALOON. HOWLERS COYOTE Totally 80s. Ross. 724-799-8333. CAFE. Dead On The Streets, SMILING MOOSE. Love Inks OC45, The Jukebox Romantics, The Danzas, Pulling Punches, DJ Soulful Fella. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. HUNGARIAN BLS SOCIETY. Angel Blue Band. 724-929-2225. KNOB HILL PARK. The hEARD Matthews Band. Wexford. 412-281-4200. MEADOWS CASINO. Totally 80s. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Pomplamoose, Danielle Ate The Sandwich, John Schroeder. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Gone South. Crafton. 412-922-3883. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Daniels & McClain. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PITTSBURGH WINERY. JD Eicher & The Goodnights, Joy Ike, Charlie Oxford. Strip District. 412-566-1000. PUB & PIZZA. Paddy’s Drunken Uncles. Mt. Lebanon. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Height & Friends, Eze Jackson, The Lopez, Lord Grunge, South Seas Sneak Each week, we bring you a new track from The Lopez, Lord Grunge, Height, a local band. This week’s offering comes Eze Jackson, South Seas Sneak. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. from bluegrass band The Shameless Hex; VERONA COMMUNITY PARK. Angel Blue Band. Verona. stream or download on our THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. McClain. Clairton.

FULL LIST ONLINE

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar

MP 3 MONDAY

Venue Tour

THE SHAMELESS HEX

UPCOMING SHOW

“One Time”

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

a uniquely modern take on traditional string music

an evening of funk from NOLA’s finest

Ages 17+

Ages 21+

SUN 21

FRI 19

BELVEDERE’S. Black Cobra, Monolith Wielder, Pray for Teeth. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Addison Groove, James Gyre. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Caleb Pogyor, Yes Yes A Thousand Times Yes, Dan Mariska, The Boys Choir,The Crash Bandits. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Daniels & McClain. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Sun Pilots, Chrome Moses, Misaligned Mind. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BREW ON BROADWAY. Gray Technology. All vinyl turntablists spinning nu-jazz, breaks, hip-hop, downtempo, more. Beechview. 412-563-6456. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. South Side. 412-720-5647. XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. Metropol/ Upstage Reunion Dance Party. Strip District. 724-987-0784.

MON 22 soul rock from the bayous of New Orleans

musically-minded downtempo & instrumental hip-hop

Oct 08 THE NEW

MASTERSOUNDS w/ CORY HENRY GROUP

Oct 10 BLACK 47 FAREWELL TOUR Oct 14 BOOMBOX Oct 16 CABINET

w/ DEAD WINTER CARPENERS

Oct 17 POSTMODERN

JUKEBOX Oct 18 TODD SNIDER Oct 21 TERRAPIN FLYER

f/ MELVIN SEALS (of JERRY GARCIA BAND)

Oct 23 JOHN HODGMAN Oct 29 ADRIAN BELEW

(of KING CRIMSON, FRANK ZAPPA)

POWER TRIO Nov 1 RUBBLEBUCKET w/ LANDLADY

Nov 5 KEYS N KRATES w/ GLADIATOR, THUGLI

All Ages

Ages 17+

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Thr Sep 18

SLIM FORSYTHE with

HELLWOOD, LOVE LETTERS Fri Sep 19

GEORGE PORTER JR.

AND RUNNIN’ PARDNERS Sat Sep 20

HEIGHT with EZE JACKSON, LORD GRUNGE, THE LOPEZ Sun Sep 21 THE SUN PILOTS with

CHROME MOSES, MISALIGNED MIND

Mon Sep 22

OPEN STAGE with SGD Tue Sep 23

SPACE EXCHANGE with PALINDROMES

Wed Sep 24

CHRIS TRAPPER

Nov 6 TWIDDLE FREE SHOW!

Thr Sep 25

Nov 8 THE BUDOS BAND

with SHELF LIFE STRING BAND

w/ ELECTRIC CITIZEN

BIG LEG EMMA

ALTAR BAR. Fortunate Youth. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HARD ROCK CAFE. Arum Rae. Station Square. 412-481-7625. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. MR. SMALLS THEPandemic Pete & www. per a p ATER. J. Roddy Walston Edgar Um. Bloomfield. pghcitym o .c & The Business. Millvale. 412-621-4900. 866-468-3401. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. BYHAM THEATER. Tommy 412-657-2279. Emmanuel w/ Loren & Mark. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 412-431-8800. CLUB CAFE. Storyman, Fry Jones. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. South Side. 412-431-4950. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. REX THEATER. Greensky 412-431-5282. Bluegrass, Swear & Shake. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, South Side. 412-381-6811. DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. SMILING MOOSE. Born 412-781-6771. Cages, Frances Cone. South Side. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 412-431-4668. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. BYHAM THEATER. Under the SMILING MOOSE. Pop Punk Streetlamp, Gentleman’s Rule. Night. South Side. 412-439-5706. Downtown. 412-456-6666. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel CLUB CAFE. The Promise Hero, City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Jordan McLaughlin, Bret Kunash. Oakland. 412-874-4582. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cliffs, The Neffs, The Lampshades. SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. East Liberty. 412-657-2279. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. KICK- The INXS Experience. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. TWELVE ON CARSON. Digital MR. SMALLS THEATER. Dave Tribute To DJ AM Feat. 42 Phat Man Dee & Tommy regional DJs. Benefits the DJ AM Amoeba, Lilith Deville, Middle Memorial Fund. South Side. Children, Pittsburgh Complaints 412-656-7193. N’At Choir, Gena. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. New CABARET AT THEATER Orleans Suspects. South Side. SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ 412-381-6811. Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. SMILING MOOSE. Lionize, 412-325-6769. American Sharks. South Side. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. 412-431-4668. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. North Side. 412-761-3302. Chris Trapper. Lawrenceville. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. 412-682-0177. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville.

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 23

WED 24

SUN 21 TUE 23

WED 24

DJS THU 18 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon,DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

SAT 20

412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B

BLUES FRI 19 LEGACY LANES. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-653-2695.

SAT 20 THE BLIND PIG SALOON. The Blues Bombers. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Tarentum. 724-226-3301. MOONDOG’S. Smokin’ Joe Rossi. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. TEDDY’S. The Satin Hearts. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

JAZZ THU 18 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. The George Jones Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 19 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Lilly Abreu. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Max Leake. Downtown. 412-553-5235. RIVERS CASINO. Antoinette. North Side. 610-962-1600.

SAT 20 ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HAMBONE’S. Ronnie Wiess. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo/Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 21 BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie Watkins Trio Jazz Jam. Beechview. 412-437-8676. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. RILEY’S POUR HOUSE. Etta Cox & Al Dowe, Michele Bensen, Don Aliquo & Samantha St. John. Carnegie. 412-279-0770.

FRI 19

MON 22

REX THEATER. Stitches, Phresh LaRosa, N8O, Miss Money, R.A.D. South Side. 412-381-6811.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.


COUNTRY THU 18 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

SAT 20

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

CLUB CAFE. The Bumper Jacksons, Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. RIVERS CASINO. Justin Fabus Band. North Side. 610-962-1600.

PHILADELPHIA {TUE., NOV. 04}

CLASSICAL

Chrissie Hynde

FRI 19 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: TWO TRIPS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Tower Theater

WASHINGTON, D.C.

SAT 20

{SUN., NOV. 09}

OVREARTS. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: TWO TRIPS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Johnny Marr 9:30 Club

COLUMBUS {MON., NOV. 17}

SUN 21

Interpol

DON FELLOWS, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. DON FELLOWS, RASA MAHMOUDIAN. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGAN RECITAL. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: TWO TRIPS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Newport Music Hall

TUE 23

WED 24

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Palindromes. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WED 24 ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC THU 18 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

FRI 19 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181.

SAT 20 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Tim Menees, Peter King. Downtown. 412-325-6766. THE BEER MARKET. Gina Rendina Acoustic Duo. North Side. 412-322-2337. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 21 HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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WORLD FRI 19 HAMBONE’S. Shawn McIntyre & Lucht Siull, Ryan Taylor, Chuck Owste, more. Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 20 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Michael Flaherty. Robinson. 412-489-5631. PNC RECITAL HALL, DUQUESNE UNIV. Pittsburgh Song Collaborative. Looking to the East: Orientalism in Song. Uptown. 412-396-6080.

THU 18

OTHER MUSIC SAT 20

WED 24

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

FRI 19 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

TA S T E

PEACE, LOVE & CHAMBER MUSIC. Lilly Abreu, soprano; Daphne Alderson, contralto; Erina Goldewasser, viola; Richard Page, clarinet; Chuck Lirette, trumpet; Pauline Rovkah, piano Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside. 412-381-5105.

UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

REGGAE

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TUE 23

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CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donnya-showtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

September 17 - 23 WEDNESDAY 17 Parachute

REX THEATER South Side. 412381-6811. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Panda Bear MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. With special guest Blues Control. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

WEDNESDAY 18 Islands

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Justin Townes Earle MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. With special guest American Aquarium & Essential Machine. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone

or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Lisa Lampanelli

FRIDAY 19

Eargasm - Spoken Word Poetry & Music

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL

East End. 412-243-5201. Tickets: geminitheater.org. Through Oct. 12.

MONDAY 22

Pomplamoose

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Oakland. Tickets: 412-622-8866 or pittsburghlectures.org. 7:30p.m.

James McBride

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 9p.m.

HILL HOUSE, KAUFMANN CENTER Uptown. 412-2811026. Tickets: $10 at the door. 7:30p.m.

Lisa Lampanelli

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412462-3444. Over 18 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Clemente: The Legend of 21 BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Sept. 21.

Fortunate Youth / New Kingston

TUESDAY 23

2nd Annual Steel City Tattoo Convention

SUNDAY 21

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Downtown. Tickets: shaneoneillproductions. com. Through Sept. 21.

TRAX FARMS South Hills. Every weekend. Free event. 10a.m. Through Oct. 26.

The Book of Mormon HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-

45th Annual Fall Festival 315-3155. Tickets: trustarts.org.

After the Burial

SATURDAY 20

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Peter Pan

GEMINI CHILDREN'S THEATER

Through Oct. 5.

Born Cages / Frances Cone SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

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“TO AN OUTSIDER, THIS LOOKS LIKE TOTAL CHAOS.”

LAST CALL {BY AL HOFF} Michael K. Roskam’s The Drop, adapted from a Dennis Lehane story, revolves around an ordinary bar in a gritty part of Brooklyn. Marv (James Gandolfini) runs it, but Chechen mobsters own it. So some nights the bar serves as a drop for a lot of mob money. And the soft-spoken, laconic Bob (Tom Hardy) — well, he’ll tell you, “I just tend the bar and wait.” We wait, too, knowing that as sure as there are crime thrillers, something always goes wrong around that much cash.

POOR HEALTH Man’s best friend: Bob (Tom Hardy) and Rocco

But The Drop is also a lightly sketched character study of Bob. He’s a solitary, sphinx-like figure, slowly coaxed out of his protective shell by two new acquaintances: an abandoned pit-bull puppy and a sad, wary woman (Noomi Rapace). The film is relentlessly downbeat, with each character trapped — in old-fashioned homes left behind by dead parents, in pointless cycles of violence, or in a no-win cycle of choosing lesser evils. The Drop is short on action, long on deadpan, but these are three actors you could simply watch stare at each other — as you will here. Manor AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Liam Neeson is a former cop hired to find a kidnapped woman. No, it’s not Taken Tak 3, but A Walk Among Amon Tombstones, the Tombstone Frank directed by Scott Fra and adapted adap from the Lawrence Lawr Bloch novel. Starts FFri., Sept. 19

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{BY AL HOFF}

On the front line of public health: resident doctor Jamie Eng, at L.A. County’s emergency facility

M

AYBE IN THE future, there will be feel-good films about America’s health-care system, but for now, the best we can hope for are documentaries that temper horror with hope. Such is the case with Code Black, an insider’s look at the emergency room of one of the nation’s busiest public hospitals. While a resident at Los Angeles County Hospital, Dr. Ryan McGarry documented the frantic, frustrating and rewarding times that he and other residents experienced over five years. This is a generation of young doctors, Code Black explains, who have been raised in the ongoing throes of the health-care crisis. And for many young doctors, residency is the time when their lofty ideals crash against the rocks of a system that can seem to favor bureaucracy and profit over patient care. L.A. County Hospital was also the home to “C-Booth,” an innovative concept that was the birth of the modern emergency room, and where these residents get their early training. The film depicts scenes there in which doctors, nurses, cops

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and EMTs work shoulder to shoulder over patients, while orders are barked, monitors attached and bodies vigorously cut open — often next to a second and even third such team. “To an outsider, this looks like total chaos,” says one staffer. “But as a doctor, I see unity: There is a team here.” (A note for the squeamish: This is an unfiltered look at emergency medicine, with some potentially disturbing surgical footage and on-screen deaths.)

CODE BLACK DIRECTED BY: Ryan McGarry Fri., Sept. 19, through Wed., Sept. 24. Melwood

CP APPROVED Midway through the film, L.A. County shifts its trauma unit to a newly built emergency facility that complies with current regulations, and the residents face a different set of challenges, namely increased amounts of paperwork and documentation. And perhaps something

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else is lost, when the managed chaos of C-Room gives way to mandated procedures. It “changed the intimacy with the patients,” observes one resident. Now, it’s “buckets of paperwork [which] kill the passion of saving someone’s life.” And then there’s the perpetual crisis from which the film draws its title: “Code black” denotes a packed emergency waiting room, in which patients can wait up to 24 hours to be seen. As awful as that is, at least Los Angeles has a public hospital. It’s one of very few cities in the U.S. that still does. Code Black is hardly a comprehensive portrait of modern health care, but it does raise important and provocative issues and concerns, voiced by those on the front lines who are acutely aware of the system’s successes and failures. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

McGarry, who earned his medical degree at the University of Pittsburgh, is scheduled to attend the Fri., Sept. 19, and Sat., Sept. 20, screenings.

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THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ELEANOR RIGBY: THEM. I’ve always liked intimate, characterdriven dramas performed by appealing actors, albeit for the same reason, more or less, that I like Bugs Bunny cartoons: They make me feel sophisticated and knowing. The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them is satisfying enough. But it’s not Ingmar Bergman, not even Blue Valentine, and the title alone signifies a movie that’s too aware of itself. Written and directed by Ned Benson, the story revolves around Conor and Eleanor (James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain), a romantic young couple whose relationship ends after the death of their infant son, a tragedy that leads Eleanor (her parents, obviously, were Beatles fans) to attempt suicide. This premise is true to life, but it’s too easy and hackneyed in a movie — or at least, in this movie. It takes half an hour to learn why they split, and we never learn how the boy died, which is another touch of pretense: If you want us to get close to these characters, we need to know what they know. One also can’t help wondering whether it’s easier to heal when you can do it in a world of social privilege. Some of the dialogue is crisp and smart, and some is not. It’s just hard to tell whether Benson intends his clichés to be profound, or comforting, or just a reminder that people talk this way. The alternative to his polished script would be naked emotion — the language of the soul. Benson tips his hand early, when Conor says to Eleanor, “There’s only one heart in this body — have mercy on me.” It’s a good line, but I like Carly Simon’s observation better: “There’s more room in a broken heart.” And when Eleanor’s father (William Hurt) says, “Tragedy is a foreign country — we don’t know how to talk to the natives,” I can only attribute that to his being an academic psychologist (or to an actor not telling his director, “I won’t say that line”). The two leads are fine, if at times affectless, so I concentrated on the others: Isabelle Huppert is alert as Eleanor’s violinist mother, and Ciarán Hinds finely somber as Conor’s restaurateur dad. Benson has made two other version of this film, subtitled Him and Her, each telling the story from its eponymous point of view. I doubt they’ll clear much up, but I’m willing to watch them anyway. Starts Fri., Sept. 19. Manor (Harry Kloman) THE MAZE RUNNER. Wes Ball directs this adaptation of James Dashner’s sci-fi young-adult novel about teens who have to find their way out of a maze. Starts Fri., Sept. 19

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THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU. A family reunites for a funeral, and various domestic issues are hashed out in this ensemble comedy from Shawn Levy, adapted from Jonathan Tropper’s novel. Jason Bateman and Tina Fey head an ensemble cast. Starts Fri., Sept. 19. Manor TO BE TAKEI. There are a lot of great moments in Jennifer M. Kroot’s documentary, which offers a peek inside the life of George Takei, once known only as “Sulu” from Star Trek. Takei found second and third acts in life, first as an activist for LGBT issues, and later as a social-media sensation. Takei has shared his life with Brad Takei, his partner for 25 years — and husband for six — who also serves as Takei’s manager. The best scenes are glimpses of the Takeis during those mundane but meaningful moments that spouses share together. In one scene, George and Brad are

CP

To Be Takei driving to the mountains to scatter the ashes of Brad’s mother. George opens a bag of corn chips while Brad calls for a chip by snapping his fingers. He eats the chip and repeats the process as an unfazed Takei hands the chips over. This isn’t a celebrity-couple moment, but an appealing everyday-couple moment. And this documentary offers time well spent with two endearing and engaging men. 4 and 7 p.m. Sat. Sept. 20; 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21; and 7:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 23. Hollywood (Charlie Deitch) TUSK. Kevin Smith (Clerks) tackles a new genre with this horror dramedy about a podcaster (Justin Long) who goes missing in the wilds of Manitoba. Starts Fri., Sept. 19 THE ZERO THEOREM. Christoph Walz stars in Terry Gilliam’s new film, a sci-fi drama about a reclusive genius trying to determine if life has any meaning. Closes out the director’s dystopia trilogy which also includes Brazil (1985) and 12 Monkeys (1995). Wed., Sept. 24-Tue., Sept. 30 (no shows Fri., Sept. 26 or Mon. Sept. 29). Hollywood

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Cat People (gorgeous, spooky film from 1942 about a woman who may also be a dangerous big cat), Sept. 17-18. Let the Right One In (creepy, beautiful 2008 Swedish film about a teenage vampire), Sept. 17-18. Despicable Me (relive when you first fell in love with the minions), Sept. 18. Lawrenceville Films: She’s Out of My League (2009 rom-com starring Jay Baruchel shot in Larryville), Sept. 17-18. I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951 film tells the mostly true story of Lawrenceville’s own Matt Cvetic), Sept. 18. Katherine Hepburn Retrospective: Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967 dramedy was last pairing of Hepburn and Spencer Tracy), Sept. 19-22 and Sept. 25. The Philadelphia Story (marriage comedy with Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart), Sept. 19- 23 and Sept. 25. Adam’s Rib (Hepburn and Tracy battle of the sexes), Sept. 19- 21, and Sept. 23-25. The African Queen (Bogart and Hepburn on African adventure), Sept. 19-21 and Sept. 23-25. Summertime (1955 romance set in Venice), Sept. 19-22 and Sept. 24-25. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. THE KILLING. Stanley Kubrick directed this influential nonlinear 1956 crime thriller about a meticulously planned racetrack heist that goes awry (Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs is one of this film’s direct descendants). Gang leader Sterling Hayden heads a cast that includes Marie Windsor and Elisha Cook Jr. spouting dialogue penned by

CP


The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them hard-boiled pulpster Jim Thompson. Continues the Hollywood’s year-long retrospective of Kubrick films. 7 p.m. Thu. Sept. 18; 9:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20; and 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21. Hollywood (AH) GLOBAL SHIFT FESTIVAL. The four-day event focused on global social change presents seven films: The Revolutionary Optimists (7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 18), adolescents in Calcutta; Without a Fight (7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 19), about soccer in Africa; Finding Mike, suicide prevention; and The No Name Painting Association, about Chinese artists (3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20); Deflated, kid and a toy ball; and Before You Know It, older gay Americans (5 p.m. Sat. Sept. 20); and Project Wild Thing, encouraging kids to go outside (1 and 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21; free). Point Park University, Downtown. Unless noted, films are $5. For tickets and more information, see www.globalshiftfestival.com.

typically downbeat 1970s. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of film about addiction. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21. Regent Square (AH)

SHAUN OF THE DEAD. London slackers defend themselves from zombies in writer/star Simon Pegg and director Edgar Wright’s remarkable debut feature: This is an original zombie movie, an original zombie parody, and an original romantic comedy, all in one film. But at its heart, Shaun succeeds because it is very much its own film: Its romance is romantic, its comedy hilarious, and its horror, if not actually frightening, at least lovingly and effectively executed. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 24. AMC Loews. $5 (JH)

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S. Blake Edwards’ 1961 film is, at its heart, still Truman Capote’s simple tale of the rootless nature of America’s thenimpending future. Audrey Hepburn stars. 10:30 a.m. Sun., Sept. 21. Hollywood (Justin Hopper)

CP

CALIFORNIA SPLIT. Robert Altman’s shaggy 1974 comedy-drama finds busted gambler George Segal colliding fortuitously with the free-spirited Elliott Gould, who wholeheartedly lives for cards, ponies, hookers, Froot Loops and whatever comes his way. The two embark on a chaotic journey for the big score that proves at first elusive, then illusory. This film was Altman’s first full exercise in employing a loose narrative, explicated with improvised dialogue and overlapping sound that would become characteristic of his later work. Already, though, the bittersweet, somewhat hollow frenzy of gambling excitement this film captures feels

CP

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— The Editorial Staff at Pittsburgh City Paper

CP

10 DAYS THAT UNEXPECTEDLY CHANGED AMERICA: THE HOMESTEAD STRIKE. Martin Sheen narrates this 2006 History Channel documentary about the infamous 1892 strike, a work that has since been presented as definitive. After the screening, Steffi Domike, of the United Steel Workers and producer of The River Ran Red, will discuss the film’s inaccuracies and lead a discussion. Continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free

Let the Right One In at Row House Cinema

Thanks, Potter

ROBIN WILLIAMS TRIBUTE DOUBLE-FEATURE. The late actor-funnyman is remembered with this special showing of two films: the 1991 Peter Pan-pirate adventure Hook (7 p.m.) and 1996’s gay domestic comedy The Birdcage (9:45 p.m.). Tue., Sept. 23. AMC Loews. $3 each

BLOOD SIMPLE. This genre-twisting 1984 neo-noir of cheating spouses and tricky dicks, written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, was among a batch of well-received, early-’80s indie features that signaled a new generation of filmmakers. In the ensuing quarter-century, the Coens have held fast to their iconoclastic style, while delivering a variety of hits and misses spanning multiple genres (though favoring dark crime stories and screwball comedies). 7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25. Melwood (AH) ROOT HOG OR DIE . A new film from Dan Stafford about zine-maker and indie-comics artist John Porcellino, best known for his “King-Cat Series.” Porcellino is scheduled to appear, and the evening includes a reception, film screening, Q&A and a booksigning. 8 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25 (7 p.m. meet-and-greet). Harris. $7-8 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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FACE TO FACE WITH AMERICA’S BUSIEST ER

“EXTRAORDINARY…

ILLUMINATING AND POWERFUL.” -THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“SPELLBINDING! VITALLY IMPORTANT, URGENT AND FASCINATING.” -USA TODAY

“ELECTRIFYING!” -THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Directed by RYAN McGARRY, M.D.

“RIVETING! PERSONAL, VITAL AND REVELATORY.” -LOS ANGELES TIMES CODEBLACKMOVIE.COM

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS MELWOOD SCREENING ROOM 477 Melwood Ave 412/681-5449

Q&As with Director RYAN McGARRY, M.D. on FRI. 9/19 at the 8:00 show and SAT. 9/20 at the 3:00, 5:30 & 8:00 shows.

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[STAGE]

THE EXHIBIT ASKS THE VIEWER, “WHO IS REALLY AHEAD OF HIS TIME?”

PREY TELL

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FRESH WORKS: MARK C. THOMPSON’S KIMONO 8 p.m., Fri., Sept. 19. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10-15. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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[[EXHIBIT REVIEW]]

Mark C. Thompson in performance {PHOTO COURTESY OF LINDA WALLEN}

Predation is a theme that movement artist Mark Conway Thompson says he has been returning to in his works since 2007. “That has a lot to do with what I think is wrong with the world today,” says Thompson. The domestic-violence case of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice is just one example now in the headlines. Such episodes, along with Thompson’s reading on social-justice issues, prompted the Pittsburgh native to revisit the topic in a new and perhaps more definitive way. Thompson’s stage work Kimono receives a work-in-progress showing Fri., Sept. 19, at The Alloy Studios as part of the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s artistincubator series Fresh Works. Kimono is a dark and disturbing movement piece in parable form: the fictional story of an older artist traumatized by a past predator. With the help of a woman who appears on his doorstep, and through the creation of artful kimonos, he finds new life and the courage to symbolically confront and drive back his predator. The largely dialogueless work draws on the life of the late Japanese textile artist Ichiku Kubota, who during World War II was a brutalized prisoner of war in a Siberian detention camp. Kubota reclaimed his life through the ancient kimono-fabric-dying technique called tsujigahana. Similarly, Kimono’s main character “uses his art as a pathway back from hell,” says Thompson. Thompson, 66, has a background in dance and mime. He is a former teacher at Duquesne University and principal soloist with French movement-theater company Le Theatre Magenia. He has performed throughout the U.S., France, Italy and Germany and has appeared on Broadway, in film and on television. He will be joined in Kimono by Slowdanger dance duo Anna Thompson (no relation) and Taylor Knight. Set to an atmospheric original score by composer/musician David Bernabo, the 40-minute work-in-progress, which contains nudity, will incorporate elements of Butoh. It will touch on graphic experiences of victims and delve into something Thompson feels is too little discussed: our pursuit of, and attempt to rein in, predators themselves. In keeping with the theme and format of Fresh Works as a learning program, Kimono will be followed by a Q-&-A with the artists to discuss the work and the art of movement theater.

FULL STEAM BEHIND {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

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T’S TRUE, but also poetic, that archaeologists found the remains of the Steamboat Arabia not submerged in the riverwater of Brownsville or Pittsburgh, where it was constructed, but buried under 45 feet of soil in a Kansas cornfield. Factually, the Missouri River, where the Arabia sank in 1856, has shifted course substantially and left a century-and-a-half of silt behind. Poetically, though, it seems as though the past itself was nearly lost, necessitating renewed digging, further down. So emerges the Heinz History Center exhibit Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia, produced in partnership with Kansas City’s Arabia Steamboat Museum and curated by Leslie Przybylek. Walk amid the wry prop cornstalks down an oddly long hallway and arrive at a dramatic photomural of the excavation that opens the exhibition. What the text describes as a 45-foot hole looks much deeper. All the better to handle a subject that is about a continent as much as an object. Sure, the paddlewheel steamboat, as developed by Robert Fulton, could go up the river as well as down, but that’s like

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HEINZ HISTORY CENTER}

The Missouri Breaks: exhibit view, with replica paddle-wheel, of Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat

saying your computer can both send and receive data. The real drama ensues when thousands of these devices are unleashed in a sprawling network. The Arabia’s just happened to be liquid rather than electronic, consisting primarily of the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri rivers.

PITTSBURGH’S LOST STEAMBOAT: TREASURES OF THE ARABIA continues through Jan. 4. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

But don’t let the slow streaming speeds fool you. The numbers from the steamboat era, largely forgotten, have a renewed capacity to astonish. One thousand people could travel down the Ohio River in a day on their way to the new territories, which would not have been feasibly reachable without steamboat travel. The Arabia carried 200 tons of manufactured goods. Four hundred steamboats sank in a stretch of the Missouri in four years. A typical steam-

boat, if it didn’t sink or explode, would last four years. And the era’s politics are another kind of exhumed entity. Here we see the Kansas-Nebraska debates unfold. A dusty textbook item to some, eclipsed by the Civil War in which it culminated, the dispute unravels forcefully in this exhibition, with moving first-person narratives and unexpectedly vicious political cartoons. And firearms. Though the History Center displays the Sharps Model 1853 rifle with nonpartisan detachment — it was prominent in commerce and politics — there is an unsettlingly familiar feeling to this combination of incendiary rhetoric about race, political division, threats of secession and firearms. And in this history, we know it will get worse. Happily, the commercial realm of the riverboat industry is instructive in much more cheerful fashion. The Arabia is archaeologically distinguished by the remarkable preservation of such a large sampling of manufactured goods. Many of these are laid out in large numbers of repeating items in one long hall of the exhibit, visually extended by well-placed CONTINUES ON PG. 36


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* Courses are shorter in duration than our degree programs, are noncredit bearing, and do not transfer into any degree program offered. ** Offer ends October 31, 2014. Offer can be changed or discontinued at any time. 50% discount is automatically applied to the cost of the course during registration and will be applied to all courses registered for. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh is one of The Art Institutes, a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options are subject to change. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. 420 Boulevard of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 © 2014 The Art Institutes International LLC. Our email address is csprogramadmin@edmc.edu. 062414

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FULL STEAM AHEAD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

PRESENTS...

OKLAHOMA!

A musical by Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBE R 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 Saturday & Sunday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

Starter Kits E-Juice

Mods Tanks

1614 COURSIN ST. ST.

McKEESPORT

(412) 673-1100 For Reservations www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

Batteries Accessories

mirrors. There is an overt nod to the repeating pop images of Andy Warhol. The exhibit asks the viewer, “Who is really ahead of his time?” Look at the ad for the prefabricated tiny house, two of which were in transit on the Arabia when it sank, and repeat the question. And of course it all has prominent beginnings in Pittsburgh. The entrepreneurial spirit and manufacturing capacity that we associate with metals and minerals in the late 19th century has substantial antecedents in transportation and durable goods a few decades earlier, with all the overzealous entrepreneurialism that we associate with our city. Witnessing the sudden rush of people and goods, William Larimer is quoted on wall text: “I intend to make arrangements to fill this country with Pittsburgh manufactured articles.”

Come in and hang out, charging stations, learn more about quitting smoking and using vapors. U.S. made E-Juice. The perfect gift for someone you love!

4322 Butler St , Lawrenceville (Below Arsenal Lanes) 412-709-6443 • www.maverickvapors.com Artist’s rendering of “Arabia Underway.” Art by Gary Lucy.

There are many things to like about this exhibition, where numerous compelling photomurals of the steamboat and some of its relevant landscapes balance well with delicate guidebooks, maps and those repeating examples of clothes, shoes, tools, lamps, keys and crates. The supporting research is thorough and contextually rich. Perhaps all that’s missing is a more detailed documentation of the Arabia’s actual construction and mechanics. Nonetheless, repeated visits to this exhibition prove to be rewarding, with new favorite objects emerging amidst the profusion, and a greater range of subtopics deserving attention than a single viewing can really cover. The Internet, we realize anew, is a delight and a tragedy, making information both easily available and homogenous, depriving it of any sense of discovery or materiality. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat defuses that paradox, providing a wealth of objects and explanations to satisfy InformationAge yearnings, while leaving the pleasures of challenging exploration and palpable substance well intact. It’s a good lesson for any network. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

[LIT BRIEFS]

LIT BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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Lucie Brock-Broido, Sept. 25 at the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series

MC KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER EATER

“Extinguish me from this,” writes Lucie Brock-Broido. “I was sixteen for twenty years. / By September I will be a ghost / And flickering in unison with all the other fireflies in Appalachia, / Blinking in the swarm of it, and all at once, above / And on a bare branch in a shepherd’s sky.” “A Girl Ago” is from BrockBroido’s 2013 collection Stay, Illusion, a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award. The acclaimed poet, a Pittsburgh native who now directs Columbia University’s poetry program, returns to kick off the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series season with a reading. 8:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 25. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Dr., Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwritersseries.wordpress.com

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As every month, poetry is on tap at Versify. The series, hosted by East End Book Exchange, features three exceptional local poets this week. Lynn Emanuel, an English professor at Pitt, is the author of collections including 2010’s darkly comic Noose and Hook. Joy Katz’s 2013 collection All You Do Is Perceive was lauded by CP for its “attractively strange, layered, distinctive voice.” And Ellen Smith is a widely published and anthologized poet and critic. 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. www.eastendbookexchange.com

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One week, Jimmy Cvetic is opening a boxing gym in the Hill District. Another week, the retired Allegheny County cop is hosting The Troopers Rode On, an evening of readings of his poems at the Hollywood Theater. Cvetic’s written thousands of them, plain-spoken, sometime hilarious and usually thought-provoking verses drawn largely from his Pittsburgh childhood and his years encountering wild characters on unpredictable streets. Readers include locally based actors David Conrad and Patrick Jordan. As usual for Cvetic, it’s a benefit, this time for the Western Pennsylvania Police Athletic Association. 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 19. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $20. www.thehollywooddormont.org

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Daniel Rinaldi is back, and so is Dennis Palumbo. Rinaldi is Palumbo’s fictional psychologist who consults for the Pittsburgh police. In the fourth installment of the Rinaldi detective series, Phantom Limb (Poisoned Pen Press), Palumbo’s hero tackles the kidnapping of one of his patients, a former Hollywood starlet. Palumbo, himself a Pittsburgh native turned longtime Hollywood-based psychotherapist, launches the book at a Mystery Lovers Bookshop Coffee & Crime event. 10 a.m.-noon Sat., Sept. 20. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 888-800-6078 or www.mysterylovers.com DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


[PLAY REVIEWS]

ALL IN

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THERE’S NOTHING like a 15th-century morality play to shake off the doldrums of summer. It definitely helps that the anonymously written Everyman is in the public domain, meaning not only that the rights are free, but that the Throughline Theatre Co. can be as free as it wants in its new interpretation. Co-directors Abigail Lis-Perlis and Joseph Ryan Yow have taken the allegorical text into an even more allegorical piece of theater. The conceit is that the apocalypse has happened, or might still be going on, and nine women in what remains of a library have been surviving, or at least staying warm, by burning books. Heavy symbolism, right? But after staving off death for however long, the nameless ladies prepare for their demise reading the old tome. The production is more layered than a Dobosh torte, if you can imagine one with mystery ingredients. There’s no explanation of the doom raining down via LisPerlis’ evocative sound design: It could be military action, the earth falling apart in volcanoes and earthquakes, or all the seals of the Book of Revelation fulfilling biblical prophecy. But it doesn’t matter.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THROUGHLINE THEATRE/RICK MOORE}

From left: Jenny Malarkey, Samantha Westervely and Lauren Connolly in Throughline Theatre’s Everyman

DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY

and Riches. Lauren Connolly provides music and songs for her companions. Quite a medieval hit under its title Middle English title (The Somonyng of Everyman), this stunningly ambitious take on Everyman is thick but short. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

continues through Oct. 12. The Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $49.75-50.75. 412-325-6766 or www.clocabaret.com

EVERYMAN

We are looking for new clients to satisfy with our experienced cleaning services.

{BY TED HOOVER} PITTSBURGH CLO Cabaret offers a return

It’s also beside the point that the characters have no names and, really, so little personality remaining from their shared hardships. We get only glimpses of individuality as the women multi-cast themselves as the title character and his various life companions. At first, they seem playful, and the stilted verse somewhat comic. Everyman’s masochistic version of Christianity is as offputting as it is scary. There’s a lot of leeway for actors portraying amateurs acting. Most arresting are Asia Bey and Samantha Westervelt as youngsters teetering between terror and acquiescence. Amy Portenlanger processes her character’s pain for Everyman’s pivotal companion, Good Deeds, and Hannah Brizzi provokes a few laughs channeling Kardashiana as Goods

engagement of Dixie’s Tupperware Party, a highly interactive show where nothing is as it seems. On one level, we’re attending an honestto-God Tupperware party, hosted by trailer trash Dixie Longate — a voluble Southern dame as fond of the wine in her adult sippy cup as she is of her nonstop entendres of both the double and single variety. But Dixie’s a performer as well, a salty, sassy broad, and this party is really an improv-ed 90-minute excuse to pull people from the audience and, a la Dame Edna, turn them into hilarious comic fodder. Dame Edna’s an apt reference since, on another level, Dixie is an illusion. She’s really a drag creation written and performed by Kris Andersson. The character (and I’m abashed to say it took me forever to get the pun in her name) was thought up on a dare, and Andersson started hosting Tupperware parties in

THE PRODUCTION IS MORE LAYERED THAN A DOBOSH TORTE.

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

Upcoming Workshops: Frugal Gardening Want to save money, time, and toil? Growing your own food is one of the most satisfying forms of gardening. In today’s economy, many are now turning to their backyard vegetable plots to help lessen high grocery bills. Others are looking for ways to live more ecologically-friendly lives, to have more choice in vegetable selection and to grow fresh produce free from harmful pesticides. This workshop, offered by the Penn State Master Gardeners will cover the basics of planning: siting your vegetable garden, preparing the soil, selecting plant and seed varieties (including hybrids and heirlooms), starting plants from seed, planting, tending your plants, troubleshooting problems, harvesting, extending the season, getting the most out of small plots, and putting the garden to bed for the winter. The class will look in a specific way at straw bale gardening—a type of raised bed and/or container gardening—as one type of frugal gardening.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 • 6:00 - 7:30 PM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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Johnnie Bryant, CEO

SOLD

continues through Sat., Sept. 20. Throughline Theatre Co. at the Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 888-718-4253 or www.throughlinetheatre.org

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people’s home as Dixie. He and she became such a success that a theatricalized version of the party eventually made it to New York, where he garnered a Drama Desk Award nomination for Outstanding Solo Performance. The show has since toured the country and the world — and no wonder. Andersson’s an extremely gifted comedian, and his ability to work a room, mining for comedy gold, is highly entertaining. But even that may be an illusion since — to double back like an Escher drawing — Dixie’s Tupperware Party is, in fact, a real Tupperware party. Each audience member is given a catalogue and, after the show, can place real orders for real Tupperware with Dixie in the lobby. As it turns out, Andersson — as both himself and Dixie — is actually one of Tupperware’s top sellers in the US and Canada … reportedly moving $25,000 worth of what Dixie calls “fantastic plastic crap” each month. So what’s the truth, then, of this show? Is Tupperware how Andersson supports his theatrical career? Or is theater what he uses to support his Tupperware sales? I don’t know the answer, but there are plenty of laughs while you try to work it out.

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[BOOKS]

LIT BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

A Harvest Beer & Food Festival Local and National breweries team up with local chefs for an exciting afternoon of small plates paired with brews. When: Saturday, September 27, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM Where: 5601 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 Tickets: hopfarmbrewingco.com/events.htm 100% of proceeds to benefit Camp Chihopi, a summer camp for transplant patients at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

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Hip-hop pioneers get treated like Marvel Comics superheroes — each with his own auspicious origin story, and his own foibles — in volume 2 of Ed Piskor’s docu-comic Hip Hop Family Tree (Fantagraphics). The Pittsburgh-based artist’s grittily over-the-top style, full of fun and brimming with Jack Kirby references, has gone over big: Vol. 1, which covered the birth of rap and other hip-hop culture, is on its third printing. It was a New York Times bestseller and is out in German and Japanese versions. The 112-page Vol. 2 covers 1981-83, starting with rap’s first commercial success outside the South Bronx. On pages “aged” and inked to look period-appropriate: Uptown definitively meets Downtown; “The Message” is heard; Afrikaa Bambataa releases Planet Rock; Run-DMC gets it together; punk rockers The Beastie Boys get ideas; and dozens of little-remembered but important players get their due. The book chronicles the development of beat-boxing, street art and breakdancing, plus the advent of the drum machine. Piskor also offers a winning sequence on the making of seminal hip-hop film Wild Style (including pirated Con Ed

{IMAGE COURTESY OF ED PISKOR}

“Flash to the Beat”: The Furious Five and Melle Mel, as rendered by Ed Piskor in Hip Hop Family Tree Vol. 2

electrons) and his account of the origins of West Coast rap, featuring Ice-T and a teenaged Dr. Dre. Piskor’s gestural vocabulary perhaps could grow, with a few too many clenched fists to signify anger or defiance. But overall, this second in a planned six-volume series is as impassioned and wickedly entertaining as it is informative (complete with index, discography and bibliography).

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Epic in a different way is Top of the Line, Daniel McCloskey’s series of eight hand-made mini-comics about a young man in a post-apocalyptic society. It starts crazy — with wild animals that seem to have evolved from power tools — and gets crazier. Most of

the fantasy/science-fiction elements are explained eventually, sort of, but McCloskey doesn’t spell out more than necessary. Top of the Line’s plot trades on an urban/rural class divide, mythic overtones, a high action quotient and primitive and high-tech devices deployed cheek-by-jowl. It’s maybe Star Wars crossed with a Hunger Games-like dystopia, except with carnivorous, elephant-sized monsters and more humor than you might expect amidst the general darkness. The drawing style is jagged and explosive, the storyline sometimes a bit obscure. McCloskey, who founded the Cyberpunk Apocalypse writers’ collective, is asking $2.99 each for these black-and-white booklets; the finale, in color, costs $8. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Maggie’s Dundee, 2003. Architect: Frank Gehry, Gehry Partners, LLP. Landscape design: Arabella Lennox-Boyd. Photo: © Maggie's Centres.

Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care September 13, 2014–January 5, 2015

Design Matters Explore how cancer care is facilitated in buildings that are bright and unorthodox; that prioritize essential human needs of social gathering and private contemplation; and that introduce gardens into the daily lives of patients.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

This exhibition is organized by the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) and organized for Carnegie Museum of Art by curator of architecture Raymund Ryan.

cmoa.org


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1. Wood Street Galleries

8. Trust Arts Education Center

18. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

28. Dream Cream Ice Cream

601 Wood Street

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

539 Liberty Avenue

fünf: Celebrating Five Years of Art on the Walls

September Dreamer Gabriel Ash and the KG Dynasty Contemporary Dance Company perform throughout the District. Final performance at 8pm.

SECOND/SECOND | Finnbogi Peterson Iceland’s master of Light and Sound returns to Wood Street Galleries with newly commissioned installations.

2. SPACE

Wordplay: True Stories with a Live Soundtrack. Music by Keebs. Performances at 6:30, 7:30, 8:30pm Third and Fourth Floors

812 Liberty Avenue

Public Record: Pittsburgh Biennial Participating Artists: Carolina Loyola-Garcia, Susanne Slavick, Matt Biederman (with Aljosa Abrahamsberg, Marko Peljhan, Brian Springer), Caroline Record, Paul Rosenblatt, Martha Rial, Rafael Abreu-Canedo, Paolo Pedercini. Love, absurdity, surveillance, gaming and identity are exposed in this multimedia exhibition in celebration of Pittsburgh artists. Music by DJ Weeping. Purchase treats from Pop Stop and Simpatico. MAP OF LOVE A Project by Carolina Loyola-Garcia Choreography by Beth Corning Performed by Cara Freidheim and Harris Ferris Two characters will find each other and do a live movement performance in the village of New Friendship. Performance at 7:30pm.

AIA Pittsburgh’s 2014 Design Exhibition

9. Harris Theater

As Best I Can Remember | Travis Mitzel Sculptures around the Cultural District, in no particular place.

809 Liberty Avenue

21. Fall Night Market *Open until 11pm

811 Liberty Avenue

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

32. Renaissance Hotel

Pop in for some laughs.

Presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership.

Live Performance by Carla Bianco, 5 to 7pm.

11. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

22. 709 Penn Gallery

33. Braddock’s

Park Journeys Ambassadors High school students from Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild.

3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery

Fall 14 Student artwork and Sounds of Steel!

Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

107 Sixth Street

Deconstructed dishes to completed plate.

crawl after dark Official Biennial After Party and Music SPACE series, 10pm, $5 Live Music by YXU and Ennui Live Music by Maureen Budway 8pm-12am, No Cover Jazz at Andy’s, Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Salsa Fridays 10pm Free Lesson, 10:30pm to 1:30am Dancing with DJ Jeff Shirey No Cover, Cash Bar Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

Live music by Erik Lawrence, 5:30 to 7:30pm Industrial Opulence | Gabe Szafranski

Pittsburgh Filmmakers Presents El Topo – Digitally restored

26. O’Reilly Theater

9:30pm, $5 Admission Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Avenue

SUMMER WORK | CAPA Visual Art Students

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Karaoke Throwdown

17. Future Tenant

27. PNC Legacy Project

10:15pm, 18+, $5 Admission, BYOB Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

600 Liberty Avenue

Tectonica | Paul Chidester Live Music by Stranger Convention, 7:30 to 9:30pm.

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136 Sixth Street NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE

Stop by the O’Reilly Theater and take a celebratory #selfie for Pittsburgh Public Theater’s 40th birthday.

111 Ninth Street

819 Penn Avenue

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31. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

655 Penn Avenue

621 Penn Avenue

16. CAPA Gallery

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show

SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

7th St. and Penn Avenue

25. Backstage Bar

*Open until 9pm 914 Penn Avenue

Atmosphera | Jerry Cajko

Public Record: Pittsburgh Biennial Well Played: Paul’s Vinyl Records | Paul Rosenblatt

15. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

Artistic Integrity: Baron Batch Curated by Sean Beauford Music by Pete Butta and Music by Socrates.

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

805 Liberty Avenue

23. 707 Penn Gallery

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Exhibition by Scott Applecubed Fine Art Photo Gallery Live Music by Tony Campbell and Jazzsurgery

14. Tonic

7. Shaw Galleries

Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It | Tina Brewer

Live Music by Noel Quintana and The Latin Crew, 6 to 9:30pm Co-hosted by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Latin American Cultural Union. ¡HOLA PITTSBURGH! is a public private partnership established to improve the diversity of Pittsburgh.

717 Liberty Avenue

Painted with Coffee and Tea LIVE DEMONSTRATION | Gerard Tonti

709 Penn Avenue

24. Katz Plaza

A Life Through My Lens | Participants of “Still Feel Like Going On” photo project.

140 Sixth Street

107 Sixth Street

707 Penn Avenue

12. 820 Liberty Avenue 13. 937 Liberty Avenue

801 Liberty Avenue

Meet Your Makers Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

10. Arcade Comedy Theater

Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh | Leslie Ansley

6. Crazy Mocha

20. 10 Year Anniversary Celebration

208 Sixth Street

Archives | Group Photography Show

Tiny Harris Gallery

610 Wood Street

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

29. Boutique 208

30. Olive or Twist

3. Urban League

5. Tito Way

Free Yoga Classes: 6 to 6:30pm or 7 to 7:30pm Pre-register: info@bendyoga.com

Celebrate TEN YEARS of Gallery Crawls in the Cultural District Music by Nate da Phat Barber, 5:30 to 8pm. Live Music by Les Nubians, 8pm. Les Nubians are an Afropean, Urban, R&B Grammynominated duo composed of sisters Hélène and Célia Faussart from Paris, France. They have become one of the most successful French-language musical groups in the U.S.

Pittsburgh Filmmakers will screen selected highlights from the 2014 Film Kitchen Contest on a loop. 5:30 to 9pm The Complaints N’at Choir, sang a composition of Pittsburgh complaints as part of the 2014 Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. Film by Curtis Reaves. Screening at 7:30pm.

Carnegie Library Button-making and Books

4. Social Status

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

8th Street

212 Ninth Street

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19. Bend Yoga

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.1809.25.14

Live Music RML Jazz John Gresh’s Gris Gris

WEDNESDAY | SEPTEMBER 17 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FRIDAY | SEPTEMBER 19 | 8PM

+ THU., SEPT. 18 {TALK} “Race,” notes the Carnegie Museum of Natural History exhibition of the same name, “is a recent human invention.” And as things like racial profiling, racial targeting and the enforcement of drug laws make clear, we’re still struggling with it. University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris, a nationally recognized expert on race and law enforcement, attempts to shed some light and offer solutions. His talk tonight at the Carnegie Museum of Art Theater is titled “Law and Order and Race: The Role Race Plays in Our Criminal Justice System.” Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free with museum admission ($11.95-17.95). www.carnegiemnh.org

+ FRI., SEPT. 19

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Billy the kid & the regulators

SATURDAY | SEPTEMBER 20 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Velvet heat Dr zoot olga Watkins

WEDNESDAY | SEPTEMBER 24 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FRIDAY | SEPTEMBER 26 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SATURDAY | SEPTEMBER 27 | 8PM

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 WWW.BIGYGROUP.COM 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

SEPT. 19 Discarded: Joachim Schmid and the Anti-Museum

Anti-Museum. For 30 years, German conceptual artist Schmid has curated an “anti-museum” of scrapped photographs, titled Pictures from the Street. Discarded follows Schmid in Berlin as a dwindling supply of print photos leads him into photography’s digital wastelands. Attendees can discard a photograph — or discover one — at the event’s photo-swap before a Q&A with Schmidt and cash bar conclude the

{ART} The rollout of the Pittsburgh Biennial continues. The latest of the big show’s eight venues to open an exhibit is The Miller Gallery. This group show features work by local artists including: Edith Abeyta in collaboration with Michael Lewis SEPT. 22 Miller; Gavin James Benjamin; Alexis McBride Gideon; Ulric Joseph; Jessica Langley; and Celeste Heuhaus. Tonight’s exhibition tour with curator Casey Droege and the artists is followed by an night. Danielle Fox 6:30 p.m. opening reception. BO Tour: 4400 Forbes Avenue, Oakland. 5 p.m. Reception: 6-8 p.m. $10-15 (includes one drink Carnegie Mellon campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-3618 or coupon). 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org www.cmu.edu/millergallery

{SCREEN}

{MUSIC}

One man’s trash is another man’s art exhibit: the Carnegie Museum of Art presents the world premiere of documentary Discarded: Joachim Schmid and the

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Composer of the Year Mason Bates’ “Rusty Air in Carolina” opens the BNY Mellon Grand Classics season. Piano soloist Valentina Lisitsa

follows with Rachmaninoff’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini.” Lisitsa, a native of the Ukraine, claimed fame through her 150,000 YouTube followers. She also once performed with the late Lorin Maazel, the former PSO music director whom the group honors at Heinz Hall this weekend with a pre-concert talk and a multimedia display. The PSO, led by music director Manfred Honeck, closes this weekend’s program with Berlioz’s “Symphonie fantastique.” DF 7:30 p.m. Also 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25.75105.75. 412-392-4900 or www.heinzhall.org {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHIA MESSINA}

SPOTLIGHT of the WEEK

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

{OPERA}

Rare for opera, there’s basically no stage in Resonance Works’ production of The Elixir of Love. Instead, the troupe turns Pittsburgh Opera’s Strip District studio into “Adina’s Cabaret,” where some audience members will occupy tables amidst the action of Donizetti’s perennial-favorite comic romance about a poor peasant, a wealthy woman and a spurious love potion. Meanwhile, Bar Marco mixes its own elixirs for patrons to quaff during the show. This weekend’s two performances feature tenor Christopher Lucier as Nemorino, soprano Lindsay Ohse as Adina and local favorite Kevin Glavin in the plum role of the quack


Free!Event {PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM}

For 20 years, that 1 percent sales-tax surcharge you’ve been paying in Allegheny County has kept busy. Half has gone to propertytax relief, and the other half — some $1.5 billion — has been allocated by the Allegheny Regional Asset District to libraries, parks, civic assets from the zoo to sports stadiums, arts and cultural groups, and more. Every fall, ARAD and its beneficiaries say thanks with several weeks’ worth of free admissions, performances and other events. This year, 20 RADical Days opens with a day of free tours of PNC Park, from the batting cages to the press box; the first-come, first-served walk-throughs run from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wed., Sept. 24. Other September highlights include Hartwood Acres Hay Day and the Allegheny Green Festival (Sept. 27); free admission to Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens (Sept. 29); free tours of Heinz Field (Sept. 30); and programs and performances at local libraries. RADical Days really gets moving in October, when the 12 dates include: free performances by Attack Theatre and Pittsburgh Opera; free admission to the National Aviary, Carnegie Science Center, Children’s Museum, Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History, The Andy Warhol Museum and the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium; plus nature walks, kids’ educational workshops at libraries, and more. Plan your calendar now; the complete schedule is at www.radworkshere.org. Bill O’Driscoll Sept. 24-Nov. 9. Various venues.

Dulcamara. The show is sung in Italian, with English supertitles. BO 8 p.m. Also 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21. 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. 412-501-3330 or www.resonanceworks.org

{COMEDY} Tonight and tomorrow, it’s a neo-geek wet dream at Arcade Comedy Theater’s Knights of the Arcade. The venue’s already popular monthly Dungeons & Dragons comedy show (think: improv plus 12-sided die, halflings and wizards) is joined by celebrity dungeon master Spencer Crittenden. Crittenden became a cult hero when he rose from the audience at an episode of Community creator Dan Harmon’s podcast Harmontown to guest-DM that show’s regular D&D contests. Crittenden eventually joined the Harmontown cast and even guest-starred on Community. And he’s got a beard fit for Middle Earth.

Art by Gavin Benjamin

SEPT. 18

Pittsburgh Biennial BO 10 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www. knightsofthearcade.com

+ SAT., SEPT. 20 {WORDS} The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Main Branch’s International Poetry Collection is among the largest publiclibrary stockpiles of poetry in

the country. Starting today, the room that holds it also hosts free monthly readings by some of Pittsburgh’s best poets. Saturday Poets In Person kicks off with Toi Derricotte and Vanessa German. Derricotte’s much-acclaimed work includes her 2011 collection The Undertaker’s Daughter. German, best known for her spoken-word performances, is a powerful presence live. BO 3-4 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3114 or www.carnegielibrary.org

+ MON., SEPT. 22 {FASHION} Pittsburgh Fashion Week returns for its fifth year starting tonight, with a designer showcase of homegrown names and national talent like NYC-based Faith Pongracz Valez. The Pittsburgh native and Art Institute of Pittsburgh graduate and other designers will work to counter GQ’s 2011 assessment of Pittsburgh as America’s third-worst-dressed city. Fashion Week, which highlights autumn collections, also includes Wednesday’s free “rock at work” fashion show and Saturday’s “Backto-Basics” runway show by Art Institute student designers.

SEPT. 19

Spencer Crittenden at Knights of the Arcade

DF 7 p.m. (Highmark Stadium, South Side. $58.40). Events continue through Sept. 28. Various venues. Ticket prices vary. 412-720-5195 or www. pittsburghfashionweek.com

{WORDS} James McBride, the New York Times best-selling author, musician and (according to his website ) “worst dancer in the history of African Americans,” opens Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Nightt Lectures season. McBride e will discuss his latest book, The he Good Lord Bird, a humorous and nd provocative work based on the story of abolitionist John n Brown. A man of many figurative ve hats but always clad in his signature nature porkpie, McBride’s previous ous works include The Colorr of Water and both Miracle at St. Anna and that World War II story’s screenplay adaptation. ation. DF 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes es Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 22-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org res.org

+ TUE., SEPT.. 23 {WORDS}

Kong to The Lord of the Rings reflect the cultures that birthed them. Bellin’s own debut young-adult novel, Survival Colony 9, is a dystopic comingof-age story haunted by monsters called the Skaldi, uncanny beings who take over human bodies from within. Bellin’s hero and narrator is Querry, a teenager with traumatic memory loss who’s nonetheless tasked with helping his nomadic colony survive in a war-ravaged landscape. The book launch is tonight at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. BO O 6-7:30 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 800-888-6078 or www.mysterylovers.com

comics artists. Michael DeForge, based in Toronto, is best known for horror series Lose and his new graphic novel, Ant Colony. Simon Hanselmann, from Australia, pens the darkly comic series Meg, Mogg and Owl, about a depressed, drug-abusing witch. And Patrick Kyle is a widely published, Toronto-based illustrator whose new fantasy graphic novel is titled Distance Mover. Visiting artists Annie Mok ok k and a d Noel Freibert will an wi l also also join join n tonight’s tonig to night’ nig ht’ss ht’ signing. sig i nin ig ning. g BO g. 7-10 7-1 10 p.m. p.m. p.m .m m 3138 3138 31 38 Brereton Breret Bre reton ret o St., on St , St St. Polish Hill. ll 412-251-5451 412 2-25 51-5451 5 or www.copacetic ww www w .copac acetic comics.com ccom mics i .co om

+ WED.,

SEPT. 24 {COMICS}

SEPT. 19

Copacetic Comicss hosts a stop on the North American tour of three top

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Joshua David Bellin knows ows monsters: The LaRoche College English professor’s or’s 2005 book Framing Monsters explores how cinematic heavies from King {PHOTO COURTESY OF GILBERT FRANCOIS}

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Based on the classic TV show & movie. Presented by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. Grand Theatre. 412-405-8425. AS YOU LIKE IT. Flagstaff Hill. Presented by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. www.pittsburghshakespeare.com Sept. 20-21, 2 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-255-2539. BLEACHER BUMS. A bunch of Chicago Cubs fans make wagers w/ each other while watching a game at Wrigley Field on a summer afternoon. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. THE BOOK OF MORMON. Musical comedy by Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 5. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-456-6666. BORN YESTERDAY. Comedy by Garson Kanin. Presented by the

Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has discovered for the plastic products. Includes audience participation, giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DOUBT, A PARABLE. Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects the young Father Flynn of improper relations w/ a male student. Presented by Little Lake Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE ELIXIR OF LOVE. Immersive opera experience feat. Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy. Presented by Resonance Works. Fri., Sept. 19, 8 p.m. and Sun.,

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Sept. 21, 3 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Hall, Carnegie. 412-337-8812. MY MOTHER’S ITALIAN, MY Strip District. 412-607-1892. FATHER’S JEWISH & I’M IN EVERYMAN. Post-apocalyptic THERAPY. Steve Solomon’s story of how women sheltered comedy show. Sat., Sept. 20, in a library try to find peace 2 & 7:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, w/ each other & the end of all Greensburg. 724-836-8000. things. Presented by Throughline NUNSENSE. The Little Sisters Theatre. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and of Hoboken hold a fund raiser Sat, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. The to raise money to bury sisters Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. accidentally poisoned by the 1-888-718-4253. convent cook. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. FUNNY,YOU DON’T and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru LOOK LIKE A Oct. 5. The Theatre GRANDMOTHER. Factory. 412-374-9200. A humorous, OBSERVE THE heartwarming SONS OF ULSTER musical look at modern www. per pa MARCHING grandmothers. Thu-Sat, pghcitym .co TOWARDS THE 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. SOMME. Eight young Thru Sept. 28. South men of Ulster, thrown Park Theatre, Bethel Park. together for army training 412-831-8552. during the Great War, must THE KNIGHTS OF THE move beyond the troubles LIVING DEAD. Interactive between Protestant & medieval-themed theater & Catholic as they prepare for dinner theater shows. Presented the Battle of the Somme. by Stage & Steel Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 8 p.m. Charity Randall Theatre, Thru Sept. 20. SS Peter & Paul Oakland. 412-561-6000. Ukrainian Orthodox Church OF MICE & MEN. John Steinbeck’s classic tale of two migrant workers in the Great Depression. Presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. OKLAHOMA. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Premiering The Other Half, The Academy Of Super Heroes, Close Your Eyes, Scattered, Sleeping Aide, The Field. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 28. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-944-2639. SQUABBLES. A cautionary tale of what happens when parents move in w/ their children. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050.

COMEDY THU 18 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. Improv comedy performance based on audience suggestion. 7:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

VISUALART 27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

THURSDAY SEPT 18/10PM

AMRCNDREAMING

FREE

THURSDAY SEPT 25/10PM

NEW THIS WEEK 720 RECORDS. Sara Eve Rivera. Work by local visual & tattoo artist. Opening reception Sep. 19, 7-9 p.m., closing reception Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Home Made. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Opens Sept. 19. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines & Prickles. Artworks & books that depict the defensive structures of thorns, spines & prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Opening reception: Sept. 18, 5-7 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-2434. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Miller Gallery. Work by Edith Abeyta & Michael Lewis Miller, Gavin Benjamin, David Bernabo, Alexis Gideon, Ulric Joseph, Jessica Langley, & Celeste Neuhaus. Opening reception: Sept. 19, 6-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. texture&tension. Work by Alex Bernstein, Marsha Blaker, Byul Go, Romina Gonzales & Edison Zapata, Weston Lambert, more. Opening reception: Sept. 19, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Sid Kweller 1917-2014: A Celebration of Life. Sep. 20. Reception for family & friends, 5-7 p.m., general public, 7-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Mostly Trucks.

Photographs by Jim Miller. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 709 PENN GALLERY. Fragments, Fractals: Write It, Print It, Sew It. Work by fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Industrial Opulence. Photographs by Gabe Szafranski. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. A Tribute to Henry Fiore. Work by LeaAnn Grill, Nancy Bernheisel, Denise Gemellas, & Cynthia Saal. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Maggie’s Centres: A Blueprint for Cancer Care. Installation showcasing models, photographs, drawings, & videos relating to the design of five cancer centers in the United Kingdom. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804.

EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Tectonica. Solo exhibition by Paul Chidester. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds. Allegorical paintings by Hannah Grace Clark. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 19 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEVEN WRIGHT. 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 19 - SUN 21 CARLOS MENCIA. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Sept. 20, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 21, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

VISUAL ART

LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Behind the Platen. Showcase of letterpress work done by shops & individuals in the Western Pennsylvania/Eastern Ohio area. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi,

TUE 23

SAT 20

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

LISA LAMPANELLI. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225.

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

SUN 21

WED 24

MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 21 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ROOTED: New Works by Di-ay Battad. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by

JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Rae Gold Retrospective Sale. Hand dying wool, silk, felt, & knit garments. Through Sep 27. Transformation 9: Contemporary

EXHIBITS

ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN

Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. NO OUTLET. New work by Elizabeth Amber Rudnick. Friendship. 551-427-6655. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Connected at the Roots: An African-American Art Exhibition,. Work by Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill, Raymond Logan & others. Juried by Laverne Kemp. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Ephemeral Self. Work by Julia Betts. By appointment. unsmokeartspace.com. Braddock.

CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting.

Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with

are we so different?

SEPTEMBER EVENTS Lecture: Law and Order and Race, David Harris September 18 Performance: Vishala: Expanse, The Spilling Ink Project September 20 & 21 Visit carnegiemnh.org/race/programs for more information.

you’ll never see race the same way again. Presented by

A project of American Anthropological Association.

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

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EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes EVENT: and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. , Strip District MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes CRITIC: open for tours, lectures and more. , 56, Monroeville. 412-373-7794. a carpenter from the NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from South Hills over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. WHEN: North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. It turned out to be a nice day. I’ve just seen [musician] Oakland. 412-624-6000. Billy Price. I’ve been a long-time follower of his. He’s like OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. a blues-type thing: saxophone and keyboard. He had a This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion very diverse crowd. I’m talking, like, three generations: site features log house, blacksmith mother, grandmother and granddaughter dancing. Plus, shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. there was couple that had to be in their late 60s, and PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY they were dancing, so it’s nice to see when they bring MUSEUM. Trolley rides and everyone together, different generations and different exhibits. Includes displays, walking age groups. It’s good bringing everybody out. [The World tours, gift shop, picnic area and Festival is] great as long as you find a place to park. It’s Trolley Theatre. Washington. condensed. There’s a lot to see and a lot to do and a lot 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & to eat and drink, if you like. There was one negative: that BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer guy running that generator over there with the poker Flower Show. Feat. a variety of machines. They got live bands playing here, but they got imaginative railroad displays a generator running so you can play poker. Go down to enhanced by flowers, plants a casino. & interactive features. 14 BY DANIELLE WILLIS indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from of military artifacts showcasing IRISH DANCE TEAM. The evening around the world. Oakland. photographs, uniforms, shells also feat. hip hop dance theatre 412-622-6914. & other related items. Military artist Teena Marie Custera & PINBALL PERFECTION. museum dedicated to honoring a preview of Alexis Gideon’s Pinball museum & players club. military service members since stop-motion opera. 6 p.m. New West View. 412-931-4425. the Civil War through artifacts Hazlett Theater, North Side. PITTSBURGH ZOO & & personal mementos. Oakland. PPG AQUARIUM. Home 412-621-4253. to 4,000 animals, including ST. ANTHONY’S FRESH WORKS. Movement many endangered CHAPEL. Features theater performance by species. Highland Park. 5,000 relics of Catholic Mark Conway Thompson. 8 p.m. 412-665-3639. saints. North Side. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. RACHEL CARSON 412-323-9504. 412-363-3000. HOMESTEAD. A w. w w ST. NICHOLAS Reverence for Life. er hcitypap g p CROATIAN CATHOLIC Photos and artifacts .com CHURCH. Maxo XPRESS GIRLS. Vegas style of her life & work. Vanka Murals. Mid-20th burlesque troupe. and Sat., Springdale. 724-274-5459. century murals depicting war, Sept. 27 Cabaret at Theater Square, RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL social justice and the immigrant Downtown. 607-368-3837. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits experience in America. Millvale. on the Homestead Mill. Steel 421-681-0905. industry and community artifacts VISHALA: EXPANSE. from 1881-1986. Homestead. Performance by The Spilling Ink 412-464-4020. Project, a classical Indian dance SENATOR JOHN HEINZ company. Sept. 20-21, 2 p.m. HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Natural Lost Steamboat: Treasures ANGORA GARDENS’ History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. AUTUMNFEST. Vendors, music, nearly 2,000 once-hidden food, carnival games, face treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s painting, magician, Chinese important role as a Gateway to auction, more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. the West & a national hub for the Angora Gardens. 412-675-8556. KIDNEY WALK KICKOFF. steamboat building industry in the LIGONIER HIGHLAND GAMES. Benefits the National Kidney mid-19th century. From Slavery to Scottish games, food, music, Foundation. 6-8 p.m. Dave & Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s more. Benefits the Clan Donald Busters, Waterfront. 412-261-4115. role in the anti-slavery movement. Education & Charitable Trust. Ongoing: Western PA Sports 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Idlewild & Soak Zone. Museum, Clash of Empires, and 814-931-4714. HARVEST FOR THE HUNGRY. exhibits on local history, more. Purchase an extra bag of Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOLDIERS & SAILORS groceries from a participating MEMORIAL HALL. War in the farmers market to go to a local THE HAMMERSTEP INITIATIVE Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection food pantry. pasafarming.org/

Strip District World Festival Jeff Chojincki Sat., Sept. 13

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SAT 20 - SUN 21

FESTIVALS SAT 20

FUNDRAISERS THU 18

THU 18 - SAT 20

DANCE THU 18

events/pasa-events/local-foodmonth-harvest-for-the-hungry Thru Sept. 20

FRI 19 7TH ANNUAL CHALLENGE THE CHAMPIONS GALA. Keynote speaker: Pittsburgh Steeler Ramon Foster, tapas, live music, live & silent auctions, more. Benefits Every Child, Inc. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-665-0600.

FRI 19 - SUN 21 THE SEWICKLEY SHOW: ANTIQUES REIMAGINED. Feat. 26 unique dealers from the United States & Great Britain. Benefits Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. Sept. 19-21 Edgeworth Club, Sewickley. 412-741-2593.

SAT 20 FAMILY TREASURES SALE. High-end items for resale feat. furniture, collectibles, more. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8800. FARM-TO-TABLE: HARVEST TASTING. 5-course meal feat. produce harvested directly from the Eden Hall Campus farm. Benefits Chatham University’s Falk School of Sustainability. 6:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. INGOMAR ELEMENTARY FOOD TRUCK RALLY. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Shoppes at Northway, Ross. 412-721-1002. KATIE WESTBROOK RACE IPSA LOQUITUR 5K & DOG WALK. 9 a.m. Duquesne University, Mellon Patio, Downtown. 412-396-6186. MT. LEBANON BREWFEST. Benefits maintenance & programming at the Mt. Lebanon Veterans Memorial. Academy Ave. & Washington Rd., Mt. Lebanon. lebostore.mtlebanon.org/store/ show/id/30 4-7 p.m.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

PINEAPPLE CLASSIC 5K. Benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-395-2876. PITTSBURGH WALK FOR FARM ANIMALS. Benefits Farm Sanctuary. 10 a.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. 740-317-1327. QUE VIVA CLEMENTE. Celebration of Latin American culture & the life & legacy of Roberto Clemente. Benefits the Latino Family Center. 7 p.m. The Clemente Museum, Strip District. 412-518-9120.

CHATLINE TM

SUN 21 9TH ANNUAL ELORAPALOOZA 5K/1-MILE RUN/WALK & PICNIC. Benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society & Elora’s HOPE Foundation 9 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-608-2134.

412.566.1861 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

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[VISUAL ART] BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. NEW HORIZON THEATER SUMMER JAMZ. Dancing, hor d’oeuvres, entertainment, more. Bring a non- perishable food item for East End Cooperative Ministries. 3-9 p.m. Absolute Ballroom & Dance, Homewood. 412-431-0773. ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 3RD ANNUAL ROAST BEEF DINNER. Benefit for the Finleyville Food Pantry. 3 p.m. St Francis of Assisi. A TASTE OF GROW PITTSBURGH. Feat. tastings from Grow Pittsburgh’s restaurant partners, live music, raffles, more. 2-5 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-362-4769 x 100.

MON 22 MILESTONE GOLF CLASSIC. Benefits Milestone Centers, Inc. 9:30 a.m. Edgewood Country Club, Penn Hills. 412-371-7391 x.140. ST. BARNABAS CHARITIES FALL GOLF CLASSIC. Benefits the St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. 1 p.m. Butler Country Club, Butler. 724-444-5521.

POLITICS FRI 19 PAACC LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST. Moderated by Joe Delano. 7:30 p.m. Montour Heights Country Club, Coraopolis. 412-264-6270.

LITERARY THU 18 AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru Sept. 18 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS .. Margaret Welsh, Caitlyn Luce Christensen, Mark Sepe, Rachel Ann Brickner. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FRI 19 EARGASM OPEN MIC SERIES. Feat. Breeze the Poet & Roscoe Burnems. 8 p.m. Hill House

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 24 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing The Moons of August by Danusha Lameris. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7663.

KIDSTUFF This Friday, local tattoo artist and painter Sara Eve Rivera’s new solo exhibit opens at 720 Music, Clothing and Café. Rivera discussed her work via email. WHAT IS THIS SHOW LIKE? My work is inspired by the rich history of North American tattooing. Pretty ladies, exotic animals and plants are common themes in both my work and the work of American traditional tattooers. These themes combined with a more modern and bright color palette are the basis of my work. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN WORKING ON PAPER VS. ON SKIN? My career outside of Inka Dinka Doo [Tattoo Shop] and my career inside the shop overlap in many ways. Though my paintings are meant to be wall art, they double as tattoo flash. These designs are often bought to hang on the wall, or claimed as tattoo designs. Opening reception: 7-9 p.m., Fri., Sept. 19. Exhibit continues through Oct. 17. 4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592 or 720pgh.blogspot.com

Kaufmann Center, Hill District. 412-613-0448.

SAT 20 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LYNN EMMANUEL, JOY KATZ, AND ELLEN SMITH. Versify Reading Series. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. TOI DERRICOTTE & VANESSA GERMAN: SATURDAY POETS-IN-PERSON. 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3175.

MON 22 DOWNTOWN BOOK CLUB. 6-7:30 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-235-7263. FREADOM. Local personalities like Charlie Batch, Paul

Guggenheimer, Alan Olifson & others read from their favorite banned books. 7 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-681-7736. GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. A LITERARY EVENING W/ JAMES MCBRIDE. Author of The Good Lord Bird. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

TUE 23 BOOK SIGNING W/ JESSICA MERCHANT. Author of Seriously Delish. 6 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. JOSHUA DAVID BELLIN. Book launch party for Survival Colony 9. 6-7:30 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 888-800-6078. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

THU 18 - WED 24 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 19 FAREWELL, XOXO! CONCERT WITH JOSH & GAB. 11 a.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 19 -WED 24 TOUGH ART. Feat. Jenna Boyles’ boardable spacecraft, Jesse Kauppila & Dakotah Konick’s kinetic stained-glass work, Lindsay Packer’s walk-though physics-of-light installation & Stephanie Ross’ immersive LED environment. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 20 AMERICAN GIRL DOLL BREAKFAST PICNIC. Bring one of your favorite dolls for breakfast treats, an American Girl story, & dollsized crafts. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 20 - SUN 21 PETER PAN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 12 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

MON 22 BONJOUR LES AMIS. Stories & fun in French. Ages 2-5. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru Sept. 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS. Scientific activities for early learners ages 2–6. Mon, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 27 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 23 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. TUESDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mount Lebanon


Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: WHAT IS ISIS? Panel discussion presented by Global Solutions THE NEST. Discover the mystery Pittsburgh. 6:30-8 p.m. of a creature who has made Union Project, Highland Park. its nest in the museum. The 412-471-7852. creature’s story comes to life INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION through hands-on art making OF PITTSBURGH. Social, activities & an interactive cultural club of American/ performance. Sept. 23-28, international women. Thu First 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. of Pittsburgh, North Side. pittsburgh@gmail.com. 412-322-5058. LAW & ORDER & RACE: THE ROLE RACE PLAYS IN OUR YOUTH COOK: SALSAS & CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. Lecture w/ Distinguished Faculty SAUCES. 4-5:30 p.m. Children’s Scholar & Professor of Law David Museum of Pittsburgh, Harris. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum North Side. 412-322-5058. of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MAKENIGHT. Back-toschool-themed activities. 21+. OWL PROWL. 1-mile night hike. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Children’s 8-9:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Museum of Pittsburgh, Park. 724-899-3611. North Side. 412-322-5058. MATER MISERICORDIAE: CULT IMAGE AND CIVIC SKYWATCH. Learn about SYMBOL IN THE PROVINCE globular clusters, nebulas & OF AREZZO, C. 1350-1575. planets by seeing them w/ Art lecture w/ Katherine your own eyes. On clear Brown, PhD. 11:45 a.m. nights, visitors are invited University of Pittsburgh to come to SkyWatch at Greensburg. to get up-close NATIONAL and personal with AVIARY AT NIGHT www. per pa amazing celestial OKTOBERFEST. pghcitym o .c objects. Fri, Sat. Thru German beer specials, Nov. 29 Carnegie Science food from Atria’s, more. 5-9 p.m. National Center, North Side. Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. 412-237-3400. OHIO RIVER WATERSHED CELEBRATION. Children’s DATE NIGHT activities, watershed tour, SUPVENTURE FOR 2. Sat, canoeing, drone demo, more. 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Northeast www.orwc.org 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, North Park, Allison Park. McKeesport. 412-720-5058. 724-935-1766. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, variety of dances from the 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Oakland. 412-477-4677. Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEDNESDAY MORNING RIDESHARING & WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or TECHNOLOGY: HOW shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, PITTSBURGH IS BRIDGING Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. THE TRANSPORTATION GAP. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, UPSTAIRS. Bring your own Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. medium for a communal creation WIGLE WHISKEY & night w/ music by King Friday. HARTWOOD RESTAURANT Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. DINNER. 4-course dinner The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. w/ cocktail pairings. 5 p.m. 412-225-9269. Hartwood Restaurant, BASIC HORTICULTURE. Glenshaw. 412-224-2827. Learn about soils, plant WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ nutrition & environmental MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., factors that affect growth & Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. development. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 20 412-727-7855. Thru Nov. 6 Phipps Conservatory WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Registration is required. 412-441-4442 x 3925. Employers include Rivers Casino, CONVERSATIONAL University of Pittsburgh, West CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Penn Allegheny Health System & more. 9 a.m. Bethel Park Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Community Center, Bethel Park. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-854-9120 x 23. 412-531-1912.

TUE 23 - WED 24

WED 24

OUTSIDE FRI 19

FRI 19 - SAT 20

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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WED 24

OTHER STUFF THU 18

The beer that invented Light beer.

YELP’S ‘BURGH BASH. Live artist, pinball, screenprinting, more. 8-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-315-8088.

THU 18 - SAT 20

WEDNESDAYS

A TASTE OF PITTSBURGH. Chef Dave Racicot will combine modern cooking techniques w/ iconic Pittsburgh dishes like cabbage rolls, pierogies, & Klondike bars. Thru Sept. 20, 6 p.m. Notion, East Liberty. 412-361-1188.

2 LITE BOTTLES & DRAFTS

$ .50

35 CENT WINGS

THU 18 - SUN 21 GLOBAL SHIFT FESTIVAL. Film festival feat. screenings & workshops. www.globalshift festival.com Sept. 18-21 Point Park University, Downtown. 412-254-4405.

3

$ .50 LITE ALUMINUM PINTS SATURDAY COLLEGE FOOTBALL SPECIAL

FRI 19 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. ART DAY W/ THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Silk screening workshop. 6-7:30 p.m. Alphabet City Tent, North Side. 412-323-0278. CAFE 304 SALSA NIGHT. 8 p.m. New City Church, Downtown. 412-726-4217. DISCARDED: JOACHIM SCHMID & THE ANTI-MUSEUM. Documentary screening following Joachim Schmid into his explorations of the image in a digital world. Part of the Invisible Photograph Project. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Interactive tour through city backdrops of movies such as The Dark Knight Rises, Perks of Being a Wallflower, Flashdance, more. Meets at Duquesne Incline. 9 a.m. 412-323-4709. PIXELS OF FURY. Local designers battle it out in 20-min. rounds at computer stations onstage to create original posters with a common challenge. 6:30 p.m. Pierce Gallery, Downtown. SENIORS SOCIAL GROUP: GUIDED DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Social group for windowed or single persons 50+. Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-657-1746.

SATURDAY COLLEGE FOOTBALL

$2.25 LITE BOTTLES & $6.66 REDD’S APPLE ALE HELL BOMBS TIL 10PM F O L LO W @ M 2 T H I R D

# I T S M I L L E RT I M E # P I T T S B U R G H

Sept 26& 27

FRI 19 - SAT 20 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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FRI 19 - SUN 21 PENN BREWERY OKTOBERFEST. German beer, food, & live entertainment. Fri-Sun. Thru Sept. 28 Penn Brewery, North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 20 5TH ANNUAL RUNNING OF THE WIENERS. Fun run feat. puppies dressed in hot dog costumes. 1-5 p.m. Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. ALCOSAN’S FREE OPEN HOUSE. Tour of the plant, plus family activities, q&a sessons, more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. ALCOSAN, North Side. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CITY OF CHAMPIONS! THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS HISTORY TOUR. Begins at Duquesne Incline, 1220 Grandview Ave, Mt. Washington. 9 a.m. 412-323-4709. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First

Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 EXPLORATION IN FILM. 412-271-7660. Screenings of works by FATHERHOOD BASKETBALL experimental black filmmakers. TOURNAMENT. 9 a.m. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 Kingsley Center, East Liberty. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-362-7609 x 162. 412-363-3000. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL MT. WASHINGTON HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. WALKING TOUR. Begins Weekly letter writing event. outside of Monongahela Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Incline on W. Carson St. Oakland. 412-683-3727. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru ARABIC FOR Oct. 25 412-302-5223. BEGINNERS. SPANISH Second and Third CONVERSATION Sun of every month, GROUP. Friendly, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie . w w w informal. At the r Library, Oakland. citypape h g p Starbucks inside 412-622-3151. .com Target. Sat, FALL TEA. Learn 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, about fashions of the East Liberty. 412-362-6108. 18th century during a traditional SWING CITY. Learn & tea. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bushy practice swing dancing skills. Run Battlefield, Jeannette. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, 724-527-5584. Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. HEALTHY EATING, WOMEN’S AGLOW HEALTHY LIVING INTERNATIONAL. CONFERENCE. Speakers, Speaker: Apostle Marcelyn vendors, demos, more. Odom. Open to men & 11 a.m. Whole Foods Market, women. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. East Liberty. 412-441-7960. Macy’s, Downtown. PENGUIN PAINTING 412-390-5886. PROGRAM. Choose colors & watch penguins create a work of art. 3 p.m. National Aviary, HARMONY MUSEUM ANTIQUE North Side. 412-323-7235. SHOW & SALE. Sept. 20-21 PFLAG GREENSBURG. Harmony Museum, Harmony. Support, education & advocacy 724-452-7341. for the LGBTQ community,

SUN 21

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 20 - SUN 21

family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. WORLD GRATITUDE DAY PITTSBURGH. 3 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-242-5342.

Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

MON 22

Auditions for camp counselors during 5K races. Must like scaring people, have improv experience, & enjoy camping. Email for more info nicole@ onthenoseevents.com www.campkilarunna.com. 201 N Braddock Ave., Homewood. 412-215-5532.

RADICAL HOME ECONOMICS NIGHT: LOCALVORE LIVING IN PITTSBURGH. w/ Tara Rockacy of Churchview Farm. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. RESPITE RESOURCE FAIR. 6-8 p.m. UCP/CLASS, Swissvale. 412-749-2862. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 23 THE BIG BANG & THEN SOME: A LAYPERSON’S PERSPECTIVE. Tue, 7:30-9 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. JOURNALING TO HEAL W/ JANICE KOCHIK. Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. POLYNESIAN FIRE SHOW. Presented by Latshaw Productions. 11:30 a.m. Seven Springs. 724-836-8000.

WED 24 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LOCAL FOODS MONTH SAMPLING SESSION. Sample products & meet local suppliers. 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

AUDITIONS CAMP KILARUNNA.

Sept. 28. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org. FrameHouse, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. ILLUMINATIUON THE ART OF THE PUMPKIN. Seeking pumpkin carvers, painters, decorators for upcoming exhibit. Only non-Halloween themed pumpkins will be accepted. Submit application at www.themerrickartgallery.org Merrick Art Gallery, New Brighton. 724-846-1130. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

VOLUNTEER SATURDAYS

If you want to make Downtown a better place to be on Monday morning, join the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s Clean Street Team for Beautification Saturdays. Each week from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., participants help with various upkeep projects, such as weeding, trash clean-up, painting over graffiti, and landscaping. Individuals and groups welcome. Email rdethlefs@blockbyblock.com for information.

CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for The Nutcracker. Sept. 20. Dancers ages 5-adult. www. carnegieperformingartscenter.com Carnegie. 412-279-8887. MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for A Charlie Brown Christmas. Sept. 20 & 23. Men/women, cold readings. monriverarts@gmail.com Mon River Arts Studio. 412-405-8425. PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for the 2014-15 season. Sept. 20-22. Actors of all ages, ethnicities, & backgrounds are encouraged to audition, prepare 2 contrasting contemporary monologues. www.pghplaywrights.com/ auditions Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. SPLIT STAGE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Glengarry Glen Ross. Sept. 20. 1-2 min. monologue & cold readings. splitstage@gmail.com Newlonsburg Presbyterian Church. 724-327-0061. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for Neil Simon’s Lost in Yonkers. Sept. 21-22. Men ages 30–55, Women ages 30–75, Boys ages 13-15. 1-min monologue & be prepared to read from script. tfauditions@gmail.com. 412-374-9200.

SUBMISSIONS ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening

TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom.trustarts. org/2014/08/25/call-for-artistsbicycle-racks-in-the-cultural-district/ PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Fall new member screening, Oct. 19. Drop between 12:30-1:00pm. Applicants must submit 3 gallery-ready art pieces that are exclusively created by the applicant & made within the last 2 years. $20.00 application fee. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SIDEWALL. Seeking artists for a public mural exhibition in Bloomfield. Submit artist statement, proposal for mural, & 3-5 images of past work to sidewall.project@gmail.com from Sept. 1-Oct. 3. More information can be found at sidewallproject. wordpress.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 15. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to www.silvereye.org/f15apply/. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information. Thru Oct. 13.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m the bisexual everyone loves to hate because I want to be in a poly relationship with both a man and a woman. I am a woman who is into commitment, loyalty, love, trust and honesty. I am not looking to cheat on anyone. But I discovered after one failed marriage to a man and one long-term relationship with a woman that I want to be in a romantic, sexually committed relationship with a man and a woman at the same time. This could possibly involve three-way sex, but probably not. It is more about sharing my life intimately with both a man and a woman. Unfortunately, I don’t know if I will ever find that perfect balance because so far all my potential serious partners have been turned off by the idea that I want to be with two people and believed that I should “get over it” and just be in a monogamous relationship with them — straight or gay. Should I keep searching? LOVE THEM BOTH

You are not the bisexual everyone loves to hate, LTB. You’re the bisexual everyone is looking for. Tons of MF couples are out there desperately hunting for “unicorns,” a.k.a. bisexual women who are open to dating couples. Bisexual women open to three-way sex in the context of a committed poly triad are in particularly high demand. Anyone who reads my column knows this, LTB, and presumably you’re a reader. So either you have lousy retention skills or you’re pretending not to know how in demand you are because — consciously or subconsciously — complaining about evil monosexuals and boring monogamists is more appealing to you than actually finding what you want. You’ll have a better chance of finding what you want if you’re open about your wants and if you refrain from dating people who don’t want the same things. Seek out those couples looking for unicorns, seek out poly-identified singles and be up-front about your wants with anyone who seeks you out. Don’t date people who don’t want what you want and you’re likelier to wind up in relationships with people who want what you want — or, more likely, you’ll wind up in relationships with people whose wants are different but come close enough to yours that you can hammer out a workable compromise. Because there is no settling down without settling for, LTB, and that applies to bisexual and monosexuals, monogamists and polyamorists. Good luck.

Would you date you? I realize that’s harsh, GLC, but someone who can handle a truckload of meth in one night — to say nothing of five cocks — should be able to handle a little bluntness. If you wouldn’t date someone in the condition you’re currently in, GLC, then it’s highly unlikely that anyone else would. No one is perfect, of course, and no one who wants to be partnered seeks perfection. But you do need to have your shit together to attract someone who has their shit together. Your goal should be to make yourself datable in two years’ time. Focus on school, look for work, save your money and stay the fuck away from meth and the men who use it. Turn yourself into someone you’d be open to dating — not a perfect person, but a person in good working order — and then you’ll be datable. Is it weird to find cochlear implants (a device for people with profound hearing loss that looks like a plastic circle implanted in their skull) attractive on twentysomething guys? I don’t know if it’s because I work in a field related to audiology or because it makes them look kind of vulnerable but cool at the same time. I saw two guys in a row this week with them, and I was like, “Damn. Is this weird?” If not, how do I pick these boys up?

“TURN YOURSELF INTO SOMEONE YOU’D BE OPEN TO DATING”

I’m a 31-year-old white gay man. I’ve never been in a relationship. I’ve had some extremely shady events in my sexual history, including but not limited to meth use, group sex, using my body to get drugs from disgusting older men, etc. Now I live with my parents, go to school part-time and have no money because I don’t work. Am I datable? I fear if I don’t start to try dating for real that I’ll continue to repeat my previous shady behaviors. Which I did last night, wherein I sucked five cocks and smoked a truckload of meth, although it was the first time I smoked in a year. GAY LOST CAUSE

LOVE IMPLANT BOYS

It is weird, LIB, but that shouldn’t stop you. And you pick those boys up the same way you pick up boys who don’t have cochlear implants: You smile at them, you talk to them, you flirt with them. If you establish that the attraction is mutual, you hang out, you make out, you fuck ’em silly. You don’t necessarily have to disclose that their cochlear implants were what initially drew your eye, LIB, but be sure to tell them that that isn’t the only thing you find attractive about them if you do disclose. I’m writing about the premature-ejaculation guy in last week’s column who wanted tricks for guys who are uncut and too sensitive. I’m uncut and the head of my cock was really sensitive, but my problem wasn’t premature ejaculation. As a young man, the head of my penis was so sensitive that sexual contact with anything other than my own hand was unpleasant. I decided to desensitize my dick. I started by keeping my foreskin retracted in the shower. At first, even water running over it was extremely uncomfortable. Then once that made enough progress, I started keeping my foreskin retracted inside my underwear for as long as I could stand it each day. Eventually things improved to the point that sexual contact with someone else was no longer the challenge it had been. This was a gradual process. But I got to do it at my own pace and stopped once the sensitivity level was working for me.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

HAPPY TO HAVE A HOODIE

Thanks for sharing, HTHAH. This week on the Lovecast, the perils of vibrator addiction: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.17-09.24

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I rarely waste my time trying to convert the “skeptics” who attack astrology with a hostile zeal that belies their supposed scientific objectivity. They’re often as dogmatic and closed-minded as any fundamentalist religious nut. When I’m in a tricky mood, though, I might tell them about “Crawford Perspectives,” a highly rated Wall Street investment publication that relies extensively on astrological analysis. Or I might quote the wealthy financier J. P. Morgan, who testified that “Millionaires don’t use astrology; billionaires do.” That brings us to my main point, Virgo: The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to put in motion plans to get richer quicker. Take advantage!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When Libra-born Mohandas Gandhi was 19, he moved to London from his native India to study law. Soon he got caught up in the effort to become an English gentleman. He took elocution lessons and learned to dance. He bought fine clothes and a gold watch-chain. Each morning he stood before a giant mirror and fussed with his hair and necktie until they were perfect. In retrospect, this phase of his life seems irrelevant. Years later he was a barefoot rebel leader using nonviolent civil disobedience to help end the British rule of India, often wearing a loincloth and shawl made of fabric he wove himself. With this as your inspiration, Libra, identify aspects of your current life that contribute little to the soul you must eventually become.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This might be controversial, but I suspect that for now your emphasis shouldn’t be on sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll. Instead, your specialties should be hard-earned intimacy, altered states that

are solely the result of deep introspection, and music that arouses reverence and other sacred emotions. You are entering a phase when crafty power is less important than vigorous receptivity; when success is not nearly as interesting as meaningfulness; when what you already understand is less valuable than what you can imagine and create.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You are entering a phase when you will reap rich rewards by nurturing the health of your favorite posse, ensemble or organization. How is the group’s collective mental health? Are there any festering rifts? Any apathetic attitudes or weakening resolves? I choose you to be the leader who builds solidarity and cultivates consensus. I ask you to think creatively about how to make sure everyone’s individual goals synergize with the greater good. Are you familiar with the Arabic word taarradhin? It means a compromise that allows everyone to win — a reconciliation in which no one loses face.

get your yoga on!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

The good news is that America has more trees than it did a hundred years ago. Aggressive efforts to replace the decimated old-growth forests have paid off. The bad news is that the new forests have a far less diverse selection of tree species than the originals. The fresh batches are often crowded into smaller spaces, so wildfires are more massive and devastating. And because so many of the forests are young, they host a reduced diversity of plant and animal life. All in all, the increased quantity is wonderful; the lower quality not so wonderful. Is there a lesson here for you? I think so. In your upcoming decisions, favor established quality over novel quantity.

The old Latin motto Gradu diverso, via una can be translated as either “Continuing on the same road, but with a different stride” or “Going the same way, but changing your pace.” I think this is excellent advice for you, Taurus. By my reckoning, you are on the correct path. You are headed in the right direction. But you need to shift your approach a bit — not a lot, just a little. You’ve got to make some minor adjustments in the way you flow.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If Pope Francis isn’t traveling, he comes out to meet the public in St. Peter’s Square every Wednesday. During one such event last January, he took a few moments to bestow tender attention on a talking parrot that belonged to a male stripper. I foresee a comparable anomaly happening for you in the coming days. A part of you that is wild or outré will be blessed by contact with what’s holy or sublime. Or maybe a beastly aspect of your nature that doesn’t normally get much respect will receive a divine favor.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “My definition of a devil is a god who has not been recognized,” said mythologist Joseph Campbell. “It is a power in you to which you have not given expression, and you push it back. And then, like all repressed energy, it builds up and becomes dangerous to the position you’re trying to hold.” Do you agree, Pisces? I hope so, because you will soon be entering the Get Better Acquainted with Your Devil Phase of your astrological cycle, to be immediately followed by the Transform Your Devil into a God Phase. To get the party started, ask yourself this question: What is the power in you to which you have not given expression?

ARIES (March 21-April 19): These horoscopes I write for you aren’t primarily meant to predict the future. They are more about uncovering hidden potentials and desirable possibilities that are stirring below the surface right now. When I’m doing my job well, I help you identify those seeds so you can cultivate them proactively. Bearing that in mind, I’ll pose three pertinent questions. (1) What experiments might stir up more intimacy in the relationships you want to deepen? (2) What could you change about yourself to attract more of the love and care you want? (3) Is there anything you can do to diminish the sting of bad memories about past romantic encounters, thereby freeing you to love with more abandon?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For years, Donna and George Lewis used a 33-pound, oval-shaped rock as a doorstop in their Tennessee home. Later they moved it to their garden. Then one day George analyzed it with his metal detector and realized it had unusual properties. He took it to scientists who informed him it was a rare and valuable four-and-a-halfbillion-year-old meteorite. With this as our subtext, Gemini, I’m asking you if there might be some aspect of your life that is more precious than you imagine. Now is a favorable time to find out, and make appropriate adjustments in your behavior.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve got a radical proposal, Cancerian. It might offend you. You may think I’m so far off the mark that you will stop reading my horoscopes. But I’m willing to take that risk, and I’m prepared to admit that I could be wrong. But I don’t think I am wrong. So here’s what I have to say: There is a sense in which the source of your wound is potentially also the source of the “medicine” that will heal the wound. What hurt you could fix you. But you must be careful not to interpret this masochistically. You can’t afford to be too literal. I’m not saying that the source of your pain is trustworthy or has good intentions. Be cagey as you learn how to get the cure you need.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The prestigious New England Journal of Medicine published a study with a conclusion we might expect to see in a tabloid newspaper or satirical website. It reported that there is a correlation between chocolate consumption and Nobel Prizes. Those countries whose citizens eat more chocolate have also produced an inordinate number of Nobel laureates. So does this mean that chocolate makes you smarter, as some other studies have also suggested? Maybe, the report concluded. Since it is especially important for you to be at the height of your mental powers in the coming weeks, Leo, why not experiment with this possibility? Name something you could change about yourself that would enhance your love life. Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

HELP WANTED

WORK

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Your ad could be here

IS NOW HIRING! We are local small business looking for enthusiastic, Hard working candidates to join our team of cleaning professionals to keep up with our increasing demand. The candidate will need to be able to Work as a team as well as individual and Adopt our company credo of customer centric values: “We aim to please by any means” Compensation to be based on experience. Drivers license required.

Please call Johnnie Bryant, owner at 412-538-7850 for more information

NOW HIRING

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

NOW HIRING

PAGE LIVE

HELP WANTED

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

PAGE WORK

HELP WANTED $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

85 412.316.3342

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

Seeking competitive individuals with leadership qualities. Management opportunities available. Full training provided, no exp. nec. 412-458-0058

• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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R A D I O PROMOTIONS I N T E R N S N E E D E D IMMEDIATELY

PAGE SERVICES

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INTERNS NEEDED(Fall Semester) for busy promotions department at Steel City Media (WRRK/WLTJ). Internship is non paid and must be taken for college credit. DUTIES INCLUDE: On site at events and concerts, office work, on-air writing, video hosting/ editing and more.

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INTERESTED? Send a resume to: andrewb@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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SERVICES

CLASSES

ADOPTION

AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads. TV. Film. Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CLASSES

ADOPTION

Look! Attention Sports Fans: Call for your FREE Pick today from our expert handicappers. No Strings Attached! 21+ Call: 888-513-5639 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

GENERAL FOR SALE

AUTO SERVICES

CLASSES

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

*Stuff We Like

At-Home-Mom, Financially Secure Family, LOVE, Laughter, Art, Music awaits 1st baby.

Expenses Paid 1-800-844-1670 Elisabeth

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Pittsburgh Fashion Week

Now in its fifth year, this annual series of fashion-focused events gives attendees a taste of Pittsburgh’s retail scene. Sept. 22-28. www.pittsburghfashionweek.com

412-403-6069

PGH / Digs Local illustrator Mundania Horvath does custom house portraits, illustrated in clean lines and vivid colors. Perfect for your own home-sweet-home, or as a unique house-warming gift. www.pghdigs.com

LIVE FOR SALE 20 Acres/West Texas. $15,900 $0 Down ONLY $119/mo. No Qualifying-Owner Financing. Money Back Guarantee. Beautiful Mountain View 877-284-2072 www. texaslandbuys.com (AAN CAN)

STUDIES STORAGE

Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available

3 Locations Shadyside • Oakland • Strip District

412-208-4625 GuardianStorage.com

ROOMMATES

STORAGE

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE

52

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN COLOMBO}

STUDIES

BIRTH CONTROL CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

412.363.1900 CTRS

CALL TODAY!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.17/09.24.2014

Grand Groove Radio 91.3 WYEP-FM’s new Friday-evening show, running from 6-8 p.m., features funk, R&B and mostly golden-age hip hop. A groove that’s well curated in the expert hands of DJ Selecta.

Tomato Risotto at Emporio This creamy rice dish is reason enough to stop by. Get it as a side, or with your choice of meatballs (including vegetarian) served on top. 942 Penn Ave., Downtown.

STUDIES Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

STUDIES NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Construction Fence on Forbes Avenue near Market Square. Multi-tasked as a place to display photos of the Pittsburgh region by Joey Kennedy, Jake Reinhart, Barbara G. Walker, Kaoru Tohara and Nick Childers.

Brewery Yoga Your downward dog could use a cold beer. Monday nights at Hough’s Copper Kettle, in Greenfield, enjoy an hourlong yoga class before flowing into a refreshing malted beverage. Register at www.copperkettlepgh.com.


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs

Grandng Openi

MASSAGE

WELLNESS MASSAGE

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm 1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2 McKees Rocks

412-777-7171

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat. N E W S

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BOOK VALUE

Braddock Avenue Books upholds literary tradition in 21st century {BY ABBY MENDELSON} “IT’S NOT A GOOD TIME for books that are well written,” Robert Peluso muses over coffee at Squirrel Hill’s 61C. “Books that are composed instead of just packaged.” “Imperiled,” his publishing partner, Jeffrey Condran, suggests. “These books are imperiled.” “Imperiled,” Peluso nods. “Imperiled is a better word.” “That’s why it’s all the more important that we made this gesture,” Condran adds. This gesture is their two-year-old publishing venture, Braddock Avenue Books, which was born from the idea that the world needs more literary fiction. That may sound counterintuitive in an era of ubiquitous social media and severely limited attention spans, but Condran and Peluso, both of whom teach writing at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, took space in Braddock’s UnSmoke Systems arts colony and put out a call for submissions. Braddock Avenue now publishes three books a year.

themes and ready markets. “Our readers are out there,” Peluso says. “They’re looking for authenticity and honesty, literature that speaks to these times.” These times also demand contemporary marketing. Although tweets and blogs have decimated discretionary reading time, Braddock Avenue Books is relying on those platforms to market itself. Using social media to publicize, recruit and review new work, Peluso and Condran have linked themselves to far-flung outposts of the literary landscape. As word spreads, serious readers — literally from all over the world — find Braddock Avenue Books, chat, read, recommend. Now, as Braddock Avenue Books’ Facebook numbers approach 1,000, Peluso and Condran are beginning to revel in their virtual salon. “We are developing a group of serious, committed readers,” Peluso says. “People who talk and share. People who are involved in the writing life.” “We’re profoundly grateful that we’ve had such a great early

“WE ARE DEVELOPING A GROUP OF SERIOUS, COMMITTED READERS. PEOPLE WHO ARE INVOLVED IN THE WRITING LIFE.” “Our books present thoughtful, considered ideas of the world,” Peluso says. “If there’s one thing that distinguishes a Braddock Avenue book, it’s an authentic vision of what it’s like to be alive in the 21st century.” “We want serious books that investigate who we are,” Condran says. So far, those books include: >> Aubrey Hirsch’s Why We Never Talk About Sugar, 16 searing short stories of heartache, loss and longing >> Catherine Gammon’s harrowing Sorrow, a near-hallucinatory novel of family connection, sexual abuse and redemption >> Salvatore Pane’s Last Call in the City of Bridges, a funny, post-college coming-of-age tale of a man escaping a dead-end job, the bottle and his fetid daydreams Hailed by such A-list, Pittsburgh-based writers as Toi Derricotte and Stewart O’Nan, a number of these initial Braddock Avenue offerings have been short-listed for national writing awards. Even so, publishing “remains an enormous challenge,” Peluso says. “Not only finding the right books, but then distributing them.” “Even more important,” Condran adds, “is finding friendly readers.” Lately, though, the world seems ready to arrive at their door. Braddock Avenue now receives many more high-quality manuscripts than it can publish. Condran and Peulso say the outpouring of support from the literary world reminds them of the 1920s and ’50s, when the number of American literary publishing houses skyrocketed. From New Directions to City Lights to Grove and more, writers, editors, publishers and readers were ready — eager — for literature that pushed boundaries past safe

response,” Condran says. “People may come to visit, but they end up being part of the community. They develop a kind of literary citizenship — even if they never buy a book.” People do buy, of course. Locally, Braddock Avenue’s books are available at East End Book Exchange, Caliban Book Shop and Penguin Bookshop in Sewickley. (The books are also available online at Amazon, Barnes & Noble’s website and www.braddockavenuebooks.com.) Most books in the Braddock Avenue catalog sell between 500 and 1,000 copies. That’s a flyspeck for such giants as Random House and Macmillan, but quite respectable for a fledgling literary press. And Braddock Avenue plans to do what any successful business does — introduce another product line. Over sandwiches one night, Peluso and Condran decided to launch a new imprint, Alleyway Books, coming this November. “We chose the name because of the evocative nature of alleys — the way they’re filled with unexpected encounters and discoveries,” Peluso says. “Edgy and mysterious. Perhaps including the supernatural. We envision the imprint to favor new and younger authors. Nevertheless, we’ll continue to pursue our core mission: books that seriously engage readers about contemporary life.” With a launch party set for the Wigle Distillery on Nov. 3, the pair hope their many friends will come to celebrate — either in person or online. Still, despite all the parties and planning, the heart of publishing is finding authors whom Peluso and Condran admire, and who they want to share with the world. “To discover writers,” Peluso says, “then publish their words in book form — their ideas, their vision. More than anything, that’s incredibly rewarding.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 17, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 38

September 17, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 38