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CHIEF JUSTICE? NEW POLICE BUREAU HEAD INHERITS CONTENTIOUS RELATIONSHIPS 06


EVENTS 9.26 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP Warhol theater Tickets $10

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

10.10 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 THE UNKNOWN Warhol theater Tickets $10

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Chuck Connelly: My America

Support for the Pittsburgh Biennial has been provided by The Fine Foundation; Hillman Family Foundations; the James L. Baker Memorial Fund, the Hollen Bolmgren Fund, and the W. Alfred Turner Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation; Richard King Mellon Foundation; Highmark; and an anonymous donor.

Marking his ďŹ rst solo museum show.

Chuck Connelly, Bran-Flakes (detail), 2009, Courtesy of the artist

Also on view:

+LS[HPZ[OLVŃ?JPHSHPYSPULZWVUZVYMVY4VZ[>HU[LK4LU!(UK`>HYOVSHUK[OL >VYSKÂťZ-HPY This exhibition was developed collaboratively by the Queens Museum and The Andy Warhol Museum. 13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair is made possible by a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern DANIELLE FOX

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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[FALL ARTS PREVIEW] you spend the summer ignoring 29 Did the city’s cultural offerings? Our fall arts preview gives you the chance to turn over a new leaf.

[NEWS] most certainly must restore the trust 06 “He with the community.”— Mayor Bill Peduto on the duties of new Pittsburgh Police Chief Cam McLay

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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“It’s hard to read this complaint and not be reminded of the old Monty Python routine in which a medieval peasant goads King Arthur into giving him a shove.” — Chris Potter on a lawsuit filed against the city by anti-abortion protesters

[TASTE] not easy to maintain a straight face 17 “It’s when you’re making a Harvey Wallbanger.” — Hal B. Klein on upcoming competitions at Pittsburgh Cocktail Week

[MUSIC] a pretty steep learning curve.” 26 “It’s — Bobby Zappala, of the Thrival Festival, on learning from last year’s inaugural event

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are riffs on cannibalizing Olympians, 66 “There Alanis Morisette’s Jagged Little Pill and Rome’s infamous roadways.” — Al Hoff on the new comedy The Trip to Italy

[ARTS] made me realize how universal the 68 “Itexperience is of being isolated, of feeling out of control.” — Junkette author Sarah Shotland on writing about addiction

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 74 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 81 STUFF WE LIKE 82 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 83 N E W S

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“HE MOST CERTAINLY MUST RESTORE THE TRUST WITH THE COMMUNITY.”

INCOMING City says officer involved in Pride arrest did not use excessive force (Sept. 5, online only) “I’d love to see what it takes to be excessive force. These cops are out of control.” — Web comment from “Robert Eisenberg”

Rank Deception?: Let’s get over city-ranking surveys already (Sept. 3) “I rank the bus lane from Downtown to Oakland 100 percent ideal. Enough bumps to keep you awake on your way to class/work.” — Web comment from “Pittstudent”

JAN. 12, 2010 Jordan Miles is beaten during an altercation with three Pittsburgh police officers.

NOV. 11, 2012 Leon Ford is paralyzed after being shot by a Pittsburgh police officer during a traffic stop.

“We have such a complex. Why? Every celebrity interviewed by the local news: ‘What do you think of Pittsburgh? Are we cool? Do you like us?’” — Web comment from “Sloov Sloover”

MARCH 22, 2013 Police Chief Nate Harper is indicted and later convicted of theft in office.

JUNE 15, 2014 Ariel Lawther is struck several times by an officer during Pittsburgh Pride festivities.

Budapest’s East Gipsy band is augmented by Rolling Stones’ sax player (Aug. 27) “Bravo — wonderful soul filling music by exquisite musicians. How fortunate to have this experience here in Pittsburgh in a small venue.” — Web comment from “Nettie Glickman”

“Wait, wait, wait ... When did this happen?!?” — Sept. 7 tweet from Cleveland Browns punter Lanning Spencer (@lanningspencer), showing a photo of Steelers receiver Antonio Brown kicking him in the head during a punt return following the teams’ season-opener

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CHIEF PRIORITIES W

HEN CAMERON MCLAY assumes his position as Pittsburgh’s next police chief on Sept. 15, he will take the reins of an institution that academics, activists and police-accountability experts roundly agree has lost the city’s trust. He’ll inherit a bureau whose most recent permanent chief is serving time in federal prison for diverting public money into his own pockets, and a bureau that refused to implement crime-reduction strategies that had been shown to be effective in other cities. The apprehension felt by the Pittsburgh community is not unlike that described by citizens of Ferguson, Mo.,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

where Attorney General Eric Holder recently told St. Louis Public Radio that he heard directly from residents “about the deep mistrust that has taken hold. ...

Will Pittsburgh’s new police chief be able to restore trust in the department? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN AND JEFFREY BENZING} People consistently expressed concerns stemming from specific alleged incidents, from general policing practices and from the lack of diversity on Ferguson’s police force.”

In Pittsburgh, the force has gotten less diverse in recent years, but some activists say the biggest contributor to community mistrust might be that the police almost never give specifics about how officers are disciplined when mistakes are made — or explain publicly why their conduct was justified. “If you have 900 of any employee, you’re going to have a few that screw up royally,” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. “The key is to disclose fair and regular discipline. That minimizes the misconduct.” Mayor Bill Peduto acknowledged some of this mistrust at a Sept. 2 press CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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CHIEF PRIORITIES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

conference announcing McLay — a former Madison, Wis. Police captain with 35 years of law-enforcement experience — as his pick after a months-long search process. “He most certainly must restore the trust with the community. He must rebuild the morale with the rank-and-file,” Peduto said. “He’s somebody who gets out into the neighborhoods. [He] goes to the meetings, is seen and is a part of it and then puts together a bottom-up approach to policing where people actually then feel they are a part of the solution.” And while many experts and community activists are optimistic McLay can help rebuild the public’s trust in the bureau, it’s unclear to what extent he’ll be able to address one of their primary concerns: That in the most high-profile cases of potential misconduct, the public is often left in the dark when it comes to police discipline. “If you look at Leon Ford’s case, we can use that as a prime example,” says Brandi Fisher, president of the Alliance for Police Accountability. She was referring to a minor traffic stop that ended with 19-year-old Ford being shot and paralyzed by police after officers doubted his identity and suspected he had a gun. (No gun was found). “They violated so many policies and procedures and what has happened for that?” As this story went to press, a criminal trial against Ford was underway on charges of aggravated assault and reckless endangerment. University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris, who participated in the candidate-screening committee and has high hopes for McLay, acknowledges the police have sometimes failed to make a persuasive case that they’re appropriately reviewing officer behavior. Perhaps the most high-profile incident Harris points to is the January 2010 case of Jordan Miles — a Homewood teenager beaten by police who thought he was acting suspiciously. (Miles ran from police when they approached him; whether the officers properly identified themselves is disputed.) “We had a long federal investigation and at the end of it the U.S. Attorney announced there wasn’t enough evidence to prosecute the officers criminally,” Harris says. “[But] instead of saying ‘we look forward to investigating’” to see whether bureau policy was violated, then-chief Nate Harper “reinstated [the officers] the next day and put the onus on

Jordan Miles.” “That kind of ham-handed, one-sided, insensitive sort of approach really left a scar on the community.” In that vein, PublicSource and City Paper are launching a collaborative effort to track cases of controversial police behavior. Though there are numerous allegations of misconduct, the project currently focuses on 10 that have captured public attention since the Miles incident. The interactive timeline (which can be found at www.pghcitypaper.com) includes descriptions and multimedia connected to each case. It offers a snapshot of the major cases of potential misconduct since 2010 — and will be updated as new cases arise to track how McLay handles the types of incidents that have hurt the bureau’s standing in the past. But while McLay might be able to bring years of organizational leadership experience, a community-focused policing philosophy and credibility as a former cop, the police-union contract might keep him from the kind of full disclosure some activists want. According to the contract, “there shall be no public statements about [an internal] investigation,” until it is completed. And “unless agreed to by the officer, the City shall not divulge the reasons for any disciplinary action,” unless it is appealed beyond the arbitration process, one of the final levels of appeal in the disciplinary process. “Since it’s a personnel matter, there are a lot of protections for the individual that’s accused,” says Beth Pittinger, executive director of the Citizen Police Review Board. “It protects and preserves the secrecy that has contributed to the tension that exists between the police and community.” Pittinger hopes that provision is changed to allow for more disclosure as the contract is negotiated in the coming months. But she says that there is an element of “political will” a chief can use to change the way a department handles discipline to make it fairer and more transparent — and even beneficial for officers if a respected chief makes a compelling case that their conduct is justified. For his part, police-union president Howard McQuillan says that provision of the contract is unlikely to change, but he’s open to more disclosure, especially in high-profile cases. In cases that grab the public’s attention, “I would hope that the chief would say, ‘This is what happened and at the

“THE KEY IS TO DISCLOSE FAIR AND REGULAR DISCIPLINE. THAT MINIMIZES THE MISCONDUCT.”

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end of the day we’ll let you know what’s happening,’” McQuillan says. Still, “for any and all discipline to be released, I don’t think that’s fair either.” “The perception out there right now is that we’re running amok and we’re doing whatever we want to do […] 99.9 percent of the time the officer did his job and that officer would probably want that information out there.” In 2013, 52 disciplinary actions were initiated against officers, according to the department’s annual report. Of those, 23 were dismissed or withdrawn, and 14 resulted in an oral reprimand. Six ended in a written reprimand, seven resulted in a suspension and one in a five-day suspension pending termination. One case was pending, according to the report. And while the police contract might create some limits on a new chief’s power, there is reason to think McLay could significantly change how the bureau operates, according to David Kennedy, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, in New York. A single effective chief can lead to sweeping reform, Kennedy says, though dysfunctional leaders “can have a bigger impact than we wish they could have.” Kennedy’s had that experience firsthand with the Pittsburgh Initiative to Reduce Crime, an effort to reduce homicide rates by directly engaging with gangs and other groups likely to be involved in violence.

Kennedy says the bureau refused to implement the program despite its success elsewhere. “My very strong feeling was they were not in fact opposed to the operation or the strategy, they were opposed to have anybody on the outside [saying], ‘This is what you should do.’” In a Sept. 6 interview published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, McLay said he might be open to fully implementing PIRC, which was hurt by a lack of cooperation from police. The bright side, says Kennedy, is that McLay has the right background to tackle some of the bureau’s most pressing problems. “The single most important thing in all of this is that the department knows that there are standards — and if those standards are violated, there will be consequences.” “I’m really very impressed with him,” Kennedy says. “I don’t think the city could do much better than this.”

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PA. GOVERNOR’S RACE

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WITH ELECTION DAY less than eight weeks away, Republican governor Tom Corbett has been ramping up his attack ads on challenger Tom Wolf in an effort to cut into the Democrat’s double-digit lead. Corbett has been hitting the York County businessman with allegations that Wolf’s cabinet-making company takes advantage of tax loopholes, as well as claims that he backs President Obama’s position on issues like gun control and environmental regulations on the coal industry. Wolf’s campaign has denounced the accusations; spokesman Jeffrey Sheridan calls the negative tack an act of “desperation” that relies on “discredited lies.” “Tom Wolf is a successful businessman from York County who supports the Second Amendment,” Sheridan counters. “Tom knows that coal is a vital part of Pennsylvania’s energy portfolio.” But in any case, the ads seem to have made little dent in the polls. A recent Franklin & Marshall College poll has Corbett trailing Wolf 49 percent to 24 percent, while a Robert Morris University poll last week had Corbett down 55.5 percent to 24.7 percent. Another poll from the conservative Harper Polling showed Corbett trailing Wolf by 11 points, 52 percent to 41 percent. “I don’t think it’s a bad strategy for Corbett to tie Wolf to Obama, who is very unpopular,” says professor Phillip Harold, the RMU pollster. “But I’m not sure how effective it can be because the polling data tells us that this race is not about national issues: It’s a referendum on the incumbent. … What we heard were our poll respondents volunteering information about what they didn’t like about Tom Corbett.” Pollster G. Terry Madonna, who directs Franklin & Marshall’s polling efforts, says Corbett seems to still be hunting around for a “game-changer.” “If Corbett were able to come back and win, it would be historic,” says Madonna. “[N]o candidate down 20 points in June has ever come back and won. … One advantage Tom Corbett has is money and he is the incumbent. But … if something is going to happen for him, he needs it to happen soon.” So far, however, Corbett has attacked Wolf on issues where his own record has been subject to criticism. In early August,

Corbett criticized the Democrat for not releasing an audit about “how women were treated at Wolf’s company.” The charge echoed claims made in the Democratic primary, when an ally of a Wolf rival, Philadelphia congresswoman Allyson Schwartz, questioned how many top managers in Wolf’s company were women. However, Corbett’s own track record on women’s issues has been rocky. While defending a proposed bill requiring that women get a mandatory ultrasound before an abortion, Corbett said “I’m not making anybody watch … you just have to close your eyes.” Last week, meanwhile, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported that during the time Corbett served as state Attorney General, a female employee complained to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission about discrimination and an office culture in which senior officials shared “racy pictures and [made] derogatory comments against women.” In another ad, Corbett accuses Wolf’s company of taking advantage of the so-called “Delaware loophole.” The loophole allows a company to avoid Pennsylvania’s higher taxes by incorporating in Delaware, where rates are lower. Wolf’s campaign has repeatedly indicated that, while the firm was incorporated in Delaware after Wolf sold it in 2006, it pays Pennsylvania taxes. Wolf has vowed to close the loophole, and as yet, Corbett’s campaign has yet to prove that the company — which Wolf reacquired in 2009 — has taken advantage of the tax disparity. “You can’t just make the charge,” says Madonna. “You have to provide some evidence and that’s where they’ve fallen short” Liberal critics note that Corbett hasn’t exactly been zealous about curtailing corporate tax avoidance. While Corbett signed off on a law to close the loophole in 2015, it included a sales-tax exemption for aircraft parts and maintenance, as well as other corporate tax breaks. Sharon Ward, director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, calls the 2011 law “a fig leaf.” “It makes me chuckle,” she says. “For most of his administration, Tom Corbett has denied there was such a thing [as the loophole]. Now he’s trying to use it in his ads against Wolf.”

“IF SOMETHING IS GOING TO HAPPEN, HE NEEDS IT TO HAPPEN SOON.”

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

ZONE DEFENSE

Supreme Court gives abortion opponents something to complain about {BY CHRIS POTTER} JESUS WAS crucified. Horses tore Saint

Hippolytus limb from limb. Saint Lawrence was cooked up on a griddle. By comparison, American Christians have it pretty easy. Though it’s hard to tell from listening to them. In a federal lawsuit filed last week, five Pittsburgh-area anti-abortion activists have alleged that the city’s “buffer zones” — which prohibit anti-abortion protests within 15 feet of an abortion-clinic entrance — are unconstitutional. Unless a federal court suspends the law immediately, the suit says, protesters’ rights “will be squelched, causing irreparable harm to their freedom of speech.” The lawsuit, which has backing from the conservative Christian Alliance Defending Freedom, begs the courts to “preserve the status quo of robust freedom of speech in Pittsburgh.” Actually, the buffer zone is the “status quo”: It’s been on the books since 2005. What might have changed is the U.S. Supreme Court’s attitude toward it. In June, the court’s decision in McCullen vs. Coakley overturned a Massachusetts law that established buffer zones across the state. That ruling, the new complaint argues, “eliminates any plausible legal justification” for Pittsburgh’s law. The lawsuit comes as little surprise: Within hours after the McCullen ruling, local abortion-rights advocates were fretting about what it could mean for Pittsburgh. The answer is not clear. “There are a number of ways in which the Massachusetts law was broader” than Pittsburgh’s, Sue Frietsche, of the Women’s Law Project, told me at the time. For one thing, Pittsburgh’s buffer zone is much smaller: 15 feet compared to Massachusetts’ 35 feet. Not good enough, argue the plaintiffs, who the complaint says “desire to engage in peaceful sidewalk counseling … but fear prosecution.” The zones “make Plaintiff’s communication of their message … less effective.” Sure, it’s the zones’ fault. Or maybe not. The complaint asserts that at least one plaintiff “often escort[s] women to nearby Catholic Charities,” to learn about abortion alternatives — apparently despite the zone’s interference. And while at least one of the plaintiffs claims to have been “witnessing and praying outside of Planned Parenthood since 2009,” in all that time the lawsuit alleges exactly two instances in which that ministry was interrupted. In one, a

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clinic guard told an anti-abortion protester to stop speaking with a client inside the zone. In the other, clinic escorts (who were themselves outside the buffer zone) exercised their First Amendment rights by interrupting a protester and leading a young woman, willingly, inside. Even for a First Amendment supporter, it’s hard to read this complaint and not be reminded of the old Monty Python routine in which a medieval peasant goads King Arthur into giving him a shove — and then protests, “Come see the violence inherent in the system! Help, help, I’m being repressed!” And according to the complaint, one plaintiff dates her activism no earlier than July 2014 … just days after the McCullen ruling made the lawsuit possible. Claiming irreparable harm to your civil rights is, obviously, a necessary part of any federal lawsuit. It’s also consistent with the worldview of Christian conservatives. As public opinion shifts on social issues like gay marriage, Christians fret about religious persecution. It’s not that anyone is forcing them to abandon their morality — no one’s forcing them to marry into same-sex households, after all. What they are losing, though, is the ability to dictate their morality to everyone else. That’s why Hobby Lobby became a conservative cause célèbre in the fight against Obamacare: Its Christian owners successfully challenged a provision requiring employee health-insurance policies to cover contraception. Yet, even as anti-abortion activists wail about being denied access to the clinic door, they’ve been intruding in the offices behind it. In 2011, Harrisburg Republicans passed a law requiring Pennsylvania abortion-providers to be reclassified as “ambulatory surgical facilities.” That redesignation — which was opposed by medical organizations but backed by anti-abortion groups — required women’s health clinics to undergo costly renovations, including the installation of larger elevators. Planned Parenthood has estimated the cost of renovating its Downtown clinic at more than $300,000. Now, after being compelled to spend thousands of dollars on needless renovations, they may have to allow anti-abortion protesters on their doorstep. If that happens, let’s just hope the protesters stop whining about their own martyrdom.

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PARIS 66 HAS APPLIED ITS EXPERTISE WITH LIGHT LUNCH TO SERIOUS DINNER

ALL-AGES GROCERY {BY AL HOFF} Not so long ago, most city neighborhoods had small grocery stores, where residents could pop in for various staples like milk, bread or an urgently needed can of tomato sauce. In the otherwise grocery-deprived Polish Hill, such a shop, Alfred’s Deli and Market, has been recently renovated. Owned by Anna Misiaszek, the shop is now being run by a new generation, including Misiaszek’s daughter, Natalie. Leia Nachele, who also helps manage the shop, explains that Alfred’s is trying to bridge the neighborhood’s demographic gap, serving both longtime residents and the influx of younger folks with different tastes and needs. Thus Velveeta dressing sits alongside soy milk, and the freezer is shared by Amy’s veggie meals and bags of homemade pierogies (in nine classic varieties). There’s a small selection of produce (including veggies supplied by neighborhood gardeners), Breadworks bread, bulk granola and gluten-free baked goods supplied by Gluuteny, in Squirrel Hill. If your needs run toward celery salad or fried white cabbage, Alfred’s has jars of such specialties, imported from Poland. And if opening a jar of “Hunter’s Stew” is too much work, stop by the deli counter for a made-to-order sandwich. The deli also stocks Polish-style meats including ham and kielbasa. Bottles of agave aside, Alfred’s still has plenty of old-school charm, with Polish falcons and vintage neighborhood photographs gracing the walls, and a big pile of packages in the corner awaiting pickup for a voyage to Poland. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

10 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Tue.-Sun. 3041 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-682-3100

the

FEED

Chile peppers ers from Hatch, New Mexico, ico, are famed for their flavor. or. And they’re making a Pittsburgh sburgh stop to get roasted sted this weekend at Reyna Foods’ ods’ third annual Pepper Farm m Festival. Tastings, cooking demos, farmers-andmos, farmers-and artisans market, bands, activities ds, kids’ act and more. Advance nce tickets $7 at www.reynafoods.com ($10 at gate); kids under 12 free. Sat., Sept. 13, and Sun., Sept. 14. White Oak Farm, 3314 Wagner Road, Allison Park

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Frog legs

PERFECTLY FRENCH {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

“W

E’LL ALWAYS have Paris,” the famous movie line goes, but it used to be that we couldn’t always have Paris 66. The East Liberty creperie was open only for brunch and weekday lunch. Even so, and even with a correspondingly light, simple menu of crepes (made with wheat flour), galettes (made with buckwheat) and salads, Paris 66 quickly rose above most workaday lunch spots to become a destination for birthday treats and entertaining out-of-town guests. t Well, vive la revolution! Paris 66 now serves serv dinner, and it’s not just the lunch menu men with marked-up prices. It’s real artof-French-cooking cuisine, plus wine and of a quite respectable cocktail program. Only the charming space and service — provided by native French speakers who, gently and matter-of-factly, treat you as if you are one, too — remain happily the same. What is it about French cooking that

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

makes standard fare such as steak frites, trout meunière, escargot and onion soup so timeless, yet always so enticing? We won’t resolve that in this column, but let’s say that it is mostly about attention to detail. Such

PARIS 66 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: $8-29 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED classic recipes were refined with deep intention by generations of committed chefs, while each individual cook must focus on the quality of ingredients, precise proportions and perfect technique. Paris 66 excels in all of these respects. Start with salade Niçoise, that satisfying

meal-in-one of tuna, greens, green beans, potatoes and more. These are a lot of assertive components that must all be made to get along, and in a context that’s fresh and summery, not slow-simmered and wintry like a stew. At Paris 66, every ingredient in the salad was perfectly cooked, and also sized just right, so that thin potato slices didn’t require big forkfuls of greens to balance. The dressing — a simple blend of oil, vinegar, mustard and coriander — was delicate without timidity. Corn struck us as a weirdly New-World component, but the tuna was everything it should be and more: panseared so as to create a uniformly golden, crisp crust without compromising the rosy flesh within. Such attention to just one of at least eight parts of a salad was stunning, yet par for our meal. Frog legs were served in a simple olive oil, garlic and parsley pesto in which the


plenteous minced garlic had been cooked so gently that there was no fire, only flavor. The meat itself was sweet and succulent, more like tender shellfish than poultry. Also on the plate was a tiny salad, the size of a garnish, but dressed in a light vinaigrette to please the palate without distracting from the main event. Crepes — or rather, their savory buckwheat cousins, galettes — have not been lost in the restaurant’s transition from lunch to dinner menu. Three are on offer, all with luxurious fillings. We tried the galette la Bordelaise, folded around a filling of duck breast, sauce Bordelaise, goat cheese and honey. The tang of the goat cheese balanced the fatty duck, buttery red-wine sauce and sweet honey, but barely; this dish was so rich, it bordered on unctuous.

Chocorêve cocktail

The French have always done wonders with veal, and we’ve certainly had good veal over the years. But we were not prepared for the marvel of Paris 66’s blanquette de veau, in which shoulder is gently cooked and sauced with a rich white sauce and mushrooms. The veal was served in two pieces, together about the size of a boneless pork chop, and it was superlative: browned at the edges, utterly tender within, and with a flavor that was simultaneously mild and intense, and perfectly complemented by the sauce and earthy mushrooms. Each bite was a new revelation. Combine this wonderful food with perfect service and decor so unabashedly, iconically French, it should be wearing a beret, and Paris 66 is both less pretentious and every bit as impressive as the frou-frou French fine dining of yore. Through slow, careful growth and attention to detail, Paris 66 has translated its expertise in light French lunches into serious French cuisine for dinner.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

WEEK SAUCE

Pittsburgh Cocktail Week shuns pretension

“WE WERE SURPRISED BY HOW ENTHUSIASTIC THE GENERAL CONSUMER WAS.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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When Rob McCaughey, Mike Basista and Will Groves organized the inaugural Pittsburgh Cocktail Week last year, they had no budget and only a glimmer of hope that anyone outside the local bartending community would take an interest. “We were surprised by how enthusiastic the general consumer was [for] what we put together,” says McCaughey. Indeed, the 2013 event was popular enough that it attracted national sponsors to this year’s cocktail week, which will be held Sept. 1521. With sponsors including Tito’s Vodka, Angel’s Envy and the Sazerac Company, McCaughey says, “We’re going to be able to do bigger and better events this year.” Additionally, McCaughey says, this year’s cocktail week aims to be less about the serious business of “mixology” than about celebrating the fun behind a well-crafted drink. Take, for instance, the week’s opening event at Lawrenceville’s Franktuary. Bartenders will embrace the proletarian “shot and a beer” by making boilermakers that pair whiskey and Milkman Brewing Company. There’s also an Angel’s Envy whiskey dinner on Wednesday night at Tender. Of course, cocktail geeks will still have plenty of opportunities to get super-nerdy. There are a number of spirits face-offs (scotch v. bourbon; tequila v. mezcal; gin v. vodka) and a handful of in-depth seminars. I’m especially excited for molecular mixology whiz Adam Henry’s Tuesday seminar at the Independent Brewing Company, and for Will Groves’ seminar on low-alcohol cocktails, slated for Saturday at Legume. “These kind of cocktails don’t get nearly enough attention,” says Groves. Still, when the week’s crowning competition is a citywide contest to reinvent “Disco-Era Drinks,” it’s pretty clear that the vest-and-tie combo has been loosened up a bit. It’s not easy to maintain a straight face when you’re making a Harvey Wallbanger. “Sometimes people forget the fun,” McCaughey says. “We want to execute our craft, but we don’t want to take ourselves too seriously.”

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Reservation R Take-Out T Free Delivery F Catering C

Ramen Bar

OSE EA AFÉ AF É

Taiwanese Style Cuisine

Japanese Cuisine

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

Sun-Thurs: 12PM - 10PM Fri-Sat: 12PM - 11PM

Mon-Sat 11 -9 Sun 12PM-9PM

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Sun-Thurs 11 -10 Fri-Sat 11AM-11PM

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DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE

Oakland 414 South Craig St. AM PM

5860 Forbes Ave, 15217 • Squirrel Hill

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF

Dijlah Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} But it also has some more unique specialties, including “Iraq kebab,” a patty formed from chopped lamb and beef, and served simply with rice and green salad. K FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE

CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF COCA CAFÉ. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171. This café is somehow hip but not pretentious. Variety predominates: The omelets alone include smoked salmon, wild mushroom, roasted vegetable, sun-dried tomato pesto and four-cheese. (Coca also caters to vegans, with options like scrambled tofu in place of eggs.) JF DIJLAH RESTAURANT. 4130 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-2242111. This Iraqi restaurant offers plenty of well-prepared Middle Eastern favorites such as falafel, hummus, kebab, shwarma, lentil and bean salads, and baklava.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Bocktown Beer and Grill GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentine-barbecue eatery worth stopping at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF

HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An old-school continental menu and a well-restored train station make this restaurant a destination. The menu leans toward Italian fine dining, plus steaks and chops. But well-charred chicken Louisiana and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy stewed pork) and sopes, thick CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


Under New Management. Check out www.pghgrille.com for our new menu.

FREE* event parking when you purchase $25 in food at Pittsburgh Grille! * Parking pass is only valid in the U.S. Steel Tower Garage, Monday-Friday, during any concerts, games, or events held at the Consol Energy Center.

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

MON TUE-THU FRI SUN

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Try kibbee, lamb kabob, tabbouli, falafel and much more!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

412-321-4550

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

MauraMori Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF

7258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact menu reflects a hybrid style, combining cutting-edge techniques with traditional ingredients to create unique flavor and texture combinations. Salt erases distinctions — between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE

MAURAMORI CAFÉ. 5202 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-4083160. This café-style breakfastlunch spot serves, as expected, bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, burgers and fries. This is still down-home cooking, but better-quality ingredients SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 (applewood-smoked Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. bacon) are emphasized, 412-741-1918. This and care that goes little restaurant has the into their assemblage charm of a bygone era (hand-formed and old-fashioned food www. per burger patties). J whose pleasures are pa pghcitym worth rediscovering. .co MENDOZA EXPRESS. The Continental menu 812 Mansfield Road, Green offers chestnuts like duck á Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor l’orange and Virginia spots, as well is pure kitsch — sombreros on as more distinctive dishes, such as the walls, etc. — and the location tournedos dijon bleu and French is a bit obscure. But the menu Acadian porterhouse. LE is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun scramble of chorizo, peppers Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — and cheese.) JF simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412- and Singapore. The Pangan 381-3698. This two-wheel-themed ikan is a house specialty, and the café and bar offers a creative Malaysian kway teow (practically pub-grub menu (with many the country’s national dish) offerings named for bicycle parts). may be the best you ever have The salads are more impressive without a tourist visa. JE than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. vegetarian and vegan options. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. Try the battered zucchini planks 412-665-2770. The menu offers wrapped around melty cheeses. JE a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes with warm spices. Order the Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2238. sampler platters for the best This bubble-tea café has variety of flavors, and ask for broadened its offerings to include a glass of tej, a honey-based high-quality, authentic Chinese wine that is the perfect cooking. The menu is dominated accompaniment. KE by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth of the thick, glossy brown sauces Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. which seem all but inevitable Though the menu is brief, at most American Chinese inventive vegetarian meals restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things push past the familiar at this light with delicate sauces that charming Homestead café. are more like dressings for their The emphasis is on fresh, local fresh-tasting ingredients. KF and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 In season, there’s a charming Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441rear patio. JE

FULL LIST ONLINE


The Art of Thai Cuisine 946 Penn Ave Located in Downtown’s Cultural District

NOW OPEN in the heart of Squirrel Hill!

Daily Saloon Specials Happy Hours

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Monday-Saturday • 11am-10pm Sunday • 11am-9:30pm

412-521-8989 • www.sukhothaibistro.com 5813 Forbes Avenue, Pgh., PA 15217

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$6 Long Island Iced Tea All day till Midnight $4 Stuffed Pretzel & $6 Buffalo Chicken Dip 11am - 11pm 412-765-3270 www.augusthenrys.com

Take-Out Available

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LOCAL

“IF YOU CAN, YOU SHOULD PLAY MOST OF THE ALBUM LIVE.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SO MUCH TO PLAY Ben Alper has been a solo musician gigging around town for years. But about four years ago, he hit on a new idea, after putting together a Dave Matthews Band tribute for a show with local musician Gene Stovall’s one-off Earth, Wind and Fire tribute. “I want to say we had at least 200 people at Hard Rock Café for that show,” Alper says. “And I’m looking around, thinking, ‘This is how you get people out [to shows]!’” One Sweet Burgh, the band Alper formed, had some lineup changes after that initial show, but in the past year has begun to develop a more permanent roster. (Violinist Anton Smirnov, for one, came on late and didn’t know any Dave Matthews when he auditioned. Now, Alper says, he keeps in touch with DMB violinist Boyd Tinsley.) This weekend, the group celebrates the 20th anniversary of Under the Table and Dreaming, DMB’s ticket to the big-time. One Sweet Burgh will play the album in its entirety, in order, at its show Friday night at Mr. Small’s. “Twenty years ago, I was a freshman in high school, catching rides to JV soccer practice from the upperclassmen,” Alper recalls. “My buddy pops in this CD and I hear ‘What Would You Say,’ and until that point, I’d never heard an acoustic guitar played that way.” “Teaching myself how to play [Matthews’] songs,” he adds, “it’s kind of like what they say about New York City: If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere. If you can play a Dave Matthews riff and sing over top of it, you can pretty much play and sing anything.” As for those who have a distaste for the sometimes divisive artist? “I find that most times, it’s not about the music as much as who’s listening to the music,” he explains. “You hear, ‘Oh, a Dave Matthews concert, it’s all frat boys.’ If you go to a concert to peoplewatch, fine, but I go for the music. For me, the music is always entertaining; it always makes me feel good to listen to and take part in.”

“UNTIL THAT POINT, I’D NEVER HEARD AN ACOUSTIC GUITAR PLAYED THAT WAY.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ONE SWEET BURGH with CITY LOVE STORY. 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

22

THE TWEEDY EFFECT {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SELIGER}

{BY BRIAN CONWAY}

I

N MAY, 2011, Jeff Tweedy and Wilco

headlined the final day of Sasquatch! Festival, in central Washington. Before laying into an encore that would officially close out the festival, Tweedy had one final thought to share with the audience. “I really enjoyed the White Denim set today. No offense to anybody else — everybody else sounded fantastic — but White Denim really kicked ass.” Earlier that day, Tweedy had waited offstage for the Austin-based rock band. “He was just really complimentary of the set,” recalls James Petralli, White Denim’s lead singer, over the phone from his home in Texas. “That led our agent to talk to [Wilco’s] agent — it was one of those things — and it ended up leading to a tour. We got to do 22 shows with them on the West Coast. Main support every night.” And so began the Tweedification of White Denim. Back at Sasquatch, Petralli and company were just one week removed from the release of their fourth proper studio album, D. Each of the band’s previous re-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

Still legit, even after Labor Day: White Denim

leases had been touted by the media, but D was being hailed with the headiest praise yet, with critics throwing around words like “masterpiece.” That album was the latest in a long line of genre-defying releases for White Denim. Early on, when it was just Petralli, bassist Steve Terebecki and drummer Josh Block, the band could best be described as experi-

WHITE DENIM

WITH CLEAR PLASTIC MASKS 8 p.m. Tue., Sept. 16. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

mental garage rock. Many of the songs on the first album, 2008’s Workout Holiday, are under three minutes — “We were a lot punkier,” explains Petralli — and display the exuberance of a band brimming over with ideas. “I think with the first few records it was a different band,” says Petralli. “We didn’t really talk about lyrical direction; we just kind of threw everything at it.” In 2010, fleet-fingered guitarist Aus-

tin Jenkins made the trio a quartet, and White Denim shape-shifted toward a Southern-fried psychedelic-rock sound that also counted jazz, progressive rock and blues as influences. To read through the band’s press clippings — especially from the U.K., where it’s got an outsized following — is to witness music critics struggling vainly for that one perfect analogy to encapsulate the band’s sound: “Minutemen math-punk,” “spacerock Canned Heat,” “ZZ Top playing punkfunk,” and “Krautrock Soft Machine” are just a sampling of the descriptors used over the years. Despite continual praise from the music press, Petralli acknowledges the limits of White Denim’s popularity: “There’s more critical acclaim than tons and tons of actual fans,” he says. “But,” he’s quick to add, “it’s grown at a comfortable pace. This record has kind of turned around the touring business in the States, for sure.” The record in question, Corsicana Lemonade, was released by White Denim last October. But the seeds for the album were sowed eight months after Sasquatch, CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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during late nights on tour with Wilco. “We just kind of started fishing around then,” Petralli says with a laugh. “Like, ‘Hey, we’ve seen the documentary, the studio looks really cool.’ So, just kind of pushing it into the realm that we were interested in kind of intruding, and seeing what they have going there.” Jeff Tweedy’s Chicago studio, known simply as “The Loft,” or “The Wilco Loft,” has seen tracks and albums laid down by the likes of Mavis Staples, Low, Andrew Bird and, of course, Wilco itself, a process famously captured in the 2002 documentary I Am Trying to Break Your Heart. Asked about his experience recording in Chicago, Petralli starts to trail off, suddenly distracted. “Sorry,” he says, “I’ve got an 18-month-old daughter who’s just a ball of energy. She’s jamming around right now.” It’s that newfound family life, and growing up in general, that are the reasons Corsicana Lemonade provides White Denim with its most intimate album to date: a “song-focused, personal record,” according to Petralli. It’s also the first that you can almost pin a genre to: part Southern rootsrock, part boogying blues. (Again, almost.) Another Tweedification: The band tracked all the songs for the album live, together in the studio. “It was something we

always wanted to do,” says Petralli, “but when we got to Chicago, Tweedy was really adamant. He was just like, ‘You gotta play the tunes, hear the quartet arrangement.’ I guess you could say Tweedy forced it on us a little bit, but it’s just what you do when you’re in a studio making a rock ’n’ roll album: If you can, you should play most of it live.” In the end, only two of the tracks from their four days at The Loft made it onto the final release; longtime Austin producer Jim Vollentine, along with the band, produced the remaining songs. But there’s no doubt that Tweedy, who also mixed the album’s B-side, set the tone for the remainder of the recording sessions. Despite fans and critics alike welcoming this grown-up change in direction, Petralli says the band is far from ready to settle down. “I don’t want to do adult-contemporary records,” says Petralli. “I still really wanna rock. I think that rock music should be kind of wild. I kind of want to make a crazier record. Like, something that’s really aggressive, and textured, and challenging. I’d love to make something like [Funkadelic’s] Maggot Brain. I think that’s where it’s at.” And they say you should never meet your idols. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ON THE RECORD WITH PAT DICESARE {BY ANDY MULKERIN} NOW-LEGENDARY concert promoter Pat

DiCesare was in his early 20s when he booked The Beatles at the Civic Arena on their first U.S. tour in 1964 — his second concert booking ever. This week, he celebrates the show’s 50th anniversary (and the release of his memoir) with a concert featuring Beatlemania Now! and other tribute acts. TAKE US BACK TO THAT SHOW — HOW DID YOU GET IN A POSITION TO BOOK THE BEATLES? I started out in the record business — my first job was sweeping floors. [Eventually] I became a record promoter; I drove to every little record store there was to promote our records. Around the time John Kennedy was killed, in November 1963, someone played this record for me — “Love Me Do,” by The Beatles. The next day someone said to me, “Did you ever hear this record by The Beatles, ‘She Loves You’?” When I heard “She Loves You,” with all that “Yeah, yeah, yeah,” there was something about that that grabbed me. I went to [my boss, Tim Tormey,] and said, “I want to bring this group into the Civic Arena.” He said, “You’ve gotta be crazy!” I told him to call the agent for Lou Christie [at the William Morris Agency], and ask her what the story would be to bring The Beatles to Pittsburgh. She said, “I’ve never heard of them, and they’re from England — forget it; no artist from England has ever made it in the U.S.” That was about it until Dec. 27, 1963: Capitol Records released Meet the Beatles on LP. Capitol Records sold 850,000 copies of that LP in the first 10 days. Beatlemania set in. I called the agent back — they’re telling me they have all these national promoters that want the show, [I] don’t have a track record, and I said, “Yeah, but I called you first!” They said, “If you want to get The Beatles, they want $35,000 guaranteed, against a percentage of the gate. Here’s the second part of the deal: Since we don’t know you, you have to get $5,000, put it in a paper bag, deliver it to a bartender at Club Elegant in Brooklyn. And you’ve got 48 hours to do it.” I went to bar-owners, jukebox operators I knew; they all thought this was

Pat DiCesare

the biggest scam. And these guys were all questionable characters [themselves]. I ended up coming home to my parents in Trafford, telling them the story I’m telling you. The next day, I drove back home at the end of the day, I figured I’ve just got a few more hours. After we’re done eating, my father slides an envelope over to me. There’s a check made out to me, for $5,000. He says, “That’s for you. Do your Beatles.” I said, “Dad, I can’t take your $5,000! Where’d you get that?” He said, “I put my house up against it for a loan from Westinghouse Credit Union.” I said, “Dad, I gotta give this to a bartender in Brooklyn! I can’t do that!” He said, “Do you believe in The Beatles?” I said, “Yeah!”

PAT DICESARE’S BEATLES ANNIVERSARY SHOW

FEAT. BEATLEMANIA NOW! AND TRIBUTES TO ELVIS, LITTLE RICHARD, JERRY LEE LEWIS, CHUCK BERRY, FATS DOMINO, EDDIE COCHRAN AND BUDDY HOLLY 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $36.95-99.95. 412-456-6666 or www.concertpat.com

We wired it to an attorney in New York; he took it to the Club Elegant. We made it in the 48 hours. WHEN THE SHOW HAPPENED THAT SEPTEMBER, DID YOU GET TO MEET THE BEATLES? The disadvantage of being a young man in the ’60s was the Vietnam War. Everybody was getting drafted. On May 29, I got drafted, and I went into the Army. On Sept. 14, The Beatles played Pittsburgh, I was in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. I never got to meet The Beatles. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


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THRIVAL RETURNS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} LAST YEAR’S inaugural Thrival Festival was a seat-of-your-pants affair for organizers: It was the first event of its kind put on by the folks from startup incubator Thrill Mill, and much of its funding came in late in the game, leaving organizers scrambling at the last minute to book and publicize. “It’s a pretty steep learning curve,” Thrill Mill founder Bobby Zappala says with a laugh. “That’s a good, accurate way to put it … and maybe even an understatement.” The former practicing attorney found himself learning about talent contracts and other logistical work on top of the tricky practice of booking within the constraints of artists’ touring agendas. This year, though the festival is back — with two days of music instead of one (and, as Zappala points out, nearly four times as many acts.) A DJ set by Moby and performances by Portugal. The Man and Talib Kweli are the top-billed events on the music side of the weekend-long festival, held Sat., Sept. 13, and Sun., Sept. 14. The concerts will bring the mass audience, but there’s more to Thrival: A series of “PIT Talks” (modeled after the popular TED series) by successful entrepreneurs will take place, and hopeful startups will vie for investor money as part of the $25,000 “PNC Pitch,” sponsored by the bank. Last year’s music lineup was worldclass, if limited: De La Soul, Frightened Rabbit, RJD2 and locals Formula 412. This year, it’s an expanded lineup with a considerable local contingent as well: Five Pittsburghbased acts will perform And Zappala would like to see even more local representation in the future.

“This year, the biggest limitation was space,” he explains. “In the future, I’d like to open up additional stages, so that we can have sets going on without having lag time in between for setup.” Between the growth of the festival and the growth on the East Liberty-Shadyside border, where the festival takes place, Zappala says it’s likely this will be Thrival’s last hurrah at the Bakery Square site. (Where last year’s festival was essentially on a construction site, the venue this year is no smaller, but is overshadowed by the new-construction tower overhead.)

THRIVAL FESTIVAL

FEAT. PORTUGAL. THE MAN, MOBY (DJ SET), TALIB KWELI, PHOSPHORESCENT, MORE. Noon, Sat., Sept. 13, through Sun., Sept. 14. Bakery Square Two (Penn Avenue at East Liberty Boulevard), Shadyside. $45-75. All ages. www.thrivalfestival.com

“We’ve been very lucky to have the Walnut Capital team at Bakery Square allow us to use that space,” Zappala says. “It’s cool, it’s rugged and kind of intimate. But it’s going to be built out, and it’ll be too small down the road. So this is the grand finale of the Bakery Square event, at least as pertains to the main-stage aspect of Thrival” Saturday’s lineup, in addition to Talib Kweli and locals 1,2,3, The Red Western and Tairey, includes indie rocker Phosphorescent, up-and-coming New York City band Misterwives and Atlanta songwriter Raury. Sunday’s lineup is headed up by Moby and Portugal. The Man, and includes Chicago electronic legend Green Velvet, mashup DJ Z-Trip, soul singer Mayer Hawthorne and locally based notables Buku and Pittsburgh Track Authority, both of whom have garnered national attention in recent years. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


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[INDIE ROCK] + THU., SEPT. 11 Chances are if you’re headed to Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead tonight, you’ve had tickets for a while, and you know who you’re going to see: Spoon. But don’t arrive late; you don’t want to miss the tour’s two opening acts, each of which features someone you know from another band. Operators is headed by Dan Boeckner (of Wolf Parade, Handsome Furs and the Britt Daniel-aided Divine Fits), and Hamilton Leithauser is better known as the frontman of indie greats The Walkmen. After that band’s departure last year, Leithauser bounced back quickly with a fantastic solo effort, Black Hours. It’s a stacked bill at the library that’s worth, er, checking out. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 510 E. 10 0th St., Munhall. $27.50-50. All ages. www.librarymusichall.com ww.librarymusichall.com

[BRASS RASS BAND] + SAT., SEPT 13

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[ROCK] + SAT., SEPT. 13 You know him best as host of WDVE’s longrunning morning show, but Randy Baumann also has a talent for the keys … and a knack for getting top local talent to sit in at his occasional event, Randall Baumann’s Thunderbird Ramble. This time around, the featured guest is Grand Piano, but expect plenty of other notable figures to hop on if it’s anything like past events. The focus is often on The Band and roots-andblues music of that era (the Ramble is, after all,, modeled on Levon Helm’s famous events), ) but anything could happen tonight at Thunderbird Café. AM 9 p.m. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-12. 412 412682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net www.thunderbirdcafe.

At first, it might be hard to figure exactly ctly where accordion-and-brass band d Lungs Face Feett sounds to be e from m — it just sure doesn’t sound like anything that might rise out of Pittsburgh. In fact, though, the eight-piece ht-piece outfit hails from her here e (though ough the members have ve plenty nty of travel time logged collectively, ectively, which contributes tributes to the eclectic ectic sound). While the band chiefly borrows rows from Latin American erican cumbia music, sic, there are touches ches of Eastern European opean folk, such h that fans of groups ups like Gogol Bordello dello could Sean Rowe find d plenty to like. {PHOTO COURTESY OF ANTHONY SAINT JAMES} Lungs gs Face Feet celebrates ebrates the release ase of its new full-length -length LP, Protection tection from Perfection, fection, tonight

N E W S

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[INDIE FOLK] + SUN., SEPT. 14 1 With a booming baritone and well-honed sense of lyricism, Sean one Rowe e has in recent years become o off our foremost singer-songwriters. (who’s The native of upstate New York (w also an avid outdoorsman and survivalist) grew to fame with w 2009’s Magic, c and branches branch out on his brand-new Madman, a record that tha features a sophisticated, sophisticate minimalist take on soul so songwriting without losing sight of Rowe’s Rowe folk-style roots. Fresh on the heels of its release, Rowe Row plays Club Café tonight with local loca folk-rock songwriter songwr Tom Breiding. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., $12. South Side. $12 412-431-4950 or www.club cafelive.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


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Bates: Rusty Air in Carolina (Pittsburgh Symphony Premiere) Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Opus 43 Bach: Suite No. 3: Air (Air on the G String) (In memory of Lorin Maazel) Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Opus 14 Journeys of the mind. Journeys of the senses. The BNY Mellon Grand Classics series kicks off with Two Trips, a performance featuring Bates’ Rusty Air in Carolina, a sonic trip back to summer evenings of the past. Pianist Lisitsa returns this year to play the work of Rachmaninoff. The show closes with the heady Symphonie fantastique from Berlioz. Make the trip to Heinz Hall this fall and prepare to be transported.

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FALL ARTS

PREVIEW T R A L A U VIS COLL}

{BY BILL O’DRIS

THIS FALL, it’s almost hard to find a major

{ILLUSTRATION BY EVERYDAY BALLOONS}

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visual-art venue that isn’t involved in the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Building on the expansion it began with the 2011 Biennial, the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ venerable showcase for regional artists now comprises eight galleries and museums. But although the Biennial itself promises to be an especially rich endeavor — and a few venues have already opened their Biennial exhibitions —there’s more going on around town as well. In fact, the first portion of the Biennial to open, Sleight of Hand: Corey Escoto, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, actually closes Sept. 29. Other up-and-running Biennial shows continue through Oct. 19 (Pittsburgh Filmmakers), Oct. 26 (Pittsburgh Glass Center) and Nov. 2 (Center for the Arts). Still to


Art by Sigh Meltingstar at Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists IV, at the Irma Freeman Center. Oct. 3-Dec. 5

Art by Jason Woolslare at The Gallery 4, Nov. 6-29

Art by Celeste Neuhaus at Pittsburgh Biennial at the Miller Gallery, Sept. 20-Nov. 30

come, Biennial-wise, is the Mattress Fac- is the first-ever solo museum show for tory’s artists-in-residence show (Sept. this prolific, eclectic and widely exhib13-spring 2015), including multidisci- ited Pittsburgh-born, Philadelphia-based plinary artists Danny Bracken and John painter: The exhibit features work from Peña, sculptor Ryder Henry, circus the 1970s through today. artist Ben Sota, and multimeThe Warhol also has a big FALL ARTS dia visual artist Kathleen non-Biennial show. The 13 Montgomery. That’s folMost Wanted Men (Sept. 27FREE STUFF lowed by: the Miller Jan. 4) revives Warhol’s RADical Days. On its 20th Gallery’s Edith Abeyta own famous contribuanniversary, the Allegheny show (Sept. 20-Nov. 30), tion to the 1964 New Regional Asset District offers free in which Abeyta colYork World’s Fair: a seadmission to events and laborates with seven ries of enlarged NYPD exhibitions at a wide range of area artists; Public Remugshots deemed so cultural attractions, Sept. 24Nov. 9. Citywide. www. cord (Sept. 26-Nov. 10), controversial that Fair ofradworkshere.org a group show at SPACE ficials painted them over exploring “Love, Absurdity, before the exhibition even Surveillance, Gaming and Idenopened. Warhol revamped the tity”; and, last but not least, The Andy images in 1967, and these works were Warhol Museum’s Chuck Connelly: My recently brought together again for the America (Sept. 26-Jan. 4). My America first time; the Warhol Museum show

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Art by Duane Michals, courtesy of The Henry L. Hillman Fund, at Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals. Nov. 1-March 2, at the Carnegie Museum of Art



$$3*URXS([KLELW3DVWLPHV7LPHV3DVWFXUDWHGE\ 'HDQQD0DQFHDQG%RE=LOOHUFRQWLQXHVDW0RVW:DQWHG )LQH$UW*DUĂ&#x20AC;HOGWKRXJKHQGRI6HSWHPEHU  $$3*URXS([KLELWMXULHGE\-RKQ&DUVRQRI&08 )UDPH+RXVH*DOOHU\,FH+RXVH6WXGLRV/DZUHQFHYLOOH Opening: Friday, September 19th, 6-9pm. $$3&XUDWHG*URXS([KLELWDWWKH0LQH)DFWRU\*DOOHU\ Curated by 7KRPDV6RNRORZVNL, Opening Night: Saturday October 11th, 6-9pm. $UWLVWWDONV2FWREHUWKSP  $$3)$//1(:0(0%(56&5((1,1*6HSWHPEHUWK Any artist living within a 150 mile radius of Pittsburgh may apply to the jurying of new members. 6HHZHEVLWHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQDQGPRUHGHWDLOV

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follows their exhibition earlier this year at the Queens Museum. Another world-famous local boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s altered photos are at the heart of Storyteller: The Photographs of Duane Michals (Nov. 1-March 2). This massive Carnegie Museum of Art retrospective â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the largest-ever presentation of Michalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work â&#x20AC;&#x201D; spans six decades in the career of the McKeesport native, who pioneered the use of sequenced staged narratives and writing on images. Downtown, Wood Street Galleries opens Second/Second (Sept. 26-Dec. 31). The pair of sound-and-light exhibitions is the ďŹ rst U.S. solo show for internationally ex{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY MALLS} hibited Icelandic artist Finnbogi PĂŠtursson. Art by Mozelle Thompson at The Album Art of Mozelle Thompson, Nov. 7-30, at Most Wanted Fine Art Among smaller venues, an unusual show is a fall highlight for Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery. The Album Art of Mozelle Elsewhere, The Gallery 4 spotlights Thompson (Nov. 7-30) features more than Pop Pulp Madness (Nov. 6-29), featuring 80 record-album covers drawn and the work of painter Jason Woolslare. painted between 1953 and 1969 And Gallerie Chiz has a threeby the Peabody High grad, an man show by Michael BestFALL ARTS acclaimed and pioneering wick, Bill Miller and Ron African-American artist Nigro (Oct. 17-Nov. 22), all COMEDY and illustrator. known for working with Tim and Eric & Dr. Steve Brule Across the street, found and discarded teams the Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! guys with a the Irma Freeman Cenmaterials. In Sewickley, special guest, the tongue-tied ter for Imagination will Sweetwater Center for TV host played by John C. Reilly, be in the middle of this the Arts offers its 18th Oct. 3. Carnegie Music Hall, yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of its most annual Mavuno Festival Oakland. www. popular show, Pittsburgh of African-American art druskyent.com by Pittsburgh Artists IV and culture, including the (Oct. 3-Dec. 5). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a group show exhibition Connected at the by artists with local ties who take Roots (Sept. 12-Nov. 1), juried by the city as their subject. LaVerne Kemp.

HIGHLIGHT

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

STAYCEE PEARLL dance da project at the SundaySeries, Oct. 12

DANCE {BY STEVE SUCATO}

THE NEW dance season features mile-

Celebrating 10 Years Bourbons, Beers, and Bacon Special Throwback Menus Coming this October

stones for several local companies. Attack Theatre, CorningWorks, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and the Pillow Project all celebrate major anniversaries. They, along with a bevy of other artists, promise even more memorable moments. Here’s a sampling. Opening its fifth season, CorningWorks examines our growing disconnect with traditional interpersonal communication in Parallel Lives (Wed., Sept. 10-14), at the New Hazlett Theater. The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater opens with dance icon Carmen de Lavallade’s solo show As I Remember It (Fri., Sept. 12 and Sat., Sept. 13). The theater’s Alloy Studios then hosts {PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHANIE HOFFMAN} Mark Conway Thompson’s new movePearlann Porter and Taylor Knight of ment-theater work Kimono (Sept. 19), folThe Pillow Project, Nov. 8 lowed by Casablanca-based Hind Benali/ Fleur D’Orange in Identity/Identité (Oct. and the STAYCEE PEARL dance project. Texture Contemporary Ballet finds 10-11) and FreshWorks dance artist Anthony Williams in Loving Black (Oct. 17). Synergy (Sept. 26-28) at the Kelly-Strayhorn; the company heads to PittsThe Kelly-Strayhorn then welburgh Dance Center for its comes back TanzTheater AnFALL ARTS annual WIP (Works In Progdré Koslowski performing ress) Choreography Projits latest, A Cantankerous MUSIC ect (Nov. 22). And CarnWiegenlied (Nov. 7-8). Pittsburgh Symphony egie Mellon University’s On Sun., Sept. 14, Orchestra’s subscription-series Miller Gallery hosts River City Artists Manseason-opener features Bach’s Suite LightLab Performance agement continues its No. 3: “Air,” performed in honor of the late Lorin Maazel, Sept. 19-21. Series 07 (Sept. 27), feanew SundaySeries at Heinz Hall, Downtown. turing new dance works PointBreezeway with 412-392-4900 or by Maree ReMalia/merperformances by Conwww.pittsburgh rygogo, Slowdanger and tinuum Dance Theater symphony.org Jil Stifel. and dancer/choreographer Point Park University’s Jasmine Hearn in her latest, faConservatory Dance Company voring consent. The series continues Oct. 12 with performances by Gia T. Pres- begins its season with the Student Choents international music/dance ensemble reography Project (Oct. 3-5). Then the

HIGHLIGHT

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troupe performs works by alum Luke pher Shanna Simmons present works-inMurphy and others in Contemporary Cho- progress showings at The Alloy Studios reographers (Nov. 14-23); both produc- (Oct 5). Dancer/choreographer Moriah Ella Mason presents Contained (Oct. tions are at the school’s George Row11) at the New Hazlett. land White Performance Studio. And Bodiography colAnd Dec. 5-14, the company FALL ARTS laborates with La Roche reprises Nicolas Petrov’s College for Multiplicity Romeo and Juliet at the PITTSBURGH (Nov. 21 and 22), at the Pittsburgh Playhouse. CULTURAL TRUST Byham Theater. Attack Theatre beGALLERY CRAWL Pittsburgh Dance gins its 20th season with th It’s the 10 anniversary Council opens its new the world premiere of this free, one-night, season at the Byham of Are You Still There? multi-venue arts festival with Aspen/Santa Fe (Oct. 3-10), at the Greater Downtown, Sept. 26. www.trustarts.org Ballet, featuring chorePittsburgh Coliseum. And ographer Nicolo Fonte’s luDec. 5-6, at Pittsburgh Opminescent ballet Heart(s)pace era’s George R. White Studio, (Oct. 11). PDC’s season continues Attack presents its annual familywith innovative British dance troupe Mifriendly program, Holiday Unwrapped. Murphy/Smith Dance Collective’s chael Clark Company (Nov. 1). Pittsburgh Ballet ttsbu g Ba et Theatre eat e opens its dancer/choreograJamie Murphy and dan ncer/choreogra 45th season with The Sleeping Beauty Be (Oct. 24-26). And from Dec. 5-28, PBT’s PBT holiday favorite The Nutcrackerr returns; returns both PBT productions are at the Benedum Center. On Oct. 25, the Middle Ea Eastern specialists at Khafif Music and Dance get D spooky at their annual Halloween Hafla, Hallow at Wilkins School Community Communit Center. And Murphy/Smith Murphy/Smi mith th Dance Collective’s C Renee Smith presents prepre ese sent n s the world w miere of Belong Here Her e e at the Pittsburgh P Dance Center. Rounding out u 2014: 2014: the Pittsburgh P Bellydance Festival, featuring The featu Belly-Off competition, returns return to Pittsburgh Dance Center Cent nter (Nov. (Nov. 7-9); The T Pillow {PHOTO COURTESY Project marks 10 0 years yea ears with In the Blink OF TEXTURE CONTEMPORARY of a Decade (Nov. (Nov v. 8), at The Space UpBALLET} Alan Obuzor and stairs; Prague’s Cirk Cirk La Putyka Putyk brings a Kelsey Bartman mixture of acrobatics, acrob obat a ics, dance, danc puppetof Texture Contemporary ry and live music m sic to the mu th Hillman Ballet, Center for or Performing Performi Arts in Sept. 26-28 Slapstick Slapsttic ick Sonata (Nov. 15); newcomers Simnewccom omers Shana Sha mons the mon Dance present pr site-specifi s te si t -specific work Passenger se r (Nov. (No 14-15), at Avia the National Nat ary; Dance a y; Firewall ar Firew Theater performs UpTh per roar 10), roarr (Dec. 18-Jan. 18 at Off Off f The Wall Wal Theater; and on Dec. 19, 19 STAYCEE PEARL dance project stages PE proje works-in-progress showings at PearlArts Studios. Studi

HIGHLIGHT

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM INFO@PGHCIT


GALLERY

GALLERY

GALLERY

Code Orange at Cattivo, Oct. 3

MUSIC

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

WHILE SUMMER holds sway as the heart

of concert season, a lot of classics, some up-and-comers and a few juggalos color this fall’s local music calendar. The Black Keys are arguably the biggest rock act — at least in terms of more recent bands — coming to town this fall; the Akron duo plays CONSOL Energy Center Sat., Sept. 13. In terms of indie rockers, The Afghan Whigs hit Mr. Small’s Theatre Sept. 27. Also playing Small’s: YouTube faves OK Go (Oct. 13) and Blonde Redhead (Nov. 1), a band that’s been around for 20 years, peaked in popularity about a decade ago and is back with a new album. And Jill Barber at Club Café, Sept. 30 The Meat Puppets share a bill with Cass Truise is a name you know — he appears McCombs at Club Café Oct. 25. For those whose musical tastes at the Rex Theater Sept. 17. The annual VIA stretch back a few decades to the clas- Festival offers far more than just electronic music these days, and will bring in sics, there’s no want for concert huge names from across the opportunities this fall. Willie board (Deafheaven, Blue HaNelson plays the Benedum FALL ARTS waii, Real Estate, Liturgy) Center on Tue., Sept. 16, to multiple local venues and on Oct. 12, Jackson OUTDOORS Oct. 1-5. One guy who Browne appears at the Venture Outdoors leads a will probably never be same venue. Fleetwood Coopers Rock Long Distance on a VIA lineup is SkrilMac is sure to be one of Hike in the West Virginia state park famous for its lex; he appears at Stage the biggest shows of the panoramic views, Nov. 8. AE Oct. 21. And electronyear, at CONSOL Energy www.venture ic and trap producer RL Center Oct. 14. Judy Coloutdoors.org Grime comes to Mr. Small’s lins appears Oct. 23 at the Theatre Nov. 9. Carnegie Library Music Hall of One show that’s part of Homestead, and one of the great the aforementioned VIA Festival songwriters, Janis Ian, will be at Carnis a release event for Pittsburgh-based egie Lecture Hall in Oakland Nov. 22. If your interests run electronic, Com hardcore outfit Code Orange, which has

HIGHLIGHT

GALLERY

5874 5874 Ellsworth Ellsworth Avenue Avenue Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA PA 15232 15232

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PIPER FERGUSON}

The Afghan Whigs at Mr. Small’s Theatre, Sept. 27

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LLOYD BAGGS}

Janis Ian at Carnegie Lecture Hall, Nov. 22

Ying Yang Twins at Rex Theater, Sept. 27

made a splash nationally in recent years, bit longer, an outdoor show by Saintseneca, and is celebrating its new album, I Am part of WYEP’s Final Fridays series at SchenKing. That show is Oct. 3 at Cattivo. Other ley Plaza in Oakland, is a good bet Sept. 26. notable local release shows this fall include And it’ll likely be a sweaty affair for the crowd packed into the Mr. Roboto ProjEnnui’s first local appearance in a while ect for an Oct. 5 double-bill: New (Sept. 26 at SPACE Gallery) and Jersey’s Screaming Females Andre Costello and the Cool and Nashville’s Pujol. Minors’ debut full-length FALL ARTS Hip-hop fans have a release (Oct. 3 at The Andy few items to look forWarhol Museum). ZINES ward to this fall: Twerk Also part of the The fourth annual innovators Ying Yang Warhol’s Sound Series: Pittsburgh Zine Fair hosts Twins appear at the Rex a world-premiere event local and out-of-town Theater on Sept. 27, and in which a bunch of big zine-makers, Sept. 28. Union Project, Highland Park. Taylor Gang rep Ty Dolla names (Tom Verlaine, www.pghzinefair.com $ign comes to Altar Bar Martin Rev, Dean WareNov. 4. ham, Eleanor Friedberger, Locals fill plenty of bills at Bradford Cox) supply live the intimate Pittsburgh Winery music for Warhol films in this fall — but it’s not all singer-songExposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films, Oct. 17 at the Carnegie Music Hall writer fare. Shows there range from folky (Mark Dignam and the House of Song, Sat., in Oakland. If you’re hanging onto summer a little Sept. 13) to rock (Bill Deasy, Sept. 24). A

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Halloween date from Gene the Werewolf also has plenty of promise. Some notable touring acts moving through town this fall include: Canadian chanteuse Jill Barber, whose album Fool’s Gold dropped this summer (Sept. 30 at Club Café); Brooklyn-via-the-Pacific-Northwest songwriter Mirah (Oct. 10 at Club Café); and Brooklyn-via-Norway crooner Sondre Lerche (Oct. 20 at Altar Bar). Calliope, the local folk-music society, is presenting its dual annual concert series — one at Carnegie Lecture Hall, the other at its Roots Cellar venue in Shadyside — starting {PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON NOCITO} in the fall. The Duhks play Carnegie LecSkrillex at Stage AE, Oct. 21 ture Hall Oct. 18; Boston singer-songwriter Ellis Paul kicks off the Roots Cellar season vocalist Oderus Urungus — comes to Mr. Sept. 25. Small’s Dec. 8. If your interests run a And that’s about it. Wait, bit heavier, don’t despair: what’s that? We promised you FALL ARTS There’s something for you. juggalos? Oh, right! Judas Priest headlines the You’re in luck: Not COMEDY Petersen Events Center on only does ICP bring its John Hodgman: Tonight! its Redeemer of Souls tour Shockfest tour (also feaOct. 23. The Rex on Oct. 18. Satanic Danish turing Mushroomhead, Theater, South Side. metal dude King Diamond Da Mafia 6ix and other www.rextheater.com comes to Stage AE Oct. 19. Psychopathic bands) to The Misfits hit Altar Bar Nov. Club Xtaza Oct. 1, but a couple 29, and for those into playing weeks later, on Oct. 28, former dress-up, Gwar — recuperated and Psychopathic duo Twiztid comes to back to touring after the March death of the Rex Theater.

HIGHLIGHT

Come learn about sustainable living and innovation in all forms. This zero-waste event will include earth-friendly food and product vendors, crafters, green living demonstrations, children’s activities and much more. Presented by Allegheny County Saturday, September 27 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Hartwood Acres Amphitheater Admission is free

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Celebrate C elebrate TEN YEARS of Gallery Crawls in the Cultural District We have grown from four venues in 2004, to over 30 in 2014. Party on the Black Top at 8th Street: Nate da Phat Barber, 5:30 to 8pm.

Special Guest Les Nubians, 8pm.

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AUTUMN EVENTS C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 Y E A R S

GALLERY WILLIE NELSON

& FAMILY

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2ND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS

VALENTINE MAKING WORKSHOP, 2.14

FELTED BUGS & CRITTERS A Two-Part Course

Alison Babusci, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Ages 7-14 | $20

LaVerne Kemp, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Children 8+, with adult | $50 per couple

This multi-media art workshop explores printmaking, painting, collage, and more, to create a grand collection of valentines! Bring a paint shirt and a smile.

PART I: 11.8 | PART 11: 12.13

Learn felting basics. Make felted coils, balls and sheets from dyed wool. Create one-of-a-kind critters that can become jewelry, or whatever you decide!

21+

VALENTINE HAPPY Y

FAMILY PUPPET M AKING WORKSHOP, 12.13

MAKINGHOUR

Highmark First Night® Pittsburgh 2015 FedEx Ground Parade

Cheryl Capezzuti, Instructor | 11am - 2pm All Ages | FREE!

0 Alison Babusci, Instructor | 6pm - 8pm | $20 Find love with friends, music and art! Choose from a variety of heart themed art experiences and go home with hand-made valentines!

Join artist and Parade Creative Director, Cheryl Capezzuti creating amazing puppets for the First Night Parade. Sign up to carry these creative creatures in the parade!

CERAMIC FOODS A Two-Part Course

PART I: 9.13 | PART 11: 9.20

Emily McMahon, Instructor | 11am-2pm Ages 15+ | $50 fee includes materials

Students build a plate of ceramic food using basic ceramics skills, hand building, and painting techniques. Basic color mixing covered. Come with photo references to inspire you!

ART TOGETHER, 9.13

Alison Babusci, Instructor | 11am - 12:30pm Children 4-6 with an adult | FREE!

Create multi-media masterpieces! Inspired by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater series, this workshop brings big and little artists together to explore favorite stories through art.

PITTSBURGH SKETCH CRAWL, 10.11.14 & 5.9.15

Rick Antolic, Instructor | 10am - 2pm All Ages, Under 16 accompanied by adult | Free!

A 4-hour drawing marathon! Bring a sketch book, drawing tools, lunch and a chair. Draw some of Downtown’s scenic plazas. Accomplished artist and illustrator, Rick Antolic,is on-hand at each scheduled location to assist.

GHOST STORIES, 10.11

Alison Babusci, Instructor | 12pm - 1pm Children 5+ | FREE!

Storyteller Alison K. Babusci’s most popular program features spine-tingling tales and hauntingly funny stories for all ages! Bring your PJ’s and a pillow if you like!

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13

FABRIC STENCILING, 3.14

21+ FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11

Saihou Njie, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Ages 14+ | $20

PUPPET HAPPY

Explore techniques of decorating fabric, including silkscreen, stamping, stencil, paint, ink, and markers.

MAKING HOUR

MOSAICS, 4.11

Cheryl Capezzuti, Instructor 5:30pm - 8pm | FREE

Emily McMahon, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Ages 14+ | $40 includes materials

Create amazing puppets for the First Night Parade with cocktails, hors d’ouevres, a DJ!

Learn a variety of techniques to create your own beautiful mosaic. Students should bring a hammer, work gloves and a small snack.

PLEIN AIR PAINTING WORKSHOP, 6.13

HOW TO APPROACH A GALLERY FOR REPRESENTATION, 1.10

Dianne Bauman, Instructor | 12pm - 2pm Ages 12+ | FREE! Join Pittsburgh Society of Artists’ Dianne Bauman in painting our city’s urban landscape during the Three Rivers Arts Festival. Dianne will demonstrate and explain the materials used and facilitate as participants engage in the activity as well as the steps necessary to paint in oils outdoors.

Nicole Capozzi, Instructor | 11am - 2pm $40

Learn how to approach an art gallery for representation and achieve success in this special artists’ workshop.

WHODUNIT? A MYSTERY WRITING WORKSHOP, 1.10

MASTER THE PORTRAIT, 7.11

Do you like mysteries? We’ll read tales, look for clues, and write short mystery stories. We’ll talk about the ways that great writers are like detectives.

Render a portrait drown from life using techniques of the old masters. Learn to master proportion, light and shadow, contour and perspective to capture your subject’s likeness.

Sonja Sweterlitsch, Instructor | 11am - 2pm All Ages | $40

Julie Albright, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Children 9+ | $20

TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER

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YOUNG YO YOU O WRITERS

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MAGIC DOT PAINTINGS, 11.8

Emily McMahon, Instructor | 11am - 2pm Ages 15+ | $40

Mystical painting without picking up a brush! Learn about American painter Vance Kirkland and produce a painting emulating his techniques.

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014

BELLY DANCE

EVERY THURSDAY, 6:30

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The Palace Theatre Highlights! Sep 13 Sep 17 Sep 18 Sep 19 Sep 20

Sat Wed Thu Fri Sat

7:30PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 8PM 2&7:30PM

Sep 26/27/28 Oct 4 Oct 9 Oct 11 Oct 14 Oct 15 Oct 17 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 30 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 7 Nov 8 Nov 21/22/23 Nov 28 Dec 5 Dec 6 Dec 7 Dec 9 Dec 13/14 Dec 18 Dec 19 Dec 20

Fr/Sa/Su Sat Thu Sat Tue Wed Fri Fri Sat Sun Thu Sat Sun Fri Sat Fr/Sa/Su Fri Fri Sat Sun Tue Sa/Su Thu Fri Sat

7:30/7:30/2PM 7:30PM 8PM 7PM 8PM 7:30PM 8PM 8PM 8PM 2PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 4PM 8PM 7:30PM 7:30/7:30/2PM 11AM 2&7:30PM 7:30PM 2&7PM 2&8PM 2&7PM/2PM 7:30PM 7:30PM 7:30PM

Latshaw: Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley Elko Concerts: The British Invasion Tour Latshaw Productions: The Bronx Wanderers Elko Concerts presents Steven Wright Latshaw: Steve Solomon’s My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish & I’m In Therapy STEVEN WRIGH Stage Right: Sleeping Beauty The Musical T River City Brass presents Legends Elko Concerts: An Intimate Evening/Clint Black Big Brothers Big Sisters/Laurel Region: The Clarks Latshaw Productions: Huey Lewis and The News Latshaw Productions : Engelbert Humperdinck Elko Concerts presents Robin Trower Elko Concerts: Girls Night: The Musical CLINT BLACK Elko: The Best Of Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson Latshaw Productions presents Kenny Rogers Latshaw Productions: The Beach Boys Westmoreland Symphony: Tchaikovsky Festival Break The Floor Productions: Shaping Sound Elko Concerts presents Don McLean River City Brass presents American Heroes Stage Right presents Fiddler on the Roof HUEY LEWIS & THE NEWS WCT: Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells! Latshaw Productions: The Motown Experience River City Brass: Christmas Brasstacular Latshaw: Oak Ridge Boys Christmas Night Out Latshaw: Latshaw Pops’ Christmas Memories WSO presents The Nutcracker Ballet Westmoreland Cultural Trust: A Christmas Carol THE BEACH BOYS Zodiac Productions: Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. WSO presents Home for the Holidays

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org PalacePA

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

The Intergalactic Nemesis: Target Earth, at the Byham Theater, Nov. 14

STAGE

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS ONSTAGE IN Pittsburgh this fall, it’s a

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER Sept. 26, 8 pm Sept. 27, 8 pm Sept. 28, 3 pm FOR TICKET INFO textureballet.org TICKETS $20 in advance $25 at the door

HIGHLIGHT

CHOREOGRAPHY: Alan Obuzor Kelsey Bartman Erin Halloran Alexandra Tiso Oscar Carrillo ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: Alan Obuzor

buyer’s market for both classics and irreverent musicals; fans of newer work might have to search a bit. In this season’s opening week, no fewer than three well-known titles bowed. PICT Classic Theatre stages Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (through Sept. 20), Frank McGuinness’ lyrical 1985 story of Irish soldiers fighting for England in World War I. Little Lake Theatre has John Patrick Shanley’s oft-produced PulitzerLeslie “Ezra” Smith’s Book of Ezra at Pittsburgh winner Doubt (through Sept. 20). And The Playwrights Theatre Co., Oct. 4-25 REP opens its season with Of Mice and Men (through Sept. 21), John Steinbeck’s a little Willy: In time for Halloween, PICT adaptation of his famed novel about toils and troubles with Macbeth (Oct. the best-laid plans of migrant 8-25), while Point Park’s Conserranch hands. vatory offers As You Like It Other titles are similar(Nov. 17-23). And ThroughFALL ARTS ly venerable. Pittsburgh line Theatre Co. goes preOPERA Public Theater opens Shakespeare with an adOtello, Verdi’s classic with Tennessee Wilaptation of Everyman adaptation of Shakespeare’s liams’ masterpiece The (Sept. 12-20), the famed tragedy, opens Pittsburgh Glass Menagerie (Oct. 15th-century stage alleOpera’s season, Nov. 8-16. 2-Nov. 2). More Wilgory, now given a postBenedum Center, Downtown. liams comes down the apocalyptic setting. 412-281-0912 or www. pittsburghopera.org tracks as barebones proMeanwhile, think of ductions catches A Streetthe three most popular ircar Named Desire (Nov. 20reverent musicals of recent Dec. 6). Carnegie Mellon Drama years — then find them all on stages August Wilson’s Seven Guitars Pittsburgh stages this fall. The Pittsburgh (Oct. 2-11). As usual, some troupes mix in Cultural Trust’s PNC Broadway Across

Photo by Katie Ging

CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014


COMING SOON FROM SETON HILL THEATRE & DANCE by Caryl Churchill October 3–11 by Molière November 14–22 December 5–6

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

Visit setonhill.edu/arts for tickets and information on upcoming art exhibits and music performances.

MICHELE NORRIS Eavesdropping on America's Conversation on Race Wednesday, October 1, 7 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall Tickets $10–$25 On sale now at carnegiemnh.org/race/norris Michele Norris is an award-winning journalist with more than two decades of experience. She is currently a host and special correspondent for National Public Radio. Previously, Norris served as co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, public radio's longest-running national program. Her research, writing, and programs about race and racism are world-renowned.

Presented by

A project of American Anthropological Association.

CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014

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FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

Lynne Wintersteller stars in The Glass Menagerie, at Pittsburgh Public Theater, Oct. 2-Nov. 2

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Ciaran Byrne (left) and Raife Baker in PICT Classic’s Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme, through Sept. 20

America season features the über- complete lack of musical ability. Smaller troupes, too, spotlight local popular The Book of Mormon (Sept. 23Oct. 5). Pitt’s Theatre Arts has that good- premieres. Off the Wall Productions has hearted if salty puppet musical, Avenue Q two: The Small Room at the Top of the (Nov. 6-23). And Point Park’s Conserva- Stairs (Oct. 17-Nov. 1), Carole Frechette’s tory decants the acclaimed 2001 satire 2008 drama about a woman who violates her new husband’s lone domestic Urinetown (Dec. 9-14). Of course, newer work will be under rule; and OR (Dec. 19-Jan. 10), Liz Duffy the lights too. City Theatre, which special- Adam’s 2009 neo-Restoration comedy izes in new plays, offers Outside Mullin- about poet, spy and pioneering 17thgar (Oct. 11-Nov. 2) — a domestic drama century professional female playwright set in rural Ireland and the latest from Aphra Behn. And Throughline stages The Doubt playwright John Patrick Last Days of Judas Iscariot (Oct. Shanley — and Smart Blonde 24-Nov. 1), a 2005 courtroom (Nov. 15-Dec. 21), a world drama set in Purgatory, FALL ARTS premiere about Hollyby Stephen Adly Guirgis wood star Judy Holliday, (The Motherfucker With HANDMADE ARCADE commissioned from the Hat). th 11 annual craft fair Willy Holtzman (The If local roots grab with 150 local and Morini Strad). you, try Book of Ezra national vendors, Dec. 6. The Public’s world (Oct. 4-25). Veteran acDavid L. Lawrence premiere is Ed Dixon’s tor and spoken-word Convention Center. www.handmade L’Hotel (Nov. 13-Dec. performer Leslie “Ezra” arcade.com 14), a comic fantasia Smith’s new one-man about a Paris hotel where show at Pittsburgh PlaySarah Bernhardt and Oscar wrights Theatre Co. is a comWilde, among other anachroing-of-age piece about growing nistic celebrities, meet Jim Morrison up black in America. and Victor Hugo. A celebrity’s life is also Lastly, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust mined in 21 (Oct. 17-26), Alki Steriopou- presents The Intergalactic Nemesis: Tarlos’s new play about Roberto Clemente, at get Earth — A Live-Action Graphic Novel the Conservatory. And The REP stages the (Nov. 14), a touring show in which three local premiere of Souvenir (Sept. 26-Oct. actors do a 1930s-style science-fiction 12), Stephen Temperley’s 2005 Broadway radio program live on stage, with comiccomedy about Florence Foster Jenkins, a book-style projections and live sound efreal-life socialite who once forged a sing- fects. It’s a new show and a throwback, ing career in New York City despite her all at once.

HIGHLIGHT

Are You Still There?

The Dirty Ball

Holiday Unwrapped

Remainder | Northside

October 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10

April 11

December 5, 6

June 26, 27

Between

For more information

www.attacktheatre.com

February 26, 28

Get access to these performances and more with the SEASON PASS! Season 20 tickets for two

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Learn more and purchase your Season Pass today at www.attacktheatre.com/seasonpass Attack Theatre’s Season 20 is made possible in part by: The McKinney Charitable Foundation of the PNC Charitable Trusts

Illustration by David Pohl @ House of Pingting

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014


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Gone Girl! But before we get all dark and twisty, let’s check into what’s happening locally. The first of the ’Burgh’s two longrunning festivals to return is the 29th annual Pittsburgh International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, now called Reel Q (www.reelQ.org). The fest runs Oct. 10-18, and will offer 14 full-length films. Opening night is Blackbird, with Mo’nique; 52 Tuesdays, about a teen dealing with a trans mom, closes. Soon after, the 33nd annual Three Rivers Film Festival (www.3rff.com) kicks off. The Filmmakers affair runs from Nov. 7-22. As always, variety is key, with short features, documentaries, indies Big Eyes, Dec. 25 and international cinema. The Andy Warhol Museum (www. (Oct. 18) and Bjork: Biophilia Live (Nov. 6). At the city’s newest venue, Rowwarhol.org) will screen more Unseen Treasures from the George Eastman house Cinema in Lawrenceville, upcoming theme weeks include: Coen House, including restored silent Brothers Week, Robin Wilfilms Tramp Tramp Tramp liams Tribute, Introduction (Sept. 26), The Unknown FALL ARTS to French Cinema and (Oct. 10), with Lon two weeks of Halloween Chaney, and Too Much COMEDY Arcade Comedy Theater programming. Johnson (Dec. 5). hosts the Blue Light Special Fall brings two The Hollywood Comedy Show for highly anticipated ad(www.thehollywood potty-mouthed comics, aptations of popular dormont.org) continues Oct. 4, Nov. 1, Dec. 6. books. On Oct. 3, it’s its rep programming, www.arcadecomedy Gone Girl (Oct. 3), David now with newly installed theater.com Fincher tackling Gillian Flydigital projection. The yearnn’s bestseller about a marlong Stanley Kubrick retrospecriage that goes very wrong. And tive continues, plus new indies 20,000 Days on Earth (Oct. 3), Housebound on Dec. 5, Reese Witherspoon dons hiking

HIGHLIGHT

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014


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FALL ARTS PREVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

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CP FALL ARTS PREVIEW 2014

Dumb and Dumber To, Nov. 14

Annie, Dec. 19

boots and a backpack for Wild, based on from Thomas Pynchon’s novel. Fall is also a busy season for biographCheryl Strayed’s memoir. Two musicals head for the screen: The ical films. On Sept. 26, Andre “3000” Ben1977 Broadway musical Annie gets an jamin dons a big ’Fro to play legendary update on Dec. 19, starring Quvenzhane guitarist Jimi Hendrix, in Jimi: All Is By My Side. Eddie Redmayne stars Wallis, and Rob Marshall tries as physicist Stephen Hawkhis hand at adapting Stephen FALL ARTS ing in the bio-pic The TheoSondheim’s fairty-tale-ish ry of Everything, and Jon musical Into the Woods CIRQUE Stewart helms Rosewa(Dec. 25). Cirk La Putyka, a 20-person troupe ter, the story of a jourOther reworks infrom Prague, does acrobatics, nalist abducted in Iran; clude more dystopia for dance, puppetry and live music, both films open Nov. 7. the teens in The Maze Nov. 15. Hillman Center for Benedict Cumberbatch Runner (Sept. 19), from Performing Arts, Shadyside Academy, Fox Chapel. steps into the brogues James Dashner’s novel, www.shadyside of influential British and a reboot of TV’s The academy.org mathematician Alan TurEqualizer (Sept. 26), staring in The Imitation Game ring Denzel Washington. (Nov. 21). And Christmas Day ofMove over, Charlton Heston: Christian Bale is the new Moses, in Exo- fers three high-profile bio-pics: Selma, dus: Gods and Kings (Dec. 12). Also open- in which David Oyelowo stars as Martin ing that day is Inherent Vice, Paul Thom- Luther King Jr.; Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken, as Anderson’s 1970s crime caper adapted about Olympic star and WWII POW Louis

HIGHLIGHT


Zamperini; and Big Eyes, Tim Burton’s (Dec. 25). There are also some comedy profile of Margaret Keane, famous for sequels no one asked for: Dumb and Dumber To (Nov. 14), Horrible Bosses 2 her sentimental “big-eye” paintings. Gearing up for awards season are (Nov. 26), Night at the Museum: Secret several buzzed-about dramas. Robert of the Tomb (Dec. 19) and Hot Tub Time Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall play spar- Machine 2 (Dec. 25). The additional material you’ve been ring father and son in the legal drama The Judge (Oct. 10). Alejandro Gonzalez waiting for: The freaky doll from The Inarritu’s Birdman (Oct. 17) stars Mi- Conjuring gets a prequel with Annabelle (Oct. 3); the revolt gets real in The chael Keaton as an actor weary of Hunger Games: Mockingjay — playing a winged superhero FALL ARTS Part 1 (Nov. 21); and the varcharacter. Newly serious ious creatures of Middle actor Matthew McCoFASHION Earth finally wrap things naughey stars in ChrisThe fifth annual Pittsburgh up in Peter Jackson’s The topher Nolan’s astroFashion Week features Hobbit: The Battle of Five naut drama Interstellar, designer showcases, Armies (Dec. 17). opening Nov. 7. And on runway shows and more, Lastly, for the younger Nov. 14, the docudrama Sept. 22-28. www. set, there’s Boxtrolls (Sept. Foxcatcher recounts the pittsburghfashion week.com 26), a stop-motion animabizarre shooting at John du tion about a family of tiny Pont’s wrestling camp, and creatures who live beneath the stars Steve Carrell. streets. Confounding marquees everyFor laughs, there’s This Is Where I Leave You (Sept. 19), the ensemble fam- where is the family comedy Alexander ily-dysfunction comedy headed by Jason and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bateman and Tina Fey. On Oct 24, catch Bad Day (Oct. 10), with Steve Carrell. The cranky Bill Murray as the world’s worst Penguins of Madagascar get their own babysitter, in St. Vincent. And for geo- spin-off (Nov. 26), and the toy bear from political snickers, Seth Rogen and James the classic British kids’ tale gets aniFranco plan to assassinate North Korean mated for the big screen in Paddington Leader Kim Jong-un, in The Interview (Dec. 25).

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HIGHLIGHT

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G ORI INAL

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Author Kent Nelson, Oct. 2 at the National Aviary

READINGS {{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

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ists to local poets, there’ll be plenty of literature to hear between now and the holidays. Pittsburgh’s biggest reading series, Monday Night Lectures, kicks off Sept. 22 with James McBride (The Color of Water); McBride arrives on the heels of his National Book Award for The Good Lord Bird, his novel about abolitionist John Brown. The Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures series also includes visits to the Carnegie Music Hall by: Simon Winchester (Oct. 6), the nonfiction author behind {PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER SCHATTEN} The Professor and the Madman and this Elizabeth Gilbert, Nov. 3 at Monday Night Lectures year’s The Men Who United the States; Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert Master Letters), on Sept. 25; nonfiction (Nov. 3) with her new novel, The Signa- author Adam Hochschild (King Leopture of All Things; and revered novelist old’s Ghost), on Oct. 16; and fiction writer Richard Ford (Dec. 8). NoViolet Bulawayo, on Nov. 20. The UniPAL also has a Kids & Teens program. versity of Pittsburgh Press, meanwhile, Featured this fall are illustrator Jon Klas- hosts Kent Nelson (Oct. 2), the Coloradosen and writer Mac Barnett (Oct. 26), the based writer who won this year’s Drue guys behind Extra Yarn whose new Heinz Literature Prize, for his shortpicture book is Sam & Dave Dig story collection The Spirit Bird: a Hole. And Wicked author Stories; for thematic reaGregory Maguire (Nov. sons, the reading’s at the FALL ARTS 9) returns with Egg & National Aviary. Spoon, a book inspired It wouldn’t be fall EXHIBIT National Aviary at Night by Russian folk tales. without our annual is a free open house Just out back of the visit from essayist Dawith cash bar (21 and over), Carnegie, in the Frick vid Sedaris (Oct. 21), Oct. 16 and Nov. 20. Fine Arts Building, the who stops this year at 412-323-7235 or Pittsburgh Contemporary Carnegie Music Hall. www.aviary.org Writers series gets going, And author Robert D. Katoo. This University of Pittsplan (Dec. 6), a foreign-polbu r gh p r ogram welc o mes icy expert and national correaward-winning guests including spondent for The Atlantic, speaks at poet Lucie Brock-Broido (A Hunger: The Shadyside Academy’s Hillman Center for

HIGHLIGHT

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHIA MESSINA}

Huang Xiang at City of Asylum, Oct. 18

James McBride, Sept. 22 at Monday Night Lectures

the Performing Arts, in Fox Chapel. monthly series Versify, which continues City of Asylum/Pittsburgh’s fall offer- Sept. 20 with top local poets Lynn Emings begin with I Don’t Know What I’d manuel, Joy Katz and Ellen Smith. And on Do, If I Couldn’t Speak My Mind (Sun., Oct. 11, the store hosts local poets pubSept. 14), its annual free-speech-themed lished in U.S. 1 Worksheets, the annual community reading. Also perform- journal of the venerable U.S. 1 Poets’ Coing that week is Botswana-born operative: The locals include Joan spoken-word poet T.J. Dema Bauer, Anne Curran, Richard (Tue., Sept. 16). But the big St. John and Arlene Weiner. FALL ARTS event under the group’s There’s even poetry Alphabet City Tent, on at Dormont’s Hollywood EXHIBIT Race: Are We So Different?, the North Side, is the Theater. On Sept. 19, the touring exhibit about living Exiled Voices Megacelebrities including with race in America, continues Reading (Oct. 18). It’s actors David Conrad through Oct. 27. Carnegie a 10th-anniversary rea n d P at r ic k J ordan Museum of Natural History, will read as part of union of all five authors Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.carnegie The Troopers Rode On. the group has sheltered mnh.org It’s a tribute to the gritty, from persecution in their plain-spoken (and often home countries, including very funny) poetry of Jimmy Chinese poet Huang Xiang, Cvetic, the former Allegheny County novelist Horacio Castellanos Moya, poet Khet Mar, novelist Israel Centeno police detective now better known as a poet and boxing instructor, and an ocand fiction writer Yaghoub Yadali. Local poets get their due this season casional CP contributor. The show benas well. East End Book Exchange, for one, efits the Western Pennsylvania Police has a full slate of readings, including its Athletic Association.

HIGHLIGHT

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2014 – 2015

Monday Night Lecture Series • Made Possible by the Drue Heinz Trust

Sept. 22, 2014 Oct. 6, 2014

James MCBRIDE

Oct. 20, 2014 Nov. 3, 2014

UT!

SOLD O Jodi Simon WINCHESTER PICOULT

Elizabeth GILBERT

Nov. 17, 2014

Andrew ROBERTS

James McBride opens the season with his signature porkpie hat and his 2013 National Book Award Winner, The Good Lord Bird. Based on the true story of abolitionist John Brown, the novel is irreverent, funny and provocative – like McBride himself.

Simon Winchester has a worldwide following for his books that chronicle huge, game-changing events in history. The Men Who United The States reveals surprising stories of innovators who welded our nation together, some famous, some forgotten.

Jodi Picoult says that the subjects of her books keep her awake at night. Known for compelling plots and detailed research, Picoult arrives with her latest pageturner, Leaving Time, about grief and loss as experienced by humans and elephants alike.

Dec. 8, 2014

Feb. 9, 2015

Mar. 2, 2015 Mar. 23, 2015 Apr. 13, 2015

Richard FORD

Jesmyn WARD

Sheri FINK

Richard Ford told us Sheri Fink is a Jesmyn Ward lost five he was done with his Pulitzer Prize winning young men dear to her iconic character, Frank journalist and a between 2000 and 2004. Bascombe. Now, Frank medical doctor. Her This former National returns in a new novel, riveting account of Book Award winner Let Me Be Frank With five days inside a New delivers an emotional You, where he faces Hurricane Sandy memoir, Men We Reaped, which asks Orleans hospital during Katrina and a world undone by calamity. us to examine the loss of young black raises essential end-of-life issues to Like Frank, Ford is better than ever! men in communities across America. consider.

Presented by:

Elizabeth Gilbert has created an unforgettable heroine, Alma, the 19th century botanist and scholar of The Signature Of All Things. Full of flora, fauna, and characters, this epic novel celebrates Gilbert’s return to fiction and her mastery of storytelling.

Dennis LEHANE

Andrew Roberts is a world-renowned historian and author of Masters & Commanders and The Storm of War. He arrives here with a new biography, Napoleon, “from the cradle to the grave,” based on new cutting-edge scholarship.

Alexandra FULLER

Alexandra Fuller has a Dennis Lehane looks Pittsburgh connection like a tough guy from and a new memoir about Mystic River, one of his marriage and divorce, bestselling mysteries. This coming in January 2015. award-winning writer A critic predicts, “it of Live By Night arrives with his Boston accent, his amazing will sit by Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight as a major literary memoir personal story, and his anticipated with huge universal appeal.” new novel, World Gone By.

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OCTOBER 11 – NOVEMBER 2, 2014

OUTSIDE MULLINGAR A Broadway comedy from the Pulitzer, Oscar,® and Tony®-winning author of Doubt and Moonstruck

NOVEMBER 15 – DECEMBER 21, 2014

SMART BLONDE A music-filled portrait from the author of The Morini Strad

JANUARY 24 – FEBRUARY 15, 2015

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MR. JOY A poignant solo show by the author of Through The Night and Breath & Imagination

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LARGEST SIZE SELECTION OF BRAS 32A-50N Halloween Cos Costumes • Adult Novelties Black & Gold Merchandise Authentic Bla Bridal Accessories • Belts Acc Evening Bags • Jewelry EEvening Gloves Lingerie up to 6X

11604 KELEKET DRIVE PENN HILLS • 412-243-5214 62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

ALTAR BAR. Heffron Drive Ft. Kendall Schmidt. Strip District. 412-263-2877. APIS MEAD & WINERY. Gone South (acoustic). Carnegie. 412-478-9172. BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CLUB CAFE. Reptar, New Madrid. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dead Rider, Broghton’s Rules, Triangle & Rhino, Limited. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. One Sweet Burgh (Dave Matthews tribute), City Love Story. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PARK HOUSE. Round Black Ghosts. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. ekoostic hookah, theCause. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. The Bots Bound by Fate, Klaymore, Curseborn, Greywalker, Something Involving A Monkey. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 13 ALTAR BAR. Gungor. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BAKERY SQUARE. Moby, Portugal. The Man, Phosephorescent, Talib Kweli, Motion City Soundtrack, Misterwives, Raury, 1,2,3, The Red

Western, Tairey, Green Velvet, Z-Trip, Mayer Hawthorne, Buku, Pittsburgh Track Authority. Thrival Innovation + Music Festival. www.thrivalfestival.com. Larimer. BENEDUM CENTER. Beatlemania Now! Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLUB CAFE. Melissa Ferrick (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. Gone South, Rock Pitt. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Flysum. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EIDE’S ENTERTAINMENT. City Steps, The Nox Boys, amplifiers, Grand Piano. Strip District. 412-294-6255. ELRAMA TAVERN. Churchview Saints. 412-384-3630. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Wild Girls Gone, Yeux Vis, Henry C. Rial, Satyr/Elfheim. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Filthy Low Down. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

THE HOP HOUSE. Trainwreck. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Stone Cold Killer. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Bell X1, Gabriel Kahane. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Mark Dignam & his band The House Of Song. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE SHOP. Lungs Face Feet, Working Poor, Come Holy Spirit, Common Visions, Pandemic Pete. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Action Camp, Motel Beds, Them Labs, Bryan Vamp. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. LOVEBETTIE, Jimbo & The Soupbones, The Routines. South Side. 412-481-8800. TARENTUM EAGLES. Daniels & McClain. Tarentum.

MP 3 MONDAY KILLING THING

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Killing Thing; download the band’s song

“Weathered” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Randy Baumann’s Thunderbird Ramble. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TUGBOAT’S. Guitar Zack, Misaligned Mind. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 12

MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. ANDYS. Hewlett, Anderson North Side. 412-761-3302. & Waslousky. Downtown. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, 412-773-8884. DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. BAKERY SQUARE. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Moby, Portugal. The Man, South Side. 412-431-2825. Phosephorescent, RUGGER’S PUB. Talib Kweli, Motion 80s Night w/ DJ City Soundtrack, Connor. South Side. Misterwives, Raury, 412-381-1330. . w w w 1,2,3, The Red Western, RUSTY BARREL typaper ci h g p Tairey, Green Velvet, SALOON. Pittsburgh .com Z-Trip, Mayer Hawthorne, DJ Company. Top 40. Buku, Pittsburgh Track South Side. 412-720-5647. Authority. Thrival Innovation + Music Festival. www.thrivalfestival. com. Larimer. BELVEDERE’S. TRL // PGH. CLUB CAFE. Sean Rowe, Jx4 & ADAM C. Lawrenceville. Tom Breiding. South Side. 412-687-2555. 412-431-4950. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul GARFIELD ARTWORKS. & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Jack Swing, Leroy & Jacob, Man Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. Eating Fiji Mermaids. Garfield. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-361-2262. 412-621-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. End CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Men, Carny Stomp, Bad Custer. Movements, DJ White Lyon. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Homewood. 412-657-2279. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Senses DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Fail, No Bragging Rights, Knuckle 412-431-8800. Puck. Millvale. 866-468-3401. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. SMILING MOOSE. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. Cymbals Eat Guitars. South Side. 412-431-5282. 412-431-4668.

SUN 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 13

ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Sundays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

An Evening of Music

SUN 14 SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

WED 17 MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

OCTOBER 3

HIP HOP/R&B

The

THU 11

w/Ferdinand the Bull & special guest The Weedrags

Mamadrones

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Poogie Bell Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BLUES FRI 12

Presented By

KENDREW’S.32-20 Blues Band. 724-375-5959. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blues Bombers. Emsworth. 412-761-6700.

abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

SAT 13 BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Monaca. 412-788-2333.

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

CONTINUES ON PG. 64

MON 15

724-400-6044

ALTAR BAR. Metronomy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. UNION PROJECT. Suavity’s Mouthpiece, Midge Crickett, The Spectres, Nevhar Anhar. Suavity’s Mouthpiece CD release. Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

VOICE OF SOUTHSIDE

TUE 16 31ST STREET PUB. Hocico, Hardwire, Reinforced, Godophile. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Hawthorne Heights, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Brendan James, Mikey Wax (Early) The Detroit Cobras, Brazilian Wax (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. White Denim, Clear Plastic Masks. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Teenage Kicks, Driven Lifeless. South Side. 412-431-4668.

KARAOKE CONTEST STARTS THURSDAY, SEPT 11TH

$CASH15PR0IZE

WED 17 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Panda Bear, Blues Control. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. The British Invasion 50th Anniversary Tour. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. REX THEATER. Parachute. South Side. 412-381-6811.

Winner each week moves on to

$2.50 COORS LIGHTS AND $3 FIREBALL SHOTS

the Finals!

EVERY THURSDAY

DJS

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

THU 11

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

N E W S

412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 63

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

FOOTBALL IS HERE! NFL SUNDAY

2

FREE

Ticket & College Games

BOURBON TASTING

$ DRINKS

––– Friday, September 12th –––

-BASIL HAYDEN’S-BOOKER’S- KNOB CREEK-KNOB CREEK RYE8-10pm - Cheers! 8 1908 CARSON STREET SOUTHSIDE 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

FRI-SAT

10PM-MIDNIGHT

2328 EE. Ca Carson arsson St St. SOUTHSIDE 412.481.0852

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

PITTSBURGH FEDERATION OF TEACHERS. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. South Side. 412-937-1605 x 227. PUZZLER’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. McKeesport. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Jimmy Adler Band. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

JAZZ THU 11

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

COLUMBUS {FRI., SEPT. 12}

FRI 12 ANDYS. Paul Cosentino. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 724-691-0536.

SAT 13 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

Bear in Heaven A&R Music Bar

PHILADELPHIA {MON., OCT. 20}

Courtney Barnett with San Fermin Union Transfer

WASHINGTON, D.C. {FRI., NOV. 07}

Chrissie Hynde Lincoln Theatre

SUN 14

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

4504 BUTLER STREET

MON 15

THURSDAY SEPT 11/10PM

412.326.5964

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

WE’LL CUT YOU. 64

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPERS, SOUL KITCHEN, SKINNY TIE CLUB THURSDAY SEPT 18/10PM

AMRCNDREAMING THURSDAY SEPT 25/10PM

DAILY GRIND $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. Matthew Shipp & Michael Bisio. Oakland. 412-361-2262.

TUE 16 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series with Flexure. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 17

FRI 12 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mustard Courage. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 13

LEAF & BEAN. Bill Toms, Marc Reisman. Strip District. 412-434-1480. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. RIVERS CASINO. Dixeland. North Side. 610-962-1600.

CLASSICAL

FULL WED 17 LIST E ALLEGHENY ELKS IN LODGE #339. ONwLww. paper pghcitym .co

Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE

ACOUSTIC

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

COUNTRY

SAT 13

ANDYS. James McClellan. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

THU 11

Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

THU 11

FRI 12 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ

MOONDOG’S. The Mavens. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SUN 14 ACADEMY CHAMBER ENSEMBLE. Old St. Luke’s, Scott. 412-969-7072.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 12 RIVERS CASINO. Mark Ferrari Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 13 UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

SUN 14 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Tom Breiding. Oakland. 412-622-3151. HAMBONE’S. Steel City Ukulele Club. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

September 10 - 16 The Hunts

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Used and Taking Back Sunday STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

THURSDAY 11

Instead of Sleeping / Jesse Denaro SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Spoon CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412462-3444. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 13

Skeletonwitch, Ghoul, Black Anvil, Lady Beast

Beatles 50th Anniversary Tribute Relive the ‘64 Concert

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. T ickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 7:30p.m.

FRIDAY 12 Strip District World Festival

+ Music Festival

22ND TO 27TH STREET Strip District. Free event. For more info visit stripdistrictworldfestival. com. Through Sept. 14.

BAKERY SQUARE East Liberty. All ages show. Tickets: thrivalfestival.com. Through Sept. 14.

Orchestra with Anne-Sophie Mutter

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-481-4447. With special guest City Love Story. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866468-3401. 8p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Sept. 13.

WEST NEWTON. All ages event. Tickets: pittsburghrenfest.com. 10:30a.m. Through Sept. 28.

MONDAY 15 Metronomy

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or The Pittsburgh Symphony 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

One Sweet Burgh Celebrating 20 years of Under the Table & Dreaming

Comedian Matt Stanton

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. Senses Fail 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustMR. SMALLS THEATRE arts.org. 8p.m. Millvale. 412-481-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone THRIVAL Innovation or 866-468-3401. 7p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 14

PHOTO CREDIT: DAVID M MccCLISTER

WEDNESDAY 10

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

TUESDAY 16

Willie Nelson & Family BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Dixie’s Tupperware Party Astronautalis & Band CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: clocabaret.com. Through Oct. 12.

Willie Nelson & Family TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 BENEDUM CENTER

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Celebrate Fall THIS WEEKEND TRUNK SHOWS

Introducing our Fall 2014 Collection (9/12 & 9/13) AETREX

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST.

ALLEN EDMONDS (9/12 & 9/13) MERRELL (9/13) ROCKPORT (9/12 & 9/13)

(9/12) ALEGRIA (9/13 & 9/14) ECCO

412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

Visit www. www.GORDONSHOES GORDONSHOES.com .com for a Full Listin Listing tin of Trunk Show Events N E W S

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PAIRED {BY AL HOFF}

TRIP TO ITALY IS AN ENJOYABLE, EASYGOING BIT OF DROLLERY, WITH PLENTY OF WIT

Viewers might find Charlie McDowell’s relationship dramedy The One I Love intriguing, infuriating or a little of both. It’s a bit hard to talk about without revealing important twists. It begins in a straightforward manner, with Ethan (Mark Duplass) and Sophie (Elisabeth Moss) trying to mend their broken relationship in a therapist’s office. Each is wistful about how romantic their lives used to be, and the seemingly impossible task of bringing that blissful state back. The therapist (Ted Danson) prescribes a weekend away at a remote and luxurious country house.

Unhappily married: Elisabeth Moss and Mark Duplass

ON THE

CP APPROVED

It’s a retreat with some odd properties, as both Ethan and Sophie discover that the guesthouse contains the idealized duplicates of their partners. Thus, Ethan is delighted when the other-Sophie makes him forbidden bacon, and other-Ethan says just the right thing to make Sophie feel appreciated. This works fine as a metaphor/therapy exercise, as the two bounce between imperfect and perfect versions of their relationship. Of the two, Ethan is more analytical about what’s happening, while Sophie simply luxuriates in the unexplained happiness — reactions that perhaps mirror their ongoing incompatibility. Duplass and Moss play both versions of themselves, with only small changes in costume and manner. But it’s enough for viewers to follow along … until there is another development. The film proffers an explanation that makes this two-handed exploration of a relationship somewhat muddled. Or maybe not: There’s a certain logic if viewers are willing to make the leap. Starts Fri., Sept. 12. Regent Square AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NO O GOOD GOO OO OD ED DEED Taraji P. Henson loans her phone to Idris Elba, ba, who repays this act of kindness ndness by terrorizing rizing her family. ily. Sam Miller’s r’s thriller er starts Fri., i., Sept. 12. 2.

ROAD AGAIN {BY AL HOFF}

I

F YOU ENJOYED 2009’s The Trip, you’ll

enjoy The Trip to Italy. Michael Winterbottom’s new docu-comedy has more or less the same set-up as the first: British funnymen Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon play lightly fictionalized versions of themselves, ostensibly on a food-criticism tour, but mostly just riffing on topics great and small. This time, the action has been relocated from northern England to Italy. Needless to say, the weather is much sunnier. Having seen The Trip is not a prerequisite for enjoying Italy; in fact, newcomu ers might find the material fresher. Even tthe pair starts the film carping about sequels before finishing up at a seaside hotel in Capri. In between there are riffs h on cannibalizing Olympians and Alanis Morisette’s Jagged Little Pill; telephonic M check-ins with family members; further analysis of the actors who have porttrayed James Bond; and trouble with Rome’s infamous roadways. (“They’ve had 2,000 years to sort out their traffic h system,” huffs Coogan.)

Benchwarmers Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon

Death is another perennial topic, much of it filtered through the pair’s appreciation for Romantic poets; they flirt with a recreation of Shelley’s funeral in Viareggio. A visit to Pompeii finds Brydon engaged in a funny-but-serious conversation with a plaster volcano victim in a vitrine, with Brydon deploying his signature “Small Man in a Box” shtick for … a man in a box.

THE TRIP TO ITALY DIRECTED BY: Michael Winterbottom STARRING: Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon Manor

CP APPROVED Five years on, the roles have slightly reversed, with Coogan more settled and Brydon steering into rougher domestic waters. But the pair wears their middle-aged insecurities as plainly as colorful holiday shirts. Such concerns are “solved” without much self-reflection in the traditional manner —alco-

hol, the lazy bit of unfaithfulness, and sniping about the other’s career while bragging up their own. Coogan, reciting his eventual eulogy, claims six BAFTA awards. Brydon corrects him: “You only have five.” “I’ll have six by then,” Coogan bites back. The two aren’t quite man-boys, but there’s still a resistance to moving fully into adulthood, even at their advanced ages. Plenty of sensitivity is masked in humor — Brydon is incapable of quoting poetry unless he is using a funny voice — and the families and careers each man cares about are often blithely dismissed. But none of this should suggest that Trip to Italy isn’t an enjoyable, easygoing bit of drollery, with plenty of wit and yet another round of dueling James Bond impressions. If there’s a caveat, it’s that foodies should lower their expectations. There’s some interstitial footage of fabulous-looking food being prepared, but Coogan and Brydon’s “reviews” are limited to “very nice” and “lovely.” A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


Bruce’s stripper wife, Honey. The 1974 film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about addiction and recovery. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 14. Regent Square

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

ALIENS. The 1986 follow-up to the 1979 outerspace thriller Alien finds Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) engaged in the mother of a battle against some freaky monsters. James Cameron directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 17. AMC Loews. $5

NEW DOLPHIN TALE 2. Charles Martin Smith’s family film is “inspired by real events” at a Florida marine-rescue facility, and it doubles down on the “melodramatic crises resolved in heartwarming manner” of 2011’s Dolphin Tale. The plucky teens from the first film are now more or less running the aquarium, while having on-land adolescent trials; the tail-less dolphin Winter is depressed, having lost a tank buddy to old age; and the facility is in financial trouble. Plus, there are three new injured sea creatures: a giant turtle, a sunburned dolphin and an orphaned baby dolphin. Get ready to care — a lot! It’s all very cheesy and manipulative, but how can you hate on a real-life tail-less dolphin that gamely plays itself? Be sure to sit through the credits for the actual footage of the film’s dramatized rescues. Starts Fri., Sept. 12. (Al Hoff) THE DROP. Tom Hardy and James Gandolfini star in this crime drama, adapted from the Dennis Lehane novel, about mob moneylaundering. Michael R. Roskam directs. Starts Fri., Sept. 12. GOD HELP THE GIRL. Stuart Murdoch, of the Scottish band Belle and Sebastian, writes and directs this indie coming-ofage musical-dramedy, which is right in his wheelhouse: Three sensitive, musically gifted, vintage-clothes-wearing youth meet and flit around Glasgow one summer, sort of being a band while inching forward in life somewhat bittersweetly. Yes, it’s quite a bit like a B&S tune come to life, so fans of the band will likely be enraptured regardless. But, on its own, God is a low-key, winsome film, both sunny and faintly sad; it has a keen sense of how fleeting and fairly miraculous it is when friends, fun and meaningful times all converge in a divine, if minor-key, harmony. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12; 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 14; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 17. Hollywood (AH)

CP

THE KILLING. Stanley Kubrick directed this influential nonlinear 1956 crime thriller about a meticulously planned racetrack heist that goes awry. (Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs is one of this film’s direct descendants.) Gang leader Sterling Hayden heads a cast that includes Marie Windsor and Elisha Cook Jr. spouting dialogue penned by hard-boiled pulpster Jim Thompson. Continues the Hollywood’s year-long retrospective of Kubrick films. 7 p.m. Thu. Sept. 18; 9:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20; and 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21. Hollywood (AH)

CP

God Help the Girl Orleans. Michael Dunaway’s 2012 doc about Ray Cannata, who vows to eat at all 742 New Orleans restaurants. Q&A with Cannata follows the screening. 5:15 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

impacted when her lover, upset over conditions at his workplace, flees to the West. The film begin a fall series of German films, keyed to the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In German, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 11. Cathedral of Learning (room 324), University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Free. 412-648-2614

THE BIG LEBOWSKI. In the Coen brothers’ comic 1998 homage to Raymond Chandler, a bloated hippie, Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges), gets mixed up with dirty rugs, kidnap and ransom; another guy called Jeff Lebowski; and a couple of intense bowling games. The free event begins at 6 p.m. with food and beverages available for purchase; music from Jimbo and the Soupbones at 7 p.m.; and film screening at 8:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10. Rooftop at 677 Penn Ave. (bring your own chair), Downtown

DRIVE-IN MONSTERAMA. The 8th annual twoday, all-night, monster-movie event returns. On Fri., Sept. 12, it’s a tribute to Italian horror director Mario Bava, with Planet of the Vampires (1965), Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs (1966), Kill Baby Kill (1966) and House of Exorcism (1974). The Sat., Sept 13, program kicks off with a Christopher-Lee-asDracula double feature — Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970) and Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) — followed by Trog (1970) and The House That Screamed (1969). Gates open at 7 p.m. Also, 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 7. $10 per person each night (kids under 12 free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. Route 66, North Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein.com

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Back to School: Fast Times at Ridgemont High (classic 1982 teen comedy, among the best of this genre), Sept. 10. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (the 2001 film that introduced us Harry, and Harry to Hogwarts), Sept. 10-11. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (sometimes school is best when you just don’t go), Sept. 10-11. The Breakfast Club (who knew detention could be so fun, and life-affirming?), Sept. 11. Mean Girls (Lindsay Lohan navigates girl cliques in this 2004 comedy), Sept. 11. Nosferatu (super-creepy 1922 silent film adapting the Dracula legend), 9:45 p.m. Thu., Sept. 11. Cat People (gorgeous, spooky film from 1942 about a woman who may also be a dangerous big cat), Sept. 12-18. Despicable Me (relive when you first fell in love with the minions), Sept. 12-14, Sept. 15 and Sept. 18. Let the Right One In (creepy, beautiful 2008 Swedish film about a teenage vampire), Sept. 12-14, and Sept. 16-18. Lawrenceville Films: I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951 film tells the mostly true story of Lawrenceville’s own Matt Cvetic), Sept. 12-14, Sept. 16 and Sept. 18. She’s Out of My League (2009 rom-com starring Jay Baruchel shot in Larryville), Sept. 12-15, and Sept. 17-18. Money for Nothing (shot in L’ville, this 1993 comedy features John Cusack and a stray million dollars), 9:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12. Special event: The Man Who Ate New

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THE IRON GIANT. While kids will dig this sweet story about a giant robot from the sky, there’s plenty for the adults to enjoy in Brad Bird’s 1999 animated feature based on a tale from the late poet Ted Hughes. The iron man doesn’t just land in Maine; he lands smack dab in the middle of the Cold War, and all its attendant weapons hysteria and “normalizing” activities. For kids, it’s a simple tale of redeeming friendship; for adults, some trenchant commentary on weapons disarmament. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12; 3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13; and 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 14. Hollywood (AH)

CP

Dolphin Tale 2 ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST. Jack Nicholson stars in Milos Forman’s 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel. A rebellious man thinks he can cheat the criminal-justice system by pleading insanity and serving time at a mental institution. But things — including an insurrection against the asylum’s dictatorial Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) — don’t go as well as he hoped. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10. AMC Loews. $5 DIVIDED HEAVEN. Konrad Wolf directs this 1963 East German drama in which a woman’s life is

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KEOMA. Franco Nero stars as the titular antihero in this 1976 Western directed by Enzo G. Castellari, in which a soldier returns home from the Civil War to find his hometown being run by a tyrant. This film continues the monthly “Spaghetti Western Dinner Series,” which offers patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 18. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@ yahoo.com. GLOBAL SHIFT FESTIVAL. The four-day event focusing on global social change presents seven films: The Revolutionary Optimists (7 p.m. Thu., Sept. 18), about adolescents in Calcutta; Without a Fight (7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 19), about soccer in Africa; Finding Mike, about suicide prevention, and The No Name Painting Association, about Chinese artists (3 p.m. Sat., Sept. 20); Deflated, kid and a toy ball, and Before You Know It, older gay Americans (5 p.m. Sat. Sept. 20); and Project Wild Thing, encouraging kids to go outside (1 and 3 p.m. Sun., Sept. 21; free). Point Park University, Downtown. Unless noted, films are $5. For tickets and more information, see www.globalshiftfestival.com. ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

MAN ON THE TRAIN. Patrice Leconte’s 2002 crime drama about a gangster and a teacher continues a series of foreign films. In French, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $3. 412-766-1668. THE KING OF COMEDY. “Scorsese Summer School” continues with this 1983 dark comedy about a wannabe comedian (Robert DeNiro) obsessed with a talk-show host (Jerry Lewis). Scorsese’s filmmaking techniques to be discussed afterward. 9:15 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 LENNY. Dustin Hoffman stars as the groundbreaking and troubled comedian Lenny Bruce in this gritty bio-pic directed by Bob Fosse. Valerie Perrine plays

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(2014) 9/10 @ 7:30pm, 9/11 @ 7:30pm When you think you’ve gone far enough, go farther.

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[DANCE]

ICONIC MOVES

“MY LIFE WAS NEVER SO … EVENTFUL.”

Pittsburgh dance audiences are treated to a host of great performances annually from new and established artists, some with global renown. Rarer are visits by living legends. Dancer, choreographer and actress Carmen De Lavallade qualifies. De Lavallade brings her acclaimed new one-woman show, As I Remember It, to the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater for two shows this week. The Pittsburgh premiere of the intimate, hour-long multimedia selfportrait, told through dance, film and personal writings, traces De Lavallade’s astonishing seven-decade career. A native of Los Angeles, De Lavallade joined the Lester Horton Dance Theater in 1949. She went on to dance with Alvin Ailey, whom she is credited with introducing to dance. She has performed with countless other greats including Agnes de Mille, Martha Graham, Josephine Baker, Lena Horne and husband Geoffrey Holder. As an actress she appeared in plays, on television and in films including 1954’s Carmen Jones, with Dorothy Dandridge, and 1959’s Odds Against Tomorrow, with Harry Belafonte. Interviewed by phone from New York, De Lavallade called As I Remember It “a line drawing of my life.” She created it in collaboration with a former student of hers at Yale School of Drama, director Joe Grifasi, and co-writer/dramaturge Talvin Wilks. Set to music by saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom, the show “doesn’t follow a timeline,” says De Lavallade. With a life and career as full as hers, De Lavallade explains, she had to leave out many things. “Those we saved for the book,” she quips. Still, audiences will experience the great artist dancing and recounting her triumphs and struggles growing up in an era when your skin color dictated whom you could perform with. “In the 1950s there were things you could and couldn’t do,” says De Lavallade. “On prime-time television you couldn’t dance with people of other races.” Once, De Lavallade was scheduled to dance a ballet with Glen Tetley on The Ed Sullivan Show, but was barred from doing so because Tetley was white. At 83, De Lavallade still moves and looks great. She says it has been a challenge keeping up with her career and performing. “Physically we age, yes, but you have to adjust and not fight it, but go with it and whatever you can use, use,” she says. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CARMEN DE LAVALLADE performs AS I REMEMBER IT 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12, and 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 13. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kellystrayhorn.org

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Carmen De Lavallade performs As I Remember It {PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER DUGGAN}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[BOOKS]

ADDICTIVE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

S

ARAH SHOTLAND’S striking debut novel, Junkette (White Gorilla Press), is an alternately lyrical and matterof-fact account of a few months in the life of college-graduate junkie Claire, a twentysomething bartender in preKatrina New Orleans. In chapter 1, Claire says she’s splitting for Boulder, Colo. But she can’t bring herself to leave, and over 168 pages of episodic first-person narration, she deals with scoring, her job, her boyfriend and various characters in her neighborhood’s heroin demimonde. Shotland, a Dallas native, is a widely produced playwright who’s also taught English in China. She now teaches in Chatham University’s graduate writing program and at Pittsburgh’s High School for the Creative and Performing Arts. She is co-founder and director of Words Without Walls, a local nonprofit that holds creative-writing classes for some 350 students in prisons, jails and rehab centers. “The possibilities of who you can teach writing to are pretty endless,” she says. Shotland lives in Friendship. She recently spoke with CP.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

“Fractured paragraphing”: Sarah Shotland

HOW DOES YOUR WRITING RELATE TO YOUR WORDS WITHOUT WALLS WORK? I’m definitely as a writer and as a person interested in disaster, and how people deal with disaster in different ways, especially

JUNKETTE BOOK-LAUNCH

WITH SARAH SHOTLAND 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 26. BOOM Concepts, 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. www.sarahshotland.com

the disasters that happen on the weather of your insides. Definitely the content of Junkette … would be similar to what a lot of my students at Sojourner House especially — because it’s all women addicts — are writing about. And that was really interesting working in that environment while I was editing the book. Because it kind of made me realize how universal the experience is of being isolated, of feeling out of control. And also of feeling that you really love the people that you’re around when you’re in CONTINUES ON PG. 69


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ADDICTIVE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 68

an addiction. Sort of like clinging to them.

UPCOMING FALL/WINTER 2014 SHOWS AT

THE PALACE THEATRE GREENSBURG, PA

THE RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS’

BILL MEDLEY

SAT., SEPTEMBER 13 • 7:30PM

THE BRONX WANDERERS

THUR., SEPTEMBER 18 • 7:30PM

MY MOTHER’S ITALIAN, MY FATHER’S JEWISH & I’M IN THERAPY! SAT., SEPTEMBER 20 • 2 & 7:30PM

HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS TUE., OCTOBER 14 • 8PM

ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK WED., OCTOBER 15 • 7:30PM

KENNY ROGERS SUN., OCTOBER 26 • 2PM

THE BEACH BOYS THUR., OCTOBER 30 • 7:30PM

CLAIRE INHABITS A VERY CIRCUMSCRIBED WORLD. She loses the ability to see new things. She loses the ability to travel. That’s really her lack of freedom. She can’t leave this twoblock radius. Even though through the whole book, she’s saying, “I want to go to Colorado.”

getting beaten by her son, she knows, “I’m not hard enough to live in this world. I don’t wanna live here. I want to be able to appreciate beauty. I want to be able to admit when I’m scared.” [But] she also wants acceptance in that world. She wants to impress her older boyfriend — be part of the family. So I think, hopefully, the contrast of the styles is also Claire’s back-and-forth in shaping her own identity.

“I’M DEFINITELY AS A WRITER AND AS A PERSON INTERESTED IN DISASTER.”

WHY DOES THE BOOK’S LAYOUT LEAVE HORIZONTAL GAPS BETWEEN EVERY PARAGRAPH? On one hand, I think the sort of fractured paragraphing is just the way that addicts think. And maybe more than just addicts! We’re all always thinking of a couple different things at the same time. WHAT ABOUT HOW THE BOOK TOGGLES BETWEEN PROCEDURAL PASSAGES — THE HOW-TOS OF GETTING A FIX —AND LYRICAL ONES? I think I intentionally do that. I think for better, for worse as a woman writer, I sort of carry the fear that people will criticize my work for being somehow too lyrical, or hiding behind lyricism. And one of the things that was a big challenge for me in revisions of this book was cutting through that, and really saying it straight. Saying it to the point. And a lot of the things that a lot of these characters are dealing with are striking enough on their own, just to say them. And also I think it mirrors her own sort of conflict between, “Who do I want to be? Do I want to live in this world that’s gonna make me hard?” And she sees Suzette

HOW AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL IS JUNKETTE? I would say that there are certainly autobiographical elements to the novel. I have had experiences with addiction. However, I always say, I was sort of a boring addict. I really liked to take baths and read novels, which is what I like to do now, too. So the plot is not at all autobiographical. But the internal experience of addiction, of feeling isolated, of being in inner chaos, is very autobiographical, and probably true of many experiences beyond heroin addiction. And a lot of the characters are certainly collages of different people I knew in New Orleans. But my life was never so … eventful. [Laughs] AND YOU’RE LETTING CLAIRE LIVE ON. I’m doing this postcard project. If you buy the book from me at a reading, or just email me or Facebook me and request a postcard, I’ll send you a postcard. And I’m asking people to send Claire their questions. I scan the postcards and I upload them on my website, and I write back in Claire’s voice. I have about 30 postcards now, and I want to collect more. It’s been a fun way to keep the book alive past the last page. DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THE MOTOWN EXPERIENCE FRI., DECEMBER 5 • 2 & 7:30PM

THE OAK RIDGE BOYS CHRISTMAS NIGHT OUT SUN., DECEMBER 7 • 2 & 7PM

LATSHAW POPS’

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES TUE., DECEMBER 9 • 2 & 7:30PM

FOR TICKETS:

724.836.8000

Online at www.thepalacetheatre.org 70

JUNKETTE EXCERPT Claire tries to kick heroin: The back and forth subsides and I can smoke a little Afghani and drink a little sip of Evan Williams and hope the wave will last. I feel like I could sit up and make a phone call or walk to the bathroom or turn the page in the book, that’s when my mind starts in, and what passes for logic starts churning. Chip’s right there. No point in going cold turkey, no one’s done that since the 70s. You’ve already started to wean. Then the rehab stuff starts to morph. We didn’t become addicted in one day, so easy does it. That’s right. Easy does it. I shouldn’t try to get clean in one day. How about one bag a day? One bag a day is affordable. One bag a day is totally acceptable. Totally workable. Totally totally what I should do. One bag a day. Then half a bag a day. Then a shot a day. Then I’ll move to Nicaragua and teach English and smoke hash on the beach. That’s what will happen. One bag a day. It’s almost like one day at a time. That’s the most reassuring part of the whole bullshit. Seems like the way I already operate — the way we all operate. I’m practically in recovery already. One bag at a time.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

[BOOK REVIEW]

DEVOTIONS {BY FRED SHAW} With conflict in Gaza, ISIS on the front page and Westboro Baptist protesting funerals, when religion is discussed, fundamentalism often takes center stage. Lost beneath the headlines are the important roles devotion and ceremony play in the ways many of us define ourselves, often summoning a lineage stretching back centuries. The speaker in Rachel Mennies’ first fulllength poetry collection, The Glad Hand of God Points Backwards (Texas Tech University Press), takes her faith seriously, using keen rendering of family history, descriptively paired with rituals of Judaism, in a compelling 76-page read. Mennies, a Philly native who teaches at Carnegie Mellon University, won Texas Tech’s 2014 Walt McDonald Poetry Prize. The Glad Hand seems a worthy choice for the honor. Poetry has long been an outlet for making sense of one’s identity, be it religious, sexual or racial, and the work here illustrates this with its focus on family. As members of disparate tribes, we’re often receptacles for wisdom gained from the storied trials of ancestors. Sometimes, families are defined by loss. In “How Grandmother Paid Her Passage to New York,” Mennies writes, “One by one her mother sold her silver spoons / and heirloom bracelets; goodbye porcelain bear, / silk blouses, patent-leather Mary Janes, the scarves / and stud earrings for newly pierced ears, the red wool coat / spotted walking on another tiny body’s shoulders …” The listing of sold goods works well, highlighting their unimportance in hindsight to the implied cost of the coming Holocaust. While the collection includes a Hebrew glossary, the poem “For Rose” is a concise meditation on naming: “Practical, we take the names of our dead / because the dead are sturdy — stern mantles / of opportunity, watching as we shoulder them / from windowpanes, closets. Rose — one curling r / makes hundreds of us, Rachels, Rivkas, Renates, / Richards, Ronalds …” It’s an interesting reminder of the significance names hold. While The Glad Hand necessarily deals (allusively) with difficult instances of persecution, and has moments of darkness, it also mixes in humor. A favorite, “The Joke,” adds levity to the seriousness of being Jewish in the past century. Family gossip, especially amongst female relations, is a rich area Mennies mines for a change in tone. In some of my favorite poems, food takes a lead role. “In Preparation” preserves a well-balanced personal account with strong images and straightforward language, the hallmark of a potent debut. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

OKLAHOMA!

A musical by Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II

SEPTEMBER 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC Currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas: CONSTIPATION GOUT HIGH CHOLESTEROL WITH HEART ATTACK OR STROKE HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/ UTERINE FIBROIDS BIRTH CONTROL PATCH MILD TO MODERATE ALZHEIMER DISEASE

DIABETIC NEUROPATHY VAGINAL DRYNESS ECZEMA (ATOPIC DERMATITIS)

Do you have a medical condition which is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information.

INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

www.CTRSLLC.com

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

Upcoming WorkshopS: Frugal gardening

Want to save money, time, and toil? Growing your own food is one of the most satisfying forms of gardening. In today’s economy, many are now turning to their backyard vegetable plots to help lessen high grocery bills. Others are looking for ways to live more ecologically-friendly lives, to have more choice in vegetable selection and to grow fresh produce free from harmful pesticides. This workshop, offered by the Penn State Master Gardeners will cover the basics of planning: siting your vegetable garden, preparing the soil, selecting plant and seed varieties (including hybrids and heirlooms), starting plants from seed, planting, tending your plants, troubleshooting problems, harvesting, extending the season, getting the most out of small plots, and putting the garden to bed for the winter. The class will look in a specific way at straw bale gardening—a type of raised bed and/or container gardening—as one type of frugal gardening.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 • 6:00 - 7:30 PM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

412-471-5808

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

From left: Dylan Marquis Meyers, Tony Bingham and Jonathan Visser in PICT Classic’s Observe The Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme

[PLAY REVIEWS]

MEN AT WAR {BY TED HOOVER} AT PICT Classical Theatre’s production of Frank McGuinness’ Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme, you need to just let it wash over you. This mountain of a play doesn’t easily, if ever, reveal its secrets … and if you don’t try looking for them, there are considerable pleasures to be had. In the present day, we meet a delusional Irish man haunted by his memories of having served in the First World War with a division of Ulster Protestants. Through the magic of theater, we then travel back in time and join the soldiers on their first day. We later see them back home, on leave. And in the final scene, they’re preparing for the Battle of the Somme. As demonstrated in his most popular play, Someone to Watch Over Me, McGuinness is capable of creating powerful set-ups and filling out his plot with thrilling dialogue. PICT director Matt Torney will never be accused of underplaying any emotional beat: In his hands, this play is its own sort of siege. There isn’t a second you’re not giving the production the attention demanded. And that intensity is matched by a first-rate cast. Martin Giles, Jason McCune, Ciaran Bryne, Byron Anthony, Justin R.G. Holcolmb, Dylan Marquis Meyers, Jonathan Visser and Tony Bingham, led by an impeccable Raife Baker, pull out all the stops. But I’m not sure I could say the evening is unabated theatrical joy. There is the

matter of cultural specificity: Observe the Sons, which premiered in 1985, is a terrifically Irish play, and deep knowledge of the Great War and “The Troubles” is required for some of the emotional beats to land.

OBSERVE THE SONS OF ULSTER MARCHING TOWARDS THE SOMME continues through Sept. 20. Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-54. 412-561-6000 x207 or www.picttheatre.org

McGuinness’ own talent ends up being problematic as well. The man is drunk on language, and after a while the characters all begin to sound alike; Belfast shipbuilders speak with the same studied cadences and linguistic palettes as Oxbridge graduates. Eventually the story and people give way to a highly literate meditation on God, life and death. Not an actual play, perhaps, but if you allow McGuinness and his words to weave a spell, you’re sure to be captivated. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

ALL HANDS {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} STAGING A well-loved play is a precarious

pursuit, one that risks drawing the ire of purists. Producing a play based on a wellloved book can be even more tenuous. Cut too much original material, and you’ve compromised the story. Leave too much


intact, and the play fosters no unique artistic vision. Fortunately, The REP’s Of Mice and Men has an advantage over other page-to-stage adaptations: It was written by the novel’s author. The very year of the book’s release, John Steinbeck penned this adaptation of his beloved tale about two bindlestiffs searching for their place in the world. As a result, the spirit of the play — and its earthy and sometimes coarse dialogue — remains mostly intact, while Steinbeck allows each of his characters room to grow under the tutelage of a skilled director. This time, that director is Robert A. Miller, son of playwright Arthur Miller, and though his vision of Of Mice and Men takes few risks, the overall result is one that should satisfy fans of literature and theater alike. Miller’s varied cast includes Leandro Cano as Lennie, a grown man with the faculties of a child, and a sometimes dangerous temper. Jarrod DiGiorgi turns in a surly performance as George, softening only in the moments when pal Lennie is at his weakest. The supporting players boost this production and add subtleties not so clearly rendered in the source material. Erin Lindsey Krom transforms Curley’s wife from a common “tart” into a lonely

outsider who’s as desperate as George and Lennie to escape an unjust life. David Whalen’s Slim and Tommy LaFitte’s Crooks are the voices of reason amidst a din of vulgar prejudice, and John McManus plays sensitive dreamer Candy with unbridled pathos. The scenic design by Britton Mauk captures the downtrodden hominess of early 20th-century rural life, and Michael Montgomery’s costume design enhances the Depression-set piece.

OF MICE AND MEN continues through Sun., Sept. 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

With a cast of characters trapped in cages — ones created by society, bad luck and personal regret — Of Mice and Men explores how close the American dream can seem while remaining hopelessly out of reach. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

IN GOOD FAITH {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} DEBUTING IN 2004, on the heels of the

Catholic-priest sex-abuse scandal, Doubt, A Parable mines the dark recesses of the religious hierarchy. Eschewing a contemporary setting, John Patrick Shanley’s drama takes place in 1964 New York, a choice that imbues the events with an added level of social unease. The story is devastating in its simplicity: A senior nun in a Catholic school becomes convinced that the unconventional priest has taken an unhealthy interest in a young African-American student. What follows is a meditation on the meaning of conviction, and all the messy experiences that go with it. Under Art DeConciliis’ deft direction, the four-person cast of this Little Lake Theatre production is universally strong. As Father Flynn, the priest under fire, Don DiGiulio oscillates between empathetic mentor and mercenary leader, a man whose capricious nature might belie a deeper malevolence. Lynne Franks makes accuser Sister Aloysius Beauvier a formidable presence, yet instills her with a hidden well of pain and insecurity. Likewise, Laura Barletta balances the nuances of Sister James, portraying the young nun with equal strokes of impressionable naiveté and discontented wisdom. And in her debut role, Lauren Kelley is

a revelation. With only one scene as Mrs. Muller, the mother of the possible victim, Kelley displays a kaleidoscope of emotions, each sentiment more raw and heartbreaking than the last. Her plight is at the intersection of race, gender and religion, and without Mrs. Muller as the play’s intricate moral compass, the entire production would lose its thematic resonance. While this is Kelley’s first time on stage, hopefully it will be far from her last.

DOUBT continues through Sat., Sept 20. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

TJ Firneno’s scenic design projects a lonely and austere ambiance that dovetails perfectly with the premise of the play. As with all theater in the round, there are points when one actor blocks the view of another, but DeConciliis ensures that these moments are short-lived and never detract from the story. With an unsettling and ambiguous resolution, Doubt doesn’t allow for easy answers. But in an uncertain world, a play that deals with the complexity of human nature couldn’t end any other way. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

09.1109.18.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

The Thrival Festival wraps this weekend with two big day-long concerts featuring scads of national acts. (See CP’s music section for more.) But don’t forget that Thrival is run by Thrill Mill, a nonprofit that develops entrepreneurs. There’s still time to catch some of the annual fest’s slate of free talks and demos, organized by corporations and other groups. Today’s workshops are on Gaming’s Next Frontier, and the future of social media and think tanks. Friday through Sunday, other events cover leadership, social ventures and more; Sunday brings the concluding Maker Fest. Bill O’Driscoll Continues through Sun., Sept. 14. Various venues, East Liberty/Larimer. Register at www.thrillmill.com.

324, Cathedral of Learning, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-648-2614

+ FRI., SEPT. 12

opens her exhibit in 709 Penn Gallery tonight with a talk and reception. Danielle Fox 5:30-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 16. 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412471-6070 or www.trustarts.org

{ART} Pittsburgh-based fiber artist Tina Williams Brewer weaves stories of migration and loss in her new quilt exhibit, Fragments, Fractals: Write It,

{ART} Five Pittsburgh-based artists-inresidence unveil their creations tonight at the Mattress Factory. The show of installation work

Art by Tina Williams Brewer

SEPT. 12

Fragments, t Fractals F

{SCREEN} The University of Pittsburgh’s German department and other academic departments mark the 25th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s demise with a free film-and-lecture series. It starts tonight with the 1963 East German film The Divided Heaven, about a woman’s experience working in a factory and her love for a chemist who’s fled to the West. Director Konrad Wolf’s unusually candid look at internal conflicts in the GDR screens in the Cathedral of Learning. BO 5:30 p.m. Room

Print It, Sew It. Her designs aim to be “mind stirring and soul soothing,” says Brewer; they move from depictions of natural water currents to images of forced relocations. Brewer’s quilts celebrate African-American heritage and also address family, womanhood and culture. The internationally-honored artist

is part of the Pittsburgh Biennial. The eclectic array of artists in Artists in Residence includes Danny Bracken, whose works using video, sound and physical space range from immersive pieces to small-scale sculptures. Ryder Henry creates imaginary scale models of cities with discarded cardboard. Multidisciplinary artist John Peña


sp otlight Comic Christopher Titus is wicked smart and, often, monumentally pissed off. More storyteller than joke machine, he’s that rare comic who’d riff on prescription drugs becoming the No. 2 killer in America. “Two out of three people taking antidepressants are still severely depressed,” he’ll note. “That’s like buying a six-pack of beer and four of them sober you up.” Then he’ll abruptly segue into talking about his sister’s suicide. Pugnacious and confrontational, he’s the guy who’ll argue that the word “retard” is appropriate — not for describing the disabled, but for connoting people who don’t use the faculties they were born with. The California-bred comedian is probably best known for his 2000-02 Fox show Titus, a dark, edgy, autobiographically inspired series revolving partly around his character’s crazy relationship with his father, played by Stacy Keach. Titus’ touring one-man shows are sharply written, evening-length rants, and he’s given them names like “Norman Rockwell Is Bleeding,” “The Fifth Annual End of the World Tour” and “Love Is Evol.” The current one is called “The Angry Pursuit of Happiness.” In a rare Pittsburgh appearance, he brings the tour to town for five shows at the Pittsburgh Improv, starting Fri., Sept. 12. Bill O’Driscoll Fri., Sept. 12-Sun., Sept. 14. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead. $22. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

explores the relationship between humans and nature. Ben Sota, founder of Zany Umbrella Circus, employs puppetry, music, acrobatics and more. And Kathleen Montgomery will use the Mattress Factory’s entire Monterey Street storefront building as a “physical sketchbook.” The exhibit opens with a reception tonight. BO 6-8 p.m. 500 Sampsonia Way and 1414 Monterey St., North Side. $15. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

{ART} “Mavuno” meanss “first fruit” in Swahili, and it’ss the name Sweetwater Center ter for the Arts gives to its annual nnual fall celebration of AfricanricanAmerican art and d culture. Yet it’s not fruits but roots that concern this year’s ’s Mavuno Festival. Opening g tonight is Connected at the e Roots: An African-American rican Art Exhibition, juried by acclaimed Pittsburghrghbased artist Laverne rne Kemp and featuring ing contributors including Amir Rashidd, Katie Rideout, Nyota Hill and Raymond d Logan. Tonight’s opening reception n includes live music by Christiane stiane Leach and Betty Douglas & Friends. BO 6-9 p.m. .m. Exhibit continues through h Nov. 1. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. wickley. Free. 412-741-4405 05 or www.sweetwaterartcenter.org rartcenter.org

artists, each of whom receives a free pair of prescription glasses or sunglasses. Artists include Joe Wos, Gabe Felice, Matt Gondek, Darrell Kinsel, Lauren Toohey and more. Proceeds from the silent auction, meanwhile, benefit Healthy Artists (which promotes health care as a human right) and the Bloomfield-Garfield Corp., a community-development group. Sales from an additional group exhibit of more conventional works at the old Quiet Storm space will be split between the artists and the two charities. This one-night event is hosted by comedian Davon Magwood, with live music by Holly Hood, Anqwenique Wingfield and Ricardo Iamuuri. BO O 6-10 p.m. 5430 Penn

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{STAGE} “Here begineth a treatise how the high Father of Heaven sendeth Death to summon every creature to come and give account of their lives in this world and is in manner of a moral play.” Thus begineth Everyman, the fabled but rarely produced 15th-century Christian stage allegory of anonymous English authorship. Throughline Theatre Company gives its new staging a suitably st apocalyptic frame: In a world fra devastated by war w and other disasters, a group gro of women finds refuge in a ruined library and reads the play aloud to pass the time. time The production opens tonight. BO 8 p.m. ton Continues Continue through Sept. 20. 20 Grey Box Theatre, Theatre 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15 Lawren (opening night: $22(open 25). www.through w linetheatre.org lineth

{STAGE} Burghlesque is tonight’s home-grown variety show, a follow-up to last year’s sold-out debut at Downtown’s Cabaret Theater. Local drag grande dame Kierra Darshell and comedian Mike Buzzelli indeed host two burlesque acts, Lita D’Vargas and Macabre Noir. But there’s also standup comedy from Carl Schimmel, accomplished drag acts Lady Rose Amore and Anna Steezia, dance by choreographer Joe Nickel (pictured) and his troupe, and vocalist Kelsey Rae Purcell. The late-night show is staged by Madhouse Productions. BO 10:30 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $12 (21 and over). www.trustarts.org

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Art by Katie Rideout

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{ART} Retailer Penn Avenue enue Eyewear and art gallery Most ost Wanted Fine Art team up for the eyesight of local artists. Fifteen pairs of hand-customized tomized wooden frames in n tonight’s Custom Sunglass Auction were contributed by 32

There’s also dance music from the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, Swag Monkeys and Tracksploitation, plus furnace-fired pizza and s’mores. Also: free. BO 6-9 p.m. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. www. pittsburghglasscenter.org

Ave., Friendship. Free. www. most-wantedfineart.org

SEPT. 13

Burghlesque

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATE DAVID, NATE DAVID PHOTOGRAPHY}

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Taking kids to art museums tough, but Tough might be toug Artt is made for them. The of Children’s Museum Mus program, now in its Pittsburgh pro facilitates creation eighth year, fa of interactive, immersive or projects that will collaborative p take whatever children can dish out. Many of the artists Pittsburgh ties. This year’s have Pittsburg Tough-Artworks include Jenna Tough-Artwor boardable spacecraft Boyles’ boarda Sheep; Jesse The Space Shee Dakotah Konick’s Kauppila and D stained-glass work kinetic stained Fissure & Quake; Qua Lindsay Packer’s walk-though wal physics-of-light installation physics-of-l Prism Palace; Pala and Stephanie Ross’

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immersive LED environment OmniNimbus. The exhibit opens today. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-14 (free for children under 2). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

{ARTMAKING} Pittsburgh Glass Center holds its first Teen Art Night, but it’s got plenty of help. At Play by the Fire, kids ages 13 to 18 can

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explore scratch programming with representatives from Assemble, Photoshop with the Carnegie Library, collage with Pittsburgh Filmmakers, glassmaking (duh) with Pittsburgh Glass Center itself, and much more. Other organizations participating include the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Children’s Museum’s Makeshop, The Mattress Factory and The Andy Warhol Museum.

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+ SUN., SEPT. 14 {WORDS} Annette Dashofy proudly calls herself a lifelong Pennsylvania farm girl. But now she’s also making her name with murder mysteries. Lost Legacy (Henery Press) is the brand-new followup to Dashofy’s debut novel, Circle of Influence. This second mystery featuring rural paramedic Zoe Chambers (Dashofy herself is a former EMT) starts with a farmer’s apparent suicide and ends up excavating 40-year old crimes and family secrets. Today is the book’s launch party, at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. BO 3 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. Register at 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AS YOU LIKE IT. Presented by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. www.pittsburgh shakespeare.com. Sat., Sept. 13, 2 p.m. Allegheny Commons, North Side. Sun., Sept. 14, 2 p.m. Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville. BLEACHER BUMS. A bunch of Chicago Cubs fans make wagers w/ each other while watching a game at Wrigley Field. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. BORN YESTERDAY. Comedy by Garson Kanin. Presented by the Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. DATING CAN BE MURDER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., Sept. 13, 9 p.m. South Park Club House, South Park. 412-833-5599. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has discovered for the plastic products. Includes

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PUBLICNOTICES

McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Premiering Last Night, Crisis On Infinite Earths, Some Guy At The Airport, Lovie’s Spring, Constant Companion, Raghead. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 14. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-944-2639. SOUTHERN COMFORTS. A taciturn Yankee widower & a vivacious grandmother from Tennessee find themselves stuck inside his house together through a nasty storm. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 13. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. TAMARA. Play by John Krizanc. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed, Thu, Sat, 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-362-1713.

COMEDY THU 11 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 12 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DRAFT IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. HOTEL NOWHERE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER IMPROV SHOW. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 12 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 12 - SAT 13 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

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Hall, Carnegie. 412-337-8812. LATE NITE CATECHISM LAS VEGAS: SISTER ROLLS THE DICE. The convent needs a new roof, so the order has decided that Sister will organize a Las Vegas night. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 & 5:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. OBSERVE THE SONS OF ULSTER MARCHING TOWARDS THE SOMME. Eight young men of Ulster, thrown together for army training during the Great War, must move beyond the troubles between Protestant & Catholic as they prepare for the Battle of the Somme. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000. OF MICE & MEN. John Steinbeck’s classic tale of two migrant workers in the Great Depression. Presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. OKLAHOMA. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 28.

P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861

audience participation, giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DOUBT, A PARABLE. Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects the young Father Flynn of improper relations w/ a male student. Presented by Little Lake Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. EVERYMAN. Post-apocalyptic story of how women sheltered in a library try to find peace w/ each other & the end of all things. Presented by Throughline Theatre. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. THE KNIGHTS OF THE LIVING DEAD. Interactive medievalthemed theater & dinner theater shows. Presented by Stage & Steel Productions. Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 20. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

LIVE READ: THE WONDER YEARS. Feat. Rick Seback, Curt Wootton, & Matt Light. Sept. 12-13, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 77


MATT STANTON. 8 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 13, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

this restored stagecoach stop. award-winning dancer Arthur 724-238-4983. Aviles. Presented by the Glue HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour Factory Project. Thru Sept. 13, this Tudor mansion and stable 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 14, 2 p.m. complex, and enjoy hikes New Hazlett Theater, North Side. and outdoor activities in the 1-888-718-4253. surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. CARMEN DE LAVALLADE – OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church AS I REMEMBER IT. An intimate features 1823 pipe organ, portrait of Carmen de Lavallade Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. told through dance, film & her OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. personal writings. Sept. 12-13, This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, site features log house, blacksmith East Liberty. 412-363-3000. shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. SUNDAYSERIES @ PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY POINTBREEZEWAY. Performances MUSEUM. Trolley rides and by Jasmine Hearn & Continuum exhibits. Includes displays, walking Dance Theater. PointBreezeway, tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. Point Breeze. 412-335-5293. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of HAS FIRST ANNUAL $5K RUM: imaginative railroad displays A RUM-TASTING PARTY. Benefits enhanced by flowers, plants & Hôpital Albert Schweitzer Haiti. interactive features. 14 indoor 6-9 p.m. Maggie’s Farm Distillery, rooms & 3 outdoor gardens Strip District. 412-361-5200. feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 8TH ANNUAL CHARLIE 412-622-6914. ROSS MEMORIAL PINBALL CHARITY GOLF PERFECTION. Pinball ww. r w OUTING. Benefits museum & players pe ghcitypa p Mainstay Life Services. club. West View. .com 10 a.m. Quicksilver Golf 412-931-4425. Club. 412-344-3640. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the ANIMAL FRIENDS CHARITY BAR Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 CRAWL. Participating locations once-hidden treasures exploring can be found at www.youcaring. Pittsburgh’s important role as com/pet-expenses/animal-friends/ a Gateway to the West & a 203601 4-10 p.m. E. Carson St., national hub for the steamboat South Side. 414-429-8202. building industry in the mid-19th CORVETTE & CLASSIC CAR century. From Slavery to Freedom. CRUISE. Benefits Sentinels of Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the Freedom. 11 a.m. Meridian Station, anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Butler. 412-425-0350. Western PA Sports Museum, FALL FLASHBACK TO THE 60S: Clash of Empires, and exhibits on HANGIN’ W/ THE BEATLES. local history, more. Strip District. 1960s-themed party feat. food 412-454-6000. stations, 60s fashion show, ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. dance-off, more. Benefits the Sally Features 5,000 relics of Catholic Haas Memorial Endowment Fund. saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. 7-10 p.m. Atlantic Aviation Hangar, ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Moon. 412-264-6270. Murals. Mid-20th century murals FALL FOR YOUR LIBRARY. Food depicting war, social justice and the & wine tasting to benefit Western immigrant experience in America. Allegheny Community Library. Millvale. 421-681-0905. 6 p.m. Leopold Lake Park. 724-695-8150. PENN CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 5K RUN/WALK & 1/2 MILE FUN RUN. 9 a.m. Penn Christian LEBANESE FOOD FESTIVAL. Academy, Butler. 724-586-2500. Sept. 12-14 Our Lady of Victory PITTSBURGH PASTORAL Maronite Catholic Church, INSTITUTE JUBILEE GALA. 6:30Carnegie. 412-278-0841. 9:30 p.m. East End Cooperative MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR. Ministry Community House, Sustainable living workshops, East Liberty. 412-661-1239. vendors, more. www.mother PRESIDENT’S CHALLENGE 5K earthnews.com Sept. 12-14 RUN/WALK/WHEEL. Benefits Seven Springs. 800-452-2223. the Pittsburgh Steelwheelers. 9-11 a.m. North Shore Trail, North Side. 412-487-7644.

FRI 12 - SUN 14 CHRISTOPHER TITUS. 8 & 10:30 p.m., Sat., Sept. 13, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 14, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 12 - SAT 13

SAT 13

Work by Mary M. Mazziotti, from Recent Work, at beGalleries, in Lawrenceville

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Mostly Trucks. Photographs by Jim Miller. Opening reception: Sept. 13, 7 p.m. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. FINEVIEW OVERLOOK. Art at the Overlook. Local artist showcase feat. live music, food trucks, more. Sept. 13, 1-5 p.m. North Side. 412-583-9378. MATTRESS FACTORY. Artists in Residence. Installations created in-residence by Danny Bracken, John Peña, Ryder Henry, Kathleen Montgomery, & Benjamin Sota. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Opening reception: Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m. North Side. 412-231-3169. MISS L PHOTOGRAPHY. Boundaries. A collection of photographs by Allaire Bartel, Mariah WIld, & Leah Schonauer that explore what holds us back. Opens Sept. 12, 7-9 p.m. Bloomfield. 585-307-2923. PITTSBURGH TECHNICAL INSTITUTE. The Eyes of Freedom Memorial Exhibit. Traveling military tribute feat. 23 life-sized portraits. Opens Sept. 16. 412-809-5100. REVISION SPACE. Jeff Schwarz: Loves You. Opening reception: Sept. 12, 6-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Ephemeral Self. Work by Julia Betts. Opening reception: Sept. 13, 6-8 p.m. & by appointment. unsmokeartspace. com. Braddock.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Recent Work by Mary M. Mazziotti. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. A Tribute to Henry Fiore. Work by

LeaAnn Grill, Nancy Bernheisel, Denise Gemellas, & Cynthia Saal. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell,

Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Tectonica. Solo exhibition by Paul Chidester. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds. Allegorical paintings by Hannah Grace Clark. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Behind the Platen. Showcase of letterpress work done by shops & individuals in the Western Pennsylvania/Eastern Ohio area. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is... Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MINE FACTORY. John Burt Sanders. Work produced while CONTINUES ON PG. 79

ANDY PITZ, MATT WOHLFARTH, MATT GEORGE. 6 p.m. Library Fire Hall, South Park. 412-860-9512. ARCADE HOOTENANNY. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BARPROV. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. BILLY ELMER. 9 p.m. 565 LIVE, Bellevue. 412-522-7556. HOTEL NOWHERE IMPROV. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SUN 14

FUNDRAISERS THU 11

SUN 14 BONUS STAGE: IMPROV HOUSE TEAMS. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 21 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 12 FULL T IS L ONLINE

TUE 16 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

SAT 13

WED 17 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 1 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring

FESTIVALS

FRI 12 - SUN 14

DANCE

THU 11 - SUN 14

SUN 14

PARALLEL LIVES. Performance created & performed by Beth Corning in collaboration w/

THE 14TH ANNUAL RUN/WALK TO BREAK THE SILENCE ON OVARIAN CANCER. 7 a.m. North CONTINUES ON PG. 78

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Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-661-1095. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. FARE WALK FOR FOOD ALLERGY. www.foodallergywalk. org/pittsburgh2014 10 a.m.1:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. PITTSBURGH OUT OF THE DARKNESS COMMUNITY WALK. Benefits American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. 2 p.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. 412-260-0789. PITTSBURGH PEDAL CRAWL. 10, 25, or 50-mile bike ride through Pittsburgh’s Historic North Side. Benefits the Maya Organization. Allegheny Commons, North Side. 412-589-3357.

MON 15 PLAYERS FOR KIDS GALA. Feat. players from the Pittsburgh Steelers, Pittsburgh Pirates, & Pittsburgh Penguins. Benefits the Pittsburgh Kids Foundation. 6 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 412-231-2353.

WED 17 NIGHT AT THE NEIGHBORHOOD. All proceeds benefit student scholarships. 5:30 p.m. The Neighborhood Academy, East Liberty. 412-362-2013.

OVER THE EDGE PITTSBURGH. Rappel 25 stories down the Henry W. Oliver Building. Benefits Our Clubhouse. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Henry W. Oliver Building, Downtown. 412-338-1919.

POLITICS ONGOING GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

LITERARY THU 11 3 POEMS BY . . .. Poetry discussion group feat. work by Percy Bysshe Shelley. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. IDK MAGAZINE ISSUE ONE LAUNCH PARTY. Readings by Kelly Andrews, Rachel Ann Brickner, Kaitlyn Duling, Ben Gwin, Sarah Cadence Hamm, more. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. UPPAGUS SPEAKS POETRY READING. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-726-8329.

FRI 12 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month,

1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES $4 TOP SHELF DRINKS & $2.25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVE EVERY NIGHT

$2 THIRSTY THURSDAYS $2 WELL DRINKS • $2 COORS LIGHT BOTTLES 2 FOR 1 LAP DANCES • 2 FOR 1 DRAFT BEERS EVERY THURSDAY THURSDA IN SEPTEMBER ALL NIGHT LONG

1/2ISOSIFONF ADM

1635 West Carson St.

D 412-471-5764 WITH BUCS, PENS AN . UB ST T KE TIC LL FOOTBA OPEN LATE E CALL FOR A FREE RID Thursday 7pm-2am FROM STADIUM. Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

clubcontroversy.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014

DATE NIGHT SUPVENTURE FOR 2. Sat, 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport. 412-720-5058. SUPYOGA FLOW. Sat, 9 a.m. Thru Sept. 27 Northeast Paddleboard, Downtown. 412-860-3737.

MEET THE AUTHOR: REBECCA GILBERT. Author of It’s Easy to Start Eating Vegan. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

SUN 14

MON 15 COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIT NIGHT W/ EATPGH: CELEBRATE LOCAL FOOD MONTH. Q&A & book signing. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. WORDS @ WIGLE: A LITERARY HAPPY HOUR. Feat. Barbara Edelman & Sharon McDermott. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 5-7:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

TUE 16 AUTHOR VISIT W/ BETH PEYTON. Author of Clear Skies, Deep Water: A Chautauqua Memoir. 6 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF MOUNT LEBANON SPEAKERS’ SERIES. Feat. Mary Frailey Calland, author of Consecrated Dust. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Rabbi Daniel Schiff reviews Jews & Words by Amos Oz & Fania Oz-Saltzberger 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

KIDSTUFF THU 11 LARGE SCALE STOP MOTION. Use handmade props to build a simple set & create a short stop-motion animation. 10 a.m.4 4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum o of Pittsburgh, North Side. 4 412-322-5058.

THU 11 - WED 17 T B BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical sswing set, sandbox, solar-powered iinstruments, more. Ongoing C Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, N North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 12 F

ALWAYS 1/2 OFF ADMISSION FOR SERVICE MEMBERS AND VETERANS WITH ID

SAT 13

SAT 13

WED 17 PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

[LITERARY]

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 77

FABRICATING FRIDAY. Create new things using a 3D printer, recycled materials, laser cutter, more. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Transparent. Fizzing into halves. Made of thin stuff that splits and unravels. Flaps. So much darkness around it, so much mist. Night woods thick with the wing-song of insects. Wide bend on a night with no moon, no wind. Surface disturbed, the water rolled out the notes of its logic. Red and the memory of red.

Trans-parented.

FROM “THE RIVER,” BY BARBARA EDELMAN

Barbara Edelman reads with Sharon Fagan McDermott as part of Words @ Wigle: A Literary Happy Hour. 5 p.m Mon., Sept. 15. 2401 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-224-2827

SUPYOGA FOUNDATIONS. Sun, 9 a.m. Thru Sept. 28 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport. 412-720-5058. WILD RUMPUS RACE. Challenge course inspired by Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are for adults & children combining obstacles & running through the woods. 9 a.m. Henry Kaufmann Family Recreation Park, Monroeville.

TUE 16 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 17 BYO FRIEND SUP TOUR. Wed, 5 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport. 412-720-5058. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF FRI 12 - SUN 14

MON 15

THU 11

GATHERING OF ALL BEINGS. Create costumes in preparation for the 2nd Annual Parade of All Beings at Hartwood Acres. Sept. 12-14, 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TAKING A BITE OUT OF CRIME: MEET MT. LEBANON’S K9 OFFICER. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

ART & INSPIRATION W/ WILLIAM ROCK PRESENTS AN EVENING W/ SEVAN ROSS. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. BEAVER VALLEY ARTISTS MEETING. W/ guest demonstrator Peggi Habets. 7 p.m. Merrick Art Gallery, New Brighton. 724-846-1130.

SAT 13 BALLET HISPANO CLASSICO REGISTRATION. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Quiet Storm Gallery, Garfield. 412-403-7357. KIDS/FAMILY FRIENDLY OPEN MIC. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LET’S MOVE FAMILY FUN DAY. Badminton, sack races, tour Clayton, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. PLAY BY THE FIRE. Teen art night. Ages 13-18. 6-9 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145.

SAT 13 - SUN 14 NATIONAL AVIARY DOWN UNDER: AN AUSTRALIAN ADVENTURE. Outback bingo, boomerang craft, face-painting, more. Sept. 13-14, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

TUE 16 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

EL CÍRCULO JUVENIL DE CULTURA

Are you a native Spanish speaker, or do you have an advanced command of the language? El Círculo Juvenil de Cultura, an outreach program of CMU’s Hispanic Studies program, is seeking volunteers to help facilitate its semesterlong workshops aimed at helping Spanish-speaking children develop a relationship with their language and culture. Child-abuse and criminal clearances required. Email circulojuvenil@gmail.com for information.

OUTSIDE FRI 12 - SAT 13 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. GENEALOGY & DNA TESTING. 6-8 p.m. Moon Township Public Library, Moon. 412-269-0334. GREATER PITTSBURGH LITERACY COUNCIL TUTOR TRAINING WORKSHOP. Registration required. Tue, Thu,


5:45 p.m. Thru Sept. 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-393-7645. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RAE GOLD ARTIST TALK. 5:30 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-261-7003. VERONA FARMERS’ MARKET. Thu, 2-6 p.m. Railroad Park, Verona. WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA EDUCATORS FOR AWARENESS, COMPASSION & EMPATHY (WE-PEACE) MEETING. Second Thu of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 13 Shambhala Meditation Center, Highland Park. 412-345-1759. WHAT’S NEXT IN TECH? 5 companies talking for 5 minutes each on working in the tech field. Part of the Thrival Innovation + Music Festival. 6-8 p.m. AlphaLab, South Side. 412-606-7794. WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. Thru Nov. 20 412-727-7855.

VISUAL ART

weekend-sept-12-14/ Sept. 12-14 412-471-7760.

SAT 13

BACKYARD COMPOSTING WORKSHOPS. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-488-7490 x 226. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. BRBHS GENERAL MEETING & LECTURE. Speaker: Dr. Richard Grimes, author of We “Now Have Taken Up the Hatchet against THE BUSINESS OF MAKING: Them”: Braddock’s Defeat and STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS FROM STARTUP TO EXIT. Women the Martial Liberation of the Western Delawares. 1 p.m. Business Leaders Breakfast Series. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 8-9:30 a.m. Chatham University, 724-527-5584. Shadyside. 412-365-1253. BURGHLESQUE. Drag show, G.I. BRIDES. Speakers: Nuala comedy, more. Hosted by Kierra Calvi & Duncan Barrett. 3 p.m. Darshell & Mike Buzzelli. 10 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Cabaret at Theater Square, Heritage Center, McKeesport. Downtown. 412-325-6769. 412-678-1832. CIVIL WAR ENCAMPMENT. PUBLIC ART WALKING 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Greenock Log TOUR: HILL DISTRICT. 6-7 p.m. House, McKeesport. 412-491-9820. Shop ‘N Save, Hill District. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH 412-391-2060 x 237. MT. WASHINGTON WIGLE WHISKEY WALKING TOUR. MALTED RYE WHISKEY Begins outside of RELEASE PARTY. Monongahela Incline 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey on W. Carson St. Sat, Barrel House, North www. per a p ty 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 Side. 412-224-2827. pghci m .co 412-302-5223. MAGICAL GIRL WRESTLING FEDERATION 3RD ANNUAL UKRAINIAN INAUGURAL SHOW. Benefits the FOOD FESTIVAL. Sept. 12-13, Gay & Lesbian Community Center 11:30 a.m.-7 p.m. SS Peter of Pittsburgh. 8-11 p.m. The & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-320-5834. 412-527-5359. NATIONAL BLACK MBA HAUNTED PITTSBURGH ASSOCIATION, PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. CHAPTER’S GENERAL BODY Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 MEETING. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. University City-County Building, Downtown. of Pittsburgh, Katz School of 412-302-5223. Business, Oakland. 724-382-3063. NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR SONGWRITERS IN THE 2ND ANNUAL HEALTH & CHANGING MUSIC BUSINESS. WELLNESS WEEKEND. Music publisher Bob Dellaposta will Presented by The People’s Ofdiscuss how songwriters can make fice. Complete event schedule money w/ their music. 9:30 a.m. at http://thesoulpitt.com/main/ Adams Ridge Clubhouse, Mars. the-peoples-office-invites-you-to412-596-5831. the-2nd-annual-health-wellness-

FRI 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 12- SAT 13

FRI 12 - SUN 14

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in residence at the Vermont Studio Center. Artist reception: Sept. 13, 6-9 p.m. Homewood. 585-322-3643. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ROOTED: New Works by Di-ay Battad. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching

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collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145.

PHOTO SAFARI – SKYDECK. Exclusive access to the Aviary’s birds for photo opportunities. 9-10 a.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SECOND SATURDAY CIVIL WAR SERIES: DEFEAT FROM THE JAWS OF VICTORY. w/ historian Kristopher White. 1 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. 8 a.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 x 130. SPECIMEN IDENTIFICATION DAY. Bring shells, bones, insects, rocks, & artifacts to be identified by experts. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. STEEL CITY SQUARE DANCE. Second Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 8 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-254-4074. SUPPORTING BIRDS IN WINTER. Learn about native plants & landscape elements that provide the essentials birds need to thrive in the winter. 1-3 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. THE WESTINGHOUSE STRIKE OF 1914. Labor tour of Braddock & the Turtle Creek Valley. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Homestead Pump House. 412-848-3079.

Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. NO OUTLET. New work by Elizabeth Amber Rudnick. Friendship. 551-427-6655. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

MON 15 ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide its future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 16

OF THE ATROCITY EXHIBITION. Documentary screening about the local celebration of the macabre. 7 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. MEXICAN WAR STREETS HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. Walking tour of homes & gardens in the Historic North Side Neighborhood. mexican warstreets.org 11 a.m.-5 p.m. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m.

THE BIG BANG & THEN SOME: A LAYPERSON’S PERSPECTIVE. Tue, 7:30-9 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CYBER LIABILITY: RISKS & SOLUTIONS. 8 a.m. EQT Plaza, Downtown. 814-242-3161. THE FIRST STEP: BUSINESS STARTUP ESSENTIALS. 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-1633. JOURNALING TO HEAL W/ JANICE KOCHIK. Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

WED 17 CREATIVITY IN YOUR CUPBOARD. Explore possibilities

CONTINUES ON PG. 80

SUN 14 AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. HOUSE OF ODDITIES: THE STORY

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for creative snacks & meals made w/ simple ingredients commonly found in kitchen cupboards 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENJOYING YOUR HARVEST. Call to register. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Mount Washington. 412-219-1156. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. MADAME PRESIDENTA: WHY NOT U.S.? — VAMOS MENINAS! Documentary screening exploring women being elected to presidency & discusses the lessons Brazil & similar nations offer to countries that have yet to elect a female president, including the United States. Panel discussion to follow. 6-8 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878. MAKE IT HAPPEN IN MON VALLEY. Presented by the Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence at the University of Pittsburgh. 5:30-7:30 p.m. YMCA McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-648-1544. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m.

CHEERLEADERSPITTSBURGH.com

Saturday Sept. 13

3100 Liberty Avenue • 412-281-3110

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Celebrating 20 Years! Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

2 for 1 Tuesdays 2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

(412) 771-8872

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 79

Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. A TASTE OF PITTSBURGH. Chef Dave Racicot will combine modern cooking techniques w/ iconic Pittsburgh dishes like cabbage rolls, pierogies, & Klondike bars. Sept. 17-20, 6 p.m. Notion, East Liberty. 412-361-1188.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Race, Religion and Hip Hop: 1 on 1 with Brother Ali and Jasiri X, Alloy Studios, East Liberty CRITIC: Essence Howze, a business

AUDITIONS CAMP KILARUNNA. Auditions for

owner from the Hill

camp counselors during 5K races. District Must like scaring people, have improv experience, & enjoy WHEN: camping. Email for more info nicole@onthenoseevents.com The [opening-act] performer [Blak Rapp Medusa] is a www.campkilarunna.com. 201 N revolutionary artivist. For her to have the courage and Braddock Ave., Homewood. brilliance to form music and lyrics that are her own, 412-215-5532. CARNEGIE PERFORMING and to understand that we need to stop war amongst ARTS CENTER. Auditions for ourselves as people of color — I love it. I loved the hosting The Nutcracker. Sept. 20. Dancers of Jasiri X. I loved the vibrancy of the crowd. This was ages 5-adult. www.carnegie a very diverse group. Lots of people of many different performingartscenter.com. heritages, nationalities and cultures were here together Carnegie. 412-279-8887. for an important message of “Hey, we need unity. We COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions need to understand people need to be held accountable, for The Lion, The Witch, And The and we need to stop this.” My favorite point was the fact Wardrobe. Sept. 13-14. All roles open, specifically 4 children ages that [Brother Ali] was coming from a perception of racism 8-16. www.comtratheatre.org/ himself as a [person of] European descent, as being albino, auditions.html. Cranberry. but him identifying with the African-American culture. And 724-591-8727. him mentioning in front of an audience that was biracial LARRY CERVI’S EAST END KIDS. that, “Hey, my ancestors did these savage things” — that Auditions for the Winter 2014 took courage. Season. Sept. 14. Open to all teens BY DANIELLE FOX ages 12-18. Prepare 32 bars of a ballad & 32 bars of an up-tempo selection. www.cervi-eastendkids. org. Larry Cervi’s School of prepared to read from script. Pittsburgh Artists IV. Seeking Performing Arts, Monroeville. tfauditions@gmail.com. work by artists who live here, 412-418-0797. 412-374-9200. moved away; solo or collaborative. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Deadline: Sep 13. Email sheiladali@ Auditions for Death by Chocolate. irmafreeman.org for info. Irma Sept. 14-15. Comedic actors & ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF Freeman Center for Imagination, actresses ages 21+, 2-min. comic PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS Garfield. 412-924-0634. monologue & cold readings. www. SCREENING. Screening Sept. 28. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. mckeesportlittletheater.com. Bring five works of art in the same Seeking artists in Allegheny County McKeesport. 412-673-1100. medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.- to design & develop functional MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for 2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh. bicycle racks to be located along A Charlie Brown Christmas. Sept. 20 org. FrameHouse, Lawrenceville. Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission 412-586-4559. & 23. Men/women, cold readings. information & requirements at EXPRESSION OF COURAGE monriverarts@gmail.com. Mon pressroom.trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ BLACK & WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY River Arts Studio. 412-405-8425. call-for-artists-bicycle-racks-in-theCOMPETITION. Photographers of PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS cultural-district/ all ages & skill levels are THEATRE COMPANY. THE PITTSBURGH invited to submit Auditions for the 2014-15 WATERCOLOR SOCIETY NEW photographs of a season. Sept. 20-22. MEMBER SCREENING. New patient, caregiver or Actors of all ages, Members must register on line to medical professional ethnicities, & be Considered for membership at . w ww per who is facing, caring backgrounds are www.pittsburghwatercolorsociety. a p ty ci pgh m for or treating a chronic encouraged to audition, com. Drop off works at 1:00 & .co illness or disability. Entries prepare 2 contrasting return for pickup at 3, Sep. 14. East should be an 11”x14” contemporary monologues. Liberty Presbyterian Church, East image, black & white, matted to www.pghplaywrights.com/ Liberty. 412-441-3800. 16”x20” w/ a white mat, & include auditions. Pittsburgh Playwrights SIDEWALL. Seeking artists for a brief description of the individual Theatre, Downtown. a public mural exhibition in featured. www.hoytartcenter.org. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Bloomfield. Submit artist 724-652-2882. Auditions for The Strange Case of statement, proposal for mural, ILLUMINATIUON - THE ART OF Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. Sept. 13-14. & 3-5 images of past work to Male/female ages 20-60 for all roles THE PUMPKIN. Seeking pumpkin sidewall.project@gmail.com. More carvers, painters, decorators for & a young boy age 10-12. Prepare info can be found at sidewallproject. upcoming exhibit. Only non2-min. classic monologue w/ British wordpress.com. Halloween themed pumpkins will dialect. www.primestage.com. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR be accepted. Submit application Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking at www.themerrickartgallery.org. Studio, West End. submissions for Fellowship 15. Merrick Art Gallery, New Brighton. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement 724-846-1130. for Neil Simon’s Lost in Yonkers. in PDF format, a biography/CV THE IRMA FREEMAN CENTER Sept. 21-22. Men ages 30–55, in PDF format, & work sample FOR IMAGINATION. Accepting Women ages 30–75, Boys ages to www.silvereye.org/f15apply/. submissions for Pittsburgh by 13-15. 1-min monologue & be Email jzipay@silvereye.org for info.

Fri., Sept. 05

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I ejaculate prematurely at least 50 percent of the time. I’m good for two to three minutes and then I REALLY have to be careful. I’ve learned to work around it (like, stop if I’m too close and eat her out to give me some time to relax, etc.), but it’s still a pain. I have a theory: I am not circumcised. I know that circumcised cocks are more desensitized, as they tend to rub on everything all the time. Could my problem be related to the fact that for the first 20 years of my life, the head of my cock had never been in direct contact with anything? And are there tricks to help me with this problem? UNEXPOSED NUB COULD UPSET TIMING

You’re already doing everything premature ejaculators are urged to do, UNCUT: You’re paying close attention to your arousal levels, you’re being careful not to rush past the point of no return (or past the point of “orgasmic inevitability”), you’re taking fuck breaks as needed. Those are the “tricks” to help guys like you, and it sounds like you’ve mastered them. And while the heads of circumcised cocks tend to be less sensitive, studies of men circumcised in adulthood have found no link between circumcision and premature ejaculation.

fuck ever again isn’t that into fucking, isn’t that into you, or isn’t turned on by men he actually knows. Some gay men are aroused only by anonymous sex — the kind you two had on your first “date.” Some gay men overcome that handicap, others don’t. If your “little brown prince” (erm) hasn’t overcome it 10 years into this relationship, I doubt he ever will. I have a couple of friends who prefer to use gender-neutral pronouns, which they define to be “they/them/their.” I know people often use “they/them/their” when they are unsure of gender or want to include all genders, but it makes speaking English awkward; “they/them/their” are all PLURAL, while “he/him/she/her” are SINGULAR. For instance: “My friend Chris is going to the mall. I hope they has a good time.” I’m OK with people being gender-neutral, but I also think following the rules of grammar is important.

THERE IS AN APP FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT TO CHEAT ON THEIR PARTNERS. IT’S CALLED “THE INTERNET.”

I’m a vanilla 29-year-old woman, happily married to a kinky bi guy for six years, together for 13. He is free to sleep with other men, and I consider myself GGG. You can do the math: I married my highschool sweetheart. (It wasn’t planned that way — we just got lucky on the first try.) My husband has a cuckold fetish, and I would love to make this fantasy a reality! How/ where do I find someone? I want to be as safe as possible, and I haven’t dated since I was 16. I just want to cuckold my husband! Why can’t there be an app for that? NON-EXPERIENCED WIFE BEGS YOU

You’re in luck: There is an app for people who want to cheat on their partners — with or without their partners’ permission — and I’m pretty sure you’re already familiar with it. It’s called “The Internet.” This app can direct you to websites for cheaters (Ashley Madison), websites for kinksters (FetLife), and regular dating websites where married people in open relationships are free to advertise for new partners (OkCupid).

GOT GOOD GRAMMAR

“They” can be used as a singular pronoun — Shakespeare did it — but if it makes you crazy, there’s a simple solution: “My friend Chris, who prefers gender-neutral pronouns, is going to the mall. I sure hope Chris has a good time.”

I agree with your advice to SNAP, whose wife shames him for watching porn, but there’s just one thing. I’m a porn-positive woman in my 30s. But when I was still married, my husband once got out of bed while having sex with me to watch porn. He felt himself flagging, so he switched on his computer and watched porn until he got it up again. This was not one of the countless reasons I dumped the motherfucker, but it amounted to taking a bullhorn and yelling: “You’re not sexy enough! I’d rather be sleeping with one of these porn actresses!” Is it unreasonable to ask that my partner wait with the porn until he’s done with me? PISSED-OFF ROMANCE NINJA

Your ex-husband’s problem wasn’t porn. It was insensitivity. And cluelessness. And selfishness. It is not unreasonable to ask your partner to save the porn for “alone time,” and there’s no excuse for cruelty and inconsideration — about porn or anything else. But some couples do incorporate porn into their “together time” …

I am 62 years old, fit, handsome and intelligent. I’m also as horny as a 17-year-old. My committed boyfriend/partner/husband-tobe of 10 years is 41. I met him at a men’s club when he was wearing nothing but a towel, and we had great sex. We haven’t had sex since that first date. I have loved this man from that moment in the club. He is beautiful: Asian with a bit of Spanish — my little brown prince. He is from a culture that is very private and puts on a happy face — always. It’s hard for me to get inside and crack that stubborn nut. I would love nothing more than to make love to him.

It’s not always the wife who dislikes porn. I’m a straight married guy and I don’t like porn. My wife started watching it to rev up her libido. But porn isn’t a source of conflict. She watches porn alone or asks me to go down on her while she watches porn on her tablet. Either I get myself off with my hand while getting my wife off with my tongue, or she gets so horny that she wants to be fucked. We have good regular sex, too.

NINE OUTTA TEN

On this week’s Lovecast, when is the best time to tell your boyfriend that you once had an abortion? At savagelovecast.com.

A gay dude who fucks you once and refuses to

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

ROUTINE AND REGULAR EROTICA

Thanks for sharing, RARE.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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*Stuff We Like Feral Bunny Wall Art

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

That’s one angry rabbit “ONE TON ONE” wheatpasted to an old parking kiosk. Love them red feet. Forward Street and Murray Avenue, in Squirrel Hill

East End Brewing Nunkin Ale Did you really want pumpkin in your beer? East End makes a tasty fall beer that has all the spices of “pumpkin,” but none of the actual squash.

Greg Brown The Pirates’ energetic play-by-play announcer has been on fire this season, especially when making g a big call in a crucial moment. With the hope of October baseball he’ss been even er b eball on the horizon, he more spot-on lately.

Homemade quick pickles Cucumbers overrunning the garden? Slice ’em up and put ’em in heated-up vinegar with some sugar, garlic, mustard seeds and dill. Let cool and refrigerate — great on a burger or as a snack.

Bernard Dog Run Lawrenceville’s dog park, down by the river, is a nice place to meet neighbors, both canine and human. 40th Street near Willow, under the 40th Street Bridge

The Gloss This website for women (or men) provides readers with a feminist take on pop culture, fashion, beauty and celebrities. www.thegloss.com

Let the Fire Burn Community-police relations are in the news, and it’s worth a look back at this 1985 tragedy, when Philadelphia cops ordered a crackdown on MOVE, a predominantly African-American radical movement. Jason Osder’s 2013 doc avoids the polemics of the genre, while providing plenty to think about. On DVD and various streaming services

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

09.10-09.17

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1786, Jacques Balmat and Michel Paccard were the first explorers to reach the top of 15,781-foot Mont Blanc, on the French-Italian border. They were hailed as heroes. One observer wrote that the ascent was “an astounding achievement of courage and determination, one of the greatest in the annals of mountaineering. It was accomplished by men who were not only on unexplored ground but on a route that all the guides believed impossible.” And yet today, 228 years later, the climb is considered relatively easy for anyone who’s reasonably prepared. In a typical year, 20,000 people make it to the summit. Why am I bringing this to your attention? Because I suspect that you are beginning to master a skill that will initially require you to be like Balmat and Paccard, but will eventually be almost routine.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Those who invoke the old metaphor about the caterpillar that transforms into the butterfly often omit an important detail: the graceful winged creature is helpless and weak when it first wriggles free of its chrysalis. For a while it’s not ready to take up its full destiny. As you get ready for your own metamorphosis, Libra, keep that in mind. Have plans to lay low and be self-protective in the days following your emergence into your new form. Don’t try to do loop-the-loops right away.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Scorpios are currently the sign of the zodiac that is least likely to be clumsy, vulgar, awkward or prone to dumb mistakes. On the other hand, you are the most likely to derisively accuse others of being clumsy, vulgar, awkward or prone to dumb mistakes. I recommend that you resist that temptation, however. In the coming week, it is in your selfish interests to be especially tactful and diplomatic. Forgive and quietly adjust for everyone’s mistakes. Don’t call undue attention to them or make them worse. Continue to build your likability and fine-tune your support system.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You have cosmic permission to be bigger than life and wilder than sin. You have a poetic license to be more wise than clever. And you should feel free to laugh longer than might seem polite and make no apologies as you spill drinks while telling your brash stories. This phase of your astrological cycle does not require you to rein yourself in or tone yourself down or be a well-behaved model citizen. In fact, I think it will be best for everyone concerned if you experiment with benevolent mischief and unpredictable healing and ingenious gambles.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For over 2,000 years, Chinese astronomers have understood the science of eclipses. And yet as late as the 1800s, sailors in the Chinese navy shot cannonballs in the direction of lunar eclipses, hoping to chase away the dragons they imagined were devouring the moon. I have a theory that there’s a similar discrepancy in your psyche, Capricorn. A fearful part of you has an irrational fantasy that a wiser part of you knows is a delusion. So how can we arrange for the wiser part to gain ascendancy? There’s an urgent need for you to stop wasting time and energy by indulging in that mistaken perspective.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Squirrels don’t have a perfect memory of where they bury their nuts. They mean to go back and

dig them all up later, but they lose track of many. Sometimes trees sprout from those forgotten nuts. It’s conceivable that on occasion a squirrel may climb a tree it planted years earlier. I see this as a useful metaphor for you to meditate on in the coming weeks. You are on the verge of encountering grown-up versions of seeds you sowed once upon a time and then forgot about.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): On a German TV show, martial artist Jackie Chan performed a tough trick. While holding a raw egg in his right hand, he used that hand to smash through three separate sets of four concrete blocks. When he was finished, the egg was still intact. I see your next task as having some resemblances to that feat, Pisces. You must remain relaxed, protective and even tender as you destroy an obstruction that has been holding you back. Can you maintain this dual perspective long enough to complete the job? I think you can.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 2000 film Cast Away, Tom Hanks plays an American FedEx executive who is stranded alone on a remote Pacific island after he survives a plane crash. A few items from the plane wash up on shore, including a volleyball. He draws a face on it and names it “Wilson,” creating a companion who becomes his confidant for the next four years. I’d love to see you enlist an ally like Wilson in the coming week, Aries. There are some deep, messy, beautiful mysteries you need to talk about. At least for now, the only listener capable of drawing them out of you in the proper spirit might be a compassionate inanimate object that won’t judge you or interrupt you.

gest: 50 ounces. The fact is, your stomach can’t easily accommodate more than 32 ounces at a time. It’s true that if you sip the Double Big Gulp very slowly — like for a period of three and a half hours — the strain on your system will be less. But after the first half hour, as the beverage warms up, its taste will decline steeply. Everything I’ve just said should serve as a useful metaphor for you in the coming week. Even if you are very sure that the stuff you want to introduce into your life is healthier for you than a Double Big Gulp, don’t get more of it than you can comfortably hold.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you surrender to the passive part of your personality, you will be whipped around by mood swings in the coming days. You will hem and haw, snivel and procrastinate, communicate ineptly, and be confused about what you really feel. If, on the other hand, you animate the proactive side of your personality, you are likely to correct sloppy arrangements that have

kept you off-balance. You will heal rifts and come up with bright ideas about how to get the help you need. It’s also quite possible you will strike a blow for justice and equality, and finally get the fair share you were cheated out of in the past.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his 1982 martial arts film Dragon Lord, Jackie Chan experimented with more complex stunts than he had tried in his previous films. The choreography was elaborate and intricate. In one famous sequence, he had to do 2,900 takes of a single fight sequence to get the footage he wanted. That’s the kind of focused attention and commitment to detail I recommend to you in the coming weeks, Leo — especially if you are learning new tricks and attempting novel approaches. What symbol best represents your deepest desire? Testify by going to FreeWillAstrology.com and clicking on “Email Rob.”

get your yoga on!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As far as I know, there has been only one battleship in history that was named after a poet. A hundred years ago, the Italian navy manufactured a dreadnought with triple-gun turrets and called it Dante Alighieri, after the medieval genius who wrote the Divine Comedy. Other than that, most warships have been more likely to receive names like Invincible, Vengeance, Hercules or Colossus. But it would be fine if you drew some inspiration from the battleship Dante Alighieri in the coming weeks. I think you will benefit from bringing a lyrical spirit and soulful passion to your expression of the warrior archetype.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you go to a 7-Eleven convenience store and order a Double Big Gulp drink, you must be prepared to absorb 40 teaspoons of sugar. But what will be an even greater challenge to your body is the sheer amount of fluid you will have to di-

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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ASSISTANT LISTINGS EDITOR Pittsburgh City Paper is hiring a new part-time ASSISTANT LISTINGS EDITOR to help us stay on top of our weekly calendar of events, and to help support our daily Lynn Cullen podcast. Listings duties include data-entry and proofing of calendar information, as well as handling listings-related questions, and canvassing local businesses to ensure our database is accurate. Podcast duties include production assistance, help with booking guests, and managing social media. The successful candidate will be detail-oriented and organized; familiarity with Pittsburgh’s arts and music scene is preferred. Email mwelsh@pghcitypaper.com with resume. No calls please.

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ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

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SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers. This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking. Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

WELLNESS MASSAGE

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

MASSAGE

322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR

China Massage 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Grandng Openi

$60/hr FREE Table Shower

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

412-401-4110

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Superior Chinese Massage

Asian 888 Massage

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm 1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2 McKees Rocks

412-777-7171

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat. 86

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.10/09.17.2014


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WELLNESS

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

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- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

GET HELP NOW

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

1-800-243-1001

www.glenbeigh.com

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

MONROEVILLE, PA

Pregnant?

412-380-0100

We can treat you!

www.myjadewellness.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Let Us Help You Today!

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz N E W S

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TA S T E

412-221-1091

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 10, 2014  

Fall Arts Preview 2014 Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 37

September 10, 2014  

Fall Arts Preview 2014 Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 37