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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 09.03/09.10.2014

POT SHOT: A CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICAN MAY BE THE KEY TO LEGALIZING MEDICAL MARIJUANA 06


EVENTS 9.26 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 TRAMP TRAMP TRAMP Warhol theater A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Tom Roberts. Tickets $10

Dean Wareham

Bradford Cox

Eleanor Friedberger 10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

Martin Rev

10.10 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2014 THE UNKNOWN Warhol theater A live score for the film will be composed and performed by Michael Johnsen in collaboration with Jessica Marcrum. Tickets $10

Tom Verlaine

Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films

10.18 – 2pm IN DISCUSSION: CHUCK CONNELLY: MY AMERICA WITH THE ARTIST AND JESSICA BECK, ASSISTANT CURATOR OF ART Warhol theater FREE with museum admission

10.17 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

10.30 – 5pm TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10

In celebration of the museum’s 20th anniversary, The Warhol presents the world premiere of Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films in partnership with The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. This new performance is comprised of 15 short, newly digitized and publically unseen Warhol films along with five songwriter-composers performing newly composed music for the films. The roster includes Dean Wareham, Bradford Cox, Eleanor Friedberger, Martin Rev, and Tom Verlaine.

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Co-commissioned with The Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 2014 Next Wave Festival and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. Guest music curator, Dean Wareham. Digital transfer of Warhol films courtesy of Media Sponsor:

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CORNING

W OR K S

and THE NEW HAZLETT THEATER present

THE GLUE FACTORY PROJECT

a dance theater production

PARALLEL LIVES

created on internationally & nationally renowned performers over the age of 40.

We carry the world in our pockets — “ reaching out” endlessly — hoping for more.

5 NIGHTS ONLY! SEPTEMBER 10,11,12,13,14

The New Hazlett Theater, Northside FOR TICKETS ONLINE: www.showclix.com OR CALL: 1.888.718.4253; FOR INFO: 412.320.4610

www.corningworks.org

Choreography & performance by BETH CORNING, & ARTHUR AVILES (former principal dancer with Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Co.) projection images by AKIKO KOTANI projection designs by HSUAN-KUANG HSEIH lighting by IAIN COURT

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

BUS SERVICE TO THE NEW HAZLETT THEATER, NORTHSIDE

1-2-4-6-8-11-12-13-15-16-17-54 FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO:


09.03/09.10.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 36

{COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF RON MROWIEC}

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern DANIELLE FOX

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

06

“It’s been a tough battle because as soon as you inject the word ‘marijuana’ into the discussion, it becomes very polarizing.” — Patrick Nightingale, attorney and director of Pittsburgh NORML, on the proposed legalization of medical marijuana in Pennsylvania

[VIEWS] key here is not so much to excel, 14 “The but to be thoroughly acceptable, like the boyfriend your dad approves of.” — Chris Potter on how Pittsburgh ranked as the most livable city in the continental United States

[TASTE]

platter offered an array of 17 “The grilled meats: lamb kebab, lamb kofte, doner, chicken Adana and lamb chop.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Istanbul Sofra

[MUSIC]

22

“I loved the fact that the songs actually told stories.” — Country rocker Michael Christopher on discovering country music

[SCREEN]

had the acid on me. I lost all concept 31 of“I time.” — Pittsburgh Pirate Dock Ellis recalling his infamous no-hitter in the new bio-doc No No: A Dockumentary

[ARTS] is sometimes essential between 34 “Collusion creator and audience.” — Nadine Wasserman on the appeal of art exhibit Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand

[LAST PAGE] “In my opinion, we’re the only ones 55 that make a real cherry soda.” — Master bottler Steve Vokish on the Natrona Bottling Company’s product line

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 STUFF WE LIKE 52 N E W S

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“THIS ISN’T ABOUT CANNABIS. THIS IS ABOUT CARE.”

INCOMING Strip Living: Will more residents change the Strip District’s historic landscape? (Aug. 27) “In an abruptly changing climate, complete with extreme precipitation events, near the water and on old fill is the last place you’d want to be.” — Web comment from “Jack Wolf”

Rivers Casino workers continue fight for union (Aug. 28, online only) “I work at the Rivers Casino and I love my job. I have never been intimidated by anyone. I’ve had conversation with the [general manager] and assistant [general manager]. Never once have I felt any wrongdoing. These people just want to complain about what they can, so somebody will give them a handout. If you want something, you work hard, not throw a fit and complain till you get your way like a child.” — Web comment from “James Patton” “You act like there is an abundance of full-time jobs and that all hard-working people can just find one anywhere. Many hard workers are stuck with parttime jobs because corporations want to keep it that way. It’s nothing more than a clever bail-out from providing health care to the very people who labor hard, raking in billions for the corporations, while barely making a few dollars of their own. What a gross, disgusting mentality to think that hard workers who don’t make enough to survive just want a handout. It’s narrow-minded and lacks any rational and/or intelligent thought.” — Web comment from “Julie Curry”

“The only way Tom Wolf’s numbers would go down against Tom Corbett’s is if Corbett endorsed Wolf.” — Aug. 28 tweet from “Dave Spak” (@davespak)

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF HEATHER SHUKER}

For 10-year-old Hannah Pallas, who suffers hundreds of seizures weekly, access to marijuana-based medications could result in more good days (above right) than bad.

T

EMERGING FROM THE WEEDS

HE PULPIT OF a small church in the North Hills is exactly the type of place you’d expect to see a conservative politician preaching to the choir. But tonight, state Sen. Mike Folmer (R-Lebanon) is singing from a different hymn sheet. “It’s funny having this meeting in a church,” Folmer tells the crowd of 100 gathered Aug. 26 at the Bradford Woods Community Church, near Cranberry. And then he gets to the task at hand: building support for legislation he’s co-authored to legalize the use of medical marijuana. “I’m a Bible-bleeding Presbyterian, and I believe we were given this plant and our bodies were designed … to receive this,” Folmer says. “It’s all about [the benefits] that God intended this plant to bring.” Senate Bill 1182, also known as the Compassionate Use of Medical Canna-

bis Act, would approve the medical use of marijuana dispensed in “extracted oils, edible products, ointments, tinctures and vaporization or any other medical device.” It would require the state Department

Led by a conservative senator, medical marijuana is gaining traction in Pa., but can relief come fast enough for patients most in need? {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} of Health to regulate use of the drug, and mandate patients have an access card in order to obtain it. “I need your help to get his done, folks,” Folmer tells the audience with a raised

hand, his thumb and index finger spread about an inch apart. “We’re this close.” FOLMER’S MISSIONARY zeal has carried him during a four-hour drive to a church whose pews are filled not with stoners but with parents and children, many of whom are hoping to use marijuana to treat debilitating diseases that traditional medication has not cured. “Hannah is out of options,” one of those parents, Heather Shuker, says of her 10-year-old daughter, Hannah Pallas. Hannah suffers from intractable epilepsy, which causes her hundreds of seizures every week and cannot be controlled by treatments. “She’s been on 20 different seizure medications, and there is nothing else to try.” “Doctors are essentially playing Russian CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


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Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again September 6, 2014–January 12, 2015

Rethink the Everyday In his first solo museum exhibition, the multi-faceted designer and artist Sebastian Errazuriz challenges audiences with work that is lyrical, macabre, bizarre, and eloquent.

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September 5 September 6 October 20 October 23

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Artist Talk and Opening Party Divergent Drawing workshop Coffee with the Curator: Look Again Culture Club: Designers on Design

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EMERGING FROM THE WEEDS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

roulette with her life,” Shuker adds. “I go to appointments and they say, ‘Let’s add a seizure medication,’ or ‘Change the dosage,’ or ‘A new seizure medication came out; let’s try that.’ Or ‘Let’s do a corpus callosotomy’ — where they basically cut her brain in half and hope that it stops seizures on one side of her brain from spreading to the other.” But with all those radical treatments at their disposal, she says, “They can’t even speak to us about [medical marijuana].” There is at least anecdotal evidence that cannabidiol, an extract from the marijuana plant, can be helpful for children with conditions like Hannah Shuker’s. Most of that evidence has come from Colorado, where marijuana use of all forms is legal. Parents there have said that the drug has brought about miraculous changes in children, and in December, the Food and Drug Administration granted approval for a New York University study on the drug’s effect on childhood epilepsy. But the availability of that drug could be months or years away. And that’s time parents like Heather Shuker might not want to spend, when the drug is a plane ride away in Colorado, or even a five-hour drive away in Michigan, which has its own medical-marijuana program. “What kind of person keeps potentially helpful medication away from a child?” Shuker asks. “To the government, I say, ‘Legalize it and do your job and regulate it. And let the doctors do their job by providing these children the best medicine available.’” That’s not a new request. Medicalmarijuana legislation has been proposed in Harrisburg before, but bills have failed to even get out of committee. Democratic state Sen. Daylin Leach, a liberal Democrat from the Philadelphia suburbs, has long proposed bills pushing for medical use and full legalization.

To illustrate why, he cites a parent whose child “was having 50 seizures a day” before the parents bought marijuana illegally. Since then, Leach says, the child “has been seizure-free for six weeks. To continue to deny these dying sick people the medications they need is morally outrageous.” But the moral argument got little traction until Folmer, a cancer survivor with conservative clout, began making it. Folmer says he took a Friday meeting with two mothers of sick children who gave him information about the benefits of medical marijuana. Instead of casting it aside, he took the research home and began doing his own research online. “I was online reading all of these studies and white papers until 4 a.m.,” Folmer says. “I couldn’t go to sleep. On Saturday I told my wife, ‘We have to do something [for these families]. If a conservative in Harrisburg doesn’t get on this, no one is going to hear their message,’ because I know what happens in politics.”

“WHAT KIND OF PERSON KEEPS POTENTIALLY HELPFUL MEDICATION AWAY FROM A CHILD?”

Pittsburgh NORML is sponsoring a bus trip to Harrisburg for a rally in support of the legalization of medical marijuana on Sept. 15. At press time, about 25 seats on the bus remained. More information can be found at www.tinyurl.com/ms9s32e.

On Sunday he talked to and got the support of his pastor. On Monday, he went to his office and told his chief of staff they were going to work on medical-marijuana legislation, and “I thought he was going to fall off his chair.” SB 1182 cleared a Senate committee in June, and is poised for passage in the Senate when legislators return to work Sept. 15, say Leach and Folmer. “It’s been a tough battle, because as soon as you inject the word ‘marijuana’ into

Stills from a video that Heather Shuker made to illustrate her daughter’s daily struggles with intractable epilepsy. The video can be found online at www.pghcitypaper.com.

the discussion, it becomes very polarizing,” says Patrick Nightingale, a former prosecutor, current criminal defense attorney and executive director of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. “This bill has been introduced and reintroduced and got nowhere. Mike Folmer’s involvement in this was utterly critical. You needed that conservative voice to strengthen the argument. This discussion was no longer seen as a hippie attempt to free the weed.” Adds Leach: “Mike Folmer is a hero.” While Pennsylvania has not always been a haven for progressive policies, medical legalization appears to be broadly popular. A July 2 Franklin & Marshall College poll found that 84 percent of Pennsylvanians favor legalizing the medical use of marijuana. Leach expects the measure to pass the Senate this fall by a 45-5 margin. The measure would then go to the state House, where a companion bill hasn’t yet been given a hearing. Leach says he believes a veto-proof majority has been secured to pass the bill in the House if it can get to the floor for a vote.

But following the June 27 senate committee vote, The Philadephia Inquirer reported that the bill has a tough slog even if it passes the senate. Steve Miskin, a spokesman for GOP House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, told the paper: “Obviously some members support it, but the vast majority of members in our caucus believe the states should not be in business of deciding what is or is not medicine. That’s what the FDA can and does do.” The paper also reported that Corbett “is expected to veto any marijuana legalization bill that is broader than his proposal for a pilot study of the use of cannabis oil to treat children with epilepsy.” According to a May press release from the governor, he vowed to work toward limited legislation “that would allow a research-based pilot program with leading children’s hospitals in Pennsylvania.” But so far, Leach says, there has been no movement from the governor on the issue. “The governor has threatened to veto this bill. The fact is, Gov. Corbett has not [been] given to thinking deeply on this issue,” Leach says. “He said what he said to avoid a sit-in by the parents of these children. He did it to escape the negative optics, but there is no fierce urgency from the governor to get these people this medicine.” NOT EVERYONE agrees that legalization is the best way to go. Kevin Sabet has long opposed legalization in any form. He is the director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida and the director of Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana), a nonprofit formed last year by former Congressman Patrick Kennedy, whose own struggle with substance abuse has been well documented. Sabet says his group combats “the false dichotomy in this country that when it comes to marijuana, you either lock people up or you legalize it. We reject both of those theories. There are better, smarter ways to deal with this.” CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

The Andy Warhol Museum, Arts Innovation Award; Robert Qualters, Artist of the Year; and honorees from Philadelphia, Johnstown and Indiana


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EMERGING FROM THE WEEDS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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Sabet says criminal penalties should be changed to civil fines for using or possessing marijuana solely for personal use. He also says SAM is against mandatory minimum sentences for marijuana convictions. When it comes to medical use, Sabet says there need to be regulated studies about the medical benefits of marijuana and any use by patients with severe medical conditions like juvenile epilepsy. He says such patient use could occur during the testing phase if a doctor deems it necessary. But legalizing medical marijuana, he says, is just the first step to full legalization, and also exposes patients to drugs that might not be produced at the highest standards. “We think that someone who is terminally ill, or a child dealing with a severe condition, should have access to medications that were produced with good manufacturing processes, and under the watch of the FDA,” Sabet says. “But legislation is not the way to go. “I think a lot of these parents have been used as pawns by the legalization movement, because who can say no to a child who is seizing 50 times a day on the Senate floor? These families deserve better. … They need to be able to go to a doctor and get something, and not some weasel online that can hook them up.” That argument “really makes your head explode,” Leach counters. “If these parents have to go to a ‘weasel online,’ that’s a direct result of Mr. Sabet and groups like his. If this was legal and regu-

lated like any other drugs, there wouldn’t be a need to look around online for this. By blocking this, he’s fighting to keep the weasels online in business.” Leach says he’d prefer to have the FDA oversee clinical trials and drug production. But he says that can’t happen because marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 narcotic — the same designation given to heroin and LSD. He adds, however, that during a recent tour of labs and growing facilities in Colorado, he was impressed with what he saw. “This isn’t two hippies sitting on a beanbag making this stuff,” Leach says. “It’s highly regulated, and you know exactly what you are getting.” For his part, Folmer told the crowd in Cranberry that he will continue to keep the focus on individuals who could benefit from the drug, especially the children and families with nowhere else to turn. “The fear out there surrounding that is just that: fear,” Folmer says. “And that has happened because we have been told to fear it for 70 years. And the thing that bothers me most is that we’ve lost so much time that could have been spent researching this. How much farther ahead would we be if we wouldn’t have taken this plant and forced it underground? “This is not about Cheech and Chong. This is not about Fast Times at [Ridgemont] High. This isn’t about tie-dyed T-shirts and the hippie culture. This isn’t even about cannabis. This is about care … and children in desperate need.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LANGUAGE LESSONS Latino families finding disconnect with school communications {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} IN THE TIME since Raquel Castillo began

volunteering at the Latino Family Center and getting to know other Latino parents in the Pittsburgh Public School District, she’s heard a common concern. “A lot of the schools do not have the notes, [event] flyers and newsletters that are sent home translated,” says Castillo, who is raising three grandchildren in the district. “By the time they come in to have us translate them, the meeting or event that’s going on in the school has already passed.” Last year, Castillo and others in Pittsburgh’s growing Latino community came together to form Latino Parents United in Action, an organization designed to increase Latino parent involvement in the district. The group has grown to include more than 20 families, but the language barrier is proving difficult to overcome. Of the 25,900 students enrolled in the district, there are approximately 850 English as a second language (ESL) students and Spanish is the second most commonly used language among them. (Nepali is the most common). In 2012 there were 630 ESL students, showing a sharp increase in just two years. “In terms of translation and interpretation services, more schools are becoming aware of the need to provide this support to families as the district is becoming more linguistically diverse,” says district spokesperson Ebony Pugh. But some of the parents say they often don’t feel engaged in their children’s education because when they attend events, they can’t always understand what’s being said and some of the materials they receive from the school aren’t translated. “They’re eager and want to be involved,” says Amie Matson, an organizer with advocacy organization A+ Schools who leads the parent group. “I definitely am seeing some materials that are available in Spanish but those last-minute notes — if the school nurse is going to be checking eyes in the next week — those are the ones that aren’t translated.” Translation efforts vary from school to school says Matson, but some materials produced by schools and teachers, like flyers inviting parents to attend upcoming meetings at school or letting them know about medical checkups, are often not translated. And the district says they don’t send out translated report cards. Alternatively, materials produced by the district such as school

handbooks for elementary schools Concord, Beechwood, Colfax, Greenfield, Banksville, Arsenal and South Hills, and Allderdice High School are translated to Spanish. “Based on the growth we are seeing in the District we are currently reviewing how we disseminate report cards to linguistically diverse families,” Pugh says. “You can currently find on our [ESL] website district policies, information about schools, school handbooks, etc. in various languages, including Spanish.” According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, “communication with parents must be in the parent’s preferred language and mode of communication.” Schools are also required to provide translation and interpretation services to parents. “With my experience with individuals in the group, parents are saying it’s not happening,” Matson says. “I don’t know if there’s not enough time or if they don’t have enough staff to translate things properly.” ESL Director Jonathan Covel says the resources are there for translation and interpretation: His office can translate documents for principals and teachers or send a translator to events. And both Beechview and Concord elementary schools have Spanishspeaking staff. But he’s working to make sure teachers and principals know these resources are available and take advantage of them more often. “We encourage all schools to forward documents to our office because that’s an incredibly important access point to make sure parents are involved in their student’s education,” Covel says. The district says it’s been working with schools to identify families in need of translation services. “Schools that don’t have an ESL program may not be aware that parents, whose kids don’t need ESL services, can benefit from translators and interpreters,” says Pugh. Part of ensuring families receive the help they need means making sure school staff know the parents of the students they serve. On Aug. 20, in collaboration with A+ Schools and the Latino Family Center, the district gave Latino parents the opportunity to meet with principals and staff from their children’s school. “As we’re getting more Spanish-speaking families in our district, we’re looking for different ways to make sure our parents are engaged,” Covel says.

“THEY’RE EAGER AND WANT TO BE INVOLVED.”

RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[POTTER’S FIELD]

RANK DECEPTION? Let’s get over city-ranking surveys already {BY CHRIS POTTER}

ARTWORK BY MARY HAMILTON

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working so hard! Turns out the roads are in great shape. Members of Mayor Bill Peduto’s Education Task Force? Your services are no longer needed. Our schools are already perfect. Or so we’ve been told by the latest survey purporting to document the world’s “Most Livable City,” this one compiled by the Economist Intelligence Unit, a research group affiliated with the Economist magazine. Pittsburgh, it turns out, ranks as the most livable city in the continental United States, out of 16 U.S. cities surveyed. We’re the 30th most livable city of 140 surveyed worldwide. But here’s what’s truly impressive: Pittsburgh scored perfect 100s — a score which “is considered ideal,” according to EIU — for its infrastructure and educational system. That’s right: Pittsburgh’s roads and bridges, its schools and sewers, are considered ideal. At least by people who don’t have to use them. I don’t know what you people are always complaining about. In fact, Pittsburgh was only one of 10 cities worldwide — and one of only two in the U.S. — to get a perfect score for its infrastructure. (Fully one-third of cities in the survey got perfect education scores, including notoriously dysfunctional Washington, D.C.) As you might expect, this news was widely trumpeted by the region’s marketing agency, VisitPittsburgh, and got coverage from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, KDKA and civic-booster site Next Pittsburgh. But oddly, no one seems to have asked the obvious question: “If the infrastructure is ‘ideal,’ what was that crater I nearly lost a tire inside this morning? A cave filled with leprechaun gold?” The Economist explains its rankings this way: Each city was rated for “relative comfort” across 30 factors, and each factor was rated as “acceptable, tolerable, uncomfortable, undesirable or intolerable.” (Pittsburgh, for example, is ranked as having a “tolerable” amount of corruption … which is, I guess, the level at which your most recent police chief is a convict, but your most recent mayor is not.) The EIU then combined those scores into five broad categories, like “infrastructure” and “stability,” and gave them a combined score. Based on more detailed data provided

to me by the good folks at VisitPittsburgh, our infrastructure score — which included factors like public transit, roads and water supply — rated “acceptable” across the board. And that qualified Pittsburgh for a perfect 100. (In case you were wondering, Pittsburgh’s lowest score was in the category of “stability,” which ranks things like crime rates and the “threat of civil unrest/conflict.” They must have been measuring us during the Luke Bryan concert.) So the key here is not so much to excel, but to be thoroughly acceptable, like the boyfriend your dad approves of. As the EIU report itself says, the high-ranking cities “tend to be mid-sized cities in wealthier countries with a relatively low population density.” Maybe what most sets Pittsburgh apart, however, is not the rankings themselves so much as how much we care about them. City rankings are everywhere nowadays, but the local fixation on them dates back to 1986, when Rand-McNally identified us as the country’s Most Livable City at the very moment a generation of families were leaving it. It’s only natural that we embraced the study: You most want proof that your city is livable when nobody is living here. But even though Pittsburgh has shaken off the rust of the 1980s, we can’t help cheering ourselves at the release of each new totally arbitrary quality-oflife survey. Best city for retirees. Best city for singles. Best city for people under 30. Best city for people under 30 who want to date retirees. It’s the job of groups like VisitPittsburgh to tout this stuff, of course, and they do it well. And they’ve been joined by a social-media cottage industry of happynews websites, only too pleased to share “Pittsburgh bucket lists” and document the cultural significance of parking chairs. Civic life in Pittsburgh often seems less concerned with making things better than with reassuring ourselves that everything is great. But maybe the time to stop paying attention to these surveys is when they start giving advice no Pittsburgh driver would ever trust: Don’t worry! Ignore those warning signs! The road ahead is perfect!

PITTSBURGH WAS ONLY ONE OF 10 CITIES WORLDWIDE TO GET A PERFECT SCORE FOR ITS INFRASTRUCTURE.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


DE

SI

the

ON

THE CUBES OF LAMB KEBAB WERE TENDER, JUICY AND FLAVORFULLY CHARRED

FUNGI FUN

TURKISH

{BY CHRIS POTTER} Even a shade-loving species like the mushroom sometimes gets a day in the sun. And thanks to an increased interest in locavorism, “More people are interested in foraging for mushrooms,” says Barbara DeRiso, a “mushroom enthusiast” who serves as treasurer for the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club. “The woods are a little more picked over than they used to be.” The humble fungus will truly be in the spotlight on Sept. 13, when the club hosts its 14th annual Gary Lincoff Mushroom Foray. The foray is a daylong series of events — including talks, mushroom-identification hikes and a cooking demonstration by Johnstown chef Tom Chulick — from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at North Park. Among the experts on hand will be Gary Lincoff himself, who wrote the book on mushroom identification for the Audubon Society. The event is a highlight for the 400-member club, which sponsors regular mushroom hikes from April to October. Even if you don’t attend the session on identifying mushrooms by using DNA techniques — an area of special interest to local members — DeRiso says participating in the guided walks will “start you on the road” to identifying some distinctive edible mushrooms. Events feature “a nice mix of science and more utilitarian interest,” says DeRiso, with much to offer any wouldbe foragers with “a practical interest in learning how not to poison themselves.” CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Admission for non-members is $55 ($15 students/kids ages 11-18) and includes 2014-15 club membership. www.wpamushroomclub.org

the

FEED

It’s possible you u don’t want to o hear one more e word about ice, e but what if it went in your drink and not over your head? With the garden bounty this time of year, go for gourmet ice, in which herbs (like mint, basil), bits of fruit or even a vegetable garnish, like a cucumber sliver, have been frozen. Tip for centering the add-in: Fill tray 1/3 up and freeze; then place herb or fruit, top off and continuing freezing.

DELIGHT

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

N A PRIME corner in Regent Square, graced with outdoor dining across from Frick Park, a likable local restaurant recently pulled up stakes. Alma’s pan-Latin offerings will be missed, but happily, they have been succeeded by the Turkish cuisine of Istanbul Sofra. The space within hasn’t been changed so much as embellished. The walls have the same teal-and-terra cotta color scheme, which manages to be both bold and relaxing at the same time. On the walls are pictures of Turkey, ancient and modern, and an arresting collection of gleaming copper casserole lids. Brilliantly colorful mosaic-glass lamps and beautifully woven fabric covering tabletops and menus complete an atmosphere that’s just shy of opulent. Surrounded by all these rich colors and textures, we were at first brought up short by a menu that featured mostly kebabs. Mind you, we love kebabs — grilled, seasoned meat, who could complain? — but we had hoped for a more varied picture of Turkish cuisine and feared that

Manti Turkish dumplings

this fare would be too familiar to make much of an impression. Our first mistake was to underestimate the appetizers. The falafel was dark brown outside with a fluffy chickpea mixture within and accompanied by an especially nutty tahini dip. Mucver consisted of grated zucchini mixed with herbs, egg and flour into a soft batter and fried in triangular cakes that were deeply browned outside, yet creamy and fresh-tasting inside. In a town that fries a lot of zucchini, Istanbul Sofra’s mucver are exceptional.

ISTANBUL SOFRA 7600 Forbes Ave., Regent Square. 412-727-6693 HOURS: Daily 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $4-14; entrees $11-23 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Borek, scrolls of filled phyllo nicknamed “cigarettes” for the visual resemblance, also looked a bit like elongated spring rolls, but their wrappers were pastry-tender with just

a hint of flakiness. One version, filled with feta and dill, was savory and rich, while another, filled with spinach cooked with onion in olive oil, delivered bright, gardengreen flavor. A piyaz salad of navy beans, tomatoes, onions, red bell pepper, parsley and Turkish spices took on notes of olive flavor from the oil of its dressing, although only one actual olive garnished the plate. It was a substantial and satisfying starter. The entrée list features three mixedgrill platters: lamb, chicken and Sofra. The latter offered an almost dizzying array of grilled meats: lamb kebab, lamb kofte, doner, chicken Adana and lamb chop. The chop was thinly sliced, which didn’t detract from its moistness or mild flavor, but its slenderness did seem to prevent it from gaining as much char as we’d like. The cubes of the kebab suffered no such deficiency; they were tender, juicy and flavorfully charred. Kofte, a ground lamb patty that in lesser hands can taste like little more than a hamburger, is here a thick cake that emphasizes the meat’s juiciness and tenderness, with mild spicing and CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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TURKISH DELIGHT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

more smoke than char from the grill. Then there was Adana kebab. We’d never heard of it, but our server recommended it highly. A specialty of the southern Turkish town of Adana, it turns out to have an official Protected Designation of Origin, like Champagne, or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. True Adana is a kebab of spiced ground lamb and requires fat from a lamb’s tail, smoked Turkish peppers and sumac, a wonderfully distinctive spice that offers hints of lemon. Istanbul Sofra’s version is made from chicken: After imbibing the traditional flavors via marinade, the meat is formed into a long, flat patty, following the shape of the broad skewer on which it’s grilled. This form allows it to cook through very quickly, resulting in an extraordinarily tender interior that still has some of the snap of a good sausage. Served with Istanbul Sofra’s plump, flavorful rice, grilled vegetables and tangy herbed-yogurt sauce, this dish was a supremely satisfying version of the classic chicken-and-rice combination.

Rice pudding and Turkish coffee

Along with all those kebabs, the menu has a small but worthy vegetarian section of falafel, grilled vegetables and manti. Described as “Turkish dumplings,” these are fingertip-size pouches of pasta in paired sauces of mildly spicy tomato and cool yogurt, seasoned with plenty of dill. The manti were appealingly shaped like tiny pieces of abstract sculpture and clearly intended to be chewy, but we found them perhaps a bit tough. The dish seemed better suited to a role as a side than to commanding a plate by itself. With its glittering ambience, warm and attentive service, and excellent variety of Turkish specialties, Istanbul Sofra is a wonderful new place to meet friends and share lots of delicious dishes. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

OUT FROM THE SHADOWS The Cloak Room pulls back the curtain on East Liberty landmark One of my favorite Pittsburgh colloquialisms is, “Oh that place? That’s where Insert Name of Place That Was There Before used to be.” Well, there’s a new place — The Cloak Room — where the Shadow Lounge used to be. “This is a legendary space,” says Cloak Room manager Joey Hilty. “They set a huge standard for the neighborhood.” And although The Cloak Room will also have a mix of live music, performance and dance parties, Hilty says that this new venture, while respecting the energy of the past, isn’t an attempt to clone the Shadow Lounge. Jazz trumpeter Hill Jordan will lead a revolving group of musicians (“The Ruckus”) every Saturday. “This isn’t a wine-and-cheese jazz club. This place is going to be lively,” says Hilty. Hilty hopes that The Cloak Room will “bring back a social element to your evenings out: Instead of just sitting in the corner of a bar with your friends, you’ll form new groups here.” Drinkers should expect a tightly curated cocktail menu, along with wine and mid-priced beers. Hilty says that while service behind the bar will be sharp, it’s going to be more of a high-volume atmosphere. If you’re in search of a more personalized cocktail experience, the adjoining Livermore has really found its footing over the last few months. “There was a little bit of an identity crisis at The Livermore, and people weren’t quite sure what to expect,” Hilty says. “The vibe didn’t match the space and the neighborhood.” But with an attentive bar staff, a revamped cocktail list, $3 beer specials and a focused snacks menu, the vibe and the space are now in sync. The opening of The Cloak Room and a re-energized Livermore seem poised to attract new energy to the neighborhood. And while Hilty says he’s mindful of the area’s history, “We hope that the community embraces us for what we’re trying to do now.”

“THIS ISN’T A WINE-AND -CHEESE JAZZ CLUB. THIS PLACE IS GOING TO BE LIVELY.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5972 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. Follow the @livermorepgh Twitter account for updates.


Try kibbee, lamb kabob, tabbouli, falafel and much more!

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part of the NPL Restaurant Group

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FREE* event parking when you purchase $25 in food at Pittsburgh Grille! * Parking pass is only valid in the U.S. Steel Tower Garage, Monday-Friday, during any concerts, games, or events held at the Consol Energy Center.

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C L A S S I F I E D S

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

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DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

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BenjaminsPgh.com

946 Penn Ave Located in Downtown’s Cultural District

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20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beerfriendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t diner-cheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallops-three-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-377-0916. This neo-traditional Japanese restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired as much by modern American cuisine as it is by ancient Japanese tradition. Here, roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets its own entrée. It offers a tapas-like, a la carte approach, ideal for sampling a menu that spans traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. LF GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE

Verde {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. 412-281-6595. You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. This fine-dining restaurant offers the bold flavors and confident preparations of classic Portuguese cuisine — from thick, meaty Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage flambéed en route to the table. Entrees include steak in a red-wine sauce, chicken cooked with Portuguese peppers, pork with clams and, of course, fish. LE NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding

PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-2434348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula:


The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Benjamin’s Western Avenue Burger Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests humble and down-home, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Best of all, each meat has its own custom rub and is dry-smoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF

Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brown-sugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique four-course dinner just for you. LE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and fried-rice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, THE SMILING offers above-average MOOSE. 1306 E. fare, reasonably Carson St., South Side. priced. Alongside 412-431-4668. The the contemporary www. per pa Carson Street bar American flavors are pghcitym o .c and nightclub offers numerous Asian-inspired a top-notch sandwich dishes, such as soup made and salad menu, by bringing from kabocha pumpkin. From creativity, quality preparation po’boy oyster appetizers to crab and a knack for well-selected cakes and over-sized short ribs, ingredients to the burgers, each dish is carefully conceived sandwiches and appetizers. and prepared. KE Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, cornVERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. and-black-bean fritters and a 412-404-8487. The menu here roster of inventive sliders. JE isn’t straight Mexican, but presents some traditional items, STEELHEAD BRASSERIE including tableside-prepared AND WINE BAR. Marriott City guacamole and grilled corn-onCenter, 112 Washington Ave., the-cob, with reconceived classics, Downtown. 412-394-3474. In invented, fusion-y dishes like tacos this upscale hotel restaurant, with roasted sweet potatoes, the straightforward menu fried chickpeas and Mexicanpromises that the aquatic style tzatziki. There is also an name holds more than brand extensive tequila list and a patio value. While entrées include for warm-weather dining. KE seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, VILLAGE TAVERN & the soups and starters are TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West dominated by the former, with End. 412-458-0417. This warm, old favorites like jumbo shrimp welcoming, and satisfying Italian cocktail matched with more restaurant is a reason to brave the contemporary offerings. LE West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. constrained categories: antipasti, 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. pizza and pasta, with the pasta 412-224-2579. In this intimate section organized around seven restaurant, the emphasis is noodle shapes, from capelli to on local, seasonal ingredients rigatoni, each paired with three simply yet inventively prepared. or four distinct sauces. KE

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LOCAL

BEAT

“IT SOUNDS CLICHÉ, BUT AT THE END OF THE DAY, IT REALLY COMES DOWN TO THE SONG.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

TUNES FOR GOOD It wasn’t great news when this year’s Bluegrass and Beyond Music Festival in Harmony, Pa., was canceled — but Allie Koch, who’d been brought on to help with booking, decided to make the best of it. “They were going to have me [program] the Friday night, which wasn’t bluegrass; it was more contemporary,” explains Koch, who has been booking The Center of Harmony in recent years. “I had a lineup put together, and then … the bottom kind of fell out, and they decided not to do it this year. The lineup I had was so good, I didn’t want to let the idea drop.” The result: the first of what Koch hopes will be an annual charitybenefit event, which she’s calling Beat Cancer Pittsburgh. Beat Cancer Pittsburgh is unique in that it’s the first event to specifically benefit Glimmer of Hope’s program A Home for Hope. Located at UPMC’s Hillman Cancer Center, Home for Hope will integrate traditional cancer therapy and holistic medicine: “The nutrition aspect of it, the yoga aspect, massage, acupuncture — all the other types of treatments that help cancer patients to do better,” Koch explains. “And doing it in a scientific way — the end result being to hopefully get insurance companies to pay for those types of treatments.” Koch’s dream lineup is a mix of national and local acts: Headliner Shannon Curfman came up in the ’90s as a child blues-guitar prodigy, and has more recently been the guitarist in Kid Rock’s touring band. Jeff Campbell is a San Francisco singer-songwriter whom Koch manages. Locals Brooke Annibale and Mike Medved will play as well, and VIP ticketholders will catch a performance by Nashville songwriter Shannon LaBrie. Koch says after the first event, she’ll evaluate how to go forward with the show in future years. One thing she hopes to do, though, is stay focused on worthy local charities. “I definitely lean toward the charities that keep things local over the big national ones. They’re worthy in their own right, but it’s nice to keep the money with the ones where you live.”

“THE LINEUP I HAD WAS SO GOOD, I DIDN’T WANT TO LET THE IDEA DROP.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BEAT CANCER PITTSBURGH. 6:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 4. Hard Rock Café, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $30-75. www.beatcancerpittsburgh.com

22

THAT ONE SONG {BY BRIAN CONWAY}

S

O YOU WANT to be a country-rock star?

The way Michael Christopher sees it, all it takes is one song. Christopher — blue-eyed, squarejawed, bestubbled — of Penn Township, is backstage at the Crawford County Fair, about two hours north of Pittsburgh. His eponymous band opens for Chris Higbee in 30 minutes. But for now, Christopher is discussing what it will take, from both himself and the music-industry elites, for him to become a national act. “It sounds cliché, but at the end of the day, it really comes down to the song,” he says. “You have to find that song that’s gonna catch. And then once you feel that you have that, or somebody feels that you have a specific song, that song needs to be out there — you have to find the right group, or Strawberry festivals and pumpkin fairs: Michael Christopher right person, who has the right in, to help “Strawberry festivals, pumpkin fairs, national acts. We will play at casinos, you you get that song out there.” Michael Christopher Palguta — he county fairs,” he says, counting on his fin- name it. A couple weeks ago we opened for dropped his last name for his stage name gers all the different types of events he’s Big Smo, who’s a country rapper. We’re all — has been playing guitar-heavy country- played. “We also do private events, open for over the map.” He wasn’t always a country enthusiast: rock in and around Western Pennsylvania, During high school, in Blairsville, Indiana and further up and down the East Coast, MICHAEL County, Christopher preferred bands like for the past seven years. He estimates that CHRISTOPHER BAND Metallica, AC/DC and Journey. In fact, “I the band plays about 100 shows a year, Noon, Sat., Sept. 6. Slippery Rock never listened to country at all,” he sheepVillage Fest, Main Street, Slippery Rock. and calls summertime the group’s “bread www.slipperyrockpa.org/villagefest or ishly admits. It was his then-girlfriend (now and butter.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

www.michaelchristopherband.com


his wife) who made the introduction. “She took me to a line-dancing place,” Christopher recalls. “And I was there, and I’m like, ‘Wow, this is actually really cool music.’ I just loved it. I loved the fact that the songs actually told stories.” That was 10 years ago. It would take a couple more years until his first gig, at Bella Luna, an Italian restaurant off Route 22 in Murrysville. Since then, Christopher has released a handful of EPs and recorded an album of original songs, 2012’s You and the Open Road, in Nashville, co-produced by Kent Wells, best known for his work with Dolly Parton. Besides recording and touring yearround, and approaching fatherhood for the first time — his wife is due in September — Christopher says he is waiting to hear back from, as he puts it, “an independent music group in Nashville.” The band would not necessarily be signed to this particular label directly, but would associate with its development side, which helps to push artists and their songs onto major labels and radio. “But it takes some time getting there,” Christopher explains. “We are going through a bunch of [my] songs, to see if there are one or two, or however many, that are like, ‘OK, this is a bangin’ hit; we need to record this, this is the one.’” While he enjoys writing with established industry hands — “She Stood Out in the Crowd,” off his first album, was penned with one of Kenny Chesney’s guitar players, Jon Conley — Christopher takes a lot of pride in writing his own songs, often with his guitarist, Zach Reeder. “I love, love, love, love writing and creating music,” he says. “We obviously like playing cover songs, but when you play [your own] song, that people react to, to me, there’s really no other feeling.” “If you want to be a legit songwriter,” Christopher adds, “you have to tell a meaningful story.” One of those stories comes in the

form of the title track of the band’s new EP, “Keep It Country,” which has received airplay on local country radio stations. A driving guitar line and crashing cymbals set the pace before giving way to Christopher’s rich baritone: “This ain’t a song about tractors and corn rows / I’m not gonna sing about pickups and dirt roads ... it’s about an attitude.” It works as both a single and a party anthem — not to mention a philosophy of sorts. “You don’t have to be a farmer to be country,” Christopher deadpans. But is it the one? “Buckle Up,” the very next track on the EP, was produced by Reeder here in Pittsburgh. It possesses, as Christopher puts it, “definitely a different vibe.” “It’s very modern, and it’s very — it’s got almost like a hip-hop feel,” he says. Coupled with lyrics about the weekend, beer and “You and me, and my GMC,” it’s a home-run swing at national exposure, even if it’s outside the band’s usual comfort zone of modern rock mashed with traditional country. Despite the laborious path, Christopher would not want to be doing anything else. “The way I set out about anything that I’m into in my life, I just hardcore do whatever I possibly can do to be the best at that,” he says, gazing toward his band backstage. “And that’s how it’s blossomed into [my desire to] make a career out of this, and go to Nashville, write with those writers, record in Nashville, push to radio ...” Fifteen minutes before he’s set to perform, Christopher excuses himself. Outside of the trailer, Chris Higbee, the former Povertyneck Hillbilly, takes selfies with members of the stage crew. Asked about Christopher’s quest to launch a national musical career, Higbee responds with the brevity of a man who knows the game all too well: “He’s doing the things that he needs to do: Write your own songs, perform them live and perform them good.” All it takes is just one song.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATALIE ESCOBEDO}

Changing with the times, but only sort of: Taking Back Sunday

TAKE ME BACK {BY JULIA COOK} IF YOU’RE OF a certain age, you may fondly

recall Taking Back Sunday from a mid-’00s, high school- or college-era mix CD or, more recently, an unfortunate karaoke performance. But whether you find the emohardcore band’s older hits laughable or irresistible, the band represents an enviable legacy. Taking Back Sunday doesn’t need a punctuation-mark gimmick or rap verse to remain current. Which is why, in an age when guitar bands are a dime a dozen, TBS still packs venues with audience members who range from their teens to their 30s. “It’s a rare thing when you can bring an audience like that together in one place, enjoying the same thing at the same time,” says lead vocalist Adam Lazzara. “Obviously, someone who’s 16 is gonna have a totally different set of problems than someone who’s 32. [But] for that hour and 15 minutes, it’s not about that.” It’s certainly an impressive feat for a band that deliberately pursues cabin fever, traveling to remote spots in Texas and West Virginia to write. Lazzara definitely does not listen to post-hardcore exclusively — he owns up to a fascination with popcountry — but rather approaches writing and listening as independent activities. “There’s not a lot of outside influence as far as, ‘Well, maybe we’d be more popular if we sampled this,’ or ‘Maybe we’d be more popular if we brought in more stuff that this band that’s more popular right now is doing,’” he says. “You can’t really think about that. We just write what we write, and hope people like it.”

Is it songwriting in a vacuum? Maybe. But Taking Back Sunday’s chief talent is its ability to tackle different topics through a consistent lens, the band’s sound maturing without losing its dramatic quality. (The refrain from “Beat Up Car” — “I won’t let you kill yourself” — comes to mind.) The band’s latest release, Happiness Is, presents a tribute to the past as it looks forward. The brilliant crescendos of “They Don’t Have Any Friends” have the driving, upbeat structure of TBS’s earlier material. It’s followed by “Better Homes and Gardens,” in which we get a frustrated look at long-term commitment. Like a commentary on life experience, it starts out with one mellow guitar, teasing its build until the third minute of the song.

TAKING BACK SUNDAY WITH THE USED

6 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $28.50-30. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

Relying more on harmonies this time around, Lazzara has maintained the impressive vocal range that’s made him an ideal frontman for an emo band. Guitars, drums and occasionally violins rise up to meet him, rather than holding back to emphasize the lyrics. It’s a production choice that lets listeners absorb the melodies, even when they’re not belting the chorus. Lazzara acknowledges the popularity of mid-’00s songs like “MakeDamnSure” and “Cute Without the E,” but points out that the impetus of these songs has changed as the band has grown older. “That’s what’s so cool about music in general,” he says. “It can change with you.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Gotobeds

Calling S. Carey’s well-crafted songs “understated” would be, well, an understatement. The Bon Iver drummer’s latest solo effort, Range of Light, features vocals that are mostly just whispers, over arrangements of repetitive percussion and strings. It’s not overwhelming, but it’s beautiful; Carey’s current tour is a co-headliner with chamber-pop group Califone. They play Club Café tonight. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $13. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[PUNK] + FRI., SEPT. 05 Some facts about The Gotobeds: They like beer, and the Buccos, and they think New York City is all right (but just all right). And here’s re’s something else we know: The local al band’s new record, Poor People Are re Revolting (which it releases Friday, ay, at Gooski’s) captures a certain tain modern indie-punk zeitgeist, tgeist, which might be described ribed as “partying in the twilight of civilization.” Or, if you were e in a less serious mood, you might ght just call the record (which has garnered some extra buzz zz since being featured on NPR’s PR’s First Listen) a party. The band and is joined tonight by Gangwish. ngwish. Margaret Welsh lsh 9 p.m. 3117 Brereton ereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658

[AFROBEAT] + SAT., SEPT. 06 It’s enough simply that the Chicago Afrobeat Project is playing the Rex Theater tonight:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

The group’s 2013 album “Nyash UP!” features Afrobeat covers of both Western and African music, and made Rhapsody’s top-25 list for world releases last year. But on the band’s current tour, as happened once before, it has a special guest: Tony Allen, the legendary drummer from Fela Kuti’s Africa ’70 band. Allen collaborated with Chicago Afrobeat on a forthcoming album, and is playing just eight dates with the band this fall. This one is not to be missed. Velvet Heat and Mathew Tembo open. AM 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $17-20. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., SEPT. 09 It s been a while since we It’s we’ve ve seen T Tokyo Then again, Police Club around these parts. The it’s been four years since the Canad Canadian indie-rock quartet released release anything new (if you don’t d count a series of covers the co band recorded in 2011). Earlier this year, the t band returned with w Forcefield, d an LP release by Mom + Pop, which features supersu clean, super-catchy super-catch guitar rock. Now, the group gro returns to Pittsburgh with a show tonight at Altar Alta Bar, along with equally e catchy locals Nevada Color. AM M 7 p.m. 1620 Penn A Ave., Strip District. $17-20. 412-206-9719 412or www. thealtar bar.com

S. Carey

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CAMERON WITTIG}

[INDIE] + THU., SEPT. 04


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 04 31ST STREET PUB. Downtown Brown, Super Fun Time Awesome Party Band. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Winger. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. S. Carey, Califone. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Little War Twins, Influx, Miist, Denzell. Garfield. 412-361-2262. ST. MARY PARISH HALL. Kevin Heider. STAGE AE. A Day To Remember, Motionless In White, Bring Me The Horizon, Chiodos. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Nth Power. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 05 31ST STREET PUB. Windhand, All Them Witches, Lost Realms. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Ballyhoo. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. CLUB CAFE. Sea Rights, The Me Toos, TJ from Chrome Moses (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. The Gotobeds,

Gangwish. Polish Hill. ALTAR BAR. Led Zeppelin 2. Strip District. 412-263-2877. 412-681-1658. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE HAMBONE’S. The Neffs, TAVERN. Weird Paul Duo, Good Thing. Lawrenceville. Derek DePrator Band, Scott 412-681-4318. Fry Experience. Bloomfield. KENDREW’S. The GRID. 412-682-8611. 724-375-5959. BUCKHEAD SALOON. LATITUDE 360. Tricky Lava Game. Station Square. Dick & the Cover Ups. North 412-232-3101. Fayette. 412-693-5555. CLUB CAFE. The MOONDOG’S. The Semi-Supervillains, The Igniters. Blawnox. Awful Waffles, Breaker 412-828-2040. (Late). South Side. MR. SMALLS 412-431-4950. THEATER. Liz Berlin, www. per HAMBONE’S. The pa Paul Tabachneck, A.T.S., pghcitym .co Buckle Downs, The Brewer’s Row. Millvale. Charlie Wheeler Band. 412-821-4447. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PARK HOUSE. The Grifters, HARVEY WILNER’S. Alter Ego. Patrick Varine. North Side. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. 412-224-2273. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. RAMADA INN HOTEL Totally 80s. Warrendale. & CONFERENCE CENTER. 724-799-8333. Totally 80s. Greensburg. OLD TRAILS. Gone South. 724-836-6060. Washington. 724-225-0484. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR RAMADA INN HOTEL & GRILLE. Antz Marching. & CONFERENCE CENTER. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. Lovebettie. Greensburg. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mon River 724-552-0603. Ramblers, Erika Hughes & the SMILING MOOSE. Lythem, Well Mannered. Lawrenceville. United By Hate, Incinerate 412-682-0177. Creation, Lycosa. South Side.

FULL LIST ONLINE

412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Hawkeyes, Lost in Society, Hero Jr. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TWIN HI-WAY DRIVE-IN. The Turbosonics, Mickey & the Snake Oil Boys. Robinson. 412-494-4999.

SAT 06 31ST STREET PUB. Gimmie 5, Sablowskis. Strip District. 412-391-8334.

MP 3 MONDAY {PHOTO COURTESY OF NATE SMITH}

ALTAR BAR. Adrenaline Mob. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BOSTON WATERFRONT. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Got Your Six w/ Shari Kole. McKeesport. 412-751-8112. SMILING MOOSE. Tiny Moving Parts. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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MON 08 STAGE AE. Foster The People, The Velvet Teen. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Broncho, Butterbirds. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ALTAR BAR. Tokyo Police Club. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Coronado, The Far West, Locks & Dams. South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Dinosaur Truckers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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744 REBECCA AVENUE

TUE 09

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s is a world premiere from locals The Lampshades; “Bored” is the first single from the band’s forthcoming album, Numbskull Nothinghead, to be released with a show at Gooski’s Sat., Oct. 11. Get the first listen on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

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All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

SUN 07

THE LAMPSHADES

N E W S

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INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

Dancehall, more w/ Pandemic Pete. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ALTAR BAR. Wavves. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. Strip District. 412-263-2877. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. BRILLOBOX. Papercuts, 412-761-3302. Michael Nau of Cotton Jones, ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Roger Harvey & the Wild Life. Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. 412-874-4582. CLUB CAFE. Legendary Shack RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night Shakers, Whiskey Shivers. w/ DJ Connor. South Side. South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-381-1330. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Hunts. Station Square. RUSTY BARREL SALOON. 412-481-7625. Pittsburgh DJ Company. Top 40. SLOPPY JOE’S. Mr. B South Side. 412-720-5647. & the Bad Boyz Band. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300. CATTIVO. Illusions. STAGE AE. The Used, w/ Funerals & Arvin Taking Back Sunday, Clay. Lawrenceville. www. per frnkiero andthe a p ty 412-687-2157. pghci m cellabration. North Side. .co CLUB TABOO. 412-229-5483. Gangsta Shack THEATER SQUARE Movements, DJ White Lyon. GARAGE. Jimbo & Homewood. 412-657-2279. the Soupbones. Downtown. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-566-4190. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. No BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ Mames: Latin Bass Night. Pandemic hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. Pete & Chief Boima. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. 412-251-6058. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Movements, DJ White Lyon. South Side. 412-431-2825. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Homewood. 412-969-0260. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Balkan, City Saturdays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Bhangra, Bollywood, Global Oakland. 412-874-4582.

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FULL LIST ONLINE

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THU 04

FRI 05

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The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

SUN 07 SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. East Liberty. 412-657-2279.

WED 10 MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 05 REX THEATER. Sole & DJ Pain. South Side. 412-381-6811.

BLUES THU 04 HARD ROCK CAFE. Shannon Curfman, Shannon LaBrie, Jeff Campbell, Brooke Annibale, The Mike Medved Band. Benefit for A Glimmer of Hope Foundation. Station Square. 570-294-6450.

FRI 05 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band. 412-368-5225. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 06 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Billy Price & The Lost Minds. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE LOOSE MOOSE. The Witchdoctors. 412-655-3553. MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Greensburg. 724-850-4676. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & The Blues Attack. 412-487-6259.

SUN 07 GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. Sweaty Betty. 724-547-6500.

TUE 09 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Shot O’ Soul. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

JAZZ THU 04 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE. Jessica Lee. Lawrenceville. 412-235-7696.


EARLY WARNINGS

Are you Ready for some

SUN 07

Football?

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. Mark Kroos. Oakland. 412-624-4141.

WED 10

Friday September 5th 10pm-12am

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Sailor Jerry is giving away tickets to the Stillers Sept 7th Game.

Every Friday Night!

3

$

WORLD SAT 06

The Budos Band

REX THEATER. Chicago Afrobeat Project. South Side. 412-381-6811.

{TUE., NOV. 04}

REGGAE

Ty Dolla $ign

THU 04

y a d S R TUOeUNDEt

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District {SAT., NOV. 08}

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side {MON., DEC. 08}

GWAR

P Nigh 50 $ 2. brews F !

gl Yueni Beers $ 2 Min $3 .50

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

COUNTRY

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

aye y d a S d Esrivia THURaok N D WeEud T ings Kar s Lights

aft from 15 cr hoose to c

FRI 05

The Budos Band

Sailor Jerry & Fireball shots

Coorreball $ 2 $ 3 fi .50

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

THU 04 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

FRI 05

MON 08

ALLEGHENY HYP CLUB. Rick Purcell & Shari Richards. Downtown. 412-281-5858. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Sean Jones Quartet. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries & RH Factor, Warren Wolf, George Heid III, Anton DeFade, Brett Williams. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

SAT 06

WED 10

CLASSICAL

SAT 06 CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Warren Wolf, George Heid III, Anton DeFade, Brett Williams. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dave Crisci & Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SUN 07 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

N E W S

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Rascal Flatts, Sheryl Crow, Gloriana. 724-947-7400.

ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. Lisa Bleil. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

ACOUSTIC THU 04 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SAT 06 KEYSTONE OAKS HIGH SCHOOL. Donnie Rankin, organist. Dormont. 412-241-8108. PALACE THEATRE. River City Brass. 42nd Street. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181.

SAT 06 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter King. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

TA S T E

BEETHOVEN ON THE BLUFF: ODE TO JOY. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6083. FIFTH AVENUE STRINGS. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3105.

OTHER MUSIC

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AU G U ST 29TH 2014

Drusky Entertainment Day City of Pittsburgh Proclamation

Congratulations!

WED 10

from your friends at

SOUTH PARK THEATRE. The Harmony Singers. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

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What to do September 3 - 9 KEN Mode

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 4

Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme CHARITY RANDALL THEATRE Oakland. 412-561-6000. Tickets: picttheatre.org/sons. Through Sept. 20.

A Day to Remember Parks & Devastation Tour STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 5:30p.m.

Beat Cancer Pittsburgh HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 event. Tickets:

IN PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh Irish Festival

beatcancerpittsburgh.com. VIP 5p.m., General Admission 6:30p.m. PHOTO CREDIT: LINDSEY BYRNES

WEDNESDAY 33

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

S. Carey / Califone CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Winger ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

A Fair in the Park MELLON PARK Shadyside. Free event. For more info visit afairinthepark.org. Through Sept. 7.

twenty one pilots

Boulevard of the Allies

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 STAGE AE

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 5

SATURDAY 66

Of Mice and Men

Rewind Tour 2014: Rascal Flatts with Sheryl Crow

RAUH THEATER Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com or 412-392-8000. Through Sept. 21.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

Riverlife’s Party at the Pier 2014: Gold & Glam RIVERS CASINO RIVERFRONT AMPHITHEATER North Shore. Over 21 show. Tickets: partyatthepier.com. 7p.m.

SANDCASTLE RIVERPLEX West Homestead. Tickets: pghirishfest.org or 412-4221113. Through Sept. 7.

Pittsburgh Irish Festival SEPTEMBER 5-7 SANDCASTLE RIVERPLEX

newbalancepittsburgh.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Comedian David Kaye LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 7p.m. & 9p.m.

SUNDAY 70

Tiny Moving Parts SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

MONDAY 81

Foster the People STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 92

Tokyo Police Club twenty one pilots - quiet ALTAR BAR Strip District. is viølent world tour 2014 412-263-2877. All ages STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


REEL LIFE {BY AL HOFF}

DOCK ELLIS’ LIFE AS A PROFESSIONAL BALLPLAYER SEEMS WORTHY OF SEVERAL FILMS

Ari Folman’s The Congress mixes live action with animation, a critique of Hollywood with a trippy sci-fi plot, and the real-life career of actress Robin Wright with rampant speculation about her future. It’s an ambitious project that mostly succeeds — it’s too long, and does fall into a few rabbit holes — and is surely the loopiest head trip at theaters this summer.

Robin Wright as “Robin Wright”

CP APPROVED

Wright portrays a version of herself: an actress in her mid-40s who can’t get roles. The crass studio exec (Danny Huston) pines for the “Buttercup” of The Princess Bride. But he offers her a last-chance deal: Wright could digitize herself, and the studio would continue to make movies with that data. Reluctantly, Wright agrees. Jump ahead a couple of decades and Wright is en route to “The Congress,” located in a drug-induced dreamworld where everybody is transformed into the avatar of their choice. She is an honored guest, since her digital self has become a popular on-screen action star and avatar pick. But confronting the “reality” of this unreal world sends Wright (now animated) on a soul-searching journey — and several psychedelic trips. She must try to parse waking and dream states, life and “life,” while discovering whether there is space for love in a dreamscape where everybody is pretending to be somebody else. Intriguing stuff for those willing to take the trip. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 4; 7:15 p.m. Fri., Sept. 5; 9:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 6; and 4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7. Hollywood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

See the results of The Chair, part reality show, part mini-movie, recently filmed in Pittsburgh. In it, two directors (Shane Dawson and Anna Martemucci) are given the same script, and viewers follow along with their unique interpretations and production experiences. Viewers also vote for a winner. Debuts Sat., Sept. 6, on Starz. www.starz.com

BEYOND THE FIELD {BY AL HOFF}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JANE KENYON}

Pittsburgh Pirate Dock Ellis: outstanding on field and off

O

N JUNE 12, 1970, Pittsburgh Pirate

Dock Ellis pitched against San Diego while high on LSD. “I had the acid on me,” Ellis recalls. “I lost all concept of time.” But he kept his arm, racking up a no-hitter that would have been notable even if he hadn’t been tripping. This Great Moment in Baseball History is among the life and often-infamous times of Dock Ellis recounted in Jeffrey Radice’s engaging bio-doc, No No: A Dockumentary. Radice draws extensively from archival footage, interviews with Ellis’ teammates, friends and family, and reflections from Ellis recorded before his death in 2008. Ellis’ life as a professional ballplayer seems worthy of several films. There are his accomplishments on the field and his beloved “crazy” status in the closeknit Pirates locker room. At a time when spectators still wore suits in the stands, Ellis wore an earring and flashy clothes, and received a 10-day suspension (not served) for wearing hair curlers to prac-

tice. Like many players, he took drugs — from “greenies” (Dexamyl amphetamines) to just about anything else. “I pitched every game in the major leagues under the influence of drugs,” Ellis explains, attributing much of his drug use to the pressure to stay on top.

NO NO: A DOCKUMENTARY DIRECTED BY: Jeffrey Radice Starts Fri., Sept. 5. Harris

CP APPROVED And Ellis, a self-described “angry black man,” fought myriad battles large and small to dispel baseball’s lingering legacy of racism. His acts ranged from the seemingly trivial (the aforementioned curlers) to a brilliant bit of reverse-psychology floated in the national media that secured him a starting spot against Vida Blue in the 1971 All-Star game, the

first such match-up of African-American pitchers in that annual event. They say there’s no crying in baseball, but there is in No No. Ellis breaks down reading a hand-written letter of encouragement he’d received from Jackie Robinson. And then there was the devastating death of his Pirates teammate and mentor Roberto Clemente. Even hard-bitten sports fans may find themselves blinking back a few tears in the film’s last reel, which focuses on Ellis’ off-field legacy: using his brash style and own struggles with substance abuse to help others get and stay sober. Ellis will always be defined by the acid-fueled no-no he threw — it’s simply too good a story. But Radice’s film lets that wacky moment share just a corner of a large shelf filled with Ellis’ vibrant life: his great on-field career, his commitment to advancing racial equality in baseball and his comeback second act as a drug counselor, in which he pitched hope instead of fastballs. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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DOMHNALL GLEESON

MAGGIE GYLLENHAAL

SCOOT MCNAIRY

MICHAEL

AND FASSBENDER

A GENUINE ORIGINAL IN A SUMMER SEA OF SAMENESS. A profound examination of what constitutes creativity and genius.

IT COULDN’T BE MORE CLASSIC, OR OF THE MOMENT.” – John Anderson, THE T WALL STREET JOURNAL

“C CAPTIVATING A .

It’s like an a album made u of B sides up a lost demo and tracks that y stumble you across and can’t stop replaying.” – A.O. Scott, T THE NEW YORK TIMES

WHEN YOU THINK YOU’VE GONE FAR ENOUGH ENOUGH, GO FARTHER FARTHER.

MAGPICTURES.COM/FRANK

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 DORMONT Hollywood Theatre (412) 563-0368 SAT & SUN: 7:00 PM • TUE-THU: 7:30 PM

FILM CAPSULES CP

NEW FRANK. Jon (Domhnall Gleeson) is an aspiring but not-at-all-talented songwriter who impulsively joins an experimental pop-noise band that is in sudden need of a keyboardist. Thus, he finds himself trapped in an Irish cabin for months with the band’s mostly asocial members, including the depressive Don (Scoot McNairy) and the angry Clara (Maggie Gyllenhaal). The band revolves around Frank (Michael Fassbender), a deeply sensitive artist and a musical genius who can instantly compose a song about a “lone standing tuft” of carpet. It should also be noted that Frank wears a giant fake head — always. Frank is enigmatic, but also kind and charming. (Jon rightly wonders: “What goes on inside that head inside that head?”) Tensions arise when Jon pushes the group toward “success” — recording music, using social media, playing a gig — thereby disrupting the band’s fragile equilibrium. There’s not a lot of plot in Lenny Abrahamson’s offbeat comedy. The story, written by Jon Ronson, is loosely based on the late English musician Chris Sievey, who performed as “Frank Sidebottom” (wearing a giant fake head), as well as other outsider musicians. It’s a gentle and, at times, provocative exploration of what defines art, what meaning it offers for an audience and the performer, and by what metrics success is measured. The film’s conclusion is a beautiful dialogue-free scene that perfectly encapsulates and resolves all these tensions. Along with its giant head, the film also has a big heart. It’s frequently funny, and has a great cast. And then there’s Fassbender: The actor spends 95 percent of the film with his own critically lauded head inside a fake one, and yet his portrayal of Frank is extraordinarily rich, engaging and heartbreaking. They should give him a special Oscar with its own giant fake head. 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 6; 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Sept. 9; 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10; and Thu., Sept. 11. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

CP

You can feel it.

REPERTORY

A connection to something that’s bigger than

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Intro to Japanese Cinema (from post-war classics to contemporary anime and gangster pics): Brother (Yakuza

you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of thinking and seeing your community. And of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at work, in the car, and you may even support us (thank you if you do). We’re WYEP.

Celebrating 40 Years of Music, Arts and Community.

wyep.org

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= CITY PAPER APPROVED

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone at Rowhouse Cinema

Frank gangsters go to Los Angeles in this 2000 crime story), Sept. 3 and 4. Princess Mononoke (Miyazaki’s 1997 fairy-tale anime classic; great for kids), Sept. 4. Nobody Knows (a young boy is left parentless to fend for himself in this 2004 drama), Sept. 4. Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 crime tale told from four differing perspectives), Sept. 4. Back to School: Fast Times at Ridgemont High (classic 1982 teen comedy, among the best of this genre), Sept. 5-7 and Sept. 10. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (the 2001 film that introduced us Harry, and Harry to Hogwarts), Sept 5-8 and Sept. 10-11. The Breakfast Club (who knew detention could be so fun, and life-affirming?), Sept. 5-6, Sept. 8-9 and Sept. 11. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (sometimes school is best when you just don’t go), Sept. 5-6, Sept. 9 and Sept. 10-11. Mean Girls (Lindsay Lohan navigates girl cliques in this 2004 comedy), Sept. 5-9 and Sept. 11. Also, Nosferatu (super-creepy 1922 silent film adapting the Dracula legend), 9:45 p.m. Thu., Sept. 11. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. THE BLACK GODFATHER. In this 1974 exploitation film from John Evans, a low-level drug-dealer (Rod Perry) rises up the criminal-enterprise ladder under the tutelage of his boss, the “Black Godfather” (Jimmy Witherspoon). 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 3. Hollywood BEETLEJUICE. Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis and Michael Keaton star in Tim Burton’s 1988 comedy about a haunted house, and the aggrieved ghosts who live there. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 3. AMC Loews. $5


“The Invisible Photograph” at Film Kitchen TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON’T LEGALIZE IT. Your heroes from Sunnyvale Trailer Park (or more correctly, the long-running Canadian TV mockumentary series) are back with fresh troubles, this time writ large on the big screen. Specifically, what effect will the legalization of marijuana have on the residents’ own grow-op? Series creator Mike Clattenburg directs. 10 p.m. Fri., Sept. 5. Hollywood THE LOST WEEKEND. Ray Milland stars as a novelist who ill-advisedly uses alcohol to cure his writer’s block. Unfortunately, it also destroys his life and relationships, as illustrated in Billy Wilder’s Academy Award-winning drama that takes place over a long, and yes, lost, weekend. The 1945 film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about addiction and recovery. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7. Regent Square A TERRIBLE BEAUTY. Keith Farrell’s new film retells the story of Dublin’s 1916 Easter Rising — a rebellion against the British that set the stage for Ireland’s independence — with archival footage, dramatic re-enactments and interviews with historians. The film focuses not on the more famous leaders of the Rising, but on the experiences of soldiers, volunteers and civilians. 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7. Melwood FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for local and independent work features shorts by three filmmakers, including two from the Hillman Photography Initiative’s documentary series “The Invisible Photograph.” Part I (16 min.) documents the little-known but astounding Corbis-Bettman Archive, a repository for thousands of historically important images in an underground limestone mine in Butler County. Bill Gates is cited (he owns Corbis), and the archive prompts discussion of the digital-photography explosion. Part III of this Carnegie Museum of Art project is an engaging 22-minute procedural about the team of “technoarchaeologists” who painstakingly recovered, from analog tape, the very first photographic images of the moon’s surface (pre-dating Apollo 11). “Invisible Photograph” producer and cameraman David D’Agostino will present the films. The program also includes Julie Sokolow’s short “Fear, Loathing, and Comics, at the Basement Sale,” which lovingly captures top local comics artists — including Ed Piskor, Jim Rugg and Tom Scioli — geeking out in New Dimension Comics’ retail vault. Sokolow also screens the trailer for her forthcoming feature documentary “Aspie Seeks Love,” about local writer, artist and character Dave Matthews. Finally, curator Matthew Day’s program features “The Showdown,” Franklin Carpio’s amusing actionmovie-spoof trilogy in which little kids (in amazing hairpieces) portray hardened cops and gangsters out for revenge. 8 p.m. Tue., Sept. 9 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. 412-682-4111. $5 (Bill O’Driscoll)

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THE BIG LEBOWSKI. In the Coen brothers’ comic 1998 homage to Raymond Chandler, a bloated hippie, Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges), gets mixed up with dirty rugs, kidnap and ransom; another guy called Jeff Lebowski; and a couple of intense bowling games. Also starring a full slate of indie faves including John Turturro, Steve Buscemi and John Goodman. This is the second Downtown Rooftop Shindig, held atop Theater Square Garage, at 677 Penn Ave. It’s BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair), and those wearing bathrobes, a la The Dude, will get a discount on White Russian cocktails. The free event begins at 6 p.m. with food and beverages available for purchase; music from Jimbo and the Soupbones at 7 p.m.; and film screening at 8:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10 ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST. Jack Nicholson stars in Milos Forman’s 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel. A rebellious man thinks he can cheat the criminal-justice system by pleading insanity and serving time at a mental institution. But things — including an insurrection against the asylum’s dictatorial Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) — don’t go as well as he hoped. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 10. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

The Black Godfather (1974) - 9/3 @ 7:30pm - Starring

-The- - -Congress ------------------------------------Trailer - - - - - -Park- - - -Boys: - - - - - Don’t - - - - - Legalize - - - - - - - -It- - - - - - - - - - -Rocky - - - - - Horror - - - - - - Picture - - - - - - -Show ---------------------Frank ---------------------------------------

Rod Perry.

(2013) - 9/4 @ 7:30pm, 9/5 @ 7:15pm, 9/6 @ 9:30pm, 9/7 @ 4:00pm - live action/animated film starring Robin Wright, Harvey Keitel, and Jon Hamm (2014) - 9/5 @

10:00pm - The Trailer Park Boys are back!

- 9/5 @ midnight Special performance for documentary crew shooting Rocky Horror Saved My Life

(2014) - 9/6 @ 7:00pm, 9/7 @ 7:00pm, 9/9 @ 7:30pm, 9/10 @ 7:30pm, 9/11 @ 7:30pm - New indie film inspired by British singer-songwriter Frank Sidebottom, starring Michael Fassbender and Maggie Gyllenhaal.

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[DANCE]

YOU JUST MIGHT EMBRACE THE DECEPTION AND COME AWAY A TRUE BELIEVER

ONLY CONNECT {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CorningWorks presents PARALLEL LIVES Wed., Sept. 10-Sun., Sept. 14. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25-30 (Sept. 14 show is pay-what-you-can). 888-718-4253 or www.newhazletttheater.org

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Corey Escoto’s sculpture “Soft Rocks, Cut Muenster: A Monument to the 6-Hour Brunch”

[ART REVIEW]

SLEIGHT DECEPTIONS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Beth Corning and Arthur Aviles in Parallel Lives {PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK WALSH}

You see them everywhere: the countless people tethered to cell phones and computers — texting, surfing and interacting with social media but seemingly detached from the physical world unfolding around them. Our growing disconnect with traditional interpersonal communication in favor of technological intermediaries, and all that goes with them, is the subject of CorningWorks’ latest Glue Factory Project production. Parallel Lives has five performances at the New Hazlett Theater. The hour-long multidisciplinary dancetheater work is the brainchild of dancer/ choreographer Beth Corning in collaboration with former Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company principal dancer Arthur Aviles. Anna Kisselgoff of The New York Times once wrote, “If you don’t know Mr. Aviles, you haven’t seen one of the great modern dancers of the last 15 years.” Entering its fifth season, CorningWorks’ Glue Factory series continues to buck the notion that professional dance is only for the young and athletic. The Project’s thoughtprovoking works for performers over age 40 continue to be a highlight of the local dance season. Aviles, 51, feels Parallel Lives is a real challenge to people’s trust in the Internet and the trappings of the information age. “I feel we have gone amok in this information age, and Beth’s response with this work is a very vibrant look into that,” says Aviles by phone from the Bronx, N.Y. In Parallel Lives, Aviles and Corning explore the state of social interaction through the lens of two ordinary people, and what happens when they are disconnected from their devices. “People don’t want interaction; they just want connection,” says Corning. “We are one thing online and another in person, both positive and negative.” As with all of Corning’s works, she brings to the stage what she sees in the world. “There are no defined answers in the works I do,” says Corning. “The essence in them is about communication.” Parallel Lives is set to an eclectic soundscape, with lighting design by Iain Court. The set design is by Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Artist of the Year Akiko Kotani, featuring animated projected images of her artwork by projection designer Hsuan-Kuang Hseih. The show is sure to offer an atmospherically rich and sensual dance-theater experience.

I

N ITS EARLIEST days, photography lent itself to Spiritualism by reinforcing beliefs in the occult and the paranormal. Commercial photographers capitalized on double exposures and other tricks to create images of the dead, of spirits and ectoplasmic emanations. But while trickery often works best on the gullible and on those who are vulnerable to emotional manipulation, many of us choose to suspend disbelief in order to be awed by stage magic, theatrics and special effects. Collusion between creator and audience is sometimes essential. If you go to see Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, you just might embrace the deception and come away a true believer. The Pittsburghbased Escoto was born in Texas in 1983, and his work has been exhibited internationally and throughout the U.S. This exhibition, his first solo museum show and the first solo presentation of his work in Pittsburgh (where he moved in 2010), is curated by the Carnegie’s Amanda Donnan as part is that they combine the labor-intensive process of the handmade with the instanof the Pittsburgh Biennial 2014. In the show, Escoto uses a multidisciplinary approach to explore the changing nature of photography. Interested in COREY ESCOTO: illusion, he combines light-sensitive film SLEIGHT OF HAND processes and digital formats to create imcontinues through Sept. 29. ages that are alluring, layered and complex. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org What makes his photographs so engaging

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

taneity of the digital. They are visually beguiling and will draw you in not just because of their small size but because they are at once odd and enchanting. Actually, though his photographs are quite compelling, it’s likely that you won’t even notice them at first. Dominant in the gallery are Escoto’s sculptures, which are, in fact, based on his photographs. CONTINUES ON PG. 36


Check out our new recreational and professional training courses for teens and adults.

Now registering!

GETCreative.ArtInstitutes.edu/Pittsburgh Some of our upcoming courses include: Basics of Wine Tasting* Essentials of Home Decorating Lens Flair: Introduction to DSLR Photography Watercolors for Beginners: Still Lives to En Plein Air Artisan Breads at Home Elements of Garment Construction

A Day in the Sushi Kitchen Telling Tales: A Creative Writing Workshop Red Velvet Cupcakes and More! Trash to Treasure: Furniture Refinishing Sausage from Scratch Game Jam: A Design Workshop

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SLEIGHT DECEPTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

Photo: Bradford Rogne

SEPT 4 - OCT 12 6 Weeks Only!

Recommended for adult audiences.

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com

THE CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE IS A PROJECT OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

Groups 412-325-1582

“Extraordinary Wit.” Learn more at picttheatre.org/sons.

Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme By Frank McGuinness Presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

September 4-20

The unforgettable story of an Irish “band of brothers.”

Discount: CP5OFF 412.561.6000 | 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

Scattered about the space like a bunch of Louise Bourgeois totemic figures, each piece has its own personality. But you’ll need to take some time to discover their secrets. None of them are easy. In fact, each is an enigma and together they flummox as much as entice. Escoto’s sculptures have a lot in common with the artist Rachel Harrison’s in that they are perplexing assemblages that contain multiple references and a range of materials. Where they differ is that Escoto is mostly interested in photography. He explains that it is this particular juncture that is worth exploring because digital technologies and analog photography co-exist alongside the Internet, which he describes as a vast archive of images. Escoto is not the first to question the truthfulness of the photographic image, but his methods are rather unique. He uses hand-cut light-blocking stencils, filters, multiple exposures, screen grabs and other fragments to create complex images that fold many moments into one. He then uses the textures and patterns of the photographs as prototypes for the sculptures. By recreating his photographs in three dimensions, he can explore surface, space and artifice. As confounding as the images (and their titles) are, in three dimensions they are even more so. Take, for instance, “Soft Rocks, Cut Muenster: A Monument to the 6-Hour Brunch.” The sculpture — made from Styrofoam, digitally printed silk, map pins, photographs, Plexiglas, plywood, Formica and paint — resembles the photograph, but it plays up the gimmick. It is a conglomeration of actual materials, simulated or faux materials, and photographs of those same materials. Is that really marble or just a facsimile of it? Does it really matter? Explaining the photograph “It’s a Sculpture! (Live at the Carnegie),” Escoto says that he created a multiple exposure from images he took of different pieces in the museum’s collection. It is clear that he is keenly aware of photography’s place in art history. Perhaps it is this self-consciousness that caused him to make the one misstep in the exhibition, a backdrop that mimics a green screen and that is meant to “interrupt the spatial logic of the gallery.” Ultimately it is overkill, and just distracts from what he has already achieved — an audience willing to join him in the ruse. As a photographer-magician, Escoto asks us to consider our mediated environment, and to question what we are looking at. But in the end he is no cynic. Instead he encourages in us the same sense of awe, wonder and whimsy that he clearly feels himself. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

[BOOK REVIEW]

DEAD TO RITES {BY JULIA COOK}

Kate Sweeney {PHOTO COURTESY OF KAYLINN GILSTRAP PHOTOGRAPHY}

Opens Tomorrow!

Don’t look for Stephen Foster on your lunch break. His blown-up likeness might watch over the Lawrenceville entrance to Allegheny Cemetery, but America’s first professional songwriter doesn’t draw attention to himself. Foster died penniless, yet like countless Pittsburghers past he shares a resting place with Negleys and Mellons. His modest stone sings a reminder that death takes no prisoners. Seamlessly connecting artifacts with scraps of remembrance, Kate Sweeney’s new book American Afterlife (University of Georgia Press) is an unsentimental look at the traditions we’ve fabricated to deal with death. Though she acknowledges her lack of historical training, the award-winning journalist provides a crash course in 19thcentury thinking, using benchmarks like the Second Great Awakening and the Civil War and, finally, World War I. Though it catalogs shifting patterns, her account is anything but reductionist. Sweeney emphasizes the anecdotal, allowing characters past and present to speak for themselves. With her, we draw connections between a bereaved father’s tattooed tribute and a Victorian widow’s scratchy crepe cuffs. Death, Sweeney explains, is inseparable from our personal reactions to it. Downplaying religion, she discusses mourning as a purely human enterprise. Her narrative builds upon layers of research and interactions, iced with her own revelations. A less skilled writer could easily veer into the presumptuous, but Sweeney’s style is at the same time informed and unassuming. She acknowledges her unusual interest in the subject, and revels in her nerddom. Like the subjects of her “Dismal Trade” chapters, Sweeney knows how to comfort her audience. She’s not without fear herself, and her commentary emphasizes little ironies. Missing a guided tour of Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery by a week, Sweeney visits right before a tornado shutters it to visitors. American Afterlife’s chief strength derives from Sweeney’s ability to articulate what the book is not, and subsequently exceed expectations for what it is. Borrowing elements from history, anthropology and, at times, economics, Sweeney’s work should not be consigned to pop history. What we get is a holistic approach to a topic that demands attention even as we shy away from it. Sweeney, a Pittsburgh native, reads from American Afterlife in two local appearances this week. An engaging speaker who hosts a nonfiction reading series in Atlanta, she’s one not to miss. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KATE SWEENEY 6 p.m. Mon., Sept 8 (Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley; 412-741-3838) and 4 p.m. Tue., Sept. 9 (Room 501, Cathedral of Learning, Oakland; 412-624-6506).


[BOOK REVIEW]

SHELF LIFE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

The Pajama Men: Shenoah Allen (left) and Mark Chavez

[PLAY REVIEW]

SURREAL LIFE {BY TED HOOVER} Summer is drawing to a close, and theater companies are getting ready to present their fall slates. But before giving itself over completely to its upcoming season, City Theatre presents a two-week run of touring duo The Pajama Men. Part improv and part sketch, the performance is 70 minutes of quick cerebral comedy performed by the titular Shenoah Allen and Mark Chavez — two guys who met in high school and quickly bonded over their impressive performance skills and love of the surreal. The men have appeared all over the world — they’ve been big winners on several occasions at the Edinburgh Fringe — and now here they are onstage at City. I’m unfamiliar with their work, but I can only extrapolate from this performance that the two men work out some sort of story/ structure beforehand, as well as the various characters who will follow that story’s journey. With this skeleton in place, Allen and Chavez can then riff and improv as their mood, and that of the audience, permits. They are remarkable physical comedians. It’s not just that the characters they create are formed by insight and fitted out with defining movement and physicality. What’s really

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notable is the lightning-quick change from one character to the next, and the razor-sharp precision of those changes. Both men offer nimble, tight and pristine performances. Less successful is their work as writers. Their show at City Theatre is something about a monster who comes to life once every 700 years: A few of the people who come into contact with the beast are a king and his majordomo, two suburban housewives, a pair of police officers and a bored Spanish roué. Again, I don’t know their oeuvre, but given the plaudits and awards Allen and Chavez have garnered, I doubt that what I saw represents the best they can offer. Perhaps they’re workshopping this particular set-up; in comedy, after all, failure is just as important as, and even more instructive than, success. The work feels cluttered and muddy — deadly for a comedy — and surprisingly claustrophobic. Given how extraordinarily talented the two men are, there’s a very real sense of waiting for the material to rise to the level of their abilities. At this stage in the process, that hasn’t happened quite yet. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PAJAMA MEN appear through Sun., Sept. 7. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-40. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

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Prague Summer, the first novel from local author Jeffrey Condran, is on several levels a book about books. Protagonist Henry Marten owns a rare-book dealership in the Czech capital, and he is immersed in books, as art and as objects. But this involving debut finds its narrator in over his head in more ways than one. Henry, an American in his 30s, lives in Prague with his wife, Stephanie, a State Department diplomat. They’re treading along in domestic tranquility until the sudden appearance of her old friend Selma. She’s a Muslim whose husband, Mansour, is 14 months into indefinite detention by the U.S. government, and she wants help freeing him. The narrative is complicated when Henry is drawn, dangerously, to this woman in distress. Henry’s a compelling narrator, channeling Condran’s lively eye for social nuances — whether reading Stephanie’s reactions or those of a friend who asks him to appraise a roomful of books willed to his bornrich but suddenly penniless wife. Henry is aware of being a middle-class kid slightly out of his depth in a big-money milieu. He’s also a fine tour guide to his charmingly idiosyncratic, but often foreboding, adopted city. Yet despite his coolly analytical observations of other people, Henry’s signal relationship might be with books. Assessing his shop, he says, “Sometimes I actually believe that I could close my eyes and let my fingers play along the spines of the books, all fiction or literary biography here, and the stories would leap like light from the pages, travel up

my arm, and into PRAGUE the deeper places SUMMER of my body and By Jeffrey Condran fill me with a kind Counterpoint Press, 288 pp., $26 of power.” Prague Summer is a hymn to bibliophilia, and to literature, too, with discourses on the talismanic properties of first editions. Henry’s touchstones include Cyrano de Bergerac, To the Lighthouse and, of course, looming over all, Kafka. But is Henry a little too lost in his books to catch everything that’s going down? Prague Summer is billed by its publisher as “a literary thriller.” That might be overstating things a bit: It’s more like a domestic drama with overtones of international intrigue. In any case, for Condran — who’s also co-founder of indie publisher Braddock Avenue Books — the novel is a strong follow-up to A Fingerprint Repeated, his debut short-story collection from 2013.

THE BOOK IS A HYMN TO BIBLIOPHILIA, AND TO LITERATURE.

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Live Music

FOR THE WEEK OF

09.0409.11.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

SEPT. 05

Tectonica

Art by Paul Chidester

Rick Matt

WEDNESDAY | SEPTEMBER 3 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Gresh’s Gris Gris

FRIDAY | SEPTEMBER 5 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Neon Swing X-Perience

SATURDAY | SEPTEMBER 6 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Satin Hearts

WEDNESDAY | SEPTEMBER 10 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mystic Knights

FRIDAY | SEPTEMBER 12 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vince Agwada

SATURDAY | SEPTEMBER 13 | 8PM --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

+ THU., SEPT. 04 {STAGE} The REP begins its season tonight with Of Mice and Men. Adapted by John Steinbeck from his own novel, the play follows migrant workers George and Lennie in their uphill struggle to find peace and stability in Depressionera America. Robert Miller, a frequent guest director at the REP, takes the story from your Englishclass memories to the Rauh Theatre stage with help from Leandro Cano, as Lennie, and Jarrod DiGiorgi, as George. Danielle Fox 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15-27. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

{STAGE}

W W W. N O L A O N T H E S Q U A R E . C O M

24 MARKET SQUARE | PITTSBURGH | 412.471.9100 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

The Pittsburgh New Works Festival showcases new one-acts from around the country, staged by local talent. Four distinct programs at Off the Wall Productions include three plays each, and each program runs two weekends. The fest’s 24th annual edition begins tonight. Program A includes “Last Night,” a take on Internet dating by

Pittsburgh-based Dale Hess, produced by the Red Masquers; “Crisis on Infinite Earths,” Lexington, Va.-based Chris Gavaler’s portrait of comic-book nerds moving statues in a church (Heritage Players); and local playwright

SEPT. 05

Brother Ali

Patrick Rutledge’s “Some Guy at the Airport,” about a woman meeting a man with a line on the future (Summer Company). Program B starts tomorrow. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Festival continues through Sept. 28. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $12-17 (festival pass $40). www. pittsburghnewworks.org

{STAGE} In the centennial of the Great

War, PICT Classic Theatre stages Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme. Frank McGuinness’ 1985 play tells the story of eight young Irishman, Protestant and Catholic, in the British Army and on an inexorable path to an infamous battle. Matt Torney, who comes from Belfast, Northern Ireland, directs a cast including such local favorites as Martin Giles, Jason McCune, Jonathan Visser and Tony Bingham. The first performance at the Charity Randall Theatre is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 20. Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-54. 412-561-6000 or www. picttheatre.org

+ FRI., SEPT., 05 {ART} Subverting traditional picturesque landscapes, State College-based Paul Chidester’s Tectonica collides familiar greenery and imaginary architecture in agreeably novel paintings. The works in this Future Tenant exhibit pair Mediterranean light and space in scenarios “ranging from


Free!Event

{ART} In his New York studio, artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz draws while seated beneath a piano hung from the ceiling. Creations by this wildly imaginative, Chilean-born artworld star include: a floating coffin with an outboard motor (pictured); a functional wooden cabinet that guards its contents with countless bamboo spikes; and a graffiti wall juxtaposing a count of U.S. service members dead from suicide with the tally of those killed in combat in Iraq. Errazuriz’s work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and Europe; now the Carnegie Museum of Art hosts his first solo museum exhibition. Look Again incorporates found and repurposed objects, furniture, products, sketches, prototypes — and one dangling piano, in the museum’s Hall of Architecture. Tonight’s free opening party includes an artist talk. BO 6:30-9 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Jan. 12. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

socially conscious hip-hop artist and activist is uniquely suited to speak at tonight’s Pittsburgh Hip Hop Collective discussion titled “Race, Religion and Hip Hop”: He’s an albino, born into a white family, who converted to Islam at age 15 and says he’s always felt most at home among African-Americans. The event at Alloy Studios is hosted by local rapper and activist Jasiri X. The opening act is Blak Rapp Madusa. BO 7:30 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Suggested donation: $5. www.rarenation.com

{FESTIVAL} The Pittsburgh Irish Festival turns 24 with a three-day party at the Riverplex. Attractions include beverage tastings (you don’t say), an Irish marketplace, food and dance. The musical acts, ranging from traditional to contemporary, include Scythian, Screaming Orphans, Makem & Spain and Pittsburgh’s own Bastard Bearded Irishmen. The history-themed programming includes an appearance by David McDonnell, who is touring nationally with his

SEPT. 05

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new book ClanDonnell, about ancestors who started as mercenaries and whose story reflects Ireland’s strife-filled history. BO 4-11 p.m. Also 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sat., Sept. 6, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7. 1000 Sandcastle Drive, Homestead. $8-14 (free for kids under 12). www. pghirishfestival.org

{MUSIC} In July, CP reported that top trumpeter and bandleader Sean Jones, a fixture on stages and in classrooms here, was off to a sweet new gig at Boston’s Berklee College of Music. Well, now he’s gone — but he’s back already, for a previously scheduled First Fridays at the Frick concert. Jones, former

“It’s home so we better make the best of it / I wanna make this country what it says it is,” raps Brother Ali on his new album Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color. On the eve of a national tour, the

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+ SAT., SEPT. 06 In 2005, Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks debuted with two free weekends of As You Like It in Frick Park. PSIP has branched out: For its 10th season, the troupe has cast four city parks as the Forest of Arden in its reprise of Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, with eight daylight performances over four weekends. It all starts this afternoon at Frick Park’s Blue Slide Playground. (The other parks are West, Arsenal and Schenley.) PSIP artistic director and seasoned actress Jennifer Tober stars as Rosalind; the

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lead trumpeter for the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, plays tonight’s free lawn show with pianist Orrin Evans, drummer Mark Whitfield and bassist Alex Claffy. BO 7 p.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Suggestion donation: $5. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

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show’s directed by Lisa Ann Goldsmith. For audiences, blankets and chairs are smart gear; picnics are welcome. BO 2 p.m. Also 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 7. (Beechwood Boulevard and Nicholson Street, Squirrel Hill). Continues weekends through Sept. 28 (various venues). Free. www. pittsburghshakespeare.com

Sebastian Errazuriz

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

closely observed to wholly invented,” Chidester says on his website. According to press materials, Tectonica recalls literary futurist J.G. Ballard’s “visual poetry of ruin.” The internationally recognized painter and Penn State professor’s first solo exhibit since 2006 opens with a reception tonight. DF 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 4. 819 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-325-7037

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SEBASTIAN ERRAZURIZ STUDIO}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

City of Asylum/Pittsburgh’s Jazz Poetry Concert has been a hit since its inception. It annually draws hundreds for a free — and free-of-charge — blend of the two art forms, overseen by bandleader Oliver Lake and featuring internationally known poets. But its outdoors North Side venue left it frequently running for cover from rain, over to the New Hazlett Theater. So this year, COAP is pitching a giant tent in West Park and continuing rain or shine. And for its 10th anniversary, the group (which shelters writers persecuted in their home countries) plans a reunion concert of musicians and poets from years past. The Oliver Lake Big Band will be bigger than ever, with no fewer than 17 musicians, including saxophonist Lake himself (pictured at left), drummer Chris Beck, trumpeter Josh Evans, trombonist Terry Green and pianist Yoichi Uzeki. Most of the international array of poets are encoring, too, including T.J. Dema (a native of Botswana), Kei Miller (Jamaica) and Pittsburgh-born Gerald Stern, winner of honors including a National Book Award and induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Joining them is newcomer Ali Cobby Eckerman, of aboriginal Australia. And while there’ll be plenty of seats, don’t be surprised if they fill up early. Bill O’Driscoll 7:45-9:45 p.m. Sat., Sept. 6. West Park (near the National Aviary), North Side. Free. Reserve seats at 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org.

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Six weeks back, we told you about the Lovelace Puppet Festival, created to honor the legacy of Margo Lovelace and her Shadyside-based puppet theater that enchanted generations of Pittsburghers. Well, a rainy summer intervened, and the fest was moved to today. At Shadyside Nursery, The Margo Lovelace Project presents performances by six local troupes, including Creative Citizen Studios, The Schmutz Company and 4th Wall Puppets. BO 5-9 p.m. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. $10 (includes beverage with ID; free for kids). www.margo lovelaceproject.wordpress.com

+ MON., SEPT. 08 {OUTDOORS} If you’re not giving up on summer just because Labor Day is past — and really, why should you? — Venture Outdoors asks, “Why not learn kayaking?” Today’s Family Beginner Paddle, at Kayak Pittsburgh in North Park, offers the basics. Participants 12 and older can paddle solo; younger kids can go tandem with an adult, and small toddlers can ride with two adults. BO 6-8:30 p.m. $10-29 ($50 per family). 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AS YOU LIKE IT. Presented

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

FREE RYE WHISKEY TASTING

––– Friday, September 5th ––– MASTERSON’S RYE- PRITCHARD’S RYERITTENHOUSE RYE- DAD’S HAT PENNSYLVANIA RYE- DAD’S HAT RYE FINISHED IN VERMOUTH BARRELS

8-10pm - Cheers! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. www.pittsburgh shakespeare.org Sept. 6-7, 2 p.m. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. DIXIE’S TUPPERWARE PARTY. See how Dixie Longate became the #1 Tupperware seller as she educates her guests on the many alternative uses she has discovered for the plastic products. Includes audience participation, giveaways, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO! Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., Sept. 6, 7 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-344-2069. LATE NITE CATECHISM LAS VEGAS: SISTER ROLLS THE DICE. The convent needs a new roof, so the order has

decided that Sister will organize a Las Vegas night. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, Sun, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 10. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. OF MICE & MEN. John Steinbeck’s classic tale of two migrant workers in the Great Depression. Presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Premiering Last Night, Crisis On Infinite Earths, Some Guy At The Airport, Lovie’s Spring, Constant Companion, Raghead. Thu-Sun. Thru Sept. 14. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-944-2639. SHREK THE MUSICAL. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 6. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. SOUTHERN COMFORTS. A taciturn Yankee widower & a vivacious grandmother from

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 04 SUN 07

FRI 05

COMEDY THU 04

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Tennessee find themselves stuck OPEN STAGE COMEDY inside his house together through NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. a nasty storm. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 7. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. Theater Square, Downtown. 412-831-8552. 412-325-6769. SQUABBLES. A cautionary THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. tale of what happens when Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv parents move in w/ their Theater, Shadyside. children. Thu-Sat, 412-404-2695. 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 7. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. www. er THE PAJAMA MEN. TAMARA. Play hcitypap g p Critically-acclaimed by John Krizanc. .com sketch comedians. Presented by Quantum Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Theatre. Wed, Thu, Sept. 7 City Theatre, South Side. Sat, 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 412-431-2489. 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-362-1713. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN COMEDY OPEN MIC. EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Amazing strolling magic Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. & comedy. Fun for the whole 412-681-4318. family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER IMPROV SHOW. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 12 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. YOUR LIFE: THE MUSICAL. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 05 - SUN 07 SOMMORE. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Sept. 6, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 7, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 06 DAVID KAYE. 7 & 9 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. AN EVENING OF COMEDY FT. BILL CRAWFORD, MIKE TRAVERS, JEFF KONKLE, HOSTED BY ANDY PICARRO (EARLY). 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

SUN 07 MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 21 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 08 JAMBONE’S UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LOUIS KATZ. 9 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY! Work by Susan Middleman, from Breathtakingly Basic, at Gallerie Chiz, in Shadyside

ONGOING

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK AIM GALLERY. Michael Walter Landscapes. Opens Sept. 5, 7-11 p.m. Garfield. 412-418-8301. BOULEVARD GALLERY. A Tribute to Henry Fiore. Work by LeaAnn Grill, Nancy Bernheisel, Denise Gemellas, & Cynthia Saal. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Sebastian Errazuriz: Look Again. Through found/repurposed objects & interactive furniture, viewers are asked to question everyday life & the status quo. Opening reception: Sept. 5, 6:30-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3131. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Art & Marriage. Work by Susan & David Sparks, Francine & Dirk Vendenberg, more. Opening reception: Sept. 7, 2-5 p.m. & by appointment. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. FUTURE TENANT. Tectonica. Solo exhibition by Paul Chidester. Opening reception: Sept. 5, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Breathtakingly Basic. Work by Stephen Gleasner & Susan Middleman. Opening reception: Sept. 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Ancient Gods & Hidden Worlds. Allegorical paintings

by Hannah Grace Clark. Opening reception: Sept. 6, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. 99% Love. Work by Bob Ziller. Opens Sept. 5, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-361-2262. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Behind the Platen. Showcase of letterpress work done by shops & individuals in the Western Pennsylvania/Eastern Ohio area. Opens Sept. 10, 7 p.m. Wexford. 800-838-4572. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Opens Sept. 6. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. Sep. 5, 6-10 p.m. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. ROOTED: New Works by Di-ay Battad. Opening reception: Sept. 5, 6-10 p.m. Part of Unblurred. Bloomfield. RENAISSANCE PITTSBURGH HOTEL. Beatles Art Show. Traveling art show celebrating The Beatles, feat. Yellow Submarine animator Ron Campbell. Opens Sept. 5. Downtown. 610-389-1807. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. NO OUTLET. New work by Elizabeth Amber Rudnick. Opening reception: Sept. 5, 6-9 p.m. Friendship. 551-427-6655.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Recent Work by Mary M. Mazziotti. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Gabe Felice. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection

THURSDAY SEPT 4/10PM

DAILY GRIND THURSDAY SEPT 11/10PM

MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPERS, SOUL KITCHEN, SKINNY TIE CLUB THURSDAY SEPT 18/10PM

AMRCNDREAMING $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

BABUSHKAS, HARD HATS & CARRIE FURNACES TOUR Enjoy the magical mix of immigrants and industry! Tour highlights include a historic steel mill Pump House, a steel-heritage museum, awe-inspiring blast furnaces and much more!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11

www.coachride.com 1-800-342-2349

CARRIE BLAST FURNACES TOUR Experience the awe-inspiring Carrie Blast Furnaces! Learn the entire iron-making process, with a tour led by a retired steelworker, and why Pittsburgh was once the steel-making capital of the world! Shuttle service provided by Lenzner 10:30 a.m. Saturdays.

WWW.RIVERSOFSTEEL.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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TUE 09 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 10 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. JOKING OFF COMEDY CONTEST. Presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. Wed, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Caliente Pizza & Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-1414. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew,

CONNEY M. KIMBO Remix. Feat. imagery, film GALLERY. University of & oral history narratives to Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: explore communities, cultures, Memorabilia & Awards from & innovations. Downtown. the International Hall of Fame. 412-258-2700. Oakland. 412-648-7446. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. DEPRECIATION LANDS Preserved materials reflecting MUSEUM. Small living the industrial heritage of history museum celebrating the Southwestern PA. Homestead. settlement and history of the 412-464-4020. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. CARNEGIE MUSEUM 412-486-0563. OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: FALLINGWATER. Tour the Are We So Different? Text, famed Frank Lloyd Wright photographs, interactive house. 724-329-8501. audiovisual components, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN & related artifacts CHURCH. Tours challenge perceptions of 13 Tiffany about race. Oakland. stained-glass 412-622-3131. www. per pa windows. Downtown. CARNEGIE SCIENCE pghcitym .co 412-471-3436. CENTER. Ongoing: FORT PITT MUSEUM. Buhl Digital Dome Reconstructed fort (planetarium), Miniature houses museum of Pittsburgh Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in Downtown. 412-281-9285. 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 FRICK ART & HISTORICAL are extremely rare examples CENTER. Ongoing: tours of pre World War II ironof Clayton, the Frick estate, making technology. Rankin. with classes & programs 412-464-4020 x.21. for all ages. Point Breeze. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL 412-371-0600. HISTORY. Explore the complex KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the interplay between culture, other Frank Lloyd Wright house. nature and biotechnology. 724-329-8501. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays KERR MEMORIAL 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 412-223-7698. 19th-century, middle-class

FULL LIST ONLINE

home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos

and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil

War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS FRI 05 - SUN 07 A FAIR IN THE PARK. Arts & crafts show & sale. Presented by the Craftsmen’s Guild of Pittsburgh. www.afairinthepark.org Sept. 5-7 Mellon Park, Shadyside.

SAT 06 SEWICKLEY HARVEST FESTIVAL. Art & craft vendors, food, children’s activities, sidewalk sale, live music, more. Broad & Thorn St., Sewickley. www.sewickley borough.org 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

DANCE SAT 06 A NIGHT AT THE OASIS: LIVE MUSIC & BELLYDANCE SHOW. 6 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-260-8432.

WED 10 CARMEN & GEOFFREY. Documentary about dance icons

Design a Bike Rack The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust invites Pittsburgh area artists (residents of Allegheny County) to design and develop functional bicycle racks to be located along the Penn Avenue corridor from the Convention Center (11th Street) to Stanwix Street. This second phase of the project will produce five more racks with the potential for more to follow.

Questions? Please email staggs@trustarts.org Visit trustarts.org/visualarts/bike for more information and an application.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


Carmen De Lavallade & Geoffrey Holder. Post-screening discussion w/ Carmen de Lavallade. 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. PARALLEL LIVES. Performance created & performed by Beth Corning in collaboration w/ award-winning dancer Arthur Aviles. Presented by the Glue Factory Project. 7 p.m., Sept. 11-13, 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 14, 2 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-718-4253.

FUNDRAISERS THU 04 BEDTIME STORIES: A SUMMER LOVIN’ STORY SLAM. Audience members share up to 5 minutes of real-life sexy adventures. Benefits Planned Parenthood of Western PA. 7-11 p.m. The Cloakroom, East Liberty. 412-258-9740. WIGLE WHISKEY BANTAM NIGHT. Feat. live music by The Inconsiderate Few & Saucy Mama’s Food Truck. Benefits The Denis Theatre Foundation. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-668-0737.

FRI 05 11TH ANNUAL PITTSBURGH FASHION STORY. Benefits the

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922.

Benefits Partners for Quality Allegheny Children’s Initiative. 7 p.m. Power Center Ballroom, Duquesne University, Downtown. 412-446-0702.

SAT 06 31ST ANNUAL FAMILY HOUSE POLO MATCH. 11 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-647-5811. FAMILY HOSPICE & PALLIATIVE

LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing &

CARE MEMORIAL WALK/ 5K RUN. 10 a.m. North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side. 412-572-8821. LUPUS LOOP 5K. Benefits Lupus Foundation of PA. www.lupuspa.org 8 a.m. Station Square, Station Square. 412-261-5886. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST GALA. Outdoor reception & cocktails, jazz

multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves. Work by Masha Fikhman, Zack John Lee & Travis K. Schwab. Lawrenceville. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte

Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Post Mortem Photographs & Vintage Mug Shots. A bewitching collection of Victorian Era post Mortem photographs & chilling early criminal mug shots. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings,

GARDEN TO PLATE DINNER. Feat. locally sourced fare, select wines & live entertainment. 6:30-9 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. HEALCREST URBAN FARM LATE SUMMER DINNER. 3-course meal benefiting Girls Rock Pittsburgh, Afro American Music Institute Boys Choir, Healcrest Urban Farm,

by Cyrille Aimée, more. 6:30 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-471-1497.

SUN 07 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

& Just Harvest. 5-8 p.m. Healcrest Urban Farm, Garfield. 814-525-4883.

TUE 09 CORKS, CANVAS & ACOUSTICS ART & SILENT AUCTION. Food, music by Rob & Greg from the Clarks, & Jeff & Skip from Good Brother Earl, work by local artists, more. CASA of Allegheny County, CONTINUES ON PG. 45

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

Tell us what you think about this picture. Become part of a lively, unprecedented online conversation about the use, influence, and meaning of photography—and see your response featured on our website!

nowseethis.org Arne Svenson, The Neighbors #11, 2012, pigment print, 30 x 45", ed. 5 © Arne Svenson, Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery, New York

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[VISUAL ART] Cranberry CUP, & The Woodlands. Hosted by Generoasta Coffee & Cafe. 6-10 p.m. La Casa Narcisi, Gibsonia. 724-444-4744.

FRI 05 FUN FIRST TIMERS SUP LESSON. Thru Sept. 30 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport & Mon, Wed, Fri. Thru Sept. 29 Northeast Paddleboard, Downtown. 412-860-3737. HAPPY HOUR SUP ADVENTURE. Thu, Fri, 5:30 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 10 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058.

WED 10 SUNFLOWER POWER. Party to benefit Pennsylvania Organization for Women in Early Recovery. 5:30 p.m. Perlora, South Side. 412-243-7535 x 223.

POLITICS WED 10

FRI 05 - SAT 06

CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

LITERARY THU 04 AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru Sept. 18 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DORIS ZINE READING. 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SAT 06 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUN 07 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 08 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 06

Art by Hannah Grace Clark

It’s no surprise that Hannah Grace Clark found her earliest inspiration in both fairy tales and the plants in her Texas hometown. Paintings from her new show, Ancient Gods and Hidden Worlds — opening Saturday at The Gallery 4 — seem like scenes from yet-to-be-told fables: Wild animals sleepily co-exist, and oversized bears take on unusual roles in the natural landscape. In this body of work, she says, “I explore my thoughts and feelings about parenting, responsibility and the excruciating desire to explore my own truth and passion in life.” Opening reception: 7-11 p.m. Sat., Sept. 6. 206 Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

TUE 09

WED 10 DORIT BRAUER. Discussion w/ author of Girls Don’t Ride Motorbikes. 7 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library. 412-885-2255.

KIDSTUFF

SAT 06 LEARN TO SNOWBOARD. Ages 3-8. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

OUTSIDE

benefit for Circle C’s 12th annual rgh area! bu at-risk kids in the Pitts

S HELP KILD UES!

SUN 07 SUPYOGA FOUNDATIONS. Sun, 9 a.m. Thru Sept. 28 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. FUN FIRST TIMERS SUP LESSON. Thru Sept. 30 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058.

LOSE THE B

ptt. 13 day, Sep 7pm - SSaturd n’ roll by... With blues, soul & rock

Billy the Kid and the Regulators

TUE 09 FUN FIRST TIMERS SUP LESSON. Thru Sept. 30 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

FULL LIST ONLINE

www. per pa pghcitym .co

FUN FIRST TIMERS SUP LESSON. Thru Sept. 30 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058 HAPPY HOUR SUP ADVENTURE. Thu, Fri, 5:30 & 6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 10 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English.

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

THU 04

THU 04 - WED 10

TUE 09

Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

DATE NIGHT AT THE POINT SUP TOUR FOR 2. Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 27 Northeast Paddleboard, Downtown. 412-860-3737. DATE NIGHT SUPVENTURE FOR 2. Sat, 6 p.m. Thru Oct. 11 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. FUN FIRST TIMERS SUP LESSON. Thru Sept. 30 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. SUPYOGA FLOW. Sat, 9 a.m. Thru Sept. 27 Northeast Paddleboard, Downtown. 412-860-3737.

WED 10

BYO FRIEND SUP TOUR. Wed, 5 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Northeast Paddleboard Co. McKeesport, McKeesport. 412-720-5058. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. WEDNESDAY TRAFFIC BEATER SUP TOUR. Wed, 5:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 24 Northeast Paddleboard, Downtown. 412-860-3737.

Cash Bar, Great Food, Silent & Chinese Auctions $30 AT DOOR • $20 IN ADVANCE • 412-937-1605 x227 Proceeds benefit the kids at Circle C Youth & Family Services

Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers Building 10 SOUTH 19TH STREET • SOUTH SIDE

Find us on facebook! • www.circlec.net

School of Social Work

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OTHER STUFF

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

THU 04

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BIOPHILIA: PITTSBURGH. 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5:30-8 p.m. Roland’s Seafood Grill, Strip District. 412-392-4513. GREATER PITTSBURGH LITERACY COUNCIL TUTOR TRAINING WORKSHOP. Registration required. Tue, Thu, 5:45 p.m. Thru Sept. 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-393-7645. HOSPICE 101. 6 p.m. Mt. Vernon of Elizabeth Senior Living. 412-751-0430. HYPNOTHERAPY & ALTERED STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS. 6:30-8 p.m. Nuin Center, Highland Park. 412-661-6108. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh @gmail.com. REDUCING CARBON EMISSIONS IN PITTSBURGH: WHAT YOU CAN DO. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 05

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

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CREATIVE LABOR EXCHANGE LAUNCH. Launch of timebank for creative workers & projects. 7 p.m. BUNKERprojects, Garfield. 412-335-6068. THE FIRST STEP: THE MECHANICS OF STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Mervis Hall at Pitt, Oakland. 412-648-1544. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554.

EVENT: Steel City Mods vs. Rockers, Millvale CRITIC: Hannah Aitchison, 47, a tattoo artist from Lawrenceville WHEN: Aug.

30,

2014 [It’s] is an intimate gathering for bike enthusiasts of all walks of life. This is a lot of beautiful, beautiful eye candy to take in here. I’m a big fan of vintage BMWs, so I’m big fan of slash-5, slash-6 bikes. We got a few of them here. One of our friends rode in on his 815 Norton Commando, and we’ve seen a few more of those. They are putting on a nice showing, and [the bikes] are all beautifully maintained. We’re just here to spectate, enjoy ourselves. We’ve already met with some friends who are also vintagebike enthusiasts. The great thing about bike enthusiasts is that they come in all shapes, sizes, ages and colors. There are people here that honestly look like they should be chairing a PTA meeting. Yet, they could have the most tricked-out bike in their garage, and you wouldn’t know. It’s great. BY DANIELLE FOX

GARFIELD NIGHT MARKET. Feat. local vendors. Part of Unblurred. N. Pacific Ave. between Penn & Dearborn, Garfield. First Fri of every month, 6-10 p.m. Thru Oct. 3 412-354-1174. OAKLAND GAME NIGHT BLOCK PARTY. Food trucks, live DJ, outdoor screening of Pitt game, more. Oakland Ave., Oakland. 7-10 p.m. 412-683-6243. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. First Fri of every month, 7-11 p.m. Thru Nov. 7 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

FRI 05 - SAT 06 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 06 THE ART OF SELFDEFENSE. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi. com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CELEBRATION & BLESSING OF PITTSBURGH EDUCATORS. 11 a.m. Trinity Cathedral, Downtown. 412-232-6404. CON ON THE RUN. Feat. 5 games based on historical battles put on by game masters, moving diorama, more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584. CREATIVITY BOUND ART WORKSHOPS. Sat, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thru Nov. 22 Locus, Bloomfield. 412-688-0417. DIVERGENT DRAWING W/ SEBASTIAN ERRAZURIZ. 1-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223.

LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709. THE MEDIATHON: INSPIRE THE NEWS! Assemble a team & create media that shows your passion about what news media is & can be. Presented by The Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association. www.mediathon.org 10 a.m.6 p.m. PNC Park, North Side. 412-323-5000. THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: FROM BEAN TO BAR: THE EXPLORATION OF CHOCOLATE. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ROGER HUMPHRIES FREE DRUM CLINIC. 3:30 p.m. Eastminster Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-417-7317. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STEELTOWN SHAKEDOWN. Car show, pin-up girl contest, music by The Turbosonics & Mickey & the Snake Oil Boys, more. 12 p.m. Twin Hi-Way Drive-In, Robinson. 412-494-4999. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WEDDING SLAM. Vendors & experts on hand to answer questions about weddings, honeymoons, & marriages. 12-3 p.m. Metamorphosis, Canonsburg. 412-879-0558. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 07 AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m.


Thru Oct. 5 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 08

cats. Second Tue of every month, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 7 Animal Rescue League Wildlife Center, East Liberty. 412-345-7300. GREATER PITTSBURGH LITERACY COUNCIL TUTOR TRAINING WORKSHOP. Registration required. Tue, Thu, 5:45 p.m. Thru Sept. 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-393-7645. THE HELP YOU NEED: STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY THROUGH BENEVOLENCE. 6:30 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library. 412-885-2255. MAKER SPACE OPEN HOUSE. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKERSHIP OPEN HOUSE. Tour of TechShop & information about free training & job placement opportunities. 6 p.m. TechShop, East Liberty. 412-315-4629. SLOVAK LANGUAGE LESSONS. Registration required. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Sept. 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-2990. SOME OBSERVATIONS ON 20TH CENTURY ARCHITECTURE IN PITTSBURGH. Speaker: Al Tannler, Pittsburgh History & Landmarks, Historical Collections Director. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

Danielle Marvit, Pennsylvania Association of Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. ROOFTOP SHINDIG. Food, specialty cocktails & beer. Screening of The Big Lebowski w/ live music by Jimbo & the Soupbones. 6 p.m. Theater Square Garage, Downtown. 412-566-4190. SUSTAINABLE PERENNIALS FOR YOUR GARDEN. 6-8 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical

WED 10

AUDITIONS HOPE ACADAMY ARTS.

THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR ERA: U.S. GRANT & HIS LIEUTENANTS, FROM CAIRO TO APPOMATTOX. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP. Every other Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE WOODY PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. 7-9 p.m., Mon., Sept. 29, 7-9 p.m. and Mon., Oct. 20, 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. PRESIDENT FORD’S PARDON OF RICHARD M. NIXON: A 40-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE. 3:30 p.m. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT Power Center Ballroom, GROUP. For Widows/ Duquesne University, Downtown. Widowers over 50. Second and 412-396-6300. Fourth Wed of every month, SCOTTISH COUNTRY 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, DANCING. Lessons Ross. 412-366-1300. 7-8 p.m., social dancing BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN follows. No partner WHILE YOU SPEAK needed. Mon, 7 p.m. SPANISH. Every other and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Episcopal Church, Sept. 24 Mount Mt. Washington. Lebanon Public www. per pa 412-683-5670. Library, Mt. Lebanon. pghcitym .co SPELLING BEE WITH 412-531-1912. DAVE AND KUMAR. DETROIT STYLE Mon Lava Lounge, URBAN BALLROOM South Side. 412-431-5282. DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, SPORTS DISCUSSION 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, W/ REFEREE WALTER PATTON. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. 6:30 p.m. Friends Meeting ENGLISH CONVERSATION House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! THE BIG BANG & THEN Practice conversational SOME: A LAYPERSON’S English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. PERSPECTIVE. Tue, 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Thru Sept. 30 Mingo Creek Park 412-622-3151. Observatory. 724-348-6150. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW BOUNDARIES & SELF OFFS. A meeting of CARE. Fourth and Second jugglers & spinners. All levels Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Union Project, Highland Park. Ministry. 412-366-1300. 412-363-4550. COMMUNITY CAT CHAT. PRESERVING THE SEASON. Discussion series on Program by Susanna Meyer & neighborhood stray & feral

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA STUDENT CHORALE. Open to high school students in grades 10-12, as well as college singers. Nominations due by Sept. 5. chfl218@gmail. com 412-977-2047. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. Sept. 13-14. Male/female ages 20-60 for all roles &

SUBMISSIONS ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening Sept. 28. Bring five works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 11 a.m.-2 p.m., pick up 4-6 p.m. aapgh.org. FrameHouse, Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com THE IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Accepting submissions for Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists IV. Seeking work by artists who live here, moved away; solo or collaborative. Deadline: Sep 13. Email sheiladali@irmafreeman.org for information. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PITTSBURGH CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Looking for something fun to do this fall? Why not help out at the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum? Volunteers are needed to engage visitors, monitor visitor safety, and otherwise help to maintain the museum’s permanent and seasonal exhibits. Experience with children is preferred, and a background check and orientation are required. Call 412-322-5058 or email volunteer@pittsburghkids.org for information.

Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. TAI CHI CLASS. Wed, 1 p.m. Thru Nov. 26 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-4551. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

a young boy age 10-12. Prepare 2-min. classic monologue w/ British dialect. www.primestage.com Thru Sept. 14. Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End.

PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists in Allegheny County to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located along Penn Ave., Downtown. Submission information & requirements at pressroom. trustarts.org/2014/08/25/ call-for-artists-bicycle-racksin-the-cultural-district/ THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY NEW MEMBER SCREENING. New Members must register on line to be Considered for membership at www.pittsburghwatercolor society.com. Drop off works at 1:00 & return for pickup at 3, Sep. 14. Thru Sept. 14. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 15. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to www.silvereye.org/f15apply/. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information.

Auditions for HAT’s Teen Rock Band. Sept. 6. All instruments welcome, must make a commitment to Saturday rehearsals. www.hopeacademyarts.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for Death by Chocolate. Sept. 14-15. Comedic actors & actresses ages 21+, 2-min. comic monologue & cold readings. www.mckeesport littletheater.com McKeesport. 412-673-1100. NEW HORIZON THEATER. Auditions for Queens Of The Blues. Sept. 6. 4 African-American females mid 30’s-60 & 2 African-American males late 30’s-mid 50’s. newhorizontheater@yahoo.com PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for the 2014-15 season. Sept. 20-22. Actors of all ages, ethnicities, & backgrounds are encouraged to audition, prepare 2 contrasting contemporary monologues. www.pgh playwrights.com/auditions

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47


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

My wife and I went through a long-distance period when we were dating. I used porn as a masturbatory aid during that time. I did not tell her, as she believes that porn use is equivalent to cheating. Fast-forward a couple years (and a marriage), and I let it slip that I had watched some porn during the times we were apart. She flew off the handle, and ever since then insists that we can’t have children because I’m a pedophile for watching porn that may or may not have contained women acting like teenagers. She literally yells at me in public if my gaze goes anywhere near girls or women she perceives to be younger than she is. The same goes for watching TV, looking at magazines, you name it. A lot of this stems from her best friend’s cousin, who worked with people in the porn industry and seduced underage girls into sexual acts. To her, watching porn is the same as what this guy did. Until my admission, she assumed I was a good person. How do I convince her I am the same person she fell in love with and get her to put aside this irrational fear? SINCERELY NOT A PEDOPHILE

thing else to blow up about. If you don’t DTMFA now, you’re gonna have to DTMFA at some point. My husband and I had been in the market for some Japanese bondage rope and finally found a kit we liked. The day before it arrived, I found out I was pregnant. The pregnancy means we probably won’t be able to use the ropes for a long time. I don’t think I can wait. Are there any resources that can give us some guidance in safe practices, or should we play it vanilla until the baby arrives? BONDAGE WITH BABY

If you go to BabyCenter.com and search “safe to ski while pregnant,” you’ll find a post that says skiing is safe enough during the first two trimesters and highly unlikely to harm the fetus — barring a major accident. (Skiing is obviously no-go during the third trimester.) Mary Lake Polan, chair emeritus of the department of gynecology and obstetrics at Stanford University School of Medicine, included this in her response to the skiing-whilepregnant question: “[The] baby is very well protected in the uterus — it usually takes a car accident or major trauma to harm the baby.” I’ve never been pregnant, but I snowboard and I have been tied up — and snowboarding is a lot more physically taxing. Twisted Monk, the bondage expert and hemprope merchant (twistedmonk. com), advises couples who want to do bondage while one partner is pregnant to stick to “limb ties” (rope around arms and legs, no rope around torsos and breasts). Hardcore BDSMers are advised to avoid serious pain and/or fear play, as both can release stress hormones; fetal exposure to stress hormones has been linked to low birth weight, restricted blood flow to the uterus and adult mood disorders. So stick to limb ties only, avoid scary fear-play scenes and don’t let your husband tie you up in a moving car.

HARDCORE BDSMERS ARE ADVISED TO AVOID SERIOUS PAIN AND/OR FEAR PLAY WHILE PREGNANT, AS BOTH CAN RELEASE STRESS HORMONES.

DTMFA. There’s just one thing you should be trying to convince your wife of right now, SNAP: You aren’t gonna put up with her bullshit anymore. So gather your things together — don’t forget your balls — and move out. This conflict has nothing to do with porn, or your character, or your wife’s best friend’s cousin. (Whatever the fuck to that rationalization.) The issue is that you made the mistake of marrying a controlling, irrational, abusive psycho. Begging and pleading with your wife only demonstrates that you’ll take whatever she dishes out. Get out. Leave. Don’t look back. Want a second opinion? I posted your letter to my blog, and here’s what one of the more astute commenters had to say: “This is what happens when you marry someone you already know you have to lie and cheat to be with. She set her conditions plainly — she feels porn use is evil. You knew you were fine with porn use and used it yourself. You should have broken up then and there. … Break up now and find someone who accepts you for who you are.” There you go: This advice columnist and an anonymous commenter agree that you have to leave. Being alone — and being free to enjoy porn — is better than being with someone like your wife. But if you must stay with this woman for reasons you don’t list (does she have any redeeming qualities?), you will have to tell her what she wants to hear: You did a terrible thing (you didn’t), you’re an addict (you’re not), you have a problem (you don’t). Find a therapist for some confidential sessions, talk about the weather, then tell your wife that you’ve been cured and will never look at porn — or other women — again. But even if you never look at porn ever again — which isn’t likely — your spouse will find some-

I have been married for 26 years. We have not been intimate for the last 11 years. I have been going to a sex therapist to deal with this issue. My wife says that she will make an appointment but does not follow through. She now has informed me that she never wants to have sex again. It seems strange to leave this marriage over sex, but what options do I have? SEXLESS HUSBAND IS TROUBLED

You’re not a regular reader, are you? If you were, you would know that your options are hiring sex workers, cheating on your wife (but it hardly counts as cheating, as you’re not cheating your wife out of anything she wants), or seeing other women with your wife’s permission. Go ask your wife what she wants — an open marriage or a failed one? — and make your move(s). On the Savage Lovecast, fashion force-of-nature Simon Doonan weighs in on camel toes: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

09.03-09.10

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I have a hypothesis that everyone is born with the same amount of luck,” says cartoonist Scott Adams. “But luck doesn’t appear to be spread evenly across a person’s life. Some people use up all of their luck early in life. Others start out in bad circumstances and finish strong.” How would you assess your own distribution of luck, Virgo? According to my projections, you are in a phase when luck is flowing stronger and deeper than usual. And I bet it will intensify in the coming weeks. I suggest you use it wisely — which is to say, with flair and aplomb and generosity.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When my daughter Zoe was 7 years old, she took horse-back riding lessons with a group of other young aspirants. On the third lesson, their instructor assigned them the task of carrying an egg in a spoon that they clasped in their mouths as they sat facing backwards on a trotting horse. That seemingly improbable task reminds me of what you’re working on right now, Libra. Your balancing act isn’t quite as demanding, but it is testing you in ways you’re not accustomed to. My prognosis: You will master what’s required of you faster than the kids at Zoe’s horse camp. Every one of them broke at least eight eggs before succeeding. I suspect that three or four attempts will be enough for you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Peter the Great was the Tsar of Russia from 1682 until 1725. Under his rule, his nation became a major empire. He also led a cultural revolution that brought modern European-style ideas and influences to Russia. But for our purposes right

now, I want to call attention to one of his other accomplishments: The All-Joking, All-Drunken Council of Fools and Jesters. It was a club he organized with his allies to ensure there would always be an abundance of parties for him to enjoy. I don’t think you need alcohol as an essential part of your own efforts to sustain maximum revelry in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suggest you convene a similar brain trust.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In Roald Dahl’s kids’ story James and the Giant Peach, 501 seagulls are needed to carry the giant peach from a spot near the Azores all the way across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City. But physics students at the U.K.’s University of Leicester have determined that such a modest contingent wouldn’t be nearly enough to achieve a successful airlift. By their calculations, there’d have to be a minimum of 2,425,907 seagulls involved. I urge you to consider the possibility that you, too, will require more power than you have estimated to accomplish your own magic feat. Certainly not

get your yoga on!

almost 5,000 times more, as in the case of the seagulls. Fifteen percent more should be enough. (P.S. I’m almost positive you can rustle up that extra 15 percent.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): So far, 53 toys have been inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame. They include crayons, the jump rope, Mr. Potato Head, the yo-yo, the rubber duckie and dominoes. My favorite inductee — and the toy that is most symbolically useful to you right now — is the plain old cardboard box. Of all the world’s playthings, it is perhaps the one that requires and activates the most imagination. It can become a fort, a spaceship, a washing machine, a cave, a submarine and many other exotic things. I think you need to be around influences akin to the cardboard box because they are likely to unleash your dormant creativity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m not opposed to you fighting a good fight. It’s quite possible you would become smarter and stronger by wrangling with a worthy adversary or struggling against a bad influence. The passion you summon to outwit an obstacle could bestow blessings not only on you, but on other people as well. But here’s a big caveat: I hope you will not get embroiled in a showdown with an imaginary foe. I pray that you will refrain from a futile combat with a slippery delusion. Choose your battles carefully, Aquarius.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): During the next six weeks, I suggest you regard symbiosis as one of your key themes. Be alert for ways you can cultivate more interesting and intense forms of intimacy. Magnetize yourself to the joys of teamwork and collaboration. Which of your skills and talents are most useful to other people? Which are most likely to inspire your allies to offer you their best skills and talents? I suggest you highlight everything about yourself that is most likely to win you love, appreciation, and help.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I don’t usually do this kind of thing, but I’m going to suggest that you monitor the number six. My hypothesis is that six has been trying to grab your attention, perhaps even in askew or inconvenient ways. Its purpose? To nudge you to tune in to beneficial influences that you have been ignoring. I furthermore suspect that six is angling to show you clues about what is both the cause of your unscratchable itch and the cure for that itch. So lighten up and have fun with this absurd mystery, Aries. Without taking it too seriously, allow six to be your weird little teacher. Let it prick your intuition with quirky notions and outlandish speculations. If nothing comes of it, there will be no harm done. If it leads you to helpful discoveries, hallelujah.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In English, the rare word “trouvaille” means a lucky find or an unexpected windfall. In French, “trouvaille” can refer to the same thing and even more: something interesting or exceptional that is discovered fortuitously; a fun or enlightening blessing that’s generated through the efforts of a vigorous imagination. Of course I can’t guarantee that you will experience a trouvaille or two (or even three) in the coming days, Taurus. But the conditions are as ripe as they can be for such a possibility.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Dutch word epibreren means that even though you are goofing off, you are trying to create the impression that you are hard at work. I wouldn’t be totally opposed to you indulging in some major epibreren in the coming days. More importantly, the cosmos won’t exact any karmic repercussions for it. I suspect, in fact, that the cosmos is secretly conspiring for you to enjoy more slack and spaciousness that usual. You’re overdue to recharge your spiritual and emotional batteries, and that will require extra repose and quietude. If you have to engage in a bit of masquerade to get the ease you need, so be it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When James Franco began to learn his craft as an actor, he was young and poor. A gig at McDonald’s paid for his acting lessons and allowed him to earn a living. He also used his time on the job as an opportunity to build his skills as a performer. While serving customers burgers and fries, he practiced speaking to them in a variety of different accents. Now would be an excellent time for you to adopt a similar strategy, Cancerian. Even if you are not doing what you love to do full time, you can and should take stronger measures to prepare yourself for that day when you will be doing more of what you love to do.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are a few of the major companies that got their starts in home garages: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mattel, Amazon and Disney. Even if you’re not in full support of their business practices, you’ve got to admit that their humble origins didn’t limit their ability to become rich and powerful. As I meditate on the long-term astrological omens, I surmise you are now in a position to launch a project that could follow a similar arc. It would be more modest, of course. I don’t foresee you ultimately becoming an international corporation worth billions of dollars. But the success would be bigger than I think you can imagine. Make a playful effort to change something you’ve always assumed you could never change. Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014


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REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STUDIES

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

STUDIES

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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412.316.3342

ASSISTANT LISTINGS EDITOR

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

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STUDIES

Seeking outgoing, committed people for P/T position Immediate openings Call Brittany (412)-622-8849

Your ad could be here

Lincoln Heritage

PAGE LIVE

HELP WANTED $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

STUDIES STORAGE

EAST FOR RENT

Guardian Storage

Squirrel Hill Duplex

Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available

3 Locations Shadyside • Oakland • Strip District

412-208-4625 GuardianStorage.com

STORAGE

ABC SELF STORAGE

2 units avl. 2BR or 3BR. Eq. kitch w/dishwasher, h/w flrs, gar, w/d, near bus, univ. & shops. 2BR $1,295 Avl Immed, 3BR $1,595 avl 9/1.

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

Call for pictures. 703-899-5246

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

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NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

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STUDIES

BIRTH CONTROL CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS +

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SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers. This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking. Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

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AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ARTIST COURSE For: Ads. TV. Film. Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

*Stuff We Like

ADOPTION

SERVICES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CLASSES

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

ADOPTION

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

Adopting your newborn is our Dream. Security, family, and endless love awaits! Natasha & Will 800-955-5181 Exp. Paid

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 23, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for the following Service Contract (General Prime) at Various schools for the following: • Concrete Maintenance Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on August 18, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

Memento Mori by Mary Mazziotti Pasted up in a Downtown alley (Tito Way) behind the Benedum, this series of billboard obits wryly comments on the utter futility of human existence. Just the thing for a lunchtime walk!

This Playstation video game from Naughty Dog will be making the leap to the big screen. Experience it first-hand — and personally, as a large part of the game takes you through post-apocalyptic Pittsburgh. Can be found now at bargain prices at most game stores.

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The Last of Us

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTEN LINK}

Free Shirt Fridays at PNC Park T-shirts are the most practical ballpark giveaway. They come in two sizes, which is better than one. And none of this year’s designs are as bad as last year’s A.J. Burnett-flashing-gang-signs shirt. Just two Fridays left: Sept. 12 and Sept. 19.

Swingers Club With vicious vocals and sardonic lyrics, these young locals sound like Pissed Jeans by way of the Birthday Party. Listen at swingersclubpittsburghfuck.bandcamp. com, but beware : The fittingly titled “Rottweiler” may tear your face up.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MEREDITH HANLEY}

Herb’s Grape Refresher at Burgatory The fancy burgers and shakes are great, but switch it up and try this sweet, herbal cocktail. It mixes basil, grapes, vodka, lemon and ginger ale — a great summer sipper. www.burgatory.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEROME CHARLES}

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi offers another chronicle of Wall Street’s corrosive effects on society. This time, he contrasts the justice system’s harsh treatment of low criminals with its indulgence of the titans of high finance.


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs

MASSAGE

STAR

WELLNESS

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

MASSAGE

massage Therapy

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Grandng Openi

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

412-441-1185 MASSAGE

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Shadyside Location

MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

MASSAGE

412-595-8077

1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

McKees Rocks

412-777-7171

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

724-519-2950

Credit Cards Accepted

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with this ad

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

330-373-0303

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$10 Coupon

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Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

WELLNESS

Recovery Without Judgement™

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

GET HELP NOW

Alcohol & Drug Treatment Services

1-800-243-1001

www.glenbeigh.com

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

MONROEVILLE, PA

Pregnant?

412-380-0100

We can treat you!

www.myjadewellness.com

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 09.03/09.10.2014

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com


POP ART

In Natrona Heights, beverage-making is still a craft {BY MARCUS CHARLESTON} ON BOTTLING DAYS, the former Nash automobile dealership

along Natrona Heights’ River Avenue is transformed into a scene reminiscent of the opening credits of Laverne & Shirley. The whirring sounds of the machinery combine with the clinking of the glass bottles as they’re shuttled along turntables and conveyers. The scent of the flavor being bottled — grape, cherry or vanilla — wafts through the air. And with it comes a whiff of nostalgia. Much has been written about the reinvention of Pittsburgh, where Google and technology startups have moved the economy into the 21st century. However, connections to the past remain all around us, like the dark red brick building that has been home to Natrona Bottling Company since 1959. “People love the flavors that take them back to being a kid, and Pittsburgh is the perfect place to maintain that feeling,” says Vito Gerasole. Gerasole’s title is president, but he also calls himself the Sultan of Soda — a title he and his design team created to promote the brand.

which dry ice is used to create smaller bubbles. It takes a day for carbonation to occur using this method, which resembles a naturally occurring process more than the high-volume approach used by large beverage-makers. But the carbonation lasts longer too, and partisans say you can taste the difference. “In my opinion, we’re the only ones that make a real cherry soda,” says Steve Vokish, Natrona’s master bottler. That’s another way of saying he’s the company’s jack-of-all-trades: Since graduating from high school more than 30 years ago, he’s helped run the machines, added the carbonation and mixed the flavors. Natrona Bottling Company’s two full-time employees produce 10 flavors in all, including Vokish’s favorite, the signature Red Ribbon Original Cherry Supreme. Other brands include Jamaica’s Finest Ginger Beer and Red Ribbon Almond Cream. Natrona products can be found at such local establishments as Brentwood Distributing, BRGR and Pizza Sola. Loyal customers can also shop over the Internet. Still, “Word of mouth is our big-

“PEOPLE LOVE THE FLAVORS THAT TAKE THEM BACK TO BEING A KID, AND PITTSBURGH IS THE PERFECT PLACE TO MAINTAIN THAT FEELING.” This year, the Natrona Bottling Company will celebrate its 110th anniversary, after nearly closing four years ago. Gerasole says the previous owner, Paul Bowser, kept the business running for the love of the product and nostalgia. “He was more concerned about preserving the product over profit,” says Gerasole. “It’s expensive to run a company like this. That’s the reason a lot of small bottlers are gone,” he adds. “There are only a handful of us left. When Coke and Pepsi came in and started buying up a lot of the bottlers, glass and sugar became very expensive because they demanded larger quantities.” “We’re not in competition with Coke or Pepsi,” adds administrative manager May Jane Zdila. And Natrona’s bottling process proves it. Natrona uses cane sugar and packages all of its drinks in glass bottles. The first step in the bottling involves filling the bottles with flavored syrup; water is added and then soda is carbonated in through a “pinpoint carbonation” process, in

gest form of advertising and marketing,” Zdila says. And the company still makes deliveries in a 1964 Ford Econoline van with hand-painted signage on the side. Old soda crates still lie in the warehouse, and the sign painted out front still advertises Frostie Root beer, which was once bottled here. Had the Natrona Bottling Company closed, Gerasole states, “Another piece of history would be gone.” But as it stands, “Pittsburgh has been great to us. … The people really care about keeping local traditions alive.” And while the fizzy carbonated beverages are only bottled when needed, orders have been increasing. “July 2014 was our biggest month since I’ve been with the company,” says Gerasole. As for the company’s next century, Gerasole says, “I’m always playing around with different flavors. However, I want to build on the sense of nostalgia to concentrate on the growth of Natrona Bottling Company.” Because one thing won’t change, he says. “We’re a Rust Belt city at heart with a love for local products.” INFO@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Top 100 scores will win cash and a seat into the Grand Finale!

SATURDAY QUALIFIER TOURNAMENTS SEPTEMBER 6, 13, 20 | 12PM - 8PM Earn 250 same day base points starting at 6am.

Top prize $7,500 CASH and seat into the Grand Finale!

GRAND FINALE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

Top Prize

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VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB OR RIVERSCASINO.COM FOR COMPLETE DETAILS

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 3, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 36

September 3, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 36