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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 08.20/08.27.2014

PASS PROTECTION: HAS THE STATE’S 4-FOOT SAFE-PASSING LAW INCREASED BIKE SAFETY? 06


EVENTS 8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

8.28 – 11am POP GENERATION For the generation that inspired Warhol, Pop Generation is a new program exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Tickets $10/FREE Members

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

DRESS

MID-70’S

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Her life was a Cabaret.

He provided

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

THE COLOR.

Halston AND Warhol: Silverand Suede / closingAugust24, 2014 $QG\:DUKRO+DOVWRQ GHWDLO i7KH$QG\:DUKRO)RXQGDWLRQIRUWKH9LVXDO$UWV,QF

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


{EDITORIAL}

08.20/08.27.2014 {COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF PHIL PROVENCIO}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 34

“From day one, we suspected it would be very hard to write citations, because it’s a judgment call.” — Pa. state Rep. Ron Miller on the low number of citations issued under the “Safe Passing” bike law

[VIEWS]

do we prevent the next Little 14 “How Blue from happening?” — Lisa Graves-Marcucci of the Environmental Integrity Project on the trouble with coal ash

“This is a food-preservation method that people can easily do at home.” — Sarah Walsh, of her cocktail-focused Shrubdown event

[MUSIC]

time that I say a pop-culture 23 “Every reference or name from pop culture, you have to drink.” — Nashville rapper Chancellor Warhol on a drinking game that underscores his tendency to name-drop

[SCREEN]

story, however sweet, feels 32 “The secondary to the endlessly unfolding visual tricks and fantastical sets.” — Al Hoff on Michel Gondry’s new film Mood Indigo

[ARTS]

35

“Clubs make people feel like they are going out for the night instead of standing in the back of a dingy bar.” — Molly Sharrow on Pittsburgh’s evolving comedy scene

[LAST PAGE]

55

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, DANA MCHENRY, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

19

{ART}

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

06

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

“We have to overcome the stigma that comes with our history.” — Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board CEO Stefani Pashman on the future of Pittsburgh manufacturing

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 STUFF WE LIKE 52 N E W S

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

38 SPECIAL

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 23 Don’t miss a night of explosive Southern Rock sounds!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“IT’S NOT BEING ENFORCED TO THE EXTENT IT SHOULD BE.” blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free.

POINT

OF LAW

Do ‘safe passing’ regulations really make it safer for cyclists if they’re not enforced? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Actually, so are I all the others.

T ISN’T OFTEN that lawmakers spend

years shepherding legislation they know will likely not be enforced. Yet when it came to state Rep. Ron Miller’s “Safe Passing” bicycle bill — a law designed to give cyclists a buffer from drivers — that’s exactly what he foresaw. “From day one, we suspected it would be very hard to write citations, because it’s a judgment call” for law enforcement, says Miller, a York Republican. Overwhelmingly passed by the legislature and signed by Gov. Tom Corbett in February 2012, the law was celebrated as a win by many bike advocates, who have successfully lobbied 25 state governments nationwide to pass similar measures. “The state of Pennsylvania took a huge stride toward improving our Bike Friendly State standing,” declared local advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh the day after Corbett signed the legislation. The law requires cars to allow 4 feet of space when overtaking bicycles, and to pass at a “careful and prudent reduced speed.” Drivers are barred from the right or left “hook,” a maneuver that cuts off bikers by turning in front of them. And bikers must “use reasonable efforts so as not to impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic.” Violating the law is a summary offense — in this case, a $25 fine. But as in many states with safe-passing laws, enforcement in Pennsylvania has been spotty: Just 42 citations have been issued statewide since the law took effect 28 months ago, 12 of which were recorded

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Safe passage: Pennsylvania law mandates that drivers give cyclists a 4-foot buffer when passing.

in Allegheny County, according to a City Paper review of court data. And it’s not clear if the law is having a significant effect on the number of car-related bike crashes. “It’s not being enforced to the extent it should be,” Bike Pittsburgh executive director Scott Bricker says today. “After two years, you would hope that tool would be used more often.” So why have so many politicians and advocacy groups bothered to pass bike-safety laws that are often unenforced and, some

argue, unenforceable? After all, citing drivers would require officers to both witness an instance of closepassing and accurately eyeball the distance between biker and motorist. “It’s just like the cell-phone law” that bars texting and driving, explains Pittsburgh Police Cmdr. Eric Holmes, noting that it’s a tough violation for officers to witness. “They want to make sure the person they’re writing up has actually committed the violation. They don’t want to write tickets just CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

LECTURE: Memorable Places and Recent Changes in Pittsburgh In this visual feast, which includes more than 255 images, PHLF Executive Director, Louise Sturgess, shows memorable places in the Golden Triangle, and in areas north, east, and south of downtown, that have undergone recent changes as a result of restorations, adaptive-use projects, and new construction. The interactive presentation draws on participants’ memories and knowledge of Pittsburgh and reveals how historic preservation efforts have helped create a city of great beauty and character.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21 • 6:00 - 7:30 PM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

POINT OF LAW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

to write tickets.” But some advocates of the law say it’s largely about educating drivers and bikers of their responsibilities, and enshrining the idea that bikes have a right to space on the road cars shouldn’t violate — something that can help assign liability after a crash. These laws “should change the overall culture,” says Charles Brown, a senior researcher at the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University. Brown, who authored a study of safe-passing laws across the country, adds that such a shift “should lead to a decrease in the number of cyclists who are injured and killed on the roadways,” though nationally, he notes, “There has been little overall enforcement.”

Is it working? While there isn’t total agreement on how important enforcement is to the law’s success, there is consensus that the law should be evaluated based on whether it reduces the number of car-related bike crashes. “Without a doubt, you want to see those [numbers] go down,” Bike Pittsburgh’s Bricker says, adding that one of the biggest reasons people avoid biking is a fear of having to occupy the same space as cars. And while the law hasn’t been rigorously enforced, some contend that education alone could reduce crash rates.PennDOT, for instance, now includes references to the 4-foot buffer in its driver’s manual and test, according to PennDOT spokesperson Juliann Sheldon. And even though PennDOT has not created any signage alerting bikers or drivers to the new law, Edgar Snyder & Associates teamed up with Bike Pittsburgh on an ad campaign promoting it. In the two years since the law took effect, however, there have not been significant variations in the number of bikerelated crashes in Allegheny County or across the state, PennDOT data show. In fact, the number of crashes statewide increased to 1,390 in 2012 (the year the law took effect) from 1,324 the previous year. The number also increased in Allegheny County during that time — from 85 to 104 crashes, though that’s within what appears to be the normal five-year range (in 2013, the number slid down to 93). But data on “rear-end” collisions — the kind of crash experts say the law is likely to target — may tell a more encouraging story. Statewide, rear-end collisions have been trending downward since 2009, with the largest decreases after the safe-passing law took effect — from a five-year high of 106 in

2010 to 65 in 2013. And while the overall number of crashes (the vast majority involved cars) did not decline, “there’s probably some truth” that the law is having an effect, says Brown, the researcher who has studied safepassing laws. Still, it’s nearly impossible to know whether the rate of crashes is changing. Since there isn’t precise data on how many people are riding and how frequently, a jump in the absolute number of crashes doesn’t necessarily say much about overall bike safety. Moreover, crashes are typically reported only if someone is transported to a hospital, or if a car needs to be towed. “It’s going to be very hard to have hard empirical data that’s going to prove” the law is working, says Miller, a cyclist and the bill’s prime sponsor. Still, he adds, “From my own observation, I have noticed people being much more careful while overtaking a bicyclist, so I do believe the law is having an impact.”

Undercover in Austin One police officer in Austin, Texas, is leading the charge on enforcing safe-passing laws. Armed with a pole that measures compliance with Austin’s 3-foot passing law, officer Rheannon Cunningham devised an undercover sting operation, which resulted in a nearly 12-fold increase in citations — and calls from departments around the country interested in replicating her efforts. “The cyclists always felt like the police never did anything to enforce the laws [that] were there to protect them,” Cunningham explains. And if drivers “don’t feel like they’re going to get caught or stopped for something, they will push the envelope. They’ll blow it off.” Cunningham’s operation works like this: Two plainclothes police officers on unmarked bikes ride along a half-mile stretch of road that has no bike lane, but is close to popular bike routes. Whenever a car passes within three feet — something the officers are trained to judge using the pole — they would radio a marked patrol car ahead that would pull over the offending driver. (The undercover officers recorded the encounters on bikemounted cameras in case of challenge.) “I didn’t get the feeling that people did it on purpose,” says Cunningham, who participated as an undercover officer in the operation. “There’s just very poor judgment on how close they passed you.” Ironically, Cunningham says, it was

“FROM DAY ONE, WE SUSPECTED IT WOULD BE VERY HARD TO WRITE CITATIONS, BECAUSE IT’S A JUDGMENT CALL.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


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POINT OF LAW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

SEPTEMBER 5-21

SEPTEMBER 26- OCTOBER 12

OCTOBER 17-26

NOVEMBER 7-23

the cyclists caught behind the wheel who were most indignant. “Their argument was: ‘We’re cyclists, we know how close we passed you,’ when in fact they didn’t.” Fewer than 10 people were cited in Austin between 2009 and May 2013, when the sting operation started. At least 117 people have been pulled over since, Cunningham says, and 78 of them were let off with warnings to “reinforce our message of education over purely punitive enforcement.” Cited drivers were allowed to take a “defensive cycling” class to get the $175 ticket dismissed. “It’s really hard to know that the operation directly affected the outcome, but I know our collisions dropped and fatalities did not increase,” Cunningham notes. For his part, Pittsburgh’s Cmdr. Holmes says the Austin model “is something to be considered.” He is working on refreshing his officers on bike laws in advance of the construction of a protected bike lane Downtown on Penn Avenue. It is unclear what the wider police bureau’s position is on enforcement of bike laws. Holmes said he could not speak for the department outside his zone, and Pittsburgh police spokesperson Sonya Toler declined comment after being contacted multiple times. Eventually, though, the law may not be enforced by humans at all, predicts Anthony Rowe, an electrical and computer engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University. “The assumption going in is that they’re going to be mandating transponders in

DECEMBER 9-14

Life needs more drama. Ronald Allan-Lindblom, Artistic Director • Earl Hughes, Producing Director

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cars” that communicate with everything from traffic lights to other cars, says Rowe, who is part of CMU’s “Safe Cyclist” project. “If cars are going to have these types of radios on them […] they could actually communicate to and from bicycles as well.” Alerts could be built in that notify drivers if they are venturing into the 4-foot zone — in effect creating virtual bike lanes, Rowe says. And using software loaded onto a smartphones, bikers could be alerted to close-passing cars as well. Such technology, if widely adopted, “could be transformational for safety,” Rowe says. In the long run, enforcing safe-passing laws will likely become a matter of programming, Rowe says: “Once cars become autonomous” — capable of driving themselves under computer guidance — “there’s no reason why they won’t automatically avoid cyclists.” But in the short term, Rowe explains, the technology could generate data that shows where cars are most likely to pass within the 4-foot zone, giving police a leg up on targeted enforcement. And in the immediate future, League of American Bicyclists legal specialist Ken McLeod stresses that safepassing laws signify a willingness among governments to grab low-hanging legislative fruit, making room for larger initiatives down the road. “Making it clear that bicycles need and deserve space on the roadway [is] a recent phenomenon” McLeod says. “We’re just starting that journey.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

At The Riverplex

{BY MATT BORS}

SEPTEMBER 5, 6, & 7 Fri 4-6pm $5 admission, 6-8pm $5 admission w valid College ID Socks in the Frying Pan, POGEY, Moxie, Rice Bros & Clear Blue Sunday, Bastard Bearded Irishmen, Corned Beef and Curry, Red Hand Paddy, The Wild Geese and much more!

Live Irish Music! Scythian

The Screaming Orphans

PGHIRISHFEST.ORG 412-422-1113

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

IDIOTBOX


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FRIDAY AUGUST 22ND AT 5 PM MONDAY- LABOR DAY, SEPTEMBER 1ST AT NOON.

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WHAT COULD BE BETTER?

RSVP for this one, and limited space. $50 per person! Call Dave at 724-713-2093 or reserve a space online dave@keystonesojourns.com A liability waiver required, cash or check only.

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SPRING

SUMMER SERIE S

Research Study of

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GAS RELIEF New Braddock fueling station working to move customers toward biodiesel {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

presents

PofE T the

WEEK

Spock Spock, a young, spirited rabbit, is looking for a forever home. What Spock lacks in size, he makes up for in personality. He’s almost 2-yearsold but still has some serious energy. He would love a family that would give him lots of daily exercise, both physical and mental!

Call Animal Friends today!

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www.dayauto.com 12

YEARS INTO selling local kitchens’ used

cooking grease as fuel, Fossil Free Fuel, in Braddock, is adding a new component to its slick business model: operating a biodiesel filling station. Any diesel-powered vehicle — from passenger cars to big rigs — can pull into this unassuming lot at 107 Braddock Ave. and fill up from a 4,000-gallon tank of biodiesel or a 1,000-gallon tank of regular petroleum diesel that can be accessed 24 hours a day with a self-serve card issued by the company. “We have regular diesel to entice customers who may not be comfortable with using biodiesel right off the bat,” cofounder Dave Rosenstraus says. “Once they can see other similar vehicles running [on biodiesel], it will be a real-life testimonial for them to switch.” Biodiesel is a mix of regular diesel and plant-based oil, like corn, peanut or soybean. The oil goes through a chemical process to make it conducive to existing fuel systems in cars and trucks, meaning that a diesel vehicle needs no modification to use it. “There’s a benefit of collecting and recycling vegetable oil and reusing it as fuel,” Rosenstraus says. “You’re not drilling somewhere thousands of miles away and don’t have the political ramifications that come with tar and oil. In a more scientific sense, you got less emissions out of the tailpipe.” Fossil Free Fuel offers a blend that is anywhere from 50 to 99 percent plant-based oil in the summer and 20 percent in the winter. (Diesel fuels run the risk of thickening in colder temperatures.) The company keeps the price at the market rate for diesel — right now about $4 per gallon — and vehicle owners can expect the same mileage. The hope, Rosenstraus says, is to keep the biodiesel price the same as regular diesel to get more users to make the switch. In 2008, Pennsylvania passed a law requiring 2 percent of all diesel fuel to be plant-based oil. Locals can find 100 percent biodiesel at Baum Boulevard Automotive, in Oakland, for a higher price: about $6 per gallon; just down the street from there, GetGo sells the state-mandated 2 percent blend. According to the National Biodiesel Board, the most commonly offered blends range from 5 to 20 percent, well below the mix used by Fossil Free Fuel. Local construction and landscaping

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Modern oilman: Fossil Free Fuels co-founder Dave Rosenstraus helps provide drivers with biodiesel.

companies with multiple trucks and equipment as well as individual customers have been filling up since the station opened. The station has sold a couple hundred gallons of both regular and biodiesel so far. “The future [goal] is to bring the station to full capacity over the next few months and serve all the local businesses and area residents that have diesel-powered vehicles and equipment,” Rosenstraus says. “Once the station is up and running and costs are recouped, we will look into expanding our self-serve station model to other areas.” Rosenstraus says they chose Braddock because the borough’s mayor, John Fetterman, actively sought them out to start the business there. Over the past several years, the Mon Valley town has been working to rebuild businesses and population after a drastic decline following the steel industry’s collapse.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FOSSIL FREE FUELS, call 412-447-8488. “Dave and Fossil Free Fuel, they’re great; they’ve consistently worked hard since they set foot in town,” Fetterman says. “You can look at us in three ways,” Fossil Free’s chief operating officer Garrett Reeves says. “We provide [the fueling station] with diesel and biodiesel, we process and provide vegetable oil as a fuel, and we are a wasteservice provider.” As a “waste service,” Fossil Free Fuel buys used cooking grease from local kitchens to process and sell to customers with modified fuel systems that can run on straight vegetable oil. Their biggest suppliers include the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and local chef

Kevin Sousa’s former and current restaurants, including Salt of the Earth, Union Pig and Chicken, and Station Street. Sousa’s latest venture is building a new restaurant in Braddock called Superior Motors. “They operate like a really high-functioning business,” Sousa says. “They’re always on time. I always joke that they have a sixth sense to know when our oil barrels are full.” “A lot of our interests cross,” he adds. “They’re interested in community. They started off on a shoestring, like all of us. They’re crazy smart.” Rachel Filippini, executive director of the local advocacy organization Group Against Smog and Pollution (GASP), says Fossil Free’s work “is really the kind of innovation our region needs to tackle our air-pollution problem.” According to GASP, diesel’s black smoke and particulate matter causes asthma, chronic bronchitis, decreased lung function, heart attacks and strokes, among other health difficulties for vulnerable populations. According to the EPA, biodiesel is a renewable fuel source that reduces greenhouse gas emissions — like carbon monoxide and particulate matter — and weans the U.S. off of imported oil. Rosenstraus says his company keeps the price of biodiesel on par with the market rate of regular diesel, even if it means making less profit. “The main hope is that [biodiesel] becomes price competitive with diesel,” Rosenstraus says. “Despite the environmental intentions of businesses and individuals, everyone has a bottom line, and if biodiesel isn’t cost-effective, then it will not be used by the masses, just as [with] any other alternative-energy technology.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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[GREEN LIGHT]

ASHES TO ASHES New plan to deal with Little Blue isn’t much of an improvement {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} COAL IS IN the news, mostly in terms of

A Better Route for Managing

Overactive Bladder

Should Have Fewer Bathroom Stops If the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) – such as the frequent and sudden urge to urinate, followed by leakage – are interrupting your day, the SYNERGY study may be an option. It is a clinical research study evaluating an investigational combination of two drugs prescribed for OAB to see if, when taken together, they provide more relief than when taken on their own. There is no cost to you to participate. To learn more and to see if you may qualify, please contact: <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>>

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climate change, dirty air and jobs. But burning coal for electricity gives us something else, too. One notable example sits about 40 miles northwest of Pittsburgh: the Little Blue Run impoundment. This 1,700-acre “lake” on the West Virginia line, in Beaver County, contains four decades’ worth of toxic coal ash, held back by an earthen dam overlooking the Ohio River. Coal ash is the catch-all name for coal combustion residuals, what’s left over when we burn coal to spin power-plant turbines. In 2012, according to the American Coal Ash Association, the U.S. produced 110 million tons of the stuff — the nation’s second-largest waste stream after household garbage. And Little Blue holds more than its share: Out of some 600 such impoundments nationally, it’s the largest, and it’s still taking waste by pipeline from FirstEnergy Generation’s nearby Bruce Mansfield plant. Little Blue is also unlined. In 2012, after tests found groundwater contaminated with toxins like sulfates, magnesium and arsenic, the state’s Department of Environmental Protection ordered FirstEnergy to cease using the site by Dec. 31, 2016. To assure proper closure and water-monitoring, the state ordered FirstEnergy to post a bond of $169 million, the largest ever required of a waste facility in Pennsylvania. But all that coal ash will still have to go somewhere. In January 2013, the company announced a new plan: It would load its ash — up to 3.9 million tons of it annually — on barges bound for a disposal site in Fayette County, nearly 100 miles up the Ohio and Monongahela rivers. FirstEnergy has applied to DEP to get the ash reclassified for “beneficial use” and deemed suitable for reclamation (ironically) of a waste-coal pile at the Fayette site. The plan rankles activists like Lisa Graves-Marcucci. The Jefferson Hills resident is community-outreach coordinator for the Environmental Integrity Project, a national group joining with the local Citizens Coal Council and Little Blue Run Action Group to oppose the application. Citing FirstEnergy’s environmental violations at Little Blue, Graves-Marcucci says, “They want to use that exact same ash in a different way,” and in another unlined

site. “How do we prevent the next Little Blue from happening?” Critics also note that barge transport is risky — barges can sink. And they note that while FirstEnergy has announced where it will send its coal ash, it failed to specify that in its application. DEP won’t comment on the application because it’s still under technical review, says DEP spokesperson John Poister. And FirstEnergy holds that its disposal methods are responsible; company spokesperson Stephanie Walton notes that the DEP encourages using coal ash for mine reclamation. And she says the disposal site — Matt Canestrale Contracting Inc., in LaBelle, Pa. — isn’t named in the application because siting is handled under a separate permitting process. And yes, “beneficial use” of coal ash is a thing. Nationally, almost half of coal ash isn’t landfilled or impounded, but rather blended into products like concrete and wallboard, or used for purposes like structural fill. (Some of Bruce Mansfield’s ash ends up at the nearby National Gypsum Plant.) And though environmental groups call the practice dangerous, about 8 percent of coal ash is used in mining applications, including mine reclamation, whether as fill or to neutralize acid drainage. How can a substance containing toxic metals be beneficial? Good question: Federal law has long exempted coal ash from hazardous-waste laws, even though the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency acknowledges that the toxins in coal ash are “associated with cancer and various other serious health effects … and often migrate to drinking water sources.” Following the massive 2008 spill of 1 billion gallons of coal ash from a ruptured earthen impoundment in Tennessee, the EPA finally proposed classifying coal ash in impoundments and landfills as hazardous; the more stringent of two regulatory options now under agency review would phase out surface impoundments like Little Blue entirely. A ruling is expected this year — but while reclassifying coal ash as hazardous might bring it under tighter scrutiny for transport by barge, the proposed regs still exempt most “beneficial uses,” and they don’t address minefilling, either. In any case, as long as we’re still burning coal, the ash will be with us, too.

“THEY WANT TO USE THAT EXACT SAME ASH IN A DIFFERENT WAY.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


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GRILLED ZUCCHINI AND SUMMER SQUASH WERE TISSUE-THIN

DOWNTOWN BUZZ {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} The Duquesne Club is now accepting worker bees. At least those willing to fly miles around the city, searching for nectar. On a roof six stories above the sumptuous trappings of its dining and recreation rooms, the Downtown invite-only social club is home to an apiary of roughly 75,000 bees, capable of pumping out many pounds of honey each season. “Every day is a new adventure,” says assistant pastry chef Sara Milarski, who explains that not long after launching the apiary last July, one of the hives overpopulated its space, leading to a swarm. “That whole front was just covered with bees,” Milarski says, gesturing toward one of the hives, just a few feet high. “When they swarm, [the queen] flies off with them. The hive that’s left behind has to start from scratch.” Milarski and executive chef Keith Coughenour trained with Burgh Bees and at Penn State to learn how to manage the urban apiary — and wound up taking advantage of the swarm to start a new hive. “We were talking about going to four hives eventually, but not this fast,” Milarski says. The duo put together an assortment of honey-infused dishes at an Aug. 12 media event, but “Our goal is really to jar and to sell honey,” Coughenour says. And while the chefs are reserving about 30 pounds of honey for the bees this winter, the remainder, says Coughenour, is for members only. AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FEED

Celebrate the e tomato — and itss frequentt buddy, garlic — at the e 10th annual uall

Red, Ripe pe oas a ted and Roasted festival, held on the front lawn of Phipps Conservatory, in Schenley Park. Cooking demos, tastings, farmers market and produce contests. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 24. Free

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ITALIAN REVISITED {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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N A CITY that loves Italian food, the

opening of another traditional Italian restaurant is hardly surprising — except when it happens on Butler Street, Pittsburgh’s frontier of the hip and new. San Lorenzo Ristorante occupies a space that helped pioneer the new Lawrenceville by housing a cafe that opened more than a decade ago. The bones of the old building still shine through, effectively framing the muted, tasteful decor of its newest occupant. On a summer evening not far from the solstice, old prism-glass transoms threw evening light deep into the narrow dining room, and the ambience was a peculiarly comfortable mix of formal and homey. Similarly, the menu straddled traditional and updated approaches to Italian food. While most dishes were familiar from fustier establishments, most also evinced reconsideration and, occasionally, re-invention in the kitchen. Perhaps the most creative preparation started from the simplest. A classic Caprese salad consists of just three ingredients —

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Fede gnocchi with slow-braised rabbit ragu and pickled cherries

tomato, mozzarella and basil — their flavors enhanced by a couple elemental seasonings, olive oil and salt. When tomatoes are at their summertime peak, this dish is so nearly perfect it needs no embellishment. But San Lorenzo nevertheless upped the ante by using three kinds of heirloom

SAN LORENZO RISTORANTE 4407 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-235-7696 HOURS: Dinner Tue.-Sat. 5-9 p.m.; lunch Sat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; brunch Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers and salads $8-13; pasta $16-20; entrees $20-29 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED tomato (red, green and yellow) plus balsamic vinegar, enormous capers and peaches poached in bourbon and white wine. Our verdict: We appreciate the concept behind these embellishments, but they didn’t make a better Caprese salad. The distinct textures and flavors of the differ-

ent tomatoes were interesting but unnecessary; likewise the dressing-like effects of the capers and balsamic vinegar, balanced as they were. The peaches seemed intended to add another note of summer sweetness, but were too firm, more like apples, and never quite melded with the salad’s other components. On the other hand, San Lorenzo’s upgrade of greens and beans was a resounding success. Escarole is traditional in this dish, but the combination of this tender green with hearty kale, faintly bitter rapini and juicy endive added taste and textural dimension. Warm white beans were earthy and firm, and grated Parmigiano melted gently into the savory broth, rendering it slightly and delectably creamy. This dish was the perfect accompaniment to the crusty, satisfyingly chewy, warm-from-theoven bread. (The apricot preserves, served with the bread basket, were a sweet and surprising alternative.) The meatballs had a good crust, and we liked that they were dabbed with sauce


rather than bathing in it. But their straightforwardly meaty flavor was more like hamburger than herbal Italian meatballs. If sauce is to be secondary, then the meatballs need to be top-notch. The menu offers gnocchi in two forms, both by Fede Pasta: standard dumplings with arugula and mushrooms, and ricotta gnocchi in slow-braised rabbit ragu finished with pickled cherries. We tried the latter and it was a great success. The gnocchi were not the plump, tender ones we associate with ricotta dough, but in the rich ragu, this hardly mattered. The rabbit was finely shredded, moist and just gamey enough to add real interest to the simple, brothy sauce. The cherries, their sweetness muted by pickling, added subtle contrast, not fruit bombs, to each bite.

Chef and owner David Ariondo

Chicken Milanese is often not much more than a chicken schnitzel, but San Lorenzo’s version goes light on the breading and heavy on the flavor, using a mild, piccata-like pan sauce and melted cheese to keep things interesting. The bed of leek risotto was underseasoned but creamy and tender-firm. Grilled zucchini and summer squash, that perfect July combo, were tissue-thin, yet successfully charred and smoky; it must take complete focus to cook them so successfully. Traditional Italian cuisine is many things, but spicy is usually not one of them. The kitchen took issue with this in its rigatoni with basil and jalapeño pesto, our final demonstration of San Lorenzo’s self-issued creative license with classic Italian recipes. The pesto was rustic, with coarse-chopped basil in plenty of (some might say too much) olive oil; slender crescents of sliced jalapeno were not so numerous as to directly flavor every bite, but indirectly, they infused the entire dish with their piquancy. San Lorenzo’s dining room evokes the Italian-American restaurants of Lawrenceville’s previous generation, but its kitchen pushes the boundaries of traditional Italian cooking. It does so, not by overhauling entire recipes, but by adding ingredients that transform a dish in subtle, sometimes surprising, usually successful ways.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

LEAVING THE BUSH LEAGUES

Getting the lowdown on Shrubdown, a celebration of a do-it-yourself cocktail trend

“THE CONFIDENCE THAT COMES FROM MAKING THINGS YOURSELF IS REALLY EMPOWERING.”

INFO@ PGHC ITYPAP ER.CO M

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I first wrote about shrubs, the colonial-era method of preserving fruits and vegetables as drinking vinegars, two years ago. The idea of drinking vinegar in a cocktail or soda sounded a little bit absurd at first — it seemed like a neo-hippie fashion — but shrubs are a delightful way to preserve the season. And it’s a trend that seems to have some legs. Sarah Walsh, owner of Caffe d’Amore Catering in the Pittsburgh Public Market, agrees. She became a fan of the drink when her friend Shauna Frantz showed her how easy it was to make a shrub. “The confidence that comes from making things yourself is really empowering,” she says. From there, Walsh moved on to experimenting with different fruits, ratios and booze combinations. Walsh is currently experimenting with making her own vinegars. Over the course of her studies, she says, “I started to have a lot of conversations with other people who were really interesting in making and using shrubs.” So she decided to organize a “Shrubdown” which will take place Sun., Aug. 24, at Wigle Whiskey. Bartenders and shrub enthusiasts from Butterjoint, The Livermore, 1947 Tavern, Blackberry Meadows Farm and Wild Purveyors will prepare shrub sodas and cocktails to kickstart an autumn of shrubmaking. “I want to promote this as a food-preservation method that people can easily do at home,” Walsh says. Walsh wants people to know that food preservation need not be a dowdy, dull thing to do. “It can be about fun, conversations and community. Let’s carve out some public space for that.” Of course, it helps that one of the best ways to use a shrub is to make a cocktail — and cocktails certainly have a way of making things more enjoyable. Still, at least for Walsh, it’s really about what you and your friends are bringing to the table. “I just took a personality test and it said my sin is gluttony of fun,” she says. “That really encapsulates it.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-9407777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE

The Pub Chip Shop {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellowfin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE

BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfast-andlunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch:

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sienna Sulla Piazza GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-can-eat restaurant. Servers pull barbequed meats right off the rotisserie grill and present them at your table, ready to carve off as much freshly cooked meat as you like. There are hot and cold buffets as well,

but savvy diners load up on the juicy meats. KE IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-and-true breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-6659000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — CONTINUES ON PG. 22


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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www.noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky atmosphere, Noodlehead offers an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few “snacks,” among them fried chicken and steamed buns with pork belly. The freshly prepared dishes are garnished with fresh herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF

(plus a few meat options) can be combined with interesting sauces, starches and vegetables to create a custom dinner, whether your tastes run to truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-281-6888. This fine-dining spot brings an elegantly casual, European vibe to the renovated Market Square, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE

TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east THE PINES TAVERN. of town may not be www. per pa 5018 Bakerstown where one would pghcitym .co Road, Gibsonia. expect to find refined 724-625-3252. A Cajun and Creole cuisine, longtime commitment but that’s exactly what this to seasonal and locally sourced clubhouse restaurant offers. The food (including on-site gardens menu offers Louisiana bayou and beehives) spans the menu classics such as shrimp, grits, here. The restaurant’s casual gumbo and blackened fish in elegance is suitable for drinks an authentic and well-prepared with friends or a celebration manner. In a nod to Pittsburgh, meal. And the fare ranges from steaks and Italian pasta dishes pub grub, like burgers and are also offered. LE meatloaf, to complex entrée plates, complete with wine and TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. 4300 beer suggestions. KE Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-4029522. A repurposed, elegant 19thTHE PUB CHIP SHOP. 1830 E. century bank offers craft cocktails Carson St., South Side. 412-381and inventive small plates, focused 2447. This storefront venue offers on organic, sustainable, fresh British-style quick fare, from fish and local cuisine. The bar food is and chips and meat pies, to doner mainly finger foods and/or plates kebabs and pasties. Pastry pies seemingly intended for sharing. include traditional (meat, Stilton) Besides fancified bar snacks such but also more modern fillings like as potato chips, deviled eggs chicken curry and vegan vindaloo. and popcorn, there are oysters, Beer-battered haddock pairs well burgers and even desserts. KE with housemade sauces and thick fresh-cut fries. JF YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 591-5688. This suburban eatery Washington Pike, Bridgeville. offers honest, straightforward 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers Japanese cooking without a modern yet comfortable hibachi theatrics or other culinary take on seafood, offering influences. Besides the wide sushi distinctive appetizers and a few selection and tempura offerings, signature entrées. There is also a try squid salad or entrees build-your-own entrée option, in incorporating udon, Japan’s which a dozen fish and shellfish buckwheat noodles. KF

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Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11pm


LOCAL

“WARHOL, TO ME, WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF MY DEVELOPMENT.”

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

RAISING CASH FOR KARL For decades now, Karl Hendricks has been known for singing frankly about love and loss, without holding anything back. But when the indie rocker’s guitar is put away and the roar of the power chords fades, Hendricks comes across as a rather private, mild-mannered shopkeeper, the owner of Bloomfield’s Sound Cat Records. So when Hendricks was diagnosed with oral cancer earlier this year, it was not something that was going to be publicized in the store. Sound Cat remains open for business, but Hendricks continues to recover at home. He racked up medical bills due to the illness, and several friends decided to help. Jon Solomon, who has released albums by the Karl Hendricks Trio on his Comedy Minus One label, launched a donation page on the website GiveForward.com. At press time, the page had raised just over $34,000 — 85 percent of its $40,000 goal. (It can be found at http://tinyurl.com/helpkarlh and will be active through Oct. 2.) Dan Allen, a longtime friend and Pittsburgh music-scene enthusiast, has helped organize a local benefit concert Fri., Aug. 22, at Brillobox. Performers include national acts Tim Midyett and Andy Cohen (of Comedy Mine One labelmates Bottomless Pit) and Dama/Libra (which includes Joel R.L. Phelps), along with locals The Gotobeds, Carousel and Line Forms. The latter two bands feature Karl Hendricks Trio members Jake Leger and Corey Layman, respectively. And on Sat., Sept. 27, Sound Cat employees Jason Baldinger and “Red Bob” Junkunz will present a literary benefit at ModernFormations at which Hendricks’ short-story chapbook Stan Getz Isn’t Coming Back will be available. Musical benefits are also being held in Columbus (Aug. 23) and Boston (Oct. 3). Details for all can be found on the GiveForward page. Allen, who has been friends with Hendricks for more than 20 years, is encouraged by the support. “It’s just amazing to see the amount of folks who have turned out. A lot of people care about the guy,” he says. “And I’m incredibly grateful to everyone taking part in the Brillobox show. Everybody involved with it got back to me within a week.”

AFTER

“A LOT OF PEOPLE CARE ABOUT THE GUY.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KARL HENDRICKS BENEFIT SHOW featuring TIM MIDYETT AND ANDY COHEN OF BOTTOMLESS PIT, DAMA/ LIBRA, THE GOTOBEDS, CAROUSEL, LINE FORMS. 8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net N E W S

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HANCELLOR WARHOL (real name: Antonio Boleyjack) has become one of the more notable hip-hop exports in a town not necessarily known for hip hop: Nashville. The rapper and visual artist took his stage name based on his affinity for Andy Warhol; on Sat., Aug. 23, he plays The Andy Warhol Museum, in his first trip to his namesake’s institution on the North Side. He spoke with CP about his music, art and inspiration.

ARE YOU ORIGINALLY FROM NASHVILLE? No, I’m originally from Mars; I landed in 1983 … OH, GREAT! Yeah, this is getting really interesting, right? No, I was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. It’s not the biggest hip-hop scene, but it’s pretty fun. THAT’S SOMETHING I WAS GOING TO ASK ABOUT: IS THERE A BUDDING SCENE THERE? IS THERE A HISTORY TO HIP HOP THERE? IT’S OBVIOUSLY A CITY BETTER KNOWN FOR COUNTRY, AND EVEN ROCK. I think it’s evolved a lot. I’ve always been an outsider, because I grew up in a community of skateboarders, grew up on grunge and punk music, backpack rap. My upbringing is a little different from the normal hip-hop [background]. You incorporate that with a lot of the indie bands that came up on the scene before Paramore got big, Kings of Leon, bands like that — I incorporate more of that side of it than a mainstream hip-hop side of it. I definitely see myself as one of the torchbearers of hip hop here.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSHUA BLACK WILKINS}

Rap collage artist: Chancellor Warhol

A LOT OF RAPPERS MOVE TO ATLANTA OR NEW YORK OR WHEREVER — WHY STICK AROUND NASHVILLE? ARE YOU COMFORTABLE THERE? No, I’m never comfortable. I’m always traveling. I’m actually moving to L.A. in Novem-

CHANCELLOR WARHOL WITH DJ SOY SOS

8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

ber for an extended amount of time. Most of my dealings are in L.A. and New York. WHY DID YOU TAKE THE NAME CHANCELLOR WARHOL? It’s crazy that I’m even playing there; it’s like playing the biggest venue in the world to me. Like performing at Madison Square. Warhol, to me, was an integral part of my development. I went to school for design, and when you think of art or pop culture, he’s synonymous with that. So automatically, I drew toward that as a name for my music. All the culture that he left behind CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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can still be seen today, touched by people who weren’t even born during his era.

HALF-PROMISES {BY IAN THOMAS}

THERE’S A COHESIVE QUALITY TO YOUR MUSIC; DO YOU HAVE A BIG HAND IN WHAT YOUR PRODUCERS ARE DOING IN TERMS OF BEATS? I have a huge, huge play in my sound, because at the end of the day, it’s a reflection of me. On this new album, I worked a lot with Josh Crosby; his producer name is My Kid Brother. Very forward-looking producer. We both set out to make this great project about the culture of Paris, painting this picture of somebody lost in Paris. I also work with the Boy Genius guys; we came up together. Washed Out’s Paracosm

EXPAND A LITTLE ON THE NEW ALBUM, PARIS IS BURNING. WHAT INSPIRED THE TITLE AND THE IDEA? IS IT ALL ONE THEME? The title came about when I was talking with a friend in town, and we were talking about the culture of Paris — the art, decadence, how much people were all about Paris at the time. I just wanted to paint my own picture of how I perceived Paris. I watched Midnight in Paris and thought it might be interesting to paint a picture of this guy, maybe not of this Earth, kind of lost in Paris. And in the end, finding an understanding of it all. I wanted to paint good visuals, too; in turn, we built a whole visual-art play around the record. We did a showing at the planetarium here in town, for the listening party, and I did a live performance with visual art at [the arts center] Oz Nashville. ON ONE TRACK ON THE NEW ALBUM, “KENNEDY’S,” YOU’RE SORT OF PUTTING TOGETHER A COLLAGE OF WORDS, AND MAKING LOTS OF REFERENCES AND NAME-DROPPING, WHICH IS VERY WARHOLIAN. DO YOU TRY TO EMPLOY DEVICES FROM DIFFERENT ART FORMS? There’s a rumor that there’s a Chancellor Warhol drinking game: Every time that I say a pop-culture reference or name from pop culture, you have to drink. I thought that was pretty cool. But yeah — I always look at the whole of everything I do. I always look at the beginning and the ending, making it a complete story — something that, 10 years from now, 20 years from now, can still stand alone as a story. Also, growing up, being engulfed in pop culture, being drawn toward culture in general, I always try to incorporate that into my rhymes. At the end of the day, we’re artists, we are a reflection of the culture we see. With my words, I like to reflect my take on that culture, and turn that into my story. AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

A heady take on Paracosm, the second full-length from Ernest Greene, who performs as Washed Out, might take into consideration the titles of the opening and closing tracks: “Entrance” and “All Over Now,” respectively. As bookends to the dreamy, meandering album, these titles might speak to the finite nature of experience, to the frailty of the moment, arriving as quickly as it dissipates. It’s difficult and maybe pointless to engage with Paracosm on such a thoughtful level, though. The album speaks from and to a more visceral place. Paracosm is anchored in feeling and to try to frame something so reflexive in intellectual terms is to court cynicism. It speaks volumes that it’s so hard to discern Greene’s lyrics as anything but breathy halfpromises over the swirling synth, upbeat percussion, and even ambient party chatter (as on the uplifting “Don’t Give Up”) that he places at the forefront of the mix. Really, Greene’s authorial presence is never more than a fleeting silhouette. Paracosm hovers and undulates at the apex of satisfaction and fullness. It does so with precious little buildup to the heights that it reaches and is equally short on anything in the way of descent from those heights. Rather, it brings into sharper focus the elusive moment of ecstasy and transcendence and prolongs it to the length of an album. While this naturalistic method might be short on context, conflict and resolution, it underscores the notion that the world is rife with moments like these — no orchestration required and freely available to anyone who chooses to see them.

GREENE’S AUTHORIAL PRESENCE IS NEVER MORE THAN A FLEETING SILHOUETTE.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WASHED OUT with SMALL BLACK. 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 27. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $17-20. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

GIRL SCOUT GIRL SCOUT (SELF-RELEASED)

A nice six-song debut EP from the local grungy indie band. This one’s a ride through the ’90s, from Dinosaur Jr.-style guitar wailing (and some J. Mascis-style vocals) to one straight-up punk tune and another slow-burning acoustic-guitar-based number. In the context of the rest of the EP, the punk song (“Nosebleed”) feels a little out-of-place, but the rest gels well, and is a smooth, easy listen. “Where We Slide Down,” with its fuzzy, classic indie-rock guitar tone and sly Nirvana nods, is the breakout hit here. Some of the themes — like on the who’sthe-cool-one-now? tune “Good Hustle, Hotpants” — seem a little immature, and it’s unclear at times how selfconscious that aspect is, but given the general feel, we can assume it’s intentional. Either way, it’s a great EP with quality songwriting.

JACKIE MCDOWELL BAPTISIA (HAIRY SPIDER LEGS)

A devotional vibe pervades this six-track EP from Pittsburgh’s McDowell, issued by Chicago label Hairy Spider Legs. Ambient noise and drones underlie about half of the tracks, which are more chant than anything; McDowell’s voice melds with a chord organ, creating a sound somewhere between old-style Americana and dark Celtic folk. Other tracks are more “traditional,” in the sense of being guitar-based, though no less eerie and moving. Fans of the Joanna Newsom school of new folk, or of the old outsider folks of the likes of Karen Dalton, will find something to like in McDowell’s record. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS

F rom to Broadwaoyod! Hollyw

WE KNOW

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

Experience a coast to coast musical journey with Donnie Rankin at the Wurlitzer theatre organ. Saturday, September 6 at 2 Saturday 2PM PM at

Keystone Oaks Auditorium in Dormont

Tickets

OFFTO!COURTESY

Order on-line: www.showclix.com/event/donnierankin $15 in advance, $20 at the door Students & Kids free

S} {PHO RI COAT OF DIMIT

It’s the end of August and you kids are going back to school. Before that big first day, some go back-to-school shopping, some go on last-minute vacations and others go to punk fests. Skull Fest is back again for the latter, and brings you four days of circle pits, moshing and general throwing-down. In its sixth year, the fest will take over Pittsburgh venues like Mr. Small’s, Belvedere’s and The Mr. Roboto Project, among others, with over 40 bands, including Infest, Gay Mayor and Krang. Full-festival passes are $60. The festival kicks off tonight at Mr. Roboto Project with Krang, Process, Shadows and Silence. Zach Brendza 6 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. All ages. Full schedule at www.skullfestpgh.com

[PUNK] + SAT., AUG. 23

412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

www.theatreorgans.com/PATOS

Durham, N.C.’s Bombadil is on the road touring behind the re-release of its 2009 album, Tarpits and Canyonlands. After the album’s release, the folk-pop band came to a standstill when bassist Daniel Michalak was diagnosed with neural tension. The condition caused pain to the point where he couldn’t brush his teeth, let alone play his instrument. After years of treatments, different doctors and searching for a cure, Michalak and Bombadil are back in the saddle. The band plays tonight at Mr. Small’s with Kishi Bashi and HEIDEMANN. ZB 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $13. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The Soil and the Sun’s music has an ultimately calming vibe — not unlike the members of the band themselves, who travel the country in a bus with their kids, rock-hippie style, and keep a mellow vibe. The band’s brand-new Meridian full-length was recorded

+

SOUTH SIDE

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

[FOLK POP] + MON., AUG. 25

[INDIE] + SUN., AUG. 24

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We buy all day-every day LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

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BAND INSTRUMENTS

Bombadil

Keith Morris knows a bit about punk: In the ’80s, he fronted Black Flag and Circle Jerks. In 2009, Morris started punk supergroup OFF!, the band that sends you back to punk’s heyday. On top of that, drummer Dale Crover of The Melvins is touring with OFF! this summer as a fill-in for regular drummer Mario Rubalcaba (of Rocket From the Crypt fame). The band’s latest album, Wasted Years, released in April, was recorded in its practice space with little preparation, giving it an old-school feel. The band plays tonight at Altar Bar with Bad Antics and GAY KISS. ZB 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-18. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

with big-time producer Rick Fritz, known for his engineering work on latter-day Beach Boys and Peter Cetera records; Fritz helped the six-piece embody its spirit and ethic on a beautiful sonic ride. The band pulls its caravan into the Smiling Moose tonight. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TODD COOPER}

[PUNK] + THU., AUG. 21

4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

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Ages 21+

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

a concoction of deep soul, rare funk, and afro-disco

indie rap pioneer & acclaimed platinum producer

Ages 21+

Ages 21+

FREE SHOW! ”Without Tony Allen, there would be no afrobeat” - Fela Kuti

veteran Ohio jam-rockers / Pgh’s premier Dead tribute

Ages 21+

Ages 21+

ROCK/POP THU 21 ALTAR BAR. Skid Row, Patron Saint, Silk9. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Eric Sommer. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Air Traffic Controller. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Don Strange & The Doosh Bears, Los Monster Trucks. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Charm & Chain, Faithful Sinners. South Side. 412-431-5282. RIVERS CASINO. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. North Side. 412-231-7777. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Joy Ike. Oakland. 412-621-6566. SMILING MOOSE. Swear & Shake Wild Ones. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe, Neon Swing Experience, Buffalo, Buffalo, Buffalo. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. SMILING MOOSE. Promethean Horde, Grizzly Amputation, Servants of The Mist. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. CLAIR PARK. Birds of Chicago. Greensburg. STATION SQUARE. Gathering Field, Mercury. Station Square. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Sputzy. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Grendel, Ludovico Technique, Definitive Strike Grendel, Ludovico Technique, Sensuous Enemy, Definitive Strike. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 23 31ST STREET PUB. Dead River, Lex Loser, Shamu in Exile. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. OFF! Bad Antics, Gay Kiss. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CLUB CAFE. 3 Dudes Chillin’, Doug Blevins, Chris Sabatino,

MP 3 MONDAY

FRI 22

Sep 24 Sep 30 Oct 04 Oct 08 Oct 10 Oct 16 Oct 18 Oct 21

BLUEGRASS NEW ORLEANS SUSPECTS MARC BROUSSARD with MINGO FISHTRAP LITTLE PEOPLE THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS BLACK 47 FAREWELL TOUR CABINET TODD SNIDER TERRAPIN FLYER

f/ MELVIN SEALS (of JERRY GARCIA BAND)

Oct 23 JOHN HODGMAN Oct 29 ADRIAN BELEW

(of KING CRIMSON, FRANK ZAPPA)

POWER TRIO

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Sat Aug 23

SWEET EARTH Thr Aug 28

GLOSTIK WILLY Thr Sep 4

THE N TH POWER Sat Sep 6

THE HAWKEYES Fri Sep 12

MUSTERED COURAGE Sat Sep 13

RANDALL BAUMANN’S THUNDERBIRD RAMBLE Fri Sep 19

GEORGE PORTER JR.

AND RUNNIN’ PARDNERS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

31ST STREET PUB. Corners of Sanctuary, Fubar, Radioactive. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Bayardstown Happy Hour: Pairdown, Arlo Aldo. Strip District. 412-251-6058. CLUB CAFE. Red Room Effect, The Next Month (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Twin Brother, Old Earth, Jupiter Vinyl, The Neffs. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOD TIME BAR. Northbound. Millvale. 412-821-9968. HAMBONE’S. Ray Lanich Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone, Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cody Wood & The Lumber Company, Unknown String Band Working Breed. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KENDREW’S. Gone South. 724-375-5959. MR. SMALLS THEATER. J Roddy Walston & the Business, Nox Boys. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PARK HOUSE. Still Not Sober. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Jeff Jimerson & Airborne. Greensburg. 724-836-6060. REX THEATER. The Machine (Pink Floyd). South Side. 412-381-6811.

PAINT31 {PHOTO COURTESY OF ELENA DEE PHOTOGRAPHY}

Sep 23 GREENSKY

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Joshua Marshall (Early) There You Are (Late). CD release show. South Side. 412-431-4950. COACH’S BOTTLESHOP AND GRILLE. Brad Wagner & the Barflys. Dormont. 412-207-9397. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Leftover Blue. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. 5 Seconds of Summer. 724-947-7400. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Creature Comfort, Josie McQueen, I Am A Sea Creature. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GATORS GRILLE. Antz Marching. Glenshaw. 412-767-4110. HAMBONE’S. Che Zuro. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Neffs Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. King’s Ransom. 724-265-9950. MEADOWS CASINO. 38 Special. Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. Code Whiskey. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Paint31; stream or download “Lostenberry Street” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


MR. SMALLS THEATER. Infest, Dream Death, FYPM, Occultist, Killer of Sheep. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NIED’S HOTEL. Nied’s Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Davis Rogan. Strip District. 412-566-1000. THE R BAR. Chrome Moses. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Twisted Fate. Greensburg. 724-836-6060. SMILING MOOSE. SolarBurn, Let The River Swell, Sacred Cube, Silk9. South Side. 412-431-4668. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Chris Denim. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Sweet Earth, Kitschy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. House Shoes & DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 23

CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. Homewood. 412-657-2279. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. DJ Josey. Top 40 Dance Night. South Side. 412-431-5282. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. . w w w FIRST NIAGARA 412-481-7227. typaper ci h g p PAVILION. KISS, Def WINGHART’S .com Leppard, The Dead OAKLAND. Daisies. 724-947-7400. Steel City Saturdays. HOLLYWOOD THEATER. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. Silent Partner, the Good Guys 412-874-4582. Band, Time Tested, The Rockin Brits. Jam for Joey Benefit. SERENE CAFE. DJ White Lyon. Dormont. 412-344-1245. East Liberty. 412-657-2279. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Molly Alphabet, Machete Kizoumontao. CABARET AT THEATER Shadyside. 412-363-5845. SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ SMILING MOOSE. The Soil & Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. The Sun. South Side. 412-431-4668. 412-325-6769. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Kishi Downtown. 412-465-0290. Bashi, HEIDEMANN. Millvale. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. 866-468-3401. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day REX THEATER. Orgone. chill. House music. aDesusParty. South Side. 412-381-6811. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. SMILING MOOSE. This Is All Now, RadioDriveBy. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space ExANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. change Series w/ Paul Thompson. Chancellor Warhol, DJ Soy Sos. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. North Side. 412-237-8300.

SUN 24

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 24

WED 27

MON 25

TUE 26

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 23

WED 27

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. USCO, Night Vapor, Cyrus Gold, Mortis. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Washed Out, Small Black. Millvale. 866-468-3401. STAGE AE. Slightly Stoopid, Zach Deputy. North Side. 412-229-5483.

DJS THU 21 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. Gangsta Shack Movements, DJ White Lyon. 412-657-2279. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 22 MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302.

SUN 24 BELVEDERE’S. DJ Abilities, Jake Spike, Simple Steven, Fortified Phonetx, Stillborn Identity, Cornelius The Third. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

BLUES FRI 22 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. HEY ANDY’S. The Satin Hearts. 724-258-4755. MOONDOG’S. Candye Kane. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

CIGARETTES

RumpShakers. Monroeville. 724-387-2444.

© SFNTC 3 2014

SUN 24 THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

WED 27 JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Tarentum. 724-226-3301.

JAZZ THU 21 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DOWNTOWN IRWIN. Irwin Art & Jazz Night. 724-863-342 x 3315. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844. PARKLET ON PENN AVE. Jeff’s Band. Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

FRI 22 ANDYS. Maria Becoates-Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Trio. Downtown. 412-325-6769. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Ken Karsh Quartet, James Street Swing All-Stars. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SOUTH PARK. Gloria Reuben & Caribbean Jazz Project. South Park.

SAT 23 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Swingsations. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Jevon Rushton. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. Carolyn Perteete, River City Brass Band. Monroeville Jazz Festival. River City Brass, Carolyn Perteete. Monroeville. 412-551-7315.

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

SUN 24 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 23

MON 25

BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bridgeville. ZANDERS SPORTS BAR & NIGHT CLUB. Ron & The

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio*

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

EVERY THURSDAY Now thru August 21!

*on your computer!

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS!

LAST CONCERT OF THE SEASON! TOMORROW,

AUGUST 21

KUNG FU RADIO

LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am

only on www.pghcitypaper.com

NOON TO 1PM

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR! FOR ALL THE DETAILS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

KATZ PLAZA. Dwayne Dolphin. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 27 ANDORA RESTAURANT FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo, Sam Brooks. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Spanky Wilson. Strip District. 412-642-2377. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. WALNUT GRILL, BRIDGEVILLE. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

ACOUSTIC THU 21 ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS. Arborea, Eric Carbonara, Raymond Morin. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0710. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. David Manchester. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

{FRI., OCT. 10}

Brandi Carlile Carnegie Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland {TUE., OCT. 21}

Skrillex Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

SAT 23 3RD STREET GALLERY. An Evening w/ Dave Pahanish. Carnegie. 412-596-5831. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 27 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Steve Pellegrino. North Side. 412-322-5058. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday and Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Friday

REGGAE

SUN 24 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Geese in the Bog. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

THU 21 DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

Insane Clown Posse Xtaza Nightclub, 1620 Smallman St., Strip District

CLUB CAFE. The Banned, Spencer Allan Patrick. South Side. 412-431-4950.

FRI 22

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{WED., OCT. 01}

FRI 22

WORLD

www. BOBFM969.com www.BOBFM969 .com www.QBURGH www .QBURGH.com .com

Skrillex {PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON NOCITO}

MELLON SQUARE

EARLY WARNINGS

TUE 26

SAT 23 THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. The Flow Band. Greensburg. 724-205-6402.

SUN 24 WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. The Flow Band. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

TUE 26 AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Truth & Rites. Oakland. 412-904-3400.

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

paper pghcitym .co

COUNTRY THU 21 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

FRI 22 THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Jamie Kent. Harmony. 570-294-6450.

SAT 23 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Lady Antebellum, Billy Currington, Joe Nichols. 724-947-7400. TAVERN IN THE WALL. The Mavens. Aspinwall. 412-414-1054.

TUE 26 PALACE THEATRE. Shoji Tabuchi. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

CLASSICAL THU 21 LILLY ABREU: FROM BACH TO GERSHWIN. Feat. members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia.

SAT 23 EAST WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND. Beulah Presbyterian Church. EDWARD PARKS. Benefits the Indiana Co. Young Musician’s Competition. Indiana Senior High School. 724-465-2787.

SUN 24 JENNIFER ZOELLNERMARSHALL, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 23 UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

WED 27 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


What to do August

IN PITTSBURGH

20 - 26

WEDNESDAY 20

Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM Highland Park. Free activities included with general admission. Through August 29.

2014 Pittsburgh Comedy Festival

Kids' Zoofari

Doyle

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

THURSDAY 21

Bricolage presents In The Raw (R)evolution BRICOLAGE Downtown. Tickets: bricolagepgh.org or 412-4710999. Through Aug. 30.

2014 P&G Gymnastics Championships

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Through Aug. 24.

Skid Row

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Lady Antebellum: Take Me Downtown Tour 2014 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests Joe Nichols & Billy Currington. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Shadyside ...The Art Fair on Walnut Street SATURDAY & SUNDAY WALNUT STREET

HENRY HEYMANN THEATER Oakland. Tickets: pittsburghcomedyfestival.org. Through Aug. 23.

FRIDAY 22

SOUND SERIES: Chancellor Warhol ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

Gathering Field / Mercury STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/summerjam. 6:30p.m. The Machine - Performs Pink Floyd REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. Comedian Ricky Reyes LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through Aug.23

SATURDAY 23

2014 Wine Festival SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT Seven Springs. 866-437-1300. Over 21 event. Tickets: 7springs.com. Through Aug. 24.

Animal Friends' Bark in the Dark HARTWOOD ACRES CONCERT AREA. For more info visit thinkingoutsidethecage.org. Gates open at 5p.m.

17th Annual Shadyside… The Art Fair on Walnut St. WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Free admission. For more info visit artfestival.com or call 561-746-6615. Through Aug. 24.

SUNDAY 24

The Soil & The Sun SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com Kiss / Def Leppard FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

MONDAY 25 Kishi Bashi

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Bombadil & HEIDEMANN. Tickets:866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 26 This Is All Now / RadioDriveBy

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412431-4668. With special guests Stay Seventeen & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Austin Mahone Live on Tour

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

MOST WANTED ITEMS Packages of: Pencils, Crayons, Markers, Pens, Erasers; Scissors, Pencil Holders, Binder Paper, Glue/Glue Sticks

DONATE SCHOOL SUPPLIES TO

HELP US... HELP OTHERS...

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

STOMP OUT

HUNGER

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

AND RECEIVE $10 OFF YOUR NEW BALANCE KIDS SHOE PURCHASE*

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333

*Offer valid on Regular Priced Merchandise at Waterfront and Wexford Locations Only. Cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Some vendor exclusions may apply.

JUST IN TIME FOR BACK TO SCHOOL! N E W S

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GIVE AND TAKE

THEY DANCE THE “BIGLEMOI,” DURING WHICH THEIR LEGS BECOME ELONGATED AND RUBBERY

{BY AL HOFF} In the future, humans live in a selfcontained space atop a cloud-shrouded mesa, a bland planned community where emotions are chemically suppressed and everything is orderly. Young people are assigned careers, and it’s Jonas’ privilege to be the “Receiver.” He will work with the reclusive “Giver” (Jeff Bridges), and through some unexplained mind-meld process become the repository of humankind’s suppressed history via transferred memories. Needless to say, once Jonas (Brenton Thwaites) gets a taste of real life — from fun stuff like sledding to troubling glimpses of war — fake life looks seriously messed up, and he conspired to restore the agency of humanity back to the people.

LOVE

WITH A CHANCE , OF CLOUDS

Transmission session: Jeff Bridges and Brenton Thwaites

Phillip Noyce’s adaptation of Lois Lowry’s dystopic young-adult novel begins with an interesting premise, but in the latter half, it trades its talky sci-fi-ish thoughtfulness for more typical Hollywood fare: a budding romance and an action-y escape. I could have used some more background — is this community all that’s left of mankind? Why is everybody white, when other races appear in the memory flashbacks? (Full disclosure: I have not read the book like apparently everybody under 30 did in school.) Thwaites embodies such a pleasant young man dutifully playing out an expected narrative, that I never got any sense of this risk, or larger consequences of his rebellion. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

You already know they like to move it, move it, but it’s a good bet there’s plenty more to learn about lemurs, which are among the planet’s endangered animals. The new nature doc

Island of Lemurs: Madagascar opens Fri., Aug. 22. In eye-popping 3-D in select locations.

{BY AL HOFF}

W

ITH Mood Indigo, French film-

maker Michel Gondry returns to the surreal and visually inventive after recent forays into the mainstream (The Green Hornet) and teen sliceof-afternoon (The We and the I). His latest is for fans of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Science of Sleep — particularly those who don’t require a lot of plot. Mood is a quirky, whimsical romantic comedy, in which the story, however sweet, feels secondary to the endlessly unfolding visual tricks and fantastical sets. (The film is based on Boris Vian’s 1947 novel Froth on the Daydream.) Colin (Romain Duris) is a wealthy Parisian who spends his days complimenting his valet/cook Nicholas (The Intouchables’ Omar Sy), keeping up with his flatmate (a tiny man in a mouse suit) and inventing such things as the “pianocktail” (an extra-ordinary instrument that mixes a cocktail inspired by the music played upon it). Colin’s friend Chick (Gad Elmaleh) invites him to a party, where he

Bubbly: Chloe (Audrey Tatou) and Colin (Romain Duris) take in the sights.

is entranced by Chloe (Audrey Tatou). They dance the “Biglemoi” — during which their legs become elongated and rubbery — and a whirlwind romance is born. But the bloom of love is imperiled by another, literal, bloom: A water lily has begun growing in Chloe’s lung.

MOOD INDIGO DIRECTED BY: Michel Gondry STARRING: Romain Duris, Audrey Tatou, Omar Sy Starts Fri., Aug. 22. Melwood In French, with subtitles

Viewers aren’t obligated to ferret out deeper themes beyond the love story; however oddball, Mood still offers the standard disbursement of joy, comfort, upheaval and pain. But several scenes and set-pieces explicitly comment on our desire — and frequent inability — to control life’s narrative. We’re introduced to the story via a factory-like room in which workers pound out words about our pro-

tagonists upon typewriters moving past on a conveyor belt — a modernized “exquisite corpse” exercise. Colin and Chloe’s planned nuptials suddenly depend on the outcome of a race with another couple, and one character’s schedule is kept on a Rubik’s cube-type puzzle. Chloe’s unexpected illness changes everything, and Colin tries everything he can to reverse it. Mood’s slim plot means viewers will need to be sustained by the film’s visuals, little jokes and loopy tweeness, all of which Gondry has upended a full bag of. There is stop-motion animation — a live eel “pours” out of a faucet. There are nods to Tati, and any surrealist of your choice — a bird runs the ice-skating rink. There’s a running gag about philosopher Jean-Sol Partre, whose 20-volume Encyclopedia of Nausea is “bound in nothingness leather.” And there’s the actual undeniable adorableness of Duris and Tatou. The forecast here is for “slight, but whimsical and charming,” and that could be a fair afternoon. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


“An INVENTIVE WHODUNIT With a PITCH-BLACK HEART.”

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

Rodrigo Perez, INDIEWIRE

NEW CALVARY. Brendan Gleeson stars in this Irish drama about a priest who faces tough choices after being threatened while hearing confession. Chris O’Dowd and Kelly Reilly also star; John Michael McDonagh directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 22. AMC Loews, Manor THE EXPENDABLES 3. Fast facts about Patrick Hughes’ actioner to help you decide whether this largely plotless he-man-and-weapons extravaganza is right for you: Stars Sylvester Stallone. Globe-hopping from Somalia to New Orleans to “Esmenistan” (film actually shot in Bulgaria). Sample dialogue: “We’re coming in hot”; “I’ll open up your meat shirt and show you your own heart”; “Benghazi”; “It’s time to mow the lawn.” The cat from Shrek plays a mercenary. Forty-two explosions, including a prison and the “Port of Mogadishu.” Terry Crewes in a string vest. (Al Hoff) IF I STAY. It might be my advanced age, but I would have much preferred hanging out with the lively, hip parents depicted in this film rather than the mopey teens all confused about life, love and stuff. But R.J. Cutler’s melodrama is adapted from Gayle Forman’s young-adult novel, in which a Portland teenager named Mia (Chloe Grace Moretz) struggles to find meaning in her increasingly messy life. She is by nature cautious and devoted to her cello, but meeting a boy — in a rock band! — complicates everything. Mia’s story unfolds in a nonlinear fashion, as she confronts the minor (parents are irksome) and the major (relationship trouble, which college to attend). Then, there’s the super-major issue: Is life even worth slogging through after a catastrophic family tragedy? It all plays out as expected — the dreamy boyfriend (Jamie

If I Stay Blackley), the puppy-dog romance, the not-verysurprising conclusion. Moretz effectively underplays material that veers toward cheesy, and Mireille Enos sparkles as her fierce and funny mom. Starts Fri., Aug. 22 (AH) THE NOVEMBER MAN. A former CIA agent living in Europe takes on one last mission. Roger Donaldson directs this spy thriller starring Pierce Brosnan and Olga Kurylenko. Starts Wed., Nov. 27. SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR. This sequel to 2005’s Sin City is adapted from four Frank Miller stories about variously broken men and women, lured to crime, gambling, madness and politics. Miller and Robert Rodriquez co-direct and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jes Jessica Alba, Mickey Rourke and Josh Brolin head an en ensemble cast. Starts Fri., Aug. 22

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 22

PITTSBURGH The Manor Theatre (412) 422-7729

proudly presents

WHEN THE GAM GAME STANDS TALL. Thomas Carter directs this bas based-on-real-events inspirational sports film about a Northern California high school football team tha that — spoiler alert — racked up a 151-game winning streak. Jim Caviezel stars as the coach. Starts Fri., A Aug. 22.

The Expendables 3

REPERTORY REPERT CINEMA IN THE PARK. All Is Lost, Wed., (Schen Aug. 20 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 23 (Riverview). Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2, Thu., (Brook Aug. 21 (Brookline), Fri., Aug. 22 (Arsenal), Sat.,Aug. 23 (Grandview) (G and Sun., Aug. 24 (Schenley). Planes, Plane Tue., Aug. 26 (West End) and Thu., Aug. 28 (Br (Brookline). Oblivion, Wed., Aug. 27 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.n www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUS HOUSE CINEMA. 12 O’Clock Boys (2013 doc a about a group of urban dirt-bike riders in W West Baltimore), 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. S Summer Camp Memories: Little Darlings (tw (two teen girls compete to lose their virginit virginity in this 1980 comedy), Aug. 2021. The Grea Great Outdoors (1988 John CandyAykroy vacation comedy), Aug. 20-21. Dan Aykroyd Meatballss (1979 Bill Murray comedy), 21 Wet Hot American Summer Aug. 21. (laughs and hook-ups at camp, in this c 2001 comedy), Aug. 21. Dirty Dancing (Catsk (Catskills, 1960s, time of your life, etc.), Aug. 21. Date Night Classics: Love Actu Actually (many Brits in love), Aug. 2226, and Aug. 28. Big (Tom Hanks is a giant kid), Aug. 22-26, and

Be immersed in a live laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! Featuring Laser Beastie Boys & Laser Zeppelin

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stand By Me

(1986) - 8/20 @ 7:30pm- Directed by Rob Reiner, based on a Stephen King short story.

Crippled Masters

(1979) - 8/21 @ 7:30pm Two kung fu masters—one with no arms and the other with no legs—seek revenge on the persons responsible.

Dazed and Confused (1993)

8/22 @ 7:30pm & 9:30pm, 8/23 @ 7:00pm & 9:30pm Directed by Richard Linklater

Rocky Horror Picture Show - 8/23 @ Midnight Presented by the JCCP!

Jam For Joey

- 8/24 @ 2:00pm - Four great local bands will perform at a fundraiser for a great kid.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

OPEN

Noon-5PM Daily and evenings by appointment.

A Rock n’ Roll, Baby Boomer, Collectors Emporium specializing in 50’s, 60’s and 70’s collectables. 3623 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15212

4 12 .76 6. 18 4 6 WWW.JAGINCHYSTUFF.COM

Aug. 28. Princess Bride (everybody’s favorite fairy tale, with kissing), Aug. 22-24, and Aug. 26-28. Roman Holiday (1953 film starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck), Aug. 23-24, and Aug. 28. Clueless (1995 Alicia Silverstone comedy), Aug. 23-25, and Aug. 27-28. Beer tasting and movie: beer at 7 p.m. Night of the Living Dead at 9:45 p.m., Wed. Aug. 27. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this 1986 coming-of-age dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Hollywood ARMY OF DARKNESS. Ash is back … and way back in time, to the 14th century, fending off skeleton warriors with just his trusty Olds 88, a chemistry book and a chainsaw for an arm. Sam Raimi’s 1992 comic horror thriller, starring Bruce Campbell, wraps up the Evil Dead trilogy … for now. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. AMC Loews. $5 AMARCORD. In Federico Fellini’s 1973 eulogy for his boyhood, the sex scenes, adolescent pranks and other earthy antics merely assure that our picture of little coastal Rimini in the 1930s is as raucous as it is lyrical. Families scream at each other — hilariously — over supper; lustful boys lie in confession; fascists march gaily, and interrogate suspected dissidents cruelly; a peacock flies through a snowstorm. The structure is episodic, the images often beautiful. In Italian, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Melwood. $2 (BO)

CP

MY NAME IS NOBODY. Terence Hill and Henry Fonda star in this 1973 comedy that finds a fabled gunslinger being helped by an up-and-comer known as “Nobody.” Tonino Valerii directed, with a few scenes shot by Sergio Leone. This classic Western continues the monthly “Spaghetti Western Dinner Series,” in which patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Aug 21. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com. CRIPPLED MASTERS. Kei Law’s 1979 martialarts flick features two brothers — one with no arms, the other with no legs — who team up for full-bodied revenge. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 21. Hollywood PROGRESSION. Lawrenceville’s long-running, real-life annual progressive dinner is the setting for this zesty new ensemble comedy, the debut feature from local filmmakers Gab Cody and Sam Turich (the team behind the short “Mombies”). The tone is equal parts screwball and romantic, as a mismatched set of neighbors traipses from one house to the next, more engrossed in the cascade

CP

Calvary of socially awkward situations than in the lovingly prepared dishes. Progression boasts not one but two pregnant couples (one amusingly played by Cody and Turich themselves), raunchy humor and a bit of broad social comedy. And the film, handsomely shot by cinematographer Mark Knobil, is a treat for theater fans, with roles for such local stage favorites as James FitzGerald, Gregory Lehane, Jason McCune and Mary Rawson. 6 p.m. Thu., Aug. 21 (event includes live music and cash bar). Bayardstown Social Club, 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5 (free for Bayardstown members). www.facebook.com/ bayardstown (Bill O’Driscoll) DAZED AND CONFUSED. Ahh, to be young in the mid-’70s: Besides the usual thrills and trials — girls, beer and clueless parents — there was Skynyrd, conversion vans, giant headphones and the cultivation of certain herbs. Drift back in time with Richard Linklater’s nostalgic 1993 coming-ofage comedy, set in Austin in 1976. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22; 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 27. Hollywood THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE. Running through the woods. Branches snapping. Screaming in terror. The unmistakable sound of a chainsaw revving. Once you’ve seen this 1974 cult classic flick, shot on a shoestring budget by Tobe Hooper, you’ll never forget these very effective horror scenes. Nor will you ever think about leather furniture the same way again. Some teens, some trees, a twisted family of laid-

CP

Eileen Colin Marcia Hamish Simon Emma Jacki Atkins Firth Gay Harden Linklater McBurney Stone Weaver “THE SUMMER’S MOST BEGUILING ROMANTIC COMEDY.” -Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

Woody Allen

Mount Lebanon CARMIKE GALLERIA 6 (412) 531-5551 Monaca CINEMARK Pittsburgh CENTER TOWNSHIP CINEMARK ROBINSON TOWNSHIP (800) FANDANGO #2107 (800) FANDANGO #2153

NOW PLAYING

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM Pittsburgh SOUTHSIDE WORKS CINEMA (412) 381-7335 Pittsburgh THE MANOR THEATRE (412) 422-7729

Tarentum CINEMARK GALLERIA AT PITTSBURGH MILLS & IMAX (800) FANDANGO #2112 West Homestead AMC LOEWS WATERFRONT 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.MAGICINTHEMOONLIGHTMOVIE.COM

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THE GIRL ON A BRIDGE. Patrice Leconte’s offbeat 1999 romance continues a series of foreign films. In French, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 TAXI DRIVER. “Scorsese Summer School” continues with this dark 1976 drama starring Robert DeNiro. Scorsese’s filmmaking techniques to be discussed afterward. 9:15 p.m. Sat., Aug. 23. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 THE COLOR OF POMEGRANATES. Sergei Paradjanov’s 1969 art film re-imagines the life of an Armenia poet Sayat Nova’s through a series of tableaux, incorporating history, folklore and allegory. This visually arresting film will be presented in 35 mm. Screens as part of a summer series of staff picks. In Armenian and Georgian, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 24. Regent Square THE MONSTER SQUAD. A gang of kids try to rid their town of Dracula, the Wolfman and other classic-horror-film baddies in Fred Dekker’s 1987 comedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 27. AMC Loews. $5 BEAVER TRILOGY. This 2001 film from Trent Harris comprises three parts, shot respectively in 1979, 1981 and 1985. In the first documentary segment, viewers meet “Groovin’ Gary,” a Beaver, Utah, man who does impressions of Olivia Newton-John. In 1981, Sean Penn portrays Groovin’ Gary, and in 1985, Crispin Glover does a further re-imagining of both Gary and Penn’s portrayal. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 28, and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 31. Hollywood MADE IN DAGENHAM. Rita O’Grady (Sally Hawkins) was a working-class British gal who led women in a 1968 strike against the automaker Ford, a strike which produced new labor laws. Nigel Cole, directing William Ivory’s articulate script, often uses a telephoto lens to create a documentary feel, and the period detail is spot on. The 2010 film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 28. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412831-3871 or www.battleofhomesteadfoundation. org. Free (Harry Kloman)

CP

Magic In The Moonlight Written and Directed by

off slaughterhouse workers — the title says it all. Screens in a re-mastered version. 10 p.m. nightly Fri., Aug. 22 and Sat., Aug. 23; also Fri., Aug. 29 and Sat., Aug. 30. Melwood (AH)


[BOOKS]

“EVERYONE IS EXCITED ABOUT A GROWING COMEDY PRESENCE IN THE CITY.”

LUCKY MAN With revenue estimates into the hundreds of millions of dollars annually, bootlegging liquor, a cornerstone of American organized crime, had major economic consequences. Yet, notes local author Christian Cipollini, “In school, the textbooks say maybe one sentence about prohibition and Al Capone.” Cipollini’s new book is a straightforward and rigorously researched biography of renowned mobster Charles “Lucky” Luciano, whose development of the National Crime Syndicate helped give the mafia power and longevity. Cipollini, an Indiana County native, is a freelance journalist turned true-crime expert who’s been interviewed on the History Channel, and on the Biography Channel series Gangsters: America’s Most Evil. Lucky Luciano (Strategic Media Books) is his second book, after Diary of a Motor City Hit Man: The Chester Wheeler Campbell Story. The new book is subtitled “Mysterious Tales of a Gangland Legend” for good reason: What’s clandestine isn’t usually well-documented. So Cipollini needed a new research method. “I worked in reverse,” he says. “I tried to acquire very rare photographs and look at the notes on the back, which led me into weird little archives. It was daunting; there were a lot of long nights.” Lucky Luciano dispels as many rumors as it confirms. And supplementing its 109 pages of prose is an insert with more than 60 photographs and prints, many of them debuts from Cipollini’s personal collection. Among the author’s more interesting sources was an article from a 1962 edition of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune about the police officer who apprehended Luciano. “Some little reporter found this guy and put together a story that virtually no one had seen,” says Cipollini. “That’s the kind of stuff I live for.” Long hours of sorting through microfilm, yellowed newspapers and illegible police reports have informed a portrait all the more lively for its veracity. Cipollini even reprises the rosters of gangland conferences, whose names include the likes of Jake “Greasy Thumb” Guzic and, of course, Alphonse “Scarface” Capone. The chapter on Luciano’s girlfriend Gay Orlova spares no detail all the way through to her suicide. Books, films and TV about the mob by turns demonized and celebrated organized crime’s icons. Lucky is devoted to objectivity. It simply retells Luciano’s achievements and failures, and exactly what they’ve meant for America. “People glorify the mob because there is an undoubted humanity in it, but we have so few facts about it,” says Cipollini. “I just wanted to compile everything we know is certain about Lucky.”

[COMEDY]

{BY DAN WILLIS}

FUN N YTIMES {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHANNON NORMAN, CHRISTOPHER HORNER (DAY BRACEY) AND TOM JEFFERSON (MOLLY SHARROW)}

Local comics in the festival include (from left) Shannon Norman, Day Bracey and Molly Sharrow.

I

F YOU BELIEVE comedy is struggling

in the Steel City, the inaugural Pittsburgh Comedy Festival dares you to think again. This ambitious three-day event includes headliners Judah Friedlander (of 30 Rock fame), Cackowski & Talarico and Tim Dimond, and nearly 40 other local and national improv and standup acts. The festival also fosters budding Pittsburgh talent with talks and panel discussions. “Everyone is excited about a growing comedy presence in the city,” says festival executive director Brian Gray, citing an outpouring of support from both the arts community and regional sponsors. That’s a complete turnaround from just a few years ago. After several Pittsburgh clubs closed their doors, the indie comedy scene threatened to vanish altogether. But alongside weekly open-mic events and standup showcases at area bars — and the Pittsburgh Improv, part of the national chain that focuses on touring acts — the city now features three indie comedy venues: Downtown’s Arcade Comedy Theater, Shadyside’s

Steel City Improv Theater and Lawrenceville’s Unplanned Comedy Pittsburgh. After fighting for visibility, local performers are thrilled at the city’s evolution. Before Arcade existed, “comedy shows were done in dark, smoky bars,” says Pittsburgh comedian Molly Sharrow. “Clubs make people feel like they are going out for the night instead of standing in the back of a dingy bar.”

PITTSBURGH COMEDY FESTIVAL Thu., Aug. 21-Sun., Aug. 23. Henry Heymann Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-40. Complete schedule at www.pittsburghcomedyfestival.org

Yet festival organizers selected an unusual venue: Oakland’s Henry Heymann Theatre is known primarily for straight theater. Gray, himself the founder of the Irony City Improv troupe, sees it as a perfect match. “More and more standups are touring

theaters over clubs to focus on the performance aspect of comedy over its history in bars,” he says. “And most modern improvisation resembles theater.” Plus, with more than 150 seats, the theater is twice the size of other comedy venues but “still feels very intimate,” says Gray. Local comedian Day Bracey — who’ll perform on the festival’s opening night — views this close-knit community as ideal for maturing as an artist. “I don’t know many other cities where you can get the amount of stage time that you do here, and thus grow as a comedian at such a fast pace.” And there’s nothing like learning from the best, like fest headliner Judah Friedlander. “To watch someone like [him] onstage when later that night I can go home to watch reruns of 30 Rock will blow my mind,” says Sharrow, who herself performs on Saturday. Another headliner, long-form improv duo Cackowski & Talarico, is known nationally for spinning a single audience suggestion into an hour-long theater piece. And

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Pittsburgh-born Tim Dimond is now a regular on the New York City comedy circuit. Other acts include Philadelphia-based improv duo Kristen Schier and Steve Kleinedler, who perform as Fracas; Chicago improv trio Kingsburg (“like three sock puppets on a business lunch”); and Durham, N.C.-based comic Julia McClung. Meanwhile, for his own standup performance, Shannon Norman eagerly anticipates the best and worst in audience participation. “I cannot wait to see footage of myself on YouTube that was shot on a [drunken] stranger’s shaking flip phone,” he deadpans. Joking aside, “Pittsburgh is not said in the same breath as New York, L.A. and Chicago, but I think it will be one day,” adds Norman. “This festival is definitely a stepping stone towards that.”

[ART]

BANG UP JOB {BY KATE MAGOC}

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

A SUMMER COMEDY LIKE YOU’VE NEVER EXPERIENCED

—The Times, London

August 27 – September 7, 2014 ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEETS MONTY PYTHON MEETS “SOUTH PARK”!

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY [2489] CityTheatreCompany.org

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

B Y GWE NDO LYN K IST E

Matt Gondek (left) and Brian Gonella {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEROME CHARLES}

+++++ “One of the most dazzling displays of comedy theatre I’ve ever seen.”

Prepare to experience greatness. So advises Judah Friedlander, the 30 Rock alum and Pittsburgh Comedy Festival headliner. The self-appointed “World Champion” appears Aug. 21 and 22. The trucker-hat-donning Maryland native dabbled in filmmaking before settling on a career as a comedian. In addition to his standup, he’s appeared in dozens of films, including Zoolander, The Wrestler and one of his personal favorites, American Splendor. Most famously, he played Frank Rossitano for seven seasons on the NBC comedy about behind-the-scenes hijinks at 30 Rockefeller Plaza. Friedlander jokes that he canceled all appearances for the next six months to focus on his upcoming Pittsburgh shows. In reality, he’s awash in projects. “I am trying hard to get my next comedy album and comedy concert film done and out this year,” he says. And in January, he will lend his voice to the Seth MacFarlane animated series Bordertown, on Fox. Friedlander first learned of the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival through Twitter, and his love of the Steel City — in particular the breakfasts at Pamela’s Diner — cemented his decision to appear. After all, his Western Pennsylvania roots run deep: His mother is originally from Pittsburgh, and he visits about once a year to see family. Plus, the collaboration just makes sense. “Pittsburgh is the City of Champions,” he says. “This is the World Champion coming to the City of Champions.”

Judah Friedlander {PHOTO COURTESY OF PHIL PROVENCIO}

CHAMPING

Somewhere between pop-culture consumerism and the contents of a 15year-old’s brain lies the most recent work by Matt Gondek and Brian Gonella. The local artists collaborated on collages of epic proportions for their joint exhibit Big Bang, now at The Shop, in Bloomfield. Having grown up on a steady diet of cartoons, video games, comic books and the American inundation of logos and brand spokescharacters, they’ve brought all those influences to the canvas, with each artist incorporating his own twists and sense of humor. “We share a lot of common interests,” says Gondek. “We both grew up in comic books and cartoons of the same nature, so our styles just blend well together.” Gondek and Gonella met last year, while participating in the first Pittsburgh edition of RAW, a multidisciplinary arts event. From there, the collaboration grew organically. “We started doing this [series] called Drink & Draw, which was us getting together every Tuesday and Wednesday to drink and draw,” explains Gondek. “Then we had the idea to do a live painting thing at Art All Night this year, and it went over really well. … And we sold the painting for charity and got a lot of money for it.” “It was just like a big collage, it was like 5-by-5 [feet], I think,” he adds. “We just painted a bunch of stuff. Just anything little that popped in our heads. Because it got [a] good reception, we thought we should have a whole show of it. That’s what the art show, Big Bang, stemmed from.” At once a statement about the strength of Pittsburgh’s collaborative creative culture and a demonstration of the power of the city’s many art-driven events, Big Bang is more than a showcase for humorous cartoon collages. Each piece in the show focuses on a different theme, from anime to Nintendo characters. With each collage, Gondek and Gonella created an entire world, making artwork you can look at in a new way time and time again. Fortunately for the artists — but unfortunately for you — all of the works in Big Bang had been sold by the night of the Aug. 1 opening party. But you can still check them out at The Shop, which doubles as a concert venue, during events through month’s end. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BIG BANG at The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. Open evenings Aug. 22, 23, 26 and 27, and by appointment at gondekdesign@gmail.com


{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF FUGA}

Mils James and M. Kay Reagle, in The Gospel Singer

[PLAY REVIEW]

OFF KEY

In addition to crafting the script, Wyatt, along with John Gresh and Mils M.J. James, wrote the numbers Ruthie sings {BY TED HOOVER} (which are quite entertaining), while traLAST YEAR, Pittsburgh playwright C.S. ditional spirituals are performed during Wyatt’s The Gospel Singer got a staged the church sequences. James also appears as Isaac/Ruthie and reading as part of Bricolage Productions’ In the Raw series. Director and actor Mon- sings with a powerful voice. Gresh plays teze Freeland saw that performance and the owner of the Eden, providing needed laughs and energy. Charles decided to bring the show Timbers and Ken Lutz are to life. So this year, Freethe dueling preachers, and land and Justin Lonesome each brings solid conviction launched their new theater to his role. In supporting company, The Lab Project, parts, Michael Young and with the premiere producM. Kay Reagle supply a coltion of The Gospel Singer. lective ton of sincerity. But while Freeland and I can’t overstate how Lonesome are two of Pittsmuch I wish I could tell you burgh’s pluckiest theater that I enjoyed the evening. artists, unfortunately they This scrappy little troupe can’t do much with this needs as much encourageproblematic script. ment as possible … but as Wyatt’s protagonist is Isaac, who is the choir leader of his church a calling card, this production isn’t doing in central California. But his actual job is as them any favors. Freeland’s direction feels hesitant, “Ruthie,” the area’s best female jazz singer and the premier attraction at The Eden listless and lacking in energy. And Wyatt’s script is, among other things, bloated Club, a gay bar on the outskirts of town. and overlong. It’s three acts. Three acts! You’re allowed to stage three-act plays THE GOSPEL SINGER only if (a) what you’re saying requires continues through Aug. 31. three acts to say (which this doesn’t) or The Lab Project at Pittsburgh Playwrights (b) you’re George S. Kaufmann … and he Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-15. www.labprojectpgh.org died in 1961. But even dead for five decades, The pastor of the predominantly Afri- Kaufmann still has more spark that this can-American church is fine with Isaac’s curiously overwritten but underdeveloped night job, but the fire-breathing white script. It lacks insight and its dramatic fuel pastor of a nearby evangelical church is offers only shopworn arguments. I wish The Lab Project all the best and adamant: Banish Isaac and shut down look forward to its next production. the Eden.

THIS SCRAPPY LITTLE TROUPE NEEDS ENCOURAGEMENT, BUT THIS PRODUCTION ISN’T DOING THEM ANY FAVORS.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.2108.28.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., AUG. 21

AUG. 23

{SPORTS} For the first time since 2001, Pennsylvania hosts the national championships for USA Gymnastics. More than 100 of the nation’s top competitors will bound into CONSOL Energy Center, including defending U.S. all-around champ and 2012 Olympian Sam Mikulak and 2013 all-round and floorexercise world champion Simone Biles (pictured). The P&G Championships run today through Saturday, with two sessions daily. Things kick off this afternoon, with the women’s juniors competition. Bill O’Driscoll 1 and 7:30 p.m. Also Fri., Aug. 22, and Sat., Aug 23. Singlesession tickets start at $20. www.pgchamps.com

{STAGE}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN CHENG/USA GYMNASTICS}

Always-experimental Bricolage Productions keeps finding new ways to involve the community onstage. Its In the Raw (R) Evolution began July 21, when writers, performers, directors and even the audience

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

Monster onstter Trike Night

collaborated to conceive of two plays inspired by Pittsburgh itself. Writers then drafted ensemble members from a talent pool and began an intensive, four-week creation process. The working themes for the two stilluntitled plays are “home” and “change”; the playwrights are Connor Pickett and Maureen McGranahan. One play gets the first of its four performances starting tonight, the other tomorrow. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22. Performances continue through Aug. 30. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown.

AUG. 21

P&G Championships

$25 ($40 for both shows). www.bricolagepgh.org

{STAGE} After last year’s warmly received production of In the Heights, Front Porch Theatricals is mounting the Tony Award-winning 1998 musical Parade, which opens tonight at the New Hazlett Theater. Dramatizing the 1913 murder trial of Jewish factory superintendent Leo Frank, Jason Robert Brown and Alfred Uhry’s controversial work examines anti-Semitism in the American South and the role of the media in justice. Jesse Manocherian stars as Leo, and local favorite Daina Michelle Griffith plays his wife, Lucille. Dan Willis 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $40. 412-320-4610 or www.frontporchpgh.com

+ SAT., AUG. 23 {BOOKS} Few Pittsburgh artists or authors have made a bigger splash lately than Ed Piskor. The first volume of his graphic history Hip Hop Family Tree (now in its third printing) was lauded by everyone from Fab Five Freddy to The Washington Post. The 2013 book was both thoroughly researched and outrageously entertaining, all in life-long hip-hop fan Piskor’s trademark gritty throwback style. Be in the house for tonight’s Copacetic Comics release party for Book 2, which covers 1981-83 and


sp otlight

The Moth is a Peabody-award winning radio program celebrating the art of storytelling. Its radically honest format has attracted raconteurs ranging from Molly Ringwald to Run-DMC’s Darryl McDaniels. Tonight, the group’s touring arm makes its annual stop in Pittsburgh to explore the theme of bravery in a show it’s calling Don’t Look Back. “We’re interested in provocative but broad themes,” says senior producer Maggie Chino. “We want to tell great stories, but we also want to approach the theme from as many angles as possible.” The speakers providing tonight’s angles at the Byham Theater include three-time Moth GrandSLAM champion Cole Kadzin, Detroit standup comedian Horace Sanders, and Richard Price (pictured), author of novels including Clockers as well as the screenplays for Martin Scorsese’s The Color of Money and episodes of The Wire. “Everything he does is quintessential Price. He has such a unique and powerful voice,” says Chino, “but not a lot of people realize he’s a great performer too, which is pretty unusual for a writer.” And given that Price’s contributions to The Moth have included stories about wrestling-obsessed grandmothers and the importance of bicycle safety, his distinct voice is not at all predictable. You can also listen to The Moth Radio Hour every Sunday at 6 p.m. on 90.5 WESA. Dan Willis 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

{SPORT} With a joyously crass hair-metal attitude, a cash bar and a fleet of “Adult Big Wheels,” Monster Trike Night might be the most absurd thing on three wheels. Attendees are given tricycles to race in various time trials and head-to-heads until a winner is crowned. Discounts are provided for racers who arrive in costume, or who register their punny racer name online beforehand. (Just bear in mind, Wheel Ferrel and Alex Tri-Beck are taken.) DW 9 p.m. The Wheel Mill, 6185 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. $6-12. 412-613-4707 or www.monstertrikenight.com

{COMEDY} It might be hard to define a hipster, but we bet John McIntire knows one when he sees one. Indeed, McIntire has some notable guests for his latest attempt to parse Pittsburgh’s hipster inundation. Tonight’s John McIntire Dangerously Live Comedy/Talk Show is titled “Hipsterization Too, The 2nd One!” and features Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Tony Norman, mayoral chief of staff Kevin Acklin and local activist Ellie Gordon (known for her ride-sharing advocacy). Special guests Zack and H of local garagerock revivalists The Nox Boys add their own brand of hip. BO 10:30 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $10 (free with same-night Cultural Trust ticket stub). www.trustarts.org

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system at Buhl Community Park comes courtesy of SLB Radio Productions and the nearby Children’s Museum and New Hazlett Theater. BO 12:15-1 p.m. Allegheny Square, North Side. Free. www.slbradio.org

{TALK} Alexandre Arrechea, the Cuban-born sculptor, gives a free talk at the Trust Arts Education Center, where a documentary on his creative process will also be screened. Arrechea’s 2013 NOLIMITS series blended mundane utility with grandiose architecture by warping and re-contextualizing scale replicas of famous skyscrapers. Three of these sculptures, including his elongated and coiled interpretation of New York’s MetLife building, currently reside Downtown. Tomorrow, at noon, the artist also hosts a free walking tour of his works, starting from 10th and Penn. DW 6 p.m. 805 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-391-2060 or www. pittsburghpublicart.com

{TALK}

AUG. 23

Art by Ed Piskor

Hip ip H Hop op Family Tree

tonight at the Rex Theater, in its first visit to Pittsburgh, part of a 13-city tour. Local comedians, sex-shop owners and adult-film stars in each city (says the press release) do the judging as contestants “simulate a coital experience” with an imaginary stage partner. Winners advance to finals, in AUG. 26 December’s Austin, Texas. Aspiring TTawni awnii contestants should O’Dell contact christrew@ gmail.com. You can also show up to just watch, because some people prefer that anyhow. BO 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12. www.airsexworld.com

{COMEDY} Sex is funny. Everyone knows that. But how many people can mime it? The New Movement comedy troupe’s touring National Air Sex Championship is seeking local comedy talent to compete

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where she grew up as inspiration for her tense literary thrillers. And tonight, she’ll present her latest novel, One of Us (Gallery Books), with a free talk and signing at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Set in the fictional mining town of Lost Creek, the book details a forensic psychologist’s search for a serial killer whose crimes force the town to revisit its history of violence against rebellious miners. DW 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 888-800-6078 or www.mysterylovers.com

or two — but he’ll also do “Satin Doll,” boogie-woogie and some originals, all interlaced with stories about growing up in the Mon Valley, and about the lore and lure of “the world’s finest instrument.” The solar-powered sound

With farm-market stalls overflowing with fresh produce for the next few months, it’s a great time of year to go vegan. If you’re intrigued by the health, ethical or environmental possibilities of eating only plant products, but have questions, Rebecca Gilbert has answers. The local author and founder of vegan-lifestyle website Yummy Plants presents It’s Easy to Start Eating Vegan! The free talk covers everything from easy egg and dairy substitutions to turning traditional recipes vegan. Tonight’s Carnegie Library-Homewood event is sponsored by Vegan Pittsburgh and the East End Food Co-op. BO 6:30 p.m. 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. Register at 412-242-3598. {PHOTO COURTESY OF PATTI BRAHIM}

limns such seminal figures as Afrika Bambaataa, Run-DMC and NWA. BO 7-10 p.m. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. 412-251-5451 or www.copaceticcomics.com

AUG. 21

Parade

+ WED., AUG. 27 {MUSIC} Give him 45 minutes, and he’ll make you see the accordion in a whole new way. That’s Steve Pellegrino’s goal at the final installment of the lunchtime Solar Concert Series. Sure, this veteran musician and performance artist will play “Lady of Spain” and a polka

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classic American comedy. Presented by the Summer Company. www.thesummer company.com Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Peter Mills Theater (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), Uptown. 412–243-6464. THE FOURSOME. Norm Foster’s comedy about 4 friends who get together to play a round of golf at their 25th college reunion. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE GOSPEL SINGER. Isaac Dumont has received a cult following as “Ruthie” in The Eden Club, a jazz haven where his partner, Donnie, serves as emcee. Isaac’s dream is to sing the gospel music his mother loved, a dream that frustrates Donnie, who has lost faith in himself and God. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun. Thru Aug. 31. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown.

IN THE RAW: (R)EVOLUTION. Using the audience to generate source material, 2 teams of local theatre artists work together to create 2 new plays inspired by Pittsburgh’s landscape, people, history & future. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. THE MANGO FARMER OF VERMONT. A man has a wife, a lover, & a delicate, young mango tree. Caught between the three, he grapples w/ an oath he once took to do no harm. Summer Scribes Reading Series presented by 12 Peers Theater. Sun., Aug. 24, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-496-2194. PARADE. The true 1913 story of Leo Frank, a Brooklyn Jew accused of murdering a young girl in his Atlanta, Georgia pencil factory. Presented by Front Porch Theatricals. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun,

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

2 p.m. Thru Aug. 31. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Staged COMEDY OPEN MIC. readings to open the festival. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Off the Wall Theater, 412-681-4318. Carnegie. 724-873-3576. OPEN STAGE COMEDY SHREK THE MUSICAL. NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Lounge, Lawrenceville. Thru Sept. 6. Comtra 412-251-0097. Theatre, Cranberry. PITTSBURGH 724-591-8727. IMPROV JAM. TAMARA. Play Thu, 10 p.m. by John Krizanc. www. per Cabaret at Theater pa pghcitym Presented by Quantum Square, Downtown. .co Theatre. Wed, Thu, 412-325-6769. Sat, 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, THURSDAY NIGHT 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Steel City Improv Theater, Oakland. 412-362-1713. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THINGS MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME. Olivia & Gabe are moving into their first apartment PITTSBURGH COMEDY together, halfway across the FESTIVAL. Feat. Judah country from their parents, Friedlander, Amish Monkeys, who show up to help them. Brent Peasley, Zach Pugh, Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 23. Josh & Gab, Molly Sharrow, The LuPones, more. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. pittsburghcomedyfestival.org 412-831-8552. Aug. 21-23 Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-874-9846.

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FRI 22 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 22 - SAT 23

RICKY REYES. Aug. 22-23, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 22 - SUN 24

JOSH WOLF. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Aug. 23, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 24, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 23

HUSTLEBOT. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SUN 24 SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675. CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


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NEW THIS WEEK XTAZA NIGHTCLUB. Allure. Local artist showcase feat. Desiree Palermo, Marsha Lee Moore, Max Boffo, Cliff Fields, Brad Bianchi, Bekah Coffey, Chelsie Burns, Jarrod Russell, more. Opens Aug. 27, 8 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 412-720-1396.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Character of the Living. Oil paintings by Genevieve Barbee. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Untangled. Work by Elaine Bergstrom & Charles Sawyer. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUNKERPROJECTS. Orna-Mental. Solo exhibition

by Katie Hovencamp. www.bunkerprojects.org/ current.html. Garfield. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. The Pittsburgh 10. Group show of 10 local artists. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099.

FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Oakland. 412-681-5449. THE FRAMESMITH. Lisa Marie Jakab on View. Paintings, drawings, & prints. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-0300. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. What Will Her Kids Think? Work by Sally Deskins. Mother-Artist Panel Discussion: Aug. 23, 6-7:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Hidden & Revealed. Work by Todd Sanders & Jason Schell. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Once Again Calm. Surreal minimalist landscapes by Thomas Frontini. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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VISUAL ART

TUE 26 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 27 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. THE PAJAMA MEN. Critically-acclaimed sketch comedians. Wed-Sun, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 7 City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Banking The Fire. Lithography prints by Keith Clouse. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Investigations in Terraforming. Prints by New Academy Press. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Time & Place. Paintings by Tom McNickle. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations.

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. audiovisual components, & 412-258-2700. related artifacts challenge BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. perceptions about race. Large collection of Oakland. 412-622-3131. automatic roll-played musical CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. instruments and music Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome boxes in a mansion setting. (planetarium), Miniature Call for appointment. Railroad and Village, O’Hara. 412-782-4231. USS Requin submarine, BOST BUILDING. and more. North Side. Collectors. 412-237-3400. Preserved materials www. per CARRIE FURNACE. pa reflecting the pghcitym Built in 1907, .co industrial heritage Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 of Southwestern PA. are extremely rare Homestead. 412-464-4020. examples of pre World War II CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF iron-making technology. Rankin. NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: 412-464-4020 x.21. Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive COMPASS INN. Demos and tours

FULL LIST ONLINE

Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri,

with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves. Work by Masha Fikhman, Zack John Lee & Travis K. Schwab. Gallery talk w/ Jessica Beck Aug. 22, 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. SHAW GALLERIES. Ruth Levine: Radiant Life. More than 30 works of art by the late Ruth Levine. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003.

SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Collective Unconscious. Photographs by Jay Brown, Melissa Catanese, Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton, Jake Reinhart, Justin Visnesky. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition by Sue Pollins, Doreen Currie, Michael McSorley. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794.

CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in

NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. 412-621-4253. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

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SAT 23 - SUN 24 17TH ANNUAL ART FESTIVAL ON WALNUT STREET. Paintings, photography, glass, jewelry, ceramics, more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Shadyside. 561-746-6615. SEVEN SPRINGS WINE FESTIVAL. Aug. 23-24 Seven Springs. 1-888-718-4253.

SUN 24 RED, RIPE & ROASTED: TOMATO & GARLIC FESTIVAL. Farmers market, cooking demos, tomato contest, more. Free admission to anyone who brings a bag of fresh produce for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps

Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

FUNDRAISERS THU 21 SAVOR PITTSBURGH: A CELEBRATION OF CUISINE. Sample cuisine from 20+ restaurants, live music, raffle, more. Benefits MageeWomens Research Institute & Foundation. www.savorpgh.com 6:30 p.m. Stage AE, North Side. 412-229-5483. WIGLE WHISKEY BANTAM NIGHT. Live music, crafting, more. Benefits The Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-473-0100.

FRI 22 ICANDY PITTSBURGH GENDER BLENDER. Benefits iCandy Pittsburgh, Androgynous Pittsburgh, & the Passion for Life Foundation. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400.

SAT 23

Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS .. Daniel M. Shapiro, Margaret Bashaar, Dan Nowak, Brent House. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FRI 22 BOOK CHAT: SENIOR BOOK GROUP. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

MON 25 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

BARK IN THE DARK. Dog walk, vendor fair, live music by One Sweet LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Burgh, comedy by Jim Practice conversational Krenn, more. Benefits English. Tue, 6 p.m. Animal Friends. Carnegie Library, 5 p.m. Hartwood Squirrel Hill. Acres, Allison Park. 412-422-9650. 412-847-7000. PITTSBURGH www. per pa BEER GARDEN BASH CONTINENTAL pghcitym .co V. Over a dozen craft PHILOSOPHY beers, picnic food, live READING GROUP. music, more. 6-8:30 p.m. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Mount Lebanon Public Library, Book Exchange, Bloomfield. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 412-224-2847. THE BIG SALE. Multi-family yard sale. Benefits the outreach efforts of Jonah’s Call Anglican CONVERSATION SALON. Church. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Church Second Fri of every month, of the Ascension, Oakland. 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed 724-601-6290. of every month, 1 p.m. LITTLE SISTERS OF THE Northland Public Library, POOR SPAGHETTI DINNER. McCandless. 412-366-8100. 4-7 p.m. Little Sisters of the THE MOTH MAINSTAGE. Poor, Bellevue. 412-307-1100. Storytelling by Dan Kennedy, Kate Tellers, Cole Kazdin, Horace H.B. Sanders, & Richard BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO Price. 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater, PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Downtown. 412-622-8866. Read & code letters, pick PITTSBURGH POETRY books, pack ‘em or database EXCHANGE. Discussing ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or Coming to Jakarta by by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Peter Dale Scott. 7:30 p.m. Garfield. 412-361-3022. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. GRANDVIEW PARK 412-621-6880. FARM DINNER. 5-course dinner, benefiting Friends of Grandview Park. 5:30 p.m. Grandview Park, Mt. Washington. 412-431-2650. MAKER STORYTIME. Explore PICT ME UP BRUNCH. All you tools, materials & processes can eat & drink brunch w/ inspired by books. Thu, PICT actors & artists. 11 a.m.2-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 2 p.m. The Shop in East Liberty, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, East Liberty. 925-963-3097. North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 26

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 27

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THU 21 - WED 27

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of


Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. RECYCLABLE WEAVING. Re-purpose old plastic bags into art. Thru Aug. 29, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 22 CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. COOK IT! W/ CONFLICT KITCHEN. Interactive cooking demos hosted by Big Red Room Café Chef, Angelo Galioto & Conflict Kitchen’s Chef Robert Sayre. 12:15-12:45 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. END OF SUMMER CELEBRATION & BBQ. Face painting, outdoor games, crafts, more. 6-8 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library. 412-885-2255.

SAT 23 LAST CHANCE SUMMER CAMP WORKSHOP. Make a leatherwork keychain, braid a friendship bracelet, more. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. LAWRENCEVILLE BACK TO SCHOOL BASH. Backpack giveaway, bounce house, & staff from local schools & after-school programs will be present to give out information & to sign kids up for fall programs. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville. 412-802-7220. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. WINDGAP-CHARTIERS CITY BACK TO SCHOOL FESTIVAL. Bounce house, face painting, games, more. 12-7 p.m. Chartiers City Playground, Sheraden. 412-465-0579.

MON 25 FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including

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Starter Kits E-Juice The Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh’s COOK IT! with Conflict Kitchen program provides an opportunity to learn about cooking seasonally, as well as a chance to learn about cuisine from around the world. Fans of Conflict Kitchen already know that it highlights foods from countries with which the United States is in conflict. On Friday, Conflict Kitchen chef Robert Sayre will demonstrate — using some ingredients from the museum garden — how to make two Iranian recipes: maast-o khiar, a dish made with cucumber and yogurt, and halva, a confection flavored with rose water. 12:15 p.m. Fri., Aug. 22. Free. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 23

TUE 26

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. Tue, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 27

LEGO CLUB. Ages 7-12. Call to register. 4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE FRI 22 -SAT 23

SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

Mods Tanks

Offer good until 8/25/14

Batteries Accessories

4322 Butler St , Lawrenceville (Below Arsenal Lanes) 412-709-6443 • www.maverickvapors.com

MOSS WALK. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611.

TUE 26

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 27

OTHER STUFF THU 21 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART & INSPIRATION W/ WILLIAM ROCK PRESENTS AN EVENING W/ TOM KURLANDER. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: DOCUMENTING PITTSBURGH’S PAST. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Ages 21+. Every third Thu, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. A TASTE OF TWO RIVERS WINE DINNER. Presented by Dreadnought Wines. 6 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 800-565-2816. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

THU 21 - SUN 24

www.livelinks.com

STEEL CITY’S TASTE OF THE CHAMPIONSHIPS. Competition during the P&G Gymnastics Championships feat. 5 restaurants & gymnasticsthemed entrees. Aug. 21-24 Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 412-642-1800.

CHATLINE TM Ahora en Español

Teligence/18+

FRI 22 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH! PITTSBURGH’S POPULAR FOOD CULTURE TOUR. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Crazy Mocha Coffee Company, Downtown. 412-323-4709. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GALLERY TALK W/ JESSICA BECK. 7 p.m. Revision Space, Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. GEORGE GERSHWIN, HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTRODUCTION TO HEALING TOUCH. w/ Teruyo Seya. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. OFF THE WALL CABARET NIGHT. 7 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: RANT Music Festival at Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville CRITIC: Meredith Dykstra, 30, a wellness specialist from the South Side WHEN: Sat.,

SUN 24

Aug. 16 I live in the South Side right now, but I’m moving to Lawrenceville in two weeks, so I figured I’d come out here to explore my new neighborhood. I’m looking forward to hearing some cool new bands, no one in particular even. And for how many bands are participating, this festival is running really smoothly. They’ve handled it well, and I’m sure they’re glad that the weather is totally perfect. This was the No. 1 place I wanted to move. I just love it. It has such rich history and culture and diversity, and I just hope they keep putting on events like this that I can support. BY DA N W I L L I S

FRI 22 - SAT 23 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 23 13TH ANNUAL BOCCE NEL GIARDINO. Dinner, silent auction, more. www.westmorelandculturaltrust. org 5:30 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi. com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. DAVE & BUSTER’S BACK TO SCHOOL BASH. School supply drive, live entertainment, complimentary buffet w/ college ID, more. 2-9 p.m. Dave & Busters, Waterfront. 412-462-1500. GENE KELLY BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION. Feat. screening of Singin’ in the Rain. 2 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline

Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LISTEN TO THE VOICE: A MUSIC & VOCAL CONCERT. A premier concert of sacred songs by local composer Rose Vega, performed by soprano Catherine Florian w/ pianist Josie Merlino. Presented by the PhilippineAmerican Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh. 4 p.m. Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. SAVING THE PLANET: WHERE ARE WE IN MOVING AWAY FORM FOSSIL FUELS? 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House. 412-831-3871. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount

AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Sept. 28 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DANCE LESSON & WINE SESSION. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. THE NEIGHBORHOOD FLEA. Pop-up urban marketplace. 2300 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.neighborhoodflea.com 11 a.m.-4 p.m. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House. 724-516-0441.

MON 25 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 26 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. EVERYDAY EXERCISE FOR SENIORS. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.


HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. PITTSBURGH CAREER FAIR. 6-8 p.m. DoubleTree Monroeville, Monroeville. 847-428-1118.

music by Tania Grubbs, season preview, more. 6 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

NEW HORIZON THEATER. Auditions for Queens Of The Blues. Sept. 6. 4 African-American females mid 30’s-60 & 2 African-American males late 30’s-mid 50’s. newhorizontheater@yahoo.com. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA STUDENT CHORALE. Open to high BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT school students in grades APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. GROUP. For Widows/ 10-12, as well as college Auditions for Pinchpenny Widowers over 50. Second singers. Nominations due Phantom of the Opera. and Fourth Wed of every by Sept. 5. chfl218@gmail.com Aug. 23. Males/females in month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian 412-977-2047. their 30s. One male must be Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. a true tenor & one female BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN Auditions for Teen Dating a true soprano. Applications WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Awareness Program. for stage manager, Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Aug. 23-24. choreographer, technical Thru Aug. 27 Mount Lebanon Ages 14-24, director, carpenters, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. non-equity, 1-2 min. costumer, & property 412-531-1912. monologue. www. person also accepted. COUNTRY NIGHT LINE primestage.com lindak@applehill DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru www. per Prime Stage Theatre playhouse.org Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North pa pghcitym Rehearsal Studio, 724-468-5050 x 4. Fayette. 412-693-5555. .co West End. BACH CHOIR OF DETROIT STYLE URBAN STAGE RIGHT! Auditions PITTSBURGH. Auditions BALLROOM DANCE. for the 2014-2015 season. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. for the 2014-2015 Season. Aug. 26. Men/women, Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. Aug. 23. Adult actors only. prepare song of your choice & 412-242-4345. www.stagerightgreensburg.com bring music for accompanist. ENGLISH CONVERSATION David Mateer Center for the www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org/ (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Arts, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. join-us/ First Unitarian Church, Lebanon Public Library, UNDERCROFT OPERA. Shadyside. 412-241-4044. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Auditions for our 2014-2015 COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions FARMERS AT PHIPPS. season. Aug. 28-31. www. for Dearly Beloved. Aug. 22-23. Farmers’ market. Wed, undercroftopera.org/community/ www.comtratheatre.org 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 audition/ Waverly Presbyterian Cranberry. 724-591-8727. Phipps Conservatory & Church, Regent Square. HOPE ACADAMY ARTS. Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-422-7919. Auditions for HAT’s Teen 412-622-6914. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Auditions [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] for 2014 season. Aug. 20 & 24. Open to all string, woodwind, brass & percussion players On Fri., Aug. 29, the McKees Rocks Community enrolled in area high schools or colleges. wysorc@verizon.net Development Corporation hosts the sixth Annual Run Seton Hill University Performing Your Rox Off 5K Run and 1-Mile Walk. Volunteers are Arts Center, Greensburg. needed to help with all aspects of the evening race, 724-837-1850. including registration, greeting, water stations, concessions

WED 27

AUDITIONS

FULL LIST E N O LIN

RUN YOUR ROX OFF and more. Email contact@McKeesRocks.com or visit www.mckeesrocks.com for information.

IT’S EASY TO START EATING VEGAN! Presentation by Rebecca Gilbert, of Yummy Plants & Vegan Pittsburgh. Presented by the East End Food Co-op. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-242-3598. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. PREVIEW PARTY AT THE PUBLIC. Happy hour feat.

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Rock Band. Sept. 6. All instruments welcome, must make a commitment to Saturday rehearsals. www. hopeacademyarts.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR. Auditioning young singers. Visit www. themendelssohnchoir.org or call for information. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 412-926-2488. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for all voice parts. Call or visit www. themendelssohnchoir.org for information. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259.

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performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a twentysomething genetic male. I thought for a while that I might be trans, but while I hate my masculine features and want to be “cute,” I have no desire to be female. I’ve been with both boys and girls, and currently I’m with a trans girl. Recently I’ve found myself indulging in trans-girl porn. Is it insensitive to have a predilection for trans girls? My girlfriend wants to get sex-reassignment surgery (SRS), and while I support her wholeheartedly, I think she knows I’m happy with her current equipment and I don’t have any desire for her to go through with SRS. I believe she resents me for this. But my question is more of a catch-all: Is it insensitive to be attracted to trans (or intersex) girls? I don’t want to objectify anybody. I just think trans girls are real cuties. UNAVOIDABLE GENDER HULLABALOO

“Having a sexual preference — whether it’s liking guys with red hair, tall women, sports fans, blueeyed agender individuals, men with vaginas or women with penises — is fine,” said Parker Marie Molloy, a freelance writer and trans media activist whose writing has appeared in The N ew York Times and the Advocate and on Slate. “So long as the preference is not the sole reason for the attraction, so long as UGH remembers that trans people are actually human beings … and aren’t solely defined by their transness, UGH should be able to avoid coming off as creepy.” “As is the case with any sort of attraction, a preference crosses over into the realm of objectification only when the person’s potential love interest is reduced to a single aspect of their life,” said Molloy. “So UGH’s preference for trans women is only insensitive and objectifying if UGH makes it insensitive and objectifying.” No one wants to be reduced to a single aspect of their life by a romantic partner or anyone else. But being objectified in short, concentrated bursts by a lover isn’t a problem for most people — quite the opposite, in fact. While I had Molloy on the line, I asked her to address the issues of trans porn and SRS. “It’s no more wrong to indulge in trans porn than it is to indulge in porn starring or created by cis people,” said Molloy. “Whether UGH’s favorite trans-porn outlets are stories, pictures or drawings — or if they’re videos of mainstream trans porn stars like Bailey Jay or independent queer-feminist performers like Chelsea Poe — UGH shouldn’t feel ashamed. As to whether his girlfriend gets SRS, that’s something that has to be up to her. Quiet resentment, guilt and pressure to have or not have surgery should serve as signs that maybe this relationship doesn’t have much of a future. I suggest that the two of them have a long talk about genitals, preferences and deal breakers.” Follow Parker Marie Molloy on Twitter @ParkerMolloy.

BBW just how big she actually is — to determine if one will be attracted to her? BEFUDDLED BAFFLED WONDERER

If we were talking about personal ads on sites where people look for relationships — Match. com, OkCupid, Gun Lovers Passions, etc. — it would be rude to ask someone precisely how big she is. I would suggest going on a low-stakes, no-expectations date instead and having a look/ human interaction. But we’re not talking about a dating website, we’re talking NSA hookup ads on Craigslist. And when you’re in a meat market — literally or figuratively, physically or virtually — there’s nothing wrong with asking a polite, direct question about the meat on offer. I am a bi man married to a straight woman for 10 years. On a regular basis, we invite others into the bedroom for fun. We have one friend who we do this with weekly. Because he is here so often, a bit of his clothing and a few other essentials are stored in our guest room. We hide our monogamish lifestyle from those who might unfairly judge us, but we figured a few pieces of clothing and a friend who “crashes” with us on the weekends wouldn’t raise too many eyebrows, right? Wrong. My snooping mother-inlaw found a drawer with boxers that were obviously not my size, lube and a butt plug. She continued to snoop so that she could “find evidence if I was cheating.” She found gay pornography in our bedroom and a few ambiguous text messages. I’m infuriated at the invasion of our privacy. Now she thinks her daughter is married to a closeted gay man. I want to tell her the truth, but my wife does not. MIL is religious/conservative, and she may disown my wife if she finds out our marriage is often a threesome. What’s the right thing to do?

WHEN YOU’RE IN A MEAT MARKET, THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH ASKING A POLITE, DIRECT QUESTION ABOUT THE MEAT ON OFFER.

If a woman writes in her Craigslist hookup ad that she is a “bigger beautiful woman,” is there a polite way to press her for more details? Or is it rude to ask a self-proclaimed

NOT IN THE CLOSET

You should tell your MIL to shove her fucking money — the inheritance your wife might lose if her mother were to disown her — up her religious/conservative ass. (I can only assume the stress about being disowned involves an inheritance; otherwise, there is no downside to being disowned by this bitch.) But if your wife places a higher value on her mom’s money than on her independence and your right to marital privacy, she should tell her mother that the plug and the gay porn are hers. (Shrug off the ambiguous text messages.) Lots of straight married women with straight husbands enjoy gay porn. (Most slash fiction is written by and for straight women — why not send MIL some links?) It boils down to which will be the greater torment for your MIL (and therefore likelier grounds for disinheritance): the whole truth (her daughter and SIL are sinful, nonmonogamous pervs) or the face-saving lie (her daughter being a bit of a perv). On the Lovecast, is being kinky a sexual orientation? At savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

08.20-08.27

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The artist Amedeo Modigliani lived in Paris from 1906 until his death in 1920. For most of that time, he was destitute. Proprietors of local stores and restaurants sometimes accepted his art work as payment in lieu of actual money. They didn’t necessarily appreciate it, though. One food-seller used Modigliani’s drawings as wraps for the fried potatoes he sold. Another stashed the artist’s paintings in his cellar, where they turned into feasts for rodents. Too bad for these short-sighted people and their heirs: The worth of Modigliani’s works eventually increased, and some sold for millions of dollars. In the weeks ahead, Leo, don’t be like those food-sellers. Know the value of what you have, even if it’s still latent.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’ve got three new vocabulary words for you. I need them to provide you with the proper oracle. First is the German term Schwellenangst. It refers to timidity or nervousness about crossing a threshold and heading into unknown territory. The second word is a new English term, “strikhedonia.” It means the joy that rises up when you feel the courage to say “to hell with it.” The third word is from Portuguese: desenrascanço. It means the spontaneous improvisation of haphazard but ultimately effective plans. Now let’s put them all together: To conquer your Schwellenangst, you must summon a bolt of strikhedonia and have faith in your ability to carry out desenrascanço. (Thanks to other-wordly.tumblr.com for the new words.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Desire can conquer fear. Love trumps cowardice. The power that your tenderness affords you may not completely dissolve your doubt and worry, but it will quiet them down so much that they will lose their ability to paralyze you. These truths are always good to keep in mind, of course, but they are especially useful to you right now. No obstacle will faze you, no shadow will intimidate you, as long as you feed your holy longing and unshakable compassion.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): On Aug. 2, 1830, Louis Antoine, Duke of Angoulême, was King of France for 20 minutes. (It’s a long story.) I offer this to you as a cautionary tale. A few weeks from now, I don’t want to have to be comparing you to him. If you hope to hold your new position or continue to wield your added clout for longer than just a little while, you should take all necessary steps. How? Nurture the web of support that will sustain you, for example. Don’t burn a single bridge. Cultivate real empathy, not just the showy kind. Avoid manipulative behavior, even if you think you can get away with it. Be a skillful gatherer of information.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Golda Meir was prime minister of Israel from 1969 to 1974. Her admirers described her as the “strong-willed, straight-talking, grey-bunned grandmother of the Jewish people.” She had a good sense of humor, too. “Let me tell you the one thing I have against Moses,” she said. “He took us 40 years into the desert in order to bring us to the one place in the Middle East that has no oil.” I bring this up as a teaching story for you, Sagittarius. If you plan to make any big moves, transitions or journeys in the coming months, I suggest you choose destinations that will allow you to gain access to wealthbuilding resources.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Do you know what phase of your cycle it is? Here are a few hints. It doesn’t come around often. It’s not characterized by predictable events or boring certainties. And it may allow you, even encourage you, to take a break from being your usual self. Give up? OK. I’ll tell you. You have entered the Nicolas Cage Phase of your cycle. Cage is a Capricorn, but not a typical one. He’s eccentric and manic and certifiably batty. He refers to his acting technique as “Nouveau Shamanic,” once lived in a fake castle, and owns a Lamborghini that belonged to the legendary tyrant, the Shah of Iran. For our current purposes, he has also testified, “I am not a demon. I am a lizard, a shark, a heat-seeking panther. I want to be Bob Denver on acid playing the accordion.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s one of my goals in life, Aquarius: to show you a type of astrology that does not infringe on your free will, but rather clarifies your options. In this horoscope, for instance, I will outline your alternatives so that you will be fully informed as you determine what course of action will be most closely aligned with your high ideals. Ponder the following question, and then briskly exert your freedom of choice: Would you prefer to have love make your head spin, knock you off your feet, tickle your X-factor, kick you gently but firmly in the ass, or all of the above?

while fully expressing his competitiveness. He satirized his ego’s drive to be first and best even as he achieved the goal of being first and best. I recommend you try something similar. You’re entering a phase when you’ll be wise to add a bit of humility to your bold self-presentation.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are about to make the transition from plodding to skipping; from moping to exulting. You will no longer be bogged down by cloudy doubt, but will instead be buoyed by giddy hope. To what do we owe this imminent turnaround in your fortunes? One reason is that it’s Justifiable Narcissism Week — for Tauruses only. During this jubilee, the Free Will Astrology Council on Extreme Self-Esteem authorizes you to engage in unabashed self-worship — and to corral a host of other people who want to join in celebrating you, praising you and helping you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An eagle does not catch flies. A lion won’t hunt for mice. A gourmet chef shuns recipes that call

for canned soup and potato chips. And I trust that you won’t indulge a hankering for nonnutritious sweets and treats that would spoil your appetite for more robust sustenance. You understand I’m not just talking about your literal eating habits, right? Interpret this oracle metaphorically, please.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now is an excellent time to phase out fantasies that bog you down or drag you backward. Are you up for that challenge? Can you summon the courage to leave the mediocre past behind? If so, here are your assignments: Wean yourself of longings to reconstruct bygone pleasures. Forget about trying to be like the person you used to be and to have the keys you used to have. Stop feeding the feelings that keep you affixed to obsolete goals. Break any taboo that makes you scared to change what needs to be changed. What idea, feeling, or attitude are you enslaved to? What can you do to escape your slavery? Write Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “God changes caterpillars into butterflies, sand into pearls and coal into diamonds by using time and pressure,” says pastor Rick Warren. “He is working on you, too.” Let’s make that idea your meditation, Pisces. If the word “God” doesn’t suit you, substitute “life,” “nature” or “Wakan Tanka,” the Lakotan term for “The Great Mystery.” The essential point is that you are being worked on and shaped by forces beyond your conscious awareness. Some of them are vast and impersonal, like your culture, the media and the entertainment industry. Others are intimate and close at hand, like your genes, your childhood imprints and the characters you encounter daily. Now is an excellent time to contemplate all the influences that make you who you are.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): An American named Kevin Shelley accomplished a feat worthy of inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records. While wearing a blue satin martial-arts outfit, he smashed 46 wooden toilet seats over his head in just one minute. Some observers may be inclined to dismiss his efforts as frivolous and ridiculous. But I admire how he playfully mocked his own competitiveness

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

PAGE WORK

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Work for a Major Cultural Institution!

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

HELP WANTED

MODELS

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

MODELS: Women wanted for figure modeling. Good pay, same day.

724-553-9766 Lv. Message

Seeking outgoing, committed people for P/T position Immediate openings Call Brittany (412)-622-8849

Your ad could be here

412.316.3342

50 PAGE

LIVE

50 PAGE

STUDIES

50

STUDIES

Squirrel Hill Duplex

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

2 units avl. 2BR or 3BR. Eq. kitch w/dishwasher, h/w flrs, gar, w/d, near bus, univ. & shops.

PAGE SERVICES

EAST FOR RENT

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2BR $1,295 Avl Immed, 3BR $1,595 avl 9/1.

LIVE

STUDIES

STUDIES

Call for pictures. 703-899-5246 REAL ESTATE SERVICES

PAGE WELLNESS

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ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

ESTATE SALE B.O.G.O.

ESTATE SALE Saturday August 23rd Furn. (100 pieces), Antiques, Collectables, etc. For information/pictures go to escpgh.com

STORAGE

STUDIES

ABC SELF STORAGE

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS?

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

/ PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

GOUT? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers. This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking. Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999


TITLE:

Global BAU COE Analyst DUTIES: • Responsible for protecting, maintaining and extending the SAP Global Template solution to ensure maximum availability of the service. • Ensure all incidents impacting the SAP solution are resolved efficiently and effectively by the AMS service. • Manage support of AMS during incidents and problem resolution. • Raise Change Requests based on full requirements and business case delivered from Business Relationship Manager/ Business Analysts. • Responsible for protecting the stability of the SAP solution from high risk implementations. • Collaborate with the application and infrastructure design groups to provide assistance to solution design. • Execute project deliverables and activities as identified and confirmed with the Project COE team. • Responsible for SAP configuration execution either directly or through AMS or Project COE expertise. • Perform regression and ad-hoc testing and defect tracking and resolution.

REQUIREMENTS: Master’s degree in Computer Information Systems or equivalent. Knowledge of and/or experience in SAP implementation projects. Knowledge of and/or experience in SAP Logistics Execution module, including Warehouse Management and Handling Unit Management, and SAP tools such as Solution Manager, HP Quality Center (HPQC), Microsoft Sharepoint, and eDesk. Experience in documentation, testing, training, and defect tracking in Global SAP implementation. Employer will accept any combination of education, experience, and training that is equivalent to a Master’s Degree in Computer Information Systems as determined by a credential evaluator including a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering plus five years of progressive, post –baccalaureate experience in the specialty. Job location: Pittsburgh, PA.

IF INTERESTED SEND RESUME TO: HJ Heinz Company, Attn: C. Smarrelli, One PPG Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

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CLASSES Ads . TV . Film . Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

CLASSES

Adopting your newborn is our Dream. Security, family, and endless love awaits! Natasha & Will 800-955-5181 Exp. Paid

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

GENERAL FOR SALE

ADOPTION

1-800-492-8842 Kristen & Richard

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888992-1957 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

Adopt:

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

Adventurous, Successful Professionals, Camping, Skiing, Music awaits 1st baby.

Expenses Paid

Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love.

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

*Stuff We Like Scout Dog Collars Locally made, sturdy dog collars in all manner of stylish designs — even a gay-pride rainbow pattern! Named for the owner’s dog, rescued from the side of the road. www.scoutdogcollars.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNY KARLSSON}

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

The Last Magazine Reporter Michael Hastings’ posthumously published novel is a mordantly funny takedown of his former employer (Newsweek) in the early 2000s, and the media’s blind rush to support the invasion of Iraq.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 23, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for five Service Contracts (General Prime) at Various schools for the following: • Roofing • Masonry • Fire Extinguisher and Fire Hoses

Tom Friday’s Market This popular neighborhood butcher shop can get crowded, but it’s a great stop for reasonably priced, high-quality meats, with quick no-nonsense service no matter how busy. Try the bulk breakfast sausage or the stuffed pork chops. 3639 California Ave., Brighton Heights

The Trials of Muhammad Ali This 2013 doc is a fascinating account of Ali’s conversion to Islam, his conscientious objection to the Vietnam War, and the ensuing trials he endured, from the court of public opinion to the Supreme Court. On DVD and various streaming services

• General Construction • Asbestos, Lead Based Paint, Mold and Animal Excrement Abatement Services; Repair, Restoration and Re-insulation

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on August 18, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

National Bike Challenge Maybe the best reason to join some 44,000 riders nationally, racking up miles and raising cycling awareness through Sept. 30, is local: You’ll help Pittsburgh retain its crown in the perennial Rust Belt Battle of the Bikes against Cleveland. www.nationalbikechallenge.org

Crabbie’s Ginger Beer This alcoholic ginger beer is a nice change of pace for beer and cider fans. The company is based in Edinburgh, Scotland, but you can find Crabbie’s at a few local bars, including Belvedere’s, in Lawrenceville.


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown

Chinese Bodyworks

412-401-4110

Therapeutic Massage

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

MASSAGE

/

STAR

WELLNESS

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

MASSAGE

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Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

massage Therapy

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Mon. – Sat. 10am-9:30pm Sunday 2pm-9:30pm

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MASSAGE

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1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

McKees Rocks

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TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

724-519-2950

Credit Cards Accepted

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Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

330-373-0303

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WELLNESS

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

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Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

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- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

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www.glenbeigh.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.20/08.27.2014

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com


MAKE OR BREAK

Could an upstart apprenticeship program hold the key to Pittsburgh’s future? {BY CHRIS POTTER} THE PITTSBURGH SUCCESS STORY goes something like this: Once the steel mills closed down, we turned away from manufacturing and doubled down on investments in finance, medicine and higher education. We exchanged our union cards for college diplomas. At age 29, Joshua Bannister’s success story is still being written. But so far, it doesn’t sound much like the “young person in Pittsburgh” narrative we’ve been getting used to. Bannister, who grew up east of Pittsburgh, once worked in the mortgage department for a major national bank. “I started out in collections, and that was terrible,” he says. And while he got transferred to another department, the bank “kept cutting my pay. Every job I’ve had, something like that has happened.” It got him interested in unions, on the theory that “if everybody could get together, [employers] couldn’t do this to us.’” So Bannister sought a job in the building trades, taking welding classes at CCAC and doing a union apprenticeship at the Steamfitters. But he was also an early participant in “The Makership Project,” an apprenticeship program offered by the workertraining initiative Made Right Here.

on what individuals wanted, and find where that overlapped with employers.” Lynch says the technology also allows craftspeople to become engineers — to heal what she calls “a disconnect between the head and the hand.” In much of America today, she says, “There’s almost shame in using your hands. Every parent who did manufacturing told their kids, ‘Don’t do what I did; go to college.’” That might be especially true in Pittsburgh, a place once synonymous with American industrial might. Today, manufacturing plays a smaller role here than in places like Chicago or Cleveland, and even in hipster havens like Seattle and Portland. These days, “[y]ou don’t see a lot of 24-year-olds in manufacturing,” says Stefani Pashman, who heads the Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board. As aging workers retire with no one to replace them, she says, Pittsburgh risks “losing long-term talent.” One reason for that, Pashman surmises, is that since the steel industry’s collapse, manufacturing is now widely regarded as suspect — a relic of the Pittsburgh that was. “We have to overcome the stigma that comes with our history.”

“YOU DON’T SEE A LOT OF 24-YEAR-OLDS IN MANUFACTURING.” Made Right Here seeks to reinvigorate manufacturing by tapping into the “maker movement”: a much-ballyhooed trend in which technologies like 3-D printing allow participants to blend a do-it-yourself ethos with a socially networked community. Operating from Bakery Square’s TechShop — a community-based workshop where members use computer-driven machinery and shop-class stand-bys alike — the program offers participants a chance to explore a range of tools and techniques. Bannister was taking welding classes at CCAC and union-apprentice programs, but the Makership exposed him to a range of other skills. He learned soldering, metalworking and technologies like 3-D printing. The last didn’t interest him much — “You hit two buttons and it just works while you watch” — but overall the program “was a lot of fun. They paid for the classes we took, and we were really trying to discover our interests.” Bannister might not be a typical Makership participant: While many makers dream of starting new businesses, and even new industries, he’d sought a traditional job in an established field. (Today, he works as a pipefitter.) But he learned a range of skills that might come in handy someday … and anyway, the point of the Makership is that there aren’t typical participants. The program seeks to “enable the future that people want,” says Bernie Lynch, project director of Made Right Here. With backers that include Carnegie Mellon University and the state AFL-CIO, “We wanted to make sure the focus was

Pashman’s group is the agent for a $3 million grant Made Right Here received from the federal government, money intended to demonstrate the approach’s feasibility. If successful, the model could reunite more than just hand and head. It could resolve the town-and-gown divide of Pittsburgh’s new economy, connecting college kids and knowledge workers with the working class. Lynch, for one, envisions a time just a few years from now when “[w]ithin our city, we will have 100,000- or 200,000-square-foot urban manufacturing spaces.” That’s the vision that President Barack Obama spelled out while visiting the TechShop this summer. Back in Pittsburgh’s heyday, noted Obama, “[M]anufacturing meant big factories, all kinds of smoke and fire, and a lot of heavy capital. But because of advances in technology … the tools that are needed for production and prototypes are now democratized.” Then again, take it from a journalist: New technologies can be something of a mixed bag, job-security-wise. It only takes a day at TechShop to learn how to work with files that can, for example, instruct a precision water-cutter to carve a slab of granite into an intricate shape. As Lynch acknowledges, “Just as lawyers are being replaced with computer software, engineers can be too.” But Bannister is optimistic. After his Makership, he says, “I’d definitely like to have my own company” someday. And even oldline trades might be more creative than they appear. “When I’m welding,” he says, “I feel like I’m painting.” C POT T ER@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LU

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GIVEAWAY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 23 & 30

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KIOSK DRAWING

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM Must have valid ID. Earn entries August 11 at 6:00am through August 30 at 7:59pm. Must be present to win. 25 base points = 1 entry. Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Car options include 2014 Mercedes-Benz® CLA45 AMG®, 2014 Lexus® GS 350 and 2014 BMW® 143W 328xi S. Lexus® is a registered trademark of Toyota Motor Corporation. BMW® is a registered trademark of Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Corporation. Mercedes-Benz® and CLA45 AMG® are registered trademarks of Daimler AG Corporation.

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August 20, 2014