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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 08.13/08.20.2014

UP THE CREEK: JUST HOW SAFE IS SWIMMING IN THE THREE RIVERS? 14

EVENTS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

{EDITORIAL}

08.13/08.20.2014 {COVER PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 33

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

relocation is completely contrary 16 “The to the mission of the agency and … will disenfranchise a vulnerable immigration population.” — Excerpt from a letter sent by staff at Pittsburgh’s federal immigration office, protesting the office’s planned relocation to Wilkins Township

[TASTE]

ribs were so good, they didn’t 20 “These even need sauce.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth on Brookline BBQ

[MUSIC]

you’re from here or you’re a 25 “Iftransplant, it attracts you — it’s like

a magnet, it has a pull.” — Jennifer Baron, of The Garment District, on returning to Pittsburgh after a decade in New York

[SCREEN]

a drawing-room comedy of 33 “It’s manners that lays out most of its cards

early and plainly.” — Al Hoff on Woody Allen’s Magic in the Moonlight

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

38 SPECIAL

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

law requires department heads 36 “The to actively request works of art —

seldom a priority, especially in cashstrapped times.” — Bill O’Driscoll on one shortcoming of Pittsburgh’s “percent for art” law

[LAST PAGE]

me six months before I could 54 “Itplaytook a few songs. It’s that challenging

— and physically demanding.” — Pipe major Bud Brizuela on the rigors of playing bagpipes

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 STUFF WE LIKE 51 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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INCOMING

“WE ARE TIRED OF BURYING OUR CHILDREN.”

Re: “Classroom Experiment” (Aug. 6) I want to respond to the comments by Alan Lesgold, dean of Pitt’s School of Education. He blames the lack of success [at the Pittsburgh Public Schools’ UPrep program] on the teachers’ union. As one who has spent most of his professional life teaching, I have the utmost respect for teachers and believe that they, like all others, deserve the rights and dignity afforded by a powerful union. In the U.S., the overwhelming majority of top-performing states have teacher unions. Conversely, the overwhelming majority of the low-performing states do not have teacher unions. Internationally, many of the topperforming countries have strong teacher unions. How could this be if unions were as detrimental as their critics claim? Currently, teachers make no decisions but are blamed for all poor performance. I think that I speak for all teachers when I say give us control over curriculum, budgets and policies and we will gladly accept responsibility for all educational outcomes. Until then, if you need to blame, blame the people making the decisions. — Tom Gordon Professor of Elementary and Early Childhood Education, Slippery Rock University

Re: “The Talking Cure” (Aug. 6) Might does not make right. What’s right is that UPMC be held to the same standards as ALL the taxpayers of the city. I am going to bet that once again, UPMC is going to come out ahead and the city and its taxpayers are going to get the short end of the stick. UPMC came out ahead with the Pittsburgh Promise as well: It was a quid pro quo where UPMC agreed to fund this program in lieu of being spared property and payroll taxes. However, if one adds up all the taxes the city lost with this agreement, and what UPMC has paid into [the Promise program], UPMC clearly has benefited, while the city has not. — Comment posted by “James Nih”

6

DOING THEMSELVES

JUSTICE

Group urges increased community role in preventing, solving crime {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

O

N A HOT June day, 34-year-old Autumn Perkins and about a dozen others set out from New Life AME Church in Homewood with water bottles and flyers in hand. They went into bars, barbershops and convenience stores. Their goal: to get people to come forward with information about homicides in the community. “A lot of people know who’s out here doing the killing,” said Perkins. “But a lot of them are scared of retaliation, and they don’t trust the police enough.” The “peace walk” in Homewood was organized by We Need Justice Too, an organization founded by Perkins and various local community groups. Made up mostly of individuals who’ve had a family member violently injured or killed, the group’s approximately 50 active members have spent the past few months working to reduce violence in their communities. Perkins herself lost the father of her three children, who was killed in July 2013: His killer has never been found. And as the death toll in Pittsburgh rises, she worries about her children, especially her oldest son, who is set to start high school this fall. “It’s so bad out here right now, it’s scary,” says Perkins. “I grew up when gang-banging was bad and it was not this bad then. I’m scared for my kids. All

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

{PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

We Need Justice Too member Charlie Ragan comforts a mother whose son was shot on a nearby corner.

these mothers are out here grieving for their children.” “The group started very organically,” says Shannon Williams, an organizer with gun-control group CeaseFirePA. Perkins “had enough and she wanted to do something about it.” But Perkins and her group are up against steep odds. The city has seen a sharp increase in homicides, with 11 people killed in July alone. So far, some 44 homicides have been committed in

Pittsburgh this year. At that pace, Pittsburgh may match or beat a record for homicides set in 1993. We Need Justice Too was created after the February murders of Susan and Sarah Wolfe, two white sisters who were killed in East Liberty. A suspect was arrested less than a month later, and group members started wondering why so many murders in the black community remain unsolved. Of the 214 unsolved homicides between 2004 and 2013, 85 percent CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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involve black victims. “I think the homicide detectives should be held accountable for all of the unsolved homicides,” says group member Connie Moore, whose son was killed and whose murder remains unsolved. “I don’t think they’re doing all they can do.” Police, meanwhile, say they need more help from the community. “There have been numerous shootings when there have been people around and yet no one comes forward,” counters Sonya Toler, spokesperson for the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police. “We can’t ask for help unless we’re willing to help ourselves,” agrees Charlie Ragan, another member and producer of Peace Pittsburgh, a program on violence that airs on public-access cable channel PCTV. That’s why We Need Justice is fo-

cusing on community outreach, calling on residents to come forward with information on homicides. Organizers have teamed up with a number of activist organizations including CeaseFirePA. Jay Gilmer, director of the Pittsburgh Initiative to Reduce Crime, is a fixture at We Need Justice meetings. He provides them with information on public-safety procedures and connects the group with law-enforcement officials. “I like to support any individual or group who’s attempting to reduce violence,” Gilmer says. “We won’t get anywhere if we’re working in silos,” says Williams. During their walk through Homewood in June, the 15 participants ranged from convicted felons to city officials, including Corey Buckner, special assistant CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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DOING THEMSELVES JUSTICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

to Mayor Bill Peduto. They handed out information on education and job opportunities, gun safety and how to submit anonymous information to the police. But they also hoped their presence would send a message to criminals that the community will not tolerate any more murders. “A lot of communities don’t do this,” said Chaunte Bryant-Davis, from partner organization Fathers Who Care Foundation. “I think we should do one of these in every neighborhood.” Along the way, participants stopped to comfort a woman sitting on her front stoop. As her grandson peered out from the front door, she explained how all four of her children had died. One had been shot just around the corner. “They need to know there’s people who care,” said We Need Justice member Tonya Raeberry, whose brother was shot and paralyzed. But anti-violence groups face a series of challenges. The We Need Justice Facebook group,

for one, has garnered almost 5,000 members. But getting people to show up for meetings and activities has been more difficult. “If the community doesn’t step up and speak out, nothing’s going to happen,” Perkins says. Encouraging residents to step forward may have gotten harder after 15-yearold Leroy Powell was shot and killed in Duquesne last week. Powell had testified as a witness in a preliminary hearing on a homicide case the week before. “When the little boy got killed, that put people right back at square one,” Perkins says. “People have to talk to the police to help solve the crimes that plague our community,” says Ragan. “But if the police don’t protect witnesses, they become victims. This is why people won’t talk. The police and community must do a better job of working together.” Police spokesperson Toler cautions against drawing too many conclusions from Powell’s death: Powell, she says, “was not in protective custody.” She says

“PEOPLE HAVE TO TALK TO THE POLICE TO HELP SOLVE THE CRIMES THAT PLAGUE OUR COMMUNITY. BUT IF THE POLICE DON’T PROTECT WITNESSES, THEY BECOME VICTIMS.”

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witness protection is available to anyone who comes forward with information in a homicide. We Need Justice’s next action, a rally at the City-County Building Downtown, is scheduled for Aug. 29. There they will call on city leaders to make reducing violence a priority. “We are tired of burying our children,” says Ragan. “We are asking all public officials, clergy, community leaders and concerned citizens to come together and work on solutions.” Among their demands is the implementation of a ShotSpotter surveillance system, approved by city council in June 2013. The system uses cameras and microphones to quickly notify police when and where a shooting occurs, but to date it hasn’t been installed. Even though the system was approved last year, a contract with ShotSpotter Inc. wasn’t signed until this past May. “The cameras were supposed to have been up months ago,” says Perkins. “We’ve been hearing ‘cameras, cameras, cameras.’ There’s been how many homicides in the last few weeks and we still have no cameras.” At a press conference last week, Public Safety Director Stephen Bucar identified drug trafficking as a driving force behind the spike in homicides. But Perkins believes police should focus on gun trafficking as well. “We need a gun task force going just

as hard,” Perkins says. “These days, when kids have a feud, they don’t fight — they just pull out a gun. It’s too easy for them to get a gun.” Perkins says she has seen an increase in the number of street patrols in her neighborhood, and the city has pledged to increase patrols in Zone 5 which has seen the greatest number of homicides recently. Five of last month’s 11 homicides were in Zone 5. “Since Mayor Peduto has been in office, I’ve seen more police out here on bicycles. He seems to want to help the community,” Perkins says. “I’m not just going to blame the police: There’s blame that goes all around.” “We can’t police ourselves out of this situation,” Toler says. “We can’t afford to put a cop on every block, and the community would not want to be in that situation: It would be a militarized zone.” Councilor Rev. Ricky Burgess, who proposed the ShotSpotter system for Homewood, agrees. While he couldn’t say how soon the system would be fully implemented, he says it’s only a shortterm solution. “The real problem is concentrated poverty,” Burgess says. “Without resources in the community, violence is bound to happen.” But, he adds, “When you have these community groups where people are encouraging their neighbors to come forward, it’s important.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Despite improvements in water quality, risks of river recreation can be hard to measure {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} JIM WRUBEL, president of the Pittsburgh

Triathlon Club, has never swum in the city’s rivers — and he doesn’t plan to start anytime soon. “I don’t want to be in these rivers regardless of fecal coliform count,” he says, referring to levels of sewage contamination. The Aug. 3 Pittsburgh Triathlon offered little incentive for Wrubel to change his mind. As City Paper reported online last week, some triathlon participants were likely exposed to levels of fecal bacteria that qualify as unsafe under state guidelines. Some participants say they felt misled by a chart posted near the starting line, which displayed bacterial counts which they interpreted as showing the Allegheny River’s water quality as safe. But those samples were taken before a Saturday-evening storm triggered a sewer overflow warning, likely releasing raw sewage into the river. At least one participant was hospitalized, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. John Stephen, who created the chart as the founder of Pittsburgh Triathlon host Friends of the Riverfront, expressed regret, saying he was trying to give athletes more information about water safety. “Everyone deserves more and better information about the quality of our river,” says Stephen. But on race day, he says, there can be “a large gray area.” It is, in fact, nearly impossible to conduct real-time monitoring of river water quality. Bacterial cultures typically take about 24 hours to grow, and no one is regularly testing the water to ensure it’s safe for recreational purposes. That complicates events like the annual triathlon, where organizers have struggled to make sense of bacterial counts, and to figure out how to inform athletes of the risks of getting into the water. How confident should the public be in the water’s safety? And are the rivers consistently clean enough to encourage any large-scale swimming events? In Pittsburgh, one of the main tools to determine whether the rivers are safe is the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority’s sewer-overflow advisory system, which alerts people when there is a chance that sewers are flooded with rainwater to the point that they might

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH QUESEN}

The chart that Pittsburgh Triathalon participants saw the morning of the Aug. 3 event.

be spilling untreated sewage into local waterways. (ALCOSAN says the warnings don’t guarantee that sewage is backing up into rivers and streams — just that it could, according to authority spokesperson Jeanne Clark.) In dry weather, the rivers almost certainly meet state and federal bacteria standards, says John Schombert, executive director of 3 Rivers Wet Weather. But Pittsburgh summers rarely lack for rainy periods. “Historically … it’s about 50 percent of the recreational season that’s been affected by overflows,” Schombert says. This past June, ALCOSAN issued seweroverflow advisories on 11 of the month’s 30 days. But ALCOSAN cautions that the river might be “impaired” for up to 48 hours after an overflow, meaning 23 out of 30 days in June included potentially compromised river water. In July, 15 out of 31 days might have included higher-thannormal bacteria counts. The question, says Schombert, “is how long after these overflows stop does the river water quality return to normal?” At least one municipality with similar sewer problems has tried to answer that question with smartphone apps and

a trove of data. In response to a consent decree with the federal government, the Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati developed a model to predict water quality based on how previous weather events affected bacterial levels. The agency’s website and a “Recr8OhioRiver” app allow users to plug in a type of recreational activity, and predict how risky the activity will be for about two days into the future. Since “each [overflow] size is different, each rain event is different,” it didn’t make much sense to just issue 48-hour warnings every time there was a potential overflow, explains project manager Laith Alfaqih. “You want to give better public control over how they recreate.” So far, the predictions appear to be solid: Alfaqih says that when predictions were compared with actual water samples, the model proved about 90 percent accurate. But while the smartphone app can be effective for casual users, Jonathan Grinder — race director for Cincinnati’s annual triathlon — says he’s “not going to rely on predictive data” when deciding to call off a race. That’s partly because he gets hard data from the Ohio River Valley Sanitation Commission on the Thursday and Friday before a Sunday race. Grinder acknowledges that when bacteria levels are borderline, there can be pressure to hold an event as scheduled. A few years ago, he canceled the triathlon because of heavy rain on a Thursday before the race. “People were upset because they wanted to swim and the river looked beautiful,” Grinder recalls, “We had to cancel it because it was arguable whether it was safe or not — and if it’s arguable, it isn’t safe.” S a ra h Qu e s e n, t h e open-water swim leader for the Pittsburgh Triathlon Club, has a different take. She’s led open-water swims for the past five years, and never seen an athlete get sick. While she has an admittedly unscientific system for gauging whether the water is unhealthy — “it’s basically based on the rainfall” — she thinks that as long as athletes are properly informed of the risks, they should be allowed to swim. Even if bacteria counts are higher than the standards allow. “I’m worried people will get the idea that swimming in the river is gross,” she says. “It’s never the same river twice.”

“EVERYONE DESERVES MORE AND BETTER INFORMATION ABOUT THE QUALITY OF OUR RIVER.”

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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SUBURBAN EXILE

Peduto urges U.S. immigration office to remain in city {BY CHRIS POTTER} NINE MONTHS after City Paper reported

that the U.S. government plans to relocate Pittsburgh’s immigration office to a suburban office park, local officials — and office employees — are raising concerns about the move. Pittsburgh’s office of the United States Citizen and Immigration Services, which oversees lawful immigration, is headquartered at SouthSide Works. But last year the government decided to relocate CIS to the Penn Center East VII building, in Wilkins Township. The proposal raised concerns among observers, including immigration attorneys, who felt the new location would be less accessible. Now, 10 staffers in the office have issued a public letter objecting to the move. “The relocation is completely contrary to the mission of the agency and … will disenfranchise a vulnerable immigrant population,” said the July 14 letter, which was sent to the local congressional delegation, along with Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. Staffers were wary of being quoted in a newspaper. “This really isn’t about us,” one staffer told City Paper. “It’s about the clients we serve.” In February, immigration attorneys expressed concern about the move in a meeting with Peduto, who has sought to make Pittsburgh more welcoming to immigrants. And mayoral spokesperson Tim McNulty says Peduto intends to send a letter this week — possibly as this issue goes to press — to Pennsylvania’s Senators Bob Casey and Pat Toomey, “asking that the center be kept where it is.” “A lot of the emerging immigrant population is in the south of the city, and it’s important they have access to transportation,” McNulty says, though he adds that Peduto’s “power is somewhat limited” when it comes to reversing decisions by the federal government. The move, which is slated for the end of 2014, affects the South Side office, where hearings are held and immigrants meet with caseworkers, and a Downtown “Application Support Center,” where immigrants are fingerprinted. Immigrants typically visit each location at least once. Speaking on background, a USCIS official said the new space would be more “efficient and customer-friendly,” because it would “eliminate[e] the need for [clients] to travel to multiple

locations during the application process.” But Wilkins receives far less bus service than Pittsburgh’s South Side. “The burden is going to increase tremendously, with increased travel time and possible lost wages” for immigrants, says Elizabeth Waickman, spokesperson for Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Pittsburgh. The agency serves roughly 450 immigrants each year: Most are concentrated in Carrick and other South Hills neighborhoods, Waickman says, and 90 percent of them rely on the bus. According to one CIS staffer, in an average day, about three dozen people come to the fingerprinting office alone. Fingerprinting takes less than 15 minutes: A roundtrip bus ride from Downtown to Wilkins on the 67 bus, meanwhile, takes more than two hours. “If they’re taking a bus from Carrick, maybe it takes a couple hours to manage their appointment,” Waickman says. “But for a trip to Monroeville, that could be a whole day, which may mean calling off work.” Jim Ritchie, a spokesman for the Port Authority, says that while the transit agency is adding service to some new routes, it’s focusing on “routes that are currently packed to the gills.” The 67 is not slated for a change, he says. Service can be added when new housing or job centers open, Ritchie notes, in which case “we schedule a meeting to review the impact it might have.” No one has asked for such a meeting related to the USCIS relocation, he says. The Wilkins site was chosen by the General Services Administration; GSA spokesperson Gina Blythe Gilliam previously told CP that Wilkins offered the lowest price for meeting space and other requirements. Elected officials say they want to hear more about that rationale. “We’ve received the [USCIS staffers’] letter, and we’re looking forward to what GSA has to say,” says John Rizzo, a spokesman for Sen. Casey. Concerns about transit access helped overturn similar proposed relocations in Portland, Ore., and Minneapolis, but that may not happen here. Last year, Gilliam told City Paper the government’s decision was final, and did not signal a change as of press time. “I think this is definitely happening,” says Waickman.

“THE RELOCATION IS COMPLETELY CONTRARY TO THE MISSION OF THE AGENCY.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

On the move? For over 50 years, Port Authority has helped commuters get where they need to go. Today, more than 215,000 daily riders use Port Authority bus, light rail, incline and paratransit service. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t considered public transportation in the past, try it today. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much faster, cheaper, more convenient and more environmentally-friendly than driving. Save time. More than a dozen express routes use Port Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three exclusive busways and the HOV lanes. Also, the T provides rapid service to Downtown Pittsburgh, the North Shore and southern communities. Save money. Save hundreds of dollars annually by purchasing discounted Port Authority passes. Save energy. Your energy! Port Authority ConnectCards offer an easy and more convenient way to pay fares. Save the environment. Port Authority has 32 eco-friendly hybrid electric buses to help improve the air we breathe. Go to onthemove.portauthority.org to receive more information and a special offer.

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HARKS PLACE

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

SHADYSIDE’S NEWEST GASTROPUB NOW OPEN

36 Craft Beers on Tap. Farm to Table. Gourmet Pub Food. 736 BELLEFONTE STREET • SHADYSIDE

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CHRIS HIGBEE @ 7PM DONORA / DANCING QUEEN @ 7PM KELSEY FRIDAY / RADIO TOKYO @ 7PM

CAFE / STEEL CACTUS / WILLIAM PENN TAVERN PARTICIPATING SPONSORS //////// THESHADYYARDGROVE/ CAPPY’S

S H A DYS I D E ’ S EC L EC T I C SP O RTS TAV E R N Satellite Sports Programming NFL Game Day ESPN College Game Plan NHL Hockey • NBA Hoops NCAA Hoops and GOOD FOOD

7 3 9 B E L L E F O N T E S T. 412.621.1000 KITCHEN OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT DAILY HAPPY HOUR 5PM - 7PM FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS N E W S

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THE FLAVORS OF RICH PORK MELDED DELICIOUSLY WITH THE AROMA OF THE FIRE

BAR-B-CONE {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} As the number of food trucks in the Pittsburgh area continues to grow, it’s important for vendors to have something that sets them apart. Several trucks offer staples like burgers, pierogies and hot dogs. But only the South Side BBQ Company truck offers the Bar-B-Cone. In a homemade waffle cone are layered pepper-jack macaroni and cheese, followed by pulled pork and coleslaw, with barbecue sauce and jalapenos on top. Best eaten with a fork, the cone’s ingredients combine to create a dish that is spicy with a hint of sweet. The cone, which might seem an odd pairing for a savory dish, actually complements the mix of flavors. But if the Bar-B-Cone isn’t your taste, the truck, known as the “CarnivoreMobile,” also offers more traditional barbeque fare, including: pulled pork, chicken, and brisket sandwiches; ribs; cornbread; and peach cobbler. South Side BBQ was founded by brothers Mike and Pat Joyce, who wanted to bring their love of Southern cuisine to Pittsburgh. The food is cooked using an onboard smoker they say is “known in the barbeque industry as the Cadillac of smokers.” As a result of the truck’s success, in July, the Joyce family opened The South Side BBQ Restaurant, at 75 S. 17th St. But if you’ve got a hankering for the Bar-B-Cone, you can stay abreast of the truck’s location via Twitter (@Southsidebbqco), or catch it at the weekly Wednesday food-truck roundup at the Pittsburgh Public Market in the Strip. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412-892-8566 or www.southsidebbqcompany.com

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FEED

Inspired by the rise of food trucks enough to start your own?

Stop by this free informal session at the Downtown Carnegie Library to learn about the rules and regulations, best practices and drafting a business plan. Local vendors and county officials will be on hand to provide tips and info. Bagged lunches welcome. 12:15 p.m. Thu., Aug. 14. 612 Smithfield St., Downtown. 412-281-7141

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BROOKLINE BBQ {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

G

O OUTSIDE and take a deep breath.

Dare to wear a white shirt. Pittsburgh, the former Smoky City, has long ago cleaned up its act, and the rest of the world is even starting to catch on. But there is one area where 21st-century Pittsburgh could use more smoke, and that is its barbecue. Sure, we’ve got plenty of barbecue places, from sidewalk smokers to sit-down restaurants, that have mastered the art of slow-cooked meat slathered in sauce, and some of it is quite tasty. But the true essence of barbecue is succulent meat thoroughly infused with real wood smoke, and here, despite a national resurgence of the art of smoking, our fair city still lags behind. That’s why we are so thrilled to report that Bama’s Southern Kitchen delivers the smoke. Though unassuming on the outside, Bama’s storefront along the rebuilt Brookline Boulevard is pretty and pleasant inside, and its menu of Southern specialties adds to the surprising diversity and overall quality of the Brookline dining scene. For the moment, that menu has the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Pork ribs, greens, mac-and-cheese and cornbread

stripped-down quality of a place that trades mainly in take-out, despite plenty of seating and a welcoming ambience. Ribs (beef or pork), wings, burgers and a fish sandwich are the menu’s mainstays, and can be ordered a la carte or in combos with various sides. But upon falling into conversation with the counter staff (which was easy to do), we learned that pulled pork and half fried chickens might soon be in the offing.

BAMA’S SOUTHERN KITCHEN

600 Brookline Blvd., Brookline. 412-668-3459 HOURS: Tue.-Wed. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Thu.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-close PRICES: $2-21 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED That would count as two more good reasons to visit, because if Bama’s can make the transition from simple wings to the greater challenge of cooking chicken breasts and thighs, that’s going to be some delicious bird. The wings on offer were a bit small;

they were also golden brown and crunchy outside, juicy and flavorful within, with a well-seasoned, but not too salty, crust. The picky eater in our party demolished them in record time. The fried fish — two nicely sized pieces of whiting — also benefited from an excellent cornmeal-based crust. A burger, simply seasoned with salt and pepper, was very beefy, if not overly juicy. Pork ribs were available dry or with any of four sauces: mild, spicy, sweet and mustard. Despite being intensely smoky, the meat was not the least bit dried out, so that the flavors of rich pork melded deliciously with the aroma of the fire. These ribs were so good, they didn’t even need sauce, but we didn’t let that stop us from sampling all four. Among the three forms of traditional sauce — mild, hot and sweet — there may not have been much distinction, but each one was excellent, well balanced among the sweet, tangy and fiery notes that are the pillars of barbecue flavor. The mild was actually wonderfully peppery, while the

hot was distinctly reddened by cayenne without becoming punishing. The sweet was actually savory enough that it complemented, rather than masked, the pungent taste of the meat. Perhaps most impressive was the mustard-based sauce, which may have finally made a convert of Jason. Time after time, he’s gamely tried the South Carolina style, always finding it too one-dimensional, or else too sweetened with honey. But Bama’s mustard sauce was thickly, intensely mustardy, with tang from vinegar and just enough sweetness to round out the flavors. It complemented the supersmoky ribs wonderfully.

Bama’s customer Adrian Foster

The sides, on the whole, held up to the quality of the meats. Macaroni and cheese was thick, cheesy and mild enough to defer to the meats, but savory enough to eat alone. Potato salad, in classic American style with hard-boiled eggs, was exemplary, with the yolks enriching the dressing. Greens, studded with bits of smoked meat, were too salty, and sweet-potato casserole tasted a lot like candied yams. But cornbread muffins tipped the scales back to thumbs-up. Just as Pittsburgh barbecue is seldom smoky enough, Pittsburgh cornbread always seems too sweet and cakey. Bama’s cornbread, while sweet in the northern style, was nothing you’d mistake for dessert: Its texture differentiated it from a corn cupcake, with a crumb that was tender but not without structure. Brookline may not have the most restaurants of any neighborhood in Pittsburgh, but from Mediterranean to Mexican and beyond, Bama’s is the latest in a string of satisfying meals we’ve had along the boulevard. If you haven’t made Brookline a dining destination, you should. And if you’re desperately seeking smoky barbecue, Bama’s should be your first stop.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

CREAM OF THE CROP

Milkman Brewing delivers new flavors to the Strip

“WE REALLY WANT TO FOCUS ON SOME OF THE HOPS THAT HAVEN’T GOTTEN THAT MUCH EXPOSURE.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Milkman Brewing Company is the latest addition — and the first modern brewery — to join the Strip District’s rapidly growing roster of libation makers. “There’s a rich history of brewing in the Strip,” says Justin Waters, one of Milkman’s three brewer/owners. “We’re excited to bring that back.” The brewery is located in a barebones space on the second floor of a Penn Avenue building owned by Nic DiCio of Reyna Foods. In the future, the structure could become a one-stop spot for all your drinking needs: The garage currently houses the Pittsburgh Party Peddler, a bicycle-powered mobile bar, and plans are in the works for a winery and distillery on other floors. “In this business, location is everything,” says Waters. For the moment, the site is a prime spot to pick up beer while grocery shopping in the Strip. In addition to Friday-Sunday growler hours at the brewery, Milkman is available on tap at Independent Brewing Company, Harris Grill and Piper’s Pub. A signature hook of Milkman is its single-hop beer series. It will start each batch with the same malt mix (six-row and Munich) and then use a single hop variety for each step of the brewing process. Waters pledges to experiment with the aromas and flavors contributed by different hop varieties. “We really want to focus on some of the hops that haven’t gotten that much exposure,” he says. “Even if it’s just for one batch, we want to see if it’s going to work.” Of course, a brewery isn’t built on a single hop, and Milkman offers a variety of other brews. Dahntahn Brown is malty and a little bit toasty, while the mix of peppercorns in Peppercorn Rye provides a subtle backdrop to the full-bodied brew. Indeed, Milkman’s real signature might be how straightforward the operation is. “We want our beer to taste like beer,” Waters says. “We’re not trying to beat people over the head with flavor.”

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

946 Penn Ave Located in Downtown’s Cultural District

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Daily Saloon Specials Happy Hours

Monday - Friday 5pm - 7pm Late Night Ladies Night 9-11 $1.00 off ALL Drinks

Monday

$5 Margaritas all day till midnight • $6 Quesadilla 4 - 9pm

Tuesday BURGER NIGHT

Monday & Thursday

$2 off ALL Burgers 4 - 9pm $3 Miller Lite Draft All day till Midnight

$2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Wednesday WING NIGHT

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Wings .50 each 4pm - 9pm $3 Yuengling Draft All day till Midnight

Thursday LADIES NIGHT $6 Chicken Artichoke Dip 4pm - 9pm $5 glass House Wine All day till Midnight $6 MARTINIS All day till midnight well brands only 1/2 OFF SPECIAL Appetizers 5-7pm KARAOKE Staring “Rock’n Ray the DJ” 10pm - 2am

Saturday

$6 Long Island Iced Tea All day till Midnight $4 Stuffed Pretzel & $6 Buffalo Chicken Dip 11am - 11pm 412-765-3270 www.augusthenrys.com

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

$

7-$9

MON TUE-THU FRI SUN

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB D

LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRGR. 5997 Penn Circle South, East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BZ BAR AND GRILL. 140 Federal St., North Side. 412323-2924. This sports bar offers thoughtfully conceived and better-than-average fare. Lively sandwiches include brisket sliders and a Cuban, with pickled red onions. Or try the pear-andbleu-cheese pizza, or the “turducken burger”: a turkey burger with duck confit, sage aioli, fried egg and arugula. KE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-and-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 22

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

10:30am-3pm

Friday KARAOKE

ALL LUNCHES

Tuesday

1844 RESTAURANT. 690 State Route 66, Leechburg. 724-845-1844. This restored 19th-century farmhouse offers a classic fine-dining menu with intriguing updates suited to 21st-century tastes. Thus, prime rib sits alongside tempura shrimp with orange cayenne, cucumbers and bleu cheese, and the stalwart shrimp cocktail is now dressed with sofrito lemon sauce. LE

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard Chinese-

1844 Restaurant {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} American menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE

atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-to-date: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and hand-crafted cocktails. LE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BZ Bar and Grill DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers well-prepared Italian-American cuisine and a welcoming

THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and

blogh.pghcitypaper.com Johnny’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thymeroasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE

full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue, where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from ultra-traditional offerings like crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant updates like duck with orangeapricot balsamic glaze. LF

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140 Federal St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212 • 412.323.2924

TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancycasual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, made with chicken, pulled Forbes Avenue BBQ pork and steak and Schenley Drive, fillet, on a potato roll Oakland. 412-687with red pepper and 6724. An attractive goat cheese. The fried wood-and-stone calamari come with a www. per pa structure set in the basil-garlic aioli, and pghcitym .co verdant heart of the robust Yuengling Oakland, The Porch beer-cheese sauce was offers cuisine that is modern the perfect complement to without being stark, homey “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 squash, pork belly atop roasted Bryant St., Highland Park. pumpkin, or lasagne with 412-441-1610. This Japanese house-made chive pasta. KE restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch PROPER BRICK OVEN AND counters, train stations and TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., family kitchens. From salads Downtown. 412-281-5700. This containing burdock root and cozy Downtown spot offers a rice balls to cabbage pancakes menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, and stir-fried noodles, this but strives to be about as refined diner-style venue lets casual as that workmanlike trinity can eaters expand beyond sushi. KE be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 are closer to tapas or antipasti N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. than to pub grub. More than 30 412-363-7675. This lively familybeers are on tap,as well. KE style BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. chicken) are “dry” (with sauces 412-247-4848. A neighborhood at table), and the sides are wellpizza place and more, Salvatore’s prepared classics: mac-and-cheese, offers something even rarer baked beans, collard greens and than good pizza: fast food of coleslaw. Prices are higher than the finest quality. “Fresh” is the a roadside stand, but the quality watchword, and the large, is top-notch. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Serving Breakfast and Lunch Did you know we offer... • • • • • •

Breakfast All Day Vegetarian Options Gluten-Free Preservative Free Sausage & Angus Beef Locally Home-Grown Vegetables • And so much more 1718 Mt. Royal Blvd, Glenshaw, Mt. Royal Plaza • Next to Shaler Middle School

www.colecafe.com M U S I C

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The Art of Thai Cuisine

NOW OPEN in the heart of Squirrel Hill!

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

OPEN Monday-Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9:30pm BYOB (no corking fee) Lunch specials starting at $8!

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24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111

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2301 Murray Ave. 412-422-6661

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4213 Butler St. 412-682-0217

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BLOOMFIELD 4622 Liberty Ave. 412-802-6171

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DRINK SPECIALS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 5:00 - 7:00PM; FRIDAY 4:00 - 7:00PM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

LOCAL

“I KNEW THAT I COULDN’T NOT DO IT, YOU KNOW?”

BEAT

{BY JULIA COOK}

FEST OF THE BEST With legendary Atlanta duo Outkast dominating the music-festival circuit this year, a scene that had once been the province of indie rock and jam bands has gained an appreciation for rap and hip hop. South by Southwest has hosted panels on the genre, and Atlanta’s A3C festival has become the definitive beat symposium. All this left some Pittsburgh hip-hop artists wondering why there was such a shortage of similar opportunities in their area. In early August, the Pittsburgh Hip-Hop Collective hosted Talib Kweli as part of its Cultured Steel festival. And now local manager Kurt Sculac will take his shot with the Steel the City Festival — STC Fest for short — which Sculac founded with partner Cullen DeSantis. Largely owing to the success of Mac Miller and Wiz Khalifa, Sculac notes, “There was a brief period of time where every magazine, website [and] hip-hop media outlet had something to do with a Pittsburgh hip-hop artist on its front pages. “Why not host a showcase of our own? In time, it can be built into a larger-scale platform for premier artists to showcase their talents, much like A3C and SXSW.” Huey Mack may be from Morgantown, but he’s a great choice to headline the inaugural STC Festival. His debut, Pretending Perfection, which dropped last year, features a lighthearted production style, and he’s got a cool, boy-next-door voice, like G-Eazy with a softer edge. Wilkinsburg rapper Hardo will also appear, fresh from his release from a correctional facility and with his subsequent single, “Stressing,” which samples KDKA news reports on his arrest on drug charges. Hardo, whose trap style is beat-centric with slowmoving rhymes, has strong ties to Atlanta’s rap scene and local artist Devin Miles. Sculac hopes the event will “become an incomparable platform to not only showcase your brand, but also [to] network and build relationships between the organizations, brands and artists.” It’s also about building the Pittsburgh brand. By integrating national acts with local performers on the rise, the annual event could also restore a sense of unity to the scene that’s been lacking lately. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STC FESTIVAL feat. HUEY MACK, HARDO, THE COME UP BOYS, more. 6 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.tinyurl.com/STCFest CORRECTION: The photo credit was omitted from our July 30 Local Beat column. The photo of Jacob Campbell and Molly Spear came courtesy of Foo Conner. N E W S

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{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Happy organ: The Garment District’s Jennifer Baron at home

BACK ON VINYL {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

J

ENNIFER BARON has gone on and off the radar musically over the past couple of decades. But she’s never lost that drive to write and perform music — and it’s one that goes way back. “My first toys, for my brother and I, were always my parents’ record collection,” Baron says. “I think it goes immediately back to the source. Preverbal time was — we constantly had music and stereos and vinyl, and it was music that I’ve loved my whole life. I always joke around: We didn’t go to church, but our holy trinity was Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan, Neil Young.” Baron, whose band The Garment District recently released its first vinyl fulllength, If You Take Your Magic Slow, first made it onto the map in the indie world in the late ’90s, as an integral member of the New York City-based band The Ladybug Transistor. She wrote and played (mostly

bass, but also keyboard and guitar) with the band over a span of about five years, appearing on three albums, including The Albemarle Sound, which was recently included on PopMatters’ list of 25 essential Merge Records albums from the label’s first

THE GARMENT DISTRICT LP RELEASE WITH JACKIE MCDOWELL LP RELEASE, LAUGHING EYE WEEPING EYE 9 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

25 years. Baron, who grew up in a number places around Pennsylvania, including Mount Lebanon, had settled in New York after going to college in Massachusetts.

For a time, The Ladybug Transistor as a whole was cohabitating in a house in Flatbush, in Brooklyn, and it wasn’t an average indie-band setup. “It was a band that was very much like a family unit, unlike a lot of other bands,” Baron explains. “A lot of bands just say, ‘I’ll meet you at the practice space.’ We were going out to shows every night together. We were going out to dinner together. I don’t think that’s your typical band.” “We also benefited from having the recording studio in-house,” explains Ladybug founder Gary Olson, who still lives in the Flatbush house, known as Marlborough Farms, and performs with the band. “The recording process was kept in-house.” After 2001’s Argyle Heir, but before 2003’s self-titled Ladybug album, Baron left New York for Pittsburgh. “When we toured in the U.S., we’d always CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

and we’d try to amplify those aspects.” She also helped put together 2009’s The Pittsburgh Signs Project, a book of roadside signage from the Western Pennsylvania area. But it did eventually come back to music — partly, Baron says, after a move to Dormont with her husband and collaborator, Greg Langel. “I could actually assemble instruments that el ng La eg Gr r to bora sband and colla I had and that Greg had,” Baron with hu she explains. “He had instruments in storhave these conversations — could we live in age, and he had moved into my apartment this city or this city for a while? And I was in Friendship — you know that feeling always one of those people who romanti- where you’re a little bit nomadic, things cized Pittsburgh from afar, I think. If you’re are in storage, and your mind can’t open up from here or you’re a transplant, it attracts and expand in that way. I think having the you — it’s like a magnet, it has a pull. I house, having a dedicated craft room and a applied for a full-time job as education music room, a place in our living room for a Hammond organ, a proper listening space director at the Mattress Factory.” Early on after her return to Pittsburgh, for our albums — I finally started settling Baron played organ for a time with The into having a place to call home.” What came together was The Garment New Alcindors, a soul-inflected indie band. But she fell off the map for a bit in terms of District, a project that’s directed entirely by Baron, but has a rotating cast performance in the of musicians. Its first mid- and late-2000s. album, Melody ElWhich isn’t to say der, came out on the she went through a Night-People label in creative funk. late 2011, and in 2012, “Yeah, there was a 7-inch that includa time period when ed a remix by Sonic things were germiBoom (of Spacemen nating, that led up 3) was release by La to me putting out Station Radar. Melody Elder,” The It’s a band whose Garment District’s work is colored by psyfirst cassette-tape chedelic jams, puncturelease, she says. ated by tight, melodic “Maybe I wasn’t pop tunes. The heavenly actively producvocals are supplied not ing or putting out Baron with vocalist Luc by Baron herself, but by music, but I knew y Blehar Lucy Blehar, a Mount I would get back to it eventually. I knew that I couldn’t not Lebanon native — and Baron’s cousin. “It seems like a given to ask family to do it, you know?” Baron was involved in Handmade Ar- work with you creatively,” notes Blehar, cade, the indie-craft fair in Pittsburgh, with “but knowing Jennie and her sharp ear and her craft business, The Polka-Dot Life. (She exceedingly unique perspective on music, I also participated in the earliest Brooklyn was very flattered that she wanted to use edition of the Renegade Craft Fair, around my voice.” “She inherited the singing gene in our the same time.) “It was a natural extension, to go from family,” Baron says. “I had been going to see the indie-rock scene to the indie-craft her in theater performances — lead roles scene,” Baron says. “If you’re in a band, in The Wizard of Oz and Les Mis. I was very you’re designing and making your own T- much drawn to the idea of trying to use her shirts, making your own buttons. We were voice in a different way in my music. And painting the stage sets we’d take on tour I can sing backup with her; our vocals are with us, then we’d sell them. Especially kind of similar, because we’re related.” Blehar was in high school when the when we went on tour with Of Montreal, things always involved more performance, two first started recording together two

years ago; she’s now in school for theater in Chicago. “Studying theater has absolutely helped me get into the music,” Blehar adds. “I’m the type of learner who just wants to absorb the environment and let it take me from there. If any music is capable of that, it’s Jennie’s. The music is so empowering and special; it embraces all people and makes you feel expansive.” Besides Langel and Blehar, the current iteration of The Garment District includes local session players Matt Booth and Chris Parker (who are on the new album), Dazzletine’s Dan Koshute and percussionist Sam Blehar (also Baron’s cousin). If You Take Your Magic Slow is a varied and deliberate trip of an album. There are sunshine-pop anthems slightly askew, such as album-opener “Secondhand Sunburn.” (Olson describes much of her Ladybug writing as featuring “a few Jennifer Baron left turns”; those are evident here too.) Organs and synths create a murky soundscape on the instrumental “Cavendish on Whist.” It’s all part of a strategy to create one coherent document on vinyl.

“I love the idea of curating the experience,” Baron says. “I know the reality is that someone might listen to one song and one song only, or they might go from the third song to the 10th song to the first song. “Even if it’s in the background while you’re shopping, or at work — someone created it to have a beginning and an end, so why would we not put it in a sequence? I want my songs to exist on their own, but I’m conflicted about all the fragmentation. I’m concerned and upset that we don’t seem to care about context anymore.” Blehar says, though, that some of her compatriots have an idea for context when it comes to The Garment District. “When I showed the Garment District to friends my age, they were pleasantly surprised — not surprised, awe-struck — saying the music made them want to ‘drop acid and hula-hoop.’ When I told Jennie this, we knew we did it right.” AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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with Geoff Rickly of United Nations {BY GREGG HARRINGTON}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JESANNE RECHSTEINER}

Geoff Rickly of United Nations

Following the disbandment of alternative/emo band Thursday, in 2013, vocalist Geoff Rickly formed the hardcore supergroup United Nations. The band is decidedly more aggressive and deeply rooted in punk than was Thursday. Rickly took time to answer some questions about the band via email. UNITED NATIONS IS A BIG DEPARTURE FROM THURSDAY. HOW DID UNITED NATIONS FORM? When members of Thursday wanted to go in a more subdued direction after War All The Time, I wanted an outlet for the more aggressive sensibilities I was feeling. Couple that [with] frustration over people shooting down my most radical ideas for Thursday because the scale of the proposal was too grand. That was the recipe for United Nations.

um, strict’s new alb The Garment DiYour Magic Slow If You Take

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THE BAND’S SECOND LP, THE NEXT FOUR YEARS, WAS JUST RELEASED. HOW WAS THE RECORDING PROCESS DIFFERENT THAN FOR THE FIRST RECORD? We had solidified a steady touring line-up and put new energy into the band before recording the new record. We tried to split up the writing process in new ways. I stopped being the principal songwriter. Now I concentrate on lyrics and presentation and let the real musicians write the music. WHAT PLANS ARE IN PLACE TO SUPPORT THE NEXT FOUR YEARS? Playing places that we’ve never been to yet, like the West Coast, and doing some large-scale art installations. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

UNITED NATIONS with FRAMEWORKS, KID DURANGO, WORN COLORS. 6 p.m. Thu., Aug. 14. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com +

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SHANNON CURFMAN SHANNON LABRIE BROOKE ANNIBALE JEFF CAMPBELL THE MIKE MEDVED BAND

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Jazz and hip hop: They’re a natural fit for one another, but you don’t see them paired too often in live shows. A new partnership between MCG Jazz, James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy and some local artists is putting them together tonight, though. Rap and spoken word share the stage with live instrumentation and jazz musicians; tonight’s first iteration of the Jazz + Hip Hop series features rapper and poet MaVe Sami, sax player Mark Jackovic, bassist William Macirowski and drummer Julian Powell. The show happens at Bill Deasy James Street. Andy Mulkerin 6 p.m. 422 Foreland St., North Side. $15-20. 412-322-0800 or www.mcgjazz.org

[LOCAL] + SAT., AUG. 16

This is the true story of 70 bands picked to play a festival: Find out what happens when local music consumes a neighborhood and it becomes vibrant. Yes, the annual Rock All Night Tour will take over Lawrenceville today, commandeering parks, record stores, bowling alleys and even a pinball café. Genres range from indie rock to metal, hip hop to folk and rockabilly, and the list goes on. A few acts that are definitely worth checking out: Sleep Experiments, The Lopez and Murder for Girls. Zach Brendza Various locations, Lawrenceville. Noon-midnight. Free. www.rantlawrenceville.com

[BENEFIT] + SAT., AUG. 16

From the people who book shows at Pittsburgh Winery comes a festival with a greater purpose. Tim Wolfson and Music for MS, a nonprofit raising funds and awareness to fight multiple sclerosis through music, bring you the inaugural Music for MS Roots Music Festival. The festival will feature Pittsburgh’s own Bill Deasy and City Dwelling Nature Seekers and touring acts The Town Pants, Humming House and more, and will be emceed by WDVE’s Michele Michaels. Proceeds from the festival will benefit the Western Pennsylvania chapter of the MS Society. The festival will be held at Hartwood Acres Amphitheater. ZB 4 p.m. Middle Road, Hampton Township. $15. All ages. 412-351-2528

[PUNK] + MON, AUG. 18

The only thing better than a good touring {PHOTO COURTESY band at a show is OF SARAH SAXON} multiple good touring bands at the same show. In this case, Chicago’s Dowsing is one good headliner, while Sundials and The Sidekicks serve to sweeten the deal. Dowsing is signed to Count Your Lucky Stars, the little emo label “with a lot of love,” and the band put out a great split in May with label-mate Annabel. The bands play tonight at Mr. Roboto Project with local opener Run Forever. Eat across the street at Spak’s before the show and you’ve got yourself one punk evening. ZB 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. All ages. www.therobotoproject.org

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Letitia Van Sant, Blod Maud, Erika Blatnik, 31ST STREET PUB. Gutter Ghouls, Dan Cunningham. Garfield. Under a Nightmare. Strip District. 412-361-2262. 412-391-8334. 31ST STREET PUB. The Meatmen, GOOD TIME BAR. ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Stay Volcano Dogs, Crooked Cobras, Tobacco Road. Millvale. At Home Chad, Will Simmons & Harlem Downtrotters. Strip District. 412-821-9968. The Upholsterers, Standing 412-391-8334. HARD ROCK CAFE. Wave, The Dark Lines. LAVA LOUNGE. Comfort Tech, Tantric. Station Square. RANT (Rock All Night Tori & Andy, Addison Steele 412-481-7625. Tour). Lawrenceville. & Josh Marshall. South Side. HOWLERS COYOTE 412-252-2337. 412-431-5282. CAFE. Slaves BC, ANDY JOHANSON www. per MELLON SQUARE PARK. Mark a p PHOTOGRAPHY. Broken Flesh, Lycosa, pghcitym Ferrari. Downtown. 412-665-3665. o .c Sikes, City Steps, Seducer. Bloomfield. 412MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC Nox Boys, Pow Wows, 682-0320. LIBRARY. The Tumblers. The Cynics. RANT (Rock All JERGEL’S RHYTHM Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Night Tour). Lawrenceville. GRILLE. The Clintones STAGE AE. Tesla. North Side. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Ultimate 90s Tribute. Warrendale. 412-229-5483. Impossible Colors, Neffs, Don 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Flow Tribe. Strange & The Doosh Bears, THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Roulette Waves, Wreck Loose Twin Peaks. Bloomfield. Life(Liss), Pete Flynn, Charmaine OLD TRAILS. Gone South. Evonne, Joe Vocaturo, Joe Pugsly, Washington. 724-225-0484. ALTAR BAR. Antediluvians, Credit Ryan Taylor. Lawrenceville. OUR LADY OF JOY. The Holidays. to the Creators, Part Time Punk, 412-683-5993. 412-795-3388. A Friendly Gesture. Strip District. ARSENAL PARK. Universal Beat THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 412-263-2877. Union, King Fez, Jeremy Caywood Supermonkey Battle of the Bands. CLUB CAFE. Scott Miller (Early). & The Way of Life, Molly Alphabet South Side. 412-431-4950. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Moldies & Monsters, Round Black Ghosts, Timbeleza. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. BENEDUM CENTER. Yanni. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BLACKBERRY STUDIOS. Quazi Wazi (Mark Runco), Tef Daryl Flemming & The Public Domain, Lo-Fi Delphi, Southside American, Pet Clinic. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Joe Grushecky. North Side. 412-237-3400. CATTIVO. The Big Bend, The Harlan Twins, Grand Piano, Sleep Experiments, Costello & The Cool Minors, Morgan Erina, Dave Bernabo Sablowskis, Photo Joe & The Negatives Danzas, Beagle Brothers, Murder For Girls, Crooked Cobras. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CHRISTINA’S. Fall Risk, Three Sides, Pete Rossi & Band, LIZE, Shotgun Jack, Forest & the Sea, Deflowered. Pedal 2 The Metal Festival. 412-673-0199. CLUB CAFE. U.S. Royalty, Golden Youth, Michigan (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DAVID’S MUSIC HOUSE. Hillary Reynolds Band. McMurray. Each week we bring you a new MP3 724-941-9200. DOUBLE D’S SALOON. Silver from a local band. This week’s track Thread, Misaligned Mind, The Bessemers. RANT (Rock comes from ; stream or download All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-687-1805. on our music blog, ECLIPSE LOUNGE. The Hills & The Rivers, The Seams, Shameless FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com. Hex, Panther Hollow String Band.

SAT 16

ROCK/POP THU 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

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RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. GUS’S CAFE. Kill Orion, LadyBeast, Agnes Wired For Sound, Solarburn, Island of Giants. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-315-7271. HARTWOOD ACRES. Bill Deasy, The Weedrags, City Dwelling Nature Seekers, The Town Pants, Humming House. MuSic for MS Roots Music Festival. musicforms. org. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HARVEY WILNER’S. Girlz in Black Hats. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Prime 8, Sound Servent , Outlined In Blood, Skippy Ickum, PIPEWRENCH, Demo Demon,. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KICKBACK PINBALL CAFE. Sticker Kids, Black Bear Mute, Destanie Armagost - Toy Life, Union Rye, Jayke Orvis. Lawrenceville. 412-682-3200. MILLERSTOWN INN. The Dave Iglar Band. 724-445-2157. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Elysium, Parachuting with Hand Grenades, Gods and Aliens, The Whisky Rebellion, Cats In Congress. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Grey’s Fool, Kayla Schureman, Donna O, Henry Bachorski. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. KGB. 412-487-6259.

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Hard Money, Amebeoa Knieval, Lopez, BREW ON BROADWAY. Gray Pond Hockey, Dumplings. Technology. All vinyl turntablists RANT (Rock All Night Tour). spinning nu-jazz, breaks, hip-hop, Lawrenceville. downtempo, more. Beechview. STINKY’S BAR & GRILL. Vertigo 412-563-6456. Go, Sun Hound, Masters of The MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. Universe, Allegheny Rhythm DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. Rangers, The Gimmie 5s. North Side. 412-761-3302. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Lawrenceville. 412-224-4301. Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Working 412-874-4582. Breed, BOON, Chrome Moses, ROUND CORNER CANTINA. Paddy the Wanderer, Coronado. The Gold Series. Big Phil & RANT (Rock All Night Tour). DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. 412-904-2279. WALNUT STREET. Radio ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Tokyo, Kelsey Friday. Shadyside. South Side. 412-431-2825. 412-321-4422. WATERFRONT TOWN CENTER. DJ RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night Digital Dave, Meeting of Important w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. People. Homestead. 412-476-8889. YATES FUND FOR CANCER HOPE. Suzie Vinnick, Caitlin BOOM CONCEPTS. Canty, Shari Richards, Maura Golden Donna, Sweet William, Elyse. Cindystock 11 Benefit TMC. Garfield. Concert. Wexford. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-622-1212. 412-431-8800. THE ZONE. Stone Cold LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Killers, Chip DiMonick, Night. Downtown. The Bloody Seamen, 412-465-0290. www. per Sneaky Mike. RANT a p ty REMEDY. Push It! pghci m (Rock All Night Tour). .co DJ Huck Finn, DJ Lawrenceville. Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Turner South Side. 412-431-2825. Cody, Morgan Orion, Sun S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Hound, Faithful Sinners. Garfield. 412-481-7227. 412-361-2262. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel THE NIGHT GALLERY. Suavity’s City Saturdays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Mouthpiece, Moran/Masudi, Oakland. 412-874-4582. HighDeaf, Stephen Lin. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Chet Vincent & Big LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Bend, C Street Brass, Vira Samba. Downtown. 412-465-0290. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. SMILING MOOSE. Spider Bags. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. South Side. 412-431-4668. North Side. 412-761-3302. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day 8th Street Rox. Monroeville. chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 15

SAT 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

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31ST STREET PUB. Bob Log III, Weird Paul, The Spectres. Strip District. 412-361-2262. CLUB CAFE. Dangermuffin, Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing. South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Sound/Unsound Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

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WED 20

CATTIVO. Boogarins. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Boon, Brett Newski, Guy Russo, Sugar Ransom. South Side. 412-431-4950. STAGE AE. Doyal, Ashylus, Curseborn, the Filthy Lowdown, He Hate Me. North Side. 412-229-5483.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 14 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. MaVe Sami. North Side. 412-322-0800.

FRI 15

SMILING MOOSE. Amuck, Barz Blackman & Lazy ZP, Yungn Voorheez, Reason, Mike George. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 16

DJS

720 RECORDS. Lucid Music, Jasmine Tate, Statement Records, Vaig, Divine Seven, Hail Mary, Charon Don, Blak Rapp Madusa, Dj KB. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ALTAR BAR. Kevin Gates. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

THU 14

SUN 17

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Drake, Lil Wayne. 724-947-7400.

TUE 19

REX THEATER. MC Frontalot. South Side. 412-381-6811.

WED 20

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Blu, MED, Davu, Parker Webb & Reason, Nova Saves. Oakland. 412-904-3400.

BLUES FRI 15

MOONDOG’S. Walter Trout Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. STATION SQUARE. Jill West & Blues Attack, Silent Partner. Station Square.

SAT 16 DOWNEY’S HOUSE.32-20 Fully Loaded Blues. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE GRANGE AT CACTUS JACKS. The Satin Hearts. Monaca. 724-824-8279. JIMMY Z’S PLACE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bellevue. 412-766-3110. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE R BAR. Kings Ransom. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THREE RIVERS HARLEYDAVIDSON. Shot O’ Soul. Glenshaw. 412-487-3377.

SUN 17

THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. TUGBOAT’S. The Satin Hearts. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

WED 20

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Sweaty Betty. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ THU 14

ANDYS. James McClelland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844.

FRI 15

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Swing All-Stars, B-3! Cliff, Nathaniel & Kent Barnes. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Fabulous Dan Baker Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri & Jeff Lashway. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 16

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. TCB II, Jazz Surgery. North Side. 412-904-3335.

BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. The Wreckids. North Side. 412-322-5058. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip.

FRI 15

HAMBONE’S. Gea, Preach. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 16

DOBRA TEA. Moran/Masudi. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

COLUMBUS

REGGAE

{SUN., AUG. 31}

THU 14

Reigning Sound

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Red Lion Reggae. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

Ace of Cups

FRI 15

PHILADELPHIA

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

{THU., OCT. 02}

Animal Collective (DJ set) The Dolphin

SAT 16

WASHINGTON, D.C.

SUN 17

PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

{FRI., OCT. 17}

PARADISE ISLAND. The Flow Band. Neville Island. 412-264-6570.

Zola Jesus

TUE 19

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Truth & Rites. Oakland. 412-904-3400.

Hirshhorn Museum LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Eddie Brookshire Quintet. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Charlie G Sanders & Ron Wilson. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. Benny Benack III. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 17

BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie Watkins Trio Jazz Jam. Beechview. 412-437-8676. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Elevations Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 18

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 19

KATZ PLAZA. Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 20

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Teresa Hawthorn. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

N E W S

FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. J.J. Wright Trio, Scientific Soul. Oakland. 412-361-2262.

ACOUSTIC THU 14

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

COUNTRY FRI 15 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Brooke Annibale. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x15.

SAT 16

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181.

NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & The Payday Loners, Jane West, Mark Cyler & The Lost Coins, Wayward Strangers, Faithful Sinners, Apostles of Cool, more. Part of RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SAT 16

CLASSICAL

FRI 15

HAMBONE’S. Chet Vincent, David Bielewicz, Morgan Erina, Jeremy Caywood, Brad Yoder, Henry Bachorski, Shawn MacIntyre, Lone Wolf Club, Jeremy Colbert, more. RANT (Rock All Night Tour). Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 17

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 16 VOCES SOLIS. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Carnegie. 412-523-4321.

SUN 17 DAVID BURTON BROWN, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. VOCES SOLIS. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-523-4321.

OTHER MUSIC

WED 20

THU 14

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. ALPHABET CITY TENT. Kevin Finn, The Hills & the Rivers. North Side. 412-323-0278.

SAT 16

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NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Federico Garcia-De Castro. North Side. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

13 - 19

WEDNESDAY 13 The Presidents of the United States of America

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Slaves SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Myka Relocate & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 5:15p.m.

Mötley Crüe / Alice Cooper

SUNDAY 17

North Side. 412-237-8300. With The Warhol’s Time Capsules Spider Bags Cataloguer Erin Byrne, Chief Archivist Matt Wrbican & more. SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages Tickets: warhol.org. 7p.m. show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Free event. For more info visit downtownpittsburgh.com. 6p.m.

THURSDAY 14 Jazz + Hip Hop

SATURDAY 16

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB North Side. 412-322-0800. Tickets: mcgjazz.org. 6p.m.

Tesla

Jill West / Blues Attack and Silent Partner

Downtown Rooftop Shindig

Nekrogoblikon

TOP LEVEL OF THEATER SQUARE GARAGE Downtown.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Dethlehem & more. All

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Yanni

FRIDAY 15

STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

MC Frontalot

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Free event. 7p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 19

Jam on Walnut Kelsey Friday / Radio Tokyo

PHOTO BY KRYSTAL ANN

August

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Yanni SATURDAY, AUGUST 16 BENEDUM CENTER

ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:15p.m.

Comedian Herbie Gill LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets:

latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 8p.m. Through Aug. 16.

OUT OF THE BOX: Time Capsule Opening ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. Rockstar Energy Drink UPROAR Festival featuring 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m. Godsmack, Skillet,

Buckcherry & more

Save the Carrie Deer

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: CARRIE FURNACES Rankin. All ages show. Tickets: ticketTickets: riversofsteel.com. 6p.m. master.com or 800-745-3000. VIP, 8p.m. General Admission. Doors open at 4p.m.

Kevin Gates

Tamara

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION Oakland. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412362-1713. Through Sept. 14.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

LET YOUR FEET TAKE YOU TO

THE HEAD OF THE CLASS

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

TRICKS AND TRUTH

WHAT KIND OF DISASTER MOVIE DOESN’T DOUBLE DOWN ON A TORNADO OF DIOXIN?

{BY AL HOFF}

Magic in the Moonlight is another summertime Continental trifle from Woody Allen, burnished with name actors, sun-dappled Cote d’Azur locations and Jazz Age finery. In it, a British magician and noted skeptic (Colin Firth) is brought by his pal (Simon McBurney) to a South of France estate to help debunk the otherworldly claims made by a pretty young spiritualist (Emma Stone) and her mother (Marcia Gay Harden).

A

In the cards: Emma Stone and Colin Firth

It’s a drawing-room comedy of manners that lays out most of its cards early and plainly: Will Firth and Stone overcome their philosophical differences — and the three-decade age gap — to discover the real-life magic that is l-o-v-e? This leaves viewers free to admire the scenery, vintage automobiles, Firth’s patented dithering and some adorable summer frocks. Magic oh-so-slightly suggests unresolved tensions between fact and faith, science and God, but never really sinks its teeth into such matters. And while Firth and Stone are both charming in their own rights, there’s not much chemistry between them, lending their scenes the artificial air of watching two handsome actors ably trade lines. And that age thing: If I were Woody Allen and endlessly dodging awkward questions about my own relationships with much younger women, I’d avoid making May-December rom-coms. This story wouldn’t have lost anything if, for instance, Firth’s character had been tricked and later enchanted by the middleaged but bewitching Marcia Gay Harden. That actually sounds like a more intriguing set-up. Starts Fri., Aug. 15 AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Aging action heroes, vintage planes and a tired old blow-stuff-up plot comprise The Expendables 3, starring virtually every he-man actor ever. The man-girdle budget for this film must have been epic. Starts Fri., Aug. 15 N E W S

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MIGHTY WIND {BY AL HOFF}

O

Wind shift: A storm chases a storm-chaser.

N THE FUJITA scale, Steven Quale’s

tornado-centric Into the Storm rates well above F5. There are multiple tornadoes, tornadoes within tornadoes, a tornado of fire and a supermega-tornado with winds above 300 mph. You’re gonna get your tornadodollar’s worth, at least in terms of swirling wind. Now as for plot and quality acting? Well, a giant tornado comes to town and somebody screams, “Oh shit, it’s headed for the school!” What more do you need? You could use some weather experts to provide the overwrought meteorological data, and to balance the overwrought melodrama of a single dad searching for his son in a dangerous storm. Check and check. And if those weatherpeople are also tornado-hunters with a tank car named Titus and oodles of cameras to give us “realistic” footage, that’s even better. Caught in this very serious wind

event are loads of TV actors: Walking Dead’s Sarah Wayne Callies, Veep’s Matt Walsh, Max Deacon from Hatfields & McCoys, and U.K. TV star Richard Armitage. And lest you think there are no laughs to be found in a natural disaster, Into the Storm also gives us Kyle Davis and Jon Reep as aspiring YouTube stars: They represent as “Twister Hunterz” and view getting swept up in a tornado as a pretty awesome good time.

INTO THE STORM

DIRECTED BY: Steven Quale STARRING: Richard Armitage, Sarah Wayne Callies, Matt Walsh, bad weather

There’s a throwaway line about how storms are getting bigger (hey Katrina! Sandy!) but Quale isn’t interested in getting political about climate change. He also drops the ball on the eco-angle of having two teens trapped at an aban-

doned paper mill with its — hint, hint — barrels of toxic chemicals lying around. What kind of disaster movie doesn’t double down on a tornado of dioxin? That said, the 1s and 0s line up well for some spectacular weather effects, and the vicarious destruction is pretty good (or bad, if you prefer) with plenty of airborne debris: cars, trees, airplanes and a fiberglass cow (hi, Twister!). Quale also directed Final Destination 5, so yeah, he knows a little something about the inevitability of death. So it’s a bit baffling that— spoiler alert — only two people lose their lives, despite this being the Biggest Tornado Ever. Viewers who prefer likely factual outcomes over hoped-for divine providence may be annoyed. The screening audience, however, expressed satisfaction with the low death count — this is a feel-good tornado, after all. But, confidential to those confused by hard science: Escaping from the top of a tornado is nothing to cheer about. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE GIVER. A teenage boy living in a seemingly perfect world get access to some hidden information, and discovers that the real world is full of pain and suffering. Brenton Thwaites, Jeff Bridges and Meryl Streep star in Phillip Noyce’s adaptation of Lois Lowry’s dystopic young-adult novel. Starts Fri., Aug. 15. LET’S BE COPS. Damon Wayans Jr. and Jake Johnson dress up as policemen for a costume party, only to get caught up in some actual crimefighting. Luke Greenfield directs this comedy. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES. They’re mutated turtles and teenagers and ninjas, and New York City’s subterranean avengers are back, matching some wits and a lot of weaponry against a bad dude known as Shredder. Jonathan Liebesman’s re-boot of the popular comics-movie-TV-videogame-bedsheet franchise is unnecessary: (1) There have been four TMNT films already, and (2) How many evil-fighting superheroes can we possibly keep track of this summer? The plot, even including backstory for the uninitiated, could be written on the back of a matchbook, and it’s padded with lots of CGI-heavy action, including a tumble down an epically tall snow-covered mountain within sewer-line distance of New York City. The turtles are well animated, which is more than one can say for their tedious human co-stars Megan Fox, Will Arnett and William Fichtner. See it only if your heart still belongs to TMN T, no matter what. (Al Hoff)

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WHAT IF. Wallace (Daniel Radcliffe) and Chantry (Zoe Kazan) are adorable yet highly articulate types navigating hipster Toronto. He’s a med-school dropout on the rebound, she’s a cartoonist with a live-in almost-fiancé. Much of this charming but lightweight romantic comedy from director Michael Dowse (Goon) goes down like ice cream: The dialogue is fast and funny, the performances engaging, the milieu fairly credible and reasonably fresh. Eventually, the genre’s seemingly inescapable tropes — cute situations, wacky buddies, can’t-we-just-befriends conundrums — get the better of things. But What If is 100 minutes you’ll quickly forget, yet not regret. Starts Fri., Aug. 15. (Bill O’Driscoll)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Dancing (Catskills, 1960s, time of your life, etc.), Aug. 15-19, and Aug. 21. The Great Outdoors (1988 John Candy-Dan Aykroyd vacation comedy), Aug. 15, and Aug. 17-2. Wet Hot American Summer (laughs and hook-ups at camp, in this 2001 comedy), Aug. 15-18, and Aug. 21. Little Darlings (two teen girls compete to lose their virginity in this 1980 comedy), Aug. 16-17, and Aug. 20-21. 12 O’Clock Boys (2013 doc about a group of urban dirt-bike riders in West Baltimore), 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. PEE-WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE. When man-boy Pee-Wee Herman’s bike is stolen, he sets forth on a cross-country odyssey to find it, in Tim Burton’s exuberant, off-beat road movie. The 1985 film is this year’s outdoor “Bike-In Movie” for the annual BikeFest. Activities at 6 p.m.; film begins at dusk. Wed., Aug. 13. Theater Square parking garage (top level), 667 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. www.bikepgh.org. SILENCE OF THE LAMBS. Jonathan Demme’s 1991 thriller has become one of cinema’s indelible portraits of a serial killer, and his cat-and-mouse game with the authorities. Anthony Hopkins stars as Hannibal Lecter,

killer and gourmand, while Jodie Foster portrays the FBI agent who hunts him down. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 13. AMC Loews. $5 CABIN IN THE WOODS. You know the set-up: Five friends go to a rural cabin for a getaway — and the fun turns weird and scary. This twisty-turny 2012 iteration was co-written by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard, who also directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 13; 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug., 15; and 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 16. Hollywood STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this coming-of-age dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. Adapted from a Stephen King novella, the 1986 film stars Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O’Connell. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 14; 7:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15; 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Hollywood DEAR MR. WATTERSON. This 2013 documentary from Joel Allen Schroeder looks at the influence and lasting impact of Bill Watterson’s comic strip Calvin & Hobbes, which was retired in 1995. Joe Wos, of ToonSeum, will lead a Q&A after the screening. 2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 16. Harris. 412-232-0199. $10

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, Wed., Aug. 13 (Schenley), and Sat., Aug. 16 (Riverview). The Smurfs 2, Thu., Aug. 14 (Brookline), Fri., Aug. 15 (Arsenal), Sat., Aug. 16 (Grandview) and Sun., Aug. 17 (Schenley). Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2, Mon., Aug. 18 (Highland Park), Tue., Aug. 19 (West End/Elliott Overlook), and Thu., Aug. 21 (Brookline). All Is Lost, Wed., Aug. 20 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Customer Appreciation Week: Best in Show (Christopher Guest’s dog-show comedy), Aug. 13-14. Ghost World (adaptation of Daniel Clowes’ graphic novel about moody teens and 78s), Aug. 13-14. N everEnding Story (book takes boy to fantasy land), Aug. 13-14. Who Done It? (1942 Abbott & Costello caper), Aug. 14. Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee’s cowboys in love), Aug. 14. Summer Camp Memories: Meatballs (1979 Bill Murray comedy), Aug. 15-17, and Aug. 19 and 21. Dirty

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Cabin In The Woods (2012) - 8/13 @ 7:30pm, 8/15 @ 9:30pm, 8/16 @ 10:00pm

Stand By Me (1986) - 8/14 @ 7:30pm, 8/15 @ 7:30pm, 8/17 @ 4pm

OCB City of Champions - 8/16 @ 8am Bodybuilding, Figure, and Physique classic

Can’t Stop The Serenity Party

- 8/16 @ 5pm Games, raffles, and film to benefit Equality Now

Some Like it Hot

(1959) - 8/17 @ 10:30am - part of the Breakfast and a Movie series. Also screening at 7:00pm.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

OPEN

Noon-5PM Daily and evenings by appointment.

A Rock n’ Roll, Baby Boomer, Collectors Emporium specializing in 50’s, 60’s and 70’s collectables. 3623 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15212

4 12 .76 6. 18 4 6 WWW.JAGINCHYSTUFF.COM

SERENITY. The crew of the Serenity probes the secret carried by fugitive passenger, who boasts superhuman powers. Josh Whedon’s sprightly script and direction lend the cast an amusing rapport, peppered with solid but unspectacular special effects and dizzying martial-arts sequences. Ninth annual Serenity Charity Screening, with proceeds benefiting Equality N ow. Party from 3-5 p.m. (next door at Fredo’s Market Deli); doors at 5 p.m.; film at 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 16. Hollywood. $8 (Chris Potter) SOME LIKE IT HOT. On the run from the mob during Prohibition, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon dress as women to travel incognito with an all-girl band, in Billy Wilder’s 1959 comedy. As if struggling with girdles and high heels weren’t enough, both men fall for the band’s sexy lead singer (Marilyn Monroe). 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17. Hollywood (AH) CP Approved THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU. If ironic distance were a perfume, Wes Anderson’s film would be drenched in it. Yet as an alluring scent, it wouldn’t prove particularly effective. Life bobbles along with oceanographer Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) until a couple of mildly invigorating strangers turn up. Despite multiple intertwining threads, the film lacks a compelling story and nothing here feels organic: The sets, characters and storyline are all calculated for Anderson’s peculiar and deliberately detached pantomimes. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17. Regent Square (AH) ARMY OF DARKNESS. Ash is back … and way back in time, to the 14th century, fending off skeleton warriors with just his trusty Olds 88, a chemistry book and a chainsaw for an arm. Sam Raimi’s 1992 comic horror thriller, starring Bruce Campbell, wraps up the Evil Dead trilogy … for now. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. AMC Loews. $5 AMARCORD. In Federico Fellini’s 1973 eulogy for his boyhood, the sex scenes, adolescent pranks and other earthy antics merely assure that our picture of little coastal Rimini in the 1930s is as raucous as it is lyrical. Families scream at each other — hilariously — over supper; lustful boys lie in confession; fascists march gaily, and interrogate suspected dissidents cruelly; a peacock flies through a snowstorm. The structure is episodic, the images often beautiful. In Italian, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Melwood. $2 (BO)

CP

MY NAME IS NOBODY. Terence Hill and Henry Fonda star in this 1973 comedy that finds a fabled gunslinger being helped by an up-and-comer known as “N obody.” Tonino Valerii directed, with a few scenes shot by Sergio Leone. This classic Western continues the monthly “Spaghetti Western Dinner Series,” in which patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti (with meatballs and Mancini bread). Dinner at 6 p.m.; screening at 6:30 p.m. Thu., Aug 21. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks.

What If $8. Reservations recommended at 412-766-1668 or lincolnbarber@yahoo.com. CRIPPLED MASTERS. Kei Law’s 1979 martial-arts flick features two brothers — one with no arms, the other with no legs — who team up for full-bodied revenge. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 21. Hollywood PROGRESSION. Lawrenceville’s long-running, real-life annual progressive dinner is the setting for this zesty new ensemble comedy, the debut feature from local filmmakers Gab Cody and Sam Turich. The tone is equal parts screwball and romantic, as a mismatched set of neighbors traipses from one house to the next, more engrossed in the cascade of socially awkward situations than in their lovingly prepared dishes. (“Who died and made you soup bitch?”) Progression boasts not one but two pregnant couples (one amusingly played by Cody and Turich themselves), raunchy humor and a bit of broad social comedy. And the film, handsomely shot by cinematographer Mark Knobil, is a treat for theater fans, with roles for such local stage favorites as James FitzGerald, Gregory Lehane, Jason McCune and Mary Rawson. With live music and cash bar. 6 p.m. Thu., Aug. 21. Bayardstown Social Club, 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5 (free for Bayardstown members). www.facebook.com/bayardstown (BO)

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tall 0-foot- x! 4 r u o a See Omnim n i s k r sha

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Eileen Colin Marcia Hamish Simon Emma Jacki Atkins Firth Gay Harden Linklater McBurney Stone Weaver “THE SUMMER’S MOST BEGUILING ROMANTIC COMEDY.” -Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

Magic In The Moonlight Written and Directed by

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

Woody Allen

Exclusive Engagements Start Friday, August 15 Monaca Mount Lebanon CINEMARK CARMIKE CENTER TOWNSHIP GALLERIA 6 (800) FANDANGO #2107 (412) 531-5551

Pittsburgh CINEMARK ROBINSON TOWNSHIP (800) FANDANGO #2153

Pittsburgh SOUTHSIDE WORKS CINEMA (412) 381-7335

Pittsburgh THE MANOR THEATRE (412) 422-7729

Tarentum CINEMARK GALLERIA AT PITTSBURGH MILLS & IMAX (800) FANDANGO #2112

West Homestead AMC LOEWS WATERFRONT 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

Film sponsored locally by:

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.MAGICINTHEMOONLIGHTMOVIE.COM N E W S

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[DANCE]

RECOVERING

“THIS IS ABOUT EQUITY.”

How do mental illness, poverty and addiction relate? That is the question choreographer Marjani Forte explores in being Here … /this time. It’s her reworking of being Here, which she premiered last year to critical acclaim at New York City’s Dancespace Project. Forte and company follow their weeklong residency at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s Alloy Studios with a work-in-progress showing of the newly re-envisioned production. The show, part of the theater’s East Liberty LIVE! series, also features a new binaural score by Forte’s husband, the electronic composer Everett Saunders. A Los Angeles native who now lives in Harlem, Forte previously danced with New York’s Urban Bush Women and cofounded, with Nia Love, LOVE|FORTE A COLLECTIVE. Pittsburgh audiences might remember this sought-after dance teacher and choreographer’s solo work about self-acceptance, which she performed at the Kelly-Strayhorn’s newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival in 2012. For being Here … /this time, Forte adapts being Here from its original six-member cast for a trio that includes Pittsburgh’s own Jasmine Hearn. (Forte herself does not perform.) The 50-minute, pay-what-you-can Aug. 15 showing also features new material gathered from interviews that Forte conducted, including some in conjunction with Pittsburgh’s Adaptive Behavior Services. Both the original work and the current reworking spring from a three-year project examining the intersections of mental illness, addiction and systemic poverty. “That is a super-fancy way of saying I am telling stories about recovery,” says Forte. “How are people recovering from trauma and getting over shit.” Forte sees recovery as a social, political and economic condition. For this work, she is collecting stories of mental illness, addition and recovery, and considering the context in which these challenges have evolved. “I am really invested in telling stories and telling as many facets of that story, to provide as many entryways into the story, so that people might connect,” says Forte. “I want people to come and see the work and be enlivened by it.” Forte says the new work will zero in on some of the conversations the original work brought up, including the tragic by-product of mental illness and poverty: drug addiction, in which poor individuals unable to afford conventional treatment turn to selfmedicating to help stabilize their conditions. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Marjani Forte presents BEING HERE … /THIS TIME 8 p.m., Fri., Aug. 15. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Admission is pay-what-you-can. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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Marjani Forte’s troupe {PHOTO COURTESY OF WAH MING CHANG}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{WORKERS PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY RIPPEL}

Two recent public-art projects funded partly by the City of Pittsburgh: “Shady Liberty,” Sheila Klein’s pedestrian bridge connecting East Liberty and Shadyside, and the Industrial Arts Co-op’s “The Workers,” at South Side Riverfront Park.

[ARTS FUNDING]

PERCENT SOLUTION {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

I

N FEBRUARY 2013, activists launched a

petition asking the City of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County to enforce laws requiring set-asides for public art in publicly funded construction projects. Officials, who acknowledged that these so-called “percent for art” laws have gone unenforced, said they were revamping them. Activists are still waiting, 18 months — and some 2,200 online petition signatures — later. And there are still disagreements about what the ordinance should say. Pittsburgh’s current ordinance, passed in 1977, requires that city-funded new buildings or renovations costing $50,000 or more reserve 1 percent of the total project cost “for the inclusion of works of art.” (The county adopted a similar law in 2005.) But around 1990, the city stopped enforcing the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

ordinance and instead began including a public-art line item, of about $50,000, in its annual budgets.

“IT’S A MATTER OF POLITICAL WILL TO CHANGE LEGISLATION SO THAT IT’S MORE COMPREHENSIVE AND IT WORKS BETTER.” That money provided funding to projects like the Industrial Arts Co-op’s “The Workers” sculpture, in South Side Riverfront Park, and JoAnna Commandaros’ “Lawrenceville Life Links” murals on Butler Street. But the public-art line item has itself appeared only spottily in the city’s austere

recent budgets; it’s absent from this year’s budget entirely. That disregard for public art frustrates Carolyn Speranza. “This is about equity,” says Speranza, an artist and activist who’s been the main spokesperson for the Percent for Art Campaign. “This is about people being able to earn a living within their profession.” She points to economic benefits — for fabricators as well as artists — as well as aesthetic ones, and notes that cities like Seattle have successful percentfor-art programs. Since launching its petition, the group has held rallies and a Twitter campaign, and acquired allies including Fight Back Pittsburgh and the Hill District Consensus Group. Mayor Bill Peduto is known as an arts booster, and Speranza says a meeting

in January with officials from Peduto’s the city’s Office of Public Art. A preference new administration left her believing that for locals, she says, “begins a culture of a draft of a new ordinance would be forth- local-artists-only, which is not produccoming in March. But come August, still tive for local artists.” As a practical matno draft. ter, Piechocki adds, most small public-art The city’s public-art manager, Mor- projects here will not attract many out-ofton Brown, has been trying to revive the towners anyway. percent-for-art law since he took the job Goldstein says that a local-preference in 2009. Brown acknowledges that he’d mandate might constitute an illegal rehoped to make a draft of a new ordinance straint of trade. But she notes that Seattle available for public comment this past — whose public-art program she ran from spring. He says the delay was largely due 1993-2004 — made a practice of advertisto the transition to a new administration: ing projects only to regional artists. Public art falls under the city’s planning Brown calls local preference “a complidepartment, and new planning director cated issue” that can be addressed during Ray Gastil wasn’t confirmed until June. “the public vetting process.” “We could not do anything without his Another issue involves nongovernmenbuy-in, and he wasn’t even fully estab- tal municipal authorities, like the city’s lished yet,” says Brown. Urban Redevelopment Authority and the Brown says he now hopes to present a Sports & Exhibition Authority. The existdraft of the new law for public comment by ing law doesn’t mention such authorities year’s end, and then to present the ordinance but Goldstein, for one, says Seattle included to city council. (As for Allegheny County, in its stadium authority in its percent-for-art an email, spokesperson program, and Pittsburgh Amie Downs wrote that can do the same. “It’s not while the administration rocket science,” she says. of County Executive Rich According to mayoral Fitzgerald is “extremely spokesperson Timothy supportive of public art … McNulty, however, “The there are very few councity’s legal position [is] ty-only [construction] that city ordinances like projects” to which the percent for art, prevailing county’s percent-for-art wage and similar requirelaw would apply.) ments cannot legally bind City officials consider authorities.” Still, McNulthe city’s current law efty adds in an email, “[T]he fectively unenforceable city can encourage them because it requires the deto comply or sign agree{PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM JEFFERSON} partment head oversee- Arts-funding advocate Carolyn Speranza ments with authorities to ing a given construction speaks at a Percent for Art Campaign rally voluntarily bind them.” Downtown last year. project to actively request While public-art adartwork for that project — seldom a priori- vocates mostly prefer legislative manty, especially in cash-strapped times. Brown dates, they note that some public art is wants to make the 1 percent set-aside au- done voluntarily, like the grant-funded tomatic, and possibly expand eligibility be- artworks at the David L. Lawrence Conyond buildings, to include things like pav- vention Center. State Sen. Jim Ferlo, a ing and sidewalk projects. URA board member, adds that URA board Making a successful percent-for-art members are mayoral appointees. “If plan can be a challenge. “There are a lot of [Peduto] wants something, he can make it places that have flawed legislation,” says happen,” says Ferlo (D-Lawrenceville). Barbara Goldstein, a nationally known conGoldstein, who’s also headed the publicsultant who’s helping Pittsburgh revamp its art program in San Jose, Calif., agrees that public-art plan. “It’s a matter of political will no matter what the laws are, a city needs “a to change legislation so that it’s more com- commitment to art.” prehensive and it works better.” In fact, Goldstein will return to PittsIndeed, once Pittsburgh’s draft or- burgh later this month to meet with Peduto dinance goes public, two issues might and with new city planning director Gastil prove contentious. — whose résumé, coincidentally, includes One is whether smaller public-art proj- a stint as Seattle’s director of city planning ects should be reserved for local artists. (though he was there after Goldstein). She Speranza says yes, as a form of equity and says Pittsburgh’s new leaders are commitbuy-local economic development. Others ted to public art, boosting prospects for a disagree. “I believe the best artists should new ordinance: “I feel pretty optimistic be selected for the job regardless of geog- that things are going to get moving over the raphy,” says Renee Piechocki, who heads next couple of months.”

[BOOK REVIEW]

OBJECT LESSON William Carlos Williams’ modernist maxim No ideas but in things was a 20th-century call for poetry to do away with abstraction, focusing on the concrete imagery of everyday life. In her debut collection, Soon I Will Build an Ark (Main Street Rag), Wendy Scott takes this literary advice seriously. Scott studied at Pitt and lives in Pittsburgh, but the city isn’t her focus. Instead, her speaker builds a poetic world using strong images: a hummingbird feeder, family photos, an old barstool, origami and bottles of Jagermeister, among others. It’s a focus that grounds the 72 pages of narrative poems, making them both accessible and interesting. By relying on imagery, Scott employs common items as an entry into the speaker’s life, her work centering on difficult relationships with family members and an ex-husband. A sister’s death from the effects of alcoholism is a poignant topic that gets sensitive treatment in several places throughout the collection. In “Suddenly I Want Your Leftovers,” the reader is confronted with what is left behind when a sibling passes, with Scott writing, “You left six bottles of Jagermeister in your fridge / when you died. Three empty, save for a shot. / Two full: one hidden by take-out containers, / another in the produce bin. / One more in your freezer, half-full.” It’s a successful portrait, spread over several poems, that conveys sadness without melodrama. Other pieces allude to the speaker’s childhood sexual abuse. It’s a difficult topic that’s handled bravely in poems like “At the Bars.” Here, Scott relies again on description of objects to provoke something more profound: “We played with the vinyl seats, made little / rips bigger, poked our fingers into the wooly clumps / inside. Fluffy and hidden, soft secrets, / but the wood beneath was hard / if you poked your fingers in too far.” This elevation of common objects to totems full of emotional rawness is compelling. While the confessional tone of most of the work is spot-on, poems dealing with the breakup of a marriage feel less focused, and more like an axe being ground. Thankfully, Scott understands that dysfunction can be overbearing, and mixes in poems about nature, cheese-making and motherhood to balance the heaviness carried in much of the other work. Soon I Will Build an Ark is a self-assured book written with straightforward honesty.

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Classes Begin September 2nd Register Today!

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{BY FRED SHAW}

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Through September

theater that moves you.

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BY John Krizanc CONCEIVED BY RICHARD ROSE & JOHN KRIZANC

DIRECTED BY John Shepard

Image courtesy of DK Publishing Inc., copyright Kizette de Lempicka

Rodef Shalom Congregation 4905 Fifth Avenue, Shadyside Includes pre-show champagne and dinner prepared by: Week 1: E2 and Kate Romane Productions Week 2: Above & Beyond Catering Week 3: Open Bottle Bistro Week 4: All in Good Taste Productions Week 5: Casbah Week 6: Stagioni Tickets: quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Robin Abramson (left) and Megan MacKenzie Lawrence, foreground, and the rest of the cast of Quantum Theatre’s Tamara

[PLAY REVIEWS]

PLAY HOUSE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

WITHOUT A doubt, Tamara is Quantum Theatre’s most exhausting production. For the audience, at least — physically for sure, intellectually and emotionally, too. It must be quite a handful for the cast and crew as well. Based on real people in early (1927) Fascist Italy, John Krizanc and Richard Rose’s interactive drama takes place in various rooms of a grand villa; the splendid halls of Rodef Shalom Congregation make a lovely stand-in. Audience members can choose which characters/ threads of the story to pursue: upstairs, downstairs, all around the house. The evening even includes a catered meal at intermission.

TAMARA

continues through Sept. 14. Quantum Theatre at Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $56-100. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com

It’s no surprise that Tamara was written for a Canadian audience, the 1981 Toronto Theatre Festival. Our northern neighbors are in much better shape, and — officially, at least — they’re bilingual. The title character speaks mostly French, and only one of her fellow players can translate for her. When she’s around, that is. Besides being a tremendous challenge, Tamara is also a lot of fun: puzzles and marathon combined. For any single playgoer, most of the action is (by defi-

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nition) off-stage. Though not absolutely necessary, it helps to go with friends and split up the subplots, then compare notes on who did what to whom. No spoilers here, but be assured that no one is as s/he seems at the beginning. John Shepard directs a spot-on cast, led by Fermín Suárez as the “hero poet” of another era, and Ken Bolden and Robin Abramson as a strange, estranged couple of pianists. Robert Turano (né Koch) makes a welcome return home as a Fascist officer. Megan MacKenzie Lawrence, saddled with a language that distances her from the audience, brings to life the sparks of artist Tamara de Lempicka. The “downstairs” characters have their own dramas as well as those interlocking with their “betters.” Tammy Tsai is perfect as the dominating, domineering housekeeper, with Ethan Hova, Rachel McKeon and Thomas Constantine Moore as the star-crossed servants. Cathryn Dylan strikes an appropriately discordant note as the face of a Fascist future. Costumes, sets — all are gorgeous and scrupulously period. During the centennial of World War I, Tamara provides pointed political and personal commentary on its aftermath. Wear comfy shoes, and rest assured you will be well fed. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

DELETED PUPILS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

COMEDY, LIKE BEAUTY, is in the eye of

the beholder. My spectacles aren’t much use in discerning any fun in Shuffle, Ball

Change ... and Die!, a fundraiser at and for the Gemini Theater Co., a worthy children’s theater conveniently adjacent to the East End Food Co-op, if you want to sate your appetite. My own tastes don’t necessarily run to the vegetarian — I do enjoy a meaty, hearty laugh — and definitely not to the genre of unpleasant and/or stupid people being unpleasant and/or stupid. Yes, I hated I Love Lucy. An embarrassment of bitches, so to speak. Local playwright F.J. Hartland can deliver clever wordplay and heartfelt emotion, but not in this 2010 outing. The premise is a clash of reality shows: any number of “true crime” dramas meets Dance Moms. Someone is knocking over/ off the little students of a small-town dance school. Whodunit is obvious early on. Narration is handled by a series of videos. I’m sure I could better appreciate the multi-performances of Tim Syciarz as the townspeople of Quincy Falls, Iowa, if the screen were larger or in better focus.

Playhouse found a copy of Michael McKeever’s farce Suite Surrender. Where the less stalwart might have returned it to the drawer and tiptoed backward out of the room, Apple Hill instead decided to produce it. OK, I admit parts of that story are total fabrication, but I needed something to occupy my mind during the (many) slow parts of Suite Surrender. And coming up with a reason why we were all there seemed as good an endeavor as any. It’s ridiculous being too hard on this third-rate play, since McKeever and Apple Hill want only to entertain you. Every now and again, director Thom McLaughlin and a few members of his cast manage to rise out of the puddle of blandness and achieve something like genuine comedy, but it doesn’t happen nearly enough. McKeever sets his 2008 play in a lavish 1942 Palm Beach hotel suite. Two Hollywood divas — Claudia McFadden and Athena Sinclair — have come to town to appear at a benefit concert for the war effort. These two hate each other like poison and, no matter what, they absolutely, positively cannot be allowed to meet. You’ll be as surprised as I was when the two women, for reasons Neil deGrasse Tyson couldn’t parse, end up staying in the same suite … each unaware the other is in the other bedroom. Laugh? I thought I’d pee my pants! McKeever seems intent on recreating Ken Ludwig’s hugely popular farce Lend Me a Tenor. The setting, a couple of the characters, even some of the plot feels, um, quite similar to that show.

IT’S AN EMBARRASSMENT OF BITCHES, SO TO SPEAK.

SHUFFLE, BALL CHANGE … AND DIE! continues through Sun., Aug. 17. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. $10-15. 412-243-5201 or www.geminitheatercompany.bpt.me

The live action is in the parents’ waiting room, an amazingly diverse bunch of mothers (and one father) for such an inbred little town, all irritating in their own special ways. Most sympathetic is a reluctant mom bravely played by Stephanie Cryor. Gina Preciado delivers a comic turn as a germophobe. But most suited for scenery-chewing is the trio of “dance” teachers (parodies of tap, modern and ballet), with director/set designer TJ Firneno winningly filling in for Tom Protulipac when I attended. The production is pleasant, more demanding for the crew than for the audience. Shuffle, Ball Change ... and Die! is “comedy” in the very broadest sense of the word. But the philosophy “speak loudly and carry a heavy shtick” might click with many other theatergoers. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

PULLING STAKES {BY TED HOOVER}

RECENTLY, WHILE rummaging in an old

sock drawer, the fine folks at Apple Hill

Murph Dogg • “Timescar” • 2014 Image on paper

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

SUITE SURRENDER

continues through Sun., Aug 17. Apple Hill Playhouse, 275 Manor Road, Export. $13-20. 724-468-5050 or www.applehillplayhouse.org

McKeever does what he can to mimic Tenor’s frantic mania, but never comes close. And even in a genre as illogical as farce, Suite strains credulity well past the breaking point. If the inner world of the show is fake, then what’s at stake for the characters isn’t real either. And, in comedy, if there are no stakes, there are no laughs. On Richard Caugherty’s lovely set, Stephen Young, Pat Beyer, Brianna Downs and Alexandra Swartz lead an enjoyable cast. They do what they can. God bless ’em.

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

Exterior Woodwork— Maintenance and Repair Pittsburgh woodworker and craftsman, Regis Will, returns to the Preservation Resource Center to give a hands-on presentation and discussion on the maintenance and repair of exterior woodwork to old and historic houses.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16 • 10:00 - 11:30 AM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.1408.21.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. education about food sustainability, especially the biological process that gives us stuff like beer, pickles and sauerkraut. Whitsitt is in Pittsburgh through Aug. 23 for events including today’s community potluck and talk at Chatham University. Events at the Children’s Museum include Pickle Day (Aug. 16) and an Aug. 20 fermentation workshop. On Aug. 23, Wigle Whiskey hosts a workshop titled Fermentation By Season. All events are donation-based. BO Community potluck: 4-7 p.m. (Chatham campus, Shadyside). Complete schedule at www.fermentation onwheels.com

AUG. 15

Fermentation erm rmen e tati t on on Wheels

+ THU., AUG. 14 {WORDS}

The Wigle Whiskey Garden, in Spring Garden, is the new go-to spot for outdoor events … where you can also buy craft whiskey and cocktails. Tonight, poetry becomes the latest artform featured. Speakeasy: A Wigle BarrelHouse Reading — a road edition of the Versify series — spotlights local poets Jennifer Jackson Berry, Wendy Scott and Robert Walicki, whose fine debut chapbook, A Room Full of Trees, came out this year. Bill O’Driscoll 6:15 p.m. (5 p.m. mixer). 1055 Spring Garden Ave., Spring Garden. Free. 412-224-2847

{CONVENTION} through Aug. 31. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-15. www.labprojectpgh.org

+ FRI., AUG 15 {FOOD}

Oh, the wheels on the bus … popularize a metabolic process that turns starches and sugars into alcohols, gasses or acids. If it’s the Fermentation on Wheels bus, that is. Oregonbased Tara Whitsitt’s converted International Harvester roams the land, providing free

Local geek culture heats up as Horror Realm moves its annual fall convention to mid-summer. Highlights of the three-day con include a rare reunion of cast members from George Romero’s Day of the Dead; two cast members from The Addams Family TV show (the ones who played Wednesday and Cousin Itt); screenings of rare and indie films; and “spooky burlesque” by Steel City Cabaret. And don’t forget the Zombie Luau, with live music and a costume contest themed “Surf, Sand & Blood.”

{STAGE}

A new theater group, The Lab Project, offers an inaugural full-length show that broaches “a lot of taboo subjects,” according to founder Monteze Freeland. The Gospel Singer is local playwright C.S. Wyatt’s drama-with-music about a black drag queen, booted from his Baptist choir, who wants to work gospel into his popular nightclub act. The premiere production has a cast of six headed by Mils MJ James, and features both gospel standards and original numbers. Freeland directs; the first performance at Pittsburgh Playwrights’ space is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

AUG. 17

afronaut(a)

MainEvent {IMAGE COURTESY OF SHARON BROWN}

For a year, starting in 1997, the guerrilla artists of the Industrial Arts Co-op spent every Sunday at the Carrie Furnaces, in Rankin. The overgrown, long-vacated U.S. Steel Homestead Works site was perfect for a 40-foot-tall sculpture of a deer head, crafted from materials found there, to honor both Pittsburgh’s industrial past and nature’s restorative power. Amazingly, the Carrie Deer has survived vandals, the elements and the possibility of demolition by the property’s previous corporate owner and its subsequent landlord, Allegheny County. Now the sculpture is “the sentinel for this site,” says Ron Baraff, who heads the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, which since 2005 has hosted tours and other activities at this National Historic Landmark. But the sentinel needs help: Its support structure is crumbling. To launch a $5,000 Kickstarter campaign (part of a $20,000 conservation plan), Rivers of Steel presents Aug. 16’s Save the Carrie Deer Fundraiser. Food vendors, live music and celebrity hosts David Conrad and Rick Sebak complement the premiere of The Carrie Deer, local filmmaker Sharon Brown’s hour-long documentary. “I couldn’t have imagined 15 years ago … that we would be inviting people to the site to talk about restoring the piece,” says Tim Kaulen, one of the Carrie Deer artists. “It’s the remarkable acceptance of a piece that was really on the fringe.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. (6 p.m. VIP reception) Sat., Aug. 16. Rankin. $10 (VIP: $125). www.riversofsteel.com

BO 4-10 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 17. Crowne Plaza Pittsburgh South, 1464 Fort Couch Road, Bethel Park. Single-day tickets from $15. www.horrorrealmcon.com

House, and visits as part of the Eargasm Open Mic Series. DJ Assassin will provide musical accompaniment and Deliciously Devine will sell cupcakes and other baked

{ART}

The multi-venue Pittsburgh Biennial continues its epic rollout with two openings tonight. First comes a huge reception at the Biennial’s home base, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts; the exhibit features recent work in many media by 23 local artists, including AUG. 15 Kim Beck, Seth Clark, Eargasm E Eli Blasko and Blaine Open Mic Series Siegel. Later tonight, sister organization Pittsburgh Filmmakers opens a show goods. Dan Willis 8 p.m. 1825 featuring photography-based Centre Ave., Hill District. $15. 412work by Richard Pell (of the Center for PostNatural History), 392-4400 or www.hillhouse.org Barbara Weissberger and performance-art collaborative The Sisters of the Lattice. Both exhibits are curated by Adam {ART} Welch. Filmmakers also hosts Panza Gallery hosts the Society a 9:30 p.m. screening of the of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual new Sisters of the Lattice film, Exhibition. The group show followed by the Biennial after-party. BO PCA: 5:30 p.m. (6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside; $35); exhibit continues through Nov. 2. Filmmakers: 8 p.m. (10:30 p.m. after-party; 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland; free); exhibit continues through Oct. 19. www.pittsburgharts.org

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includes such names as Ross Hardey, Dennis Childers, Teruyo Seya, Duncan McDiarmid, Adrienne Heinrich and Cynthia Vaux. The exhibit, juried by Joan McGarry of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, opens with a reception tonight. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 20. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. Free. 412-821-0959 or www. panzagallery.com

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Film festival and salon series afronaut(a) is back. The free screenings, discussions and performances continue tonight as curators Alisha B. Wormsley and Blaine Siegel highlight one of their personal inspirations with a showing of Space Is the Place. Among other things, jazz visionary Sun Ra’s far-out cultfavorite 1974 science-fiction film critiques the representations of black people in mass media. The screening, held, appropriately enough, at Tarentum’s Wagman

Observatory, is followed by a performance by local musician and sound-collage artist Ricardo Iamuuri. DW 7-10 p.m. 225 Kurn Road, Tarentum. Free. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

{DANCE}

Ballet strike you as a little stuffy? Tonight, at Hartwood Acres, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre kicks off its 45thanniversary season with an open-air sneak peek of season-opener The Sleeping Beauty. The event starts at 5 p.m., with various free family activities and photo ops, plus the BRGR food truck and Pop Stop popsicle stand. The free performance starts at 7:30 p.m. Attendees can also register online for a pre-show picnic dinner with company dancers ($75 for adults, $20 for children). DW 5 p.m. (7:30 performance). Hampton Township. Free. 412-281-0360 or www.pbt.org

AUG. 20

The Monument Quilt Project

“language hacker.” Last year, National Geographic named the Irish-born Lewis its Traveler of the Year for his multilingual facility: He’s at 11 tongues and counting, from Spanish to Mandarin. But Lewis says he’s no savant: He just works at it, and employs common-sense methods he details in his new book Fluent in 3 Months (HarperOne). Lewis visits Penguin Bookshop tonight, and will probably break out his English for you, if he must. BO 6 p.m. 417 Beaver St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-3838

+ MON., AUG. 18 {WORDS}

Benny Lewis calls himself a

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AUG. 14

The Gospel Singer

{WORDS}

Back by popular demand, Chicago-based spoken word artist Phenomenon the Poet returns to the Hill House Kaufmann Center tonight after selling out the venue last year. The magazine columnist, English teacher and poetryslam champion is currently touring behind her latest novel, A Lesbian in God’s

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{ART}

In concurrence with the annual National Sexual Assault Conference being held in Pittsburgh, The Monument Quilt Project sets up today in Point State Park. The project seeks to create a public healing space for rape survivors by sharing the stories of the group’s touring members, and

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encouraging visitors to do the same. On display are sections of a quilt that will eventually cover one mile of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to spell “NOT ALONE” — the first national monument for rape survivors. DW 4 p.m. 101 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. 443-722-0929 or www.themonumentquilt.com

{KAROAKE}

Competitive, team-based karaoke leagues are becoming very popular among our nation’s more uninhibited residents. Registration is open for the inaugural season of Steel City Karaoke, Pittsburgh’s first such league. Teams are comprised of exactly eight players, two of whom must be male. Teams have until the Sept. 3 season-opener to register, and league play will continue every Wednesday at the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern until the championship round, on Nov. 19. DW Registration is $45 per person. 844-937-4642 or www.steelcitykaraoke.com

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WORLD & OTHER BUSINESS. Arthur Miller’s sometimes humorous perspective on traditional Biblical stories. Presented by R-ACT Theatre Productions. Aug. 15-16, 7 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 17, 2 p.m. The Avenue Theater. 724-775-6844. THE FOURSOME. Norm Foster’s comedy about 4 friends who get together to play a round of golf at their 25th college reunion. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 30. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST. Shakespeare in the Park production presented by Poor Yorick’s Players. Thru Aug. 16, 7 p.m. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705. THE MIDDLE DISTANCE. Reading of a new play about a couple of twenty-something slackers hanging out on the campus of their old community

college, desperately avoiding figuring out what to do w/ their lives. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Sun., Aug. 17, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-496-2194. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SHUFFLE, BALL CHANGE.. & DIE. Comedy by F.J. Hartland. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 17. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. ST. GERTRUDE’S GUIDE TO HEAVEN. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 16. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. SUITE SURRENDER. It’s 1942, & two of Hollywood’s biggest feuding divas have been assigned the same hotel suite. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 17. Apple Hill

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

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BAMBOO & BIG PHIL ---------- 8.22 ----------

HOUSE SHOES

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VIKTER DUPLAIX

Playhouse. 724-468-5050. TAMARA. Play by John Krizanc. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed, Thu, Sat, 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 6:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 14. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-362-1713. THINGS MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME. Olivia & Gabe are moving into their first apartment together, halfway across the country from their parents, who show up to help them. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 17. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. UNDERNEATH THE LINTEL. Glen Berger’s “existential detective story.” Aug. 14-16, 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. VIRTUALLY YOURS: A COMEDIC ROAD TRIP FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM. New play by Chuck Lanigan about finding love in the age of celebrity & social networking. Sat., Aug. 16, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ngs i l g en rs .50 Yu e $2 ni Be i M $3

THEATER THE CREATION OF THE

COMEDY THU 14 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 15 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 15 - SAT 16 HERBIE GILL. Aug. 15-16 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 15 - SUN 17 LONI LOVE. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Aug. 16, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 17, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SUN 17 SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 19 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 1 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. HERITAGE MUSEUM. 412-826-9295. Military artifacts and exhibits MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection on the Allegheny Valley’s includes jade and ivory statues industrial heritage. Tarentum. from China and Japan, as well 724-224-7666. as Meissen porcelain. Butler. AUGUST WILSON CENTER 724-282-0123. FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, more than 600 birds from over Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, 200 species. With classes, lectures, film & oral history narratives demos and more. North Side. to explore communities, 412-323-7235. cultures, & innovations. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Downtown. 412-258-2700. rooms helping to tell the story BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Large collection of automatic University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. roll-played musical instruments 412-624-6000. and music boxes in a mansion OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church setting. Call for appointment. features 1823 pipe organ, O’Hara. 412-782-4231. Revolutionary War graves. Scott. CARNEGIE MUSEUM 412-851-9212. OF NATURAL HISTORY. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. RACE: Are We So Different? This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Text, photographs, interactive site features log house, audiovisual components, & blacksmith shop & gardens. related artifacts challenge South Park. 412-835-1554. perceptions about race. Oakland. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY 412-622-3131. MUSEUM. Trolley rides CARNEGIE SCIENCE and exhibits. Includes CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl displays, walking tours, Digital Dome (planetarium), gift shop, picnic area Miniature Railroad and Trolley Theatre. and Village, USS Washington. Requin submarine, 724-228-9256. and more. North Side. PHIPPS 412-237-3400. CONSERVATORY w. w w CARRIE FURNACE. er & BOTANICAL hcitypap g p Built in 1907, Carrie GARDEN. Butterfly .com Furnaces 6 & 7 are Forest. Watch extremely rare examples butterflies emerge from of pre World War II their chrysalises to flutter iron-making technology. among tropical blooms. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. Summer Flower Show. Feat. COMPASS INN. Demos a variety of imaginative and tours with costumed railroad displays enhanced by guides featuring this flowers, plants & interactive restored stagecoach stop. features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 724-238-4983. outdoor gardens feature exotic CONNEY M. KIMBO plants and floral displays from GALLERY. University of around the world. Oakland. Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: 412-622-6914. Memorabilia & Awards from PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG the International Hall of Fame. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Oakland. 412-648-7446. animals, including many DEPRECIATION LANDS endangered species. Highland MUSEUM. Small living Park. 412-665-3639. history museum celebrating RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL the settlement and history HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits of the Depreciation Lands. on the Homestead Mill. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. Steel industry and community FALLINGWATER. Tour the artifacts from 1881-1986. famed Frank Lloyd Wright Homestead. 412-464-4020. house. 724-329-8501. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ FIRST PRESBYTERIAN HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany Lost Steamboat: Treasures stained-glass windows. of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. Downtown. 412-471-3436. nearly 2,000 once-hidden FORT PITT MUSEUM. treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s Reconstructed fort houses important role as a Gateway museum of Pittsburgh history to the West & a national hub circa French & Indian War for the steamboat building and American Revolution. industry in the mid-19th Downtown. 412-281-9285. century. From Slavery FRICK ART & HISTORICAL to Freedom. Highlight’s CENTER. Ongoing: tours Pittsburgh’s role in the of Clayton, the Frick estate, anti-slavery movement. with classes & programs Ongoing: Western PA Sports for all ages. Point Breeze. Museum, Clash of Empires, and 412-371-0600. exhibits on local history, more. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the Strip District. 412-454-6000. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS 724-329-8501. HISTORY CENTER. Museum

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

VISUALART

FULL LIST ONLINE

“She Is in Orange,” by Zivi Aviraz, from Pittsburgh 10, at Christine Frechard Gallery, in Squirrel Hill

NEW THIS WEEK BUNKERPROJECTS. Orna-Mental. Solo exhibition by Katie Hovencamp. Opening reception: Aug. 15, 7-10 p.m. www.bunkerprojects. org/current.html. Garfield. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Photography & video installations by Rich Pell, Barbara Weissberger, Sisters of the Lattice & curated by Adam Welch. Opening reception: Aug. 15, 8-11 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PANZA GALLERY. Society of Sculptors’ 2014 Annual Exhibition. Curated by Joan McGarry. Opening reception Aug. 16, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pittsburgh Biennial 2014 at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Paintings, multimedia, video installation, & sculpture created by 23 local artists. Curated by Adam Welch. Opening reception:

Aug. 15, 5:30-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Character of the Living. Oil paintings by Genevieve Barbee. Closing reception: Aug. 15, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by

Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Untangled. Work by Elaine Bergstrom & Charles Sawyer. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro CONTINUES ON PG. 44

commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS SAT 16 15TH ANNUAL OHIOPYLE OVER THE FALLS FESTIVAL. Whitewater racing, live music, silent auction, food booths, more. Ohiopyle State Park. 724-329-8591. PEDAL 2 THE METAL. Live music, car & bike cruise, raffle, more. 12 p.m. Christina’s. 412-673-0199.

DANCE THU 14 - SAT 16 PIVOTAL MOMENTS. Performance by H2O Contemporary Dance Company. Aug. 14-16, 8 p.m. The Dance Conservatory of Pittsburgh, Mt. Lebanon. 412-344-3900.

FRI 15 MARJANI FORTÉ: BEING HERE…/THIS TIME. Dance performance feat. Jasmine Hearn examining the intersections of mental illness, addiction, & systemic poverty. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

SAT 16 REED DANCE INTENSIVE SHOWING. 2 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

SUN 17 BALLET UNDER THE STARS. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. 7:30 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-454-9107.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 16 BARK-B-QUE & BEER TASTING. Benefits The Proper Pit Bill. 1-4 p.m. All Saint’s Brewing Company, Greensburg. 724-515-2143. CAN’T STOP THE SERENITY. Raffles, games, movie screening, more. Benefits Equality Now & presented by the PA Browncoats & Geek Pittsburgh. 5 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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THURS, AUG, 14, 9PM

R&B/FUNK FROM NEW ORLEANS

FLOW TRIBE FRIDAY, AUG 15, 9PM

ROCK

SUPERMONKEY BATTLE OF THE BANDS SAT, AUG 16, 9PM

ROCK

R . A . N . T. (ROCK ALL NIGHT)

FREE EVENT FIVE BANDS MON, AUG. 18, 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, AUG 19, 9PM

ROCK

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH SOUND/UNSOUND TRIO VENUE IS NOW NON-SMOKING 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

DORMONT POOL PAINTING UNVEILING. Painting by Johno Prascak will be on display & offered for sale at auction. Benefits Friends of Dormont Pool. 8 p.m. James Gallery, West End. 412-561-7692. HOMEWOOD CEMETERY FOUNDER’S DAY CELEBRATION. Hoop rolling, scavenger hunt, vintage car show, Keynote Speaker: Rick Sebak, more. Benefits The Homewood Cemetery Historical Fund. 12-4 p.m. Homewood Cemetery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1822. MUSIC FOR MS ROOTS MUSIC FESTIVAL. Feat. Bill Deasy, The Weedrags, City Dwelling Nature Seekers, The Town Pants, Humming House. musicforms.org Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. TOUR DES TREES. 5-mile or 20-mile bike ride. Benefits Tree Pittsburgh. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Golden Triangle Bike Rental, Downtown. 412-496-7648.

SUN 17 20TH ANNUAL ICE CREAM FUNDAE. Ice cream stations, face painting, games, more. Benefits Pressley Ridge. 6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, Highland Park. 412-665-3640. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

MON 18 CHICK-FIL-A: COTA FOR RACHEL T. NIGHT. Print & present the flyer at cotaforrachelt.com to donate 20% of your purchase to the Children’s Organ Transplant Association. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Chick-fil-A, Robinson.

TUE 19 THU/AUGUST 14/10PM

COMFORT TECH, TORI & ANDY, ADDISON STEELE & JOSH MARSHALL THU/AUGUST 21/10PM

CHARM & CHAIN THU/AUGUST 28/10PM

EMO NIGHT 16 $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight ___________________ $5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT THURSDAYS, ALL DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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BIZARRE BOWLING W/ BROOKLYN BOTTOMVITCH & VYVYAN VYXN. Cosmic bowling, drag show, more. Benefits the Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh. 7:30 p.m. Crafton-Ingram Lanes, Crafton. 724-678-0834.

POLITICS TUE 19 LEARNING WHILE BLACK: EXCELLING IN A HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT. Panel & audience discussion. 6:30-8 p.m. The Neighborhood Academy, East Liberty. 412-434-0919.

LITERARY THU 14 CHUTZ-POW! SUPERHEROES OF THE HOLOCAUST COMIC BOOK RELEASE. Make your own

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. The Pittsburgh 10. Group show of 10 local artists. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. THE FRAMESMITH. Lisa Marie Jakab on View. Paintings, drawings, & prints. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-0300. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. What Will Her Kids Think?

superhero mask, play Superhero Cornhole, photo booth, more. 8-11 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-421-1500. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe,

Work by Sally Deskins. Mother-Artist Panel Discussion: Aug. 23, 6-7:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Hidden & Revealed. Work by Todd Sanders & Jason Schell. First Friday Art Walk: Aug. 1, 5:30-8 p.m., Artist Talk: Aug. 2, noon. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Once Again Calm. Surreal minimalist landscapes by Thomas Frontini. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Banking The Fire. Lithography prints by Keith Clouse. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Investigations in Terraforming. Prints by New Academy Press. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Design is.. Photography, short video, website screen shots, various graphic design projects for fictional community & corporate clients & more, by 35 students working with PTI School of Design faculty. Robinson.

Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SPEAKEASY: A WIGLE BARRELHOUSE READING. Feat. Jennifer Jackson Berry, Wendy Scott, & Robert Walicki. 5-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2847.

FRI 15 RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. Trigger City by Sean Chercover. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SHAW GALLERIES. Ruth Levine: Radiant Life. More than 30 works of art by the late Ruth Levine. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s

SAT 16 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. JESSICA SERVER, AUBREY HIRSCH, DEVAN GOLDSTEIN. Poetry reading, part of the Versify Reading Series. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

MON 18 COMICS DECODED

& current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Collective Unconscious. Photographs by Jay Brown, Melissa Catanese, Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton, Jake Reinhart, Justin Visnesky. unsmokeartspace.com/ index/#/collective-unconscious. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition by Sue Pollins, Doreen Currie, Michael McSorley. Happy Hour Event: Aug. 8, 5-7 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 19 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

WED 20 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE SMITHFIELD CRITICS. Discussing The Sound Of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

EVENT: Fort

Pitt Block House 250th Anniversary, Downtown

THU 14

FRI 15 BUG CAMP. Learn about early Native Americans & the web of life, sing songs, make bug crafts, more. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 16 MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market,

WED 20 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

Aug. 09 I love history, but I especially love Pittsburgh history. And I had never been to the Block House, so I figured today would be the perfect day to check it out. I learned a lot more than I honestly thought I would. Like, inside the house I read about some of the previous tenants. Apparently one of them ran a candy shop, and she paid five dollars a month for rent on something that is now a historical landmark, which I thought was funny. It was also a two-story tenement house, so people actually lived there. But the rest of the anniversary festival is cool: I’m really excited to check out the Fort Pitt Museum next.

THU 14 - WED 20 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MAKER STORYTIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Thu, 2-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LEMONS.. Enjoy some free lemonade in exchange for a promise to pay the generosity forward w/ a good deed. Thu, 2-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 28 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WHEN: Sat.,

STUDIO PROGRAM: GELLI ART. Experiment w/ a new technique in monotype printing. Thru Aug. 15, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Strip District. 412-586-7177. PICKLE DAY. Learn from food educators & professional fermenters & brewers from Fermentation on Wheels about the magical back story of the common pickle. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 16 - SUN 17 THE FANCY ROMANCER’S WHISPER BOOTH. Reflect, release, respond, & appreciate the love & joy in your life. Sat, Sun, 12-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 18 MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. Tue, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OTHER STUFF THU 14

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART & INSPIRATION W/ WILLIAM ROCK PRESENTS AN EVENING W/ BARBARA RICHARDSON. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. BACKYARD COMPOSTING 101. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. BY DAN WILLIS CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL GME/TEAM ABLE BACK CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. TO SCHOOL ALL AGES Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon TALENT SHOWCASE. 6 p.m. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Hill House Kaufmann Center, 412-531-1912. Hill District. 412-583-6994. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, SKYWATCH. Learn about book discussions, more. globular clusters, nebulas & Second and Fourth planets by seeing them w/ Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. your own eyes. On clear nights, Carnegie Library, Oakland. visitors are invited to come to 412-622-3151. SkyWatch to get up-close and GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. personal with amazing celestial Interactive games, hosted by objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu Carnegie Science of every month, 8 p.m. Center, North Side. Arcade Comedy 412-237-3400. Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL . w w w GARDEN IN THE WOMEN’S typaper ci h g p PARKS FIELD DAY. ASSOCIATION OF .com Tours, demos, children’s PITTSBURGH. Social, activities, tomato & cultural club of American/ garlic tastings, more. Events at international women. both North Park & South Park, Thu First Baptist Church, presented by the Penn State Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@ Master Gardeners. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. gmail.com. 412-562-8672. LUNCH & LEARN: HOW MUD ON THE MOUNTAIN IN TO START A FOOD TRUCK THE DARK. 7-mile obstacle race. BUSINESS. 12:15 p.m. 9 p.m. Seven Springs. 800-452-2223. Carnegie Library, Downtown. TWO WHEELS LOTS OF 412-281-7141. GREEN - A BIKE TOUR OF MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting URBAN GREEN SPACES. night. Second Thu of every 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. GTECH month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Strategies, Larimer. Homewood. 412-473-0100. 412-361-2099.

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OUTSIDE

FRI 15 - SAT 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 16

TUE 19

PITTSBURGH MAJOR TAYLOR CYCLING CLUB’S 3 STATE BICYCLE TOUR. Scenic bicycle ride through Pennsylvania, West Virginia, & Ohio. 6:30 a.m. Golden Triangle Bike Rental, Downtown. 412-719-4758.

TUE 19

CRITIC: Brendon Berkeley, 27, a web developer from Coraopolis

KIDSTUFF

SUN 17

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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45

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

[ART]

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Second Thu of every month, 11 a.m. and Fourth Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

CHATLINE TM

THU 14 - FRI 15

412.566.1861

Try for FREE Ahora en Español

OAKLAND RESTAURANT WEEK. A week of $5 lunches at participating restaurants. www. onlyinoakland.org Thru Aug. 15

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

THU 14 - SAT 16

www.livelinks.com

CHAIRPOCALYPSE: NEVER SAY NEVER SAY NEVER. Thru Aug. 14, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 16, 2-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick, Carrick. 412-882-3897.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

STYLE WEEK PITTSBURGH. Fashion shows, jewelry showcase, more. http:// www.styleweekpittsburgh. wordpress.com/ Thru Aug. 17

FRI 15 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GEORGE GERSHWIN, HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OUT OF THE BOX. Time Capsule opening w/ The Warhol’s Time Capsules Cataloguer Erin Byrne, Chief Archivist Matt Wrbican, Assistant Archivist Cindy Lisica & special guest Benjamin Liu. 7 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

Art by Katie Hovencamp

In her new solo exhibit, Orna-Mental, Bunker Projects resident artist Katie Hovencamp humorously explores ideas of femininity and beauty through photography, sculpture and other mediums. Hovencamp discussed the show, which opens Friday. WHAT IS THIS SHOW LIKE? I like to turn things on their heads by making them excessive. For example, I’ll take a concept that is considered beautiful, like bows, and put them into massive pile forms, making this overwhelming, sickeningly beautiful thing. WHAT DO YOU HOPE VIEWERS TAKE AWAY FROM YOUR WORK? I want people to [be able] to laugh at themselves, or laugh at the acts people go through in order to achieve beauty. We’re conditioned to look nice and proper in public, and it is kind of a comical act how far people will go to achieve that [idea of] ideal beauty. Opening reception: 7-10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15. Exhibit continues through Aug. 23. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-440-8422 or www.bunkerprojects.org

FRI 15 - SAT 16 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223. NCJW FALL FASHION REBOOT. Pop-up clothing sale. 11 a.m.6 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 16, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Home Consignments, Swissvale. 412-421-6118.

FRI 15 - SUN 17 HORROR REALM CONVENTION. Horror Cabaret, film screenings, zombie luau, more. Aug. 15-17 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 412-833-5300.

SAT 16 CHAIRPOCALYPSE: NEVER SAY NEVER SAY NEVER. Thru Aug. 14, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 16, 2-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick. 412-882-3897. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every

month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. I MADE IT! MARKET. Nomadic indie craft market feat. 30+ local artisans, farmers market, more. www.imadeitmarket.com Third Sat of every month, 2-7 p.m. Thru Aug. 16 Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LAWRENCEVILLE BOUTIQUE CRAWL. Part of Style Week Pittsburgh. 12-5 p.m. Lower Lawrenceville. 412-519-0182. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709.

NATIONAL THRIFT STORE DAY CELEBRATION. Games, prizes, free hot dogs, more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thriftique, Swissvale. 412-271-0544. NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY OUTREACH GARDEN OPEN HOUSE. Garden scavenger hunt, children’s crafts, local honey tastings, more. 1-3 p.m. Rosalina Sauro Sirianni Garden, Bellevue. 412-487-6316. PITTSBURGH EAST ROLLER VILLIANS: BACK TO SCHOOL BRAWL. 5 p.m. Murrysville SportZone. 724-516-1689. PUBLIC ART BIKE RIDE: DOWNTOWN TO THE SOUTH SIDE. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 17 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. PITTSBURGH’S HIDDEN TREASURES: AN ANTIQUES APPRAISAL SHOW. Bring family heirlooms & meet w/ professional appraisers as KDKA-TV cameras roam the museum. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOUTH SIDE GARDEN TOUR. Tickets & maps are available on the day of the tour at the Green N’at table at 18th & E. Carson Sts.

or online at www.showclix.com/ event/3819903 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

MON 18 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 19 BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. Tue, 7 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. 412-999-9153.

proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for Pinchpenny Phantom of the Opera. Aug. 23. Males/females in their 30s. One male must be a true tenor & one female a true soprano. Applications for stage manager, choreographer, technical director, carpenters, costumer, & property person also accepted. lindak@applehillplayhouse.org. 724-468-5050 x 4.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY AQUATIC ALLIANCE

In 2000, Connoquenessing Creek was rated America’s second-most polluted small waterway, and today it remains clogged with refuse. Volunteers are needed for Allegheny Aquatic Alliance’s Third Annual Connoquenessing Creek Clean-Up Celebration, on Sat., Aug. 23 The all-day clean-up — which meets at Beacon Hotel in Renfrew, Pa. — starts at 8 a.m. and finishes with music and food. For information, call 724-371-0416 or visit www.alleghenyaquaticalliance.com.

BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. Aug. 26. Men/women, prepare song of your choice & COUNTRY NIGHT LINE bring music for accompanist. DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org/ Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North join-us/ First Unitarian Church, Fayette. 412-693-5555. Shadyside. 412-241-4044. DETROIT STYLE URBAN THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. CHOIR. Auditioning young singers. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Visit www.themendelssohnchoir. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. org or call for information. Third ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon 412-926-2488. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. 412-531-1912. Ongoing auditions for FIGURE DRAWING actors ages 18+ for NIGHTS. Every other murder mystery shows Wed, 7-9 p.m. Thru performed in the Aug. 20 BUNKER Pittsburgh area. projects, Garfield. www. per a p 412-833-5056. HOMEMADE GREEN pghcitym o .c THE MENDELSSOHN CLEANING PRODUCTS. CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Learn how to make Auditions for all voice parts. your home sparkle with Call or visit www.themendelssohn eco-friendly solutions. Presented choir.org for information. Third by the East End Food Co-op. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. 724-263-5259. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. NEW HORIZON THEATER. 412-242-3598. Auditions for Queens Of LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice The Blues. Sept. 6. 4 Africanconversational English. Wed, American females mid 30’s-60 & 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, 2 African-American males late Oakland. 412-622-3151. 30’s-mid 50’s. newhorizontheater@ THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. yahoo.com A meeting of jugglers & spinners. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. ORCHESTRA STUDENT Union Project, Highland Park. CHORALE. Open to high school 412-363-4550. students in grades 10-12, as well SPANISH II. Geared toward as college singers. Nominations those who already have a basic due by Sept. 5. chfl218@gmail.com understanding of Spanish & 412-977-2047. are interested in increasing

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PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for Teen Dating Awareness Program. Aug. 23-24. Ages 14-24, non-equity, 1-2 min. monologue. www.primestage.com Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. STAGE RIGHT! Auditions for the 2014-2015 Season. Aug. 23. Adult actors only. www.stage rightgreensburg.com David Mateer Center for the Arts, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. STEEL CITY MEN’S CHORALE. Auditions for basses & tenors. Aug. 11-19. Vocalizing, pitch memory exercises & sight reading. www.choralnet.org/view/445665 First Trinity Lutheran Church, Oakland. 412-417-4800.

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UNDERCROFT OPERA. Auditions for our 2014-2015 season. Aug. 28-31. www.undercroftopera. org/community/audition/ Waverly Presbyterian Church, Regent Square. 412-422-7919. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Auditions for 2014 season. Aug. 20 & 24. Open to all string, woodwind, brass & percussion players enrolled in area high schools or colleges. wysorc@ verizon.net Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg. 724-837-1850.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com.

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47

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a gay male into puppy play. About a year ago, I joined a pack with one Sir and several puppies. I became very close to one of my “pup bros” and became his alpha — meaning between the two of us, I’m more Dom but still sub to our Sir. The pack has fallen apart due to each of us going through relationship troubles. My pup bro, let’s call him Fido, breaks up with his open-relationship boyfriend. I bring up the idea of dating. He admits he’s considered it but is unsure. A bit later, he tells me: “I love you, but I’m not ready for a commitment.” But a couple weeks later, he tells me that a Dom on the opposite coast wants to collar him. I have tried to respect their connection, but he’s started pulling away, saying that certain things (sex and cuddles) with me feel too much like “boyfriends.” To really make me feel like shit, I opened Fido’s Scruff profile because he updated his pic, and his profile says he’s looking “for a guy to cuddle with, laugh with, spend adventures with,” i.e., everything we used to do before he pulled away. Am I deluding myself? I thought this was a “not yet” situation. PENSIVE UPSET PUPPY

a special interest in reproductive health. “The bottom line: Vaginas are elastic and should be able to accommodate a variety of things of all shapes and sizes, even after a hysterectomy. That said, people who are menopausal (no periods for 12 months or more) or who have had their ovaries removed (which may or may not happen during a hysterectomy) no longer have estrogen.” Estrogen, among other wonderful things, keeps vaginas elastic and lubricated. “Without estrogen, sometimes the vagina can feel dry and intercourse can be painful,” said Torres. “For someone without estrogen and experiencing VAG’s concerns, I would recommend using lubrication with intercourse (when the time comes) and possibly vaginal estrogen cream while the vagina ‘readjusts.’ It’s also important for the partner to realize that the vagina may feel a bit different and there may be some adjustments to new sensations. Patience and a steady-as-she-goes attitude are best.” Patience and a steady-as-she-goes attitude — two things we should all bring to any sexual encounter. Follow Dr. Torres on Twitter @LeahNTorres. Her website is LeahTorres.com.

PEOPLE WHO ARE INTO HUMILIATION SCENES WANT TO BE IN CONTROL UNTIL THE SCENE STARTS.

Strip away the puppy masks, the alpha/beta pack dynamics, and the Doms, and what are we left with? Another dumped motherfucker who doesn’t know that he’s been dumped. I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but this isn’t a “not yet” situation. It’s a “not ever” situation. When someone you’ve fallen for says, “I’m not ready for a commitment,” what they mean is “I have no interest in committing to you.” Fido gave you a standardissue brush-off line, one that the hopeful, naive and deluded frequently fail to recognize. Your ex-packmate should’ve had the balls to go with something unambiguous like “You’re nice, we had some good times, but I’m not interested in pursuing anything further.” But he didn’t, and as an adult person/puppy on the dating/scritching scene, it’s your job to hear, “I’m not interested in you” whenever someone says, “I’m not ready for a commitment” or “It’s not you, it’s me” or “I have to focus on my studies/work/remodel.” The same goes anytime an “I love you” is followed by a “but.” When someone says, “I love you but,” it’s your job to hear, “I don’t want to hurt you, but I don’t feel about you the way you do about me.” Happily married straight woman here, just post-hysterectomy. No penis-in-vagina sex allowed for a few weeks. My question: Husband is well-endowed, and sex has often included his cock repeatedly touching my cervix. With no cervix anymore, though, will there be enough room in my remodeled space for his whole cock? Once I’m fully healed from surgery, will the vaginal tissue stretch? VERY AGITATED GENERALLY

“When a person has a hysterectomy, the cervix is often removed and the end of the vagina is closed so it’s an internal pouch, essentially,” said Dr. Leah Torres, an ob-gyn practicing in Utah with

My boyfriend is turned on by CFNM — clothed female, naked male — and his “ultimate fantasy” is to be naked in a room of fullyclothed women. So I asked four (adventurous) female friends if they would come to a small party where my boyfriend would be naked. When I told him his ultimate fantasy would be coming true, he said I had no right to share this information and he felt humiliated and exposed. (Humiliated and exposed — I thought that was the whole point of CFNM?!?) He was so angry, he barely spoke to me for a week, and then today he asked me when the party is going to happen! All I want to do now is slap him! WANTS TO FLIP

Tell him the party is off, absent an apology and an explanation from him. But you should open with an apology of your own: Tell him you should’ve checked with him before setting up the party, and apologize for freaking him out. People who are into humiliation scenes want to be in control until the scene starts, i.e., involved in negotiations and setup, and actively consenting. I was disappointed by your response to DOMME in last week’s column. She was the woman whose husband wouldn’t go down on her. DOMME stated — or her friend suggested — that cunnilingus is something that “mostly submissive men enjoy.” The misconception that concern for women’s pleasure is “submissive” seems like part of DOMME’s problem, and you should have corrected her. ENJOYS ORAL, NOT SUBMISSIVE

You’re right: I should’ve slapped down the idea that only submissive men are into eating pussy. I rolled my eyes pretty hard when I read that line, but I really should’ve used my fingers to bang out a sentence or two refuting that notion. Mea culpa. On the Lovecast, sex at Burning Man: savage lovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.13-08.20

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When we are launching any big project, our minds hide from us the full truth about how difficult it will be. If we knew beforehand all of the tests we would eventually face, we might never attempt it. Economist Albert O. Hirschman called this the principle of the “hiding hand.” It frees us to dive innocently into challenging work that will probably take longer than we thought and compel us to access new resources and creativity. To be clear: What’s hidden from us are not only the obstacles but also the unexpected assistance we will get along the way.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

The literal meaning of the Swedish word smultronställe is “wild strawberry patch.” Metaphorically, it refers to a special place that feels like your private sanctuary. It may be hard to find or unappreciated by others, but for you it’s a spot that inspires you to relax deeply. You might have had a life-changing epiphany there. When you’re in this refuge, you have a taste of what it’s like to feel at home in the world. Do you have a smultronställe, Virgo? If not, it’s time to find one. If you already do, spend extra time there in the coming week.

with actual gold or silver. Metaphorically, it suggests that something may become more beautiful and valuable after being broken. The wounds and the healing of the wounds are integral parts of the story, not shameful distortions to be disguised or hidden. Does any of that resonate with you about your current experience, Capricorn? I’m guessing it does. Let’s call this the kintsukuroi phase of your cycle.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, the bells are about to ring for you. The festive lights will flash. The celebratory anthems will throb. It’s like you’re going to win a fortune on a TV quiz show; like you will get an A+ on your final exam; like you’ll be picked as homecoming king or queen. But it’s possible I’m a bit off in my projections, and your success will be subtler than I anticipate. Maybe, in fact, you are about to accomplish the Healing of the Year, or discover the Secret of the Decade, or enjoy the Most Meaningful Orgasm of the Century.

N ear the end of his career, the painter Henri Matisse created a paper-cut composition he called “Le Bateau,” or “The Boat.” It is an abstract piece that does not depict a literal boat. That’s why the Museum of Modern Art in New York should perhaps be forgiven for mistakenly hanging it upside-down back in 1961, upon first acquiring the piece. Fortunately, after a month-and-a-half, a knowledgeable person noticed, and the position of “Le Bateau” was corrected. I’m wondering whether there’s a comparable phenomenon going on with you right now, Aquarius? Is it possible that a part of your life got inverted or transposed? If so, will you be sharp enough to see the goof and brave enough to fix it? I hope you won’t allow this error to persist.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

A teenage Pakistani boy decided he wanted to help his country’s government clean up the local Internet. Ghazi Muhammad Abdullah gathered a list of more than 780,000 porn sites and sent it to the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority. Big job! Hard work! I would love to see you summon similar levels of passion and diligence as you work in behalf of your favorite cause, Scorpio. The coming weeks will be prime time for you to get very excited about the changes you would like to help create in the world.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Working as a journalist for the Papua New Guinea Post-Courier, Simon Eroro wanted to interview a group of indigenous rebels in a remote jungle. He decided he was willing to do whatever was necessary to get the big scoop. After making a difficult journey through rough terrain to reach them, he was told he would be given the information that he sought on one condition: that he be circumcised with bamboo sticks as part of a cleansing ritual. Eroro agreed to the procedure, got the story, and ultimately won a prize for his report. I don’t recommend that you go quite that far in pursuit of your current goal, Sagittarius. On the other hand, it might be wise for you to consider making a sacrifice.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Kintsukuroi is a Japanese word that literally means “golden repair.” It refers to the practice of fixing cracked pottery with lacquer that’s blended

“I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice,” said British author G.K. Chesterton, “and then going away and doing the exact opposite.” I’m going to endorse that approach for you, Pisces. In my astrological opinion, I don’t think anyone can possibly give you accurate counsel in the coming weeks. Your circumstances are too unique and your dilemmas are too idiosyncratic for even the experts to understand, let alone the people who care for you and think they own a piece of you. I do suspect it might be useful for you to hear what everyone has to say about your situation, though. Seeing their mistaken or uninformed perspectives should help you get clarity about what’s right.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

At your next meal, imagine that the food you are eating is filled with special nutrients that enhance your courage. During the meal after that, fantasize that you are ingesting ingredients that will boost your perceptiveness. The next time you snack, visualize your food as being infused with elements that will augment the amount of trust you have in yourself. Then you will be ready to carry out your assignment for the coming weeks: Use your imagination to pump up your courage and perceptiveness as you carry out smart adventures that you haven’t trusted yourself enough to try before now.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

The leaves and berries of the deadly nightshade plant are highly poisonous. If ingested, they cause delirium and death. On the other hand, a drug obtained from the same plant is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. It’s helpful in treating many illnesses, from gastrointestinal and heart problems to Parkinson’s. Is there a metaphorical equivalent in your life, Gemini? An

influence that can either be sickening or healing, depending on various factors? I suspect that now is one of those times when you should be very focused on ensuring that the healing effect predominates.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

A New York doctor offers a service he calls Pokertox. Jack Berdy injects Botox into poker players’ faces so as to make their expressions hard to read. With their facial muscles paralyzed, they are in no danger of betraying subtle emotional signals that might help their opponents guess their strategy. I understand there might sometimes be value in adopting a poker face when you are in the midst of trying to win at poker or other games. But for the foreseeable future, Cancerian, I recommend the opposite approach. You’re most likely to be successful if you reveal everything you’re feeling. Let your face and eyes be as eloquent as they can be. “You know what to do and you know how to do it.” True or False? Why? Testify at Truthrooster@ gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Researchers in Peru have recently tracked down many previously unknown varieties of wild cacao plants. What that means is that there are exotic kinds of chocolate that you and I have never dreamed of, and they will be commercially available within a few years. As delicious as your Chocolove XOXOX Extra Strong Dark candy bar may taste to you now, you will eventually journey further into a new frontier of ecstatic delectability. I propose that we use this theme as a metaphor for the work you have ahead of you right now. It is time for you to make good things even better — to take fun diversions and transform them into experiences that engender transcendent bliss. Turn “yes” into “YESSSS!!!!”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

WORK

PAGE LIVE

50 PAGE

SERVICES

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HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

412-661-5921

HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

ABC SELF STORAGE

EAST FOR RENT

ROOMMATE WANTED Wanted Roomate

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Follow us on

Squirrel Hill Duplex 2 units avl. 2BR or 3BR. Eq. kitch w/dishwasher, h/w flrs, gar, w/d, near bus, univ. & shops. 2BR $1,295 Avl Immed, 3BR $1,595 avl 9/1.

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$975 heat incl.

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

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25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Turtle Creek area Call between 6pm-midnight Please leave detailed message

412-969-2626 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT 131 Shiloh St. 1 Comm. Unit, 3 Res. Apts. 1 blk. from Grandview Ave! $270k OBO ccestate131shiloh@ gmail.com

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

Shadyside Lg 2BR, h/w fls, high ceilings, pvt back porch, sml pet OK,

HELP WANTED

Call for pictures. 703-899-5246

STUDIES

EAST FOR RENT

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

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Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

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• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

@PGHCityPaper

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

412.316.3342

*Stuff We Like

Warhol Rehang

In May, for its 20th anniversary, The Andy Warhol Museum totally reorganized. The top four floors are now a veritable Warhol bio, from juvenalia and long-unexhibited artifacts to hours of on-demand video and even an Exploding Plastic Inevitable room.

ADOPTION

CLASSES

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Ads . TV . Film . Fashion 40% OFF TUITION SPECIAL $1990 - Train & Build Portfolio . One Week Course Details at: AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

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PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

GENERAL FOR SALE

ADOPTION

1-800-492-8842 Kristen & Richard

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888992-1957 (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

Adopt:

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

Adventurous, Successful Professionals, Camping, Skiing, Music awaits 1st baby.

Expenses Paid

Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love.

Pittsburgh b h Riverhounds h

Free New Yorker archive access

The venerable magazine has made its online archives temporarily free through this fall. Enjoy 90 years of hoity-toity writing and reporting on your tablet while you relax in your hammock.

Still fired up after the World Cup? The city’s pro soccer team has a couple of home games left at Highmark Stadium, on the South Side, before its season ends Sept. 6. www.riverhounds.com

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 2, 2014, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for four service contracts at Various Schools for Mechanical Prime Contracts. • Yearly Service Contract for Repairs to Plumbing Systems

Clarion River Organics CSA

There’s still time to reap the late-summer bounty of locally grown fruits and vegetables, but sign up soon. www.clarionriverorganicscsa. blogspot.com

• Inspection, Service and Repairs for Gas and Oil Burners, Boilers and Furnaces

WZUM 1550 AM

This classic-R&B station went back on the air last year after a period of radio silence; now tune in and hear Motown hits, ’70s soul and the like, complete with that warm, fuzzy AM-radio feel. Also available through streaming. www.1550wzum.com

• Planned Maintenance and Service for Chillers and Refrigeration Systems • Service Contract – Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Water Treatment

Elwin Green’s Homewood Nation blog Former Pittsburgh Post-Gazette scribe Elwin Green edits a blog that looks at Pittsburgh through the lens of one of its most critical, and critically underserved, communities. A recent example: a discussion of whether Barack Obama should have dropped by Homewood on his multiple visits to the d rregion. www.homewoodnation.com

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Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on July 28, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs MASSAGE Xie LiHong’s

WELLNESS

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Your ad could be here

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park 412-595-8077

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

MASSAGE

412.316.3342

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

STUDIES

Your ad could be here

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS

STUDIES NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

STUDIES 412.316.3342

STUDIES

STUDIES

SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS?

Overactive Bladder? Diabetes? C.O.P.D? High Cholesterol?

Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers.

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Pregnant?

412-650-6155

We can treat you!

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz N E W S

WE SPECIALIZE IN

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

If you suffer from any of the following please call PPCP at

This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking.

GOUT?

Recovery Without Judgement™

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

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IN THE BAG

Bagpipes echo in the highlands of the North Hills {BY ABBY MENDELSON} IT’S A CACOPHONY out here tonight at the Ohio Township

Nature Center, off I-279. Nine bagpipers warm up, tune up, adjust their pipes, change reeds, run scales. The sound is overwhelmingly loud, like a flock of deranged geese all complaining at once. Faces glowing red as they blow, air filling small underarm sacks, the Macdonald Pipe Band prepares for the night’s practice. Three drones on the shoulder, pipe in the mouth, chanter held down and fingered, the pipers calm down a bit, the sound a steady whine of truck tires on asphalt. From the noise emerges the traditional nine-note scale, melodies played in that odd, utterly distinctive quacking sound. Forming a circle, the pipers settle on a favorite, “Scotland the Brave.” It’s recognizable, but raw; it’s still early in the evening. “We’re all drawn by the musical challenge,” offers pipe major Bud Brizuela. A skilled musician who also plays trumpet and sax, Brizuela wandered into piping some six years ago when he picked up an $11 practice chanter — it somewhat resembles a snake-charmer’s flute — in a Moroccan gift store. He discovered the nine-note scale was akin to that on a bagpipe.

One of six area pipe bands, Macdonald has 25 active members, with an average practice night drawing half to two-thirds of the roster. With the sound so loud they all wear ear plugs, the pipers form a circle to watch each other’s fingers and keep time in a repertoire that includes traditional Scottish, Irish, French, Celtic, folk and military tunes. Tonight’s fare includes “Minstrel Boy,” “Green Hills of Tyro” and “Cabar Feidh.” As the band plays, master piper Nick Hudson runs about, using a chromatic tuner to test for pitch, adjusting pipes and reeds. A Carnegie Mellon-trained piper, Hudson “brings up our musicality,” Brizuela says. “We’re lucky to have such a great instructor.” Shaking his head, Hudson replaces one man’s five-yearold reed, which keeps flatting out. Pipes are cranky, finicky instruments, easily thrown off by heat, humidity and playing pressure. One flat set of pipes can ruin a show — or cost the team competition points. “It’s one of the most temperamental instruments I’ve ever played,” Brizuela says. “And it’s a real discipline. You have to play every day.”

“IT’S A REAL DISCIPLINE. YOU HAVE TO PLAY EVERY DAY.” Graduating to the big rig, Brizuela discovered what every novice knows: Wind endurance matters enormously. He also found he had to get used to blowing to fill the sack, then squeezing it to make the notes, two very distinct operations. “It takes a lot of air to keep the bag filled at a constant pressure,” Brizuela says. As the bag expels air to the three drones and the chanter, “It takes a precise mix of embouchure, endurance and squeezing to play. It took me six months before I could play a few songs. It’s that challenging — and physically demanding.” It’s also not cheap. A set of pipes averages $1,200, with full regalia (kilt, uniform vest, etc.) another $800. That’s two large just to show up. But it’s worth it, Brizuela says, for the music and the Scottish heritage, although the latter is not a pre-requisite. (Brizuela, for example, has none of the Highlands in him.) Part of the fun is the two-dozen-odd annual performances: church services, festivals, parades on St. Patrick’s Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day. Private fundraisers are often on the docket, as are pipe competitions and Ligonier’s Highland Games.

A 10th piper wanders in, looking like an extra out of Braveheart or Lord of the Rings: bespectacled, bushy hair, bushy beard. Brizuela calls the tune. “Let’s do ‘When the Battle’s Over’ one more time,” he says. “So — pipes up. And ...” He taps his foot, they hoist and blow. Playing strictly in unison — there’s no improvising here, no jazz — the pipers start and stop on time. “Much better,” Brizuela nods. Three more pipers straggle in, raising the complement to eight men, five women. (Once a male preserve, pipe bands, pipes and drums, now come in both genders.) In an instant, the ensemble is joined by five drummers, three of them women. There’s a great deal a lot of rattle and snare, mallets spinning in the air. The sun has set, darkening the blue sky, painting the clouds orange. Lost in the melodies and precision, Macdonald music penetrates the quiescent dusk. “The Boys of Wexford” ends with a jolt, the sound echoing off the green hills. “I’m very pleased,” Brizuela nods. “Pipes up.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.13/08.20.2014

Find your happy place Upscale urban rentals where you want to live.

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August 13, 2014