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STREET MUSICIANS: APP DEVELOPERS CREATE MUSICAL SCORE FOR NORTH SIDE NEIGHBORHOOD 28


EVENTS 8.15 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

8.28 – 11am POP GENERATION For the generation that inspired Warhol, Pop Generation is a new program exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Tickets $10/FREE Members

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

Isabella Rossellini in Green Porno

10.17 – 8pm EXPOSED: SONGS FOR UNSEEN WARHOL FILMS Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

11.21 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | visit www.ticketmaster.com

11.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE BARR BROTHERS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

The Warhol and the Carnegie Museums of Art & Natural History welcome the iconic actress, performer and model, Isabella Rossellini to the Carnegie Music Hall for a special presentation of her one-woman show, Green Porno. Adapted from the Sundance Channel series of the same name, Rossellini has crafted a uniquely thoughtful, odd and comical performance-lecture with projected illustrations that celebrates biodiversity while focusing on mating rituals and insects and marine life - an imaginative tour de force that sits aptly at the intersection of art and science.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


08.06/08.13.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 32

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} {COVER ILLUSTRATION BY PAT LEWIS}

[MAIN FEATURE] we will break it, 16 “Ifblowit’sitnotup,working, rebuild it and put kids first.” — Principal Derrick Hardy on his efforts to turn around Pittsburgh Public Schools’ UPrep 6-12 program

[NEWS]

could be unilateral disarmament. 06 “ItTo me, it remains to be seen whether dropping the suit is going to make UPMC do the right thing.” — State Rep. Dan Frankel on the city’s decision to drop its legal challenge of UPMC’s tax-exempt status

[TASTE] specific kind of mint can make a 23 “A big difference in a drink.” — Amy Stewart, author of The Drunken Botanist

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC]

{ADMINISTRATION}

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“They’re creating sanctuaries, and have been creating sanctuaries for a decade, for writers.” — Composer Susie Ibarra on City of Asylum, which hosts her new Digital Sanctuaries music-based walking-tour app

38 SPECIAL

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[SCREEN] artists are] a group of people 40 “[The that have this drive where they have to create, where they continually have to develop.” — David Bernabo on the focus of his new documentary Ongoing Box

[ARTS] the first designer to realize the 43 “As potential of licensing and branding, he inevitably lost control of his own name.” — Nadine Wasserman on fashion icon Halston

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 STUFF WE LIKE 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 23 Don’t miss a night of explosive Southern Rock sounds!

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“I WAS CONCERNED THAT IT COULD BE UNILATERAL DISARMAMENT.”

INCOMING Re: Anti-immigrant sentiment reaches fever pitch over Central American child refugees (July 30) “I hope Tom Corbett and those on the right do ‘look into the background of this,’ because they’ll see the history of us propping [up] rightwing dictators, overthrowing centrist and left-leaning elected officials, dumping industrial waste, destroying whole economic sectors, deporting violent gang members, lusting after illegal drugs (which created the cartels), and generally causing this refugee crisis. Now we want to refuse the refugees that our actions caused, WTF????” — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

Re: Trib sports writer Dejan Kovacevic leaves paper to start website (July 22, online only) “Is Dejan really going to travel to road games? How’s that gonna work when the Steelers and Pens are both on the road at the same time? How ’bout when the Pirates have a big story breaking and he’s allegedly in Columbus covering the Pens? Methinks it’ll really be just Dejan bloviating from his couch on topics, doing no real reporting. So, on that basis, I’m out.” — Web comment from “Jorgensen” “Dejan’s columns and blogs are often interesting enough, but, wow, does he demonstrate an ego beyond belief, which intrudes in his writing. From his constant and shameless plugs for radio appearances and other media events to the recent (and more frequent) nasty comments directed at any participants in his chats who dare to disagree with him or question his views, Dejan has gone over the top with his perceived local celebrity.” — Web comment from “Pittsburgh Native” “As a Pittsburgher born and bred, Dejan is about the only print journalist I’ve followed in recent months. His style is honest but fair, and his sense of humor adds to his efforts. He doesn’t take himself too seriously and is always willing to interact with his readers. Congratulations to Dejan and good luck! He is making a bold move and I believe it will pay off!” — Web comment from “ajwrites57”

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{PHOTOS BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Hundreds of demonstrators gather at a rally outside UPMC’s Downtown headquarters July 30.

THE TALKING CURE O

N JULY 30, hundreds of protesters shut down a block of Grant Street in front of UPMC’s Downtown headquarters. There were chants of “$15 in a union!” and nearly 30 arrests of those who sat in the middle of the street, blocking traffic. The scene, and the complaints, were familiar: UPMC has been dogged by a labor dispute since 2012, along with yearsold gripes about its tax-exempt status and an ugly debate over its battle with insurer Highmark. Demonstrators brought similar grievances to UPMC’s door in early March, when they also shut down Grant Street. But behind the scenes, UPMC is in a less contentious position today. Days before the July protest, Mayor Bill Peduto’s administration dropped a city lawsuit challenging UPMC’s taxexempt status. “I prefer to negotiate at a table where there aren’t guns,” Peduto

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

explained to City Paper after making the decision. Doing so, he said, would allow “a broader conversation with the entire nonprofit community that has viewed [the lawsuit] as an attack from the previous administration.”

Opinions mixed on whether a shift in tactics will produce better results with UPMC {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN AND REBECCA NUTTALL} UPMC responded to the overture by dropping a counter-suit, which claimed the giant nonprofit was being unfairly singled out by the city. While campaigning for mayor last year, Peduto had supported the suit: Shortly after winning the May 2013 Democratic primary,

Peduto told CP that he was “not going to change my opinion on fracking in the city, or the UPMC lawsuit. I’ve planted those flags already.” The issue might have played a sizable role in the campaign. According to a poll released earlier that month by Make it Our UPMC, “[m]aking UPMC pay its fair share of taxes was named as the top issue [for] 30 percent of voters.” The group, which has pressured UPMC on a variety of issues, says that three-quarters of poll respondents said their vote would be motivated by a pledge to “find a way to ensure UPMC pays its fair share.” Peduto says he still intends to do just that, noting that he carried on with the lawsuit until a judge’s recent ruling against it. “I did keep my promise” by continuing with the case to that point, he says. The city could refile the case, he adds, although it is choosing not to do so because the lawsuit was a “two-sided sword” that “held the city


back from being able to do anything with any of the nonprofits.” Some veterans of the UPMC fight approve of the decision. Neal Bisno, one of the labor leaders battling UPMC, says his union members “fully support” Peduto’s efforts. “Pittsburgh wants real change at UPMC, which continues to benefit from generous tax exemptions and spend millions on lavish executive pay ... while keeping many service workers in poverty.” “It’s a tactical move,” says Pittsburgh UNITED executive director Barney Oursler, a longtime activist, of Peduto’s shift. “This is a way he can get [UPMC CEO] Jeffrey Romoff to actually bargain.” UPMC itself declined comment on this story. But Peduto’s move has raised some eyebrows. “I was concerned that it could be unilateral disarmament,” says state Rep. Dan Frankel. “To me, it remains to be seen whether [dropping the suit] is going to make [UPMC] do the right thing.” “We’ll be prodding the mayor’s office to be aggressive in their negotiation,” Frankel added. Some rank-and-file workers, and average citizens, also have doubts. “When are we going to set the standard?” said Nancy Smith, a member of the United Food and Commercial Workers union who also attended the rally. “Who’s going to have the cojones to stand up to UPMC?” THE CITY’S challenge of UPMC’s nonprofit status was launched by former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl — long a Peduto rival — in the waning months of his administration. The suit was filed after a 2012 state Supreme Court ruling which held that, to keep their tax-exempt status, nonprofits had to meet a more stringent standard than previously required by state law. The new standard requires an organization to: advance a charitable purpose; donate a substantial portion of its services; benefit people who legitimately need charity; relieve the government of some burden; and operate entirely free from a profit motive. The city argued that UPMC’s exemption saved it some $20 million in city property and payroll taxes. But experts are divided on the lawsuit’s merits. “The city had a reasonable case,” says Nicholas Cafardi, dean emeritus and professor at Duquesne University’s law school and an expert on charity law. As evidence,

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Activist Erin Kramer leads protesters in a chant for better wages and union jobs at UPMC.

he cites the compensation given to top UPMC executives — roughly two dozen make in excess of $1 million a year — and the closing of community hospitals like UPMC Braddock. “Whenever you close underperforming hospitals in poor sections of the city, does that mean you’re operating by profit — especially when the rest of the system isn’t losing money?” Cafardi asks. Cafardi says UPMC’s counter-suit wasn’t strong, and as a result, “UPMC is gaining something here by having that lawsuit go away.” Peggy Morrison Outon, executive director of the Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management at Robert Morris University, disagrees. “I have not assumed that they would not meet the nonprofit test” even though they don’t always “seem like they are part of a charitable mission.” The city’s legal position was complicated by a county judge’s June 25 decision dismissing the case. Common Pleas Judge R. Stanton Wettick Jr. ruled that rather than try to collect payroll taxes from UPMC as an umbrella organization, the city had to go after subsidiary hospitals one by one. “The original suit obviously was not filed properly,” Peduto says, though he adds “that does not take away our ability to file it properly in the future.” It’s not clear how much that ruling would complicate the city’s case. Wettick wrote that it was “a narrow ruling that

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THE TALKING CURE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

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does not consider whether UPMC or any of its subsidiaries are charitable organizations.” And City Controller Michael Lamb, for one, contends the matter was largely a “document issue and a filing issue” — problems that, had the city addressed them, “wouldn’t have added significantly to the cost” of pursuing the lawsuit. (Lamb says the city, which has been represented by outside attorneys, has spent at least $148,000 on litigation against UPMC so far.) Lamb adds that the city brought in about $3 million combined last year from nonprofits through payments in lieu of taxes. Most of that money came from Highmark and the University of Pittsburgh; Lamb says the city’s initial goal for collecting money from nonprofits “should more than double that number.” That doesn’t include UPMC’s contribution to the Pittsburgh Promise scholarship program, which Lamb says amounts to roughly $7 million a year. Lamb says it’s impossible to know whether the decision to drop the suit was a good one. “I’ve seen what we’ve given up,” he says. “I haven’t seen what they’ve given up.” Peduto says negotiations with UPMC now have the potential to go “much beyond” getting a “fair share” of money from the health-care giant. He says he hopes “the nonprofit community partners with us on initiatives like low-income housing, education, opportunities for workforce development and jobs and really becomes a partner in seeing the rebuilding of Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods.” Peduto didn’t offer details, saying they are “being negotiated as we speak.” But his chief of staff, Kevin Acklin, first suggested the broad outlines of the approach to CP in March: The city, he said, wanted to “get

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Tassi Bisers is led away in handcuffs after being arrested for blocking traffic July 30.

away from the short-term tin-cup discussion” of seeking annual tax contributions. Instead, Acklin suggested, the city could allow nonprofits to earmark money for specific causes, “giv[ing] the nonprofit community an opportunity to help transform the city.” At the time, a spokesperson for a nonprofit umbrella group told CP that the UPMC lawsuit was “still hanging out there” as a complicating factor in those efforts. But others worry about letting mammoth organizations choose for themselves how to support the city. “It really concerns me that nonprofits are having a say over what they contribute,” says community activist Helen Gerhardt. “That’s a non-democratic exertion of big-money power.” Also unclear: whether dropping the suit could have an impact on UPMC’s longstanding battle with a local union. Since 2012, a segment of UPMC’s non-medical employees have been working to unionize with the Service Employees International Union. At the July 30 rally, UPMC workers continued their call for a base wage of $15 an hour and a union. SEIU says UPMC has used intimidation and fired employees to thwart unionization efforts in the health system’s hospitals. The union has filed a number of complaints with the National Labor Relations Board; employees are still waiting for an administrative judge to rule on the latest round of complaints. State Sen. Jay Costa (D-Monroeville) agrees that it makes sense to negotiate instead of going after UPMC’s 39 subsidiary organizations. “It’s a classic compromise

situation in my view that leads to a revenue level that’s appropriate.” But dropping the lawsuit, Costa says, “probably harms SEIU’s position.” The union’s campaign so far, he says, is “to make [UPMC] look like they’re this forprofit, insensitive, uncaring institution. If the city has an agreement with them, all of the sudden in the eyes of the public, maybe UPMC isn’t this bad guy any longer.” Peduto says his future negotiations with nonprofits — not just UPMC — could include a wage “floor” that would allow workers to “join the middle class.” Union activists are backing Peduto’s move. “I have no doubt that the mayor is bringing our concerns about low pay to his conversations with Mr. Romoff,” says Christoria Hughes, a UPMC employee who has been a prominent figure in the SEIU campaign. Hughes says she asked Peduto about his approach to UPMC back when he was a city councilor. “What he told me then and what he’s saying now is the same: that he’s going to stand up for UPMC workers like me who are working to form our union.” Neal Bisno, President of SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania, called Peduto “a champion for Pittsburgh’s service workers” who “has made holding UPMC accountable ... a central priority of his administration.” Philip Dine, a labor expert in Washington, D.C., and author of the book The State of the Unions, said local politicians typically don’t get directly involved in labor disputes. But he said support from local politicians can be integral to swaying public opinion.

“I’VE SEEN WHAT WE’VE GIVEN UP. I HAVEN’T SEEN WHAT [UPMC HAS] GIVEN UP.”

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BikeFest Kickoff Party 2014

This Friday, at the Pittsburgh Opera, celebrate and support BikePGH's work. Come early from 6 to 8 pm for the BikeFest VIP event featuring small plates by some of Pittsburgh's best chefs, including Kevin Sousa, Chad Townsend, and Jamilka Bourges of Bar Marco. Or kick it at the main party from 8 pm to midnight, where DJs Nate the Phat Barber, Selecta, and Matty B will keep you dancing through the night. Plus, it's your only chance to bid on our silent auction full of desirable bikes, art, clothing, and more. Ticket prices increase at the door, so get yours today. BikeFest Party Fundraiser Friday, August 8 6-8pm: VIP Party 8pm - Midnight: Main Party At the Pittsburgh Opera - 2425 Liberty Ave, Strip District

For more information and pricing visit bikepgh.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


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THE TALKING CURE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

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THE COURT battle over taxing nonprofits is not the only front on which UPMC has arguably scored a win this summer. In June, Gov. Tom Corbett and state Attorney General Kathleen Kane forged an agreement between UPMC and Highmark that largely severs the long-standing relationship between the region’s biggest healthcare provider and its larger insurer. The agreement will allow patients with Highmark insurance to pay in-network rates for UPMC doctors and facilities only if they are undergoing current treatment, or have few alternatives. Otherwise, Highmark subscribers will have to pay higher out-of-network rates. UPMC, which long sought to terminate the contract, issued a statement saying it was “grateful” for a “patient-focused transition plan that addresses the expiration of the Highmark-UPMC contracts” at the end of the year. But it remains to be seen how

the transition will play out for patients with Highmark coverage, like Janice Nathan. When Nathan moved to Pittsburgh in 2001, shortly after a kidney transplant, she developed a close relationship with a UPMC physician who helps her with chronic bladder infections. “She knows me really really well,” Nathan says. “She knows my whole history.” By contrast, she says, “I feel like UPMC could care less about their patients. … I think laws are going to have to change to prevent this and to make UPMC stop.” Frankel, the state representative, decries such uncertainty. “Businesses who are negotiating now for their [insurance] contracts are going to have folks who are saying, ‘Am I going to have access to my doctor or this hospital?’ It’s not clear.” And UPMC, he adds, benefits from the confusion “because that would help take business from Highmark.” “I think the agreement still blocks access for a lot of people,” says Erin Ninehouser, of advocacy group PA Health Access. “It’s being hailed as this great solution, but it’s putting a lot of people in a tight spot. I think the agreement cuts the legs out of real meaningful oversight.” But Ninehouser predicts the fight against UPMC will continue. “I don’t think the public is going to let them off the hook,” Ninehouser says. “There’s still a lot of scrutiny on UPMC and whether they’re living up to their charitable mission.”

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“Everyone, even if they’re not a public institution, cares about their public image, so it’s good if you can sway public opinion,” Dine says. It’s not unusual, he says, for politicians to publically espouse the union cause as “a show of support for workers.” And some worry that dropping the suit may mute that message. “His decision impacts a lot of people,” said Charene Kindle, a member of the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 23. “There’s a lot of things still going on with UPMC and we need someone to help.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

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CLASSROOM

EXPERIMENT

After ambitious reforms, the Hill District’s “university preparation” program wrestles with lofty expectations

{ILLUSTRATION BY PAT LEWIS}

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


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HEN PITTSBURGH’S Milliones 6-12 school building opened in 2008, classrooms were named after prominent universities, and the halls were hung with college banners from schools like Notre Dame, Howard, Temple and Duke. The decor reflected the Hill District school’s status as a “university preparatory” program, specially designed to send city kids on to higher education. And it was just one sign of the district’s high hopes for the program, housed in the former Herron Hill School building after a $15 million renovation. There was the promise of laptops — one for every high school student to take home — and school uniforms in khaki, blue and white. The school pledged to provide college tours. And there was a muchbuzzed-about partnership with the University of Pittsburgh, which would provide academic expertise to teachers and gradstudent assistants in classrooms. Such ties, the district pledged, would make the school “a national center for excellence in public education and a model for school district/ university partnerships.” Then-superintendent Mark Roosevelt called the school — which quickly became known as “UPrep” — a centerpiece for education reform. “It’s about transformational success,” he said in an interview with public-TV station WQED after the school opened. Six years later, the transformation remains incomplete. The college banners still hang in the halls, but few students who pass beneath them are eligible for the district’s collegescholarship program. UPrep ranks among Pittsburgh’s lowest-performing schools on standardized tests, and the school has struggled with disciplinary problems. “It’s a nice show, but all you have to do is look closely,” says Damon Randolph, whose son transferred to UPrep last year. UPrep is in the midst of yet another new initiative — a student-leadership program focused on discipline. Two years into that effort, says UPrep Principal Derrick Hardy, “We are seeing the most significant growth we have experienced.” But even if that trend proves sustainable, UPrep offers difficult lessons about education reform at a time when, in Pittsburgh and other urban districts, such reforms are proposed at a dizzying pace. Big-dollar grants can pay for new initiatives, but won’t necessarily sustain them. Diminished resources and labor disputes can undermine innovations. And some challenges in urban schooling might lie far outside the classroom. “The promise that they had made, for it

to be a university-preparatory school, was undermined from the very beginning,” says Sala Udin, chair of the Hill District Education Council. “The promise has never been kept to this day.”

‘He said people would come from around the country’ UPREP WAS born out of the 2008 closing of

Schenley High School and a district-wide “right-sizing” plan to adjust to a dwindling student population by closing schools. Roosevelt’s adjustments included combining middle schools with high schools, creating “6-12s” at UPrep and two other buildings. This configuration, officials hoped, would provide continuity in education from middle school to high school, giving educators a chance to help troubled students before ninth grade, by which time research suggests it’s often too late to help. “In order to get community acquiescence to right-sizing, the promise was made to the Hill District that they would get a special high school,” says Udin, a former city councilor whose group gives the community a voice in neighborhood education. “That was the deal.” UPrep was modeled after programs like

YES Prep in Houston, Texas, and Lionel Wil- students $40,000 for post-secondary educason College Preparatory Academy in Oak- tion if they meet attendance standards and land, Calif. Such schools feature smaller have a GPA of at least 2.5. “Roosevelt said he wanted to focus on student populations, longer school days and school years, and partnerships with the underachieving students,” says Anarea universities. Those reforms have im- nette Werner, an education advocate who proved outcomes for low-income students, opposed the closing of Schenley. “He said who are among the least likely to graduate people would come from around the country to see University Prep.” from college. Roosevelt, who is now president of Similarly, Pittsburgh’s original UPrep Ohio’s Antioch College, did proposal recommended not respond to multiple reextended hours, giving stuquests for comment. dents more classroom time There were plenty of and teachers more time to people willing to help prepare. UPrep teachers pay for the experiment. were individually selected Some UPrep innovations by the school’s principal, were paid for with a fivewhile a dress code reinyear, $1.2 million federal forced high expectations grant. The Heinz Endowfor students. ments offered a $500,000 Education reform, Roo— UPREP PRINCIPAL grant to purchase new sevelt told WQED in 2008, DERRICK HARDY laptops in partnership “implies something systemwith the University of ic, not just tinkering around the edges. It implies improving systems in Pittsburgh, as part of a “digital village” the long-term interest of children’s better initiative to increase access to education through technology. education.” Yet despite those innovations, “I think Meanwhile, Roosevelt hoped UPrep’s success would dovetail with another high- you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone profile innovation: the Pittsburgh Promise who thinks [Uprep] lived up to the origischolarship program, which grants city nal vision,” says Carey Harris, executive

“IF IT’S NOT WORKING, WE WILL BREAK IT, BLOW IT UP, REBUILD IT AND PUT KIDS FIRST.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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director of A+ Schools, a local education watchdog organization. As of 2013, only 23 percent of UPrep students were eligible for the Pittsburgh Promise, compared to the 53 percent average for students in the district’s 6-12 schools. Statewide Keystone exams, which test 11th-graders on the knowledge they should have before graduation, show a similar trend. Students at UPrep are less likely to score proficient or better than are 11th-graders at all other high schools except Westinghouse High School and Perry High School. UPrep students also trailed similar city schools on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Tests for the 2012-13 school year. “I’m not saying there aren’t highachieving kids there, because there definitely are, but clearly as a school it hasn’t lived up to what we had all hoped,” Harris says. “I think it’s a reflection of just not having everything they wanted in place.” “There were a lot of positive innovations planned for that school,” says former veteran school-board director Jean Fink. “I guess those all got forgotten.” “There was inertia in the system that did not allow the school to be the innovative space we thought it would be,” says Derrick Lopez, who designed UPrep as the district’s former assistant superintendent for school reform. The school’s “incredible innovations … were supposed to be a part of the work that went on day in and day out, and it just did not happen.”

‘There was no commitment to fund that’ FROM THE OUTSET, the district’s math never

really added up. UPrep was supposed to include extendend ed hours, but the recommendation was never enacted. The original principal, Sito Narcisse, left after one year. When current rent UPrep principal Hardy replaced him, Hardy ardy says, he sought to extend UPrep’s school hool day by 45 minutes. But that would cost $2,100 per teacher annually, and the district trict couldn’t afford it. “There was no commitment to fund und that,” Hardy says. (District spokesperson rson Ebony Pugh couldn’t say why the original inal recommendation was scrapped.) Roosevelt left Pittsburgh in 2010, two years after UPrep opened its doors. And d almost from the moment current superintentendent Linda Lane took over, Udin says, “The The school district was facing a financial crisis risis and just did not have the money to put in n to keeping [Roosevelt’s] promise.” The district trict predicts it will run out of money in 2016, 016, in part because of a $27 million drop in state funding under Gov. Tom Corbett.

18

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

UPrep Director Anthony Esoldo and Principal Derrick Hardy are tasked with serving some of the district’s neediest children.

The initial $1.2 million federal grant to support UPrep has also expired. Hardy says he’s maintaining UPrep programs as best he can. “Our kids still have the need, so we are very creative in streamlining site-based funds and other federal funds to make sure college opportunities and college visoccur,” he says. “[T]eachers its still occur, [T]eachers receive annual professional development and we continue our partnership with the University of Pittsburgh.” Budget problems — and yet another reform experiment — also saddled UPrep with unexpected responsibilities. Peabody High School was closed in 2011 in another round of closings, and some Peabody students were reassigned to UPrep. Meanwhile, the district attempted a controversial overhaul at Westinghouse, changing it into a single-gender academy. Parents who wanted their children to

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

continue attending co-ed classrooms also had to send their students to UPrep. In the 2011-12 school year, UPrep’s population went from 550 to 735. The district originally planned for UPrep to have no more than 600 total students, ensuring smaller class sizes. “The promise of a limited and controlled student population was ditched,” Udin says. “If the school district had made a commitment to uphold these ideas, then maybe our results would be different,” says Hardy. As it was, disciplinary problems swelled along with the number of kids in the hallways. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education Safe Schools Report, inci-

dents of misconduct at UPrep nearly doubled, to 252, up from 127 the previous year. Meanwhile, UPrep wasn’t getting the assistance Roosevelt had hoped Pitt could offer. Originally, Pitt agreed to house its Center for Urban Education at UPrep, and to provide in-classroom tutoring to students during school hours and professional development for teachers. When the district had funding to pay tutors, there were more than 100 of them working in most classrooms all day long, says Erika Gold Kestenberg, Pitt’s associate director of community partnerships and practice. Now that number varies, but it’s considerably less. Alan Lesgold, the dean of Pitt’s School of Education, blames “serious structural barriers” — namely the teachers’ union contract — for the absence of a deeper partnership. The university offers teachers some training in cutting-edge educational techniques during school hours, but Lesgold says they offer professional development only “when the [teachers] contract allows, since there are no district funds to pay teachers to come to training outside the school day.” (The district says UPrep teachers have a professionaldevelopment period every day, but it isn’t


some turnover at UPrep. According to the provided solely by Pitt.) UPrep has also struggled to hold onto district, an average of 50 percent of teachthe expertise Pitt has provided. Union se- ers and staff have changed over each of the niority rules allow teachers to choose a past five years. But she says teachers aren’t preferred job at another school when posi- the cause of UPrep’s problems. “I don’t consider UPrep a failing school,” tions become available. Additionally, teachers with fewer years of experience can be Esposito-Visgitis says. “I’m really proud of displaced from UPrep by a teacher from what [our teachers have] done, but it’s unfortunate that some of the another school with more programs weren’t carried years of experience. As a reon, and a lot of districts sult, Lesgold says, “each year have that problem.” a number of the people we Education-reform exhave worked with end up pert Bryan Hassel agrees. being displaced or moving Hassel says many of the to schools they prefer.” UPrep reforms — like lapBy contrast, an agreetops and uniforms — are ment with the union at common-sense solutions. the Science and TechnolAnd “[g]iving teachers ogy magnet school premore time and giving stuvents teachers from being dents more time has been displaced, although it can’t shown to really have an stop them from leaving if impact,” says Hassel, who they choose. Such an agreeworks for education policy ment hasn’t been reached — COMMUNITY consulting firm Public at UPrep. District spokesACTIVIST SALA UDIN and Impact. “Low-income, diswoman Pugh says that advantaged students often teachers at Sci-Tech are more intimately involved in designing need more time to get up to the standards things like curriculum at their school “and we have.” Still, he adds, it’s not unusual for such in order to support the program, they efforts to get mired in financial and conneeded to have those protections there.” Getting the full benefit of Pitt’s help, tractual problems. “Union contracts sometimes specify Lesgold says, “would require flexibility that doesn’t currently exist.” While Pitt makes hours of work [and] how teachers are as“an annual six-figure investment … mostly signed in ways that limit the ability of in faculty and staff time spent in UPrep,” schools to reorganize things,” Hassel says. without the ability to retain a critical mass So if a district wants to carve out exceptions given school,, Hassel says, contracts ofof highly skilled teachers, “We achieve small for a g successes, but not major transformations.” sformations.” ten must include an “opt-in” clause allowvolunteer to work in schools According to Pittsburgh Federation of ing teachers to volunt hours. Teachers president Nina Esposito-Visgitis, posito-Visgitis, with longer ho district teachers have worked ked At the same time, Hassel longer school days in otherr says, school districts have district schools, including at to be realistic about the the district’s (now-scrapped) ccost of reforms and ask, “If these things Accelerated Learning Acadare important, how emies. But she says it’s unfair to expect teachers ccan you restructure your funding to pay for to work longer hours without ut paying yo Administrators “need them more. it?” A “It’s much easier, instead ad of talking to design reforms that are sustainable from about the real issues, to blame teachers,” the start, not depending on a temporary she says. “We’re willing to be innovative source of funding.” The pledge to purchase laptops for and work with the district.” Similarly, Esposito-Visgitis says that UPrep students to take home is a case in there are ways to encourage teachers to point. For the first three years of the proattend additional training. For instance, gram, all UPrep high school students had teachers are paid a workshop rate when access to such computers, a benefit ofthey attend professional development over fered at only a few of the district’s magnet schools. But since then, there have been the summer. “You can’t make them come, but a lot enough laptops for students to take home of our schools have done a lot of creative only on a case-by-case basis. The original computers are “antiquated, things to get teachers to come in after so we’re in a state right now where we’re school and on the weekends,” she says. Esposito-Visgitis admits there has been replenishing,” Hardy says. The school

“THE PROMISE THAT THEY HAD MADE, FOR IT TO BE A UNIVERSITYPREPARATORY SCHOOL, WAS UNDERMINED FROM THE VERY BEGINNING.”

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recently purchased 500 new laptops for use in the coming school year, but Hardy didn’t say where the funding came from. “If there are structural barriers in place — one of which is the teachers’ contract, the other is the way people think we should spend money — nothing will change,” says former administrator Lopez, who agrees the district should earmark long-term funding for innovations. University-preparatory schools that serve low-income students can struggle in their first two or three years, Hassel says, partly because they “don’t have a normal problem.” Still, he adds, the experience in Pittsburgh is troubling: “Six years is plenty long to conclude they need to do something really differently.”

‘It makes you want to try to get better’

twenty fourteen

ON A Thursday morning this past March, UPrep’s eighth-grade students listened attentively as eighth-grader Tarea Franklin and her fellow “Wildcats” led a meeting of approximately 25 students. Every morning, UPrep students who have been deemed Wildcats for their good behavior lead a grade-wide meeting. There, they discuss their peers’ accomplishments: On this

day, one student was praised for helping to keep a class orderly the day before. A whole class won recognition for improving its test scores. s. Implemented at UPrep at the start of the e 2012-13 school year, the he Wildcats program rewards rds students for positive behavior. Students start as “neutrals”; neutrals”; depending on behavior and academic performance, they can rise to “positive” or fall to “concern” status. The e positive students (Wildcats) receive special cial privileges like field trips, and leadership roles like the one Franklin was filling. “The other students see what we get so they want to be like us,” Franklin says. “It makes you want to try to get better and to improve your behavior,” says Mikasia Griffin, another eighth-grader. The Wildcats program was created by consultants at Specialized Education Services Inc.; implementing it at UPrep and two other schools cost the district $400,000. UPrep school director Tony Esoldo, who’s in charge of grades 6-8, says the program seeks to “identify our leaders — leaders who are leading in the wrong ways — and to get them to lead in a positive way.” In the

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

process, he says, it does something that’s “been lacking for so many years in schools like ours — giving kids a voice.” voice. UPrep’s student body — which is drawn from Garfield, East Liberty, Lawrenceville and the Hill District — is 95 percent African American. Nearly nine in 10 students are eligible for free or reduced lunch, a marker of poverty, compared to a district average of six in 10 students. “Where we’re seeing poverty becoming an issue is with our teenagers,” Hardy says. “School isn’t as attractive to them and … isn’t viewed as, ‘This is my opportunity to escape this cycle.’” “The kids in the Hill District are not getting the same kind of enrichment as kids Fox Mountt LLebanon,” kid from f F Chapel Ch l or M b ” says Wendy Etheridge, executive director of Higher Achievement, which provides after-school and summer programs for UPrep students. “When you don’t have a lot of role models who have gone on to earn a master’s or a bachelor’s degree, you don’t understand the kinds of opportunities that lifestyle provides.” “I can’t tell you how many kids were in danger of not walking in their graduation because they didn’t have a cap and gown, or not going to their prom because they couldn’t afford it,” says Malcolm Thomas, director of UPrep’s Reaching Back African American Male Mentoring Program. The program provides academic and social support. “Our children deal with a lot of things that would not typically be presented to young people. … In the last two years I’ve seen so many kids crying.” Take the heartbreaking case of Earnest Williams. In 2010, the then-14-year-old recorded a segment for community-radio group Neighborhood Voices, in which Williams outlined his goals. “For the new year I hope to have a 3.8 GPA,” said Williams, a ninthgrader at UPrep at the time. “I want to study to become a lawyer and I can’t do that without having a good GPA.” This past May, one week before he was

sset to graduate, Williams was shot W and killed, making an him one of three h UPrep or gradup students st ates killed kill this past school k year. Such Su tragedies complicate plicatte school discipline and the learning pr process. roc “Brain research shows sh how very conclusively that whenever you have ha high stress, you can’t think clearly or ccorr correctly because your mind is preoccupied with wit survival,” Thomw as says. “Grief and the create a culth he terror t ture of tension, so you kids who tend u have h to under- and overreact to a lot of things. overre When there’s multiple people in an environment like that, there the are kids that are easily distracted and distracting.” Statistics suggest sugge the SESI program has had an impact. The year after it pact was implemented, the number of incidents of numb misconduct dropped from miscond 252 to 41. 4 The number of fights dropped from 54 to just ju 13. “You don’t have kids who are just running around the school anymore,” anymore Franklin says. “There were more mor fights two years ago, when h I was iin sixth i th grade, than there are now.” “We’ve seen major changes,” says Esoldo. “The culture in this school has dramatically changed.” Teachers seem to agree. In a 2013 survey, 74.5 percent of UPrep teachers said they work “in a school environment that is safe” — nearly triple the rate of the previous years. Just over half of teachers agreed that students “follow rules of conduct” — a five-fold increase from the prior year. SESI might also be having an impact on teacher turnover. According to the district, in the 2011-12 school year, seven teachers resigned from UPrep. Four resigned the following year, and only one resigned in the most recent school year. For Hardy, UPrep’s principal, the turnaround proves the necessity of experimenting with new ideas. “We make decisions to change and reform year after year,” he says. “If it’s not working, we will break it, blow it up, rebuild it, and put kids first.” Hardy acknowledges that when it comes to measurements like eligibility for the Pittsburgh Promise, “The data is not in our favor.” But he says there is anecdotal evidence of improvement. In UPrep’s most recent graduating class, eight students already had credits from at least one college class under their belts. Hardy says 90


percent of his students have been accepted to a college, vo-tech program or other postsecondary institution. In this way, Hardy says, UPrep has maintained its commitment to promoting a college-going culture. Students attend yearly college tours and receive fee waivers for up to six college applications. “In spite of the obstacles we’ve been thrown, we’re preparing kids for the rest of their lives,” Hardy says. “They cry on our shoulders when they graduate, and we cry on their shoulders when we send them off to college.” UPrep has “made tremendous gains,” agrees Esposito-Visgitis. “It’s a different school than when I went there to visit three years ago.” And for good or bad, it may be a different school three years from now as well.

‘I think consistency is missing’ IN THE 2012-13 school year, SESI consul-

tants helped students with behavior, allowing teachers to focus on academics. But despite the apparent success of that approach, this past school year, consultants were absent at UPrep because their contract was for only one year. Discipline problems began cropping up again as a result, says teacher Theresa Stipkovitz, who will start her third year at UPrep this fall. The Wildcats program “really began to turn the school around,” says Stipkovitz. But while the district hasn’t yet compiled statistics on behavioral issues for the past school year, she says, “it was a little rough this year because we didn’t have the extra support. More teachers were involved in addressing behavior than we should have been.” Despite the school’s challenges, Stipkovitz is passionate about working at UPrep. In fact, she turned down the opportunity to leave the school for another position. “I like being at UPrep,” she says. “I love the teachers. I love my principal. They’re very hard-working.” But Stipkovitz says that enforcement of the school’s dress code has also waned. A City Paper reporter visiting the school on Take a Father to School Day saw a number of students not wearing the uniform of a white collared shirt and khaki bottoms. “I think consistency is missing in [the students’] own lives and in school,” Stipkovitz says. “There have to be consequences for their actions. If they can’t follow the small rules, how are they going to follow the larger ones?” “How do you expect them to adhere to a policy you’re not going to follow up?” says Damon Randolph, whose son transferred to the school after the family moved

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from Plum Borough. Randolph says his son’s academic performance and behavior have declined since he started at UPrep. He’s visited the school a number of times to meet with teachers and administrators, and hasn’t liked what he’s seen. Last year, he says, his son told him one of his teachers never showed up for a class. And when Randolph tried meeting with his son’s counselor to see how he was doing academically, the counselor didn’t even know who his son was. “I’m not saying my son is a perfect angel,” Randolph says. “But I don’t know if I could do what I was supposed to do in this environment. It’s total chaos.” And Randolph says there’s a lack of follow-through in the school. He says educators should emphasize consistency, more than implementing the latest innovation. “In chaos, anything can happen. That’s why you have fights and kids skipping class,” Randolph says. The school’s programs “aren’t working,” he says. But “when you tell [administrators] there’s a problem, they tell you they have a new program to address it.” Says school-district spokesperson Pugh, “Changing a school and building a school is not something that happens overnight, and we definitely agree it’s not there yet.”

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ROADSIDE ATTRACTION {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} “Blueberries,” “Peaches” and “Fresh! Local Sweet Corn,” read the signs posted along Second Avenue in Hazelwood. The hand-lettering announces Dylamato’s Market, a 16-foot-long converted hay wagon that began selling produce July 10. Hazelwood is a food desert, with no grocery store and just one half-daya-week farmstand. Dylamoto’s is the brainchild of Dianne Shenk, a former Chatham University food-studies student who hopes the simple but attractive displays of strawberries, cabbages and zucchini will help neighbors eat better and keep grocery money in the community. Shenk rents this vacant lot — featuring free parking — from the Urban Redevelopment Authority. With help from Hazelwood’s food-buying club and Lawrenceville-based distributor Paragon Foods, she gets produce wholesale, sourcing much of it locally — sometimes hyperlocally, like garlic from a neighbor’s garden. “When we first started, people were staring and looking and wondering,” says Leroy Dunning, a Hazelwood resident who staffs the stand. So far, he says, the many commuters who traverse Second Avenue supply most customers, but locals use Dylamoto’s, too. The stand is open six days a week through October; eventually, says Shenk, who lives in Squirrel Hill, she hopes to acquire affordable indoor space to share with other local vendors. But for now, she says, “People like to stop and get fruit and vegetables from a stand. They like that idea.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., and 10 a.m.5 p.m. Sat. and Sun. 4800 block of Second Avenue, Hazelwood

the

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Love the Steelerss d and ? pierogies? It’s your lucky day: Mrs. T’s is releasing black-and-gold pierogies. Available in Pittsburgh-area grocery stores, for a limited time. Love pierogies but not the Steelers? Serve black ones for goth party, yellow for cheery, hearty breakfast.

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BURGERS IN HARMONY {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

ACK WHEN fancy burger joints were the hot new thing, we heard there was a sizzlin’ place up near Harmony. But with so many burger-centric establishments barely farther away than our backyard grill, that seemed like a long haul. Then, truth be told, we got to the point where we needed a break from burgers. Well, we finally made it to Burgh’ers in Harmony, and it has resuscitated our appetite. Because, despite the name, Burgh’ers is so much more than above-average all-beef patties on buns. Firstly, it styles itself as an organic, farm-to-table restaurant, sourcing its ingredients from local farmers, foragers, distillers and brewers whenever possible. Secondly, its thoughtful selection of all-American sandwiches, burgers (including veggie and bison burgers), hot dogs and sides offers something for everyone. In fact, it seems a shame to narrowly define Burgh’ers as a “burger place.” It has a legit cocktail program, too, and we noticed a second shift of customers arriving post-dinner on a Friday night. Though located in a strip mall, Burgh’ers’

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

Pitt’s Burger with mixed greens

decor has more in common with urban gastropubs than suburban sports bars, with rustic wall boards, photos by a local artist and a concrete bartop that was simultaneously sleek and industrial. An outdoor patio in the parking lot felt a lot more sophisticated than tailgating.

BURGH’ERS 100 Perry Highway, Harmony. 724-473-0710 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $3-13 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED And, speaking of sophisticated: watermelon-tomato gazpacho. We were impressed, not just by the seasonality of this creation, but by its execution. The sweetness of the melon accentuated that of the tomatoes, while pungent onion and spicy jalapeño peppers cut short any tendency to taste like a Jolly Rancher. Most items on the “small bites” list double as sides, so our party coordinated to try

them all. Mac-and-cheese was creamy but bland, like a béchamel unsharpened by any sufficiently bold cheese. But our other side plates were winners: a solid mesclun salad, finely diced creamy coleslaw and shoestring-style rosemary fries that managed to hit several notes at once. Golden, fluffy fries intermingled with thinner, crispier ones, and the rosemary flavored every bite without making the potatoes taste like a Christmas tree. It was hard to resist fish tacos (and the daily special of kangaroo tacos, whose place in the farm-to-table ethos we questioned), but we did try Southern-fried-chicken strips and fried pierogies. The chicken was absolutely superb, the white meat incredibly juicy, the crust lightly crisp and well seasoned. We were surprised that the pierogies were not sautéed in butter, but lightly deepfried for a wrapper that was still pale, but crisp. The potatoes inside were creamy, and the accompanying local kraut was tangy and crunchy. Despite its suburban coordinates, Burgh’ers names most of its predesigned


On the RoCKs

“craft burgers” after city neighborhoods. There’s the “Mexican War” with chilies and avocado, the “Polish Hill” with a pierogie, and so on; there’s also a “Polamalu” with grilled pineapple. Build-your-own is also an option, with a happily broad array of toppings, cheeses and sauces. The patties themselves were big but not huge, and griddled. The result was not one of these massive, smoky beef bombs, but rather a team player with a tender texture and crisp edges. The bun was a step up from fast food — soft, with just a hint of crust. A shorter list of craft hot dogs included a chili dog, more of that excellent kraut on a Reuben dog and an “everything bagel dog,” which required some clarification. It turned out to be served on a regular bun with a generous “schmear” of cream cheese, bacon, avocado and seeds sprinkled over all, evoking the bagel for which it was named. The wiener had a natural casing with lots of beefy flavor and the combination of ingredients was tasty, but overwhelmed by the too-thick slabs of cream cheese.

The sandwich portion of the menu had its own appeal, such as the chicken pita filled with basil, carrot, sweet pepper, onion, Swiss cheese and a sweet aioli. But Jason was craving the steak sandwich, packed with sweet grilled red pepper, piquant pickled onions, creamy smoked gouda, roasted chili and black-garlic aioli, all melded into a glorious hot mess. The only, and minor, hitch was that the chili was more or less a whole jalapeño smack in the middle of the sandwich, offering a lot more heat than Jason expected or the sandwich really needed. Burgh’ers’ superb quality across several styles of casual fare led us to a level of satisfaction that far exceeded the modest promise of “another burger place.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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LIQUID CROPS The Drunken Botanist visits town

Amy Stewart {PHOTO COURTESY OF DELIGHTFUL EYE PHOTOGRAPHY}

Fish tacos with Sriracha aioli and pickled red onions

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

According to Amy Stewart, author of The Drunken Botanist, just about everything in your cocktail (except the water) was once a plant. “I’m telling the story behind the plants in what you drink,” she says. Stewart, who has also written books on Wicked Bugs and Wicked Plants, visits Pittsburgh as the inaugural guest of the new Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. She’ll help lead a daytime tour of the Oakdale garden, and on Aug. 7 will lecture (you’ll want to go, she’s a dynamic speaker) Downtown on the history of plants, people and booze. Although this is her first visit to Pittsburgh, she’s already influenced the city’s cocktail culture. Next time you’re in a cocktail hotspot, look around: You’ll likely spot The Drunken Botanist. “It’s an amazing feeling when I meet a working bartender who says the book gave them an idea or made them feel differently about their job,” Stewart says. It’s not just bartenders who can benefit. “Even something as seemingly simply as growing a specific kind of mint can make a big difference in a drink,” she says. For example, a variety called mojito mint is perfect for, well, you got it. Easy-to-grow flowers and herbs can have a big impact, too. “Clean, bright, floral flavors don’t come out of a bottle in the same way as they do from a plant,” she says. Lemon verbena adds citrus notes without the acidity, and scented geranium, the popular garden plant, can add aromatic dazzle. And Stewart has a tip for infusionlovers: “When you’re extracting a plant in alcohol, you’re extracting all of the flavors. It’s not as refined a process as would happen at a distillery,” she says. So it’s best, she says, to drink your infusions shortly after making them. One of-the-moment infusion is a garden Bloody Mary. Muddle tomato, basil, peppers and other savory summer vegetables into some vodka. Strain and serve over ice. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Amy Stewart lecture and book-signing. 7 p.m. Thu., Aug. 7. Westin Convention Center, 1000 Penn Ave., Downtown. $59.99. 412-444-4464 x222 or www.pittsburghbotanicgarden.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

APSARA CAFÉ. 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664. This storefront restaurant offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection, with a menu balanced between unfamiliar and familiar dishes. For less common fare, try Cambodian puffed rice squares, or saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick, warmly spiced coconutmilk sauce. KF ATRIA’S. Multiple locations. www.atrias.com. A local chain, Atria’s locations offer distinctly different atmospheres but the same quality steaks, chops and pasta menu. Suburban spots are for quiet casual dining while the North Side location is pure sports pub. Regardless of the ambience, the sherry crab bisque and the pasta fra diablo are superb. kE

BenjaminsPgh.com

China Palace Shadyside

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

BIRYANI. 4063 William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-8561105. Here, an Indo-American menu offers fresh takes on burgers, fries and chicken, in addition to a few traditional Indian dishes. There are intriguing variations of sandwich wraps (made with naan bread), and there’s a burger made with ground lamb, served with mint-garlic yogurt sauce and “Asian” cabbage slaw. KF BOHÈM BISTRO. 530 Northpointe Circle, Seven Fields. 724-741-6015. This charming North Hills venue offers sophisticated comfort food and peasant fare, designed to be shared in a casual atmosphere. Deviled eggs, pulled pork, roast chicken, mac-and-cheese and a selection of items available as tartines, crepes or flatbreads. Yes, a croque madame can be a superbly presented as a flatbread. KE THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sit-down venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, of fresh-cooked Cambodian cuisine. Kabobs, fried wontons, chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-338-9100. This dark, clubby restaurant excels at VIP service, and offers a menu

Lula {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} highlighted by steaks, chops and seafood, with sophisticated but straightforward preparations such as crab cakes with added lobster, or steak encrusted in Kona coffee beans. Also, the Grille employs its own butcher (for cutting and dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE

DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House cachet of Pamela’s, but the portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J

THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412-828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE

DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-390-1111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and wood-grilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666. This established venue is known for its revered pub fries and the classic wiener with kraut (plus plenty of beer to wash it down). But don’t miss the pizza, with a top-notch crust. D’s continues to raise the preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty comfort food to an art. JE

Himalayas {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DAPHNE. 5811 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-1130. Outside seating is a plus here, but the well-prepared Turkish food is a year-round asset. The menu is familiar — hummus, falafel, gyros, shish kebab — but the execution is notable and the flavors rich. Lamb features as sausages, chops and a burger, and grilled chicken breast doesn’t get much better than Daphne’s shish kebab. KF

HIMALAYAS. 20445 Route 19, Excel Center Plaza, Cranberry. 724-779-4454. This restaurant features the cuisine of Nepal, fare influenced by neighboring India and China. Thus, expect chow mein to be flavored with subcontinental spices, and to find tweaked version of familiar Indian items such as samosas. Be sure to try the signature dish — momos, or large fried or steamed dumplings, filled with meats or vegetables. KF LA CUCINA FLEGREA. 100 Fifth Ave., No. 204, Downtown. 412-521-2082. The specialties of


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La Palapa {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Italy’s Campi Flegrei are featured at this Downtown restaurant. The cuisine of this coastal region naturally offers seafood, but also vegetables and cured meats. Thus, a pasta dish might be laden with shellfish, or enlivened with radicchio and prosciutto. LE LA PALAPA. 1925 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7015 or 412-586-4943. Among the basic offerings at this bright, colorful storefront Mexican restaurant — tamales, nachos, tacos, enchiladas — there is other less familiar fare, such as a squid and shrimp salad. And the staple dishes excel with the inclusion of expertly cooked meats, which are moist and flavorful. KF

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE

ALL LUNCHES

OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for seating denote a place for moderately priced Japanese food, including sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean dishes for variety and spice; those seeking a little heat might consider bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF www. per pa LULA. 515 Broad pghcitym .co TAMARIND FLAVOR St., Sewickley. 412OF INDIA. 257 N. Craig 749-1200. Seating at St., Oakland (412-605-0500); this informal tapas bar is 2101 Green Tree Road, Green Tree lounge-style indoors, and in (412-278-4848); and 10 St. Francis warm weather, along the sidewalk at café tables. The menu, Way, Cranberry (724-772-9191). This menu combines southern which also offers a few entrees, Indian cuisine with northern is eclectic, and suggestive of Indian favorites, including meat, Mediterranean cafés, with poultry, seafood and vegetable plenty of seafood, cured meats, curries with rice. Chief among cheeses and seasonal produce. its specialties are dosas, the Portions are adequate for enormous, papery-thin pancakes sharing, if you can bear to part that are perhaps the definitive with, say, asparagus spears southern Indian dish. JE wrapped in ham. KE

$

MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey St., North Side. 412-322-6535. A welcoming neighborhood bar with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE

TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE

NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant, but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The lesstypical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF

YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF

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PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST HOT SPOT IN THE NORTH HILLS

1st Floor Restaurant

(American Menu Specializing in Burgers)

2nd Floor Bar & Night Club

Friday August 8 ....DJ HYPNOTIZA Saturday August 9 ..... TRES LADS Friday August 15... DJ HYPNOTIZA Saturday August 16 ..... MERCEDEZ part of the NPL Restaurant Group

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300


North/South Indian • Indo Chinese & Tandoori Elegant Dining Hall

Catering Call 412.877.7731 (Didar cell) Grand Lunch Buffet Dinner Buffet Festival - Sunday and Thursday 50% Off Dinners Tues 5-9pm

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LOCAL

“THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE COMMUNITY REALLY STIMULATES THE ARTISTS.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SOFAR, SO GOOD

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more on SoFar Sounds and to sign up for the mailing list: www.sofarsounds.com

28

A LITTLE

GARDEN MUSIC {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

M Gabe Wolford (left) and Dean Davis at the first SoFar Sounds Pittsburgh show {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX ISEMAN}

On a late-July night in Pittsburgh, a lot of music fans were on the North Side, taking in Jack White’s outdoor show. But a few dozen were across the river, in a rather tony Gateway Towers condominium, enjoying something else: the first iteration of SoFar Sounds Pittsburgh, a new chapter of a global house-show series. SoFar — short for “Songs from a Room” — was founded five years ago in London; it’s since expanded to cities in 37 countries. The premise is simple: Have small, intimate shows with touring and local bands, held in people’s homes, allowing for a more relaxed atmosphere and closer engagement with the music. Audience members sign up to attend via the organization’s mailing list; attendees are selected from the sign-up list as space permits, and if you’re selected, you find out where the show will be. SoFar came to Pittsburgh via Gabe Wolford, a musician from the Indiana, Pa., area who recently moved to the city to attend Point Park University. After seeing a video from a SoFar show played by a band he was familiar with, Wolford started thinking it was something that could work here; he worked on setting it up with SoFar’s Dean Davis (himself a Pittsburgharea native), who started Boston and Nashville’s groups and works with new cities to launch their own. “I go to a lot of concerts,” says Wolford. “And you have some bad experiences” at conventional venues sometimes. “People are talking on their phones the whole time, people aren’t paying attention. Sometimes you just want to go and really listen to the music.” You could hear a pin drop (or a poster fall off the wall, as it were) at the first event on July 27. Singer-songwriter Joel Lindsey, Indiana, Pa.-based band Wolves in Sheeps’ Clothing and local indie rockers Nevada Color each played a short set, keeping the volume low and the crowd interaction high. SoFar Pittsburgh plans about one show a month, and hopes to incorporate touring bands for most; all the shows are recorded and will show up on YouTube. The next show is Wed., Aug. 27. Where? Only a handful will find out.

ANY MUSIC-LOVERS have experienced it: You’re walking somewhere, or even driving in your car, and the music you’re listening to matches up so perfectly with the environment around you, it’s almost like it was made for this moment. In the case of users of a new mobile web app tailored to the Central North Side, it is. The Digital Sanctuaries Pittsburgh app is the second such project of New York City composers Susie Ibarra and Roberto Rodriguez, a husband-and-wife team that performs together as Electric Kulintang. It was put together through a partnership with City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, the arts organization on the North Side that hosts writers who have fled their home countries due to persecution or other adverse conditions. Ibarra, a decorated avant-garde percussionist and composer, has performed with the likes of John Zorn and Mirah; Rodriguez, who’s played with everyone from Zorn to Celia Cruz, is a multi-instrumentalist, also known primarily for percussion. Digital Sanctuaries began as a walkingtour project in Lower Manhattan, mostly around Battery Park, close to the World Trade Center site. The original iteration debuted last November. “It started with a conversation in Lower Manhattan with former Public Programs Director Andrew Horwitz, of the Cultural Council, about the joining of art and technology and what it can do,” explains Ibarra. “As musicians, that’s our medium, we’re talking through music. We chose a modular mobile web app — and later an iOS and Android app — because of its accessibility.” The Manhattan app combines music from Ibarra and Rodriguez with visual art

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CEM KOCYILDIRIM}

From the Lower East Side to the Central North Side: Roberto Rodriguez and Susie Ibarra

from Makoto Fujimura, and features interaction design by Shankari Murali. It works as an accompaniment for a walking tour of 12 historical sites, with a connection, Ibarra says, to the natural world beneath the cityscape. “In Lower Manhattan, that

DIGITAL SANCTUARIES

PITTSBURGH APP LAUNCH Composer-led tours at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Thu., Aug. 7-Sat., Aug. 9. Free; reservation required. Bring smartphone and headphones; limited number of devices available for those without smartphones. 412-323-0278 or www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

natural world, the story is all about the water,” she explains. The Pittsburgh environment is different, and therefore the whole of the project here is different; the new app, to be debuted this week with a series of tours led by Ibarra and Rodriguez in person, takes walkers along City of Asylum’s Garden to Garden Trail, and features recordings of poetry, selected by City of Asylum co-founder Henry Reese. “As you go through this, you’ll hear poetry being read both in its original language and in translation when it’s from another country,” Reese explains. “You’ll CONTINUES ON PG. 30


A LITTLE GARDEN MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

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www. BOBFM969.com www.BOBFM969 .com www.QBURGH www .QBURGH.com .com

and Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Friday

hear Polish, and then the Polish translation — you’ll hear it being read with an accent. … We thought that was important, that you hear the presence of these voices and what they mean, both to what we do [at City of Asylum] and to animating the spaces in the community.” The tour, which takes about an hour and 15 minutes, reaches from City of Asylum’s Alphabet Reading Garden, on Monterey Street, to the site of its planned Alphabet City literary center, near the old Garden Theater, on North Avenue. Besides featuring music and spoken word, the app also offers a four-track mixer that the user can control, allowing listeners to remix the material as they see fit. The project came to Pittsburgh as a result of an informal conversation Ibarra and Rodriguez had with Reese after meeting through poet Yusef Komunyakaa. “We started talking about Digital Sanctuaries,” Ibarra says, “and it was very much in alignment with what they do at City of Asylum, because they’re creating sanctuaries, and have been creating sanctuaries for a decade, for writers.” Reese attended the debut last fall of the Digital Sanctuaries app in Manhattan, and talks continued; Ibarra and Rodriguez then visited Pittsburgh to work on developing the sites for the tour and the music. Digital Sanctuaries may soon expand elsewhere, Ibarra says — there’s interest in the Philippines (where Ibarra’s parents were born, and where she has worked in the past) and in Mumbai. That puts Pittsburgh at the forefront of a promising project. “I think for them, this has been an interesting experience, but what’s even cooler is, when you think about the places they’re looking at — we’re a relatively small city, and the neighborhood we’re in is a tiny neighborhood in that relatively small city,” says Reese. “And we’re doing a couple projects where we find we’re attracting wellknown international artists who tend to do these projects in huge cities; they’re finding this very attractive as a community. The involvement of the community in these kinds of projects really stimulates the artists.” While the whole thing isn’t an entirely brand-new concept, it’s something different for a lot of people — certainly for the North Side, and for Ibarra and Rodriguez, who are more used to composing for a livemusic environment. “People have designed sound walks before; we’re not the first to it,” admits Ibarra. “But I think it’s also our take on it. We’re also composers and live performers, and our tradition comes from performing arts. That’s something I’ve been very much interested in: moving from live music to immersive music.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

JOE MATZZIE THIS BOX MAKES NOISE (U.S. RECORDS)

Singer-songwriter rock from a former Pittsburgher, now living in Los Angeles. Nice stuff here; Matzzie’s gritty vocals — sometimes bordering on a harsh whisper — are pleasant to hear, and his songwriting is better than many. Matzzie excels on rock tunes like “Run to the Beach”; the almost-rap on “Houndstooth,” on the other hand, was maybe a questionable decision. Good album!

NATHAN MARSHALL WHAT SHIPS ARE FOR (SELF-RELEASED)

Nine tracks of faith-informed country-folk (and a little spoken word) from the relative newcomer, who made his debut locally via the 48 Hour Film Festival a couple years back, working with the Greensburg band Essential Machine. That band accompanies him some here, along with Jim Avett, the recording artist known widely for siring the Avett Brothers. Marshall’s tunes are generally sweet and sentimental, his vocals steady if not always strong. Simple, steady tunes like “Red Slippers” (which recalls Jim Croce and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” at once) are catchy and suit Marshall well.

LOUIS CON CARNE UNTITLED (SELF-RELEASED)

I’m calling this one Untitled because there’s no real identifying information; the cover features a drawing of a weird penis (which I’ll spare you) and it came with a photograph of some rusting farm machinery, so maybe one of those things is the title? Anyway, more nightmare soundscapes from the Waynesburgbased artist — industrial noise collages, occasional synthetic beats, samples of insane sounds. Recommended if you like harsh noise, Throbbing Gristle or having a nervous breakdown. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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DISCLAIMER: Bike Pittsburgh assumes no legal responsibility for the events listed. We are merely advertising these events, not organizing them, unless noted in the schedule. If you participate in an event, you do so at your own risk, according to the terms of the event organizer. Discuss any concerns you have with the event organizer, or email us at bikefest@bikepgh.org 3OHDVHFRQĂ€UPDOOHYHQWVGHVFULSWLRQVORFDWLRQVGDWHVDQGWLPHVZLWKWKH)XOO2QOLQH&DOHQGDUDW %LNH3*+RUJ%LNH)HVW

Friday, August 8

Coastin’ to Coca Cafe 8-9AM @ Coca Cafe, 3811 Butler Street Meet up with bike commuters for a BikeFest car-free breakfast and enjoy the great food at Coca Cafe. )PRL-LZ[2PJRVɈ7HY[`,HZ[ZPKL=07 6PM-8PM @ Pittsburgh Opera: $100 - $140 :[HY[)PRL-LZ[VɈYPNO[^P[OJVJR[HPSZMYVT4HNNPLÂťZ-HYT9\T ILLYMYVT7LUU)YL^LY`HUKZTHSSWSH[LZI`ZVTLVM7P[[ZI\YNOÂťZ restaurants; Union Pig and Chicken, Bar Marco, Cure, and Pizza Boat! bikefestparty.eventbrite.com )PRL-LZ[2PJRVɈ7HY[` 8PM-12AM @ Pittsburgh Opera: $25 / $40 / $60 DJ Selecta, DJ MB, Mary Mack and Edgar Um will keep guests dancing all night long. The main party will also feature silent auction with dozens of desirable items like bikes, art, and much TVYL(UKVMJV\YZLRLLWHUL`LV\[MVY;OPJR)PRLZÂťHUU\HS BikeFest Surprise. bikefestparty.eventbrite.com

Saturday, August 9

>7>)PRL9HSS` 6:30AM-3PM @ Miller Grove, North Park PA: $20 membership fee; free for WPW members Marked 30 and 60 mile rides shorter rides available on the bike trail around the lake. wpwbikeclub.org 5VY[O:PKL(YJOP[LJ[\YL;V\Y 10AM-11:30AM @ North end of Andy Warhol Bridge Explore awesome architecture on the North Side encounter spectacular buildings of the International Style, Art Deco and Brutalism. )PRLHUK,H[3VJHSS` 11AM-2PM @ Moraine State Park bike rental shelter: $29/$22 Join Venture Outdoors for a 14 mile ride around Lake Arthur in 4VYHPUL:[H[L7HYR>LÂťSSLUQV`HWPJUPJS\UJOVMSVJHSS`NYV^U foods midway! ventureoutdoors.org 4PSS]HSL)YL^-LZ[ 7474'4PSS]HSL9P]LYMYVU[7HYR!   :HTWSLHIYVHK]HYPL[`VMILLYZHUKNY\IVU[OL(SSLNOLU`9P]LY along the 3 rivers heritage bike and water trail. millvalepa.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

)YHUKVU:LTLU\RÂťZ9HK*VTWHU` 6PM-10PM @ The Wheel Mill: $5 spectators/regular rates for riding 1VPU9LK)\SSHUK[OL>OLLS4PSSMVY[OL7P[[ZI\YNO7YLTPLYLVM9HK *VTWHU`9LK)\SS4LKPH/V\ZLÂťZMYLLYPKLKPY[Q\TWHUKKV^UOPSS TV\U[HPUIPRPUNĂ„STMVYZ\TTLY

)LNPUULY<UPJ`JSPUN 6-7PM @ Thick Bikes Join Thick Bikes to learn how to balance on one wheel! Come out [VWYHJ[PJL`V\YZRPSSZ>LÂťSSOH]L\UPJ`JSLZVM]HY`PUNZPaLZMVY`V\ to ride.

Sunday, August 10

Tuesday, August 12

4VU=HSSL`*LU[\Y` 6AM-3PM @ Plum St, & Water Ave, Elizabeth, PA: $18 (JV\YZLMVYL]LY`YPKLYÂťZHIPSP[`TVU]HSSL`JLU[\Y`VYN (UU\HS;Y`()PRL1HTIVYLL (474')\K/HYYPZ*`JSPUN6]HS Join Flock of Cycles for your chance to try riding recumbents, trikes, folders, unicycles, and more. (SSLNOLU`*LTL[LY`)PRL;V\Y 10AM-11AM @ Allegheny Cemetery - Butler St. Entrance 1VPU[OL3H^YLUJL]PSSL/PZ[VYPJHS:VJPL[`IPRL[V\YVM(SSLNOLU` *LTL[LY`;OPZ`LHYÂťZ[OLTLPZWLVWSL^OVOH]LZ[YLL[ZUHTLK after them. 3V^LY5VY[O:PKL*O\YJO;V\Y7HY[ (474')PJ`JSL/LH]LU9HPUKH[L! Begin and end at Bike Museum and tour 14 cool churches in the lower North Side. Tour of Bike Museum after the ride!

;LHT+LJHM9PKL 7474';HaaH+Âť6YV5VY[O/PNOSHUK(]LU\L 7LKHS`V\YZVJRZVÉ&#x2C6;^P[OTLKP\T[VMHZ[WHJLKYVHK YPKLYZ^OVSPRL[VZLL[OLJP[`ÂťZILZ[]PL^Z]PHIPRL[LHTKLJHMJVT )PRL7VSV9VVRPL5PNO[ 7:30PM-10:30PM @ Arsenal Park Polo Court (242 39th St) Learn to play Bike Polo in a relaxed, non-competitive pickup setting. Loaner mallets available! pghbikepolo.org

Wednesday, August 13

)PRL0U4V]PL!7LL>LLÂťZ)PN(K]LU[\YL 6PM-9PM @ Theater Square Garage top level (7th and Penn) 1VPU[OL7+7HUK7./-PSTTHRLYZMVYHZJYLLUPUNVM7LL>LLÂťZ Big Adventure like you have never seen it before, on a rooftop KV^U[V^U;OLZJYLLUPUNRPJRZVÉ&#x2C6;^P[O-VVK;Y\JRZ*HZO)HY HUK3P]L4\ZPJMYVT.YHUK7PHUV)YPUNHJOHPY9HPUKH[L!

5VY[O:PKL4\YHS9PKL 1PM-4PM @ Kayak Pittsburgh, North Shore: $15 /$10 Join Venture Outdoors on a 10 mile ride that connects the murals HUKHY[WYVQLJ[Z[OH[THRL7P[[ZI\YNOÂťZ5VY[O:PKLULPNOIVYOVVK unique! ventureoutdoors.org

(YYPIH/PSS+PZ[YPJ[ 6:30PM-8PM @ OTB Bicycle Cafe -VY/PSSSV]LYZ-V\YSHWZVMHOPSSJSPTI[YHPUPUNSVVWPU[OL/PSS District. Low in mileage; high in elevation.

)PRL[V[OL)HSS.HTL 1:35 @ PNC Park $20 )PRL7./PZOVZ[PUNV\YĂ&#x201E;YZ[L]LY)PRL;V;OL)HSSNHTL7\YJOHZL tickets at pirates.com/bikepittsburgh and $3.00 from every ticket W\YJOHZLKH[NV[V)PRL7./)PRL[V[OL)HSSNHTLMHUZ^PSSIL seated together, so you can enjoy the game with other members of the cycling community.

)LNPUULY)PRL9PKL 7474'4PSS]HSL9P]LYMYVU[7HYR UVUTLTI TLTI 1VPU=LU[\YL6\[KVVYZ[VSLHYUOV^[VJOHUNLHĂ&#x2026;H[[PYLILMVYL IPRPUNTPSLZH[HULHZ`WHJLHSVUN7P[[ZI\YNOÂťZ9P]LYMYVU[[YHPS ventureoutdoors.org

Monday, August 11

-YPJRUÂť,^YLJRYPKL 6-8:30PM @ Blue Slide Playground (Beechwood and Nicholson) Join in for a weekly ride in Frick Park!

Thursday, August 14

7P[[ZI\YNO/HZO/V\ZL/HYYPLYZ)PRL/HZO 6:30PM-10:30PM @ Gristhouse brewery, Millvale Non-competitive hare and hound course with check points and possible false trails. Social stops along the trail. Parking available H[4PSS]HSL9P]LYMYVU[7H]PSSPVU)YPUNJHZOMVYHK\S[IL]LYHNLZPM desired.


;OL>OLLS4PSS-VV[KV^U*SHZZPJ 7PM-10PM @ The Wheel Mill: $3 to enter competition. A foot down tournament for all bikes. Many games will be played but only one lucky bike rider will roll away with a cash prize.

Thursday, August 21

,HZ[,UK:OVY[J\[Z9PKL 2PM-4PM @ Forbes and Bouquet Explore various shortcuts in the East End by bike.

)SHJR.VSK-PST:LYPLZ!;OL)SHJR7V^LY4P_[HWL 7PM-10PM @ BOOM Concepts, 5139 Penn Ave -YLLĂ&#x201E;STZJYLLUPUN!Âş;OL)SHJR7V^LY4P_[HWLÂť)PRLWHYRPUN provided, and stickers for BikeFest participants!

>7>(UU\HS)YL^]L[ 7474'1HJRZVU:[/HYTVU`7( 30 mile C ride no-drop with checkpoints much like a brevet. Our checkpoints happen to be microbreweries hence the name brewvet.

Friday, August 15

Sunday, August 17

-YPKH`5PNO[;PTL;YPHSZ 74 74')\K/HYYPZ*`JSPUN;YHJR! HK]HUJL KH`VM Test yourself against the clock. 5 mile individual time trial at the Cycling Oval. Great intro to racing. acaracing.com

;OL74;**:[H[L;V\Y !(474'.VSKLU;YPHUNSL)PRL9LU[HS!  Come tour the scenic roads of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio on the Pittsburgh Major Taylor â&#x20AC;&#x153;3 State Tourâ&#x20AC;?. 92 / 62 miles Includes t-shirt and water bottle, while supplies last. http://www.pmtcc.com/join/3-state-tour/

-SVJRVM*`JSLZ7P[[ZI\YNO)PRL7HY[` 6-10PM @ Dippy The Dino (4100 Forbes Ave) Meet in Oakland for a fun, friendly, all-inclusive ride! MHJLIVVRJVTĂ&#x2026;VJRVMJ`JSLZ

*`JSPUN;OYV\NO:HTZHYH (474'/PNOSHUK7HYR4HPU,U[YHUJL (`VNH^HYT\WILMVYLOLHKPUN[OYV\NOV\[7P[[ZI\YNOÂťZ trails, bridges and streets for a 20 mile ride. A 1/2 hour yoga decompression follows.

Saturday, August 16

;^V+H`.(7;YHPS(K]LU[\YL 6AM @ GAP Trail Mile Marker 0, Cumberland, MD: $160/ $110 Bike 72 miles in two days along the GAP from Cumberland, MD to Ohiopyle, PA with Venture Outdoors! A beer tasting and lodging are provided. ventureoutdoors.org

/H\S[V[OL/VSSV^ (474':V\[OZPKL9P]LYMYVU[7HYR ;HRLHTPSLQV`YPKL[V MYVT+LHK4HUÂťZ/VSSV^VU[OL.(7 ^P[O(SSLNOLU`3HUK;Y\Z[;OLYLÂťSSILMVVK MVSRSVYLH[[OLOVSSV^

;OL,]LY`7P[[ZI\YNO5LPNOIVYOVVK9PKL 8AM-8PM @ Doughboy Square (Penn and Butler) A very hilly and challenging group ride which touches all 90 City of Pittsburgh neighborhoods.

/HUKSLIHYÂş:[HJOL9PKL (474'/VMIYp\OH\Z A short loop through South Side, up the Jail trail and back to /VMIYp\OH\ZOVZ[LKI`[OL:[LLS*P[`)LHYKHUK4\Z[HJOL club! 18-mile ride followed by refreshments and a tour of Bicycle /LH]LU

*VUĂ&#x201E;KLU[*P[`*`JSPUN 10AM-1PM @ Carnegie Public Library: South Side $10/$20 1VPU(\N\Z[ÂťZ*VUĂ&#x201E;KLU[*P[`*`JSPUNJSHZZ[VSLHYU[OLĂ&#x201E;ULYWVPU[Z VMOV^[VYPKLVUJP[`Z[YLL[Z;OPZTVIPSLJSHZZNP]LZYPKLYZĂ&#x201E;YZ[ OHUKL_WLYPLUJLYPKPUNPU[YHÉ&#x2030;J\ZPUNIPRLSHULZHUKJYVZZPUN intersections. Intended for riders 15+ of all skill levels. Presented by Edgar Snyder & Associates bikepgh.org/citycycling/

Monday, August 18

-YPJRUÂť,^YLJRYPKL 6PM-8:30PM @ Blue Slide Playground (Beechwood and Nicholson) Join in for a weekly ride in Frick Park!

Tuesday, August 19

:H[\YKH`)PRLHUK3\UJO (474'5VY[O7HYR)VH[/V\ZL!    Bike around North Park on this easy 15 mile pedal with Venture 6\[KVVYZ4PK^H`[OYV\NO[OLYPKL^LÂťSSZ[VWH[6;))PJ`JSL*HML for lunch. ventureoutdoors.org

;LHT+LJHM9PKL 7474';HaaH+Âť6YV5VY[O/PNOSHUK(]L 7LKHS`V\YZVJRZVÉ&#x2C6;^P[OTLKP\T[VMHZ[WHJLKYVHKYPKLYZ ^OVSPRL[VZLL[OLJP[`ÂťZILZ[]PL^Z]PHIPRL[LHTKLJHMJVT ;OL-\[\YLVM+V^U[V^U)PRL0UMYHZ[Y\J[\YL 6:30PM-7:30PM @ City County Building, 414 Grant Street, 15219 City of Pittsburgh Policy Director, Matt Barron, and Assistant +PYLJ[VYVM:[YH[LNPJ7SHUUPUN(UKYL^+HZO^PSSSLHKHZSV^Ă&#x2026;H[ ride around Downtown and the Strip District and answer your questions about upcoming improvements.

;^V>OLLSZ3V[ZVM.YLLU (474'.;,*//HTPS[VU(]L!  Tune up that bike. Plant those veggies. Join Gtech to explore green community spaces around Pittsburgh by bike, followed by a block party! gtechstrategies.com )YPKNLZ9P]LYZTPSLZ (474';HaaH+ÂťVYV5/PNOSHUK A fun riverside adventure with Team Decaf, crossing 12 of the best bridges in Pittsburgh! Mostly city roads, some trail. Medium pace, not for novices.

Wednesday, August 20

*HYYPL-\YUHJL9PKL !7474';OL7\TW/V\ZL>H[LYMYVU[ :[HY[H[;OL7\TW/V\ZLMVYHYPKL[OYV\NO*HYYPL-\YUHJLUV^H national historic parklet. Afterwards, convene at Blue Dust in the Waterfront for food and drinks!

7\ISPJ(Y[9PKL 11AM-1PM @ the David Lawrence Convention Center: $7 Pedal to public artworks through Downtown to the South Side ^P[O[OL6É&#x2030;JLVM7\ISPJ(Y[/PNOSPNO[ZPUJS\KL(SL_HUKYL(YYLJOLH ZJ\SW[\YLZHUK[OL0(*ÂťZ;OL>VYRLYZ O[[W!IP[KV7P[[ZI\YNO7\ISPJ(Y[9PKL

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7./<UKLY^LHY9PKL 8:30PM-11PM @ 46th and Butler ;OL<UKLY^LHY)PRL9PKLPZHIV\[OH]PUNM\UWYVTV[PUNH positive self-body image, and building a stronger bike community in Pittsburgh.

Friday, August 22

7LKHSPUÂť[V7HTLSHÂťZ  (4'7HTLSHÂťZZ[PU[OL:[YPW Meet up with other bike commuters for a BikeFest car-free IYLHRMHZ[HUKZH]VYHZ[HJRVM7HTLSHÂťZILZ[JHZOVUS` 5VY[O:PKL9PKL 6-8PM @ North and Cedar Ave *HZ\HSZVJPHSTVZ[S`;OYLL9P]LYZ/LYP[HNL;YHPSVU[OLUVY[O IHURZVM[OL(SSLNOLU`HUK6OPV9P]LYZ

7PUIHSS9PKL 10AM-4PM @ Thick Bikes, 62 S. 15th St Join Thick Bikes on Aug 17 at 10am for a ride out to Carnegie for [OL7(7(>VYSK*OHTWPVUZOPWZ9PKL7SH`9PKL

;V\Y+LZ;YLLZ (474'.VSKLU;YPHUNSL)PRL9LU[HS HK\S[Z RPKZ .\PKLKYPKLHSVUN[OL;OYLL9P]LYZ/LYP[HNL;YHPS9LNPZ[LYH[ treepitsburgh.org.

)LNPUULY)PRL9PKL 7474'4PSS]HSL9P]LYMYVU[7HYR!   Come out and learn how to properly clean/maintain your bike ILMVYLOP[[PUN[OL9P]LYMYVU[;YHPSMVYHTPSLYPKL^P[O=LU[\YL Outdoors! ventureoutdoors.com

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Saturday, August 23

7P[[ZI\YNO-VVKHUK;LJOUVSVN`,U[YLWYLUL\Y9PKL (474'*VTTVUWSHJL*VÉ&#x2C6;LL:X/PSS Interested in either food or tech entrepreneurship? If you have a business or want to, come for a 25-30 mi ride with us and trade ideas! 6KL;V;OL/PSSZ 9AM-Noon @ Jitters Cafe, Walnut St Inner city ride through a few obscure neighborhoods, with great bends, views and hills. 25 miles. no drop. Not for the faint of heart. /HUKJ`JSPUN^P[O(JOPSSLZ0U[LYUH[PVUHS 9AM-11AM @ Jail Trail/Swineburn Parking Lot 1VPU(JOPSSLZ0U[LYUH[PVUHS7./OHUKJ`JSPUN[LHTMVYHYPKLHUK learn about adapted cycling for people with disabilities! UK(UU\HS7*9.9PKL 9AM-12PM @ Lake Elizabeth on the North Side ;HRLWHY[PU[OLUK(UU\HS7P[[ZI\YNO*VTT\UP[`9PU]LZ[TLU[ .YV\W)PRL9PKLHUKL_WSVYLV\YTLTILYJVTT\UP[PLZ 7HUOHUKSL;YHPS9PKL 10AM-4PM @ Panhandle Trail: $15 non-members / $10 members Join Venture Outdoors for a 23 mile ride through the beautiful & diverse landscapes along the Panhandle Trail in Southwestern PA! ventureoutdoors.org 465:;,9;902,50;, 9PM-2AM @ The Wheel Mill: $6 advance / $12 at the door. (K\S[)PN>OLLS9HJPUN(UPNO[VMMHZ[WLKHSPUNOHYKYHJPUN  tires spinning. http://monstertrikenight.com

Sunday, Aug 24

7LKHS7./    (474':V\[OZPKL9P]LYMYVU[7HYR7LKHS7./VYN )PRL7./ÂťZHUU\HSM\UKYHPZPUNYPKL^P[OM\SS`THYRLKJV\YZLZ [OH[ZOV^VÉ&#x2C6;ZVTLVM[OL*P[`ÂťZILZ[IPJ`JSLMYPLUKS`YVHKZ scenic views and bike lanes. Choose from the Breathe Project -HTPS`-\U9PKL/PNOTHYR*P[`;V\YVY[OL71+PJR;Y\TI\SS Lindy Paving Metric Century. Full service rest stops along each route will provide riders with gourmet snacks from our partner >OVSL-VVKZ([[OLĂ&#x201E;UPZOKVUÂť[MVYNL[[VWPJR\W`V\Y7LKHS7./ T-Shirt and enjoy music and great food from local food trucks.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF WILL MEBANE}

Less narrative, more samples: Hospitality

OUT OF TROUBLE {BY MIKE SHANLEY} HOSPITALITY’S debut album was one of 2012’s brightest releases, full of chiming guitars and some studio trimmings, and topped off with Amber Papini’s lyrical outlook that seemed to vividly encompass a handful of stories in the naked city. Trouble, the trio’s sophomore release, journeys into darker territories. While Papini’s clean guitar sound hasn’t completely vanished, it’s joined by some churning synth bass lines on a couple of tracks, most notably the dreamy trance of “Last Words.” This time, Papini doesn’t lay out a storyline so much as offer an outline that we’re left to color in ourselves. Brian Betancourt, the group’s bassist, says the new sounds weren’t a departure, but instead a chance to help the songs come to complete fruition. “We didn’t have a lot of time with the first record. The songs had been around for years, but they were recorded quickly,” he says. “This time we had more hands-on time in the studio to make decisions. We all have tons of music influences and we wanted to flex different muscles this time.” The results could land Trouble’s intriguing sounds on a lot of year-end lists, and offer a crowning achievement for the band’s label, Merge, which just celebrated its 25th anniversary, a history marked by many unique albums. When Hospitality came together, the group sounded admittedly more lo-fi than its current set-up. Papini played acoustic guitar and drummer Nathan Michel played a small, scrappy drum kit. As the band started to play larger spaces, amplification and better drums were in order. Both situations resulted in what Betancourt calls “creativity by necessity. When Nathan’s behind the

kit, he plays very musically and compositionally, so it kind of takes up a lot of space.” He adds, “My bass parts are kind of melodic, so it’s almost like a lead guitar sometimes. That’s how our sound gelled at first, because we only had three people.” The band still records as a trio, but on tour, Hospitality is a quartet. Michel, who has also released instrumental albums on the electronic Tigerbeat6 label, occasionally gets behind the kit, but he just as often handles lead guitar and keyboard duties. Betancourt puts down the bass on a few songs, like the aforementioned droney “Lost Words.” “We tried to make it so I’m still actually playing the sampler musically, not just pressing play and having a recording play over it. I’m using samplers as an instrument that plays a lot of the synth stuff,” he says.

HOSPITALITY

WITH FRANKIE COSMOS, PORCHES 7 p.m. Thu., Aug. 7. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

When the band comes to Pittsburgh, it will be on the last leg of a tour that took it to North Carolina for two days of a threeday festival marking its label’s silver anniversary. Speaking a few weeks prior to the event, Betancourt was looking forward to sharing a bill with bands like Destroyer and the Mountain Goats. He appreciates the devotion of the Merge crew, which don’t put a lot of pressure on bands. “They’re genuinely enthusiastic. And they wouldn’t work with someone that they weren’t totally enthusiastic about,” he says of Merge founders Mac McCaughan and Laura Ballance. “And since they’re musicians, it really helps them make wise decisions for smaller bands. I don’t think every label has that kind of perspective.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS

Mötley Crüe

[R&B] + SUN., AUG. 10

[HAIR METAL] + WED., AUG. 13

She tries to say goodbye and she chokes. She tries to walk away and she stumbles. She may try, but Macy Gray can’t stay away. If you haven’t been keeping up, the singer and songwriter has in fact released music after her debut album On How Life Is, which featured the song “I Try,” her claim to fame. There have been six albums, actually, with a seventh on the way in October. Spoiler alert: “Bang Bang,” the first single off her new album The Way, is really good. Gray performs tonight at Hartwood Acres. Zach Brendza 7:30 p.m. Middle Road, Hampton. Free. All ages. 412-351-2528

School’s out for summer. School’s out for … Dr. Feelgood? They say this is the end of Tommy Lee, Nikki Sixx and company playing together as Mötley Crüe — and there is a contract to prove it. The band claims to be the “first ever” to sign a “Cessation of Touring” agreement, which is cool, right? Eh, not necessarily. But, if you ever wanted to hear “Kickstart My Heart” or “Shout at the Devil” live, this is reputedly your last chance — plus, plenty of pyrotechnics are promised. The Crüe plays tonight with Alice Cooper at First Niagara Pavilion. ZB 7 p.m. 665 Route 18, Burgettstown. $31-131. All ages. 724-947-7400

[YACHT ROCK] + MON., AUG. 11

Macy Gray

Since meeting in the late ’60s, Steely Dan’s Walter Becker and Donald Fagen — who bring their absurdly named Jamalot Ever After tour to the Benedum Center tonight — have produced records that are easy to listen to, but somewhat hard to fathom. Maybe their commercially successful jazz-rock was a Trojan horse for some of the darkest, sleaziest lyrics ever written but, more likely, these nerdy jazz fanatics (whom Jay Black of Jay and the Americans dubbed “the Manson and Starkweather of rock ’n’ roll”) just happened to have a pretty good handle on the American psyche. Margaret Welsh 8 p.m. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Sold out as of press time. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

NEWS

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[PUNK] + WED., AUG. 13 Coming to a DIY venue near you this summer, the state of Michigan presents: The Reptillian, a threepiece mathy screamo/ post-punk band. Hailing from Kalamazoo, The Reptillian is signed to Count Your Lucky Stars, a Michigan indie label that has offered releases from Penfold, Into It. Over It. and Moving Mountains. Check out the band’s latest album, Low Health: If you go to house shows and like yelling, it’s for you. The band plays tonight with Two Knight, Tare, Us, Homies and Small Fish Great Lake at The Mr. Roboto Project. ZB 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. www.therobotoproject.org

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ALTAR BAR. Powerman 5000, (hed) PE. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Strand Of Oaks, Christopher Denny. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Girl Scout, Blød Maud, Pond Hockey. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Ying Yang Twins

WED 13 31ST STREET PUB. Goatwhore, Island of Giants, Dreadeth, Haunt for the Wretched. Strip District. 412-391-8334. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Moon & You, Jason Trunzo. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Slaves, Myka Relocate, Nightmares, Youth in Revolt. South Side. 412-431-4668. THEATER SQUARE GARAGE. Grand Piano. Downtown. 412-566-4190.

{SAT., SEPT. 27}

Ying Yang Twins

DJS

Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side

THU 07

{WED., OCT. 15}

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

B.B. King Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall

Cass McCombs

MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Stretch Armstrong & Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 09 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. PLAZA AZTECA. DJ Devin. Saturday Night Salsa Craze. Robinson. 412-708-8844. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Saturdays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

WED 13 LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

NEWS

th

Club Café, 56 S. 12 St., South Side

BLUES

Change Collection. Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855.

FRI 08

FRI 08

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Melinda w/ Kristian H & Marc Reisman. North Side. 412-237-3400. INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. NIED’S HOTEL. Shot O’ Soul. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. OBEY HOUSE. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Crafton. 412-922-3883.

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Ron Horton & OUTLET, James Street Swing All-Stars. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SUN 10

SAT 09

SAT 09

THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

JAZZ THU 07 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844. MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PARKLET ON PENN AVE. Loose

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SUN 10

FRI 08

An Evening of Music

WORLD SUN 10 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Kim & Tony. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 13 BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Machete Kisumontao. North Side. 412-322-5058.

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Erik Lawrence Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

MON 11

SAT 09

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Toby Keith. 724-947-7400.

TUE 12

SAT 09

KATZ PLAZA. Tom Wendt. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. WALNUT GRILL, BRIDGEVILLE. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

with The Meat Puppets

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Satin Hearts. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

REGGAE

WED 13

{SAT., OCT. 25}

FRI 08

NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Dan Wilson. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. Salsamba Latin Jazz Group. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

PHOTO CREDIT: BEN ROSSER

EARLY WARNINGS

TUE 12

AUGUST 22

SUN 10 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Ras Prophet. Fox Chapel. 412-860-9600.

COUNTRY

Jamie Kent Presented By

OTHER MUSIC

abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$

SUN 10 POINTBREEZEWAY. Pittsburgh Complaints n’At Choir. Point Breeze. 412-335-5293.

253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

ACOUSTIC THU 07 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

FRI 08

THE BEER MARKET. Gina Rendina Duo. North Side. 412-322-2337. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Eric Taylor. Harmony. 724-452-0539. PARK HOUSE. Broke www. per pa Stranded & Ugly. pghcitym .co North Side. 412-224-2273.

4504 BUTLER STREET

FULL LIST ONLINE

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. John C. Hall Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. KENNEDY PARK. RML Jazz. Sharpsburg. 412-370-9621. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee w/ Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

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SAT 09

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

412.326.5964

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 10 J&D CELLARS. Shelf Life String Band. 724-579-9897.

We’ll cut you.

WED 13 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

August 6 - 12

MONDAY 11

WEDNESDAY 63

FRIDAY 8

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guests This Or The Apocalypse, Phinehas & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:25p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Nameless In August, Sam Goodwill. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

The Acacia Strain

Peach Festival

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Delusions of Grandeur, Improvidence. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

SOERGEL ORCHARDS Wexford. 724-935-1743. Free event. 11a.m. Through August 10th.

Sleeping Giant

Tyler Ward ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Brynn Elliot, My Silent Bravery, Chelsea Summers. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 7 Battlecross

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Ikillya, Disillusion Effect, Talion, Curse The Wicked. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5:30p.m.

Red Wanting Blue

Dark Star Orchestra

Classic Rock Experience / Lily Wine Affair STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Unparalleled Height, In Lust Lies Loyalty, Klaymore and Obelisk ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

Kublai Khan

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With Special guests Forever We Stand, Bound By Faith, Recollections. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

SUNDAY 10

Chevelle TUESDAY, AUGUST 12 STAGE AE

Youngblood Hawke guests The Script, American Authors. Tickets: livenation. com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Aug. 9.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Caught A Ghost, Nevada Color. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 96

The Devil Makes Three

One Republic

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Comedian Ed Driscoll

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special

Gasoline Heart

newbalancepittsburgh.com

Nothing More ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Sleepwave & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 12 Chevelle

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Powerman 5000 / (hed) PE

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest JP Harris. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests SUNFLOWER DEAD, Shrouded In Neglect, Overdost. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

MOST WANTED ITEMS Packages of: Pencils, Crayons, Markers, Pens, Erasers; Scissors, Pencil Holders, Binder Paper, Glue/Glue Sticks

DONATE SCHOOL SUPPLIES TO

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HUNGER

AND RECEIVE $10 OFF YOUR NEW BALANCE KIDS SHOE PURCHASE*

112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

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3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333

*Offer valid on Regular Priced Merchandise at Waterfront and Wexford Locations Only. Cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Some vendor exclusions may apply.

JUST IN TIME FOR BACK TO SCHOOL! NEWS

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THE FILM’S ONLY REAL THEME IS THE CREATIVE PROCESS

FUN IN SPACE {BY AL HOFF} I’m not a comic-book reader, so I generally find the film adaptations of various superhero franchises to be somewhere between confusing (for lack of background knowledge) and tedious (too much mindless action). So I wasn’t expecting much from Guardians of the Galaxy, a Marvel title I’d never even heard of.

CREATIVES

On guard: Zoe Saldana and Chris Pratt

CP APPROVED

But James Gunn’s actionadventure-comedy turned out to be a fun outing, a film that was helped immeasurably by not taking itself too seriously. (Gunn gave us 2006’s Slither, or the greatest movie ever made about slugs from outer space.) It’s a loose origin story, in which the pursuit of an orb unites five unlikely heroes: a goofball spaceship pilot (Chris Pratt), an assassin (Zoe Saldana), a muscleman (Dave Bautista), a talking raccoon (voice of Bradley Cooper) and a surprisingly engaging tree (Vin Deisel voices its five words). The story is largely secondary to the group’s antics, squabbling and evolving camaraderie, and a dull villain doesn’t promote further engagement with the plot. (As if any of these newly minted Marvel heroes are in any real danger …) Instead, audiences are invited to laugh at the gags, laugh doubly hard at the many in-jokes, tap their toes to the cheesy ’70s pop tunes and goggle at Pratt’s newly buff physique. It’s summertime, and even comics heroes aren’t up for any brooding or heavy mythology-lifting. In 3-D in select theaters. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

STEP UP: ALL IN

The fifth (!) installment of this faststepping dance-contest franchise reunites stars from the previous films — alas, not break-out Step Up star Channing Tatum — for yet another do-or-die competition. This time, the moves get busted in Las Vegas. Trish Sie directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 8.

40

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

M

From David Bernabo’s Ongoing Box (clockwise from upper left): Kevin Sousa forages; video art by Bernabo; Ray Morin crafts a guitar; a Blaine Siegel art installation; Mark C. Thompson, masked; and more video by Bernabo.

USICIAN, COMPOSER, filmmaker and performer David Bernabo is plenty busy with his own art. But recently, he spent nine months exploring the creative processes of eight other Pittsburgh artists. The result is the featurelength documentary Ongoing Box, which gets its local premiere this week. Bernabo is best known for his adventuresome band and art ensemble Host Skull. The 100-minute Ongoing Box forgoes narrative; its only real theme is the creative process. With a probing eye and a penchant for closeups, Bernabo captures the artists in their studios. Choreographer Maree ReMalia and her troupe rehearse and perform a raucous group dance titled The Ubiquitous Mass of Us. Painter Stephanie Armbruster crafts her encaustic paintings with tools including torches and razor blades. Blaine Siegel works on paintings and a multimedia piece; conceptual artist Lenka Clayton explores a “residency in motherhood”; photographer Garret Jones sets up a studio shoot; and veteran mime artist Mark C. Thompson develops a physical-theater

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

work about crime victims and predators. A couple of Bernabo’s subjects fall outside the usual definition of fine art: Luthiers Raymond Morin (of the band Pairdown) and Adam Rousseau craft acoustic guitars from scratch, and noted local chef and restaurateur Kevin Sousa (of Union Pig and Chicken, and formerly Salt of the Earth) scours vacant lots in Braddock, gathering wild edibles like garlic mustard and yarrow, and prepares a dessert of rhubarb and white chocolate.

ONGOING BOX DIRECTED BY: David Bernabo 8 p.m. Thu., Aug. 14. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. $8.

Ongoing Box actually grew out of Bernabo’s own in-studio filmmaking experiments with motors, smoke, ice and paper (some of which remain in the finished feature, as a sort of rhythmic punctuation). The project expanded to feature length due to his interest in his own artistic process: when he realized, for instance, how much

of the work of music and film are about editing. He came to understand that that’s the case with other art forms as well. “I really like to see different people’s approaches,” he says — whether they start with an idea they pursue, or discover the concept as they go. “It’s comforting to know what other people are doing, and if they feel the same feelings” and share similar goals in their work, he says. Bernabo says he was inspired partly by grassroots efforts to support local artists, like subscription-art series CSAPGH. His seemingly disparate cinematic influences include both the “how they make that” segments on Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood and Swiss artist Roman Signer’s lyrical, nonnarrative 1996 European travelogue Signer’s Suitcase. Some segments in Ongoing Box (which takes its name from a Host Skull project) are observational and wordless, others interview-based. The more voluble subjects include Mark C. Thompson, who discusses the questions he asks himself about how best to communicate with the audience in a given piece. Lenka Clayton, whose


conceptual artworks about motherhood include “Objects Taken Out of My Son’s Mouth,” explains, “Motherhood isn’t my subject, it’s my material as an artist.” Though it won’t be apparent to most viewers, one near-common denominator in the segments is Bernabo himself: Ongoing Box largely features artists with whom he’s collaborated. “I started working with more of them as the film progressed,” he says. It’s a circumstance he considers emblematic of the creative cross-pollination that’s endemic to Pittsburgh. He even appears onscreen, unidentified, in such endeavors as performing with ReMalia’s troupe. Bernabo also composed the film’s exceptional soundtrack of guitar music, and performed it on locally made guitars, including one of Morin’s acoustics.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY. An Indian family moves to a small French town and opens a restaurant across the road from a fine-dining joint run by the imperious Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren). Will Madame melt for budding chef Hassan’s (Manish Dayal) sublime curries? He’s already won the tastebuds of charmant sous chef Magritte (Charlotte Le Bon). Can lonely widower Papa (Om Puri) find romance in France? Will Michelin stars fall on everyone? There’s little a viewer won’t see coming in Lasse Hallstrom’s overly long ensemble foodie-rom-com. But like ordering your favorite dish time and again, this lightweight conoction will satisfy those looking for an easy-breezy, feel-good summer film. Starts Fri., Aug. 8. (Al Hoff)

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

FILM SCREENING: “The Greenest Building: The Role of Historic Buildings in Creating a Sustainable Culture.” Restoring old and historic houses is “green building” because repurposing our built environment helps reduce our impact on the natural environment. Join us for a screening of “The Greenest Building,” by Jane Turville, a preservationist, writer, and producer of this important documentary that examines the cost of tearing down our historic built environment. Following the film, Ms. Turville will facilitate a short question-and-answer session. Jane Turville, writer, producer and director of THE GREENEST BUILDING, received her Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Oregon and interned with the National Trust for Historic Preservation in London, England. She has worked for several architectural firms in the Portland area and more recently as non-profit development director/program manager for the Northwest Earth Institute. With over 12 years experience in historic preservation, architectural design and construction administration, Ms. Turville has given presentations on Portland, Oregon’s Old Town historic district and has organized and presented various sustainability conference workshops for teenagers and adults.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7 • 6:00 PM — 8:00 PM The Hundred-Foot Journey INTO THE STORM. A small town is ravaged by huge tornados in this climate-horror story, directed by Steven Quale. Starts Fri., Aug. 8.

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES. New York City’s subterranean avengers are back, matching reptilian wits against an evil dude known as Shredder. Along to document it are a human news crew (Megan Fox, Will Arnett). Jonathan Liebesman directs. Starts Fri., Aug. 8.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARRET JONES}

David Bernabo

Bernabo, who by day works an administrative job at Highmark, self-funded the film. Ongoing Box has had small screenings in cities including Chicago and Columbus, Ohio. However, he has since tweaked it enough, he says, to qualify the Aug. 14 showing at the Melwood Screening Room as the world premiere. While additional Pittsburgh screenings are planned, Bernabo also hopes to submit Ongoing Box to film festivals. Although all the artists profiled are based in Pittsburgh (ReMalia has since relocated to Washington, D.C.), Bernabo says he believes the subject is universal enough to resonate anywhere: people pushing themselves outside of their comfort zones. The artists in Ongoing Box, he says, are “a group of people that have this drive where they have to create, where they continually have to develop.” D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

For more on the film, visit www.ongoingbox. com. View a City Paper-exclusive excerpt of Ongoing Box at www.pghcitypaper.com. NEWS

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YVES SAINT LAURENT. Pierre Niney stars in this bio-pic about the influential French designer, who began his career at Dior before meeting his business (and romantic) partner Pierre Bergé (Guillaume Gallienne) and starting his own powerhouse line. Jalil Lespert directs. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 8. Manor

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Great Gatsby, Wed., Aug. 6 (Schenley), and Sat., Aug. 9 (Riverview). Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Thu., Aug. 7 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 8 (Arsenal); Sat., Aug. 9 (Grandview); and Sun., Aug. 10 (Schenley). The Smurfs 2, Tue., Aug. 12 (West End / Elliott Overlook), and Thu., Aug. 14 (Brookline). The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, Wed., Aug. 13 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-2552493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Terry Gilliam series: Brazil (dark futuristic 1985 comedy), Aug. 6. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (knights, kings, curtains and a very dangerous bunny), Aug. 67. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (in which Johnny Depp channels Hunter S. Thompson), Aug. 6-7. The Fisher King (1991 dramedy starring Jeff Bridges and Robin Williams), Aug. 7. 12 Monkeys (Bruce Willis in a time-bending sci-fi film), Aug. 7. Customer Appreciation Week: Who Done It? (1942 Abbott & Costello caper), Aug. 8-9, Aug. 11-12 and Aug. 14. Best in Show (Christopher Guest’s dog-show comedy), Aug. 89 and Aug. 13-14. Ghost World (adaptation of

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

OPEN

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Hedwig And The Angry Inch (2001) - 8/6 @ 7:30pm

Noon-5PM Daily and evenings by appointment.

Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon (2013) 8/7/ @ 7:30pm, 8/8 @ 9:30pm, 8/10 @ 4:00pm

A Rock n’ Roll, Baby Boomer, Collectors Emporium specializing in 50’s, 60’s and 70’s collectables.

Killer’s Kiss (1955) Directed by Stanley Kubrick 8/8 @ 7:30pm, 8/10 @ 7:00pm

Purple Rain Movie Party - 8/9 @ 6:30pm

Screening of Purple Rain (1984) Dance to Prince music, prize giveaways, and a surprise 2nd feature!

3623 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15212

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

4 12 .76 6. 18 4 6 WWW.JAGINCHYSTUFF.COM

Yves Saint Laurent Daniel Clowes’ graphic novel about moody teens and 78s), Aug. 8-9 and Aug. 12-14. The NeverEnding Story (book takes boy to fantasy land), Aug. 8-10, Aug. 11, and Aug. 13-14. Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee’s cowboys in love), Aug. 11-12, and Aug. 14. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH. Director John Cameron Mitchell stars as Hedwig, a transgender rock performer who relates her story of a failed relationship, and of the ex-lover who stole her songs, in this 2001 adaptation of Mitchell’s own stage musical. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. Hollywood

A Better Route for Managing

Overactive Bladder

Should Have Fewer Bathroom Stops If the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) – such as the frequent and sudden urge to urinate, followed by leakage – are interrupting your day, the SYNERGY study may be an option. It is a clinical research study evaluating an investigational combination of two drugs prescribed for OAB to see if, when taken together, they provide more relief than when taken on their own. There is no cost to you to participate. To learn more and to see if you may qualify, please contact: <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>> <<Insert Contact Information>>

412-650-6155 20131203-US-ENG-PA-PAD

Starter Kits E-Juice

Mods Tanks

Batteries Accessories

CLERKS. Kevin Smith’s low-low-budget debut 1994 feature depicts the minute-to-minute hell of working at a convenience store. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

4322 Butler St , Lawrenceville (Below Arsenal Lanes) 412-709-6443 • www.maverickvapors.com 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

CHRISTINE. It’s always a risk when you get a used car, but this one — an evil Plymouth Fury with a mind of its own — is a real “buyer beware.” John Carpenter directs this 1983 adaptation of Stephen King’s horror story. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. Regent Square PEE-WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE. When man-boy PeeWee Herman’s bike is stolen, he sets forth on a crosscountry odyssey to find it, in Tim Burton’s exuberant, off-beat road movie. The 1985 film is this year’s outdoor “Bike-In Movie” for the annual BikeFest. Activities at 6 p.m.; film begins at dusk. Wed., Aug. 13. Theater Square parking garage (top level), 667 Penn Ave., Downtown. www.bikepgh.org. Free

SUPERMENSCH: THE LEGEND OF SHEP GORDON. This recent documentary from actor Mike Myers looks at the life and career of Shep Gordon, a Hollywood insider who began his career by moving to Los Angeles and befriending rock stars. Partial to the freewheeling lifestyle, he made a career of artist management. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 7; 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8; and 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. Hollywood KILLER’S KISS. Stanley Kubrick’s 1955 crime thriller was only his second feature, but it’s a stylish work, set in New York City’s seedy neighborhoods, that belies its small budget. A love triangle goes sour, leading to murder, and a kicky scene in which two men stalk each other in a warehouse filled with mannequins. The film continues a year-long series of Kurbick films. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8, and 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. Hollywood PURPLE RAIN. If you’ve never seen this deliriously demented autobiographical vanity production about the Rise of Prince on the big screen, consider making a date. All his purple majesty’s highlights — riding his motorcycle, pitching a hissy fit, bleating out the title song and getting upstaged by Morris Day — deserve to be writ large. Albert Magnoli directs this 1984 cheese-o-classic. For the 30-year celebration, the Hollywood is hosting a pre-screening party and gifting patrons a surprise second feature. Party starts at 6:30 p.m.; screening at 8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. Hollywood

Come in and hang out, charging stations, learn more about quitting smoking and using vapors. US Made E-Juice. The perfect gift for someone you love!

techniques discussed afterward. Come heavy … with ideas. 9:15 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3

13 TZAMETI. Gela Babluani’s tense 2005 thriller, about a Georgian immigrant in France who assumes a false identity, begins a series of foreign films. In French, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 MEAN STREETS. This 1973 crime drama kicks off “Scorsese Summer School,” in which the films of Martin Scorsese will be screened and his filmmaking

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas SILENCE OF THE LAMBS. Jonathan Demme’s 1991 thriller has become one of cinema’s indelible portraits of a serial killer, and his cat-and-mouse game with the authorities. Anthony Hopkins stars as Hannibal Lecter, killer and gourmand, while Jodie Foster portrays the FBI agent who hunts him down. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 13. AMC Loews. $5 CABIN IN THE WOODS. You know the set-up: Five friends go to a rural cabin for a getaway — and the fun turns weird and scary. This twisty-turny 2012 iteration was co-written by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard, who also directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 13; 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug., 15; and 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 16. Hollywood STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this coming-of-age dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. Adapted from a Stephen King novella, the 1986 film stars Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O’Connell. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 14; 7:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 15; 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 17; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 20. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[STAGE]

THE EXHIBITION SHEDS LIGHT ON TWO AMERICAN ORIGINALS

VOYEURS The recent trend toward theater productions that let audiences choose among multiple scenes, or when to see them, isn’t exactly new. This week, Quantum Theatre presents the Pittsburgh premiere of a pioneering 1981 play arguably more ambitious than any similar work it predated. Canadian playwright John Krizanc has called his Tamara “[a] tale about the mass psychology of Fascism, sexual and political impotence.” The fact-based story depicts 10 characters on two days in January 1927, in the opulent home of nationalist poet Gabriele d’Annunzio, who’s under house arrest by Mussolini and awaiting a visit by famed art-deco painter Tamara de Lempicka. What’s striking is the play’s form: Each audience member must follow one of the play’s characters, whether wily servant or dissolute aristocrat, to his or her scenes. (Switching characters between scenes is allowed, with accommodations for less-mobile patrons.) The sprawling “set” is a whole building. And at any moment, up to 10 of the show’s 100 scenes play out simultaneously in different rooms, sometimes with only one character. While no patron can see the whole show, the cast unites at key moments. It’s really 10 separate but overlapping plays, each with its own star … and with a catered supper in the middle. Tamara prefigured environmental productions like New York City troupe Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More and, in Pittsburgh, Bricolage Productions’ STRATA. While Tamara is not interactive — there’s no bantering with the actors — its intimacy has drawn comments like “a living movie.” The Los Angeles production ran for nine years; Quantum artistic director Karla Boos says that seeing it influenced the creation of her own itinerant, site-specific company a few years later. Tamara requires coordinating actors who can’t see each other across unusually long distances. “It’s the biggest challenge I’ve ever had as a director,” says Quantum’s director, John Shepard (who also saw the L.A. staging). Quantum’s production takes over the grand chambers and hallways of Oakland’s landmark Rodef Shalom Congregation; the voluminous set dressing features a grand piano, a stuffed warthog, saucy wallpaper and lots of cushions. The higherthan-usual ticket price includes champagne and an intermezzo dinner catered by top restaurants like E2 and Casbah. Tamara is a philosophical melodrama that will keep you on your actual toes, with surprises around every literal corner (and up some stairs). Wear comfortable shoes. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TAMARA Aug. 7-Sept. 14. Quantum Theatre at Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $56-100. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com NEWS

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Megan Mackenzie Lawrence and Fermin Suarez in Quantum’s Tamara

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

[EXHIBIT REVIEW]

AFTER A FASHION {PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART}

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

A Halston evening ensemble dress (1970), a Halston evening dress with print based on Warhol’s Flowers painting (1964–72) and Halston’s “Clouds” evening dress (1982-83)

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N 1973, acclaimed fashion columnist and editor Diana Vreeland became a Special Consultant to the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There, she single-handedly transformed the rarified world of costume display into high art. Her keen eye and her sense of drama and style were part of her persona, one that she cultivated in her illustrious careers at Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. Vreeland is a mythic figure whose own life story is a blend of fact and fiction. “Faction,” as she called it, is a perfect word for the mythology that suffuses the cult of celebrity. And who was better at that game than Andy Warhol? What Vreeland and Warhol had in common, besides their unflagging energy in both their work and social lives, was their ability to understand the power of fantasy and iconography. And while

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their social circles inevitably intersected, in the Andy Warhol Museum exhibit Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede, there is only one picture of Vreeland. In it, she is seated with the pioneer dancer and choreographer Martha Graham. This black-and-white photograph forms an inadvertent bookend to the exhibition.

HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE

continues through Aug. 24. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

The show begins with a comprehensive timeline that focuses on the parallels and intersections between the lives of Warhol

and Roy Halston Frowick, later known just by his middle name. (The exhibit is curated by Halston’s niece, Lesley Frowick, in collaboration with The Warhol.) That timeline, in turn, begins in the early 1960s, when Halston and Warhol knew each other but were not yet friends and collaborators. It was Vreeland who, in 1961, chose Halston, a prominent milliner at Bergdorf Goodman, to help with Jackie Kennedy’s inaugural wardrobe. Her cloth coat and pillbox hat changed fashion history. And it is here that the story of Halston and Warhol begins, with that famous hat next to a grid of 16 iconic Warhol Jackies. Early examples of illustrations by both Warhol and Halston also fill this first gallery, along with a number of other Halston hats. But the real treat here is the velvet gown with mink trim and bunny mask CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry. Now - August g s 24

Directed & Choreographed by Guy Stroman

L to R: Jon Rohlf, Paul Koudouris, Mitch Marois, Jay Hitt & Nicole Stefonek | Photo: Archie Carpenter

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Opening Night

theater that moves you.

August

7

(through Sept 14)

BY John Krizanc CONCEIVED BY RICHARD ROSE & JOHN KRIZANC

DIRECTED BY John Shepard

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Image courtesy of DK Publishing Inc., copyright Kizette de Lempicka

Rodef Shalom Congregation 4905 Fifth Avenue, Shadyside Includes pre-show champagne and dinner prepared by: Week 1: E2 and Kate Romane Productions Week 2: Above & Beyond Catering Week 3: Open Bottle Bistro Week 4: All in Good Taste Productions Week 5: Casbah Week 6: Stagioni Tickets: quantumtheatre.com 412.362.1713

designed by Halston and worn by Candice Bergen to Truman Capote’s celebrated Black and White Ball. This is probably the only piece of clothing in the show that can hold its own on a mannequin. Halston was an expert at cut and drape, but his clothes look best in motion. Thankfully, the exhibition includes videos of runway shows where his models sashay and strut in his luxuriously sensuous and shimmery clothes. Halston came along when lifestyles and attitudes were changing and he brought a new American simplicity to clothing at a time when women wanted comfortable, chic and modern clothes that were easy to care for. In 1972, Warhol and Halston officially collaborated for the first time. Warhol created a “happening” for Halston’s design show at the Coty American Fashion Critics’ Awards. Shortly thereafter, Warhol’s signature flowers appeared on a Halston evening dress. In 1979, Halston was the subject of an episode of Warhol’s Fashion TV and in 1982 Warhol did an ad campaign for Halston Menswear. But apart from these formal collaborations, Warhol and Halston clearly benefitted from their close friendship. Their work and their social lives intertwined and the exhibition demonstrates this throughout. Surrounding the clothing are paintings by Warhol, including portraits of Halston, Liza Minnelli and Mao. And there are Warhol Polaroids of Halston as well as other key figures of the era, such as Martha Graham and Diane von Fürstenberg. Photographs show celebrities at Studio 54 and friends at Montauk. Items from Warhol’s time capsules include telegrams and invitations. The exhibition sheds light on two American originals, equally ambitious and innovative, and both attuned to and inseparable from a period of freedom, experimentation and excess. While Halston was the first American celebrity couturier, he is not as recognized today as Warhol. As the first designer to realize the potential of licensing and branding, he inevitably lost control of his own name. It is fitting that this show is taking place almost simultaneously with Charles James: Beyond Fashion, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Considered to be America’s first couturier, James fell into obscurity at the end of his life; by 1978, he was known to only a handful of devotees, one of whom was Halston. But in 1975, James had accused Halston of plagiarism, and he also railed against Vreeland, who he believed was purposely ignoring him at Vogue and then at the Costume Institute. Even as these two great fashion designers get their due, the mythologies surrounding them endure. Fact? Fiction? Faction. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[BOOK]

HARD KNOCKS {BY DAN WILLIS} It makes sense that Dammit, I Learned a Lot From That Son-of-a-Gun began with the title. As Anita Kulina, the book’s publisher, says, “I’ve always loved movies with sentence titles, like I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang. That way you really know what you’re getting into.” Kulina, a writer herself and graduateprogram coordinator at the Carnegie Mellon School of Design, started Brandt Street Press to publish local writing with an acute sense of time and place. One of its first publications was her own Mill Hunks and Renegades, a creative historical account of her home neighborhood of Greenfield. Now comes the “Dammit” series, collections of essays by local writers both amateur and professional, telling stories of lessons learned from hardship. In this case, the hardship’s at the hands of said sons-of-guns. But a fascination with history shines through even in these 12 deeply personal stories. The opening essay, Mike Connell’s “Honor,” vividly recalls its author’s Pittsburgh childhood while name-checking neighborhoods, intersections and even Giant Eagle locations. The language is functional and distinctly Pittsburghese, without laying it on too thick. “The writers we got for this project, we got because they were just really good storytellers,” said Kulina. “We just told them to write the story as if they were just speaking it to another person in a dark room.” Brandt Street Press insists on the veracity of these stories; authors were even made to sign contracts to that effect. And if some stories seem outlandish, well, truth is stranger than fiction. But some of the stories are truly traumatic. For example, Bill Collins’ entry uses the essay to respond to the long-ignored letters his sister sent him from jail. Planned Brandt Street titles include Dammit, I Love You, and a travel-themed edition with the working title Dammit, Why Did I Go There? For now, Son-of-aGun is available directly through the press (www.brandtstreetpress.com), or at East End Book Exchange, in Bloomfield. While the writing in Son-of-a-Gun isn’t all particularly elegant, it’s compulsively readable, full of history, and clever without being didactic. Plus, it does an excellent job of outlining the son-of-a-gun as a character. “In Pittsburgh jargon, we would probably call them jag-offs, but they’re still our teachers,” said Kulina. “We learn more from them than we do from the people who treat us well.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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WORLD TOUR 2014

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ASSOCIATED Artists of pittsburgh 103 rd annual exhibition

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Tell us what you think about this picture. Become part of a lively, unprecedented online conversation about the use, influence, and meaning of photography—and see your response featured on our website!

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF BUBBLE:PGH}

Getting hot in here: bubble:PGH’s No Exit, under a dome

[PLAY REVIEW]

HELL OF A TIME {BY TED HOOVER} RECENTLY, Carnegie Mellon School of Art

students Max Hawkins and Robb Godshaw designed and built a giant white plastic bubble held up only by the output of a large air-blower. Not about to let a good thingamajig go to waste, a clutch of Carnegie Mellon Drama students calling themselves bubble:PGH have invaded the contraption and are presenting JeanPaul Sarte’s classic drama No Exit. As novelties go, the bubble’s a fairly interesting one. The space is roomy and comfortable … even if you sometimes feel like you’re sitting inside a condom. And, all things considered, the bubble hardly detracts from the terrific production

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happening inside. In case you don’t know, No Exit is a one-act set in what we come to learn is hell. The piece opens with the arrivals of: Garcin, a writer shot for desertion; Inez, an unpleasant woman who has killed herself; and the flighty and vain pneumonia victim Estelle.

NO EXIT

continues through Sat., Aug. 9. bubble:PGH at Flagstaff Hill, Schenley Park. Oakland. $10. www.bubblepgh.com

Each enters terrified to meet his or her pitchfork-bearing torturer; because of sins committed during life, they’ve assume an eternity of torment is in the cards. There is, but not quite in the


way they think. No Exit’s most famous line, “Hell is other people!,” sums up Sarte’s cynical and amusingly sarcastic point: There are no instruments of torture or programs of unspeakable pain, and the only demons are the ones already in the room. Garcin, Inez and Estelle are each other’s tormentors, locked in this airless chamber and condemned to psychologically flay each other for all time. Thanks to director Alex Tobey’s concise and clear direction (which overcomes a fusty and stilted translation by Stuart Gilbert), and to spot-on performances by Benjamin Edelman, Madeline Wolf and Rosemary McInnes, this production is a wonderful opportunity to examine the economy and skill of Sarte’s playwriting talents. He imbues each character with the exact sort of personality absolutely designed to drive the others mad. Inez (Wolf’s blend of sadism and need is palpable) is in love with Estelle (whose tyrannical self-regard McInnes perfectly

captures). And Estelle craves the adoration of Garcin (a whining man/boy whom Edelman turns into a fully realized creation). Garcin’s collapsed sense of self can be reversed only by Inez’s regard, but she hates him because Estelle wants him, and her desire means nothing to Garcin, but is a betrayal to Inez … etc. Tobey’s control of the play’s thrust, thanks to the solid performances he gets from his actors, is first-rate. Of course, directors these days feel they haven’t done their job if they haven’t tacked on some extraneous “bit” heralding their vision. Tobey’s added a number of dumbshows silhouetted onto the bubble walls: When the three characters talk about past events, these shadows act them out for us. And that, unfortunately, yanks us out of the claustrophobic, inescapable prison which Sarte has constructed so brilliantly. It’s a serious miscalculation on Tobey’s part, but the only one in an otherwise tremendously enjoyable evening.

PITTSBURGH CLO ACADEMY

Classes Begin September 2nd Register Today!

THE BUBBLE HARDLY DETRACTS FROM THE TERRIFIC PRODUCTION HAPPENING INSIDE.

CLASSES AVAILABLE Ages 3-18 Tap · Ballet · Hip Hop Musical Theater Voice · Acting · Piano and more! New Classes: Acting for TV & Film Stage Combat · Yoga Technical Theater and more! Scholarship & Mini Star Auditions: August 9th Call for an appointment ENROLL ONLINE @ pittsburghCLO.org or call 412-281-2234 for a brochure Pittsburgh CLO Academy 130 CLO Academy Way Pittsburgh, PA 15222

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

are we so different?

Exploration: Genetics Day Saturday, August 9, Noon–4 p.m. Free with museum admission Dig deeper into the traveling exhibition RACE: Are We So Different? Learn about special topics in science such as DNA, heredity, and variation in living organisms. Explore these with educators from Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Carnegie Science Center.

you’ll never see race the same way again. A project of American Anthropological Association.

Presented by

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

08.0708.14.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., AUG. 07 {DANCE} Continuum Dance Theater asked itself why it’s chosen to be an all-female company, and what its struggles and successes mean. Get the answer in the form of EMPIRE, a new full-length work about “the roles of power, instinct, cunning and sexuality” from the perspectives, historical and personal, of women creating their own legacy. Founding artistic director Sarah Parker and her troupe bring their talents to the intimate setting of the Off The Wall Performing Arts Center for four performances, starting tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 10. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-20. www.insideoffthewall.com

+ FRI., AUG. 08 {STAGE} Winchester Thurston Preparatory School hosts the 14th annual Three Rivers Storytelling Festival starting today. Headliners at the two-day fest include internationally recognized

Art by Jay Knapp

AUG. 09 10 Years Year

talents like the madcap Andy Offut Irwin and Charlotte Blake Alston (pictured), who specializes in traditional and contemporary stories from African and African-American oral traditions. Other attractions include two dozen local tellers, live music, a liar’s contest, and two hours of ghost stories for Pittsburghers who cannot wait for Halloween or who otherwise wish they were at summer camp. Storytelling workshops

AUG. 07 {PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUGLAS DUERRING OF DUERRING PHOTOGRAPHY}

EMPIRE EMPI EM MPI PIR RE RE

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are also available for $35 each. Dan Willis 9 a.m-11 p.m. Also 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. 4225 Middle Road, Allison Park. Free. 412-4499373 or www.3rstf.org

{ART} Dutch photographer Charlotte Dumas has been capturing images of service animals since she first exhibited her shots of Rotterdam police horses in 2002. Tonight, Silver Eye Center for Photography holds its opening reception for her 2012 exhibit Anima, which depicts the burial horses of Arlington National Cemetery through both video and photographic portraiture. With the goal of explicating the emotional relationship between humans and animals, Dumas took the pictures using only the natural light in the horses’ stalls as they went to sleep each night. DW 6-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 4. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

{SCREEN} The crime thriller Killer’s Kiss continues the Hollywood Theater’s year-long exploration of the films of Stanley Kubrick. In this 1955 feature, Kubrick’s second, a boxer and his new girlfriend try to evade her possessive ex-employer, and


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF THICK BIKES}

Ten years ago, Bike Pittsburgh had maybe 300 members. Today, says spokesperson Ngani Ndimbie, it’s got 2,600 — growth that reflects both the city’s embrace of cycling and the advocacy group’s own success. In July, the group welcomed 4,000 visitors Downtown for the inaugural Open Streets Pittsburgh, a one-day, car-free, bike- and pedestrian-friendly festival. Bike Pittsburgh also pursued a bike-share program that’s set to start next spring. Now, over 17 days, the 10th annual Bike Fest celebrates such progress with its big Aug. 8 kick-off party and more than 100 independently organized, bike-themed fun rides, competitions, movie screenings and workshops around the city and region. Some highlights: a Hill District hills challenge (Aug. 13); an outdoor Bike-In Movie — Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, on the roof of Downtown’s parking garage at Theater Square (Aug. 13); the Every Pittsburgh Neighborhood Ride (Aug. 16); an Underwear Ride (Aug. 21); and the big annual Pedal PGH (Aug. 24). New events include The Wheel Mill Foot Down Classic (Aug. 14), a skills contest at the indoor track in Homewood. Then there’s Aug. 19’s Future of Downtown Bike Infrastructure ride, with city officials exploring a planned protected bike lane and other anticipated improvements in the Golden Triangle. Bill O’Driscoll Party: 8 p.m.-midnight Fri., Aug. 8, with 6-8 p.m. VIP reception (Pittsburgh Opera, 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District; $25-50 and $130 for VIP). Fest continues through Aug. 24. Most Bike Fest events are free. Complete schedule at www.bike-pgh.org

this, of course, leads to murder. The black-and-white film barely betrays its miniscule budget, with gorgeous cinematography (much of it shot at night) and extensive use of real and appropriately downscale New York City locations. The film’s set piece is an unforgettable shootout in a warehouse of department-store mannequins. Al Hoff 7:30 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $8. 412-563-0368 or www.the hollywood dormont.org

4 p.m. Downtown. Free. www.fortpittblockhouse.com

{ART} Detroit-based multimedia artist Jay Knapp makes his Pittsburgh debut tonight

{COMEDY}

AUG. 08 Three Rivers Storytelling Festival

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{COMMEMORATION} Unlike groups with a decennial bug, the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution rations its anniversaries: The chapter commemorates its most famous charge, the Fort Pitt Blockhouse, only once every 50 years. Today’s Block House 250 Summer Celebration fetes the city’s oldest architectural landmark — all that remains of our namesake British colonial fort at the Point — with a day of historical re-enactments, lectures, live period music and more. There are even demonstrations of how the Brits under Col. Henry Bouquet built this utilitarian structure, which thanks to the DAR somehow survived waves of industrialization and urban renewal. You can even party like it’s, um, 1764, with firings of a 19th-century cannon in Point State Park. The day includes special $2.50 admission to the adjacent Fort Pitt Museum. BO 11 a.m.-

NEWS

(the varsity and JV teams) up against Indianapolis’s Naptown Roller Girls. This revived sport still offers plenty of spectacle, but it’s worth coming just for the opportunity to hear punny names like Shockrates, Cruisin’ B. Anthony, or ’Snot Rocket Science spoken aloud. Kids under 10 get in free, and reserved seating is available for an additional $5. DW 7 p.m. Romp ’n Roll, 1661 E. Sutter Road, Glenshaw. $10. 412486-4177 or www. steelcityrollerderby.org

at Boxheart Gallery with 10 Years, an exhibit devoted to the psychology of America’s anxiety over nuclear weapons. Featuring turned-wood sculptures, paintings and digitally processed photographs, Knapp’s art blends the classical beauty of decorative arts and geometric perfection with an acute social awareness and a carefully cultivated sense of chaos. The exhibit follows Knapp’s recent gallery openings in his hometown, as well as at the Westmoreland Museum of Art. DW Opening reception: 5-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Oct. 3. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

Mayor Bill Peduto has declared today Amish Monkeys Day, in honor of the long-running improv group’s 15th year of performing. To celebrate, these pioneers of the burgeoning contemporary Pittsburgh improv scene put on a special show at Gemini Theater, where they perform on the second Saturday of every month. The show features special guest Brian Buckley on keyboard, along-

Anima

+ MON., AUG. 11 {FASHION}

Art by Charlotte Dumas

side such familiar Monkeys as Laura Lind and Frank Schurter. They’ll perform both musical and non-musical short-form improv based entirely on audience suggestions. Content is generally PG-13. DW 8 p.m. 7501 Penn Ave., Point Breeze. $9. 412-243-5201 or www. amishmonkeys.com

+ SUN., AUG. 10 {DANCE} River City Artists Management,

a Pittsburgh-based promoter of dance troupes nationally, launches a new performance showcase. SundaySeries @ PointBreezeway takes over this new event hall on second Sundays through October for matinees, each featuring two local arts groups. The inaugural session features the Pittsburgh Complaints N’At Choir (a hit at the Three Rivers Arts Festival) and Shanna Simmons Dance. The informal setting includes food trucks. BO 2 p.m. 7113

AUG. 11

Steel City Roller Derby’s 20132014 season is almost over, but you can catch one more home bout tonight, with Steel Hurtin’ and The Steel Beamers

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AUG. 08

Clothes by Toya Taylor

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Designers, boutiques, stylists and models — and others into fashion — will converge for Style Week Pittsburgh. Wadria Taylor, the annual event’s founder and director, promises local and international brands on display at doings around town from tonight’s Kick-Off Party at the Priory Grand Hall, to an accessory trunk show, a jewelry showcase, Aug. 14’s Style Awards, the free Aug. 16 Lawrenceville Boutique Crawl and more. BO Opening night: 6-10 p.m. (614 Pressley St., North Side; $35-75). Festival continues through Aug. 17 at various venues. www. styleweekpittsburgh.com

+ THU., AUG. 14 {MUSIC} The works of Pittsburgh-based composer Federico Garcia-De Castro have been performed around town and around the world, from Thailand to Panama. Tonight, he’s out to make you rethink what a familiar instrument can do, with an evening of compositions arranged for two pianos. Works include Alexander Borodin’s “Au covent,” Simon Eastwood’s “Interference for two performers at piano” and two of Garcia-De Castro’s own works, including the world premiere of “Renderings.” The show kicks off the new season of the New Hazlett Theater’s CSA Performance Series, but it’s open to non-subscribers, too. BO 8 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-25. www.newhazletttheater.org

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THEATER 6TH ANNUAL SUMMER BROADWAY REVUE. Scenes & music from Broadway favorites. Presented by The Heritage Players. Sat., Aug. 9, 7 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 10, 2 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. DANCING AT LUGHNASA. Brian Friel’s Tony winning play about 5 unmarried sisters who have shared a cottage in Ireland’s rural County Donegal since childhood & the events of their summer in 1936 that forever change the family dynamic Thru Aug. 9. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST. Shakespeare in the Park production presented by Poor Yorick’s Players. Fri-Sun, 7 p.m. and Aug. 15-16, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 10. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705. NO EXIT. Existential tale by Jean-Paul Sartre about

three strangers brought together forever. Presented by bubble:PGH. Fri, Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 9. Schenley Park, Oakland. 502-263-3326. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. ST. GERTRUDE’S GUIDE TO HEAVEN. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 16. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. STRAIGHTENING COMBS. One-woman show written & performed Kim El about coming-of-age in urban America. Aug. 8-9, 8 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 10, 3 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 800-838-3006. SUITE SURRENDER. It’s 1942, & two of Hollywood’s

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biggest feuding divas have cat-&-mouse when a small town is quarantined during been assigned the same the 1918 influenza pandemic. hotel suite. Thu-Sat, Presented by 12 Peers Theater. 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sun., Aug. 10, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Aug. 17. Apple Hill Playhouse. Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 724-468-5050. 412-496-2194. TAMARA. Play by John Krizanc. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed, Thu, Sat, 7 p.m. and Tue, Sun, 6:30 p.m. Thru COMEDY OPEN MIC. Sept. 14. Rodef Shalom Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Congregation, Oakland. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-362-1713. 412-681-4318. THINGS MY MOTHER OPEN STAGE TAUGHT ME. Olivia & COMEDY NIGHT. Gabe are moving into Thu Eclipse Lounge, their first apartment Lawrenceville. together, halfway www. per pa 412-251-0097. pghcitym across the country .co PITTSBURGH from their parents, who IMPROV JAM. Thu, show up to help them. 10 p.m. Cabaret at Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Theater Square, Downtown. Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 17. 412-325-6769. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. THURSDAY NIGHT 412-831-8552. SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel THE WIDOW OF TOM’S City Improv Theater, Shadyside. HILL. A reading of a new play 412-404-2695. about a young sailor & a widow playing a dangerous game of TOM SEGURA. 7 p.m., Fri., Aug. 8, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Aug. 9, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 10, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 08 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DAVID KAYE: DIGITALLY ENHANCED. Multi-media show feat. comedic material, sound effects & flashing digital screen projection. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 08 - SAT 09 ED DRISCOLL, ZIGGY KLETT. Bonkerz Comedy Club. Aug. 8-9, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 09 AMISH MONKEYS IMPROV COMEDY 15-YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW. 8 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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VISUALART “Pattern 5,” by Ruth Levine, from Ruth Levine: Radiant Life, at Shaw Galleries, Downtown

NEW THIS WEEK THE FRAMESMITH. Lisa Marie Jakab on View. Paintings, drawings, & prints. Opens Aug. 7. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-0300. FUTURE TENANT. What Will Her Kids Think? Work by Sally Deskins. Opening reception: Aug. 8, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Charlotte Dumas: Anima. Portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. Opening reception: Aug. 8, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Character of the Living. Oil paintings by Genevieve Barbee. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768.

BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Untangled. Work by Elaine Bergstrom & Charles Sawyer. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. The Pittsburgh 10. Group show of 10 local artists. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Mark Barill. Window installation.

Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Hidden & Revealed. Work by Todd Sanders & Jason Schell. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Once Again Calm. Surreal minimalist landscapes by Thomas Frontini. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. DOUG BENSON. 4:20 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. JOHN PRIDEMORE & DEREK MINTO. Comedy Show Benefit for Cancer. 8 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. TRUTH OR DARE: STAND-UP COMEDY CHALLENGE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SUN 10 ABITHA DENTON, ED BAILEY, JOHN DICK WINTERS, ANDY PICARRO, JENNIFER CHANDLER, COMEDIENNE EYE HOLLA, BLAIR HAYA, OLIVIA GRACE TRAINI, MORE. Talkin’ All Types of Sh*t Comedy Night. 7 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. DOUG LOVES MOVIES. 4:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 12 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 13 CANDIDATES’ COMEDY NIGHT. Political candidates for races of local interest perform stand-up, dance, more. 7:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Banking The Fire. Lithography prints by Keith Clouse. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Investigations in Terraforming. Prints by New Academy Press. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274.

and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Hiroshima-Nagasaki Legacy Exhibit. Photographs, graphics, poetry, & artwork. Co-sponsored by Remembering

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SHAW GALLERIES. Ruth Levine: Radiant Life. More than 30 works of art by the late Ruth Levine. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative

Hiroshima, Imagining Peace & Veterans for Peace. Downtown. 412-310-8007. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285.

exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Collective Unconscious. Photographs by Jay Brown, Melissa Catanese, Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton, Jake Reinhart, Justin Visnesky. unsmokeartspace. com/index/#/collectiveunconscious. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition by Sue Pollins, Doreen Currie, Michael McSorley. Happy Hour Event: Aug. 8, 5-7 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. EVENT: OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. , 412-851-9212. Kelly-Strayhorn OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Theater, East Liberty This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, CRITIC: blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. , 28, an PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY enrollment coordinator MUSEUM. Trolley rides and from Penn Hills exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic WHEN: area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly I would be hyped just for Talib Kweli, but the Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter fact that Rapsody is such a breath of fresh air among tropical blooms. Summer when it comes to women in hip-hop music made Flower Show. Feat. a variety of the concert that much better. I checked out her imaginative railroad displays mixtapes when I found out she was playing and enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor now I’m definitely a fan. But there’s more than rooms & 3 outdoor gardens just music here; the art installations and stuff really feature exotic plants and floral show how meticulous the people that planned this displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. festival were. You have to have all the elements of PINBALL PERFECTION. hip hop: MCing, DJing, breakdancing and graffiti, Pinball museum & players club. which is often overlooked. You really have to have West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG them all if you’re going to call yourself a hip-hop AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 culture festival. But they really nailed it. animals, including many BY DAN WILLIS endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence dedicated to honoring military for Life. Photos and artifacts service members since the BELLYDANCE HAFLA. of her life & work. Springdale. Civil War through artifacts & 8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 724-274-5459. personal mementos. Oakland. 412-449-9833. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL 412-621-4253. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. on the Homestead Mill. Steel Features 5,000 relics of PITTSBURGH COMPLAINTS industry and community artifacts Catholic saints. North Side. N’AT CHOIR, SHANA SIMMONS from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-323-9504. DANCE. 2 p.m. PointBreezeway, 412-464-4020. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN Point Breeze. 412-335-5293. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo HISTORY CENTER. Vanka Murals. Mid-20th Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: century murals depicting Treasures of the Arabia. war, social justice and the Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 immigrant experience BRINGING SEXY BACK TO once-hidden treasures in America. Millvale. THE BURGH. Drag show charity exploring Pittsburgh’s 421-681-0905. benefit for Polycystic Ovarian important role as a WEST OVERTON Gateway to the West Syndrome. Presented by Carrie MUSEUMS. Learn & a national hub Ann’s Bridal. 7 p.m. The Tonidale. www. per pa about distilling and for the steamboat 412-788-1224. pghcitym o .c coke-making in this building industry in the mid-19th century. pre-Civil War industrial From Slavery to Freedom. village. 724-887-7910. ST. FERDINAND FAMILY Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the FESTIVAL & WHITE anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: ELEPHANT FLEA MARKET. Western PA Sports Museum, Aug. 8-10 St. Ferdinand Church, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on Cranberry. 724-776-2888. local history, more. Strip District. 21ST ANNUAL RUSYN 412-454-6000. FOOD FESTIVAL. Aug. 7-9 SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS St. John the Baptist Orthodox VIOLET RIPPY 5K WALK/RUN HISTORY CENTER. Museum Greek Catholic Church, FOR PULMONARY FIBROSIS. commemorates Pittsburgh Ambridge. 724-266-2879. 9 a.m. Heinz Field, North Side. industrialists, local history. 888-222-8451 x 703. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. EMPIRE. Performance by PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read a collection of military artifacts Continuum Dance Theater. & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em showcasing photographs, Aug. 7-9, 8 p.m. and Sun., or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. uniforms, shells & other Aug. 10, 3 p.m. Off the Wall or by appt. Thomas Merton related items. Military museum Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

Cultured Steel Hip Hop Festival

Celebrating 20 Years!

Devon Swain

Fri., Aug. 01

Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

2 for 1 Tuesdays 2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

NOW HIRING MALE DANCERS

FRI 08

for more information email us at http://Cluberoticapittsburgh.com

SUN 10

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

FUNDRAISERS

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

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THU 07 - SAT 09

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WED 13 PINTS FOR PITS. Each $10 donation buys one Hello Bully pint glass. www.hellobully.org 6-9 p.m. Industry Public House, Lawrenceville. 412-235-1997.

POLITICS WED 13 CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LITERARY THU 07 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

THOMAS SWETERLITSCH. Author of Tomorrow and Tomorrow. Part of the Writers LIVE @ CLP-Main series. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. WRITERS LIVE @ CLP MAIN: THOMAS SWETERLITSCH. Book talk & reading w/ author of Tomorrow & Tomorrow. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

TUE 12

FRI 08

THU 07

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 09 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 11 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

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FRI 08 CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 09

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412.566.1861

THU 07

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MAKER STORYTIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Thu, 2-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 14 Children’s Museum of BEULAH CHRISTIAN Pittsburgh, North Side. SPORTS CAMP. 412-322-5058. Basketball, soccer, golf, www. per SOAR! Free-flight pa & cheerleading skills pghcitym bird show. Thru .co clinics for students who Sept. 1, 12 p.m. have completed grades National Aviary, K-6. Thru Aug. 7, 6-8:30 p.m. North Side. 412-323-7235. Beulah Presbyterian Church. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL 412-829-2756. ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, GIRLS ROCK! PITTSBURGH 12 p.m. National Aviary, SUMMER ROCK CAMP. Thru North Side. 412-323-7235. Aug. 9 Winchester Thurston, XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT Upper School, Shadyside. LOVE & FORGIVENESS. 412-440-8241. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum SHIBORI PEACE QUILT of Pittsburgh, North Side. PROJECT. Make a collaborative 412-322-5058. quilt honoring those who XOXO: WHEN LIFE GIVES were hurt in World War II & YOU LEMONS.. Enjoy some their families. Presented by free lemonade in exchange for Remembering Hiroshima, a promise to pay the generosity Imagining Peace. Thru Aug. 10, forward w/ a good deed. 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum Thu, 2-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 14 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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CIRCUS! SUMMER FAMILY FUN DAY AT THE FRICK. Paint big top animals, try your acrobatic skill at balancing, games, more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KINDERGARTEN…HERE I COME! Celebrate the transition from preschool to kindergarten w/ storytellers, activities, Mr. McFeely, more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: KIDS COMEDY SHOW. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SUPER SCIENCE SATURDAY: GENETICS EXPLORATION. Hands-on activities examining genetics. Learn about special topics in science such as DNA, heredity, & variation in living organisms. 12-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SAT 09 - SUN 10 VULTURE WEEKEND. Vulture-themed activities, educational displays, special keeper talks, more. Aug. 9-10, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

SUN 10 MONROEVILLE SPORTS CENTER OPEN HOUSE. For families w/ preschool to high school students. 1-4 p.m. Monroeville Sports Center, Monroeville. 412-646-1467. PENGUIN PAINTING PROGRAM. Choose colors & watch penguins create a work of art. 3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

MON 11 MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 13 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 11 - WED 13 PUSS-IN-BOOTS. Presented by the Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 13 Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. STUDIO PROGRAM: GELLI ART. Experiment w/ a new technique in monotype printing. Aug. 11-15, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 12 CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. Tue, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

OUTSIDE FRI 08 - SAT 09 SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get up-close and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

TUE 12 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 13 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 07 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BIOPHILIA: PITTSBURGH. Guest speaker: Marijke Hecht, director of education at the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy. 5:30-7 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EXTRAORDINARY EXPERIMENTS: THE PRINTS OF BRUEGEL, DÜRER, SCHONGAUER & REMBRANDT. Course examining a period of dramatic change in Europe through the work of four of its most significant artists. Thu, 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: COMBATING THE HIGH COSTS OF LOW MORALE. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PITTSBURGH RESTAURANT WEEK KICKOFF PARTY. Cocktails, samplings from participating restaurants, charity raffles, more. 6-8 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-586-4727. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 07 - SAT 09 DIGITAL SANCTUARIES: A JAZZ POETRY SOUNDWALK. Launch of self-guiding app feat. tours by Susie Ibarra & Roberto Rodriquez. Aug. 7-9 City of Asylum, North Side. 412-323-0278. SUMMER ARTISAN BAZAAR. Craft show & sale feat. handmade jewelry, pottery, stained glass, paintings, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 9 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

FRI 08 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.


[LITERARY] the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. UCAN2 5K TRAINING PROGRAM KICK-OFF. 8 a.m. Steel City Road Runners, North Side. 412-586-7785. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 09 - SUN 10 FORT PITT BLOCK HOUSE: 250TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. 18th century blacksmithing techniques, musket demos & cannon firings, more. Aug. 9-10 Fort Pitt Museum, Downtown. 412-471-1764.

SUN 10 In Tomorrow and Tomorrow, the first novel by local author Thomas Sweterlitsch, Pittsburgh has been destroyed in an apocalyptic accident and — 10 years later — all that is left is “the Archive,” a digital recreation of the city. Survivor John Dominic Blaxton, who lost his wife in the incident, is obsessed with the Archive, which, naturally, leads to some dark discoveries. Thursday, Sweterlitsch reads from and discusses his dystopian novel — which another local writer, Stewart O’Nan, describes as “utterly visionary” — as part of the Writers LIVE @ CLP-Main series. 6 p.m. Thu., Aug. 7. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3114 or www.clpgh.org

FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GEORGE GERSHWIN, HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

FRI 08 - SAT 09 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 08 - SUN 10 SAN ROCCO CELEBRATIONS. Aug. 8-10 American Italian Club. 724-378-3434. STEEL CITY CON. Toy, comic & pop culture convention. Special guests: Billy Dee Williams, LeVar Burton, Penny Marshall, Steve Guttenberg, more. www.steelcitycon.com 1-9 p.m., Sat., Aug. 9, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville.

SAT 09 ANTIQUE GUN SHOW. 9 a.m.-

4 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. www. pittsburghtangueros.org Sat, 5-6 p.m. Thru Aug. 10 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. BRING THE BEAT BACK SERIES PART 1. Hip Hop/ Activism Panel Discussion. 6 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. BUYING & SELLING ONLINE: CRAIGSLIST BASICS. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. CITY OF CHAMPIONS! THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS HISTORY TOUR. Begins at Duquesne Incline, 1220 Grandview Ave, Mt. Washington. 9-11:30 a.m. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library,

Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PHOTO SAFARI – GRASSLANDS. 9-10 a.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At

AFRONAUT(A) 2.0: AN EXPLORATION IN FILM. Screenings of works by experimental black filmmakers. 1 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BRUNCH AT THE NATIONAL AVIARY. 10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. I MADE IT! MARKET. Nomadic indie craft market. www.imadeitmarket.com 10 a.m.2 p.m. Whole Foods Wexford, Wexford. 724-940-6100.

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MON 11 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

August 9th - The Rex Theatre Good Ship Gibraltar - The Semi-Supervillians Dead Gumbies - Shrouded in Neglect

12 oz. Straub American Lager Bottles

$4.00 night of show

MON 11 - WED 13

Doors at 8 PM - Show 9 PM

OAKLAND RESTAURANT WEEK. A week of $5 lunches at participating restaurants. www. onlyinoakland.org Aug. 11-15 STYLE WEEK PITTSBURGH. Fashion shows, jewelry showcase, CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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Tickets available at Pennrockscholarship.com 10% of all ticket sales go to: Guitars4Vets www.guitars4vets.org

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

more. http://www.styleweek pittsburgh.wordpress.com/ Aug. 11-17

TUE 12 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. COMMUNITY CAT CHAT. Discussion series on neighborhood stray & feral cats. Second Tue of every month, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 7 Animal Rescue League Wildlife Center, East Liberty. 412-345-7300. EMPOWERING YOUR TEAM: RECRUITING, RETAINING & INSPIRING WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE. 7:30 a.m. Power Center Ballroom, Duquesne University, Downtown. 412-396-4434. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465.

WED 13

6 p.m. Theater Square Garage, Downtown. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. WINE 101 - THREE PART WINE CLASS. Wed, 6-8 p.m. Thru Aug. 13 Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. 412-391-1709.

AUDITIONS APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for Pinchpenny Phantom of the Opera. Aug. 23. Males/females in their 30s. One male must be a true tenor & one female a true soprano. Applications for stage manager, choreographer, technical director, carpenters, costumer, & property person also accepted. lindak@applehill playhouse.org . 724-468-5050 x 4.

RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Auditions for the 2014-15 season. Aug. 11-12. Prepare 30 sec. selection w/ sheet music, accompanist provided. rccpittsburgh.com/auditions East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722. STEEL CITY MEN’S CHORALE. Auditions for basses & tenors. Aug. 11-19. Vocalizing, pitch memory exercises & sight reading. www.choralnet.org/view/445665 First Trinity Lutheran Church, Oakland. 412-417-4800. UNDERCROFT OPERA. Auditions for our 2014-2015 season. Aug. 28-31. www.undercroftopera. org/community/audition/ Waverly Presbyterian Church, Regent Square. 412-422-7919. WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Auditions for

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

MCG JAZZ

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT Since its founding in 1987, MCG Jazz has aimed to GROUP. For Widows/Widowers promote and preserve jazz music in the area. It’s currently over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. seeking volunteers to help further that mission. Assistance St. Sebastian Church, Ross. is needed with marketing, ticket and administrative 412-366-1300. office support, and at events, as well as with archiving BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN its library of historical photos, videos and audio files. WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Call 412-322-0800 or visit www.mcgjazz.org. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. 412-531-1912. 2014 season. Aug. 20 & 24. Auditions for the 2014-2015 CHAIRPOCALYPSE: NEVER SAY Open to all string, woodwind, season. Aug. 26. Men/women, NEVER SAY NEVER. Aug. 13-14, brass & percussion players prepare song of your choice & 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 16, enrolled in area high schools or bring music for accompanist. 2-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, colleges. wysorc@verizon.net www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org/ Carrick, Carrick. 412-882-3897. Thru Seton Hill University join-us/ First Unitarian Church, COUNTRY NIGHT LINE Performing Arts Center, Shadyside. 412-241-4044. DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Greensburg. 724-837-1850. THE JUNIOR Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North MENDELSSOHN CHOIR. Fayette. 412-693-5555. Auditioning young singers. Visit DETROIT STYLE URBAN THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking www.themendelssohnchoir.org BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. performers & artists to participate Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, or call for information. Third in First Fridays - Art in a Box. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. For more information, email 412-926-2488. ENGLISH CONVERSATION thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount 412-403-7357. Ongoing auditions for Lebanon Public Library, Mt. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY actors ages 18+ for Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking murder mystery shows “GMO OMG” submissions in all genres for performed in the FILM SCREENING. fledgling literary magazine Pittsburgh area. Followed by discussion curated by members of the www. per 412-833-5056. w/GMO FREE PA pa Hour After Happy Hour pghcitym THE MENDELSSOHN 6:30 p.m. Carnegie .co Writing Workshop. CHOIR OF Library, Homewood, afterhappyhourreview.com. PITTSBURGH. Auditions Homewood. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. for all voice parts. Call or visit 412-731-3080. Submit your film, 10 minutes www.themendelssohnchoir.org LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! or less. Screenings held on the for information. Third Practice conversational English. second Thursday of every month. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, 724-263-5259. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. NEW HORIZON THEATER. MOWA YOGA PRESENTS: THE NEW YINZER. Seeking Auditions for Queens Of PRACTICE ON THE PODS. original essays about literature, The Blues. Sept. 6. 4 AfricanGrandview & Shiloh St., Mt. music, TV or film, & also essays American females mid Washington. Wed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. generally about Pittsburgh. To 30’s-60 & 2 African-American Thru Aug. 27 339-237-0891. see some examples, visit www. males late 30’s-mid 50’s. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. newyinzer.com & view the newhorizontheater@yahoo.com A meeting of jugglers & spinners. current issue. Email all pitches, PRIME STAGE THEATRE. All levels welcome. Wed, submissions & inquiries to Auditions for Teen Dating 7:30 p.m. Union Project, newyinzer@gmail.com. Awareness Program. Aug. 23-24. Highland Park. 412-363-4550. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Ages 14-24, non-equity, 1-2 min. ROOFTOP SHINDIG. Food, Seeking various types of monologue. www.primestage. specialty cocktails & beer. poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ com Prime Stage Theatre Pee Wee’s Big Adventure w/ Rehearsal Studio, West End. hotmail.com. live music by Grand Piano.

SUBMISSIONS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a 38-year-old woman. My husband of 18 years is 22 years my senior. I credit my husband for giving me a good life and helping me pursue goals. But he’s a typeA professional, and that has played out in the bedroom. He has always been disinterested in my pleasure. When our kids were little, I did not want sex as often as he did. I suggested that he masturbate in the shower if he wanted a quickie. His answer: A married man “should not have to pleasure himself.” If I ask for oral, he tells me to “clean it really, really well,” then he’ll “think about doing that.” This makes me feel disgusting. I have tried to spice up our sex life. For years, it has been missionary position or doggy style. It can feel pretty “rapey” a lot of the time, as he typically comes at me rounding third base and it’s over in five minutes. A few months ago, I told a friend that I had never received “enthusiastic oral.” She said it made sense that my husband didn’t enjoy doing it because it was a “domination thing” that mostly submissive men enjoy. I started visiting online domination forums, and my new “online friends” would love to orally service me. Two of these “sub males” want me to “own” them. I have spoken to each on the phone and exchanged hundreds of emails. This is the happiest I have been in my life, and I want to act on these desires. My husband is my only concern. He is my best friend, and I don’t want to lose that. I feel like I can’t even tell him about the online stuff. How do I deal with this?

orgasm during sex is being on top and rocking back and forth on him in a similar manner. I’ve never climaxed during oral or hand stimulation, or in any other position. My husband has been very understanding (he even finds the way I masturbate “hot”), but I want to be able to do more. I’m also concerned about this being bad for me in the long run, like how the “death grip” is for guys. How can I teach myself to masturbate correctly? I’m currently abstaining from masturbating for a week to become more sensitive and then trying to get off only with my hands while on my back. I’ve been reading online and hearing conflicting suggestions. Some say to take a month off of sex, too? I’m terrified of never being able to get off the conventional way.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

CAN’T REALLY USE DIRECTION

Forgive the mixed messages I’m about to send you, although they won’t be nearly as mixed as what I just sent DOMME. I’ve advised guys with Death Grip Syndrome — a.k.a. Traumatic Masturbatory Syndrome — to keep masturbating but to use a lighter touch and a lot of lube. (Not all of these guys are clenching their dicks too hard; some are rubbing up against pillows like you or — my personal favorite — sliding their dicks between mattresses and box springs.) But here’s the difficult part: If they can’t come with the lighter touch and more lube, they don’t get to come. No reverting to a tightly clenched fist (or a pillow) after 20 minutes of “trying.” Allow the pressure and frustration to build long enough, and a dick will adapt. But they may have to keep at it for months, plural, not a month, singular. Go ahead and have sex but, again — no death grip, no pillow. If you want to get off in other ways, masturbate regularly — constantly — but without the pillow. If you don’t come, you don’t come. Focus on the pleasure you are able to achieve, and give it at least three months. It’s a good sign that you aren’t entirely dependent on a pillow — you can get off with/on your partner. Most people with TMS aren’t so lucky. And it’s less awkward to grind on your partner pillow-style when you want to come than it is for a guy to shift from penis-in-vagina sex (PIV) to penis-in-between-mattressand-box-spring sex (PIBMABS). That said, some people with DGS/TMS simply aren’t able to retrain their junk. But you don’t have to live without orgasms, or view yourself as damaged. After giving your junk a chance to adapt, you may have to accept that this is how you get off, and let go of the shame. Enjoy the fingering, enjoy the oral and enjoy the fucking, and when you want to get off, maneuver your husband into a position that works and shamelessly grind away.

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

YOU MAY HAVE TO ACCEPT THAT THIS IS HOW YOU GET OFF, AND LET GO OF THE SHAME.

DON’T OFFEND MY MAN EVER

On the one hand … a man who demands “rapey” sex on his schedule for 18 years, makes his wife feel bad about her genitals and isn’t open to trying new things is begging to be cheated on. On the other hand … you say your rapey, pussy-disparaging, sex-shaming husband is your best friend (baffling!) and you don’t want to lose him (equally baffling!). And a guy with his retrograde attitudes about sex, gender roles and “wifely duties” would divorce you if he found out you cheated on him. So you probably shouldn’t take this into real life. But on the other other hand … your husband sounds like the type of guy who would regard your secret online life as cheating — the emails, the phone calls, the lurking on domination websites — and divorce you just the same if he found out. So you might as well fuck those subs, because if you get caught — and you probably will — you’ll be in the same trouble whether or not you got enthusiastic oral. I’m a 25-year-old woman who can only get off lying facedown and rubbing my clit against a pillow. The orgasms are great, but it limits the ways I can get off with my husband. The only way I can

On the Lovecast, hear how rich girls slutshame poor girls on college campuses: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

08.06-08.13

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Every 12 years, the planet Jupiter spends about a year cruising through the sign of Leo. It’s there with you now, and will be with you through early August 2015. What can you expect? EXPANSION! That’s great, right? Yes and no. You might love to have some parts of your life expand; others, not so much. So I suggest you write down your intentions. Say something like this: “I want Jupiter to help me expand my faith in myself, my power to do what I love and my ability to draw on the resources and allies I need. Meanwhile, I will prune my desires for things I don’t really need and cut back on my involvement with things that don’t inspire me. I don’t want those to expand.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): TV comedian Stephen Colbert confesses that his safeword is “pumpkin patch.” Does that mean he participates in actual BDSM rituals? Is it the codeword he utters when he doesn’t want the intensity to rise any further, when he doesn’t want his next boundary crossed? I don’t know. Perhaps he’s simply joking or speaking metaphorically. Whether or not you engage in literal BDSM, Virgo, there’s an aspect of your life right now that has metaphorical resemblances to it. And I suggest that you do the equivalent of using your safeword very soon. Nothing more can be gained from remaining embroiled in your predicament. Even if the ordeal has been interesting or educational up until now, it won’t be for much longer. Escape your bondage.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’re planning to hurl a thunderbolt, make sure you are all warmed up and at full strength before you actually unleash it. It would be sad if you flung a half-assed thunderbolt that looked like a few fireflies and sounded like a cooing dove. And please don’t interpret my wise-guy tone here as a sign that I’m just kidding around. No, Libra. This is serious stuff. Life is offering you opportunities to make a major impression, and I want you to be as big and forceful and wild as you need to be. Don’t tamp down your energy out of fear of hurting people’s feelings. Access your inner sky god or sky goddess, and have too much fun expressing your raw power.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In your dreams you may travel to Stockholm, Sweden, to accept the Nobel Prize or to Hollywood to pick up your Oscar. There’s a decent chance that in your sleepy-time adventures you will finally score with the hot babe who rejected you back in high school, or return to the scene of your biggest mistake and do things right this time. I wouldn’t be surprised if in one dream you find yourself riding in a gold chariot during a parade held in your honor. I’m afraid, however, that you will have to settle for less hoopla and glamour in your waking life. You will merely be doing a fantastic job at tasks you usually perform competently. You will be well appreciated, well treated and well rewarded. That’s not so bad, right?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Lake Superior State University issues a “Unicorn Questing Privilege” to those people who are interested in hunting for unicorns. Are you one of them? I wouldn’t be surprised if you felt an urge like that in the coming weeks. Unusual yearnings will be welling up in you. Exotic fantasies may replace your habitual daydreams. Certain possibilities you have considered to be unthinkable or unattainable may begin to seem feasible.

Questions you have been too timid to ask could become crucial for you to entertain. (You can get your Unicorn Questing License here: http:// tinyurl.com/unicornlicense.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your ethical code may soon be tested. What will you do if you see a chance to get away with a minor sin or petty crime that no one will ever find out about? What if you are tempted to lie or cheat or deceive in ways that advance your good intentions and only hurt other people a little bit or not at all? I’m not here to tell you what to do, but rather to suggest that you be honest with yourself about what’s really at stake. Even if you escape punishment for a lapse, you might nevertheless inflict a wound on your integrity that would taint your relationship with your own creativity. Contemplate the pleasures of purity and righteousness, and use them to enhance your power.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The thorn arms the roses,” says an old Latin motto. The astrological omens suggest you’ll be wise to muse on that advice in the coming weeks. How should you interpret it? I’ll leave you to draw your own conclusions, of course, but here are a few hints. It may be that beauty needs protection, or at least buffering. It’s possible that you can’t simply depend on your sincerity and good intentions, but also need to infuse some ferocity into your efforts. In order for soft, fragile, lovely things to do what they do best, they may require the assistance of tough, strong, hearty allies.

every foregone conclusion; propose amusing plot twists that send the narratives off on interesting tangents.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Breve orazione penetra is an old Italian idiom. Its literal translation is “short prayers pierce” or “concise prayers penetrate.” You can extrapolate from that to come up with the meaning that “God listens best to brief prayers.” In the coming week, I invite you to apply this idea whenever you ask for anything, whether you are seeking the favors of the Divine Wow or the help of human beings. Know exactly what you want, and express it with no-nonsense succinctness.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Every February, you go through a phase when it’s easier to see the big picture of your life. If you take advantage of this invitation, your experience is like being on a mountaintop and gazing into the vastness. Every August, on the other hand, you are more likely to see the details you have been missing. Transformations that have been too small

and subtle to notice may become visible to you. If you capitalize on this opportunity, the experience is like peering through a microscope. Here’s a third variation, Gemini: Around the full moons of both February and August, you may be able to alternately peer into the microscope and simulate the view from a mountaintop. I think that’s about to happen.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You wouldn’t sip dirty water from a golden chalice. Am I right? Nor would you swig delicious poison from a fine crystal wine glass or 10-yearold vinegar from a queen’s goblet. I’m sure you will agree that you’d much rather drink a magical elixir from a paper cup, or a rejuvenating tonic from a chipped coffee mug, or tasty medicine out of a kids’ plastic soup bowl you bought at the thrift store. Don’t you dare lie to yourself about what’s best for you. Tell what techniques you’ve discovered about feeding honey to crocodiles. Truthrooster@ gmail.com

get your yoga on!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you go to an American doctor to be treated for an ailment, odds are that he or she will interrupt you no more than 14 seconds into your description of what’s wrong. But you must not tolerate this kind of disrespect in the coming days, Pisces — not from doctors, not from anyone. You simply must request or, if necessary, demand the receptivity you deserve. If and when it’s given, I urge you to speak your truth in its entirety. Express what has been hidden and suppressed. And this is very important: Take responsibility for your own role in any problems you discuss.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t just be smart and articulate, Aries. Dare to be wildly wise and prone to unruly observations. Don’t merely be kind and well-behaved. Explore the mysteries of healing through benevolent mischief. Don’t buy into the all-too-serious trances. Break up the monotony with your unpredictable play and funny curiosity. Don’t simply go along with the stories everyone seems to believe in as if they were the Truth and the Way. Question every assumption; rebel against

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

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Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com

HELP WANTED

MODELS

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

MODELS WANTED

ABC SELF STORAGE

724-421-7888

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

EAST FOR RENT

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Your ad could be here

No Experience Necessary.

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

DRIVERS

Part Time Driver For Pittsburgh Executive, as needed basis, must be flexible. Perfect for Retiree. $15.00/hour send resume and references to: mcdonald@fbmgg.com

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

412.316.3342

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Shadyside Lg 2BR, h/w fls, high ceilings, pvt back porch, sml pet OK,

$975 heat incl. 412-661-5921


ADOPTION

CLASSES

STUDIES

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool. com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

ADOPTION

CLASSES

STUDIES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

GENERAL FOR SALE

STUDIES

Adopt:

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888992-1957 (AAN CAN)

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS? 412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love. Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

ADOPTION:

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

Adoring teacher (will stay home) & Attorney, LOVE, Music, Travel awaits first baby. Expenses Paid ~ 1-800-816-8424 Sheila & Justin

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

412-403-6069

Your ad could be here

STUDIES 412.316.3342 SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers.

CALL TODAY!

This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking.

GOUT?

Compensation will be provided.

CALL TODAY!

If you suffer from any of the following please call PPCP at

412-650-6155

For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

412.363.1900 CTRS

STUDIES

Overactive Bladder? Diabetes? C.O.P.D? High Cholesterol?

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on September 2, 2014, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for four service contracts at Various Schools for Mechanical Prime Contracts. • Yearly Service Contract for Repairs to Plumbing Systems • Inspection, Service and Repairs for Gas and Oil Burners, Boilers and Furnaces • Planned Maintenance and Service for Chillers and Refrigeration Systems • Service Contract – Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Water Treatment Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on July 28, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us NEWS

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs MASSAGE Xie LiHong’s

STAR

WELLNESS

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

MASSAGE Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

/ PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Your ad could be here

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park 412-595-8077

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412.316.3342

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

MASSAGE

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 08.06/08.13.2014


Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Pittsburgh

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Recovery Without Judgement™

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Pregnant?

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

We can treat you!

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

You can feel it.

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

A connection to something that’s bigger than you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

thinking and seeing your community. And of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at work, in the car, and you may even support

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

us (thank you if you do). We’re WYEP.

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Celebrating 40 Years of Music, Arts and Community.

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100

wyep.org

www.myjadewellness.com NEWS

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Celebrating Five Years of Fun! NOW - AUGUST 9 | 12PM - 10PM

WIN

NEW SLOT TOURNAMENT AREA

,000 $5 BIG ANNIVERSARY

SPIN OUR 12ft GAME TODAY!

GRAND FINALE DRAWING SATURDAY, AUGUST 9 | 8PM

Top prize is GUARANTEED to be

OVER $50,000 CASH! Entries earned July 6 through 7:59pm August 9.

WALK-UP SLOT TOURNAMENT

EARN 100 SAME DAY BASE POINTS BEGINNING AT 6AM TO BE ELIGIBLE. WEDNESDAYS 1PM - 4PM AND THURSDAYS 6PM - 9PM Visit Rush Rewards Players Club for complete details. Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Registration begins at 1pm on Wednesdays and 6pm on Thursdays.

Rivers Casino is celebrating its 5th Anniversary. In the first five years of operation, Rivers has become a proud community partner, strong economic engine and a great place to work.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

August 6, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 32

August 6, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 32