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STAYING POWER: IMMIGRANTS, ADVOCATES FIGHT XENOPHOBIC BACKLASH 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

{EDITORIAL}

07.30/08.06.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 31

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{ART}

[NEWS]

we’re going through right 06 “What now is just patently ridiculous.” — The ACLU’s Vic Walczak on attitudes toward Latino immigrants

[VIEWS]

when he says awful stuff about 14 “Even social issues — gay marriage is like

is a serious menu, focused on 19 “This the western Mediterranean and ranging from nibbles and substantial salads to full dinner plates.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Open Bottle Bistro

[MUSIC]

context, negative, and 24 inturntheittraditional around.” — Rapper ChaRon Don, “I wanted to take something that was,

who is black, on appearing in blackface on his album cover

[SCREEN] “Watching the onscreen growth of Mason is both seamless and shocking.” — Al Hoff, on Boyhood, a film shot over 12 years

[ARTS] “Preservation is a battle.” — Charles Rosenblum on the unlikely story of Downtown’s Skinny Building

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 47 STUFF WE LIKE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 N E W S

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[TASTE]

34

{ADVERTISING}

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

siblings wanting to get hitched! — he seems more clueless than hateful.” — Chris Potter on Tom Corbett’s hardto-watch re-election campaign

31

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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38 SPECIAL

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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INCOMING

“THEY TELL LATINOS TO GO GET IN LINE IF THEY WANT TO COME HERE. BUT THERE IS NO LINE.”

RE: Parking Problems (July 16) Reading the article “Parking Problems,” one solution absent from the dialogue is a parking garage. The problem? In the July 8 South Pittsburgh Reporter, in an article dealing with that same problem, city planner Ashley Holloway states, “There’s too many cars and not enough spaces on the street.” Residential permit zones won’t change that, but a parking garage would. In the same article Holloway says, “At the SouthSide Works, there are five parking garages with a total of 2,347 spots.” In historic South Side, we have two metered parking lots on S. 18th Street. Why can’t one of those be used for a three-story parking garage? When asked separately about this glaring lack [of garages], two local elected officials both said they feel a garage would draw more “undesirables” to the neighborhood. Really? How then do you explain the SouthSide Works and its aforementioned five garages? … To follow that logic must mean that [SouthSide Works is] inundated with “undesirables” every week! If so you’d think the monthly police report would reflect more crime in that area. (I’m pretty sure it doesn’t.) Rather, I suspect they know that parking draws paying customers to SouthSide Works. … It’s true that people, like water, seek the path of least resistance. Garages at 18th Street, centrally located, would keep many people on Carson Street and out of neighborhoods. Bathrooms in them would dramatically reduce public urination as well. Residential Permit Parking zones in historic South Side aren’t the solution. The only way to increase available parking spaces, while [also] reducing public urination, is by building a parking garage. — Dan McSwiggen South Side

Re: In Memoriam: Victor Navarro Jr. (July 23) Whether he intended consciously or not, Victor challenged our acceptance of our own limits on how we deal with others. Andrew, your article so nicely cuts through the status quo, just as Victor did in his very being. … The last few times I passed through Pittsburgh and stopped in Bloomfield, I only saw that silkscreened image of Victor that someone created — in honor, I like to believe. I wondered how he was, and now I know, when it’s too late to chat with him. I’m sorry for everyone whom he’s left behind who cared about him. We’re always left holding the memory until we’re gone ourselves. — Web comment from “rayorkwis”

6

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Members of SEIU Local 32BJ rally July 24 for a presidential order giving limited rights to undocumented workers

“ME VOY A QUEDAR!” T

HE HEADLINE from the July 20 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette seemed innocuous enough: “Residents express concerns over arrival of child immigrants in Emsworth.” The story described the impending arrival of as many as 30 Central American refugees under the age of 12 at the Holy Family Institute, a Catholic-run orphanage. The children will be just a few of the estimated 60,000 undocumented, unaccompanied minors entering the U.S. under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an executive order signed by President Obama last year. But the concerns some residents voiced weren’t in any way minor, nor were they grounded in either compassion or fact.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

“A lot of community members are concerned about the disease and drug-cartel involvement these children could bring. The news was quite a shock,” the P-G quoted Emsworth Mayor Dee Quinn as saying. And Quinn wasn’t alone. Gov. Tom Corbett

Undocumented workers and their advocates speak up for residency {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} also cited the children as a potential public-health worry, telling KDKA: “We cannot be a country that just takes everything that comes here without at least looking into the background of this.”

Congress is deciding whether to tackle immigration reform on a large scale, and the country waits to see how strong the executive order that Obama has promised is; many suspect it will grant work rights and deferred deportation to more than 11 million undocumented Latino immigrants. Meanwhile, rhetoric about “illegals” has reached a fever pitch. While undocumented immigrants in this country come from all over the world, the focus — and a lot of the vitriol — from both the public and elected officials has lately targeted Latinos. The conversation is so heated that it has become commonplace to discuss child refugees from Latin America in the same breath as drug cartels. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

Guillermo Perez, at left, and Maria Antonio at the July 24 rally for undocumented workers.

“What we’re going through right now is just patently ridiculous,” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the Pennsylvania American Civil Liberties Union, who has long litigated cases of discrimination against immigrants. “There is a long and shameful history in this country of treating immigrants horribly. At one time, the same claims about health and safety issues were made about the Irish, and they are as ridiculous now as they were then. “Latino immigrants are oftentimes more physically and audibly identifiable, and because of that they have become the new scapegoats of the xenophobic segment of our society. Although I don’t believe that it’s a large segment of the population. It’s just a group that is very loud and vocal about their hate.” That fact isn’t lost on Maria Antonio. She spoke at a July 24 rally on the South Side urging President Obama to sign an executive order to give undocumented workers the right to work without fear of deportation. The rally was hosted by the Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ. Antonio, who lives here with her children

and works in the area, is undocumented; her husband, she says, is currently awaiting an immigration hearing after being picked up by authorities simply because of the way he looks. “We work and pay taxes. We pay our bills, we pay our rent, but we live in fear that the police will stop us and put us in the hands of immigration,” Antonio told the crowd through an interpreter. “I do believe firmly because we can be seen and immediately identified as Latino that we are being discriminated against.” Antonio says her children, who were born in the U.S., are fearful that their father will be sent home and they will be separated. But she says she is not going anywhere: “No me voy a ir. Me voy a quedar!” (“I’m not going to go. I am going to stay.”) “I don’t have fear,” she says. “Even if he goes, I am staying. These kids were born here and I intend to make sure they stay here. “President Obama, do what you promised and give us a legal pathway to work. … You said you would do it, and I and 11 million others are waiting.”

“WE PAY OUR BILLS, WE PAY OUR RENT, BUT WE LIVE IN FEAR THAT THE POLICE WILL STOP US AND PUT US IN THE HANDS OF IMMIGRATION.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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“ME VOY A QUEDAR!”, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

How much longer they’ll wait is uncertain. In Congress and on the streets, the right has pushed back hard against any effort to reform the country’s immigration system. And most, if not all, of that pushback has been against Latinos. “There are undocumented people living in this country from all over the world. In fact, there are tens of thousands of Canadians living illegally in this country, and I have yet to meet a Canadian who has been rounded up,” says Guillermo Perez, president of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. “But the reality is that the majority of the undocumented are Latin Americans, and they seem to be the ones who bear the brunt of enforcement. Even the bipartisan [immigrationreform] bill passed by the Senate wanted to spend $40 million to further militarize the border of a county with which we are at peace and have great economic relationships with. “So, yes, there is little doubt in my mind that there are elements of racism that come into play in this issue.” Patricia Documet, a professor of behavioral and community health sciences at the University of Pittsburgh who studies Latino health issues, agrees that the negative attitudes expressed toward Latinos is a cyclical phenomenon. “We are not the first community in the United States to be treated badly,

but it’s our turn right now,” she says. “How do we get it to end is the question, and unfortunately, I don’t have an answer. “There is a narrative out there that Latinos are a threat; that we’re coming here to live on welfare and use social services. That’s the narrative and it’s just not true, but so many people believe it.” Documet says one way to address the hostility is with better education by the media. Many people, she says, don’t fully understand how the immigration system works. She and her husband came to the U.S. on his work visa 25 years ago. It took them nearly 12 years to get through the system and obtain citizenship. “People don’t understand that there aren’t a large number of visas granted to Latin Americans looking to immigrate to this country legally,” Documet says. “They tell Latinos to go get in line if they want to come here. But there is no line and if there is, no one really knows where it is.” Perez, of the Latin American Labor Council, says the anticipated executive order from Obama could also help ease tensions. “We need this executive order,” Perez says. “If it’s bold and broad, it will lead to a better form of immigration reform down the road. We worked like hell to get him elected. We’re part of this country and we are staying.” C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

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SIGNED PRINTS Artist’s work brings voice of the homeless off the street and into galleries {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} ON THE 579-NORTH off-ramp onto East

Ohio Street on Pittsburgh’s North Side, Willie Baronet spots a man holding a sign: “Homeless and Hungry Anything Helps.” He beeps the horn, rolls down the window and asks if the man would be willing to sell the sign. “Would I sell you my sign?” the man asks skeptically. “Yeah, it’s for an art project,” Baronet answers. Negotiations ensue. After Baronet offers up a $20 bill, the man, who introduces himself as Steve, answers, “Yes sir!” “Some people are unbelievably enthusiastic and energetic,” Baronet says of the numerous similar transactions he’s made over the years. “I’ve had guys flipping off the cars behind me when they started blowing their horns because they wanted to keep talking, which I love. I really do love the conversations.” On July 23 and 24, Baronet, a Dallas-based artist joined by a documentary film crew and a local guide, drove around Pittsburgh as part of a 31-day trek across America to buy homeless peoples’ signs. For an aver-

age of $15 a pop, Baronet buys the signs and creates various art installations — fixing them to walls, hanging them from ceilings, creating digital iterations and even placing them next to mirrors so people can see themselves as they read the signs. “I think it’s easy for people to put the homeless in a box and make up stories about why they’re homeless,” Baronet says. “They’ve had tough circumstances. I’ve had tough circumstances. I used to think of it as us and them, and after 21 years, I’m so clear that it’s just us. ” That’s why Baronet is calling this current project “We Are All Homeless.” He says he started buying the signs as a way to deal with his guilty feelings whenever he saw this situation on the streets. Counting this trip, he said he’s collected about 800 signs since 1993. Three of the most recent ones came from Pittsburgh’s North Side — the other two read “Homeless and Hungry / 2 Honest 2 Steal,” and “Homeless God Bless.” This is not Baronet’s day job. He’s a former advertising executive who teaches

“I THINK IT’S EASY FOR PEOPLE TO PUT THE HOMELESS IN A BOX AND MAKE UP STORIES ABOUT WHY THEY’RE HOMELESS.”

creativity and design as part of the advertising program at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University. In fact, he loses money on his art. “I think I sold two digital prints, but I’ve spent over $10,000 on both signs and production of digital prints, so I’m way in the hole,” Baronet says. “But I’m OK with that.” Baronet crowd-funded this trip on Indiegogo and will use additional private donations to fund the art installations. He says he’s over his $3,200 sign budget this trip, and he still has a week to go. “That part I’m kind of excited about,” he says. “I want to buy as many signs as I can.” Forty dollars is the most he’s ever paid for a sign. “In Austin, there was a woman who was super-clear that she needed 40 dollars before she could leave the street, and I believed her,” he recalls. It wasn’t about what the sign said — in fact, he can’t remember. “She just said, ‘I have kids, and I need $40 to get off this highway median.’” He says $25 is usually his limit. “In Las Vegas, a guy on the Strip said right away that he needed $150 for

his sign, and I told him I couldn’t afford that. So I gave him five bucks, and we talked for a while, but that was out of my price range.” Baronet said most of the time people are willing to sell. Last week in Detroit, a woman named Cheryl reached through his car window and hugged him. But, there’ve been sad days on this trip, too. Baronet bought a sign from a guy in his 20s in Cincinnati. “He said, ‘I will do anything, including prostituting myself, to get heroin.’ He was unbelievably clear about his agenda, and it was heartbreaking,” Baronet explains. Baronet ideally wants to present this installation in every city he visited this summer. The first installation is slated for Dallas in November, the month of several homelessness-awareness events. “There are clearly people who are struggling with psychological disorders, and addiction issues, and I don’t think it’s my place to judge what they’re doing,” Baronet says. “… The majority of the people, I am very clear, are in pretty dire straits.”

“SHE JUST SAID, ‘I HAVE KIDS, AND I NEED $40 TO GET OFF THIS HIGHWAY MEDIAN.’”

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[POTTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIELD]

TOM FOOLERY Corbett re-election bid may be hard to watch {BY CHRIS POTTER} BACK IN 2012, Gov. Tom Corbett achieved

national notoriety while discussing a proposed law requiring women to get an ultrasound before having an abortion. If a woman didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to see the image, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not making anybody watch. â&#x20AC;Ś You just have to close your eyes.â&#x20AC;? I suspect a lot of us will be remembering that advice as his re-election campaign hits the airwaves. For one thing, Corbett â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who backed Mitt Romneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidential bid just two years ago â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is apparently intent on denouncing his Democratic rival, Tom Wolf, for making too much money. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millionaire Tom Wolf spent a fortune on TV ads,â&#x20AC;? Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest TV spot begins in a sneery voice. This in a month during which Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own campaign spent $1.66 million on advertising, according to nonproďŹ t journalism outďŹ t PublicSource. (Wolf himself, by contrast, had yet to spend a dime in July.) And surprise, surprise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ads are partly ďŹ nanced with money donated by millionaires. Former PNC Bank head honcho James Rohr, to pick a name almost at random from Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s donor list, kicked in $25,000 for Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign this spring. A Philadelphia Phillies co-owner has spent $300,000. Bullshit populism is stock in trade for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GOP, of course: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what allows them to denounce Democrats as â&#x20AC;&#x153;elitistâ&#x20AC;? for opposing tax cuts for the wealthy. But attacking rich people may carry a special risk for Corbett: Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already ticked off everyone else. Although lefties hate him, according to a recent Franklin & Marshall College poll, barely half of Republicans say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve decided to vote for him. Among other things, Corbett alienated conservative hardliners by pushing for a desperately needed transportationspending bill, which included some barely-feel-them tax hikes. And while heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ghting a self-defeating battle to ensure Obamacare helps as few Pennsylvanians as possible (yay!), he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gone out of his way to destroy unions (boo!). Even when he says awful stuff about social issues â&#x20AC;&#x201D; gay marriage is like siblings wanting to get hitched! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he seems more clueless than hateful.

The truth is that Corbett is far from the worst Republicans have to offer; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not more popular with Republicans. His curse is that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reasonable, if unimaginative, pro-business lackey, saddled with a Tea Party base that is far from reasonable â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and nothing if not imaginative. So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a ďŹ&#x201A;ailing gov to do? For Corbett, apparently, the answer is to challenge the state legislature, which is run by his fellow Republicans. Corbett wants Harrisburg to focus on the pension crisis, damn it, but the legislature has so far refused to act. So he has unleashed his lineitem veto to block legislative spending in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget. Corbett became governor partly because, as the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney general, he prosecuted several successful corruption cases against state legislators. You can see why picking a ďŹ ght with them might not seem like a dumb idea. Plus, pensions are a real problem: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some $50 billion in retiree-related debt hanging over the state. But Corbett admits that his own proposal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which focuses on shifting to a more 401(k)-style plan for future public workers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will do little to resolve the issue. At most, it may be a starting point for a discussion over possibly doing something that might eventually begin to curtail future increases. And think of all the other legislative outrages during Corbettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenure. Voter ID. Spurious regulations to hamper womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health clinics. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;stand your groundâ&#x20AC;? gun law. Corbett wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily gung-ho about that stuff, but he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ ght it, either. Nor has he pulled out all the stops to, say, get a statewide LGBT anti-discrimination bill passed. But now! Now that he has nothing to lose! Now that he has this last, shining chance to ensure his legacy! The issue he chooses is â&#x20AC;Ś pensions. Instead of pursuing a cause like lowering college costs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pennsylvania has some of the priciest state-supported universities in America â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he chases an issue few voters care about, with a ďŹ x that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. Incumbents generally have an easy time in Pennsylvania, and Democrats have a gift for snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. So Corbett could somehow turn this election around. But at this point, does anyone really want that? Even Corbett himself?

CORBETT IS FAR FROM THE WORST REPUBLICANS HAVE TO OFFER; THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WHY HEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT MORE POPULAR WITH REPUBLICANS.

Join us Aug. 1 for our next NO-KIDS night! Listen as Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians demonstrate their instruments. Watch musical sound ZDYHVPDNHçDPHVVKRRWLQWRWKHDLUGDQFHRQD JLDQWçRRUSLDQRDQGSOD\7ULYLDO3XUVXLWFRPSOHWH with a prize giveaway. 7KLVDGXOWVRQO\HYHQLQJLQFOXGHVIRXUçRRUVRIH[KLELWV PXVLFDQGKDQGVRQVFLHQFHGHPRV&DVKEDUDQGVQDFNV DYDLODEOHIRUSXUFKDVH CarnegieScienceCenter.org &RVWLQDGYDQFHGD\RIWKHHYHQW

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

CHOOSE FROM THE SEASON’S FINEST COLLECTION. You can feel it. A connection to something that’s bigger than you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of thinking and seeing your community. And of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at

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KITCHEN FOR RENT {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} As a former restaurant owner, Kelly James knows what it takes to operate a traditional restaurant. Her experience running the former Sugar Café, in Dormont, was rewarding — but also challenging and expensive. Now the manager of the soon-toopen Market Kitchen at the Strip District’s Pittsburgh Public Market, James says, if “there had been a public kitchen for me to use when I set out, I might not have opened a brick-and-mortar restaurant.” The Market Kitchen will be a commercial-grade kitchen within the public market that individuals can rent by the hour to make products for resale. Cooks can launch a business without overhead and building leases. James says the kitchen should be operational in early September. But after costing about $600,000 so far — mostly from grants and other donations — the project still needs about $10,000 to finish. So James turned to Kickstarter and has raised nearly $6,000 (as of press time), ahead of the July 31 deadline. “They say a lot of projects hit their goal with a big push in the last day,” she says. “We’re hoping that’s the case.” Ideally, the commercial kitchen will generate a community, and that goal is reflected in Kickstarter rewards, which include brunches, cooking classes and a grand-opening party. Several businesses have already signed on to use the kitchen, including several caterers, food trucks, bakers and a lunch-delivery business. “By giving to this project,” James explains, “you are investing in local entrepreneurs and you’re becoming part of a great community.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

http://tinyurl.com/PublicKitchen

the

FEED

Stuck with too many cucumbers? But they’re so versatile! Add to drinking water. Pair with cheese on a sandwich. Drop into jar of spiced vinegar for refrigerator pickles. With tomatoes, chop into a traditional Middle Eastern salad. Add fresh mint, vodka and ice for a sublime summer cocktail.

OPEN BOTTLE BISTRO HAS A WINE LIST EQUAL TO THAT OF ITS SMALL PLATES AND ENTREES

WINE AND DINE

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

D

AVE DESIMONE, longtime leader of

the local wine scene, recently ended a two-year stint running a wonderfully traditional French restaurant in a difficult location at the south end of the 10th Street Bridge. But he’s not done pairing food with wine, not by a long shot. His new venture, Open Bottle Bistro, brings a more eclectic approach to a more congenial location on Ellsworth Avenue. DeSimone isn’t the first to attempt a wineand-small-plates format in this space over the past dozen years, and it’s no wonder. The location is demographically favorable, and the space consists of a pair of pleasing, intimate dining areas: a small indoor dining room lined with a bar made for meeting, and a delightful back patio, tucked amongst a jumble of small buildings yet lush with plants and fountains. This is one of our city’s sweetest outdoor dining situations, and on a mild summer evening, it was irresistible. Open Bottle moves the focus on wine upfront in its name and its menu, which has a wine list easily equal to that of the

Charcuterie and cheese plate

small plates and entrees. But the food is by no means an afterthought. This is a serious menu, focused on the western Mediterranean and ranging from nibbles to substantial salads, appetizers meant for sharing and full dinner plates.

OPEN BOTTLE BISTRO

5884 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-450-8217 HOURS: Mon. 5-10 p.m.; Tue.-Fri. lunch 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 5-10 p.m.; Sat. lunch 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m., dinner 4:30-10:30 p.m. PRICES: Lunch $5-15, dinner $7-20 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED It’s also a menu that is refreshingly light on clichés. Only a few of its offerings are standard tapas, and many of the familiarseeming dishes offer intriguing variations, such as ham-wrapped asparagus with smoked salmon, or chorizo sautéed to crispness with raisins, pine nuts and spinach, a combination which seemed to touch every taste bud in our mouths. A clever presentation of traditional

tapas components were “pinchos,” short skewers of tasty trios. There were three choices and the option to mix and match; next time, we’d probably double up on the well-balanced Genoa salami, Piavé cheese and green olive skewer, and skip the Serrano ham with melon — an excellent start — and shrimp, the vibrant saffron gold of which imparted no flavor. The third option, mild white anchovy with cornichon and chorizo, was boldly extra-savory. Another trio, this time of bean-based spreads, lacked the variety of the skewers. Hummus was unmistakable, but the white bean and fava bean “pâtés” were hard to distinguish; seasoning could have been used more effectively to highlight the subtle natural differences between the earthy white beans and the more vegetal favas. However, this dish gets full credit for the crostini, carefully balanced between brittle edges and chewy crumb. The aforementioned ham and smoked salmon with asparagus spears was available as a small appetizer or as a bigger salad over greens. The latter made for a great CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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summer meal: Crispy, paper-thin slices of Serrano ham played with savor off the sweeter, richer salmon, all wrapped around just-tender spears. Tuna Carpaccio was less successful, its impossibly thin slices of sashimi-grade tuna tragically drowned by citrusy ponzu. A better approach would have been a drizzle of a reduction, or, failing that, a sauce dish for dipping. Two classics, escargots Bourguignonne and steak tartare, showed the kitchen hasn’t lost its French chops. The former featured tender snails in a vibrantly green, pesto-esque parsley butter emboldened by garlic and subtly perfumed with Pernod: magnifique. The tartare, made with chopped filet mignon and dressed traditionally with capers, egg yolk, shallot and chives, was also superb; the beef was tender and mild, but not so meek as to disappear beneath its accompaniments.

Dining outside on the patio

In the Niçoise salad, the seared ahi tuna filet on top was a nice thought, but imperfectly butchered — there was a stringy edge — and the mustard “vinaigrette” earned those quotations marks by being too creamy in texture and insufficiently tangy in flavor. A good Niçoise is a tenuous balance among some very big flavors, and this one, alas, fell off the mark. Service was unusually prompt; perhaps the focus on appetizer-like dishes allows the kitchen to turn orders around quickly, or perhaps the bistro concept dictates that wine drinkers have some ballast with their beverage. Either way, we enjoyed the seemingly non-stop parade of pleasures brought to our table at a pace which (not incidentally) kept us ordering more wine. Open Bottle’s best dishes were as good as we could wish for, its setting and service were delightful, and its menu composition made for a lively meal. Not all was perfect, but its goal — to pair wonderful wine with equally wonderful dining — seems well within reach. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SAGE ON THE MOUNTAIN Alan Uchrinscko offers a high-minded take on wine Alan Uchrinscko, general manager and director of wine and spirits at Mount Washington’s Altius restaurant, is thrilled that Pittsburgh’s wine culture is deepening. “People’s palates have really opened up,” he says. “They’re much more willing to experiment.” And Uchrinscko, whose résumé includes work at New York City’s Burgundy Wine Company and as the sommelier of Lautrec at the Nemacolin Woodlands Resort, is an accomplished guide. (In fact, along with pairing wines for dinners at Altius, Uchrinscko teaches a series of Saturday seminars on wine selection.) “I’m so interested in sharing what I’ve learned over the past 18 years in the wine business,” says Uchrinscko. “I know what I like and I do whatever I can to find it.” His exacting standards are reflected in Altius’ tightly curated wine list. “I have a connection to every wine that’s on the list,” he says. He’s also done a lot of legwork: The list has just over 30 wines (a number he says will grow a bit), but they are obtained from 18 different suppliers. There are rules about which wines make the cut. First, grapes must begin at a vineyard that’s farmed organically, sustainably or biodynamically. Uchrinscko isn’t trend-chasing; he’s been fascinated with biodynamic wines — those grown according to principles that range from the sustainable to the nearly spiritual — for years. And a wine won’t make the list just because it’s made in a vineyard with a manure-filled cow’s skull buried by the light of the moon. Take the 2010 Mongrana from Tuscany’s Agricola Querciabella. The vineyard uses more than 30 plants to feed the soil and protect grapes from pests. But the real selling point is the way the soft-tannin Super Tuscan resonates with dark cherry, subtle spice. It’s also terrifically food-friendly. “It has to be the best wine of its kind at the price point,” he says. “The wine has to be to be all killer, no filler — like Def Leppard’s Hysteria.”

“I KNOW WHAT I LIKE AND I DO WHATEVER I CAN TO FIND IT.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1230 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-904-4442 or www.altiuspgh.com

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museum-staff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wideraging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. A bar that serves welldesigned retro chic with its whiskey and beer, Brillobox is (for now) the cool place to be. The menu isn’t lengthy, but it’s broad: Choose from bar staples or more inventive (and veggie-friendly) specialties such as Moroccan roastedvegetable stew or herbed polenta wedges. JE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J DINETTE. 5996 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thin-crust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-262-2920. This stylish and

New Oakland Location!

2 floors, the , BEST BURGERS whiskey loft, and 24 beers on tap.

Spoon {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

Dinette {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterranean-inspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place

that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE

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HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffet-style restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard Chinese-American fare, but also sushi, hibachistyle Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-344-4123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE J.W. HALL’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD INN. 2284 Broadhead Road, Aliquippa. 724-375-6860. This oldfashioned, family-style steakhouse offers a satisfying, well-executed menu of surfand-turf favorites, including broiled shrimp appetizer, langostinos and prime rib. The menu’s emphasis on steak and seafood rises to special occasions, while plenty of pasta dishes, sandwiches and pub-style appetizers accommodate regulars. LE KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107

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The Art of Thai Cuisine

NOW OPEN in the heart of Squirrel Hill! OPEN Monday-Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9:30pm BYOB (no corking fee) Lunch specials starting at $8!

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

Eggs N’At {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

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Wednesday

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Friday

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Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

412-521-8989 www.sukhothaibistro.com 5813 Forbes Avenue, Pgh., PA 15217

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2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

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LIVE MUSIC THUR-SAT.

THURS, JULY 31st Spiffy Sean Styles FRI, AUG 1st Trey Satterfield SAT, AUG 2nd Gene Stovall & Taylor Frost BZBARANDGRILL.COM

140 Federal St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212 • 412.323.2924

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive specialties such as filet saltimbocca. KF

412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived MALLORCA. 2228 E. — from flavor, texture Carson St., South Side. and the creation of 412-488-1818. The fresh combinations. ww. r w ambience here is full Thus, ancho chilies pape pghcitym of Old World charm, and pork are paired .co with just a touch of with new, yet just-right hipness bolstered by blendings such as cilantro, attentive service. The fare is lime and feta. LE Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., signature dish: paella, featuring South Side. 412-586-4738. This a bright red lobster tail. In warm cozy storefront restaurant weather, enjoy the outdoor patio offers a marriage of traditional along lively Carson Street. KE ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. inventive salads utilizing seasonal 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. ingredients and house-made 412-422-0220. This modern take pastas to flavorful meat entrees on the traditional Jewish deli and vegetarian plates, the fare makes the argument that such exhibits a masterful combination Eastern European cuisine deserves of flavors and textures. KF to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball STATION STREET. 6290 Broad St., soup, egg creams, blintzes and East Liberty. 412-365-2121. classic deli sandwiches, including A neighborhood hot-dog joint one made with “Montreal meat,” with exotically dressed dogs, a sort of Canadian hybrid of including: chili cheese (with corned beef and pastrami. JF curds), Hawaii (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, sweetbreads and SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip “devil” (egg salad, Tabasco and District. 412-281-0660. The Strip potato chips). Also offers tacos. JF District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. prepared cuisine suggests a cross 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412between current fine-dining 394-3400. The venerable Italian culture (locally sourced foods, restaurant from Greensburg now sous vide meats), lounge favorites has a Downtown outpost. In this (sliders and fish tacos) and elegant space, some classic dishes Southern comfort (chicken with are updated; a few favorites, black-eyed peas and greens, like turtle soup are retained; watermelon salad). LE and the fresh mozzarella bar deserves to become a classic. SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Try the distinctive pizza, with a Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/ layered, cracker-like crust. LE

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PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST HOT SPOT IN THE NORTH HILLS

1st Floor Restaurant

(American Menu Specializing in Burgers)

2nd Floor Bar & Night Club

Friday August 1 ...... No Bad JUJU Saturday August 2 .............Live DJ Friday August 8 .................. Live DJ Saturday August 9 .... Tres Lads part of the NPL Restaurant Group

Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300

VOTED PITTSBURGH’S BEST NEW ROOFTOP DECK & HAPPY HOUR!

Pittsburgh’s Ultimate Rooftop Lounge

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HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

WITH LIVE DJ EVERY FRIDAY 4PM TO 9PM

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NEW TAPAS MENU FEATURING SHARE PLATES OF SPECIALTY APPETIZERS, SALADS, SUSHI & CHARCUTERIE

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1014 FIFTH AVENUE

WWW.PGHUPTOWN.COM

412.281.2583 (BLUE)

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/UPTOWNPGH

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ALL MIXED DRINKS & WINE BY THE GLASS

DRINK SPECIALS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 4:30 - 6:00PM; 10:00 - 11:30PM; FRIDAY 4:30 - 6:30PM

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LOCAL

“PUTTING ON BLACKFACE, AS A BLACK PERSON, IT WAS LIKE TAKING MYSELF OUT OF IT.”

BEAT

{BY JULIA COOK}

TAPES AND TAPES

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Traveler, aveler veller, artist arti ar tistt and tis and d teacher: teache tea cher: h r:: ChaRon Don

Seizure Man’s Jacob Campbell and Molly Spear, playing in their band, Sup, Muscles?

If you want something done right, do it yourself: That’s the philosophy behind Pittsburgh music label Seizure Man. “We kind of have a collective, at this point,” says co-owner Molly Spear. “We’re all just working together, trying to elevate each other right now.” Musicians themselves, Spear and co-owner Jacob Campbell saw a void in the Pittsburgh music scene — it lacked a connection between labels and artists. The decision to start their own label came from “the need to put out our own music, not have to find somebody else to do it,” Campbell explains. “Having a name to do it under was important to me. We got a tape duplicator, and went from there.” That’s right: a tape duplicator. With the recent vintage revival, cassette tapes are back on the rise. Campbell realized his label could stand out with this step back into the past. Besides that, cassettes are “more cost-effective than vinyl, less disposable than CDs.” Especially when they’re handmade and labeled by the bands themselves. But Seizure Man isn’t solely about the kitsch. “Labels need to be more interested in the well-being of their bands,” Campbell insists. “[For many labels], it’s not about working with and developing an artist, like it was 50 years ago. Taking a real interest in the musician, that’s a big part of what we do.” “It’s about elevating bands we love to their full potential, and helping them achieve their goals,” Spear adds. The label has a special emphasis on math rock, but Campbell is accepting all genres for a new Cassette Store Day compilation to be released Sept. 27. The compilation, an annual project of the Cassette Culture forum on the Reddit website, will come with a zine that profiles the bands as well as the story of Seizure Man. A different label handles the comp each year, and Seizure Man was chosen for 2014. Submissions, due Aug. 10, should be “dynamic, innovative and emotive.” Fans of the medium should also look into Seizure Man’s tape-of-the-month club, which is limited to 10 subscribers in order to give each artist the necessary attention. A subscription, Campbell explains, is not only a way to stay informed on Pittsburgh music, it’s also an investment in that music’s future.

FINDING

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

HIS

VOICE KERIN}

{BY ANDY MUL

A

LBUM ART CAN often be tangential, an afterthought — once the album is complete, the musician does a quick photo shoot, or commissions an abstract painting. But for ChaRon Don, the artwork on his new album, Voice of the Voiceless, says everything: The Pittsburgh rapper appears in a tuxedo and combat boots, in blackface (he’s African American), with a zipper closed over his mouth. On the inside panels, he’s seen, still in blackface, draped in an American flag, then in garments with the colors of the Pan-African and Ethiopian flags,

then, on the back cover, back in the tux, starting to undo the zipper on his face. “I kind of wanted to take something that was, in the traditional context, negative, and turn it around

MORE ON CHARON DON www.charondon.com

and do it how I wanted to do it,” says the rapper (real name: ChaRon White). “Put a positive spin on it. Me putting on blackface, as a black person, it was like taking myself out of it, because I didn’t want people to

ChaRon Don’s Voice of the Voiceless album art

focus so much on the artist, but focus on the voice of the artist — which represents the voice of the people, who I’m speaking for and to. “In another way, it’s to say what people consider dark, what people consider unattractive, what people consider evil — no! You could switch that and make it fly. That’s why I’m wearing the tuxedo blazer; I’m still bringing the style on. It’s not condescending, I’m not looking down; I’m wearing this mask proudly.” It’s all indicative of ChaRon Don’s most cohesive and most politically charged work to date. Don’t expect Voice to sound like Public Enemy, though; White, who’s been performing locally since he was in high school in the late ’90s, took inspiration from the traveling he did starting around the time of his last release, Thee Official. “It’s a great album,” he says of Thee Official. “I put it on iTunes and all the online stores, and it was doing OK. Just OK. I never really promoted it; I didn’t have the time. “I was traveling a lot: I started traveling probably three years ago. Went to Africa for some weeks. I got married. My focus was on family and home. I was living the life: I was reading a lot, sitting out on the back porch, reading a lot of history, reflecting on what I’d seen on these travels. I went to Central America, just went on a couple retreats.” In the meantime, White’s longtime collaborator, DJ Huggy, whom he’d known growing up, moved to California with the rock band he played with, The Full Steam. Music wasn’t gone from White’s life, but it wasn’t his main focus — until he started toying around with some tracks with another longtime friend, producer Diezel (Londell Robinson). “I’m his children’s godfather,” White

RAISING THE BARS An early chance encounter with producer and engineer Riccardo Shulz — who also sits on the faculty of the music school at Carnegie Mellon University — provided a connection that put local rapper ChaRon Don (real name: ChaRon White) into schools as a teaching artist. Back when White and DJ Huggy were still high-schoolers looking for someone to master their early work, they contacted Shulz, who lived nearby in East Liberty. It was the start of a long working relationship; three years ago, Shulz recommended White to fellow faculty member Natalie Ozeas, head of the department of music education, who runs the Urban Music Education Project. That project, founded 20 years ago, originally supplied keyboards and African drums for schools in districts in Pittsburgh and Wilkinsburg. More recently, the project took on hip-hop education, employing teaching artists including White. “Not only is ChaRon an artist, but he’s a great teacher,” Ozeas says. “I call him a stealth teacher, because he doesn’t just stand there and lecture. He walks around, he goes down to the kids’ level, speaks quietly. One of the principals last year said, ‘ChaRon is the greatest role model, because he’s totally cool, and kind.’” And for White, teaching budding young artists has its benefits in his life. “It helps me to stay open as far as how I write and what I write about,” he says. “If I hang with just the people I came up with musically, a lot of times we can start speaking from the perspective of old heads, start hating on the younger generation: ‘I don’t know why they talk about this! I don’t know why they dress like this!’ And in one respect, I get it. But then in another respect, when we were younger, the older generation was saying the same stuff about us! I have to walk that balance, and I love that balance.” BY ANDY MULKERIN

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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FINDING HIS VOICE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

explains. “I’m always hanging out with him anyway. He could see where I’m at, and [I was] telling him what I need: something warm, has to be live music. You can sample, you can manipulate it how you want to, but I want a lot of live music played, a lot of tribal drums.” That was the framework that emerged for Voice of the Voiceless. Where previous projects had felt to White like they were catalogs of collaborations, this was an album where he and Diezel took the lead and established an aesthetic. There are other artists (and producers, including DJ Huggy) on the album, but the overall product was ChaRon Don’s vision, with Diezel’s supervision. “We have a great chemistry already,” explains Robinson. “When we got about four or five songs in, he came up with the name of the album and it was like, ‘Yo, that’s it!’ It just seemed like it was out of nowhere — we were working, and the other songs started to fit the mold of the album.” Thematically, Voice addresses social and cultural issues: Reggae artists join ChaRon Don in songs about the state of world affairs vis-a-vis Rastafarianism, as on “Inna These Last Dayz,” which features Kabaka Pyramid. And, if the provocative album art wasn’t enough, ChaRon shows that he doesn’t shy away from the politically incorrect in order to make a point on “Cracker Nigger,” a track about social status when one grows up in a mixed-race family. Throughout the album, ChaRon’s flow is quick and often feels spontaneous, a product of his background as a battle-rapper and freestyler. White says a lot of the inspiration for the direction the album took came from Nas and Damian Marley’s 2010 album Distant Relatives. “They were speaking to a lot of what I’d seen and experienced, and what I studied, coming up in black arts and culture, Rasta — they were hitting a lot of points. I was like, ‘Whoa, I really haven’t exposed these parts of myself in my music. I want to do that before I just keep putting out these albums of battle-oriented rhymes.’” Besides battle-rapping, White came up as a bit of a ladies’ man, writing romantic material. While Voice goes deeper than all that, he says that doesn’t mean he’s moved on completely. “I would still say ‘ladies’ is a topic,” he says with a laugh. “I didn’t drop that. It’s whatever the music gives me. I’m not gonna limit myself to writing about one thing. With this album … I stuck with one topic, one kind of vibe. Even at that, it’s different feels.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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ON THE RECORD with Shelley Johansson of Flood City Music Festival {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVIN STIFFLER}

Shelley Johansson

The Flood City Music Festival began 25 years ago as part of an event commemorating the anniversary of Johnstown’s 1889 flood; it’s grown into an annual staple. Shelley Johansson, of the Johnstown Area Heritage Association, is an 11-year festival vet, and a big reason why the fest is what it is. HOW HAS THE FESTIVAL GROWN? The level of talent that we attract has gone up and up and up. And we’ve got a new park, which I think is a fantastic venue for something like this. WHAT ATTRACTS ACTS AND KEEPS THEM COMING BACK TO THE FESTIVAL? The performers often remark on how warm the audience is; they say how nice everyone is, and they love their volunteer shuttle-drivers. They just feel like they’re really well-treated by the festival and the community. IS IT EVER AN UPHILL BATTLE TO CONVINCE AN ARTIST TO COME TO JOHNSTOWN? I think our lineups speak for themselves on that count. People look at the festival’s history, like: “Wow. You had Grace Potter in 2009? This is legitimate.” ANY FAVORITE FESTIVAL MOMENTS? One kind of moment we have that I really like is the collaborations that take place. In 2010, on our main stage we had Billy Price, then Los Lobos played. Los Lobos thought Billy was great, and invited him up to sing an encore with them. And for our audience, to watch this regional icon onstage with Los Lobos — what an incredible experience! AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FLOOD CITY MUSIC FESTIVAL with BOZ SCAGGS, LEFTOVER SALMON FEATURING BILL PAYNE, LEE FIELDS & THE EXPRESSIONS, more. 2 p.m. Fri., Aug. 1. Continues through Sun., Aug. 3. Peoples Natural Gas Park, 90 Johns St., Johnstown. $10-140. www.floodcitymusic.com

CRITICS’ PICKS

Rapsody

artist at Buhl Community Park (in front of the Don’t call it a comeback. It is, after all, only the Children’s Museum), with live sound powered by a solar-energy system. It’s like musical photosynfirst year for the two-day Cultured Steel Hip Hop Festival, presented by 1Hood and R.A.R.E. thesis, sort of. Jazz group Thoth Trio gets green with it today, performing original and obscure Nation. Day one kicks things off with the opening of 40 Years of Hip-hop Arts & Culture, instrumental pieces. Catch part of the 45-minute set while on your authorized — or unauthorized an exhibit of classic hip-hop photos and origi— lunch break. ZB Noon. 10 Children’s Way, nal art by artists and photographers, and a North Side. Free. All ages. 412-322-5058 or screening of producer 9th Wonder’s documenwww.solarconcertseries.org tary The Hip Hop Fellow. Day two features performances by Talib Kweli and Rapsody, with support from notable The Sablowskis locals Jasiri X, Palermo Stone and Kellee Maize. Two-day passes are $20. Zach Brendza 6 p.m. Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10. Continues: 6 p.m. Fri., Aug. 1. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15. All ages. 412-363-3000 or www.rarenation.com

[HIP HOP] + THU., JULY 31

[ALL LOCAL] + SAT., AUG. 02 Chalk this one up to the “hope this thing works” category: The “All Scene” Entertainment Festival is about to go where no fest has gone before — or, at least, achieve what no fest has achieved before. Throughout the afternoon and evening, Mr. Small’s Theatre and its facilities will host multiple stages of music, stand-up comedy, a curated art gallery, short films and more. Musical performers include LocaL, Fun Home and Sikes; comedians include Davon Magwood, Alex Stypula and Jeff Konkle. Cross your fingers and expect a good time. ZB 3 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $8-10. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[JAZZ] + WED., AUG. 06

In its seventh year, the Solar Concert Series is back in action, using the sun’s rays to rock out. Every Wednesday through Aug. 27, the series hosts an acoustic lunchtime set from a local

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If you’re familiar with The Sablowskis, you might think of the street-punk band as dealing with at least somewhat grown-up themes: drinking, eating pierogies. But the four-piece is showing some versatility this weekend, releasing a six-song “children’s punk rock” EP. “All My Friends Are Grounded” is cheeky at times (one song deals with a boy at school who vomits a lot), and potato-based treats are still on the menu (in the form of “Tots” this time), but it’s all family-friendly stuff. There’s even an assist from the band members’ own kids on one track. Tonight, they release the album with an all-ages show at Hambone’s. Photo Joe and the Negatives open. Andy Mulkerin 6 p.m. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. All ages. 412681-4318 or www.hambonespittsburgh.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & PhonetX, Daily Grind. “All-Scene” MUSIC HALL. PIPEWRENCH, Rule Entertaiment Festival. Millvale. Of Two, Twelve Gauge Justice. 866-468-3401. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. OBEY HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The 31ST STREET PUB. Blackfinger, DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Game Face. Ramblers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. Argus, Brimstone Coven. Strip Robinson. 412-489-5631. RAMADA INN HOTEL & District. 412-391-8334. HAMBONE’S. Sablowski, The CONFERENCE CENTER. Fonic. CLUB CAFE. Briar Rabbit, Conner Huggies, Mathew Tembo & Make Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Gilbert, Sol Persona. South Side. Love, DAVU. Sablowski’s CD ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD 412-431-4950. Release Party. Lawrenceville. GRILLE. Frank Rodrigues Band. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 412-681-4318. Ross. 412-364-8166. Dave Arcari. Bloomfield. HOWLERS COYOTE SMILING MOOSE. The Existential 412-682-0320. CAFE. Color Fleet, Gentlemen, Klaymore, Curseborn. LAVA LOUNGE. Sun Hound, Margo South Side. 412-431-4668. Can’t Dance, Stoop Van Hoy. Bloomfield. TEDDY’S. The Dave Iglar Band. www. per Goodnoise, Painted By 412-682-0320. pa North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. pghcitym Millions. South Side. .co THE LOOSE MOOSE. TILTED KILT PUB & EATERY. Ray 412-431-5282. Shotgun Jack. Powers, DavesArtRoom. RockOut MELLON SQUARE PARK. 412-655-3553. to KnockOut Cancer ‘14. North Shannon &The Merger. MEADOWS CASINO. Smokey Side. 412-235-7823. Downtown. 412-665-3665. Robinson. Washington. WASHINGTON ROAD OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea 724-503-1200. BUSINESS DISTRICT. Radio Tokyo. Iglar Duo. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jessica Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-3400. SCUMBAGS. The Copyrights, Bitsura, LocaL, Fun Home, Made BARONS, A Lovely Crisis. Natrona Sacred, Reason, Balloon Ride Heights. 412-439-5706. Fantasy, Willful Souls, Romeo Harp, HARD ROCK CAFE. Charm City Sikes!, Life(Liss) and the Graveyard Devils. Station Square. 412-481-7625. Orchestra, A. Lee, 30 Realm, The MR. SMALLS THEATER. ALTAR BAR. Battery (Metallica Romantic Era, H&T, Fortified Manchester Orchestra, The Tribute), Penntera (Pantera Tribute). Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Bear’s Den (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Natural Vibrations. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Volcano Dogs, Legendary Hucklebucks, Six Speed Kill. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Blackbird Bullet & the Employers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PALACE THEATRE. Gary Racan. A Benefit for Wounded Warrior Project. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. PARK HOUSE. Joel Lindsey Trio. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero & Jingles. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. Common Nightmare, Dead Signal Chasers, Misaligined Mind. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Serena Ryder, The Harlan Twins. South Park. STAGE AE. Panic! At The Disco, Walk The Moon, Magic. North Side. 412-229-5483. STATION SQUARE. Bruce in the USA (Springsteen Tribute), Traffic Jam. Station Square. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Dave Each week we bring you a Iglar Band. New Brighton. 724-494-1578. from a local artist. This week’s track comes

ROCK/POP THU 31

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 03

FRI 01

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CRYSTAL ENGEL}

MH THE VERB

new MP3

SAT 02 CLUB CAFE. Elysium, The Casket Girls, Dreamend (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

from MH the Verb; stream or download “Coraline” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

Mowgli’s, Brick + Mortar. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Boston Babydolls. South Side. 412-381-6811. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. The Red Western, Andre Costello & Cool Minors, Reverend Hedge. Shadyside. 412-363-5845. SMILING MOOSE. NGHBRS. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roby Edwards & New Direction. North Side. 412-904-3335. RIVERVIEW PARK. Poogie Bell. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

MON 04 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Miley Cyrus, Lily Allen. Uptown. 412-642-1800. SMILING MOOSE. Kobra & the Lotus. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Tori Amos

Cain Park

COLUMBUS

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. w/ Pandemic Pete. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. w/ DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 02 CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. No Mames: Latin Bass Night. Pandemic Pete & Uproot Andy. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. WINGHART’S - OAKLAND. Steel City Saturdays. w/ DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582.

WED 06 LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290.

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FRI 01 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Wiz Khalifa, Young Jeezy. 724-947-7400. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Talib Kweli, Rapsody, Jasiri X, Kellee Maize, Palermo Stone, DJ Big Phil, Get Down Gang. Cultured Steel Hip Hop Festival. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

BLUES

THE BEER MARKET. The Satin Hearts. North Side. 412-322-2337. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

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SUN 03 THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

ANDYS. Kathy Connor. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844.

FRI 01

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CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. The Allegheny Drifters. North Side. 412-237-3400. MOONDOG’S. Monday Blues Review. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Witchdoctors, Johnny Smoothe. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THREE RIVERS HARLEY-DAVIDSON. Shot O’ Soul. Glenshaw. 412-487-3377. THE VALLEY HOTEL. The Satin Hearts. 412-233-9800.

THU 31

BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District. THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Greensburg. 724-205-6402. ST. BERNADETTE CHURCH. The Satin Hearts. Monroeville. 412-373-0050.

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CHAZ BOWERS, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 01 LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 02 LEMONT. Donna & Mark Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Charlie & The Foxtrots, Science! Harmony. 570-294-6450. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181.

SAT 02 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

4504 BUTLER STREET

WED 06 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD

412.326.5964

FRI 01 FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

REGGAE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band, Roger Humphries & RH Factor. North Side. 412-904-3335.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

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SUN 03

FRI 01

M U S I C

SUN 03

FRI 01

SAT 02

JAZZ

THU 31

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. guest conductor Christian Capocaccia & pianist Xiayin Wang. John Williams, Ravel, Rossini & more. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 02

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

Newport Music Hall

HIP HOP/R&B

MON 04

THU 31

The Kooks

MR. JACKS NEIGHBORHOOD. DJ Rojo, DJ Goodnight. North Side. 412-761-3302. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

CLASSICAL

ACOUSTIC

{MON., OCT. 06}

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Poogie Bell & Friends. North Side. 412-904-3335.

BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Thoth Trio. North Side. HEINZ HALL. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Union Transfer

THU 31

CLUB CAFE. Girlz In Black Hatz (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 06

Shabazz Palaces

DJS

FRI 01

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. KATZ PLAZA. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

{FRI., AUG. 22}

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Infatuations. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

COUNTRY

TUE 05

PHILADELPHIA

WED 06

ST. JOE’S SOCIAL CLUB. The Flow Band. Latrobe. 724-398-3726.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

{THU., AUG. 07}

BLUEBERRY HILL PARK. Shameless Hex. 412-364-4115. CLUB CAFE. Mikaela Davis. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Supersuckers. Station Square. 412-481-7625. STAGE AE. MKTO, Action Item, Tiffany Houghton. North Side. 412-229-5483.

SAT 02

SUN 03

CLEVELAND

TUE 05

FRI 01

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. The Flow Band. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SAT 02

We’ll cut you.

FRI 01

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

July 30 - August 5 WEDNESDAY 30

FRIDAY 1

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. Through Aug. 2.

Jurassic 5 Word of Mouth Tour

Under the Influence of Music Tour: Wiz Khalifa, Jeezy & More

Cheers Elephant

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Main Squeeze / Charm & Chain THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod. com. 9p.m.

THURSDAY 31

Walking with Dinosaurs CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Through August 3.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

the Moon & Magic Man. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Comedian Chuck Krieger

SATURDAY 26

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

SUNDAY 37

9th Annual Hosanna House presents Summer Nights 2014

Manchester Orchestra MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest The Mowgli’s & Brick & Mortar. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

Wiz Khalifa

SHERWOOD EVENT CENTER Wilkinsburg. Tickets: groveproductions.com or 1-888-383-5760. 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 1 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Battery (Metallica Tribute)/ Penntera (Pantera Tribute) Bruce in the USA ALTAR BAR Strip District. / Traffic Jam

Panic! at the Disco

412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. With special guests Walk

STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

MONDAY 48

Bigler Bros, Z-Breez, Nate O, K-Ace, C-Note & Kaderelli

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 6p.m.

Boston Babydolls - Burlesque Show

Charm City Devils HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Kobra and the Lotus / Icarus Witch SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

TUESDAY 59 MKTO

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Supersuckers HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests The Cheats & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S

SUMMER CLEARANCE

SANDALMANIA! 50-70% OFF

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

GET ON THE GOOD FOOT

WATCHING THE ONSCREEN GROWTH OF MASON IS BOTH SEAMLESS AND SHOCKING

{BY AL HOFF} Tate Taylor’s bio-pic Get On Up tracks James Brown’s life, from an impoverished youth in Jim Crow Georgia to fame and fortune as the Godfather of Soul. Taylor rarely deviates from the standard bio-pic model — even the flashbacks, time-jumps and asides to the camera are perfunctory these days — and the rush to pack in everything from Brown’s long and complicated life leaves far too much unexplored.

Soul Brother No. 1: James Brown (Chadwick Boseman)

Taken as a whole — say, as an LP — this work isn’t that great. That said, there are a few tracks that may be worth the investment. Just as a great artist can transform the most lamely written song — Brown’s first hit found him keening “please” repeatedly, to brilliant effect — so too does Chadwick Boseman find the sweet spots in Get On Up’s jumbled presentation of Lifetime movie, comedy and musical numbers. Boseman, who recently played Jackie Robinson in 42, ably tackles the challenge of portraying Brown’s well-known — and physically dynamic — persona. (This film has more outrageous wigs than RuPaul’s Drag Race.) Nelsan Ellis is also good as Brown’s long-suffering sideman, Bobby Byrd. Wisely, Get On Up uses Brown’s own recordings (including live numbers), and Boseman busts a sweat animating them on screen. There will never be another James Brown, but his music will outlive us all. Starts Fri., Aug. 1 AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Get your

Terry Gilliam on, with a mini-fest of his films at Lawrenceville’s Rowhouse Cinema: From his Middle Ages romp with fellow Pythons — Monty Python and the Holy Grail — and the 1991 dramedy, The Fisher King — to three deliriously wacky works: Brazil, 12 Monkeys and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Films run Fri., Aug. 1-Thu., Aug. 7. See www.rowhousecinema.com for dates and times.

LIFE TIME Here and now: Mason (Ellar Coltrane) hates his new haircut.

{BY AL HOFF}

“I

T’S ALWAYS right now,” says a young man staring at the future. Though our lives have pasts and hopefully futures, it is always right now. Film, of course, is one technique used to “freeze” time, but what if the medium were used not to illustrate a snapshot of singular significance, but the endless stream of now? That’s filmmaker Richard Linklater’s goal in Boyhood, for which he filmed the same actors periodically over 12 years, in order to depict the childhood of one Texas boy. The experiment recalls the long-running British Up documentary series, as well as Linklater’s Before trilogy, which charted a fictional relationship in more-or-less realtime chunks. Even if Boyhood were a terrible film, you’d have to commend Linklater for simply mastering the logistics of it, but it’s especially notable when the product is as engaging and affirming as this. Boyhood follows Mason (Ellar Coltrane), from age 6 to 18, along with his mom Olivia (Patricia Arquette), dad Mason Sr.

(Ethan Hawke) and sister Sam (Lorelei Linklater, the director’s daughter). Mason’s life plays out with relatively normal upheaval — moving, marriage, blended families, divorce, new schools and friends. The material is low-key and natural, with little sentimentality and the air of a lightly scripted documentary.

BOYHOOD DIRECTED BY: Richard Linklater STARRING: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke Starts Fri., Aug. 1. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Watching the onscreen growth of Mason from child to adult is both seamless and shocking (where did that kid go?). Physical changes are inevitable, but Mason retains aspects of his personality throughout: The sensitive, slightly dreamy boy staring at the sky in the opening scene is bookended by the sensitive, slightly dreamy young

man staring at the sky in the final scene. The title directs us toward Mason, but quietly, in the background, his parents also grow up. Olivia’s transformation is broader and more difficult; she’s a single mom, also juggling school, a job and new relationships, while every-other-weekend Mason Sr. is a man-child to whom self-awareness comes more slowly. Also thrumming behind the plot is a portrait of recent middle-class life, transformed by new technologies, political shifts and economic crises. It’s always right now, but still we try to save the past, even as most of it — mundane, repetitive — disappears. Linklater’s “save” is a cleverly constructed artifice that seeks to assuage our anxiety about our ephemeral nature, particular the dramatic change as a small child is transformed into an adult through a million lost moments. Boyhood is both a celebration of, and an elegy to, this transition — an ode to being a kid or a parent, and all the sweet, fraught space in between. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY. A half-human/ half-alien pilot (Chris Pratt) puts together a team to fight a villain, Ronan the Accuser, and save the galaxy. James Gunn directs this action adventure adapted from the Marvel Comics title. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., Aug. 1. I, ORIGINS. You’ve waited for it, and here it is: a biometric, metaphysical, faith-vs.-fact thriller starring eyeballs! Plus, Michael Pitt — who portrays a molecular biologist obsessed with the evolution of the eyeball. He’s also obsessed with Sofi (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey), a free-spirited exotique with great eyeballs. He’s less obsessed with his lab partner (Brit Marling), but she might be obsessed with him. A few life jolts later, and Dr. Eyeball is confronting some very peculiar unexplained stuff about eyeballs: What if you had a spiritual experience that made you question your scientific beliefs? (Well, what if you saw a movie that made very little real-life sense but was still kinda fun?) Mike Cahill (Another Earth) treats the film’s potentially heady subject matters fairly lightly, but that’s to be expected in a movie about pretty people’s eyeballs. Starts Fri., Aug. 1. AMC Loews and Manor

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

“BOLD, ORIGINAL & INVOLVING.” TODD MCCARTHY, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Lucy

CP

A SUMMER’S TALE. There’s something about everyday life in France that makes for compelling cinema. But long before Richard Linklater, there was Eric Rohmer, a master of both the mundane and the humane. Do we really need to watch a young man unlock the gate to a beach house and unpack his bag at the start of Rohmer’s lovely 1996 film? If your answer is “no,” then go see Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Set at a beach resort in Brittany, A Summer’s Tale follows the new friendship of Gaspard, a mop-haired engineer and musician, somewhat reserved, who’s waiting for his girlfriend, Léna, to arrive; and Margot, a gregarious ethnologist with a boyfriend across the world. Gaspard later meets Solène, who’s single and fancies him. The three relationships unfold with charm, ease and measured erotic tension. And yet, for all these people say to each other, Rohmer clearly knows it’s the unspoken that intrigues the most. Rohmer’s colors, lighting and background noises are all unadulterated: Are those paid extras milling about the outdoor scenes, or did they just happen by? We can’t tell, and we don’t want to know, lest it ruin the illusion of watching life and love unfold with a mutually reassuring and unsetting grace. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Aug. 1. Harris (Harry Kloman)

REPERTORY Frozen at Cinema in the Park

National Lampoon’s Vacation (1983) 7/30 @ 7:30pm benefit screening for People’s Food Mart in Dormont, 7/31 @ 7:30pm, 8/2 @ 3pm & 7:00pm, 8/3 @ 4:00pm

---------------------------------------Hedwig and The Angry Inch (2001)

8/2 @ 9:30pm - Come at 9:00pm for Hedwig with trivia, a costume contest, and a chance for a red carpet photoshoot. Also screening 8/3 @ 7:00pm, 7/6 @ 7:30pm

---------------------------------------EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY , AUGUST 1 WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

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Rocky Horror Picture Show 7/2 @ Midnight

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

LUCY. Learned professor Morgan Freeman explains that there is a huge part of the brain that humans are not using — perhaps best evidenced by the junky cinematic fare we thoughtlessly shovel in there. And, yes, you’ll need only a fraction of your noggin to take in Luc Besson’s sci-fi actioner, but it’s a kicky thrill ride that should light up a few pleasure centers in your gray matter. After a drug deal goes bad, Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) finds her body processing a chemical that will bring her brain up to 100 percent functionality. Just what she needs to track down the bad guys and kick their asses. Actually, at somewhere around 40 percent, Lucy can re-arrange matter, which means she can asskick with just her mind. She also tracks down Freeman, and the two of them enjoy mutually beneficial rounds of pseudo-science. (“I’m colonizing my own brain,” she tells him. Sounds … um … fun!) Lucy is a lean 90 minutes, fast-paced and with no extraneous subplots. Just one gal, one sage adviser, a seemingly unlimited number of Asian drug thugs and one seriously supercharged and angry brain. Bring it. (AH)

CINEMA IN THE PARK. 42, Wed., July 30 (Schenley) and Sat., Aug. 2 (Riverview). Frozen, Thu., July 31 (Brookline); Fri., Aug. 1 (Arsenal); Sat., Aug. 2 (Grandview); and Sun., Aug. 3 (Schenley). Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Tue., Aug. 5 (West End / Elliott Overlook) and Thu., Aug. 7 (Brookline). The Great Gatsby, Wed., Aug. 6 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial (little green guy from space is lost), July 31. Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (very high-flying kicks in this 2000 martial-arts dazzler), July 31. Top Gun (Tom Cruise flies fighter jet into danger zone), July 30-31. Total Recall (Arnold Schwarzenegger stars in this 1990 action sci-fi), July 30-31. Beverly Hills Cop (Eddie Murphy is a fast-talking Detroit cop, visiting L.A.), July 30-31. Terry Gilliam series: The Fisher King (1991 dramedy starring Jeff Bridges and Robin Williams), Aug. 1, Aug. 3-5 and Aug. 7. 12 Monkeys (Bruce Willis stars in this time-bending sci-fi film), Aug. 1-3, and Aug. 7. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (knights, kings, curtains and a very dangerous bunny), Aug. 1-3, and Aug. 5-7. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (in which Johnny Depp channels Hunter S. Thompson), Aug. 1-4, and Aug. 6-7. Brazil (dark futuristic 1985 comedy starring Jonathan Pryce and awesome sets), Aug. 2-6. Call or see website for times and complete

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

FILM SCREENING: “The Greenest Building: The Role of Historic Buildings in Creating a Sustainable Culture.” Restoring old and historic houses is “green building” because repurposing our built environment helps reduce our impact on the natural environment. Join us for a screening of “The Greenest Building,” by Jane Turville, a preservationist, writer, and producer of this important documentary that examines the cost of tearing down our historic built environment. Following the film, Ms. Turville will facilitate a short question-and-answer session.

listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. YOJIMBO. Akira Kurasawa directs this 1961 film about an unemployed samurai (Toshiro Mifune) who discovers he can benefit from an ongoing battle between two rival clans. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., July 30. Melwood. $2 INEQUALITY FOR ALL. Jacob Kornbluth’s documentary gives former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich a platform to discuss the current state of income inequality in the United States, i.e., why do so few people have so much money, and what does it mean for the rest of us? The 2013 film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 31. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free

THE KARATE KID. A new kid (Ralph Macchio) being bullied learns self-defense — and so much more — from an elderly Japanese gardener (Pat Morita). “Wax on, wax off.” John G. Avildsen directs this 1984 teen fave. 10 p.m. Fri., Aug. 1, and 10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 2. Oaks HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH. Director John Cameron Mitchell stars as Hedwig, a transgender rock performer who relates her story of a failed relationship, and of the ex-lover who stole her songs. 9:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 2; 7 p.m. Sun., Aug. 3; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. Hollywood

CP

DAYS OF HEAVEN. Terence Malick’s 1978 film is a lyrical study of pioneer life amid a love triangle. The plot is simple, but the film is beautifully shot, with extreme close-ups and big wide shots, and lots of fabulous light. Richard Gere, Brooke Adams and Sam Shepard star. Continues a Sundaynight series of staff favorites. 8 p.m. Sun., Aug. 3. Regent Square (AH)

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7 • 6:00 PM — 8:00 PM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

I, Origins VACATION. Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) wants to take his family to Wally World, but the trip turns into a nightmare. Harold Ramis directs this 1983 comedy adapted from John Hughes’ National Lampoon short story. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 31; 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 2; and 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 3. Hollywood JAMES BALDWIN: THE PRICE OF THE TICKET. Karen Thorsen and Douglas Dempsey’s 1990 documentary recounts the life of novelist and activist James Baldwin (1924-1987), combing archival footage (some of it rare) and interviews with his friends and colleagues. The film is presented by the Sembene African Film Festival, on what would have been Baldwin’s 90th birthday. There will also be readings and cake. 2:30 p.m., Sat., Aug. 2. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. www.sembenefilmfestival.org

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SUPERMENSCH: THE LEGEND OF SHEP GORDON. This recent documentary from actor Mike Myers looks at the life and career of Shep Gordon, a Hollywood insider who began his career by moving to Los Anglese and befriending rock stars such as Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison. Partial to the freewheeling lifestyle, he made a career of artist management, taking charge of rock acts (Alice Cooper, Pink Floyd), R&B star Luther Vandross and even Canadian countrypop crooner Anne Murray. Later in life, he made helped make stars of chefs, such as Emeril Lagasse. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Aug. 7; 9:30 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8; and 4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. Hollywood

DISCOVER

EXTRAORDINARY MOVIES OF THE

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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I LIVE IN FEAR. In Akira Kurosawa’s 1955 drama, an elderly Japanese man is terrified of another nuclear attack, and wants to move his family to South America. Co-sponsored by Remembering Hiroshima Pittsburgh, and will be followed by a Skype interview with Japanese peace activists. In Japanese, with subtitles. 6 p.m. Tue., Aug. 5. Melwood CLERKS. Kevin Smith’s low-low-budget debut 1994 feature depicts the minute-to-minute hell of working at a convenience store. Rough-edged and occasionally over-done, this talkie has its fun moments, such as the dumb video-renter and the Russian heavy-metal guy. What is alarming after all these years is noting how much of today’s mainstream culture has caught up to Smith’s defiantly vulgar outsider vibe. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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HIGHEST RATING

A Summer’s Tale

Jane Turville, writer, producer and director of THE GREENEST BUILDING, received her Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Oregon and interned with the National Trust for Historic Preservation in London, England. She has worked for several architectural firms in the Portland area and more recently as non-profit development director/program manager for the Northwest Earth Institute. With over 12 years experience in historic preservation, architectural design and construction administration, Ms. Turville has given presentations on Portland, Oregon’s Old Town historic district and has organized and presented various sustainability conference workshops for teenagers and adults.

UNFORGETTABLE

A NEW AMERICAN CLASSIC.’’ PETER TRAVERS

PATRICIA

ELLAR

LORELEI

ARQUETTE COLTRANE LINKLATER

ETHAN

AND

HAWKE

Written and Directed by

Richard Linklater

BOYHOODMOVIE.COM

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS START FRI AUG 1

REGENT SQUARE THEATRE AMC LOEWS WATERFRONT 22 1035 SOUTH BRADDOCK AVE (412) 682-4111 • PITTSBURGH

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[BOOK REVIEW]

“IT’S MORE LIKE A GREENHOUSE OR AN ENCLOSED PORCH THAN AN OFFICE BUILDING.”

NEIGHBORHOOD {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} In Eight Mile High, Jim Ray Daniels covers familiar turf in surprising new ways. Like his earlier fiction, these 14 stories are set largely in working-class Detroit. But unlike 2007’s Mr. Pleasant and 2011’s Trigger Man, the new collection’s pieces are sometimes linked, and often tread an experimental path. For sure, this is Daniels territory: The prolific writer and poet, an English professor at Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in evoking Detroit’s industrial fringe, where he grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. “The acrid stench from the colorless assortment of factories large and small stung in our noses, a daily tattoo that spelled home, and whenever we went somewhere that smelled otherwise, we stopped trusting whoever had taken us there,” he writes in “Et Tu.” The Ford plant, where fathers work and sons are bound, looms over all. And Eight Mile High (the title references the book’s neighborhood high school) is suffused with Daniels’ mordant, blue-collar humor: As the narrator in “Bend in the Road” notes, “our neighborhood was high — high on funerals and court appearances.” There’s an exceptional intimacy here, too, even if many of these characters — parents, children, boyfriends, girlfriends, pals — are wary of getting too close to each other. Settings, like the Eight Miles High bar and The Clock diner, recur, and so do EIGHT MILE characters; two stories HIGH recount the same By Jim Ray Daniels deadly house fire from Michigan State different perspectives. University Press, There are classically 205 pp., $19.95 structured stories here. “Raccoon Heaven,” about an ex-coke-dealer, his wife and their gone-wrong cabin up north, recalls T.C. Boyle’s smart-ass narrators. “My Republican Love Affair,” narrated by a college student from Detroit interning at a Nixon-era Washington, D.C. think tank, is a bittersweet — and very funny — romantic comedy. Still, what’s most memorable is Eight Mile High’s experimentalism. The narrator of “Et Tu,” for instance, revises a shaggydog story about his pimply teenage self in the very telling, as with adding apocryphal dialogue and immediately gainsaying it. “Pearl Diving” is more a portrait of a street than a traditional narrative. “13-Part Story With Mime,” featuring deadpan comic wordplay, details a doomed collegiate romance in brief, strobe-lit scenes. Perhaps most challenging is “Target Practice,” a bleak, multi-narrator story in which a convict offers different explanations of why he killed someone. That Daniels wields all this sophisticated technique while maintaining his deceptively conversational tone is all the more impressive.

[ARCHITECTURE]

GETTING SKINNY {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

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ISTORIC-PRESERVATION battles emerge in the public realm to save old buildings, but every once in a while the fights seem nearly as old as the buildings themselves. The recent announcement by Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation that grant funds will go toward a facade restoration of Downtown’s Skinny Building and the adjacent Roberts Jewelers building, at Forbes and Wood, effectively signals a victory in a debate for preservation that dates back 15 years. In 1999 and 2000, under the administration of Mayor Tom Murphy, a redevelopment plan by Chicago-based developers Urban Retail Properties would have leveled essentially a full city block bounded by Fifth and Forbes avenues, between Wood and Market, with spillovers in various directions. More than 60 old and genuinely historic buildings would have fallen to the wrecking ball, with only a few facades saved. The plan collapsed more from its own dead weight than anything else. When prime tenant Nordstrom pulled out, the entire project stalled. But a few historic-building all-stars emerged in the Fifth-Forbes debates, none more eccentric than the Skinny Building. Amid Downtown’s singular blend of cast iron, Victorian Gothic and neoclassical storefronts of significant architectural pedigree, the Skinny Building earned its appeal because of its width. The 5-foot-2-inch-wide structure was probably built before 1903 (when it appeared on an insurance map), just after the widening of Diamond Alley into Forbes Street. Property owner Hugh McKee found himself with a much narrower piece of land than the one he purchased in

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Narrow is the way: Downtown’s Skinny Building, at Forbes and Wood.

1895. Whether out of irritation or simple persistence, he built the widest structure that the new property lines would allow. Historical records are uncertain about the use of the upper two floors, accessed by a precarious spiral staircase, but over the years the ground floor has housed successful businesses including a popular lunch counter. The property has changed owners many times; in recent decades it passed through the hands of a few small privately owned real-estate companies. Most recent-

ly, it went to the Urban Redevelopment Authority in a $1.3 million package that included the adjacent Roberts building. As activists in the Fifth-Forbes era, Pat Clark and Al Kovacik became prime figures in advocating for the Skinny Building’s reservation. They publicized and re-energized it, using it as a street-facing gallery for images of, variously, graffiti art, vintage strippers and the late sportscaster Myron Cope. Its popularity and notoriety grew. No one has found a building with narrower floors.

[ART REVIEW]

Meanwhile, other historic structures seemed to survive and disappear at the behest of banks. PNC helped support the restoration of properties on the south side of Fifth Avenue, but only so it could demolish buildings on the other side of the street. More recently, the Bolan’s Candy building at Fifth and Wood, which had been designated by preservationists as one of the most desirable candidates for preservation, fell unceremoniously to the wrecking ball because PNC needed the land for its Tower at PNC Plaza. So the preservation of the Skinny Building is that much more significant. It is actually possible because of a number of participating parties. PHLF was executing a $4 million state Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program grant to renovate facades on eight Downtown buildings. At the end of the grant, the group had leftover funds. “We went to the city and said, ‘Let’s do Roberts and the Skinny Building,’” recalls PHLF President Arthur Ziegler.

Of course, that strategy requires having an administration that is particularly sympathetic to historic preservation, which Mayor Bill Peduto clearly is. Development plans involving the Skinny Building and Roberts have not been announced, yet the preservation plan is already in place. That is exactly the reverse of earlier practices. It’s a wiser course of action and a welcome sign, not just to preservationists, but to anyone who wants Pittsburgh to continue to have a unique identity. “We want to see preservation work hand-in-hand with development, so we don’t have plans to throw away or tear away our past, but [to] develop it and respect it,” Peduto has said. So now Landmarks Design Associates Architects is undertaking the restoration. “It’s more like a greenhouse or an enclosed porch than an office building,” comments architect Ellis Schmidlapp of the steelframe structure, whose mostly glass walls are also enclosed with brick and wood. The Skinny Building would not be iconic without the efforts of Clark and Kovacik. (Disclosure: Clark is married to CP associate editor Al Hoff.) It would not have available funds without the work of PHLF. It would not have priority of history over real estate without the values of the Peduto administration. Preservation is a battle, not simply of many years, but also of many players.

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Alexandre Arrechea’s “Metropolitan Life Insurance”

IT’S A WELCOME SIGN TO ANYONE WHO WANTS PITTSBURGH TO CONTINUE TO HAVE A UNIQUE IDENTITY.

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Dear Laurel Foundation: You do great things for Pittsburgh and Southwestern PA, so why must you continue to subject us to Seward Johnson sculptures? It was bad enough when the sculptures were life-size (last year’s “Man on the Street” series), but now we have to deal with one 20 feet tall! This travesty in PPG Plaza, while referencing real art by Renoir, is neither replica nor parody, and therefore gives us nothing whatsoever to contemplate besides scale. In most public sculpture, scale lends drama. Remember the giant rubber duck? But like Jeff Koons’s “Split-Rocker,” which currently dominates New York’s Rockefeller Center Plaza, the duck referenced a kitschy toy, conjuring issues not just of of scale but of whimsy, nostalgia, popular culture and the ready-made. Fortunately, Downtown has other monumental sculptures to ponder: three by Alexandre Arrechea, temporarily installed for the Three Rivers Arts Festival. From his series No Limits, each references a different iconic building in New York City. Shiny, streamlined and made of steel, they are not exact reproductions, but appear like massive toys. And Arrechea alters them by making them appear elastic. “Metropolitan Life Insurance” and “Seagram” are curled like hoses: “Met Life”’s top points toward the ground, while “Seagram” uncoils in a squiggle from a giant red spool. “Courthouse” remains upright but is mounted on a stand that lets it tilt horizontally like a barrier — a metaphor for justice. Originally installed on Park Avenue, in New York, the series honors some of the artist’s favorite icons for their beauty, as well as critiquing their individual histories. As a whole, Arrechea’s series comments on how cities expand and contract over time based on economics, disasters and population. Most cities are a mix of new and old. Some buildings survive while others are razed. Tastes change, political administrations come and go, and perspectives shift. Arrechea captures this by playing with the normally static and vertical shapes of buildings that represent money and power, success and failure. While the sculptures represent buildings in New York, the commentary is not lost here, where cranes dot the skyline and the sounds of construction can be heard almost daily, in neighborhoods throughout the city. Buildings might look static, but ultimately they emerge from a space where ideology meets reality.

PITTSBURGH CLO ACADEMY

Classes Begin September 2nd Register Today! CLASSES AVAILABLE Ages 3-18 Tap · Ballet · Hip Hop Musical Theater Voice · Acting · Piano and more! New Classes: Acting for TV & Film Stage Combat · Yoga Technical Theater and more! Scholarship & Mini Star Auditions: August 9th Call for an appointment ENROLL ONLINE @ pittsburghCLO.org or call 412-281-2234 for a brochure Pittsburgh CLO Academy 130 CLO Academy Way Pittsburgh, PA 15222

W Y E P & T h e P i t t s b u r g h C u l t u r a l Tr u s t p r e s e n t

ON SALE FRIDAY! THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 8PM • BYHAM THEATER

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square

NO LIMITS continues through Sept. 6. Sculptures at 4 Gateway Center, Gateway Center Park and the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. www.trustarts.org +

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Final 4 Weeks!

A NO-HOLDS-BARRED

SMASH HIT!

NOW - August 3 Benedum Center

Directed & Choreographed by Guy Stroman

NOW - August 24 CLO Cabaret

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org GROUPS 412-325-1582

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL KRUSE}

Mallory Fuccella and Parag S. Gohel in Walldogs, at Hatch Arts Collective

[PLAY REVIEWS]

TAGGED {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} A SINGLE white wall endures graffiti, adver-

+++++ “One of the most dazzling displays of comedy theatre I’ve ever seen.”

A SUMMER COMEDY LIKE YOU’VE NEVER EXPERIENCED

—The Times, London

August 27 – September 7, 2014 ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEETS MONTY PYTHON MEETS “SOUTH PARK”!

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY [2489] CityTheatreCompany.org

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tising, a prophetic message and a hastily designed mural. Using four interwoven tales, Hatch Arts Collective’s new play Walldogs examines the nature of art and artists. It’s staged at Artists Image Resource, and the intimate setting allows the raw energy of the stories to shine. Playwright Paul Kruse, director Adil Mansoor and producer Nicole Shero collaborated on this world premiere, the group’s second full-length outing as a company. After curtain call, the audience can participate in a live art-making event with artists Saric Feng and Katie Kaplan overseeing a screen-printing and wheat-pasting project designed specifically for Walldogs. Although Pittsburgh already boasts a plethora of theater companies, Hatch Arts Collective offers an interactive, interdisciplinary performance above and beyond the typical theatergoing experience. But even without the art-marking, Walldogs is a venture worth seeing. Portraying four characters apiece, Mallory Fuccella and Parag S. Gohel carry this two-person show with flair. From a street-savvy property owner to a neurotic nonprofit manager/wannabe novelist, Fuccella excels in capturing the nuances of her varied roles. Likewise, Gohel shifts effortlessly among his diverse characters, including a noncommittal artist who buckles under pressure and a serpentine “walldog” eager to paint his advertisement on the best wall he can

find. The simplicity of these tales coupled with the fast-paced yet philosophical dialogue instills the play with an exhilarating combination of humor and poignancy as the characters try — and often fail — to connect with one another. With its deliberate anachronisms and epic scope, the Biblical episode involving Gohel’s King Belshazzar and Fuccella’s Daniel seems somewhat uneven against the unpretentious overtures of the rest of the play. But ultimately, the quartet of stories coalesces into a rousing exploration of how one ordinary wall can affect the lives of so many people.

WALLDOGS continues through Sat., Aug. 2. Hatch Arts Collective, Artists Image Resource, 518 Foreland St., North Side. $10. www.hatcharts.org

At the close of the brisk, one-hour play, Fuccella portrays an adolescent graffiti artist opposite Gohel’s awkward teen. Through their shared confessions at the wall, the two forge an unlikely bond. This sentiment captures the message of Walldogs and the trajectory of Hatch Arts Collective: Nobody said being an artist was easy, but it doesn’t have to be isolating either. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

MEMORY PLAY {BY TED HOOVER} IF YOU’RE LOOKING for an evening of

visionary, mold-breaking hyper-theatri-

cality, it would probably be best to avoid Little Lake Theatre’s production of Brian Friel’s Tony-winning 1992 drama Dancing at Lughnasa. And that’s not a criticism, since Friel didn’t set out to break any molds with this quiet, ruminative memory play about his own childhood with a mother and four aunts in a small, poverty-stricken village in 1936 Ireland. But to appreciate Lughnasa, it’s essential you understand exactly what you’re getting yourself into. There’s not much in the way of plot or character development over the course of two acts. The Friel doppelgänger, Michael Evans, appears as an adult remembering a long-ago summer when a number of changes seemed imminent, but never appeared.

DANCING AT LUGHNASA continues through Aug. 9. Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

Well, almost. Some things do happen — dreams turn sour and die. And every now and again, Evans gives us a glimpse into the women’s future as well … none of which is any good. This is one seriously sad, somber play. But you do get Friel’s luminous writing and even, amidst the melancholy, an understanding of how the love these women have for each other can be shimmering and beautiful. Director Jena Oberg and her cast go out of their way to emphasize that love. Jenna Lanz, Deborah Bender, Katie Kerr, Katy Pretz and Jennifer Sinatra bring an enormous warmth to their portrayal of the sisters. New battles and old resentments bubble up from time to time, but Oberg and cast make us understand quite clearly that the feuding comes directly from the love they share. The production does feel a bit rushed right now, almost as if the women are afraid that, by slowing down, they’ll lose the audience. I salute that instinct (audiences can be impatient and actors can be self-indulgent), but this play is one instance where a little more breathing room could provide texture. Given the obvious talents of Lanz, Bender, Kerr, Pretz and Sinatra, the production (which I saw on opening night) will only ripen as the performers relax into their roles and the evening acquires more depth. And sadness. Hurray!

ATTENTION: Men and Women. How Often Do You Feel Weak in Your, Body, Mind or Spirit? Let Me Ask You a Second Question...

THE HELP {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} EVER HAVE one of those days at work where the demands from “upstairs” make less and less sense as they grow ever more insistent? Then you already have some affinity for The Dumb Waiter, staged by Dog & Pony Show Theatricals at the Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre. But this production of Harold Pinter’s early one-act has a twist. (Cockney-slang pun warning.) Two of them, actually. The British blokes from 1960 are portrayed by two women. Except for the shoes, the characters don’t seem particularly feminine, and the dynamic is still thuggish alpha male. It’s probably best not to get too hung up on gender, since there’s so much else in this darkly comic gem to ponder. There’s the title. Central to the plot, as it were, is one of those little hand-operated elevators for sending food from the kitchen to the dining area upstairs. Usually, it’s spelled as one word: dumbwaiter. Ah, but we have two guys here who spend the entire play waiting. Dumb? They’re very chatty about it, but maybe not very bright. And the events certainly leave them dumbfounded. But is only one of them dumb about the waiting? Dog & Pony artistic director Lissa Brennan directs and portrays the junior partner, Gus, with Gayle Pazerski as the senior, Ben. Sort of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy types, those hardy comics who also inspired an earlier 20th-century classic about waiting. But according to Samuel Beckett, no girls are allowed to wait for Godot. Brennan (who is also an occasional CP contributor) demonstrates that such restrictions are quaint at best. Even with its 50-plus year history, there are still people who haven’t seen The Dumb Waiter (trust me, I brought one), so

THIS IS ONE SERIOUSLY SAD, SOMBER PLAY.

THE DUMB WAITER continues through Sat., Aug. 2. Dog & Pony Show at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. 412-728-2952

I’d rather not give up any plot details. It’s more fun if the characters reveal themselves. But in the interest of clarity amid the dated Britishisms, I will report that what Ben and Gus argue about is an Eccles cake — a currant-filled pastry, not anything that an American would identify as cake. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.3108.07.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ FRI., AUG. 01 {ART}

AUG. 01

The e Takeaway: Tak keaway Made With Love

+ THU., JULY 31 {FESTIVAL}

City Summer Festival continues with an evening of live music and poetry. Actress, poet and Cup-A-Jo Productions founder Joanna Lowe opens with a set of spoken-word pieces. She’s followed by singer and multi-instrumentalist David Dickinson. The evening concludes with a performance by Sarah Fina, 24, a guitarist, singer and songwriter from Lawrenceville who’s active on the open-mic scene. The Alphabet City series of performances under a tent is presented by City of Asylum/ Pittsburgh. BO 6 p.m. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. Reservations recommended at www. cityofasylumpittsburgh.org. cityofasylumpittsburgh.o . rg.

The annual Black Family Reunion seeks to strengthen the African-American community, but its organizer, the Community Empowerment Association, blends a lot of recreation and entertainment into its mission. The four-day festival begins with tonight’s Artists Block Party in Homewood, with live singers, hip-hop artists, poets and more. On Aug. 1 comes the Peace in the Hood Basketball Tournament, in Mellon Park. Aug. 2 brings workshops and panel talks on activism, education and entrepreneurship, hip, plus a performance off Kim El’s fine one-woman coming-of-age m g-of-age min play Straightening ning Combs. And on Sunday, in Schenley chenley Park, the Reunion concludes oncludes with a free concert headlined by old-school R&B masters Con Funk Shun and singer Howard Hewett. Bill O’Driscoll ’Driscoll Artists Block Party: rty: 5 p.m. (CEA Cultural Center, r, 7120 Kelly St., Homewood; wood; free). Festival continues through ugh AUG. 01 Sun., Aug. 3. Jerry Times and venues ues Grcevich vary. www.cea pittsburgh.org

Sure, the colors are odd, the gestures are stilted and the execution’s patchy — but who are you to say the thrift-store paintings in The Takeaway: Made With Love are “bad”? Tonight, in fact, lucky patrons at 937 Gallery will head home with some of the roughly 100 amateur artworks (also including hand-knitted afghans, handmade ceramics and more) carefully thrifted by curator Robert Raczka. “I have a genuine appreciation for amateur art at its unselfconscious best,” says Raczka, also an art critic and CP contributor. During the three-week exhibit, visitors have entered a free lottery to win; Raczka is randomly selecting the winners, who can claim their prizes at tonight’s closing reception. BO 5:30-9 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

{ART} The Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial continues with a new exhibit at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Idea Furnace features new work by seven local artists, who have no experience with glass, but who for the past six collaborated with months t ha have v col co Center’s in-house the Glass ss Center artists. The h goal a is experimental glass art from an outsider’s Participating artists perspective. Part Fraley (pictured), include Toby Fra Bob Beckman Will Schlough, B and Vanessa a German. Dan Willis Opening reception: 6 p.m. rec Exhibit continues Exh through Oct. 26. 5472 throug Penn Ave., Friendship. 412-365-2145 Free. 412www.pittsburgh or www.p biennial.org biennia

{ART} {ART {WORDS AND MUSIC}

The Alphabet

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Work Working as printmaking printm collaborative New collab Academy Press, Acade

sp otlight Comedian Myq Kaplan has opened shows by saying, “I’m glad that you guys seem like you’re my demographic, which is people who know the word ‘demographic.’” The one-liner acknowledged the often nerdily cerebral style of a guy who jokes, “My girlfriend said she wanted me to dominate her. So I said, ‘Let’s play Scrabble.’” But in truth, this vegan who studied graduate-level linguistics at Boston University — and whose new album is titled Small, Dork and Handsome — has proved plenty accessible. In 2010, Kaplan was a finalist on NBC’s Last Comic Standing, and he’s toured nationally and guested on The Late Show With David Letterman and The Tonight Show. He’s confident he’s finding his audience, or vice versa. “My aim is certainly to do what I want to do, to say the things I want to say that are interesting and funny to me,” Kaplan, 35, told CP by phone from Denver. Three days into an Eastern U.S. tour with comic/rapper Zach Sherwin (from YouTube’s Epic Rap Battles of History), Kaplan plays Arcade Comedy Theater. It’s his first Pittsburgh date in several years. “I’ve had people come up to my shows and say, ‘I didn’t understand all of the things you said, but I loved it,’” he says. “Nobody has ever heard that joke about the word ‘demographic’ and walked out.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. www.arcadecomedytheater.com

{PHO TO OF RIC COURTE SY H JAR VIS}

Michael Burch and Justin George turn out “prints and sculptures that are both art objects and fictitious historical artifacts.” Their work, which draws on “the natural world and the people who study it for inspiration,” is the focus of Investigations in Terraforming, which opens with tonight’s reception at the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. The exhibit is part of the monthly gallery crawl Unblurred, incorporating more than a dozen venues along Penn Avenue. Also check out Visions, new paintings by Lauren Toohey and Linzy Miggantz, at Most Wanted Fine Art. BO Unblurred: 6-11 p.m 41005400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/ Friendship. Free. www.pennavenue.org

at Mystery Lovers Book Shop today about the latest installment in her Blackbird Sisters series, A Little Night Murder. The series follows {STAGE} three Philadelphia sisters, Jean-Paul Sartre’s claustroamateur sleuths who solve phobic landmark play No Exit aristocratic murders, after one depicts an afterlife in which of them becomes the assistant three characters are locked to a newspaper’s society into a single room for eternity columnist. Martin has written more than 40 novels, won a Lifetime Achievement Award from Romantic Times magazine, and co-founded a statewide organization AUG. 03 called PennWriters. Boston Reservations are Babydolls requested for today’s book launch, which includes cheesecake and a string quartet. DW 3 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd. Free. 412828-4877 or www. mysterylovers.com Point Breeze. $5 donation suggested. 412-371-0600 or www.TheFrickPittsburgh.org

{ART}

{MUSIC} Pittsburgh has fewer ties to the Old Country than it once did. But Jerry Grcevich is a living link. Growing up in Turtle Creek, he studied tamburitza, or Croatian string music, with his father and uncle; for three decades now, he’s been internationally known as a master player and composer. But tonight, it’s the sounds of the prim, brac, taburitza cello, bugarija and tamburitza bass under the stars, as Grcevich leads the five-piece Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra at First Niagara Presents First Fridays at the Frick. The series encourages picnicking while you listen on the lawn of the Frick Art & Historical Center. BO 7 p.m. 7227 Reynolds St.,

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as punishment. And what better way to stage this high-water mark of modernist theatrical misery and restraint than by staging it inside a giant inflatable plastic bubble? bubble:PGH and the Carnegie Mellon School of Drama are doing exactly that with a four-show run on Flagstaff Hill, in Schenley Park, starting tonight. DW 9 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9. Oakland. $10. www.bubblepgh.com

Canadian painter Thomas Frontini combines pastel-colored minimalism and elegant depictions of architecture with the impossible spaces of surrealism to produce his own unusual take on the landscape. Active since 1990, Frontini has displayed his artwork in galleries around the world. Now, Pittsburgh receives his work for the first time; his exhibit Once Again Calm opens tonight at the Gallery 4. The opening reception includes complimentary cocktails and refreshments. DW 7 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 30. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

AUG. 01 Investigations in Terraforming

Art by New Academy Press

that the century-old Rex Theater was originally a vaudeville house. That makes it the natural choice for a nationally renowned neo-burlesque act like the Boston Babydolls, whose Madame Burlesque tour stops there tonight. Performances include: Miss Mina Murray doing a Sally Rand-inspired

fan dance; Brigitte Bisoux’s (pictured) tap-dancing balloon-pop routine; and a solo show by local performer Lita D’Vargas. The event is 21 and over, and tickets can also be purchased at the neighboring Culture Shop. DW 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-381-6811 or www.bostonbabydolls.com

AUG. 01 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial

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Pittsburgh-based mystery writer Nancy Martin speaks

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{BURLESQUE} Local history buffs might know

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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SAT, AUG 2, 9PM ROCK

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OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, AUG 5, 9PM JAZZ

S PAC E EXCHANGE SERIES WED, AUG 6, 8PM R&B

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER CHILDREN OF EDEN. Heartfelt & humorous look at the age-old conflict between parents & children, loosely based on the book of Genesis. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 3. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. DANCING AT LUGHNASA. Brian Friel’s Tony winning play about 5 unmarried sisters who have shared a cottage in Ireland’s rural County Donegal since childhood & the events of their summer in 1936 that forever change the family dynamic Thru Aug. 9. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. FIVE TELLERS DANCING IN THE RAIN. Set in the break room of a small bank in Mississippi, this play eavesdrops on the conversations of women who have for too long defined themselves in terms of their past & present relationships. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

FIXING KING JOHN. A contemporary adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John. Presented by No Name Players. Thru Aug. 2, 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-207-7111. HAIRSPRAY. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. HEART OF STEEL. A new musical feat. original songs by Gil Snyder, Craig King & The Mystic Knights Band. Presented by Studio Saville Productions. July 31-Aug. 2. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-744-4873. MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT. Hilarious & twisted take on the story of King Arthur, the Knights of the Round Table, & canned meat. Thru Aug. 1, 8 p.m., Sat., Aug. 2, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 3, 2 & 7 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. NO EXIT. Existential tale by Jean-Paul Sartre about three

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

strangers brought together forever. Presented by bubble:PGH. Fri, Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Aug. 9. Schenley Park, Oakland. 502-263-3326. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. ROMANCE. David Mamet’s courtroom farce. Presented by Kinetic Theatre Company. Thru Aug. 2, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. WALLDOGS. A new play weaving together four stories that explore what it means to mark a wall with text & image. Presented by the Hatch Arts Collective. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-533-2256. WOMAN & SCARECROW. A woman converses w/ Scarecrow, a companion only she can see, about how to reconcile herself to these last

moments. Presented by PICT. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000 x 207.

COMEDY THU 31 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 31 - SAT 02 CHRIS D’ELIA. 8 p.m., Fri., Aug. 1, 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 2, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 01 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 01 - SAT 02 CHUCK KRIEGER. Aug. 1-2 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SUN 03 SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 05 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 06 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Buckhead CONTINUES ON PG. 41

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Southwestern PA. Homestead. Saloon, Station Square. 412-464-4020. 412-232-3101. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Are We So Different? Text, Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. photographs, interactive 412-431-9908. audiovisual components, & MYQ KAPLAN. 8 p.m. Arcade related artifacts challenge Comedy Theater, Downtown. perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-339-0608. 412-622-3131. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Third Wed of every month, Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome 7-9 p.m. and First Wed (planetarium), Miniature of every month, 7-9 p.m. Railroad and Village, Thru Oct. 1 Gay & USS Requin submarine, Lesbian Community and more. North Side. Center, Downtown. 412-237-3400. 412-422-0114. CENTER FOR STAND-UP COMEDY ww. r w POSTNATURAL OPEN MIC. Wed, pe ghcitypa p HISTORY. Explore 8 p.m. The BeerHive, .com the complex interplay Strip District. between culture, 412-904-4502. nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. HERITAGE MUSEUM. 412-223-7698. Military artifacts and exhibits COMPASS INN. Demos and on the Allegheny Valley’s tours with costumed guides industrial heritage. Tarentum. featuring this restored stagecoach 724-224-7666. stop. 724-238-4983. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. DEPRECIATION LANDS Large collection of automatic MUSEUM. Small living roll-played musical instruments history museum celebrating the and music boxes in a mansion settlement and history of the setting. Call for appointment. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. 412-486-0563. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour Preserved materials reflecting this Tudor mansion and stable the industrial heritage of complex, and enjoy hikes and

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outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many CONTINUES ON PG. 42

Work by Genevieve Barbee, from The Character of the Living, at 720 Music, Clothing & Café, in Lawrenceville

NEW THIS WEEK BOULEVARD GALLERY. Untangled. Work by Elaine Bergstrom & Charles Sawyer. Opening reception: Aug. 2, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 10 Years. Sculpture, painting, & digital media by Jay Knapp. Public reception: Aug. 9, 5-9 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Hidden & Revealed. Work by Todd Sanders & Jason Schell. First Friday Art Walk: Aug. 1, 5:30-8 p.m., Artist Talk: Aug. 2, noon. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Once Again Calm. Surreal minimalist landscapes by Thomas Frontini. Opening reception: Aug. 2, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Banking The Fire. Lithography prints by Keith Clouse. Opening reception: Aug. 1, 6-9 p.m. 412-464-4020. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Investigations in Terraforming. Prints by New Academy

Press. Opening reception: Aug. 1, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MINT SALON & GALLERY. 2nd Seasonal Gallery Installation. Work by Giuseppe Ragozzino. Gallery party: Aug. 2, 7:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-737-1557. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. The Biennial at Pittsburgh Glass Center. Work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Melissa Fitzgerald, Jason Forck, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ashley McFarland, Juliet Pusateri, more. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Opening reception: Aug. 1, 6-9 p.m. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SHAW GALLERIES. Ruth Levine: Radiant Life. More than 30 works of art by the late Ruth Levine. Opening reception: Aug. 2, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. TRUNDLE MANOR. Nightmare Worlds. Work by James Guentner. Opening reception: Aug. 2, 1 p.m. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Collective Unconscious. Photographs by Jay Brown, Melissa Catanese, Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton,

Jake Reinhart, Justin Visnesky. Opening reception: Aug. 2, 7-11 p.m. & by appointment. unsmoke artspace.com/index/#/collectiveunconscious. Braddock.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Character of the Living. Oil paintings by Genevieve Barbee. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS SAT 02 ALL-SCENE ENTERTAIMENT FESTIVAL. One day & night of multiple genres of music, art, film & comedy. 3:30 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theater, Millvale. 866-468-3401.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 02 FLASH TATTOO DAY. Must choose from pre-designed list. Benefits North Hills Community Outreach. 12-7 p.m. Brothers Keeper Tattoo, West View. 412-408-3830. ST. BARNABAS 5K RUN/WALK. Benefits the St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. 9 a.m. St. Barnabas Health Care System, Gibsonia. 724-444-5521. ULTRAPARTY. Street party to benefit Accessible Lebo. www.ultapartylebo.com 5 p.m.

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by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BUNKERPROJECTS. Circles, Squares & Other Points Interest. Solo exhibition by Joe Beddall. Artist reception: Aug. 1, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-440-8422. BUTLER ART CENTER. Works by Sally Jones Rodgers & Patricia Young. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232.

Washington Road Business District, Mt. Lebanon. 412-343-3400.

SUN 03 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt.

DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene.

Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. PGH ZINE FAIR FUNDRAISER. Live music, silent auction, more. 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 724-554-3790. ST. KOLBE GOLF TOURNAMENT. 1 p.m. Champion Lakes Golf Course, 724-396-5643.

Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest

MON 04 EMSDC GOLF OUTING. www.e-msdc.org 10:30 a.m. Quicksilver Golf Club, 412-391-4423. SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS OF THE NEUMANN COMMUNITIES (MILLVALE) GOLF TOURNAMENT. 12 p.m.

songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Contemporary Figurative Drawing Pittsburgh. B&W work by Stephen Tuomala, Tim Fabian, Marc Snyder & Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-441-0194. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

Sewickley Heights Golf Club, Sewickley. 412-821-2200 x 217.

LITERARY THU 31 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater

PLATINUM7X.COM | PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY ©2014 Platinum 7X® Vodka. 40% ALC/VOL (80 Proof). Distilled seven times from grain. Bottled by Sazerac Co., Frankfort, KY. Product of the U.S.A.

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Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. T & E POETRY ROAD SHOW: PITTSBURGH STOP. Poetry reading feat. T.A. Noonan, Erin Elizabeth Smith, Joy Katz, & Adam Atkinson. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 02 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SUN 03 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 04 NANCY MARTIN. Book launch for A Little Night Murder. Sales from the book will benefit The Homeless Children Education Fund. 3 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 412-828-4877. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library, 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Carnival Part Deux, UnSmoke Systems Artspace, Braddock

FRI 01

CRITIC: Gail Simpson, 38, a sculptor from Wisconsin WHEN: Fri.,

July 25

The whole premise of this art show is just a lot of fun, the way it’s set up like a carnival. I’m actually hoping to win a mutant goldfish by the end of the night and also get my picture taken in the photobooth. They’ve been doing this carnival gallery for a couple years now. I think the idea is to make an art show that’s interactive and has a sense of humor and engages people. And I think they do it better every year; there are some especially talented people involved this year. This is a fantastic place. I love UnSmoke, and I love how they put it in a neighborhood as interesting as Braddock. BY DAN WILLIS

TUE 05

XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 15 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. NATIONWIDE TEEN LOCK-IN. Skype author visits, crafts, gaming, more. 6 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Learn how to create duplicates of body parts by casting w/ polymer clay & chocolate. Ages 10+. 5-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 01 - SAT 02 THE CAT IN THE HAT. Based on the book by Dr. Suess. Fri, Sat, 1:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 2 Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. DISNEY JUNIOR LIVE ON TOUR! PIRATE & PRINCESS ADVENTURE. 7 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 2, 11 a.m., 2 & 5 p.m. Petersen Events Center, Oakland. 412-648-3054.

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KIDSTUFF

ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. Communication, leadership & public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. THURSDAY CRAFTERNOONS. UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Ages 4-8. Thu, 4 p.m. Thru July 31 Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. Mount Lebanon Public Library, JAPANESE CONVERSATION Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CLUB. First and Third XOXO: WHEN LIFE GIVES Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. YOU LEMONS.... Enjoy Carnegie Library, Oakland. some free lemonade in 412-622-3151. exchange for a promise to KID’S BOOKS FOR pay the generosity forward GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. w/ a good deed. Thu, 2-4 p.m. First Tue of every Thru Aug. 14 Children’s month, 10 a.m. Museum of Pittsburgh, Penguin Bookshop, North Side. Sewickley. 412-322-5058. 412-741-3838. YOUTH LET’S SPEAK DRAGONBOATING. w. w w ENGLISH! Practice per Ages 12-18. ghcitypa p conversational .com Presented by English. Tue, 6 p.m. Paddlers for Peace. Carnegie Library, Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. TRRA Millvale Boathouse, PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL Millvale. 412-366-3528. PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Informal knitting session. 412-322-5058. First and Third Wed of every SOAR! Free-flight bird show. month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. National Aviary, North Side. 412-622-3151. 412-323-7235. JEFF OAKS, JENNY TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL JOHNSON, PAUL ZELEVANSKY. ADVENTURE. Rose garden Poetry reading presented free-flight bird show w/ live by City of Asylum. 6-8 p.m. narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, Alphabet City Tent, North Side. 12 p.m. National Aviary, 412-323-0278. North Side. 412-323-7235.

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wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 13 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 04 - WED 06 GIRLS ROCK! PITTSBURGH SUMMER ROCK CAMP. Aug. 4-9 Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 412-440-8241. PUSS-IN-BOOTS. Presented by the Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 13 Apple Hill Playhouse, 724-468-5050. SHIBORI PEACE QUILT PROJECT. Make a collaborative quilt honoring those who were hurt in World War II & their families. Presented by Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace. Aug. 4-10, 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 05 ANNUAL MGR YOUTH RALLY FOR CHANGE. Using art as a creative outlet for students to express their feelings of injustice against the city’s most distressed

CLO ACADEMY OPEN HOUSE. 12-2:30 p.m. CLO Academy, Downtown. 412-281-2234. GET CRAFTY W/ THE MATTRESS FACTORY. Create your own Chiharu Shiota yarn art piece. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. GOSPEL XPLOSION. Gospel performance by Iron Cross Ministries & Reconcile, face painting, door prizes, more. 2 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

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TUESDAYS

$2 LITE BOTTLES & TRIVIA AT 8:30PM LEINENKUGEL’S SUMMER SHANDY NOW ON DRAFT!

SUN 03 SUNNY DAY STORY TIME. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Aug. 3 The University Store on Fifth, Oakland. 412-648-1455.

1.75 LITE BOTTLES $

SUN 03 - WED 06 BEULAH CHRISTIAN SPORTS CAMP. Basketball, soccer, golf, & cheerleading skills clinics for students who have completed grades K-6. Aug. 3-7, 6-8:30 p.m. Beulah Presbyterian Church, 412-829-2756.

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27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP House-Made Liquor Infusions: VODKAS: CHERRYCHERRY GRAPEGR RAP APE E ESPRESSOESPRE ESS SSO O MIXED BERRIES- OLIVE-PINEAPPLE. RUMS: PEACH. GIN: CUCUMBER. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO CHILI PEPPER. TEQU QUIL ILA A: MANG ANGO O - CHIL ILII PE PEPP PPER.

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areas. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Brashear High School, Dormont. 773-313-0075 x 126. CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. Tue, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

TUE 05 - WED 06 PRE-ALGEBRA MATH CAMP. Aug. 5-6, 6-8 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

Art by Jay Brown

WED 06 WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru Aug. 13 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 01

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

GNC LIVE WELL LIBERTY MILE. www.libertymile.org 7 p.m. Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-586-7785. VENTURE OUTDOORS STAR PARTY HIKE. www.ventureoutdoors.org 7 p.m. Deer Lakes Park, Tarentum. 724-265-3520.

FRI 01 - SAT 02

Collective Unconscious, which

opens Saturday at UnSmoke Systems Artspace, brings together six locally based photographers, all attempting to reconcile their past and present selves by exploring their early influences, past misconceptions and shifting identities. It’s a diverse collection, ranging from Jay Brown’s music photojournalism (of bands like 1980s Black Flag) to Jake Reinhart’s evocative townscapes and Melissa Catanese’s haunting snapshots. The show also features Ross Mantle, Matthew Newton and Justin Visnesky. Singer songwriter Jon Bindley offers musical entertainment, with refreshments available from Braddock Brew Gentlemen and Blowfish BBQ. Reception: 7-11 p.m. Sat., Aug. 2. Exhibit continues through Aug. 29. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. unsmoke@gmail.com or unsmokeartspace.com

MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Aug. 1-2, 6:30 p.m. EDIBLE WILD PLANT Mingo Creek Park Observatory, WORKSHOP. Registration 724-348-6150. required. Aug. 2-3 SKYWATCH. Learn about Raccoon Creek State Park, globular clusters, nebulas & 724-899-3611. planets by seeing them w/ REGATTA AT LAKE ARTHUR. your own eyes. On clear Sailing race, geocache nights, visitors are competition, car cruise, invited to come to kayak lessons, fireworks, SkyWatch to get more. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. up-close and personal and Sun., Aug. 3, with amazing celestial 10 a.m.-6 p.m. objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Moraine State Park, www. per pa Nov. 29 Carnegie Butler. 724-687-0707. pghcitym o .c Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. WAGMAN PUBLIC BUTTERFLIES & STAR PARTY. Presented by WILDFLOWERS. 2-4 p.m. The Amateur Astronomers Raccoon Creek State Park, Association of Pittsburgh. 724-899-3611. Aug. 1-2, 8:30 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677. FROG & TOAD NIGHT HIKE. Registration required. 8-10:30 p.m. Raccoon Creek WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or State Park, 724-899-3611.

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shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 31 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. COOL OFF W/ FREE ICE CREAM! The Climate Reality Project is teaming up w/ Ben & Jerry’s to spread the word & support the EPA’s proposed limits on carbon pollution. For location information, visit climate realityproject.org/blog/coolfree-ice-cream Thru July 31 ESSENTIAL OILS WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, 412-885-2255.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPERIMENTS: THE PRINTS OF BRUEGEL, DÜRER, SCHONGAUER & REMBRANDT. Course examining a period of dramatic change in Europe through the work of four of its most significant artists. Thu, 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@ gmail.com. THE LIVING LAWN: SUSTAINABLE YARD & LANDSCAPING PRACTICES WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. LUNCH & LEARN: DON’T GET ANGRY, GET ASSERTIVE. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Ages 21+. Every third Thu, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. POP GENERATION. Educational tours & complimentary refreshments for ages 65+. Last Thu of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. UNDERSTANDING & PLANNING FOR LONG TERM CARE. 6 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. VERONA FARMERS’ MARKET. Thu, 2-6 p.m. Railroad Park, Verona. THE WATERFRONT’S WEEKLY FARMERS’ MARKET. waterfrontpgh.com/ events/ Thu, 2-6 p.m. Thru Aug. 28 Macy’s Courtyard, Homestead. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

WILKINSBURG FARMERS’ MARKET. 732 Ross Ave., Wilkinsburg. Thu, 3-6 p.m. Thru Nov. 20 412-727-7855.

THU 31 - SAT 02 SUMMER ARTISAN BAZAAR. Craft show & sale feat. handmade jewelry, pottery, stained glass, paintings, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 9 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

FRI 01 21+ NIGHT: THE SOUNDS OF SCIENCE. Learn about the science of sound, craft a harmonica, pose w/ a Mozart cut-out, musical trivia, more. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. EYE READINGS. Fri, 7-10 p.m. Thru Sept. 26 Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 323-839-6866. THE FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH! PITTSBURGH’S POPULAR FOOD CULTURE TOUR. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Crazy Mocha Coffee Company, Downtown. 412-323-4709. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GARFIELD NIGHT MARKET. Feat. local vendors. Part of Unblurred. N. Pacific Ave. between Penn & Dearborn, Garfield. First Fri of every month, 6-10 p.m. Thru Oct. 3 412-354-1174. IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON & WARHOL: SILVER & SUEDE, W/ LESLEY FROWICK & NICHOLAS CHAMBERS. 7 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. First Fri of every month, 7-11 p.m. Thru Nov. 7 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

FRI 01 - SAT 02 CLASSIEST YARD SALE IN PITTSBURGH. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 2, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. St. Brendan’s Episcopal Church, Sewickley. 412-364-5974. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru

Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 01 - SUN 03 ALL ABOUT THE BURGH, THE CULTURE TO KETCHUP TOUR! Fully guided 2-hour tour presented by Molly’s Trolleys. Fri, Sun, 12:45 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Sept. 27 Station Square. ST. PETER PARISH RUMMAGE SALE. Aug. 1-2, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. St. Peter Parish, North Side. 412-321-0711.

SAT 02 ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. www.pittsburgh tangueros.org Sat, 5-6 p.m. Thru Aug. 10 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277.

today & how to play a part in helping to address this global problem. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. Tue, 7 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. 412-999-9153. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library,

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

OASIS TUTORING

OASIS Tutoring is seeking tutors age 50 and older to work with students (kindergarten through fourth grade) in the Pittsburgh and Woodland Hills school districts. No experience necessary, and free training is provided to volunteers. Training sessions will be held Aug. 20 and 27 at Macy’s, Downtown, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Call 412-232-2021 or visit www.oasisnet.org for information. CONOVER ORGANIC FARM DINNER. Organic, sustainable 5-course dinner. 5:30 p.m. Conover Organic Farm, 412-841-8381. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 20 412-271-7660. EREADER CLASS: KINDLE DEVICE. 11 a.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, 412-885-2255. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. HIP HOP YOGA: LOVE MOVEMENTS. First Sat of every month, 1-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 2 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HUMAN TRAFFICKING. Reflect upon the range of human slavery in the world

Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 02 - SUN 03 251ST ANNIVERSARY BATTLE OF BUSHY RUN. Battle reenactments, trade & craft demonstrations, more. Aug. 2-3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584.

SAT 02 - WED 06 GISHWHES: GREATEST INTERNATIONAL SCAVENGER HUNT THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN. Register by yourself, as a team, or as a partial team. www.gishwhes.com Aug. 2-9

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

SUN 03 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. THE BOSTON BABYDOLLS: MADAME BURLESQUE. 7:30 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MANCHESTER HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR. Starts on the 1300 block of Page St., North Side. manchesterhistoric societypa.com 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 412-321-7707. WHERE LIVED A FAMILY OF NEGROES. Explore unique instruments utilized by the working members of Woodville Plantation w/ Temujin Ekunfeo, African-American historian. 1-4 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-221-0348. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

MON 04

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

CAFÉ SCIENTIFIQUE. Author Craig Nelson discusses the women who made nuclear energy possible. 6 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. EREADER CLASS: IPAD & TABLET DEVICES. 6:30 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library, 412-885-2255. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PONCILI CREATION PRESENTS PINK PANIC! Surrealist puppetry & performance group. 9 p.m. BGC Community Activity Center, Garfield. 412-956-6468. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

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TUE 05 AKIRA KUROSAWA’S I LIVE IN FEAR. Film screening presented by Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace. 6 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-716-1696. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. THE FIRST STEP: BUSINESS STARTUP ESSENTIALS. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Butler County Chamber of Commerce, Butler. 724-283-2222. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. MEDITATIVE YOGA FLOW. Tue, 7 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Aug. 30 Crafton Park, Crafton. 412-999-9153. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 06 824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

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COUNTRY NIGHT LINE DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. THE FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH! PITTSBURGH’S POPULAR FOOD CULTURE TOUR. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Crazy Mocha Coffee Company, Downtown. 412-323-4709. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MOWA YOGA PRESENTS: PRACTICE ON THE PODS. Grandview & Shiloh St., Mt. Washington. Wed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 339-237-0891. PGC LECTURE SERIES: SAM STANG, JODIE MCDOUGALL, SUSAN TAYLOR GLASGOW. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers

& spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. WINE 101 - THREE PART WINE CLASS. Wed, 6-8 p.m. Thru Aug. 13 Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. 412-391-1709.

AUDITIONS BACH CHOIR OF

newhorizontheater@yahoo.com PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for Teen Dating Awareness Program. Aug. 23-24. Ages 14-24, non-equity, 1-2 min. monologue. www.primestage.com Prime Stage Theatre Rehearsal Studio, West End. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Murder with Mummies. Aug. 1-2. Men/women, cold readings. www.ract productions.com 724-775-6844. RENAISSANCE CITY CHOIR. Auditions for the 2014-15 season. Aug. 11-12. Prepare 30 sec. selection w/ sheet music, accompanist provided. rccpittsburgh.com/ auditions East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722. STEEL CITY MEN’S CHORALE. Auditions for basses & tenors. Aug. 11-19. Vocalizing, pitch memory exercises & sight reading. www.choralnet. org/view/445665 First Trinity Lutheran Church, Oakland. 412-417-4800.

PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. Aug. 26. Men/women, prepare song of your choice THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking & bring music for performers & artists to accompanist. www.bach participate in First Fridays choirpittsburgh.org/ Art in a Box. For more join-us/ First Unitarian Church, information, email thedap Shadyside. coopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-241-4044. COMMUNITY 412-403-7357. THEATRE PLAYERS. THE HOUR AFTER Auditions for The HAPPY HOUR Mouse That Roared. REVIEW. Seeking www. per Aug. 2-3. Everyone a p submissions pghcitym is invited to audition .co in all genres for w/ a cold reading. fledgling literary No preparation or magazine curated by members experience is required. ctp@bactp.com Community of the Hour After Happy Presbyterian Church Hour Writing Workshop. of Ben Avon. afterhappyhourreview.com. THE HERITAGE INDEPENDENT FILM PLAYERS. Auditions for NIGHT. Submit your film, Little Women: The Musical. 10 minutes or less. Aug. 3-4. Male/female Screenings held on the second non-equity performers aged Thursday of every month. late teens-early 70s. Prepare 32 bars of a ballad from DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, a musical, audition sides & Greensburg. 724-219-0804. accompanist will be provided. THE NEW YINZER. Bring sheet music. Seeking original essays www.bphp.org/events/auditions/ about literature, music, TV or Seton Center, Brookline. film, & also essays generally 412-254-4633. about Pittsburgh. To see MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. some examples, visit Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder www.newyinzer.com & view mystery shows performed the current issue. Email in the Pittsburgh area. all pitches, submissions 412-833-5056. & inquiries to newyinzer@ NEW HORIZON THEATER. gmail.com. Auditions for Queens Of THE POET BAND COMPANY. The Blues. Sept. 6. 4 AfricanSeeking various types of American females mid poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ 30’s-60 & 2 African-American hotmail.com. males late 30’s-mid 50’s.

SUBMISSIONS

FULL LIST E N O LIN

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a straight guy who’s been in an open relationship for six years. I often seek out extracurricular activities, but I am unsure of how to bring up my situation. I wrote to a seduction blogger who often writes about open relationships, and his advice was to not mention it until I’ve had sex with the girl a few times. This feels contrary to my nature, but is it the better method? Many of my “potentials” have been scared away when they learn of my relationship status. STRAIGHTFORWARD HONESTY OFFENDS POTENTIALS

If your goal is to maximize the amount of pussy in your life without regard for the feelings of the women attached to those pussies, then you should take the advice of the blogger. But if you wanna be a decent dude who gets more than enough pussy — and “enough is as good as a feast,” as Mary Poppins says —you’ll listen to me. Tell “potentials” after the third hang/date/ whatever. Let them get to know you a bit, then spill — before fucking but after they’ve made a small emotional investment in you. They’ll be more likely to reconsider prejudices they may have against guys in open relationships after they’ve gotten to know a semi-straightforward one, and perhaps be less quick to slam the door. But unless it’s a clear case of drunken-one-night-stand/ NSA encounter, no lying by omission. There are lots of single people seeking sex for sex’s sake, but a majority of sex-forsex’s-sake types are hoping to leverage it into something more at some point. And most single people make the assumption that the people they’re fucking are also single — otherwise they wouldn’t be fucking them, right? If you neglect to inform the women you fuck that you’re not single or emotionally available (you’re in an open relationship, not a poly one), you are taking advantage — and needlessly! There are plenty of women in open and/or poly relationships, as well as women who are looking only for sex. While you might have to work harder to find these women, you’ll have better sex with less drama — and you’ll spend fewer millennia in Purgatory burning off your sins.

Your “tried-and-true” repertoire may feel like a rut, ROUTINE, but it’s a successful rut. You both enjoy the sex, and you come more often than you used to. There are worse problems. My advice would be to relax and give yourself permission to not come when you’re trying something new. Remind yourself that new things you both enjoy will be incorporated into your routine. And when things that work for you both join the ranks of the tried-and-true, you’ll be able to come while doing them. And you don’t have to stop doing the shit that works now. Let’s say you try something new on Wednesday night, and you enjoy yourself but you don’t come. So the next time you have sex, stick to the stuff that gets you there consistently. My best friend has a girlfriend of two years. I’ve had a crush on him, but I never made any advances. We did have a threesome with a girl in March — he was broken up with his girlfriend at the time — but it was all about the girl and nothing happened between us guys. He got back with his girlfriend after that. Then last month, he and I had sex. We had been drinking, he initiated it, and neither of us came. It was awkward, and we didn’t talk for a week. Then we bumped into each other, and had sex again. Three weeks ago, we did it again. The next day, he said the “gay sex stuff” had to stop. He said he felt like he was cheating on his girlfriend. But later that night, he seemed to be on the verge of initiating again. Could he be developing feelings? I can tell he’s had sex with a guy before — it slid in pretty easy and he kept saying how good it felt.

A MAJORITY OF SEX-FOR-SEX’SSAKE TYPES ARE HOPING TO LEVERAGE IT INTO SOMETHING MORE AT SOME POINT.

I’m a straight woman, and I’ve been with my male partner for four years. The sex has gotten better in the sense that I orgasm a much greater percentage of the time now that he knows what I like. But in the service of that, we’ve fallen into a “tried-and-true” rut. I try to switch it up sometimes, and I surprised him with some sexy lingerie last night… and I got self-conscious, started to worry about whether I’d get off, and then didn’t come. My feeling is that I should not worry about my orgasms and focus on spice and variety, but I think that if we go too many times without me coming, it might be a downer for his boner, too. So which do we give preference to: variety or orgasms? RUTTING OR UNDERTAKING TOTALLY INTERESTING NEW EXPERIENCES?

BOYS EASING SEX TENSION SECRETLY

Maybe it would help if you told your friend that you’re not having gay sex — you’re having hot bi sex, just without an accommodating/ exonerating girl present. As for what to do … You might wanna look around for another guy — maybe even a gay one — to have a crush on. But I’m not going to push you to do that, because it’s clear that you’ve got feelings for this guy, and at the very least he’s got Feelings While Drunk for you. And while I should probably scold you both for fucking around behind his girlfriend’s back, I have a hunch that you’re teenagers and/or very young adults. So you’re getting a pass because this kind of bullshit is often a necessary rite of passage for kids who are still figuring out who they are, what they want and who they can trust. But I predict this will end badly, and you will one day look back on the bi threeways and gay two-ways and be deeply, deeply embarrassed. But in the meantime, enjoy sliding in.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

On the Savage Lovecast, hear Dan and YouTube sensation Arielle Scarcella go full lesbian: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.30-08.06

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Earth has been around for almost 4.6 billion years. But according to scientists who study the fossil records, fire didn’t make its first appearance on our planet until 470 million years ago. Only then were there enough land-based plants and oxygen to allow the possibility of fires arising naturally. Do the math and you will see that for 90 percent of the Earth’s history, fire was absent. In evolutionary terms, it’s a newcomer. As I study your astrological omens for the next 10 months, I foresee the arrival of an almost equally monumental addition to your life, Leo. You can’t imagine what it is yet, but by this time next year, you won’t fathom how you could have lived without it for so long.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the nights to come, I expect you will dream of creatures like fiery monsters, robot warriors, extraterrestrial ghosts and zombie vampires. But here’s the weird twist: They will be your helpers and friends. They will protect you and fight on your behalf as you defeat your real enemies, who are smiling pretenders wearing white hats. Dreams like this will prepare you well for events in your waking life, where you will get the chance to gain an advantage over fake nice guys who have hurt you or thwarted you.

packed with 10,000 tons of gold and 100,000 tons of platinum, meaning it’s worth over five trillion dollars. Can we humans get to it and mine its riches? Not yet. That project is beyond our current technology. But one day, I’m sure we will find a way. I’m thinking there’s a smaller-scale version of this scenario in your life, Capricorn. You know about or will soon find out about a source of wealth that’s beyond your grasp. But I’m betting that in the next 10 months you will figure out a way to tap into it, and begin the process.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

It’s fine if you want to turn the volume all the way up on your charisma and socialize like a party animal. I won’t protest if you gleefully blend business and pleasure as you nurture your web of human connections. But I hope you will also find time to commune with the earth and sky and rivers and winds. Why? You are scheduled to take a big, fun spiritual test in the not-toodistant future. An excellent way to prepare for this rite of passage will be to deepen your relationship with Mother Nature.

“I just sort of drifted into it.” According to author Gore Vidal, “That’s almost always the explanation for everything.” But I hope this won’t be true for you anytime soon, Aquarius. You can’t afford to be unconscious or lazy or careless about what you’re getting yourself into. You must formulate a clear, strong intention, and stick to it. I don’t mean that you should be overly cautious or ultra-skeptical. To make the correct decisions, all you have to do is be wide awake and stay in intimate touch with what’s best for you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

You are hereby excused from doing household chores and busywork, Scorpio. Feel free to cancel boring appointments. Avoid tasks that are not sufficiently epic, majestic and fantastic to engage your heroic imagination. As I see it, this is your time to think really big. You have cosmic authorization to give your full intensity to exploring the amazing maze where the treasure is hidden. I urge you to pay attention to your dreams for clues. I encourage you to ignore all fears except the one that evokes your most brilliant courage. Abandon all trivial worries, you curious warrior, as you go in quest of your equivalent of the Holy Grail.

Members of the industrial band Skinny Puppy are upset with the U.S. military. They discovered that an interrogation team at America’s Guantanamo Bay detention camp tortured prisoners by playing their music at deafening volumes for extended periods. That’s why they sent an invoice to the Defense Department for $666,000, and are threatening to sue. Now would be a good time for you to take comparable action, Pisces. Are others distorting your creations or misrepresenting your meaning? Could your reputation benefit from repair? Is there anything you can do to correct people’s misunderstandings about who you are and what you stand for?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Broadway is one of New York City’s main streets. It runs the length of the island of Manhattan. But hundreds of years ago it was known by the indigenous Lenape people as the Wickquasgeck Trail. It was a passageway that cut through stands of chestnut, poplar and pine trees. Strawberries grew wild in fields along the route. Is there a metaphorical equivalent in your own life, Sagittarius? I think there is: a modest, natural path that you will ultimately build into a major thoroughfare buzzing with activity. Part of you will feel sad at the loss of innocence that results. But mostly you’ll be proud of the visionary strength you will have summoned to create such an important conduit.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The heavenly body known as 1986 DA is a nearEarth asteroid that’s 1.4 miles in diameter. It’s

or destinies that inspires you as you face your own challenges? Or is your link with them based more on sentimentality and nostalgia? In the near future, I urge you to dig deeper in search of the power they might have to offer you. Proceed on the hypothesis that you have not yet deciphered some of the useful messages you can derive from how they lived their lives. Explore the possibility that their mysteries are relevant to yours.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The prolific American author James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) wrote 32 novels. In those pages, he crammed in almost 1,100 quotations from Shakespeare. What motivated such extreme homage? I suspect he regarded Shakespeare as a mentor, and wanted to blend the Bard’s intelligence with his own. I invite you to do something similar, Gemini. What heroes have moved you the most? What teachers have stirred you the deepest? It’s a perfect time to pay tribute in a way that feels self-empowering.

I suspect you will benefit from revivifying their influence on you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Was there an actual poet named Homer who wrote the ancient Greek epics the Iliad and the Odyssey? Or was “Homer” a fictitious name given to several authors who created those two master works? Whatever the case may be, we know that Homer plagiarized himself. The opening line of Book XI in the Iliad is identical to the opening line of Book V in the Odyssey: “Now Dawn arose from her couch beside the lordly Tithonos, to bear light to the immortals and to mortal men.” So should we be critical of Homer? Nah. Nor will I hold it against you if, in the coming days, you imitate some fine action or brilliant move you did in the past. It was great the first time. I’m sure it will be nearly as great this time, but in a different way. Finish this sentence: “The one thing that really keeps me from being myself is _______.” Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

If a farmer plants the same crop in the same field year after year, the earth’s nutrients get exhausted. For instance, lettuce sucks up a lot of nitrogen. It’s better to plant beans or peas in that location the next season, since they add nitrogen back into the soil. Meanwhile, lettuce will do well in the field where the beans or peas grew last time. This strategy is called crop rotation. I nominate it as your operative metaphor for the next 10 months, Aries. Your creative output will be abundant if you keep sowing each new “crop” in a fertile situation where it is most likely to thrive. Maybe your grandparents are dead, or maybe they’re still alive. Whatever the case may be, do you have a meaningful or interesting connection with them? Is there anything about their souls

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

WORK

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Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com

HELP WANTED

MODELS

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

MODELS WANTED

ABC SELF STORAGE

724-421-7888

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HELP WANTED

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REAL ESTATE SERVICES

EAST FOR RENT

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today!www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Your ad could be here

No Experience Necessary.

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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DRIVERS

Part Time Driver For Pittsburgh Executive, as needed basis, must be flexible. Perfect for Retiree. $15.00/hour send resume and references to: mcdonald@fbmgg.com

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

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25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Shadyside

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$975 heat incl. 412-661-5921

HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

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NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

ADOPTION

CLASSES

STUDIES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

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NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

CLASSES

STUDIES

Adopt:

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS?

Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love. Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

GENERAL FOR SALE

ADOPTION:

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

KILL ROACHES GUARANTEED

Adoring teacher (will stay home) & Attorney, LOVE, Music, Travel awaits first baby. Expenses Paid ~ 1-800-816-8424 Sheila & Justin

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

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starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

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Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

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412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

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STUDIES 412.316.3342 SMOKING RESEARCH STUDY Smokers who are willing to smoke research cigarettes are wanted for a research study. The main purpose of the study is to collect urine, saliva and blood samples after smoking the research cigarettes for five days. Participants must be willing to spend five days and four nights in a local hotel. Smokers may volunteer with friends and family members who are also smokers. This is NOT intended as a treatment for smoking.

GOUT?

S C R E E N

Your ad could be here

A R T S

Compensation will be provided. For more info call: Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab 412-624-9999

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Overactive Bladder? Diabetes? C.O.P.D? High Cholesterol? If you suffer from any of the following please call PPCP at

412-650-6155

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs MASSAGE Xie LiHong’s

WELLNESS

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Your ad could be here

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park 412-595-8077

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

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Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

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TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

MASSAGE

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.30/08.06.2014

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

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We can treat you!

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Let Us Help You Today!

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com N E W S

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July 30, 2014