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ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT: PRIDEFEST POLICE CONTROVERSY A CHALLENGE FOR PEDUTO 06


EVENTS 8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

8.15 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films 10.17 – 8pm

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members and students

Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

In celebration of the museum’s 20th anniversary, The Warhol presents the world premiere of Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films in partnership with The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. This new performance is comprised of 15 short, newly digitized and publically unseen Warhol films along with five songwriter-composers performing newly composed music for the films. The roster includes Tom Verlaine, Martin Rev, Dean Wareham, Eleanor Friedberger and Bradford Cox.

11.14 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

Co-commissioned with The Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 2014 Next Wave Festival and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance. Guest music curator, Dean Wareham. Digital transfer of Warhol films courtesy of Media Sponsor:

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07.23/07.30.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 30

{COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF JIMMY KATZ}

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

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“This is an important incident for Mayor Bill Peduto because he has made police accountability the cornerstone of his administration.” — The ACLU’s Vic Walczak on the ongoing police controversy surrounding PrideFest

[VIEWS] in coal-dependent Pennsylvania, 16 “Even meeting the EPA’s target might require only modest efforts.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the EPA’s Clean Power Plan

[TASTE] an elder statesman of Pittsburgh fine 22 “It’s dining, but not stuck in the past.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Alla Famiglia

[MUSIC] can see Roger Humphries on Thursday 28 “You night for free. That’s absolutely absurd.” — Sean Jones on what’s both good and bad about the jazz scene in Pittsburgh

[SCREEN] about the film feels contemporary to 39 “Much the downbeat, character-driven spy thrillers of the late 1960s and ’70s.” — Al Hoff, on A Most-Wanted Man

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, CJ KELLY, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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[ARTS] am a citizen and a patriot before I’m a 42 “Icomedian.” — Bill Maher on why he wouldn’t mind if Americans got smarter

[LAST PAGE] groups say, ‘If you can save just one 62 “Some kid, then you’re a success.’ But I’m out there trying to save every kid who comes to me for help.” — Jimmy Cvetic on what drives him to run the Police Athletic League

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 STUFF WE LIKE 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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INCOMING

ACLU HEAD CALLS PRIDEFEST ALTERCATION “IMPORTANT INCIDENT” FOR YOUNG PEDUTO ADMINISTRATION

RE: Venezuelan author living in exile in Pittsburgh publishes translated novel (July 16) I am writing in response to the recent cover story on author Israel Centeno. I must say that this interview was quite uninformed and horribly misleading in its portrayal of Venezuela and its government. While Centeno, without any challenge by the interviewer, portrays Venezuela’s leader Hugo Chavez as “a militaristic president,” a “strongman,” and even tries to compare him to Hitler and Stalin, this is quite far from the truth. Recently, Venezuelans ranked their own country very high in terms of democracy, and indeed, Venezuela ranked second only to Uruguay in this Latin American poll. This jibes with my own experiences as an election observer in Venezuela last year in which Venezuela ran a very clean and fair national election for president. Indeed, Jimmy Carter himself concluded that, after Chavez took power, and in large part due to his very efforts, Venezuela’s election process is now “the best in the world.” This is a far cry from the tyrannical government Centeno is allowed to portray, unchecked, in his interview. Indeed, Centeno, in portraying the 2002 coup against Chavez, in which Chavez was kidnapped and ordered killed, somehow paints Chavez as the villain in this story. This again is far from the truth. Thus, it was the right-wing coup leaders who immediately dissolved the National Assembly and Supreme Court and declared the popularly created constitution null and void. And, upon Chavez’s return to power — a return brought about by popular protests — Chavez treated the coup leaders with great mercy and magnanimity, and it was Chavez who then quickly restored democracy to Venezuela. While Centeno’s narrative fits nicely into the narrative pushed by the U.S. government — the U.S. government having helped instigate the unconstitutional coup in 2002 against Chavez — this narrative is false. And, I would expect publications like the City Paper to do a better job at least challenging this narrative. — Dan Kovalik Highland Park

“Also never thought I’d see a day when I’d be slightly annoyed that Josh Harrison isn’t in the lineup.” – July 18 tweet from “Brian McElhinny“ (@rtjr)

Images from a YouTube video of Pittsburgh Police Officer Souroth Chatterji arresting Pride attendee Ariel Lawther following a disputed altercation between the pair.

FOLLOWING UP W

HEN A June 15 video surfaced of a Pittsburgh police officer pulling a 19-year-old girl, Ariel Lawther, from a crowd of PrideFest attendees by the hair and neck just before punching her several times, the incident became the first high-profile allegation of police misconduct made during Mayor Bill Peduto’s watch. “This is an important incident for him because he has made police accountability the cornerstone of his administration,” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Walczak says he’s reserving judgment on the PrideFest incident until results of the investigation are released. But he adds, “One of the biggest problems we’ve seen with police over the last several years is the city’s failure to hold police officers accountable [even] when the evidence of wrongdoing is overwhelming.” The Lawther incident comes at an awkward time for Peduto, whose efforts to recruit a new public-safety director took longer than expected. The administration

is now searching for a new police chief. And the PrideFest controversy hasn’t just raised questions from police-accountability activists: Event organizers have questioned the procedures that determined which officers provided security — procedures established to address an earlier police scandal.

PrideFest altercation raises as many questions about police policy as it does about the officer’s conduct {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} THE CHOPPY, 16-second video that initial-

ly emerged after the incident shows the events leading up to the arrest near Sixth Street and Liberty Avenue Downtown. The footage became a flashpoint in interpretations of whether Officer Souroth Chatterji was justified in punching Lawther. The video shows Chatterji dragging a screaming Lawther from a crowd of PrideFest attendees gathered around a group of anti-gay protesters. Chatterji can then be seen punching her in the abdomen several

times before arresting her. In a criminal complaint, Chatterji contends he was trying to subdue Lawther because she had shoved anti-gay protester Eric Moure — and that she “began to push and strike me in the chest with her hands and groin area with her legs.” “To defuse the situation quickly before I was attacked by the crowd once more,” Chatterji wrote, “I punched Lawther in the left abdomen several times to distract her enough so I could handcuff her.” Lawther is facing a felony aggravatedassault charge and charges of disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. She’s also facing a misdemeanor assault charge filed last November in an unrelated incident. Those critical of Chatterji’s use of force, including two witnesses who later posted video of the altercation online, say Lawther didn’t physically accost either Chatterji or the protester — and that they weren’t sure why the officer responded with such force. But according to Bryan Campbell, Chatterji’s police-union attorney, investigators have uncovered video and photographic evidence that Lawther did lash out at both CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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FOLLOWING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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Moure and Chatterji. One of the photos shows Lawther and Chatterji grabbing each other’s forearms, though it’s not clear exactly when the photo was taken. Campbell says Lawther was “a woman who attempt[ed] to punch an officer. He strikes her twice in the stomach — he didn’t hit her in the head. That’s acceptable force.” He says he expects the investigation to wrap up within a few weeks. ALREADY, however, PrideFest’s chief orga-

nizer says changes in city policy made it difficult to hire off-duty police officers who’d provided security for the event in the past. That resulted in the assignment of officers who may not have been ideally equipped to handle a confrontation between antigay protesters and Pride attendees. “We’ve always had protesters at the festival,” says Gary Van Horn, executive director and board president of the Delta Foundation, the organization that hosts Pride. “In the past, we have worked with specific lieutenants that … scheduled the officers and briefed the officers,” Van Horn says. “The scheduler was going to [assign] officers who understood the event.” But this year, Van Horn says, the city required officers to be selected through North Carolina-based Cover Your Assets, a company contracted to help manage scheduling off-duty police officers to work events like Pride. The handling of off-duty assignments has long been controversial, and Cover Your Assets was awarded the task of doing so last fall. The move came in the wake of reports that some city officers — a so-called “detail mafia” — had an inside track on getting the often-lucrative assignments. The contract was unanimously approved by city councilors, including Peduto, with the support of then-Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. Cover Your Assets now selects from a list of officers seeking to work after-hours details. That is “to avoid favoritism or any other potential issues,” says Peduto spokeswoman Katie O’Malley. The police union has opposed the change. “We’ve always felt that secondary employers should be able to choose the officers that work these events,” Campbell says. “[Wouldn’t] you feel more comfortable with someone who’s been showing up for a couple years?” Indeed, Van Horn says the new process meant that of the roughly 50 to 60 officers providing security during Pride, only a couple had worked the event previously. Van Horn says that Chatterji, who has been on the force for nearly two years, had not worked previous Pride events. (Van Horn stresses, however, that he’s not drawing a link between the change in policy and the

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Pride protesters engaging with attendees in front of the City-County Building June 15

Lawther incident.) What’s more, Van Horn says, he was given an incomplete roster two days before the event, which showed six slots that hadn’t been filled. “In the past eight years, I never had that happen,” he says. On-duty officers had to be pulled from other zones to work the event, says Van Horn. The last-minute scramble, he says, prevented organizers from reviewing planned events with individual officers, or “making sure we’re protecting both sides” should anti-gay demonstrators appear at the event. “When you give me 48 hours’ notice that an officer is going to be at an event,” says Van Horn, “I don’t think that’s enough time to educate him about his role.” Van Horn says he met July 18 with acting public-safety director Stephen Bucar to discuss his concerns. The meeting “went well,” Van Horn says, but using department schedulers was “not even on the table” of possibilities. Public-safety spokeswoman Sonya Toler confirms the city is “not going to change how secondary details are put together,” and that all secondary appointments will continue to run through Cover Your Assets. She says the use of schedulers is unnecessary since “All of our officers are equally qualified. There’s no need to vet them.” Toler stresses that signing up for offduty work is purely voluntary, so if officers don’t want to work an event like Pride, they don’t have to. “I really think what’s most important CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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FOLLOWING UP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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ACTIVISTS SAY that for the most part, Peduto has appropriately handled the PrideFest fallout. Some wonder, however, about his approach to a self-imposed 30-day deadline to provide a substantive update on the investigation. In a press conference called June 16, the morning after the incident, Peduto promised to “make sure that justice is not delayed.” Chatterji would be on desk duty for 30 days, he added, pledging “to proceed over the next month to find out exactly what happened, and to take the proper action.” On July 2, in response to a tweet asking about the investigation, Peduto wrote, “we announced at the start, [the Office of Municipal Investigations] would be conducting their review within 30 days. We are still committed to 30 days.” But as July 16 came and went, spokesman Tim McNulty told City Paper, “We’re aware of that commitment. The investigation is ongoing. The mayor promised to have an investigation done as quickly and fairly as possible and that’s what the city’s doing.” (A day later, the mayor issued a

statement reiterating that he is committed to a full and fair investigation, and that Chatterji will remain on desk duty until its completion.) “As mayor, you can’t make promises you won’t keep,” says Brandi Fisher, president of the Alliance for Police Accountability. But she chalks the promise mostly up to Peduto being “a little eager” to move quickly. Fisher is more concerned that the incident is part of what she sees as a broader pattern of police using unnecessary force. “That’s what we’re bumping into over and over again,” she says. “I’m not saying all these police officers are bad. I just think they’re not using their best judgment.” The ACLU’s Walczak hopes Peduto will help usher in a sea change, but “it’s too early to tell” if that will happen, he says. “There appears to be a clear desire at the top to make changes, but until there’s a police chief” and a permanent public-safety director, “that change is not going to occur.” The test in this case, Walczak says, is how open the city is with the investigation’s findings, whatever they may be. “The footage looked pretty damning, but it was a snapshot and there needs to be a full and fair investigation,” he says. “What we’re looking for here is transparency.”

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ORACLE IN SLIP-ON SHOES A memory of Bloomfield character Victor Navarro Jr. {BY ANDREW MCKEON} VICTOR NAVARRO JR. was more than just

a fixture in Pittsburgh. He was like an “Ol’ Faithful”: a temperamental tourist attraction whose very force of nature inspired different responses. Before the longtime Bloomfield character, who died June 30 at age 66, became a reliable feature of the landscape, he struggled with the world at large. Seasons of unpredictable behavior complicated the search for a comfortable place to loaf, a place where Victor wouldn’t be written off as a moody element but, rather, enjoyed for all his peculiarities. Already banned from a few diners by the time he could score a senior citizen’s discount, this child of the ’60s found his comfort blanket in Bloomfield. About a decade ago, he began posting up at the Crazy Mocha coffeeshop, on the corner of Liberty Avenue and Taylor Street, absorbing everyone’s energies, and transmitting his own, for days on end.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAE RUBERTO}

Victor Navarro Jr. in a photograph set up by artist friend Jae Ruberto

Victor reveled in the foot traffic of a changing neighborhood; he drafted thoughts with fluid abandon, pulling ideas out of the air and simultaneously force-feeding his opinions back into the universe. Protruding from a beautiful haphazard of layers, Victor’s small, peanut-shaped head poked from beneath an always curious haircut. He wore his gruff exterior like a turtle shell. His frame was broad-shouldered, 6 feet tall though shrinking. According to Victor, his belly protruded on account of a baby dinosaur (named Kyle) gestating in-

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side him. Below the equator, casual pants hovered well above his favorite leather slip-ons. Victor hand-tailored all of his trouser socks; he cut vertical slits in the sides to achieve a comfortable crew cut, despite creating sock flaps that hung like torn flags. His most iconic clothing item was a dirty gray duster jacket that was just the right fit (even if it was technically too big). Victor never consumed much of anything beyond coffee and cigarettes, both of which you could hear in his gravelly, unmistakable voice. Raspy yet orotund, Victor’s tone of voice was so inimitable that it beckoned friendly imitation from all his friends at the coffee shop. During my years working at Dreaming Ant, the DVD-rental shop in the back of Crazy Mocha, I grew to understand Victor’s antics beyond any sort of casual appreciation. Yes, he was a chain-smoking misanthrope, but his conversational approach was gentle, and usually quite journalistic in its effect. Cigarettes represented an ongoing “favor economy” with Victor, and he had an elephant’s memory when it came to his inventory. Victor had purchased cigarettes from every possible outlet in Bloomfield, so all the clerks knew him by name, by reputation, and by whichever flavor-ofthe-week he was puffing at the time. But it wasn’t the smoking, and its culture of random conversation, that defined Victor as a people person. It was the literature: Victor had an inborn magnetism toward books of all kinds. He was a human lending library/giving tree that rarely ever asked for anything in return. Before Victor even thought about reading each new book, he made sure to open it to the middle pages and, with the poise of a sommelier, sniff the inner spine. He tasted the vintage, cross-referencing its scent with those of libraries once wandered. Each title functioned like a token of kinship, passing through his hands with the purpose of connecting people to ideas, and also to each other. Victor was a savant and a renaissance man: a poet, a painter, an exhibitionist, a musician, a novelist, a bullshitter, an “expert” piano tuner, a muse, a philosopher, an old-school fighter, a doodler, a vulgarian, a confidante, a hopeless romantic, an atheist and a “holy smoker,” born on the night before Christmas, among other things. Victor had been through it all, and still had a sense of humor about his “non-viable” place in society. From his salad days

growing up in Highland Park to his midlife stints in homelessness and halfway houses, he’d always led a strangely dignified life, albeit on the fringes. For nearly 10 years, I worked alongside a one-man peanut gallery who wasn’t really an employee or a customer, but was more than both combined. Victor became a consummate symbol of Bloomfield. Customers who really knew Victor entrusted him with watching over their dogs, and sometimes even their children, while they went into the shop. The guy was good with all life-forms, not to mention art forms. Victor crafted scores of subliminal paintings, recorded albums’ worth of salacious songs, and wrote a few elegantly trippy novels. But it was his random musings that give the most telling glimpse into Victor’s everyday experience at the coffee shop. Upon paper scraps and old rolls of receipt paper, Victor would concoct a theoretical treatise entitled “On Levels,” while simultaneously sketching cartoonish anatomies. Victor wrote his receipt scrolls like he was live-tweeting with a blue Sharpie, aiming his insouciance at all manner of familiar people, places and things. Toward the end of one of his more “unrated” tapestries, Victor wrote, “‘Up yours,’ if you read this asinine scroll.” Such an author delights in reminding the audience that his work is a personal abstraction of art itself.

HE’D ALWAYS LED A STRANGELY DIGNIFIED LIFE, ALBEIT ON THE FRINGES.

A GiveForward campaign has been established to raise money for Victor Navarro’s funeral expenses: https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/ s905/victor-navarro-memorial-fund

Victor lived his life with nary a care, but always an immense love, for the outside world. He left a lasting impression on everything around him, so the good feeling is more than mutual. Friends and family are sending their condolences to Victor’s younger brother, Anthony Navarro, and donating to the Carnegie Library, in honor of a now-deceased, underground library named “Victor.” I find it hard to write about my friend in the past tense because he was always so present. Deep in the groan of every moment, Victor’s undying spirit trained a spotlight on life’s hidden absurdities, turning drama into comedy. He really knew how to make people smile. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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TAKE OUT AVAILABLE FOR ALL LOCATIONS WEXFORD (in the Pine Tree Shoppes)

LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

Restoration and Green Building Materials

12009 Perry Highway (Route 19 N) • 724-935-8866

The restoration of old and historic houses is green building because repurposing our built environment helps reduce our impact on the natural environment. To that end, if you’re concerned about the materials you’re putting into your house, come to this workshop by Ian Miller, who will discuss leading construction products for green building, chemical sensitivity, and sustainability.

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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(across from Waterworks Mall) 1034 Freeport Road • 412-784-8980

SHADYSIDE

(near Banana Republic) 5528 Walnut Street • 412-687-8586

Thank you for voting us Best Thai Restaurant in Pittsburgh Magazine Readers Poll.

THURSDAY, JULY 24 • 6:00 - 7:30 PM 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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$2.50 Special Miller Lite & S_m_ir_no_f_f_V_od_k_a Come see the Miller Lite & Smirnoff Vodka girls for Prizes and Giveaways. SOUTHSIDE | 140 S. 18TH ST. 412-488-0777

HPV is an anti-cancer vaccine for tweens and teens. It’s Safe - Effective - Recommended.

Talk with your child’s health care provider.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!


VOTED PITTSBURGH’S BEST NEW ROOFTOP DECK & HAPPY HOUR!

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VOTED PITTSBURGH’S BEST NEW SPORTS BAR & HAPPY HOUR! N E W S

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SIZZLING SUMMER SALE

20% - 50% OFF

ON SELECT ITEMS THROUGHOUT THE STORE. Have to make room for the new Fall arrivals. Hurry in for best selection.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

[GREEN LIGHT]

CARBON NATION Pittsburgh will host hearings on EPA’s emission-reduction plan {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} ON JULY 31 and Aug. 1, Pittsburgh will be one of four U.S. cities to host public hearings on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rule to reduce carbon emissions from power plants. Hundreds will testify at all-day sessions at Downtown’s William S. Moorhead Federal Building, the comments largely familiar, since the plan was announced June 2. Environmentalists will support the rule for its health benefits, and to arrest climate change. “Big Coal” — whose facilities produce 75 percent of power-plant carbon — will attack the rule with predictions of lost jobs and higher energy prices. If enacted, the rule would be the first national attempt to limit carbon emissions, the main source of the greenhouse gasses behind climate change. But it’s easy to miss two important facts. One, hitting the rule’s emissions target is pretty easy. Two, hitting it won’t get us very far on climate change. The EPA’s hopefully named Clean Power Plan would require states to cut carbon emissions from power plants so that by 2030 they’d drop 30 percent from 2005 levels. States can do this however they choose: by making their plants more efficient (or switching from coal to gas, which emits half the carbon); by moving to renewable or nuclear energy; or by simply using less energy through efficiency and conservation. Thirty percent sounds like a lot. But in fact, we’re already halfway there: Last year, according to federal figures, U.S. power plants emitted 15 percent less carbon than in 2005. That partly reflects reduced reliance on coal: Natural gas is cheaper. It also reflects shrunken demand: Electricity use peaked in 2007 and has dropped since. Such trends suggest the target might almost meet itself. In Pennsylvania, the drop in electric usage was surely aided by Act 129, the 2008 law requiring the state’s electricity distributors to reduce consumption; distributors like Duquesne Light offered everything from discounted compact fluorescent light bulbs to rebates on efficient appliances and home energy audits. State law also requires that a certain percentage of the state’s energy mix be from renewables, like wind and solar. But even in coal-dependent Pennsylvania, meeting the EPA’s target might require only modest efforts. Last year, for instance,

Akron, Ohio-based First Energy closed two aging, coal-burning plants in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Hatfield’s Ferry and Mitchell; First Energy President James H. Lash blamed the closures on market forces. Robert Altenburg, a senior energy analyst for environmental group PennFuture, says that closures of other old plants could mean that by 2020, Pennsylvania will have half as many coal-fired units as in 2012, Clean Power Plan or no. In fact, a 30 percent cut is unambitious enough that even some power generators are taking it in stride. “FirstEnergy believes it is in a strong position to meet the requirements in the proposed rule,” company spokeswoman Stephanie Walton told the Associated Press in June. Tom Schuster, a Sierra Club staffer based in Johnstown, says that Pennsylvania could easily do much more. It could further boost efficiency by, say, lifting Act 129’s spending cap. And it could raise the bar for renewables from a measly 8 percent of the state’s electricity by 2021 to levels comparable to, say, New Jersey and Maryland, which will require 20 percent or more in a similar time frame. Even as is, the Clean Power Plan — by cutting the soot and smog from burning coal — will mean more breathable air. Nationally, “[l]iterally thousands of lives will be saved because of it,” and “hundreds of thousands of asthmas attacks” will be avoided, says Dr. George Leikauf, a professor of environmental and occupational health at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. But the climate’s a different story. To avoid the most catastrophic effects of climate change, scientists say, by 2050 we need to cut at least 80 percent of greenhouse-gas emissions from 2000 levels. In the power sector alone — which accounts for just 40 percent of U.S. emissions — the Clean Power Plan gets us less than one-third of the way there. At best, the Plan is only a start, though one that might give the U.S. a little leverage in convincing China and India to cut their own burgeoning emissions.

IF ENACTED, THE RULE WOULD BE THE FIRST NATIONAL ATTEMPT TO LIMIT CARBON EMISSIONS.

To comment on the Clean Power Plan Proposed Rule, register to speak at the July 31 or Aug. 1 hearings Downtown, or write to EPA by Oct. 16. For details see www2.epa.gov/ carbon-pollution-standards. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


this must be the right place and the right time The 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival presented by Peoples Natural Gas. July 25-27 at Hartwood Acres. Benefits the Food Bank. Hear the boogie-blues of six-time Grammy winner Dr. John, along with J.J. Grey & Mofro, Bernard Allison, Spin Doctors, Albert Cummings and lots more as they play for a great cause.

PITTSBURGH BLUES FESTIVAL

20TH ANNIVERSARY pghblues.com

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Pittsburgh SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT 2100 SMALLMAN STREET

STRIP DISTRICT

MAKER ACTIVITIES! TAKE HOME PROJECTS! FREE FOOD & MUSIC! REMAKELEARNING.COM/MAKERPARTY

Saturday, August 2nd 10am - 2pm AMPHITHEATER

ENTERTAINMENT

The Time Jumpers featuring Vince Gill, Dawn Sears, Kenny Sears, Ranger Doug Green Friday, July 25 • 8:15 p.m. • Chautauqua Amphitheater

Order single tickets online at CHQTickets.com Or call our Ticket Office at 716.357.6250 * Subject to availability. All information subject to change.

C H A U TA U Q U A I N S T I T U T I O N • C I W E B . O R G 18

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014


Port Authority 50th Anniversary Transit Trivia Port Authority is celebrating 50 years of service this year! And to commemorate this event, we want to see how much you know about Pittsburgh transit history–both past and present. Twenty-five winners will be chosen from the correct entries and will receive a four pack of passes to the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh. Good luck!

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THE DOUBLE-CUT VEAL CHOP COMES IN THREE EXTRAORDINARILY REFINED PREPARATIONS

SWEET SPOT {BY AL HOFF} Eight years ago, Tabrina Avery switched schools and regions — from business school in North Carolina to the Le Cordon Bleu in Pittsburgh. This summer, with the help of her former employers at Opening Night catering, she opened Dulcinea Bakeshop, in the Strip District. (“Dulcinea” is the woman whom Don Quixote fell in love with, and the name translates to “sweet lady.”) Though barely open a month, Dulcinea may have already minted a signature item — a cinnamon roll topped with crumbled bacon. Also popular are the lemon bars with candied rosemary and an oatmeal chai-infused cream “pie,” an oversized filled cookie that’s an upscale play on Little Debbie snacks. Or try the muffins, Danishes, cupcakes, cookies and fruit turnovers. (The cherry turnover I snapped up was made with whiskey from Wigle, Dulcinea’s neighbor.) Avery also bakes a savory quiche each day, and takes orders for cakes, including wedding cakes. Avery says baking at Dulcinea is a “one-woman show”; her day starts at 5:45 a.m. Asked if she has a favorite item to bake, Avery cites “laminated dough,” as in a Danish or croissant. “You take this huge chunk of butter, and fold it between the layers of the dough,” she explains. “It’s labor-intensive, but the product that you get is so rewarding, because you have thousands of layers of dough and little butter pockets.” Sweet, indeed. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Open 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 9 a.m.3 p.m. Sat. 2627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-709-6188

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FEED

These days, there’s ere’s no shortage of beer festivals ’round here, but the Big Pour still remains a Big Deal. The e eighth annual Pour ur is Sat., Sept. 6, at Construction struction Junction, and you know ow what you get: beer, food, ood, beer, bands, beer, art, rt, beer, a chance to support the re-use community and beer. Tickets go on sale at noon, Mon., July 28, att www.showclix.com www h ($75; $35 for designated drivers).

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LASTING QUALITY

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

F

OR YEARS, a peculiarity of Pittsburgh

was that one of our finest dining experiences was situated far from Downtown’s hotels and expense accounts, and the well-heeled enclaves of Shadyside and Squirrel Hill, in one of the city’s grittier neighborhoods. Alla Famiglia had a reputation for its intimate ambience, impeccable service and refined Italian cuisine, and people would always add incredulously, “It’s in Allentown!” Pittsburgh’s restaurant bandwidth is so much broader now, we wondered if Alla Famiglia’s star had faded, or if it was still as impressive as ever. We set forth for Allentown to find out. We weren’t alone: We knew enough to make a reservation at the exalted spot, but the earliest one we could get on a Friday was at 8:30. When we arrived at the tiny secondfloor bar for cocktails at 7:45, three of the five stools were occupied by people having full dinners — no small feat as the portions, are, in the Italian gustatory tradition, enormous. Having left the main dining room, with its copper-hooded open kitchen,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

House-made Pasta Margherita with fresh mozzarella, olive oil, garlic and basil

behind on the first floor, we ascended to the restaurant’s third-floor space, a dim, almost ecclesiastical chamber decorated with stained glass and a trompe l’oeil night-sky ceiling. Accordingly, our table was set with “holy oil” — a seasoned olive oil — for dipping warm, crusty, chewy Italian bread into while we perused the menu. More

ALLA FAMIGLIA

804 E. Warrington Ave., Allentown. 412-488-1440 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 5 p.m.- last reservation PRICES: Appetizers 12-16; pasta $28-48; entrees $42-65 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED substantial condiments were also provided, including a superb gustoso — a chunky bowl of three plump cheeses with earthy chickpeas, all in luscious olive oil. This was a promising start. The frequently changing menu is reprinted daily but always anchored by Alla Famiglia classics like beans and

greens and a meatball appetizer, where we decided to start. The meatball was massive, somewhere between a baseball and a softball, both stuffed with and smothered in cheese, and served in a chunky marinara that brightened the plate while deferring gracefully to the savory meat and cheese. Beans and greens was a broth (but not soupy) with lightly braised escarole, creamy white beans and coarsely crumbled salsiccia sausage, which hovered elegantly to just this side of spicy. Locatelli Romano cheese finished this lovely dish with mildly nutty notes. Black mussels diavola came in a sweet plum-tomato broth whose piquant edge derived from spicy banana peppers. The mussels themselves were succulent morsels. Famiglia’s signature item is the doublecut chop of Wisconsin formula-fed veal. This is the costliest thing on the menu at $65, but it’s two ribs’ worth of chop, with frenched ribs still attached. It’s available in three extraordinarily refined preparations: Milanese (crumb-coated, pan-fried, and served with lemon, pignoli and Indonesian


blue lump crab); griglia (stuffed with Parma ham, sage and provolone, char-grilled, and finished with a wild-mushroom cabernet demi-glace); and pizzaiolo. The last, which we ordered, featured a chunky tomato sauce with bell and banana peppers plus morsels of sausage, onions and provolone. All of this seemed like it would overwhelm mild veal, but because of the considerable heft of the chop, it did not. The meat itself was beautifully cooked, the thickness permitting a lovely grilled exterior and ultra-tender, pale pink interior, adding up to a rich flavor that shone through the hearty sauce, picking up the various sweet, savory and spicy notes without getting lost. As an added bonus, the sausage — which might seem like lilygilding — was no standard Italian, but a relative of Greek loukaniko, a mild sausage flavored with orange rind for notes that are distinctly fruity without overt sweetness. This was, simply, a magnificent dish.

Chef de cuisine Mark McManus (right)

From the maccheroni list, our friend chose tonno salmoriglio, or Genoa oilpoached tuna tossed with tagliatelle pasta along with imported olives, onions, garlic, pignoli, spinach and anchovies. Again, the ingredients were many, but they played harmoniously as one, with the two fishes bracketing the overall flavor profile: the tuna big and meaty, the anchovies small but packing a briny punch. The other ingredients filled in with toasty, earthy, pungent and mineral notes for a dish that satisfied every taste bud. In fact, though the name and menu specialties have remained, the restaurant is continually evolving. In his nine years as chef/owner, Jonathan Vlasic has: added new dining areas, including an outdoor terrace; opened a sister restaurant in a small church in the South Hills; and even purchased a farm that is being restored to full function in order to provide fresh produce for both locations. Alla Famiglia has become an elder statesman of Pittsburgh fine dining, but we were delighted to find it not stuck in the past.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

FIRE PROOF After devastating blaze, Perle and NOLA return with enhanced drinks list

“WE TOOK ALL THE THINGS WE WANTED TO MAKE BETTER, AND WE DID THAT.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Thai Tapas and Wine Bar

Upscale Casual Authentic Thai

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

LUNCH SPECIALS

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

Monday-Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

11:30am to 3:00pm

1712 Murray Avenue Squirrel Hill 412.421.8801

OPEN DAILY Sun-Thurs 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat 11:30am-11pm

www..silkelephant.net www

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE

Vivo Kitchen {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multileveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE

CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops

fine-dining but casual establishment. There’s a wellcurated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-4814414) and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to endless preparations and dressings, the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J

E2 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KOUS KOUS CAFÉ. 665 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-563-5687. This small Moroccan restaurant mostly eschews clichés like kebab and falafel, instead offering sophisticated preparations such as lamb osso bucco and salmon in sharmoula. Worthy starters include harira (meat and lentil soup), eggplant zaalouk (similar to ratatouille) and grilled sardines. KF LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this

PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in oldfashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412-441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

PITTSBURGH’S NEWEST HOT SPOT IN THE NORTH HILLS Great Music!

Drink ! Specials

New Oakland Location!

1st Floor Restaurant

(American Menu Specializing in Burgers)

2nd Floor Bar & Night Club

2 floors, the , BEST BURGERS whiskey loft, and 24 beers on tap.

Friday August 1 ...... No Bad JUJU Saturday August 2 .............Live DJ Friday August 8 .................. Live DJ Saturday August 9 .... Tres Lads

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

OAKLAND • 226 MEYRAN AVENUE

now open 7 days a week!

winghartburgers.com

1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620 Westmoreland estmoreland m reland M Mall all • 724 724.830. 724.830.8810 830 83 8810 10

part of the NPL Restaurant Group

Open Seven Days Per week 11am to 2am 3385 Babcock Blvd Phone 412-847-3300 LITTLE E’S JAZZ CLUB AND RESTAURANT

DINNER • DRINKS COOL JAZZ

OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

The Picnic Special! Chef’s

SANDWICH

$

99 699 +TAX

WITH HOM HOMEMADE AD POTATO, MACARONI SALAD & COLE SLAW

EERS B T F A R C 40 N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com N E W S

New Menu Items: - Spiced Up Gourmet Grilled Cheese & Bacon

WALKING DISTANCE FROM THE CONVENTION CENTER, BENEDUM CENTER, HEINZ HALL, THE STRIP DISTRICT AND DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM THE AUGUST WILSON CENTER.

- Meat Lovers Omelet - Mediterranean Mixed Grill - Buffalo Shrimp Wrap

HAPPY HOUR MON- FRI 5PM – 7PM

& BLUES

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

WEEKEND

LIVE JAZZ

EVERY

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd, Glenshaw, PA 15116 • (412) 486-5513 S MAKE U YOUR P O T O N E S P! SHO

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Kitchen Hours: Monday-Saturday 6am - 3pm Sunday 6:30am - 2:30pm

LE CATERT US UPCOMYOUR G EVENTIN !

949 LIBERTY AVE.

949 LIBERTY AVE.

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

(412) 471-4243

(412) 392-2217

mahoneysrestaurant.com

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

2008 Readers -2013 ’ Choice

The Art of Thai Cuisine

Best Mex Restauraican nt Gift s Certificate Available!

NOW OPEN in the heart of Squirrel Hill!

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

OPEN Monday-Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9:30pm Burgatory {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BYOB (no corking fee) Lunch specials starting at $8!

1/S2eleoctff

appetizers

HAPPY H A HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

www.elcampesinospgh.com MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

ALL LUNCHES

$

7-$9

MON 11:30-3:00 TUE-THU 11:30-9:00 FRI-SUN 11:00-9:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT BYOB

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM 26

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412-521-8989 www.sukhothaibistro.com 5813 Forbes Avenue, Pgh., PA 15217

unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE

SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The restaurant’s offerings include tapas, hearty meat dishes with an array of international seasonings, and a mix-n-match, create-yourown section for mixed grill. KE

RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly triedand-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., and Thai toast make for Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. excellent starters, and the This immensely popular kitchen shows skill in Bloomfield institution, balancing the flavors of set in an old more complex curries neighborhood corner and meat entrees. KF bar, has built its www. per a p pghcitym reputation on o .c THE RED RING. 1015 enormous wood-fired Forbes Ave., Uptown. hamburgers: choice meat, 412-396-3550. This Duquesne ground in-house; fresh rolls; University venue is a decided cut and a variety of toppings. above student dining. The dining Regulars sit at the bar, and, on room is spacious, with a handbusy weekends, diners line up some fieldstone bar. The fare is to get in. KE contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty internationally inflected classics Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. like chipotle barbecue pork Located in a narrow former tenderloin and blackened chicken lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is alfredo. Artisanal touches like the casual, no-nonsense and a side dish of “chef’s grains” no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s complete the picture. KE Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF quality is high and the portions SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 are huge. The decor mixes Asian Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. themes with diner kitsch 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills in a delightful way. JF venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., pork, with all the sides you’d Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The expect, such as greens (cooked fare is contemporary American in pork broth), mac-and-cheese with a vaguely European and corn-filled corn bread. Get accent, featuring elegantly the sauce on the side to savor simple preparations of elemental, the smokiness of the meat. KF straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver with gorgonzola or scallops St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. At with blood-orange sauce. this revamped hotel, the offerings Flavorings such as lemon, garlic reflect a balance between timeand fennel reflect the kitchen’s honored dishes such as turtle Mediterranean heritage. LE soup and more modern fare, like a crabmeat-stuffed quesadilla. THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Steak-lovers will be pleased, but Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique adventurous burger fans should décor you can buy and a massive, check out the Light Up Night convivial Sunday brunch make this burger, topped with blue a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For crabmeat, bacon, avocado and the tea snob, the multi-page list is pepper-jack cheese. LE not to be missed. FJ

FULL LIST ONLINE


FR E E

Lunch

BUY ONE LUNCH AND 2 DRINKS, GET THE SECOND LUNCH FREE! Buy one lunch entree and 2 drinks and get the second entree of equal or lesser value for free. Valid Monday - Thursday only. Not valid with any other offers, coupons or specials. Not redemable for cash. Limit one offer per check. Must print and present o your server to recieve discount. Expires 7/3 coupon to 7/31/14.

MONDAY - THURSDAY

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LOCAL

BEAT

“I HATE BEING COMFORTABLE. NO MUSICIAN SHOULD EVER BE COMFORTABLE.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

SEALED IN WAX As a photographer, Don Patterson has always understood the power of images. Even so, when he encountered a figure of Whitney Houston during a visit to a wax museum last year, he was blown away. “I thought she was going to reach out and touch me,” he says with a laugh. “It humanized it. It made me think about her life.” This experience spawned an idea related to another of Patterson’s passions: Pittsburgh’s rich, but somewhat overlooked, role in the history of jazz, blues and R&B. How better to get people interested than with our very own wax museum? Patterson — founder of the nonprofit Pittsburgh Next Generation Music Legends, whose goal is to “record the great legacy of Pittsburgh African-American Music” — is currently in the process of putting together what he’s calling the Pittsburgh Jazz Giants Music Scene Traveling Wax Exhibition. The goal: to feature 10 to 12 wax figures of musicians who were born or lived in Pittsburgh, including George Benson, Mary Lou Williams, Lena Horne and Stanley Turrentine. At least some would be made by a company called LifeFormations, which has constructed wax figures for the Walt Disney Company and Baltimore’s Great Blacks in Wax Museum. There are also plans to include touchscreen kiosks, photographs and memorabilia, and the exhibit would be displayed at various educational institutions. Patterson, who helped bring the Stax Museum of American Soul Music’s “It Remains to Be Seen” exhibit to Pittsburgh in 2006, aims to have the exhibit ready by next June, assuming funding comes together. Currently, Patterson is trying to raise money with an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, which features incentives ranging from a “Thank You” wrist band for a $10 donation, to a plaque and status as a “Wax Figure Friend” for a contribution of $2,500. While Patterson certainly wouldn’t turn down funding from arts foundations, “I’m going directly to people who love music, who have a passion for Pittsburgh and a passion for history,” he says. “Kansas City has a jazz museum, Detroit has Motown, Memphis has Elvis, Stax … all these cities are celebrating their music legends and attracting tourism. But not here.”

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF JIMMY KATZ}

Leaving his heart in Pittsburgh: Sean Jones

“I’M GOING DIRECTLY TO PEOPLE WHO LOVE MUSIC.”

GONE, BUT NOT FOR GOOD

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more on the campaign: www.indiegogo.com/projects/pittsburghmusic-wax-museum

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{BY Y ZA ZACH ACH BRE BRENDZA} RENDZ R NDZ

R

ENOWNED JAZZ trumpeter Sean Jones

came to Pittsburgh in 2004, as an artist in residence at Duquesne University. In his 10 years here, Jones has brought back the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra, released several albums (including his latest, Im•pro•vise — Never Before Seen), and has now accepted a position as chair of brass at Boston’s Berklee College of Music. He plays a free show at Riverview Park Sat., July 26, then leaves for Boston the next day. Jones talked to us about his time in Pittsburgh and how things have changed in the past decade, for jazz and for Jones himself. CONTINUES ON PG. 30


GONE, BUT NOT FOR GOOD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

MELLON SQUARE

NEW RELEASE

SUMMER CONCERT SE R I E S

is ck!! back is ba BROUGHT TO YOU BY 96.9 BOB FM, Q929, AND PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

EVERY THURSDAY

SEAN JONES IM•PRO•VISE — NEVER BEFORE SEEN (MACK AVENUE)

Now thru August 21!

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS!

THIS THURSDAY,

JULY JU LY 24

TRIGGER HAPPY NEXT THURSDAY,

JULY 31

SHANNON AND THE MERGER NOON TO 1PM FOR ALL THE DETAILS

www. BOBFM969.com www.BOBFM969 .com www.QBURGH www .QBURGH.com .com

Sean Jones plays trumpet with a distinct style — strong in the upper register as well as the lower, with a tone that is equal parts lyrical, sanctified and fiery. But his albums have presented him in a variety of contexts, from straightahead jazz to gospel, occasionally adding vocalists to his group. Im•pro•vise, his seventh album as a leader, pares things back. He’s the only horn this time, backed up by his long-standing rhythm section (pianist Orrin Evans, bassist Luques Curtis, drummer Obed Calvaire). They took the old-school approach, recording live with everyone in the same room, and the intimacy can be felt. Jones and Evans play with an especially intimate rapport on the ballads; the pianist’s chording on “We’ll Meet Under the Stars” creates a warm setting for the muted trumpet. The two of them go it alone on album closer “Not While I’m Around,” which serves as a fitting conclusion. But the album features plenty of uptempo moments as well. “60th and Broadway” begins with a trumpet-drums duet and pays tribute to a busy intersection familiar to Jones from his Jazz at Lincoln Center days. “Dark Times” has a yearning melody line that gets suspenseful, with the band using open space to add to the mood. A brief rip through saxophonist Jackie McLean’s “Dr. Jekyll” tips the hat to its composer, while the quartet uses it more as a vehicle for interplay. Anyone who doesn’t know Jones’ discography would benefit from starting here. BY MIKE SHANLEY

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WHAT WAS THE JAZZ SCENE IN PITTSBURGH LIKE WHEN YOU FIRST CAME HERE IN 2004? The scene was great. A lot of the same cats are still on the scene. There was a couple clubs. Actually, I think it’s a little bit similar to what it is now. “[The] main thing that I saw lacking was just opportunities for musicians to do special projects. A lot of cats will play gigs, going out and playing standards, music from other people, but I didn’t necessarily see a lot of people doing a lot of their [own] music all the time. So that’s something I wanted to do when I first started. I started a band called The Mission Statement. I just wanted to give younger artists, younger jazz musicians a chance to write their own music for this group.

full-time position. And I would tell them over and over again, “You would really have to do a whole lot to get me to leave Pittsburgh.” I love Pittsburgh, man. This is home. I grew up an hour and 15 minutes from here. Although I didn’t grow up in Pittsburgh, I grew up with Pittsburgh in mind. And just moving here, I’ve been able to do a lot of wonderful things. And I’ve had a lot of life stuff happen while I was here: get married, get divorced, get married again. Meet new people. See people pass away, see people born.

HOW HAS THE JAZZ SCENE CHANGED? ARE THERE THINGS THAT ARE STILL LACKING? HAVE THERE BEEN IMPROVEMENTS? There are a ton of young musicians coming up that are — this new generation, they’re gung-ho. So they’re putting out their product. Pittsburgh has a couple new stars — like Brett Williams. The city is really proud of the people they produce, and Brett Williams, to me, is like one of the new jazz stars. It’s only a matter of time before he’s really doing big things. He already is, playing with Marcus Miller, but I really think he can do some big things. One of the things that I would say needs to change with the scene is that we’re spoiled in Pittsburgh. You can see Roger Humphries on Thursday night for free. That’s absolutely absurd. Not only y do musicians need to stand up and say, “I’m worth this,” but the audience nce has to say, “You know what? They are worth this. They are making me happy. They’re hey’re giving me an outlet.” But there’s here’s a lot right with the scene, a whole lott that’s right with it. There’s jazz seven nights ghts a week in multiple venues in Pittsburgh. h. That’s unheard of outside of New York, k, Chicago, New Orleans.

I want Pittsburgh to understand, I’m not leaving Pittsburgh. I’m going to do a job. And I’m hoping to bring that skill back home. Pittsburgh will still always be home, and I’ll always have a connection to it as long as the city will have me.

SEAN JONES

7 p.m. Sat., July 26. Riverview Park, Perry North. Free. 412-255-2493

WHAT IS YOUR DEFINING MOMENT AS A MUSICIAN/PROFESSOR IN PITTSBURGH? Wow, man. My defining moment as a performer in Pittsburgh? I would have to say the first time I played with the [Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra] and led the PJO. That was the first time that I realized that if you have a vision for something bigger than you, that that vision is what you live for. I learned that once you have an idea and it’s birthed through you, then that idea no longer belongs to you. It belongs to the world. And it’s it s your job to work for that idea. And that’s what I’ve been doing with the PJO. The PJO is not about Sean Jones; it’s about Pittsburgh.

“THERE’S A LOT RIGHT WITH THE SCENE, A WHOLE LOT THAT’S RIGHT WITH IT.”

WERE YOU U OFFERED OTHER OPPORTUNITIES, UNITIES, AS FAR AS BEING A PROFESSOR? OR? WHY HAVE VE YOU STUCK AROUND ROUND PITTSBURGH? RGH? While I was at Duquesne, I was teaching aching part-time at Oberlin. They would come back every ry year and offer a


My defining moment as a professor is when a student, who will remain nameless, came into a lesson crying. I didn’t have any notes to show ’em. I didn’t have any scales. All I had was a hug. And I realized that it’s more important to express spirit in music than it is to express notes in music. Then there was the moment when I got tenure. That was one of the happiest and saddest days of my career in higher education. I was happy, because I felt that it was a major accomplishment, and I was sad because I felt myself inside — just kind of feel a sense of complacency. I got tenure; now they can’t get rid of me. [Laughs.] I got a job for life. And I hate being comfortable. No musician should ever be comfortable. Going back to my move now: It’s a big step to potentially step away from a tenure position. But you have to grow as a person, and comfort doesn’t allow you the means to grow. So I just want to move on upward and take this gig and do the best I can in this gig, because it’s my duty. YOUR NEW ALBUM, IM•PRO•VISE, IS OUT. WHAT’S NEW AND DIFFERENT ABOUT THIS ALBUM? WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF ABOUT IT? This particular record, I’m proud of it because I’ve really defined what I’m about as a jazz musician. I believe in the tradition of the music. I believe certain traditions should still stay. Now, while saying that, I’m not denying that music needs to move forward. But my place in this music is to represent certain traditions: ensemble playing, ensemble synergy, mastery of musicianship, mastery of your art form and mastery of rhythm and improvisation. So I’ve pared down the ensemble. I went from a sextet-quintet format to just a quartet. So my connection with the rhythm section is really celebrated on this particular album. And also my writing style. YOUR SHOW SAT., JULY 26, AT RIVERVIEW PARK, WILL BE YOUR LAST ONE IN THE CITY. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THIS LAST PITTSBURGH GIG? WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU? It will be my last gig as a resident. It will not be my last gig. I want to make sure everybody knows that I’m gonna play in Pittsburgh as long as they’ll have me. It’s kind of like a going-away party. Like a bon voyage. That’s how I’m looking at it. It will be bittersweet. I’ll miss seeing everybody all the time. But I just want everyone to know that I’ll still be around. Sean Jones, even though he’s moving to Boston, his heart is still gonna be in Pittsburgh.

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

CASINO BULLDOGS STUN GUN (SELF-RELEASED)

Nine new tracks from the local indie-rock trio. Good tunes, running the gamut from riff-heavy guitar jams to — just as often — atmospheric stuff that sometimes recalls Joy Division. Casino Bulldogs hold it down with good tunes year after year, without calling that much attention to themselves: It’d be worth your while to get in on this hidden gem. CASINO BULLDOGS CD RELEASE 9 p.m. Fri., July 25. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. 412-621-4900

HARLAN TWINS “LEAVE IT ALONE” / “BURIED ALIVE” (WILD KINDNESS)

If you follow local music, you know what to expect from Harlan Twins: chooglin’ country-rock tunes that roll along like the Allegheny River. The band’s new 7-inch single doesn’t disappoint; the Aside is an uptempo jam ripe for summernight dancing, and the B-side is a bit more of a mid-tempo anthem with roots in Appalachian folk. Blink and you’ll miss the chance to pick up a great Pittsburgh record. HARLAN TWINS 7-INCH RELEASE 8:30 p.m. Sat., July 26. Bayardstown Social Club, 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. www.facebook.com/bayardstown

R. COOK TOMORROW’S YESTERDAYS (SELF-RELEASED)

This is the first original studio release from local musician R. Cook … at 66 years of age. And — what do you know? — it’s pretty good! The album-opening title track takes a page from Neil Young’s plugged-in rock stuff, then Cook goes acoustic for a few. He writes love songs, but with an almost religious vibe, giving a glimpse into an interesting mind. It’s a notch above a lot of singer-songwriter material that comes across my desk. Cook is a character, and the good kind. AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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SIZZLING

S T I H R E M M U S ON ALSO

DVD

AND YOU WILL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD

DIRTY HEADS

GOATWHORE

G-EAZY

SOUND OF CHANGE

LIVE AT ROCKPALAST

THESE THINGS HAPPEN

CONSTRICTING RAGE OF THE MERCILESS

MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO

JOE

JUDAS PRIEST

MASTODON

BRIDGES

REDEEMER OF SOULS

ONCE MORE ‘ROUND THE SUN

NOTHING MORE

SEPTICFLESH

TRAMPLED BY TURTLES

NOTHING MORE

TITAN

WILD ANIMALS

BB KING THE LIFE OF RILEY

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065

LIKE E US S ON N E W S

COMET, COME TO ME

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 24

31ST STREET PUB. Interface, Cynical Existence, Vanguard, Agnes Wired for Sound. Electronic Saviors III compilation release show. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Sevendust. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Run River North, The Lighthouse & the Whaler. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Wicked Chief. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARMONY MUSEUM. Kardaz. Harmony. 888-821-4822. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gambler’s Mark. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KATZ PLAZA. Scott & Rosanna. Downtown. 412-456-6666. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. No Limits: C Street Brass w/ DJ Jakeisrain. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. SMILING MOOSE. Laura Stevenson. South Side. 412-431-4668. ST. FRANCIS FIELDS. Gone South. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Tropidelic. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

The Recipe. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. 412-487-6259. SPACE. Sleep Experiments, The Van Allen Belt. Downtown. 412-325-7723. STAGE AE. Clutch, American Sharks, Fist Fight In The Parking Lot. North Side. 412-229-5483. STATION SQUARE. Molly Hatchet, River Trail. Station Square. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Richard Buckner, The Red Western, Kevin Finn. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 26

ALTAR BAR. Influx, Road Runer, Cape Cod, Something Dear. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Harlan Twins, Roger Harvey & the Wild Life, Trapper’s Harp. Strip District.

CATTIVO. Astronautalis & Band. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. CLUB CAFE. Matt Fuchs & Amanda, My Cardboard Spaceship Adventure, The Jellyrox, Best Friend Fight, Switch Kids (Early) Gasoline Genes, The Hoffman Road Band, Douglas & the Iron Lung (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium, Cannibal Corpse, Suicide Silence, Body Count, more. 724-947-7400. FRANKIE I’S. Zero Fame, Brian Belonzi. Washington. 724-743-3636. GOOSKI’S. Oneida, Dirty Faces, Gangwish. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658.

MP 3 MONDAY THE DANZAS

FRI 25

222 ORMSBY. Ma Jolie. Mt. Oliver. ALTAR BAR. 54th Regiment, TBG, Shortfuze, Fam Ross, Briefcase Wood, YoungPat, Playa. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Casino Bulldogs, Velcro Shoes, Patton. Casino Bulldogs & Velcro Shoes Dual CD Release. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Slaid Cleaves (Early) Jester Jenkins The Old E Allstars (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Nicholas Hohman, Brandon Schmitt, David Dondero. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. The B-Side Players American Giant. Elysium. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Steelesque, The Me Toos. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. RX Bandits, The Dear Hunter, From Indian Lakes. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OAKDALE STREET FAIR. The Dave Iglar Band. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Lovebettie. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Rusty Haywhackers, The Wandering Coalition, the Weathered Road,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from The Danzas; stream or download

“Torn”

on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


HAMBONE’S. American Giant Band American Giant. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. 412-687-2555. KNOB HILL PARK. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Antz Marching. Dave Matthews Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. Tribute Band. Wexford. 724-935-3090. LA CASA NARCISI. ONE 10 LOUNGE. Austin Drive Band. Gibsonia. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. 724-444-4744. Downtown. 412-874-4582. THE LEGACY THEATRE. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Pittsburgh Doo Wop Big Band. Gold Series. 5 year anniversary Allison Park. 412-635-8080. party w/ DJ Scratch & DJ Bamboo. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. Sylvania, A Friendly Gesture, ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Lane 5, Home Again, Talion. South Side. 412-431-2825. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RUGGER’S PUB. NIED’S HOTEL. Street 80s Night w/ DJ Level. Lawrenceville. Connor. South Side. 412-781-9853. 412-381-1330. RAMADA INN www. per HOTEL & pa pghcitym CONFERENCE .co BRILLOBOX. CENTER. Switch. #danceCRUSH: #FLEXXXX. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ST. BASIL CATHOLIC PARISH. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Gone South. Carrick. 412-431-8800. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Jester Jenking. Lawrenceville. Downtown. 412-465-0290. 412-682-0177. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. TUGBOAT’S. The Dave South Side. 412-431-2825. Iglar Band. East Pittsburgh. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-829-1992. 412-481-7227. WALNUT STREET. Donora, Dancing Queen. Shadyside. 412-321-4422. BRILLOBOX. ILLUSIONS.

DJS

THU 24

FRI 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 26

SUN 27

SUN 27

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. KBD Trio, 8 Cylinder, AA Arm, SNWV. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jenny Lewis, The Apache Relay. Millvale. 866-468-3401. STAGE AE. Jack White, Benjamin Booker. North Side. 412-229-5483. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. The Holidays. Monroeville.

MON 28 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Maxwell Hughes (of the Lumineers), Pairdown. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

TUE 29

CLUB CAFE. Lukas Nelson & P.O.T.R., Derek Woodz Band. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Psychotic Reaction, Dumplings. Bloomfield. STAGE AE. The Offspring, Bad Religion, Pennywise, The Vandals North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 30 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Still Not Sober. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. BRILLOBOX. Reignwolf. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. SMILING MOOSE. Cheers Elephant. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Main Squeeze. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

w/ Bezier, RedRedRed, Max+Mara, Cutups, Edgar Um, Tella, Vaneck. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

WED 30 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B WED 30

STAGE AE. Jurassic 5, Dilated Peoples, Beat Junkies, MC Supernatural. North Side. 412-229-5483.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers w/Pat Scanga. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARTWOOD ACRES. 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. MOONDOG’S. Post-Blues Festival Jam w/ Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. TEDDY’S. The Satin Hearts. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SUN 27

HARTWOOD ACRES. 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

TUE 29 SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700. U.S. STEEL TOWER. Jimmy Adler Band. Downtown.

JAZZ THU 24

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CRAFTON PARK. RML Jazz. Crafton. 412-370-9621. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844.

FRI 25

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 26

BLUES THU 24

BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District.

FRI 25

HARTWOOD ACRES. 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENDREW’S.32-20 Blues Band. 724-375-5959. MOONDOG’S. Post-Blues Festival Jam w/ Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 26 CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Border Ride. North Side. 412-237-3400.

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Roby ‘Supersax” Edwards The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FRESCOS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Wexford. 724-935-5950. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. LEMONT. Dave Crisci, Maria Sargent. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NINE ON NINE. Charlie Sanders & Ron Wilson. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. Sean Jones. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

EARLY WARNINGS

WYNDHAM GRAND PITTSBURGH. The Boilermakers. Benefits the Homeless Children’s Education Fund. 412-562-0154.

SUN 27 STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. 724-423-5604.

MON 28

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 29

KATZ PLAZA. Kevin Howard. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker 3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 30

{WED., SEPT. 10}

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Roby ‘Supersax” Edwards. Homewood. 412-731-3080. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. WALNUT GRILL, BRIDGEVILLE. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621. THE WASHINGTON PLACE. The Donna Bailey Jazz Trio. Gibsonia.

Wavves

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District {SAT., OCT. 18}

Judas Priest

Petersen Events Center, 3719 Terrace St., Oakland {SAT., NOV. 01}

Blonde Redhead Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

ACOUSTIC THU 24 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Amanda Heartneck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Tom & Katie Show. Downtown. 412-255-0525. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

FRI 25 FOUR DIRECTIONS CENTER. Ernie Hawkins. Gibsonia. 412-403-1146. PITTSBURGH WINERY. River Whyless, Masters of American Music. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 26

WORLD SUN 27

HAMBONE’S. Hambone’s International Night. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

REGGAE FRI 25 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

FULL LIST ONLINE ww.

w FARMERS @ paper pghcitym FIREHOUSE. Joe .co WESTMORELAND Matzzie. Strip District. COUNTRY CLUB. 412-471-1900. The Flow Band. 724-237-2354. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SAT 26

WED 30 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BUHL COMMUNITY PARK. Eve & Tracy. North Side. 412-322-5058. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. Eve Goodman. North Side. 412-322-5058. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

SUN 27

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. The Flow Band. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

CLASSICAL FRI 25 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: A SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION. Dvorak’s Carnival Overture, Brahms Symphony No. 3, Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 27 KEN DANCHIK, DON FELLOWS. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 25 SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. South Park Gospel Music Night. South Park. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SAT 26 UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

SUN 27 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Daniel Teadt. Benefits Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

WED 30 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


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SUNDAY 27

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7:30p.m.

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT Seven Springs. 800-452-2223. Tickets available at the gate. Through July 27.

HENRY HEYMANN THEATRE Oakland. 412-561-6000. Tickets: picttheatre.org. Through Aug 2.

Boyz II Men

The Milk Carton Kids KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER East Liberty. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 24 Side Show

ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL Carnegie. Tickets: stage62. org or 412-429-6262. Through July 27.

Sevendust ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Gemini Syndrome & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7:30p.m.

Rib & Wing Festival

Woman and Scarecrow

MONDAY 28 Caskey

A Symphonic Celebration HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 7p.m.

Boyz II Men WEDNESDAY, JULY 23 HEINZ HALL

Summer Safari PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM Highland Park. Tickets: pittsburghzoo.org. 6:30p.m.

Jazz Attack ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY Moon Twp. Tickets: mcgjazz.org or 412-322-0800. 7:30p.m.

Molly Hatchet / River Trail STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Grey Blues 20th Annual Pittsburgh Blues Festival HARTWOOD ACRES. All ages event. Tickets: pghblues.com. Through July 27.

Comedian Jersey LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa.

TUESDAY 29 Through July 26.

org or 412-392-4900. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 26

Pittsburgh Power vs. Philadelphia Soul

Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 1p.m.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 5p.m.

Monty Python’s Spamalot BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through Aug. 3.

The Summer Nationals Tour feat. The Offspring, Bad Religion, The Vandals and Pennywise

Bill Maher

Jam on Walnut STAGE AE North Side. All ages Donora / Dancing Queen show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com

HEINZ HALL Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.

WALNUT STREET Shadyside. Free event. 7p.m.

or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

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COLORFUL HISTORY

HOFFMAN PORTRAYS A BLOATED DEPRESSIVE TRYING TO FIND LIGHT IN A DARK WORLD

{BY AL HOFF} Alejandro Jodorowsky, the filmmaker who made cult classics El Topo (1970) and The Holy Mountain (1973), returns with a new film, The Dance of Reality, an autobiographical fable about his youth in a small Chilean village.

Jaime (Brontis Jodorowsky, right) gets read

Y P I, S

CP APPROVED

The film starts out a bit loopy, but soon settles into a relatively coherent, if at times surrealistic, narrative: Young Alejandro (Jeremias Herskovits) is a sensitive child, intrigued by the mystical and the metaphysical, and buffeted by his domineering father, Jaime (Brontis Jodorowsky, the director’s real-life son). Throughout the tale, Jaime is variously a circus performer, a Communist, a lingerie salesman, a groomsman, a carpenter’s assistant and an enlightened soul. The son’s journey is more observant, but he does do a stint as a firehouse mascot. Intertwined with the loose plot are digressions — some thoughtful, others fantastic — into the broader issues of politics, labor rights, religion, individual identity and mucho death. Jodorowsky, now 85, also appears as a Greek chorus and adviser. Throughout there are exaggerated costumes, bizzaro characters and set-pieces (this is the sort of film where a line like “I don’t want to live in a world of dressed-up dogs” actually makes sense), and the odd bit of visual trickery. It’s clearly a very personal work, but it’s visually captivating, frequently funny and a treat for fans of the idiosyncratic filmmaker. In Spanish, with subtitles. Fri., July 25Tue., July 29. Melwood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

No, it’s not Cats — it’s Dwayne Johnson as Hercules! The modern he-man stars as the ancient-world he-man in Brett Ratner’s actioner. Also on deck, such noted British hams … er … thespians as Ian McShane and John Hurt. Hercules starts Fri., July 25. N E W S

{BY AL HOFF}

The thrill is gone: Philip Seymour Hoffman

T

HE END OF the Cold War was a di-

saster for the spy genre. But adapt we must, and the internationalintrigue entertainment complex has stumbled, with varying success, into the post-9/11 realm, where the enemy is more ill-defined. But aspects of the Cold War carry on, as seen in veteran spy-novelist John Le Carre’s A Most-Wanted Man, here shepherded to the screen by Anton Corbijn. The tale has been updated to reflect today’s geo-political concerns, but much about the film — from its grubby European location and weary spies to its pervasive sense of impotence against institutions — feels contemporary to the downbeat, character-driven spy thrillers of the late 1960s and ’70s. The tension revolves around Issa, a Russian-Chechen seeking refuge in Hamburg. The Germans and Americans think he’s an Islamic terrorist and want him picked up. But Gunther Bachmann (Philip Seymour Hoffman), who toils for a secret arm of German intelligence, hopes that

Issa will lead him to a bigger fish, who may be funneling money to terrorists under the guide of Islamic charities. The investigating, scrambling and dissembling play out over several days, as Bachmann enlists several allies — an immigration lawyer (Rachel McAdams), a banker (Willem Dafoe) and a well-placed CIA agent (Robin Wright). But allegiances, whether to the state or self, are held close, and all players scheme, undermine and deceive toward competing outcomes.

A MOST-WANTED MAN DIRECTED BY: Anton Corbijn STARRING: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Rachel McAdams, Willem Dafoe, Robin Wright Starts Fri., July 25. AMC Loews

CP APPROVED We’re more than a decade into our War on Terror, and Most-Wanted underscores that this murky quest is already becoming as numbing and unwinnable for its covert warriors as the Cold War

was for its shadowy agents. Against the grays of Hamburg — cloudy skies and concrete buildings — are the moral and legal grays of, as the CIA agent reminds us, “making the world a safer place.” And so the players, in tones from light to dark, move forward, even as the game board shifts beneath them. Most-Wanted Man is mildly tense, but don’t expect action sequences. When people aren’t talking, they’re silently brooding. (Hoffman’s character smiles once, and even then it’s sardonic.) I’m a fan of tales about rumpled spies who spend the night drinking alone, so this was an enjoyable two hours for me. It is bittersweet watching Hoffman, in one of his last roles, portray a bloated depressive trying to find bits of light in a dark world — though of course his portrayal of such a character is effortless. It’s also fun watching Hoffman and Dafoe spar, even as it brought to mind all the other scenerychewing actors that Hoffman will never parry with: a real-life gloomy note in an already moody fictional tale. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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to walk, you may find your own feet itching for the Camino. Producer Annie O’Neill will present the film both nights. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 5:30 and 8 p.m. nightly, Wed., July 23, and Thu., July 24. Melwood (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW AND SO IT GOES. Here’s a film that seemed to give up caring — from its meaningless title right through to its inevitable “storybook” resolution. In between, some more lackluster stuff, seemingly pulled from discarded soap-opera scripts. But forget the nonsense about people randomly going to jail and surprise grandkids: The “meat” of the story is a torturous, yet wholly predictable, courtship between two mismatched neighbors of a certain age (Michael Douglas and Diane Keaton). Rob Reiner’s film is supposed to be lighthearted, a la Nora Ephron or even Nancy Meyers, but the sit-com jokes and worn-out characterizations — Keaton’s flibberty, Douglas is an ass — fall flat. Reiner has a small cameo, and his character’s bad toupee is the funniest thing in this movie. Starts Fri., July 25. (Al Hoff) LUCY. Scarlett Johansson stars in Luc Bresson’s sci-fi thriller about a woman who develops super-human abilities and seeks revenge on those who harmed her. Starts Fri., July 25. THE PURGE: ANARCHY. It’s 2023, and it’s “Purge N ight,” the annual evening during which murder is legal and even encouraged. It clears out the troublesome underclass who have nowhere to hide; killing is one’s patriotic duty toward keeping America safe and prosperous. Or at least that’s what the government assures us. Yeah, the set-up of James DeMonaco’s horror thriller is some twisted shit, but it’s probably fair to say we get the movies we deserve.

Wish I Was Here This is a junky thriller, but in its own scrambled way, it’s got something to say about the American propensity for violence, our dysfunctional relationship with government and related authorities, and the real-world effects of letting income inequality play out “naturally.” Last year’s The Purge focused on one affluent family, and was chiefly a home-invasion tale with predictable results. This time, we’re out in the streets with a small band of good folks unlucky enough to be stranded on Purge Night, and then hunted. The broader issues regarding class, race and state-sanctioned violence are more explicit in this sort-of-sequel, and these ordinary people are more sympathetic. Anarchy is still plenty exploitive, but is at least more provocative (without taxing any brains) than the first outing. That’s not a recommendation, necessarily, but you can’t deny that a lot of the material feels timely and worth exploring. (AH) SEX TAPE. To spice up their sex lives, a married couple (and parents to two movie-moppets) makes

THRILLING.

KEEPS YOU ON EDGE THROUGH EVERY TWIST AND TURN.” Catherine Mayer,

“A TENSE, TWISTY AND TERRIFIC SPY THRILLER.”

a sex tape. A three-hour sex tape … based on the zillion-year-old guide, The Joy of Sex. And because lazy screenwriters love the tech-impaired, their video winds up in the cloud by mistake. Even less believable, the whole mess starts because Dad cycles through iPads like underpants and gives away his old ones — fully loaded — to assorted strangers. So the pair — Jason Segel and Cameron Diaz — spend a frantic evening trying to get the devices back, including one that went to her soon-to-be-boss (Rob Lowe). It’s a shaggy-dog tale, directed by Jake Kasdan, that might have been amusing if it had any laughs or fresh ideas at all, which it doesn’t. Yes, the two stars spend a lot of time buck naked as promised, but with so many strategically placed props and discreet camera angles, don’t expect more than butts and some side boob. (AH) WALKING THE CAMINO: SIX WAYS TO SANTIAGO. Lydia B. Smith’s documentary lets you travel along as six individuals tackle the Camino de Santiago, the 500mile hike across Spain. The ancient route was once traversed by Catholic pilgrims, and still today, many of the hikers regard the journey as a spiritual quest. But for others, it is a bucket-list-type expedition (the scenery is marvelous), or simply a chance to unplug from the world and walk for several weeks. (The Camino was also the subject of the recent Martin Sheen film The Way.) Smith takes us across the meadows and mountains, to the hostels and churches that serve as way stations, and through towns large and small en route. The six walkers share their struggles (both physical and emotional), as well as their triumphs and their ultimate self-discoveries. It’s a pleasant armchair visit to the popular undertaking, but be warned: If you like

WISH I WAS HERE. In this dramedy from Zach Braff, Aidan Bloom (Braff) is a thirtysomething facing assorted crises: He has no luck finding acting jobs; his father (Mandy Patinkin) is dying; his wife (Kate Hudson) is fed up; and the kids are tossed out of yeshiva for lack of funds. Oh, and his weirdo brother (Josh Gad) is dating a furry. Most of this is played for laughs, while the more serious stuff is given the schmaltzy treatment. The meandering film is mildly amusing, but when it aims to be quirky or offbeat, the effort clearly shows. The tale mines relatable situations, but Braff doubles down on silly rather than illuminating (which, done well, can still be funny). And somebody should stop Braff from writing terrible aphorisms like, “If you hide in a fishbowl, people can see you.” Well, duh. In case you forgot, Braff raised some funds for this film on Kickstarter, so if you were an “associate producer,” you might want to see how your investment turned out. Starts Fri., July 25 (AH)

REPERTORY ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Big Fish, July 24; Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, July 24; Science of Sleep, July 23-24; Edward Scissorhands, July 23-24; Coraline, July 23-24; E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial, July 25-29 and July 31; Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, July 25-29 and July 31; Top Gun, July 25-27 and July 29-31; Total Recall (1990), July 25-27 and July 30-31; and Beverly Hills Cop, July 26-28 and July 30-31. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www. rowhousecinema.com. $5-9.

Peter Travers,

“PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN IS BRILLIANT.”

Mucho Gusto

Kenneth Turan,

Sorcerer (1977)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7/23 @ 7:30pm, 7/25 @ 10:00pm, 7/27 @ 7:00pm

PHILIP

SEYMOUR HOFFMAN

RACHEL

MCADAMS

WILLEM

DAFOE

ROBIN

AND

WRIGHT

Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

7/24 @ 7:00pm, 7/25 @ 7:30pm, 7/26 @ 10:00pm, 7/27 @ 4:00pm

Film Kitchen - 7/26@ 6:00pm 48 Hour Film Fest

Best of Screening and Awards

SELECT ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, JULY 25

PITTSBURGH Cinemark Robinson PITTSBURGH The Manor WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Township (800) FANDANGO #2153 Theatre (412) 422-7729 Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES • NO PASSES ACCEPTED

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7/28 @ 7:00pm

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

CINEMA IN THE PARK. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Wed., July 23 (Schenley), and Sat., July 26 (Riverview). Big Miracle, Thu., July 24 (Brookline); Fri., July 25 (Arsenal); Sat., July 26 (Grandview); and Sun., July 27 (Schenley). Frozen, Tue., July 29 (West End/ Elliott Overlook), and Thu., July 31 (Brookline). 42, Wed., July 30 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-2552493 or www.citiparks.net. Free BLAZING SADDLES. OK, so cowboys and beans don’t mix, but Mel Brooks’ riotous send-up of Westerns, riddled with gleefully offensive jokes, holds together just fine. This 1974 laugh-fest stars Gene Wilder, Cleavon Little and the incomparable Madeline Kahn. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 23. AMC Loews. $5 SORCERER. William Friedkin’s 1977 thriller adapts the French novel Wages of Fear, as done in the classic 1953 film. But the nail-biting plot is still the same, as a truck driver (Roy Schneider) transports explosives over a dangerous mountain road. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 23; 10 p.m. Fri., July 25; and Sun., July 27. Hollywood


Sex Tape LIFE OF BRIAN. It’s not the story of Jesus, but that of some guy named Brian who lived nearby. The Monty Python gang takes on the N ew Testament in this irreverent 1979 comedy. 7 p.m. Thu., July 24; 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 25; 10 p.m. Sat., July 26; and 4 p.m. Sun., July 27. Hollywood MUCHO GUSTO. Wordsmith Robert Isenberg — formerly of Pittsburgh, and once a regular CP contributor — relocated to Costa Rica more than a year ago and found work as a reporter. He returns to the ’Burgh tonight to screen a selection of short films from his travels and encounters in Latin America. Subjects include: a cigar factory in Nicaragua, attempting to scuba dive, a dog hotel, and Isenberg’s own bike ride from the Caribbean to the Pacific. 7 p.m. Fri., July 25. ModernFormations, 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. robertisenberg@yahoo.com. $2 suggested donation

Medusa and the Kraken sea monster along the way. The film features stop-motion animation from Ray Harryhausen. The 1981 film continues an ongoing Sunday-night series of staff picks. 8 p.m. Sun., July 27. Regent Square 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT. It’s becoming a summer tradition: Form a film-production team; be assigned a genre, a prop, a character and a line of dialogue; and shoot a short film in just 48 hours. Pittsburgh’s teams have finished their films; judges have seen them; and tonight, you can screen the finalists and see the prizes awarded. 6 p.m. Mon., July 28. Hollywood YOJIMBO. Akira Kurasawa directs this 1961 film about an unemployed samurai (Toshiro Mifune) who discovers he can benefit from an ongoing battle between two rival clans. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., July 30. Melwood. $2

RISKY BUSINESS. Paul Brickman directs this 1983 comedy about a teen (Tom Cruise, in Ray-Bans) who throws a big party when his parents are away. 10 p.m. Fri., July 25, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 26. Oaks FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent film does a special road edition at the Hollywood Theater — and instead of featuring just a few filmmakers, curator Matthew Day offers 16 shorts by 14 local artists. Most works are only a few minutes long. “Pittsburgh Winter” is a charming, fanciful comedy by Marcus Morelli. “Dreaming Ant” is Chris Smalley’s black-and-white homage to the Bloomfield store that was Pittsburgh’s last brick-and-mortal videorental emporium. Ivette Spradlin offers the playful “Courtney’s Birthday at Moraine State Park.” N ils Hanczar’s “God Hates Radiation” is a delightfully sick-’n’-twisted animation employing appropriated audio. In the experimental “Lost Kingdom,” Madelyn Roehrig juxtaposes Hindu Buddhist sculpture and contemporary architecture. Tess Allard’s “Bird.land” uses voiceover to tell a creepy supernatural story, with evocative images from Allegheny Cemetery. “Helen Iris: Watch Dog” is a comedy about a misguided busybody, made by Day himself, Gayle Pazerski and Brad Stephenson. Julie Sokolow’s “Making House Calls” profiles Dr. Jim Withers’ Operation Safety Net, which does street medicine for Pittsburgh’s homeless. Sarah Kaili Chamizo and Lakeeba Coleman offer music videos (the former spoofy, the latter earnest). Andy Kellemen profiles “A Patisserie in Pittsburgh.” Sean Ferris tells a dystopic, dialogueless murder tale in “Barking Lane.” Michael Pisano blends live action and animation in the dreamlike “Loss.” And Scott Whiteman, of the Everything is Terrible! collective, offers three mischievously — and hilariously — tweaked 1980s anti-drug videos. 7 p.m. Sat., July 26 (6 p.m. reception). Hollywood. $5. (Bill O’Driscoll) CLASH OF THE TITANS. In this actioner from Desmond Davis, set in mythical Greece, Perseus (Harry Hamlin) goes questing, battling the snake-headed

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The Purge: Anarchy INEQUALITY FOR ALL. Jacob Kornbluth’s documentary give former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich a platform to discuss the current state of income inequality in the United States, i.e. why do so few people have so much money, and what does it mean for the rest of us? The 2013 film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 31. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free VACATION. Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) wants to take his family to Wally World, but the trip turns into a nightmare. Harold Ramis directs this 1983 comedy adapted from John Hughes’ short story. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 31. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[STAGE]

WALL TO WALL

“IT’S A ’60S DORM ROOM THEY’RE AFRAID OF.”

{BY KAYLA BERKEY}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WALLDOGS July 25-Aug. 2. Hatch Arts Collective at Artists Image Resource, 518 Foreland St., North Side. $10. www.hatcharts.org

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[COMEDY]

MAHER , MAHER PLEASE Hatch Arts’ Walldogs (from left to right): Parag S. Gohel, Adil Mansoor and Mallory Fuccella {PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL KRUSE}

Advertisements, public murals and graffiti might be a bit more public than the inner 5-year-old’s urge to grab some markers and have at a vertical surface, but they are all related in Walldogs. The new stage work offers a mix of stories examining the stuff people put on walls. Walldogs, a play and art-making event from Pittsburgh’s Hatch Arts Collective, shifts back and forth between four different stories connected by an 8-foottall wall that the characters paint on, graffiti and contemplate throughout the performance. They even give the wall a couple of awkward hugs. The interwoven stories include: a 1920s “walldog” staking out homes along the highway for the prime place to paint a Campbell’s Soup ad; a contemporary public-art muralist; a young graffiti artist with big ideas; and the Biblical King Belshazzar’s infamous writing on the wall. Playwright Paul Kruse explores wall metaphors in comedic and intriguing ways throughout, heightened by director Adil Mansoor’s transformation of a wall into a dynamic and reflective space. The two-person cast of Mallory Fuccella and Parag S. Gohel offer seemingly effortless transitions between their characters and the relationships they build within each setting. Their talents particularly shine during the tension-filled scenes involving a high-strung nonprofit arts coordinator and a subdued hipster artist who must create a mural under a four-day deadline. Fuccella and Gohel each have their turn at offering rants, breakdowns and playful jabs at working in the nonprofit world. Walldogs runs at the North Side’s Artists Image Resource, where audience seating will literally line the walls of the long printmaking studio. Each performance includes an invitation for the audience to stick around afterward for an art-making activity inspired by the play’s wall art, led by Pittsburgh artists Katie Kaplan and Saric Feng. Hatch Arts Collective was created three years ago by Kruse, director Mansoor and producer Nicole Shero. As its second full-length production (not counting workshops and other performance projects), Walldogs sticks to the group’s mission of bringing together artists from different mediums to create collaborative works. If you have ever used a Pittsburgh mural as a landmark, or been impressed by or annoyed with the sheer volume of CHU’s graffiti around the city, you will certainly want to take a look at Walldogs.

Bill Maher

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

U

NFLAPPABLY IRREVERENT comedian Bill Maher has been a force in national politics for more than 20 years, but he’s not above Googling cities on his tours, even when not much is happening. “I always find out who the [congressional] representative is,” says the host of HBO’s Real Time during a phone interview, name-checking Rep. Mike Doyle. Though he’s reliably on the left politically, Maher has a penchant for offending people across the idelogical spectrum, as with a tweet last week — after this interview took place – in which he likened Israel’s attack on Hamas to slapping a “crazy woman.” Still, with an environment and middle class in peril, the comic will have much to rant about this Saturday at Heinz Hall.

A BIG ISSUE IN PENNSYLVANIA IS FRACKING, WHICH CONTINUES DESPITE SCIENTIFIC WARNINGS AND POPULAR OBJECTIONS. AS WITH RECENT SUPREME COURT DECISIONS, IT SEEMS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

CORPORATIONS ALWAYS WIN IF THEY HAVE A STAKE IN AN ISSUE. IS IT POSSIBLE TO BEAT MONEYED INTERESTS? Well, we live in a democracy, theoretically, but for it to work people have to participate. … If we extract all the carbon that’s in the ground right now, which is what the Koch brothers want to do, game over for the planet. We’re already teetering on the brink, and these people want to go on making money.

BILL MAHER

8 p.m. Sat., July 26. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $58.75-78. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

I never understand what goes on in rich people’s minds. What, they’re going to buy their own air? When the oceans swallow up the cities, what are they going to do? Move inland? I guess you can do that. It just seems like it’d be more sensible,

because you already have all the money in the world, to live on the money you already have — which you will never be able to spend anyway — and do right by the planet. But they don’t want to. It was only a few years ago we were hearing, “Well, we don’t know fracking causes earthquakes.” Now, we pretty much do know, and the argument has moved to, “Well, yeah, it causes earthquakes, but what’s a few earthquakes?” [Editor’s note: Studies have linked underground storage of hydrofracturing wastewater to seismic activity in some states.] POLLS SHOW MAJORITIES OF AMERICANS FAVOR GAY MARRIAGE, POT LEGALIZATION, UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE, ABORTION RIGHTS AND ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE, WHILE CHURCH ATTENDANCE AND GUN OWNERSHIP ARE DECLINING. AS SOMEONE WHO MAKES A LIVING MAKING FUN OF THE COUNTRY FOR BEING STUPID, DO YOU CONTINUES ON PG. 44


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MAHER, PLEASE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

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C H A U TA U Q U A I N S T I T U T I O N • C I W E B . O R G 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

“TWO STATES HAVE REGULAR, ROLL-UP-A-FATTYAND-WATCH-SPONGEBOB MARIJUANA, WHICH IS PRETTY AMAZING.” But the rear guard is going to fight this until the end. The crypt-keeper’s claw is going to come out to grab us, and unfortunately these are the people who are the most organized. We’re entering the midterms and that coalition I was describing — the black and the young and the stoned and the gay — don’t come out. The people who come out are the ones who make farting noises when they get up. It’s the fucking 80-year-old white people who come out, and that’s why we have a Congress Obama can’t work with. WHY THIS SHIFT NOW? WASN’T YOUR GENERATION SUPPOSED TO LIBERALIZE THE COUNTRY? America changes, but it changes more slowly than everybody else. We were one of the last countries to give up slavery. SHOULD LIBERALS MOCK RELIGION AS MUCH AS YOU DO, CONSIDERING IN THE POOREST NEIGHBORHOODS OF PLACES LIKE PITTSBURGH, CHURCHES ARE OFTEN THE LAST INSTITUTION STILL THERE AND WORKING TO BETTER THINGS? I have never denied religions do good work: Catholic charities feed the poor and so forth. [But] there is absolutely no reason you need to believe in a Bronze Age myth to do that when there are plenty of charities that don’t. So if you are asking me if I am going to stop making fun of religion — which does so much more harm than good —because it does some good, the answer is “no.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[ART]

DIMENSIONS {BY NICK KEPPLER}

And weep: from Veronica Cianfrano’s “For Crying Out Loud”

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WORRY ABOUT IT GETTING TOO SMART? [Laughs.] I’d be gratified if it did get too smart. I am a citizen and a patriot before I’m a comedian, so even if it did take away some material, I think it would be a great thing, and you’re right: The country is changing. It’s finally becoming more like a Western European country, and this is what’s making the Tea Party types’ heads explode. … A third of the country can get gay-married, a third has medical marijuana. Two states have regular, roll-up-a-fattyand-watch-SpongeBob marijuana, which is pretty amazing. We have six openly gay congresspeople. We have a Hindu in Congress, two Muslims [and] a bisexual, and there’s a gay guy in the NFL. This is what’s making them crazy: This confluence of black and gay and pot and Latino. It’s a ’60s dorm room they’re afraid of.

Art group Manifesto-ish has had four exhibits in as many years, but it has never had a gallery. The collective, formed by four former graduate students at Philadelphia’s University of the Arts, runs an art space that exists only online (www.manifesto-ish.com). Arranged like Google Maps’ Street View, the gallery features 2-D art hanging on virtual 3-D “walls.” Visitors even see fellow patrons appear as ghost-like figures. Shows have presented famous paintings altered through Instagram filters, and artwork appropriated from the backgrounds of video games. “There is a lot of tongue-in-cheek,” says co-founder Veronica Cianfrano. “We prefer art that can only be done digitally.” Now, the group (with three members still based in Philadelphia) has moved its vision into the real world. But the works in Digital Divide, at Assemble Gallery, still concern data. Manifesto-ish co-founder Matt Zigler’s “Natura Technica” is a series of inkjet portraits of endangered species spliced into digital collages of charts and graphs about their numbers, habitat, physiology, etc. “These are animals that would not exist anymore except for this scientific effort to save them,” says Zigler. “The animal and the information go hand in hand.” For “Profile Pictures,” Lauren McCarty recreated some 50 of her friends’ Facebook profile pictures using the primitive cyanotype photography process, creating a wall of blue-ish outlines. Her “Life Line” is a long series of life events, written like status updates on clear panes of plastic, laboriously transplanting a social-media staple into physical space. To create “For Crying Out Loud,” Cianfrano culled YouTube videos of people crying. She sketched 20 of them, and the portraits are exhibited in a grid while projections of the videos themselves play over top, serially. The teary vloggers range from a frustrated agoraphobe to a teenager whose friends ditched him at a carnival. Jessie Ann Clark’s “Message in a Bottle” is a collection of household bottles (drink, perfume, spice, etc.) containing notes she wrote, ranging from poetry to grocery lists and her thoughts on a 2012 shooting at a Seattle coffee shop where she once worked. Visitors may open the bottles and read the notes. Clark says that if the works have a theme, it’s “the difficulty of communication. Whether you are crying on YouTube or writing a message in a bottle, you’re trying to reach out without having the necessary skills.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DIGITAL DIVIDE continues through Sat., July 26. Assemble Gallery, 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-432-9127 or www.assemblepgh.org


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[PLAY REVIEWS]

REPAIR WORK

It’s not difficult to figure out reasons for possible reluctance: the usual and unusual jokes about Jews, Christians, Muslims, Arabs, LGBT folks, lawyers, doctors, race relations, etc. Romance is supposed to be a sex farce, so the plot is irrelevant but subject to spoilage with too much revelation. You just need to know that a courtroom trial goes awry because of the judge’s hay-fever medication, and that there is a Middle East peace conference in town. Hilarity ensues. Theatrically speaking, there’s a lot going on with multiple loci of interest, overlapping dialogue and general outrageousness. Director Paul and his seven-man (yes, all men) cast are up to the challenges, complemented by a solid (and mostly female, hmmm) design/production team.

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THERE ARE several ways to look at this

show’s title. In rewriting and reworking Shakespeare’s King John, playwright Kirk Lynn “fixes” an unpopular history play, turning it into a hip tragedy. But there’s also the title character, who is not just a monarch but a “fix-it” guy, wielding an electric screwdriver like a scepter and a hammer as his weapon of choice. And ultimately, the players are all tools — using and being used. In its Pittsburgh premiere, the No Name Players production of Fixing King John is funny, fast and profane. Steven Wilson directs a well-chosen cast and design team in this alternative universe of Anglo-French wars and liaisons. Though outnumbered, the ladies more than hold their own, offering various interpretations of motherhood. Tressa Glover, the company’s producing artistic director, vents both vengeance and grief in her plot to place her child on the throne. Cary Anne Spear is pleasantly dotty, and dotes on her son, King John. Outscheming them all is the young wannabe mom, studiously played by Hayley Nielsen.

ROMANCE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LUKE BRUEHLMAN}

Left to right: Mike Mihm, Hayley Nielsen and Todd Betker in No Name Players’ Fixing King John

Gregory Lehane explores the nuances of father, warrior and king of France. Jody O’Donnell makes for a dashing Dauphin. Mike Mihm is gritty in many senses of the word as the title character. Matt Henderson, a dependable source of comic relief, will probably be playing unfortunate

“One of the best PICT plays in memory. I can’t stop thinking about it!” —Patricia C.

Woman and Scarecrow By Marina Carr Directed by Alan Stanford

July 10–Aug 2 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland

children until he is grey. Ricardo VilaRoger and Todd Betker portray notable schemers, with Jason Spider Matthews as an unlikely knight.

FIXING KING JOHN

continues through Aug. 2. No Name Players at Off The Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $15-20. 412-207-7111 or www.nonameplayers.org

No Name artistic director Don DiGiulio literally sets the scene: a throne room in what seems to be a basement workshop for England, a wild splash of color for France. Costume designer Beth Steinberg’s Brits are dirty and disheveled; their foes wear spiffy suits. For what it’s worth, 2013’s Fixing King John is not very dissimilar from Shakespeare’s original, but much improved by eliding characters, shredding battle scenes and updating lingo. Some plot changes even make the play seem more, well, Shakespearean. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ON OFFENSE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

Beware of what’s in the wardrobe... City Paper Special! Use code CP5OFF for $5 off each full-price adult ticket.

picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

DAVID MAMET is not known for his delicacy, and Romance, a farce bordering on self-parody, reaches spectacular degrees of offensiveness. Andrew Paul, producing artistic director of newly minted Kinetic Theatre Co., expresses surprise that his production of the 2005 comedy is a Pittsburgh premiere, i.e., that it has taken so long for a Mamet play to hit town.

continues through Aug. 2. Kinetic Theatre Co. at the Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $15-35. 888-718-4253 or www.kinetictheatre.org

Patrick Jordan and David Whalen, as the defendant and his counsel, take bickering to new heights (literally if not metaphorically over the head of Kevin Brown as the most sensible guy in the story) and deliver new lows of anti-Semitism. Matt DeCaro controls the judge’s personality shifts, with Mark Ulrich as the hapless prosecutor and John E. Reilly as the hopeless doctor. Even with all these heavy hitters, youngster Andrew Swackhamer threatens to steal the show, or at least chew the most scenery (courtesy of Gianni Downs, especially the wonderfully dreadful living room). Julianne D’Errico has a great eye for the clothes to make the men. Technical director Diane Melchitzsky also handles props and a portentous New York state seal. Elizabeth Atkinson provides the sounds of the city. The expertly played and paced Romance is funny, mostly in that puerile sense of humor that finds giggles in every naughty word. Still, it is Mamet, who can build such absurdly constructed insults that they force out the laughs. Not for the sensitive or the whole family. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CARNY ART {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE} THE TITLE OF the lavish opening number

says it all: “Come Look at the Freaks.” Side Show is based on the real-life story of conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton, who are arguably best remembered for


their roles in the 1932 classic horror film Freaks. However, Bill Russell and Henry Krieger’s musical, which debuted on Broadway in 1997, only alludes to the sisters’ eventual careers in Hollywood, focusing instead on their rise from small-time carnival attraction to major vaudeville act. Rob James directs this ambitious Stage 62 production, which includes a 12-piece orchestra and more than two dozen songs. But the actresses portraying the Hilton sis-

SIDE SHOW continues through Sun., July 27. Stage 62 at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.org.

ters are the real draw. Kristin Welch imbues Violet with level-headed pathos, while Cara Walkowiak captures Daisy’s indomitable ambition. When it comes to love, though, the two girls share taste in cads, falling for impresarios Buddy (Andrew DeBonis) and Terry (Chad Elder), who care less about the twins than about their own careers. The elaborate revue numbers of Side Show live up to their Broadway roots, but the somber duets, in which the girls contemplate their lives behind the scenes, feature a few too many maudlin lyrics

and clunky metaphors: Under a less capable director, the “Tunnel of Love” interlude could have been cringe-inducing. Yet like the show-biz matrons they’re playing, Walkowiak and Welch sell the songs with effortless style, as does the entire ensemble, from the sideshow boss to the four-woman harem. Korey White in particular shines as Jake (a.k.a. the Cannibal King), who harbors an unrequited love for Violet and the voice to belt out songs like “You Should Be Loved.” Side Show’s timeline for the supposedly true events is a bit sketchy: For example, it has film director Tod Browning first meeting the twins at the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936 — four years after the reallife release of Freaks. But the heart of this show doesn’t lie in historical accuracy. It’s in the story of two outcasts learning to find their place in the world. That’s a tale worth telling, and thanks to the superb players behind this production, this is a musical worth seeing. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

DEAD RECKONING {BY TED HOOVER} THEATER’S CRUELEST illusion? That comedy is fun. Wringing a tear from an audience is

simple; getting and keeping them laughing is nearly impossible, as demonstrated in Throughline Theatre Co.’s premiere of A New Death, by local playwright C.S. Wyatt and directed by Kaitlin Kerr. Wyatt’s thesis: When someone dies, two entities get busy. A Messenger of Death tells the deceased that time is up, and The Grim Reaper carts away their souls. Such a labor-intensive routine requires bureaucracy. The messengers are supervised by layers of middle management watched over by archangels who, ultimately, report to the Big CEO in the Sky.

A NEW DEATH

continues through Sat., July 26. Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 888-718-4253 or www.ThroughlineTheatre.org

Enter Harlan Howe. A resolute loser, Harlan’s life has been a series of bad jobs done poorly. By accident he winds up as a messenger-trainee, and his klutzy ways soon bring the hulking bureaucracy to a halt. Wyatt is aiming for two comedy payoffs: mundane corporate-think juxtaposed with the sadness of death, and the merry mix-ups of a Charlie Brown-like figure.

With the usual (but no less relevant) caveat that the premiere of any comedy is going to be bumpy, I’d still have to say that Wyatt misses more than he hits. The playwright gets lost inside his own Byzantine corporate maze. Great stretches are spent delineating the rules and regulations of his imagined world. Right up until the very end, Wyatt is still doling out exposition about what is and isn’t real inside the play. It’s interesting watching him construct a cosmology by divine law, but for a comedy it’s airless and deadly. And in place of all that description, he needs to supply about 10 times the number of gags, all funnier than what’s there now. The director has been a bit too literal about the title, furnishing an almost funereal pace. The endless pauses and low-energy acting are the exact opposite of what comedy demands. Eric Leslie plays Harlan with a winning, endearing quality, and Andy Coleman, as his boss, displays some much-needed comedy style. It’s a cliché, but appropriate for this play: On his deathbed, Edmund Gwenn famously said: “Dying is easy, comedy is hard.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

This is your family photo album, Pittsburgh. A People’s History of Pittsburgh is your place to share the pictures and stories that make this region unique. Submit your photos online or in person on one of our scanning days, and we’ll share them all online in a collective photo album. Scanning Days at Carnegie Museum of Art Thursday, July 24, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. and Saturday, July 26, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.  

Museum admission is free for anyone bringing in a photo to be scanned. Plan to spend a few hours with us, and create some new Pittsburgh memories!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.2407.31.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. JULY 25

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL HEBERT}

I made this for you

{ART}

709 Penn gallery presents Monotype Prints, an exhibition of local artist Jo-Anne Bates’ latest work. The opening reception is tonight. The artist’s color palette for this exhibit was inspired by her travels to South Africa a decade ago, and the vivid hues of both the landscape and the locals’ clothing. Bates has been a major local proponent of the arts, serving as chairwoman of Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Friends of Art committee and as a member of the Carnegie Museum of Art Education Committee. Dan Willis 5:30 p.m. 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

{SCREEN}

Last year, the formerly Pittsburgh-based writer, playwright and performer Robert Isenberg moved to Costa Rica, where he’s been reporting for the Englishlanguage Tico Times. His work there includes a series of short documentaries for the publication, some of which the former regular CP contributor screens tonight in Mucho Gusto, his mini film fest at ModernFormations Gallery. Featured: a (humane) bull-fight; a portrait of a German woman who’s swum {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRUCE BENNETT}

+ FRI., JULY 25

{ART}

Tonight at Unsmoke Artspace, it’s art you can knock around. Carnival Part Deux is the follow-up to Unsmoke’s popular 2012 event that asked artists to go midway for a night of playable artworks — like Tresa Varner’s “Punk Town-Knock Down” game (pictured) — and performances for the whole family. Step right up to work by more than a dozen artists in total, also including Mary Tremonte, The App Expo, Alisha Wormsley and Dave English. Pizza will be made in Unsmoke’s famous outdoor wood-fired oven. Bill O’Driscoll 6-10 p.m. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. unsmoke@gmail.com or www.unsmokeartspace.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

Costa Rica’s Pacific Coast seven times; a Nicaraguan cigar factory; and an account of Isenberg’s own Caribbeanto-Pacific bike ride. BO 7 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $2. www.modernformations.com

{DANCE}

Gabrielle Revlock and Nicole Bindler, two Philadelphiabased dancers and choreographers, bring their award-winning “community performance work” I made this for you to the KellyStrayhorn Theater tonight for one night only. The genre-defying collaboration incorporates elements of satirical theater, yoga and even the kissing of audience members. It was designed to break down the barrier between performer and audience, as well as seamlessly integrate elements of improvisation into careful choreography. The show will also utilize the talents of 25 additional dancers, all local. DW 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay-what-youwant. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

+ SAT., JULY 26 {STAGE}

JULY 29

Spamalot

As part of its ongoing, multi-faceted XOXO exhibit, and in accordance with the show’s themes of love and forgiveness, the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum presents The Gift, a reinterpretation of O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” by Pittsburgh’s


Art by Logan Randolph and Nic Marlton

sp otlight While researching a mural project in Shadyside, artists Logan Randolph and Nic Marlton learned the unlikely story of Margo Lovelace, who in 1964 launched Lovelace Marionette Theater at 5888½ Ellsworth Ave. Along with entertaining two decades’ worth of Pittsburgh kids, Lovelace helped spark the neighborhood’s rebirth as an arts corridor. But Randolph and Marlton’s Margo Lovelace Project didn’t end with their Lovelace-inspired mural on Ellsworth (detail pictured), a kids’ puppet workshop, nor even Alex Lee’s in-progress Lovelace documentary. This Sunday, the Project and the Weather Permitting series present The Lovelace Puppet Festival. The Shadyside Nursery event features six original performances by local artists. Cheryl Capezzuti and Kellee Van Aken present “Random Teleology,” a selection from their new puppet opera “Songs from a Lost Civilization.” The Schmutz Company offers “Moses of the Allegheny,” a “wild yet (most likely) true” story about a baby who survived the Johnstown Flood only to become a sideshow attraction. Other performers include Creative Citizen Studios, Cyberpunk Apocalypse, Joan Kielar and Miko Miko. Lovelace now lives in New Jersey. “She had a dream and she accomplished absolutely everything she set out to do,” says Marlton. Adds Randolph: “Her legacy was that she found a way for creativity and the creative process to be a way to revive the community and the neighborhood.” Bill O’Driscoll 5-9 p.m. Sun., July 27. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. $10 (includes beverage with ID). www.weatherpermittingpgh.com

{OUTDOORS}

works ranging from Julie Sokolow’s moving documentary “Making House Calls” — about the street medicine for Pittsburgh’s homeless practiced by Operation Safety Net — to “God Hates Radiation,” a delightfully sick-’n’-twisted animation by Nils Hanczar. Chris Smalley’s “Dreaming Ant” memorializes the city’s final bricks-and-mortar video store; Tess Allard’s “bird.

Art by Jo-Anne Bates

Pittsburghers with a little kayaking experience and a big itch to get out of the city have a perfect opportunity tonight, when Venture Outdoors holds its Stargazing Paddle at Moraine State Park. The moderatedifficulty kayaking excursion will go from dusk until aboutt 10:30 p.m., with the ultimate goal of seeing a starlit sky. Beginner’s paddling lessons and ecology tours are also scheduled to take place in the park throughout the rest of the summer. DW 8 p.m. 225 Pleasant Valley Road, Portersville. $33. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

{SCREEN}

More than a dozen local filmmakers showcase short works tonight in an on-theroad edition of Film Kitchen. The series, usually ensconced at the Melwood Screening Room, takes over the Hollywood Theater to screen

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Hour! is a set of nine commissioned, comic “bar arias” depicting Pittsburgh singles on the dating scene, from “Karaoke Catastrophe” and “Bachelorette” to “Desperately Seeking” and “Full Service Menu.” The composer is Pittsburgh-based Roger Zahab, with librettos by local talent as well. The cast features Opera Theater’s 2014 Young Artists. Drink it all in at performances tonight and tomorrow. BO p.m. Also 5:30 p.m. 10 p Sun., July 27. 4201 Su Bigelow Blvd., Bi Oakland. $25 Oa (students half-price (st at the door). 412386-9687 or www. otsummerfest.org

+ SUN., JULY 27 JU {WORDS} {W

Fo Following its complete renovation last year, re Pitt’s University Store JULY 25 on Fifth is offering Monotype ono notty no type P type Prints rin ri some new in-house so programming. p This T summer, the venerable bookstore ve — now with a café and an other new amenities — hosts am SUNny Day Story SU Time, a weekly Ti reading series for kids. Today, land” evokes gothic mystery; staff read aloud kid-friendly and Scott Whiteman offers poetry, including work by vintage 1980s anti-drug videos Shel Silverstein (of Where (deviously tweaked) from the the Sidewalk Ends fame), famed Everything Is Terrible Maya Angelou and Nikki archive. BO 7 p.m. (6 p.m. Grimes (Words With Wings). reception). 1449 Potomac Refreshments are included. Ave., Dormont. $5. www. The series concludes next thehollywooddormont.com Sunday with pigeon stories by Mo Willems. BO 1 p.m. {OPERA} 4000 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. It’s the closing weekend of www.pittuniversitystore.com Opera Theater’s SummerFest, but it’s going out with a full slate of performances including {SPORTS} one world premiere. Happy In the wake of all that World

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JULY 25 Carnival Part Deux

playing Italy’s A.C. Milan. This afternoon’s match is one of three for each team in the Cup’s round-robin format. BO 4 p.m. North Side. $35-275. www.international championscup.com

Cup madness, what the rest of the globe calls “football” takes over Heinz Field today as Pittsburgh becomes one of 12 North American cities to host the second annual Guinness International Champions Cup. The tourney brings eight elite European squads across the pond for a competitive version of the Continent’s traditional preseason. Pittsburgh gets reigning Premier League champ Manchester City

S C R E E N

+ TUE., JULY 29 {STAGE}

Spamalot, the Tony-winning musical based on Monty

JULY 26 “The Gift of the Magi”

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Python and the Holy Grail, tonight begins an eightshow run at the Benedum Center. The show, which concludes Pittsburgh CLO’s summer season, incorporates musical material from across the Monty Python canon in spoofing the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Closedcaptioning and audio description are available for select performances. DW 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 3. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-65.75. 412-281-3973 or www.pittsburghclo.org

{WORDS}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY RIPPEL}

own Zany Umbrella Circus. Performers Ben Sota and Karen Forney use masks, audience participation and circus skills to explore giftgiving as an expression of love. It’s this 30-minute show’s final weekend; today’s performances will be ASLinterpreted, and a workshop on animation projection and acting in masks will follow the first performance. DW 1 and 3:30 p.m. Also 1 and 3:30 p.m. Sun., July 27. 7. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $12-14. 412-322-5058 or www. w. pittsburghkids.org

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You know summer is getting on when the Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series wraps up. Tonight’s the night of the three-month series’ Grand Finale, with readings from seven poets affiliated with online magazine The New Yinzer and its own reading series, TNY Presents. Reading at Hemingway’s Café are Holly Coleman, Kurt Garrison, Mike Good, Taylor Grieshober, Mark Mangini, Don Wentworth and Carolyne Whelan. BO 8 p.m. 3911 Forbes Ave., Oakland. jbauer103w@aol.com

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the Hits of Elvis Presley. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru July 26. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ARIADNE ON NAXOS. Opera by Richard Strauss. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. Sat., July 26, 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. CATS. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Broadway classic. Tue-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. CHILDREN OF EDEN. Heartfelt & humorous look at the age-old conflict between parents & children, loosely based on the book of Genesis. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 3. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. DANCING AT LUGHNASA. Brian Friel’s Tony winning play about 5 unmarried sisters who have shared a cottage in Ireland’s rural County Donegal since childhood & the events of their summer in 1936 that forever change the family dynamic July 24-Aug. 9.

Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE FANTASTICKS. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest & Attack Theatre. Fri., July 25, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., July 26, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. FIVE TELLERS DANCING IN THE RAIN. Set in the break room of a small bank in Mississippi, this play eavesdrops on the conversations of women who have for too long defined themselves in terms of their past & present relationships. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. FIXING KING JOHN. A contemporary adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John. Presented by No Name Players. Thru July 26, 8 p.m., Mon., July 28, 8 p.m. and Thru Aug. 2, 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-207-7111. HAIR. Presented by Alumni Theater Company. July 25-26, 8 p.m. and Sun., July 27, 7 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-945-0282.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Starts at Noon- 21+ Private Cabanas Available For Reservations email: info@roundcornercantina.com

MUSIC BY PELIGROSA: King Louie & Orion Bottomless Mimosas $30

HAIRSPRAY. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT. Hilarious & twisted take on the Sun., July 27, 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. story of King Arthur, the Knights CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. of the Round Table, & canned 412-469-6219. meat. July 29-Aug. 1, 8 p.m., HAPPY HOUR! Step into the Sat., Aug. 2, 2 & 8 p.m. and minds of average Pittsburghers Sun., Aug. 3, 2 & 7 p.m. Benedum as they contemplate, in musical Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. fashion, a meet-up in a local bar. Part of Opera Theater SummerFest. A NEW DEATH. Play by C.S. Wyatt envisioning the transition Sat., July 26, 10 p.m. and Sun., July to the after-life as a mismanaged 27, 5:30 p.m. Twentieth Century monopoly. Presented by Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. Throughline Theatre. LATE-NIGHT CABARET. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Broadway favorites, jazz Sat, 2 p.m. Thru July 26. standards, & beloved The Grey Box Theatre, arias after each mainLawrenceville. stage performance. www. per a p 1-888-718-4253. pghcitym Presented by Opera .co RING OF FIRE: THE Theater SummerFest. Fri., MUSIC OF JOHNNY July 25. Twentieth Century CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. THE MERRY WIDOW. Franz and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. Lehár’s operetta about Hanna, a 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, rich widow, & her countrymen’s Downtown. 412-456-6666. attempt to keep her money in ROMANCE. David Mamet’s the principality by finding her the courtroom farce. Presented by right husband. Presented by Opera Kinetic Theatre Company. Thru Theater SummerFest. Sun., July 27, July 30, 8 p.m. and Thru Aug. 2, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Oakland. 412-326-9687. Friendship. 412-363-4321. SIDE SHOW. Based on the true story of Siamese twins Violet & Daisy Hilton who became stars during the Depression. Presented by Stage 62. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. ST. GERTRUDE’S GUIDE TO HEAVEN. Cabaret dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat and Fri, Sat. Thru Aug. 16. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. A STRAUSS CELEBRATION. Celebrating the birthday of one of the most illustrious conductor/ composers. Part of Opera Theater SummerFest. Thu., July 24, 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. SUMMER OF LOVE. Musical feat. songs by the Mamas & the Papas, Donovan, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, & more. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Thru July 27, 2 p.m. Thru July 26. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. WALLDOGS. A new play weaving together four stories that explore what it means to mark a wall with text & image. Presented by the Hatch Arts Collective. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Aug. 2. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-533-2256. WOMAN & SCARECROW. A woman converses w/ Scarecrow, a companion only she can see, about how to reconcile herself to these last moments. Presented by PICT. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014


Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000 x 207.

COMEDY THU 24 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

VISUALART “Forbes Field,” by Fritz Keck, from An Illustrious Age, at Gallerie Chiz, in Shadyside

NEW THIS WEEK 709 PENN GALLERY. Monotype Prints: An Exploration of Color. Work by Jo-Anne Bates. Opening reception: July 25, 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Character of the Living. Oil paintings by Genevieve Barbee. Opening reception: July 25, 7-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ALPHABET CITY TENT. River of Words. Community-wide art installation, involving the participation of over 40 residents of the North Side. Launch event: July 25, 6 p.m. North Side. 412-323-0278. THE TOONSEUM. When Universes Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. 70 years of original comic book art. Opening reception: July 24, 7-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Takeaway: Made w/ Love. Feat. nearly 100 amateur artworks handpicked from thrift store collections across several states. Organized by Robert Raczka. Downtown. 412-456-6666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606.

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Making a Splash. Watercolors by Nancy Smith & Jeanne Adams. Verona. 412-828-1031. BUTLER ART CENTER. Works by Sally Jones Rodgers & Patricia Young. 724-283-6922. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Butler. 724-283-6922. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Sandbox: At Play w/ the Photobook. Rotating selection of photobooks. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand. Part of the 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mildred Sidorow. A sunny collection of work by the 94 year old Johnstown native. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paint-

ings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Niche Inheritance. Window installation by Dakotah Konicek. Gallery Crawl: July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Chainsaw Show. New Paintings by Anthony Purcell. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Wonderings. Work by Betty & Alan Reese. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. CONTINUES ON PG. 53

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP House-Made Liquor Infusions:

FRI 25 AGE & AL: GINGER BINGER SKETCH COMEDY. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DUO SHOW: IMPROVISED COMEDY DUOS. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LAST FRIDAYS W/ DAVON MAGWOOD. Feat. a rotating cast of comedians. Last Fri of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 26 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-251-6058. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER W/ ALI SPAGNOLA. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TYLER ROSS, CHRIS CLEM, RODSECU HOPKINS, DYLAN SCOTT. Comedians of Various Sizes Tour. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

VODKAS: CHERRYCHERRY GRAPEGR RAP APE E ESPRESSOESPRE ESS SSO O MIXED BERRIES- OLIVE-PINEAPPLE. RUMS: PEACH. GIN: CUCUMBER. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO CHILI PEPPER. TEQU TE QUILA LA: MA MANG NGO O - CHIL HILII PE PEPP PPER ER.

––––––– ––––––– Thursday, July 24th – ––––––– ––––– BOURBON TASTING: B G: George Dickel RyeSmall Batch and Sour Mash

8-10pm - Cheers!

1908 CARSON STREET l SOUTHSIDE l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

4504 BUTLER STREET

FRI 25 - SAT 26 JERSEY. July 25-26, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. RICKEY SMILEY. 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., July 26, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 26

412.326.5964

BILL MAHER. 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. BYOT: A FREE IMPROV JAM. 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MATT STANTON, NICHOLAS SOLOMAN, ALONNA BREISCH, MARKY NAAS, ROBERT TEDESCO. Laughing Rat Comedy Summer Tour. 9 p.m. Royal Place, Castle Shannon. 412-583-2863.

MISTER GROOMING ANDGOODS.COM

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SUN 27 MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 29 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 30 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700.

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285.

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARMONY MUSEUM. Flags of Freedom. Feat. several of the most prominent flags of America’s Colonial, Revolutionary & Federal periods. Harmony. 724-452-7341. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Friday and Saturday nights, the Carnegie Tours of a restored 19th-century, Science Center opens Buhl Planetarium for middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. SkyWatch. Dan Malerbo, the planetarium’s NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to program-development coordinator, talked to more than 600 birds from over CP about this ongoing event. 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. WHAT HAPPENS AT SKYWATCH? 412-323-7235. There’s a 16-inch telescope which gives great images NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story for our location. We also have a smaller scope, and of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. we always have a staff member giving a tour of the University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. night sky. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church WHAT CAN PEOPLE SEE RIGHT NOW? features 1823 pipe organ, Saturn and Mars are in the sky until mid-August. There Revolutionary War graves. Scott. is nothing more exciting than looking at Saturn through 412-851-9212. a telescope. When you zoom in and see the rings, PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and usually the word people use is “awesome.” exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE CURRENTLY Trolley Theatre. Washington. VISIBLE CELESTIAL OBJECTS? 724-228-9256. I’m fond of Jupiter because of its moons. It has four and PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & they’re always dancing around the planet. [And] star BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly clusters — one in Hercules, the M13, is a collection of Forest. Watch butterflies emerge stars like bees in a beehive. from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of 10-11:30 p.m. through August. Program continues imaginative railroad displays (with earlier hours) through November, weather enhanced by flowers, plants & permitting. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $2; free interactive features. 14 indoor with laser-show or Omnimax ticket. 412-237-3327 or rooms & 3 outdoor gardens www.carnegiesciencecenter.org feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection FESTIVAL. July 25-27 Seven AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 of military artifacts showcasing Springs. 800-452-2223. animals, including many photographs, uniforms, shells & endangered species. Highland other related items. 412-621-4253. Park. 412-665-3639. THE LOVELACE PUPPET Military museum dedicated to RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. FESTIVAL. Cheryl Capezzuti, Crehonoring military service members A Reverence for Life. Photos and ative Citizen Studios, Cyber Punk since the Civil War through artiartifacts of her life & work. Apocalypse, Dave English, Joann facts & personal mementos. Springdale. 724-274-5459. Kielar, Miko Miko. Part of Weather Oakland. 412-621-4253. RIVERS OF STEEL Permitting. 5-9 p.m. Shadyside ST. NICHOLAS NATIONAL HERITAGE Nursery, Shadyside. 412-363-5845. CROATIAN CATHOLIC AREA. Exhibits on CHURCH. Maxo Vanka the Homestead Mill. . www per Murals. Mid-20th cenSteel industry and pa pghcitym tury murals depicting .co community artifacts war, social justice and the from 1881-1986. I MADE THIS FOR YOU. Fiercely immigrant experience in Homestead. 412-464-4020. feminist, wild, & genre-defying America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY work by Gabrielle Revlock & Nicole CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost SteamBinder. 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theboat: Treasures of the Arabia. ater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 oncehidden treasures exploring PittsST. ATHANASIUS PARISH burgh’s important role as a GateFESTIVAL. July 24-26, 5 p.m. way to the West & a national hub St. Athanasius Church, West View. for the steamboat building indusBYE BYE, BLACK BIRD. Burlesque 412-931-4624. try in the mid-19th century. From & drag performances, live music UKRAINIAN FOOD & FUN Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s by Phat Man Dee & Holly Hood, FESTIVAL. www.ukiefestrox.com Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery vendors, raffle, more. Benefits MaThru July 26, 5 p.m. St. Mary’s movement. Ongoing: Western PA cabre Noir’s travel fare to compete Ukranian Orthodox Church, Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, in the Burlypicks Finals. 10 p.m. CatMcKees Rocks. 412-331-9288. and exhibits on local history, more. tivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Strip District. 412-454-6000. THE FABULOUS FORTIES SOLDIERS & SAILORS SEVEN SPRINGS RIB & WING MEMORIAL HALL. War in the FASHION SHOW & GALA. Silent

SUN 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

DANCE FRI 25

FESTIVALS

Available after 7/26 at better beer retailers.

THU 24 - SAT 26

SAT 26

FRI 25 - SUN 27

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

FUNDRAISERS

auction, 40s-themed best dressed contest, live music, more. Benefits The Homeless Children’s Education Fund. www.homelessfund.org/ events.html 7:30 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-391-4600. JUST CAUSE: BENEFIT FOR GLCC OF PITTSBURGH. An evening of music & discussion benefiting The Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh. 7-10 p.m. 6022 Broad St., East Liberty. 330-635-3543.

SUN 27 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

MON 28 NO MENU MONDAY. Dinner & one-of-a-kind drinks. Benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 5 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-395-2879.

LITERARY THU 24 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 25 BOOK CHAT: SENIOR BOOK GROUP. Dear Life by Alice Munro. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 26 CHEF KAREN BLUMENSAADTSTOECKLEY. Author of A Culinary Legacy From Escoffier to Today 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Pittsburgh Public Market, Strip District. 412-281-4505.

SUN 27 YOUNG ADULT SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY AUTHOR LECTURE SERIES. Feat. Bruce Coville & Tamora Pierce. 5 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-4092.

MON 28 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 29 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. A Walk in My Shoes:

Walk the Diaspora. Interactive exhibit feat. the work of local, national & international artists, musicians & authors. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Identity Materials. Work by Theresa Baughman & Julia Betts. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Contemporary Figurative Drawing Pittsburgh. B&W work by Stephen Tuomala, Tim Fabian, Marc Snyder & Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-441-0194. THE TOONSEUM. When Worlds Collide: The Ultimate Superhero Smackdown. Check out artwork by legendary comic book artists like Jack Kirby & Jim Steranko, & vote for your favorite heroes. Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

SUN 27

Oakland. 412-477-4677.

SUNNY DAY STORY TIME. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Aug. 3 The University Store on Fifth, Oakland. 412-648-1455.

WED 30 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

MON 28 FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru July 30 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OTHER STUFF THU 24

MON 28 - WED 30 THE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF MAIDE MARIAN. While Robin Hood hides in a tree, Marian, the best swordswoman in England, furious with Robin for having deserted her, picks youngsters from the audience to become her “Gang.” Presented by Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru July 30 Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050.

TUE 29 PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 24 XOXO: WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU LEMONS.. Enjoy some free lemonade in exchange for a promise to pay the generosity forward w/ a good deed. Thu, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru July 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 24 - WED 30 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden freeflight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 25 CAMPOUT STORYTIME. Fri, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru July 25 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh,

N E W S

North Side. 412-322-5058. COOK IT! W/ CONFLICT KITCHEN. Interactive cooking demos hosted by Big Red Room Café Chef, Angelo Galioto. 12:15 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MAKESHOP: MARIONETTES. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. RETRO ARCADE NIGHT. Classic arcade & console games, crafts, music, more. Open to teens in grades 6-12. 7-9 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

SAT 26 THE JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY. Children’s opera based on Mark Twain’s short story. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. Sat, 11 a.m. Thru July 26 Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. KIDS OPEN MIC. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MADCAP PUPPET THEATER: THE ENCHANTED WORLD. Interactive puppet show feat. fairy tales from around the world. 10 a.m. Chatham University Eden Hall

RACCOON CREEK STATE PARK

THE CAT IN THE HAT. Based on the book by Dr. Suess. Wed, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 1:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 2 Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

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Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. VENTURE OUTDOORS TYKE HIKE. For parents or caregivers w/ children ages newborn to 5. www.ventureoutdoors.org 12 p.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park.

M U S I C

SUMMER ARTISAN BAZAAR. Craft show & sale feat. handmade CONTINUES ON PG. 54

WED 30 THE CAT IN THE HAT. Based on the book by Dr. Suess. Wed, 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 1:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 2 Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. Mon, Wed, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru July 30 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 25 - SAT 26

In honor National Moth Week, Raccoon Creek State Park is hosting Moth Night in the park. On July 26, between 9 p.m. and 12:30 a.m., volunteers are needed to help document the moths in the park’s Wildlife Reserve, along Route 30. No need to be a moth expert: All skill levels are welcome. Bring water and bug spray (for other bugs). Call 724-899-3611 for information.

FRI 25 - SAT 26

THU 24 - SAT 26

OUTSIDE

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

STAR WARS EXTRAVAGANZA. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 116.

CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. Tue, 2:30-3 p.m. Thru July 29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. EXTRAORDINARY EXPERIMENTS: THE PRINTS OF BRUEGEL, DÜRER, SCHONGAUER & REMBRANDT. Course examining a period of dramatic change in Europe through the work of four of its most significant artists. Thu, 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: PRESERVING PITTSBURGH’S HISTORIC LANDMARKS. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Second Thu of every month, 11 a.m. and Fourth Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WALKING THE CAMINO: SIX WAYS TO SANTIAGO. Documentary screening about walking the Camino de Santiago in Spain & Q&A w/ Co-Producer/ featured pilgrim Annie O’Neil. Thru July 24 Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-681-5449. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

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SKYWATCH. Learn about globular clusters, nebulas & planets by seeing them w/ your own eyes. On clear nights, visitors are invited to come to SkyWatch to get upclose and personal with amazing celestial objects. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

SAT 26 BASICS IN MAP & COMPASS. Registration Required. 10 a.m.2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611. NATIVE AMERICAN WILDERNESS SKILLS. Sat, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru July 26 Latodami Environmental Education Center, Wexford. 724-935-2170.

TUE 29 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park,

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

jewelry, pottery, stained glass, paintings, wood carvings, more. Mon-Sat, 12-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 9 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CANNING PARTY: JAMMIN’ W/ JANE. Learn how to make & preserve jam. 12 p.m. Earthen Vessels Outreach, Bloomfield. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second 267-251-9487. and Third Fri of every month and FAMOUZ CLOTHING CO. Fourth and Last Fri of every month MID-SUMMER FASHION EVENT. Irma Freeman Center for ImaginaLaunching of the locally based tion, Garfield. 412-924-0634. clothing line, Famouz Clothing Co. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS 9 p.m. One 10 Lounge, Downtown. NETWORK. Meetup to help se412-562-0238. niors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie FOSSIL-FREE ENERGY FAIR. Solar garden workshop, Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. children’s activities, live music, WIGLE WHISKEY TAR & more. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. FEATHER PARTY. Celebrate Slippery Rock the Whiskey Rebellion w/ University, Slippery Rock. Attack Theater, Carnegie 724-738-1606. Library, Carnegie SciGREAT WAVES ence Center, Yelp, Oh ww. r w EXHIBITION FASHION My Grill, The Pop Stop pape pghcitym SHOW. Fashion show Popsicle Company, more. .co presented by Eye Kandy 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, & Velvet Salon & Boutique Strip District. 412-224-2827. w/ artwork by Masha Fikhman, Zack Lee and Travis Schwab. 6 p.m. Revision Space, Lawrenceville. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. MT. WASHINGTON Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 CityWALKING TOUR. Begins outside County Building, Downtown. of Monongahela Incline on 412-302-5223. W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. HORROR FAN FLEA MARKET. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Hollywood Theater, www.pittsburghtangueros.org Dormont. 412-215-6317. Sat, 5-6 p.m. Thru Aug. MADNESS AT THE MEADOWS. 10 Wilkins School Community Heavyweight & light heavyweight Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. championship boxing event. www. meadowsgaming.com/sports/ madness-at-the-meadows 6:30 p.m. Meadows Casino, Washington. 724-503-1200. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

FRI 25 - SAT 26

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Teligence/18+

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House. 724-516-0441.

SUN 27 - SUN 28 TEMPLE EMANUEL RUMMAGE SALE. July 27-28, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Temple Emanuel, Scott. 412-279-7600.

TUE 29 HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014

Downtown CRITIC: Saad Feroz, 24, a student from Baltimore, Md.

WHEN: Sun.,

July 20

I’m here because my friend invited me to do Zumba with her, but I totally wussed out at the last second. There were a lot of girls there and I felt uncomfortable. But my other friend and I found an impromptu group of runners, and we went with them instead, so I ended up seeing all of the Open Streets stuff. The stuff on the [Roberto Clemente] bridge is especially cool. We’re definitely doing the rockclimb later, and the gigantic chess board over there is nice, too. This is my first time doing anything like this. It’s great that other cities are doing it. Coming from Baltimore, I’m not supposed to say I like Pittsburgh, but so far it’s a really cool place.

SAT 26

SUN 27

54

EVENT: Open Streets Pittsburgh,

FRI 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

www.livelinks.com

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

— DAN WILLIS

Oakland. 412-681-7465. PAINT NITE. Painting event w/ food & cocktails. No experience required. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru July 29 Notion, East Liberty. 412-361-1188.

WED 30 COUNTRY NIGHT LINE DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MOWA YOGA PRESENTS: PRACTICE ON THE PODS. Grandview & Shiloh St., Mt. Washington. Wed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 339-237-0891. PGC LECTURE SERIES: NATHAN SANDBERG. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER SUMMER LECTURE SERIES. Nathan Sandberg. 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. THE SCIENCE BEHIND RAW FOODS & JUICING. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. Aug. 26. Men/women, prepare song of your choice & bring music for accompanist.

www.bachchoirpittsburgh.org/ join-us/ First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-241-4044. COMMUNITY THEATRE PLAYERS. Auditions for The Mouse That Roared. Aug. 2-3. Everyone is invited to audition w/ a cold reading. No preparation or experience is required. ctp@bactp. com Community Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon. THE CRUSH CHARITY FASHION SHOW. Model & talent casting call. UrbanNerdEnterprises@gmail. com The Club Level at Lee Davis & Associates Consulting, Downtown. 412-467-6373. GEMINI CHILDREN’S THEATRE. Auditions for Peter Pan. July 28-29. Prepare 1-2 minutes of a song to sing a cappella. Actors will be asked to do cold readings from the production. Casting for all roles, adults and students. Students aged 10 and older may audition for this show. Adult roles are all contracted, paid positions Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for Little Women: The Musical. Aug. 3-4. Male/female non-equity performers aged late teens-early 70s. Prepare 32 bars of a ballad from a musical, audition sides & accompanist will be provided. Bring sheet music. www. bphp.org/events/auditions/ Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Murder with Mummies. Aug. 1-2. Men/women, cold readings. www.ractproductions. com. 724-775-6844.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a gay man and have been in a relationship with my GGG boyfriend for more than three years. I just discovered that he has been engaging in what can only be described as cyber infidelity. He had a secret email account, posted on Craigslist M4M, and had an Adam4Adam account. He would exchange photos and engage in conversations with other men. He claims he never met with any of them and it was just to exchange photos. He let me look at his secret email account, and there was nothing that pointed to any physical meet-ups. I asked him to delete his accounts, and he did. I am completely shocked. I understand if he wants to look at porn (I certainly do), but the quantity and secrecy of his actions is obviously not healthy. Where do I go from here, and what steps should I take to make sure it stops? STRESSING OVER CYBER INFIDELITY

It isn’t true that your boyfriend’s actions can “only be described as cyber infidelity.” They could be described as “harmless online flirtations.” But you’ve chosen to slap the “infidelity” label on his actions, and now you feel compelled to have a my-boyfriendcheated-on-me meltdown. If your boyfriend stopped at a bar to have a cocktail, and people flirted with him, and he flirted back — and that’s all he did — would that constitute an “appletini infidelity”? If some guys looked him up and down in the locker room, and he looked those guys up and down back, would that constitute a “cardio infidelity”? No and no — and a boyfriend who flipped out about those interactions would be regarded as jealous, insecure and controlling. Is it that your boyfriend jacked off thinking about other guys? You jack off thinking about other guys when you watch porn. Is it that he jacked off thinking about and interacting with guys he could have IRL? Lots of guys in monogamous relationships — gay, straight or bi — jack off about people they interacted with and could have IRL. Ask your boyfriend to knock this shit off because it goobs you out. But don’t round this “online flirtation” up to “cyber infidelity” unless you want to make yourself miserable. And don’t police your boyfriend’s online activities — snooping is the only way to “make sure it stops” — unless you want to get dumped.

prior meeting during the interview, but by the look on his face, my guess was that he was as surprised as I was. He handled himself well in the interview. My supervisor intends to hire him. I would be his supervisor, but our contact would be almost exclusively via email. My instinct is that our one-night stand shouldn’t disqualify him from the job. What are your thoughts? Any red flags? NERVOUS SUPERVISOR ANXIOUS

Lots of red flags — I could spin out a few Worst Case Scenarios — but the kid is qualified, he handled himself (and only himself) well during the interview, and your supervisor plans to hire him. Under the circumstances, I don’t see how you can avoid supervising this guy. What would you say to your supervisor? “I sometimes cruise Craigslist looking for young-but-legal ass, and I fucked this kid a couple of years ago, so … let’s interview a few more candidates, and hopefully I won’t have fucked any of them.” I agree the kid shouldn’t be penalized for a consensual one-night stand. So have a quick faceto-face word with your new hire on his first day. Acknowledge the awkwardness privately and verbally (put nothing in writing), tell him the hiring decision wasn’t yours and he got the gig on his merits, and close with something like this: “Things between us will be strictly professional, of course — and, hey, crazy coincidence, huh?” Then stick to emails for the duration of his internship. Grain of salt: I’ve never had a corporate job, so my advice could be total crap.

DON’T ROUND “ONLINE FLIRTATION” UP TO “CYBER INFIDELITY” UNLESS YOU WANT TO MAKE YOURSELF MISERABLE.

I’m in my mid-40s. About two years ago, I had a one-night stand with a 19-year-old college student who placed an ad on Craigslist. He was charming, intelligent and fun. I was surprised to learn that he hoped to pursue a career in my profession. I gave him some advice, and we went our separate ways. Flash forward two years. We are looking for some temporary intern-type help, and we got a résumé from a qualified person looking for a summer job. We brought the candidate in for an interview. To my surprise, the applicant was the one-night stand. We obviously did not discuss our

I’m a gay man who is about to turn 35. Being halfway to 70 is freaking me out. The gay world is obsessed with youth and beauty. If you don’t have a tight ass and ripped abs and a hot cock, you have nothing to contribute. Why is the gay world so shallow? ONE VERY ENRAGED ROMANTIC

Ed Murray was 58 years old when he became mayor of Seattle. Larry Kramer was 52 when he inspired the founding of ACT UP. Bayard Rustin was 51 when he organized the historic 1963 March on Washington. Harvey Milk was 47 when he was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Barney Frank was 41 when he was first elected to Congress in 1981, and 73 when he retired last year. Neil Patrick Harris was 41 when he won a Tony Award for starring in the Broadway revival of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Jonathan Capehart was 40 when he became a member of the Washington Post’s editorial board in 2007. Tony Kushner was 37 when he won the Pulitzer Prize for Angels in America. George Takei (77), RuPaul (53), Andrew Sullivan (50), Andy Cohen (46), Jared Polis (39) — I could go on. If you don’t think gay men over 35 have anything to contribute, then it’s not the “gay world” that’s shallow, it’s you.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

On this week’s Savage Lovecast: Spanking, cheating, pervy cousins, and sleeping with the cab driver: savagelovecast.com

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.23-07.30

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Diamonds are not rare. They are so numerous that if they were evenly distributed, you and me and everyone else on the planet could each have a cupful of them. And if you are ever in your lifetime going to get your personal cupful, it may happen in the next 11 months. That’s because your hard work and special talent are more likely than usual to be rewarded with tangible assets. Strokes of luck will tend to manifest in the form of money and treasure and valuable things you can really use. Be alert for the clues, Cancerian. One may appear momentarily.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

According to the legends about Camelot and the Knights of the Round Table, the boy who would ultimately become King Arthur didn’t know he was heir to the throne while he was growing up. His future destiny was hidden from him. The wizard Merlin trained him but made sure he never found out he was special. When the old King Uther Pendragon died, a tournament was staged to find a replacement. The winner would be whoever was able to withdraw the enchanted sword that was embedded in a large stone. Quite by accident, our hero got a chance to make an attempt. Success! I have reminded you of the broad outlines of this tale, Leo, because at least one of its elements resembles your destiny in the next 11 months.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

When a crocodile slams its jaws shut, the energy it summons is powerful. But when the beast opens its jaws, the force it exerts is weak. That’s because the muscles used to close are much more robust than the muscles used to open. I’m wondering if an analogous story might be told about you these days, Virgo. Are you more prone to close down than to open up? Is it easier for you to resist, avoid and say no than it is to be receptive, extend a welcome and say yes? If so, please consider cultivating a better balance. You need both capacities running at full strength in the coming days.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

In the latter part of the 18th century, American rebels and rabble-rousers used to gather regularly in the basement of the Green Dragon Tavern in Boston. There they plotted the Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere’s ride, and other dissident adventures that opposed British Rule. That’s why the Green Dragon became known as the “Headquarters of the Revolution.” I think you and your cohorts need a place like that, Libra. It’s high time for you to scheme and dream about taking coordinated actions that will spur teamwork and foster liberation.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

“When one has not had a good father, one must create one,” said philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. What does that mean? How might you go about “creating” a good father? Well, you could develop a relationship with an admirable older man who is an inspiring role model. You could read books by men whose work stirs you to actualize your own potentials. If you have a vigorous inner life, you could build a fantasy dad in your imagination. Here’s another possibility: Cultivate in yourself the qualities you think a good father should have. And even if you actually had a pretty decent father, Scorpio, I’m sure he wasn’t perfect. So it still might be interesting to try out some of these ideas. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to get more of the fathering energy you would thrive on.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“If I seem free, it’s because I’m always running.” So said Sagittarian musician Jimi Hendrix, widely regarded as one of the most inventive and electrifying guitarists who ever lived. Does that prospect have any appeal to you, Sagittarius? I don’t, of course, recommend that you keep running for the rest of your long life. After a while, it will be wise to rest and ruminate. But I do think it might be illuminating to try this brazen approach for a week or two. If it feels right, you might also want to mix in some dancing and skipping and leaping with your running.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

In the next 11 months, Capricorn, you will be given some choice riddles about the art of togetherness. To solve them, you will have to learn much more about the arts of intimacy — or else! It’s up to you: Either work your ass off as you strengthen your important relationships, or else risk watching them unravel. But don’t take this as a grim, sobering assignment. On the contrary! Play hard. Experiment freely. Be open to unexpected inspiration. Have fun deepening your emotional intelligence. That approach will work best.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Hypothesis: The exciting qualities that attract you to someone in the first place will probably drive you a bit crazy if you go on to develop a longterm relationship. That doesn’t mean you should avoid seeking connections with intriguing people who captivate your imagination. It does suggest you should have no illusions about what you are getting yourself into. It also implies that you should cultivate a sense of humor about how the experiences that rouse your passion often bring you the best tests and trials. And why am I discussing these eccentric truths with you right now? Because I suspect you will be living proof of them in the months to come.

nant women in the U.S. claim to be virgins. They testify that they have conceived a fetus without the benefit of sex. That’s impossible, right? Technically, yes. But if there could ever be a loophole in natural law, it would happen for you Aries sometime in the coming weeks. You will be so exceptionally fertile, so prone to hatching new life, that almost anything could incite germination. A vivid dream or captivating idea or thrilling adventure or exotic encounter might be enough to do the trick.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

As you weave your way through the next chapter of your story, I suggest you take inspiration from the turtle. You may even want to imagine that the turtle is your animal ally, a guide that helps you access the gradual and deliberate kind of intelligence you will need. Moving quickly will not be appropriate for the leisurely lessons that are coming your way. The point is to be deep and thorough about a few things rather than halfknowledgeable about a lot of things. There’s one

other turtle-like quality I hope you will cultivate, too: the ability to feel at home wherever you are.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

America’s biggest winery is E&J Gallo. It sells more wine than any other company, and has been named the planet’s “Most Powerful Wine Brand” four different years. Ernest and Julio Gallo launched the enterprise in 1933 after studying the art of winemaking in pamphlets they found in the basement of a public library in Modesto, Calif. I foresee a less spectacular but metaphorically similar arc for you, Gemini. Sometime soon — maybe it has already happened — information or inspiration you come across in a modest setting will launch you on the path to future success. There is one caveat: You must take seriously the spark you encounter, and not underestimate it because it appears in humble circumstances. Make up a secret identity for yourself. What is it? How do you use it? Testify at Truthrooster @gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

In 1961, Paul Cezanne’s painting The Artist’s Sister was on display at a museum in Aix-en-Provence, France. Then a lucky event occurred: It was stolen. When it was finally recovered months later, it had been ripped out of its frame. An art restorer who was commissioned to repair it discovered that there was a previously-unknown Cezanne painting on the back of the canvas. As a result, the appraisal of the original piece rose $75,000. Now both sides are on view at the St. Louis City Art Museum. I foresee a comparable progression in your life, Pisces. An apparent setback will ultimately increase your value.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

A report in the prestigious British medical journal BMJ says that almost 1 percent of young preg-

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Drivers WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Downtown Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

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GIFT BOX

For Jimmy Cvetic, a locally shot boxing film offers a chance for local kids to step into the ring. JIMMY CVETIC may not move as fast as he used to, but when he’s on

a mission, his mouth and brain can function with lightning speed. On this Friday morning, the long-retired Allegheny County Police detective is running around trying to help a local casting director find 100 to 150 extras to act as spectators for a charity boxing match in the new Jake Gyllenhaal boxing film, Southpaw, currently filming around the city. He’s been up early making calls, trying to get the word out about the event. “Yeah?” he yells into a cell phone, a call from “this guy that I have to take.” “Don’t worry, I’ll make it happen,” he tells the guy on the other end of the line. It’s a natural task for Cvetic, who today serves as the executive director of the Police Athletic League, training at-risk kids in the art of boxing at eight PAL gyms scattered across the area. He’d be worth every penny the film production was paying him — if he were actually getting paid at all. “Jimmy is really something else,” says Chelsea Peterson, the extras casting director on the film. “He’s been a giant help to my

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

he can open up a new PAL gym in the Hill District. In particular he wants the boxing ring that they have been using in shoots around the city. A new ring can cost between $5,000 and $10,000 or more depending on the quality. The location is the former Centre Avenue YMCA, which now stands vacant except for a group that uses it for church services on Sunday. In its former life, it housed a boxing gym where, according to published reports at the time, the city’s African-American boxers, like 100-bout winner Jackie Wilson, routinely worked out. However, other Pittsburgh legends like Fritzie Zivic and Billy Conn also frequently passed through the site, according to press reports of the time. Cvetic has a nearly six-decade-old photograph of those three and Sugar Ray Robinson standing together in the ring at the YMCA. He wants to reopen that gym and take a similar photo with modern local boxing notables like Paul Spadafora, Rod Salka, Sammy Vasquez and Monty Clay — along with boxing legend Mike Tyson, who will be promoting a fight at the Consol

HIS ASKING PRICE: DONATE SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT THAT WILL BE USED IN THE MOVIE, SO HE CAN OPEN UP A NEW PAL GYM IN THE HILL DISTRICT. department, finding us boxers to act in the film and helping us Energy Center in August. “This gym was a huge part of this city’s boxing history,” Cvetic find locations for the boxing scenes.” (Some of Cvetic’s former says. “It’s a beautiful place and deserves to be a boxing gym again.” fighters even got large roles in the upcoming picture.) Peterson says Cvetic’s work on Southpaw will be a huge benefit “And he’s doing it for free.” Well, not exactly. Most of what Cvetic does comes out of the to the community and to PAL. “A lot of the stuff that is used in movies goodness of his heart. But it rarely comes withjust ends up sitting in a warehouse someout a hitch or remuneration of some kind — EXTRAS ARE NEEDED where,” Peterson says. “But here we have though not for himself. for a scene in the upcoming film Southpaw, an opportunity to give some equipment to The Police Athletic League is financed with filming at the Priory July 24-25. an organization that we know will put it to the generosity of individuals and businesses in The scene is a charity boxing match good use. Although I’m not sure at this time the community. “We’ve operated for years on a and anyone over 18 is welcome; dress is semi-formal, suits and jackets for men what equipment will be donated.” beg and a borrow,” Cvetic says. “It takes a Ph.D. and party dresses for women. Arrival time Cvetic confirms that no promises have in ‘street’ to do what we’ve been able to do over is between 8 a.m. and noon both days: been made, but says confidently, “They the years. Shooting will last approximately 12 hours each day. Prizes, including a trip haven’t said it yet, but I have to have that “I need help to do what I do, and I’m never to Las Vegas, Pirates tickets and more, ring for the kids so we can get this gym afraid to ask anyone out of fear that they say will be given away. Register by emailing open.” no. If you’re not willing to risk hearing no, southpawpittsburgh@gmail.com. “Some groups say, ‘If you can save just you’ll never hear yes.” one kid, then you’re a success,’” he adds. “But Peterson was tasked at the last minute with finding extras for next week’s movie shoot at the Priory. She every day, no matter what I’m doing, I’m out there trying to save turned to Cvetic — who among other things is a poet whose work every kid who comes to me for help. “That’s why I need that ring.” sometimes appears in City Paper — for help. His asking price: C DE IT C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM Donate some of the equipment that will be used in the movie, so

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.23/07.30.2014



July 23, 2014