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EVENTS 7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/$40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

8.15 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

Chancellor Warhol with special guest, DJ Soy Sos 8.23 – 8pm

10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets: $10/$8 Members and students

Warhol entrance space | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes the appropriately named indie hip hop artist, Chancellor Warhol (aka Antonio Boleyjack), from Nashville, TN. Since his first solo album, Japanese Lunchbox, in 2010, Boleyjack has been developing his rap style and a sound that blends influences from alternative rock and electronic music. With an overall interest in intersections of art, cinema, fashion and music within pop culture, he cites Andy Warhol as a strong influence and inspiration.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


07.09/07.16.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 28

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[NEWS] was the oddball because I told 06 “Ieveryone I wanted to drive a bus or trolley.” — Andrew, who has spent the past decade tracking Port Authority transit for his Mobile Bus Information Hotline

“The fact that Scaife has been eclipsed by the Kochs and Rupert Murdoch is, perhaps, the strongest evidence of his legacy.” — Chris Potter on the passing of Richard Mellon Scaife

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STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“FROM A MACRO PERSPECTIVE, WHAT [ANDREW] IS DOING IS VERY VALUABLE.”

INCOMING Stuff We Like (July 2) “While I have no doubt that this section will eventually become a regular part of my City Paper reading experience, I was shocked, saddened, and dismayed to discover this in place of my favorite section of the City Paper: the Ink Well crossword puzzle! Say it ain’t so! What sets the CP crossword apart from the rest is the fun, irreverent answers and the challenges that they bring because you can’t cheat using sites like “One Across” as you are able to do with the more “traditional” crossword puzzles. It is/was a truly unique puzzle and with all the buzz about “neuroplasticity” and brain training going around, I feel like this is a truly epic loss to my brain’s weekly routine! Please don’t leave us crossword lovers out in the cold! For years, I have worked on these puzzles with friends, family, and even strangers on the bus; it is a bonding experience, truly, and the fact that it’s free makes it even more indispensable in my life! I very much hope that the paper will bring the crossword back because it has saved me countless hours of boredom, allowed me to open up and cooperate with others in the pursuit of answers, and has no doubt brought many a smile to my face when I have filled in those boxes, knowing that I am aware of the correct answer. My favorite clue? ‘It delivers the hits;’ the answer: bong.” — Web comment from “Way Lucas”

WYEP marks 40 years as “the station that refused to die” (June 25) “Sadly, this article entirely omits WYEP’s stunning impact on Pittsburgh’s Punk and New Wave scene in the late ’ 70s and early ’80s. Hell, aside from nurturing its growth locally, DJ W.T. Koltek and [his] cohorts introduced us to so very many cool sounds that weren’t even necessarily punk or new wave, but all shared an … edge that superbly expanded one’s musical references. To me that was the period of WYEP’s golden age. I can very easily say these folks had the same tremendous impact locally as did the legendary underground radio DJ ‘Brother Love’ (Ken Reeth) at WAMO during the late ’60s.” — Web comment from “Pa Ubu”

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TIMED TRAVEL Amateur transit-spotter tries to fill PAT’s real-time information void {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

A

NDREW’S IDEA of prime Downtown

real estate is a crowded rush-hour bus stop. It doesn’t have much of a view, and every few minutes a bus belching diesel fumes roars past. But he’s too busy to let any of that bother him. “It’s a really good spot for transitspotting,” he says, his face buried in a pristine white iPhone 5s. Settled into a green fold-up captain’s chair at Fifth Avenue and William Penn Place, he cranes his neck to watch a 71D Hamilton pull away across the street. “There are people who mock me for the chair, but if you’re at a bus stop, and it’s hot, you want a seat,” he says. His fingers race across his phone, which tells him the bus is running six minutes late. He pauses, unsure if it’s worth inputting the 71D’s tardiness into Tiramisu, an app that lets riders track buses with information gathered from other users. Buses often run behind schedule during rush hour, and six minutes isn’t that late. But as he’s done thousands of times before, Andrew decides more information is better than less, and plugs the update in. It hardly seems like subversive activity, but Andrew requested that his last name be withheld from this story due to tensions with the Port Authority and “unforeseen repercussions [from] people who don’t like the service.” The agency has claimed that at times his “customer service” has bordered on impersonating transit workers.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Andrew updates the @PGH_BUS_INFO Twitter feed.

Nevertheless, for the past decade, Andrew, now 26, has spent much of his day tweeting and answering phone calls about basic scheduling information and service disruptions. He doesn’t have another job — he uses the public assistance he gets to take care of Internet and phone costs, but he’s quick to point out his lifestyle is hardly lavish: He lives in subsidized housing in Penn Hills and often doesn’t have enough money to even afford a monthly bus pass. The information he provides is the

center of “Mobile Bus Information Hotline” — an all-purpose phone number (412-7593335) and Twitter account (@PGH_BUS_ INFO) that he runs after the evening rush into the early morning hours when Port Authority’s own customer-service center is typically shut down. Port Authority has lagged behind larger transit agencies in providing real-time information about delays and other disruptions. “There’s definitely a demand for it,” Andrew says, proudly adding that he’s CONTINUES ON PG. 08


Come see what we’ve uncovered Have coffee with the curators! Monday, July 14 10:30–11 a.m.: Light breakfast in Carnegie Café 11 a.m.– Noon: Program in CMOA Theater $35/$28 members Join Lulu Lippincott and Ellen Baxter for a look into the forensic investigation of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection.

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fielded roughly 30,000 calls; as of press time, his account had sent out nearly 24,000 tweets and had 924 followers. But technological changes at Port Authority could force Andrew to change the focus of his operation. The agency has installed an automated phone system that gives out scheduling information during off hours. And by year’s end, Port Authority plans to completely launch real-time tracking — allowing anyone with an Internet connection to track Port Authority’s 700bus fleet. FOR AS LONG as he can remember, Andrew’s

dream was to work for Port Authority. When classmates talked about wanting to be police officers or firefighters, he recalls, “I was the oddball because I told everyone I wanted to drive a bus or trolley.” His family didn’t have much money, so almost all the traveling he did was on public transit. “I had a very hard childhood growing up, [and] one of my escapes would be to just ride the buses and trolleys,” he says. “He started talking to the bus drivers when he was a kid,” recalls Colleen Dearolf, Andrew’s mother. “I would notice he was over by the drivers watching what they do.” He collected schedules, gave bus drivers nicknames — “old man Allentown” — and would often help strangers navigate the system. As time wore on, it became clearer that a job at Port Authority might not be in his future. To get a job “you need to have a high school diploma or GED equivalent,” says Andrew, who says he went to Pressley Ridge but never ended up getting a diploma. (The school declined comment, citing privacy laws.) “You’re also going to need a driver’s license, and I’ve just never had anybody teach me, or had the money for it.” Sometimes, he’d dress up in a Port Authority operator’s uniform — and during this year’s Pittsburgh Marathon, he was “behaving as if he was a member of our road operations department and telling drivers where to go that day,” according to Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie. Andrew calls the marathon incident a “misinterpretation” — he had previously agreed to stop wearing the uniform — and changed the heading of his Twitter account from PGH Bus Help to “NOT PortAuthority!!” “He can be a good guy, but he also has his moments,” Dearolf says. For Andrew, running a transit hotline became the next best thing to actually

working for the agency. He started “back when Port Authority was making dramatic cuts to service,” Andrew says. “It’s not like Port Authority was going to pick up the slack.” In the mid 2000s, when Andrew was launching his hotline, Port Authority mostly got information to riders through its website, Ritchie says. It was a time before cell phones — let alone smart phones — were ubiquitous. When there were service disruptions or changes, riders were often left in the dark. “It was a huge challenge,” Ritchie says. “To this day we still lack that technology out on the street when we have a change like that.” To Andrew, starting the hotline that operated mostly during off-hours seemed like a public service. It started as “just a phone number I answered when I wasn’t in school or wasn’t working,” Andrew says. He distributed the number to transit riders and wrote it inside of bus schedules. “Within the first three months, it went from being a hobby to going over the [cell-phone] plan” he shared with his mom, Andrew says. Dearolf confirms she “had to get rid of the phone for him because it was too expensive.” Andrew started using whatever money he had on hand to pay for his own phone, though most of his attention now centers on updating his @PGH_BUS_INFO Twitter account — since phone-call volume has become “highly variable.” In fact, he received no phone calls on a recent Tuesday afternoon. And when he’s not scraping together money for rent, his disability and welfare assistance are spent keeping the operation afloat. “As much money as I can spare goes into the hotline,” he says.

“WE THINK [THE HOTLINE] IS FINE AS LONG AS THE INFORMATION’S ACCURATE.”

THIS PARTICULAR Tuesday afternoon, An-

drew’s phone is about to run out of power, and he’s stranded on a P76 headed to North Versailles, where he plans to get a money order for his landlord. He spits into a Gatorade bottle — a necessity after a tonsillectomy years ago that seemed to kick his salivary glands into overdrive. “If my phone dies, that’ll put me out of commission,” he mumbles, rifling through his backpack. “Bingo!” he says, pulling one of his three backup chargers out of his bag. “The day — and the public — are saved.” It’s just in time: Out of the corner of his eye, Andrew spots a broken-down bus alongside the East Busway. Within seconds he tweets, “A P12 Bus is broken down in Wilkinsburg and will be out of service! CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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Expect delays! (via Transit Spotter ) ^AAH.” Since he can’t be everywhere at once, information is always incomplete, though he says, “Something is better than nothing.” Andrew says there are about 25 other people who help staff the hotline, which is why he tries to make sure each tweet is signed with the initials of the person who tweeted. (He declined several requests for interviews with other hotline staffers.) Aaron Steinfeld, for one, argues there’s value in the information Andrew provides, even if it’s incomplete. He’s a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute — and part of the team that helped develop the Tiramisu bus-tracking app. “Real-time information,” Steinfeld explains, has “a significant impact on rider perception about transit service,” since one of the biggest rider frustrations with transit is its unpredictability. And every time Andrew tweets about a disruption, or enters a bus into the Tiramisu app, he’s reducing that uncertainty — even if it’s only at the margins. “From a macro perspective, what [Andrew] is doing is very valuable,” Steinfeld says. “There’s a demand and interest in people sharing their experiences on transit.” And even though “Port Authority does provide information [on] its website, [they’re] very short-staffed when it comes to [real-time] information.” From Port Authority’s perspective, “We think [the hotline] is fine as long as the information’s accurate,” says Ritchie, who

declined to say whether the agency thinks @PGH_BUS_INFO meets that criterion. Port Authority is “making good use of the social media they have,” says Stuart Strickland, a transit advocate and follower of Andrew’s Twitter presence. “But the need for transit information is an order of magnitude higher than what Port Authority is providing.” Andrew’s value to the community, Steinfeld adds, isn’t just based on random data points: “He’s clearly an expert on the local transit system,” and facilitates discussions on transit issues. As Port Authority rolls out a $1.8 million real-time bus tracking project and begins to install electronic displays at high-volume stops, the value of Andrew’s twitter account may increasingly depend on people like Daniel Little, who uses it mostly as a forum for discussing issues like restoring streetcar service, or asking when a particular line was discontinued. Little says there should be more conversations about transit, but other than @PGH_BUS_INFO, “I don’t necessarily know where those conversations are taking place.” Still, Andrew isn’t particularly worried about Port Authority’s push for real-time information disrupting his operation — and suggests that people without smartphones are more than welcome to call in for real-time information. “There are going to be people who are left out,” he says. “Technology doesn’t cater to everyone.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

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Connect and Save with Port Authority andthe Pittsburgh Pirates Use your Port Authority ConnectCard and save up to $10 per ticket on all Monday-Thursday Pittsburgh Pirates home games from April 2-August 7. Go to Pirates.com\connectcard or show your ConnectCard at the PNC Park ticket window to receive your discount. Connect and Save with this special offer today!

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HIDDEN HARVEST Nonprofit will put city’s wasted produce to good use {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

ON ROSE SMIECHOWSKI’S block in Friend-

ship there are four types of edible fruit trees. Near Carolyn Barber’s home in Highland Park, there are five. In total, Pittsburgh is home to more than 20 varieties of edible trees whose fruit — including mulberries, pears, apples and figs — frequently lays wasted on city sidewalks. But Smiechowski and Barber are working to put this produce to good use. That’s why they founded Hidden Harvest, a nonprofit organization that will take produce from trees throughout the city and donate it to local food banks. “There are food deserts in Pittsburgh where people don’t have access to fresh food,” says Barber. “We can’t solve major food-security issues, but we can contribute by educating people and raising awareness about food options.” Right now, Hidden Harvest is working to register trees and volunteers. A lot of their work will involve reaching out to private tree-owners to see if they are interested in having their trees harvested. The harvest from each tree will be split equally between the volunteers, the tree owner, and the food bank. “[Tree owners] might not even realize what they have in their backyard is edible but they do know that it drops berries and it makes a mess every year,” Smiechowski says. While interest in foraging and urban gardening is growing throughout the city, Hidden Harvest will be the first organization of its kind in Pittsburgh. There are about 60 similar organizations throughout North America. Hidden Harvest is modeled after “Not Far from the Tree,” a fruit-tree project based in Barber’s native Toronto. Since it was founded in 2008, the Canadian organization has collected more than 70,000 pounds of fruit, and donated 22,000 pounds to social-service agencies. “Just seeing how many thousands of pounds of food has been harvested in these different places is inspiring,” Smiechowski says. “And some of these things happening in other parts of the country are just really small community groups, and they’re still making an impact.” Smiechowski and Barber plan to partner with the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank as part of the nonprofit’s community harvest program, which allows gardeners to donate excess produce. “We encourage gardeners to donate

their excess fruit and vegetables,” says Jeralyn Beach, food-bank produce coordinator. “So we’re excited that [Hidden Harvest is] trying to get this organized. We know harvesting these trees can be difficult, so if we can get folks who are willing to do that, there is a need and we’ll make sure they can get that food into the right hands.” While food banks have traditionally been focused on distributing non-perishable items, the food bank redoubled its efforts more than two decades ago to distribute more fresh produce. “We’re about providing people with a full, balanced, nutritious meal, and it is hard to do without fresh produce,” Beach says. “These donations are just a small part of all the produce we distribute, but it adds up.” While the organization will be primarily supported on the backs of volunteers who register to harvest the fruit, in the future Smiechowski and Barber plan to seek funding for equipment like apple pickers and baskets to make the job easier. They hope to hold their first harvest before the end of the summer.

Volunteers and tree owners who want to help Hidden Harvest can register online at www.hiddenharvestpgh.org In addition to fruit harvesting, the group will also be tackling food scarcity through educational programs. “We may be donating food to the food bank, but I also imagine that with outreach and education there might be a single mom who has a mulberry tree in her back yard and suddenly realizes, ‘I can go pick what’s in my back yard and I can eat that,’” Smiechowski says. Hidden Harvest will also be educating the community on how to use the food collected from trees. Its website will feature recipes for jams, pies, marmalades, breads and more. The founders are especially interested in finding unique ways of using uncommon ingredients in order to eliminate the stigma associated with them. “There are a lot of things, like mulberries and ginkgo nuts, that are really maligned and people just think they’re completely bothersome,” Barber says. “I don’t know if we can change people’s minds completely, but we can certainly try.” RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


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With nine Grammys and more than 200 million records sold, the legendary sounds of the Bee Gees have stood the test of time. Join the Pittsburgh Symphony for “Stayin’ Alive: One Night of the Bee Gees,” a tribute featuring all of your Bee Gees favorites, like “You Should Be Dancing,” “How Deep Is Your Love,” “Stayin’ Alive” and many more! To purchase tickets, visit pittsburghsymphony.org or call 412.392.4900.

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UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: Home Buying by Dollar Bank Come for this free credit-counseling and credit-repair workshop given by Dollar Bank. This seminar will include instruction on how to save for your first house; how to monitor your credit, and how to access grant money for closing costs associated with mortgage financing. Come ready to access your free credit report and to go through an evaluation of your credit profile.

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FEELING BLUE UPMC, Highmark deal offers partial fix for Community Blue subscribers {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} LAST YEAR, UPMC told subscribers to Highmark’s new Community Blue health plan that, with few expections, they would have to find new doctors. For plan subscribers, UPMC was no longer an in-network provider: Even patients in the middle of treatments would need to find a new doctor — and even if they were willing to pay for care out of their own pockets. But a recently announced consent decree between UPMC and Highmark, brokered by Gov. Tom Corbett and Attorney General Kathleen Kane, has addressed that problem to some extent. That’s assuming you consider paying higher, out-ofnetwork rates a solution. Jim Donahue, executive deputy attorney general for consumer protection, confirms that the agreement allows Community Blue customers to use UPMC facilities at out-of-network rates, though the two entities must work out the details. They will have until July 15, according to the consent decree, to come to terms; if a consensus is not reached, the matter will go to binding arbitration. But without a consent decree in place governing the UPMC/Highmark relationship now, he says, likely court battles “would have led to chaos come January 2015,” when the current UPMC/Highmark deal expires. In the meantime, Donahue says, the agreement mandates that Highmark customers at UPMC facilities will get a 40 percent discount on the usual out-of-network rate. (Still, Donahue says, UPMC “has been known to have some pretty high charges.”) UPMC did not return requests for comment, but Community Blue has long been a flashpoint in the health-care giant’s battle with Highmark. The insurer designed the plan to exclude most UPMC services from its network, and last year UPMC responded by barring many Community Blue patients from seeing doctors even if they paid cash. (It made exceptions for patients who lacked alternative treatment options, such as those seeking care from Children’s Hospital, Western Psych or some rural hospitals, like UPMC Bedford.) Now, however, Highmark spokesman Aaron Billger says questions about the fate of Community Blue patients are “being resolved by Highmark and UPMC.” For now, Billger says, Highmark does “not believe that UPMC will turn Community Blue patients away” because “the consent decree states that UPMC will accept all High-

mark members, even if it is on an out-ofnetwork basis.” “While not yet formalized,” Billger says, at a minimum “it is our interpretation that the consent decree provides Community Blue members with a 40 percent discount for out-of-network services.” That may be the fate of Community Blue subscribers both in Pittsburgh, where alternatives to hospitals like UPMC-Shadyside exist, and in outlying areas where they were previously barred from UPMC facilities. Those include Erie’s UPMC Hamot and the Kane Community Hospitals: Under the consent decree, Community Blue subscribers may now access those facilities, but only at the steeper rate. Melissa Fox, spokeswoman for the state’s insurance department, says that by design, Community Blue is “a narrow network product. The consent decrees are not intended to change the contractual nature of those products.” Still, she said, even Community Blue patients in some areas might benefit from the consent-decree protections ensuring in-network rates for treatment in “emergency situations.” In any case, Billger adds, “The most important thing is that details of how the consent decree affects Community Blue are being resolved by Highmark and UPMC.” Since its inception last year, Community Blue is fast becoming a popular option for Highmark customers. In the most recent open-enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act, for example, Highmark signed up more than 148,000 new customers. Of that, about 120,000 chose Community Blue. Erin Ninehouser, education and outreach director for advocacy group the Pennsylvania Health Access Network, says the agreement is “better than nothing but will still hurt an awful lot of people.” The agreement has truly failed, she says, if it does not allow for in-network Community Blue access, particularly at all hospitals outside Pittsburgh. While Community Blue customers who live in or near the city will be inconvenienced by being forced to switch doctors, “for people in those rural areas, UPMC is their only choice. And Community Blue is so competitively priced that it’s really their only option in health plans. “This is not an agreement that protects our citizens and provides affordable access to community health care. The whole thing is a mess.”

“THE WHOLE THING IS A MESS.”

C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


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[POTTER’S FIELD]

BYE LINES Scaife’s place in history is assured — like it or not {BY CHRIS POTTER}

Welcome to the GREAT INDOORS.

PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW publisher Richard Mellon Scaife never backed down from a fight. Even when he disclosed that he had untreatable cancer on his paper’s front page May 18, he tartly observed, “Some who dislike me may rejoice at the news.” It’s not surprising he thought so. His own paper has given little quarter to its foes, even after they’ve fallen. When legendary Washington Post publisher Katherine Graham died in 2001, the Trib memorialized her with an editorial that, among other things, seemed to insinuate she had a role in her husband’s death. But the 82-year-old Scaife’s own passing — on July 4, no less — prompted little such rancor. Among other encomiums, the Trib ran a 364-word eulogy from former PNC Bank head Jim Rohr, who in 2006 was the target of a daily editorial-page shaming campaign, denouncing Rohr personally for using a tax subsidy to build a new office tower. (With typical restraint, the Trib’s editorial page called the subsidy “a public molestation.”) T h e P i rat e s , m e a n while, held a moment of silence for Scaife during their homestand against the Philadelphia Phillies. Even granting the large number of Trib Total Media ads gracing PNC Park, it was a remarkable gesture. Not only had the Trib denounced the public subsidies used to build the ballpark, but Scaife funded a local think tank that also opposed them. And in a 2001 magazine story, a Trib editor said that Scaife told him flatly, “I don’t want the Pirates on page one.” Sure, the response from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s editorial page was … less than fulsome. (“While Dick Scaife’s voice was mostly one of opposition, not of support, today we leave it to history to decide whether that was good or bad.”) And sure, plenty of media accounts noted Scaife’s personal and political controversies. He helped provide start-up capital to rightwing think tanks like the Heritage Foundation, and Tea Party groups like FreedomWorks — groups that urge know-nothing/ do-nothing responses to rising sea levels and rising inequality alike. And Democrats saw Scaife as the architect of a “vast right-wing conspiracy,” as he financed journalism seeking to dig up dirt on former

President Bill Clinton. But for the most part, Scaife’s death has been observed with a notable lack of rejoicing. One reason for that, obviously, is that Scaife made civic investments — ranging from social services to historic preservation — that benefited people from all walks of life. And whatever his partisan intentions, the Tribune-Review provides Pittsburgh with a luxury few other cities enjoy: a second source of daily print journalism, thanks to a staff that features a number of talented reporters. And as the Trib itself has pointed out, Scaife’s support of abortion rights and same-sex marriage have put him at odds with the Republican Party. In any case, Scaife no longer looms as large as he did 15 years ago. He’s been replaced as a Democratic bête noir by the Koch Brothers, and Fox News now dominates the media landscape as no regional daily newspaper ever could. And while Scaife’s C l i n t o n - e r a a dvo c a c y helped restore paranoia to the political mainstream, years of empty allegations concerning Benghazi and birth certificates are almost enough to make you nostalgic for the good old days of Whitewater and Ken Starr. But the fact that Scaife has been eclipsed by the Kochs and Rupert Murdoch is, perhaps, the strongest evidence of his legacy. By investing in think tanks to craft policy, media outlets to publicize it, and politicians to carry it out, he helped pioneer a vertically integrated approach to manufacturing consent, much as Andrew Carnegie pioneered the manufacturing of steel. And Scaife’s name belongs alongside Carnegie and Frick’s in another sense: His legacy too reflects the fact that, in a trickle-down society, the wealthy can both enrich our lives and impoverish our politics. His bequests, like theirs, beautified our city, while turning a blind eye to the despoliation of our environment. But whatever Scaife expected, there’s no reason for anyone to celebrate his passing. Friends and allies will mourn the death of one of Pittsburgh’s most fascinating figures. As for the rest of us, this is still Dick Scaife’s world. And we’re still living in it.

IN A TRICKLEDOWN SOCIETY, THE WEALTHY CAN BOTH ENRICH OUR LIVES AND IMPOVERISH OUR POLITICS.

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A STANDOUT IS THE “RAVIOGIE,” A MASH-UP OF MEAT RAVIOLI AND POTATO PIEROGIE

NEW FOOD, OLD NAME {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Veterans of the Downtown lunch hour likely spent time at Mario Moussa’s old Mexican restaurant, Madonna’s. It occupied a couple of different storefronts from 2001 until last summer, when it was forced to close for a second time because of changes to the Smithfield Street building it was located in. Early this year, Moussa re-opened — but not as Madonna’s, and not making Mexican food. His new spot was at first called Palmyra; it serves Mediterranean food, specifically dishes prevalent in Syria, where Moussa and his wife are originally from (though he lived in Bulgaria for years). Chicken shawarma, hummus, grape leaves and the like fill the menu. Moussa says the larger space at the new location lent itself to Syrian cuisine where his previous, smaller spots did not. The new menu was great, but the name was an issue: For one thing, old Madonna’s customers didn’t necessarily know Palmyra was Moussa’s new place. For another, Moussa’s brother opened another Middle Eastern restaurant, a few blocks down Smithfield, with the same name. (“I don’t consider it competition,” he says. “If he gets business, that’s good — he’s my brother!”) Three weeks ago, Moussa changed Palmyra’s name to … Madonna’s. He says almost immediately he saw old regulars from the Mexican restaurant drop in, and only a few have said, “Where are the nachos?” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

408 Smithfield St., Downtown. Open Monday-Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. 412-281-4963

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{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

SOUP AND MORE HE LITTLE Allegheny River hamlet

of Springdale doesn’t loom large in our culinary geography, but maybe it should. Ladles started as a soup-centric luncheonette in Arnold, but expanded to a full-service location across the river, where it serves breakfast, lunch and dinner six-and-a-half days a week. Ladles’ American and Italian-American menu is well in line with local standards, but its approach sets it apart from typical smalltown and suburban fare. Dominated by the stacks of a coalfired electric plant, Springdale’s main drag is mostly parking lots, but Ladles’ cottage-chic ambience is right at home in an older brick building nestled right up to the sidewalk. There’s a covered patio out back, hosting live music on a Friday night,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

{PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

Homemade soups, front to back: seafood chowder, crab bisque and wedding soup

and a tiny bar with a separate entrance off the side parking lot. The comfortable dining room is in the front, deftly decorated with just enough vintage gewgaws to feel cozy, but not so many that it feels cluttered.

LADLES 516 Pittsburgh St., Springdale. 724-274-5230 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 7 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat. 7:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. PRICES: Starters, soups, salads and sandwiches $3.50-10; entrees $14-24 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED But it is the food that really sets Ladles apart. Co-owner Kathy Marsico-Kaminski’s passion for homemade soups is on dis-

play on the chalkboard menu daily; five were on offer when were there. And a large portion of the regular menu is homemade, including gnocchi, pierogie and ravioli. Keeping things local, Ladles features organic breads and grass-fed beef from Friendship Farms in Ligonier. The promise seems to be Western Pennsylvania home-cooking with a foodie ethos. A standout on the menu is the “raviogie,” a mash-up of meat ravioli and potato/cheese pierogie, available with butter and onions or marinara sauce. This could have been a gimmick, but Ladles’ kitchen executed it well, with thick yet tender pasta wrapping hearty meat and potatoes. Though the meat was a mite bland, with the onions, plus melted cheddar on top, the dish as a whole was satisfying.


A special appetizer of roasted Portobello was impressive and lusciously flavorful: The mushrooms were filled with crabmeat and topped with a creamy tomato “gravy” and melted asiago, which lent a nice sharpness. While beans and greens, that Italian classic, is often soupy, it is seldom served as a soup; Ladles made us wonder why not. Marsico-Kaminski’s version was thick with firm yet creamy beans and plenty of escarole, but it was the broth that made this dish truly superlative. It was full of vegetal flavor with strong undertones of peppery spice that, again, drew a line between bland and bold. The sandwiches on offer were a similar blend of the familiar and inventive, with a very tempting Chesapeake Bay crab melt (served open face) and sea scallop sliders, served with Asian slaw and lemon aioli. A dining companion polished off the latter before we could try it, which we took as a firm recommendation.

On the RoCKs

AN INTERESTING FEATURE OF THE ITALIAN PART OF THE MENU WAS THE VARIETY OF RED SAUCES. We had the cheddar haystack beef. Here, house-braised brisket was topped with onion “tanglers” — strips of red onion in a light, crunchy coating — and cheddar. The sandwich’s flavors were good, but the brisket, despite braising, was a touch dry. The accompanying potato pancake was pale and lacking in crust, but onion and parsley pumped up its flavor. An interesting feature of the Italian part of the menu was the variety of red sauces: a traditional marinara, which we found a touch sweet; the aforementioned tomato-cream “gravy,” its richness brightened by tomatoes’ native astringency; mild tomato vodka sauce; and a spicier tomato sauce that comes with the stuffed banana-pepper pasta. We really appreciated that the kitchen recognizes that one size does not fit all, and that different pastas cry out for different sauces. Angelique tried the vodka sauce on homemade ravioli stuffed with meat and spinach. While the sauce didn’t have enough sweet-tart tomato flavor for her taste, the ravioli were excellent, tender and fully plumped with savory filling. Ladles’s high-quality home-cooking highlights one of the primary pleasures of dining out: sampling the skill and invention of an enthusiastic cook. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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SOUTH HILLS GET A LIFT Hitchhiker Brewing promises experimental approach to craft beer Good news, South Hills beer-lovers: There’s now a Pittsburgh brewpub on your side of the Mon. “The neighborhood has really embraced us,” says Hitchhiker Brewing Co. head brewer Andy Kwiatkowski. Still, a few Mount Lebanon customers haven’t quite caught on to the “brew” part of the brewpub concept yet: “Some people that come here don’t know we’re a brewery,” says Kwiatkowski, who’s fielded several requests for a Yuengling, among other things. “I have to tell them that we make all of our own beers here.” And fortunately for craft-beer lovers, Hitchhiker owner Gary Olden made a savvy move hiring Kwiatkowski.

“I GET TO SATISFY MY INNER BEER NERD.” After nearly five years of homebrewing and hitting the festival circuits, Kwiatkowski is a well-known face in the Pittsburgh brew community. He worked at East End Brewing for about eight months before returning to a desk job and honing his craft in his spare time. “I was brewing a lot more beer than I probably should have been,” he says. Kwiatkowski describes his approach as constantly curious, even tilting toward obsession: “It’s just about impossible for me to sit down and enjoy a beer. I’ll taste and evaluate them, but that’s it.” Expect the beers at Hitchhiker to reflect his restlessness. The brewhouse selections will rotate often, with previous recipes either tweaked a bit or thrown completely on their heads. “We’re going to be doing a lot of experimentation here,” Kwiatkowski says. For example, the beautiful saison, resonant with undertones of pear peel and apricot, is soon to be swapped out for one enhanced with orange peel and juniper, and likely two other iterations of the summertime style. Kwiatkowski promises something for drinkers requesting Yuengling, too. He’s brewing a Dusseldorf altbier which, while remaining a craft beer, will have many of the same notes as the Pennsylvania commercial label. “I get to satisfy my inner beer nerd,” Kwiatkowski says of such experiments, “but give something to the customers that they are asking for.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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OPEN Monday-Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9:30pm BYOB (no corking fee) Lunch specials starting at $8!

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Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALL INDIA. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600. With more than 200 items, All India’s menu is both epic and exciting, including novel choices such as Goan coconut shrimp and green jackfruit curry alongside the old denizens, chicken curry and the tandoor. Here, a thali, or combination platter, is a great option for the culinary explorer who wants the experience of multiple tastes. KF AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweet-potato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and house-recipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels sprouts or rich mac-and-cheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE CAFÉ VITA. 424 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. 412-828-5506. Embracing the inherent dichotomies of brunch, this restaurant offers both traditional Italian, complete with panini, pasta, ratatouille and eggplant parmesan; and classic breakfast fare, such as omelets and French toast. Italian notes pervade some of the breakfast options, too: You’ll find French toast made with focaccia, and omelets served with Tuscan toast. JF THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere

Sushi Tomo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF

south-of-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tunaand-avocado spring rolls. LE KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE

Red Orchid {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, wood-fired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such

OLIVES AND PEPPERS. 6052 William Flynn Highway (Route 8), Bakerstown. 724-444-7499. This casual Italian spot that offers pizza, pasta and sandwiches as well as more refined entrees. The meat-and-cheese sandwiches are a forte, with ciabatta “panini” and hoagies options. The lasagna is enormous, its homemade noodles laden with a creamy five-cheese mix and a savory Bolognese sauce with meatballlike chunks of beef. KE


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OUTDOOR PATIO OPEN!

Legume Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). These two fish restaurants fill the gap between humble lunch counter and snooty steakhouse — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of higher-end dishes, particularly at the Downtown location. KF RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF

meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty of well-prepared sushi, including specialty maki. KE

TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888. This Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, but also less-common dishes. The menu has a section of com tam (“broken rice”) dishes, including some topped with a fried egg; there is also a jellyfish salad with pickled carrot and SEVICHE. 930 Penn daikon. Another Ave., Downtown. worthy entrée was 412-697-3120. banh xeo, savory crepes . w ww per This upscale Latin filled with shrimp, a p ty ci h pg American-style tapas sautéed pork and .com restaurant specializes vegetables, or try the in citrus-cured fish, while make-your-own summer also offering a small selection roll option. FK of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn better to wash down an Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. empanada or mini taco than a The menu features a manageable refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., soups. There’s also a tempting Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open assortment of simple vegetable late for the Downtown theater dishes and appetizers that go crowd, this cheery restaurant beyond mere spring rolls, such as satisfies theater buffs, families whole quail with lemon leaves and young professionals alike. and herbs, and ground-shrimp The seasonal menu offers lively patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. short ribs. Gourmet burgers and 530 E. Bruceton Road, West pizzas make for quick meals. Mifflin. 412-650-9090. An Linger for homemade desserts, Alabama seafood chain claims a or stop by after the show. KE welcome northern outpost in the Pittsburgh suburbs. The menu is SMILING BANANA LEAF. dominated by seafood, with a few 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. steak, burger, and chicken options, 412-362-3200. At this absolute prepared in a Southern style — jewel-box of a restaurant, the mostly fried, and accompanied menu emphasizes authentic by grits, gumbo, hushpuppies Thai dishes rather than Thaiand okra. And oysters, naturally, inflected Chinese food. Grilled served in a variety of ways. EK

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LOCAL

BEAT

“I THINK IN THE SOUTH, WE HAVE A TENDENCY TO TRY TO BE VERY POLITE.”

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

NORTH BY NORTH SIDE On Sat., July 12, the Deutschtown Music Festival will celebrate its second annual gathering on the North Side. More than 70 acts are scheduled to play a total of 16 different stages spread throughout historic Deutschtown, from Max’s Rathskeller to Wigle Whiskey’s Barrel House and the North Side Elks Lodge. Outdoor stages will also be set up at Middle and Foreland streets and Allegheny Commons East. Festival organizer Cody Walters expects nearly 6,000 people. (Last year’s inaugural event had an estimated attendance of 2,500, according to Walters.) With so many people expected, Deutschtown and its small venues may seem an unexpected locale for hosting such an event — one that might easily be overtaxed. “Part of that problem will be taken care of by the outdoor stages,” Walters says, “and if it does get a bit crowded in one of the clubs or bars, so be it: Everyone that attended last year was really respectful of each other, and I expect the same this year.” Furthermore, for Walters and the residents of Deutschtown, it seems the perfect spot. “Neighborhoods like Deutschtown are the ones I seek out when I travel,” says Walters. “It has good music [at venues like] the Park House and the Pittsburgh Banjo Club [at the Elks Lodge], good beer, good food [and] old, historic buildings — Deutschtown has style.” The Deutschtown Music Festival is actually the culmination of four annual bar crawls organized by Walters to showcase North Side bars. After the second year, which more than doubled the attendance of the first, Walters began thinking about how to expand the event to accommodate the popularity. The attendees of the Deutschtown Bar Crawl, which takes place in November, had already been pestering Walters about a spring event, and live music seemed the most natural progression. “Music brings people here that otherwise wouldn’t come to the North Side, which has a reputation of being dangerous,” Walters notes. “But if they lived here, they would realize that it isn’t dangerous. The North Side is just misunderstood — I want the festival to change that general perception.” Volunteers are still needed for the event; organizers can be contacted through the festival’s Facebook page, listed below. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DEUTSCHTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL. 11 a.m.-midnight, Sat., July 12. Multiple venues through the North Side. Many venues all ages. Free. Full list of shows and venues: www.facebook.com/ DeutschtownMusicFestival

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SWEET HOME {PHOTO COURTESY OF WES FRAZER}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

“I

THINK IN the South, we have a tendency to try to be very polite,” says Lee Bains III. “Sometimes at the expense of saying what we really feel.” It’s into that climate that the Alabamaborn Bains emerged with his band, The Glory Fires — but their new full-length, Dereconstructed (released on Sub Pop), is anything but polite, and puts an unexpected spin on Southern rock. Bains is unapologetically progressive in terms of politics, and the band’s music bridges the gap between Skynyrd and punk rock. It makes for an unexpected listen: riffs straight out of the Southern-rock playbook, with lyrics questioning aspects of Southern culture, from the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow to widespread religious intolerance. It’s straightforward and honest, and as a Southerner, it made Bains a bit uneasy. “I have a friend who I share my writing with all the time,” Bains says. “And when I wrote this record, I was nervous about even sharing it with him.” But,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

Birmingham’s best: Lee Bains III and the Glory Fires

while it might have been easier to lay the politics aside and make a party-rock record, he says the route he took was simply honest. On Dereconstructed — a telling and loaded title alluding both to the politics of the post-war South and to literary theory — Bains attempts a difficult task: determining which Southern values to carry with him, and which to discard.

LEE BAINS III AND THE GLORY FIRES 6:30 p.m. Tue., July 15. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

There’s a spirit of rebellion on the record that recalls outlaw country; on the title track, Bains sings, “They wanted meth labs and mobile homes / They wanted moonlight and magnolias / We gave them songs about taking your own damn stand / In spite of those who’d define and control you.” But earlier in the

same song, he recalls: “We were whooped with the Good Book / Wound up shamed, sorry and worse.” Christianity is a topic of special concern to Bains; he was brought up in the church like so many in the South, went through a period of questioning, and settled into a revised version of religion. “I’d still call myself a Christian,” Bains says. “But what that means to me now is very different from what it meant growing up.” Seven of the 10 tracks on Dereconstructed mention Christianity or Christian themes and images explicitly. Pilate makes an appearance on track one; the song “What’s Good and Gone” starts, “In the beginning was the Word and the small naked Earth heard it.” Biblical imagery is part of Bains’ milieu, and throughout the record he brings us into his world time and again. But he’s not Pat Robertson or Joel Osteen, flaunting his piety for us to admire; he’s Flannery O’Connor, quietly allowing his religion to inform his work.


For a Bible-belt dweller, Bains also shows courage in privileging God over country, rather than equating the two. “And, when it would come time to say the Pledge in class, I would sit my ass down at that desk,” he sings on one song, “And the only words I’d say were ‘under God.’ I figured we were beyond the help of anyone else.” That song “Flags,” begins with a reference to the tendency of Southerners to still raise the Confederate flag, but quickly turns to questioning the way flags of all types — American and otherwise — affect ideology. Now we’re a long way from Skynyrd. It’s not all politics, though; Bains, while questioning certain aspects of Southern life and thought, takes time to write sweet anthems to his home. “The Weeds Downtown” is a perfect, ambivalent ode to Birmingham: “I know that Birmingham gets you down / And I guess that makes sense,” Bains begins, “When so many old friends retired, / If not expired, by the time we were 23.” He goes on to point out that, while things aren’t perfect, there’s also beauty that’s unique to the region: “Paris and New York don’t have honeysuckle vines like grow on 32nd Street.” Weeds and wildflowers are some of Bains’ chief signifiers of the South, and play into his vision of a balance of urban and rural — several times throughout Dereconstructed, he notes how flowers and weeds grow amid urban development. At first glance it feels like Bains is showing off a degree in the natural sciences or something; it’s a safe bet to say there won’t be another rock record this year with as many references to specific types of flowers. “I don’t have a background in botany, no,” he says with a laugh. “My grandmother was into that kind of stuff, so maybe I got that from her.” But more than just a laundry list of wild plants, Bains is presenting a theory on mixing the best of different worlds: Sweet-smelling flowers growing free in the city also allude to traditional Southern values like independence and individual rights running through a broader social context that’s more friendly to minorities, and less politically oppressive. It’s a complicated task that Bains has taken on, but he’s met it with care, poetic vision and straight-up rock ’n’ roll on Dereconstructed, one of the most thoughtful rock entries so far this year. Not everyone will agree with everything Lee Bains III has to say, but, especially in the context of Southern rock, that’s what makes it all the more worth saying. AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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MELLON SQUARE

ON THE RECORD Todd Porter of The Cheats {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SUMMER CONCERT S E R I E S

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The Cheats (Todd Porter, second from left)

The Cheats have been in the Pittsburgh punk-rock game since 2001, and singer Todd Porter — previously of Silver Tongued Devil — has been the band’s face since day one. He talked with CP about the band’s new split LP with New Jersey’s Electric Frankenstein. EACH BAND ON THE SPLIT CONTRIBUTED A COVER SONG ALONG WITH THEIR ORIGINALS. WHY DID YOU PICK “LOADED,” BY THE NORWEGIAN BAND THE BACKSTREET GIRLS? We’re all weird record-collectors, so even when we do covers, it’s always obscure stuff nobody knows anyways. For a long time, everybody thought [“Loaded”] was our song, because we’ve been doing it in the set for years. HAVE YOU TURNED ANYONE INTO A BIG BACKSTREET GIRLS FAN WITH THAT COVER? Well, the guys in my band. That’s about it. Maybe when the record comes out, people will try to find them. THOSE COVERS ARE VINYL-ONLY; YOU CAN’T GET DOWNLOADS OF THEM. You’ve gotta make it a little more collectible. It’s limited-edition too, with colored [vinyl] — the colored comes with a poster and a beer coaster. When we were kids, you always liked the KISS records — look inside the KISS records and there’s all kinds of cool shit. ARE YOU AFRAID SOMEONE’S GOING TO JUST RIP THE SONGS AND PUT THEM ONLINE ANYWAY? Yeah. They’re probably online now! HAVING BEEN WITH THE CHEATS FOR SO LONG, WHAT ARE YOU IN IT FOR? Not money! I think I’m a stunted teenager. I just love music, and love having fun. I’m stuck as a permanent 17-year-old. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE CHEATS/ELECTRIC FRANKENSTEIN SPLIT LP RELEASE with THUNDER VEST, LEGENDARY HUCKLEBUCKS. 7:30 p.m. Sat., July 12. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


CIGARETTES © SFNTC 3 2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN STURDY}

Who’s getting emotional? Owls (Tim Kinsella, third from left)

RUNNING ON SCHEDULE {BY IAN THOMAS} IT MIGHT COME as a surprise after hearing Tim Kinsella pour out his emotions as the leader of his myriad projects — Cap’n Jazz, Joan of Arc and once again, after a 13-year hiatus, Owls — but the seemingly unhinged frontman likes to be cool and in control. As he approaches 40, he tends to indulge that instinct. Take, for example, the song titles on Two, Owls’ latest offering. From the opening track, “Four Works of Art,” to the closer, “A Drop of Blood,” each title is simply the first word or phrase of the song. Rigid constraints like these lend an air of premeditation, of meticulous arrangement. “I think of myself as [a] formalist in pretty much everything I create,” Kinsella says. “I’m inspired by limitations. Maybe it’s some kind of control issues I have. Before I go to bed, I make an hour-by-hour list of what I’m doing the next day and I get anxiety if I stray from that [routine].” Lately, it’s a regimen that seems to be serving Kinsella well, musically and otherwise. In April, his second novel was published, an event that can be felt on Two in the form of the vivid vignettes and evocative metaphors that pepper his lyrics. He’s also recently taken the helm of Featherproof Books, an indie publishing house in Kinsella’s base city of Chicago. With so many plates spinning, it’s easy to see why Kinsella would welcome routine. “It’s ironic that we’re champions of this emo thing when emotions are actually the last thing I want to come in contact with,” he says. “Grids. I like grids.”

Musically, Kinsella has been putting himself under the spotlight since 1989. It’s hard to look at the rigor of Kinsella’s current approach and not see it as fantasizing about a normal life. Rather than continuing as a visionary, Kinsella is, through Featherproof Books, making the transition to the role of facilitator of other creators’ visions. That he is making that transition of his own free will exhibits a certain maturity. “I don’t need to see one more thing in the world with my name on it, but I’m very inspired and invested in realizing creative projects,” he says. “This is just a way to invest the same energy, but help other people get their stuff in the world.”

OWLS

WITH HOP ALONG, GLOCCA MORA, RUN FOREVER 7 p.m. Sat., July 12. Mr. Small’s Theater, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

Kinsella seems to find this new phase of his creative life freeing, as he no longer feels tethered to the trappings that come with making the scene, like late nights at the bar. “It’s much more natural for me to fall asleep at midnight and wake up at 7:30,” he says, “than it is to force myself to stay awake for some idea of a good time.” Kinsella seems grateful for the opportunity to continue creating. Though he has a dedicated following, the rewards of his labor over the years have not been commensurate with his effort. “We’ve been stamped losers long ago,” he says. In hinting that his days as a performer might be numbered, Kinsella is none too subtle. “There’s something real tough about making yourself vulnerable,” he says. Each time out, “It takes more and more resilience to muster the energy.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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An Evening of Music

CRITICS’ PICKS

JULY 11

Brooke Annibale w/Jesse Lafser & Angela Mignanellie AUGUST 1

Charlie & The Foxtrots w/Science!

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Pentimento [POP-PUNK] + FRI., JULY 11 Buffalo’s Pentimento and Baltimore’s Have Mercy have a few things in common: Besides being on tour and having four members in their respective wolf packs, both bands are about to be huge in the indie and pop-punk scene. Pentimento has an edgier, punk-rock feel (think Polar Bear Club) while Have Mercy has a cleaner, sweeter sound (i.e., Transit). Having both released debut LPs in 2013, the bands are quickly climbing the ranks. The two bands play the Smiling Moose tonight with Gates, Music From Another Room and Shirts vs. Skins. Zach Brendza 6 p.m. 1306 E Carson St., South Side. $12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[METAL] + SAT., JULY 12 It’s only been a few months since Sardonyx Productions’ last Women of Metal Fest, but the latest edition — tonight at the Rex Theater — is anticipated to be bigger and better. While the spring edition was largely locals, the summer version has A Sound of Thunder (from the D.C. area), Beyond Eden (from Eastern Pennsylvania) and others from beyond. If you purchase your ticket in advance, you can also hit the reception the night before the show. Andy Mulkerin 2 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10-12. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[R&B] + SAT., JULY 12

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat. 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

Her name is Jazz, but her quarry is soul: Jazz Garcelle, a Pittsburgh-based R&B/ soul singer, headlines Club Café tonight with a few of her local friends. Garcelle, currently at work on her debut album,

Jazz Garcelle {PHOTO COURTESY OF WILL STOTLER}

has grown comfortable on the local stage over the past couple of years, and is using tonight’s show to showcase some of the other talent she’s found around her: singer Belove Sanaa and spoken-word artist Crystal Noel. AM 6 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[HIP HOP] + TUE., JULY 15 Hip-hop supergroup Deltron 3030 has two LPs and one EP — not an exhaustive amount of material, but volume becomes insignificant when you create “the greatest rap record of all time.” That’s what member Dan The Automator thinks of 2013’s Event 2, the group’s latest full-length, though the jury is still deliberating on its place in rap history. When the stars align and Deltron assembles, magic happens. Or something like that. The group plays Altar Bar tonight with Kid Koala and Fortified PhonetX. ZB 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave, Strip District. $18-$20. All ages. 412-263-2877 or www.thealtarbar.com

[ROCK] + TUE., JULY 15 In its last year of teenagery, Vans Warped Tour is on the road once again, two years away from hitting the bars without a fake ID (unlike much of its audience). Nineteen years and the festival and proud papa/creator Kevin Lyman (who went on to coordinate Mayhem Festival and the Taste of Chaos tour) show no sign of slowing down. The premier playground for indie, pop-punk, screamo and hardcore will be situated on 10 stages with around 100 bands. Should you go, you’d be wise to check out Every Time I Die, Saves The Day, Real Friends and Bad Rabbits. The festival will be held at First Niagara Pavilion today. ZB 11 a.m. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. $48.50. All ages. 724-947-7400


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} PARK HOUSE. Me Toos. North Side. 412-224-2273. 31ST STREET PUB. Torn Apart PITTSBURGH ART HOUSE. Hearts, Activations, Girl Scout. UniversalBeatUnion, Radio Strip District. 412-391-8334. for the Daydreamers, the CLUB CAFE. The Tillers, Scattered Planets, Jolexx, Life[Liss], The Seams, Mark Williams (Late). Onewayness, FlexX, DJSanti. South Side. 412-431-4950. Highland Park. 419-650-8601. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. RAMADA INN HOTEL Unicycle Loves You. Garfield. & CONFERENCE CENTER. 412-361-2262. Mercedez. Greensburg. HAMBONE’S. 724-552-0603. EH3 (Eric Himen), ROCHESTER INN Jeremy Caywood. HARDWOOD GRILLE. Lawrenceville. The Tony Janflone Jr. w. w w 412-681-4318. er Band. Ross. hcitypap g p THE HANDLE BAR & .com 412-364-8166. GRILLE. Five Horizons THE SHOP. Vulvapalooza, Pearl Jam Tribute Duo. Night One: Angstea, The Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. Awful Waffles, Bunny Five Coat, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Del Rios, The Fuckies, The Lopez. Derek DePrator Band, Love Letters, Benefits the Women’s Shelter & Hard Money. Bloomfield. Center of Pittsburgh. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. 412-951-0622. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. SMILING MOOSE. Have Mercy, Gates Testosteroso, Washington. 724-225-5221. Crippled Mess, Klaymore. PALACE THEATRE. South Side. 412-431-4668. 10,000 Maniacs. Greensburg. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. 724-836-8000. Ha Ha Tonka, Townsppl. South Park. SPACE. Andre Costello & the Cool Miners. Downtown. 412-325-7723. STAGE AE. The Neighbourhood, Travi$ Scott, White Arrows. North Side. 412-229-5483. STATION SQUARE. Marshall Tucker Band, Sick Sense. Station Square. TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Mace Ballard & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 11

ROCK/POP THU 10 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. North Side. 412-322-1850. BRILLOBOX. Snowmine, The Beauregards, Culture Thief. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Valkyrie, Outsideinside (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GREEN TREE PARK. Tony Janflone Jr. Green Tree. HARMONY MUSEUM. Eugene & the Nightcrawlers. Harmony. 888-821-4822. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Arliss Nancy. The Remainders, Bryan MCQuaid. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MELLON SQUARE PARK. Kiersten Kelly. Downtown. 412-665-3665. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Buckle Downs. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY MELINDA

SAT 12 31ST STREET PUB. The Putz, Latecomer, Lady & The Monsters, The Remainders. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALL SAINT’S BREWING COMPANY. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Greensburg. 724-289-1202. ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Bastard Bearded Irishmen, Chet Vincent & The Big Bend, Big Gypsy, The Hawkeyes. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. 412-321-1834. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. Ferdinand The Bull Ferdinand the Bull. Bloomfield. 412-708-1277. BRADY’S RUN PARK LODGE. Blind Association, Circle of One, Olive Mountain, Papa Fuse, The Delaneys, Brighton Boys. Gear & Cheer Music Festival. Beaver Falls. 724-728-2625.

Each week we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Melinda; stream or download “Witness” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

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EARLY WARNINGS tUnE-yArDs

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Fins, Wealth, Satyr/Elfheim. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Grandma Moses, The Neffs. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

DJS THU 10

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLLY ANDRES}

CLUB CAFE. Sephus Lee, River Daughters, The Mixus Brothers (Late). CD release. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Seeming, Terror Firma Sky, 2020K. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Vulvapalooza, Night Two: The Bloated Sluts, Brazilian Wax, More AM than FM, Murder for Girls, Motorpsychos, Rogue Signals, Zeitgeist. Benefits the Women’s Shelter & Center of Pittsburgh. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Shelf Life String Band, The FED, The Black Six, André Costello & The Cool Minors, Shade. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. 412-904-3335. KEY WEST. The Wreckids, City Dwelling Nature Seekers, We Came From Space, Weird Paul Rock Band, Misaligned Mind. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. MAX’S ALLEGHENY TAVERN. The Red Western, Triggers, The Mobros, Dan Getkin and the Masters of American Music, Faithful Sinners. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. 412-231-1899. MOONDOG’S. Antipsychotics. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Owls, Hop Along, Glocca Morra, Run Forever. Millvale. 866-468-3401. NORTH SIDE. Apostles of Cool, Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners, The Turbosonics, Fourth River Revival, 3TG, Charm & Chain, Working Breed. Park Stage. Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, The Chad Sipes Stereo, Neighbours, City Steps, The Wire Riots. YMR Club. Gypsy And His Band Of Ghosts, Nox Boys, The Wiley Coyotes, Coastal Remedy. The Harlan Twins, Grand Piano, 28 North, The Pressure, Olympus Mons D.o.B. w/ Sirkus Days Fire Troop. Main Stage. Deutschtown Music Festival.deutschtownmusicfestival. org. North Side. 412-452-1724. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Daniels & McClain. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PARK HOUSE. Lock & Dams. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Walk of Shame. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Beyond Eden, Writing Off Tomorrow, Theatrum Mundi, Midnight Eternal, MindMaze, A Sound of Thunder, Leeja Stark, Lies, Inc. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Horrid Ordeal, Skinbound, III Days of Darkness, Mutilist. South Side. 412-431-4668. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. stranger convention. Point Breeze. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Askultura, The Awful Waffles, Scott Fry Experiance. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 11

{SAT., OCT. 18}

tUnE-yArDs Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {SUN., OCT. 19}

King Diamond

King’s Ransom. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

MON 14

WED 16

THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Brightside, Makeshift Shelters, Unraveler, Gifts, Sup Muscles? Bloomfield. 412-862-5670. STAGE AE. 311, Sublime with Rome, Ballyhoo! North Side. 412-229-5483.

LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

TUE 15

THU 10

1810 TAVERN. Tony Janflone Jr. 724-728-5282. CLUB CAFE. Johnnyswim. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Tony Lucca, Tyler Hilton. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Spacewaster, No Movement, Shadowbrook Lane. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Town Mountain, The Weedrags. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ALTAR BAR. Big Smo. Strip District. 412-263-2877. REX THEATER. Cage, Sadistik, Maul Skull, 30 Realm, The H&T, Joey Smooth, Holly Hood, Stillborn Identity. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 11

WED 16

BLUES

{WED., OCT. 29}

Adrian Belew Power Trio Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side

SUN 13 ANDYS. Hewlett, Anderson & Waslousky. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BEACH HOUSE RESTAURANT. The Dave Iglar Band. CLUB CAFE. The Brothers Comatose, The Unknown String Band. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cousin Boneless, Thom Hunter & the Rocket Surgeons, Stolen Pizza, Big Spoon Little Spoon. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RUMFISH GRILLE. Tony Janflone Jr. Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. SHOOTIN’ BULL. Ironhorse. 724-339-7299. SMILING MOOSE. Post Mortal Possesion, Clover, Embers to Ashes, Disgruntled. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Old Man Markley, Miner, The Scandals. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TUGBOAT’S. The Dave Iglar Band

SAT 12 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

THURSDAY’S. Display Case. Beaver. 724-728-2229. VERDETTO’S. Muddy Creek Blues Band, Jon Bindley, The Hedonismbots, Don Strange & The Doosh Bears, Yinzide Out. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL HOUSE. Meeting Of Important People, Sun Ray Shining Light, Household Stories, Roger Harvey & The Wild Life, Brewer’s Row. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side.

ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. UNiiQU3 & Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Down North. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Tony Janflone Jr. O’Hara. 412-963-1514. CLUB CAFE. Raised By Wolves, Johnny Leitera-Tuff Sunshine, Morgan Erina. South Side. 412-431-4950.

HIP HOP/R&B

ALTAR BAR. Mike Stud. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

SAT 12 CLUB CAFE. JazzGarcelle & Friends, Crystal Noel, BeLove Sanaa (Early). ‘360 Degress of R&B & Soul’. South Side. 412-431-4950.

THU 10 BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District.

FRI 11 BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Bridgeville.


BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Carpenter Ants. Harmony. 724-452-0539. MOONDOG’S. Anthony Gomes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NEW CASTLE DOWNTOWN AMPHITHEATRE. Sweaty Betty. Event for Wounded Warriors. New Castle. 724-654-8408. XLERATOR BAR & GRILLE. The Satin Hearts. Beaver Falls. 724-581-4880.

SAT 12 BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. TIKI BAR. The Satin Hearts. Washington. 412-508-0200.

SUN 13

CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Mark Strickland Trio, Elevations Trio, Kenia, Poogie Bell, James Johnson II feat. Cliff Barnes, Chris Parker Trio, Carolyn Perteete & James Johnson II, Roger Humphries & RH Factor, Internal Trio feat. Howie Alexander, David Throckmorton feat. Dan Wilson &. Deutschtown Music Festival. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. The Brydge. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

CHRISTIAN W. KLAY WINERY. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 724-439-3424. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Ruby Red & the Dirty Devils, Shannon & the Merger, Cheryl Rinovato & Bottom Shelf Blues, Bubs McKeg & the Rhythm Aces, Sweaty Betty, Ron & the Rumpshakers, Vince Agwada Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL THE R BAR. The Midnite CHURCH. Jazz at Horns. Dormont. Emmanuel. North Side. 412-942-0882. 412-231-0454. TUGBOAT’S. HARTWOOD ACRES. Craig King Band. www. per a p pghcitym Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra East Pittsburgh. .co w/ Paquito D’Rivera. 412-829-1992. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB SWHINERY & SPEAKEASY. The Kevin Howard SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. SONOMA GRILLE. Rick Matt. 412-344-8700. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

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JAZZ

MON 14

THU 10 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844.

FRI 11 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT ASSOCIATION. Salim Washington. Wilkinsburg. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The New View Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MOON PARK. RML Jazz. Moon. 412-370-9621. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. PENN HILLS LIBRARY. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Penn Hills. 412-795-3507.

SAT 12 ANDYS. Elliot Roth. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

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FRI 11 THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Brooke Annibale, Jesse Laster, Angela Mignanellie. Harmony. 570-294-6450.

SAT 12 BISTRO TO GO. Steve Foht, Crystal Lee Morgan, Devin Moses, Willis Tree, Paul Luc, Micah Nagel, Dan Pritchard, Skye Steele, Nameless in August. North Side. 412-231-0218. MAPLEWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Brad Yoder. Greensburg. 724-834-4960. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter King. 412-782-6542. Peter King. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

SUN 13 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Erika May. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 16 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD FRI 11 RENAISSANCE PITTSBURGH HOTEL. Aqui Tango. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

REGGAE FRI 11 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

CLASSICAL

TUE 15

AN EVENING W/ MARIANNE CORNETTI. Solo recital. Part of Opera Theater SummerFest. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687.

ALPHABET CITY TENT. Oliver Lake & Friends. North Side. 412-323-0278. KATZ PLAZA. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-456-6666. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

WED 16 ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Eric Susoeff: Salsamba. Homewood. 412-731-3080. IO. Dave Brosky-Chapman Stick. Mt. Lebanon. 412-440-0414. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC

FRI 11

TRIPTYCH PIANO TRIO. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-567-8861.

SAT 12 GLADIATOR” LIVE FEATURING CLARA SANABRAS & THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 12 TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Night Star. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SUN 13

THU 10 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Yarn, Some Kind Of Animal. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

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What to do

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

July 9 - 15 WEDNESDAY 95 FRIDAY 11 Braid

10,000 Maniacs

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 10

Marshall Tucker Band / SickSense

Whiskey Rebellion Festival

DOWNTOWN WASHINGTON. Free event. For more info visit whiskeyrebellionfestival.com. Through July 12.

The Crookes SMILING MOOSE 412-4314668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 6:30p.m.

Big Smo ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guest Cody Gibson & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Theater Summerfest ART DECO THEATER, THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB Oakland. Tickets: otsummerfest.org. 2p.m.

The Brothers Comatose / The Unknown String Band

ZAC BROWN BAND

STATION SQUARE. Free event. All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Gallery Crawl MULTIPLE LOCATIONS, CULTURAL DISTRICT. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org/crawl. 5:30p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

SATURDAY JULY 12 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION

latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. Through July 12. 8p.m.

livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Owls The Merry Widow MR. SMALLS THEATRE Opera Theater Sumerfest Millvale. 412-821-4447. ART DECO THEATER, THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB Oakland. Tickets: otsummerfest.org. 7:30p.m.

All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 12

Comedian, Glen Gerard

Zac Brown Band: The Great American Road Trip Tour

The Jumping Frog of Calaveras County - Opera Theater Summerfest

LATITUDE 360. Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets:

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets:

ART DECO THEATER, THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB Oakland. Tickets: otsummerfest.org. 11a.m.

2014 Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. Tickets: trustarts. org/cosmo. 9p.m.

The Cheats / Electric Frankenstein ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Women of Metal Fest REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com Doors open at 2 p.m.

SUNDAY 13

The Fantasticks - Opera

MONDAY 14 311 and Sublime with Rome

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

TUESDAY 15

Tony Lucca / Tyler Hilton HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. Under 21 show (with parent or legal guardian.) Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To ďŹ nd the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING

FANS OF TILDA SWINTON’S BIZARRE ROLES WILL NOT WANT TO MISS THIS TRAIN

{BY AL HOFF} What hath Citizens United wrought? That’s the central question explored in Tia Lessin and Carl Deal’s documentary Citizen Koch, about the 2010 Supreme Court ruling that, among other things, opened a path for huge amounts of private money to be funneled, often without explicit disclosure, into political campaigns.

CP APPROVED

“Reagan Republican” and registered nurse Dee Ives works to recall Gov. Walker.

By way of example, the filmmakers focus on Wisconsin in the wake of Republican Scott Walker’s 2010 election to governor, and his early decision to take on public-sector unions. On one side, various outraged nurses, prison guards and schoolteachers, armed with sit-ins, poster-board signs and leaflets; on the other, extraordinarily wealthy and well-connected businessmen, like the state’s Koch brothers, who generously funded “advocacy” groups like Americans for Prosperity. Much of the film centers on the movement to recall Walker, but the filmmakers also spend time on Buddy Roemer’s quixotic presidential campaign. (Needless to say, now is not a good time in American politics to run against candidates with huge cash piles from corporations, or to refuse to accept such donations.) And running throughout the Walker/unions battle is the dismay of lifelong Republicans, who as ordinary citizens, feel their interests are subsumed by those of mega-donors. If you’re a policy nerd, plenty of Citizen Koch will be familiar to you, but the film is a good précis of a tumultuous time in American politics, a series of rifts and adjustments that is still ongoing. And if the film feels like something one might watch on, say, Frontline, you’re not wrong. The filmmakers claim that the film was being developed for PBS, but that interference from David Koch, who is a major donor to the network, resulted in the withdrawal of funding. The film was subsequently funded partly through a Kickstarter campaign, in perhaps a victory for the little guys. Starts Sat., July 12. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CORRECTION In last week’s article “Next Steps,” about the film Progression, the name of actor Alex Falberg was misspelled. City Paper regrets the error.

TRAIN IN VAIN Life aboard the Snowpiercer: “Know your place, keep your place”

{BY AL HOFF}

S

NOWPIERCER may be the first dys-

topic film to explore the genre’s requisite privations, violence, class struggles, lost humanity and flickering hope, all aboard a single train. Bong Joon-ho’s action thriller is adapted from a French graphic novel, and marks his English-language debut. (Bong helmed 2007’s superior monster movie The Host.) The titular train holds the only humans left after a 2014 attempt to fix climate change went awry and plunged the planet into an ice age. Now, 17 years later, the train still circumnavigates the globe, propelled by a perpetual-motion engine, while the ragged underclass in the train’s tail plans to storm to the front and gain control of the engine. Most plots are linear, but perhaps no more so than here, in which the action begins at the rear of the train and moves forward car by car, in more or less real time. As each new car is breached, neither the rebels nor the viewers know what lies behind the door — an administrative car,

like where the protein bars are made, or another glimpse at the life of leisure and even decadence that the privileged lead? Normally, the distance between the have-nots and the haves is illustrated with a pyramid, as there are many more on the bottom and few on top. Snowpiercer plots this disparity on a line, where

SNOWPIERCER DIRECTED BY: Bong Joon-ho STARRING: Chris Evans, Song Kang-ho, Tilda Swinton AMC Loews and SouthSide Works In English, and some Korean, with subtitles

CP APPROVED each class shares a similar amount of space, and it’s also an effective visual: Hundreds of poor are crammed into one cage-like train car, while the man in charge is alone in his well-appointed carriage. Bong further underscores this with his palette: The rebels’ journey begins in

a washed-out monochrome murk and grows increasingly more colorful and light-filled. Like the passengers, all the film’s action is confined to the narrow space of a train, creating a visceral claustrophobia, even in the fancy cars. There are occasional shots from outside the train that show the breathtaking snowy horror that is our planet — from forbidding mountain ranges to former cities collapsed into icy piles. Fans of Tilda Swinton’s bizarre roles will not want to miss this train: A nearly unrecognizable Swinton portrays a matronly, propaganda-spewing liaison, and her performance is darkly funny as well as chilling. Snowpiercer also proffers a lot of intriguing explorations of heroics, societal order and the usefulness of revolution, but at the risk of spoiling plot twists, you’ll have to claw your way to the end of the film to fully appreciate them. It’s a journey worth taking. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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The Grand Seduction film contest. This year’s theme was “outer space.” 7:30 p.m. for reception and other films; shorts screen at 9:15 p.m. Thu., July 10. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. www.2mff.cmoa.org . $10 PROGRESSION. Gab Cody and Sam Turich’s locally produced new ensemble comedy was shot entirely in Lawrenceville, and relates the various travails that occur over several courses of a progressive dinner. 8 p.m. Thu., July 10. Regent Square. Tickets at www.showclix.com. ZOMBO’S GREATEST SCHMO ON EARTH. The centerpiece of this laugh- and fun-packed evening is Schmo Business, local DJ Zombo’s new 70-minute documentary that catches up with some survivors of the 1980s standup comedy scene. (BYOB, or Bring Your Own Brickwall.) The evening also includes live comedy from Davon Magwood and Shannon Norman, plus surf music from Vertigo-go and free beer. 7 p.m. Fri., July 11. Hollywood. $10 FATEFUL FINDINGS. Neil Breen directs this new paranormal thriller about a computer hacker, who has a decidedly off method of uncovering government secrets. The film — described as “hilarious campy fun” — is making the rounds as a new potential cult classic. 9:15 p.m. Fri., July 11. Harris THE BREAKFAST CLUB. A little sad, a little happy is one way to sum up this 1985 dramedy about high school from John Hughes. You don’t need me to re-tell the plot (five kids from different cliques discover they have plenty in common). So, whether you’re a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess or a criminal — just be there when the bell rings. 10 p.m. Fri., July 11, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 12. Oaks SEVEN CHANCES. In this 1925 silent comedy, Buster Keaton portrays a young single lawyer who will inherit $7 million at 7 o’clock on his 27th birthday — if he is married. Naturally, he is besieged with offers. Live musical accompaniment provided by Dale Abraham on theater organ and Tom Roberts on piano. 3 p.m. Sat., July 12. Hollywood THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY. When a dead body is discovered in the woods outside a sleepy New England town, much consternation and several cover-ups ensue — though perhaps not what you’d expect. John Forsythe and Shirley MacLaine star in Alfred Hitchcock’s breezy 1955 comedy, which is closer to a slamming-door stage farce than a murder thriller. Continues a month-long, Sundaynight program of staff favorites. 8 p.m. Sun., July 13. Regent Square (AH) AS HIGH AS THE SKY. In this new comedy from

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Nikki Braendlin, a jilted bride finds solace in compulsive housecleaning. Then, her estranged sister and her child turn up unannounced, throwing her order into disarray. The film stars Caroline Fogarty, a Pittsburgh native, who will introduce the film. 7 p.m. Sat., July 12. Hollywood COHERENCE. In this new sci-fi-ish brain-twister and relationship drama, eight friends at a dinner party find “reality” coming apart. Written and directed by James Ward Byrkit. Co-star Nicholas Brendon will be on hand. 7:30 p.m. Tue., July 15. SouthSide Works STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this coming-ofage dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. Adapted from a Stephen King novella, the 1986 film stars Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O’Connell. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 16. AMC Loews. $5 DON’T LOOK IN THE BASEMENT. A young female nurse takes a new job at an isolated psychiatric facility where there has been a murder. S.F. Brownrigg directs this low-budget horror thriller from 1973. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 17. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Many of Warhol’s films and video works are available for personal viewing in the Warhol’s new multimedia room. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org

ONGOING BEGIN AGAIN. In 2006, filmmaker John Carney had a surprise hit with Once, a low-budget, Irish, sort-of musical dramedy starring nonprofessional actors; it later became a stage musical. In his generically titled new film, Carney asks: What if I made a film something like Once, but with famous people? Lightning rarely strikes twice, and Begin Again definitely lacks the ragged, bitterweeet charm that won Once fans. Begin is not a bad movie, but the effort to appear effortless shows, and it takes a lot of suspended disbelief to process these well-known actors as struggling musicindustry denizens. Keira Knightley plays a tentative singer-songwriter in whom washed-up music exec Mark Ruffalo sees potential. Her ex-boyfriend (Adam Levine) has become a big star, and left her behind in New York city to pen wispy heartbreak songs. So Knightley and Ruffalo put together a band of misfits and then, quite magically, record an LP live on the streets of Manhattan. (Adorable!) It’s an enjoyable enough fantasia, and there are plenty of indie-pop songs to keep things bouncing along. You could do worse this summer at the cineplex, but don’t be surprised if this tune has left your head by the time you get home. Manor (AH)

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[OPERA]

IT IS A PORTRAIT, A DOCUMENT, A TRIBUTE, A REVERIE, A CELEBRATION AND A DIRGE.

FESTIVE Opera Theater of Pittsburgh is launching its third SummerFest, and this annual three-week offering alights for the second straight year at Oakland’s Twentieth Century Club. The 2014 Fest leans toward the light and the light-hearted — all with live music, and sung in English. And OTP artistic and general director Jonathan Eaton promises that the facility has improved seating and air conditioning. After an opening-night solo recital by internationally known, Pittsburgh-native mezzo soprano Marianne Cornetti, the main-stage performances begin with Franz Lehár’s perennially popular The Merry Widow (July 11, 18 and 27). With familiar tunes like “The Vilja Song,” the 1905 comic operetta tells the story of a wealthy widow (sung by Pittsburgh’s Anna Singer), whose countrymen scheme to find her a husband. With five performances, the Fest’s featured show is The Fantasticks (July 12-26), that fabled Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt musical that ran a record four decades on Broadway. “The music’s lush and lovely,” says Eaton, noting songs like “Try to Remember.” OTP’s twist on this coming-of-age love story is its direction by Attack Theatre’s Peter Kope, with choreography and performers from Attack. It’s “a whole new slant on what is sort of an icon of musical theater,” says Eaton. The third main-stage show is Richard Strauss’ Ariadne on Naxos (July 18, 20 and 26), which Eaton calls a rare combination of high art and low comedy. Arias by the title character (award-winning soprano Elizabeth Baldwin) include one that’s “higher than the Queen of Night and three times as long,” says Eaton, who directs. The Fest also includes something for kids: “The Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (July 12, 19 and 26), a 40-minute comic work based on the Mark Twain story. And on July 22, there’s a free workshop performance of A New Kind of Fallout, Gilda Lyons and Tammy Ryan’s “eco-opera” about how Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring changes the life of one young woman in the 1960s. (The world premiere is planned for 2015’s SummerFest.) The Fest also includes its familiar late-night cabaret performances. And on July 26 and 27 — in the spirit of last year’s popular “Night Caps” series — look for Happy Hour! Pittsburgh-based composer Roger Zahab teams with seven librettists on these commissioned short comic operas about singles on the bar scene. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OPERA THEATER OF PITTSBURGH SUMMERFEST July 10-27. Twentieth Century Club, 4201 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. Main-stage operas: $25-75, other prices vary. 412-326-9687 or www.otsummerfest.org

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Sean Cooper (in rear), Rachel Eve Holmes and Adam Hill in The Fantasticks, at SummerFest {PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW PLACE COLLABORATIONS}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

[ART REVIEW]

BUILDING CULTURE {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

D

AVID HARTT’S Stray Light is an ode not only to a building, but to an era. His installation work resonates so profoundly with me that I hope you’ll forgive a moment of nostalgia for the city of my youth. Chicago in the 1970s was quite a different place than it is now. At evening rush hour in the Loop, hordes of office workers, in their standard beige overcoats, would stream across the bridges to commuter trains bound for the predominantly white suburbs. Downtown would be deserted save for the few restaurants that catered to those headed to an evening concert or performance. Race, ethnicity and class rather strictly demarcated the rest of the city’s neighborhoods. My family lived on the South Side, in one of the few integrated neighborhoods. When we ventured north for the evening, I would relish the return trip along Lake Shore Drive, from which you could see the magnificent

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CORBETT VS. DEMPSEY, CHICAGO}

David Hartt’s photograph “Kiosk” (2011)

skyline with its twinkling lights. It was easy to recognize the buildings along Michigan Avenue by their distinctive marquees. And while the understated brown sign atop the Johnson Publishing Company headquarters was not neon or flashy, its formidable elegance was palpable. You always knew it was there, its very presence speaking volumes about the country’s shifting cultural and political terrain.

DAVID HARTT: STRAY LIGHT

continues through Aug. 11. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Avenue, Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Hartt is from Canada and now lives in Chicago. Through his video installation, you sense that he too has an emotional connection to the era and to the Johnson building,

a particularly powerful testament to time, place and race. Designed by John Moutoussamy, the building complemented the other modernist showcases around the city, which was home to visionaries like Mies van der Rohe. As publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines, John H. Johnson and his wife, Eunice Walker Johnson, built a media and cosmetics empire focused on African-American lifestyles. In 1971, the newly constructed Johnson Publishing headquarters opened on Michigan Avenue, the first major building in downtown Chicago designed by an African-American architect. While the exterior was minimal and understated, the interior reflected the era’s aesthetics — bold, colorful, expressive and, in this case, distinctly Afrocentric. Unaltered since, the interiors are clearly midcentury. Designed by Arthur Elrod, each floor and private office had a different character. With a flair and style that combined


[ART REVIEW]

LIVABILITY {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Photo of a peach farmer, by Hyla Willis, part of America’s Least Livable City

pattern and texture with contemporary furnishings and unique designs, the spaces were hip and avant-garde, presenting a new twist on the modernist canon. Stray Light is not simply a portrait. Hartt presents the building’s interiors with a moving and reverent eye, and a sense of awe, nostalgia and wonder. Rarely seen by outsiders, the offices were made available to Hartt by Linda Johnson Rice, now chairman of her parents’ company. Thanks to Michael Darling, of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Hartt was permitted to investigate the inner workings of the building and the company, as both a cultural icon and a seminal African-American business. Many of Hartt’s previous works have examined how the built environment reflects particular ideologies. He has explored urban farming, hippie communes and company towns through photography. For Stray Light, he used film for the first time to create an installation. The 12-minute film, accompanied by a musical score by Nicole Mitchell, allowed Hartt to present a realtime, nuanced and emotional narrative. The film, still images, sculptural components and a replicated carpet combine to momentarily transport the viewer into the inner sanctum of a legacy. Hartt often relies on the clinically detached yet still seductive approach of the Dusseldorf School of Photography. Here, the interiors of the Johnson building are so rich and fantastical that they yield something that resonates emotionally and intellectually as well as visually. In addition to playing with the conventions of landscape versus portraiture, Hartt’s camera mines the conceptual territory specific to this particular business and its history. Not only does he capture the workaday world behind the glossy pages of the magazines, but he also explores the boundaries between public and private while making reference to the publishing industry’s shift from paper to digital. Ultimately, underlying all of this is a complex story about the changing nature of culture, particularly as it relates to race. Using images captured prior to the building’s recent sale to Columbia College, Hartt’s installation works on many levels. It is a portrait, a document, a tribute, a reverie, a celebration and a dirge. Johnson based his business strategy on an ideology that focused on African-American success and aspirations. It is because of this that Stray Light is so poignant. While much has changed culturally since the 1970s, the role of the Johnson Publishing Company is not yet obsolete, and even though the headquarters have moved, the building and its signature marquee will remain, a testament to a vision that has had a lasting impact on American culture. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Hyla Willis is an unlikely recruit for your tourism board or chamber of commerce. Since 1999, she’s made her art mostly with subRosa, a feminist collective that explores things like the globalized exploitation of women’s labor, and the interplay of digital information, biotech and women’s bodies. A 2003 subRosa pamphlet titled “Culture of Eugenics” provocatively asks, “How are chickens like women? And women like chickens?” So what’s Willis up to with America’s Least Livable City, her Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Artist of the Year show? Ostensibly, it’s a (somewhat belated) riposte to Rand McNally’s 1985 Places Rated Almanac — the one that named her current hometown, Pittsburgh, America’s most-livable city while consigning to dead last (out of some 320 towns) her former hometown, little Yuba City, Calif. The two-room installation includes an unassuming collection of documents — most just pinned to the wall — like Willis’ photos of Yuba’s vast fruit orchards, with hand-lettered text explaining that many of them are owned by Sikhs. Also depicted, to illustrate Yuba’s legacy of Cantonese immigration, is the annual Bok Kai Festival, honoring the Chinese water god and featuring Bomb Day (fireworks). An enlarged news clipping tells the story of the Pittsburgh woman who won a radio contest to visit Yuba City, which was seeking affable ways to protest its ranking. (Wined and dined like dignitaries, she and her mother loved the place.) There’s a fruit crate of locally pertinent books and a photo depicting Willis herself, with her hand-written memories of two Yuba convenience stores and the human stories behind them. A wryly parodied Del Monte label reading “Dull” aside, the exhibit paints Yuba as an ordinary town with an unusual cultural diversity that dates to the 19th century. Even Willis’ five-minute video featuring documentary footage about the Dust Bowl (which drove migrants to Yuba in the 1930s) notes Yuba’s huge Sikh religious festival. In 1985, Yuba ranked last thanks to Rand McNally’s matrix of stats on things like climate, housing, health care, crime and amenities like the arts. But just as Pittsburgh remains unlivable for some of us, so Yuba felt like home for reasons often unquantifiable. As in her work with subRosa, Willis is asking who’s doing the counting — and why numbers count more than life experience. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMERICA’S LEAST LIVABLE CITY, AND OTHER WORKS continues through July 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org +

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ASSOCIATED Artists of pittsburgh 103 rd annual exhibition june 1 st - August 31 st, 2014 4764 State Route 30 • Greensburg 724-837-1500 • wmuseumaa.org Visit our website for hours and directions

summer concert series THURSDAY

JULY 10th

6:30PM

Happy Hour 5:30PM

Come for happy hour, lawn seating selection donna bailey Jazz Vocalist and complimentary 2014 PGH Jazz guest gift! Hall of Fame Inductee

RSVP

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Anne Marie Letinski

412.469.3330 or aletinski@ltcmail.com +

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World Premiere! an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

Extraterrestrial: The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project And The 2-Minute Film Festival July 10, 2014 Carnegie Museum of Art Theater and Sculpture Court $10; includes one drink ticket! 8:15–9 p.m. Screening of Extraterrestrial 9:15–11 p.m. 2-Minute Film Festival, back for the 4th time!

nowseethis.org

Picnic food and bar open in Sculpture Court beginning at 7:30 p.m. Culture Club is sponsored by

The Invisible Photograph, a project of the Hillman Photography Initiative, is a five-part documentary series investigating the expansive realm of photographic production, distribution, and consumption by way of the hidden side of photography.

LA COUR DES MIRACLES BILL VORN LOUIS-PHILIPPE DEMERS WOOD STREET GALLERIES 07.11–09.07.14 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, July 11th, 5:30–10pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of: Bill Vorn, DSM-V1, 2012

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#CrawlPGH

601 Wood Street

La Cour des Miracles (The Court of Miracles) Bill Vorn and Louis-Philippe Demers interactive robots act as ‘fake’ humans displaying symptoms of “abnormal” psychological behaviors.

2. SPACE 812 Liberty Avenue

Cataloguing Pattern Guest curator: Kristen Letts Kovak Participating artists: Salinda Deery, Aaron Henderson, Todd Keyser, Kristen Letts Kovak, Maria Mangano, Natalie Settles, Brooke Sturtevant-Sealover, Rebecca Zilinski. While patterns adorn our homes, our belongings and ourselves, they are more than ornamentation. Music by DJ Edgar Um

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center 212 Ninth Street

Coloring Pittsburgh Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Youth and Arts Program.

9. 820 Liberty Avenue

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30. Olive or Twist

819 Penn Avenue

140 Sixth Street

Niche Inheritance | Dakotah Konicek

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Show

Performance by Triptych Piano Trio

31. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

19. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

fünf: Celebrating Five Years of Art on the Walls

107 Sixth Street

Live Music by Aqui Tango, 6 to 8pm.

Live Music by Brad Yoder, 6 to 8pm.

21. Summer Night Market *Open until 11pm

33. Braddock’s

11. THERE Ultra Lounge

Presented by Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership

929 Liberty Avenue

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

931 Liberty Avenue

Pittsburgh Filmmakers: short films on a loop. 5:30 to 9pm. Tiny Harris Gallery

Live Music by The Pressure, 6:30 to 10pm Carnegie Library Button-making and Books WYEP Music Station

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Karaoke Throwdown 10:15pm, 18+, $5 Admission, BYOB Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

Fateful Findings 9:15pm, $5 Admission

655 Penn Avenue

Exposed Steel | Dave Dicello Live music by Reggie Watkins, 5:30 to 7:30pm

Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Avenue

Fateful Findings is a paranormal camp thriller where a hacker with mystical powers exposes worldwide secrets.

26. PNC Legacy Project

928 Penn Avenue

600 Liberty Avenue

Let’s Make Amends! An examination of Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating Black History Month.

15. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

539 Liberty Avenue

27. Dream Cream Ice Cream

*Open until 9pm

Showcasing seasonal Dreamer, The Prez Show.

914 Penn Avenue

28. Boutique 208

Middle School Art Show

16. Lando Lofts

7. Arcade Comedy Theater

At the Museum | Tom Mosser

909 Penn Avenue

811 Liberty Avenue

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Jazz at Andy’s, Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Live Music by Andre Costello and the Cool Miners 10pm, No Cover Salsa Fridays

Meet Your Makers Meet several of our artists in person. Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

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Live Music by Spanky Wilson 8pm-12am, No Cover

SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

208 Sixth Street

Pittsburgh Filmmakers Photography Alumni group show.

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25. Backstage Bar

14. Neighborhood Legal Services Association

crawl after dark

Music, open bar, comedy, art, activities, noshes and more! Visit TrustArts.org/cosmo for details. Sponsors: UPMC, UPMC Health Plan, First Commonwealth

24. Katz Plaza

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Sculptures, Paintings, and Pottery by Jess Bala. Handmade jewelry by Valerie Pollak. Live music by The Willful Souls.

Deconstructed dishes to completed plate.

Show your Crawl map for a $5 discount at the door August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Avenue

Some Begins | Meg Shevenock and Jamie Boyle

13. Tonic

107 Sixth Street

CONSOL Energy Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh 7pm VIP, 9pm General, Tickets: $25-$125

707 Penn Avenue

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

809 Liberty Avenue

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709 Penn Avenue

Batik works by Saihou Nije

6. Harris Theater

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

32. Renaissance Hotel

3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery:

Mars Is Underwater | Ricardo Iamuuri Performances at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30pm. African Beats and World Cup History | Cameroon Football Development Program

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Free yoga classes: 6 to 6:30 pm and 7 to 7:30 pm. Pre-register: info@bendyoga.com

10. Amazing Books *Open until 8:45pm

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808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

New Hazlett Theater CSA Performance Series Preview

Fourth Floor

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18. Future Tenant

23. 707 Penn Gallery

American Society of Media Photographers

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Bombyx Collective presents POLYMORPHIA Performances at 8:30 and 9:30pm.

The Takeaway: Made With Love Guest curator: Robert Raczka

Third Floor

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142 Sixth Street, Third floor

2nd floor:

Belly Dance Show Performances at 7, 8, and 9pm.

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The newest gallery in the Cultural District. The debut exhibition will be a set of paintings by Justus Cox.

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

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3. Tito Way

5. Trust Arts Education Center

8 6 7 9 2 S

901 Penn Avenue

Portraits of Air | Susan Goethel Campbell

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22. 709 Penn Gallery

805 Liberty Avenue

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4. Shaw Galleries

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Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

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Handmade Arcade Hands-on crafting using recycled materials.

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1. Wood Street Galleries

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CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

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Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

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Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience A Production of:

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All information and locations are subject to change.

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Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

10pm Free Lesson, 10:30pm-1:30am Dancing with DJ Jeff Shirey No Cover, Cash Bar

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A NO-HOLDS-BARRED

THE TRUTH IS SHE NEVER LEFT YOU.

SMASH HIT!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES ORR}

From left: James Curry, Naomi Grodin and Bob Rak in Little Lake’s Brighton Beach Memoirs

[PLAY REVIEWS]

July 29 - Aug 3

SIMON SAYS {BY TED HOOVER}

PHOT PHO HOT OTO B BY RIC R HARD ARD TER T MINE E

Now - July 13

SAY WHAT YOU want about Neil Simon

(and I have on several occasions): There’s a reason he remains the most commercially successful playwright of all time. And no better explanation exists than the new production of Brighton Beach Memoirs at Little Lake Theatre.

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org GROUPS 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS

continues through July 19. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelaketheatre.org

This autobiographical play is the story of Eugene Morris, a teenager in Depression-era New York, and his awakening to the sexual, social and political landscape around him. For the first time, Eugene/Neil is beginning to understand how large and unknown the world is, and he’s trying to figure out his place in it. Eugene being Simon (and Simon being Simon), you know you’re in for an evening of laughs. Less obvious, though more important, is the fact that Simon is a master of construction: This is a rocksolid vehicle built to take an audience on a theatrical journey. The argument can be (and has been) made that Simon’s plays are too well-built, that craft is his

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substitute for artistry. That might or might not be true, but there’s no denying the pleasure of watching an outstanding craftsman ply his outstanding craft. That goes double for watching James Curry as Eugene at Little Lake. I like kids onstage as much as I like them off (which is to say not at all), and when I read his bio and learned that a 10th-grader was playing a role the size and substance of Eugene … well, a long evening seemed to be on offer. But after watching Curry at work, I’m willing to go out on a limb and say that he gives the most fully realized performance by a “child” actor I’ve ever seen: a complete creation filled with immediacy and honesty. Either that, or he actually is a 16-year-old New Yorker from 1937 who somehow finds his way to Little Lake every night. Director Carol Lauck surrounds Curry with a talented cast of supporting players: Renee Ruzzi-Kern, Naomi Grodin, Alyssa Bockman, Abby Martz, Taylor Piedmonte and Bob Rak. All take their individual moments to shine. But the brightest star of the evening is Curry, and shine he does. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

DICKENS ASKEW {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} SADO-MASOCHISM, homo-eroticism and juvenile puns: It must be time for


another world premiere from the Rage of the Stage Players. Add anti-Semitism and dystopian steampunk for Oliver Twisted, which is lightly “inspired by characters from the novel Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens,” according to company founder/co-executive producer James Michael Shoberg. Amazingly in its 12 th year, ROTS remains true to its core mission of “darker” adult-oriented theater with large, scantily (but colorfully) clad casts chewing on both the scenery and the vision of Mr. Shoberg. In Twisted, he portrays a pedophilic Fagin as well as writes and directs, among other production duties.

OLIVER TWISTED

continues through July 19. Rage of the Stage Players at the McKeesport Little Theater, 1614 Coursin St., McKeesport. $15. 724-292-8427 or www.rageofthestage.com

Even if you didn’t slog through the Dickens original in school, and somehow avoided the various movie and musical versions, you’ve probably absorbed the story by literary osmosis. Poor but honest (and boring) orphan. Powerful but dishonest officials. Unspeakable slums. Charming but doomed urchins. Nasty

people get comeuppance. Our hero, though still dull, triumphs. Twisted is not so very different, but with heaps of horrors and far more attractive rags. The title character is a lovely but indifferent Nick Kempin. Devin Hunt adopts a more heroic stance as the Artful Dodger, Vincent Anthony Bombara oozes sleaze as Sikes, and Brian Seymour fulfills the dashingly re-imagined Fang. But dominating the show is the glass-greeneyed Fagin, with the best lines, the best gestures, the best polish. A ROTS/Shoberg production is about a bunch of people not merely following a plot, but rather fulfilling an aesthetic — more pageantry than poetry. Alas, such style needs a smooth grace lying just below the surface to keep all the pieces afloat. Twisted fills, even overfills, the intimate space of the McKeesport Little Theatre, but the flow and the fun are stymied by clunky blackouts and unseemly pauses. At two-and-a-half hours, it’s definitely too long. Popular legend proclaims that Dickens’ books are so cumbersomely verbose because he was paid by the word. That’s not really so, though the sentiment applies for Oliver Twisted: Audiences pay 10 cents per minute. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Murph Dogg • “Renaissance” • 2014 Image on paper

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.1007.17.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. through Sun., July 13. 166 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $25. 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

+ FRI., JULY 11 {SCREEN}

JULY 10

Pablo Francisco

+ THU., JULY 10 {STAGE} Although its name might suggest otherwise, PICT Classic Theatre is also concerned with the contemporary. Its latest production is Irish playwright Marina Carr’s 2006 work Woman and Scarecrow, and Carr herself will work on the show with the cast and director Alan Stanford. The first performance is tonight; Carr speaks before July 12’s opening-night performance, and attends the reception that follows. The tragicomic play concerns the final moments of a woman’s life, which she spends conversing with a scarecrow that only she can see. Nike Doukas stars. Dan Willis 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 2. Henry Heymann Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-54. 412-5616000 or www.picttheatre.org

{COMEDY} Comedian and impressionist Pablo Francisco begins his four-night stint at the Pittsburgh Improv tonight. His absurd and high-energy stand-up has earned him appearances on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, Last Comic Standing and Comedy Central Presents. Francisco’s impressions and characters, ranging from the late movie-

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trailer voiceover king Don LaFontaine to Count Dracula as a Spanish-language DJ, continue to be an integral part of his routine, even seven albums into his career. He brings them all to the Improv tonight. DW 8 p.m. Continues

JULY 11

I-Dentify: f All-Butch Fashion Show

During the 1980s comedy boom, according to the press release for Zombo’s Greatest Schmo on Earth, “everyone under the age of 30 still living at home or mooching off a girlfriend was a standup comedian.” Local DJ and musician Zombo’s new 70-minute documentary, Schmo Bizness, depicts a reunion of comics from “the trenches of grade-B comedy clubs who haven’t seen each other in nearly 30 years.” The film premieres tonight at the Hollywood Theater, with live standup from locals Davon Magwood and Shannon Norman, live surf music by Vertigo-go and


Art by Aaron Henderson and Ted Coffey

MainEvent

Of its free quarterly Gallery Crawls, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s summer installment is the busiest, and surely the most humid. The three dozen venues featuring visual art and live music, free yoga classes and more are both indoors and out — the latter including the popular Summer Night Market, with indie vendors of food, music, jewelry, crafts and more. New exhibits include Wood Street Galleries’ interactive La Cour des Miracles, where Bill Vorn and Louis-Philippe Demers’ robots portray “fake” humans like “The Harrassing Machine” and “The Heretic Machine.” SPACE has group show Cataloguing Pattern (pictured). And The Takeaway: Made With Love fills the second floor of 937 Liberty Ave. with “nearly 100 amateur artworks hand-picked from thrift-store collections” (and available to lucky visitors via free lottery, per curator Robert Raczka, a frequent CP contributor). Other highlights include sound artist Richard Iamuuri’s live performance of the original score to his multimedia work Mars Is Underwater, at the Trust Arts Education Center. The July 11 Crawl is capped by the six-venue CrawlAfterDark. These ticketed events include the CONSOL Energy Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh party, with performances and more, at the August Wilson Center, and Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Karaoke Throwdown. The latter is Arcade Comedy Theater’s competition for improvisers, comics and public speakers giving PowerPoint presentations for slides they’ve never seen before. Bill O’Driscoll Crawl: 5:30-10 p.m. (free). CrawlAfterDark starts at 7 p.m. (ticket prices vary). Fri., July 11. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

free beer. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $10. 412-563-0368 or ww.thehollywooddormont.org

+ SAT., JULY 12 {SHOWCASE} Despite the queer community’s big gains in recent years in civil rights and more, expressly queer voices in mainstream

{FASHION}

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Rhinestone Steel

{COMEDY} Chicksburg Presents: The Wild Women of Comedy Showcase promises a no-holds-barred night of standup, with a focus on local comics. The line-up includes Christina Let’s Build Mcneese (who organized the show), Eye Holla, Samantha Bentley, Molly Sharrow, Olivia Grace Traini, Abby Denton and more. The well-populated program also features male comics including Derek Minto and Ed Bailey. The perhaps unlikely venue is the International Children’s Art Gallery, in Bloomfield. BO 9 p.m. 5020 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-290-9652

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food-preservation techniques as canning, fermentation and drying. You can even grade the instructor when you sample some of the preserves made by Hooper and his staff at Legume. BO 6:30 p.m. 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. 412-242-3598 or www.eastendfood.coop

{TALK} The rise in edible gardens and urban farming has sparked new interest in food preservation, as well. How else to make the harvest last all year? Tonight, one of the city’s best-known restaurateurs offers An Overview of Food Preservation at Home, an East End Food Co-op program at the Carnegie Library’s Homewood branch. Trevett Hooper, of Legume restaurant, will cover such simple

+ THU., JULY 17 {WORDS} “Missed the surgery / made the recovery,” writes Wendy Scott in “Traveling.” “70 on 17 / 80

on 76 / to stand / your arm resting on mine / as you shuffle. / You say pull me up. / No, I say, tuck your feet / push yourself up / with your hands. / Like the nurse / I stand / just out of reach.” Scott, Pittsburghbased author of the recent collection Soon I Will Build an Ark, reads at tonight’s installment of Versify, at the East End Book Exchange. Joining her are poets Rachel Mennies, who teaches at Carnegie Mellon University, and Emily Mohn-Slate. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847

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TBS sitcom Sullivan & Son is in its third season, and so is the Sullivan & Son Comedy Tour. Local native Steve Byrne stars in the series, set in the South Side neighborhood bar his character runs. But on the national tour, Byrne shares the marquee with on-screen co-stars Owen Benjamin, Ahmed Ahmed and Roy Wood Jr. Wood, speaking by phone from his home in Los Angeles, has come to appreciate Pittsburgh cuisine. “Every Primanti Brothers sandwich should come with a dude rubbing your belly at the end of it, telling you, ‘Life is gonna be OK. I know you just stuffed your face.’” A native of Birmingham, Ala., he says no college-football fans are more passionate than the ones back home: “There’s nothing funnier than watching two fans of Alabama and Auburn argue over a school that neither one of them had the grades to get into.” And he notes that the Sullivan & Son tour isn’t pure standup: “We definitely come out [as a group] and we’re very much interacting with the crowd for the entire back end of the show,” he says. “That’s what I’m most excited about.” For more from the interview, see www.pghcitypaper.com. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $18-20 (18 and over). 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

{COMEDY}

The What Is Butch campaign calls itself “the first national traveling fashion-show movement to [offer] dominant lesbians, masculine-of-center persons, queer, androgynous and transmenbodied models a place on the runway and JULY 12 a show to call their The Th h Wild Wil Wi ild ld own.” The I-Dentify: Women All-Butch Fashion of Comedy Show is the PittsShowcase burgh iteration, with help from the Garden of Peace Project. Tonight’s event at The Andy Warhol Museum spotlights 10 menswear/androgynousinspired designers. There’s a live DJ and more, red-carpet entry included. BO 7:30 p.m. music and arts spaces remain (show at 9 p.m.). 117 Sandusky rare. So Rhinestone Steel is St., North Side. $15-25 ($45 back. This annual, all-day queer VIP). www.gardenofpeace music and performance festival project.org fills the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination with artists {MUSIC} from Pittsburgh and around The Pittsburgh New Music the country. In the spotlight Ensemble has performed today are Majorheavy, a works by many adventuresome collaboration between singer/ composers during its 38 guitarist Roopa, DJ/drummer years of existence, including innovators like John Cage and Pulitzer Prize-winner Ellen Taafe Zwilich. PNME’s new season opens tonight at City Theatre. Among the pieces being performed are Vinko Globokar’s “Corporel,” wherein a shirtless percussionist uses his own body as an instrument, and Martin Bresnick’s “The Lost Traveler.” Also on the program is Kevin Puts’ “Living Frescoes.” DW 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., July 12. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $12.50-25. 412431-2489 or www.pnme.org

Vex, Chicago’s Lezerection, Pittsburgh’s Vanessa German and more. Mexico-born, Chicago-based Sofia Moreno is a multimedia and performance artist. Joy KMT and Bekezela Mguni are the local performance poets of Testify. And Rainbow in the Dark, a “queerdo” variety show, features performers including SSTR, Little Debbie and Gay Orphans. BO 3 p.m.-1 a.m. 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10-20. www.rhine stonesteel.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ALL SHOOK UP. All Shook Up. Music from the Hits of Elvis Presley. Comptra Theater Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ANDREY NEMZER. Counter-tenor performance, part of Opera Theater SummerFest. Sun., July 13, 6:30 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. BE MY BABY. A comedy by Ken Ludwig. Presented by The Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat. Thru July 19. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS. Neil Simon’s family story set during the Great Depression in Brooklyn, New York. Thru July 13, 8 p.m. and Thru July 19, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. CACTUS. Loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru July 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744.

EVITA. Presented by Pittsburgh CLO. Thru July 11, 8 p.m., Sat., July 12, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., July 13, 2 & 7 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE FANTASTICKS. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest & Attack Theatre. Sat., July 12, 7:30 p.m., Sun., July 13, 2 p.m., Thu., July 17, 7:30 p.m., Fri., July 25, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., July 26, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. LATE-NIGHT CABARET. Broadway favorites, jazz standards, & beloved arias after each mainstage performance. Presented by Opera Theater SummerFest. July 11-12, July 17-19 and Fri., July 25. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. THE MERRY WIDOW. Franz Lehár’s operetta about Hanna, a rich widow, & her countrymen’s attempt to keep her money in the principality by finding her the right husband. Presented by Opera

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Theater SummerFest. Fri., July 11, SUDS: THE ROCKING 60’S MUSICAL SOAP OPERA. 7:30 p.m., Sat., July 19, 7:30 p.m. The story of a young woman and Sun., July 27, 2 p.m. & her guardian angels who Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. come to teach her about 412-326-9687. finding true love in a OLIVER TWISTED. Dark retelling laundromat. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. of Oliver Twist. Presented Thru July 12. South Park Theatre, by Rage of the Stage Players. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. Mature audiences. Thu-Sat, YOUNG ARTIST 8 p.m. Thru July 19. FACULTY RECITAL. McKeesport Little Part of Opera Theater, McKeesport. Theater 724-292-8427. SummerFest. PATRIOTIC SONGS. Wed., July 16, Stories on the history www. per pa 7:30 p.m. Twentieth of our nations most pghcitym o .c Century Club, beloved American Oakland. 412-326-9687. patriotic songs. Presented by 2nd Stage at Prime Stage. Fri., July 11, 7 p.m. Max’s Allegheny Tavern, North Side. 412-231-1899. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, RING OF FIRE: THE 9 p.m. Thru Sept. 25 MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Tribute to Johnny Cash. 412-681-4318. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret 412-251-0097. at Theater Square, Downtown. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 412-456-6666. 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

THU 10 - SUN 13

PABLO FRANCISCO. 8 p.m., Fri., July 11, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., July 12, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., July 13, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 11 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. ELECTRIC SLIDEZ: POWERPOINT THROWDOWN. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER W/ TORI MISTICK. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 11 - SAT 12

GLEN GERARD. July 11-12, 8 p.m. Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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“Our Cade Ride,” by Gabe Felice, from FAKE, at ModernFormations Gallery, in Garfield

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. Some Begins. Work by Meg Shevenock & Jamie Boyle. Opening reception: July 11, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Gallery Crawl: July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Takeaway: Made w/ Love. Feat. nearly 100 amateur artworks handpicked from thrift store collections across several states. Organized by Robert Raczka. Opening reception: July 11, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Exposed Steel. Photographs by Dave DiCello. Opens July 10. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Collecting: Woods to Water. Work by Sharon McCartney. Opens July 12. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Coloring Pittsburgh. Photography exhibition curated by students from Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Youth & Arts Program. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. COX CONTEMPORARY. Justus Cox. Paintings. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Free, festive showcase of arts

& entertainment at galleries & arts spaces. July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Followed by CrawlAfterDark at participating venues. Downtown. 412-456-6666. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Shawn Quinlan, Elizabeth A. Douglas, Gerry Florida. Quilts, sculpture, jewelry. Opening reception: July 13, 2-5 p.m. & by appointment. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. GREATER PITTSBURGH ARTS COUNCIL. fünf: Celebrating Five Years of Art on the Walls. Feat. many of the artists that have participated in the Art in the Walls exhibition program. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. LANDO LOFTS. At the Museum. Work by Tom Mosser. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE NIGHT GALLERY. Rise of the Gargantuans. Group show feat. Cheryl Adamson, Brittney Werner, Angel O’ Connor, Ned Lyden, Steven Bright, more. Opens July 13, 1-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-255-0524. REFRESH PGH. Shoes on a Wire: A Sneaker Art Show by Danny Devine. Opens July 11, 6-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-708-9129. SHAW GALLERIES. FROM_ PITTSBURGH_WITH_LOVE. Photos of sunrises by Kurt Shaw. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-281-4884.

SPACE. Cataloguing Pattern. Collaborative exhibit on the role of pattern in artistic practice. Opening reception: July 11, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Contemporary Figurative Drawing Pittsburgh. B&W work by Stephen Tuomala, Tim Fabian, Marc Snyder & Richard Claraval. Opening reception July 12, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-441-0194. THERE ULTRA LOUNGE. Amalgamations. Recent works by Donnie Toomer. Opens July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. TRUNDLE MANOR. Properly Filthy. Adult art show. Opens July 11, 6 p.m. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Mars Is Underwater. Multimedia sound collage by Ricardo Iamuuri. Opens July 11 w/ performances at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. La Cour de Miracles. Interactive robotic installation by Bill Vorn & Louis-Philippe Demers. Opening reception: July 11, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

KARAOKE

MISTER GROOMING & GOODS

THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the “Best Party in Town”! 9:30PM to 1:30AM

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1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOU TH SID E WWW.D EESCA F E.COM POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Making a Splash. Watercolors by Nancy Smith & Jeanne Adams. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BUTLER ART CENTER. Works by Sally Jones Rodgers & Patricia Young. Butler. 724-283-6922.

live music, great wine

PITTSBURGH WINERY

LIVE IN THE CELLAR July 10 Yarn with special guests Some Kind of Animal July 11 Jimmer Podrasky with special guests The Optimists 2 Shows - 7PM and 10PM July 17 Feufollet “Frenchmen on Penn” series July 18 Nameless in August - CD Release Party July 24 The Collection July 25 River Whyless July 26 The Farewell Drifters Aug 1 SONGWRITERS IN THE CELLAR Hosted by Arianna Powell with: Dan Bubien, Arsena Schroeder, Justin Stagg & Susan Ouchis

Aug 2 Paul Luc and Charlie & the Foxtrots Aug 8 Jimbo and the Soupbones + special guests Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

SAT 12 ARCADE RADIO MYSTERIES. Original radio play & improv based on vintage radio shows. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY SHOWCASE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JAMIE CAMPBELL, ROB SPEER, ED BAILEY. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SUN 13 IMPROV: ALMOST INFAMOUS ONE YEAR SHOW + BONUS STAGE. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-605-4807. MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

TUE 15 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Weather Permitting outdoor concert series at the Shadyside Nursery, Shadyside CRITIC: Bob Pacheco, 39, a high school teacher from Blackridge WHEN: Sun.,

July 06 I’m here to see the Beagle Brothers. It’s my wife’s and my anniversary, so we thought it might be nice to go to a show and do something local. This is my first time here, but it’s awesome. Right away, I noticed it was really laid-back and there were really cool people. We’ve already seen some of our friends, there’s great music, and it’s a great place to bring your kids, too. Cool vibes all around. And I haven’t had any of the food yet, but I’m excited to check out that hot-dog truck, Franktuary. Plus my oldest is a big fan of grilled cheese, so we’ll probably hit up Oh My Grill as well. It’s a cool place and a cool neighborhood. BY DAN WILLIS

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COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. OPEN MIND OPEN MIC. Third Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Wed of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 1 Gay & Lesbian Community Center, Downtown. 412-422-0114. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin

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submarine, and more. North Side. ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. 412-237-3400. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, this Tudor mansion and Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely stable complex, and enjoy hikes rare examples of pre World War II and outdoor activities in the iron-making technology. Rankin. surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-464-4020 x.21. 412-767-9200. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the with costumed guides featuring other Frank Lloyd Wright house. this restored stagecoach stop. 724-329-8501. 724-238-4983. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. CONNEY M. KIMBO Tours of a restored 19th-century, GALLERY. University of middle-class home. Oakmont. Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: 412-826-9295. Memorabilia & Awards from MARIDON MUSEUM. the International Hall of Fame. Collection includes jade and Oakland. 412-648-7446. ivory statues from China and FALLINGWATER. Japan, as well as Meissen Tour the famed Frank porcelain. Butler. Lloyd Wright house. 724-282-0123. 724-329-8501. MCGINLEY HOUSE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN & MCCULLY LOG www. per pa CHURCH. Tours of 13 HOUSE. Historic homes pghcitym .co Tiffany stained-glass open for tours, lectures windows. Downtown. and more. Monroeville. 412-471-3436. 412-373-7794. FORT PITT MUSEUM. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Unconquered: History Meets more than 600 birds from over Hollywood at Fort Pitt. 200 species. With classes, lectures, Original movie props, demos and more. North Side. photographs, & costumes 412-323-7235. alongside 18th century artifacts NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 & documents, comparing & rooms helping to tell the story contrasting historical events of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. w/ Hollywood depictions. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. Reconstructed fort houses 412-624-6000. museum of Pittsburgh history OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. circa French & Indian War and This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion American Revolution. Downtown. site features log house, blacksmith 412-281-9285. shop & gardens. South Park. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL 412-835-1554. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY Clayton, the Frick estate, MUSEUM. Trolley rides and with classes & programs for all exhibits. Includes displays,

FULL LIST ONLINE


BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

VISUAL ART

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CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Sandbox: At Play w/ the Photobook. Rotating selection of photobooks. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mildred Sidorow. A sunny collection of work by the 94 year old Johnstown native. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Cranberry. 724-283-6922. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection.

walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639.

Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Niche Inheritance. Window installation by Dakotah Konicek. Gallery Crawl: July 11, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-567-8861. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Art Walk reception: July 11, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Chainsaw Show. New Paintings by Anthony Purcell. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the

RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role

constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. A Walk in My Shoes: Walk the Diaspora. Interactive exhibit feat. the work of local, national & international artists, musicians & authors. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Identity Materials. Work by Theresa Baughman & Julia Betts. Bloomfield. NEW CITY CHURCH. Layers. Paintings by John J. Donnelly. Downtown. 412-726-4217. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/

in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. CFEVA Exchange Exhibition. Work by Jake Beckman, Jeanne Jaffe & Jennie Thwing. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SANCTUARY GALLERY. Sllimdaert: Brent Birnbaum. Lawrenceville. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

THUR, JULY 10, 9PM FUNK/SOUL

THE BUCKLE DOWNS FRI, JULY 11, 9PM ROCK

MACE BALLARD

AND FRIENDS PERFROMING WEEZERS BLUE ALBUM

SAT, JULY 12, 9PM

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THU/JULY 10/10PM

PUNK/BLUEGRASS

OLD MAN MARKLEY/MINER PLUS THE SCANDALS

BURLESQUE SHOW

MON, JULY 14, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH S G D

THU/JULY 31/10PM

TUES, JULY 15, 8PM

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JULY 18 & 19

ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

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FESTIVALS THU 10 - SAT 12 WHISKEY REBELLION FESTIVAL. Historic activities, live music, petting zoo, more. July 10-12 Downtown Washington 412-281-1442. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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FRI 11 - SUN 13 SOUTHSIDE WORKS EXPOSED. Feat. I Made It! Market, live music, children’s activities, more. www.imadeitmarket.com July 11-13 SouthSide Works, South Side.

Wildlife Center, & the Western PA Humane Society. www.pghpupcrawl.org 7:45 a.m. Clemente Bridge, North Side.

SAT 12

JOY KMT/ THE TABERNACLE OF IMMACULATE PERCEPTION: POEM 2. Part of Testify: A Black Womanhood Series. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

10TH ANNUAL GARDEN PARTY IN THE COURTYARD. 6-8 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 3RD ANNUAL 5220 BIKE RALLY. Bike ride, raffles, buffet, more. Benefiting Officer James Kuzak Jr. 9:30 p.m. Quaker Steak & Lube Pleasant Hills, Pleasant Hills. 412-401-2165. NIGHT IN THE TROPICS AT THE NATIONAL AVIARY. An evening of tropical birds, dancing, more. 7 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. PITTSBURGH CURE SARCOMA 5K RUN/WALK. 9 p.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 724-816-4074.

FUNDRAISERS

SUN 13

SAT 12 TROPICAL FOREST INDIA MANGO FESTIVAL. Hands-on activities, tastings, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

DANCE FRI 11

FRI 11 COSMOPOLITAN PITTSBURGH. Interactive entertainment, art, dance party, more. Benefits the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-471-6086. PITTSBURGH PUP CRAWL. Dog walk, raffles, games, more. Benefits Animal Friends, Animal Rescue League Shelter &

24TH ANNUAL GARDEN TOUR. Plant sale, free consultations w/ Penn State Master Gardeners, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

PURPLESTRIDE PITTSBURGH 5K. Benefit for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. www.purplestride.org/pittsburgh North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side.

TUE 15 BIZARRE BOWLING W/ BROOKLYN BOTTOMVITCH & VYVYAN VYXN. Cosmic bowling, drag show, more. Benefits the Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh & the Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Crafton-Ingram Lanes, Crafton. 724-678-0834.

POLITICS THU 10 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

SAT 12 SOCIALIST ALTERNATIVE’S ELECTORAL CAMPAIGNS: SEATTLE, MINNEAPOLIS & BEYOND. Sat., July 12, 2:30 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-589-2558.

LITERARY THU 10 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK

Over 500 Cigar Brands to choose from! Lots of accessories to match any budget!

CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THOMAS SWETERLITSCH. Tomorrow & Tomorrow book launch. 7-9 p.m. WYEP Community Broadcast Center, South Side. 412-381-9131.

FRI 11

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 12 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. WRITERS IN THE GARDENS 2014. Readings by Craig Bernier, Leslie Ann McIlroy, Dave Newman, Wendy Paff, Jamar Thrasher. 4-5:30 p.m. Mechanics’ Retreat Park, North Side. 412-323-0278.

MON 14 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WORDS @ WIGLE: A LITERARY HAPPY HOUR. Feat. Dylan Nice. Benefits Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 5-7:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

TUE 15

COLLIER TOWN SQUARE 1597 Washington Pike Bridgeville, PA (next to Bottleshop Café) 412-276-1118

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

[LITERARY]

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 16 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First

Vector and Hyacinth Girl, two local literary presses with marked interests in feminism and experimental poetry, collaboratively host a poetry reading to celebrate the release of Vector’s third issue. The free event, held at the ModernFormations Gallery, in Garfield, will feature poetry by Rachael Deacon (pictured), Sally Rosen Kindred, Dan Nowak and many other friends of the presses. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served, and volumes by both publishers will be available for purchase. 7 p.m. Thu., July 12. 4919 Penn Ave. 412-362-0274 or www.modernformations.com

and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 10 STEEL CITY ROWING RIVER FUN CAMP. For ages 8-11. Mon, Tue, Thu. Thru July 17 THURSDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Thu, 4 p.m. Thru July 31 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 10 - FRI 11

PPG COLOR WEEK. DIY cutting w/ color swatches, explore 3D printing, more. Thru July 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 10 - WED 16

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh,

North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 11 CAMPFIRE STORYTIME. 2:30-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. COOK IT! Interactive cooking demonstrations w/ Chef Angelo Galioto. 12:15 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 12 THE JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY. Children’s opera based on Mark Twain’s short story. Presented by Opera Theater


SummerFest. Sat, 11 a.m. Thru July 26 Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. LETS MOVE! FAMILY DANCE PARTY. Dancing, face painting, craft activities, more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SECRET AGENT 23 SKIDOO. Family hip-hop performance promoting positivity, education & awareness. 4 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375.

SUN 13

GLAM IT UP. Create your own lip gloss, facial scrubs, bath salts, & soaps. For students in grades 3-5. 2 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-0937. PENGUIN PAINTING PROGRAM. Choose colors & watch penguins create a work of art. 3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SUNNY DAY STORY TIME. 1 p.m. The University Store on Fifth, Oakland. 412-648-1455. WECAN! EVENT: NUTRITION W/ THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 14

BONJOUR LES AMIS. French stories & activities. Ages 2-5 w/ parent. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru July 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. XOXO: LOVE STORYTIME. 2:30-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 15 GARDEN PROGRAM: CURIOSITY HIKE. Explore the gardens, paths, sidewalks, & parks around the museum. 2:30-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 16

3D FOR KIDS. Ages 7+. 1 p.m. Penn Area Library, Jeannette. 724-744-4414. CLUB 24. Math workshop for students entering 4-6 grades. Must pre-register. Wed, 4:30 p.m. Thru July 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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THE JOSH & GAB SHOW. 12:15 p.m. Buhl Community Park, North Side.

OUTSIDE FRI 11 - SAT 12 WAGMAN FULL MOON STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. July 11-12, 8:50 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SAT 12 BIKE TO FEED FAMILIES. Pittsburgh’s only food drive delivered to The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank via bicycle. Simply bring your bike, food donations, & something to carry them in. 10 a.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. TREES OF THE WILDFLOWER RESERVE. Learn how to identify trees, as well as the tales associated w/ the folklore & history of the park’s many tree species. 10 a.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611.

TUE 15

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 16 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 10 2-MINUTE FILM FESTIVAL. Short films exploring the concept of outer space. 8-11 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. GLAMAZONS: A TOUR OF EPIC PROPORTIONS. All-female variety show. 9 p.m. Lava Lounge, South Side. 267-934-6263.

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INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF RESOUNDING COURAGE. PITTSBURGH. Social, Chamber music, dance & spoken cultural club of American/ word. Feat. members of Texture international women. Thu First Contemporary Ballet & Continuum Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. Dance Theatre. July 10-12, 8 p.m. pittsburgh@gmail.com. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. JAZZ IS BALANCE: LIVE JAZZ 724-873-3576. & YOGA. 6 p.m. Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, North Side. 412-322-0800. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second LOCAL LEVO PITTSBURGH’S and Third Fri of every month ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY. and Fourth and Last Fri of 6-8:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey every month Irma Freeman Barrel House, North Side. Center for Imagination, 724-875-2695. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LUNCH & LEARN: FIRST STEP CELEBRATING PROGRAM: PITTSBURGH www. per MECHANICS OF pa HISTORY: THE FORT pghcitym .co STARTING A SMALL PITT BLOCK HOUSE. BUSINESS. 7:30-10:30 a.m. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Mervis Hall at Pitt, Oakland. Library, Downtown. 412-648-1542. 412-281-7141. THE FLAVOR OF PITTSBURGH! MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting PITTSBURGH’S POPULAR FOOD night. Second Thu of every month, CULTURE TOUR. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Crazy Mocha Coffee Company, Creative Reuse, Homewood. Downtown. 412-323-4709. 412-473-0100. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA MT. LEBANON PUBLIC DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Park Community Center, Drawing workshop. Second Swissvale. 412-945-0554. Thu of every month, 11 a.m. GEORGE GERSHWIN, HIS LIFE and Fourth Thu of every month, & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. Thru July 18 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. HIGHLAND PARK & PICNIC. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, 7 p.m. Highland Park, food, more. Ages 21+. Every third Thu, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 21 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. THE STEEL CITY KITTY BURLESQUE & VARIETY SHOW. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. SUMMER SHORT COURSE W/ NIKI JABBOUR. Lectures covering topics related to maximizing & extending the harvest season w/ year-round vegetable gardening techniques. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

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FRI 11 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 12

ART BREW. Craft beer & food pairings, art activities, live music, more. 6:30-10 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat,

1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MANUFACTURING MATTERS. Dan Swinney delivers the United Steel Workers’ annual Bernard Kleiman Lecture. 3 p.m. Homestead Pump House. 412-831-3871. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. 8 a.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 x 130. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. UNCONQUERED: HISTORY MEETS HOLLYWOOD @ FORT PITT. Presentation & guided tour of the Unconquered exhibit at the Fort Pitt Museum. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 13

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SALE. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-836-1800. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

CHERWITZ. Lecture w/ CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. MCKEESPORT LITTLE orgasmic meditation leader. Second and Fourth Sun THEATER. Auditions for of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Irma Freeman Center Oklahoma! July 13-14. Carnegie Library, Oakland. for Imagination, Garfield. Male/female ages 14-70, 412-622-3151. 412-924-0634. prepare a song & be ready I MADE IT! MARKET. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! to dance & do a cold reading. Nomadic indie craft market. www.mckeesportlittletheater.com Practice conversational www.imadeitmarket.com McKeesport. 412-673-1100. English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Sun., PITTSBURGH NEW Carnegie Library, Oakland. Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WORKS FESTIVAL. Auditions 412-622-3151. Whole Foods Wexford, for one-act plays produced AN OVERVIEW OF FOOD Wexford. 724-940-6100. by 18 regional companies. PRESERVATION AT HOME. THE ISLAMIC CENTER July 19-20. Seeking all types/ Workshop presented by OF PITTSBURGH experience levels. Prepare the East End Food Co-op OPENING DOORS a 2-min monologue. & Trevett Hooper of HUMANITY auditions@pittsburghnewworks. Legume. 6:30 p.m. INTERFAITH BANQUET org Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie Library, IFTAR. Free/ open Carnegie. 724-873-3576. Homewood, to the public, RSVP Homewood. ww. r w required. Email 412-242-3598. pape pghcitym outreach@icp-pgh.org. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking THE PITTSBURGH .co 6:30 p.m. The Islamic performers & artists to SHOW OFFS. A Center of Pittsburgh, participate in First Fridays meeting of jugglers Oakland. 412-682-5555. Art in a Box. For more & spinners. All levels information, email welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Union Project, Highland THE AMERICAN CIVIL 412-403-7357. Park. 412-363-4550. WAR ERA - U.S. GRANT THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY SPANISH II. Geared toward AND HIS LIEUTENANTS HOUR REVIEW. Seeking those who already have a FROM CAIRO TO APPOMATTOX. submissions in all genres basic understanding of w/ Rodger Duffy. Second for fledgling literary magazine Spanish & are interested in Mon of every month, 10 a.m. curated by members of increasing proficiency. First and Thru July 14 Mount Lebanon the Hour After Happy Third Wed of every month, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Hour Writing Workshop. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-531-1912. afterhappyhourreview.com Oakland. 412-622-3151. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Hosted by St. Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church in 412-531-1912. McKees Rocks, the Ukrainian Food and Fun Festival SCOTTISH COUNTRY features traditional foods, live music, family activities DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., and more. Volunteers are needed to help run various social dancing follows. aspects of the big event — which runs July 23-26 — No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace including setup, on July 19. Call 412-331-2362 or visit Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. www.ukiefestrox.com for information. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. WEST COAST SWING Lava Lounge, South Side. Submit your film, 10 minutes WEDNESDAYS. Swing 412-431-5282. dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. or less. Screenings held on The Library, South Side. the second Thursday of 916-287-1373. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. every month. DV8 Espresso WHAT ARE STARTUP Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. ACCELERATORS & WHY Oakland. 412-681-7465. 724-219-0804. ESTABLISHED COMPANIES THE WATERFRONT’S WASH. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking SHOULD CARE. 4 p.m. Car wash, contests, more. original essays about literature, AlphaLab, South Side. waterfrontpgh.com/waterfrontsmusic, TV or film, & also essays 312-321-5145. wash/ 5-9 p.m. Dave & Busters, Waterfront. 412-462-1500. generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit BELLE VOCI. Seeking www.newyinzer.com & view women of all ages & COUNTRY NIGHT LINE the current issue. Email all pitches, backgrounds for the local DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. submissions & inquiries to intergenerational women’s Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, newyinzer@gmail.com. choir. July 21 & 23. BV North Fayette. 412-693-5555. THE PITTSBURGH performs compositions of DETROIT STYLE URBAN WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. wide-ranging musical styles BALLROOM DANCE. & diverse languages from 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Seeking entries for 68th around the world. Call or Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. Annual International visit bellevocipgh.com 412-242-4345. Aqueous Open exhibition. 412-292-1928. ENGLISH CONVERSATION http://www.pittsburgh MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. watercolorsociety.com/ Ongoing auditions for Mount Lebanon Public Library, THE POET BAND actors ages 18+ for murder Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. COMPANY. Seeking various HOW TO UNLOCK THE mystery shows performed types of poetry. Contact “INFINITE PLAYER” IN YOU: AN in the Pittsburgh area. wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com EVENING W/ RACHEL 412-833-5056.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 14

UKRAINIAN FOOD AND FUN FESTIVAL

TUE 15

WED 16

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

SUBMISSIONS

AUDITIONS


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a straight female who was a dominatrix for a while — and out of all the jobs I’ve had, I loved it the most. Working as a secretary — one with a master’s in writing — wasn’t that hard to beat, I guess. But I fell in love with a client. We are still together after a year-and-a-half, after I closed my practice and sold (most of) my toys because he didn’t want to be with a woman who was still practicing this kind of physical intimacy with others. Fair enough. But the list has grown longer. His jealousy flared when I told him that I went to lunch with a male friend that I’d played with before, and again when he found an old picture on my computer of me blowing my ex (snooping sucks when someone’s not mature enough to handle what they find). But the latest and most bitter pill is that he no longer wants me to write about my experiences, because he doesn’t want me to think about the experiences I’ve had. I love this guy, but I miss the sex-positive community and the impact (ha) I had on people who decided to pay a professional to share this creative, spiritual, erosinfused intimacy. DTMFA, I know, but why has it been so hard to do? DESPAIRING OVER MY MAN’S EXPECTATIONS

she should spend some time with a therapist. This guy has planted so much poison in her head, more than she can even see right now. She needs to dig it all out, so she can move on to a relationship with a man who loves her exactly as she is. And trust me, those guys are out there.” Follow Mistress Matisse on Twitter @mistressmatisse. I’m a straight guy, and my girlfriend just read my journal. I’d written some pretty harsh things in there about her. But despite my questions about our relationship, I really do want to see whether we can work through our issues. I believe that we have a strong connection despite having very different personalities. I feel guilty that she saw some of the things I wrote, but I am also angry that she read my journal. What do I say to her? STUPID CONFLICT ABOUT READING ENTIRE DIARY

“Goodbye.” She invaded your privacy, which was bad enough. But if you were so stupid as to put “Things That Cannot Be Unsaid” into writing — now “Things That Cannot Be Unread” — then I don’t see how this relationship can be salvaged.

“SURELY A DOMINANT WOMAN COULD NOT BE IN AN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP, RIGHT? WRONG.”

“I was once in a relationship with a guy who did very similar things,” said Mistress Matisse, a professional dominatrix, writer and sex-worker-rights activist. “He knew exactly who I was when we started the relationship, and he said it was fine. But once I got emotionally invested, that changed. He tried to control me by making me feel insecure, like I was a flawed person and my only chance for a relationship was him — who else would be willing to be with an (ick) sex worker? I think part of what blinded me to what he was doing was the fact that I was a dominatrix! Surely a dominant woman could not be in an abusive relationship, right? Wrong. Leaving him was the best thing I ever did.” And that’s exactly what Matisse thinks you need to do: DTFMA. But Matisse isn’t telling you anything you don’t already know. So why is it so hard? “It’s ‘so hard’ because she’s in a relationship with an abusive, controlling man who’s been systematically tearing down her confidence and her sense of self,” said Matisse. “He’s made her give up things that were positive and meaningful to her, he gets angry when she sees her friends, and now he’s trying to tell her what she’s allowed to think?” “DOMME’s boyfriend is leveraging all the power of a sex-negative world to make her think she has to give up all of who she is — even her own mind — to be in this relationship,” said Matisse. “Leave him. She shouldn’t agree to talk it over, or try to understand his feelings, or work out a compromise. Her thinking about, writing about or even being a dominatrix is not the problem. He is the problem. She should leave and not look back — and

I’m a straight girl with a question regarding oral sex. My boyfriend wants to come in my mouth. I can deal with the taste, but in order to climax, my boyfriend needs to pump his penis very fast. He needs to do this at a speed I can’t match even with my hands. This makes it very hard to contain his dick in my mouth. He also thrusts, which makes me feel choked, and I pull away. Is there something fixable here or is this simply a question of “what he needs to do to come” and I have to learn to deal with it? I hope this question doesn’t sound too silly. I’m not very experienced! NO SIGNATURE FOR WONDERER

Your question isn’t silly, NSFW, and I’m happy to answer it for you. Most men need to thrust during oral to come — if oral isn’t foreplay prior to thrustbased vaginal or anal penetration — and that thrusting action can present problems for even the most enthusiastic and experienced cocksucker. The solution: Shorten your boyfriend’s cock by wrapping a fist (or two) around the base of his shaft, and let him thrust through your wet fist(s) and into your mouth. Since your fist(s) can grip his dick firmly, you can relax your mouth a bit — you don’t need to maintain a suction seal during this stage of the blowjob. You relax your mouth and jaw, your boyfriend thrusts in and out, his cock won’t go all the way to the back of your throat (so no choking), and your clenched fist(s) provide(s) the necessary friction and pressure to get him off.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

Find the Savage Lovecast every Tuesday at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

07.09-07.16

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Since 1981, Chinese law has stipulated that every healthy person between the ages of 11 and 60 should plant three to five trees per year. This would be a favorable week for Chinese Cancerians to carry out that duty. For that matter, now is an excellent time for all of you Cancerians, regardless of where you live, to plant trees, sow seeds, launch projects or do anything that animates your fertility and creativity. You now have more power than you can imagine to initiate long-term growth.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The weeks preceding your birthday are often an excellent time to engage the services of an exorcist. But there’s no need to hire a pricey priest with dubious credentials. I can offer you my expert demon-banishing skills free of charge. Let’s begin. I call on the spirits of the smart heroes you love best to be here with us right now. With the help of their inspirational power, I hereby dissolve any curse or spell that was ever placed on you, even if it was done inadvertently, and even if it was cast by yourself. Furthermore, the holy laughter I unleash as I carry out this purification serves to expunge any useless feelings, delusional desires, bad ideas or irrelevant dreams you may have grown attached to. Make it so! Amen and hallelujah!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You know what it’s like to get your mind blown. And I’m sure that on more than one occasion you have had your heart stolen. But I am curious, Virgo, about whether you have ever had your mind stolen or your heart blown. And I also wonder if two rare events like that have ever happened around the same time. I’m predicting a comparable milestone sometime in the next three weeks. Have no fear! The changes these epiphanies set in motion will ultimately bring you blessings. Odd and unexpected blessings, probably, but blessings nonetheless. P.S.: I’m sure you are familiar with the tingling sensation that wells up in your elbow when you hit your funny bone. Well, imagine a phenomena like that rippling through your soul.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Since 2008, Marvel Studios has produced nine movies based on characters from Marvel Comics. They’re doing well. The Avengers earned $1.5 billion, making it the third-highest-grossing film of all time. Iron Man 3 brought in over a billion dollars, too, and Thor: The Dark World grossed $644 million. Now Marvel executives are on schedule to release two movies every year through 2028. I’d love to see you be inspired by their example, Libra. Sound fun? To get started, dream and scheme about what you want to be doing in both the near future and the far future. Then formulate a flexible, invigorating master plan for the next 14 years.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): While in Chicago to do a series of shows, comedian Groucho Marx was invited to participate in a séance. He decided to attend even though he was skeptical of the proceedings. Incense was burning. The lights were dim. The trance medium worked herself into a supernatural state until finally she announced, “I am in touch with the Other Side. Does anyone have a question?” Groucho wasn’t shy. “What is the capital of North Dakota?” he asked. As amusing as his irreverence might be, I want to use it as an example of how you should NOT proceed in

the coming week. If you get a chance to converse with higher powers or mysterious forces, I hope you seek information you would truly like to know.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In one of her poems, Adrienne Rich addresses her lover: “That conversation we were always on the edge / of having, runs on in my head.” Is there a similar phenomenon in your own life, Sagittarius? Have you been longing to thoroughly discuss certain important issues with a loved one or ally, but haven’t found a way to do so? If so, a breakthrough is potentially imminent. All of life will be conspiring for you to speak and hear the words that have not yet been spoken and heard but very much need to be.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): This would be a fun time for you to brainstorm about everything you have never been and will never be. I encourage you to fantasize freely about the goals you don’t want to accomplish and the qualities you will not cultivate and the kind of people you will never seek out as allies. I believe this exercise will have a healthy effect on your future development. It will discipline your willpower and hone your motivation as it eliminates extraneous desires. It will imprint your deep self with a passionate clarification of pursuits that are wastes of your precious energy and valuable time.

Where do you go to renew yourself? Who are the people and animals that treat you the best and are most likely to boost your energy? I suggest that in the coming week you give special attention to these founts of love and beauty. Treat them with the respect and reverence they deserve. Express your gratitude and bestow blessings on them. It’s the perfect time for you to summon an outpouring of generosity as you feed what feeds you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Why do birds fly? First, that’s how they look for and procure food. Second, when seasons change and the weather grows cooler, they may migrate to warmer areas where there’s more to eat. Third, zipping around in mid-air is how birds locate the materials they need to build nests. Fourth, it’s quite helpful in avoiding predators. But ornithologists believe there is yet another reason: Birds fly because it’s fun. In fact, up to 30 percent of the time, that’s their main motivation. In accordance with the astrological omens, Taurus, I invite you to match the birds’ standard

in the coming weeks. See if you can play and enjoy yourself and have a good time at least 30 percent of the time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Is there an important resource you don’t have in sufficient abundance? Are you suffering from the lack of an essential fuel or tool? I’m not talking about a luxury it would be pleasant to have or a status symbol that would titillate your ego. Rather, I’m referring to an indispensable asset you need to create the next chapter of your life story. Identify what this crucial treasure is, Gemini. Make or obtain an image of it, and put that image on a shrine in your sanctuary. Pray for it. Vividly visualize it for a few minutes several times a day. Sing little songs about it. The time has arrived for to become much more serious and frisky about getting that valuable thing in your possession. The media love bad news. They think it’s more interesting than good news. Is it? Send your interesting good news to uaregod@comcast.net.

get your yoga on!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Expect nothing even as you ask for everything. Rebel against tradition with witty compassion, not cynical rage. Is there a personal taboo that no longer needs to remain taboo? Break it with tender glee. Do something playful, even prankish, in a building that has felt oppressive to you. Everywhere you go, carry gifts with you just in case you encounter beautiful souls who aren’t lost in their own fantasies. You know that old niche you got stuck in as a way to preserve the peace? Escape it. At least for now, live without experts and without leaders — with no teachers other than what life brings you moment by moment.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Every year, the U.S. government spends $25,455 per capita on programs for senior citizens. Meanwhile, it allocates $3,822 for programs to help children. That’s only 15 percent as much as what the elders receive. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I believe your priorities should be reversed. Give the majority of your energy and time and money to the young and innocent parts of your life. Devote less attention to the older and more mature aspects. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need to care intently for what’s growing most vigorously.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): What are the sources that heal and nourish you?

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

PAGE WORK

52 PAGE

LIVE

SERVICES

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to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

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ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

EAST FOR RENT

STORAGE

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Newly remod. lg. 3BR, eq. kit, combo l/r and d/r, laun, off str prkg, stor. Close to shop and trans. Avl July $1,065+g&e

Tony 412-849-8856

EAST FOR RENT

53 53

AUDITIONS Saltworks Theater Company

is located in Pittsburgh and tours social issue shows to schools throughout PA, WV, OH, NY, NJ. This is a nine month parttime contract, Sept-May. Paid per show, per diem, hotel accommodations, hourly rehearsal rate. Shows educate students K-12 on various issues including drugs and alcohol, bullying, violence, relationships, self-esteem, etc.

Check us out at www.saltworks.org

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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HELP WANTED

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

Shadyside/ Friendship

PAGE WELLNESS

HELP WANTED $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

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Must have Bachelor’s degree in theater or related field or equivalent acting experience. E-mail headshot and resume to nalrutz@saltworks.org. If interested, I will call you to schedule an audition. Minorities are encouraged to apply.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014

Furn. 1BR apt, 2nd flr., no smkg or pets, laun.

$650 +security+light

Avl Immed. 6 months-1yr lease

CMU/Pitt students welcome! Nancy 412-661-2143

GREAT PAY FOR ONE DAY!

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Drivers WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Downtown Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 JIM for an application


HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

LEGAL NOTICES

STUDIES

LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS in 60 Days! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weight loss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Call 877761-2991 (AAN CAN)

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BO ARD

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS?

HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Public Hearing Notice (3) Pre-Hearing Conferences

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

GENERAL FOR SALE

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

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Loving couple promises your baby a life of secure endless love. Christine + Tom 888-316-5136 Exp pd.

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Available: Hardware Strores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

CBR Cases: #208-13 #281-11 #286-13

Tuesday, 7/22/14 5:00PM - 6:00PM City Council Chambers 510 City County Building Pittsburgh, PA 15219 CPRB monthly meeting will follow immediately @ 6pm

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

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CPRB PITTSBURGH

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

STUDIES

GOUT? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

STUDIES NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with ponse res design of our ads and the e to hav I w they evoke. When I kno in ts jec sub advertise for research ly ate edi the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE United Lender Services, a whollyowned subsidiary of USAA, is currently seeking talented and positive people to join our growing team in Robinson Township!

Current Openings Include: • • • •

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www.ulsnow.com

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Escrow Officers Title Curative Officers Title Examination Officers Customer Service Representatives • Appraisal QC Analysts • Scheduling Coordinators Visit www.ulsnow.com to view all current openings and to apply. United Lender Services is an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action employer of Females, Minorities, Veterans and Disabled.

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Act 235 Courses October 18, 19, 23, 24, & 25, 2014 Renewal Classes: August 7, 2014 www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required 724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class +

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MASSAGE

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massage

Downtown

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BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

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Open 24 hrs MASSAGE Xie LiHong’s

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Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

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Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

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Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

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TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

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724-519-2950

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.09/07.16.2014


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July 9, 2014