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CITIES THAT AREN’T HERE ANYMORE: LOCAL AUTHOR ENVISIONS PITTSBURGH’S DESTRUCTION: 43


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8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

8.15 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Warhol theater Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

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10.3 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS Warhol theater Tickets: $10/$8 Members and students

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


07.02/07.09.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 27

{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[MAIN FEATURE] I found the ballroom scene, 16 “When it was like, ‘This is the road to take so I can be who I want to be.’” — Michael Brookins on the power of the city’s ballroom scene to transform the lives of young gay black men

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

“I usually just leave it off now.” — A Lyft driver on displaying the company’s signature pink mustache during the current state crackdown on ride-share services

[TASTE] squeezing juice like 23 “We’re nobody’s business.” — Il Tetto’s

{ADMINISTRATION}

Rob Hirst, of the prep work for the rooftop bar’s cocktails

[MUSIC]

very fortunate that I’ve kind of 28 “I’m been able to tie all my passions together under one roof.” — Musician and Pittsburgh Winery owner Tim Gaber on his wine bar and music venue

[SCREEN]

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“It was a community enterprise.” Co-director Gab Cody on the making of Progression, a new comedy shot and set in Lawrenceville

[ARTS] sort of led me into the wider 43 “He realm of science fiction as literature.” — Debuting novelist Thomas Sweterlitsch on the influence of Philip K. Dick

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 15 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 STUFF WE LIKE 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 NEWS

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FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“THE VEHICLE-REGISTRATION ISSUE HAS ME WORRIED.”

INCOMING Re: WYEP marks 40 years as “the station that refused to die” (June 25) I stopped listening to WYEP years ago back when I heard so much Tom Petty that I thought I was listening to a Clear Channel station. WYEP is a pale ghost of its former self and the term “independent” is a misnomer. The playlist is pre-determined by the program director and the bland-out DJs have no input into what music is selected. In fact, the playlist of WYEP is practically the same as just about every other NPR station across the country. Whether you listen to WFUV of [New York] or WXPN of Philadelphia, you will hear an eerily identical playlist. And they all follow the same NPR formula complete with the same vanilla syndicated snoozer programs like This American Life and The World Café. Even the nerdily vapid (though thoroughly professional) DJs all sound the same — after all, you don’t want to risk alienating or offending any yuppie donors or corporate sponsors with someone with a personality. Risk, not predictable insipidity, used to be what independent radio embraced. And although after 40 years WYEP still survives, there is such a thing as a “Spiritual Death.” Thank the gods that the true spirit of independent radio still lives in stations like WFMU in Jersey City. — Alan Zavacky Morningside

{ILLUSTRATION BY PAT LEWIS}

Re: Port Authority board to hold special Bus Rapid Transit meeting (June 27, online only) “Anyone who thinks we need bus rapid transit from Oakland to Downtown has obviously never ridden a bus from Oakland to Downtown.” — Web comment from “Anonymouse”

CORRECTION A June 25 City Paper story on the construction of the Frick Environmental Center contained several inaccuracies. It was incorrectly reported that the center would impact 35 acres of woodland; due to a reduction in the project’s scope, only 10 acres will be impacted. The previous environmental center was a total of 11,000 square feet, not 6,000. The Frick Trust holds $16 million, not $27 million and Harriet Stein resides in Hazelwood, not Regent Square.

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UNDER THE RADAR A

TTORNEYS FOR ride-share compa-

tal operational permits are considered by nies Lyft and Uber were in court the Public Utilities Commission. last week trying to convince a panel of administrative-law judges not to shut down their local operations. But judges Mary Long and Jeffrey Watson weren’t the only ones with a decision to make. Many of the companies’ drivers are torn over whether to continue doing a job they enjoy at the risk of steep penalties including revocation of their {BY DAN SLEVA} vehicle registration. Emergency cease-and-desist hearings were held in Pittsburgh June 26 to deterLyft and Uber launched in Pittsburgh mine if Uber and Lyft can continue to oper- without first seeking approval from the ate while their applications for experimen- PUC. Each company connects contracted

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

Ride-share companies work to keep their service on the streets while drivers try to keep a low profile to avoid steep penalties

drivers with passengers seeking a ride through a smartphone app and charges a fare based on distance and time. Earlier this year, the PUC told City Paper that it would begin citing the companies and their drivers. That effort began in earnest in April when 23 drivers were cited for transporting passengers without a permit. That was followed by the PUC issuing a cease-and-desist order to the companies on June 16. In filing the cease-and-desist orders, the PUC also called for an additional $1,000 fine for each driver, plus the revocation of their vehicle registration. According to Title 75 of the state vehicle code, registration CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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can be suspended if the vehicle has been used to transport passengers for compensation without having a certificate of public convenience. PUC spokeswoman Jennifer Kocher says the revocation of vehicle registration is fairly common. Although she could not provide specific numbers, she says one or two happen each week statewide for running afoul of PUC regulations. Kocher says the drivers either find out about the revocation immediately or when they go to renew their registration for the vehicle. Uber and Lyft drivers say this is the part of the battle over ride-sharing that concerns them most. The threat has resulted in fewer of Lyft’s signature pink mustaches being visible on the road. Several drivers reported pulling the mustache off the front bumper and moving it to either the trunk or backseat to avoid being a target. One Lyft driver says he no longer displays the mustache because losing his vehicle registration would make it impossible for him to find other employment. The driver, who did not want to be named, says he has been working for Lyft since its February launch. At first, it was part time, but he has been driving full time while waiting to hear if he’s landed a new job. And if he gets that job, he says he would need a vehicle to get back and forth to work. “I usually just leave it off now,” the driver says. “The vehicle-registration issue has me worried.” Another Lyft driver says the company has told him not to worry and to just continue driving, but he has also heard of his fellow drivers ditching the mustache, especially when taking fares to the airport. “It is basically asking for trouble at this point,” the driver explains. Luigi Lista, who has been driving for Uber since its launch, was not happy to hear about the possibility of losing his vehicle registration. He says he believed the issues had already been worked out. He reached out to Uber, but says he was told to “obey all traffic laws and consider the risks for himself.” Not content with that response, Lista followed up. He says he asked Uber specifically about drivers losing vehicle registration, and received an email reply that stated, “Uber cannot give legal advice.” He says they never addressed his particular concerns, but did put out an email to drivers guaranteeing $60 an hour for driving the weekend of June 20-22. Lista says this is the highest incentive that Uber has

put out since launching. In addition to the larger fines and consequences for drivers, the PUC proposed $1,000-per-day fines for Lyft and Uber, retroactive to their launch dates. Before launching, both companies contended they did not need approval from the PUC and that there were no forms for them to fill out because they did not fall into traditional categories of transportation. Each has since filled out an application to begin service. The applications have been formally protested by existing taxi and limo companies and the Insurance Federation of Pennsylvania. YellowX, a ride-sharing service proposed by Pittsburgh Yellow Cab, received no protests and was approved in May. Many state officials have also written letters of concern to the PUC stating they would like to see commercial insurance as a requirement before the applications are approved. Locally, however, Mayor Bill Peduto and several members of Pittsburgh City Council support the companies. In a June 17 letter to the PUC, Peduto wrote: “It is evident that your enforcement activities against these entrepreneurs go above and beyond what is required or prudent. … The role of government is to facilitate innovation and growth, not to stand in its way.” In the separate, back-to-back hearings last week, a PUC enforcement officer testified that Lyft and Uber are operating without regard to the law and have disregarded sanctions, making an immediate ceaseand-desist order necessary. PUC Western Region Enforcement Manager Charles Bowser was the sole witness at both hearings. Allowing the companies to continue to dispatch drivers without oversight would be “a recipe for disaster,” Bowser testified. “They are not submitting to any oversights and we do not know how many drivers they have, who the drivers are or where the drivers are.” Bowser detailed a sting operation conducted in late March and early April that resulted in 23 citations being issued to drivers, 11 working for Uber and 12 for Lyft. He says he downloaded the apps and took rides. Bowser also testified that the PUC bureau of investigation and enforcement has continued to take undercover rides. He said the last undercover rides were taken June 24. No citations have been issued yet for those rides, according to the PUC. Lyft attorney Adeolu Bakare urged the judges not to issue the cease-and-desist order, saying it is the highest power the

“WE DO NOT KNOW HOW MANY DRIVERS THEY HAVE, WHO THE DRIVERS ARE OR WHERE THE DRIVERS ARE.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


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UNDER THE RADAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (8:00 pm)

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (8:00 pm)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

commission has and that there has been no proof of a clear and present danger to life or property due to the company’s operation. Prosecutors for the PUC argued the order is appropriate because the companies have applications pending and prior enforcement has not stopped them from operating. PUC attorney Michael Swindler argued the PUC has the duty to protect the public, and Lyft and Uber have “thumbed their noses” at all sanctions so far. The two PUC administrative-law justices that heard the cases are expected to rule by July 1, as this issue was going to press. Judges can accept, reject or modify the petition. Then, the PUC commission will vote at its next public meeting on July 9 to accept, reject or modify the judges’ decision. Taylor Bennett, a spokesperson for Uber, called the PUC’s action “unexpected and disappointing.” Bennett says Uber “looks forward to continuing our work with the PUC to find a permanent home for ride-sharing in Pennsylvania.” Lyft officials would not comment on the cease-and-desist action. Among the several issues addressed in the June 26 hearing is whether the rideshare companies have sufficient insurance. Jamie Campolongo, CEO of Pittsburgh Yellow Cab, along with Lyft and Uber representatives, testified in Harrisburg June 24 in front of the House Insurance Committee about what types of insurance are needed for ride-sharing. Lyft and Uber drivers rely on their own personal insurance policy first, before ex-

cess liability insurances kick in. Insurance companies contend that personal insurance would not cover these drivers or their passengers because they are operating in a commercial manner. Campolongo says his company’s ridesharing service, YellowX, will roll onto Pittsburgh streets this summer, and while YellowX drivers will use their own cars, Yellow Cab will provide commercial insurance to its ride-sharing drivers — a step he says Lyft and Uber should have taken before they began operating. State Rep. Tina Pickett, who led the committee’s examination of the issue, said in a statement that she appreciates the technological advances of these companies, but consumers have a right to know if they are properly insured. “The increasing use of ride-sharing demonstrates a clear need for these types of inventive transportation solutions and this online network offers a great way to match up drivers and passengers, but there are still a number of questions regarding liability and insurance coverage should an accident occur,” Pickett said. “People have an expectation that when they step into a ride-sharing vehicle, there will be a way to seek redress should something happen.” For his part, Lista says he hopes Uber gets approval from the PUC so he can continue to work for them. “It is good money and I like it,” Lista says. “But I’m looking for other employment in case it doesn’t work out.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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NO BENEFIT County decision to phase out domestic-partner benefits draws fire {BY CHRIS POTTER}

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EILEEN HALLORAN and her partner have signatures by press time. Fitzgerald says the absence of statewide waited years for their decade-long samesex relationship to be recognized by the anti-discrimination protections “concerns state. Yet even after federal Judge John E. me a bit.” But while “we can’t make things Jones III legalized same-sex marriage in perfect, we’re trying to treat people fairly.” Pennsylvania in May, she says, “We’re at He notes that providing the domestic-partner benefits was one of his first acts as couna standstill.” The reason? Halloran is self-employed ty executive: “We did it because folks of the and receives health coverage through her same gender did not have the same rights to partner, an Allegheny County employee marry. … I’m not doing this to hurt people.” There is some question about whether enrolled in the county’s domestic-partner benefits program. (Halloran’s partner did Fitzgerald can change the benefits just yet. not wish to be identified for this story.) Once established, benefits for union emBut in June, the county announced it was ployees — including Halloran’s partner — “have to be negotiated terminating the benefit for “DOES EVERYBODY with the union,” says Richthe 11 employees receiving ard Grejda, spokesperson it: Employees wishing to THINK THAT for SEIU Local 668. The local cover their partners would JUST BECAUSE represents more than 1,000 have to furnish a marriage MARRIAGE county employees, and Grelicense by the end of July. The news was “a slap BECOMES AVAILABLE, jda says, “The county cannot arbitrarily change the in the face,” says Halloran. HOMOPHOBIA terms of employment.” Such She’d planned to marry in GOES AWAY?” changes can only be car2016, she says, but Fitzgerald’s timetable left little time for wed- ried out through negotiations — and “Even ding planning: “It’s basically telling us then, we’ll ask that anybody currently reto buy a sheet cake and throw a party in ceiving the benefits be grandfathered in.” The county isn’t alone in facing these the backyard.” On June 30, Allegheny County Executive questions. The city of Pittsburgh, whose Rich Fitzgerald told City Paper he was push- Personnel Department says there are 45 ing the deadline back, perhaps by three to employees receiving benefits for either six months: “We want to treat everybody same-sex or opposite-sex partners, is also equally, but the July time-frame is too short.” reviewing its policies after Jones’ ruling. So That may not satisfy critics, who note are the Pittsburgh Public Schools and the there’s more at stake than picking out a Allegheny County School Health Insurance china pattern. Despite Jones’ ruling, Penn- Consortium, which oversees health covsylvania doesn’t have a statewide law bar- erage for most suburban school districts. ring discrimination on the basis of sexual Seven local districts provide benefits for doorientation. Given that, Halloran worries mestic partners: Jan Klein, who chairs the that “If we go on record as being married, consortium board, says the board is likely we wouldn’t be protected if we tried to find to decide this summer whether to phase work in Cranberry” — which unlike Pitts- them out. If the benefits are discontinued, Klein burgh doesn’t have an ordinance that covsays, “We’d probably say, ‘We will no loners anti-gay discrimination. Nancy Polikoff, an American Univer- ger offer [partner benefits] as of a certain sity law professor with expertise in LGBT date, or as the end of a contract allows it — law, calls the county’s move a “knee-jerk” whichever comes later.’” Ironically, the status quo costs Halloran reaction. “You’re making people get married when they could face discrimination more than she’d be paying if she got marelsewhere as result,” says Polikoff, who has ried. Under federal law, benefits for partlong been wary of LGBT advocates’ focus on ners are considered taxable income; spoumarriage rights. “Does everybody think that sal benefits are not. The tax bill “costs us dearly,” Halloran just because marriage becomes available, says. But she’s willing to go on paying, in homophobia goes away?” LGBT activist and blogger Sue Kerr has part to avoid a reprise of her first marriage, echoed those concerns in an online pe- in which she was married by a judge. (She tition urging that the county “continue came out years later.) “It wasn’t the wedding you dreamed of,” offering domestic-partner benefits until we achieve statewide non-discrimination she says. “My partner deserves the wedding protection.” The petition had more than 500 she always wanted. “ C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

“Foxxie Revlon,” at the PATF kiki ball

DANCING TO A DIFFERENT TUNE

Jasmine Taylor, a.k.a. “Jasmine Elite,” takes the stage at a June 4 kiki ball sponsored by the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force.


Project Silk takes an unorthodox approach to serving a community whose HIV-infection rates are a “national scandal” {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Michael Brookins, a Project Silk staff member, poses in front of the convention center

O

N A HOT summer evening 10 years

ago, 14-year-old Michael Brookins stood — in shoplifted designer clothes — at the entrance to what looked like a vacant building in Homewood. What was going on inside would change his life forever. From the sidewalk, Brookins recalls today, “It look[ed] like there’s nothing going on. But when you walk in there’s this whole party.” It wasn’t the blaring house music or multi-colored disco lights that overwhelmed him. It was the blur of men in rhinestone blazers, high heels and v-neck shirts that opened to the base of their chests. Some men wore makeup — and some of the women looked a lot like men. Yet by the time he made it upstairs, where he saw men in heels strutting in front of a wall of mirrors, the strangeness morphed into a sense of familiarity. “I don’t know what took over me, but I was way too comfortable,” Brookins recalls. Brookins was well-liked at school: He

played football at Wilkinsburg Middle School and served as a mentor to other students. But he sometimes found himself attracted to teammates or the brothers of girlfriends. And sometimes, when his mom was at work, he’d put on a pair of her heels and parade around the basement. “I just considered it being goofballs and clowns,” Brookins says. But now he was watching other men do the same thing — and they weren’t clowning at all. He watched one person after another strut down the runway. It was, he would later learn, a European-style competition — lots of spins and tricks. “It’s about your personality and your walk and how you bring it to the floor,” Brookins says. And though he didn’t quite understand the rules governing the competition, “It didn’t take no hesitation. I just went out there,” says Brookins. Even as he took the

stage, his mind swirled. “You’re being gay right now,” he thought. And then a switch flipped: “All the shit I was doing this whole time — this is why.” The judges and audience “really, really liked me,” says Brookins. “I never thought of myself as being gay before then.” Brookins had stumbled into the ballroom community, a world populated mostly by black and Latino gay men and transgender women — and invisible to most other Pittsburghers. The scene revolves around “house balls” where members compete against each other in a variety of events, ranging from fashionmodel runway posturing to the acrobatic angular dance style known as “voguing.” With a few exceptions — like Madonna’s 1990 song/music video “Vogue” and Jennie Livingston’s documentary Paris Is Burning

“WHEN I FOUND THE BALLROOM SCENE, IT WAS LIKE, ‘THIS IS THE ROAD TO TAKE SO I CAN BE WHO I WANT TO BE.’”

— the scene has drawn little mainstream attention. But some local public-health experts have been taking a closer look, partly in response to an ongoing national health disaster: By the time a black gay American male reaches middle age, his chances of being infected with HIV are about the same as a coin toss coming up “heads.” Trying to lower those odds, in fact, has become a central part of Brookins’ life. It’s the reason he helped devise Project Silk, a unique attempt to provide a community space where members of the local ballroom community could get an HIV test, practice dancing and hang out in a safe place. Because a decade after walking his first ball, Brookins hasn’t forgotten the feeling of belonging that came from that performance — or the uncertainty he felt afterward. “I just kept having in the back of my head, like, ‘I can’t get caught doing this,’” Brookins says. “‘I love it, it’s awesome, but if I get caught doing this, what’s going to happen to me? How’s my world going to change?’ I wasn’t prepared for that at all.” CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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DANCING TO A DIFFERENT TUNE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

‘I was dying for family’ Kenny McDowell is serving up questions along with the green beans, potatoes, pork chops and chicken he’s been preparing in his small North Side kitchen. “Who was the founder of the Pittsburgh chapter of Revlon?” he asks some of the handful of Revlons gathered in his apartment on a Sunday evening in May. “What year did Revlon win best house of the year?” Answers are offered — and debated — until McDowell responds with an approving nod. Such questions are common during meetings of the House of Revlon, one of a handful of local “houses” that act as touchstones for Pittsburgh’s estimated 100-member ballroom scene. Quizzing members is “all about keeping them down to family,” says McDowell, who is the “overseer” of the local chapter of Revlon. Overseers handle the logistics of preparing for competitions — one of the agenda items at tonight’s meeting. Chazie Bennett is crouched on the floor in the center of the living room, reading from an agenda in a spiral notebook; there are are

upcoming balls in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Also on the agenda: whether to admit a new member who’d had problems showing up to meetings and paying the $15 monthly dues that subsidizes everything from travel costs to costumes, known as “effects.” McDowell and others stress the importance of ballroom’s history. As Michael Battle explained at an April gathering of ballroom members, Pittsburgh’s scene emerged during the 1990s, though the culture has its roots in New York dating back to the Harlem Renaissance. Black drag queens often “couldn’t go to white gay bars, so they created their own scene,” Battle says. Social life was defined by contests in which participants “walked” — competed — for trophies, in an array of categories. A vocabulary emerged, with candidates receiving “tens” from judges — or being “chopped” and eliminated — in a slew of performance categories. The categories are often built around different representations of gender, mixing dance, costumes and attitude to appear in the desired role. McDowell, for instance, often walks “thug realness,” which rewards strict adherence to straightt male gender norms. male ma l gen nde d r norms ms.

Chazie Bennett, member of the House of Revlon

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

And along with “school boy” and “executive” realness categories, it’s increasingly popular in the Pittsburgh scene. It offers “a chance to be that executive or that thug or that straight person society said he couldn’t be,” McDowell explains. That’s in contrast with categories like female figure performance, a voguing category where gay men (“butch queens”) or trans women (“femme queens”) can vogue in a style that plays up female gender norms. Other categories — “realness with a twist” — mix the two. The performance and house cultures are intertwined — and the houses themselves are like college fraternities or sororities, with regional chapters in cities across the country. And the houses become part of its members’ identity: Participants often substitute the house name for their own last name, and travel to each other’s cities. At competitions, houses provide a cheering section for their members: Early on, Brookins noticed that house members had “the whole family yelling and cheering them on.” Meanwhile, “Being a 007 — meaning I wasn’t in a house — I had my friends cheering me on, but it was like, ‘I want to be in one of those houses.’”

“IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT, ‘OH, WE NEED TO TELL SOMEONE TO USE A CONDOM.’ IT’S A LOT MORE COMPLICATED.”

Houses provide support off stage as well, with house “mothers” and “fathers” caring for “children” often discarded by their biological parents. Younger members “come to me for advice, whatever they’re going through,” says McDowell. “It’s good that they can get advice on how to be gay.” That support is part of what draws people to the scene. John Easter grew up in Erie, where being gay was “a big taboo.” And then, as a freshman at Pitt taking a course in gender, race and class, he saw a screening of Paris Is Burning. Watching the film, Easter recalls, “I was sort of jealous” of the support offered by the houses (Easter would later join House of Krayola) and the voguing itself. “You can be a character; it involves dancing and it connects you to other gay people,” says Easter, who today works at the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force. “It’s not like you against the world.” Brookins, too, needed that refuge. His own mother was


addicted to drugs — “I was there physically, but emotionally I wasn’t,” Kelly Brookins says today — while his father was absent. “I was dying for family — to feel like I had family again,” Brookins says. “And when I found the ballroom scene, it was like, ‘This is the road to take so I can be who I want to be.’” A few months after his first ballroom performance, he joined a house, the House of LeBeija, and grew close to house mother Lucky LaBeija. “I couldn’t talk to my mom about sex,” Brookins says. “I couldn’t talk to my mom about wanting to fight somebody.” But with Lucky, “I could talk about anything I wanted.” And when Brookins was outed by a family friend, his mother kicked him out, beginning a stretch of periodic homelessness. “I was mortified, devastated,” his mother recalls. Brookins began relying on his new family, which “gave me a place to stay. I was able to eat.” But life in Brookins’ adopted home was troubled, too. For one thing, he says, “People were catching HIV before my eyes.”

‘It’s almost turning into a national scandal’ “It’s pretty clear […] that young black men who have sex with men have been ignored in HIV-prevention efforts,” says M. Reuel Friedman, a University of Pittsburgh publichealth researcher who has spent nearly two decades working on HIV prevention. What’s less clear, though, is what to do about it. Though African Americans make up only 12 percent of the population nationally, they accounted for 44 percent of new HIV infections in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Especially troubling are HIV rates among young black gay and bisexual men ages 13-24, who account for twice as many new HIV infections as their white and Hispanic/ Latino peers, CDC data show. “If black gay American men could be

turned into a country of their own, they would have the highest HIV rates in the world,” says Ron Stall, director of the Center for LGBT Health Research at the University of Pittsburgh. “What hasn’t happened is a unified, carefully constructed publichealth response. It’s almost turning into a national scandal.” Stall cautions that these high HIV rates are not the result of riskier behavior. In fact, he says, research suggests that black gay men are actually more conservative than their white peers. “You have to be a saint as a gay black man to be HIV-negative,” agrees Stacy Lane, a West End Health Center doctor who often works with the LGBT community. There isn’t much research on why the disease is so prevalent within the black community. “There’s a lot we don’t know,” says Anthony Silvestre, an investigator at the Pitt Men’s Study, a longstanding effort to understand HIV infection. But he cites a range of likely factors: poverty, homelessness, discrimination, stigma and lack of access to education and health care. Another factor is that the odds of infection are higher simply because the pool of possible partners is smaller, and has a higher infection rate to begin with. Brookins himself worked as a “dancer,” a job in which he’d take his clothes off for cash. (“If somebody tells you they’ve never sex-worked — shame on them because they’re lying,” he says.) And living on the margins often brought elevated risk. “We never had nowhere to go,” says Brookins. “We didn’t have access to condoms, so we had sex without because we didn’t have money to buy them.” “There were other agencies that didn’t treat us that well,” says Brookins, noting there wasn’t much outreach to the black gay community. “We felt like it was about time we had something specifically for us.” In high school, Brookins had been involved with the Young Adult Roundtables, an effort by the state Department of Health to involve youth in HIV prevention, especially in high-risk populations. It was a venue for expressing frustrations about the lack of resources available to young gay black men.

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DANCING TO A DIFFERENT TUNE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

Along with Terrance McGeorge — a friend who’d convinced Brookins to go to his first ball — Brookins began to imagine a space where the ballroom community could hang out, feel safe and compete all they want … and where you could get an HIV test, condoms and access to other services. They’d talked about the idea with Friedman, who’d also participated in the Roundtables, and who “kind of became an uncle to me,” Brookins says. Together, they proposed a unique approach to public health, which they called Project Silk. The premise of Project Silk — so named for the “web of social support we’re trying to build,” Friedman says — is simple: If you’re trying to communicate a health message, “people respond much better to their peers,” Silvestre says. Project Silk opened its doors in February 2013, with a $ 1.3 million “demonstration” grant from the CDC that passes through the state Department of Health to Pitt. The funding recognizes a problem that “for 30 years, no one has been able to fix,” says Silvestre, the principal investigator of the project. And it makes people “more willing to consider new approaches” — starting with the space organizers rented on Penn Avenue Downtown. Anyone from the community can drop in to the eighth-floor space, which is furnished like a living room — save for the HIV-prevention posters and condoms. There’s warm lighting, couches, a TV, faux hardwood floors and a full-length mirror propped against the wall. Four nights a week, Silk offers space for voguing, but also mentoring, testing and connections to other health services. Through a partnership with Community Human Services, Project Silk also provides help finding housing and employ-

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Danielle Miller, a.k.a. “Drea Ebony,” at the PATF kiki ball

ment – and just over half of the 323 unique visitors to the space reported at least one of those needs, according to an abstract posted on the American Public Health Association website. “I assess [its success] by looking at the fact that kids are coming in and are getting tested [and] getting other services, [but] HIV is only one of the issues,” Silvestre says. “We’re talking to kids who are homeless, kids who may have been abused,” adds Silvestre, emphasizing the range of social support Silk offers. But the space isn’t staffed just by people with academic or social-work experience. Roughly half of its 11 employees come from the ballroom community itself (though all of them have public health-related experience), according to Friedman, now Project Silk’s director. That includes Brookins, who does both HIV prevention

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

and mentoring work. “Houses have this really familial structure to them,” Friedman says. “One of the things we wanted to do is really build on that.” “It’s not just about, ‘Oh, we need to tell someone to use a condom.’ It’s a lot more complicated,” Friedman adds. The challenge, he says, is “How do we make it feasible and acceptable to those in the community?”

‘One foot on the street and one foot in the clinic’ Chazie Bennett crashes to the ground, and in unison, the room lets out a collective “OH!” Bennett springs back to his feet and struts down the platform where dozens of voguers are watching. “Hey — hey-hey — hey REV-LON!” the crowd yells, clapping

to the beat. “Ready for the rhythm are you ready for the … Ready for the rhythm are you ready for the,” the emcee is rapping continuously into the microphone, playing off the beat that fills Cruze Bar. The judges are perched in front of the stage facing Bennett. He collapses back to a crouch and his feet slide in opposite directions, his legs alternately kicking out from under his body. He momentarily appears to be balanced on nothing but the air under him. Sweat drips from his forehead — one of the few signs this isn’t at all effortless. “Start over — I don’t even know what I’m judging,” one of the judges interjects. Bennett collapses into a heap on the ground, a wave of frustration crosses his face. But it’s only momentary: This is just a kiki ball. Kiki balls are supposed to be lower-pressure events. The prizes here are gift cards, nothing like the $ 7,500 in cash prizes that can be scored at balls in bigger cities. Sponsored by the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force — which holds a kiki ball every two months and offers HIV testing at them — these are mostly for fun. “It’s kind of just a way to kill politics” and drama, says Dalen Hooks, the overseer of the House of Ebony and a staff member at the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force. But drama is often unavoidable. A few hours into the event, an argument erupts among a few judges, which Bennett explains as “drama going on between the houses.” And there are significant rifts in the ballroom community. Last year, a Project Silk “town hall” meeting — called to discuss the past and future of the community — devolved into a fight. Such tensions are a real challenge for Project Silk, which as the West End Health Center’s Dr. Lane puts it, has “one foot on


the street and one foot in the clinic.” The same social connections that help build the mission also complicate it. “When we were doing HIV screenings at Project Silk, we were finding kids who knew they were HIV-positive, but weren’t getting care anywhere,” Lane says. Part of the problem, she says, is that young people “don’t have a sense of mortality.” But there’s also “just a lot of misinformation that people with HIV are dirty or bad people.” More than a year ago, Lane says, an Instagram account went up that showed the faces of certain members of the community and claimed some were HIV-positive, among other accusations. It has since been taken down, Lane explains, but incidents like that play off a profound sense of stigma. “There are people in the black gay community who would die before they let anyone know” they are HIV-positive, Lane says. And since Project Silk’s own mentors are drawn from the ranks of those they serve, they too are susceptible to rumors — about HIV status and much else. “People perceive [peer leaders] as king of the hill,” Lane says, “and you have people who want to knock them off the hill.” That’s an experience Brookins knows first-hand. He’s found himself being accused of “telling people’s HIV status, which wasn’t true at all,” he says. To minimize such drama, Brookins says, he avoids some of his old hangouts and gave up his house earlier this year, becoming a “007” again. “You have to deal with being a professional, then having your own personal life — being on the ballroom scene, being a leader,” he adds. “It’s way easier said than done.”

‘I trust some of these people with my life’ From the time he sneaked out of his house in Michigan as a teenager to attend balls in Detroit, Chris Robinson has been interested in building ballroom communities. “I was very surprised at how small the [Pittsburgh] community was,” says Robinson, who teaches social work at CCAC and who came here eight years ago for graduate school. He later founded the local chapter of the House of Infiniti. “One of my goals was to help Pittsburgh become nationally respected as a ballroom city,” but he says the effort is hampered by “a big differential between ‘I’m born and raised here, and you came here’ — that’s been the most damaging part of the city.” Transgender participants face challenges of their own, says Michael Battle, who is transgender and was brought in by Project Silk to encourage more trans people to participate. Battle says that the ballroom scene

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Melvin P. at the PATF “kiki” ball

can reinforce conservative ideas about gender roles: The “realness” categories, after all, encourage participants to “pass” as the gender they’ve transitioned to. Battle worries that, at times, it “furthers the stereotypes” defined by gender. “The tension starts when people start telling you […] ‘I’m going to teach you how to conform in the world out there,’” Battle says. “There are people who are starting to realize it’s a problem.” Still, he acknowledges, having to practice presenting your gender identity can be good training for life outside the ballroom

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community. “Everybody wants to fit in,” says Battle, and “as a person of color, you already have a strike against you.” And Quiyanna Carey, a 29-year-old African-American trans woman who competes in the ballroom scene, is proud to call herself a “realness girl. … I take realness to a higher level because I work 9 to 5 every day [as a woman].” And even though she acknowledges that it can be demoralizing when judges at a ballroom event don’t think you’re “real” enough, she’s “found more acceptance in

the ballroom community” than from her family or the outside world, Carey says. “I trust some of these people with my life.” That trust, says Friedman, is the foundation Project Silk hopes to build upon. “If it works someplace like here,” he says, “maybe it will work in Cleveland, or Harrisburg, or Allentown” — smaller communities “whose populations are experiencing similar issues.” But first Project Silk must establish itself here. Battle, for one, says, “We have to come up with better programming [to] bring people here, so the image shifts from it just being a community center to a space for education.” More pressing is the fact that Silk’s funding runs out at the end of this year, and it’s not clear if it will be renewed. “There are a lot of open questions” about future revenue, Friedman says, noting the CDC funding is “time limited” and that Silk might need to be “supported in another context.” “We’re looking everywhere” for funding, says Silvestre. “Ideally, health departments and children- and youth-services agencies should be providing these kinds of services. … There’s definite need.” Project Silk staffers, Dr. Lane says, are “the only people who are really engaging this population in this area well.” The problem, she says, is “They’re running in brandnew waters [and] nobody really knows what they’re doing.” For his part, Brookins is optimistic about Project Silk’s future. He has, after all, been in tough spots before. “The scene is about being yourself and being proud of that,” Brookins says. “I feel like I made it. My road is just beginning.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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EVEREST’S MOMOS WERE FILLED WITH WELL-SEASONED, SLIGHTLY SPICY CHICKEN

A NEIGHBORHOOD DRAW {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} When Hemi Braunstein lived in Israel, he hung out in coffee shops where, he says, “You sit and meet people and talk about politics or sports.” But when he moved to the United States in his late 20s, “I was missing that. It seemed like a very closed society, unless it involved alcohol.” That was part of the impetus for opening Make Your Mark Artspace & Coffeehouse, a joint venture with his wife, Amy Siebert, tucked away in a small Point Breeze business district. The décor, like the all-vegetarian menu, is locally sourced. Mosaics and paintings by regional artists line the walls. There’s also an expansive magnetic board lined with sketches, like a community refrigerator door. The menu features a few staples: baked goods in the morning, and hummus, wraps, paninis and salads for lunch. Also featured are a few rotating daily specials, including a vegan soup. A recent panini special featured asparagus, grilled kale, roasted-garlic spread and feta, which balanced well with fresh, juicy tomatoes and the multigrain bread. And while the vegetarian fare is mostly Siebert’s domain, Braunstein prides himself on the fair-trade coffee; he promises all beans are roasted within two weeks of consumption. The iced “dirty chai” (chai with a shot of espresso) is a favorite meant to be sipped on the back patio. And while Braunstein acknowledges that “it might cost a little more, or you might have to wait a little longer,” Make Your Mark doesn’t want to be “just another coffeehouse.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

6736 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-365-2117

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MOMOS AND MORE FROM NEPAL

HEN IT RAINS, it pours, and right

now, it’s raining momos, a.k.a. Nepalese dumplings. In the past year, two Nepalese restaurants have opened in and around Pittsburgh, with another soon to follow. Our first Nepalese dining experience taught us about the cuisine’s distinctive amalgam of Chinese and Indian traditions and whetted our appetite for momos, which are filled with assertive flavors and pursed in delicate wrappers. We sought a second momo-licious meal at Everest, in the South Hills. Located in the same mini-strip mall as an established Nepalese grocery, Everest occupies a pretty spare space, with most of the decor provided by a bold swath of red paint and blown-glass pendant lights. An adjacent room with a pool table appeared to

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

Momo and chicken tiki masala

be a sort of clubhouse, not part of the public accommodation, supporting the idea of the restaurant as a hub for the nearby Nepalese immigrant community, as much as an entrepreneurial effort.

EVEREST 4042 Saw Mill Run Blvd., Brentwood. 877-650-2694 HOURS: Daily 10 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $2-9 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED On the other hand, the fellow in charge on the night we were there — who acted as our host, server and the restaurant’s seeming general manager — wore the many hats of the small businessman. He told us

he’d just hired a new chef and apologetically handed us a handwritten menu of the kitchen’s new Indian specialties, which hadn’t made it onto the printed menu yet. He also warned us that our extensive order might take some time, but assured us he would bring things as they came ready. We were amenable to this, but the 55 minutes that passed from submitting our order to receiving the first dish tested our patience, not to mention our kids’ restaurant manners. Fortunately, the wait was — mostly — worth it. Momos were available in chicken or vegetable — both the Nepalese and the Indian menus contain extensive vegetarian options — and we tried both, steamed. Most dumplings, whether East Asian or Eastern European, tend to rely on mild-tasting


ingredients and, possibly, a more assertive dipping sauce, but what we love about momos are the big flavors of their fillings. Everest’s were excellent. Shreds of wellseasoned, slightly spicy chicken also offered remarkably true chicken flavor, while tender ribbons of cabbage carried the flavor in the vegetarian version. The wrappers were thin and tender, but ever-so-slightly dried at the edges, not at all slippery. Dipping sauces were the same for both: thick in texture, pale brown in color and with a flavor that doubled down on Indian-style spices, blended with what seemed to be nuts. Samosas were pretty standard fritters of mashed potato and peas, but what stood out was a sort of sambar made with large, green lentil-like legumes. The broth was thin but deeply seasoned, the beans firm and hearty; we enjoyed it spooned on the samosa and eaten alongside, and like many a good sambar, it would have made a satisfying soup on its own. The menu promised fried catfish in a batter that sounded like pakora, India’s answer to tempura, with a light chickpeaflour-based batter. Instead, we were served four overcooked slices of salmon alongside a bowl of what looked like American-style hot sauce. The menu’s chicken wings, supposedly marinated in spice and deep fried, similarly turned out to be indifferently roasted drumsticks with no seasoning at all. True, our daughter had requested zero spiciness, but what arrived was flavorless and a bit dried out. The dipping sauce was a thick honey chili that looked like nam prik, the Thai sauce, but had less fire. We employed it to upgrade a pair of hard-boiled eggs that we ordered based on a menu photo that made it appear they’d be served on a bed of sauce. Instead they came bare, with the aforementioned hot sauce alongside. Somewhat mysteriously, the menu promised “mixed fruits” in the Kashmiri chicken pulav (a rice dish: think pilaf), but other than a currant or two, there was little but rice and small, deep-fried morsels of chicken. Fortunately, the rice was fantastic, its tender, individual grains infused with curry flavor. The chicken was not tender, but the little nuggets popped with surprising flavor and their jerky-like texture actually added a satisfying texture. Goat biryani had a different flavor profile and texture from the pulav, with moister, softer rice and a hint of chili fire, but the goat was disproportionately bone. An Indian lamb curry was tender, though, in a rich, thick gravy that was deeply seasoned but not challengingly spicy. Everest is ironing out some kinks as it adopts a new chef and Indian menu, but fellow momo fans will find it a worthy destination. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TOP SHELF Il Tetto brings rooftop drinking to Downtown On a typical Saturday night, there’s a queue for the elevator to Il Tetto, the rooftop drinking garden on the third floor of Downtown’s Sienna Mercato. Lining up to chill at the latest “cool” spot feels out of place in Pittsburgh — a city that’s long rejected such Los-Angeles-like behavior — but this line is worth waiting in. “We all knew we were going to be busy, but we didn’t know we were going to be this busy,” says Rob Hirst, who manages the upstairs and downstairs bars with Ryan Laing. In a city that needs more killer outdoor drinking destinations, Il Tetto is a gem. The fully retractable roof opens to a stunning view of Downtown’s landmark buildings. Overhead twinkle lights set the mood. Even when it’s raining, the roof’s greenhouse design makes for an enjoyable experience. But what really sets Il Tetto apart from other wait-in-line drinking spots is good booze. The beer list is a strong mix of national craft, local micro and a couple of commercial brands. There’s also a nicely curated wine list. And Hirst, who’s worked in both high-volume and craft-cocktail bars, set up a cocktail program that finds harmony in both worlds. “We’ve been keeping quality up, but not making people wait 15 minutes for a drink,” he says. The secret is heavy prep work. Hours before opening, cucumbers and mint are muddled and mixers are made. “We’re squeezing juice like nobody’s business,” he says. That effort is translating into advanced drinking for a crowd that’s graduated from East Carson and Walnut Street bars. “Vodka still is king here, but it’s nice to see that drinker starting to expand and try a Vesper or a Blood and Sand,” Hirst says. And even if you’re not quite ready to give up your vodka, it’s still going to be better than the one you’re used to drinking. “Even a Grey Goose on the rocks is in a glass with perfect ice,” Hirst says.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nuggetlike, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF

Ramen Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} brings a confident approach to a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes. KE HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in

JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An old-school continental menu and a well-restored train station make this restaurant a destination. The menu leans toward Italian fine dining, plus steaks and chops. But well-charred chicken Louisiana and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE

CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE GRIT & GRACE. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748. Small plates with plenty of unexpected ingredients and designed for sharing mark this Downtown venue. The menus offers updates on classics (Rueben, ramen) and eclectic Asian fusion fare to dim sum and “pork face” sandwich. Fortunately, the kitchen

ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely among European, American and Asian influences. LE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Pigs-2-Peaches

preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE

JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy stewed pork) and sopes, thick


savor authentic flavors

OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412381-3698. This two-wheel-themed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE

412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE

Happy Hour Specials 5-7pm 2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

FULL LIST ONLINE

RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley.

*WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum purchase! It’s like eating or parking for FREE!

SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY. Edgewood Towne Center, 1763 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. 412518-9556. The pork-free menu at this soul-food restaurant focuses on fried chicken and fish, along with beef ribs, turkey and burgers, plus an extensive selection of appetizers and sides. Good picks are the hash browns, the fried wings with sweet-hot mumbo sauce, savory blackeyed peas and greens www. per pa with smoked turkey. JF pghcitym .co

PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF

FREE EVENT PARKING

from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

JG’s Tarentum Station Grille {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF

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now open 7 days a week!

600 Grant Street

Downtown Pittsburgh

412-434-0800

www.pghgrille.com

VOTED PITTSBURGH’S BEST NEW ROOFTOP DECK & HAPPY HOUR!

Pittsburgh’s Ultimate Rooftop Lounge

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE

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HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF

WITH LIVE DJ EVERY FRIDAY 4PM TO 9PM

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NEW TAPAS MENU FEATURING SHARE PLATES OF SPECIALTY APPETIZERS, SALADS, SUSHI & CHARCUTERIE

WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, contemporary, candle-lit cottage, the Italian- and Mediterraneaninspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF

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412.281.2583 (BLUE)

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LOCAL

“THE VENUE ITSELF KIND OF REMINDS ME OF A SPEAKEASY.”

BEAT

{BY JULIA COOK}

FOR THE LOVERS Landon Thomas is an artist who knows what he wants and what it takes to get it. With a single and album dropping this month, the self-proclaimed “hopeless romantic” from the North Side pulls from late-’80s and early-’90s R&B. And like the crooners of that era, his verses leave sentimentality behind in favor of a more honest approach. This stripped-down strategy makes Thomas want to reach past his hometown — after all, he’s got a general appeal. “There’s something for everybody,” Thomas says, “whether you listen to Kurt Cobain, Jimi Hendrix or Outkast. I make music for everybody. I’m very collective with what I choose to write. It’s not your normal rap CD; I’m more R&Bish. It’s going to be universal, ’cause I’m not talking about drugs, drinking and drive-bys.” So what is he talking about? The important things: familial and romantic relationships. “You’ll get a lot of questions from your girlfriend like, ‘You talking about us?’ It gets you in trouble,” Thomas laughs. Still, with the support of his family and a few mentors like R.A.R.E Nation’s Palermo Stone, he’s been encouraged to take his songs into deeper territory, and he hasn’t pulled any punches. “Toss It Up” builds the anticipation with a creeping bass line and highpitched, trilling samples. The rhythm is rapid-fire, as if you’ve taken a shot and unintentionally ended up on the dance floor. The best part is that it could be at any club, in any city, and the song could flow into a Ja Rule or Usher track. Mission Control Records will release the single as part of a compilation, in hopes of gaining Thomas some national airplay. DJs and college students, he notes, are constantly combing the underground for something different. “We don’t really have a big, original style,” he says of Pittsburgh’s hip-hop scene. “Usually our style is collaborative between New York and Atlanta. We’re so far north that we’re not south, but we’re so far south that the north doesn’t claim us. It’s just about trying to find your own sound. The city itself is competitive, so it makes you want to do more quality work.”

A

TOAST TO THE MUSIC

“IT’S NOT YOUR NORMAL RAP CD; I’M MORE R&B-ISH.”

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More on Landon Thomas: www.facebook. com/LandonThomasLIE

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{BY ZACH BRENDZA}

A

FEW STOREFRONTS aside, the

2800 block of Penn Avenue looks .practically vacant. This is the part of the Strip District that seems to mostly be driven through, rather than stopped in. A tall, four-story building near the corner of the block bears the name Franklin Savings and Trust Company. Through the 1920s-era barred gate, once used to keep out bank-robbers, are barrels and barrels of wine and a steep set of steps leading to a stage — graced one night in June by an Americana band from Knoxville, Tenn. “The venue itself kind of reminds me of a speakeasy, because you don’t really know it’s there,” says David Manchester, guitarist and vocalist of Arlo Aldo, which has played the venue more than once. “But it’s such a beautiful little gem.” Arlo Aldo on this particular evening is opening a show for Knoxville’s The Black Lillies, playing to a capacity crowd in the basement of the Winery. The 99-capacity space lends itself to intimate performances, with a feeling of warmth and closeness between the performer and the audience. The crowd, either standing or sitting at candle-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

{PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON}

Pittsburgh Winery owner Tim Gaber at the “Songwriters in the Cellar” series

lit wine-barrel tables, sips zinfandels, malbecs and petite sirahs and sways to the inviting bluegrass and Tennessee twang. The winery-slash-music venue is owned by Tim Gaber, bass player for the Buzz Poets and wine aficionado. After years of working as a booking agent, promoter and musician, Gaber got involved

HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL WITH LONE WOLF CLUB

8 p.m. Thu., July 3. Pittsburgh Winery, 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15. 412-566-1000 or www.pittsburghwinery.com

with wine-making as a hobby about 15 years ago. As the music part of his life was winding down, his interest in wine ramped up. His hobby progressed into studying wine-making and working with California vintners. Pittsburgh Winery opened its doors almost two years ago. “I made a place that I wanted to hang out in,” Gaber says. “Just like the wines. We make wines that we love.

“It all comes together here now. I’m very fortunate that I’ve kind of been able to tie all my passions together under one roof.” Open to the public Wednesday through Sunday, 2815 Penn Ave. is a tasting room, just like the ones in California, from where the winery’s grapes are imported. But now, around seven nights a month, the winery closes its doors only to reopen later in the night for live music, with local and national acts. Gaber books some of the music for the winery’s basement — its walls lined with wine barrels, and featuring a full array of lights — but gets help from fellow wineand-music-lover Tim Wolfson. Gaber books more singer-songwriters acts, while Wolfson books bands he’s met while traveling, via Music Night on Jupiter, the company he runs with his wife, Debby. Wolfson, an attorney by day, has long been a prolific traveler, with his trips around the U.S. centering on three things: wine, food and music. Through his travels, he connected with bands along the way, and he and Debby would host bands in their Allison Park home when the groups CONTINUES ON PG. 31


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A TOAST TO THE MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

came through Pittsburgh. Having worked with local promoters in his day job, Wolfson would get bands gigs when he could. The traffic of musical guests in the Wolfson home was getting hectic and he couldn’t always find them a place to play. Having met Gaber through Engine House, another local winery where Gaber was previously a partner, Wolfson reached out to him about doing concerts. “I came in to talk to Tim opening weekend or soon thereafter,” Wolfson says. “He basically said to me, ‘You kept saying you wanted to do music — let’s do it.’” Shows started at the Winery in March 2013 and gradually the space became more and more in demand. Now, Wolfson says, they could do two or three shows a week if they said yes to everyone who wanted to play there. While a year ago he was reaching out to bands about shows, now he fields calls daily. All of the touring bands stay at the Wolfsons’ home, where they have hosted more than 30 bands and counting. Debby Wolfson describes it as a free bed-andbreakfast, with the bands getting a meal, and beds to sleep in. “Sometimes it ends up it’s a jam session at 3 in the morning, or sometimes doing a couple shots,” Debby Wolfson says. “Or sometimes it’s, ‘Hey, let’s go to sleep, because I gotta get out of here at 6 in the morning.’” While the Winery benefits in terms of wine sales when shows draw well, the money from ticket sales goes straight to the bands. “We’re not interested in taking one dollar from the bands,” Gaber says. “I think we both love and respect the musicians so much that we want them to get to the next city.” On the musicians’ part, there’s both an element of comfort and a level of nerves to playing the unique setup of the Winery. A wrong maneuver with an amp or bass drum, Arlo Aldo’s Manchester notes, and 700 bottles’ worth of wine could go uncorked. “If you bump into walls at Smiling Moose, no one’s going to notice,” he says. “If you kinda bang into a chair at Club Café, its fine; they’re chairs. But if you bang into a wine cask at a winery, you’re probably not going to get asked back— or be allowed to play that night.” As the music community grows in Pittsburgh, Gaber sees a need for more and different venues — and he thinks the Winery helps fill that need. “Our intention wasn’t initially to become a major music venue or anything like that,” he says. “I think we’re just filling a small niche that needed to be filled, and we just do it because we love it.”

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

MARK MANGINI LOSS (PENCIL GHOST)

A new 7-inch from the local visual and sound artist. The only downside to this record is that as soon as you get into Mangini’s ambient psych zone during the first track, it ends and you have to flip the record to get to the B-side. Track one (“Another, Again”) starts with a nonverbal vocalization repeating like a mantra; track two (“Chemicals”) utilizes repetitive guitar strumming and panning techniques to create a moving (and eventually swelling) drone — listen on headphones and you might start moving your head to the rhythm without realizing it. Cool stuff as always from Mangini.

INSTEAD OF SLEEPING YOUNG LUNGS (SELF-RELEASED)

New fulllength from the polished and talented local indie-rock quartet. On this Marc McClusky-produced record, the band travels further in the direction of sonic experimentation — in some spots showcasing interesting vocal arrangements, and in others, using some funky synth sounds. If there’s a fault here, it’s that perhaps the record is too precise: Largely mid-paced and squeaky clean in terms of production (even in those moments when it’s intentionally muddy), it can feel at times like it lacks that spark that would set it apart from the crowd. But fans of indie giants like Minus the Bear should take note of this band; there’s a lot of good stuff happening on this record.

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

IF THE SYNTH FITZ {BY JULIA COOK} LONG BEFORE he joined Fitz and the Tantrums, keyboardist Jeremy Ruzumna found himself in front of a college music class, with no idea what to say. A producer at the time, Ruzumna couldn’t even read music, but his visit went surprisingly well. “When you talk to people who are younger, and just coming up, you realize you know more than you think you do,” he says. “There’s always something you can teach people.” That knowledge — along with “a pretty formidable collection of vintage synthesizers”— has helped take Fitz and the Tantrums from buzz to critical acclaim. (Ellen Degeneres dancing to their song “The Walker” in an Oscar commercial didn’t hurt, either.) The band is festival-hopping and headlining tours, impressing funk purists and preteens alike. Last year was undoubtedly the musicians’ best thus far, all because they decided to switch gears. “On the first album, it was all about Fitz’s massive old organ and his old, out-oftune piano,” Ruzumna explains, referring to frontman Michael Fitzpatrick. “On this new record, we wanted to take our sound somewhere different. We wanted to do what sounded good to us, and hopefully other people would be into it. I was able to take the songs home at night and just lace them with tons of different weird and obscure keyboards. We used everything on this album, from old vintage synthesizers to modern laptop synthesizers. Just mixed them all together to taste.”

How many synthesizers, exactly? Over 30. More Than Just a Dream takes the edge off the neo-soul sound of the band’s debut, Pickin’ Up the Pieces. What’s left is a triumph of pop — with all the artistry of the earlier efforts and hooks that are infinitely danceable. The band also broke its own ban on guitars — saxophonist James King learned to play for “Spark.” Far from dumbing down the sound, Fitz and the Tantrums have made good music popular.

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS

WITH MAX FROST, HOLYCHILD 6:30 p.m. Sat., July 5. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $15. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

“There’s a song, ‘Merry Go Round,’ which I think ties it all together,” Ruzumna says. “It’s about the drudgery — the merry-go-round aspect — of being on the road all the time. Being on the road all the time does put a strain on your relationships: People in the band are married, people in the band have kids, girlfriends. To me, ‘Merry Go Round’ bridged the gap between the two albums, sonically and in terms of the subject matter. It’s about being on the road all the time and it’s about relationships. Fitz and [singer Noelle Scaggs] have to take on the lyrics, because they have to sing them, and that’s where they were at when this record was being written.” The live show is a must-see, Ruzumna says, because of those two singers. “Fitz and Noelle work really hard every show to connect with everyone in the audience,” he says. “I think that’s one of our secret weapons, too. There’s a true sincerity there.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


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CRITICS’ PICKS A 30 year collaboration between Jerome Augustyniak, Steven Gustafson and Dennis Drew joined by guitarist Jeffery Erickson and vocalist Mary Ramsey for an incredible live show! Hits include: More Than This, These Are Days, Hey Jack Kerouac, Don’t Talk, What’s the Matter Here, and Candy Everybody Wants.

FRIDAY• JULY 11• 8PM

Yonder Mountain String Band

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY BLAKESBERG}

Orchestra seating only, $40

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

ow Folls! U

PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

YOUR CITY… YOUR STYLE!

PITTSBURGHSTEELROCKS.COM LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: Workbenches, Design and Construction Regis Will, a member of Western Pennsylvania Woodworkers Association and historic preservation enthusiast, will give a hands-on presentation on the design and construction of a workbench. A workbench is a necessary tool for anyone involved in Do-It-Yourself projects. Come learn how to construct one and help us as we build a work bench for the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center.

SATURDAY, JULY 12 • 10:00 AM—11:30 AM All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

412-471-5808

[NOISE ROCK] + THU., JULY 03

[BLUEGRASS] + WED., JULY 09

Swans’ appearance in Pittsburgh last summer was a bit polarizing — the band spent more than two hours constructing a punishing mountain of sound, as if subjecting the audience to an endurance test and daring it to fail. But any waves of fatigue were worth it, because the best moments were transcendent. That time around, they were playing the songs which would become this year’s acclaimed release, To Be Kind: See them with Xiu Xiu, Thursday at the Rex Theater, for what will likely be another glimpse of things to come. Margaret Welsh 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20-25. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

The music of Yonder Mountain String Band lends itself to the outdoors. The band is best described as a bluegrass jam band, with banjos, mandolins and guitars plucked and strummed almost endlessly. It’s hard to believe that they came up through the bar and club scene; after 10 albums, the band, which formed in Boulder, Colo., in 1998, has cemented itself as a favorite of the festival circuit, playing Bonnaroo, Austin City Limits and Telluride Bluegrass Festival, among others. The band plays Stage AE tonight with Railroad Earth. ZB 6:30 p.m. Braid 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25-30. All ages. 412-229-5438 or www.stageae.com

[POP-PUNK] + THU., JULY 03 After years of talking about it, the Monumentour has finally happened. Warped Tour alums and pop-punk heavweights Fall Out Boy and Paramore are co-headlining one of the biggest tours of the summer for the 20-to-30 crowd. After neither band released an album for years, Fall Out Boy’s Save Rock and Roll and Paramore’s self-titled record came out in 2013 and put both acts back in the limelight (and in heavy rotation on rock radio). The bands play First Niagara Pavilion tonight with New Politics. Zach Brendza 7 p.m. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. $26-66. All ages. 724-947-7400

[EMO] + WED., JULY 09 There is an ongoing conversation about a new “emo revival”; up-and-coming bands seem to be taking after the sound created by standardbearers like American Football, Mineral and Braid. The last, an Illinois band of emo-forefathers, has stopped and started since its creation in the early ’90s, going through a cycle of disbanding and reuniting. But now after signing to Boston indie label Topshelf Records, the emo outfit is set to release its new album, No Coast, in July. Braid plays Altar Bar tonight with some more recent acts: Into It. Over It., Pity Sex and Signals Midwest. ZB 7:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $14-16. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com


Spend the evening discovering the science behind fireworks and beating the heat with IRXUçRRUVRIKDQGVRQH[KLELWV, +LJKPDUN6SRUWV:RUNV®, an 2PQLPD[PRYLH, and a ODVHU show! Rain or shine! Call 412.237.3400, then press 7, to register. Hurry! Space is limited.

2WKHUSODQVI RUWKHHYHQLQ J"  We’re

also open all day! 

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM + 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

ROCK/POP THU 03 31ST STREET PUB. The Living Deads, Parking Lot Whiskey, The Anti-Psychotics. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. The SemiSupervillains, Mutiny on the Mayflower, Bryan Vamp. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Fall Out Boy, Paramore. 724-947-7400. LAVA LOUNGE. The Electric Grandmother, Weird Paul Rock Band, Dumplings, Will Simmons & the Upholsterers. South Side. 412-431-5282. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Holy Ghost Tent Revival, Lone Wolf Club. Strip District. 412-566-1000. REX THEATER. Swans, Xiu Xiu. South Side. 412-381-6811. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Kansas Bible Company, The Howlin’ Brothers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 04 31ST STREET PUB. The Goddamn Gallows, Jayke Orvis & the Broken Band, Buzzard Wagon. Strip District. 412-391-8334. DORMONT PARK. Daniels & McClain. Dormont. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Setsuna, Townhouses, Diamondbreaker, Trash Bag, The Missing Pets. Bloomfield. 412-862-5670. STATION SQUARE. Joe Grushecky & Time Tested. Station Square. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Bessemers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Change Gang. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Fitz & the Tantrums, Max Frost, Holychild. North Side. 412-229-5483. TEDDY’S. King’s Ransom. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Walking Shapes, Bodhi Watts, King Fez. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Glasgow, pony diver, Butterbirds. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Cloud Becomes Your Hand, Ryan Power, In Arthur’s Court, Secret Paper Moon. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Circa Survive, Ume. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

SUN 06

ALPHABET CITY TENT. Joy Ike. North Side. 412-323-0278. CLUB CAFE. The Cordovas feat. Joe Firstman, Brandon Sensor, Douglas Lowell Blevins. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Wrecked Lexus, YOU, Pours. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. The James Hunter Six. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Barcelona. South Side. 412-431-4668.

AVALON PARK. The Panthers. Avalon. BELVEDERE’S. Blueprint, Count Bass D, Real Deal, Proseed, I The Conflict. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Say Anything, The Front Bottoms, The So So Glos, You Blew It! Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Pittsburgh Guitars Big Beatles Show #12! South Side. 412-381-6811. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. The Beagle Brothers, Broke, Stranded, & Ugly. Shadyside. 412-363-5845.

MON 07 CLUB CAFE. A Sunny Day In

TUE 08

WED 09 ALTAR BAR. Braid, Into It. Over It., Signals Midwest, Pity Sex. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Filthy Still, Sawyer Family,

MP 3 MONDAY HEATHER KROPF

SAT 05 BRILLOBOX. Moldies & Monsters, Will Simmons & the Upholsterers, Fantasy Crime, Hellwood Jr. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Aaron “The Uke Slinger” Jones, Great Ancient Trees, Broke Stranded & Ugly (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Clintones - Ultimate 90s Tribute. Station Square. 412-481-7625. LATITUDE 360. Elysium. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The EOE Reunion, Skratch, Cutthroat. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Dancing Queen. Greensburg. RIVERS CASINO. Broken Road. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Brothers Jenkins, Brent Kunash, Loose

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Conemaugh Trio. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PALACE THEATRE. Peter Frampton. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. STAGE AE. Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth. North Side. 412-229-5483.

DJS THU 03

SAT 05

TUE 08

ARSENAL PARK. Shot O’ Soul. Lawrenceville. TWIN LAKES PARK. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. Latrobe.

KATZ PLAZA. Erik Lawrence. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

BELVEDERE’S. Neon Soul. Fox Chapel. w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s paper pghcitym 412-963-0640. Night. Lawrenceville. .co THE R BAR. The 412-687-2555. Midnite Horns. Dormont. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. 412-942-0882. Pandemic Pete & DJ Juan Diego. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. ALLEGHENY ELKS J. Rocc, Edgar Um, Boo Lean, LODGE #339. The Jazz Gusto, Naeem, more. Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. Lawrenceville. 412- 904-2279. 412-321-1834. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. South Side. 412-431-2825. Downtown. 412-773-8884. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ CJ’S. Roger Humphries & Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. Waterfront. 412-476-8844. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. 412-773-8884. Downtown. 412-465-0290. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Burkett & Virgil Walters. New South Side. 412-431-2825. Kensington. 724-337-7008. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. LEMONT. Dave Crisci, Judi Figel. 412-481-7227. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

TUE 08

FRI 04

JAZZ

THU 03

SAT 05

FRI 04

LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

SAT 05

HEINZ HALL. Maxwell. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RIVERVIEW PARK. Thomas Wendt. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493.

BLUES

SUN 06

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 08

THU 03

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 06 FULL LIST E BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Shot O ONwLwIN w.

WED 09

Each week we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Heather Kropf; stream or download “Ghost in My House” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. Sweaty Betty. 724-547-6500.

BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District. MOONDOG’S. Shot O’ Soul. Open jam. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 04 GRANDVIEW GOLF CLUB. Kenny Blake w/ the Witchdoctors. Braddock.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. RML Jazz RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

MON 07 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 09 ANDYS. James McClelland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Jazz Workshop Ensemble. Homewood. 412-731-3080.

ACOUSTIC THU 03 THE BEER MARKET. Gina Rendina Duo. North Side. 412-322-2337. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

SAT 05 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 09 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 04 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY SAT 05 MEADOWS CASINO. Oak Ridge Boys. Washington. 724-503-1200. SEVEN SPRINGS. The Joseph Sisters. 814-352-7777.

CLASSICAL SAT 05 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. South Park Amphitheater, South Park. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. St. Clair Park, Greensburg.

OTHER MUSIC WED 09 SCHENLEY PARK. L’Lamint Dance Band. Flagstaff Hill. Oakland. 412-255-2539.


#CrawlPGH

La Cour des Miracles (The Court of Miracles) Bill Vorn and Louis-Philippe Demers interactive robots act as ‘fake’ humans displaying symptoms of “abnormal” psychological behaviors.

2. SPACE 812 Liberty Avenue

Cataloguing Pattern Guest curator: Kristen Letts Kovak Participating artists: Salinda Deery, Aaron Henderson, Todd Keyser, Kristen Letts Kovak, Maria Mangano, Natalie Settles, Brooke Sturtevant-Sealover, Rebecca Zilinski. While patterns adorn our homes, our belongings and ourselves, they are more than ornamentation. Music by DJ Edgar Um

212 Ninth Street

Coloring Pittsburgh Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Youth and Arts Program.

9. 820 Liberty Avenue Handmade Arcade Hands-on crafting using recycled materials.

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AVEN

Fourth Floor

Mars Is Underwater | Ricardo Iamuuri Performances at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30pm. African Beats and World Cup History | Cameroon Football Development Program

6. Harris Theater 809 Liberty Avenue

Pittsburgh Filmmakers: short films on a loop. 5:30 to 9pm. Tiny Harris Gallery

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18. Future Tenant

30. Olive or Twist

819 Penn Avenue

140 Sixth Street

Niche Inheritance | Dakotah Konicek

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Show

Performance by Triptych Piano Trio

31. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

19. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

fünf: Celebrating Five Years of Art on the Walls

20. Bend Yoga

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

32. Renaissance Hotel

Free yoga classes: 6 to 6:30 pm and 7 to 7:30 pm. Pre-register: info@bendyoga.com

107 Sixth Street

Live Music by Aqui Tango, 6 to 8pm.

Live Music by Brad Yoder, 6 to 8pm.

21. Summer Night Market *Open until 11pm

33. Braddock’s

11. THERE Ultra Lounge

Presented by Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership

10. Amazing Books *Open until 8:45pm 929 Liberty Avenue

931 Liberty Avenue

New Hazlett Theater CSA Performance Series Preview 3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery:

Batik works by Saihou Nije

13. Tonic 971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Sculptures, Paintings, and Pottery by Jess Bala. Handmade jewelry by Valerie Pollak. Live music by The Willful Souls.

14. Neighborhood Legal Services Association

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

709 Penn Avenue

707 Penn Avenue

Some Begins | Meg Shevenock and Jamie Boyle

25. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Exposed Steel | Dave Dicello Live music by Reggie Watkins, 5:30 to 7:30pm

26. PNC Legacy Project

15. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

539 Liberty Avenue

27. Dream Cream Ice Cream

*Open until 9pm

Showcasing seasonal Dreamer, The Prez Show.

914 Penn Avenue

28. Boutique 208

At the Museum | Tom Mosser

811 Liberty Avenue

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

CONSOL Energy Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh 7pm VIP, 9pm General, Tickets: $25-$125 Show your Crawl map for a $5 discount at the door August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Avenue

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Karaoke Throwdown 10:15pm, 18+, $5 Admission, BYOB

The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating Black History Month.

7. Arcade Comedy Theater

crawl after dark

Live Music by The Pressure, 6:30 to 10pm Carnegie Library Button-making and Books WYEP Music Station

600 Liberty Avenue

909 Penn Avenue

Deconstructed dishes to completed plate.

7th St. and Penn Avenue

Let’s Make Amends! An examination of Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

16. Lando Lofts

107 Sixth Street

Music, open bar, comedy, art, activities, noshes and more! Visit TrustArts.org/cosmo for details. Sponsors: UPMC, UPMC Health Plan, First Commonwealth

24. Katz Plaza

928 Penn Avenue

Middle School Art Show

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808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

Pittsburgh Filmmakers Photography Alumni group show.

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Bombyx Collective presents POLYMORPHIA Performances at 8:30 and 9:30pm.

23. 707 Penn Gallery

American Society of Media Photographers

HA

142 Sixth Street, Third floor

The Takeaway: Made With Love Guest curator: Robert Raczka

Third Floor

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The newest gallery in the Cultural District. The debut exhibition will be a set of paintings by Justus Cox.

2nd floor:

Belly Dance Show Performances at 7, 8, and 9pm.

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29. Verve Wellness

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

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901 Penn Avenue

3. Tito Way

5. Trust Arts Education Center

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17. Cox Contemporary

Portraits of Air | Susan Goethel Campbell

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4. Shaw Galleries

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Amalgamations | Donnie Toomer

Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

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601 Wood Street

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

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1. Wood Street Galleries

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CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

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Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

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Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

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All information and locations are subject to change.

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208 Sixth Street

Meet Your Makers Meet several of our artists in person. Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

Fateful Findings 9:15pm, $5 Admission Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Avenue

Fateful Findings is a paranormal camp thriller where a hacker with mystical powers exposes worldwide secrets. Live Music by Spanky Wilson 8pm-12am, No Cover Jazz at Andy’s, Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Live Music by Andre Costello and the Cool Miners 10pm, No Cover SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

Salsa Fridays Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

10pm Free Lesson, 10:30pm-1:30am Dancing with DJ Jeff Shirey No Cover, Cash Bar


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

July 2 - 8 WEDNESDAY 28 Bret Michaels: Live in Concert

BIG BUTLER FAIRGROUNDS Prospect. For ticket info visit bigbutlerfair.com. 8p.m.

John Hiatt & The Combo and The Robert Cray Band CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412462-3444. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Quincy Mumford & The Reason Why THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Bear Hands Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412687-2157. All ages show. With special guests Junior Prom and Total Slacker. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY TIX. 7p.m.

MONDAY 73

THURSDAY 39

Horse Thief

Monumentour: Fall Out Boy & Paramore

SMILING MOOSE 412-4314668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. 7p.m.

Paul McCartney CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival

Circa Survive / Ume

TWIN LAKES PARK Greensburg. Free event. For more info visit artsandheritage.com or call 724-834-7474. Through July 6.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

Fall Out Boy

TUESDAY 84

THURSDAY, JULY 3 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION

FRIDAY 40

The James Hunter Six

Big Butler Fair

BIG BUTLER FAIRGROUNDS Prospect. For ticket info visit bigbutlerfair.com. Through July 5th.

Joe Grushecky / Time Tested STATION SQUARE. Free event.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

All ages show. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

Square. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 10:30p.m.

SATURDAY 51

Fitz & The Tantrums

The Clintones

HARD ROCK CAFE Station

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

at 6:30p.m.

Andy Picarro CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. With special guests John Dick Winters & more. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 10:30p.m.

Evita BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through July 13.

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COVER BAND

“WE’RE GOING TO HAVE TO GO OUT AND CULTIVATE OUR AUDIENCE.”

{BY AL HOFF} In 2006, John Carney had a surprise hit with Once, a low-budget, Irish, sort-of musical dramedy starring non-professional actors; it nabbed an Oscar for Best Song, and later, became a stage play. In his new film — generically titled Begin Again — Carney asks: What if I made a film something like Once, but with famous people? Lightning rarely strikes twice, and Begin Again definitely lacks the ragged bittersweet charm that won Once fans. Begin is not a bad movie, but the effort to appear effortless shows, and it takes a lot of suspended disbelief to process these well-known actors as struggling music-industry denizens.

NEXT STEPS

I write the songs: Keira Knightley

Take, for example, Keira Knightley as a tentative singer-songwriter, whom washed-up music exec Mark Ruffalo sees potential in. Knightley’s ex-boyfriend Adam Levine has become a big star, and left her behind in New York City to pen wispy heartbreak songs. So Knightley and Ruffalo put a band of misfits together and then, quite magically, record an LP live on the streets of Manhattan. (Adorable!) Financial and emotional support arrives from CeeLo Green, Mos Def and Catherine Keener. It’s an enjoyable enough fantasia of being a musician and finding personal, if not financial, success, and there are plenty of indie-pop songs to keep things bouncing along. You could do worse this summer at the cineplex, but don’t be surprised if this tune has left your head by the time you get home. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SNOWPIERCER In 2031, only a few people are left alive, traveling the globe in a train. Tensions break out around class and power, in this new futuristic thriller from Bong Joon-ho (The Host). AMC Loews and SouthSide Works

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{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

G

AB CODY AND Sam Turich say it took

a Lawrencevillage to make their debut feature film, Progression. Now, they plan to distribute the film using a novel, hands-on model as well. “The do-it-yourself nature of the film goes from beginning to end,” says Cody. As traditional indie distribution models break down, she says, the big question is whether there’s “space for films that have independent voices rather than [being] driven solely by commercial interests.” The local theater veterans, among other on- and off-stage credits, were both on the creative team for Bricolage Productions’ immersive hit STRATA. They shot Progression mostly in August 2012. The microbudget ensemble comedy is the Lawrenceville residents’ screwball, slightly bawdy take on their neighborhood’s progressive dinner, which since 1984 has sent neighbors on a four-course trek to different houses, where they dine with new partners in each spot. The film’s plot includes infidelity, breakups, attempts at pregnant sex and awkward encounters

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

Dishing it out: (from left) Mark Staley, Jason McCune and Nayli Russo in Progression

between new and old Lawrencevillians. The husband-and-wife writing-anddirecting team honored their artistic vision — even if that meant orchestrating a first feature with 43 actors and more than a dozen shooting locations. And while most indie films — with marketing in mind — pursue name actors, Progression was “cast almost entirely from our group of friends who we really love in the Pittsburgh theater scene,” Cody says.

PROGRESSION

premiere 8 p.m. Thu., July 10 (7 p.m. reception). Regent Square Theater, 1035 Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $10 ($25 includes reception). 412-682-4111 or www.pittsburgharts.org/progression

Progression is a local-stage who’s-who, from Cody and Turich themselves to James FitzGerald, Gregory Lehane, Jason McCune, Theo Allyn and Mary Rawson, with relative newcomers Alex Valberg and Hayley Nielsen as the film’s cute, young would-be couple. Tony Bingham, Jeffrey Carpenter

and Patrick Jordan play a raucous trio of rowhouse uncles, and local country singer Molly Alphabet recurs as a street performer whose tunes — mostly Chet Vincent’s “Let’s Make Love With the Lights On” — wryly punctuate the action. Progression looks great, too. The crew, including director of photography Mark Knobil, drew on the team from Cody and Turich’s 2009 zombie spoof “Mombies,” a short that screened at festivals nationally and overseas. Progression’s shoestring budget — Cody and Turich decline to name a figure — was assembled from grants (from the Heinz Endowments Small Arts Initiative, among others), Kickstarter and Indiegogo campaigns and, aptly, a progressive-dinner fundraiser. But Cody and Turich say they also received loads of neighborly in-kind support, including food from restaurants and donated shooting locations in people’s homes. On one outdoor shoot, a stranger even let them run an extension cord to his outlet. “It was a community enterprise,” says Cody. “We absolutely could not have done


it without everybody in the neighborhood pulling together.” After months of post-production, the film gets its Pittsburgh premiere July 10, at the Regent Square Theater. The night before that, it’ll screen at New York City’s legendary Anthology Film Archives as part of the NewFilmmakers Series — a status that series producer Barney Oldfield says is granted to only about 30 percent of its hundreds of applicants. The next challenge is attracting a wider audience for Progression’s brand of sophisticated screwball, set in a quirky world foreign to the Ikea sensibilities of mainstream storytelling. For decades, small-budget indie films found audiences at festivals and — via distribution companies — homes at arthouses. But as the ranks of arthouses have shrunk, most of today’s festivals are more marketplaces than showcases, and even DVD sales are tanking.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW DELIVER US FROM EVIL. A police officer finds his skills challenged by a series of demonic possessions gripping some of New York City’s citizens. Eric Bana stars in Scott Derrickson’s horror film. EARTH TO ECHO. For three 13-year-old boys, it’s their last night together as pals before their suburban street is demolished for a freeway. They grow intrigued by some unknown force jamming their cell phones, and surmising the weird signals might be a map, they head out into the Nevada desert to investigate. There, they find a metal canister that appears to contain an alien — a friendly visitor who also needs some help getting back to its home planet. Dave Green’s comedy adventure indeed borrows some of E.T.’s story, and is reminiscent of other 1980s kids-on-a-quest films. (It also employs the more recent gimmick of using “found footage.”) But today’s kids likely haven’t seen those old movies, so this lowkey family film should seem fresh to them. I liked that the kids were kinda nerdy, and into creating their own adventures and doing problem-solving.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROWAN BROOKS}

Writer-directors Sam Turich and Gab Cody

Anyone can stream online, of course. But how to stand out amidst thousands of films? “We’re going to have to go out and cultivate our audience,” says Cody. “People are hungry for an experience that is more personalized,” says Turich. “We’re interested in trying to involve the audience as participants in the event.” For now, that means not theatrical bookings, or even exclusively festival submissions. Instead, they’re seeking partners in other towns for intimate screenings — perhaps “dinner and a movie” nights tied to other progressive dinners. The idea is to build word-of-mouth to drive online viewing. Turich and Cody spoke to CP by phone from San Francisco in late June. While they’d headed west partly to scout possible DIY screenings, Cody says they’re also “very interested in partnering with like-minded distributors. That means distributors who believe in serving up hand-crafted fare that caters to an adventurous audience.” An audience, perhaps, not unlike one that would crave a progressive dinner.

For my tastes, the alien looked too much like a cute, big-eyed steampunk owl — could there be another Portland in another galaxy? But I guess there’s as much chance of other life forms looking like a keychain fob as like a green tentacled blob. (Al Hoff) A HARD DAY’S NIGHT. Those boots, those suits! The Beatles romp and smirk and sing their way through Richard Lester’s exuberant 1964 film. The slimmest of backstage plots simply provides a hook from which to dangle sight gags, visual riffs, four adorable leads and a dozen hit songs. Lester and his off-beat style catch Beatlemania lightning in a bottle: In this first heat of their incredible media celebrity, the lads — and indeed the whole generation they’ll come to represent — just sparkle with youth, enthusiasm and plenty of infectious, mildly anarchic fun. The film has been restored for its 50th anniversary. Starts Fri., July 4. Regent Square (AH)

CP

TAMMY. A scorned woman (Melissa McCarthy) goes on a road trip with her hardboiled grandma (Susan Sarandon). Ben Falcone directs this comedy. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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The Art of Life at Film Kitchen

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Last Vegas, Wed., July 2 (Schenley) and Sat., July 5 (Riverview). Space Jam, Thu., July 3 (Brookline); Sat., July 5 (Grandview) ; and Sun., July 6 (Schenley). Despicable Me 2, Tue., July 8 (West End/Elliott) and Thu., July 10 (Brookline). Thor: The Dark World, Wed., July 9 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Do the Right Thing (1989), Wed., July 2. Shaft (1971), Wed., July 2 and Thu., July 3. Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard’s sci-fi-ish 1965 drama), Wed., July 2 and Thu., July 3. The Big Lebowski (1998), Thu., July 3. The Shining (1980), Thu., July 3. Across 110th Street (NYC cops vs. gangs in this 1972 blaxploitation feature), Fri., July 4, through Mon., July 7; also Wed., July 9. Goodfellas (1990), Fri., July 4, through Tue., July 8. Barbarella (1968, Jane Fonda in space), Fri., July 4, Sat., July 5, Wed., July 9, and Thu., July 10. Psycho (1960), midnight, Fri., July 5; also Sat., July 6, through Tue., July 8. Amélie (2001, with Audrey Tatou), Sat., July 5 and Sun., July 6; also Tue., July 8, through Thu., July 10. Call or see website for times. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. JAWS. Steven Spielberg’s aqua-thriller terrified beachgoers in the summer of 1975, when it unspooled the tale of a great white shark eating swimmers along the Atlantic seaboard. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 2 (AMC Loews); also 10 p.m. Fri., July 4, and 10 p.m. Sat., July 5 (Oaks) JURASSIC PARK. See how those big lizards hold up in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 actioner, and ponder anew the perils of messing around with science. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 3; 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 4; 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., July 5; and 4 p.m. Sun., July 6. Hollywood LA BARE. This new documentary from Mount Lebanon native Joe Manganiello looks at life onstage and off for the men of La Bare, a popular male strip club in Dallas. Manganiello is no stranger to the thong, having played a stripper in Magic Mike. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 2; 10 p.m. Fri., July 4; 9:30 p.m. Sat., July 5; and 7 p.m. Sun., July 6. Hollywood LOGAN’S RUN. Michael York and Farrah Fawcett star in Michael Anderson’s 1976 sci-fi film about a wondrous future (in the year 2274) where life in full of leisure. That is, until you turn 30 and are eliminated. Kicks off a month-long, Sunday-night series of Filmmakers’ staff picks. 8 p.m. Sun., July 6. Regent Square FILM KITCHEN. For years, Kyle Holbrook has created art with local youths through his MLK Community Mural Project. On July 8, Holbrook visits this monthly series with his own debut feature film, The Art of

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Life. Kristoffer Smith and Joy Taylor play young people who struggle to realize their artistic dreams in a harsh world. “They’re all in need of inspiration,” says Holbrook, who himself plays a guardian-angel character named Art. Working from Nicholas Atkins’ script, Holbrook directs scenes in locations including the Allegheny County Jail (with actual inmates) and employs expressionistic visual effects. The film (www. artoflifethemovie.com) screened at last year’s Three Rivers Arts Festival. Film Kitchen curator Matthew Day will show its first 20 minutes, then complete the evening’s program, after which the rest of Art of Life will screen. Also on the hour-long program: Madelyn Roehrig presents the entertaining third installment in her documentary series Figments, about people visiting Andy Warhol’s grave; visitors include paranormal researchers, and there’s a birthday party, with bagpipes. Film Kitchen also screens Marc Czornij’s naturalistic drama “Invisibility & Flight” and Rachel Brickner’s “The Necklace.” 8 p.m. Tue., July 8 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. $6. (Bill O’Driscoll) BATMAN. Tim Burton’s 1989 adaptation of the popular comic finds Bruce Wayne, a.k.a. Batman (Michael Keaton), brooding, and battling The Joker (Jack Nicholson) for control of Gotham. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 9. AMC Loews. $5 STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE. The first big-screen adaptation of the TV series reunites the original cast members, as the Enterprise fights a giant alien cloud on a path to destroy Earth. Robert Wise directs this 1979 actioner. Come in costume and get $2 off ticket price. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 9; 10 p.m. Fri., July 11; 10 p.m. Sat., July 12; and 1 and 4 p.m. Sun., July 13. Hollywood FEAR AND DESIRE. This 1953 drama, about four soliders trapped behind enemy lines during a war between two unidentified countries, marked the start of Stanley Kubrick’s career as a film director. It also marks the start of the Hollywood’s year-long series of Kubrick films, with one film to be featured monthly, in chronological order. 7 p.m. Thu., July 10, and 7 p.m. Sun., July 13. Hollywood 2-MINUTE FILM FESTIVAL. See the finalists in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s annual super-short-film contest. This year’s theme was “outer space.” 7:30 p.m. for reception and other films; shorts screen at 9:15 p.m. Thu., July 10. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. www.2mff.cmoa.org . $10 PROGRESSION. Gab Cody and Sam Turich’s locally produced new ensemble comedy was shot entirely in Lawrenceville, and relates the various travails that occur over several courses of a progressive dinner. 8 p.m. Thu., July 10. Regent Square. Tickets at www.showclix.com.


[TOUR]

“I OFTEN WRITE ABOUT WHAT I FEAR THE MOST.”

ON LOCATION Judging from the attendees for Lights, Camera, Pittsburgh!, the far-reaching appeal of movies is obvious. The crossgenerational crowd for this bus tour of local film locations includes hip, young film-buffs, begrudging tweens and nostalgic older folks alike. But when asked what their favorite movie filmed in Pittsburgh is, even non-natives immediately have an opinion — except for maybe those torn between Flashdance and Striking Distance. The two-and-a-half-hour tours from Pittsburgh Tours & More and the Pittsburgh Film Office began May 31. “I don’t know why I was thinking it would be skewed more to the hipster crowd, which we do get,” says Sherris Moreira, director of Pittsburgh Tours & More (a division of the Pittsburgh Transportation Group, whose other ventures include Yellow Cab). “But we’ve been actually been getting way more women in their 50s or 60s, calling and getting their girlfriends together, which is awesome.” The tour of more than 30 film and TV locations — from The Silence of the Lambs to The Perks of Being a Wallflower — encourages its diverse audience to share. When visiting Heinz Field to mark The Dark Knight Rises, for instance, don’t be surprised if a tourmate chimes in about his experience as an extra, wearing a Gotham Rogues scarf in the dog days of summer and watching the Steelers’ home get detonated. Arrival at each filming location is preceded by a film clip, shown on the 24-seat bus, and anecdotes from the tour guides. For example, a parking garage Downtown was chosen as Jack Reacher’s sniper post because of the elegant triangle it formed with the edge of PNC Park and the midpoint of the Fort Duquesne Bridge. Pittsburgh is “an attractive place for filmmakers. You can be city, you can be country, we’ve got so many different identities,” says Moreira. “Also, we who live here forget that there’s a lot of really friendly people here. It’s kind of our reputation that we’re willing to do a lot for each other.” The tours continue on selected Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 25. Each ticket includes a gift bag of coupons and snacks, a ride up the Duquesne Incline (whose upper platform serves as the tour’s starting point), and a special surprise for fans of George A. Romero. In Moreira’s words, “Nothing beats a zombie attacking your shuttle.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! Tours continue through Oct. 25. $40 (group discounts available). www.pghtoursandmore.net NEWS

Tourmate: aboard the Lights, Camera, Pittsburgh! bus {PHOTO BY DAN WILLIS}

{BY DAN WILLIS}

E R E H S I W O R R O M TO [BOOKS]

Thomas Sweterlitsch

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

I

N 2011, Stewart O’Nan got a fan letter from Thomas Sweterlitsch. O’Nan, an acclaimed novelist (Last Night at the Lobster), had just moved back to Pittsburgh; Sweterlitsch, an aspiring writer, was a customer-service rep at the Carnegie Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. But O’Nan agreed to critique a short story Sweterlitsch sent, a science-fiction work titled “The City That Lies Within.” O’Nan was impressed, but told Sweterlitsch, “It really wants to be a novel.” Sweterlitsch was thrilled but sat on the story. Soon after, at a reading O’Nan was giving at Chatham University, Sweterlitsch introduced himself and O’Nan responded, “How’s that novel coming?” Sweterlitsch says, “I thought, ‘His enthusiasm’s real. Maybe I should really write this novel now.’” Long story short about a short story that got longer: Thanks to O’Nan’s agent and further rewrites, Tomorrow and Tomorrow comes out July 10 on Putnam, part one of a two-book deal. Perhaps more amazingly, this debut novel sparked a movie-studio

bidding war. Sony Pictures bought the film rights to Tomorrow and Tomorrow — a “six-figure” payday, Sweterlitsch says, that let him quit his job of 12 years to focus on book No. 2.

TOMORROW AND TOMORROW BOOK LAUNCH with Thomas Sweterlitsch. 7-9 p.m. Thu., July 10. WYEP Community Center, 67 Bedford Square, South Side. Free. 412-381-9900

The 339-page Tomorrow and Tomorrow is set in 2058, 10 years after a terrorist’s bomb has incinerated Pittsburgh. The protagonist, John Dominic Blaxton, lost his pregnant wife in the blast and now lives near Washington, D.C. But he’s addicted to reliving his Pittsburgh days via the Archive, an online virtual-reality document of the city. Depressed and abusing drugs, he loses his job researching bomb deaths in Pitts-

burgh for an insurance company. Then he’s hired by a software magnate to investigate another mysterious case — an assignment that plumbs a really dark rabbit-hole. The novel’s Pittsburgh is a phantom, but Sweterlitsch’s 2048 ’Burgh is a good deal like today’s model, with shout-outs ranging from Phipps Conservatory and Butler Street coffeehouses to local circa-2013 indie bands. Another key premise is that in 2058, we’ll all be using Adware — a sort of 10th-generation Google Glass implanted in the scalp and retinas that definitively retires privacy. Dominic is literally wired into the Internet. He can instantly access information like people’s online profiles, but he’s a sitting duck for 3-D ads incessantly anticipating his desires. The novel (whose title quotes Macbeth) blends detective fiction and a dark futuristic vision. Asked what struck him about the book, O’Nan says, “That combination of both the addiction and the virtual assault upon [Dominic] reminded me weirdly enough of both Raymond Chandler CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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TOMORROW IS HERE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

THE TRUTH IS SHE NEVER LEFT YOU.

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At the Benedum Center

and William Burroughs.” “I often write about what I fear the most,” says Sweterlitsch. The author lives in Greenfield with his wife, the painter Sonja Sweterlitsch, and their young daughter. He says Tomorrow and Tomorrow grew from his concern over “the distraction the Internet created, the Internet plus cable TV. Just how it filled my mind with images I didn’t necessarily want to fill my mind with.” Chandler was in there, too: Sweterlitsch started reading the hard-boiled master based on recommendations from readers he served at the Library for the Blind, a storehouse of audio books. The Canton, Ohio, native’s interest in science fiction dates to the days after he graduated from Carnegie Mellon University. “It wasn’t until my mid-20s that I read Philip K. Dick for the first time, and I kinda realized that was the door I wanted to go through,” he says. “He sort of led me into the wider realm of science fiction as literature.” O’Nan’s literary agent, the Gernert Company, actually rejected Sweterlitsch’s first draft, but recommended changes that included moving to page one a murder scene originally set much later. “They saw

if you put that murder scene at the front it becomes a thriller, instead of just a moody kind of thing,” says Sweterlitsch. After his rewrite, the manuscript sold quickly; while several publishers were interested, Sweterlitsch chose Putnam “because that’s where William Gibson publishes!” he says. “I didn’t know what I was doing. But William Gibson is a hero of mine.” Gernert — whose clients include John Grisham — routinely markets books for film. Sweterlitsch says he was “shocked” by the bidding war. “That doesn’t mean they’re actually going to make the movie,” he adds, laughing. Pre-publication, the book itself is off to a running start, with positive notices from Kirkus Review and Booklist. And Playboy magazine just named it Book of the Month. Kirkus described Tomorrow and Tomorrow as “vividly and beautifully written but extraordinarily bleak.” Sweterlitsch acknowledges the book’s grimness, even though the mood hardly seems to apply to the daily life of a newly successful novelist. “I have a lot of dark, brooding thoughts, like most people do,” he says. “I just harness them for the fiction.” D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CRIME SCENE

An excerpt from Tomorrow and Tomorrow, by Thomas Sweterlitsch Gazing out the window at a heavily armed cop talking to a boy with eyebrow studs and lip piercings. … What’s going on? The boy’s profile lights long enough for me to scroll his Twitter feed, @MimiStarchild — Body in the bathroom, it says. Joanna, it says. Found her, it says. A twitpic of the mess: the victim stripped, the remnants of her dress binding her ankles. Blonde, but her face is ruined. She’d been bent over the toilet, hands tied to the pipes, breasts down in the water. “Jesus Christ,” I say, and close out Twitter, but the Washington Post feed’s already picked up the story, knocking Chance in Hell from the top DC trends: Joanna Kriz, a student at George Mason, found dead in Fur. Pics of her flood the streams, discovered by tabloid Facecrawlers that hacked private accounts. A gorgeous girl — a student of architecture. Jesus Christ. The Post feed displays 3-D renderings of her school assignments, buildings she’d designed, architectural models. Pictures flash of her high school graduation and with her family at Thanksgiving, but I’m watching her life unspool, and now I’m watching sexts she’d sent to boyfriends, found by the Facecrawlers, nude selfies posing in front of mirrors, drunk tongue-kissing a girlfriend while a crowd cheers her — within minutes the feeds are only interested in Joanna Kriz if she’s fucking or mutilated, they’ve reduced her to the essence of what the viewing public will click on and trend. I ring the bell and leave the bus, the feeds saturated with Joanna Kriz. … Within minutes the murdered girl’s family signs with Crime Scene Superstar, grieving but ready for their opportunity to share their daughter’s beauty with the world and collect royalties. #Kriz trends in the feeds, critiques of the dead woman’s body — face too horsey but nice tits — rating her fuckability based on the crime-scene photographs. I reach my apartment, out of the range of the public Wi-Fi. Everything in my apartment is silence and the only thing I can do to fill it is cry.

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[ART REVIEW]

MALLEABLE

EXCHANGES

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CFEVA EXCHANGE EXHIBITION continues through July 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org NEWS

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A view from inside Bunker Projects

{BY WEENTA GIRMAY}

“My Black Hole,� by Jenny Thwing

The natural landscape has inspired artists for centuries, but the industrial landscape has provided equally compelling subject matter. Influenced by the built environment, artists depict both the new and the decrepit with a mixture of awe and critical judgment. The rich history and forlorn decay of the Rust Belt provides fodder for Jake Beckman. He grew up in the Cleveland area, and the vestiges of industry clearly made an impression. His work is made with wood beams, coal, sand, plaster and flooring — the raw ingredients of buildings — as a study of constructed spaces and environmental resources. Titled Small Pieces Tied to Something Bigger, the seven works shown together in one gallery convey a sense of bemused melancholy. Beckman’s work occupies one of three second-floor rooms at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Each room contains the work of one artist as part of an exchange with Philadelphia’s Center for Emerging Visual Artists. While each show stands alone, Beckman’s creates a sort of ballast for them. Beckman is interested in the processes of extraction, construction and decay, but he’s also clearly fascinated with the malleability of organic forms. In his hands, what appears to be solid becomes fleshy and imperfect. In “Sag II,� the middle section of the gallery wall droops like a skin-fold; on the opposite wall, a wooden beam rests on the floor while its opposite end sinks into the wall. By suggesting impermanence, Beckman reminds us that we are all intimately connected to a larger ecology. The same fantastical, cartoony and visceral sensibility is apparent in BETWIXT and BETWEEN — Liminal Objects, by Jeanne Jaffe. Like Beckman, Jaffe mixes sculptural objects and prints to explore tangibility. A limbless torso dangles amidst teardrop shapes; bulbous, vaguely organic pods sprout hair and fleshy protrusions. On a small screen, a short animation appears to abbreviate the birth process from its cellular level through a surreal journey traversing the four classical elements of earth, water, fire and air. A similar corporeal malleability informs Jennie Thwing’s short video My Black Hole. Just as Beckman and Jaffe grapple with the contradictions inherent in human experience, Thwing explores the machinations of the creative process by recreating her dreams and personal mythologies in her studio. Ultimately, each artist uses the body and/or its surrogates to explore the contradictions inherent in human endeavors.

CR AWL AFTER DARK

[ART]

PITTSBURGH CULTUR AL TRUST PARTNERS’ BOARD PRESENTS:

Two winters ago, a lone white door on Penn Avenue’s art corridor opened into an installation with no heat, its electricity from a generator. Today, the door is painted to suggest brick, mortar and beams breaking through a logo announcing Bunker Projects, an experimental gallery and artist residency. “What I imagined happening here was hosting shows that a more traditional gallery wouldn’t do. Stuff that’s more performance-based, or installations where the pieces can’t be commodified or bought and sold,� says Cecilia Ebitz, one of the residency’s three founders. Ebitz and co-founders Jessie Rommelt and Abagail Beddall graduated from Penn State’s undergraduate sculpture program in 2011. They moved to Pittsburgh’s East End and searched for a space they could turn into a communal studio for young artists. The Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. offered to house Bunker in the two stories above music-and-art venue The Roboto Project, which had suffered serious fire and water damage. A year-long, rent-free renovation began in 2012. “It’s a beautiful space now. It glitters,� says Rommelt. In this all-in-one studio, gallery and intentional living space at 5106 Penn Ave., two artists at a time create and show work. The three-month residencies began in April. Bunker’s “social practice� — art that catalyzes an event or experience involving its audience — required applicants to name three ways they’d interface with the local community. “Interfacing doesn’t necessarily mean in the way that you present the work, it could be the way that you let the community inspire or provide the content for the work,� says Ebitz. Artists have proposed projects that range from taking portraits of neighbors and collecting field recordings from the street, to presenting workshops and talks open to the community. During studio hours, artists will open their doors to passersby. Early residents’ work has focused on abstraction. Paintings from Lisa Jakab’s solo exhibition Crystalline Shadows utilized deep, vibrant hues to explore the concept of liminal spaces, nature and the playfulness of light. On Thu., July 3, at monthly gallery crawl Unblurred, Bunker features a retrospective of collaborative work from two non-residents, video artist Julie Mallis and painter D.S. Kinsel (who themselves help run another new art space across the street, BOOM Concepts). “I want the artists here to feel supported by people who already live in the neighborhood, and vice versa, by having art that’s less about the exchange of money and more about the exchange of ideas,� says Ebitz.

2014

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Cactus at 12 Peers Theater

[PLAY REVIEW]

BLOOD SHORTAGE {BY TED HOOVER}

summer concert series THURSDAY

JULY 10th

6:30PM 5:30PM

YOU CERTAINLY can’t fault Cactus for a dearth of ideas. 12 Peers Theater presents the world premiere of this play by Pittsburgh-based Philip Real, and to say that it’s chock full o’ plots is putting it mildly. We’re in a U.S.-Mexico border town where undocumented migrants slip into America. But aren’t they in for a surprise!

CACTUS

continues through July 13. 12 Peers at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-17. www.12peerstheater.org

The border is being guarded by a voluntary militia that is — get this — a vampire family that kills the Mexicans under order from a government henchman. The feds have developed some sort of sensor which can locate sleeping vampires, and if the family doesn’t do the work, they’re dead … er, dead again. A bolder nosferatu would stand up to the Man, but some dark secret in his past has robbed Daddy Vampire of his moxie, so kill they must. Meanwhile, there’s another vampire family with a “blocker” protecting them from the government baddies, and they spend their time rescuing the Mexicans. We learn, through some quite abstruse backstories, that these vampire families hate each other like garlic powder, and wouldn’t you know it but the son of the one falls in love with the daughter of the other. Will that love be killed by the families’ hate?

Now you might be thinking: “It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.” Except that she’d be fried to a crisp! So … from out of all that, pick what should be the main dramaturgical thrust of Cactus. You can’t, can you? I’m not really sure playwright Real has managed it, either. Everything in the play gets equal weight, and in trying to serve all the plots Real doesn’t quite manage to completely serve any of them. Just as we become absorbed in one strand, we’re jerked to another. The weakest links are the border shenanigans, which seem like a nuisance to be navigated by the characters. Surprisingly, the vampire angle feels uninteresting as well. Real goes out of his way to make his vampires as middle-class and middlebrow as possible, and is forced to invent some not-very-plausible reasons why they don’t use their vampiric powers to escape. Rather than menacing and powerful, they’re all morose and helpless: It’s like a 12-step meeting for the Undead. Real’s desire to write a play about vampires is negated by the constraints of playwriting mechanics. Director Kyle Bostian could infuse a greater sense of urgency and desperation into what is now a curiously bloodless enterprise. (Sorry.) Corwin Stoddard and Christine Starkey play the vampire Romeo and Juliet with lots of appropriate angst; teenagers in love are so annoying — even if they actually are in their 80s! And Tom Driscoll as a hotheaded vampire and a vile G-man brings much needed energy to the production. At its heart, I think Real means Cactus to be about a family at war with itself. He’s got some way to go to reach that destination. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FOR THE WEEK OF

07.0307.09.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

{COMEDY}

JULY 10 2-Minute ute t FFilm ill FFestival ilm es

{HOLIDAY} Just like it says in the Constitution, July 4 is all about free entertainment. And if you’re anywhere near the Point today, you’re covered. The EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta runs one more day, starting at noon, with its temporary beach, boat races, Anything That Floats contest and live music from the likes of No Bad JuJu (funk) and The Granati Brothers (rock). At 2 p.m., the Steelers kick off the Heinz Field Fourth of July Celebration, including free admission to the Steelers Experience exhibit and more live music. (The all-country lineup includes The Stickers and Jerrod Niemann.) And that’s about it — oh, except for the big, inevitable Zambelli Fireworks show at 9:30 p.m., which you can watch, also for free, from countless vantage points near and far. Bill O’Driscoll Regatta: www. threeriversregatta.net. Heinz Field: www.steelers.com

+ SAT., JULY 05 {ART} Anthony Purcell’s Chainsaw Show comprises a series of painstakingly detailed paintings of vintage chainsaws — rendered on hunks of wood

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rough-cut by power tools similar to the ones whose portraits they bear. The exhibit of new work is at The Gallery 4, where the locally based Purcell is a favorite for offerings 2011’s Wunderball and 2012’s The Sepia Show. The new show’s formal opening reception is actually on July 12, but you can see the art itself starting this afternoon. BO 1-8 p.m. 206 S. Highland Ave.,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREA VASZKO}

+ FRI., JULY 04

Pittsburgh Improv again opens its doors to local talent. The Pittsburgh All Star Comedy Showcase spotlights Terry Jones, Jeff Konkle and T-Robe. Headlining is Mike Wysocki (pictured), the WDVE regular who last fall made his national TV debut on The Arsenio Hall Show after winning the inaugural Jack Rollins Breakthrough Talent Competition, in Mexico. The weekend’s three showcase performances are hosted by Jerry Wilson. BO 7 and 9:30 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Sun., July 6. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead. $10 (21 and over). 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

{COMEDY} “I went down a YouTube wormhole,” says Kasey Daley, explaining how she conceived of The Orson Welles 1978 4th of July Spectacular. Tonight’s live show imagines the great filmmaker, late in life and having spent his earnings from

JULY 08 Susan Elia MacNeal


Free!Event {PHOTO COURTESY OF BOOM CONCEPTS}

Endless road construction be damned — up on Penn Avenue, they’re still opening new art galleries. The latest technically isn’t brand-new: BOOM Concepts has already hosted several events, including an art show, a fashion show and the Rhinestone Steel Queer vaudeville night. But this week is its official debut in the long-vacant storefront at 5139 Penn Ave., which houses Magic Organs (e.g., artists D.S. Kinsel, who’s pictured, and Julie Mallis) and online youth-lifestyle publication JENESIS Magazine. BOOM plans diverse programming, from exhibits to community classes on everything from business and technology to health and politics. On July 3 and 4, BOOM joins a bustling, if still partially blockaded, Unblurred for a special two-day holiday-week gallery crawl. This Thursday, BOOM holds studio tours and an art exhibit; on Friday, a 6-11 p.m. open house includes live music, free massages and an outdoor fundraiser barbecue. Elsewhere on Penn, some Unblurred venues are open both evenings, some only one day or the other. Highlights include Rust Belt Rivalry, an annual group show and exchange with Cleveland’s Waterloo Arts Festival, at Garfield Artworks (open both days) and Friday’s Fourth of Ju Luau, at Artisan, including a pig roast (really). And on Friday, don’t miss the crafters and food vendors at the Garfield Night Market. Bill O’Driscoll Thu., July 3, and Fri., July 4. 4100-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/Friendship. Times and dates vary by venue. Most venues are free. www.pennavenue.org

hawking Paul Masson wine — see the ads, and piteous outtakes, online — hosting what proves to be “the worst variety show ever for a major network.” Daley says the partly improvised show at Steel City Improv Theater features a cast of 10 SCIT regulars, including Justin Zell as Welles. Expect period-appropriate celebrity impressions and, one imagines, a certain air of comic pathos. BO 8 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-404-2695 or www.steelcityimprov.com

+ SUN., JULY 06

writing about wartime England. MacNeal — who grew up in Buffalo, N.Y., and went to Wellesley College — published her debut novel, Mr. Churchill’s Secretary, in 2012. That was quickly followed by Princess Elizabeth’s Spy and His Majesty’s Hope, the next two entries in her series centering on Maggie Hope, an American spy and codebreaker in 1940s England. The award-winning MacNeal’s in town with her new one, The Prime Minister’s Secret Agent. Tonight’s Mystery Lovers Bookshop event includes a dinner. BO

led by local vinyasa yoga teacher er LA Finfinger. Call it hep cats and down dogs: The 75-minute te session for practitiooners from beginners rs on up is done to live music by a band d led by bassist Paco Mahone, himself a Bikram yoga teacher. er. Well, if you can dance to it, why not? BO 6 p.m. 1815 Metropolitan St., North Side. $30.. 412-322-0800 or www.mcgjazz.org

JULY 05 Chainsaw Show

Art by Anthony Purcell

{MUSIC}

{OUTDOORS}

{SCREEN}

Everybody around here knows about McConnells Mill State Park — situated around scenic Slippery Rock Creek Gorge, about 40 miles north of town — but JULY 05 here’s betting All Star that you haven’t Comedy been there in a Showcase while. Today’s Waterfall Hike is a perfect excuse to catch up. The guided, day-long Venture Outdoors trek traverses seven miles of trails, taking in the falls themselves and whitewater rapids. The terrain ranges from easy to difficult, and your guide will 6:30 p.m. 514 Allegheny contribute a little history, River Blvd., Oakmont. $25. such as tales of the park’s 412-828-4877 or namesake 18th-century grist www.mysterylovers.com mill. BO 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 2697 McConnells Mill Road, Portersville. $12. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

Few directors have had a greater impact on the medium than the maker of Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey and A Clockwork Orange. But in 1953, Stanley Kubrick was a 25-year-old former Look magazine staff photographer and aspiring filmmaker from the Bronx, making his first feature-length film with money borrowed from friends and relatives. Tonight, the Hollywood Theater launches its year-long, chronological Kubrick retrospective with the rarely screened Fear and Desire, a drama about four soldiers trapped behind enemy lines. Kubrick’s 62-minute debut feature stars future Hollywood name Paul Mazurky, with a script by future Pulitzer-winner Howard Sackler. The series continues in August with 1955’s Killer’s Kiss. BO 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Sun., July 13. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

+ THU., JULY 10

+ TUE., JULY 08 {BOOKS} For a Yank, Susan Elia MacNeal has done pretty well for herself

NEWS

{YOGA} We’ve had heavy-metal yoga in these parts, but here’s a new one: yoga and live jazz. Jazz Is Balance is an evening class at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild,

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Ryan McMasterss might be best known for his music and sound design theater No d i ffor th t ttroupe N Name Players. But McMasters is a composer, too, and two of his works feature in reSOUNDing Courage, three evenings of chamber music, dance and spoken word he’s curated for No Name. The

program includes Frederik Rzewski’s “Coming Together” and “Attica,” both works inspired by letters from prisoners involved in the 1971 Attica prison uprising. Vocalist Anna Elder is featured in “Battle Hymns,” a song cycle of Civil War tunes arranged by McMaster for string trio. Along with local and visiting musicians,

{SCREEN} If you’ve ever thought it would be nice to spend a summer evening on the back patio of the Carnegie Museum of Art — the terraced Sculpture Court just outside the big glass wall — watching movies and sipping a cool beverage, tonight’s the night. The museum’s 2-Minute Film Festival, founded in 2010, threatens to become a tradition, with filmmakers from around the country vying to create prize-winning works of 120 seconds or less. This year’s theme is “Outer Space.” Watch the finalists and help choose an audience favorite tonight; at 8:15 p.m., in the museum’s indoor theater, pre-game with a screening of the documentary “Extraterrestrial,” about efforts to digitally recover the first photographs of the lunar surface. BO 7:30 p.m. (screening at 9:15 p.m.) 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10. www.2mff.cmoa.org

JULY 06 Waterfall erffall ll Hike Hiike

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the weekend’s collaborators at Off the Wall Theater also include members of Texture Contemporary Ballet and Continuum Dance Theatre. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Fri., July 11, and 8 p.m. Sat., July 12. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $15-20. 412-207-7111 or www.nonameplayers.org

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

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TUES, JULY 7, 9PM JAZZ

S PAC E EXCHANGE SERIES VENUE IS NOW NON-SMOKING 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS. Neil Simon’s family story set during the Great Depression in Brooklyn, New York. Thu., July 3, 8 p.m., Sat., July 5, 8 p.m., July 10-13, 8 p.m. and July 17-19, 8 p.m. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. CACTUS. Loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru July 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. EVITA. Presented by Pittsburgh CLO. July 8-11, 8 p.m., Sat., July 12, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., July 13, 2 & 7 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SUDS: THE ROCKING 60’S MUSICAL SOAP OPERA. The story of a young woman & her guardian angels who come to

teach her about finding true love in a laundromat. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 6. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

COMEDY THU 03 OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STEEL CITY COMEDY TOUR. 8 p.m. Paradise Island, Neville Island. 412-264-6570. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 04 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South

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Side. 412-488-2995. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

COMEDY SHOWCASE. Mike Wysocki , Terry Jones, Jeff Konkle & T-Robe, hosted by Jerry Wilson. July 5-6 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SUN 06

BONUS STAGE: IMPROV & JAM. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 ANDY PICARRO, Steel City Improv JOHN DICK WINTERS, Theater, Shadyside. TIM ROSS, MOLLY www. per 412-404-2695. pa SHARROW (LATE). pghcitym SUNDAY NIGHT .co Hosted by Matt Light SLAUGHTERHOUSE. 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, Comedy open mic night South Side. 412-431-4950. hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. A DECIDEDLY TBD JULY 5TH Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 VARIETY HOUR. 9:30 p.m. Steel Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-363-7675. 412-404-2695.

SAT 05

FULL LIST ONLINE

THE ORSON WELLS 1978 4TH OF JULY SPECTACULAR. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 05 - SUN 06

TUE 08

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 09

PITTSBURGH ALL STAR

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THURS, JULY 3, 9PM ROCK N ROLL, OLD TIME/BLUEGRASS

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related CONTINUES ON PG. 52


BUCCO’S SPECIAL

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ART

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“Trees 3,” by Lila Hirsch-Brody, from In Good Company Part 2, at Panza Gallery, in Millvale

NEW THIS WEEK

ONGOING

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Making a Splash. Watercolors by Nancy Smith & Jeanne Adams. Opening reception 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 3rd Annual AABC Invitational Show. Opening reception July 9, 7-9 p.m. Cranberry. G SQUARED GALLERY. Human Nature: Observations From the Studio of Priscilla Weidlein. Illustrations. Opening reception: July 5, 5-8 p.m. 724-238-8083. THE GALLERY 4. Chainsaw Show. New Paintings by Anthony Purcell. Opening reception July 12, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. FAKE: New Psyence by Gabe Felice. A collection of paintings, drawings, & objects concerning the following: Generic Toys, Psychic Powers, Trapdoors, 8-bit video games, Lightning Bolts, Military Tanks, “Neckism”, Submarines, Magnetism, Invisibility, Self – Hypnosis & Positive Thinking. Opening reception July 3, 710 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. A Walk in My Shoes: Walk the Diaspora. Interactive exhibit feat. the work of local, national & international artists, musicians & authors. Opening reception, July 3, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-328-4737. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Identity Materials. Work by Theresa Baughman & Julia Betts. Opening reception: July 3, 6-10 p.m. Bloomfield. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. July 3 & 4, 6-11 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7.

709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African

Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mildred Sidorow. A sunny collection of work by the 94 year old Johnstown native. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection

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artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, EVENT: comparing & contrasting historical , events w/ Hollywood depictions. by Barbara Johnstone, Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa Carnegie Library, Oakland French & Indian War and American CRITIC: Revolution. Downtown. 412-2819285. , 34, a doctoral FRICK ART & HISTORICAL student from Ben Avon CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with WHEN: classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the This was a really fascinating talk, because it wasn’t surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. just about linguistics or whatever. It was also about KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the history and genealogy and geography. It was really other Frank Lloyd Wright house. cool. And then I just stepped outside and saw this 724-329-8501. whole area, the library and Schenley Plaza, bustling KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, with activity. I think there’s a music festival, too. I’m middle-class home. Oakmont. going to reveal how old I am when I say this, but I 412-826-9295. remember when there was just a parking [lot] here. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection And now there are all these people taking classes at includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well the library or lounging on the lawn or visiting food as Meissen porcelain. Butler. vendors. It’s just incredible what they’ve done here. 724-282-0123. BY DAN WILLIS MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG the Civil War through artifacts NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 & personal mementos. Oakland. more than 600 birds from over animals, including many 412-621-4253. 200 species. With classes, lectures, endangered species. Highland ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. demos and more. North Side. Park. 412-665-3639. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic 412-323-7235. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 A Reverence for Life. Photos ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN rooms helping to tell the story and artifacts of her life & work. CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Springdale. 724-274-5459. Murals. Mid-20th century murals University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL depicting war, social justice and the 412-624-6000. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the immigrant experience in America. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church Homestead Mill. Steel industry and Millvale. 421-681-0905. features 1823 pipe organ, community artifacts from 1881WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. 412-851-9212. Learn about distilling and SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. coke-making in this pre-Civil War CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost This pioneer/Whiskey industrial village. 724-887-7910. Steamboat: Treasures of Rebellion site features log the Arabia. Exhibit feat. house, blacksmith shop nearly 2,000 once-hidden & gardens. South Park. treasures exploring 412-835-1554. Pittsburgh’s important PENNSYLVANIA FOURTH AT THE FORT. Living role as a Gateway to www. per TROLLEY MUSEUM. history demonstrations, fireworks, a p ty ci h the West & a national pg Trolley rides and more. 11 a.m. Fort Pitt Museum, .com hub for the steamboat exhibits. Includes displays, Downtown. 412-471-1764. building industry in the walking tours, gift shop, mid-19th century. From picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Washington. 724-228-9256. Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery PHIPPS CONSERVATORY movement. Ongoing: Western PA & BOTANICAL GARDEN. PITTSBURGH THREE RIVERS Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, Butterfly Forest. Watch REGATTA. www.threerivers and exhibits on local history, more. butterflies emerge from their regatta.net Thru July 4 Strip District. 412-454-6000. chrysalises to flutter among Point State Park, Downtown. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY tropical blooms. Summer 412-471-0235. CENTER. Museum commemorates Flower Show. Feat. a variety of Pittsburgh industrialists, local imaginative railroad displays history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. enhanced by flowers, plants & SOLDIERS & SAILORS interactive features. 14 indoor MEMORIAL HALL. War in the rooms & 3 outdoor gardens BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection feature exotic plants and floral PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read of military artifacts showcasing displays from around the world. & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em photographs, uniforms, shells Oakland. 412-622-6914. or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. & other related items. Military PINBALL PERFECTION. or by appt. Thomas Merton museum dedicated to honoring Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. military service members since

“Speaking Pittsburghese ” Robyn Bracco Sat., June 28

FULL LIST ONLINE

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM-MIDNIGHT 2-4-1 LAP DANCES

HOLIDAY FRI 04

FESTIVALS

THU 03 - FRI 04

FUNDRAISERS SUN 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


VISUAL ART

POLITICS WED 09

CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LITERARY THU 03 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SAT 05 ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAGGIE STIEFVATER. Author of the Shiver trilogy & the new book, Sinner 4 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743.

SUN 06 POETRY.COM PRESENTS SOOTHING SUNDAYS. Poetry, comedy & R&B. First Sun of every month House of Savvy, North Side. 412-867-0827.

MON 07 OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Midland Arts Council’s Ninth Annual Summer Gallery Exhibition. General exhibition juried by a panel of artist members of the Midland Arts Council. 724-643-9004. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40

Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NEW CITY CHURCH. Layers. Paintings by John J. Donnelly. Downtown. 412-726-4217. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company Part 2. Work by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, Susan Sparks. Closing reception July 5, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145.

SANCTUARY GALLERY. Sllimdaert: Brent Birnbaum. Lawrenceville. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 04 CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP TOUR. Presentation & walking tour about the history & significance of the Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.) in the establishment of Raccoon Creek State Park & other projects. 10-11:30 a.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611.

SAT 05 MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 05 AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC “STARGAZING” PARTY. 8 p.m. Kunkle Park, Washington.

SUN 06

TOUCH-A-TRUCK. 1:30-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 08

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

MON 07

BONJOUR LES AMIS. French stories & activities. Ages 2-5 w/ parent. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru July 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKER MONDAYS. A different project each week, including soldering, robotics, woodworking, filmmaking, wearable technology, more. Mon, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

MON 07 - TUE 08 STEEL CITY ROWING RIVER FUN CAMP. For ages 8-11. Mon, Tue, Thu. Thru July 17

TUE 08 works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

TUE 08 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. SUSAN ELIA MACNEAL. Author

of The Prime Minister’s Secret Agent. 6:30 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 888-800-6078.

KIDSTUFF THU 03 THURSDAY CRAFTERNOONS. Ages 4-8. Thu, 4 p.m. Thru July 31 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 03 - WED 09

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PHOTOGRAPHY FOR KIDS. For students entering grades 4-6. Must pre-register. Thru July 9, 6 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. 6:30 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 09

CLUB 24. Math workshop for students entering 4-6 grades. Must pre-register. Wed, 4:30 p.m. Thru July 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PA VIRTUAL CHARTER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE. 5 p.m. PA Virtual Charter School West, Tarentum.

WED 09 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 03 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library,Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. AN EVENING W/ TEMPA DUKTE LAMA. Discussing “Heartdrop of the Loving Mother.” 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: INSIDE GUANTANAMO. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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NEWS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

JULY 18 & 19 live music, great wine

PITTSBURGH WINERY LIVE IN THE CELLAR

July 3 Holy Ghost Tent Revival July 10 Yarn with special guests Some Kind of Animal July 11 Jimmer Podrasky with special guests The Optimists 2 Shows - 7PM and 10PM July 17 Feufollet “Frenchmen on Penn” series July 18 Nameless in August - CD Release Party July 24 The Collection July 26 River Whyless Aug 1 The Farewell Drifters Aug 8 SONGWRITERS IN THE CELLAR

at

Hosted by Arianna Powell with: Dan Bubien, Arsena Schroeder, Justin Stagg & Susan Ouchis

SEE PAGE 4 FOR MORE DETAILS!

Doors at 8PM show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+

2815 PENN AVENUE, PITTSBURGH PA 15222

SuperMonkey Recordng Co. & Pat DiCesare present PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

The PennRock Scholarship

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST PARTY PRICES $4 TOP SHELF DRINKS & $2.25 BUD LIGHT BOTTLES  ALL NIGHT EVERY NIGHT

Sponsored by:

1/2 OSIFONF

ADMIS WITH BUCS TICKET STUB

EVERY THURSDAY TH IN JULY ALL NIGHT LONG 1635 West Carson St. 412-471-5764

OPEN LATE Thursday 7pm-2am Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

clubcontroversy.com

ALWAYS 1/2 1/ OFF ADMISSION FOR SE SERVICE MEMBERS AND VE VETERANS WITH ID 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014

KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LAWRENCEVILLE INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION. 11 a.m. Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville. Live music, family activities, petting zoo, fireworks, more. 11 a.m. Arsenal Park, Lawrenceville. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9-11:30 a.m. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA 412-323-4709. DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Park Community Center, Lessons 7-8 p.m., social Swissvale. 412-945-0554. dancing follows. No PARTY IN THE partner needed. Mon, TROPICS. Cocktails, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. dancing, more. First Grace Episcopal Church, . w Fri of every month, Mt. Washington. ww per a p ty ci 7-11 p.m. Thru Nov. 7 412-683-5670. pgh m o .c Phipps Conservatory SPANISH & Botanical Garden, CONVERSATION GROUP. Oakland. 412-622-6914. Friendly, informal. At the RAINBOW RISING COFFEE Starbucks inside Target. Sat, HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. and transgendered individuals 412-362-6108. and friends. Music, games, SWING CITY. Learn & practice movies, entertainment and swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. more. Unitarian Universalist Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. Congregation, Smithton. First Fri 412-759-1569. of every month 724-872-5056. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, help seniors get & stay involved North Side. 412-224-2827. in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. BRUNCH AT THE NATIONAL Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 AVIARY. 10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. City-County Building, Downtown. National Aviary, North Side. 412-302-5223. 412-323-7235. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. www.pittsburghtaichi.com Sat, NATURE’S NASTIES. Join 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, the park educator in a discussion Oakland. 412-683-2669. of ticks, chiggers, leeches, poison BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY ivy, stinging nettles, venomous MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., snakes, & other outdoor hazards Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 during this indoor program. 412-708-1277. 2 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. EMPATHY FIRST. A 724-899-3611. compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace MORNING SPANISH activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Thru Sept. 19 412-271-7660. 412-531-1912. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First MT. WASHINGTON and Third Mon of every month, WALKING TOUR. Begins outside 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, of Monongahela Incline on Oakland. 412-622-3151. W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 HIP HOP YOGA: LOVE Mount Lebanon Public Library, MOVEMENTS. First Sat of every Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. month, 1-4 p.m. Thru Aug. 2 SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing North Side. 412-322-5058. follows. No partner needed. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. 412-683-5670.

FRI 04

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 06

FRI 04 - SAT 05

SAT 05

$2 THIRSTY THURSDAYS $2 WELL DRINKS • $2 COORS LIGHT BOTTLES 2 FOR 1 LAP DANCES • 2 FOR 1 DRAFT BEERS

8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

2014 Venues: 1. Aug 9th @ The Rex – Pittsburgh, Pa 2. Aug 15th @ Thunderbird – Pittsburgh, Pa 3. Aug 23rd @ The Smiling Moose – Pittsburgh, Pa 4. Aug 30th Finals at Altar Bar – Pittsburgh, Pa

10% of all ticket sales go to: Guitars4Vets www.guitars4vets.org This is an opportunity for an artist or band to get some help taking their musical career to the next level. If you think you have a hit song, we want to hear it and want award you the 1st annual...

PennRock Scholarship Visit www.pennrockscholarship.com for a complete list of prizes and rules.Bands must submit entry by 7/15.

MON 07


Celebrating 20 Years!

[VISUAL ART] SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 08

Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. IN SEARCH OF PITTSBURGH’S MR. SELFRIDGE: UNKNOWN STORIES FROM PITTSBURGH’S DEPARTMENT STORES. Talk by David Grinnell. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill.

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

Art by Steve Klein

WED 09

BEATS-N-EATS. Special lunch & drink menus, a specially crafted playlist, & dancing. 12-2 p.m. Station Street, East Liberty. 412-365-2121. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru July 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. COUNTRY NIGHT LINE DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for Sleeping Beauty. July 5. Call for information. Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

THE CASA ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Volunteers for Court Appointed Special Advocates of Allegheny County help to ensure that child victims of abuse and neglect receive the attention and care that the court system is often unequipped to give. At 6 p.m. on July 16, CASA will hold a volunteer open house for those interested in learning about helping children in foster care. Call 412-594-3606 or visit www.pgh-casa.org.

NEWS

2 for 1 Tuesdays 2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

Fused glass dates to before the ancient Romans, but that technique of heat-processing glass in a kiln largely fell from fashion as glassblowing proved more efficient. In recent years, however, the method has made a comeback. Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery revisits the theme with Synthesis2: Fusing & Kilnforming. A sequel, of sorts, to a similar show held in 2006, Synthesis2 features a diverse and colorful mix of sculpture and wall pieces by Dorothy Hafner, Amanda Simmons, Steve Klein and others. Continues through Sept. 13. 5833 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-5200 or www.morganglassgallery.com

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

MOWA YOGA PRESENTS: PRACTICE ON THE PODS. Grandview & Shiloh St., Mt. Washington. Wed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 339-237-0891. A VIRTUAL CHARTER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE. 5 p.m. Pittsburgh Mills, Tarentum. 484-680-7979. PGC LECTURE SERIES: SALLY PRASCH, GEORGE KENNARD, ROBERT MICKELSEN. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners.

COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Auditions for one-act plays produced by 18 regional companies. July 19-20. Seeking all types/experience levels. Prepare a 2-min monologue. auditions@ pittsburghnewworks.org. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

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M A I N F E AT U R E

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoop zumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.new yinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com/ THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SHALER GARDEN CLUB GREAT LOCAL GARDENER CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. Submit 5 photos of your garden w/ description of what makes it special. Registration forms available at Shaler North Hills Library. Deadline: July 8. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

I am a single woman, 31, in L.A., and on OkCupid. (We all are.) I’ve gotten a number of unicorn requests. I’ve never responded — until the other day. One unicorn request stood out. They seem like cool, smart, interesting people, and they’re quite attractive! I am not doing anything else or anyone else … and I’m thinking … why not play around while everything is still slim and perky? But! I have some concerns! 1. I gave them my number, but I can’t say that I’m definitely a YES on this. I’m also not a NO. What happens now? We meet for drinks? Then what? 2. I’ve never even had a one-night stand. I’ve pretty much always had boyfriends. I don’t know what my question is, I just don’t want to feel like a hooker! (Not that there’s anything wrong with being a sex worker!) 3. I’m not bi. I cannot imagine a scenario in which I would want to put my face in someone’s twat. (I know you understand the feeling.) But I don’t think I have any issue with being on the receiving end. I think, if I meet them, and if it goes well, I should ask them what their thoughts are about this, what their boundaries are, etc. I would confirm that if anyone feels uncomfortable, everyone involved can call a stop to the whole thing. I’d also lay out my limitation in regards to the wife. But … should I go for it? What should I do or say? FUTURE UNICORN NERVOUSLY GUESSING AT LOGISTICS

Straight couples looking for a bi female third — someone both partners can share and enjoy — call that person a “unicorn,” a mythical beast, because bi females open to playing with straight/bi couples are so rare. What do gay couples looking for a third call the beasts they seek? FRUSTRATED LONGTIME UNICORN SEEKERS TAKING EARLY RETIREMENT

We gays don’t have a special term for a guy open to sleeping with a male couple. But if we were going to give that guy an affectionate nickname, I would go with “horse.” Because a horse, while a magnificent and majestic beast, is a whole lot easier to come by — and in and on and over. I’m a producer with a Chicago-based production company started by a handful of former Oprah show producers. We specialize in developing unscripted/reality show concepts. We are thinking of producing a show about unicorns, those bisexual women who wish to be “thirds,” and I thought you could help us find women who identify as unicorns and could be potential characters. I look forward to hearing from you!

BETTER TO HAVE A NICE, HONEST REJECTION THAN TO FIND YOURSELF IN BED BEING PRESSURED TO DO SOMETHING YOU DON’T WANNA DO.

1. Meet, have drinks and talk, FUNGAL — and be sure to tell that nice, funny, attractive couple everything you’ve told us. And then fuck ’em if it feels right, don’t if it doesn’t. 2. Don’t let the nice couple pay you, and you won’t be a sex worker. (Not that there’s anything wrong with being a sex worker.) And if you’ve only ever had sex in the context of a relationship, and if you want it to stay that way, make that clear: Developing a relationship with you is a requirement before you can all jump into bed together. And they’ll probably be up for it, as most couples who are out there looking for unicorns — which is hard work — are seeking a regular, reliable third, i.e., someone they can get to know better and come to trust. 3. Again, tell this couple everything you’ve told us. The only reason you hesitate is that you fear rejection. Your fear is thoroughly common, completely understandable and totally irrational. Think about it: The reason you’re hesitating to tell them that you’re not bisexual — that you have no interest in putting your face in a twat (but you’re up for having her face in yours) — is that you worry you’ll be rejected. But if they have their hearts set on a unicorn that wants to go facedown in twat, then you’re the wrong unicorn for them. More importantly, they’re the wrong couple for you. Better to have a nice, honest rejection over cocktails — a mutual recognition that you’re not a match — than to find yourself in bed being pressured to do something you don’t wanna do.

HOPING UNICORNS NOT TELEVISION AVERSE

You have two hurdles to clear: You’re not just looking for unicorns, which are hard enough to find, but unicorns who wanna go on television and talk about being unicorns. (You’ll probably want telegenic unicorns, too, which would be hurdle No. 3.) But on the off chance that there are any telegenic unicorns reading this who want to be on TV — or any women who want to be on TV so bad that they’ll pretend to be unicorns — send me an email with “TV Unicorn” in the subject line, and I will forward your email on to the unicorn HUNTA. DEAR READERS: There was a miscommunication during the production of last week’s column — and the fault was entirely mine. Elder-sex expert Joan Price advised Old But Alive, a reader hoping to arrange a threesome with a female cousin, to hang out in lesbian bars to find a third. I advised OBA to ignore that aspect of Price’s otherwise excellent advice, since there’s nothing lesbians hate more than opposite-sex couples trolling dyke bars. But Price didn’t think she was advising an opposite-sex couple: She thought OBA and the cousin were both women. I knew that OBA was a man because I saw OBA’s e-mail address and his name. I don’t pass along names or e-mail addresses when I share questions with guest experts, so Price didn’t have that information. I should’ve made it clear to Price that OBA was a man — at the very least, I should’ve checked in with Price before rapping her knuckles for appearing to advise an opposite-sex couple to cruise a lesbian bar. My apologies to Price! On the Lovecast, Dan “Asks Amy” for a Second Opinion: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

07.02-07.09

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Venus de Milo is a famous Greek statue that’s more than 2,100 years old. Bigger than life-size, it depicts the goddess of love, beauty and pleasure. Its current home is the Louvre Museum, in Paris, but for hundreds of years it was lost — buried underground on the Greek island of Milos. In 1820, a farmer found it while he was out digging on his land. I foresee a comparable discovery by you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. You will uncover a source of beauty, love or pleasure — or perhaps all three — that has been missing or forgotten for a long time.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to an ancient Greek myth, Sisyphus keeps pushing a boulder up a steep hill only to lose control of it just before he reaches the top, watching in dismay as it tumbles to the bottom. After each failure, he lumbers back down to where he started and makes another effort to roll it up again — only to fail again. The myth says he continues his futile attempts for all eternity. I’m happy to report, Leo, that there is an important difference between your story and that of Sisyphus. Whereas you have tried and tried and tried again to complete a certain uphill task, you will not be forever frustrated. In fact, I believe a breakthrough will come soon, and success will finally be yours. Will it be due to your gutsy determination or your neurotic compulsion or both? It doesn’t matter.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many of America’s founding fathers believed slavery was immoral, but they owned slaves themselves and ordained the institution of slavery in the U.S. Constitution. They didn’t invent

hypocrisy, of course, but theirs was an especially tragic version. In comparison, the hypocrisy that you express is mild. Nevertheless, working to minimize it is a worthy task. And here’s the good news: You are now in a position to become the zodiac’s leader in minimizing your hypocrisy. Of all the signs, you can come closest to walking your talk and practicing what you preach. So do it! Aim to be a master of translating your ideals into practical action.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the last two decades, seven Academy Award winners have given thanks to God while accepting their Oscars. By contrast, 30 winners have expressed their gratitude to film-studio executive Harvey Weinstein. Who would you acknowledge as essential to your success, Libra? What generous souls, loving animals, departed helpers and spiritual beings have contributed to your ability to thrive? Now is an excellent time to make a big deal out of expressing your appreciation. For mysterious reasons, doing so will enhance your

get your yoga on!

luck and increase your chances for future success.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

by fire.

You have permission to compose an all-purpose excuse note for yourself. If you’d like, you may also forge my signature on it so you can tell everyone that your astrologer sanctified it. This document will be ironclad and inviolable. It will serve as a poetic license that abolishes your guilt and remorse. It will authorize you to slough off senseless duties, evade deadening requirements, escape small-minded influences and expunge numbing habits. Even better, your extra-strength excuse note will free you to seek out adventures you have been denying yourself for no good reason.

“I awake in a land where the lovers have seized power,” writes Danish poet Morten Sondergaard in his fanciful poem “The Lovers.” “They have introduced laws decreeing that orgasms need never come to an end. Roses function as currency. … The words ‘you’ and ‘I’ are now synonymous.” A world like the one he describes is a fantasy, of course. It’s impossible. But I predict that in the coming weeks you could create conditions that have resemblances to that utopia. So be audacious in your quest for amorous bliss and convivial romance. Dare to put love at the top of your priority list. And be inventive!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the Inuktitut language spoken in northern Canada, the term iminngernaveersaartunngortus saavunga means “I should try not to become an alcoholic.” I encourage you to have fun saying that a lot in the coming days. Why? Now is an excellent time to be playful and light-hearted as you wage war against any addictive tendencies you might have. Whether it’s booze or gambling or abusive relationships or anything else that tempts you to act like an obsessive self-saboteur, you have more power than usual to break its hold on you — especially if you don’t take yourself too seriously.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Percival Lowell (1855-1916) was an influential astronomer who launched the exploration that led to the discovery of Pluto. He also made some big mistakes. Here’s one: Gazing at Venus through his telescope, he swore he saw spokes emanating from a central hub on the planet’s surface. But we now know that Venus is shrouded with such thick cloud cover that no surface features are visible. So what did Lowell see? Due to an anomaly in his apparatus, the telescope projected shadows from inside his eyes onto the image of Venus. The “spokes” were actually the blood vessels in his retinas. Let this example serve as a cautionary tale for you in the coming weeks, Capricorn. Don’t confuse what’s within you with what’s outside you. If you can clearly discern the difference, your closest relationships will experience healing breakthroughs.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I believe in getting into hot water; it keeps you clean.” So said British writer G.K. Chesterton. Now I’m passing his advice on to you just in time for the Purge and Purify Phase of your astrological cycle. In the coming weeks, you will generate good fortune for yourself whenever you wash your own brain and absolve your own heart and flush the shame out of your healthy sexual feelings. As you proceed with this work, it may expedite matters if you make a conscious choice to undergo a trial

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Would you like your savings account to grow? Then deposit money into it on a consistent basis. Would you like to feel good and have a lot of physical energy? Eat healthy food, sleep as much as you need to and exercise regularly. Do you want people to see the best in you and give you the benefit of the doubt? See the best in them and give them the benefit of the doubt. Would you love to accomplish your most important goal? Decide what you want more than anything else and focus on it with relaxed intensity. Yes, Aries, life really is that simple — or at least it is right now. If you want to attain interesting success, be a master of the obvious.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your urge to merge is heating up. Your curiosity about combinations is intensifying. I think it’s time to conduct jaunty experiments in mixing and blending. Here’s what I propose: Let your imagination run half-wild. Be unpredictable as you play around with medleys and hodgepodges and sweet unions. But don’t be attached to the outcomes. Some of your research may lead to permanent arrangements, and some won’t. Either result is fine. Your task is to enjoy the amusing bustle, and learn all you can from it.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The American painter Ivan Albright (1897-1983) was a meticulous creator. He spent as much time as necessary to get every detail right. An entire day might go by as he worked to perfect one square inch of a painting, and some of his pieces took years to finish. When the task at hand demanded intricate precision, he used a brush composed of a single hair. That’s the kind of attention to minutia I recommend for you — not forever, but for the next few weeks. Be careful and conscientious as you build the foundation that will allow you maximum freedom of movement later this year. Picasso said, “I am always doing that which I cannot do in order that I may learn how to do it.” Your comment? Write uaregod@comcast.net.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.02/07.09.2014


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