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PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS UNVEILS CITY’S EMERGING ARTIST OF THE YEAR 36


EVENTS 6.26 – 11am POP GENERATION For the generation that inspired Warhol, a new program exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Tickets $10/FREE Members

6.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NAT BALDWIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SLEEP EXPERIMENTS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON & WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014


{EDITORIAL}

06.25/07.02.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 26

{ART}

{COVER PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

[NEWS]

it’s impossible to do a 06 “Unfortunately, construction project without removing some trees.” — Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy education director Marijke Hecht, on the challenges of building a new environmental center in Frick Park

[VIEWS]

can be coming in ways that 15 “Growth undermine your state and region.” — Sustainable Pittsburgh’s Matt Mehalik, on our short-sighted conception of economic growth

[TASTE]

Hat Trick is three stuffed banana 20 “The peppers, one each with shrimp, grilled

[MUSIC]

probably underestimated the 24 “People passion of the city to keep the radio station around.” — WYEP-FM general manager Abby Goldstein on the secret of the 40year-old station’s success

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[SCREEN]

a journey that involves parents, friends, 33 “It’s work, romantic relationships and, yes, Planned Parenthood.” — Al Hoff on the new rom-com Obvious Child

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

OAK RIDGE BOYS

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

selection of jumbo-size pills are 36 “A suspended from the ceiling, their intense colors evoking the emotions they are designed to suppress.” — Robert Raczka on Mia Tarducci Henry’s Emerging Artist of the Year show at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts

[LAST PAGE]

like this helps capture the essence 55 “Artwork of who we are that we’ve carried with us.” — Ujamaa Executive Director LaKeisha Wolf on the power of African art

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 49 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 +

{ADVERTISING}

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

veggies and chorizo.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review the hockey-themed fare at the Blue Line Grill

N E W S

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

SATURDAY, JULY 5

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INCOMING

“I SEE A BEAUTIFUL WILDERNESS THAT’S GOING TO BE BULLDOZED TO BUILD A NATURE CENTER.”

Re: Treatment Options: A proposed law would make it easier for the mentally ill to be treated, but would it come at the expense of their rights? (June 18) “[Congressman Tim] Murphy’s bill is foolish. We know that violence is not from mental illness. Violence stems from anger. Forcing people into bad treatment won’t help. It will only make people more angry. … We need to help people find safe ways to feel and express their emotions including the big, scary emotions like anger.” — Web comment from “Pat Risser” “If Murphy really wanted to help people with mental illnesses, he would support the ACA [Affordable Care Act], whereby millions would gain insurance coverage for their mental illnesses instead of having to live on the streets. “ — Web comment from “Advoc8”

RE: A conversation with Dr. Karen Hacker, director of the Allegheny County Health Department (June 18) “Karen Hacker’s comments essentially supporting fracking should come as no surprise. … [It] does not bode well for the health of our community when our Health Director so willingly and eagerly adopts the industry position rather than delving into the research done on fracking and the reports from various medical associations … warning us that ‘danger lies ahead.’ Politics must never be allowed to determine medical and health decisions. Unfortunately, that’s exactly what’s happening in Allegheny County.” — Web comment from “Mel Packer”

CORRECTION In a June 18 City Paper article on federal legislation regarding mental-health treatment, it was incorrectly reported that under a provision of the proposed law, patients would risk jail if they refused mandatory treatment. If mandatory treatment is not followed, it would trigger a patient evaluation.

“@billpeduto Seriously! U think regular people have trainer who can follow u around & help? Get reallll! Do it like WE have to!” — June 19 tweet from “Ljoy20” (@ljoy20), who lists her hometown as Tampa, regarding a City Paper story on the mayor’s fitness regimen

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NATURAL

SELECTION Critics question choice of site for new Frick Environmental Center {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

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HEN HENRY CLAY Frick died in 1919, he gave the city 151 acres of land, and a $2 million trust to create and maintain a park. The city park that bears his name has since grown to encompass 644 acres, making it Pittsburgh’s largest. But Frick’s original bequest, now called the Frick Woods Nature Reserve, has largely remained a wilderness area, filled with native plants for locals to enjoy. If all goes as planned, two years from now the reserve will also be home to a new environmental education center, complete with a redesigned parking lot featuring a canopy for solar and rainwater collection. The new Frick Environmental Center, planned by the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, has been designed to meet cutting-edge environmental standards, including the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification and the Living Building

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Harriet Stein fears the new Frick Environmental Center will cost the park too many mature trees.

Challenge. The green facility will be netzero energy and water, feature a geothermal heating and cooling system, and include recycled wood. But critics are saying the greenest thing the conservancy could do would be to build the center somewhere else. And they wonder whether increasing environmental awareness is more valuable than protecting the environment itself. “I see a beautiful wilderness that’s going to be bulldozed to build a nature

center,” says longtime park patron Harriet Stein, who lives in Regent Square. “You can’t bulldoze a park to build an institution, and plant some trees and say that’s good enough.” The new $15.9 million center will serve as a hub for programs like youth summer camps and other special events. It will contain classrooms, public restrooms, offices for the center’s staff, a reception area and a 60-to-80-seat amphitheatre. The new center will be


located near the Beechwood Boulevard entrance the park, on the site of the old Frick Environmental Center, which burned down in 2002. But construction, which is anticipated to last two years, will affect approximately 35 acres of the park, though only ďŹ ve acres will be closed off by a fence. A portion of the park, including some trails and a nearby parking lot, will be closed during that time. Building the structure will require cutting down 95 mature trees and uprooting countless wildowers. PPC has already begun relocating some of the wildowers, and plans to plant some 195 trees, doubling the existing population. Even so, and despite the fact that the new structure would replace an old one, critics worry about the impact. Stein says newly planted trees could take as long as 80 years to mature, and construction of the facility will disrupt wildlife habitats. She and several other Frick Park patrons worry about the impact of an inux of students: Stein says increased school-bus trafďŹ c will detonate a “diesel bombâ€? in the area. While Stein applauds the work the environmental center has done with youth over the years, she says the PPC is looking at economic beneďŹ ts of the development (like providing jobs to construction workers) instead of how the center will impact the Frick Woods Nature Reserve. “I think everyone thinks this is a good idea, because they’re not looking at the bigger picture,â€? Stein says. “It’s a capitalistic enterprise disguised as environmentalism.â€?

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PPC ACKNOWLEDGES there will be some

environmental costs: “It’s challenging to see so many trees taken out; it’s hard, admittedly,� says Marijke Hecht, the Conservancy’s director of education. “Unfortunately it’s impossible to do a construction project without removing some trees.� Still, she says, she can’t see how the center could be viewed negatively. “Environmental education serves so many functions,� says Hecht. “It provides a hands-on way for kids to understand the world around them. All of our programs have some stewardship component. The kids are planting trees; they’re helping to curb erosion.� Since the original center burned down, the center’s staff has continued to run a variety of educational programs for youth in the park, but needs more space to expand the programs to more participants. What’s more, Hecht says, the facility will be a model for green building.

ccac.edu 3GDĂ?ĂŽQRSĂ?BGNHBDĂ?ENQĂ?E@RSDQĂ?QDRTKSR

CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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NATURAL SELECTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

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cover The site plan for the new Frick Environmental Center

Photo by Phil Damer

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

There are only five “living buildings” in the world. In order to qualify, the building must be constructed from environmentally safe local materials, filter and treat all waste water, and use 40 percent less energy than similar buildings. “Especially early [on,] the biggest concern we heard was footprint. Because [the site is] so wild-feeling, a concern we heard is how is it going to feel,” Hecht says. “But our footprint is slightly smaller than the original building, and we have more usable square feet. We were trying to be as light as we can. What we wanted to do is make it small, so we’re not taking a lot of land.” Hecht says while the new facility is nearly the same size as the old 6,000-square-foot center, an additional floor and outdoor “classrooms” boost it to

about 15,000 square feet. And, she says, the value of inspiring youth to be more environmentally conscious outweighs the cost. “We are planting not only more trees than we’re removing, but we’re also improving the bio-diversity there” by planting different species, Hecht says. As for the trees being lost, she says, “We’re working with a couple local craftsmen to ensure we’re reusing the wood.” PPC sent out a request for proposals in April, but Hecht says the bids they received were too high and her organization is trying to rework the design to stay within their budget. Currently PPC only has $8 million for the project and predicts the first phase will cost between $5 million and $6 million. In August 2013, Pittsburgh City CounCONTINUES ON PG. 10

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Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest at Convention Center February 20 & 21, 2015.

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NATURAL SELECTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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ENTERTAINMENT

cil voted to use $5 million from the $27 million Frick trust for the project. City Councilor Corey O’Connor, who represents neighbors of the park and chairs the council committee with jurisdiction over parks, says council is unlikely to delay construction of the new center, which is set to start this summer. “I believe everyone’s happy to get the center back up and running,” O’Connor says. “Unless there was going to be harm to residents, I can’t see wanting to stop a center that’s going to benefit kids and the community.” Similarly, the city’s parks and recreation director, James Griffin, expects city administrators to sign off on permits needed for construction. “It’s an asset that’s going to be tremendously valuable,” says Griffin, who previously worked for PPC. “The vast overwhelming majority of people support it.” Both men say they’ve heard from more residents in support of the environmental center than from opponents, though plenty of concerns have been raised on the 205-member “Occupy Frick” Facebook page. Among the page’s active members is Dennis Sullivan, who believes the environmental center could be housed in a building bordering the park. He likes the idea of adding amenities to the park, but says the proposal is too large because it also utilizes outdoor space for classrooms. “I’m not sure it’s the best use of

the park,” says Sullivan. “I like the idea of a nature center and restrooms, but I think it needs to be scaled back in scope.” Sullivan says he’s also concerned with the lack of transparency in the planning process. Neither he nor other members of the Facebook group, he says, were aware of a chance to weigh in on the project other than a public meeting in April. “There didn’t seem to be sufficient public input,” Sullivan says. “My request would be to slow the process down.” Hecht disagrees, saying the design process has been three years in the making, and has involved more than 600 people who provided input through workshops at the site, focus groups and meetings with key stakeholders. Among those groups were local environmental nonprofits, schools and community organizations like the Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition and the Regent Square Civic Association. Throughout the process, Hecht says, community feedback has been overwhelmingly receptive to increasing environmental education at Frick Park. “We have serious environmental issues that need attention,” Hecht says. “We can’t expect to see more environmental change if we don’t get people engaged. To have some small cuts for the larger good of engaging hundreds more children is what motivates us. We want to see those children grow up to love Frick Park.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

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PRESSURE POINTS Protesters, investors urge PNC to abandon mountaintopremoval financing {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} The 1st Annual

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

EILEEN FLANAGAN is no stranger to executives at PNC Bank. Flanagan, of the Philadelphia-based environmental group Earth Quaker Action Team (EQAT), appeared at an April PNC shareholder meeting in Tampa, and as recently as October, stood outside the bank’s Downtown headquarters and bank branches with a single demand: Stop funding companies that engage in mountaintopremoval coal mining (MTR). Now she and other environmentalists plan to protest outside of PNC’s Downtown headquarters on July 3 (the time has not yet been set). EQAT gave PNC until June 1 to stop funding MTR companies or face the July protest. The protest coincides with the annual Quaker Friends Gathering Conference, held at California University of Pennsylvania the same week. Meanwhile, a group of investors is trying to change PNC’s environmental policies from the inside. “We have people — both Quakers and non-Quakers — from across the country who are fired up about coming to town and holding PNC accountable for this destructive practice,” Flanagan says. MTR is a form of strip-mining practiced in West Virginia and elsewhere. The process lops off the tops of mountains to get the coal beneath; dislodged rock is frequently dumped into nearby valleys. Environmentalists say the process harms wildlife, drinking water and community health. PNC has long publicized its environmental agenda, touting the green-building principles being used in the Tower at PNC Plaza project currently underway Downtown. And in 2010, the company announced that it would no longer provide financing to “to individual MTR projects” nor to “coal producers whose primary extraction method is MTR.” But environmentalists say little has changed, in part because there are no coal producers who use MTR as their principal extraction method. The environmental group Rainforest Action Network (RAN), which issues an annual report card on banks’ energy policies, found that in 2013, PNC provided $211 million to companies engaged in MTR, and that PNC ranked seventh among 12 banks for financing firms that used MTR. (The financing was for companies that engage in MTR, but not necessarily for specific projects, which PNC’s policy forbids.) That’s far less than the $687 million in financing PNC provided in 2012, when it ranked third among lenders supporting MTR businesses, but attributes the drop to a decline in coal

demand and other business factors. “We think [the 2010 pledge] was always intended to be a smokescreen,” Flanagan says. PNC largely declined comment for this story, instead pointing to the “green-banking practices” section of its Community Responsibility Report. The bank invests in alternative sources of power, the report says, and provides lower fees and interest rates to small businesses making “environmentallyfriendly decisions.” In addition to challenging the company on the streets, environmentalists hope to hit PNC in its own wallet. EQAT has also been asking PNC customers to close their accounts: To date, it says, $3.5 million has been divested. And for the past two years, investment firm Boston Common Asset Management, which owns shares in PNC, has proposed a climate-change resolution to be voted on by PNC shareholders. Boston Common says it invests based on “rigorous analysis of financial, environmental, social and governance factors.” Its resolution would require PNC to provide an “assessment of the greenhouse-gas emissions resulting from its lending portfolio and its exposure to climate-change risk in its lending, investing and financing activities.” Lauren Compere, who works in shareholder engagement with Boston Common, says, “There seem to be two sides” to PNC’s environmental stance. “They focus on green building and real estate, but offer no sectorspecific guidance around high-risk energy sources outside of mountaintop removal, which appears to still be an issue.” In addition to mountaintop removal, Boston Common has taken issue with coal-fired power plants and fracking. Boston Common’s resolution came before stockholders twice but has been rejected both times, garnering just 22 percent support in 2013. A PNC spokesperson told City Paper via email that “we have no comment on the resolution” other than noting that “shareholders decisively rejected the proposal” previously. Compere says while the resolution did not pass, the attempt over the past two years has helped to open the lines of communication between the bank and the investment company. “There is a willingness” now, Compere says, to begin having discussions about their concerns. “We hope to have more strategic conversations with the bank about where they have real risk and real opportunity to invest in renewable energy,” Compere says. “And I do believe that conversation is about to happen.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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Connect and Save with Port Authority andthe Pittsburgh Pirates Use your Port Authority ConnectCard and save up to $10 per ticket on all Monday-Thursday Pittsburgh Pirates home games from April 2-August 7. Go to Pirates.com\connectcard or show your ConnectCard at the PNC Park ticket window to receive your discount. Connect and Save with this special offer today!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014


[GREEN LIGHT]

LESS GROSS, MORE GREEN Measuring progress by more than just money {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} WHEN CRITICS oppose environmental protections — say, federal limits on carbon emissions — they usually object on economic grounds: Cutting pollution costs jobs, they say. Such critics are often wrong, but their arguments get traction because most of us believe in economic growth, as measured by the gross domestic product (GDP). And as we’ve always been told, jobs mean growth, and growth means higher GDP. GDP is basically the total value of goods and services produced by a nation’s economy — how much money we spend. It’s been society’s standard for prosperity for decades. But as even its creator agreed, as a measure of true well-being, GDP misleads: “The welfare of a nation can scarcely be inferred from a measurement of national income,” said economist Simon Kuznets in 1934. GDP, for instance, fails to count desirable things, like the value of free time and clean air. It ignores harmful conditions like income inequality. GDP encourages us to deplete natural resources like freshwater without considering how fast they are renewed — or even, as with fossil fuels, that they’re completely nonrenewable. In fact, undesirable but costly conditions like terminal illnesses actually boost GDP while making lives worse. So do eco disasters like oil spills. Suburban sprawl grows GDP, even as it degrades the environment and lengthens commutes. Of course, raw spending is simply easier to quantify than are quality-of-life issues. So even if money can’t buy happiness, when making big decisions we act as if it’s the only thing that does. “It’s possible to have the perception that your region is doing well based on GDP, but that growth can be coming in ways that undermine [your] state and region,” says Matt Mehalik, of Sustainable Pittsburgh. The nonprofit group is part of the international movement to take us, as one European Commission initiative puts it, Beyond GDP. The idea is that by fully accounting in dollar terms for long-term, often “hidden” costs as well as shortterm benefits, we’ll make decisions that improve quality of life, instead of blindly boosting GDP. Cutting pollution, for instance, creates such economic benefits as cleaner air and healthier people. Next year, the United Nations plans to announce its Sustainable Development Goals. Even some U.S. states are forging ahead. In 2010, Gov. Martin O’Malley ordered that Maryland begin calculating its Genuine Progress Indicator, one of several available measures of sustainable economic

activity. The GPI’s 26 measures of well-being include GDP standbys like consumer spending. But GPI also calculates the dollar cost of things like income inequality. GPI adds the value of housework and education, and subtracts the costs incurred by crime, car crashes … and commuting. Environmentally, GPI debits things like the damage done by water, air and noise pollution, and the costs of climate change, lost forests and depletion of non-renewable energy resources.

REAL GDP AND GPI PER CAPITA 1950-2004 IN $2000 40,000 35,000 30,000

Saturday, S aturday JJu June une 2 une un 28 8a att 8 8pm pm Tickets start tart at $ $25* 25*

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 1950

1960

1970

1980

GDP PER CAPITA

1990

2000

GPI PER CAPITA

Saturday, Satu Sa turd rday day, July July 12 12 att 8 8pm pm

SOURCE: THE GENUINE PROGRESS INDICATOR 2006, A REPORT BY JOHN TALBERTH, CLIFFORD COBB AND NOAH SLATTERY FOR REDEFINING PROGRESS

Maryland calculates that from 1960 until the mid-’70s, GPI paralleled the growth of its gross state product (GSP). After that, although per-capita GSP kept rising, percapita GPI leveled off, reflecting factors like environmental degradation and increasing inequality; today, Maryland’s GPI is less than half its GSP. A graph tracking GPI vs. GDP nationally (pictured), from a 2006 report by the nonprofit Redefining Progress, is nearly identical. Our well-being hasn’t kept up with our spending. While Vermont too tracks its GPI, the metric isn’t yet formally used to guide decision-making anywhere. Still, the Seattlebased Center for Sustainable Economy is urging Maryland legislators to start including a “GPI note” on major legislation, so this new metric can begin to influence policy. Will GDP alternatives like GPI spread? Sustainable Pittsburgh has spent a decade arguing that social equity and the environment are as important as the traditional bottom line. The group’s made progress, with dozens of businesses, nonprofits and local governments participating in projects like its Southwestern Pennsylvania Sustainable Business Compact. Why not a Southwestern Pennsylvania GPI? Says Sustainable Pittsburgh’s Mehalik, “I think it would be very smart for our region to adopt something like that.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.


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BLISTERED ASPARAGUS WAS A BAR APP WORTHY OF A FINE-DINING RESTAURANT

NEW CONE ON THE BLOCK {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} For Scoops owner Mike Collins, Bloomfield was the perfect location to open a third ice-cream shop. “Ice-cream shops need restaurants, and in Bloomfield, there are a lot of restaurants and people,” says Collins. “People come to Bloomfield from all over.” With locations in Mount Lebanon and Brookline, Collins says he prefers neighborhood stores to the cookie-cutter mall environment. And while there’s nothing particularly unique about the Scoops minichain, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Scoops promotes a quaint neighborhood-hangout vibe straight from the 1950s, employing local teenagers, and serving as a place for local residents and families to get together. “It’s hard to say what drives people to us,” Collins says. “You can get ice cream at a lot of different places, but what’s really important is to be providing good customer service.” His Bloomfield store, which opened in May, serves freshly made waffle cones with traditional Perry’s and Hershey’s hard ice cream and sherbet. In the future, Collins will add ice-cream cakes, which are a staple of his other stores, and Italian ice, since the new store’s customers have requested it. Beyond simple cones, there are specialty sundaes, including: grasshopper (mint-chocolate-chip ice cream, hot fudge and crushed Oreos); mocha madness (coffee ice cream, chocolate syrup and chocolate jimmies); and “nutty butty” (chocolate-peanut-butter ice cream, hot fudge and peanuts). RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4806 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-6871111 or www.scoopspittsburgh.com

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Juicing is all the rage, and everybody y knows that assorted fruit juices turned into nto popsicles make a great, healthful summer-time me treat. Why not experiment iment with savory popsicles psicles, using carrot or tomato juice, spiced up with herbs? Get a popsicle kit at any dollarr store, and get to freezing g new flavors. Worse case, let it melt and just drink it.

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HIGH SCORE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

LUE LINE GRILLE is named after

markings on a hockey rink — features no doubt very familiar to part-owner Billy Guerin, who is also an ex-Penguin player and current front-office employee. (Fellow ex-Penguin player and current announcer Phil Borque is also listed on the restaurant’s press release as a “marketing consultant.”) The Grille sits directly across from the Consol Energy Center and features a big, hockey-themed mural as well as a banquet area called the Sin Bin, which is designed to look like a giant penalty box (complete with rink-style boards for walls). It’s safe to say that this sports bar has a pretty clear mission: to draw in ’Burgh pret hockey enthusiasts for food, drink and the comradeship of fellow fans. comrades This plum location and all of these highprofile names could be squandered on a profile stock sports-bar menu dominated by hockey stoc references and a few obligatory “specials” re that aren’t. But Blue Line has higher aspirations than that. OK, the hockey references are there in dishes such as “The Hat Trick” and “Pen Wings,” but the menu is selec-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

Cracked-pepper-crusted beef carpaccio and greens

tive, offering variety through customization rather than lengthy lists of uninspired dishes. Poutine is enjoying a moment of popularity city- and perhaps nation-wide, but Montreal poutine, made with Canadian cheese curds, seemed extra-authentic in a restaurant themed around hockey. Quesadillas are ubiquitous, but chorizo and wild mushroom filling with scallion aioli isn’t

BLUE LINE GRILLE

1014 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-281-2583 HOURS: Sun.-Wed. 11 a.m.- midnight; Thu.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches, pizza $7-15; entrees $16-34 LIQUOR: Full Bar

CP APPROVED the usual rendition. And that Hat Trick? Three stuffed banana peppers, one each with shrimp, grilled veggies and chorizo. Scratch our backs with a hacksaw! We started with blistered asparagus. Grilled until a bit of char developed, the tender, flavorful spears were served over a

thick glaze of pomegranate balsamic vinegar, whose distinctly fruity tang cut the sweetness that too many kitchens treat as the dominant flavor of balsamic. This was a bar app worthy of a fine-dining restaurant. Pretzel buns are another trendy item; Blue Line serves them with its signature smoked-paprika-and-garlic-smashed cheese. The buns were good and chewy, and although the crust was on the thin side, it had the distinctive tang of lye-dipped dough. The cheese, served in a bowl, had the zesty flavors and clumpy texture of a cheese ball; it begged to be spread and devoured. Blue Line’s house salad was also a cut above, with currants, gorgonzola and toasted pumpkin seeds boosting a bushel of tender spring greens. Best of all was the chef’s special lemon-thyme dressing, a tartly herbal vinaigrette that we practically wanted to eat with a spoon. These days, it’s not unreasonable to expect pretty good pizza at bars, and Blue Line’s chewy-crisp crust more than met our expectations. Where it stepped up its game was with a truly exceptional list of available


toppings (divided into three “lines” at different price levels), including pulled chicken, a fried egg and Gulf shrimp. Choices for sauces included basil pesto and roastedgarlic butter; the latter offered plenty of rich, mellow garlic flavor, a welcome departure from by-the-book tomato sauce. Jason was sorely tempted by “RJ’s Pork Chop Whop Chop” sandwich — panko fried with shaved sweet onion — but our server’s description of the sirloin, brisket and shortrib combo in the burger won his heart. But though the patty itself was juicy and delicious, with a good-quality bun, the Blue Line preparation, proclaimed a “Signature Item,” didn’t really deliver on its “blackened Cajun” promise. It basically tasted like an ordinary, albeit high-quality, burger with bleu cheese on top. This was a surprising failure from a kitchen that generally executed well.

Uptown seafood martini

Angelique, however, was well pleased with her “adulterated” grilled-cheese sandwich. The blend of sharp cheddar, nutty Swiss and tangy gorgonzola cheeses was bold and complex without overstepping the comforting bounds of the grilled-cheese genre, and the bread was substantial, toasty and not too greasy. Similarly, lobster spaezle — Blue Line’s original take on nowclose-to-cliched lobster mac-and-cheese — was mild yet rich, creamy and pleasantly lumpy. The sandwich’s side of buffalo slaw, made with hot-sauce-spiked mayonnaise, was underwhelming, though. Despite its blatant black-and-gold allegiance, Blue Line is more than just a sports bar. Going the extra mile extended beyond the menu: Our server was prompt and friendly, one of the bartenders plied his specialty in balloon art for child and adult diners alike, and the rooftop lounge is more nightclub than sports bar, with a dedicated menu that’s mostly sushi and sashimi. The Pens’ season might have ended prematurely this year, but that just provides us more opportunities to visit a hockey bar that offers so much more. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SWEET REDEMPTION At Allegheny Wine Mixer, long-derided riesling gets its due If you still associate riesling with that sticky-sweet bottle of Blue Nun that you drank in college, Jamie Patten says it’s time to step up your game. “It’s a wine that’s a bit misunderstood,” says Patten, owner of Lawrenceville’s Allegheny Wine Mixer. “It comes in all different styles.” To help foster better understanding of the often-maligned varietal, the AWM is participating in the “Summer of Riesling,” a celebration that lasts from June 21 to Sept. 21. This is the seventh summer for the international festival, which began at Terroir in New York City in 2008. Patten says that AWM will have at least four rieslings by the glass all summer long, including some rare permutations like a sparkling riesling. She’s happy to make recommendations for those who still think riesling isn’t too dissimilar to sweet wines like Boone’s Farm, the wine many of us drank before we could legally buy wine.

“IT’S A WINE THAT’S A BIT MISUNDERSTOOD.” Riesling is made from a highly aromatic green grape of the same name. It’s believed the grape originated in Germany, where many of the best rieslings are produced, and is considered one of the primary white-wine grapes. Outside of Germany, high-quality rieslings are produced in Alsace (France), Austria, Finger Lakes (New York), Washington state, Canada and New Zealand. Although some versions of riesling are dry, sweetness is a defining characteristic of the grape. However, sweetness need not be demonized as saccharine liquid courage for the “I Don’t Like to Drink So I’m Drinking Sweet Wine” set. “There was so much bad sweet wine in the U.S. for so long that people started to associate ‘sweet’ and ‘bad,’” Patten says. Sweet is indeed bad when it’s unbalanced. A fine riesling, however, is balanced because of the grape’s high acidity. And that unique mix of sweetness and acidity, according to Patten, is a recipe for a refreshing summer wine you don’t have to be embarrassed to drink. “I love riesling,” she says. “I always have.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5326 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-2522337 or www.alleghenywinemixer.com

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OPEN Monday-Saturday 11am-10pm Sunday 11am-9:30pm BYOB (no corking fee) Lunch specials starting at $8!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallops-three-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF CASA RASTA. 2056 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-918-9683. This casual storefront taqueria combines the tropical, sometimes spicy flavors of Caribbean and Mexican cuisines in tacos, burritos and tortas. Thus, jerk chicken might be a wing appetizer, or taco filling. Also broaching both cultures: fruit salsa and citrus-marinated fried pork. JF COCA CAFÉ. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171. This café is somehow hip but not pretentious. Variety predominates: The omelets alone include smoked salmon, wild mushroom, roasted vegetable, sun-dried tomato pesto and four-cheese. (Coca also caters to vegans, with options like scrambled tofu in place of eggs.) JF FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-377-0916. This neo-traditional Japanese restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired as much by modern American cuisine as it is by ancient

Casa Rasta {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Japanese tradition. Here, roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets its own entrée. It offers a tapas-like, a la carte approach, ideal for sampling a menu that spans traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. LF GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentinebarbecue eatery worth stopping at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF

a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. This fine-dining restaurant offers the bold flavors and confident preparations of classic Portuguese cuisine — from thick, meaty Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage flambéed en route to the table. Entrees include steak in a red-wine sauce, chicken cooked with Portuguese peppers, pork with clams and, of course, fish. LE MENDOZA EXPRESS. 812 Mansfield Road, Green Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Gaucho Parrilla MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were

PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But


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Sun Penang {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-243-4348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bonemarrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE

Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brown-sugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique four-course dinner just for you. LE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and fried-rice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The everchanging but compact menu TRUTH LOUNGE. 51 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-381-9600. A reflects a hybrid style, combining Mediterranean-inspired menu cutting-edge techniques with spans cocktail-hour noshes and traditional ingredients to create light meals to full entrees. Pleasing unique flavor and texture appetizers include saganaki combinations. Salt erases (Greek flaming cheese) distinctions — between and the novelty fine and casual dining, “lambsicles.” Flatbreads between familiar and fill the spot for upscale exotic ingredients, pizza, with hearty between your party www. per meat and pasta and adjacent pa pghcitym dishes, such as shortdiners. LE .co rib ragu, rounding out the entrees. LE SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. simple but not austere — and to This cozy restaurant, set in a peruse its menu is to explore the restored 1902 hotel, offers abovecuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and average fare, reasonably priced. Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian Alongside the contemporary American flavors are numerous kway teow (practically the Asian-inspired dishes, such as soup country’s national dish) may be made from kabocha pumpkin. the best you ever have without From po’boy oyster appetizers a tourist visa. JE to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, each dish is carefully TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth conceived and prepared. KE Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, VILLAGE TAVERN & inventive vegetarian meals push TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., past the familiar at this charming West End. 412-458-0417. This Homestead café. The emphasis is warm, welcoming, and satisfying on fresh, local and unexpected, Italian restaurant is a reason such as asparagus slaw or to brave the West End Circle. beet risotto. In season, there’s The menu offers variety within a charming rear patio. JE a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. pasta, with the pasta section 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. organized around seven noodle 412-224-2579. In this intimate shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, restaurant, the emphasis is on each paired with three or four local, seasonal ingredients distinct sauces. KE simply yet inventively prepared.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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LOCAL

“PEOPLE UNDERESTIMATED THE PASSION OF THE CITY TO KEEP THE STATION AROUND.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

TALE OF THE TAPE While the general public might consider cassette tapes an impractical medium, the format has its devotees. And with its new release, Secretly Yours, local three-piece Secret Tombs makes digging out that tape deck especially worthwhile. Secretly Yours — recorded at drummer Dave Rosenstraus’ studio, Braddock Hit Factory — is the band’s third cassette release. But unlike many bands, who make cassette demos with the intention of later re-recording and re-releasing, Secret Tombs’ cassettes are complete works. “Tapes are very conducive to our songs,” explains Rosenstraus. Skipping around on a cassette is a pain, and because Secretly Yours is essentially one long, epic track, it wouldn’t make much sense to try, even if you wanted to. “It’s like our shows,” he adds with a laughs. “No one can leave the room.” Secret Tombs formed in 2008, with Rosenstraus joining singer/ guitarist Ben Klahr and original bassist Colin Post. In 2011, Andy McDonald took over for the second bassist, Ben Hickling, who is credited with introducing a certain “rowdiness” to the band’s sound. Comparisons are frequently made to dark, garagey punk bands like Deadmoon. (According to the band, Secret Tombs has also been described as “The Black Crowes’ version of ‘Hard to Handle’ meets the King of the Hill theme.”) But the group also brings to mind bands like Harvey Milk, effortlessly mixing heavy, sardonic angst with the swaggering, radio-friendly rock of ZZ Top or Bob Seger; Klahr says he wants Secret Tombs’ next record to sound like the Silver Bullet Band, “if the Silver Bullet Band just smoked resin all the time.” Klahr, the primary songwriter, also cites Meatloaf as an influence: In other words, “people you listen to and think, ‘Wow, they’re serious.” (And it should be noted, Meatloaf’s influence on Secretly Yours is both hard to miss and one of the highlights of the tape). There are other advantages to cassette releases: They’re financially manageable for a band that self-releases everything — plus, as Klahr points out, there’s something special about the way a cassette sounds. “Not that I’m into the lo-fi-on-purpose sound, but it’s just how it’s quote-unquote ‘supposed to sound.’” And, he adds, you can listen to Secret Tombs while riding in cool, old cars. “If it’s a car that plays CDs,” he says, ‘I wouldn’t want to ride in it anyway.”

SKIPPING AROUND ON A CASSETTE IS A PAIN; SECRETLY YOURS IS ONE LONG TRACK.

FORTY YEARS ON THE AIR

{PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

{BY JULIA COOK}

I

T WAS THE early ’90s, and legend-

ary Pittsburgh soul singer Billy Price was headed to a gig when the radio murmured a soft bass line, offset by fluttering violins and a deep, full voice. WYEP’s Rhett Witherspoon was spinning Joe Simon’s “Your Time to Cry,” and Price was transfixed. “This song knocked me in the solar plexus,” Price laughs. “I pulled off the highway, and I went to a phone booth, called up and said, ‘Rhett! Rhett, what was that record you just played?’” That was all it took for Price to fall for the song; he would later record his own version, which ended up on his Soul Collection album. It’s just one example of the station’s impact on local listeners and musicians alike. Though it’s inspired some grand endeavors, WYEP’s genesis was hardly a lofty one. The first cracklings over 91.5 FM on April 30, 1974, came from a few friends, a grand idea, and a basement.

sic director and Midday Mix host Mike Sauter met with some opposition: The project was deemed too hard, too timeconsuming. Still, he persisted, collecting newsletters, reel-to-reel tapes, and interviews with founders Jeff Smith, John Schwartz and Ellory Schemp. Through it, he’s gained a feel for the climate in 1970s Pittsburgh and the urgency with which WYEP was conceived — and preserved.

WYEP SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL

FEATURING THE SAM ROBERTS BAND, VALERIE JUNE, ELIZABETH AND THE CATAPULT, THE RED WESTERN 2 p.m. Sat., June 28. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. All ages. www.wyep.org/smf2014

“If we waited for another milestone, like the 50th anniversary, who knows how much history is going to be lost in that WHEN HE SUGGESTED building an archive time?” Sauter points out. He shares disto celebrate WYEP’s 40th anniversary, mu- coveries with the public daily, through

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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They keep the music playing (clockwise from left): On-air WYEP personalities Cindy Howes, Joey Spehar, Kyle Smith, Mike Sauter, Brian Siewiorek, Rosemary Welsch and general manager Abby Goldstein

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

WYEP’s “Time Capsule” segment. As Sauter explains it, WYEP was a very different place in the beginning, and not just because of its decrepit Oakland location at 4 Cable Place. “Almost all of the people who were going to be on the air had no experience doing any kind of radio whatsoever.” A sounding board for community announcements, WYEP was not terribly formal. There are accounts of impromptu station keg parties, someone getting mugged on the air, and a DJ almost being electrocuted because of a flash flood. This early period also made WYEP its own time capsule. Investigative programs were recorded from remote events like a KKK rally, and Sauter has found interviews with folk singer Pete Seeger, science-fiction writer Issac Asimov and Monty Python member Graham Chapman, all now deceased. His research has given Sauter a glimpse into 1970s “society at large, and broadcasting as well.” Schwartz and Smith poured savings into the station, tirelessly securing grants


FORTY YEARS ON THE AIR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

With permission to renovate from the FCC and a handful of volunteers still dedicated to the cause, WYEP hosted a fundraising event featuring Billy Price and the Keystone Rhythm Band. Eventually, the station was able to outfit a completely new studio at Chatham College. The basement studio was “like the Starship Enterprise compared to what we had at Cable Place,” Rosenfeld says with a laugh. It featured new equipment, two spaces for live performances, and — Mountjoy emphasizes — air conditioning. By gathering representatives from Chatham into the mix, as well as professionals in marketing and accounting, WYEP found the support it had been missing from the community. “It was probably in the late ’80s and early ’90s when the station started really becoming the tastemaker on the national music scene,” says current general manager Abby Goldstein, who had corresponded with the station in her days as a music promoter. She laughs upon hearing Mountjoy’s characterization of WYEP: “the station that refused to die.” “I think it’s very accurate,” Goldstein says. “People probably underestimated the passion of the city to keep the radio station around.”

SY {PHOTO COURTE

} OF JIM HURRAY

Fred “Mac” McKenzie and Jim “Youngblood” Hurray on the phone with listeners, Cable Place, July 1977 (See more WYEP archival images online at www.pghcitypaper.com.)

FORMER GENERAL manager Lee Ferraro “knew they turned the corner, and were doing fairly well,” when he arrived in 1996. He was also aware of a high turnover rate among general managers at

the station in the early ’90s. “But I knew there was a passion for the station,” Ferraro claims. “I knew I wasn’t coming into a happy family, fully mature, but I knew Rosemary [Welsch] was very good

at her job, and some of the board members I’d talked to were very committed to the station.” WYEP needed to consolidate its brand to become a uniquely Pittsburgh asset. Instead of being “the granola station, or the lesbian folk station,” Ferraro realized “we had to be more about great music, and building great community.” During the late ’90s and into the 2000s, WYEP would cement its current format: adult album alternative, with a mix of contemporary indie rock (especially in prime time) and roots music. Most of the daytime blocks adhere to a regular rotation with DJs adding in their favored songs; overnight, the station still has free-form DJ blocks. Soon after being hired, Ferraro got in touch with the producers at NPR’s syndicated live-music-and-interview show The World Café. The idea was to bring a broadcast to The Andy Warhol Museum, after which the bands would move to an outdoor stage and serenade tailgaters. The nationally broadcast program could bring attention to the Warhol, as well as Pittsburgh’s other cultural offerings. During The World Cafe’s Warhol run, from 1997 through 2007, WYEP’s Summer Music Festival expanded from the museum parking lot to North Shore Riverfront Park, and

Peter Paul Rubens, Saint Catherine in the Clouds (detail), early 17th century

Andrew Raftery, professor of printmaking at Rhode Island School of Design, joins us for two unique programs this weekend. Don’t miss this opportunity to gain insight into the artistic choices of master engravers.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

Uncovering the Secrets of the Master Engravers Artist Talk June 27, 6:30–7 p.m.; reception follows, galleries open until 9 p.m. FREE Language of Line Workshop Hands-on workshop June 28, 1–4 p.m. $60 non-members/$48 members Information and registration at cmoa.org


finally to its current location in Schenley Plaza, where attendance tripled. (The 16th Summer Music Festival takes place Sat., June 28; see info box.) Under Ferraro’s leadership, WYEP was gaining recognition on a national level, and it needed a true home base. As the station began planning to build a new studio, green architecture was on the rise, especially in Pittsburgh, where the new convention center was built to be environmentally friendly. As a progressive organization, a green structure “was in our DNA,” Ferarro says. “We were leaders, and our listeners would expect us to do that.” WYEP had already been in the South Side for eight years when planning began in 2002. The goal was to begin broadcasting from Bedford Square as WYEP entered a new year, but winter of 2005 found the station scrambling again. Though the capital campaign had been successful, receiving endorsement from Allegheny County Chief Executive Dan Onorato and former Pittsburgh Steeler Lynn Swann, “We weren’t quite sure if all of the equipment was going to work properly,” remembers content director Kyle Smith. “But it all went off quite well.” After its completion, the building would receive a LEED Silver rating, the first time a radio station’s home was certified green. In February 2006, the widely recognized voice of WYEP, Rosemary Welsch, announced the first song played out of the new studio: “Radio Radio,” by Elvis Costello. ITS HOME BASE firmly situated in the South Side, WYEP was about to become an even bigger force. When mostly-jazz NPR affiliate WDUQ went on the market, administrators at WYEP realized they had the funds to take on a sister station. “Pittsburgh really deserved an allNPR news station,” Ferraro explains. The new affiliate, WESA, now runs NPR programming along with two hours of local news per day, and a Saturday-night jazz program. WYEP still plays a meaningful role in the education of its inspiring musicians. Last fall, the station launched Reimagine Media, a site written and curated by students. WYEP will release a compilation album of local student acts later this summer, and invite each contributor to perform at a station-sponsored concert. As Ferraro attests, “I don’t think people realized how mature WYEP was, or just what a sophisticated organization it had become over the years.” With 90,000 weekly listeners, it’s not just the station that refused to die: It’s the station Pittsburgh kept alive. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SAVE US FROM THE ARCHON THEREAFTER (SEIZURE MAN)

Sometimes chaotic, sometimes mathy and precise, and sometimes beautiful and intricate, Save Us From the Archon has created a complex and gorgeous record. There are nods to the classic Pittsburgh math-rock without the sense of arrested development that sometimes comes with bands trying to recreate the ’90s. There are moments that are reminiscent of postrock heavy-hitters like Envy. Then, out of nowhere, it’s ambient sound and cunningly manipulated feedback. Expect big stuff from these young locals. SAVE US FROM THE ARCHON CASSETTE RELEASE. 6 p.m. Fri., June 27. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4688 or www.smiling-moose.com

DON STRANGE & THE DOOSH BEARS PIERRE (SELF-RELEASED)

Don Strange brings what we might think of as anti-folk on steroids: Clever, sometimes funny songwriting, with jangly guitars, but often a bit more driving than anything most of us would call “folk.” There’s a certain melancholy beneath Strange’s humorous façade, and it’s clearly meant to be found — the namesake of the song “Imaginary Foe” is silly to think about, but also easy to identify with. Strange is one of our more intriguing local entries right now; any survey of the Pittsburgh music scene should probably include this endearing outlier. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DON STRANGE & THE DOOSH BEARS CD RELEASE with THE 65S, DOS MONSTER TRUCKS. 10 p.m. Fri., June 27. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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Jump Into a New Pair!

CRITICS’ PICKS

The latest fashions in Men’s underwear, sockwear, casual tee’s & swimwear Instead of Sleeping 5968 Baum Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA • East Liberty Connect with us @TRIMPITTSBURGH.COM

Instead of Sleeping has been on the Pittsburgh music scene since 2008; in that time, the four-piece indie-rock band has played with fun., The Dear Hunter, The Fall of Troy, Hawthorne Heights … the list goes on. The band worked on its new album, Young Lungs, with producer Marc McClusky (Weezer, Bad Religion, Ludo), and the result is a crispsounding release that warrants at least one listen, if not more. The band plays Mr. Small’s tonight with Paper States, Maid Myriad, Young Fox and Our Family Portrait. Zach Brendza 6:30 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[INDIE FOLK] + FRI., JUNE 27 If you know the Chevy source of Communist Woods Daughter’s band name, you might be expecting some lo-fi, unconventional indie folk in the vein of Neutral Milk Hotel. But the St. Paul, Minn.-based band often holds down the more polished side of the genre, with whistles and hand-claps accenting simple, beautiful melodies. The main pair behind the band, husband-and-wife duo Johnny Solomon and Molly Moore, create quiet harmonies that could ease you to sleep — in a good way, of course. Tonight, they play Panza Gallery, in Millvale, on a tour that they say isn’t so much about promoting a record, but more about finding good things to eat in different cities. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. $10 suggested

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donation. All ages. 412-821-0959 or www.panzagallery.com

[RAP] + SAT., JUNE 28 Taylor Gang or Die: a mere slogan for some, a way of life for others. The mantra associated with Wiz Khalifa’s hip-hop collective and label Taylor Gang has practically become a part of Pittsburgh vernacular. Chevy Woods, a Taylor Gang member who grew up in Hazelwood, has established himself as an artist after releasing mixtape after mixtape (Gangland 2 is his latest) and touring with Wiz. Set to release his debut EP on Taylor Gang Records, Woods is on the up and up; he plays Mr. Small’s tonight with Boaz, Beedie, KH and TreeoO. ZB 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK PALADINO}

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., JUNE 27

[INDIE ROCK] + WED., JULY 02 In recent years, it feels like Brookyn is more or less a music factory that churns out band after band. That’s the provenance of Bear Hands; the indie-electronic outfit has toured with Vampire Weekend, Passion Pit and MGMT, and fits into that niche of catchy indie rock, without losing its own identity. Distraction, the band’s newest LP, is the release that might give Bear Hands the push necessary to enter the spotlight. The single “Giants,” in fact, could be this summer’s anthem. The band plays Cattivo tonight with Junior Prom and Total Slacker. ZB 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12-14. All ages. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 26 31ST STREET PUB. Dirty Rotten Imbeciles, Six Speed Kill, Weapons of Choice, Wrought Iron. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Xavier Rudd. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Simone Felice, The Mixus Brothers. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Kenny Sukitch, Marcus Meston. Dual CD Release. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Miss Lonelyheart. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MELLON SQUARE PARK. The Bill Ali Band. Downtown. 412-665-3665. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Avi Diamond, Ghost Pal, The Spectres, No Shoes, Mustache Required! Bloomfield. 412-335-4197. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo.

SMILING MOOSE. American Opera. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Counting Crows, Toad the Wet Sprocket. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Hanging Hills, Paul Luc, Guy Russo. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Harlan Twins, Host Skull, Allies, Cyrus Gold, The Lopez, Trappers Harp, Driver, more. Drag Me Home zine/music comp release. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Instead of Sleeping, Paper States, Maid Myriad, Young Foxes, Our Family Portrait. Instead of . w ww per Sleeping CD Release a p ty ci h g p Show. Millvale. .com 866-468-3401. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. STATION SQUARE. TEN, One Sweet Burgh. Station Square. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chuck Mead & His Grassy Knoll Boys, The Mavens. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 27

CLUB CAFE. The Corned Beaf & Curry Band (early) The 65s, Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, Dos Monster Trucks (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. City Steps, Teenage Assholes, Make Out Vertigo. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Rue Snider & No Strand, The Sea Life, Jeremy Caywood & The Way of Life. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LATITUDE 360. No Bad Juju. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 28 31ST STREET PUB. Sloppy Seconds, The Cheats, The Scratch ‘N Sniffs. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Girls Rock! Pittsburgh Camp Showcase. Performances by 6 all-girl bands. North Side. 412-440-8241. ALTAR BAR. Guttermouth. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Nat Baldwin, Sleep Experiments. North Side. 412-237-8300. ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE ARMS CLUB. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Washington. 724-222-9966. THE BRONZE HOOD. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. CLUB CAFE. Speedy Ortiz, Legs Like Tree Trunks, The Lopez. Brooklyn Brewery Mash Bash. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. ShroudedIn Neglect, For What Its Worth, The Flithy LowDown, Until We Have Faces, Strength In Numbers, Last Rights. Benefits the Mario Lemieux Foundation. McKees Rocks. 412-972-3295. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bottom Floor. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. Bunny Five Coat, Latecomer, Grumpy, Gary Abuseys. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Henry Bachorski & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dethehem, Lords of The Trident, Klaymore. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MP 3 MONDAY GRAND PIANO

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Grand Piano; stream or download “February Blues” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

e We’ve got th

ot best satp to w ch the fireworks!

LATITUDE 360. No Bad Juju. HARTWOOD ACRES. Bruce North Fayette. 412-693-5555. Hornsby & the Noisemakers. NIED’S HOTEL. Bad Habits. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. RUMFISH GRILLE. Tony Janflone PALACE THEATRE. Jr. Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. Gordon Lightfoot. Greensburg. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. 724-836-8000. Weather Permitting feat. SAINT THOMAS A BECKETT The Pressure, Alba Flamenca. CHURCH. The Holidays. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. 412-655-2885. SMILING MOOSE. Crobot, SCHENLEY PLAZA. The Shiva Stone. South Side. Red Western. Oakland. 412-431-4668. 412-381-9900. TUGBOAT’S. Dave Iglar. SHOOTIN’ BULL. Ironhorse. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992. 724-889-7216. SMILING MOOSE. Easy Tiger, Chessie BYHAM THEATER. & the Kittens, Cold Neko Case, Laura Veirs. Front. South Side. Downtown. 412-431-4668. 412-456-6666. SQUIRREL HILL HARD ROCK . w SPORTS BAR. w w CAFE. Melodime. aper p ty ci h theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. g p Station Square. .com 412-422-1001. 412-481-7625. TEDDY’S. Lenny Smith HOWLERS COYOTE & The Ramblers. North CAFE. Ono, KMFD, Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. Dream Weapon, Owner. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Polish Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Hillbillies, The Bessemers, The MR. SMALLS THEATER. Jello Beagle Brothers. Lawrenceville. Biafra & the Guantanamo School 412-682-0177. of Medicine, Negative Approach, Submachine, Zeitgeist. Millvale. 866-468-3401. CHEERLEADERS GENTLEMEN’S

MON 30

FULL LIST ONLINE

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CLUB. Smooth Tutors, Pittsburgh Track Authority. Visuals by Ben Tabas. Strip District. 412-291-3110. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Kissing Candice, Only Flesh, The Existential Gentlemen. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

An Evening of Music JUNE 27

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ALTAR BAR. Delta Rae. Strip District. 412-263-2877. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Shame Thugs, John Flannelly, Middle Children, Submistress. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Radioactivity, Bad Sports, Activations. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Andy Grammer, Andrew Ripp, Brendan James. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

The Weathered 02 Road w/Heidi WED ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Triggers. Lawrenceville. Jacobs

AUGUST 1

BIKE NIGHT KARAOKE BAND NIGHT $10 HIGH LIFE $2.50 MILLER WITH $3.50 16OZ CAN BUCKETS LITE BOTTLES LEINIE’S

TUE 01

724-400-6044

412-683-5993. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. John Hiatt & the Combo, The Robert Cray Band. 412-368-5225. CATTIVO. Bear Hands. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Dear Rabbit, Ivory Weeds, Cold Weather, Caleb McCoach. Garfield. 412-361-2262. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Antz Marching. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. ROCK ROOM. Street Eaters. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Quincy Mumford & The Reason Why, MoChester. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 26 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 27 ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Brenmar, Boo Lean, DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-689-2802. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 28 DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

WED 02 LOS SABROSOS. Salsa Night. Downtown. 412-465-0290. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 28 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Chevy Woods w/ Boaz, Beedie, KH, TreeO. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

BLUES THU 26 BAR STREET KINGS. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Blues Jam Session. Strip District.

FRI 27 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. MOONDOG’S. The Bo’ Hog Brothers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 28 KOSBAR RANCH. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Neville Island. LEGACY LANES. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-653-2695. THE R BAR. Shot O’ Soul. Dormont. 412-942-0882. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Witchdoctors, Johnny Smoothe. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202.

SUN 29 THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

TUE 01 SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

JAZZ THU 26 CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET. Jazz Night at Mitchell’s. Waterfront. 412-476-8844.


MUSIC AWARDS

FRI 27 LIGONIER TAVERN. Yarn. 724-238-4831. MARTY’S MARKET. Shelf Life String Band. Strip District. 412-586-7177. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Drymill Road, The Weedrags. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

SAT 28 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

MON 30 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Dos Equis: Singer/Song Writer Competition. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 02 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Primavera Vills’ “Slot No. 2” is one of eight nominees in the “Best Hip-Hop Video” category at the Pittsburgh

Underground Music Awards this weekend. The awards program takes place from 6-10 p.m. Sat., June 28. Penn Hills Senior High School auditorium, 309 Collins Drive, Penn Hills. $20-30. All ages. www.pghundergroundmusicawards.com

WORLD THU 26 BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Chicha Libre, Gena y Pena, Pandemic. Strip District.

REGGAE TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Tom Roberts. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 27 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LA CASA NARCISI. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The New View Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SOUTHSIDE WORKS. RML Jazz. South Side. 412-370-9621.

SAT 28 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LEMONT. Dave Crisci, Maria Sargent. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Lilly Abreu Show. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Charlie G Sanders & Ron Wilson. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. The Tania Grubbs Quartet. Stars at Riverview Jazz Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. ST. MARY OF THE MOUNT. The Tim Stevens/ Leonard Johnson Project. Benefits Just Harvest. Mt. Washington. 412-431-8960.

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FRI 27

STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. 724-423-5604. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY

SUN 29 HAMBONE’S. Woody Stoner, Ian Kane, Ronnie Wiess. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 30 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Marty Ashby Trio w/ Kenia. North Side. 412-322-1850. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

SAT 28 WALNUT STREET. Chris Higbee. Shadyside. 412-321-4422.

CLASSICAL SAT 28 PLAY IT AGAIN, MARVIN! A MARVIN HAMLISCH CELEBRATION. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

TUE 01 CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH. Bar Marco, Strip District. 917-363-6089. CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH: CHAMBER MUSIC READING PARTY. Bring an instrument, a stand, & any music you’d like to play. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900.

TUE 01 KATZ PLAZA. Jevon Rushton. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

OTHER MUSIC

WED 02 CJ’S. Sandra Dowe Spanky Wilson. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

SAT 28

ACOUSTIC

ALPHABET CITY TENT. Allstar Refugee Band, Archa Theater. North Side. 412-323-0278.

THU 26

SUN 29

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

ALPHABET CITY TENT. Allstar Refugee Band, Archa Theater. North Side. 412-323-0278.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 25 - July 1 Black Flag

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Hor & Cinema Cinema. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Footloose BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through June 29.

THURSDAY 26 American Opera

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Constants & Addison Steele. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 6:30p.m.

Xavier Rudd ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Ash Grunwald. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Aries Spears

Wild Moccasins / The Eastern Sea

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through June 29.

FRIDAY 27

DVE Comedy Festival BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: dve.com. 8p.m.

FOOTLOOSE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 BENEDUM CENTER

Comedian Brian Beaudoin LATITUDE 360 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. Through June 28.

show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Journey & Steve Miller Band

STATION SQUARE. Free event. For more info visit stationsquare.com/ summerjam. 6:30p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 6:45p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: BOB COMPTON

WEDNESDAY 25

TEN & One Sweet Burgh

SATURDAY 28

Counting Crows

Third Annual Summer Wine Festival

STAGE AE North Side. All ages

TRAX FARMS South Hills. Over

21 event. Tickets: traxfarms. com. 12p.m.

SOUND SERIES: Nat Baldwin

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Influx & Wilhelm. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Play It Again, Marvin! A Marvin Hamlisch Celebration HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 8p.m.

Dave Matthews Band FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

MONDAY 30 Melodime

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Hey Compadre & Molly Rae. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 10 Iska Dhaaf

Guttermouth

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. With special guests Sleep Experiments. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

guests Doctor Smoke & Shiva Stone. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Bastard Bearded Irishmen & More. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-8774-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 29

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Gabe Dixon. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Crobot

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special

Delta Rae

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

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NOT KIDS’ STUFF {BY AL HOFF}

DIRECTOR KELLY REICHARDT’S VISUAL STYLE REMAINS UNASSUMINGLY ELOQUENT

In Gillian Robespierre’s sweet, offbeat rom-com Obvious Child, aspiring standup comedian Donna (Jenny Slate) is unceremoniously cut loose by her boyfriend in the nightclub’s unisex toilet. (“Stop looking at your phone while you’re dumping me.”) Later that night, Donna meets Max (Jake Lacy), who’s not really her type. Still, they enjoy a drunken hook-up during which Donna gets pregnant, and later she has an abortion. Because that happens.

DAMMED

IF YOU DO

Street meet: Jake Lacy and Jenny Slate

CP APPROVED

But this hot-button issue is the catalyst for the film’s larger narrative, a sometimes raunchy, rough-edged but heartwarming coming-of-age story about a bright but unfocused twentysomething. It’s a journey that involves parents, friends, work, romantic relationships and, yes, Planned Parenthood. The punny title comes from the bouncy Paul Simon tune, and refers not only to the pregnancy but also to Donna’s transitional state, as much a girl as woman. Set in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, comparisons to Girls will be inevitable, but Robespierre’s characters are warmer and more normally flawed. Onscreen this summer, we will see men fight aliens, be James Brown and pretend to be cops. Entertaining, if highly unusual events, but finally, there’s a no-drama, frequently funny and subversively informative film about a common fact of modern American life: Lots of women have safe, legal abortions. While not a polemic, Obvious Child breaks the taboo of talking matter-offactly about abortion, which in its own way is a political act; Donna understands this power and speaks openly about her decision with her bestie (Gaby Hoffman), her mom (Polly Draper) — who has her own unique historical perspective — and even her nightclub audience. Unplanned pregnancies are standard fodder in films and television stories, and in the more self-consciously “modern” tales, abortion is presented as an option — before being rejected. (TV’s Friday Night Lights was the rare recent exception.) Sure, pro-lifers will hate this film, but let them spend the summer adding up all the zillions of other onscreen “deaths,” before watching Knocked Up again. (Same set-up, decidedly less-typical outcome.) Folks who want to see amusing and provocative movies about relevant real-life topics can start here. Starts Fri., June 27. AMC Loews and Manor

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

On the fence about direct action? Jesse Eisenberg portrays an eco-activist

N

IGHT MOVES is a thriller about ecosabotage and its aftermath, but it’s also a Kelly Reichardt film. So while necessarily plot-driven, it’s simultaneously the kind of low-key, almost observational character study you’d expect (and ardently hope for) from the director of the sublime Old Joy, arthouse favorite Wendy and Lucy and provocative, bigger-budget revisionist Western Meek’s Cutoff. Josh (Jesse Eisenberg) and Dena (Dakota Fanning) are young activists for whom protest marches seem laughably inadequate to address the global environmental crisis. Drawing on the explosives expertise of Josh’s buddy Harmon (Peter Sarsgaard), they plan direct action: blowing up an Oregon hydroelectric dam that blocks a salmon run. The film’s first half is substantially a procedural, but in Reichardt’s hands it never feels that way. There’s the drama, for instance, of acquiring ammonium nitrate for a speedboat-borne fertilizer bomb. Yet characteristically, Reichardt and long-time writing partner Jonathan Raymond are

equally concerned with exploring characters through meaningful silences. Key background information often appears almost casually, in a lone line of dialogue. And symbolic resonances — like a scene with a dead pregnant doe on a roadside — abound, as do such deadpan ironies as can be found in a suburban mansion stocked with nature videos, or a wordless sequence in a mountain-country landfill.

NIGHT MOVES DIRECTED BY: Kelly Reichardt STARRING: Jesse Eisenberg, Peter Sarsgaard, Dakota Fanning Starts Fri., June 27. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Reichardt’s visual style, meanwhile, remains unassumingly eloquent. Consider the eerie nighttime shot as the bombbearing boat approaches the small but imposing dam (which, perhaps significantly, already has a crack in it). Reichardt’s characters are always com-

plex and intriguingly inaccessible, and Fanning, Sarsgaard and a brooding Eisenberg give potent performances. If the film’s second half is slightly less satisfying, it’s because Reichardt moves the target a little: The first half (recalling last year’s Brit Marling thriller The East) seems to want us to ask whether such sabotage is moral or effective, while the second act perhaps rigs the game with tragedy. Josh, explaining why he wanted to destroy the dam, says, “People are gonna start thinking. They have to.” Reichardt clearly disagrees with the saboteurs’ approach (even if she sympathizes with their larger environmental concerns). But what direction would the drama have gone if — spoiler alert — the protagonists had chosen an act of sabotage that didn’t risk human life? On the other hand, maybe this otherwise fine film is Reichardt’s exploration of the wages of extremism. As in Meek’s Cutoff, she demonstrates a healthy mistrust of people who are too sure they know what’s right.

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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WE ARE THE BEST!’ REVIEWED MOVIE OF THE YEAR. “ IF EVER A MOVIE EARNED THE EXCLAMATION POINT IN ITS TITLE, IT’ S ‘ WE ARE THE BEST!’” – SHERI LINDEN, LOS ANGELES TIMES “There is hardly a shortage of movies about rock ‘n’ roll, but there are few as PERFECT AS ‘ WE ARE THE BEST! ’” – A.O. SCOTT, THE NEW YORK TIMES

“WHEN MEASURED BY THE PLEASURE IT CONFERS, ‘WE ARE THE BEST!’ IS A BIG DEAL THAT WILL BE WINNING HEARTS – AND EVEN GROWNUP MINDS – FOR A LONG TIME TO COME.” – JOE MORGENSTERN, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

WE ARE THE A F I L M BY

LUKAS MOODYSSON

B EST !

THREE GIRLS VS THE WORLD.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh Filmmakers

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW AI WEIWEI: THE FAKE CASE. Andreas Johnsen’s documentary is less a profile of the infamous Chinese artist Ai Weiwei than a followup to his recent troubles with the authorities in Beijing. (Newcomers are advised to start with Alison Klayman’s 2012 doc Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry.) After nearly three months in detention, Ai Weiwei is released on probation, and Johnsen’s cameras capture him trying to get his groove back despite various restrictions imposed upon him. The film is of interest to those following Ai Weiwei’s travails, but doesn’t proffer much we don’t already know about the artist, activist and provocateur: Despite strictures, Weiwei remains irrepressible, cooperating with this film and creating a new installation inspired by his imprisonment. In English, and Mandarin, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 27. Harris (Al Hoff) BEGIN AGAIN. A washed-up record executive (Mark Ruffalo) and a newbie singer-songwriter (Keira Knightley) make music together in John Carney’s comedy-with-songs. Starts Wed., July 2. DELIVER US FROM EVIL. A police officer finds his skills challenged by a series of demonic possessions gripping some of New York City’s citizens. Eric Bana stars in Scott Derrickson’s horror film. Starts Wed., July 2.

Screening Room STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 27 Melwood theaters.pittsburgharts.org

LA BARE. This new documentary from Mount Lebanon native Joe Manganiello looks at life onstage and off for the men of La Bare, a popular male strip club in Dallas. Manganiello is no stranger to the thong, having played stripper “Big Dick Richie” in Steven Soderbergh’s Magic Mike. Featured performers include: “The Chef,” “The Latin Lover” and “Ace Boogie.” 9:15 p.m. Sat., June 28; 2 p.m. Sun., June 29; 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 2; 10 p.m. Fri., July 4; 9:30 p.m. Sat., July 5; and 7 p.m. Sun., July 6. Hollywood TAMMY. A scorned woman (Melissa McCarthy) goes on a road trip with her hardboiled grandma (Susan Sarandon). Ben Falcone directs this comedy. Starts Wed., July 2.

magpictures.com/wearethebest

La Bare EARTH TO ECHO. Dave Green directs this family film about kids who set out to help an alien. The outstretched finger on the movie’s poster wants to remind you of E.T. Starts Wed., July 2. JERSEY BOYS. Clint Eastwood directs this adaptation of the popular Broadway musical tracing the career of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, and it’s a surprisingly flat affair. Part mob comedy, part backstage melodrama, it never really gels into a compelling (or believable) tale of the highs and lows of struggling to become a huge pop sensation. Befitting its stage roots, it’s endlessly feel-good (even the few sad parts are designed to entertain), and the actors deliver a decent facsimile of the Four Seasons’ distinctive sound. (John Lloyd Young, who portrays Valli, originated the role on Broadway.) Eastwood’s not even trying here — it plays out like a better-than-average TV movie, complete with fake New York City sets and a muddled timeline. But in fairness, the whole venture doesn’t seem to be aiming to be anything more than a mildly entertaining time-waster with some big hit songs tossed in. (AH)

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Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

THINK LIKE A MAN TOO. The couples from the 2012 ensemble rom-com are back, and taking a fun trip to Las Vegas for a wedding. But first! Separate bachelor and bachelorette parties that almost immediately get wildly out-of-control. (Hint: The parties do reunite … in jail!) Tim Story returns to the director’s chair in this sequel to the 2012 hit, loosely based on Steve Harvey’s titular guide to modern relationships. The book-advice angle is downplayed here in favor of a PG-13 Hangover-type romp, and Caesar’s Palace resort gets most of the extraneous on-screen promotion. (But here’s free advice not offered or taken: Don’t get so drunk!) The mildly raucous film offers nothing new on Vegas, relationships or learning to be a better person. But star Kevin Hart never stops working his motor-mouth gag machine, and his fans, and those of strip-club brawls, should be entertained. (AH)

own youth) perfectly captures the fearless, crazy-fun time girls enjoy before the miseries and insecurities of adolescence descend. (And such heartache is nigh: An impulsive meeting with a boy punk band threatens the trio’s stability when crushes erupt. But until then: “We’re anti-makeup!”) The shaggy tale stays on track, sweetly depicting the girls’ friendship, and the strength they draw from each other and from having a creative outlet. It all meanders up to the band playing the funniest, greatest gig ever — the source of the film’s exuberant title. In Swedish, with subtitles. Fri., June 27, through Tue., July 1. Melwood (AH)

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Gravity, Wed., June 25 (Schenley), and Sat., June 28 (Riverview). E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Fri., June 27 (Arsenal); Sat., June 28 (Grandview); Thu., June 26 (Brookline); and Sun., June 29 (Schenley). Space Jam, Tue., July 1 (West End/ Elliot) and Thu., July 3 (Brookline). Last Vegas, Wed., July 2 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION. The Autobots and Decepticons are back for more clanging, crushing brawling in this actioner from Michael Bay. Mark Wahlberg stars. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., June 27.

Think Like A Man Too

ARE THE BEST! In 1982 Stockholm, two CP WE tomboyish 13-year-old girls decide to start a punk band. Sure, everybody says “punk is dead,” but only people who aren’t real punks would say that. And it doesn’t matter that the girls can’t play any instruments; Bobo and Klara instinctively know punk is the perfect outlet for their pent-up energy and their disdain for all things “fascist.” After working out a song on just a borrowed bass and drum kit — it’s a rant about how pointless sports fandom is — they decide to add a third member, another social outcast at their school: Hedvig is quiet and a Christian, but can play guitar. Lukas Moodysson’s coming-of-age comedy (adapted from his wife’s graphic novel based on her

ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Citizen Kane (1941), 4:30 p.m. Wed., June 25, and 2 p.m. Thu., June 26. Cool Hand Luke (1967), 7 p.m. Wed., June 25, and 4:20 p.m. Thu., June 26. Trading Places (1983), 9:30 p.m. Wed., June 25. Trainspotting (1996), 7 p.m. Thu., June 26. Pulp Fiction (1994), 9:10 p.m. Thu., June 26. Do the Right Thing (1989), Fri., June 27, through Sat., June 28. The Shining (1980), Fri., June 27, through Tue., July 1; also Thu., July 3. Shaft (1971), 10 p.m. Fri., June 27, through Sun., June 29; also, Tue., July 1, through Thu., July 3. The Big Lebowski (1998), midnight, Fri., June 27; Sat., June 28, through Mon., June 30; and Thu., July 3. Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard’s sci-fi-ish 1965 drama), Sat., June 28, through Mon., June 30; also Wed., July 2, and Thu., July 3. Call or see website for


LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: Michael Wetmiller - DIY PIttsburgh At some point, and regardless of economic conditions, your home will need repairs or improvements. Don’t pay for professional services when you can Do-It-Yourself and save money. In this workshop, students will learn essential repairs and improvements through hands-on experience in basic home improvement skills.

BASIC HOME IMPROVEMENT AND REPAIR (PART 4) THURSDAY, JUNE 26 6:00 PM—7:30 PM We Are The Best! times. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST. Jack Nicholson stars in Milos Forman’s 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel. A rebellious man thinks he can cheat the criminal-justice system by pleading insanity and serving time at a mental institution. But things — including an insurrection against the asylum’s dictatorial Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) — don’t go as well as he hoped. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 25. Hollywood EVERGREEN: THE ROAD TO LEGALIZATION. Riley Morton and Nils Cowan’s new documentary looks at Initiative 502, which in 2012 made Washington the first state to legalize the possession of recreational marijuana. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 26, and 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., June 28. Hollywood AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON. Two American tourists run afoul of a werewolf while visiting London in John Landis’ 1981 horror thriller with a splash of comedy. Not to be confused with the “Werewolves of London.” 10 p.m. Fri., June 27, and 10 p.m. Sat. June 28. Oaks ART ON FILM SERIES. Get your New York City gritty on with this double-feature. First, The Warriors (1979), Walter Hill’s cult-classic drama about street gangs. After, catch the 1983 documentary Style

Wars, one of the first films to spotlight the “street art” of graffiti. 5:30 p.m. Sat., June 28. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $5

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527. WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

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SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Hollywood’s transition from silent film to talkies is lovingly skewered in this rousing musical from Stanley Donen. The 1952 film stars Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor, Pittsburgh’s own Gene Kelly and a very important lamppost. The film concludes a month-long series of films related to Mad Men. (Singin’ just happens to be Betty Draper’s favorite film.) 8 p.m. Sun., June 29. Regent Square (AH)

Call now to schedule your appt. in our gorgeous private boutique

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JAWS. Steven Spielberg’s aqua-thriller that terrified beach-goers in the summer of 1975, when it unspooled the tale of a great white shark eating swimmers along the Atlantic seaboard. Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw and Roy Scheider hit the waves to capture the man-eater. It’s still lots of scary fun. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 2. AMC Loews. $5 (AH) JURASSIC PARK. It’s been more than 20 years since dinosaurs stalked this earth — well, at least those impressive digital creations we encountered in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 actioner. See how those big lizards hold up, and ponder anew the perils of messing around with science. 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 3; 7:30 p.m. Fri., July 4; 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., July 5; and 4 p.m. Sun., July 6. Hollywood

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[BOOK REVIEW]

THE RESULTS FEEL FRESH WITHOUT LOOKING ENTIRELY UNFAMILIAR

DEATH AND ART {BY FRED SHAW} As a kid in the ’80s reading Helter Skelter, I was gripped by the real-life horror story of the Manson family, boogeyman of a counter-culture I was just beginning to understand. In his newest book, Sharon Tate and the Daughters of Joy (Time Being Books), David Herrle moves beyond journalistic analysis to take a profound look at the Tate/LaBianca murders using both prose and poems through 190 pages of near-philosophical scrutiny. It’s not beach reading, for sure. Herrle, a technical writer living in Pittsburgh and creator of online lit mag SubtleTea, goes deep, using dozens of sources to make historical connections between the deaths of Marie Antoinette, Mary Jane Kelly (Jack the Ripper’s final victim) and Sharon Tate. His speakers make interesting claims about beauty and revolutionary violence, saying, in “The Sorcerer’s Apparatchik,” “You ask me what the secret / of mass violence is. / It’s beauty. / Resentment or envy of it, / letdowns, spurn-burns. / A fetish for its order without / its ‘oops’ factor. / An unreaching of the high bar, / a falling short. / Rage rages and become a ruling stone / when pacifism falls to pieces.” His thoughtful hypotheses work best when couched with witty wordplay. Herrle’s speakers throughout Sharon Tate ... include Psalmic Eeyore and Davidus Thermidor, a Scarlet Pimpernel-esque character who shows up in the middle of the Tate slaughter as a sermonizing superhero hoping to neutralize the Manson gang. It’s weird, ambitious stuff for a poetry collection that kept this reader on his toes with working references to French Revolutionary figures. Throughout this work, Herrle employs a panoply of historical and pop-culture figures. At times, the name-dropping is informative; at others, it distracts from the craft and feels like intellectual posturing. Aside from the final “chapter” of the book, “Charlie Manson and the Scorpion Children,” the most intriguing was “Black Dahlia Nihilismus.” Here, Herrle uses a keen sense of irony to meditate on art, death and mass murder in the 20th century. Poems like “Spiritual Giants” and “I’m So Over the Rainbow” note the delicious hypocrisy of weapons monikers in relation to high casualty counts. It culminates in “Art Doesn’t Save,” in which he concludes, “What was the name / of the companion plane / for the Hiroshima and / Nagasaki bombings? / The Great Artiste.” Sharon Tate … is a cerebral work, not for the faint of heart.

[ART REVIEW]

MOOD (DIS) ORDERS {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

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IA TARDUCCI HENRY has found room to move in the genre of gestural abstraction. For Inside and Out, her Emerging Artist of the Year exhibit at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, she chose to explore new directions, counterbalancing the primal goo of oil paint with concepts that push at the limits of painting. The results feel fresh without looking entirely unfamiliar. Henry has been regularly exhibiting her work in Pittsburgh and elsewhere for the past several years. (She’s also director of the Mine Factory gallery, in Point Breeze.) As with much recent ambitious abstract painting — i.e., painting that aspires to do more than serve as decoration — Henry’s work is based in the gestural and expressive rather than the geometric. Henry’s canvases are thick with paint and heavily worked, often combining

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

Honed to a resolution: Mia Tarducci Henry’s “surfaces” (detail)

brushwork, impasto, scraping, dragging and overpainting. While they can look disorderly at a glance, upon closer examination they feel worried over, honed to a resolution rather than the residue of reckless abandon. Within each painting, there is usually a consistency of mark-

MIA TARDUCCI HENRY: INSIDE AND OUT continues through July 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or pittsburgharts.org

making and technique. The tone of the paintings often feels retro-modern — as opposed to modern — with echoes of Joan Mitchell, Jean-Paul Riopelle and early Philip Guston. But the keyed-up color

is thoroughly contemporary, glowing as intensely as a flat-screen television. Abstract painting often seems as constrained as the blues, and as endlessly mutable, but those sources in modern painting ground Henry’s work in the past without trapping it there. Henry’s work is contemporary, or postmodern, in the way that virtually all art now is: exploratory, conditional, provocative and open to interpretations that don’t necessarily align with the artist’s intentions. Her work builds on the renewed vitality of abstract painting since Gerhard Richter began to squeegee paint onto canvas in 1980, producing gorgeous pictures that simulated expressionism and felt emotional in a non-specific way. A door was opened as many painters acknowledged that abstraction is not direct expression but rather an imprecise form of


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GOLD STANDARD {BY DAN WILLIS}

Dee Briggs’ House of Gold

representation, employing colors, shapes and marks to evoke feelings. We expect a lot of choices these days, and Henry supplies them. The paintings strike off in different directions while still cohering. Some have an all-over quality, such as the briny “in the deep,â€? while others, such as “out of the light,â€? are carefully constructed compositions. Those directions and more are pulled together in “the ride,â€? a 60-foot long tour de force incorporating all of her favorite techniques. As with all Henry’s paintings, “the rideâ€? is impressionistic as well as expressionistic. Oriented along horizontal and vertical axes that can seem geologic or humanmade, it suggests a panoramic landscape or cityscape viewed through a “special effectsâ€? ďŹ lter. Then there are the 3-D elements. The painting “layersâ€? is paired with a similarly painted plaster ďŹ gure crouching before it, possibly forlorn or exhausted. “color coded,â€? a hybrid of furniture and minimalist sculpture painted in precise bands of color, ďŹ lls some of the space between paintings, contrasting in form while mimicking their colors. Actually, this exhibit feels like two exhibits: the abstract paintings and, in a separate room, 3-D accompaniments and theme-and-variations on pharmaceuticals. Both “24 avorsâ€? and “100 pill bottles and countingâ€? echo Warhol’s grid of Campbell’s Soup varieties, though here the avors include Prozac, Wellbutrin and Zoloft. Arrayed on the wall, the paintings make a dramatic presence. Scattered throughout the room like so many chemical drums are giant pill bottles, and a selection of jumbo-size pills are suspended from the ceiling, their intense colors evoking the emotions they are designed to suppress. While representing the variety and quantity of mood-altering drugs available, the artwork doesn’t editorialize beyond presenting them as a somewhat alarming force to be reckoned with. I remain unclear as to what exactly the Center for the Arts’ “Emerging Artist of the Yearâ€? and “Artist of the Yearâ€? designations are meant to connote, beyond the stated “signiďŹ cant creative contributions.â€? There are nominators and a selection jury, with some overlap, I gather, though it’s about as transparent as a Super PAC. Although the awardees sometimes seem rather arbitrary, the choices rarely strike me as serious missteps. In the case of Mia Tarducci Henry, I found the choice somewhat unexpected yet sound. And Henry, impressively, took the opportunity and ran with it, which is a whole other matter, as the artists are selected on the basis of their previously exhibited work, which is not typically included in the exhibit.

House of Gold’s power lies in its simplicity. The art project consists of an uninhabited house on Swissvale Avenue in Wilkinsburg whose exterior was coated entirely in gold paint by artist and Wilkinsburg resident Dee Briggs. The fresh coat was applied over two days, with the help of a small crew of friends and volunteers. Briggs said of the house, “It had patches; it was dirty and dingy. The reason behind the gold was to dematerialize the house while communicating value and beauty.â€? Visitors will see just how dematerialized it is. All of the doors and most of the windows are either boarded up or locked. No feature escapes the thick coat of paint. Photographs online reveal that the interior is filled with trash. The only relief from the relentless luster is a graffiti url: www.house-of-gold.com. It’s not just uninhabited; it is, by its metaphorical nature, uninhabitable. Briggs is primarily a sculptor who works in architectural materials like steel and concrete. House of Gold is a massively ambitious project, and yet its spectacle can be captured in four words: a house, painted gold. The motivation was the undervaluing of human life Briggs says she saw in rougher neighborhoods. “Walking around my neighborhood, I see young people aged 5 to 30, and they behave in a way that tells me they clearly don’t value each other’s lives,â€? says Briggs. “But these kids are golden inside. ‌ It’s about seeing the beauty in people before they’re gone.â€? Appropriately enough, the house itself will not be around for long. The borough plans to demolish it as soon as this week. The project’s website details the rich cultural history of the building. It was built in 1875, then partially converted into a grocery store in the 1930s; multiple families and generations of Americans were born and raised there. Monolithic and just a little bit garish, House of Gold is inner beauty made boldly external. It’s not something you flock to. It’s something that you stumble upon, that makes you stop, stare and wonder why you don’t stop and stare more often. “Houses like this are not just about the garbage strewn on the lawn,â€? Briggs says. “There were lives in there.â€?

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

Sorority: Iphigenia and Other Daughers, at Alarum Theatre

[PLAY REVIEWS]

RETRIBUTIONS {BY TED HOOVER} AT THE BOTTOM of a hill near a Squir-

rel Hill entrance to Frick Park, a handful of folding chairs are set in a few rows. A couple of torches are lit to keep away the pests (not including critics) and three young woman in off-white shifts loll about. Soon a figure glides in from the distance. She turns out to be Clytemnestra, the women are the Chorus and Ellen McLaughlin’s Iphigenia and Other Daughters, a Pittsburgh premiere by Alarum Theatre company, comes to life.

IPHIGENIA AND OTHER DAUGHTERS continues through Sat., June 28. Alarum Theatre at Frick Park (Beechwood Avenue at Nicholson), Squirrel Hill. $15. www.alarumtheatre.com

Here McLaughlin revisits the Greek legend The Oresteia. For those who were in the nurse’s office the day we covered that, let me remind you: In order to please the gods and win the Trojan War, King Agamemnon (Mr. Clytemnestra) sacrifices his daughter Iphigenia. In revenge, Clytemnestra murders him and for 20 years sits at home with her two other daughters, Chrysothemis and Electra (remember her and her complex?). They’re waiting for the other kid, Orestes, to return from some endless war — at which point, it has been foretold, he will kill his mother. Which just sets off

another round of vengeance … you know those ancient Greeks. McLaughlin certainly does, and from out of this tale, by focusing exclusively on the women, she has crafted a wonderfully intelligent and thought-provoking play. History tends to be a nonstop of litany of battles and wars and sieges and skirmishes — written by men, about men, for men. McLaughlin’s play puts women’s lives (and deaths) front and center, on equal footing with the Great Men of the Past. She’s a writer of considerable skill, as this 1994 play demonstrates, and Alarum Theatre does her justice. Director Shannon Knapp invisibly conjures a production that is both mysterious and explicit. Though now and again everyone seems to be aware they are Performing Important Work, on the whole the evening is subtle and sharp, featuring a uniformly impressive cast — Elizabeth Farina, Kaitlin Kerr, Alyssa LaVacca, Abby Lis-Perlis, Connor Shiroshita Pickett, Moire Quigley and Madelyn Tomko. To tell you the truth, these nutty Greeks and their loopy fairytales usually leave me cold; who knew Alarum and McLaughlin could warm me up? I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

COMIC ANGST {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} LITTLE LAKE Theatre Co. luxuriates in the

fun of Christopher Durang’s 2013 Tonywinner Vanya and Sonya and Masha and Spike. The quirky if sometimes drawn-out


comedy mixes Chekhovian atmosphere and references with Durangian irreverence and anger. Consider angst a given for both playwrights. It’s funny even if you don’t know Chekhov’s Three Sisters, Uncle Vanya, The Cherry Orchard, The Seagull, et al. But it helps. Directed by Little Lake’s artistic director Sunny Disney Fitchett, Vanya is a well-cast character comedy, with scenery-chewing opportunities for all. Plot? Meh. The first three eponymous folks are middle-aged siblings, and the last-named is a young stud. Toss in a psychic cleaning lady and a starry-eyed Chekhovian ingénue. Soulsearching hilarity ensues.

VANYA AND SASHA AND MASHA AND SPIKE continues through Sat., June 28. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-18. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

Everybody shines, but it’s hard not to admire the ever-versatile Mary Liz Meyer, who truly embodies the self-effacing Sonya. Her brief but successful transformation from frump to femme fatale is scrumptiously credible. And give a hand

to Art DeConciliis for his 100th main-stage role with Little Lake and the fitting role of “sensible” Vanya. When he ultimately loses his calm, his rant is a joy to behold: the loss of articulate discussion and a shared popular culture, the futility of millennial multitasking and the ceremony of letter-writing from flowing cursive to stamp-licking. And so much more. Ross Kobelak supplies most of the heavy physicality of the evening, strutting and posturing as Spike. Second for body English, Adrienne Fischer leaps and bounds as the multi-talented Cassandra. Setting the plot’s necessary conflict in motion, Allison Cahill brings glamour as the movie star Masha, with counterpoint by Jocelyn Hyrb as the lovely innocent, Nina. The costumes, lovely and otherwise, work to further define the characters. The design/tech crew of Martha Bell, Philip Irvin and Leigh Ann Frohnapfel add their discrete and discreet talents to Fitchett’s production. Poor Christopher Durang. He misses all that mundane Americana he used to make fun of. In Vanya, the erstwhile enfant terrible, now an established eminence, channels an old codger metaphorically yelling at the kids to get off his lawn. It’s a beauty. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Come see what we’ve uncovered! Get a behind-the-scenes perspective on the intersection of art and science taking place in the museum every day. Several Renaissance paintings with uncertain origins have been in museum storage for decades, waiting to be re-discovered. Don’t miss this opportunity to see what we uncovered under a 19th-century fake.

Opens this weekend!

cmoa.org

| 412.622.3131 drop-in tours daily | call 412.622.3289 to schedule a group tour

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.2607.03.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Nikki Glaser (pictured), and the WDVE Morning Show’s Bill Crawford. The show’s co-presented by the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport. Dan Willis 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $48. 412456-6666 or www.dve.com

JUNE 29 yART

+ SAT., JUNE 28 {ART}

+ FRI., JUNE 27 {STAGE}

Cactus loosely adapts Romeo and Juliet — except that it’s set on the Arizona border … with vampires. One star-crossed lover’s vampire family works with the U.S. government to kill illegal migrants, while the other’s vampire clan protects migrants. Local playwright Philip Real’s previous work has been produced nationally. He developed Cactus with 12 Peers Theater, which opens its world-premiere production tonight, at Grey Box Theatre. Kyle Bostian directs. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through July 13. 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-17. www.12peerstheater.org

{DANCE} “Concepts interest me,” writes Dean Moss in an online profile. “Imagery interests me. Activities of falling involve me. I like to do all, all at once.” The veteran award-winning, Brooklyn-based choreographer visits Pittsburgh with a work in progress courtesy of the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s Community Residency Program. johnbrown is Dean Moss/Gamophyte Inc.’s interdisciplinary work exploring the still-controversial legacy of the radical abolitionist of Harper’s Ferry fame. The show will premiere this fall, at New York City’s The Kitchen. BO 8 p.m. 5931

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Penn Ave., East Liberty. Admission is pay-what-youcan. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

{COMEDY} Tonight’s the third annual DVE Comedy Festival, and the lineup features talent both local and national. Headlining at the Byham Theater is Harland Williams, well known for his rapid-fire, absurdist standup and his roles in Dumb and Dumber and There’s Something About Mary. Also performing are Tommy Johnagin, MADtv’s Bryan Callen, Last Comic Standing’s

One of Pittsburgh’s longestrunning arts institutions teams with one of the newest. About 40 area artists — including Patricia Barefoot, Claire Hardy, Christopher Ruane and Bob Ziller — have contributed to the latest Associated Artists of Pittsburgh group show, curated by the 114-year-old group’s Scott Hunter. The venue is Most Wanted Fine Art at the Waterfront, a new-thisspring offshoot of its Garfield parent gallery. The opening reception is tonight. BO 6 p.m. 149 W. Bridge St., West Homestead. Free. www.aapgh.org

{ART}

Alongside the Carnegie Museum of Art’s exhibit of baroque prints, a new exhibit opens today. Faked, Forgotten, Found documents the scientific analysis and conservation of

JUNE 28 Faked, Forgotten, Found


{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Free!Event

Almost everyplace has its refugees. But unlike the more privileged immigrants cities like Pittsburgh are recruiting, those fleeing political or economic strife are typically voiceless. LOST/FOUND: Finding Refuge in Pittsburgh is a new stage work that gives some local refugees not only a microphone, but also actors, a brass band and a stomping beat. This City of Asylum/Pittsburgh-produced project enlists the Czech Republic’s Archa Theatre collective and its Allstar Refugee Band. In recent weeks, an Iraqi engineer, a family from the Democratic Republic of Congo, and refugees from Nepal and Bhutan shared their stories; Archa’s Jana Svobodová and Phillipp Schenker devised ways to stage them; and the Allstar Refugee Band and bandleader Michael Romanyshyn composed original music. On June 28 and 29, audiences will convene at COAP’s Alphabet City tent, then walk to four nearby venues for each 20-minute telling. An Allstar Refugee concert follows, with local musicians joining the group’s eclectic mix of members from Kurdistan, China and beyond, and its equally hybridized music. LOST/FOUND is all about making the politics behind refugees personal. “It doesn’t work if people are just told about the political reasons … it does not touch people at all,” says Svobodová. But through storytelling, “suddenly you find you can identify with the person as an audience.” Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. Sat., June 28, and 6 p.m. Sun., June 29. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free; reservations recommended at cityofasylumpittsburgh.org/events.

five alleged Renaissance paintings from the museum’s collection. They include a 16thcentury portrait of Florentine noble Isabella de Medici (pictured), which was painted over during the Victorian era. By tracing the life of this painting and others, the exhibit showcases modern restoration technology, and provides historical context for both the original and revised paintings. DW 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sept. 15. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

JUNE 29 USS Requin

But starting today, and on select Sunday mornings this summer, visitors on guided Tech Tours can get special access, going behind the scenes to better understand the vessel’s history, science and engineering. The sub’s unrestored compartments,

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ annual yART sale has sixth annu some new twists —including flames. The Th fundraiser, held on the big Fifth Avenue building’s lawn, lets local artists sell artworks, s l affordable sel afford equipment equipme and supplies, from ceramics to art books, ce and this year including photos by b Kelly Bogel from her fine fin recent Ghost Signs Sign exhibition. New at yART is a live 3 p.m. performance by singerpe songwriter Joy Ike. so Then there’s Burn, T a show and sale by

{EXHIBIT}

JUNE 27 DVE Comedy Festival N E W S

conning tower and periscope will all be accessible, with Science Center staff and a submarine veteran on hand. Self-guided tours of the rest of the submarine are also available daily. DW 911:30 a.m. Also July 13 and 27; Aug. 10 and 31; and Sept. 14. Allegheny Ave., North Side. 1 Alleghen or www. $15-20. 412-237-3400 41 carnegiesciencecenter.org carnegiesc

{ART}

+ SUN.,, JUNE 29 If you’ve been n to the Carnegie gie Science Center, er, r chances are you’ve seen its ts Cold War-era submarine, the he USS Requin.

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{FESTIVAL} EQT presents the 37th annual Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta at Point State Park. The threeday river and boating festival will once again host a Powerboat Superleague race, the city’s largest Fourth of July fireworks display, live music and more. But

{COMICS}

{FILM} Want to know more about male strippers? La Bare is a new doc about the titular strip club in Dallas, directed by Mount Lebanon’s own Joe Manganiello (who portrayed “Big Dick Richie” in Magic Mike). In La Bare — whose Hollywood Theater run starts tonight — you’ll go onstage and off with mancake including “The Chef,” “The Aerialist” and “The Crowd Pleaser.” On Fri., June 27, Manganiello will attend a fundraising party arty at Ivy, in the Strip District ($20; $20; proceeds benefit the Hollywood ollywood and Denis theaters). rs). Al Hofff Film: 9:15 p.m.; also o 2 p.m. Sun., June 29; 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 2; and July ly 4 weekend. 1449 Potomacc Ave., Dormont. $8. 412-563-0368 368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org ddormont.org

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watercolorist Kathleen Zimbicki. She celebrates her 80th birthday by steeply discounting her paintings — and by offering a selection of $8 paintings that, if not sold, will be burned in an onsite kiln starting at 1 p.m. BO 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

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{WORDS} Enough corporations lately claim to be green that they’ve exhausted all stock art of drops of water on leaves, and hands cupping seedlings. But if you suspect such ads unhelpfully narrow the environmental conversation, tonight’s Big Idea Bookstore event is for you. The co-

Cyberpunk Apocalypse holds its first writers’ showcase of the year. The North Side-based arts collective, which offers artist residencies, hosts the multi-talented Fiona Avocado. Brooklyn-based Avocado is a cartoonist, illustrator, zine-maker, writer and more whose work has appeared in Rain Zine, Stumptown Underground, the Artists vs. Walmart campaign and Van Jones’ Rebuild the Dream project. Also reading tonight are local writers Tyler McAndrew and Laura Brun. BO 7 p.m. 1200 Boyle St., North Side. Donations encouraged. www.cyber punkapocalypse.com

{SPORTS}

Ultimate Dodgeball is an up-and-coming extreme sport that takes the perennial playground activity and incorporates the added insanity of trampolines. Sound interesting? Well, the SkyZone Indoor Trampoline Park, in Leetsdale, is closing off its unique wall-to-wall trampoline court tonight for the Pittsburgh qualifier round of the national Ultimate Dodgeball Championship. The grand championship in Las Vegas will award $50,000 in cash prizes. Teams can register for $50 at UDodgeball.com DW 7 p.m. 740 Brickworks Drive, Leetsdale. $50 per team. 724-2516100 or www.skyzone.com

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JUNE 29 Fiona Avocado

starting today, there are some new attractions as well, including a smoker and grill housed in a big rig (courtesy of the History Channel’s Cross Country Cookout) and the extreme pogo-stick world championships, Pogopalooza. DW 10:30 a.m. Continues through Fri., July 4. 101 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. www.threeriversregatta.net

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operative’s Radicalism 101 discussion series continues with Against Green Capitalism, a presentation facilitated by local scholar Lars Peterson. Suggested readings include Bob Black’s “The Abolition of Work” and Janice Peck’s “The Oprah Effect: The Ideological Work of Neo-liberalism.” BO 7 p.m. 4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-4323

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THEATER BYE BYE BIRDIE. Presented by Mon River Arts & Stagemasters Youth Theatre. June 26-27, 7:30 p.m., Sat., June 28, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 2 p.m. Grand Theatre, . 412-628-1032. CACTUS. Loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru July 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. CINDERELLA. Presented by Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre. Mon-Wed, 11 a.m. Thru July 2. Apple Hill Playhouse. 724-468-5050. THE COMEDIE OF ERRORS. Presented by The Unrehearsed Shakespeare Project. June 28-29, 2 p.m. Collier Community Park. 773-208-7848. THE CRUCIBLE. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 29. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat, 7 p.m. Thru

June 28. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL. Based on the cult classic films by Sam Raimi. Presented by No Name Players. www.nonameplayers.org Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 28. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. FOOTLOOSE. Presented by Pittsburgh CLO. Thru June 27, 8 p.m., Sat., June 28, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 2 & 7 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. IPHIGENIA & OTHER DAUGHTERS. A new look at the Orestes myth from Greek tragedy focusing on the women, those who were excluded from the wars, from revenge, & from history itself. Presented by Alarum Theatre. Thu-Sat, 7 p.m. Thru June 28. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 814-715-2769. NOISES OFF. A play-within-a-play about a troupe of middling British actors rehearsing & performing a comedy. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m.

FULL LIST ONLINE

COMEDY

THU 26

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Thru June 29. O’Reilly Theater, in a laundromat. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Downtown. 412-316-1600. July 6. South Park Theatre, RED. John Logan’s Tony Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. Award-winning play about VANYA & SONIA & MASHA & Mark Rothko. Presented by SPIKE. When movie star Masha Smithfield Street Theatre. unexpectedly returns & announces June 26-28, 8 p.m. Smithfield to her adult siblings, Vanya & United Church of Christ, Sonia, her plans to sell their family Downtown. 412-251-7904. farmhouse, the rug is pulled out RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC from under their bucolic existence. OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, June 28. Little Lake 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. Theatre, Canonsburg. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. 724-745-6300. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, www. per pa Downtown. pghcitym .co 412-456-6666. SPEED DATING COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, TONIGHT! World premiere 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, orchestration presented by The Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Microscopic Opera Company. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. 5 Shadyside Lane, Shadyside. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. www.microscopicopera.org 412-251-0097. Fri-Sun, 7 p.m. Thru June 29. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, SUDS: THE ROCKING 60’S 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, MUSICAL SOAP OPERA. The Downtown. 412-325-6769. story of a young woman & her SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, guardian angels who come to 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City teach her about finding true love Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 27 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. DAHRI FERKS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. FAST & SLOWPROV. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LAST FRIDAYS W/ DAVON MAGWOOD. Feat. a rotating cast of comedians. Last Fri of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Sept. 26 Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. 412-251-6058. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 27 - SAT 28 BRIAN BEAUDOIN. June 27-28 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 27 - SUN 29 ARIES SPEARS. 8 & 10:30 p.m., CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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VISUAL

ART NEW THIS WEEK CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated. Showcase of five Renaissance paintings in the museum’s collection that have undergone significant scientific analysis & conservation. Opens June 28. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Mildred Sidorow. A sunny collection of work by the 94 year old Johnstown native. Opening reception June 28, 5:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CLUB ZOO. Panorama. Local artist showcase feat. Pat Rock, Zarien Santiago, Paige Babin, Brittany Thornton, more. Opens June 26, p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 213-995-6729. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Marcia Koynok. Paintings. Mark Barill. Window installation. Opens July 1. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Midland Arts Council’s Ninth Annual Summer Gallery Exhibition. General exhibition juried by a panel of artist members of the Midland Arts Council. June 26 - July 4. 724-643-9004. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Generals of the Civil War. Feat. photographs of President Abraham Lincoln. Opens July 1. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. Great Waves. Work by Masha Fikhman, Zack Lee & Travis Schwab. Opening reception June 27, 6-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201.

SANCTUARY GALLERY. Sllimdaert: Brent Birnbaum. Opens June 27, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

ONGOING 709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. ASSEMBLE. Transformed Linearities. Work by Julie Mallis. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Crayons, Cats, Dolls & Monsters. Work by Tara Zalewsky-Nease. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Chasing the Sun. Work by Nadya Lapets, Vickie Schilling, & Gloria Tsang. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work

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by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Nia Quilt Guild Member Show. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Born & Raised. A photo series of people & places in West Virginia by Aaron Blum. Closing reception July 31, 6 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Lucky After Dark:Gay & Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh 1960-1990. Feat. photos, video & other artifacts CONTINUES ON PG. 45

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“Perseus Slays Medusa,” by Richard Claraval, from Mythological Gestures, at Spinning Plate Gallery, in Friendship

24TH & CARSON ST

THURS, JUNE 26, 9PM FOLK ROCK

HANGING HILLS PLUS PA U L L U C AND GUY RUSSO FRI, JUNE 27, 8PM COUNTRY/AMERICANA/ROCKABILLY

CHUCK MEAD & THE GRASSY KNOLL BOYS PLUS THE MAVENS SAT, JUNE 28, 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY/ROCKABILLY

POLISH HILLBILLIES

REUNION PLUS THE BESSEMERS AND T H E B E AG L E BROTHERS MON, JUNE 30, 8PM

DOS EQUIS SINGER/SONG WRITER

COMPETITION

SouthSide DogFestival

TUES, JULY 1ST, 9PM JAZZ

S PA C E EXCHANGE SERIES

VENUE IS NOW NON-SMOKING 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7

C a n i n e C o n t e st s• Gi v e aways C a r n i va l Gam e s • Fac e Pai n t i n g • V e n d o rs A d op ti on s • F u n d rai si n g & Aware n e ss . . . an d M O R E !

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BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THU/JUNE 26/10PM THE VELCRO SHOES, ACTION CAMP, GOODNIGHT DARLINGS

THU/ JULY 3/10PM THE WEIRD PAUL ROCK BAND, WILL SIMMONS & THE UPHOLSTERERS, DUMPLINGS, ELECTRIC GRANDMOTHER

THU/JULY 10/10PM BURLESQUE SHOW $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight ___________________ $5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT THURSDAYS, ALL DAY ‘till Midnight 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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Sat., June 28, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 28 BYOT (BRING YOUR OWN TEAM). 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. COMEDY ROYALE III. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE DEATH SHOW: AN IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE JUSTIN & JEROME EXPERIENCE. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SUN 29 MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SUNDAY NIGHT SLAUGHTERHOUSE. Comedy open mic night hosted by Ed Bailey & Gio Attisano. Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 31 Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

MON 30 UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru June 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 01

Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by related artifacts challenge Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. perceptions about race. Oakland. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-622-3131. 412-431-9908. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, (planetarium), Miniature Railroad Strip District. 412-904-4502. and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. ALLEGHENY-KISKI CARRIE FURNACE. VALLEY HERITAGE Built in 1907, Carrie MUSEUM. Military Furnaces 6 & 7 are artifacts and exhibits extremely rare on the Allegheny www. per examples of pre World Valley’s industrial pa pghcitym War II iron-making heritage. Tarentum. .co technology. Rankin. 724-224-7666. 412-464-4020 x.21. ARTDFACT. Artdfact COMPASS INN. Demos and tours Gallery. The works of with costumed guides featuring Timothy Kelley & other this restored stagecoach stop. regional & US artists on display. 724-238-4983. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, FALLINGWATER. Tour the mixed media, found objects, famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. more. North Side. 724-797-3302. 724-329-8501. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FIRST PRESBYTERIAN FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, stained-glass windows. Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, Downtown. 412-471-3436. film & oral history narratives to FORT PITT MUSEUM. explore communities, cultures, Unconquered: History Meets & innovations. Downtown. Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original 412-258-2700. movie props, photographs, BOST BUILDING. Collectors. & costumes alongside 18th Preserved materials reflecting century artifacts & documents, the industrial heritage of TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 02

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

ACROSS THE NATION, WE’RE STEPPING UP ON BEHALF OF OUR FRIENDS, OUR FAMILIES AND OUR FUTURE. EVERYONE HAS A REASON TO END ALZHEIMER’S — AND EVERYONE CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.

START A TEAM. JOIN A TEAM. Supported in part by:

alz.org/walk 800.272.3900

HEINZ FIELD - North Shore

October 11, 2014 Registration Begins at 8:00 a.m.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West &

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Thursday Night Special at Steel City Improv Theater, in Shadyside CRITIC: Emanuel Bose, 34, an information-technology assistant from Shadyside WHEN: Thu.,

June 19 I found out about this place through The Moth, which is a storytelling thing down at the Rex. I thought tonight’s show was great, though. I had way more fun than I expected to. Improv’s a little hit-and-miss sometimes, but these guys were great. When the last group were pretending to be floorboards in a jazz club, and one of them started bragging about how Miles Davis stepped on him and one of the other boards says, ‘Oh, did he and Coltrane take Giant Steps?’, I thought that was hilarious! What a cool reference to make! These guys are really good at what they do. I’m definitely going to recommend this place to some friends in the future. BY DAN WILLIS

a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

SPECIAL SAT 28 WARS-WE ALL RULE

SOMETHING-BBOY EXHIBITION &GRAFFITI SHOWCASE. w/ double feature of The Warriors & Style Wars, BBOY exhibition, open cypher, “WARS” dance workshops, more. 5:30 p.m. The Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks. 412-313-1087.

FESTIVALS THU 26 - SAT 28 BROOKLYN BREWERY MASH. Traveling food, beer & arts festival. Various events & locations. BrooklynBreweryMash.com Thru June 28

FRI 27 - SUN 29 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA RIB FESTIVAL. 5-10 p.m., Sat., June 28, 12-10 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 12-8 p.m. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 800-747-5599.

SAT 28 FEAST-IVAL. Live music, crafts, rock wall climbing, food trucks, more. Pennsylvania 51 & Furnace St., McKees Rocks. 12-7 p.m. 412-331-9900. SUMMER WINE FESTIVAL. 10+ wineries, live music, food, more. 12 p.m. Trax Farms. 412-835-3246.

SAT 28 - SUN 29 THE GREAT EUROPEAN BEER FESTIVAL. Over 100 Belgian & European beers, live music, more. June 28-29 Sharp Edge Beer Emporium, Friendship. 412-661-3537.


VISUAL ART

DANCE FRI 27 JOHNBROWN. Performance presented by Dean Moss/ Gametophyte Inc. meditating on the legacy of 19th century white abolitionist John Brown. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

TUE 01 THE MOVE TOUR W/ JULIANNE & DEREK HOUGH. 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FUNDRAISERS SUN 29 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. PITTSBURGH CONGENITAL HEART WALK. Benefits The Children’s Heart Foundation & the Adult Congenital Heart Association. 8:30 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-551-3557. SHOOT COWS FUNDRAISER. Benefits Heifer International 12 p.m. Legions Hobbies & Games, Green Tree. 412-953-7557.

POLITICS SAT 28 THE BATTLE FOR PUBLIC TRANSIT IN PITTSBURGH. Presented by Pittsburgh Socialist Alternative. 2:30 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-589-2558.

LITERARY THU 26 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

from iconic clubs. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. With the Grain. Recent works by Ashley Jean Hickey. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. COLOR!!! Juried exhibition feat. regional artists. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Blind Intersections: Another Series of False Leads. Feat. work by Paul Paddock, Michael Matos, Thad Kellstadt, Terry Carroll, Dean Cercone, Keith Knight, Mark Lyons & Lara Lampenfield. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800.

CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young

LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Affair w/ the Arts Part 2. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Small Works. Work by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEW CITY CHURCH. Layers. Paintings by John J. Donnelly. Downtown. 412-726-4217. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company Part 2. Work by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every

PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/ Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work

by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Mythological Gestures. Drawings by Richard Claraval. Closing party June 27, 7p.m. Friendship. 412-877-7394. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Strip District. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. transformBECOME. Work by Elan Wojciechowski, Andy Scott, Stephanie Neary, Ron Hornbeck, Christina Labrise, Justin Hartman, Tyler Palladino, Jen Green, & Maura Doern Danko. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. Feat. work by 66 artists in all media. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

FRI 27

month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WRITERS LIVE @ CLP - MAIN: KATHLEEN GEORGE. Lecture & book signing w/ author of The Johnstown Girls. 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

BOOK CHAT. The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WORD OF MOUTH: THE WINDS. Spoken word &

poetry. 9 p.m. Ujamaa Collective, Hill District. 412-228-5160.

SAT 28 THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: SPEAKING PITTSBURGHESE: THE HISTORY OF HOW YINZ TALK N’AT. Discussion & book signing w/ Barbara Johnstone. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PLAYS INVERSE POETRY & PROSE READING. Readings by Joshua Young, Aubrey Hirsch, Alexis Pope, Nicole Wilson, & Abigail Zimmer. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

MON 30 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S SUMMER VACATION. Informal scene night, actors & non-actors read works of Shakespeare. 7:15 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. SHAKESPEARE READERS. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru June 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 01 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 02 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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KIDSTUFF THU 26 YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 26 - WED 02 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 28 THE 2ND ANNUAL WE CAN! DAY. Relay racing, campfire-themed stories, grilling station, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, N orth Side. 412-322-5058.

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

MON 30 BONJOUR LES AMIS. French stories & activities. Ages 2-5 w/ parent. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru July 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

TUE 01

OUTSIDE TUE 01 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 02 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF

FULL LIST E N O wLwIN w. r

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 02 PHOTOGRAPHY FOR KIDS. For students entering grades 4-6. Must pre-register. July 2-9, 6 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

THU 26

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

pape pghcitym .co

FIG FEST IN THE WIGLE WHISKEY GARDEN. Cooking demo, fig tree care & growing tips, silent auction, more. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796. GLOBAL DAY OF DISCOVERY: STARGAZING. Screening of “Undaunted,” music, cocktails, more. 5 p.m. Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-562-1200. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Second Thu of every month, 11 a.m. and Fourth Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NORTHSIDE SANDWICH WEEK. Participating locations at sandwichweek.pittsburgh northside.com Thru June 26 201-669-9046. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. TWO TRADITIONS OF CHINA: TEA & TAI CHI. 2:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 27

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM-MIDNIGHT 2-4-1 LAP DANCES

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. COPYING AS RESEARCH: UNCOVERING THE SECRETS OF THE MASTER ENGRAVERS. Lecture w/ Andrew Raftery, professor of printmaking at Rhode Island School of Design. 6:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GRAIN-TO-GLASS. Tasting of organic locally produced spirits w/ music by The Early Mays. 7 p.m. Chatham University Eden Hall Campus, Gibsonia. 412-365-1375. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

Working in a new medium, it was brave Civil War photographers — risking bodily harm lugging their unwieldy equipment across battlefields — who did so much to dispel any romantic notions the public held about warfare. The Photo Antiquities Museum of Photographic History’s new exhibit, Generals of the Civil War, demonstrates that portraiture was a crucial source of public understanding as well. On view through Aug. 31, the show features photos of Ulysses S. Grant, Hiram Burnham and Lincoln himself, as well as others. Open Monday, and Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 531 E. Ohio St., North Side. 412 231-7881 or www.photoantiquities.org

FRI 27 - SAT 28 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 28 BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-362-9880. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. FIG TREE CLASSES. Hands-on workshop. Part of the Italian Garden Project. www.theitaliangardenproject.com 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and Sat., July 19, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Earthen Vessels Outreach, Bloomfield. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223.

LANGUAGE OF LINE WORKSHOP W/ ANDREW RAFTERY. Discuss the artistic choices made by artists from the 15th–17th centuries. Part of the Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque exhibit. 1-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PITTSBURGH UNDERGROUND MUSIC AWARDS. Recognizing Pittsburgh’s best hip hop, rap, more. 5-10 p.m. Penn Hills High School, Penn Hills. 412-583-2760. POSITIVE PARROTING: THE HEALTHY HAPPY PARROT. Interactive discussions & demos of cage designs, making play areas, safe toys, healthy diets, more. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SATURDAY SILVER SCREEN FILM CLUB. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.


SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STEEL CITY PET EXPO. www. steelcitypetexpo.com 10 a.m.6 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VERONA & OAKMONT HISTORICAL SOCIETIES’ ANTIQUE ROADSHOW. Appraisal limit of 2 items per family. 1-4 p.m. The Western Center for the Arts, Verona. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SAT 28 - SUN 29 COLONIAL COURT DAYS. Re-enactments. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. and Sun., June 29, 2 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-836-1800.

SUN 29 6TH ANNUAL GREAT GARDENS TOUR. Tickets & maps available at Shaler North Hills Library. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. 6TH ANNUAL YART SALE. Outdoor sale/event feat. 70 local artists. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. DANCE LESSON & WINE SESSION. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-512-1507. FLOW, FLY, FORGET. Athletic yoga workshop & happy hour. Ages 21+. 3-5 p.m. The Summit, Mt. Washington. 339-237-0891. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, . 724-516-0441.

MON 30 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

HOT METAL BLUES DANCING. Tue. Thru Aug. 26 Peter’s Pub, Oakland. 412-681-7465. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 02 COUNTRY NIGHT LINE DANCING. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 Latitude 360, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

EPILEPSY FOUNDATION OF WESTERN/CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA On July 19, the EFWCP hosts its 26 annual Pirates th

Family Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy at PNC Park. Volunteers are needed to help with registration, information, prize distribution and the subsequent tailgate party. Perks include a voucher for tickets to a Pirates game. 1-800-361-5885 or www.efwp.org

DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MOWA YOGA PRESENTS: PRACTICE ON THE PODS. Grandview & Shiloh St., Mt. Washington. Wed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 27 339-237-0891. PGC LECTURE SERIES: ADAM HOLTZINGER, NATE COTTERMAN, TIM DRIER. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

TUE 01

AUDITIONS MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES.

DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056.

N E W S

MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for The Addams Family. June 30July 1. Male/female non-Equity actors of all ages. Prepare 32 bars of a Broadway musical w/ sheet music. monriverauds@gmail. com Mon River Arts Studio. 412-628-1032. PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Auditions for one-act plays produced by 18 regional companies. July 19-20. Seeking all types/ experience levels. Prepare a 2-min monologue. auditions@

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TA S T E

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pittsburghnewworks.org Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for “A Kidsummer Night’s Dream.” June 27 & 28. Seeking males & females ages 10 +. Cold readings from the script, actors should bring 16-32 bars of a prepared song. Accompanist will be supplied. Bring a picture & resume. For an audition appointment e-mail tfauditions@ gmail.com. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prizefor-short-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking crafters for the Summer Artisan Bazaar. All artwork & crafts submitted must be original, no kits or work produced from commercial patterns or manufactured pieces will be accepted. www.northhillsartcenter. org 412-364-3622. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com/ THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com SHALER GARDEN CLUB GREAT LOCAL GARDENER CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. Submit 5 photos of your garden w/ description of what makes it special. Registration forms available at Shaler North Hills Library. Deadline: July 8. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

Teligence/18+

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG’S SUMMER IN THE CITY. Seeking artists, crafters & makers for the annual citywide outdoor festival. $15.00 for a 8’ x 17’ parking space to display & sell your work. For further information & application, call or email greensburgba. info@gmail.com 724-689-0040. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages

M U S I C

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47


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

I’m out of your usual demographic, agewise (I’m 70), but I am still an avid reader. My cousin and I have flirted and joked about getting it on together for 50 years or more. Now she’s divorced and having the time of her life. The other day, she told me she’d like to have a “lesbian experience” with me watching and then joining. This is a kinky dream come true! What I don’t know is how to contact someone to do this. I don’t want someone who’s got a disease, or someone with a boyfriend waiting to break in and rob everyone. How do I arrange such a thing? How would I ensure my concerns are dealt with? Is using an escort service any guarantee of safety? OLD BUT ALIVE

“Good for you, OBA, for acknowledging that you’d love a lust-crazed encounter with your cousin and a third,” said Joan Price, author of Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex. “I hope you’re indulging that lust with plenty of hot talk, make-out sessions and role-playing as you figure out how to make your fantasy a reality.” I was going to let Price field this one solo, as she’s the expert on senior sex. But I’m going to break in to note that while cousin-on-cousin action strikes many people as deeply squicky, there’s nothing illegal or dangerous about cousins — even first cousins — doing it. First-cousin marriage is legal in 25 states (and legally recognized all 50 states) and Canada. And we’re not talking about marriage: We’re talking about scorchinghot seventysomething-onseventysomething action between two people who share a grandparent. (In the “both descending from” sense of the word “share,” not … any other sense.) OK, back to Price. “Start hanging out at lesbian bars and other social venues,” said Price. “Don’t go in aiming to pick someone up right off the bat — you don’t want to come across as predatory and creepy. Instead, go on a date with your cousin, dance, chat up women who are friendly. You could make great connections if you’re open and take your time.” I gotta break in again. Loath as I am to contradict Price, don’t hang out in lesbian bars. About the only thing lesbians hate more than opposite-sex couples prowling for “thirds” in their bars are sharp fingernails digging for clams in their pants. And while at first you might be treated like a cute older couple who wandered away from their assisted-living community, as soon as the other patrons realize that you’re just another opposite-sex couple who feels entitled to lesbian space, attention and pussy, you’ll be out on your asses. For the love of all things holy, stay out of lesbian bars. OK, back to Price’s advice: “Another way to go, as you suggested, is to hire someone,” said Price. “The advantage of a paid escort is that you can choose the woman and spell out exactly what fantasy you want her to provide. She’ll be experienced, creative and focused on your pleasure.” Breaking in again: Yes! Hire someone! Young couples complain about how hard it is to find a willing third — they’re called “unicorns” for a

reason — and forgive me for being ageist, but time is not on your side. Hire someone immediately — someone older, who has been in the field for a while (look for reviews online), as they’re less likely to rip you off or play you. “As for getting a disease,” concluded Price, “you will use safer-sex practices with either a paid escort or a new friend. Don’t even consider otherwise.” Breaking in one last time: Use condoms, even if there’s no risk of pregnancy, as condoms decrease your risk for contracting — or passing along — many STIs. But there’s no way to eliminate the risk. You have to decide whether the risk of contracting an STI is worth the reward of a three-way with your cousin. And I think we both know the answer. Joan Price blogs about sex and aging at NakedAtOurAge.com. Follow her on Twitter @JoanPrice. My husband and I have been swingers for years. Our issue? I’m pregnant. My husband had a vasectomy two years ago, and neither of us has wavered in our desire to remain child-free. We know the “father” is the male of a couple we play with regularly. We used protection, but these things are never foolproof. We consider ourselves good friends with this couple, but we are not in any sort of “poly” relationship with them. Do we need to tell the couple about what happened and our decision to terminate the pregnancy? We wouldn’t ask them to help pay for the procedure, and their feelings wouldn’t change our course of action. We’re just unsure about the “swinger etiquette.”

THERE’S NOTHING ILLEGAL OR DANGEROUS ABOUT COUSINS — EVEN FIRST COUSINS — DOING IT.

NO ACRONYM HERE

No method of birth control is foolproof — not even a vasectomy. Now, the failure rate for vasectomies, according to the Centers for Disease Control, clocks in at 0.01 percent, which is far, far lower than the failure rate for, say, condoms (3 percent with “perfect use,” 15 percent with “typical use”). But there are documented cases of men who’ve had vasectomies impregnating their female partners. So it’s possible that your husband fertilized that egg. You can cling to that small possibility and opt not to inform the other couple about your pregnancy. But I would urge you to tell them. One in three North American women have had an abortion, but millions of men don’t know that they have benefited from access to safe and legal abortion services because their female partners terminated pregnancies without informing them. On the off chance your play buddy is either against abortion or hasn’t given the issue much thought — because he’s never needed one — you should let him know that your freedom to choose has benefited him and his family. You should also let him know there’s a small chance your husband impregnated you. Either way, you’re terminating this pregnancy. On the Lovecast, Dan welcomes philosophy professor and gay-rights diplomat John Corvino: www.savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.25-07.02

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you could harness the energy from a typical lightning bolt, you would be able to use it to toast 100,000 slices of bread. That’s an impossible scenario, of course. But I see it as an apt metaphor for the challenge you have ahead of you. I suspect you will soon get access to a massive influx of vital force that arrives in a relatively short time. Can you find a way to gather it in and store it up? Or will most of it, after the initial burst, leak away and be unavailable for long-term use? The secret to success will lie in whether you can figure out how to create the perfect “container.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Forget the suffering / You caused others. / Forget the suffering / Others caused you.” Czeslaw Milosz wrote these words in his poem “Forget,” and now I’m passing them on to you. According to my reading of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to purge the old hurts you are still carrying, both those you dealt out and those you endured. Opportunities like this don’t come along often, Leo. I invite you to repay emotional debts, declare amnesty and engage in an orgy of forgiveness. Any other things you can think of that will help wipe the slate clean?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When a Navajo baby laughs for the first time, everyone in the community celebrates. It’s regarded as the moment when the child completes his or her transition from the spirit realm into the physical world. The person who has provoked the baby’s laughter is charged with planning the First Laugh Ceremony, a party to commemorate the magical event. I foresee a comparable develop-

ment in your life, Virgo. You won’t be laughing for the first time, of course, but I suspect your sense of humor will reach a new ripeness. How? Maybe you will be able to find amusement in things you have always taken too seriously. Maybe you will suddenly have a deeper appreciation for life’s ongoing cosmic jokes. Or perhaps you will stumble upon reasons to laugh longer and harder and louder than you ever have before.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Would you like to be free from the experience of getting criticized? Do you think it might be nice if no one ever accused you of being wrong or offtrack? If so, here’s how you should proceed, says American writer Elbert Hubbard: “Do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.” But I’m afraid I can’t recommend that behavior for you, Libra. In the coming weeks, you have a sacred duty to your Future Self to risk being controversial. I urge you to take strong stands, speak raw truths and show your real feelings. Yes, you may attract flack. You might disturb the peace. But that will be an

get your yoga on!

acceptable price to pay for the rewards you receive. This is one time when being courageous is more important than seeking harmony.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Be respectful to your superiors, if you have any,” said American writer Mark Twain. How do you respond to that impish nudge, Scorpio? Are there any geniuses and heroes out there whom you consider to be worthy of your respect? If not, I urge you to go out in search of some. At this phase of your evolution, you are in special need of people who inspire you with their greatness. It’s crucial for you to learn from teachers and role models who are further along than you are in their mastery of the game of life. I also believe it would be healing for you to feel waves of admiration and reverence.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Everyone has something to hide,” declared Russian author Anton Chekhov. Is that true? Do even you blunt Sagittarians have something to hide? I’m going to say that for 90 percent of you, the answer is yes. There are secrets you don’t want anyone to find out about: past events you are reluctant to disclose or shady deeds you are getting away with now or taboo thoughts you want to keep sealed away from public knowledge. I’m not here to scold you about them or to encourage you to spill them. On the contrary, I say it’s time to bring them fully into your conscious awareness, to honor their importance to your life story and to acknowledge their power to captivate your imagination.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A German chemist named Felix Hoffman had a prominent role in synthesizing two very different drugs: aspirin and heroin. In analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I see you as having a similar potential. You could create good stuff that will have the power to help and heal; or you could generate borderline stuff that will lead to a lot of problems; or you could do both. How it all plays out really is up to your free will. For best results, set your intention to go in the direction of things like aspirin and away from things like heroin.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): This is a good time to risk a small leap of faith, but not a sprawling vault over a yawning abyss. Feel free and easy about exploring the outer borders of familiar territory, but be cautious about the prospect of wandering into the deep, dark unknown. Be willing to entertain stimulating new ideas but not cracked notions that have little evidence to back them up. Your task is to shake up the status quo just enough to invigorate everyone’s emotional intelligence, even as you take care not to unleash an upheaval that makes everyone crazy.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): British poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (17721834) had an unusual fetish: He enjoyed eating apples and pears and other fruits while they were still hanging on the tree. Why? Maybe because the taste was as pure and brisk and naked as it could possibly be — an experience that I imagine would be important to a romantic poet like him. In accordance with your astrological omens, I suggest you use Coleridge’s quest for ultimate freshness as a driving metaphor in the coming week. Go to the source to get what you need. Dispense with intermediaries. Be as raw as the law allows.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to an astrologer named Astrolocherry (astrolocherry.tumblr.com), Aries is the sign of the freedom fighter, the explorer, the daredevil and the adventurer. That’s all true; I agree with her. But here’s an important caveat. As you get older, it’s your duty to harness all that hot energy on behalf of the softer, slower, more tender parts of your life. The coming weeks will offer you a great opportunity to work on that challenge. To get started, imagine how you can be a freedom fighter, explorer, daredevil and adventurer in service to your home, family and community.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): After a thorough, detailed, painstaking analysis of the astrological omens, I’m inclined to advise you to be neither thorough nor detailed nor painstaking in the coming days. Instead, I suspect you will thrive by being spontaneous and improvisatory. Wing it, baby! Throw away the script. Trust your gut. Play it by ear. Make it up as you go along. If you find yourself frowning with indecision and beset by lazy procrastination, you will know you’re off course. If you are feeling blithe and agile as you get a lot done with creative efficiency, you will know you’re right in the groove.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Japanese word tsundoku describes what happens if you buy a lot of books but never read them, leaving them piled up in a neglected heap. I recommend that you avoid indulging in tsundoku any time soon, Gemini. In fact, I urge you not to acquire any resources that you then proceed to ignore. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when it’s crucial to make conscientious use of your tools and riches. To let them go to waste would be to dishonor them, and make it less likely that you will continue to receive their blessings in the future. Take full advantage of what’s yours. What are the five conditions you’d need in your world in order to feel you were living in utopia? Write uaregod@comcast.net.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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LIVE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE

HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

EAST FOR RENT

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Newly remod. lg. 3BR, eq. kit, combo l/r and d/r, laun, off str prkg, stor. Close to shop and trans. Avl July $1,065+g&e

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SERVICES

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www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 1-855-4WARDEN wardeninsurance@aol.com

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Sq. Hill

Tony 412-849-8856

Company Drivers:

Owner-Operators:

• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

www.teamwarden.tmilesgroup.com

STUDIES

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

Lincoln Heritage

52 PAGE

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

800-871-4581 TheKAG.com Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer. TA S T E

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

massage

Downtown

Therapeutic Massage

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

WELLNESS MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

China Massage

STAR

/ PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

412-401-4110

Chinese Bodyworks

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Shadyside Location

322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs MASSAGE Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Superior Chinese Massage

$60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

MASSAGE

724-519-7896

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

TIGER SPA

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

$40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014

CHINESE HEALTH SPA

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-441-1185

FULL BODY MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy 412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

MASSAGE

Grand Opening!

Full Body Massage/ Pressure Point Foot Massage/ Reflexology Hrs: 7 days- 9:30a-10p 1789 Pine Hollow Rd #2 Mckees Rocks

412-777-7171


SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION

JADE

LF SEAY P

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

412-681-1406 Positive Recovery Solutions

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST

NOW TAKING PATIENTS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 Recovery Without Judgement

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

www.myjadewellness.com

Now Open! 1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Please Call: 724-684-4890 Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

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Let Us Help You Today!

Monessen Office

Help is Available!

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IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

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• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Next Day Appointments Available

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HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS in 60 Days! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weight loss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Call 877761-2991 (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-2103935 (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES

CLASSES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

REHEARSAL

MASSAGE

Rent -A- Bay

Rehearsal Space

AnExquisite Massage Licensed

ADOPT Art classes to Zoo trips, and Everything in between. Your baby will be Our King/Queen.

1-800-989-6766 Expenses Paid

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

Massage Therapist CORAOPOLIS, PA. 15108

412-474-3236

www.anexquisitemassage.com

STUDIES

STUDIES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

HEAVY & FREQUENT MENSTRUAL BLEEDING/UTERINE FIBROIDS? 412.363.1900 CTRS

STUDIES

STUDIES

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

CALL TODAY!

STUDIES

GOUT? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

LOOKING FOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE WOMEN’S HEALTH? The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study to better understand the effects of birth control on the immune system. You may be eligible if you are: *18-34 with regular periods *Healthy *Not currently pregnant or breastfeeding *Not currently using birth control

For more information call: 412-641-5496

Participants may receive birth control at no cost and be compensated up to $470, over 3 to 4 office visits.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.25/07.02.2014


MARKET VALUE

At the Hill District’s Ujamaa Collective, cultural connections are part of the bargain {BY ABBY MENDELSON} A BURLY MAN walks out of a bright, sunny morning and into Ujamaa Collective, 1901 Centre Ave., in the Hill District. Facing a dazzling array of shapes and colors, he examines a cornucopia of arts, crafts, collectibles, edibles. He rustles through some of the 1,000 individual items — batiks and carvings, clothing and jewelry, ceramics and pottery — all of it fair-trade, from local artists as well as international artisans. Finally he settles on a large display piece: a traditional West African mask for which he says he has the perfect spot at home. He hoists the carved-wood eagle design, a stunning, fearsome piece in black and brown. “Works like this, affirmational in both language and symbol, help reawaken the African in all of us,” says Ujamaa Executive Director LaKeisha Wolf, who has been helping the man navigate the store. “There’s so much that we’ve lost: the beauty of self, of community, of home in the diversity of Africana culture. What we have here” — she gestures around the boutique — “helps us to re-connect.”

munity,” Wolf says. “We are growing increased wellness. We are growing a plan for economic stability.” The same could be said of the Hill itself, long the victim of destructive urban-renewal policies. More than 1,000 buildings were razed, and thousands of people displaced, to make way for the Civic Arena. Now, after more than five decades, the Hill is finally emerging from a moribund neighborhood economy. The Centre Avenue corridor, while perhaps not yet flourishing, is shaking off its sluggish past. With efforts spearheaded by Hill House, there is a new full-service grocery store, new office space and new housing, as well as branches of the Carnegie Library, YMCA and PNC. “We’re at a pivotal point in the neighborhood,” offers Ujamaa’s Frankie Harris. “It’s not just about sales. It’s about us. It’s about the women that we’re serving. “It’s a launch pad for people. This” — she gestures at the artwork in Ujamaa — “is an awakening.” “We believe in cooperation,” Wolf adds. “We believe that we

“THERE’S SO MUCH THAT WE’VE LOST: THE BEAUTY OF SELF, OF COMMUNITY, OF HOME IN THE DIVERSITY OF AFRICANA CULTURE. WHAT WE HAVE HERE HELPS US TO RE-CONNECT.” “There were always folks in touch with being African,” Wolf adds. “But resources have come and gone. The visibility wasn’t always there. Artwork like this helps capture the essence of who we are that we’ve carried with us: nuances in what we do, colors we put together in a particular way. The spirit that lives in us and manifests itself in how we talk, how we think, how we act.” Now in its fourth year, Ujamaa — a Swahili word that translates roughly as “unity” or “family” — represents some six dozen artists. They hail from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, Washington and Baltimore — as well as from Tanzania, Congo, Nigeria, Kenya, Malawi, Senegal, Brazil, Jamaica, Trinidad and the Virgin Islands. “Ujamaa products are handcrafted by women and artisans who need opportunities for self-sufficiency and wealth creation,” Wolf says. “Many of the same impoverished conditions faced by women and families in developing countries can be found right here in Pittsburgh’s own low-income communities.” To combat such challenges, Ujamaa also sponsors an entrepreneurship-preparation program and open-air marketplace, sells cut flowers and oversees herb gardens and urban agriculture. (Among other things, it manages the DeWayne Cooper Garden of Hope, on nearby Bedford Avenue.) “We are not only growing things, we are also growing com-

gain more when everybody does something together, and profits from it. That’s an ancient concept that had to be re-introduced. We had to recognize who we are. Because if we forget who we are, we are constantly subject to others’ definition of who we are. For far too long, we’ve bought into how other people have defined us. So Ujamaa is also very much about self-definition, a definition we’re creating for ourselves. “There’s always been an African way of life,” she adds. “That cooperation, that community — it’s an essence that we’ve carried with us. There’s very much an African mind, too. Our ancestors are pushing that in all of us.” Speaking of the obligations imposed by tradition, a tall, slender man walks into the boutique, mumbling about his wife’s impending birthday. Stepping lightly through the store, he hefts note cards, rustles T-shirts, sniffs soaps — olive, green tea, coconut, papaya. Tapping a drum, he shakes his head. “Wife,” he says, “not Babatunde Olatunji.” Finally, he gravitates toward jewelry, necklaces and earrings, hand-carved stones, blues and greens, pastels that seem to glow from within. “Perfect,” he says. “Gorgeous colors. Well made.” The man flips them over, “Right price.” “I made them,” LaKeisha Wolf says, and smiles. INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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E M M

E M I RT

ZE I R P

S

$100K

SUMMER SWEEPS

SATURDAYS IN JUNE

DRAWINGS AT 2PM, 4PM, 6PM, 8PM AND 10PM 25 daily winners have a chance to win Hot Summertime Prizes. Don’t miss out! Must be present and have valid ID to win. Check-in at the kiosks will be 12pm-9:59pm each Saturday.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


June 25, 2014