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STAR VEHICLE: FILMED-IN-PITTSBURGH ‘FAULT IN OUR STARS’ OFFERS SAD, SWEET ROMANCE 37


EVENTS 6.13 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH VINCENT FREMONT AND GERALYN HUXLEY This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

6.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NAT BALDWIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SLEEP EXPERIMENTS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/$40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

DRESS

MID-70’S

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

Her life was a Cabaret.

He provided

8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

THE COLOR.

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A sweet treat on our birthday On Thursday, June 12th Port Authority and Dunkin’ Donuts are teaming up to bring you a special treat* at the Swissvale Park and Ride starting at 7:30 am. If you are in the neighborhood or on your way to work, stop by, say hi and help us celebrate Port Authority’s 50th Anniversary.

*While supplies last.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014


{EDITORIAL}

06.11/06.18.2014 {PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN MORRISON & KELLY O}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 24

not really porn. It’s much more 06 “It’s an artful and real expression of human sexuality.” — Robert Crocker, executive producer of the Hump! Film Festival tour

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

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“The people making the rules are willing to expand gun rights, but not in their place of work.” — Gun-control advocate Shira Goodman on the hypocrisy of Harrisburg gun-rights proponents

[TASTE]

play music, then get up early to 20 “Imake bread.” — Dino Lopreiato, on

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[MUSIC]

you play music, you never don’t 26 “Once play music.” — Kristian Habenicht,

STEEL CITY MEDIA

[SCREEN]

you’re prone to tears, wear 37 “Ifsomething waterproof.” — Al Hoff on

the teens-with-cancer rom-com The Fault in Our Stars

[ARTS] “There’s no escaping the feeling that the force created is reaching out to get us.” — Lissa Brennan on Wood Street Galleries’ exhibit Electrified

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 58 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 59 +

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{PUBLISHER}

who plays and co-writes with Melinda Colaizzi, on the musician’s life

N E W S

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

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playing in a band while also helping to run his family’s bakery

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{ART}

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

SATURDAY, JULY 5

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“THE GREAT THING ABOUT THE MOVIES IS THEY TOUCH US IN A LOT OF WAYS.”

INCOMING After Dormont officials object, Hollywood Theater cancels Dan Savage-curated “Hump!” festival (June 4, online only) “Bring the show to Pittsburgh, if Dormont elected officials won’t treat their constituents like adults. Too bad that the makers of Hump!, and Dormont-ians, have to travel elsewhere to have their Bill of Rights respected.” — Web comment from “Helen Gerhardt” “The problem is that people like … the majority of our borough council are backwards-thinking, small-minded and unworldly. I beg you, don’t judge the majority of us in Dormont by the small group of small people who represent us.” — Web comment from “Goldmountainlove”

P M U H E H OVER T

“We are members of the Hollywood Theater and support anyone bringing art and culture to our community. I find it disgusting and appalling that [Borough Manager] Jeff Naftal is strangling efforts to promote our town as being interesting, progressive or ‘hip.’ I have great neighbors that are educated, talented, open-minded and passionate. There is actually more to Dormont than a diner and dive bars. If only we were represented that way. I am embarrassed and ashamed.” — Web comment from “G2” {PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN MORRISON & KELLY O}

Camera-ready: The Hump! Film Festival highlights a variety of porn films made by amateurs.

Fate of Mount Washington dog park remains unclear (June 5, online only) “Neighbors, including many dog owners, bordering the park were NOT notified or included in the planning of the ‘dog park,’ while hundreds of others remote from the park were notified. No legislation adopted this use for this area and no planning reviews or approvals were sought/received.” — Web comment from “Elizabeth Pittinger” “If you don’t like the noise living next to a city park, then move! Olympia certainly is a community park, but it does not belong to a handful of cranky old people that live next to it. Go buy a home next to an airport and then complain to the FAA about low-flying airplanes and see how that works out.” — Web comment from “TPopek”

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HE HUMP! TOUR, a festival of independently made dirty movies curated by sex columnist Dan Savage, has been touring cities in the U.S. and Canada. But the festival will not be appearing at Dormont’s Hollywood Theater, as originally planned, because of objections raised by borough officials last week. Organizers have found a new venue for the June 13-15 event — Lawrenceville’s newly opened Row House Cinema — but say the local controversy was unexpected. Since the festival’s founding in 2005, “We have never had a complaint from a city in nine years,” says Robert Crocker, executive producer of the Hump! Tour. Hump! consists of five-minute films that feature an array of naked bodies and un-simulated sex acts — performed by pairs, groups and soloists and representing a broad spectrum of gay, straight and trans-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

gender performers. Taken together, says Savage, the films “combine erotica with humor and compassion in a way that’s oddly absent from commercial porn.” (See “Boffing Box Office,” page 10.)

Dan Savage’s film festival overcomes a change in venue to screen some of America’s finest amateur pornography {BY NICK KEPPLER} And the festival has attracted indie filmmakers, some of whose work boasts impressive cinematography and clever scripts. The program even features a stopanimation segment. “The films are explicit but also very artful and real,” says Crocker. “The ‘porn’ la-

bel is there due to the sexual nature of the shorts, but it’s not really porn. It’s much more an artful and real expression of human sexuality.” Borough officials in Dormont, however, didn’t see it that way. The tour was slated to come to Dormont’s single-screen, refurbished 1920s-era community theater until last week, when the theater’s executive director, Chad Hunter, received a call from Dormont Borough Manager Jeffrey Naftal. Hunter says Naftal told him the municipality “had received some complaints” about the festival, and the screenings violated zoning laws in the inner-ring suburb of 8,593. Hunter says he “accepted that if they said it was illegal, it was illegal” and refunded the festival’s deposit. Naftal says the borough council relayed citizen complaints to him, and that CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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OVER THE HUMP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY Turn your Liberal Arts degree into a marketable career

CCAC’s Court Reporting program is now enrolling for fall 2014. lĂ?Ă?NEĂ?DKHFHAKDĂ?OQNFQ@LĂ?FQ@CT@SDRĂ?ÆMCĂ?DLOKNXLDMSĂ? HMĂ?SGDĂ?BNTQSĂ?QDONQSHMFĂ?@MCĂ?B@OSHNMHMFĂ?ÆDKCR Ă? lĂ?$MSQX KDUDKĂ?BNTQSĂ?QDONQSHMFĂ?@MCĂ?B@OSHNMHMFĂ?R@K@QHDRĂ? @UDQ@FDĂ? Ă?NUDQ@KKĂ?R@K@QHDRĂ?Q@MFDĂ?EQNLĂ? Ă? SNĂ?  Ă? Class space is limited—for more information or to enroll, contact: Mary Beth Johnson at mjohnson@ccac.edu or 412.237.2748. *2012–2013 Pa CareerLink, Allegheny County area

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screening the festival would involve “multiple violationsâ€? of zoning regulations. According to section 210-62 of the borough code, “adult businessesâ€? must feature the classic “peep showâ€? format, with individual viewing booths, and be at least 500 feet from a church or school. The former Dormont Presbyterian Church, which now houses an interdenominational Christian church, is just across Potomac Avenue from the Hollywood. Naftal says that a weekend engagement with Hump! is enough to reclassify the Hollywood as an “adult business.â€? “If they show adult movies, they’re an adult business,â€? he says. “The code is very speciďŹ c and the theater didn’t argue.â€? When asked if similar reasoning could be applied to limited screenings of other controversial ďŹ lms, Naftal retorts, “There is a difference between homemade sex movies, which is what this was advertised to be, and Last Tango in Paris.â€?

HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL Fri., June 13-Sun., June 15. Row House Cinema, 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $18. 412-904-3225 or rowhousecinema.com

Borough Council President Bill McCartney says he doesn’t know how many citizens raised objections to Hump!, and says it isn’t “relevantâ€? anyway. “Does a theft constitute a theft even if no one sees it?â€? he asks. “Does a violation of a code constitute a violation even if no one reports it?â€? He cites another local ordinance that asserts, “It shall be unlawful for any person to promote pornography.â€? “The description of the Hump! festival uses the term ‘porn star’ in its publicity,â€? McCartney notes. Naftal says the Hump! cancellation raises no greater constitutional issues than does a blocked driveway. “When I have a person call up and say a person has parked illegally in front of their yard, I don’t wait until the complaints add up. I call an enforcement ofďŹ cer and see if it is or is not illegal.â€? Sara Rose, a staff attorney at the Pittsburgh ofďŹ ce of the American Civil Liberties Union, says Dormont’s actions were unconstitutional. When seeking to quarantine a certain kind of commerce, Rose says, ofďŹ cials “need to show a reason for keeping out the crowds this would attract,â€? such as evidence that a business created “secondary effectsâ€? like an increase in crime. “Dormont can’t say, ‘We don’t like sexually explicit movies.’ That would be overtly unconstitutional,â€? Rose says. CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014


CELEBRATE MARRIAGE

EQUALITY WEDDING SHOWCASE A wedding show featuring the best wedding vendors in the Pittsburgh area and all participating vendors have been interviewed and found to be LGBT friendly!

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The Heinz History Center 6:00-9:00PM

Culture Club: Old Masters, New Music Experience master prints from the 15th to 17th centuries like never before.

Peter Paul Rubens, Saint Catherine in the Clouds (detail), early 17th century

Join us for an evening of contemporary music inspired by the knights, saints, and fantastical landscapes of some of the most notable master prints, including works by Rembrandt and Dürer. Featuring musicians Matt Aelmore, Rob Frankenberry, Jonghee Kang, George Sabol, Jeff Weston, and Roger Zahab.

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This Thursday, June 12 5:30–9 p.m. Carnegie Café bar open 6:30–7:30 p.m.; Performance $10; Includes admission and one drink ticket. Parking is available for a $5 flat rate. Culture Club is sponsored by

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OVER THE HUMP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

presents

PofE T the

WEEK

Given that the Hollywood usually doesn’t host anything racier than a midnight Rocky Horror Picture Show screening, she says, “The borough would have a hard time arguing that two or three days of more explicit films would create any secondary effects.” That may be especially true given the socially conscious, indie-film-viewing, alt-weekly-reading crowd that consumes Savage’s output. Borough officials “don’t have much of an argument,” Rose says, “unless they’re saying they don’t want to attract hipsters [for a reason] like increased bicycle traffic.” Hump! should be right at home, then, in Lawrenceville, home to two bike shops and a population of new residents who skew young, tattooed and bearded. The neighborhood’s Row House Cinema, which just had a “soft opening” on June 6, is much smaller than most Hump! venues: It seats 83, compared to the Hollywood’s nearly 300. The festival has added three Sunday screenings, on June 15, to accommodate the expected crowd. Brian Mendelssohn, the developer who spent two years bringing Row House to fruition, stands by Hump! as just another cinematic experience. “The great thing about the movies is they touch us in a lot of ways,” he says. “Some are emotional, some political, some violent and some sexual. If you want to challenge people, you aren’t going to shy away from any of it.” I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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BOFFING BOX OFFICE Dan Savage’s amateur-porn film festival depicts erotica ‘with humor and compassion’ {BY NICK KEPPLER} Each year, the submissions to the Hump! Film Festival reflect some inexplicable new trend. “One year, we got half-a-dozen James Bond parodies, even though there wasn’t a big Bond movie in the e theaters and we never suggested we wanted to see that,” says Dan Savage, founder and curator of the homemade-pornography festival. “A couple years ago, we got five different submissions that featured lesbians and fruit.” Savage — also author of the advice column Savage Love, editorial director of Seattle’s The Stranger newspaper and co-founder of the It Gets Better Project — says shifting through each year’s Hump! entries eats up about a weekend of his busy schedule. “Growing up, I never thought it’d be my job to sit there and watch porn for two days. I’ve watched a lot of cunnilingus but — oh well, we all have our crosses to bear.” The festival, which has been held in Portland and Seattle since 2005, is in

IDIOTBOX

the midst of its inaugural nationwide tour, screening a best-of compilation. Though the five-minute films capture a wide variety of unfeigned sex acts, that’s about all the movies have in common with the smut on YouPorn or xHamster. The program is more like a collection of indie short films — comedies, dramas, thrillers and, in one case, a Jackass-like stunt — that all happen to feature full-frontal nudity and/or graphic sex. Hump! is heavy on humor; there’s a foray into pie-fetish porn and a depiction of a gay time-travel paradox that is titled, of course, “Go Fuck Yourself.” Hump! features “combine erotica with humor and compassion in a way that’s oddly absent from commercial porn,” says Savage. “That’s because most Hump! performers are friends and lovers who get together, make something sexy and have a good time, and want to share that.” then wa The festival is self-regenerating, T inspiring attendees to make a film ins ffor next year’s fest. An anonymous, Portlandbased filmmaker — we’ll call Dan him “Sean” — says he and Savage his friends were moved to create a submission after seeing a few Hump! festivals. “We talked about it for a while,” says Sean. “I finally put out a message saying, ‘OK, next year’s deadline is coming up. Who’s really in?’” More difficult than finding people to boff on camera was concocting a plot that could be contained within the festival’s five-minute time limit. “Only two things could happen,” says Sean. “One of [the performers] was a [Dungeons and Dragons] player and suggested that. I said, ‘OK, D&D and then orgy. We got it!’” The resulting film, called simply D&D Orgy, is a part of the touring slate and depicts a night of table-top gaming that escalates in intensity until the players are rolling around naked on the floor. Sean calls it “a remarkable symbol of our friendship.” Essential to Hump! is the anonymity of filmmakers and performers. To ensure that everyone involved “can be a porn star in that theater that weekend and not for life on the Internet,” says Savage, all hard copies of the films are destroyed after the festival, along with the associated paperwork. This practice left Savage and company scrambling to compile the touring best-of show. Through the Pacific Northwest indie film scene, organizers put out a request for a few favorites to resubmit; ultimately, they secured most of the films they wanted. Hump! exposes viewers to an expansive range of sexuality in an era when the Internet feeds each individual with their given niche, says Savage. He points to “Lauren Likes Candy,” a woman-on-woman S&M scene voted best film by the audience in 2007. “Most of the audience was not lesbian S&M-ers, but they responded to the passion and intensity of that film and how much both women were enjoying it,” Savage says. “You have straight people cheering for the gay porn, gay people cheering for the straight porn and kinky people cheering for the vanilla porn, and you have first-gender people cheering to trans porn. That, I think, is wonderful and what Hump! is all about.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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UNSHOWN, UNHEARD Art exhibit canceled after dispute over boycott of Israel {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} A MAP OF Palestine made of broken glass. Rubber bullets lying beneath a tree like fallen olives. A few photographs are about all that remains of an art exhibit that never opened. Sites of Passage: Walls, Borders & Citizenship was designed as a cultural exchange among Palestinian, Israeli and American artists. But The Mattress Factory museum cancelled the exhibit on May 28 — days before it would have opened, and days after a reported social-media campaign accused the show’s three Palestinian artists of violating an international cultural boycott. Installation works by the 11 artists — including three Israelis and five Americans — have been removed from the North Side museum’s gallery at 1414 Monterey St. A related exhibit at Pittsburgh Filmmakers was also cancelled. “It was going to be a beautiful show,” says Mattress Factory director Barbara Luderowski.

Bashar Alhroub with his work “Diamond Land,” made of broken glass. The map on the wall depicts Palestine.

The roots of the controversy lie in Israel’s military occupation of Palestine and the treatment of Palestinians, which critics have likened to apartheid. (Many supporters of Israel, of course, defend that

nation’s practices on security grounds.) ticipation. (Musallam and Mahamid The cultural boycott of Israel is part of the declined, through La Follette, to speak Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) with CP.) Then the Israeli artists — Dror movement. It bars participation with Yaron, Emmanuel Witzthum and Itamar Israelis in projects that are not expressly Jobani — offered to withdraw instead, if about opposing Israeli oppression of Pal- that would help the Palestinians remain. “The Israeli voice is very much present estinians. Such participation is rejected in Pittsburgh,” says Yaron, who works as “normalization.” Bashar Alhroub, one of the three at Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Institute. Palestinian artists in Sites of Passage, “The Palestinian voice is not.” Ultimately, though, the actual arttold City Paper via email that the original idea behind the exhibit “was consistent work wasn’t the issue. The online firewith BDS and the academic and cultural storm — which La Follette says included petitions asking the Palestinians to withboycott of Israel.” “The main goal behind our presence draw, and personal emails pressuring them — was too strong. and participation in the exhibit was The Mattress Factory’s stateto focus on the rights of the ment “could have ruined my Palestinians, and to expose re See mo reputation in my country, Israeli racism, occupation, f images o where I am well known as and human-rights violaF O S E SIT E an artist who opposes the tions,” he tells CP. G A S PAS www. position of normalization,” Alhroub says he withonline atpaper says Alhroub. drew because a statement on pghcity .com Ironically, however, “The the Mattress Factory’s website show would have revealed a lot announcing the show “gave the about the injustice of the occupaexhibit a normalizing character, and had no relationship to the basic idea of tion,” says La Follette. In one photo of Alhroub’s nowthe exhibit.” Tavia La Follette, an independent dismantled work, supplied by LaFolcurator, began working on Sites of lette, fragments of broken glass sit in a Passage two years ago. She traveled in large pile, and also form a wall map of both Israel and Palestine, but some Pal- Palestine. In another room, Mussallam estinian artists she approached turned mounted a flourescent light bulb on the her down because of the boycott; one ceiling and outfitted it with candles, artist told her, “You’re never going to find to wittily suggest the rolling blackouts anybody.” The boycott, La Follette says, where he lives, in Gaza. A video instalis “all that they h ave l e f t . … T h e y ’ r e lation by Mahamid depicted the artist stooping to harvest rubholding tight to it.” ber bullets scattered on The three Palestinian the ground as though they artists — Alhroub, Manal were olives fallen from a Mahamid and Mohammed nearby tree. Musallam — agreed to parOther works included ticipate only after the IsYaron’s panoramic phoraeli and American artists tograph depicting bags of expressed their support of concrete at a checkpoint Palestinian rights. outside Hebron, illustrating La Follette also made the Israeli military’s limits sure all the artists reon construction materiviewed any public stateals in Palestine. A video by ments about the exhibit. The lone exception was a statement Pittsburgh-based artists Susanne Slavick announcing the exhibition at the and Andrew Ellis Johnson overlaid images Mattress Factory posted online April 28. of the massive, Israeli-built concrete separaA month later, La Follette says, language tion wall between Israel and Palestine with from that statement was cut-and-pasted footage of the shoreline in motion. “Pales“out of context” on Alhroub’s Facebook tinians in the West Bank are always saying, wall. Phrases like “[t]he artists have been ‘I would like to go to the sea,’” but they can’t, working collaboratively” were twisted says Slavick. The Mattress Factory’s Luderowski to accuse the Palestinians of normalization. (“It was my fault,” La Follette says. lamented the lost opportunity to exhibit the show. “I didn’t show it to them.”) “The world is a lot smaller than you La Follette says that Musallam, fearing for the safety of himself and his think it is,” she says. “Where is the comfamily should he be thought to have munication in the future going to happen violated the boycott, withdrew his par- if it isn’t going to happen in the arts?”

“THE SHOW WOULD HAVE REVEALED A LOT ABOUT THE INJUSTICE OF THE OCCUPATION.”

D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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has become a form of trench warfare, with activists and politicians firing above each other’s heads, if only to ensure that supporters and campaign contributors keep supplying them with ammo. Take House Bill 2243, introduced last month by Ford City Republican Jeff Pyle. The bill prohibits any business or property owner from “prohibiting a person from transporting or storing a firearm in a motor vehicle” in their parking lots. Assuming the gun is locked out of sight, and the owner is licensed to carry a concealed weapon, the bill allows gunowners to sue over such policies. It also provides remedies for anyone fired after stowing firearms in the company lot. This in a state where many residents can still be fired just for being gay. It’s not clear this measure is going anywhere. Pyle’s bill is in committee, though last week, Mon Valley Democrat Ted Harhai tried, and failed, to attach it as an amendment to legislation concerning driver’s tests. But Pittsburgh police brass say that, if anything, we should be discouraging people from leaving weapons in cars. “Leaving guns in vehicles is extremely dangerous,” says Pittsburgh Police Zone 1 Commander RaShall Brackney. Brackney’s North Side zone includes Heinz Field and PNC Park, where she says weapons are stolen from parked cars “at least once every other game.” It takes less than a minute to break into and search a car’s likely hiding places, she says — and criminals know car-owners probably won’t return for hours. “That brings a lot more opportunities.” Pyle and Harhai did not return calls for comment; neither did Pittsburgh Rep. Dom Costa, who co-sponsored Pyle’s bill. In a memo to colleagues, Pyle’s only attempt to justify the legislation was to quote the state Constitution: “[T]he right to keep and bear arms … shall not be questioned.” Well, mission accomplished. No one in government, at least, does question gun rights anymore, as the numbed public response to mass shootings proves nearly every week. Yet gun-rights absolutists are still on a hair-trigger. The NRA, for one, is upset that one of

its pet bills, HB 2011, was introduced in February and still isn’t law — four whole months later! The bill makes it easy for gun-owners to sue local municipalities who pass their own gun laws. Pittsburgh, for example, has a 2008 ordinance requiring gun-owners to report firearms that are lost or stolen … from parking lots, say. And as the NRA wailed in April, Pittsburgh is among “nearly 50 municipalities” with such ordinances — yet the legislature “has still not acted.” Of course, as City Paper’s Rebecca Nuttall reported May 14, local officials haven’t acted either. While campaigning last year, Mayor Bill Peduto pledged that enforcing the lost-and-stolen law would be central to his crime-fighting strategy. Since taking office, however, he’s decided the ordinance can’t survive a legal challenge, even under current law. Gun-rights absolutists have won without firing a shot. If state legislators really want to expand gun rights, though, they still have at least one option. They could get rid of the state’s most notable gun-free zone: the state Capitol building itself. Instead of telling private companies what they can do in their parking lots, elected officials could open their own offices and hallways to guntoting citizens. Firearms are necessary to keep our government in check, right? Even gun-control advocates might support the change. “The people making the rules are willing to expand gun rights,” says Shira Goodman of CeaseFirePa, “but not in their place of work.” There would be risks, of course. Not the chance of a gunman mowing down innocent people — why should state lawmakers be less at risk than, say, kindergartners? No, the real danger is that, when facing gun-wielding strangers in their workplace, politicians might see an upside to gun control after all. California, for one, passed one of the nation’s most sweeping gun-control laws in 1967 — after 30 gun-wielding Black Panthers showed up outside their state capitol. That law, incidentally, was signed by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan, who opined there was “no reason why on the street today a citizen should be carrying loaded weapons.” Imagine a pinko like that getting elected to Harrisburg today.

“THE PEOPLE MAKING THE RULES ARE WILLING TO EXPAND GUN RIGHTS, BUT NOT IN THEIR PLACE OF WORK.”

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MUSICIAN ON THE RISE {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Local music fans are used to seeing Dino Lopreiato behind the drums in bands like Chaibaba and Machete Kisumontao. But you can also find him behind a great big table of bread at local farmers’ markets, representing Vibo’s Italian Bakery, the Brackenridge operation he owns and runs with his family. Lopreiato’s mother started Vibo’s — named for the city in Calabria where the family is from — 30 years ago. It’s still a family affair, with Dino’s father working full time, and his brother helping out. Lopreiato started taking baked goods (breads of all sorts, plus big sellers like pepperoni bread and sweet fried dough) to markets after discovering markets beyond the bakery itself. A trip to a flea market down the street in Brackenridge revealed untapped customers: “I was on the same street, but the people there never came in the bakery.” Now he and his family and friends can be found at farmers’ markets in Bloomfield, Carrick, the South Side and Squirrel Hill, among others. He also appears every third Sunday at the Fleatique in Tarentum, where his team makes several trips back and forth from the bakery with fresh goods. Despite the long hours of the bakery life (a good 80 hours a week during the summer), Lopreiato still finds time for music. “Other musicians drink whiskey all night and sleep all day,” he says. “I play music, then get up early to make bread.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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20

PAST AND PRESENT {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

N

AMED IN honor of some old nails

discovered during construction, Ten Penny is a restaurateur’s latest run at spinning Pittsburgh’s Rust Belt heritage into gold. The space is dominated by an aesthetic that’s less postindustrial chic than outright industrial throwback: Massive old wood beams and columns set the tone for rustic shelves framed with cast-iron gas pipes and stacked to the ceiling with jars, cans and boxes of dry goods. Massive tables are mounted on bases adjustable with iron gears, and many Edison light bulbs hang gear from the ceiling. Amid this, the cushy grey leather sofas which serve as booth seating are a touch wh of luxe. Yet, the food on offer isn’t a Gilded Era throwback; there are no oysters piled E high alongside turtle soup. Instead the h menu caters to current tastes, offering middle-road contemporary American fare that’s no longer exciting, but still fresh and enjoyable, in part because it relies on quality ingredients, straightforwardly prepared. Brussels sprouts have become de rigueur on such a menu. Ten Penny’s were

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Ten Penny Burger, with watercress, red-onion jam, bacon and a sunny-side-up egg

very dark without achieving actual crispness, perhaps due to too much of the sweet Jack Daniels balsamic glaze (which wasn’t itself objectionable). Chewy bits of bacon brought savor and texture, and crumbles of goat cheese added creamy counterpoint, but it was not enough to raise these sprouts

TEN PENNY

960 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-318-8000 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 5-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $7-14; entrees $14-32 LIQUOR: Full Bar

CP APPROVED above the very high standard other restaurants have recently set. Seared gnocchi appeared handmade and were delightfully fluffy and light. Young watercress that had been flash-fried, such that the stems and edges were lightly crisped even as they retained their leafy freshness, nicely complemented the little

dumplings. Some goat cheese melted gently into the sage-brown-butter dressing. This was a dish of texture as much as flavor. Beet salad, made with big beet slices, the same cress and goat cheese, and marinated yellow tomatoes, was pretty as a spring garden and held together with a light apple-butter vinaigrette. Something more assertive was necessary against the sweetness of the beets and tomatoes, though, and we found the stems of the greens too prominent. The traditional burger (there is also a burger with a fried egg and other extras) was big, juicy and flavorful, with a lightly toasted bun and a thick layer of melted cheddar. But for $ 14, we would have liked those extras (which will run you $ 16). At least the thick-cut fries were excellent: super-fluffy inside, golden crisp outside with some deeper brown edges offering more intense flavor. Margherita flatbread subbed whipped ricotta for buffalo mozzarella, an innovation we heartily endorse, as the thick, creamy yet mild cheese created a distinct


textural layer between the thin, crisp crust and the tomato slices. Oregano-garlic oil added flavor, both enriched and buffered by the cheese. Flatbreads usually succeed or fail on the quality of their crusts and ingredients, so we commend the Ten Penny kitchen for pushing the envelope in such a tasteful — and tasty — way. We found similar attention to detail in Angelique’s pork chop. Ordered “cooked through,” a thick chop arrived that had been butterflied, briefly griddled on the interior, and then properly grilled top and bottom. The result was meat that was cooked to temperature throughout, without getting overdone or dried out at the surface. Indeed, this was as succulent a chop as we’ve had anywhere. Its accompanying vodkapancetta cream, which we’d imagined as a sauce, instead seemed to be almost melded to the chop, more like a coating, so that it subtly infused every bite.

Truffle mac-and-cheese with bacon

Alas, the kitchen’s conscientiousness stopped short of Jason’s American clam bake. The components were largely traditional — littleneck clams, mussels, shrimp, fish, sweet Italian sausage, corn and potatoes. The dish had been slightly modified to include crawfish, admittedly more practical than lobster for a single serving, if a bit messier to shell, and haricots vert, a welcome spot of green. Steamed in microbrew from Philly and spiked with some spice, the flavors were generally quite good. But the potatoes were close to raw, the clams too chewy and “crusty” bread was inexplicably served inside the lidded cast-iron pot such that it, too, steamed before reaching the table. All that good broth but no edible means to sop it. Ten Penny has forged a highly appealing atmosphere from warehouse furnishings. The kitchen attempts the same alchemy with fundamental ingredients. It doesn’t always succeed — and at these prices, it’s hard not to expect something a little closer to perfection. But where it does, it creates textures as pleasurable as flavors. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

GETTING ON THE MAP

Atlas Bottle Works offers new Butler Street destination for beer drinkers When I lived in Lawrenceville, I sometimes felt like I was in the opening number of an urban musical. Walking my dog down Butler Street, I’d see Roger and Chris working the bar at Franktuary, Emily arranging the latest styles at Mid-Atlantic Mercantile, and I always half-hoped that Dom would step out from behind the pizza oven at Piccolo Forno singing a killer aria, a la Don Giovanni. Alas. Atlas Bottle Works, the new sixpack shop owned by developer Brian Mendelssohn, adds to Butler’s mix of engaging neighborhood storefronts. “We want this to be more than just a retail store,” says general manager Theo Ackerson. “I want people to pop in and hang out for a few minutes and talk about beer.” He adds that he and his staff are there to provide education and recommendations, not just simple conversation, to beer snobs and novices alike. As part of that education, Mendelssohn says, “We’ll be pretty liberal about opening up beers to let people taste them and try them out.” To further foster community, Mendelssohn says that the shop will host special events like “meet the brewer” evenings and dinners with suitable beer pairings. The bottle shop will open with a list of about 300 beers, but Mendelssohn and Ackerson say they expect that number to grow to about 1,000 over the next few months. “We want to have the largest selection in the region,” says Ackerson. Most beers cost between $2.50 and $3, and there is a price break when you assemble a six-pack. Domestic craft beer, international selections and a nod to a few larger breweries with local roots (Iron City, Duquesne, Straub) will all be available. And here’s a bonus: You’ll be able to purchase draft beer from the five-tap system, and take it next door to the attached Row House Cinema — the singlescreen neighborhood theater making its own unique contribution to the pageant along Butler Street.

“WE WANT THIS TO BE MORE THAN JUST A RETAIL STORE.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-9043436 or facebook.com/atlasbottle

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

OAKLAND 260 Atwood St SQUIRREL HILL 1936 Murray Ave SHADYSIDE 5857 Ellsworth Ave

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

Tables On the Green {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} specialties, such as carne asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles (a homey casserole). Tacos are come with a variety of fillings, including mahi mahi and shrimp, and burrito fillings run from standard to breakfast and French fries and steak. JF GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-7812546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. The cannelloni alone merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE

DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfastand-lunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the Latin-Asian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE EL BURRO COMEDOR. 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-9043451. A casual Southern Californiastyle taqueria offers a variety of tacos, burritos and Cal-Mex

HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffetstyle restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard ChineseAmerican fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and roast Peking duck, and even frog legs. KF JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-andtrue breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-3816000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knife-wielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE

Tender {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-can-eat restaurant. Servers pull barbequed meats right off the rotisserie grill and present them at your table, ready to carve off as much freshly cooked meat as you like. There are hot and cold buffets as well, but savvy diners load up on the juicy meats. KE

NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO. 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-0220. This modern take on the traditional Jewish deli makes the argument that such Eastern European cuisine deserves to be served alongside the world’s favorites. Stop in for matzoh-ball soup, egg creams, blintzes and classic deli sandwiches, including one made with “Montreal meat,” a sort of Canadian hybrid of corned beef and pastrami. JF PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. www.pamelasdiner.com. There CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

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Urban Tap {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner mini-chain: the cheery atmosphere; the oldfashioned breakfasts featuring raisin French toast, fried potatoes and corned-beef hash; and light, crispy-edged pancakes so good that President Obama had them served at the White House. J

pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east of town may not be where one would expect to find refined Cajun and Creole cuisine, but that’s exactly what this clubhouse restaurant offers. The menu offers Louisiana bayou classics such as shrimp, grits, gumbo and blackened fish in an authentic and well-prepared manner. In a nod to Pittsburgh, steaks and Italian pasta dishes are also offered. LE

THE PINES TAVERN. 5018 Bakerstown Road, Gibsonia. 724-625-3252. A longtime commitment to seasonal and locally sourced food (including on-site gardens and beehives) spans the menu here. The restaurant’s casual elegance is suitable for drinks with friends or a celebration meal. And the fare ranges from pub grub, like burgers and TENDER BAR + meatloaf, to complex KITCHEN. 4300 Butler entrée plates, complete St., Lawrenceville. with wine and beer 412-402-9522. A suggestions. KE www. per a p repurposed, elegant pghcitym o .c 19th-century bank POOR RICHARD’S offers craft cocktails and WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. inventive small plates, focused 10501 Perry Highway, on organic, sustainable, fresh Wexford. 724-935-9870. This and local cuisine. The bar food is bar and restaurant delivers mainly finger foods and/or plates top-notch pub grub, plus a seemingly intended for sharing. well-curated beer menu. Among Besides fancified bar snacks such the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. as potato chips, deviled eggs classic sandwich, roast beef and popcorn, there are oysters, on weck, a Germanic roll with burgers and even desserts. KE caraway seeds; and mac-andcheese, made with Buffalo hot URBAN TAP. 1209 E. Carson St., sauce. Well-prepared burgers, South Side. 412-586-7499. wings, fish and chips, and sandThough it’s wallpapered in giant wiches round out the menu. KE TVs, the menu here is mostly devoid of sports-bar clichés. RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 Instead, there is duck-confit Washington Pike, Bridgeville. poutine, mac-and-cheese with 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers smoked Gouda, a burger topped a modern yet comfortable take with pork belly and even aged on seafood, offering distinctive rib-eye steak. With top-notch appetizers and a few signature service and excellent food, Urban entrées. There is also a build-yourTap elevates tavern dining. KE own entrée option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few VERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., meat options) can be combined Garfield. 412-404-8487. The with interesting sauces, starches menu here isn’t straight and vegetables to create a custom Mexican, but presents some dinner, whether your tastes run to traditional items, including truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE tableside-prepared guacamole and grilled corn-on-the-cob, with SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. reconceived classics, invented, 22 Market Square, Downtown. fusion-y dishes like tacos with 412-281-6888. This fine-dining roasted sweet potatoes, fried spot brings an elegantly casual, chickpeas and Mexican-style European vibe to the renovated tzatziki. There is also an extensive Market Square, leaning toward tequila list and a patio for small plates and starters without warm-weather dining. KE conceding an inch to American

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FOOD SAMPLING ΠCOOKING DEMOS ΠENTERTAINMENT

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1212 Smallman St. qPittsburgh, PA q412-454-6000 qwww.heinzhistorycenter.org

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LOCAL

“EVERYONE WAS TELLING ME THIS KIND OF MUSIC WAS DEAD.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

KEYS TO SUCCESS

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GRAND PIANO LP RELEASE with ROGER HARVEY AND THE WILD LIFE, CHET VINCENT AND THE BIG BEND, MORGAN ERINA. 8 p.m. Fri., June 13. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

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BACK WITH THE BLUES With or without words: Grand Piano

Grand Piano’s new LP, Leap Year, didn’t start out with a concept … but it sort of came together with one. “The song titles that have to do with weather and stuff, they kind of just went together,” explains singer and keyboardist Thomas Cipollone, referring to a trio of tunes mid-album called “The Sun,” “The Rain” and “The Wind.” “We didn’t write the album planning on having those weather-titled ones. But the record kind of ended up being about going on a trip — going away and being poor, basically. The overall thing is not having any money and wanting to be on the road, making music.” It’s a fitting theme for the sixpiece, which is starting to make inroads as a touring act, little by little. (And let’s be honest: Most rock bands that are on the road making music are also, by default, not having much money.) Leap Year, out this week on Wild Kindness Records, should help with that. After several shorter records recorded in smaller studio setups, the new LP is the band’s first recorded in a full studio (at +/-, with Sean Cho), bringing new life to the band’s compositions. Some of those songs are traditional and twangy, others more hard-driving, and more than one is fully instrumental — a trait that can be attributed at least partly to the band’s two-man horn section, made up of Ryan Booth and Bob Kircher. “Having horns has made it easier to play instrumentals, because that replaces vocals easily,” says Cipollone. And the horns allow the band to branch out — like on “Debt March,” which developed into a song with a brass-band feel, even though the group as a whole is more rock band than brass. “Because of the size of the band and the many voices, it’s easy to fill the room where lyrics would be,” says bassist Wes Conroy. “Our philosophy has always been to do what we really wanted, not to be limited by anything.”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLI BEAVERS}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

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ELINDA COLAIZZI went to Berklee

College of Music in Boston, and spent some time in Los Angeles — but ultimately, the Forest Hills native ended up returning to Pittsburgh, because her gritty brand of blues-rock just seemed to fit here. “The music scene in L.A., it was not what I’d expected it to be,” Colaizzi explains. “And for someone doing this gritty, bluesy rock thing, it just — I wasn’t feeling it.” In 2011, Colaizzi and her longtime collaborator, Kristian Habenicht, moved to Pittsburgh. (Habenicht grew up in California, near San Jose; they met at Berklee, where he studied music synthesis and guitar, and she studied music business and vocal performance.) The two recorded an EP in L.A., but had been working since then to put together a full-length — Witness, which they release this weekend with a show at the Pittsburgh Winery. Powerful, gutsy vocals are Colaizzi’s forte — she wails with the best of them throughout the album. But singing wasn’t her first musical talent.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

“I’m finally at a point where I just don’t care”: Melinda Colaizzi

“I started playing guitar as a kid,” she says. “I took lessons at Swissvale Music. I totally dug guitar, but it limited me in terms of performances. So I thought if I could sing, I could start doing some coffeeshop stuff with my acoustic guitar. Then the singing component of it kind of took over.”

MELINDA COLAIZZI CD RELEASE 8:30 p.m. Sat., June 14. Pittsburgh Winery, 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20 (includes a copy of Witness on CD). 412-566-1000 or www.pittsburghwinery.com

Nowadays, Colaizzi still plays guitar some, and often writes on an acoustic, but Habenicht takes up much of fretwork live and on record while Colaizzi concentrates on vocals. They write together; often, Colaizzi explains, the songs develop from a basic guitar part and a name. “I always like starting with a title,” she says. “Then I have to hear that riff. For

me, I’m always doing the melody and the lyrics last.” On Witness, larger themes range from the title track (which harkens to the traditional refrain from testimony in churches, which has made its way through pop-music history) to “Leave Your Key,” a once-and-for-all breakup anthem. “I think sometimes it’s autobiographical,” says Habenicht. “But other times it’s purely fictional. Just an idea for the sake of itself, kind of exploring it as a storytelling device.” The sounds on the album tend to have a hard edge to them — blues riffs often underlie the songs, but there’s a bombastic hard-rock quality as well. Colaizzi could find her musical ancestors in the likes of Bonnie Raitt, Melissa Etheridge and Susan Tedeschi. Her vocals have such depth, they recall Aretha Franklin at times. “It took me a long time to become comfortable making the kind of music I like,” Colaizzi says. “When I was at Berklee, I was thrown into one of these really polished, slick all-girl rock bands that was produced CONTINUES ON PG. 28


BACK WITH THE BLUES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

by this big-time guy. It got us a developmental deal with Epic, and I kind of had a lot of that industry mentality hanging over me — everyone telling me this kind of music was dead. I think I’m finally at a point where I just don’t care.” Coming back to Pittsburgh, though, didn’t necessarily land Colaizzi and Habenicht in a hotbed of music just like their own. “It’s hard to find a place,” Colaizzi notes. When the band plays blues-oriented events, “it’s always, ‘You guys are too rock!’ I wish that those kinds of things could be broken down. That was something I liked about Los Angeles: There was so much freedom and acceptance. And it’s kind of really closed here.” “We’re not traditional, straightforward blues,” adds Habenicht. “So if you’re a fan of traditional, straightforward blues only, that’s that. But we’re also not a regular rock band, we’re not an indie-rock band, we’re not a metal band, we’re not a classicrock band. “It’s funny, because when you think of what makes up American music, it’s those acts that combine country, soul, blues, R&B, all of those things that are quintessentially American. But then when it comes time to find new acts, people wrap themselves up in one genre, and it gets really specific. Sometimes it makes it tough for bands that overlap a little bit.” While it’s only Colaizzi’s name on the record (and in fact, it’s just her first name — she’s long gone by just “Melinda” as a singer, but is slowly transitioning to using her full name), Habenicht is an important part of the formula that makes the band. “I think in writing, I can sometimes be too close to the writing,” Colaizzi says. “So I need to collaborate, to have someone to keep me going, say it’s OK to be outside of the box on an idea, tell me, ‘You’re on track with this idea.’ I don’t really enjoy writing solo.” With a full-length finally recorded — mostly at Mr. Smalls in Pittsburgh, but also in Minneapolis and L.A. — Colaizzi and Habenicht are ready to take it where they can, considering label options and already working on another record. It’s something neither can imagine straying from. “No matter what, if we were playing together or not, we would both be playing music,” says Habenicht. “Once you play music, you never don’t play music. Whether we get to grow our careers as musicians or life’s got other plans in store, you just don’t stop playing music. You can’t help it.” “I just really love rock ’n’ roll!” Colaizzi says with a laugh. “I just caught the bug when I was 13 and I just loved everything about it.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

TROXUM GAIA OMEN (TELEFUTURE)

Five songs of synth-based, mid-paced, sometimes-danceable pop, though dancing isn’t necessarily the purpose here — Troxum brings us shimmering musical contemplations and encourages reflection throughout. The pervading sound is spacey and fantastic, jibing with the thematic elements about Earth, its parts and its environs. A nice, easy listen, but with depth; recommended. SEPHUS LEE HEARD IT TELL (SELF-RELEASED)

A new (debut) EP of countryrock from the local four-piece. Some good playing here, and when Sephus Lee concentrates on the traditional folk-blues stuff, it comes out well. Something — maybe in the recording, maybe in the songs — feels a little lacking on the more rock-like tunes. (The interplay between instruments on “Gallows” leaves something to be desired.) But overall, a nice first effort, with plenty of promise. IRA SOUL SOULFUL HIP HOP (LISTEN NOW RECORDS)

A full-length collection of R&B from the local singer/ rapper, with production from Black Inc. The funky production has its hits and misses, but on the whole helps keep the album fresh, with deep, bassy beats; more unconventional songs like “Switchin’” are winners. It can be tough not to get repetitive if your quarry is all love songs and sex jams, but this one actually gets better as it goes on instead of getting stale. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Local bands play tribute to the late Tommy Osh (above).

REMEMBERING TOMMY {BY ANDY MULKERIN} WHEN THOMAS O’Shanick — known in

the punk scene as Tommy Osh — was killed in a car wreck last February, it was tough on lifelong friend and Ultimatics bandmate Angelo Amantea. “I had been out with him the night before the accident,” Amantea recalls. “He got in the car late that night — early that morning, really — and that’s when it happened.” It wasn’t the first time Amantea had to deal with losing a close friend; Ultimatics guitarist Ray Chmielewski died at age 30 of a heart attack. “Nobody escapes this stuff,” says Amantea. “But it’s been a rough time for me.” O’Shanick, 47, left behind family — a daughter, a young grandson and his own mother. Helping them cover funeral costs and get back on their feet led Amantea to put together a tribute show and benefit, which takes place Sat., June 14, at the Rex Theater. (“The cost of dying keeps going up,” says Amantea with a wistful laugh. “That’s a good line from an old punk band, but it’s true.”) Amantea and O’Shanick grew up together in South Oakland, went to Central Catholic together and were initiated into the rock scene at a young age, going to Metropol to see acts like Norman Nardini. They started their first band, Outta Hand, in the early ’80s, then went on to successive bands including The Addicts and The Social Wrecks. “It was all this incestuous scene,” explains Amantea. “It was all the same

group of guys in a bunch of bands.” “Me and Tommy were the motivators,” says Amantea. “He was an artist, and he would come up with these ideas. We’d develop our own merch — little pinball machines, trading cards for our band. We were always go-getters, we weren’t bashful at all about self-promotion. I think that’s why we were as successful as we were.” O’Shanick and Amantea reached their greatest popularity in the mid-’90s, when Pittsburgh punk had its shining moment, and The Ultimatics hit the national limelight. Then the band broke up, following Chmielewski’s death. More recently, Amantea was playing in The Dirty Charms, while O’Shanick played in The What Else, and in Tom Kurlander and Pale Blue Sound.

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TOMMY OSH TRIBUTE

FEATURING THE ULTIMATICS, TRASH VEGAS, MORE 7 p.m. Sat., June 14. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

For the show on Saturday, Amantea pulled out all the stops: The Dirty Charms will play (though the band is otherwise on hiatus), along with several bands that O’Shanick was previously involved with. The Ultimatics will reunite, as will Trash Vegas and Torn ’n’ Frayed. Norman Nardini will play, along with Motoropsychos, The Cheats, The Bessemers and O’Shanick’s most recent band, The What Else. “He would want us to be celebrating right now,” says Amantea. “He wouldn’t want us bumming around any more than we already have. This is gonna be a party, not a wake.” AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Andy D

[ELECTRO-RAP] + FRI., JUNE 13

[FUNK] + SAT., JUNE 14

So, the idea of a white dude doing funny raps might sound at best overdone, and at worst a really bad idea — but bear with us. Andy D, from Bloomington, Ind., makes electronic beats and raps in a way that’s not serious, but also isn’t just a bunch of silliness or offensive shtick. He gets raunchy, yes, but he also stands up against date-rape culture; he’s funny, but he doesn’t play into stereotypes or make the jokes that are low-hanging fruit. He plays Howlers tonight with two local funny dudes: Tommy Amoeba’s Amoeba Kneivel, and Weird Paul. Andy Chaka Khan Mulkerin 9 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-682-0320 or www.howlers coyotecafe.com

The “Queen of Funk” is taking to the streets, literally: Chaka Khan performs on Liberty Avenue as part of 2014 Pittsburgh Pride, the annual festival celebrating the LBGT community. Pride in the Street, the concert, will take place on Liberty Avenue between Ninth and 10th streets. The 10-time Grammy-winning funk and R&B singer hasn’t released new music since 2007’s Funk This, but she’s sure to play hits like “I’m Every Woman,” “Ain’t Nobody” and “I Feel For You.” With Ayah Marar, Vita Chambers and Lazaro Arbos. ZB 5 p.m. Liberty Avenue, Downtown. $4050. All ages. www. pittsburghpride.org

[SOUL] + FRI., JUNE 13 Some artists are bred into the music world. Such is the case with Curtis Harding: He spent time traveling with his mother as she sang gospel on the road, on occasion bringing the young Curtis on stage to sing with her. His debut album Soul Power is an enigma, grounded in soul, rock, R&B and blues. Harding has the capability to groove and to rock, and at times do both, making him and his sound unclassifiable by genre. The artist plays the Dollar Bank Stage at the Three Rivers Arts Festival tonight. Zach Brendza 7:30 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. Free. All ages. www.3riversartsfest.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

[INDIE ROCK] + SAT., JUNE 14

Last time Pity Sex was scheduled to come to town, the show was canceled due to dangerous wintry conditions after the Ann Arbor, Mich., band spun out and nearly drove off an overpass. This time around, they won’t have to brave the early-January tundra. The band’s first fulllength, Feast of Love released last June, hones its sound further: With elements of shoegaze, indie and emo tied in, Pity Sex is a fuzzysounding force and a standout act on Run For Cover Records. The band plays the Smiling Moose tonight with Run Forever, Somos and Driver. ZB 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10-12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} RIVERS CASINO. The Clintones - Ultimate 90’s Tribute. 31ST STREET PUB. Hellstomper, North Side. 412-231-7777. The Loaded Nuns, Parking SAINT BRUNO’S CHURCH. Lot Whiskey. Strip District. The Holidays. Greensburg. 412-391-8334. 724-834-6880. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. SMILING MOOSE. Orwellian. Antz Marching. North Side. South Side. 412-431-4668. 412-237-3400. CLUB CAFE. David Wilcox. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB CAFE. Chuck DOWNTOWN Prophet & the Mission PITTSBURGH. Curtis Express (Early). South Harding. Downtown. Side. 412-431-4950. GOOD TIME BAR. DOWNEY’S Tobacco Road. Millvale. www. per HOUSE. Leftover pa 412-821-9968. pghcitym .co Blue. Robinson. HAMBONE’S. Sephus 412-489-5631. Lee, Casino Bulldogs, DOWNTOWN The Me Toos. Lawrenceville. PITTSBURGH. Chaka Khan, 412-681-4318. Ayah Marar, Vita Chambers, THE HANDLE BAR & Lazaro Arbos. Liberty Ave GRILLE. Gary Prisby. Canonsburg. between 9th & 10th St. 724-746-4227. www.deltafoundation.us/tickets HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Andy DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. D, Amoeba Knievel, Weird Paul. Lucinda Williams. Downtown. Bloomfield. 412-758-6724. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Pillar JAMISON’S RESTAURANT Point, Scott Fry Experience, & TAVERN. Tony Janflone Jr. 2020K. Garfield. 412-361-2262. Greensburg. GOOSKI’S. Murder For Girls, RAMADA INN HOTEL & Crooked Cobras, Brazilian Wax. CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Murder For Girls EP release. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. The Spuds. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Jumpin Jack Flash. Rolling Stones Tribute. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Cold & The Lovely, Casino Bulldogs, Sun Hound. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MEADOWS CASINO. Terry Bradshaw, Jimbo & the Soupbones. Washington. 724-503-1200. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Melinda Colaizzi. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Fonic. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROYAL PLACE. Antz Marching. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SMILING MOOSE. SuperVoid, BrimStone Coven, Wasted Theory. South Side. 412-431-4668. STRAND THEATER. Lights Out! Tribute to Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons. Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

FRI 13

ROCK/POP THU 12 BRILLOBOX. Ratking, Show Me The Body, PlutocratNoose. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Mother Falcon, The Family Crest. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. The Smithereens. Dollar Bank Stage. Part of the TRAF. Downtown. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Many Arms, Triangle & Rhino, Radon Chong. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Indigenous. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Backyard Superheros w/ P-Funk North. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Charm & Chain, The Working Breed, Sun Hound. South Side. 412-431-5282. MELLON SQUARE PARK. Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution. Downtown. 412-665-3665. SMILING MOOSE. Incan Abraham. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY SHAKY SHRINES

SUN 15 DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Jake Bugg. Downtown. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Axxa/Abraxas, The Spectres, Lure. Garfield. 412-361-2262. RUMFISH GRILLE. Tony Janflone Jr. Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. Moldies & Mosters, Essential Machine. Shadyside. 412-251-6058.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Shaky Shrines; stream or download “Hypnotic Eyes” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

UPCOMING SHOWS

SMILING MOOSE. Modern Baseball. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 16 CATTIVO. Crystal Stilts, Your Friend Your Friend. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Designer, Palberta, Los Tigres. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

FRI 13

TUE 17 CLUB CAFE. Reuben & the Dark, Road Runner. South Side. 412-431-4950. HEINZ HALL. Ben Folds w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sidewalk Chalk, Davu, Blak Rapp Madusa. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. STAGE AE. Arctic Monkeys, White Denim. North Side. 412-229-5483.

PITTSBURGH ACOUSTIC CHALLENGE-RD. 5 // 8 pm // no cover Y108 NIGHT WITH THE HOBBS SISTERS // 8 pm // no cover DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s dance // 9 pm // $8 TOTALLY 80'S // 80's covers // 9 pm // $8 THE JAGGERZ // Ticketed Event // 7 pm show // $13/$15

WED 18

DJS

THU 12 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ

An Evening of Music JUNE 13

Can’t Dance w/ Hey Nostradamus JUNE 27

The Weathered Road w/Heidi Jacobs JULY 11

Brooke Annibale w/Jesse Lafser & Angela Mignanellie Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

SAT 14

FULL LIST ONLINE

SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 6.11 Thu 6.12 Fri 6.13 Sat 6.14 Sun 6.15

BRILLOBOX. LAZERCRUNK. w/ Shiftee, Cutups, & Keebs. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Bobbito Garcia & Rich Medina. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. www. per DIESEL. DJ CK. South hcitypa g p Side. 412-431-8800. CLUB CAFE. The .com ROWDY BUCK. Fuckies, Happy Fangs, Top 40 Dance. South Side. Brazilian Wax. South Side. 412-431-2825. 412-431-4950. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. MARKET SQUARE. Soupbone 412-481-7227. Trio. Downtown. 412-471-1511. STAGE AE. O.A.R., Phillip Phillips, LP. North Side. 412-229-5483. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

WED 18

sun jun 15 wed jun 25 fri jun 27

hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 17 ALTAR BAR. Asher Roth. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

BLUES FRI 13 565 LIVE. The Blues Orphans w/ Lou Schreiber. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. THE BEER MARKET. The Satin Hearts. North Side. 412-322-2337. FUGH MEMORIAL SOCIAL HALL. Shot O’ Soul. Etna Fireman’s Fair. Etna. KOPPER KETTLE. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. Washington. 724-225-5221. MOONDOG’S. Ron & The RumpShakers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 14 THE HOP HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. MOONDOG’S. Dennis Gruenling & Doug Demming w/ the Jewel Tones. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. The Satin Hearts. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-233-9800. WINGHART’S. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-5500.

SUN 15 BOSTON WATERFRONT. Shot O’ Soul. McKeesport. 412-751-8112. TIKI BAR. The Satin Hearts. Washington. 412-508-0200.

TUE 17 SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

JAZZ THU 12

ANDYS. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Doug Levine. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 13

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Jeff Lashway. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 14 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BALTIMORE HOUSE. RML Jazz. Pleasant Hills. 412-370-9621. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. HOMESTEAD PUMP HOUSE. Jazz Workshop, Inc. 412-831-3871. LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RIVERVIEW PARK. Reggie Watkins. Stars at Riverview Series. North Side. 412-255-2493. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 15 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. TALL TREES AMPHITHEATER. Dr. Zoot. Monroeville. TWIN LAKES PARK. RML Jazz. Latrobe. 412-370-9621.

MON 16 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 17 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 18 ANDYS. Judi Figel & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Fred Pugh. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.


Shootout w/ Pete Freeman, Jim Relja & Chris Parker. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

W DV E PR ESENTS THE

CLASSICAL

per for ming windbor ne’s

FRI 13 PITTSBURGH OPERA. South Park Amphitheater, South Park. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Strauss’ 150th Birthday Celebration feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Rudolf Buchbinder, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

COLUMBUS

SAT 14

{FRI., SEPT. 12}

Bear in Heaven

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Strauss’ 150th Birthday Celebration feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Rudolf Buchbinder, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

A&R Music Bar

WASHINGTON, D.C. {MON., SEPT. 15}

FEATURING

SUN 15

Ty Segall

Conductor Brent havens and Vocalist Brody Dolyniuk

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Strauss’ 150th Birthday Celebration feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Rudolf Buchbinder, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SOPRANO CHARLENE CANTY, COUNTERTENOR ANDREY NEMZER, ORGANIST NICHOLAS WILL. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

9:30 Club

PHILADELPHIA {SUN., SEPT. 21}

Yacht

First Unitarian Church

MON 16

ACOUSTIC

WORLD

THU 12

SAT 14

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran & Friends. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

FRI 13 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181.

SAT 14 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Kaylie Swoon, Jon-Michael Kerestes. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH OF HIGHLAND. Pittsburgh Mandolin Orchestra. McCandless. 412-364-1606.

TUE 17 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Guy Russo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

GRETCHEN VAN HOESEN & HEIDI VAN HOESEN GORTON. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970.

TUE 17 JONATHAN DIMMOCK, ORGANIST. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

REGGAE THU 12 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Preach Freedom, Connect, Truth & Rites. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 13 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 18 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. The Flow Band. Homewood. 412-731-3080.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

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SEVEN SPRINGS. Latshaw Pops Orchestra: Dancing In The Street. 724-853-4050.

SUN 15 FREEDOM INN. Howard Vokes & His Country Boys. New Kensington.

WED 18 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Texas

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WED 18 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

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THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTR A & FULL ROCK BAND PERFORM QUEEN CLASSIC SONGS IN A BRILLIANT COMBINATION OF PASSION AND POWER With a pre-concert performance featuring students from School of Rock!

TUE 17

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chris Knight. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

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CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Culture Club: Old Masters, New Music. Six musicians & composers will perform a range of musical styles in front of large projections of artworks that have inspired them. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. No Bad Juju No Bad Juju. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

SAT 14

h

THU 12

FRI 13

COUNTRY

WED 18

OTHER MUSIC

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Tuesday, June 24 Heinz Hall

MEDIA SPONSORS

412.392.4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 11 - 17 WEDNESDAY 11

Devil Driver / Whitechapel ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Chvrches STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Atmosphere MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Prof & Dem Atlas. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 12 Ralphie May

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through June 15.

Stryper ALTAR BAR Strip District.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Indigenous HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Ben Folds Orchestral Experience

TUESDAY, JUNE 17 HEINZ HALL

FRIDAY 13 Legally Blonde The Musical

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through June 22.

Comedian Frankie Paul LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through June 14.

Jennel Garcia SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Lindsey Stirling STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 14 Backstreet Boys

newbalancepittsburgh.com Oakland. Tickets: picttheare.org or 412-561-6000. Through June 21.

Modern Baseball SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guest Avril Lavigne. Tickets: The Ben Folds livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m. Orchestral Experience HEINZ HALL Downtown. Chuck Prophet 412-392-4900. Tickets: & The Mission Express pittsburghsymphony.org. CLUB CAFE South Side. 4127:30p.m. 431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ Reuben and the Dark opusone. 7p.m. / Road Runner

TUESDAY 17

Chris Knight THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 15

Waiting for Godot CHARITY RANDALL THEATRE

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Asher Roth ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To ďŹ nd the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

WEXFORD

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


RE-PLAY

IF YOU’RE PRONE TO TEARS, WEAR SOMETHING WATERPROOF

{BY AL HOFF} In a season marked by tiresome sequels and remakes, it’s amusing that one of the more entertaining popcorn movies is Doug Liman’s Edge of Tomorrow, in which the same thing happens over and over and over. In a troubled future in which Europe has been invaded by gigantic alien squid-things, one hapless soldier (Tom Cruise) relives the same awful day: Hit beach in France, die, wake up and repeat. Until he meets another soldier (Emily Blunt) who has been in a similar time loop. Together, they re-do (and re-do and so on) the battle, hoping to defeat the aliens. (Yes, it’s Groundhog Day, but now the consequences are the Fate of Entire World.)

I’ll be back: Emily Blunt and Tom Cruise

CP APPROVED

Time-loop movies are always a kick — and this one has a fair amount of humor. Hitting the restart button on life is a heady fantasy, and Liman deftly handles the re-booting, keeping the narrative fresh. Cruise is also best in the film’s middle, as we watch him transition from slick jerk to capable leader. (For once, we see the action hero earn his status, day by day.) The end is less effervescent, falling back on standard sci-fi action tropes, but the lather-rinse-repeat journey getting there is good clean fun. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A great white shark is big — up to 20 feet long and weighing up to 2 tons — so it certainly warrants the Omnimax treatment, where viewers can experience wrap-around shark. The much-maligned fish is also due for a doc that advocates for its protection and debunks prevalent myths, such as by pointing out that they pose virtually no threat to humans. True, a shark encounter isn’t so good if you’re a seal — but the footage of great whites exploding out of the sea to chomp on a wooden seal decoy is spectacular. See it from the safety of your seat with the new 40-minute IMAX film Great White Shark, which starts Fri., June 13, at the Carnegie Science Center’s Rangos Omnimax theater. N E W S

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LOVE AND DEATH

Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley discuss life’s unexpected swings.

{BY AL HOFF}

“I

’M A GRENADE,” terminally ill teen Hazel explains, “and at some point, I’m going to explode. … It’s my responsibility to minimize the casualties.” But besotted Augustus is willing to risk any collateral damage. That’s love, life, death and lifeafter-a-death, all wrapped up in the sweet-and-sad dramedy The Fault in Our Stars, Josh Boone’s adaptation of John Green’s best-selling young-adult novel. In Indianapolis (played by Pittsburgh), Hazel (Shailene Woodley) and Gus (Ansel Elgort) meet in a support group for teen cancer survivors. They banter, flirt and debate Hazel’s favorite book, An Imperial Affliction, a novel about Anna, a young girl with cancer, that ends in midsentence. Hazel understands — “you die in the middle of life” — but she longs to learn what becomes of those left in Anna’s wake. So, between health crises, the pair journey to Amsterdam to meet the novel’s reclusive author (Willem Dafoe). Hazel worries about her grenade

status: It’s the root of her ironic detachment, and choosing whether to love and be loved is her greatest leap. Gus fears “oblivion,” that his life will go unmarked. Despite its heavy themes, this is a work created for young adults that just happened to find an audience with adults as well, so one must be forgiving of some of Fault’s obviousness. (Kids: Is it better to have loved and lost, than to have never loved at all?)

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS DIRECTED BY: Josh Boone STARRING: Shailene Woodley, Ansel Elgort

CP APPROVED The film is faithful to the book, if truncated. The biggest departure might be that there’s not much attempt to impose the ugly physical realities of terminal illness on these vibrant, glowing actors, but this is hardly the first Hol-

lywood film about dying young to favor beauty over truth. I can’t imagine anyone who loved the book not loving this film, despite some of its missteps. (I would watch this again just for Laura Dern’s warm-but-emotionally-raw portrayal of Hazel’s mom.) Woodley cries wonderfully, but isn’t as convincing in humorous scenes. Elgort is better at being glib, than at conveying more complex emotions like love, anger and sorrow. If one was being charitable, these limitations could be excused considering that many real-life teenagers find communication tricky. Augustus’ big scenes are like watching a puppy cry — more adorable than heart-wrenching — but it should go over gangbusters with younger and more sentimental viewers. It’s no spoiler to say Fault doesn’t end fairy-tale happy; we’re told that from the start. (“This is the truth. Sorry.”) And yes, there was a lot of sniffling throughout the final reel. If you’re prone to tears, wear something waterproof. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Dan Savage's

TOUR WORLD’S BEST AMATEUR DIRTY MOVIE FESTIVAL!

C ur at ed by D an Sa va ge !

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Black Gestapo (1975) - 6/11 @ 7:30pm Jaws (1975) - 6/13 @ 7:30pm & 10pm, 6/14 @ 7pm & 10pm Father of the Bride (1950) - 6/15 @ 11am Till Tomorrow: Don McLean in Concert (1972) - 6/15 @ 4pm Pete Seeger: A Song & A Stone (1972) - 6/15 @ 5:15pm Johnny Cash! The Man, His World, His Music (1969) - 6/15 @ 7pm Chiller Films and Horror Realm present: (2014) - 6/17 @ 7:30pm A group of friends is pursued by a blood-thirsty predator. Executive Produced by Drew Barrymore.

Animal JUNE 13 9PM JUNE 14 & 15 5PM, 7PM, & 9PM

THE ROW HOUSE • 4115 BUTLER STREET TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW! ONLY AT WWW.HUMPTOUR.COM

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

How To Train Your Dragon 2

FILM CAPSULES NEW CP

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2. Hiccup and his pet dragon, Toothless, are back in the continuing saga of ancient Vikings who live with tame dragons, adapted from Cressida Cowell’s books. In this sequel to the 2010 animated adventure, Hiccup discovers the world beyond his home island is a considerably more dangerous place. There are dragon poachers, a fearsome leader of a dragon army and a mysterious woman who also controls dragons. Dean DeBloius’ film is fast-paced, and viewers will thrill to several epic aerial battles. The humor of the first film remains, but this second installment also offers much darker material, including: a lot of destruction, a particularly unpleasant villain, some heavy parent-child issues and a death. (Younger viewers may need a Viking funeral explained to them, flaming arrows and all.) But if there’s another animated film that does a better job depicting the exhilaration of flying, I can’t think of it now. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., June 13. (Al Hoff)

by fine performances by both actresses, the pair a study in physical and philosophical contrasts — Wanda, hardened by life and buttressed with makeup and booze, and the impossibly untouched Anna. A personal and historical study in grays, shot appropriately in black and white, with most scenes exquisitely framed and photographed. In Polish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., June 13. Manor (AH) PALO ALTO. This coming-of-age drama is the directorial debut of Gia Coppola (granddaughter of Francis Ford Coppola, niece of Sofia), and adapted from short stories penned by actor James Franco, who also appears. Over a few weeks, it follows four teens — sensitive April (Emma Roberts), reckless Freddy (Nat Wolff), even-more-sensitive Teddy (Jack Kilmer, son of Val) and lonely Emily (Zoe Levin) — as they navigate the awfulness of adolescence. Sex is a big part, naturally, with all parties submitting more out of pressure than desire (despite bravado on the part of some characters). Also navigated are: the gap left by absent (or disengaged) parents; drugs and alcohol; balancing self-protection with the demands of a group; crime and punishment; and, in April’s case, an inappropriate relationship with her soccer coach (Franco).

HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL. The Dan Savagecurated touring festival of amateur short porn films has been relocated to the brand-new Rowhouse Cinema. (See page 6 for a preview of the film and an account of the controversy its booking caused locally.) 9 p.m. Fri., June 13; 5, 7 and 9 p.m. Sat., June 14; and 5, 7 and 9 p.m. Sun., June 15. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $18. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com

CP

IDA. In 1962 Poland, a young woman named Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska) is about to take her vows as a nun; an orphan, she has been raised in a rural convent. But first she must visit her only known relative, her aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza), living in the city. The brusque Wanda has some news for her: Anna is really “Ida,” the only survivor of her Jewish family, who were killed during World War II. Prompted by memories of the past, the two women embark on a road trip, looking to uncover the truth — or even just the graves — of their lost relatives. Pawel Pawlikowski’s film is one of those quiet dramas that might try some viewer’s patience, but beneath its economical storytelling is a fair amount of revelation and complex emotion. It’s essentially a two-person drama —three if you count the unseen ghost of the past that defines the women’s relationship. (Four, if you count post-war, Communist-controlled Poland, depicted here in mid-winter, caught in tense present between a fading past and an uncertain future.) The spare dialogue is supplemented

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Palo Alto Coppola proffers a languid take on familiar material, also presented in a familiar indie manner (loose plot, long scenes of “nothing,” a washed-out look). Seasoned viewers will be reminded of Larry Clark’s Kids (but with the glossy ennui of privilege) and the teen dramas of Gus Van Sant. (Sharp-eyed viewers will also catch a clip of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, a touchstone coming-of-age film.) It’s buoyed by good performances, especially from Kilmer, that are mostly non-showy. (Wolff’s troubled Freddy is on the bubble of real and “movie real.”) It delivers a moody sadness that occasionally stumbles into cinematic clichés, such as the film-school close-up of the pink milkshake dropped in the parking


lot. It’s not a bad first effort — especially if this is a viewer’s first confused-kids-are-sad-about-sex-and-life film. The rest of us may feel a little ho-hum about it all. Starts Fri., June 13. Regent Square (AH)

ANIMAL. Brett Simmons directs this new horror film in which a group of friends holed up in a cabin is pursued by bloodthirsty predator. 7:30 p.m. Tue., June 17, and 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 18. Hollywood

22 JUMP STREET. The undercover cops are back, and posing as college students, in this sequel to the 2012 comedy, 21 Jump Street (itself a re-boot/spoof of the 1980s TV show). Jonah Hill and Tatum Channing reprise their roles; Phil Lord and Christopher Miller direct. Starts Fri., June 13.

DIE HARD. It’s pretty much the worst way to spend Christmas Eve, single-handedly defending a Los Angeles skyscraper from a dozen terrorists. But New York cop John McLane (Bruce Willis) makes it look fun. John McTiernan directs this 1988 actioner that made Willis a big-time movie star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 18. AMC Loews. $5

WORDS AND PICTURES. Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche star in Fred Schepisi’s romantic comedy about two pre-school teachers who lead respective groups of students in a competition to determine whether words or visual art is more important. Can’t words and pictures just get along? Starts Fri., June 13.

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. Man of Steel, Wed., June 11 (Schenley), and Sat., June 14 (Riverview). The Little Mermaid, Thu., June 12 (Brookline); Fri., June 13 (Arsenal); Sat., June 14 (Grandview); and Sun., June 15 (Schenley). Monsters University, Mon., June 16 (Highland Park). Iron Man 3, Tue., June 17 (West End/ Elliott Overlook); Wed., Jun 18 (Schenley); and Thu., June 19 (Brookline). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ART ON FILM SERIES. In conjunction with the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh Filmmakers screens eight documentary films about art and art-making. Cutie and the Boxer: Recent Oscar-nominated doc about “boxing” painter Ushio Shinohara and his artist wife, Noriko (8:15 p.m. Thu., June 12). “Margo Lovelace and the Magic of Puppetry” and “Thaddeus Mosley: Sculptor”: two short films from local filmmaker Ken Love about two local legends (4:15 p.m. Sat., June 14). Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation: Relive the early 1960s folk scene with participating singers, authors and performers (8:45 p.m. Fri., June 13). Open City of Amereida: local filmmaker Andres Tapia-Urzua’s profile of a radical and long-running architectural project/community in Chile (6:30 p.m. Wed., June 11, and 3 p.m. Sat., June 14). Sign Painters: This recent doc explores the history of advertising sign-painting by hand, and catches up with a few living practitioners (6:30 p.m. Thu., June 12). Indie Game: The Movie: Just how hard is it to develop and market a successful video game? (7:30 p.m. Sat., June 14). In No Great Hurry: 13 Lessons in Life With Saul Leiter: a look at the career of the street photographer, filmed shortly before his death last year (5:45 p.m. Sat., June 14). Antonio Gaudi: The work of famed Barcelona architect Antonio Gaudí is documented in Hiroshi Teshigahara’s unconventional 1984 film (7:45 p.m. Wed., June 11, and 7:15 p.m. Fri., June 13). All films screen at Harris. Free THE BLACK GESTAPO. In Lee Frost’s 1975 blaxploitation flick, some brothers form a “people’s army” to fight back against the mob in the Watts section of Los Angeles. But after victory, the army evolves into a fascist entity, Nazi uniforms and all. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 11. Hollywood

Particle Fever one. Sean S. Cunningham’s 1980 horror flick launched a zillion sequels. Screens as part of the Moonlit Matinee series. 10 p.m. Fri., June 13, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 14. Oaks

TIL TOMORROW: DON MCLEAN IN CONCERT. Catch the singer-songwriter (“American Pie,” “Vincent”) in this 1972 film from Bob Elfstrom. 4 p.m. Sun., June 15. Hollywood

FATHER OF THE BRIDE. The luminously youthful Elizabeth Taylor stars as the bride, whose upcoming nuptials throw the household — dad Spencer Tracy and mom Joan Bennett — into a tizzy, in this lighthearted 1950 comedy from Vincente Minnelli. 11 a.m. Sun., June 15, and 2 p.m. Thu., June 19. Hollywood

PETE SEEGER: A SONG AND A STONE. Bob Elfstrom directed this 1971 doc that follows the folk singer and his wife and they perform concerts in the Hudson Valley. Johhny Cash and Don McLean also make appearances. 5:15 p.m. Sun., June 15. Hollywood JOHNNY CASH! THE MAN, HIS WORLD, HIS MUSIC. Spend some time with the Man in Black, and his wife, June Carter, as the pair sing duets and welcome fellow musicians Carl Perkins and Bob Dylan. Directed by Bob Elfstrom. 7 p.m. Sun., June 15. Hollywood

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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Ida ART ON FILM DOUBLE FEATURE. Amble around with artist Jean Michel Basquiat in Edo Bertoglio’s “Downtown 81,” a long-lost document of sorts of New York City’s edgy art and music scene in 1980 and ’81. Another New York graffiti artist, the late Keith Haring, is profiled in “Drawing the Line.” 1 and 3:30 p.m. Sun., June 15. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 or www. parkwaytheater.org. $6

FRIDAY THE 13th. A group of teenagers working to re-open a rundown lake camp are killed off one by

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PARTICLE FEVER. Mark Levinson’s documentary about the launching of the Large Hadron Collider and its use in searching for the Higgs (or “God”) particle is a lot more fascinating than 90 minutes spent with badly coiffed physicists would have you believe. Particle Fever is pretty hard science (with a dash of philosophy), but is quite accessible for the layman. You’ll leave the theater smarter than you went in, as well as hopeful and inspired about those who pursue knowledge for its own sake. In English, and several languages, with subtitles. Mon., June 16, through Thu., June 19. Harris (AH)

Saturday, June 21st

Odorama with Mink

JAWS. Steven Spielberg’s aqua-thriller that terrified beach-goers in the summer of 1975, when it unspooled the tale of a great white shark eating swimmers along the Atlantic seaboard. Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw and Roy Scheider hit the waves to capture the maneater. 7:30 and 10 p.m. Fri., June 13, and 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., June 14. Hollywood

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CAPTAIN Z AND THE TERROR OF LEVIATHAN. In this locally produced adventure/comedy, directed by Steve Rudzinski, a powerful amulet can unleash the destructive “Leviathan.” The evil was thwarted in 1714 by Captain Zicari, but now in the present day, the amulet is back in play — and in the wrong hands. Tonight is the theatrical premiere. 8 p.m. Thu., June 19. Hollywood

BORN FREE. Virgina McKenna and Bill Travers star in James Hill’s 1966 adaptation of Joy Adamson’s book, about her experience raising an orphaned lion cub and later releasing it into the wild. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of movies with connections to the TV show Mad Men. 8 p.m. Sun., June 15. Regent Square

THE GODFATHER. Catch one of the most enduring and influential American films of the late 20th century on the big screen, where Francis Ford Coppola’s multigenerational 1972 drama, about a mafia family and the perversion of the American Dream writ large, belongs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 11. AMC Loews. $5

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ANTHOLOGY: LOCAL #471 MUSICIANS’ UNION. This hour-long documentary looks at Local 471, Pittsburgh’s African-American musicians’ union. A key factor in the establishment of Pittsburgh as a jazz center and an integral part of Pittsburgh’s black community, the union was eventually disbanded after such groups became integrated. Harry Clark, of the African American Jazz Preservation Society of Pittsburgh, will introduce the film, and lead a discussion after the screening. The film continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 19. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free

Stole in Person!

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

Tickets at www.showclix.com/event/OdoramaWithMinkStole +

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[DANCE]

SPACE INVADERS

THEY CRASH INTO PROTECTIVE PANES, CAPTURED LIGHTNING AGAINST GLASS.

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Maree ReMalia/merrygogo perform THE UBIQUITOUS MASS OF US 8 p.m. Sat., June 14. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

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CURRENT [ART REVIEW]

EVENTS

Last year’s work-in-progress showing of The Ubiquitous Mass of Us {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SIMPSON}

Outer space may be the final frontier, but it is the space we humans occupy on Earth that has inspired countless choreographers and their works. The latest to address that subject is choreographer Maree ReMalia, whose The Ubiquitous Mass of Us premieres June 14 as part of the New Hazlett Theater’s Community Supported Art performance series. ReMalia — who also performs with the Staycee Pearl Dance Project — moved here in 2012. She was born in South Korea and raised in Medina, Ohio, where she began studying ballet at age 7. After high school, she apprenticed with Richmond Ballet and Florida’s Southern Ballet Theatre. She transitioned into modern- and contemporary-dance styles, and earned a graduate degree in dance at Ohio State University. ReMalia says her return trips to South Korea — with its infamous DMZ border with North Korea — and the ongoing ruckus over the U.S./Mexico border, got her thinking about ways we claim geographic space. That led her to incorporate into the hour-long Ubiquitous Mass a multitude of other ideas on how humans take up space. “We reflect issues of territory and question the bounds of our identities,” says ReMalia. “What are the myriad ways we can inhabit space and the spaces within the space?” Set to an original soundscape by local musician David Bernabo (who also performs in the work), including music from his band Host Skull, Ubiquitous Mass is ReMalia’s first large-scale work. It was developed during a Kelly-Strayhorn Theater residency this past November. Ubiquitous Mass, says ReMalia, is derived largely from improvisational exercises helped along by a movement process called “Gaga,” of which ReMalia is a practitioner. The work showcases nine diversely-skilled, multigenerational performers (including herself). As seen in a video clip of November’s work-in-progress showing, the piece is a bit of a wild ride, running the gamut of mood and tone and full of quirky characters and humor. That was especially evident in a section ReMalia calls “The hot me box,” where the very territorial performers compete for a small area of the stage. Add a found-object set design by Blaine Siegel, and bold costuming by Rachel Vallozzi, and Ubiquitous Mass is sure to be a unique exploration of how we take up physical space.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

T

HE EXHIBITION Electrified combines

the work of Edwin van der Heide and Alexandre Burton, two artists working independently while employing as their primary material the same unexpected element: electricity. The exhibition is inspired by the legacy of Nicola Tesla (1856-1943), who went from fame and fortune to utter destitution during the course of his life. Tesla fell into obscurity after his death, but in recent decades has been rediscovered and acknowledged as a pioneer in the study and harnessing of power. The Wood Street Galleries exhibition showcases two installation pieces as akin as they are different, and bound together through their innovation and complexity. Sound figures strongly in both works, present through a hum that may accelerate into a crackle of frequency vibrating constantly, or through a fusillade of eruptions. Both artworks require the existence of the viewer for their ignition, waiting in a state of

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

Alexandre Burton’s installation work “Impacts” (detail)

hibernation when left to their own devices. And both can strike awe or terror. Rotterdam-based van der Heide crafts with sound and space, consistently placing the viewer in the midst of his work rather than outside of it. His “Evolving Spark Network” is no exception. The title is actually simplistically self-explanatory. Eighty spark bridges are installed in an overhead

ELECTRIFIED

continues through June 22. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

grid. Alone, they rest dark and silent. When a viewer enters the gallery space, motionsensors animate the piece, prompting a series of patterns in which one, some or all of the bridges counter with a bang and a flare. Depending on the number of people in the

room and their movements within it, the ceiling could fire in an expansive volley or twinkle in centralized outbursts. Working historically in digital technologies, Quebec-based composer and digitalinstrument maker Alexandre Burton continues on the same road with “Impacts.” Like “Evolving Spark Network,” this work is dormant when solitary. Tesla coils await the presence of the viewer, who generates their response with her presence. The coils proceed to throw arcs in the viewer’s direction; they crash into protective panes, captured lightning against glass. From a distance, the bolts are small and slight, but as the viewer gets closer, they convulse violently. “Impacts” might be as at home in a science center as in a gallery space; it’s a demonstration as much as an installation. “Evolving Spark Network” definitely belongs to the art world. The latter is a slow burn while the former is an explosive attack. But these two installations are similar


beyond their use of charged particles: Both are capable of fomenting intense reactions. Some viewers will find experiencing one or the other a little disquieting. And a few viewers might feel one or both to be profoundly disturbing. Electricity can be a mysterious force for those who do not work with it directly, and a lack of technical understanding can take it beyond mystery to menace. “Evolving Spark Network” is intended to evoke the communication of information, replicating the way our nerves send electrical impulses throughout our bodies. Rationally, as we read an artist’s statement on the work or research the scientific principles that went into its construct, this makes perfect sense. We can admire the concept behind it from a place of safety and well-being, from another room.

“EVOLVING SPARK NETWORK” IS AN INDISCRIMINATE BARRAGE, BUT THE GRASPING TENTACLES OF “IMPACTS” FEEL MORE PERSONAL. But as the piece mimics our own communication, and our presence communicates with the piece directly above our heads, what we receive from it on a visceral level might overpower our appreciation for the intellectual element. As it explodes in pops and bursts, it might subtly suggest neural synapses. But our own neurons might perceive fireworks, which possess the potential for danger, or the blasting of weaponry, designed to be dangerous, making our hearts race, palms sweat, heads pound. While “Evolving Spark Network” can provoke fight or flight based on its mimicry of man-made peril, with “Impacts,” it’s nature herself that unsettles. True, a pane of glass does separate us from the arcs thrown by the coils, containing the bolts and ensuring our safety. But because the intensity of each arc is either magnified into a tempest or lessened to nothing based on our proximity, there’s no escaping the feeling that the force created is reaching out to get us. Because it is. “Evolving Spark Network” is an indiscriminate barrage, but the grasping tentacles of “Impacts” feel more personal. But even if your comfort level is trampled, it’s worth pushing through Electrified. Electricity is a force that we rely on daily but might not understand, and whose usage we take for granted. Our exposure to it in the context of a gallery exhibition will charge us. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[ART BRIEFS]

ART BRIEFS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Quick hits on three exhibits at the Three Rivers Arts Festival:

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New federal limits on power-plant emissions have critics bemoaning a “war on coal.” New Mexico-based photographer Carlan Tapp’s The China Express explores Big Coal’s war on us. The 40 black-and-white prints trace the route strip-mined U.S. coal would take from Wyoming’s Powder River Basin to the site of a proposed shipping terminal in Puget Sound. Mining has already scarred the land and drained ranchland wells and streams, even as open rail-cars scatter coal dust far and wide. The 2,980-foot-long wharf and big stockyard would pave over pristine shorefront held sacred to Native Americans … all to facilitate shipping coal to energy-hungry China and India. Two short accompanying videos by Tapp (a former assistant to Ansel Adams) feature interviews with rancher L.J. Turner and Lummi tribal official Jay Julius. Trust Education Center, 805-807 Liberty Ave.

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As public art goes, Elizabeth Abeyta’s “O:ne:ka’” is both quite accessible and rather cryptic. It’s an installation of some 3,000 donated T-shirts displayed on big wooden frames in Point State Park’s “underpass” pond. Anyone can enjoy spotting colorful shirts touting everything from Hello Kitty to Banksy, Dunder Mifflin and Wrestlemania XVIII. But what’s it about? Seen from above, the frames spell out “O:ne:ka’,” Seneca for water, and Abeyta’s accompanying text notes that it takes 700 gallons of water to make a single cotton T-shirt. Multiply by 2 billion shirts a year worldwide. One might ask whether we really need so many of these ubiquitous and (clearly) disposable garments; Abeyta merely requests that you show up after noon on Mon., June 16, to help her tear down by taking a shirt (or 20) for reuse in lieu of disposal. Point State Park

Sponsors as of early June 2014.

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Also critiquing disposal is Rose Clancy’s cleverly titled “Diversion.” You’ll have to look for it: Stashed around back of the Fort Pitt Blockhouse, it’s a small mound with a two-sided vertical display. One side explains that landfilling organic waste, such as food, is bad because it removes nutrients from the food web. The other face explains how composting solves that problem. If Clancy’s artfully lettered text is a little hard to read, it’s still a good-looking display, and a hands-on element lets you create a “compostable sculpture” (of cardboard, seeds, etc.) to take home and get you started. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL continues through Sun., June 15. Downtown. www.3riversartsfest.org

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Nancy + Woody Ostrow Pittsburgh Steelers PNC Bank Quest Diagnostics Radiant Hall Studios Schell Games LLC Stoltenberg Consulting Inc. Tier 1 Verizon

Day Automotive Group First National Bank Highmark Hilbish McGee Lighting Design HP Susan + Scott Lammie Level 3 Communications Logix Guru LLC Maher Duessel Marilyn Coleman Consulting NACR One World Labs, Inc.

Allegheny General Hospital Allegheny Health Network Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Amcom Office Systems Anonymous AT&T Audiocare Systems Avaya CA Technologies CleanCare Crawford Ellenbogen LLC

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Waiting for Godot By Samuel Beckett Directed by Aoife Spillane-Hinks

June 5–21 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland Waiting was never so funny! {PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY KIRTLAND}

Amy Landis and Jonathan Visser in Unseam’d Shakespeare’s Orlando

[PLAY REVIEWS]

UNENGENDERED

DISCOUNT CODE: CP5OFF

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

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FAST AND outrageous — two good words to

describe Unseam’d Shakespeare Co.’s production of Orlando. In this 2010 adaptation by Sarah Ruhl, Virginia Woolf’s talky (and cheeky) 1928 novel Orlando: A Biography becomes a wild theatrical play of and on words, time, gender, sex, culture and more. Everybody in the cast of this localpremiere production cross-dresses, chews the spare scenery, riffs on love and rips off laughs. Director Robert C.T. Steele makes few concessions to reality in this epic fantasy. Costumes barely suggest the period. Props are mostly imaginary. Footwear is mostly eschewed.

ORLANDO

continues through June 21. Unseam’d Shakespeare Co. at the Henry Heymann Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland. $15-30. 888-718-4253 or www.unseamd.org

then own property), but let’s not get picky. At the center of this tight one-act, Amy Landis fulďŹ lls the demanding title role, shouldering the heaviest explanatory narration. Wafting about the edges, Lisa Ann Goldsmith combines coquettishness and machismo as the love of Orlando’s life, ďŹ rst as a Russian princess and then as a ship’s captain, with hardly an alteration of costume. Both are rather trumped by the multi-cast/cast-against-type chorus of three guys. Among the most notable roles are: Brett Sullivan Santry’s turn as the rose-collared QEI; Jonathan Visser as an unlikely but lustful suitor who also switches genders for Orlando; and Unseam’d artistic associate Andy Kirtland as the title character in Othello, among others. Unseam’d makes a virtue of its low budget, forgoing extensive stage trappings for stripped-down multimedia design by Nicholas Quinn and a superb ensemble ďŹ lling the intimate space. Orlando does have real, serious things to say — but they don’t get in the way of a fun evening. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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The unlikely tale begins with a nubile young lad, Orlando, lover of the aging Queen Elizabeth I. After her death, the attractive aristocrat embarks on a series of adventures — sexual, literary and otherwise. After a really rip-roaring party in Constantinople, he has a veeery long sleep and wakes up a woman, which Orlando remains until the 21st century. (Obviously Ruhl takes the story further than Woolf.) Orlando also remains a head-turning 30-something over the centuries. This is easier to accept than her complete lack of a means of support (she loses title to the family estate because women could not

WAIT GAIN {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} APPARENTLY I’VE been mispronouncing the title since my ancient undergraduate days, when Samuel Beckett’s 1949* classic ďŹ rst crossed my consciousness as one week of a Modern Theater class. The professor and my fellow students likewise put the accent on the second syllable, as Americans do. Brits tell us that this is the opposite of what the Irish-born Beckett intended: a rhyme that establishes as credible the possibility


that the larger-than-life Pozzo can be mistaken for the never-seen Godot. That’s surprise No. 1 in the Waiting for Godot produced by PICT Classic Theatre (né Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre). The bigger surprise is that it’s often funny yet reverential, both to Beckett’s text and to the movement style of the early-20th century duo Laurel and Hardy (widely supposed as inspirations for Godot’s Estragon and Vladimir, respectively). One might call the performers’ carefully nuanced gestures smooth, studied, even stately. Modern audiences are likely to find them exasperatingly slow. OK, so Godot is not for the casual or drowsy theatergoer. Many library shelves, lectures, symposia, curricula, etc. have been filled with arguments, analyses, explanations and expectations, and more than a few lamentations, about this Most Serious of Absurdist Plays. I wouldn’t try to upstage them.

WAITING FOR GODOT continues through June 21. Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

PICT’s Godot, directed by Aoife Spillane-Hinks, is one for the books — or the bookish, like scholars and students. But while it might seem slow, it’s never stodgy or clumsy. The gentlemen enunciate their body language as well as their vowels. Bracketing the questions, the action and the stage are Martin Giles as the timid Gogo and James FitzGerald as the more perspicacious Didi. Alan Stanford, the company’s artistic and executive director, looms large (literally) as Pozzo — a role with which he has long been associated — and as the production’s scenic/co-costume designer. Ken Bolden approaches Joycean heights in his sole speech as the mostly mute lackey, Lucky. * Beckett’s original version, in French,

was first produced in 1953. A somewhat bowdlerized English-language Godot opened in 1955. The American premiere followed in 1956, at Florida’s eventually renowned Coconut Grove Playhouse. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ALL OUT {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} ACTING OUT is the sixth annual edition of the Pittsburgh Pride Theater Festival. And this brisk, 90-minute anthology of four new LGBTQ-themed one-acts by local playwrights — two comedies, two dramas — is a well-crafted evening’s entertainment. Nik Nemec’s “Shaving the Beard” is a smart little coming-out comedy. That theme is familiar by now, but Nemec writes crisp dialogue, and Kyle Coughlin is fine as the indecisive, pouty Jay, who’d rather skip his “bitchy sister’s wedding” than tell his family he’s gay. The piece features witty direction by festival co-organizer Ted Hoover (who’s also CP’s lead theater critic) and good supporting performances by Anthony Gullickson and Felicia Cooper. “Mercy” is Staci Backaukas’ toughminded drama about a woman visiting her ex-lover in prison and getting more than she bargained for. Jezebele Zbonzy-DelPercio, as the self-described “ghetto rat,” and Brittany Dorazio, as her more-privileged ex, pull off this engrossing two-hander with help from sensitive direction by Ja’Sonta Roberts-Deen. Two more ex-lovers square off in Keith Foster’s “(Un)packing,” also directed by Hoover. It’s a heady piece, set in a bookfilled room, that uses one former partner’s obsession with U.S. foreign policy — specifically, Obama’s approach to Syria — to launch a metaphor about their own failed relationship. Ryan Westwood and Connor Bert handle the tricky dialogue with skill. The program closes with the proud camp of “Nightingale.” Carol Mullen’s

spoof, which combines elements of Star Trek and Star Wars, is set aboard a femalecrewed space cruiser where an old lover is as likely to turn up as is over-the-top dialogue, a Casablanca reference and every sight gag director Kim El can cram into the play’s fast-paced 15 minutes. Corrine Paulson plays Capt. Kate Cox with appropriate swagger (and a hip flask tucked in her garter).

ACTING OUT

8 p.m. Thu., June 12, and 8 p.m. Fri., June 13. Pittsburgh Pride Theater Festival at Pittsburgh Playwrights, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. 412-256-8109 or www.pittsburghpridetheaterfestival.org

Produced on a shoestring, with lots of help from Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., the Pride Theater Festival continues to be an important showcase and proving ground for local playwrights and actors, and for nurturing young talent. (Playwrights Nemec and Foster, for instance, are recent college graduates.) But it’s also an entertaining program in its own right.

revolved, so we’re out front again during one of the final performances before the tour shuts down. That sounds more complicated than it is. Frayn, and the Public’s director, Don Stephenson, never lose the audience. This is a show specifically built to wow anyone who sees it. And it does, especially that second act, which is performed almost entirely without words (except the Nothing On lines). It’s a dizzying, even dazzling, showcase for the mechanical brilliance of Frayn’s craft. Unfortunately for him, there’s no way the other acts can compete. The first is really a set-up for the second, and the third is … well, it seems like an afterthought. The Public has been very clever in presenting acts two and three without an intermission, so that the lingering euphoria goes a long way toward carrying us to the finish line. This is a monster of a play, and Stephenson and his company present an impeccably timed, lightning-quick second act which more than gives Frayn his due.

NOISES OFF

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continues through June 29. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

ON/OFF {BY TED HOOVER} PAY ATTENTION, because this might

be confusing: In Michael Frayn’s 1982 farce Noises Off, now at the Public Theater, a British troupe performs the first act (and only the first act) of a sex farce called Nothing On three times. The first act of Noises Off depicts the final rehearsal before the show goes on tour. The second act takes place a month into the tour, and we see it from behind. The set (gorgeously designed by Michael Schweikardt) has spun around, and we witness the backstage lunacy of the cast navigating egos, libidos and a matinee. For the third act, the set has been re-

Perhaps my biggest complaint is a lack of clear delineation between Noises Off and Nothing On in terms of style. There’s some unsupported broad playing going on in the former which would really better suit the later … although I did enjoy the work of actors Michael MacCauley, Preston Dyar, Garrett Long and Scott Cote. What made me laugh the most, however, is this: Nothing On is clearly Frayn’s scathing piss-take on all those smutty (and dreadfully unfunny) Ray Cooneyesque British sex farces … and yet the audience was laughing at every purposely dreary joke. Someone ought to write a play about that. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Friday, June 20 – 7:30 pm | Ninth Street and Penn Avenue – Cultural District

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͕ǀŝƐŝƚĚŝŐŶŝƚLJĂŶĚƌĞƐƉĞĐƚ͘ŽƌŐ ŵĂƟŽŶ͕ǀŝƐŝƚĚŝŐŶŝƚLJĂ Sponsored by UPMC N E W S

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Performance Series

Poets Martín Espada & Vanessa German Thurs., June. 19, 6 p.m. New Hazlett Theater

Good poetry humanizes even when addressing the most despairing of subjects; it conveys the transcendent power of hope and resistance. — Martín Espada The stakes are higher than your silence is comforting … — Vanessa German Funded by the Heinz Endowments

FREE with a suggested donation of $5 RSVP at heartjournalonline.com/event

[DANCE]

DANCE WITH PRIDE {BY STEVE SUCATO} “Ladies with an attitude, fellows that were in the mood / Don’t just stand there, let’s get to it / Strike a pose, there’s nothing to it.” Madonna’s 1990 call to vogue lives at this year’s PrideFest Pittsburgh. The free June 15 street fair’s dance showcase on Liberty Avenue includes newcomers True T Entertainment’s voguing tribute to the 1990 LGBT-ballroom-scene documentary Paris Is Burning. The voguing performance (and battle) is one of seven acts in the three-hour showcase, again curated by Richard Parsakian and taking place on PrideFest’s two outdoor stages. On the Sixth Street Stage, Texture Contemporary Ballet (1:45 p.m.) returns for the fourth time to PrideFest to perform three repertory works: “Cognitive Closure” (2014); Kelsey Bartman’s duet for her and Texture artistic director Alan Obuzor; and two works choreographed {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SIMPSON} by Bartman and Obuzor: an excerpt of The Staycee Pearl Dance Project performs “Playground” “Broken Flow” (2013), set to music by Cleveland rapper Kid Cudi, and the 2011 excerpt from “Playground,” Pearl’s work-induet “Hollowed.” Staycee Pearl Dance progress inspired by childhood memories. Project (2 p.m.) presents a 12-minute And The Pillow Project (4 p.m.) presents

artistic director Pearl Ann Porter’s “In Neutral,” an improvised work featuring Porter and dancer Zëk Stewart exploring androgyny and gender neutrality. On the Tenth Street Stage, Taylor Knight/Slowdanger (3 p.m.) makes its PrideFest debut with the premiere of “memory 4: The Bird,” a 10-minute solo choreographed and performed by Knight that muses on the idea of growing into one’s wings. Reed Dance (3:15 p.m.) offers choreographer Levi Philip Marsman’s 2014 work “Bitter”; performed by James Barrett, the solo reflects on lost love. Dancer/choreographer Jasmine Hearn (3:30 p.m.) returns to premiere her 12-minute duet “favorite” with dancer Anna Thompson. Says Hearn: “The work uses dance, song, imagery and live music as tools for the artists to give consent to what pleases them.” PrideFest is also the coming-out party of True T Entertainment’s (4:45 p.m.) as a performance team, says artistic director Duane Binion. Danced to a music mix by Philadelphia’s D.J. Delish, the performance inspired by Paris Is Burning’s theme of “finding a home” also honors The Wizard of Oz, with True T’s transgender and gay male performers costumed as characters from the movie. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH PRIDEFEST 2014 DANCE SHOWCASE 1:45-4:45 p.m. Sun., June 15. Liberty Avenue between Sixth and Tenth streets, Downtown. Free. www.pittsburghpride.org

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

May 3–July 28, 2014 Artists-in-residence Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar have transformed Carnegie Museum of Art’s Coatroom Gallery into a playful, hybrid space for encounters with the photobook. Visit nowseethis.org for related programs.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

nowseethis.org


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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.1206.19.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JUNE 12

{MUSIC}

{MUSIC}

Tonight, the Carnegie Museum of Art features the talents of composer/performers from across the country. The museum has commissioned compositions inspired by its latest exhibit: Small Prints, Big Artists, with master prints based on etchings by Rembrandt, Brueghel, Dürer and more. The composers have formed a sextet to premiere their compositions in the Heinz Galleries, alongside the prints that inspired them. Composer/ performers include Jonghee Kang, George Sabol and Matt Aelmore; the latter’s Rembrandt-inspired piece incorporates both live and prerecorded sound. Dan Willis 5:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10. 412-622-3131 or cmoa.org

{SCREEN} In 2012, Maryland became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage by popular referendum. But the battle was bruising, especially in the African-American community, as documented in Yoruba Richen’s The New Black. The hour-long film exploring both sides of the fight screens tonight at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, as part of WQED Multimedia’s Community Cinema series. A panel discussion follows with local LGBT activists of color including La’Tasha D. Mayes of New Voices Pittsburgh. The event complements the exhibit RACE: Are We So Different? Bill O’Driscoll 5:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free; registration required at www.wqed.org/community/ cinema.php.

+ FRI., JUNE 13 {BEER}

Think the Carnegie Science Center is a little too familyfriendly? Reconsider as the Center’s 21-and-over evening series continues with The Science of Beer. Tonight, visitors can sample 10 beers

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JUNE 19 Miranda Sings

It’s a 20-year tradition for Squonk Opera to premiere its outdoor shows at the Three Rivers Arts Festival. The seventh and latest is the 30-minute Pneumatica, in which the art-and-music troupe’s quirky, original art rock accompanies the blossoming of inflatable sculptures, including the 40-foot-tall Lady Pneumatica, whose lungs are a vertical accordion. Expect visual puns, wacky costumes, electronic bagpipes and general surreal merriment. The first of this weekend’s seven free arts-fest showings is tonight. BO 7 p.m. Performances continue through Sun., June 15. Point State Park, Downtown. Free. www.3riversartsfest.org

{STAGE} from five local breweries and discuss the chemistry of brewing with experts. Admission to the rest of the museum is included, as well as a souvenir glass and a $15 slots voucher for Rivers Casino. The event also boasts a cash bar, snacks and live music — and all without any kids. DW 6 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $17. 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

As musical adaptations run rampant on Broadway, it’s nice to know that some theater companies can still surprise us. Just in time for Friday the 13th, the always-adventurous No Name Players are mounting Evil Dead: The Musical, based on the eponymous 1981 zombie film. Special effects artist Steve Tolin (The Dark Knight Rises, Adventureland) will debut some of his latest

Art by Mara Light

JUNE 14 Associated Artists of Pittsburgh


MainEvent

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DELAT FOUNDATION}

Now that Pennsylvania at last enjoys marriage equality, like all the other cool states, Pride Pittsburgh should be more celebratory than ever. The culminating weekend of the Delta Foundation’s annual festival — among Pittsburgh’s biggest parties — begins with the June 13 Pub Crawl ($32), a chauffered bus tour of 14 bars from Shadyside to Downtown. Revelers will have just enough time to recover for June 14’s Pride in the Street ($40-125); the Saturday-night Downtown concert is headlined by funkmistress Chaka Khan, who’ll feel for you after opening acts Ayah Marar, Vita Chambers, Lazaro Arbos and local drag performer Jezebel. On Sun., June 15, things kick off at noon with the Pride March, as thousands of marchers wind through the Golden Triangle, proudly led by Dykes on Bikes. Then, all afternoon, enjoy PrideFest, a street festival on Liberty Avenue between Sixth and 10th streets that reliably draws tens of thousands of visitors. The vendors, street performers, food booths, family-friendly carnival games and more are complemented by a fast-changing lineup of acts on two stages, on Sixth and 10th: a local dance showcase (see page 44), drag performers, pop and hip-hop vocalists and rock bands. Headlining is Steve Grand, whom some consider the first openly gay male country musician to get mainstream notice, as evidenced by his video “All-American Boy.” Bill O’Driscoll Fri., June 13-Sun., June 15. Downtown. www.pittsburghpride.org

creations. Audience members with a propensity for gore can request seats in the “splatter zone.” DW 8 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $15-20. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

{PARTY} Pride comes in many flavors this weekend. Tonight’s special is Hellhole: A Friday the Thirteenth Gay Pride Nightmare. Hosted by one of the world’s most famous drag queens — Pittsburgh’s gh’s own Sharon Needles — the big party at Cruze Bar features co-presenter ter Pgh Bro Club’s resident DJs Dad Time! and Edgar Um. Also welcome Baltimore artist Colby Keller, who’ll wield a thick … wooden paddle at his spanking station, and Toronto-based d GoGo Guy Jon Shields. The event doubles as the kick-off of the Honcho & Friends Totally Vers Pride Weekend. BO 9 p.m.m.2 a.m. 1600 Smallman man St., Strip District. $10-13 (21 and over). er). www.honchopgh.com com

Depression-era coal miner’s wife through parallels with the seventh-century legend of St. Barbara, patroness of miners. A book signing follows. DW 2 p.m. 3233 W. Liberty Ave., Dormont. Free. 412-344-7444 or rickertandbeaglebooks.com

{FESTIVAL} If tonight’s Pride in the Streets isn’t enough for you, two Liberty Avenue venues offer extra fun. The ToonSeum museum of cartoon art offers the one-night-only Kitty Pryde lounge (named for the X-Men character); for $25, Pride ticket-holders enjoy an all-you-can-drink private indoor lounge. And

JUNE 13 Hellhole: lhol hole: A FFriday riid id the Thirteenth Gay Pride Nightmare

{ART}

The Associated Artists of Pittsburgh’s annual exhibition returns — just as it has every year for the past 103. The nation’s oldest continual survey of regional art has a new home, at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art (itself temporarily relocated). The exhibit, juried by the Westmoreland’s Barbara Jones, features work by 66 artists in all media. Juror’s award-winners include such names as David Stanger, Stephanie Armbruster, Chuck Johnson, Seth Clark and Mia Tarducci Henry. Tonight is the opening reception. BO 6-9 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 31. @art30, 4764 Route 30, Greensburg. Free. www.aapgh.org

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JUNE 12 The New Black

Asylum Pittsburgh features not one but two National Book Award finalists: Tim Seibles, who teaches at Old Dominion University, and New Jerseybased Patricia Smith (pictured). Smith is a former National Poetry Slam individual champion whose Book Award finalist was 2008’s Blood Dazzler, poems about Hurricane Katrina. Cave Canem, which nurtures and promotes African-American poets, also

book to demonstrate the usefulness of art as civil disobedience, and its continuing importance in America. DW 7 p.m. 4812 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-4323 or thebigideapgh. wordpress.com

+ THU., JUNE 19 {WORDS}

The fifth annual Cave Canem poetry reading at City of

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF ASYLUM, © CAVE CANEM}

{TALK}

UNE 14 + SAT., JUNE

History might be written by its victors, but that hasn’t stopped Nicolas Lampert from unearthing the centuries-long story of America’s oppressed artistic expression. Lampert visits the Big Idea Bookstore tonight to discuss his debut book, A People’s Art History of the United States, a chronological treatment of radical and activist art in America. Lampert, an artist himself with works in the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, wrote the

{WORDS}

Marian Szczepanski, ki, originally from Greensburg, stops by Rickert & Beagle Books, ooks, in Dormont, tonight to discuss her debut novel, Playing laying St. Barbara. Inspired d by the author’s heritage (both both her grandfathers were e immigrant coal miners), and by the historical struggle of womankind, it tells the story ory of a

N E W S

late-night, Arcade Comedy Theater and comedian Mike Buzzelli host the Pride Comedy Show, featuring Carl Schimmel, Abby Denton, storyteller Stacy Keene, musicians and an allLGBT improv team. BO Pryde lounge: 5:30 p.m.-midnight (947 Liberty Ave.; www. toonseum.org). Pride Comedy: 10 p.m. (811 Liberty Ave., $5-10; www.arcadecomedy theater.com). Downtown

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hosts Lyrae Van Clief-Stafanon, an award-winner in her own right who teaches at Cornell University. The reading’s under COAP’s Alphabet City tent. BO 7:30 p.m. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free; reservations at www.cityof asylumpittsburgh.org

{COMEDY} Comedian Colleen Ballinger’s overly made-up, sweatpantsclad alter-ego Miranda Sings, best known for her off-key butcherings of various pop songs and showtunes, stops by the Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall tonight for a truly one-of-a-kind performance. What began as a simple satire of self-absorbed YouTube popstar hopefuls has slowly grown in popularity, culminating in this year’s world tour. In addition to Miranda’s trademark musical numbers, the show should include magic tricks, life lessons and numerous tirades against her “haters.” DW 6 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $26. 877-987-6487 or librarymusichall.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ACTING OUT. Skits & one-acts

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP House-Made Liquor Infusions: VODKAS: PINEAPPLE E - CUCUMBER CUCUMBE BER R - GRAPE - ESPRESSO - PEAR-OLIVE - MIXED BERRIES. RUMS: PEACH. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO CHILI PEPPER. TEQU QUIL ILA A: MA MANG NGO O - CH HIL ILII PE PEPP PPER.

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8-10pm - Cheers!

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presented by The Heritage Players Acting Class students. Fri., June 13, 8 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. ANGELS IN AMERICA, PART 1: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES. Tony Kushner’s award-winning play about the AIDS epidemic in the 80s. Presented by Throughline Theatre. Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru June 14. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. ANGELS IN AMERICA, PART 2: PERESTROIKA. Tony Kushner’s award-winning play about the AIDS epidemic in the 80s. Presented by Throughline Theatre. June 12-13, 8 p.m. and Sat., June 14, 2 & 8 p.m. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. AS YOU LIKE IT. Admission: a nonperishable canned food item benefitting the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank or a cash donation to the Kevin Dilworth Memorial Theatre & Dance

Scholarship. Thru June 14, 8 p.m. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-1100. AVENUE Q. Adult-themed spoof on Sesame Street. Presented by Split Stage Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 14. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 1-888-718-4253. BROADWAY SHOW STOPPERS. Songs from Chicago, Phantom of the Opera, South Pacific, more. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru June 21. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat, 7 p.m. Thru June 28. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL. Based on the cult classic films by Sam Raimi. Presented by No Name Players. www.nonameplayers.org Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 28. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

LEGALLY BLONDE: THE Penelope Hart is suddenly let go from her job, she decides MUSICAL. Tue-Fri, 8 p.m. and to pursue her dream of opening Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 22. a cake shop. But she soon Benedum Center, Downtown. discovers that starting her own 412-456-6666. business is anything but a piece NOISES OFF. A play-within-aof cake! Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. play about a troupe of middling and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 15. British actors rehearsing & South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. performing a comedy. Presented 412-831-8552. by Pittsburgh Public Theater. PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, FESTIVAL. An evening 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & of 4 new one-act 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. LGBT plays. Thu, Fri, Thru June 24. O’Reilly 8 p.m. Thru June 13. Theater, Downtown. Pittsburgh Playwrights 412-316-1600. www. per Theatre, Downtown. pa OJO. Immersive theater pghcitym 412-256-8109. .co experience. Part of the PNEUMATICA. Dollar Bank Three Rivers Performance & installation Arts Festival. Thru June 15. by Squonk Opera about air, Bricolage, Downtown. made by air & powered by 412-471-0999. air feat. live original music & ORLANDO. Adaptation of inflatable objects. Part of the Virginia Woolf’s novel. Presented Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts by Unseam’d Shakespeare Co. Festival. www.squonkopera.org Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 4 p.m. and Fri., June 13, 7 p.m. and Sat., June 21, 3 & 8 p.m. Thru June 14-15, 12, 2:30 & 7 p.m. June 15. Henry Heymann Theatre, Point State Park, Downtown. Oakland. 412-621-0244. 412-471-0235. A PIECE OF CAKE. When RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. RUN FOR YOUR WIFE. Comedy by Ray Cooney about a cab driver who juggles two wives until he ends up in the hospital. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 14. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. VANYA & SONIA & MASHA & SPIKE. When movie star Masha unexpectedly returns & announces to her adult siblings, Vanya & Sonia, her plans to sell their family farmhouse, the rug is pulled out from under their bucolic existence. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 28. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. WAITING FOR GODOT. Samuel Beckett’s existential tragic comedy. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 15. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-561-6000.

COMEDY THU 12

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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Work by Laura Petrilla, from Inspired Life, the Art, Craft, Vision, and Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni, at the AI Pittsburgh Gallery, Downtown

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK THE UNION HALL. Initric: the Exhibition. More than 100 paintings, drawings, photographs, & mixed media pieces by artist Laura Mustio over the course of 319 days in India, Italy, Ireland, & Iceland. Book launch & reception June 14, 7:30-10 p.m. Strip District.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499.

ASSEMBLE. Transformed Linearities. Work by Julie Mallis. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. A Response to Life. Work by Mari Yobp & Daniel Yobp. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Crayons, Cats, Dolls & Monsters. Work by Tara Zalewsky-Nease. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Chasing the Sun. Work by Nadya Lapets, Vickie Schilling, & Gloria Tsang. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Nia Quilt Guild Member Show. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232.

THURS, JUNE 12, 9PM FUNK/REGGAE

CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Lucky After Dark:Gay & Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh 1960-1990. Feat. photos, video & other artifacts from iconic clubs. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. With the Grain. Recent works by Ashley Jean Hickey. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. COLOR!!!. Juried exhibition feat. regional artists. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Blind Intersections: Another Series of CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Thu, 9:30 p.m. Thru July 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT:

Jeff Tweedy concert at the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Point State Park

FRI 13 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BRAD RYAN, CHRIS KEMP, ANDY PICARRO, CHUCK KRIEGER. 9 p.m. Level 20 Sports Lounge, Bethel Park. THE LAUGHSBURG STAND UP COMEDY SHOW W/ ERICK WILLIAMS, TIM ROSS, ED BAILEY (LATE). 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

FRI 13 - SAT 14

FRANKIE PAUL. June 13-14 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

CRITIC:

Nicole Farnan, 31, a teacher from the North Hills WHEN:

Fri., June 06 We came here to see Jeff Tweedy. I’ve been a fan of his solo work and Wilco for quite some time now. I thought the show was wonderful, beautiful. I loved hearing the Wilco songs played acoustically in this setting, and I liked a lot of the new stuff he was doing with his new band. It was nice to hear it before the general public gets a chance to. I also liked the decision to bring his son on stage [as the band’s drummer]. It’s nice that there’s some kind of continuity there. There’s a tradition already being established, and it’s going to live on. I like that the festival brought in a wide variety of artists, plus the venue is just naturally beautiful. It’s great. BY DAN WILLIS

SAT 14 AMISH MONKEYS’ FATHER’S DAY SHOW. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. MICHAEL IAN BLACK, DAVON MAGWOOD (LATE). 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSICAL IMPROV SUNDAYS. CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Sun, 8 p.m. Thru July 27 Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, Steel City Improv Theater, film & oral history narratives to Shadyside. 412-404-2695. explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. UNPLANNED COMEDY BAYERNHOF IMPROV. Mon, MUSEUM. Large 9 p.m. Thru June 30 collection of automatic Hambone’s, roll-played musical Lawrenceville. instruments and 412-681-4318. www. per a p music boxes in a pghcitym .co mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. TUESDAY NIGHT 412-782-4231. STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. Preserved materials reflecting 412-592-7869. the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. Are We So Different?. Text, 412-431-9908. photographs, interactive STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN audiovisual components, & MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, related artifacts challenge Strip District. 412-904-4502. perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military Dome (planetarium), Miniature artifacts and exhibits on the Railroad and Village, USS Requin Allegheny Valley’s industrial

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FULL LIST ONLINE

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submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and


American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Harmonious couplings of botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639.

VISUAL ART

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False Leads. Feat. work by Paul Paddock, Michael Matos, Thad Kellstadt, Terry Carroll, Dean Cercone, Keith Knight, Mark Lyons & Lara Lampenfield. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Small Works. Work by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company Part 2. Work by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, Susan Sparks. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/

RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts

Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Savage Elements. Work by Nugent Kos. Lawrenceville. 412-728-4916. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Mythological Gestures. Drawings by Richard Claraval. RFriendship. 412-877-7394. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY SUN 15 FATHER’S DAY BRUNCH AT THE NATIONAL AVIARY. 10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. FATHER’S DAY PIG ROAST. 2-4:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

PRIDE FRI 13 HELLHOLE: A FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH GAY PRIDE NIGHTMARE!. Feat. Sharon Needles Pgh Bro Club resident DJs DAD TIME! & EDGAR UM. 9 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400. PITTSBURGH PRIDE PUB CRAWL. City-wide bus tour of LGBT-friendly bars & clubs. www.pittsburghpride.org/ tickets 8 p.m.

SAT 14 ARCADE PRIDE COMEDY SHOW. Proceeds benefit LGBT charities. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. PRIDE IN THE STREET. Feat. Chaka Khan, Ayah Marar, Vita Chambers, & Lazaro Arbos, plus local drag performer Jezebel. Liberty Ave between 9th & 10th St. 5:30 p.m.

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[BEES] PRIDE WEEK: ARCADE HOOTENANNY. Long-form improv based on true tales. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-334-3209.

LITERARY THU 12

SUN 15

PRIDE MARCH. Begins at the corner of Grant Street & the Blvd. of the Allies. 12 p.m. PRIDEFEST. Vendors, street performers, family friendly activities. Liberty Avenue between 6th St & 10th St 1 p.m.

FESTIVALS THU 12 - SUN 15 DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Music, visual art, arts & craft booths, more. Thru June 15 Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 13 - SUN 15 BANTAM JEEP HERITAGE FESTIVAL. History exhibit, vendors, demos, more. 9 a.m.4 p.m., Sat., June 14, 9 a.m.6 p.m. and Sun., June 15, 9 a.m.3 p.m. Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 724-234-2291.

SAT 14 2ND ANNUAL PENNSYLVANIA WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL. Feat. 15 wineries, live music, door prizes, more. 1-4 & 5-9 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 800-747-5599.

TUE 17 - WED 18 WILKINS SUMMER FESTIVAL. Live music, car cruise, fireworks, more. www.wilkinstownship.com June 17-21 Penn Center Blvd., Monroeville. 412-824-4523.

DANCE SAT 14

In 2007, the U.S. Senate declared that one week in June would celebrate the contributions of those sometimes-unsung members of the ecosystem: the pollinators. In honor of this year’s National Pollinator Week — June 16-23 — the East End Food Co-op presents Landscape Strategies for Nourishing Bees. During this workshop, at the Gemini Children’s Theater, Christina Neumann of Burgh Bees will delve into the details of pollination, identifying bee species and approaches to landscaping to support and nourish these important insects. 6:30 p.m. Wed., June 18. 7501 Penn Ave., Point Breeze. Free; call to reserve a spot. 412-242-3598 or www.eastendfood.coop

Reed Dance. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org 2 & 5 p.m. Pierce Gallery, Downtown.

FUNDRAISERS THU 12 ANCHORPOINT CHARITY USED BOOK SALE. Benefits Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. Thru June 12 Shoppes at Northway, Ross. 412-366-1300.

ALBA FLAMENCA. Flamenco dance performance. RELEASE THE Part of the PASSION OF YOUTH Dollar Bank Three DEVELOPMENT: Rivers Arts Festival. ww. r w TOMORROW’S www.3riversartsfest. pe ghcitypa p FUTURE, INC. org 2 & 5 p.m. Pierce .com AWARDS BANQUET. Gallery, Downtown. 6 p.m. Rivers Club, DON QUIXOTE. Downtown. 412-471-4332. Presented by the Laurel Ballet. 2 & 7 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 2ND ANNUAL FREE TO 724-836-8000. BREATHE WALK. 5K & 1-mile THE ROAD TO TRIUMPH. walk benefiting Free To Breathe’s Celebrating 15 years of lung cancer research. 8:30 a.m. performances by the Visionary North Park Boathouse, Allison Performing Arts Academy. Park. 608-833-7905. 6 p.m. Byham Theater, 3RD ANNUAL MILES Downtown. 412-584-2105. AGAINST MELANOMA THE UBIQUITOUS MASS 5K RUN/WALK. OF US. Movement & sound www.mampa.org 9 a.m. performance by Maree South Park, South Park. ReMalia/merrygogo. 8 p.m. DINNER THEATER: New Hazlett Theater, North Side. MOBSTERS, MOLLS & 412-320-4610. MARINARA. Benefits Mainstay Life Services. 6:30 p.m. Spaghetti Warehouse, SUITE STEVIE. Performance by

FRI 13 FULL T LIS ONLINE

SAT 14

SUN 15

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

Strip District. 412-344-3640. DIRTY GIRL MUD RUN PITTSBURGH. The original women-only national 5K mud & obstacle run series. Benefits Bright Pink. godirtygirl.com Steel City Raceway. 304-284-0084. HERB & GARDEN FAIR. Trade plants, vendors, entertainment, more. Benefits Harmony Museum. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Harmony Museum Barn Annex, Harmony. 724-452-7341. WALK NOW FOR AUTISM SPEAKS. Non-competitive walk & resource fair for those on the autism spectrum. 8 a.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-367-4571.

3 POEMS BY . . Poetry discussion group feat. work by John Donne. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 13 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 14 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 16

POLITICS

COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FOURTH THURSDAY FEATURES. Local artists interpret fact, fiction, & contemporary lived experience through spoken word & performances inspired by the RACE: Are We So Different? exhibit. 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SHAKESPEARE READERS. Mon, 10:30 a.m. Thru June 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

THU 12

TUE 17

SUN 15 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m.

Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MYSTERY READER’S BOOK CLUB. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 18 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 12 YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 12 - SUN 15 FATHER’S DAY CD CARD MAKING. Audio card workshop w/ the Saturday Light Brigade. Thru June 15, 1-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 12 - WED 18 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR!. Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden free-flight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 13

COOK IT!. Interactive cooking demonstrations w/ Chef Angelo Galioto. Every other Fri, 12:15 p.m. Thru June 27 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MAGICIAN DOC DIXON. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 14 CITIPARKS ROVING ART CART & BIKE-POWERED SMOOTHIE STATION. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 9 a.m. 412-708-1277.


FAMILY FRIENDLY KIDS OPEN MIC. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: FAMILY COMEDY SHOW. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Presented by The Theatre Factory KidWorks. June 14-15, 2 p.m., Fri., June 20, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., June 22, 2 p.m. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200.

TUE 17

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. KENDAMA, PILL & YO YO -SKILL GAMES. For middle & high school students. Tue, 3:15 p.m. Thru June 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE SAT 14 LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70-mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors.org Sat. Thru June 14

THE FORT PITT BLOCK HOUSE: 250 YEARS OF PITTSBURGH’S OLDEST ARCHITECTURAL LANDMARK. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. GWEN ELLIOTT 70TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION. Food, entertainment & tours of Gwen’s Girls headquarters. nbeasley@gwensgirls.org 6-8 p.m. Gwen’s Girls, North Huntingdon. 412-904-4239 x 44.

TUE 17

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 18 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 12 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

N E W S

KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIGHTS, CAMERA, PITTSBURGH! THE OFFICIAL PITTSBURGH FILM OFFICE TOUR. Begin at Lower Parking Lot of the Duquense Incline, Downtown. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-323-4709. NATIONAL BLACK MBA ASSOCIATION, PITTSBURGH CHAPTER’S GENERAL BODY MEETING. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. University of Pittsburgh, Katz School of Business, Oakland. 724-382-3063. RACK-O TOURNAMENT. 1 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832. SATURDAY SILVER SCREEN. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making,

LEBO NERDFIGHTERS. For high school & college students only. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. WIGLE’S 92 NEIGHBORHOODS SERIES: CENTRAL LAWRENCEVILLE. Celebrating Lawrenceville w/ speaker Brian Mendelssohn, food & drink from Tender Bar & Kitchen, more. 7-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ALLEGHENY CLEANWAYS

SAT 14

This summer, join Allegheny CleanWays in cleaning up alleyways, vacant lots and green spaces. Volunteer crews help remove illegal dumping — everything from light litter to tires and appliances — around the Pittsburgh area. This month’s cleanups are in Brookline, on June 14, and Glenfield, on June 21. Wear long pants and sturdy shoes; tools and refreshments are provided. Call 412-381-1301 or visit www.alleghenycleanways.org for information.

SUN 15 BANTAM JEEP MUDDY 5K RACE. 8 a.m. Cooper’s Lake Campground, Slippery Rock. 724-234-4619.

Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. VERONA FARMERS’ MARKET. Thu, 2-6 p.m. Railroad Park, Verona. THE WATERFRONT’S WEEKLY FARMERS’

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: SMALL BUSINESS RESEARCH. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MT. LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY ZENTANGLERS. Drawing workshop. Second Thu of every month, 11 a.m. and Fourth Thu of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE NEW BLACK. Documentary screening about the gay rights issue in the African American community. Part of the RACE: Are We So Different? exhibit. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant

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MARKET. waterfrontpgh.com/ events/ Thu, 2-6 p.m. Thru Aug. 28 Macy’s Courtyard, Homestead. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 13 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE BUSINESS OF NONPROFITS: STARTING AND OPERATING THESE ECONOMIC ENGINES. Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series. 7:30-9 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON & WARHOL: SILVER & SUEDE. w/ Vincent Fremont & Geralyn Huxley. 7 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. INTUITIVE EYE READINGS BY SHAY. Fri, 7 p.m. Thru June 27 Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 323-839-6866.

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BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-362-9880. BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET. 5050 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Sat. Thru Nov. 1 412-708-1277. CON ON THE RUN. Feat. 5 games based on historical battles put on by game masters, moving diorama, more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584. DAY OF UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY. Live music, vendor market, & community presentations on strategies & solutions to improve the quality of boys in education & mental health systems. 1 p.m. Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum, Homewood. FALCONRY—THE SPORT OF KINGS!. Discover the history, practices, & theories behind the unique sport of falconry. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. FLAG DAY AT THE FORT. Feat. a sing-a-long of the national anthem w/ colonial re-enactors surrounding a 36-foot American flag. 4 p.m. Fort Pitt Museum, Downtown. 412-471-1764. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced students will engage in debates, conversations, more. Sat, 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. pittsburgh.score. org/localworkshops 8 a.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. www.pittsburghtangueros.org Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru June 22 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458. CHINESE II. First and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. COMPLIMENTING PITTSBURGH PAINTING CLASS. Learn to paint scenes of Pittsburgh w/ local artist Ryan Ian McCormick. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. FATHER’S DAY CAR CRUISE & PURE GOLD CONCERT. 2 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of

every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

PGC LECTURE SERIES: ED SCHMID + CAPPY THOMPSON. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. LANDSCAPE STRATEGIES FOR NOURISHING BEES. Workshop presented by the East End Food Co-op & Christina Neumann of Burgh Bees. 6:30 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. MORNING SPANISH 412-243-6464. LITERATURE & LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH!. CONVERSATION. Practice conversational Mon, 10 a.m. Mount English. Wed, Lebanon Public 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Mt. Lebanon. Library, Oakland. 412-531-1912. . w w w 412-622-3151. ROBOTO MONTHLY r citypape h g p THE MEETING. Meet w/ .com PITTSBURGH the Roboto board of SHOW OFFS. A directors to find out meeting of jugglers & what’s happening at the space spinners. All levels welcome. & help guide it’s future. Third Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. SPANISH II. Geared toward 412-853-0518. those who already have RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. a basic understanding of First and Third Mon of Spanish & are interested in every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. increasing proficiency. First Carnegie Library, Oakland. and Third Wed of every 412-622-3151. month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, Carnegie Library, Oakland. 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 25 412-622-3151. Mount Lebanon Public Library, TAROT CARD LESSONS. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, SCOTTISH COUNTRY Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., WEST COAST SWING social dancing follows. No WEDNESDAYS. Swing partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal The Library, South Side. Church, Mt. Washington. 916-287-1373. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. DAY ROOM WINDOW. 412-431-5282. Auditions for Day Room Window. June 24, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Call backs the following BOARD GAME NIGHT. evening. Multiracial cast. For high school students & Women ages 35-55. Men ages adults. Every other Tue, 7 p.m. 35-60. Prepare 2 minute dramatic Thru June 17 Mount Lebanon contemporary monologue. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Bring head shot & resume. 412-531-1912. Equity & Non-Equity actors WSET LEVEL 2 CLASS welcome. Schedule audition IN WINES & SPIRITS. w/ Kathryn Kelly at Tue, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 1 kskelly412@gmail.com. Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. More info at www.dayroom 412-391-1709. window.com New Hazlett Theater, North Side. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. DEMYSTIFYING THE Ongoing auditions for PROCESS: A “HOW-TO” actors ages 18+ for murder PANEL FOR APPLYING TO mystery shows performed ARTIST OPEN CALLS & in the Pittsburgh area. EXHIBITIONS. 7 p.m. 412-833-5056. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. 412-681-5449 x 217. Auditions for Gilbert & DETROIT STYLE URBAN Sullivan’s The Sorcerer. June 4 BALLROOM DANCE. & 23. Prepare a song that best 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. showcases your voice, either Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), 412-242-4345. standard musical theater, or ENGLISH CONVERSATION classical. Accompanist will be (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. provided, no a capella selections. Mount Lebanon Public Library, auditions@pittsburghsavoyards. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. org Our Lady of Victory Maronite FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Catholic Church, Carnegie. Farmers’ market. Wed, 412-734-8476. 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking 412-622-6914. performers & artists to participate

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG’S SUMMER IN THE CITY. Seeking artists, crafters & makers for the annual citywide outdoor festival. $15.00 for a 8’ x 17’ parking space to display & sell your work. For further information & application, call or email greensburgba.info@gmail. com. 724-689-0040. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview. com Ongoing. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prizefor-short-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking crafters for the Summer Artisan Bazaar. All artwork & crafts submitted must be original, no kits or work produced from commercial patterns or manufactured pieces will be accepted. www.northhills artcenter.org 412-364-3622. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com/ THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail.com SHALER GARDEN CLUB GREAT LOCAL GARDENER CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. Submit 5 photos of your garden w/ description of what makes it special. Registration forms available at Shaler North Hills Library. Deadline: July 8. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.


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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Come Saturday, I will be a high school grad! The only thing I’m worried about besides my hopes and dreams, and making it in the real world? My sex life. I’m a virgin. When I go online, I see all my friends and peers having awesome, smoking-hot sex lives. I am obsessed with this guy in my class. Like all teenage-girl crushes, I can’t get him out of my head. Would it be weird to ask him to hook up at a post-graduation party? I don’t care if my first time is with someone “special,” I just feel like if I don’t say something to him now, I’ll never get a chance to have sex at all, ever. DOES IT GET SEXIER?

First, some research shows a link between time spent on social media and depression. The issue seems to be people comparing what they know of their own lives — which are messy and sometimes painful — with the idealized portrait others create of their own lives on Facebook, etc. While your friends might appear to have awesome, funfilled lives on Facebook, their lived reality likely includes as many sads and fails as yours. Something else to bear in mind: Teenagers are waiting longer to have sex, according to the Guttmacher Institute, and nearly 40 percent of 18-yearolds of both sexes are not yet sexually active. So you are not a freak. Your friends and peers might tell you they’re sexually active — or their Facebook posts might imply it— but the data tells us (and I’m telling you) that some of your friends are liars. Finally, you will have other chances to have sex, with other people. But I think you should make a pass at this boy — if not for the sexual experience, then for the experience of making the pass. Make it an honest, straightforward and explicit pass. (“I’ve had such a crush on you, and this is crazy, but fuck me maybe?”) If he’s interested, tell him you’re a virgin, condoms are required, and you’d rather do it sober or soberish. If he’s not interested, that’ll suck. But you’ll have an opportunity to practice handling rejection with grace (“Well, I still think you’re a great guy, and I hope things won’t be awkward between us”) and you’ll see that rejection isn’t the end of the world — or the end of boys, either. Good luck!

on a pair of dirty underpants. So unless you’re conventionally hot and willing to put yourself out there (show your handsome face and hot body online), you aren’t going to move many units. I love my girlfriend, but she might be a lesbian. She’s dated women in the past, hits on women when she’s drunk and has made out with at least two female friends in the last year. Most troubling is that despite many honest conversations, she won’t/ can’t be sexual with me. I know what you’re going to say: Tell her what my needs are, and if she can’t meet them, ask for an open relationship. But that conversation is harder to have than I think you realize. Although it’s hard to see her hit on women/make out with her girlfriends when we aren’t being sexual, I love her more than I can say. My questions: (1) Is it unfair to ask her to define her sexuality? (2) Am I overthinking this? (3) Are the behaviors I’ve described normal? HELPING EVALUATE LESBIAN PREFERENCE

1. You know what’s unfair? Hitting on other people — men, women, whatever — in front of the boyfriend/ girlfriend/whateverfriend you can’t bring yourself to fuck. Your girlfriend is being unfair, and you have to stop making rationalizations for her behavior. She could be a lesbian, bi or the kind of straight woman who has relationships with other women, hits on them when drunk and makes out with them biannually. (That kind of straight woman is called a “closeted lesbian.”) But defining her sexuality won’t change this fact: She has no interest in fucking you. Not into men, not into you — what difference does it make? That rumbling sound you heard a moment ago was millions of Savage Love readers mumbling “DTMFA” as they read your letter. Take their advice. 2. Yes, you are overthinking this. You’ve spent too much time thinking about how to make this relationship work, when you should be thinking about how to extricate yourself from it. 3. Are we talking about her behavior or yours? Her behavior is normal — for scared and closeted lesbians with security-blanket boyfriends they can’t let go of. Your behavior isn’t normal — because very few people would swallow the shit she’s been feeding you.

TEENAGERS ARE WAITING LONGER TO HAVE SEX, AND NEARLY 40 PERCENT OF 18-YEAR-OLDS OF BOTH SEXES ARE NOT YET SEXUALLY ACTIVE.

I was combing through some old columns/ podcasts and came upon a few instances where you counseled women on selling their used underwear online. Is there a market for used men’s underwear? I would happily earn a few bucks selling my old boxer briefs. UNDIE NOOB DESIRING INTERESTING EXTRA SALARY

Duncan Black — the gay porn star and male escort (duncanblackxxx.com), not the liberal blogger (eschatonblog.com) — does a brisk business selling his used jocks and briefs online. No offense to anyone, but I don’t think Blog Duncan could move as many units of dirty underpants as Porn Duncan. The more people who want into your pants, and the more sexualized your public image, the more people will pay to get their hands

My fiancé came home, and his beard smelled like pussy. He denied having his face in someone else’s business. Is there anything else it could have been?

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

SICK IN MINNEAPOLIS

I have no idea what pussy smells like, as I’ve never had my face in that business. So I can’t tell you what else it could’ve been — Clamato? Caramel corn? Crème brûlée? But I’m running your letter in the hopes that otherwise-cute hipster boys will be inspired to shave off their ugly beards to escape justified or unjustified accusations of infidelity. On the Lovecast, Dan and a global-health doctor talk about the pros and cons of Truvada: savage lovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

06.11-06.18

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your brain absorbs about 11 million pieces of information every second, but is consciously aware of less than .001 percent of all that richness. Or at least that’s usually the case. Having analyzed your astrological omens, I suspect that you might soon jack that figure up as high as .01 percent — a ten-fold increase! Do you think you can handle that much raw input? Are you amenable to being so acutely perceptive? How will you respond if the world is 10 times more vivid than usual? I’m pretty confident. I suspect you won’t become a bug-eyed maniac freaking out on the intensity, but rather will be a soulful, wonder-filled explorer in love with the intensity.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have a strong, intricate understanding of where you have come from. The old days and old ways continue to feed you with their mysterious poignancy. You don’t love every one of your past experiences, but you love ruminating about them and feeling the way they changed you. Until the day you die many years from now, your history will keep evolving, providing an endless stream of new teachings. And yet at this particular moment in your destiny, Cancerian, I think your most important task is to focus on where you are going to. That’s why I urge you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about your past and instead concentrate on getting excited about the future.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1928, Bobby Pearce won a gold medal in rowing at the Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. An unforeseen event almost sabotaged his victory. As he rowed his boat along the Sloten Canal, a family of ducks swam leisurely from shore to shore directly across his path. He stopped to let them pass, allowing an opponent who was already ahead of him to gain an even bigger advantage. Yet he ultimately won the race, rowing with such vigor after the duck incident that he finished well ahead of his challenger. I foresee a comparable sequence in your life, Leo. Being thoughtful and expressing compassion may seem to slow you down, but in the end that won’t hinder you from achieving your goal — and might even help.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In one of her “Twenty-One Love Poems,” Adrienne Rich talks about her old self in the third person. “The woman who cherished / her suffering is dead. I am her descendant. / I love the scar tissue she handed on to me, / but I want to go from here with you / fighting the temptation to make a career of pain.” With your approval, Virgo, I’d like to make that passage one of your keynotes in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will have an excellent opportunity to declare your independence from an affliction you’ve been addicted to. Are you willing to say goodbye to one of your signature forms of suffering?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “You should be interviewing roses not people,” says a character in Anne Carson’s book The Autobiography of Red. That’s sound poetic advice for you in the coming days, Libra. More than you can imagine, you will benefit from being receptive to and learning from non-human sources: roses, cats, dogs, spiders, horses, songbirds, butterflies, trees, rivers, the wind, the moon and any other intelligences that make themselves available to you. I’m not saying you should ignore the revelations offered by people. But your emphasis should be

on gathering in wisdom from life forces that don’t communicate with words.

your true self. Congratulations! It’s hard work to be so authentic.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

William Shockley was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who co-invented the transistor. He also helped launch the revolution in information technology, and has been called “the man who brought silicon to Silicon Valley.” Time magazine named him one of the 100 most-influential people of the 20th century. On the other hand, Shockley became a controversial advocate of eugenics, which damaged his reputation, led many to consider him a racist, and played a role in his estrangement from his friends and family. I suspect that you will have to deal with at least one Shockley-type phenomenon in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Will you overlook the bad stuff in order to take advantage of the good? Should you?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Novelist Herman Melville wrote that in order to create art, “unlike things must meet and mate.” Like what? “Sad patience” and “joyous energies,” for example; both of them are necessary, he said. “Instinct and study” are crucial ingredients, as well as humility and pride, audacity and reverence, and “a flame to melt” and a “wind to freeze.” Based on my interpretation of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, I believe you will soon need to meld opposites like these as you shape that supreme work of art — your life.

“The art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease,” said French philosopher Francois-Marie Voltaire. That principle will be useful for you to invoke in the coming weeks. You definitely need to be cured, although the “disease” you are suffering from is primarily psychospiritual rather than strictly physical. Your task will be to flood yourself with fun adventures, engaging stories and playtime diversions so that nature can heal you without the interference of your worries and kibitzing.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In its quest for nectar, a hummingbird sips from a thousand flowers every day. As it flaps its wings 70 times a second, zipping from meal to meal, it can fly sideways, backward or forward. If it so desires, it can also hover or glide upside-down. It remembers every flower it visits, and knows how long it

will take before each flower will produce a new batch of nectar. To some Spanish speakers, hummingbirds are known as joyas voladoras, or “flying jewels.” Now take everything I’ve just said, Aries, and use it as a metaphor for who you can be in the coming week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1947, the impossibly wealthy Duke of Windsor went shopping in Paris to buy a gift for his wife, the Duchess. She already had everything she wanted, so he decided to get creative. He commissioned the luxury-goods manufacturer Hermes to build her a high-fashion black-leather wheelbarrow. I am not urging you to acquire something like that for yourself, Taurus. But I do like it as a symbol for what you need in your life right now: a blend of elegance and usefulness, of playful beauty and practical value, of artistry and hard work. Imagine your future self has sent a message to you back through time. What is it? Write: uaregod@ comcast.net.

get your yoga on!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Haggis is a Scottish pudding. According to the gourmet-food encyclopedia Larousse Gastronomique, it has “an excellent nutty texture and delicious savory flavor.” And yet, to be honest, its ingredients don’t sound promising. To make it, you gather the lungs, liver, small intestine and heart of a sheep; put all of that stuff inside the stomach of the sheep along with oatmeal, onions, salt and suet; and then simmer the whole mess for three hours. I’m guessing that your work in the coming week may have a certain metaphorical resemblance to making haggis, Capricorn. The process could a bit icky, but the result should be pretty tasty.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Almost a hundred years ago, world-famous comedian Charlie Chaplin decided to take part in a Charlie Chaplin lookalike contest in San Francisco. He did his best to imitate himself, but it wasn’t good enough. He didn’t come close to winning. But I think you would have a different fate if you entered a comparable competition in the coming weeks. There’s no question in my mind that you would be crowned as the person who most resembles you. Maybe more than ever before, you are completely yourself. You look like your true self, you feel like your true self and you are acting like

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Sodexo

located at the University of Pittsburgh Now Accepting Applications for the 2014-2015 school year!

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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Looking for candidates with great customer service to join our team! Openings include cooks, bakers, food service workers, baristas, catering drivers, banquet servers and set up, and utility. We also are recruiting for bake shop and retail bakery supervisors, catering, culinary and retail dining supervisors.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

HELP WANTED

MODELS

Go to www.tour.pitt.edu/campus-map

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Models:

for campus map. A full listing of all postings is available in our office.

We are accepting applications M-TH from 9:00am- 3:00pm

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

in our HR office in McCormick Hall.

Women wanted for photo figure modeling. Good pay, same day.

724-553-9766 leave message

Please contact 412.624.2347 or sodexoupitt@gmail.com with any questions. Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer

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Company Drivers:

Owner-Operators:

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• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

800-871-4581 TheKAG.com Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

China Massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy

$60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896 MASSAGE

massage Therapy

WELLNESS

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

STAR Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Open 24 hrs

Xie LiHong’s Superior Chinese Massage

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MASSAGE

Therapeutic Massage

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

MASSAGE

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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CLASSES

Your ad could be here

AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-2103935 (AAN CAN)

CLASSES

SERVICES

LIVE

EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-9802119 (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

HEALTH SERVICES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE

LOSE WEIGHT & KEEP IT OFF! Up to 30 pounds in 60 days. Once Daily, Maximum Prescription Strength - No Prescription Required! Free Shipping. Call 877-7612991 (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES

MASSAGE

AUTO SERVICE

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

AnExquisite Massage Licensed

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

412.316.3342

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper STUDIES

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412-403-6069

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

LOOKING FOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE WOMEN’S HEALTH? The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study to better understand the effects of birth control on the immune system. For more information call: 412-641-5496

Participants may receive birth control at no cost and be compensated up to $470, over 3 to 4 office visits. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.11/06.18.2014

SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION LF SEAY P

PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406 Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

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412-403-6069

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

You may be eligible if you are: *18-34 with regular periods *Healthy *Not currently pregnant or breastfeeding *Not currently using birth control

412-474-3236

www.anexquisitemassage.com

REHEARSAL

UTERINE FIBROIDS?

STUDIES

Massage Therapist CORAOPOLIS, PA. 15108

Rent -A- Bay for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

WELLNESS

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Recovery Without Judgement™


JADE Wellness Center

Monessen Office Now Open! 1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Please Call: 724-684-4890

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Let Us Help You Today!

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

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412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Help is Available!

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Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com

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Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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START YOUR WEEKEND

EARLY

THURSDAYS 2 FOR $25 MENU 2 Entrées PLUS 1 Appetizer & Dessert to Share for $25!

Limited menu.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM Rivers Casino is celebrating its 5th Anniversary. In the first five years of operation, Rivers has become a proud community partner, strong economic engine and a great place to work.

RIVERS CASINO FIRST FIVE. THANKS TO THE TEAM, COMMUNITY AND YOU!

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


June 11, 2014