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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 06.04/06.11.2014

NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS: ACTIVISTS SAY CITY SCHOOLS SHOULD BECOME COMMUNITY CENTERS 06


EVENTS 6.13 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH VINCENT FREMONT AND GERALYN HUXLEY This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/ $40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

Nat Baldwin with special guests, Sleep Experiments 6.28 – 8pm Warhol theater | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes songwriter, vocalist and double bassist, Nat Baldwin on tour supporting his latest release In The Hollows on Western Vinyl Records. Known primarily as a member of the experimental rock ensemble, Dirty Projectors, Baldwin has also contributed to albums by Grizzly Bear and Vampire Weekend. His compositions blend influences as varied as avant-jazz legend Anthony Braxton (with whom Baldwin studied), to the sparse, intimate and minimal arrangements of artists such as Nick Drake, Bill Callahan and Anthony Hegarty. Pittsburgh’s own atmospheric, dream-pop trio, Sleep Experiments, opens the show.

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8.23 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CHANCELLOR WARHOL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DJ SOY SOS Warhol entrance space Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


{EDITORIAL}

06.04/06.11.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 23

{ART} Color in this week’s cover and tw tweet the result to us @pghcitypaper!

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

06

“It helps teachers; it takes away a lot of problems and makes education and learning a priority. I can’t tell you how many teachers have offered to have their schools be a pilot.” — Teachers-union President Nina Esposito-Visgitis on the impact of “community schools”

[VIEWS]

right: Jack Kelly chose this week 16 That’s to mock students at UC-Santa Barbara for being too sensitive. Classy! — Chris Potter on the insipid debate over college costs

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[TASTE]

a lot nerdier than the other tour.” 23 “It’s — Meredith Grelli, of Wigle’s Whiskey Garden and Barrelhouse new tour and tasting facility in Spring Garden

[MUSIC]

really a function of who’s going out 28 “It’s on tour, and who’s going to fit on the

{ADMINISTRATION}

stage. This is something I’ve learned.” — Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Veronica Corpuz, on booking acts for the Three Rivers Arts Festival

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

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Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

TERRY BRADSHAW

{PUBLISHER}

“It’s a one-man show set in the tiny space of a car seat — but it works.” — Al Hoff on the new film drama Locke

[ARTS]

can only be 42 “You one way if you are going to be down home.” — Matthew Ferrence, author of All-American Redneck

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 N E W S

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STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

SATURDAY, JUNE 14

TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE! Don’t miss your chance to see Pittsburgh’s very own football legend.

VISIT MEADOWSGAMING.COM OR TICKETMASTER.COM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“I CAN’T TELL YOU HOW MANY TEACHERS HAVE OFFERED TO HAVE THEIR SCHOOLS BE A PILOT.”

Peduto’s gun position right on target Although I appreciate the effort that Rebecca Nuttall took in preparing her “Lost Bill” article (May 14), I write to clarify CeaseFirePA’s position regarding the enforcement of local “lost or stolen firearms” laws, as well as our opinion about the Peduto administration’s work to keep Pittsburgh safe. As many of your readers know, CeaseFirePA has been advocating for the adoption of local “lost or stolen gun reporting” ordinances since our state legislature failed to adopt a statewide law in 2008. A statewide “lost or stolen” law could (along with universal background checks) be the most effective legislative tool to seriously curtail gun trafficking. In the absence of a comprehensive state law, local “lost or stolen” ordinances are an important tool in the fight against illegal gun possession (both as actively enforced ordinances and as tools for law enforcement to employ when investigating the origins of illegal firearms). And we firmly believe that the Peduto administration is doing everything in its power to act in the best interests of Pittsburghers. Contrary to the position of the gun lobby and its grassroots “puppet” groups, local “lost or stolen” ordinances are not “illegal.” No court in the state of Pennsylvania has ever ruled that to be the case. However, we understand why any given mayor’s office might hesitate to become the guinea pig when the NRA inevitably files their first, second, third, etc., lawsuit the second after the law is enforced. It’s a tough call, but we believe that Mayor Peduto is making the right one and will continue to do so. — Rob Conroy, Western PA Regional Director, CeaseFirePA

“Ant, birth this watermelon. — Kennywood’s parking-lot egress philosophy.” — May 27 tweet from Virginia Montanez (@JanePitt)

OPEN

ENROLLMENT “Community schools” advocates say schools can stay open ... by opening their doors {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

A

T A TIME when most of the news coming out of the Pittsburgh Public Schools involves cutting services and closing schools, one coalition is pushing to expand district services, and keep schools open. Local activists are pushing a “community schools” model, which opens school buildings up to house social services used by children and their families — all under one roof. “It’s really about changing our collective mindset around what public schools are and should be,” says Jessie Ramey of Great Public Schools Pittsburgh, a coalition comprised of community groups and the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers. “We have to shift our way of thinking, so that we collectively embrace our public schools as community assets. … Schools should only close if there are no children to go to them.” Still, the district says the proposal comes

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Community-schools advocate Jessie Ramey of Great Public Schools Pittsburgh

with hidden costs — and officials caution against viewing the proposal as a way to prevent school closings in the short term. Community schools became popular in the 1990s as a way of addressing problems associated with poverty. Today, according to the Coalition for Community Schools, a national organization, there are approximately 5,000 community schools in cities across the country, providing “wraparound services” such as after-school programs for students whose parents work late, and on-

site health care for students whose parents can’t take them to the doctor. Schools can also partner with community organizations that provide art and music programming. Programs are paid for through public and private funding, including foundation support and federal grants. Some organizations offer their services free of charge. For districts, Ramey says, the principal cost is hiring a community-schools coordinator to solicit funding and build partnerships with service providers. Ramey also recommends CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


ALL ABOARD! BABUSHKAS, HARD HATS & CARRIE FURNACES TOUR Enjoy the magical mix of immigrants and industry! Tour highlights include a historic steel mill Pump House, a steel-heritage museum, awe-inspiring blast furnaces and much more!

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Come see room after room of miniature trains and summer blooms at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Follow our newly expanded Garden Railroad as it travels in, around and through the most beautiful owers the season has to offer. For more information, or to plan your visit, go to phipps.conservatory.org.

Experience the scale and awe-inspiring Carrie Blast Furnaces! Learn the entire iron-making process, with a tour led by a retired steelworker, and why Pittsburgh was once the steelmaking capitol of the world! Shuttle service provided by Lenzner 10:30 a.m. Saturdays.

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having $50,000 in funding to help with other start-up costs. “The community vision is to reduce class sizes and restore lost programs, such as music [and] art,” Ramey says. But before that can happen, district officials will have to do the math.

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ALTHOUGH CITY-schools Superintendent Linda Lane supports the community-school concept, she says implementing it would have additional costs. For security reasons, school buildings would have to be retrofitted, so students would be insulated from outsiders using the services. “There are some things that need to be figured out,” says Lane, who is waiting for the community to present a plan the district can discuss with them. Lane says she couldn’t estimate the potential impact on the $459 million city-schools budget. But such costs have been an issue in districts where community schools have been implemented. Schools in Hartford, Conn., for example, were obliged to cover some maintenance and security costs. “In some schools,” the district noted in a progress report, “this has been an issue for principals who are required to staff the facility in the afterschool hours.”

Almost any cost might be difficult for the district to swallow. City schools are facing a $37.5 million deficit in 2015, and the district projects that each school it closes will save between $500,000 and $1 million yearly. Officials are pondering the closure of between five and 10 district schools, and Lane says that because community schools take time to implement, the approach is unlikely to spare those programs. “Nobody has really laid out what the next steps are,” says Lane. “But if we have a plan that we have community support for … and they have a plan for how to finance it, I’d absolutely support it.” Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers President Nina Esposito-Visgitis says preventing school closings is only one of many reasons to support the model. “I’ve followed the community-schools model for years, and I’ve tried to talk to the district about it for years,” Esposito-Visgitis says. “It helps teachers; it takes away a lot of problems and makes education and learning a priority. I can’t tell you how many teachers have offered to have their schools be a pilot.” Some parents don’t have the knowledge or time needed to take advantage of the social services that are available, Esposito-Visgitis says. Putting these services in schools, CONTINUES ON PG. 10

Congratulations to Pittsburgh City Paper winners at the 50th Annual Golden Quill Awards, hosted May 22 by the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania.

Starla Starla is an affectionate Pit Bull living at Animal Friends. She is a sweet girl, patiently waiting for her forever home. Could it be yours?

BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY/CONSUMER ARTICLE OR SERIES, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Charlie Deitch, “No Help Wanted: In Filing to Labor Board, UPMC Claims It Has No Employees” This story also won the best-of-show Ray Sprigle Memorial Award for non-daily newspapers EDUCATION, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS AmyJo Brown, “The Neverending Story” FOOD, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth, Dining Reviews SPORTS, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Lauren Daley, “Hometown Hero: For Neil Walker, Pirates Success Is Special” COLUMNS, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Hal B. Klein, “On the Rocks”

City Paper contributors were also finalists in seven categories:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY/CONSUMER ARTICLE OR SERIES, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Chris Potter, “Storm Shelter”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ARTICLE OR SERIES OR CRITICISM, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Michelle Pilecki, Theater Reviews

HEALTH/SCIENCE/ENVIRONMENT ARTICLE OR SERIES, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Lauren Daley, “Health Barrier: From Insurance Coverage to Simply Finding a Doctor, Health Care Presents Challenges for the Transgender Community”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT, ONLINE Bill O’Driscoll, “Cultural Trust, Local Artist Squabble Over Rubber Duck”

HISTORY/CULTURE ARTICLE OR SERIES, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Andy Mulkerin, “Lord Finesse’s Suit Against Mac Miller Raises Questions About the Future of the Hip-Hop Mixtape”

COLUMNS, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Chris Potter, “Potter’s Field” ENTERPRISE/INVESTIGATIVE ARTICLE OR SERIES, NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS Rebecca Nuttall and Alex Zimmerman, “Cuts in Federal Food Benefits Mean Tightened Belts for Residents and Charities Alike”


THERE’S AN ART TO GETTING TO THE FESTIVAL This year, let the Three Rivers Arts Festival open your eyes to something completely new and totally cutting-edge: Public transit. Take a bus or the T Downtown and get there without the stress of fighting traffic. So you can relax and enjoy the art, the music, the food, the atmosphere… Our Downtown bus routes get you where you need to go and our Gateway T station is in the heart of the action. So don't suffer for your art. Take the bus or T. And enjoy total artistic freedom.

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O EDEN HALL CAMPUS O SUMMER EVENTS SERIES JULY IS K

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MUSIC Thur., June 19, 7:30 p.m. • Bluegrass: The Roustabouts Sat., July 12, 4:00 p.m. • Kids: Secret Agent 23 Skidoo* Thur., Aug. 21, 7:30 p.m. • Classical/Chamber: Various Artists

MOVIES Thur., June 26, dusk • New Release: Saving Mr. Banks Thur., July 10, dusk • Kids: Bears Thur., Aug. 7, dusk • Date Night: Chocolat Thur., Sept. 4, dusk • American Classic: American Graffiti

OPEN ENROLLMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

instead of having them scattered throughout the community, makes them easier for parents to access. “I understand money is a true issue, but I don’t think we should use that as a reason not to do it,” Esposito-Visgitis says. “I don’t want us to talk too long. What I would really love to talk to a few possible funders and get it started in one of our schools.” Two months ago, members of the teachers’ union, school-board members and other officials attended a conference in Cincinnati, to get a closer look at the community-schools approach. “I think the nicest surprise I found is absenteeism tends to be down, graduation rates tend to go up [at community schools],” said Carolyn Klug, the school-board representative for District 9. Student often miss school as a result of physical- or mental-health problems, but Klug says chronic absenteeism can be reduced by addressing these problems in school. According to the Cincinnati school district, students receiving any opportunity or support service — including tutoring or after-school activities — saw an average 5.6 percent increase in their reading scores between the 2009-2010 and 20102011 school years, and a 4.6 percent ad-

vance in math. Students who did not receive these services saw only a 2 percent gain in reading and a 1.8 percent improvement in math. The Cincinnati event was hosted by the Coalition for Community Schools, a national alliance affiliated with the Institute for Educational Leadership, a nonpartisan organization funded by a variety of national foundations. The gathering drew an estimated 1,400 participants from school districts around the country, many of which are also facing budget cuts. “I’m aware of the budgetary challenges in public schools … but there are still ways,” says CCS Executive Director Martin Blank. Districts are utilizing the business community, health systems, local government, community nonprofits and other agencies to expand opportunities for students. In Philadelphia, for example, the United Way and other foundations came together to provide funding to hire a communityschools coordinator to work in the schools. In other cities, local governments help provide funding. “It’s the school system’s space,” Blank says, “but they figured out a funding source independent of the school system.” And the diversity of support for community schools, he says, is a testament CONTINUES ON PG. 12

THEATER Sat., July 26, 10:00 a.m. • Madcap Puppet Theater: The Enchanted World Thur., Sept. 18, 7:30 p.m. • The Improvised Shakespeare Co.* All events are held outdoors at the Hilda M. Willis Amphitheater on Chatham University’s new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, PA

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

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to its effectiveness. “The strategy is growing across the country,” says Blank. “It’s in all parts of America, whether they’re red or blue; whether they’re serving the black, Latino or white populations.” COMMUNITY schooling isn’t a completely

new idea in Pittsburgh. The Homewood Children’s Village, a local nonprofit organization, has been providing wraparound services to students at Faison K-5, Lincoln K-5, University Prep 6-12 and Westinghouse 6-12. The nonprofit “has reached out to our partners in the community to really bring to bear the services that are necessary for our kids to develop,” says HCV President Derrick Lopez. “It’s important for us to leverage the time we have with kids, and we’ve made it easier for parents to access the services their families need.” While not a school itself, HCV provides programs similar to those found in community schools, such as transportation and a weekend nutrition program. The nonprofit utilizes relationships with community organizations including: the YWCA, which provides after-school programs; the University of Pittsburgh, whose volunteers tutor and mentor students; and foundations,

which provide needed funding. “This is incredibly difficult work,” says Lopez. HCV, he notes, spent several years planning and soliciting community contributions before implementing the model. Success, he says, is “based on relationshipbuilding. We build upon the model every year. It can be done on a large scale, but it has to be done incrementally.” At least one potential community partner is already on board. “I love the idea” of community schools, says Mayor Bill Peduto. By housing community services, “we can provide a source of revenue to keep the schools open, and provide a foundation to attract people to the neighborhood.” Peduto, who convened a task force on public schools earlier this year, says the community-school approach will be on the agenda. The task force, he says, should release a report on the district’s future around Labor Day. Peduto acknowledges the district’s concerns about costs, and says the city could help find resources to cover them. “I’m not trying to place an unfunded mandate on Dr. Lane,” he says. “I want to work with her.” “We don’t need to close more schools,” Peduto adds. “We need to find ways to keep them open.”

“WE HAVE TO SHIFT OUR WAY OF THINKING, SO THAT WE COLLECTIVELY EMBRACE OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS AS COMMUNITY ASSETS.”

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Visit historic Pittsburgh sports locations and learn the history of the teams and sports legends that make Pittsburgh the City of Champions! Treats included. Portion of proceeds goes to the Josh Gibson Foundation. (2.5 HOURS)

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Residents worry a proposed AutoZone on Babyland site could jeopardize neighborhood rebound {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

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FOR 61 YEARS, Babyland’s powder-blue façade and block letters defined the corner of Penn and Negley avenues. It was a city landmark long before anyone dreamed that, a few blocks away, Penn would become an arts corridor, or that East Liberty’s business district — just down the street — would attract new bars and restaurants. But neighborhood groups fear that a proposal to bring an AutoZone parts store to the Babyland site jeopardizes years of progress. And they plan to contest some of developer’s plans at a June 5 zoning hearing. “Twenty-five or 30 years ago, we might’ve said, ‘There’s nothing going on [along] Penn Avenue: Maybe an auto-parts store wouldn’t be so bad,’” says Rick Swartz, executive director of the Bloomfield-Garfield Corporation. “But times have changed.” The development is proposed by Lawrence Gumberg and LG Realty Advisors, which bought the property in 2012. LG Realty’s plans envision a 6,787-squarefoot store with 16 parking spaces. The site is zoned as “Local Neighborhood Commercial,” a designation which, according to the zoning code, is intended to “maintain the small scale and rich diversity of neighborhood-serving commercial districts, promote and enhance the quality of life in adjacent residential areas.” Stefani Danes, an architecture professor at Carnegie Mellon University, doesn’t think the AutoZone proposal qualifies. “Everything we’ve worked for on the Penn Avenue plan is looking to [create] a really vibrant and pedestrian-oriented area,” says Danes, a Friendship Community Group board member. “It’s not like Baum Boulevard,” a heavily-trafficked thoroughfare with numerous automotiveoriented businesses. The city’s planning department found the current AutoZone proposal would require five “variances” — or exceptions — to the code. The store’s design, for example, features what city planners call a “long, flat façade”; the code requires a more varied design. The store interior would also be hidden behind walls and dark glass; the zoning code requires that 60 percent of the ground floor be visible from outside. Waiving the requirements requires a hearing before the Zoning Board of Adjustment, and Swartz predicts turnout from “a number of community organizations.” “We’re hearing from folks as far away from Highland Park, because people feel a sense of ownership over that corner,” Swartz adds.

Gumberg did not respond to phone and email requests for comment. But privateproperty rights may take precedence over neighborhood misgivings. City planning employee Kate Rakus notes that retail is expressly permitted in the area. Even if an auto-parts store isn’t what neighbors have in mind, “There’s nothing that regulates what you can sell in that store.” Danes says she thinks community groups would compromise “if [the store] didn’t diminish the quality of the street,” and included better urban-architecture principles. “Everybody was at least willing to have a meeting with the developer,” she says. Community groups met with Gumberg in February. Gumberg “listened for quite a while — I give him credit,” says Freddie Croce, an architect and former BGC board member. But he says that while Gumberg said “a large national retailer might want to move in there, he was pretty cagey about what it might be.” Over the following months, Swartz says, “We didn’t hear anything from him. Then three weeks ago, we got notice from city planning that he’s looking for zoning approval.” Representatives of BGC and neighborhood groups from East Liberty and Friendship responded in a May 12 letter. In it, they expressed fear that a project “that discourages pedestrians and does not contribute to the distinctive character of the district … will undo some of the progress” made in the area. The groups pledged “to do what it takes to stop development that would be detrimental to … the future of Penn Avenue.” So far, elected officials have said little. The property falls in City Councilor Ricky Burgess’ district, though Shawn Carter, Burgess’ chief of staff, says it’s unclear whether Burgess would weigh in. “We’re going to have to talk to the neighbors and see how they feel,” Carter says. Mayor Bill Peduto also sounded cautious. “The corner itself could be an entranceway to both the arts corridor and East Liberty,” he says. And “There are so many auto places in that area that I don’t see a need for it. But everybody has rights.” “If done in the right way, I could see where [an AutoZone] would be beneficial,” Peduto adds. “But it would have to be an urban model, and most of these that I’ve seen have had a suburban model.” The Zoning Board will hold a hearing on the development at 9:20 a.m. on Thu., June 5, at 200 Ross St., Downtown. A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

IT’S HARD TO know what Pittsburgh would

make of Andrew Carnegie today … and not just because of the union-busting, or the fact that his steel mills would obstruct the use of riverfront trails. This was a guy who didn’t like football. “[T]o me, the spectacle of educated young men rolling over one another in the dirt was — well, not gentlemanly,” he once told college students. Carnegie also showed an interest in a group of people that remains unfashionable even today: underpaid academics. While Carnegie had little formal schooling, writes biographer Joseph Frazier Wall, he “had been shocked to discover how very small the salaries of college professors were”: Clerks in his office earned more. So Carnegie set up a nationwide pension fund for professors, asserting that “the least rewarded of all the professions is that of the teacher in our higher educational institutions.” The venture later became TIAA-CREF, a financial-services firm academics nationwide still rely on. Today, of course, colleges are among Pittsburgh’s largest employers. But now, as in Carnegie’s day, local leaders often demonstrate only fitful interest in the hardship that makes their own prosperity possible. Even much-beloved University of Pittsburgh Chancellor Mark Nordenberg, who is taking a victory lap as he retires from 19 years of leading the school, seems to have some blind spots. Nordenberg spoke to a May 28 opening session at the 2014 Social Equity Leadership Conference, hosted by Pitt with the theme of “assessing social equity and civil rights in the light of growing income inequality.” And to hear Nordenberg tell it, universities generate social equity just by virtue of existing. Citing a slew of studies, he declared that a “college degree can be a ticket out of poverty.” Spiraling studentloan debt — which has topped $1 trillion nationwide — was a problem, he allowed. But it could be blamed largely on state legislators with budget concerns and, sometimes, “anti-intellectual views.” True enough. College grads do earn more over a lifetime than those without a diploma. And Pennsylvania’s support of higher education has lagged, one reason students here carry among the largest debt loads in the country. But in outlining the prosperity a di-

ploma offers students, Nordenberg didn’t mention the ill-paid adjuncts who are increasingly likely to teach them. Nor did he reckon with research like a February report from the nonprofit Delta Cost Project, which found that as tuition rises, colleges have shifted resources away from teaching. “You see it on every campus — an increase in administration and a decrease in fulltime faculty, and an increase in the use of part-time faculty,” one report author told the Chronicle of Higher Education. (The trend does have an upside: My own spouse works in college administration.) When such subjects get broached, it’s often by conservatives whose real interest is in cackling over the possibility of seeing pointy-headed professors kicked to the curb. Take the June 1 column by Post-Gazette columnist Jack Kelly, in which Kelly professes to care about the fact that administrator salaries have risen, and that “student debt has increased 500 percent, but starting salaries for college graduates shrunk 10 percent.” It’s not like Kelly cares about income disparity — or the fact that graduates are entering a job market that lags even as corporate profits soar. The problem, he says, is that “at many colleges, preparing students for a career takes a back seat to political indoctrination.” At Harvard, he wails, students “will be required to attend ‘power and privilege’ training,” while at the University of California-Santa Barbara, the student council “demands that syllabi contain warnings” about material that “might trigger feelings of … distress.” (That’s right: Kelly chose this week to mock students at UC-Santa Barbara for being too sensitive. Classy!) Confused about why a conservative, whose tribe usually denounces “Ivy League elitists,” would oppose urging Harvard kids to be more humble? It’s simple: Blaming colleges for not “preparing students for a career” is easier than asking why our economy generates so few jobs — even as it produces more and more wealth at the top. Even during academic discussions of social inequality, college leaders can struggle to acknowledge their part in the problem. Conservatives, meanwhile, argue that French majors are the only ones to blame for it. It’s almost enough to make you nostalgic for the guy with the Pinkerton guards.

TO HEAR SCHOOL LEADERS TELL IT, UNIVERSITIES GENERATE SOCIAL EQUITY JUST BY VIRTUE OF EXISTING.

C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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PAID AD V E RTIS E ME N T

P I T TS B U R G H SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 4-10PM

Equality on Ellsworth

WITH LIVE PERFORMANCE BY CHARICE. The newest pride event, in Shadyside, with live music performances. FREE EVENT – Donations accepted

FRIDAY, JUNE 13, 8PM-2AM

Pub Crawl For whatever your taste is.

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PITTSBURGH AIDS CENTER FOR TREATMENT (PACT) PROVIDING WORLD-CLASS HIV MEDICAL CARE SINCE 1989 As a patient at our outpatient clinic, you will have on-site access to: • • • • • •

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


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For more information: www.patf.org N E W S

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IMPRESSIONZ IS A JAMAICAN RESTAURANT THAT MADE US FEEL LIKE PART OF THE FAMILY

MARKET DAY

ISLAND WARMTH

{BY AL HOFF} A group of bagpipers seemed an odd choice to kick off the new Bloomfield Saturday Market, but the mournful tunes hardly kept the crowds away. Held in a parking lot on Liberty Avenue, the market is an initiative of the Bloomfield Development Corp., and offers a farmers-market-plus. Besides food and produce vendors, there were: a show-and-tell fire truck and “Sparky the fire dog” mascot; chalk for the kids to turn the pavement into art; a raffle; and an activity area where attendees could apply colored dots to demographic queries. But it was the food that drew the traffic — from empanadas and hummus to plants and bundles of rhubarb. Vendors included: Pittsburgh Pie Guy, Lawrenceville’s Pastitsio, Healcrest Urban Farms (with exotic popsicles), Zeke’s Coffee and olive-oil purveyors Olive and Marlowe. Farmers-and-reality-TV-stars the King brothers, from Freedom Farms, were on hand with their new “Meet Your Meat” bus. Customers could step inside for a variety of meat, eggs, pickles and T-shirts. A big hit was the portable pizzeria set up by Woodfired Flatbreads, which was providing samples and taking orders for whole pizzas (baked in just 90 seconds). An ongoing demo for “garden quiche pizza with lemon sauce” drew a receptive crowd, including a fireman who collected a recipe sheet. Did he intend to make pizza for the firehouse? “I’m gonna try,” he said. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 1. Liberty Avenue, between Winebiddle and Gross streets, Bloomfield. www.bloomfieldnow.com

the

FEED

A sweet treat reat for Downtown wn workers, ers, the annual al

Strawberry y Festival al,

sponsored by the Smithfield United Church of Christ, is 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fri., June 6. There will be lunch items — including the signature strawberry shortcake — and music. Held on Strawberry Way (naturally), off Smithfield Street, between Sixth and Seventh avenues. www.smithfieldchurch.org

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

F

ROM HOLE-in-the-wall to haute cuisine, restaurants inhabit a broad spectrum of formality, but almost all of them cultivate an atmosphere. And while decor goes a long way toward communicating an establishment’s ambitions, ultimately it’s the interactions with the staff that set the tone. Most strive to be friendly and welcoming, but only rarely does an experience that starts with food end up feeling like it’s about new friends. Impressionz is the fourth consecutive Jamaican place, dating back at least to the mid-’90s, in its storefront on Broad Street in East Liberty. It is small and bright, with island-themed murals airbrushed on the walls, tables for two lining the side opposite the counter, and a raised platform at the back that creates a sort of beach pavilion for one large table. Most importantly, Impressionz is a family restaurant that made us feel like part of the family. Chef Desmond Knight doesn’t stay hidden in the kitchen but brings finished dishes to the table — and he’ll stay to talk about them, too (though

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

Curry chicken

he won’t give up his secrets). Middleschooler Cecil fetches drinks between pages of homework, his younger sisters stand ready to befriend any child guests who might arrive, and owner Cecilia PriceKnight hosts and oversees all. Most servers give their names before reciting, “I’ll be taking care of you tonight,” but rarely do

IMPRESSIONZ

6008 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-362-7134 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: Sides and meat or veggie patties, $2.50-5; entrees $10-18 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED the introductions go both ways; at Impressionz, Cecilia not only introduced herself but also asked all of us our names, including our children. Her warmth was palpable, and conversation began to flow, pausing only when she returned to the kitchen. Impressionz’s menu is split between a limited selection of Jamaican specialties,

including jerk chicken and a few stews and curries, that are made in advance, and a much longer, more varied list of items “made to order,” which take a little more time to arrive. To take full advantage of the latter, plan to arrive on the early side: Impressionz closes at 8 on weeknights. Jamaican cuisine is a melting pot, reflecting Caribbean, African, European and Asian influences, and all of it was on display at Impressionz. As you might expect from an island, many of the dishes revolve around seafood. Not only the famous chicken, but also fish and shrimp can be had jerk-style, as well as in several other preparations: steamed, curried, salted and more. We tried tilapia escoveitch, a Jamaican variation of Latin American escabeche, in which fish is marinated in an acidic sauce with onions, carrots, peppers and spices. The pair of deeply browned filets was very vinegary indeed, but a bed of rice was a good foil. Somewhat gummy, it became loosened and brightened by the vinegar. Goat curry had a golden sauce like a turmeric-based Indian curry, but a different


spice blend: less hot chili, more allspice and mustard. Americans don’t eat much goat, possibly because of all the bones, but Impressionz’s goat was so meltingly tender, and so savorily flavorful, that the bones were a small price to pay. In this dish, we wouldn’t trade it for any other meat. Also tender and extraordinarily flavorful was oxtail, presumably the form of beef most available in a poorer nation, but transformed here into a stew rich enough for a king. Simmered in a deep-brown sauce that was lightly spiced to let the beef flavor come forward, it required almost no fork-and-knife work to separate the meat from its bones.

Owners Cecilia and Desmond Knight

One can hardly dine at a Jamaican restaurant without sampling its jerk chicken, rubbed and marinated in herbs, spices, sugar and chilies. Impressionz served one piece of dark meat and one of white: Both were tender and juicy within their mahogany jerk coating. The heat of the peppers came on strong at first, then receded to a manageable level. Plantains as well as rice helped counterbalance the spice. The chicken was dry, however, in a stirfry which was otherwise an interesting interpretation of a generic Chinese dish. Its thin, slightly sweet soy-based sauce was more satisfying than typical takeout Chinese-American, perhaps thanks to surprising bits of thyme. Chicken and beef patties were unremarkable, tasty enough but neither fiery within nor especially crispy without. But we’ll return to Impressionz for the unique seafood preparations, the luscious meat stews and the wonderful warmth of the Price-Knight family. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

WHEN THE SPIRIT MOVES YOU Wigle Whiskey expands to North Side with new barrelhouse Wigle Whiskey is growing … again. With an expanding team of employees and staff, as well as a continuing parade of new products — including an aged ginever, various whiskeys and some soonto-be-announced releases — the owners decided they’d outgrown the distillery’s Smallman Street home. And a new northof-the-rivers facility, Wigle’s Whiskey Garden and Barrelhouse, is now open for tours and tastings. “We just ran out of room. Everyone is climbing over stuff at this point,” says Meredith Grelli, one of the distillery’s founders. Wigle has spent the past few months remodeling a 5,000-square-foot warehouse — the former home of Balistreri Produce — into a spirits destination. The distillers will move most of the company’s barrels to the new location. There, deep inside what used to be a produce locker, gargantuan cognac barrels will house a whiskey that will age “for decades,” Grelli says. Grelli says that Wigle’s tour guides will use the new site to offer a “dramatic sequel” to the original Wigle story. Here, visitors will learn about the craft and science of aging spirits: Guides will, for example, blow a cascade of soap bubbles through a piece of red oak, demonstrating why its non-porous white oak cousin makes a superior aging vessel. A counterpoint to the science on the tour is the post-Whiskey Rebellion history of local distilling, during which guests learn how iconic Pittsburgh families, like the Fricks, built their fortunes while changing the way American consumed whiskey. “It’s a lot nerdier than the other tour,” Grelli says. Wes Shonk (formerly of Butcher and the Rye and 1947 Tavern) will run the tasting room. He’ll have a mix of barrel-aged cocktails, specials and punches on offer: The room is open Thursday and Friday evenings plus Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Finally, there’s the Whiskey Garden, an outdoor event space bordered by plants including apple trees, lavender bushes, iris flowers, and rye and wheat grasses. “Everything we’re planting,” Grelli says, “is used in one of our spirits.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1055 Spring Garden Ave., Spring Garden. www.wiglewhiskey.com/whiskey-garden

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Garden d D Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery

Thai Tapas and Wine Bar

Upscale Casual Authentic Thai

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday

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Supplying Pittsburgh with Locally Grown, All Natural Garden Seedlings for over a Decade. Wednesday y y Thursday y Friday y Saturday y Sunday

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Father’s Day Open p 1pm-8pm! p p

Menu featuring our Italian Favorites, Seafood, Chicken, Steak & Chef Specialties!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree woodfired oven in the open cucina. JF BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE

J.W. Hall’s Steak and Seafood Inn {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF CHINA STAR. 100 McIntyre Square, 7900 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-364-9933. Though a standard ChineseAmerican menu available, the real action is on the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan menu that’s all in Chinese. Fortunately, there is a translated version available, and the names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE

BRGR. 5997 Penn Circle South, East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. A bar that serves well-designed retro chic with its whiskey and beer, Brillobox is (for now) the cool place to be. The menu isn’t lengthy, but it’s broad: Choose from bar staples or more inventive (and veggie-friendly) specialties such as Moroccan roasted-vegetable stew or herbed polenta wedges. JE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soulfood restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-

Naya {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the

donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterraneaninspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with CONTINUES ON PG. 26


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE

J.W. HALL’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD INN. 2284 Broadhead Road, Aliquippa. 724-375-6860. This old-fashioned, PROPER BRICK OVEN AND family-style steakhouse offers a TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., satisfying, well-executed menu Downtown. 412-281-5700. This of surf-and-turf favorites, cozy Downtown spot offers a including broiled shrimp menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, appetizer, langostinos and but strives to be about as refined prime rib. The menu’s emphasis as that workmanlike trinity can be. on steak and seafood rises Some cheeses and pasta are to special occasions, while housemade, and many plenty of pasta dishes, starters are closer to sandwiches and tapas or antipasti than pub-style appetizers to pub grub. More than accommodate www. per 30 beers are on tap, a p pghcitym regulars. LE as well. KE .co

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MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and hand-crafted cocktails. LE

SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-247-4848. A neighborhood pizza place and more, Salvatore’s offers something even rarer than good pizza: fast food of the finest quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K

THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF

VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3400. The venerable Italian restaurant from Greensburg now has a Downtown outpost. In this elegant space, some classic dishes are updated; a few favorites, like turtle soup are retained; and the fresh mozzarella bar deserves to become a classic. Try the distinctive pizza, with a layered, cracker-like crust. LE

NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF

YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF


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LOCAL

BEAT

“IT’S NOT LIKE GOING TO A GROCERY STORE AND PICKING OUT WHAT YOU WANT.”

{BY ZACH BRENDZA}

JAMMIN’ ON THE MOUNT Back when he lived nearby, in the summer of 2012, Max Kovalchuk remembers noticing the great view Grandview Park had overlooking the city. He knew he wanted to do a show there someday — but then he moved. Late this past March, as Kovalchuk began planning a block-party-style show near his Lawn Street home, in Oakland, he starting running into logistical issues; the initial location and a second proposed location, South Oakland’s Dan Marino Field, were both scrapped. By that time, all the bands were booked, and that’s when things clicked: Kovalchuk thought of Mount Washington, and remembered Grandview Park, “a better spot than any to do the festival.” The result: Mountain Top Music Festival will be held Sun., June 8, starting at 1 p.m. The daylong festival will feature 12 bands, including Philly’s Cold Fronts, Pittsburgh’s Legs Like Tree Trunks, Kovalchuk’s band Nevada Color and more. The festival lineup ranges from DIY bands to bands signed to major labels, and Kovalchuk hopes to help bridge the gap between the two scenes. “I think the music scene in Pittsburgh is really growing,” he says. “If there was less of a disconnect there, it would be able to grow even more.” The festival’s future is unknown, but Kovalchuk says he’d like to make it an annual event, possibly a two-day festival, adding vendors and tying it to the community, while making it bigger and better. With a number of bands on the verge of breaking out, the festival could prove to be memorable, Kovalchuk says. “This definitely can be a thing where people say five years down the road, ‘Holy shit, I remember going to the Mountain Top Music Festival and seeing this band, this band and this band.’”

KOVALCHUK REMEMBERED GRANDVIEW PARK, “A BETTER SPOT THAN ANY TO DO THE FESTIVAL.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MOUNTAIN TOP MUSIC FESTIVAL with COLD FRONTS, KEVIN GARRETT, WHITE LIKE FIRE, GYPSY AND HIS BAND OF GHOSTS and more. 1 p.m. Sun., June 8 . Grandview Park, 499 Bailey Ave., Mount Washington. Suggested donation $10. Search “Mountain Top Music Festival” on Facebook.

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G N I K O BO E TH

L A V I T FES

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

P

ITTSBURGHERS KNOW it’s traditional

to get a few windy thunderstorms just in time for the kickoff of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival in early June each year. Customary, too, is the storm of public opinion that sweeps over the festival’s music lineup. It’s understandable that the festival would be a lightning rod: It’s big, it’s free and it provides an artfocused alternative to the big, commercial outdoor concerts of summer. This year’s festival has some big names and some acts that have never been to Pittsburgh before: Jake Bugg (headlining Sunday, June 15), the British rock singersongwriter who’s all the buzz right now, and The Kaiser Chiefs (Tue., June 10), also from England, who have been around a bit longer. Lucinda Williams headlines on Sat., June 14, and up-and-coming soul singer Curtis Harding plays on Fri., June 13. But at the same time, there are aspects of the lineup that are worth questioning: Of nine headlining pop acts, only one is a woman, and only two feature musicians of color; more than half of the acts are acoustic-guitar-based, whether alt-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

{AMOS LEE PHOTO COURTESY OF HARPER LEE; CURTIS HARDING PHOTO COURTESY OF HEIDI SLIMANE}

This year’s Three Rivers Arts Festival lineup includes, clockwise from top left: Jake Bugg, Amos Lee, Lucinda Williams and Curtis Harding

country, bluegrass or rock. Organizers are quick to point out that there’s a lot more to booking a 10-day festival than just picking who you want and bringing them to town. “I always say, it’s not like going to a grocery store and picking out what you want,” says Gary Hinston, the festival’s main stage and music consultant, who’s booked the music since 2002. “We know exactly what we want, what’s going to fulfill the mission of the festival.”

DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL Fri., June 6-June 15. Point State Park, Downtown. Free. www.3riversartsfest.org

“We go into this, and as the acts start coming together, we check off the things that were on our list,” he explains. “As things go on, we keep looking for the pieces we’re missing. And then it comes down to the point where, the pieces we’re missing, we’re not gonna fill them.”

Past festival lineups have generally been a bit more diverse; last year’s music included multiple world-music groups. “Last year, the experiment I wanted to test right off the bat was, let’s look at a world-music act that would be not too dissimilar to what we do for our Trust Presents series,” explains Veronica Corpuz, director of festival management and special projects for the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, which runs the festival. “I was able to see Red Baraat in New York during Global Fest, and also Grupo Fantasma — to see if we can present a Latin band and a South Asian band. And it did bring a different audience, but then, just the nature of the cycles of different artists going out at different times.” “Gary and I have this conversation [about diversity] a lot,” Corpuz notes. “It’s really a function of who’s going out [on tour], and who’s going to fit on the stage. This is something I’ve learned. I saw this Native American DJ group at Global Fest, A Tribe Called Red. I thought ‘They’re so awesome!’ But they’re a night-club act. It’s a large stage.” CONTINUES ON PG. 30


BOOKING THE FESTIVAL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

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Another aspect of booking: the fact that the festival ďŹ ts into a larger framework of programming the Cultural Trust puts on all year. “I’m supposed to coordinate with the director of the jazz festival, the children’s festival, First Night,â€? says Corpuz, “to map out a year-long program that taps into different channels, different audiences.â€? The JazzLive International Festival, also free and produced by the Trust, takes place a week after the Arts Festival ends. (In previous years, it took place during the festival, but it was moved this year.) That means jazz acts are more likely to end up on that bill, rather than being steered toward the Arts Festival. Perhaps that’s one reason for all the acoustic guitars — not that they’re being played by a bunch of slouches. The headliner Fri., June 6, is Jeff Tweedy, who appeared at the festival twice in the early 2000s with Wilco. On Sat., June 7, bluegrass takes over, with Sam Bush headlining. Trampled by Turtles, a Minneapolis band that doesn’t fall far from the bluegrass moniker itself, headlines the next night, Sun., June 7. Local music programming is another highlight of the festival this year; in addition to local openers for several of the music headliners, the Dollar Bank stage will host local acts during the noon hour on the festival’s weekdays. And non-traditional music pieces will be put on by local artists, too: Squonk Opera premieres a new work, “Pneumatica,â€? on the festival’s second weekend, and local musician Chistiane D will work with other locals for nightly performances by the Complaints n’At Choir, a local installment of a global movement in which musicians make songs out of people’s gripes. That’ll all make for plenty of happy audience members, even if there are questions about the lineup’s diversity of sound and demographics this time around. And the festival’s organizers are quick to point out that they’re not looking to sweep the diversity issue under the rug — but it’s not always easy to get everything you want every year. “We have so little control over when we can get the acts we want, we kind of have to make the pieces work with what we have sitting on the table,â€? says Hinston, a 30-year veteran of show promotion in the area. And Corpuz is perfectly happy with the festival lineup having its share of both fans and detractors. “I think if we feel like this is it, we can stand behind it, then here it is,â€? she says. “All curating is subject to the whims of the public. And that’s what’s great about this city.â€? AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

CHRISTIAN BECK WRECK MY TRAIN (SELF-RELEASED)

Full album of pop-country from the local singer, who’s just 20. Some nods to John Prine and Willie Nelson in the opening track belie what’s mostly a rock record, with country themes — that’s what country radio today is, though. “My House� starts out sounding like “Turn the Page,� but turns into a country party anthem that could well be Beck’s hit. About half of the songs here are penned by Beck; among them, “Street Preacher� might be the best. CHRISTIAN BECK CD RELEASE. 4 p.m. Sat., June 7. The Venue at Harmony Ridge, 1280 Breitenstein Road, Ambridge. $25-50. All ages, includes pig roast and chicken dinner. www.tinyurl.com/4bandbbqbash

9SUNDAYS CAGE

(SELF-RELEASED)

The packaging of this full-length features a quote from Rush, but on the whole the band feels like a cross between ’80s thrash and ’90s grunge: Chugging mid-paced metal guitar riffs combine with vocals that at times bring to mind Alice in Chains. Good energy and guitar-playing with some blazing solos; the vocals are largely welldone, but in places feel a little affected. 9SUNDAYS CD RELEASE. 10 p.m. Sat., June 7. Hard Rock CafÊ, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $5. 412-481-7625

MURDER FOR GIRLS MURDER FOR GIRLS (SELF-RELEASED)

Simple, good, lo-fi alt-rock from some veterans of the local scene (including current and ex-members of The Fuckies, Blindsider, Bunny Five Coat and Liverball). Influences like Pixies and Le Tigre show through; the more punk tracks bring to mind Lunachicks. More, please! AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MURDER FOR GIRLS EP RELASE. 10 p.m. Sat., June 14. Gooski’s, 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658


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EVERY THURSDAY Now thru August 21! {PHOTO COURTESY OF COLIN KERRIGAN}

A little left of center: Poliça’s Channy Leaneagh

NEGOTIATING THE HYPE {BY BRIAN CONWAY} ROLLING STONE once called Poliça “Amer-

ica’s Portishead,” and in some ways, that’s not such a bad comparison. There are the haunting female vocals, downtempo beats and lyrics that brim with distress and heartache: check, check, check. But why saddle an emerging band with comparisons, however well meaning, that might yet be surpassed? Poliça, at its core, is vocalist Channy Leaneagh in tandem with producer Ryan Olson. Both are standouts of Minneapolis’ lively music scene; Leaneagh sang on a few tracks for Olson’s soft-rock collective GAYNGS in 2011, a year before the release of Poliça’s first album, Give You the Ghost.

POLIÇA WITH REPUTANTE

7 p.m. Tue., June 10. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

“Ryan just reminded me last night the only reason I have a band is because he does nice things for people,” Leaneagh says with a laugh. “I sent him some beats and asked if he’d help me, and that’s what happened with Poliça.” Shulamith, the band’s much-lauded second LP from 2013 didn’t drastically evolve from Give You the Ghost so much as expand on what was already there. From the outset, Olson and Leaneagh envisioned an aesthetic to underpin all of their work as Poliça. To wit, even though Leaneagh

needs her voice auto-tuned less than anybody this side of Adele, her modulated vocals have become the ghostly hallmark of Poliça’s electro-pop noir. “In general, I try to look for the spaces that haven’t been found yet,” says Leaneagh. “I just desire to go against the grain, to go against the norm. I just find that that’s what I’m attracted to musically.” “It’s not intentionally trying to be different,” she adds. “But I think I notice that I and the people I’m making music with all have very different tastes, but we all like things to be a little twisted, or a little bit off … and I think that way you can capture the hearts and the souls of people that aren’t quite fed by just the middle line.” It’s a welcome philosophy, one that has attracted fans well outside the Twin Cities. The band’s summer tour hits U.S. locations that missed out on the first round of Shulamith dates, before embarking for Europe. Leaneagh, however, like so many well-hyped artists before her, seems most concerned about staying true to herself. It’s a sentiment captured in “Tiff,” the buzzedabout single featuring guest vocals from Justin “Bon Iver” Vernon, on which she sings out, “I’m a pawn in the hype machine.” “I think about how people carry on their own Instagram accounts, and they’re documenting, like, what they had for breakfast, and what they’re wearing today, and the size of their ass, or what their boyfriend looks like, or something,” Leaneagh says. “And [we are] really into sort of creating this hype around ourselves, and this story, and kind of advertising ourselves. And in general, that’s what can be expected of you as an artist: to do that one-hundredfold. “Is it possible to just to be a musician and not create a false sense of reality about yourself?”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


Featured Visual Art

Alexandre Arrechea’s No Limits, a series of nearly 20-ft. sculptures, will be featured throughout Gateway Center and have received critical-acclaim since their first appearance in New York City in 2013. Candy Chang’s Before I Die, to be featured in the Cultural District’s Katz Plaza, has been called “one of the most creative community projects ever” by The Atlantic. In addition to annual favorites - the Juried Visual Art Exhibition and Artist Market presented by Peoples Natural Gas - creative activities and gallery exhibitions will explore the intersection of art and the environment.

No Limits by Alexandre Arrechea Gateway Center

Before I Die by Candy Chang Cultural District

o:ne:ka’ by Edith Abeyta Point State Park

Portraits of Air

The China Express

709 Penn Gallery

Trust Arts Education Center

by Susan Goethel Campbell

by Carlan Tapp

Juried Visual Art Exhibition Trust Arts Education Center

Artist Market PointStatePark+GatewayCenter Presented by Peoples Natural Gas

Diversion by Rose Clancy Point State Park

World Premieres

FRIDAY!

The Minature Marina Gateway Center

OJO by Bricolage A world premiere immersive theater experience – free vouchers required in advance at TrustArts.org/OJO.

Three artists and companies, rooted in Pittsburgh, will present genre-bending world-premiere performances that range from immersive theater to participatory performance and beyond.

820 Liberty Avenue June 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15

Pneumatica

Complaints n’at Choir

by Squonk

by Christiane D and collaborators

A world premiere outdoor work made of air, powered by air, and about air.

Complaints from local residents will be gathered and constructed into a song for the choir, for all to sing.

Point State Park June 13 | 7pm June 14 & 15 | 12, 2:30 & 7pm

Various Locations Daily | 6pm

Presenting Partner

Artist Market Presenter

Creativity Zone Presenter

TRUSTARTS.ORG/TRAF

OPENS

91.3 FM WYEP | 90.5 FM WESA KDKA TV • Pittsburgh City Paper Pittsburgh Post-Gazette WQED 89.3 FM

Bessie F. Anathan Charitable Trust of The Pittsburgh Foundation • The Buhl Foundation • Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation Colcom Foundation • The Fine Foundation • The Grable Foundation • The Heinz Endowments • Henry Hillman Foundation Lannan Foundation • Laurel Foundation • The Pittsburgh Foundation

Dianne Reeves • El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico • Gregory Porter • Snarky Puppy • Joe Locke Raul Midon • The Messenger Legacy Band Tribute to Art Blakey • Fred Wesley • Dwayne Dolphin Sean Jones • Big Sam’s Funky Nation • Emmet Cohen Trio featuring Benny Benack III Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra w/ Allan Harris

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CRITICS’ PICKS Meeting of Important People

[PUNK] + THU., JUNE 05

Two years ago, Scranton punks The Menzingers were playing a packed and sweaty Mr. Roboto Project. Now, the band has released its fourth full-length, Rented World, which debuted at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 chart. Rented World continues to fine-tune The Menzingers’ sound: punk yet accessible. This isn’t Black Flag; think more in the vein of Hot Water Music and Alkaline Trio — a punk-rock style that isn’t polarizing to those outside the scene. The band plays Altar Bar tonight with Lemuria, PUP and Cayetana. Zach Brendza 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $1416. All ages. 412206-9719 or www. thealtarbar.com

[ROCK] + FRI., JUNE 06

suggested donation. All ages. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

[INDIE ROCK] + SUN., JUNE 08

The Empress, a vessel of the Gateway Clipper Fleet, will be the site of a show today — a rock cruise on the Three Rivers, to be exact. The second annual indie-rock cruise, officially titled “A Three Hour Tour,” was organized by local band Round Black Ghosts and will feature all Pittsburgh-based bands: Wreck Loose, Andre Costello and the Cool Minors, Round Black Ghosts, The Big Bend and Shelf Life String Band. ZB 1:30 p.m. 350 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $25. 412-355-7980 www.pittsburgh threehourtour.com

[SYNTH POP] + The Frick Art & WED., JUNE 11 Historical Center’s The intro of the First Fridays at the insanely catchy, Frick series has been synth-heavy hit “The going on for 20 Mother We Share” years, but this year’s calls up an image of a first installment, group walking from which takes place Chvrches the horizon into view. tonight, is something When the intro turns of a twist. It’s a rare into verse, the band’s instance in which identity is revealed: a local rock band This is Chvrches. Proheadlines the series, nounced “churches,” which features the Glasgow, Scotland, world music and electro-pop band jazz as often as it sounds like M83 or a brighter Phantogram. does pop fare. Meeting of Important People Chvrches released its first LP, The Bones of What is at the fore this evening; later in the season, You Believe, last September, peaking at No. 12 you’ll find the likes of the Jerry Grcevich on the Billboard 200. The band plays Stage AE Tamburitza Orchestra and the Sean Jones tonight with The Range. ZB 7 p.m. 400 North Quartet — both nationally known practitioners Shore Drive, North Side. $22-$25. All ages. who call Pittsburgh home. Andy Mulkerin 412-229-5483 or www.promowestlive.com 7 p.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $5

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} Love Bettie, Twisted Fate, Part of the TRAF. Downtown. The Flow Band, Dallas Marks, FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Hugo Down, more. CENTER. Meeting Of 412-377-7025. Important People. Point Breeze. ALTAR BAR. The Menzingers. RAMADA INN HOTEL & 412-371-0600. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CONFERENCE CENTER. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL Skero n’ Jingles. Greensburg. Flight of Fire, Los Monster CLUB. Carousel. Strip District. 724-552-0603. Trucks, Paddy The 412-251-6058. THE SHOP. Seth Graham, Wanderer. Bloomfield. CATTIVO. Titus Andronicus. Giant Claw, Hunted Creatures, 412-682-0320. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. Stage Hands. Bloomfield. JERGEL’S RHYTHM CLUB CAFE. Diana Chittester, 412-951-0622. GRILLE. The Clintones Jasmine Tate, Crystal Lee Morgan. THUNDERBIRD Ultimate 90’s Tribute. South Side. 412-431-4950. CAFE. City Dwelling Warrendale. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Nature Seekers, w. 724-799-8333. w w Black Lillies, Arlo Aldo. Strip er Apostles of Cool hcitypap g LAVA LOUNGE. p District. 412-566-1000. .com (Nick Lowe cover Mother’s Little Helpers, STAGE AE. The Naked And band. Lawrenceville. SS All-Stars, Soul Kitchen. Famous, White Sea. North Side. 412-682-0177. South Side. 412-431-5282. 412-229-5483. MIDDLE ROAD INN. Tobacco Road. Glenshaw. 412-486-7159. BRILLOBOX. Triggers, Mariage MR. SMALLS THEATER. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Blanc, The Caribbean. Bloomfield. Crisis Car, Drowning Clowns, Gene Stovall. North Side. 412-621-4900. The Wreckids, Morgan Erina, 412-323-2924. CLUB CAFE. Whitney Ann Korel Tunador, Phat Man Dee. CLUB CAFE. Jeremy Messersmith, Jenkins & Her Platonic Guy Friends, Creative.Life.Support Revival Series. Big Scary, EMay (Early) Tom Pappas (Early). South Side. Millvale. 866-468-3401. The Black Six, Discount Guns (Late). 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH RACEWAY South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Blake & PARK. Zodiac Music Festival. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Dean. Robinson. 412-489-5631. Jeff Tweedy. Dollar Bank Stage. Donnie Iris & the Cruisers, GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Jumpcuts, Thin Sketch, Girl Scout, Anello. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GATORS GRILLE. Antz Marching. Glenshaw. 412-767-4110. GOOSKI’S. ATS-Electric Band, Raised by Wolves, Slim Forsythe’s After Midnight BigBand. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARD ROCK CAFE. 9Sundays. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. T-Tops, Molasses Barge, Jar’d Loose, The Swan King. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. 412-655-3553. MALL AT ROBINSON. Drake Bell. Robinson. MOONDOG’S. Mikey Riot. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PITTSBURGH RACEWAY PARK. Zodiac Music Festival. Donnie Iris & the Cruisers, Love Bettie, Twisted Fate, The Flow Band, Dallas Marks, Hugo Down, more. 412-377-7025. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. 13 Stories. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. Driver Friendly The Kickback Quiet Company. South Side. 412-431-4668. Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Scarlet a local band. This week’s track comes & the Harlots, Charm & Chain. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. from Brightside; stream or download

ROCK/POP THU 05

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 07

FRI 06

MP 3 MONDAY BRIGHTSIDE

“Circa 2006” on our music blog,

SUN 08

FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

ALTAR BAR. Screeching Weasel. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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An Evening of Music JUNE 13

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

CLUB CAFE. Blitzen Trapper, The Parkington Sisters. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Jimbo of Jimbo & the Soup Bones. Acousticafe Stage. Trampled by Turtles. Dollar Bank Stage. Part of the TRAF. Downtown. GRANDVIEW PARK. Mountain Top Music Festival. Feat. Cold Fronts, Legs Like Tree Trunks, Nevada Color, DRGN King, Kevin Garrett, White Like Fire, more. Mt. Washington. GUARDIAN SELF STORAGE. Long Leggate Spyder, Dan Bubien, Stache. Shadyside. 412-441-7368. HAMBONE’S. Crystal Bright & the Silver Hands, King Fez. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARTWOOD ACRES. 28 North, 7Horse. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Spoonboy, Colour Me Wednesday, The Otis Wolves, Calyx. Bloomfield. 412-706-1643. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting feat. The Hill & the Rivers, Cousin Boneless. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. SMILING MOOSE. Against the Current. South Side. 412-431-4668. TUGBOAT’S. E-Z Action, Deliverance. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

MON 09 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. State Champion, Beagle Brothers,

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TUE 10 DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Kaiser Chiefs. Dollar Bank Stage. Part of the TRAF. Downtown. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Polica, Reputante. Millvale. 866-468-3401. STAGE AE. Dr. Dog, The Districts, The Hawks (of Holy Rosary). North Side. 412-229-5483.

WED 11

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WED 11

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 06

SUN 08

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 11

BLUES THU 05

DJS

THU 05

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Tropical Bass & Balkin Beats. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. Diamond D. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 07

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. No Mames: Latin Bass Night. Lawrenceville. 412-251-6058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

ALTAR BAR. DevilDriver, ROYAL PLACE. Yung Bru. Whitechapel. Strip District. Castle Shannon. 412-945-0356. 412-263-2877. ANDYS. Five Guys Named Moe. Downtown. HOWLERS COYOTE 412-773-8884. CAFE. SIN Open Mic. ARSENAL BOWLING Hip/Hop, spoken LANES. Love word, comedy, Letters. Lawrenceville. more. Bloomfield. . w w w 412-683-5992. 412-682-0320. typaper ci h g p BRILLOBOX. Eagulls, THE NEW BOHEMIAN. .com Cheatahs. Bloomfield. Homeboy Sandman, The 412-621-4900. Difference Machine, Mega CLUB CAFE. King Khan & the Def, Time Capsule, Parker Web Shrines, Red Mass. South Side. & Reason. North Side. 412-431-4950. THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Dormont. 412-942-0882. Amos Lee, Jimbo & the Soupbones. Downtown. GOOSKI’S. Tyvek, The MR. SMALLS THEATER. Gotobeds, The Sicks. Polish Hill. Atmosphere, Prof, Dem Atlas. 412-681-1658. Millvale. 866-468-3401. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Amen Lucy Amen, The Hills & The Rivers, The Lone Pine String Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. HARD ROCK CAFE. Angel Blue Crown Larks, Robin Vote, Znagez, Band feat. Craig King, Jill West Satyr/Elfheim, Ouais. Bloomfield. & Blues Attack, Zack Wiesinger, 412-853-0518. Misaligned Mind. Justice For Dom STAGE AE. Chvrches, The Range. Benefit Concert. Station Square. North Side. 412-229-5483. 718-867-8500. WIGLE WHISKEY BARREL MELLON SQUARE PARK. Angel HOUSE. Luke Winslow-King. Blue & The Prophets. Downtown. North Side. 412-665-3665. MOONDOG’S. Shot O’ Soul. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 06

Yuenglings

“Survey says.. it’s a BLAST!”

The Armadillos. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Skinny Lister, Onward. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157.

FRI 06

PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials, Jill West & Blues Attack. South Park. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Satin Hearts. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 07

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. ELWOOD’S PUB. Ms. Freddye’s Home Cookin’. 724-265-1181. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE HOP HOUSE. Sweaty Betty. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler. Dormont. 412-942-0882. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

TUE 10 SWHINERY SMOKEHOUSE BAR & GRILLE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Beechview. 412-344-8700.

JAZZ THU 05

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cory Henry (of Snarky Puppy), Ingrid Laubrock/ Tom Rainey. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 06

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Tony Janflone Jr. w/ Curtis Swift. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Just Ahead Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. WILMERDING PARK. Southside Jerry & Friends. Wilmerding. 412-302-7553.

SAT 07 CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB CAFE. Jazz & Jokes w/ One Eye Callwood, Miss Tanil, Kenny Champion, Jaye Cooper, Lawrence Wright (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. LEMONT. Mark & Donna Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Skip Peck Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. RIVERVIEW PARK. Roger Humphries. Stars at Riverview Series. North Side. 412-255-2493.

SUN 08

ANDYS. Kinetic. Downtown. 412-773-8884. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Walter Beasley. Oakland. 412-719-4120. SONOMA GRILLE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 09

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 10

KATZ PLAZA. Salsamba Latin Jazz. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Matt Booth Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 11 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HOMEWOOD. Eric Johnson. Homewood. 412-731-3080.


EARLY WARNINGS

SAT 07 {PHOTO COURTESY OF IVAN OTIS}

HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. OBEY HOUSE. Moonshine Steel. Crafton. 412-922-3883.

Jill Barber

CLASSICAL FRI 06 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mahler Symphony No. 9. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 07 NATURAL FREQUENCY. Melding works of Debussy, Barber, Copland, & Pittsburghbased composer Nancy Galbraith w/ projected images designed by local photographer Chuck Beard. www.resonanceworks.org New Hazlett Theater, North Side.

{SAT., AUG. 23}

SUN 08

Infest

NATURAL FREQUENCY. Melding works of Debussy, Barber, Copland, & Pittsburgh-based composer Nancy Galbraith w/ projected images designed by local photographer Chuck Beard. www.resonanceworks.org New Hazlett Theater, North Side. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mahler Symphony No. 9. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {SUN., SEPT. 28}

Erasure

Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall, 510 E. 10th St., Munhall {TUE., SEPT. 30}

Jill Barber

MON 09

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side CJ’S. Michele Bensen. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

ACOUSTIC THU 05

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Pete Flynn, Jane Not East, BAT. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Dollar Bank Stage, part of the TRAF. Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown.

#339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 06

565 LIVE. Hermie & Harry’s Dueling Pianos. Bellevue. 412-522-7556.

SAT 07

WORLD

PHIPPS GARDEN CENTER. Steven Sciulli Shakuhachi Transmission. Shadyside. 412-956-2482.

THU 05

CASA RASTA. Gena y Pena, Miguel Cha. Beechview. 412-344-4700.

SUN 08

SAT 07

FRI 06 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Christopher Mark Jones. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1811. FOUR DIRECTIONS CENTER. George Balderose, Richard Hughs. Gibsonia. 412-403-1146. HAMBONE’S. Jeremy Caywood & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. RIVERS CASINO. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 07

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

TUE 10

CLUB CAFE. James McMurtry. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 11 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE

N E W S

BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Grand Bon Rien. West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

TUE 10

PITTSBURGH WINERY. Andy Irvine, Mark Dignam. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

MON 09

REGGAE FRI 06

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY FRI 06

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

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TA S T E

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Saltworks Young Actor Studio, Cobalt String Quartet, Amiche Artist. Oakland. 412-622-3151. HAMBONE’S. Steel City Ukulele Group Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PHIPPS GARDEN CENTER. Steven Sciulli Shakuhachi Transmission. Shadyside. 412-956-2482.

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DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Dollar Bank Stage. Part of the TRAF. Downtown.

WED 11

THE CHADWICK. Latshaw Pops Orchestra: Dancing In The Street. Wexford. 724-853-4050. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

June 4 - 10 WEDNESDAY 41

FRIDAY 63

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through June 7.

Tyler, the Creator

THURSDAY 52

The Naked and Famous STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Menzingers ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Lemuria, PUP & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Cory Henry Trio THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guests Ingrid Laubrock & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

CRAIG SHOEMAKER SUNDAY, JUNE 8 PITTSBURGH IMPROV

Comedian Dwayne Gill

SATURDAY 74

Craig Shoemaker IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

Pittsburgh Power vs. New Orleans VooDoo CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000. 5p.m.

MONDAY 96 Skinny Lister

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guests River Daughters & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Chicago The Musical

Tim McGraw: Sundown Heaven Tour

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org or 724-836-8000. Through June 8.

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Scarlet & The Harlots Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

POINT STATE PARK, CULTURAL DISTRICT & GATEWAY CENTER Downtown. Free event. Through June 15.

SUNDAY 85

Lily Wine Affair HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

TUESDAY 10 Dr. Dog

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Screeching Weasel

Polica

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests The Manges & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-44447. With special guests Reputante. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To ďŹ nd the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Oksana 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

Olive

Olivia

Facebook.com/GordonShoes


LOCKE IS A GIMMICK — A ONE-MAN SHOW — BUT IT’S ONE THAT WORKS

MISS UNDERSTOOD {BY AL HOFF} The best thing about Robert Stromberg’s Maleficent, a re-telling of Disney’s 1959 Sleeping Beauty from the point of view of its titular villainess, is Angelina Jolie’s seriously fierce drag. As Maleficent, Jolie sports: contacts that make her eyes look like gemstones; blood red lips; razor-sharp cheekbones; a figure-flattering, furtrimmed cape; and a sleek skull cap out of which curl gleaming ebony horns. It’s over: Everybody else in this film might as well wear a burlap sack.

I’m not so bad: Angelina Jolie

Jolie is fabulously watchable, but the story is a bit of a muddle. It can’t decide between dark and Disney, and the tale of the princess cursed into slumber has been re-edited into meaninglessness. The young Aurora (Elle Fanning) and Maleficent become besties, and the bad guy — Aurora’s dad (portrayed by Sharlto Copley) — is disappointingly one-note. Even the Fresh Prince, enlisted to kiss the sleeping beauty, seems to have wandered in from a boy-band video. The CGI worlds look pretty, if a bit familiar. (Stromberg, who won an Oscar for art direction on Avatar, clearly hit James Cameron’s garage sale: “Get that deep verdant valley, and I’ll throw in the rainbow-hued fireflies.”) I suspect this movie would have been better if it had embraced the dark subversion it promised, rather than add the “heartwarming.” Everything is sorted out by one “who was both hero and villain.” How convenient. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FILM KITCHEN CONTEST

See the finalists of this year’s

Film Kitchen short-film contest.

The theme for 2014 was “front porches.” Prize-winners will be announced. 7 p.m. reception; 8 p.m. screening. Tue., June 10. Harris, Downtown. $8

Not quite in the driver’s seat: Tom Hardy as Locke

{BY AL HOFF}

I

N STEVEN KNIGHT’S drama Locke, a man named Ivan Locke (Tom Hardy) leaves a construction site, gets in his BMW and drives into the night. He sets his mobile phone into the handsfree console, and makes and takes calls throughout the journey. It’s clear from his first calls that he is not going home as previously planned, but instead to London for an unexpected personal reason. Also, he will not be at his job the next morning to supervise the critical pouring of a concrete foundation, and the necessary tasks preceding this operation must be delegated en route. Locke unfolds in real time during the drive from Birmingham to London, and only Hardy appears in the film. Yes, it is a gimmick — a one-man show set in the tiny space of a car seat — but it works. It’s a character study that doesn’t need anything more than a proficient actor to sell it. Oh, and perhaps a heavily underlined ongoing metaphor about concrete and its role in providing a secure foundation. “You make one mistake and the whole

world comes crashing down around you,” Locke explains. As in concrete, so in life. But despite its highly constrained setting, Knight finds a surprising amount of space around Locke. There are the disembodied voices with whom he speaks, who color in Locke’s personal and professional

LOCKE

DIRECTED BY: Steven Knight STARRING: Tom Hardy AMC Loews

CP APPROVED life while revealing a bit about themselves: the tentative voice of his young son who knows something is wrong, or the breezy attitude with which one of his underlings normally approaches his work. Knight also keeps his camera very fluid, capturing Locke from several angles and in mirrors, and returning to totems of the outside world: the cellphone console, and the familiar but in-

distinct scenes of a nighttime highway (cars, signs, lights, barely glimpsed landmarks whizzing by). Even the oft-shot GPS screen functions as a visual metaphor, its two parallel lines of motorway converging into darkness with no depicted destination. Between juggling personal and professional calls, Locke also argues out loud with his dead father, whom he imagines sitting in the back seat. All these conversations are illuminating, both to advance the narrative and reveal the man. But some of the film’s most dramatic moments simply feature Locke driving in silence, disconnected from the outside world with its comforting tasks, feints and distractions. He is simply alone, with his failings laid bare, and Hardy makes it chilling. If I had to provide an example of “a dull way to spend 90 minutes,” driving down the M1 at night with a troubled conc rete engineer would certainly qualify. But Locke and Tom Hardy have proven me wrong. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

Repo Man (1984)

NEW

(2006) 6/5 @ 7:30pm, 6/6 @ 9:30pm, 6/8 @ 2pm

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. Josh Boone directs this adaptation of John Green’s bestselling young-adult novel about two teens with cancer who strike up a relationship. Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort star. Filmed partially in Pittsburgh. Starts Fri., June 6.

----------------------------------------Inland Empire ----------------------------------------Rocky Horror Picture Show ----------------------------------------The Big Lebowski ----------------------------------------Survival Knife

6/4 @ 7:30, 6/6 @ 7:30pm, 6/7 @ 7&9:30pm

- 6/7 @ Midnight

(1998) 6/8 @ 7pm - Guest programmer Kevin Sousa’s pick! (2014) - 6/9 @ 7pm A return to the true horror genre, Survival Knife is a unique, inventive approach to the typical slasher film.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

FOR NO GOOD REASON. British illustrator, political cartoonist and provocateur Ralph Steadman seems like an interesting guy. His artistic career is in its fifth decade, and he seems to have achieved his goal of using his provocative drawings “as a weapon, [that] people would see and think about,” and made a good living doing so. I say “seems,” because Charlie Paul’s documentary about Steadman is less about traditional biographical data than about just hanging out with the loquacious artist. The film takes us through some highlights of Steadman’s career, most of which seem to include lowlights with frequent collaborator Hunter S. Thompson; they first worked together on Thompson’s 1970 piece about the Kentucky Derby, which kickstarted “gonzo” journalism. Steadman also spends time demonstrating his artistic process — from ink splat to finished portrait — which is pretty fascinating. It’s essential stuff, if you’re a fan of Steadman’s work, but not very helpful as a primer to newcomers.

Antonio Gaudi at Art on Film Series the town’s newest resident (Charlize Theron). There’s a germ of a good idea in debunking the romanticism of the Old West, but pairing toilet humor with gorgeous B-roll of Monument Valley isn’t very illuminating. MacFarlane’s smug delivery fails to engage, even as he’s trying to sell a heartwarming love story (really!) while having a sheep piss on his face. (AH)

REPERTORY INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE. In this 1989 adventure thriller, Indiana Jones is in Europe, in search of the Holy Grail. Can he find it before the Nazis do? Harrison Ford and Sean Connery star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 4. AMC Loews REPO MAN. Sometimes it takes an outsider to lay bare the everyday madness we take for granted. Such was the case with Alex Cox, a punkish young Brit, who made this sci-fi, punk-rock, protoslacker deadpan 1984 comedy about Los Angeles, which riffs on everything from Scientology and public transportation to hippie parents and crimes-for-sushi. Starring Emilio Estevez and Harry Dean Stanton, music from an assortment of SoCal punk bands and way too many Little Tree air fresheners. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 4; 7:30 p.m. Fri., June 6; and 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., June 7. Hollywood (AH)

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INLAND EMPIRE. David Lynch has spent much of his career cultivating a serious obsession with not only the dark side of Hollywood but also the very machinery of filmmaking. In this 2006 film, a threehour pomo paranormal noir thriller, Lynch peels back new layers of shadow inside the little boxes where dreams flourish like bacilli. Laura Dern portrays Nikki Grace, a Hollwood actress, seeking a role in an Oscarbaiting romance. Lynch does have a way of keeping us fruitfully off balance and ill at ease: A dream narrative is powered by undertows, and subtexts metastasize like undiagnosed cancers. N ikki seems both a person and a poltergeist who haunts her. Cinema, Lynch suggests, is an engine that consumes real lives to fuel fake ones. And whatever else it might be, Inland Empire is a harrowing rumination on the quicksand of media make-believe. Not because Lynch delivers that familiar news, but because he makes us feel it. The film concludes a series of Lynch films. 7:30 p.m. Thu., June 5; 9:30 p.m. Fri., June 6; and 2 p.m. Sun., June 8. Hollywood (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

For No Good Reason We’re joined in Steadman’s studio by Johnny Depp, whose presence is never explained. Depp did star in the 1998 film version of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, the Thompson gonzo classic that also featured Steadman’s illustrations. Perhaps this is why they’re friends. In any case, Depp does open the film with an epic humblebrag: “I haven’t seen Ralph since the signing of Hunter’s memorial poster.” Starts Fri., June 6. Regent Square (Al Hoff) A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST. If you have an unlimited capacity for played-out jokes about poop and sex acts (there’s a BJ gag in the first scene), witless send-ups of stereotypes and Western-film tropes, and Seth MacFarlane’s “acting,” then you may enjoy this overly long trip to Old Stump, Old West. Everybody else may simply be thinking of a million other things they’d rather be doing. MacFarlane, who also directs, stars as a sheep rancher who hates living on the frontier, and winds up in a duel, after being coached by

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CINEMA IN THE PARK. Now You See Me, Sat., June 7 (Riverview). Here Come the Boom, Sat., June 7 (Grandview) and Sun., June 8 (Schenley). Man of Steel, Wed., June 11 (Schenley). The Little Mermaid, Tue., June 10 (West End/Elliott Overlook) and Thu., June 12 (Brookline). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free


A Million Ways To Die in the West ART ON FILM SERIES. In conjunction with the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh Filmmakers is screening eight documentary films about art and art-making. Cutie and the Boxer: Oscar-nominated recent doc about “boxing” painter Ushio Shinohara and his artist wife, Noriko (7:30 Fri., June 6; 8 p.m. Mon., June 9; and 8:15 p.m. Thu., June 12). “Margo Lovelace and the Magic of Puppetry” and “Thaddeus Mosley: Sculptor”: two short films from local filmmaker Ken Love about two local legends (3 p.m. Sat., June 7; 2 p.m. Sun., June 8; and 4:15 p.m. Sat., June 14). Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation: Relive the early 1960s folk scene with participating singers, authors and performers (4:30 p.m. Sat., June 7, and 8:45 p.m. Fri., June 13). Open City of Amereida: local filmmaker Andres Tapia-Urzua’s profile of a radical and long-running architectural project/community in Chile (6:45 p.m. Sat., June 6; 3:15 p.m. Sun., June 8; 6:30 p.m. Wed., June 11; and 3 p.m. Sat., June 14). Sign Painters: This recent doc explores the history of advertising sign-painting by hand, and catches up with a few living practitioners (8 p.m. Sat., June 7, and 6:30 p.m. Thu., June 12). Indie Game: The Movie: Just how hard is it to develop and market a successful video game? (4:30 p.m. Sun., June 8, and 7:30 p.m. Sat., June 14). In No Great Hurry: 13 Lessons in Life With Saul Leiter: a look at the career of the street photographer, filmed shortly before his death last year (6:30 p.m. Mon., June 9, and 5:45 p.m. Sat., June 14). Antonio Gaudi: The work of famed Barcelona architect Antonio Gaudí is documented in Hiroshi Teshigahara Teshigahara’ss unconventional 1984 film (7:45 p.m. Wed., June 11, and 7:15 p.m. Fri., June 13). All films screen at Harris. Free

Now You See Me at Cinema in the Park

STAND BY ME. Rob Reiner directs this coming-ofage dramedy about four boys who go in search of a dead body. Adapted from a Stephen King novella, the 1986 film stars Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O’Connell. Screens as part of the Moonlit Matinee series. 10 p.m. Fri., June 6, and 10 p.m. Sat., June 7. Oaks THE BIG LEBOWSKI. In the Coen brothers’ 1998 comic homage to Raymond Chandler, a bloated hippie, Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges), gets mixed up with dirty rugs, kidnap and ransom; another guy called Jeff Lebowski; and a couple of intense bowling games. Also starring a full slate of indie faves including John Turturro, Steve Buscemi and John Goodman. Film was picked by guest curator and local chef Kevin Sousa; White Russians will be available. 7 p.m. Sun., June 8. Hollywood THE MISFITS. John Huston’s 1962 work is one depressing movie, inside and out, even as it’s billed as comedy-drama. The story, written by Arthur Miller, follows a group of lost, lonely and brokendown souls, banging around the Western desert. Plus, wild horses being rounded up and killed. In real life, this was the last on-screen performance by stars Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe (who was also divorcing Miller at the time), and another sad chapter in the trainwreck that was co-star Montgomery Clift’s life. Regardless, it’s a fine movie, with some good performances and a downbeat, cynical vibe that would be trendy in a d decade. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-n Sunday-night series of movies with connections to the TV sh show Mad Men. 8 p.m. Sun., June 8. Regent Square (A (AH)

CP

Live shadowcast by The Junior Chamber of Commerce Players

You can feel it. A connection to something that’s bigger than

SURVIVAL KNIFE. In this modern slasher flick, directed by Michael McKown, McK a young woman who survived an attack by a sserial killer finds the trauma unleashing some darknes darkness within her. This new movie was filmed in the Pittsburgh Pittsbu area. 7 p.m. Mon., June 9. Hollywood. $5

you are. It’s a lifestyle, it’s art, it’s a way of thinking and seeing your community. And of course, it’s music. You listen at home, at work, in the car, and you may even support

THE BLACK GESTAPO. GESTAP In Lee Frost’s 1975 blaxploitation flick, some brothers form a “people’s army” to fight back against aga the mob in the Watts section of Los Angeles. But after victory, the army evolves into a fascist en entity, N azi uniforms and all. 7:30 p.m. Wed., June 11. Hollywood

us (thank you if you do). We’re WYEP.

Celebrating 40 Years of Music, Arts

THE GODFATHER. Catch one of the most enduring and influe influential American films of the late 20th century on tthe big screen, where Francis mult Ford Coppola’s multi-generational 1972 drama, about a mafia fami family and the perversion of the w large, belongs. 7:30 p.m. American Dream writ AM Loews. $5 Wed., June 11. AMC ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with admissio Andy Warhol Museum, museum admission. www.w North Side. www.warhol.org

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STAGE]

FLYING BLIND {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Most people spend their lives striving for certainty. Not so with artists, says Jeffrey Carpenter, artistic director of Bricolage Productions. Asked by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust to produce an immersive theater work for the Three Rivers Arts Festival, the adventuresome troupe created OJO, a show meant to suggest the artist’s metaphorical journey of creation. As an artist, “You have more questions than answers,” says Carpenter. “How do we get someone to that space of the unknown?” With OJO, Bricolage built on the critical and popular success of 2012’s STRATA, which took audiences on a choose-your-own-adventure trip through a mocked-up (and vaguely menacing) corporate self-improvement experience that ranged throughout a large Downtown building. This time, the “business” is an old-school travel agency housed Downtown, in a Liberty Avenue storefront where eight participants at a time gather. They then embark on a series of encounters with various “agents,” a journey devised by Carpenter and Bricolage’s Tami Dixon along with STRATA co-conspirators Gab Cody and Sam Turich. Carpenter won’t reveal too many details about OJO (which was developed with a grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation). But he says one big twist is that — in a show whose title is Spanish for “eye” — viewers will be blindfolded for “a good portion” of the 80-minute experience. Guided by the agents, sightless viewers will “travel” indoors and out, traversing soundscapes suggesting different environments. The senses of touch and smell will also be stimulated. Why blindfolds? “The whole artistic process is going into the dark and emerging with something new,” says Carpenter. OJO “reveals itself as it goes along. You don’t get the full picture until the end.” Carpenter cautions that OJO isn’t for the claustrophobic, or for those afraid of the dark. But while “there’s going to be moments of surprise in it ... it’s not designed to scare the wits out of you.” In fact, thanks to its size-limited audience, the show is already sold out. However, Bricolage plans a “standby” option, for viewers without tickets who come to the venue at one of the showtimes. And Carpenter says OJO, with its minimal staging, could be revived “really easily.” “The whole idea is it will alter your perspective,” he says. “It will change your way of looking at the world.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OJO Sat., June 7-15. 820 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. The show is sold out; for “standby” option, see www.bricolagepgh.org.

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“THEY WISH WE COULD GO BACK TO AN UN-INTERROGATED WHITE-SUPREMACIST CULTURE.”

[BOOKS]

REDNECKED — AND WHITE — ALL OVER

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

S

TRUGGLING FOR a subject for his dissertation in English literature, Matthew Ferrence found an unlikely inspiration: Larry the Cable Guy. A neighbor in Morgantown invited Ferrence, a Ph.D. candidate at West Virginia University, to watch the sleeveless comedian’s routine on DVD. Finding it “racist,” “sexist” and “problematically bad,” Ferrence set out to explore why the good ol’ boy attitude appealed to people like his neighbor. Now an assistant professor at Allegheny College, he’s expanded his dissertation into a book, All-American Redneck: Variations on an Icon, from James Fenimore Cooper to the Dixie Chicks (University of Tennessee Press). “Redneck identity functions as the one and true way to separate citizenry and, more sinisterly, guarantee that America is preserved for the normative white, hetero, masculine baseline that has been synonymous with

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HARMONY MOTTER}

Sticking his neck out: author Matthew Ferrence

Redneck,” Ferrence writes. “In this movement, the Redneck becomes a tool for a broader conservative America, a shifting of the identity from outcast to renegade to mainstream totem.” SOME OF THIS BOOK COMES FROM YOUR OWN BACKGROUND: YOU GREW UP IN INDIANA, PA., AS THE SON OF A COLLEGE PROFESSOR. WAS IT HARD TO BE BRAINY THERE? What can be hard is to convey that combination of being brainy and rural. I had the advantage that when I was 6, my father bought a farm outside of town. He had grown up on a working farm and had always wanted to have a farm. So we actually had an active farm when he was a professor and all our neighbors were rural people, so we were able to be in both those worlds. But there is a perceived conflict between those worlds, which is the image I write about in the book: You can only be one way if you are going to be down home.


YOU WRITE THAT YOU’VE TAKEN SOME SNARK IN ACADEMIA FOR STUDYING REDNECKS. COLLEGES HAVE SHIFTED FROM TEACHING CLASSICAL DEAD WHITE GUYS TO ALSO TEACHING BLACK AND HISPANIC CULTURES. IS WHITE, RURAL CULTURE THE LAST FRONTIER? When I say I researched rednecks at WVU, [peers] would say, “Oh, that’s perfect” … and when I talk about “redneck literature,” people always say, “Isn’t that an oxymoron?” On the other hand, I think the identity politics of the redneck, that sense of rural pride, are being used to get back to the old dead white guys in a way. There is an anxiety in people who want to maintain the way it was. They wish we could go back to an uninterrogated white-supremacist culture. I don’t mean that in a KKK sort of way, but in a way where our culture used to support whiteness above all else. In talking about the downtrodden redneck, you can reinvigorate support for the attitude that used to be canon.

WAS THERE A POINT WHERE OUR IMAGE OF RURAL PEOPLE BECAME SO REDUCTIONIST? You can even look back to Natty Bumppo, the frontiersman of James Fenimore Cooper. I’m arguing he was doing the same work as “the redneck.” He was creating a narrative that was useful for those in power, about how the frontiersman was noble and should have the land that once belonged to the British and the Native Americans. As we move into the late 19th century, we start to see clearer attempts to manipulate the image of rural people for particular ends. … The image of a hillbilly, or someone living in Appalachia, changed [depending] upon what those in power wanted from the region. They were seen as pure Americans out there when we hoped for progress. Then we found out there was coal out to be had, and they became dangerous degenerates in the way. They were cast as needing religion when churches wanted to expand into those regions. Because there is no power in the rural poor, their image has been used however it is needed to be used. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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CATCHING UP {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Erin Foley’s comedy career is going pretty well. She’s performed on stages across the country, appeared in movies and TV shows, has her own sports podcast — Sports Without Balls — and last year made her debut on the Conan O’Brien show. But the 35-year-old comic has a bigger dream — one she recently discussed with City Paper in advance of her upcoming performance during Pittsburgh Pride. IS THIS YOUR FIRST TRIP TO PITTSBURGH? I actually did Cruze bar last year. It was super-fun and this year it seems like it’s going to be even more out of control, so I’m going to start sleeping now. It’s part of gay pride, so I think it’s going to be ridiculous.

Erin Foley

ARE REDNECKS TOOLS? I wouldn’t call any individual person a tool, but I think you can use their attitude to leverage power, and you saw that in the first Obama election. He made some comments about people “clinging to guns and religion.” There are reasons to not like those comments, but they were used by people — the GOP — to say, “Look how out of touch this guy is,” when they had no agenda of improving conditions for the people being discussed. In fact, poverty is important [to perpetuate] when you are trying to consolidate power.

[COMEDY]

HOW HAVE YOU SEEN PRIDE EVENTS CHANGE OVER THE YEARS? [Pride has] gotten bigger and there seems to be more booze involved. It’s definitely not my scene anymore, not that I’m 80. But when I was in my 20s and trying to figure out whether I was gay, Pride was like “Oh, my God! What is this, this is the greatest thing on Earth.” But now, you know, I’m good. I’m gay enough. HOW DID YOU GET INTO COMEDY? I joined an improv troupe and we were performing at a comedy club at 6:30 while everyone around us was eating dinner — you know, because it was really good improv — and I’d stick around and start watching the standup comedians and I fell in love with it. I READ THAT YOUR CHILDHOOD DREAM WAS TO PLAY WIDE RECEIVER FOR THE NEW YORK GIANTS. WHEN DID YOU REALIZE THAT DREAM WAS NOT GOING TO COME TRUE? I’m actually still holding onto that dream. I feel like another bad season and I’m in there. But seriously, I’d say pretty early on when I noticed, “Hey, why are there are no ladies playing out there?” WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU? People always ask me, “Erin, what are your career goals?” and I always say to play catch with Derek Jeter and run down the field and have Eli Manning hit me with a pass. Those are my comedy goals because I feel like if I keep getting funnier they won’t be able to ignore me and I can make that happen. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ILAUGH PRIDE EDITION featuring ERIN FOLEY 7:30 p.m. Fri., June 6. Cruze Bar, 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $2025. 412-471-1400 or www.cruzebar.com

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bad … or really, really bad. The show’s cast, four men and one woman, sing Johnny’s songs and aren’t supposed to imitate him. But they often do. Performer Nicole Stefonek also imitates Cash’s wife, June Carter — a tough stretch since Stefonek looks too much like a young, carrot-topped Bette Midler and sings in a high frilly voice. The show was created by Richard Maltby Jr. and conceived by William Meade. But it covers ground that anyone familiar with even a cursory biography of Cash will already know: He was raised poor; his 14-year-old brother, Jack, died in a freak accident; he was a drug addict because he thought the red, orange, green and black pills made him a better performer; and he fell in love with June at first sight at the Grand Ole Opry. Writing in the show’s program, Van Kaplan, the CLO’s executive producer, cashes in and spends his first three lengthy paragraphs on Cash’s career ... facts and quotes that should be in the show, not on a page no one reads. (Except me.) Maltby and Meade knew the show was in trouble; it was a hit in Buffalo but a bomb on Broadway, and was renamed several times. So much work was done that

Kaplan admits, “Maltby Jr. and Meade continued to make a great idea greater.” Director and choreographer Guy Stroman gives the show little fluidity between the awkward blackouts; any creative moves are impossible on Tony Ferrieri’s stage, which is as big as two Johnny Cash postage stamps issued last year.

RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH

Waiting for Godot By Samuel Beckett Directed by Aoife Spillane-Hinks

June 5–21

continues through Aug. 17. Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $39.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

What the hell is going on here? Where are the spark and soul and rousing energy? The good news: The men — Jay Hitt, Paul Koudouris, Mitch Marois, Jon Rohlf — have great voices, especially Hitt, long a popular local acoustic performer. Cash’s mother once told him that overcoming adversity means putting faith in the Lord. I agree. I also have decided that if I am ever forced to waste two hours on such nonsense again, I will become a boy named Sue who heads to Actors Equity to sue.

4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland Waiting was never so funny!

DISCOUNT CODE: CP5OFF

picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

What do you see in this picture? Become part of a lively, unprecedented online conversation about the use, influence, and meaning of photography. Join in and let us know how this picture moves you!

nowseethis.org Charles Jourdan, 1970. Estate of Guy Bourdin. Used by permission.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

06.0506.12.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Art by Ashley Jean Hickey

{STAGE}

JUNE 07 With the Grain

+ THU., JUNE 05 {STAGE}

Months ago, when they were creating their 2014 program, Pittsburgh Pride de Theater Festival organizers nizers couldn’t have known how big marriage equality ality would be in Pennsylvania ia this June. But coincidentally, y, says artistic director Judy Meiksin, the fest’s four new LGBT T one-acts by local playwrights ghts are all about love. “Shaving g the Beard” is Nik Nemec’ss coming-out comedy; Staci Backauskas’ “Mercy” depicts cts a woman visiting her ex x in prison; Keith Foster’s “(Un) packing” explores ores the possibility of love between two friends; and “Nightingale” gale” is Carol Mullen’s n’s outer-space farce. arce. Two of the plays ays are directed by festival stival co-organizer (and CP theater critic) tic) Ted Hoover. The first irst of six performances ces at Pittsburgh Playwrights aywrights Theatre Co. is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll lll 8 p.m. Continues through rough Fri.,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

fantastical 1928 novel Orlando. The story’s titular poet spends the first half of his 350-year life as a man and the second as a woman. The script was penned by MacArthur genius-grant recipient Sarah Ruhl (The Clean House, Dead Man’s Cell Phone); the Unseam’d cast includes Amy Landis as Orlando (pictured, with Andy Kirtland). Dan Willis 8 p.m. Continues through June 21. Henry Heymann Theater, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-30. 412-612-0244 or www.unseamd.com

June 13. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. 412-256-8109

{STAGE}

Unseam’d Shakespeare Company continues Co pa y co t ues to reinvent classic works with its latest production, a new adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s

Irish actor and playwright Alan Stanford’s introduction to Pittsburgh was by way of playing Pozzo in the Gate Theatre Dublin’s acclaimed, long-running touring production of Waiting for Godot. Stanford later moved to Pittsburgh and now runs PICT Classic Theatre. And he’s again ready for Pozzo, as PICT stages Beckett’s touchstone depiction of existential comedy and despair. Aoife SpillaneHicks directs a cast that also includes PICT favorites Martin Giles, James FitzGerald and Ken Bolden. The first evening performance is tonight. BO Charity Randall Theatre, 8 p.m. Charit Foster Memorial, Stephen Fost 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-48. 412-561-6000 or 412 www.picttheatre.org www.pictt

FRI., JUNE 06 + FRI {PRIDE}

JUNE 06 Pittsburgh Pride

Pittsburgh P Pride ramps up. In next weekend’s big advance of n Pride in the SStreets bash, the annual LGBT LG celebration — now with marriage equality equal — features a series of talks, parties and performances. p Highlights include Highli tonight’s tonigh TransPride Regional Regio Showcase, at Cattivo Catt dance club, and Sat., Sa June 7’s Youth Pride Prom, at The Andy P Warhol Warho Museum. On Sun., June Ju 8, there’s the day-long Race day to Equality Equa Spin Cycle


Free!Event

International art and, well, air are emergent themes at this year’s Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. The free, 10-day Pittsburgh Cultural Trust event fills Point State Park and much of Downtown with visual art, live music and performances of all kinds (not forgetting the Artist Market or the vast array of snack booths). The international art taps folks like Cuban-born Alexandre Arrechea — whose playful, large-scale transformations of iconic Manhattan buildings will dot the landscape — and Candy Chang, whose interactive “Before I Die” walls have appeared in 65 countries. As for air, visit 709 Penn Gallery for Detroit-based Susan Goethel Campbell’s Portraits of Air, displaying the 100 small, spun-glass air filters that were distributed at last year’s fest for placement throughout the region. Then there’s Pneumatica, wacky-yet-venerable troupe Squonk Opera’s new show “made of air, powered by air, and about air,” including live music and inflatable props like 40-foot tall “Lady Pneumatica.” Elsewhere, at 6 p.m. each night, at a different location, Pittsburgh’s inaugural Complaints ’n At Choir performs an original song compiling complaints gathered from locals. Bricolage Productions has interactive theater work OJO (see page 42). Don’t forget the Juried Visual Art Exhibition, with work by 50 local artists. And the live music offerings are previewed in CP’s music section (page 28). Bill O’Driscoll Fri., June 6-15. Downtown. Free. Complete program at www.3riversartsfestival.com

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT C.T. STEELE}

fundraiser for the Delta Foundation, on Ellsworth Avenue, followed by that evening’s Equality on Ellsworth party. The latter (suggested donation: $10) features nationally known pop singer Charice (pictured). BO Complete Pride schedule at www.pittsburghpride.org

{PARTY}

This fall, the building housing the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater turns 100. And the KST itself just received a $1 million Heinz Endowments grant. So there’s plenty to celebrate at Full Bloom, the theater’s annual summer dance party that doubles as a fundraiser for its summer programming. The party includes food, drink, tunes by DJ Vex and J. Malls, and an outdoor VIP performance by dancer and vocalist Vie Boheme. BO VIP reception: 7-9 p.m. ($125, includes dance party). Dance party: 9 p.m.-midnight ($35-45). 412-363-3000 or fullbloom@ kelly-strayhorn.org

JUNE 05 Orlando

{ART}

B-Tree. BO 7 p.m. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5. Pittsburgh HipHopCollective@gmail.com

{STAGE}

Tony Kushner’s epic, twopart Angels in America ranks

{WORDS}

“What’s a young JUNE 11 boy to do when he Charlie doesn’t want to do Lovett wrong but there’s a lock on the right door?” asks Black Ice in his “Imagine.” “When he has the heart of a soldier, the aggression of a prizefighter, but no one’s taught him what to fight for?” The veteran Philadelphia-based spoken-word artist — the first among the most important poet signed to Def Jam American plays of the past Records — headlines Word = half-century. The latest Life. This Pittsburgh Hip Hop Pittsburgh troupe to tackle Collective event at the Alloy this Pulitzer-winner set in the Studios, hosted by Jasiri X, also Reagan era, at the height of features local spoken-word the AIDS crisis, is compact but stars Vanessa German and accomplished Throughline

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Theatre Company. Kushner’s “Gay Fantasia on National Themes” depicts characters ranging from a closeted Mormon lawyer to Republican attack dog Roy Cohn, a drag queen named Belize … and yes, an angel. Part 1,, Millennium Approaches, ss, opens tonight, and is performed ed three times; Part 2, Perestroika, stroika, gets three performances ces starting June 12. BO 8 p.m. Continues through June 14. 3595 Butler ler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15 2-15 (add $10 for opening ning night, with reception). tion). www.throughline e theatre.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUPERIEUR PHOTOGRAPHICS}

The Penn Avenue Arts District offers this month’s Unblurred. Among the gallery crawl’s 20 venues are: Image Box, opening Eastern Standard: A Time Exhibition (featuring clocks and other time-based art); The Irma Freeman Center, with Blind Intersections: Another Series of False Leads, a group show curated by underground music vet Tee Glitter; and Pulse, with Abbie Miller’s The Euclid Avenue Project, in which she draws every house on that East End street’s 11 blocks. BO Times vary by venue. 4100-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/ Friendship. Most events are free. 412-441-6950 or www.pennavenue.org

alongside pieces by Brahms and Beethoven, a contemporary piece featuring the talents of concertmaster and violinist Noah Bendix-Balgley premieres: James McMillan’s biblically inspired Woman of the Apocalypse. DW 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., June 7, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., June 9. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25.75-105.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburgh symphony.org

Looking for an art exhibition that’s a little more down-toearth? Pennsylvania native Ashley Jean Hickey y is opening With the Grain, at the Gallery 4 tonight. The show displays her “moss paintings,” in which preserved moss, lichens and wood are the medium. The exhibit features both new and old works, including some that helped her win RAW Pittsburgh’s Visual Artist of the Year award.

JUNE 06

{MUSIC}

Black Ice

Pittsburgh Symphony y Orchestra welcomes former music director Manfred Honeck back for a weekend of monumental Romantic pieces and a Pittsburgh premiere. Friday and Sunday, he conducts Gustav Mahler’s profound and haunting Ninth Symphony. And on Saturday,

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The free opening reception includes complimentary refreshments and hors d’oeuvres. DW 7 p.m. Continues through June 28. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us

+ SUN., JUNE 08 {FESTIVAL}

The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh hosts its 14th annual Summer Reading Extravaganza at the main branch, in Oakland. Today, children and adults can browse the book sale, attend readings and workshops, and catch free performances by the Cobalt String Quartet, Pittsburgh Puppet Works, Brazilian drum ensemble Timbeleza, and many more. The library’s new 3-D printer will also be demonstrated. The full schedule is on the library’s website. DW Noon-5 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3144 or www.carnegielibrary.org

+ WED., JUNE 11 {WORDS}

Rare-book collector and prominent children’s playwright Charlie Lovett visits Sewickley’s Penguin Bookshop tonight to discuss his debut novel, The Bookman’s Tale. The literary thriller winds its centuries-wide web of intrigue and murder around a shy, lowly bookseller who discovers long-lost proof of Shakespeare’s true identity. According to USA Today, “Lovett tells his story with ease, charm, and a faith in his characters.” The author’s talk is followed by a Q&A session and a book signing. DW 7 p.m. 417 Beaver St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-3838 or www. penguinbookshop.com

C L A S S I F I E D S

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL. Presented

PITTSBURGH WINERY LIVE IN THE CELLAR

June 5 June 10 June 14 June 21

June 22 June 27 July 3 July 10 July 11 July 12

July 17 July 18 July 25 July 26

The Black Lillies with special guests Arlo Aldo Andy Irvine with special guest Mark Dignam Melinda CD Release Party SONGWRITERS IN THE CELLAR Hosted by Tim Mulhern with: Mike Marks, Chris Lohr, and TJ Isenberg Heather Kropf - Album release with guest Paul Tabachneck Doors open at 6PM Showtime at 7PM Drymill Road, with special guest Gary Antol Holy Ghost Tent Revival Yarn with special guests Some Kind of Animal Jimmer Podrasky with special guests The Optimists 2 Shows - 7PM and 10PM SONGWRITERS IN THE CELLAR Hosted by Ben Shannon with: Kelly Zullo, Paul Luc, and Carolyn Perteet Feufollet “Frenchmen on Penn” series Nameless in August - CD Release Party River Whyless livemusic, great wine The Farewell Drifters

Doors at 8PM, Show at 9PM unless otherwise noted | 21+

2815 PENN AVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15222

by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 8. Grand Theatre. 412-628-1032. ANGELS IN AMERICA, PART 1: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES. Tony Kushner’s award-winning play about the AIDS epidemic in the 80s. Presented by Throughline Theatre. Fri., June 6, 8 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru June 14. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. AVENUE Q. Adult-themed spoof on Sesame Street. Presented by Split Stage Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 14. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 1-888-718-4253. BROADWAY SHOW STOPPERS. Songs from Chicago, Phantom of the Opera, South Pacific, more. Presented by Pohl Productions. June 6-7, 6:30 p.m. and Sat, 6:30 p.m. Thru June 21. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178.

CHICAGO THE MUSICAL. The classic show about crime in Prohibition-era Chicago. Sat., June 7, 8 p.m. and Sun., June 8, 2 & 7 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR. Presented by Poor Yorick’s Players. Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 8. Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705. MOONLIGHT & MAGNOLIAS. A Hollywood farce. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 8. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. NOISES OFF. A play-within-aplay about a troupe of middling British actors rehearsing & performing a comedy. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru June 24. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. OJO. Immersive theater experience. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. June 7-15. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES COMEDY P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

ORLANDO. Adaptation of Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Virginia Woolf’s novel. Presented Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. by Unseam’d Shakespeare Co. RUN FOR YOUR WIFE. Comedy Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 4 p.m. and by Ray Cooney about a cab driver Sat., June 21, 3 & 8 p.m. Thru who juggles two wives until he June 15. Henry Heymann Theatre, ends up in the hospital. Fri, Sat, Oakland. 412-621-0244. 7:30 p.m. Thru June 14. Comtra A PIECE OF CAKE. When Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. Penelope Hart is suddenly let SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN. Sat, go from her job, she decides to 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and pursue her dream of opening Thru June 6, 8 p.m. Thru a cake shop. But she soon June 8. Benedum discovers that starting Center, Downtown. her own business is 412-456-6666. anything but a piece TOO MANY COOKS. of cake! Thu-Sat, www. per Irving Bubbalowe & his pa 7:30 p.m. and Sun, pghcitym daughter have risked .co 2 p.m. Thru June 15. everything to open a South Park Theatre, gourmet restaurant. When Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. their singing chef fails to appear, PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER the grand opening becomes FESTIVAL. An evening of outrageously hysterical. Thu-Sat, 4 new one-act LGBT plays. 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat., June 7, June 8. Apple Hill Playhouse. 4 & 8 p.m. Thru June 13. 724-468-5050. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, WHEN WE ARE MARRIED. Downtown. 412-256-8109. On an evening in 1908 when 3 RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC upstanding couples gather to OF JOHNNY CASH. Tribute to celebrate their 25 years of wedded Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., “bliss,” a secret is revealed that hilariously upends the party: none of them are legally married. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 7. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

THU 05

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. STEEL CITY COMEDY TOUR. 8 p.m. Paradise Beach, Neville Island. 412-264-6570. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 06 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. ILAUGH PRIDE EDITION: ERIN FOLEY. 7:30 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 614-886-6550. THE LIVE SHOW W/ AARON KLEIBER. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014


Mullaneys’

“Câlin,” by Nugent Kos, from Savage Elements, at Revision Space, in Lawrenceville

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK

709 PENN GALLERY. Portraits of Air: Pittsburgh. Installation by Susan Goethel Campbell. Opening reception: June 6, 5-7 p.m. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ASSEMBLE. Transformed Linearities. Work by Julie Mallis. Opening reception: June 6, 6-9 p.m. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Chasing the Sun. Work by Nadya Lapets, Vickie Schilling, & Gloria Tsang. Opening reception: June 7, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by New Academy Press. Opens June 6. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. GALLERIE CHIZ. An Illustrious Age. Work by Fritz Keck & Nancy McNary Smith. Opening reception: June 5, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. With The Grain. Recent Works by Ashley Jean Hickey. Opening reception June 7, 7-11 p.m. With the Grain. Recent works by Ashley Jean Hickey. Opening reception: June 7, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GATEWAY CENTER. No Limits. Large-scale sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea. Opens June 6. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest.org. Downtown. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Blind Intersections: Another Series of False Leads. Feat. work by Paul

Paddock, Michael Matos, Thad Kellstadt, Terry Carroll, Dean Cercone, Keith Knight, Mark Lyons & Lara Lampenfield. Opening reception June 6, 710 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Synthesis 2: Fusing & Kilnforming. Celebrating the studio glass movement’s re-discovery of ancient techniques. Opening June 6, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Small Works. Work by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Opening reception: June 6, 611 p.m. Garfield. 412-328-4737. PANZA GALLERY. In Good Company Part 2. Work by Zivi Aviraz, Lila Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris (Kathy) Sickels, Susan Sparks. Opening reception: June 7, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. June 6, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7 SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Mythology. Drawings by Richard Claraval. Reception June 14, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-877-7394

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. BE GALLERIES. Crayons, Cats, Dolls & Monsters. Work by Tara Zalewsky-Nease. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Nia Quilt Guild Member Show. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque. 200+ pieces from the museum’s collection. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakla nd. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Elisabeth Minningham. Sculpted paintings. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FAIRMONT PITTSBURGH. Magenta POP. Work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin & Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters & sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, across from the hotel. Downtown. 412-773-8800. FRANK L. MELEGA ART MUSEUM. National Road Festival Juried Art Exhibition. Work by artists from Allegheny,

E L D D I F & P R A H e l d d i F d n a p r a H r o f s r e t r a u q d a He

! p u C d l r o W Cheer on your home team Daily drink specials June 12 - July 13 The heart Th h t off Ireland I l d in i the th heart h t off the th Strip! 24th St. and Penn Ave. • 412-624-6622

w w w. HARPAN DFIDDLE .com

The beer that invented Light beer. Sewickley & Millvale

20

FOR 4 MILLER LITE BOTTLES AND 2 DOZEN WINGS

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY SATURDAY

$

BIKE NIGHT KARAOKE BAND NIGHT $10 HIGH LIFE $2.50 MILLER WITH $3.50 16OZ CAN BUCKETS LITE BOTTLES LEINIE’S

MILLER LITE ORIGINAL WHITE CANS

1

THROWBACK $ THURSDAYS

CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FRI 06 - SAT 07

DWAYNE GILL. June 6-7, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 06 - SUN 08

CRAIG SHOEMAKER. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., June 7, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., June 8, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 07

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP House-Made Liquor Infusions: VODKAS: PINEAPPLE E - CUCUMBER CUCUMBE BER R - GRAPE - ESPRESSO - PEAR-OLIVE - MIXED BERRIES. RUMS: PEACH. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO CHILI PEPPER. TEQU QUIL ILA A: MANG ANGO O - CH CHIL ILII PE PEPP PPER.

––––––– –– –––––  Friday, June 6th ––– ––––––– ––––– BOURBON TASTING: B G: Hudson’s d Baby Bourbon - Corn Whisky Four Grain- Single Malt and Manhattan Rye

8-10pm - Cheers! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. HOUSE TEAM MEGAMIX. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LINDA DUTY, SHARON DALY, JAMES KENNDY, BOB POLAND, DAVID BEY. Super Heroes of Comedy fundraiser. 8:30 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

SUN 08 BONUS STAGE: IMPROV & JAM. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 09 UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru June 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 10 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 11

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

EVENT: Sharon Hughes, 51,

a nurse from Homestead

CRITIC: fireWALL dance theater’s On the Rox, at Off The Wall, in Carnegie WHEN: Thu., May 29

This was our third time at this theater, and we really enjoyed the show today. I really liked when the one lady, the choreographer actually, did a dance, a really seductive solo dance to “Let’s Get It On,” by Marvin Gaye. She did a great job. I like that we have smaller, cozier venues like this. It’s a little bit outside of Pittsburgh, but we like coming over to this side of town. One of the things I really enjoy most about Pittsburgh is the cultural scene. So we’ll definitely come back here for more. BY DAN WILLIS

complex, and enjoy hikes CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. and outdoor activities in the Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome surrounding park. Allison Park. (planetarium), Miniature 412-767-9200. Railroad and Village, USS Requin HUNT INSTITUTE FOR submarine, and more. North Side. BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 412-237-3400. Duets. Harmonious couplings of CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL botanical art w/ items created HISTORY. Explore the complex between the 16th & 21st centuries interplay between culture, nature from the Hunt Institute collections. and biotechnology. Open Fridays Oakland. 412-268-2434. 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours 724-329-8501. with costumed guides featuring KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. this restored stagecoach stop. Tours of a restored 19th-century, 724-238-4983. middle-class home. Oakmont. CONNEY M. KIMBO 412-826-9295. GALLERY. University of NATIONAL AVIARY. Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Home to more than 600 Memorabilia & birds from over 200 Awards from the species. With classes, International Hall lectures, demos and of Fame. Oakland. . w w w more. North Side. 412-648-7446. aper p ty ci h g p 412-323-7235. DEPRECIATION LANDS .com NATIONALITY MUSEUM. Small living ROOMS. 26 rooms history museum celebrating helping to tell the story of the settlement and history of the Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. University of Pittsburgh. 412-486-0563. Oakland. 412-624-6000. FALLINGWATER. Tour the OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. features 1823 pipe organ, 724-329-8501. Revolutionary War graves. Scott. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 412-851-9212. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. stained-glass windows. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Downtown. 412-471-3436. site features log house, blacksmith FRICK ART & HISTORICAL shop & gardens. South Park. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of 412-835-1554. Clayton, the Frick estate, with PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY classes, car & carriage museum. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibPoint Breeze. 412-371-0600. its. Includes displays, walking tours, HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour gift shop, picnic area and Trolley this Tudor mansion and stable

FULL LIST ONLINE

Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHIPPS GARDEN CENTER. 33rd Annual Bonsai Show. Presented by the Pittsburgh Bonsai Society. Shadyside. 412-956-2482. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

FESTIVALS FRI 06 - WED 11 DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Music, visual art, arts & craft booths, more. June 6-15 Downtown Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

DANCE SAT 07

BOOMERANG. Dance & performance project comprised of Kora Radella, Matty Davis, & Adrian Galvin. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival.


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland Counties. 724-785-9331. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Lucky After Dark:Gay & Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh 1960-1990. Feat. photos, video & other artifacts from iconic clubs. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. COLOR!!! Juried exhibition feat. regional artists. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell,

www.3riversartsfest.org 2 & 5 p.m. Pierce Gallery, Downtown.

SUN 08 SHANA SIMMONS DANCE & THE ECLECTIC LABORATORY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Part of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. www.3riversartsfest. org 2 & 5 p.m. Pierce Gallery, Downtown.

FUNDRAISERS THU 05

FULL STEAM AHEAD! Fundraiser to benefit Gateway to the Arts’ new STEAM education initiative. 6-8 p.m. ThoughtForm, South Side. 412-362-6982. JUSTICE FOR DOM BENEFIT CONCERT. w/ Angel Blue Band feat. Craig King, Jill West & Blues Attack, Zack Wiesinger, Misaligned Mind. 7 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 718-867-8500.

FRI 06 21ST ANNUAL SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL. Benefits the Sojourner House MOMS program. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 18471865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/ Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Savage Elements. Work by Nugent Kos. Lawrenceville. 412-728-4916. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in

BETH’S BENEFIT. Performances by Hop A Train, The Po’ Folks Cabaret, Fuste Vartej, plus raffles, auctions, & a bake sale. Benefit to fight breast cancer. www.facebook. com/bethsbenefit 7 p.m. Boston Waterfront, McKeesport. 412-751-8112.

SAT 07 13TH ANNUAL HAT LUNCHEON. Benefits Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra. 11 a.m. Greensburg Country Club, Jeannette. 724-837-1850. 6TH ANNUAL FULL BLOOM SUMMER DANCE PARTY. Food & drink, music by J. Malls, Vie Boheme, more. 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. AIRCADE: PRINTMAKING + PINBALL. AIR Summer Fundraising Party feat. 10 pinball machines, hands on art activities, bands, video game lounge, exhibition art raffle, more. 4-11 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664. AIRCADE: PRINTMAKING + PINBALL PARTY. 10 pinball machines, hands-on art activities, live music, video game lounge, raffle, print sale. 4-11 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664.

Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

THURS, JUNE 5, 8PM JAZZ

CORY HENRY TRIO FEATURING CORY HENRY OF SNARKY PUPPY

FRI, JUNE 6, 9PM ROOTS ROCK/AMERICANA

CITY DWELLING NATURE SEEKERS PLUS APOSTLES OF COOL (NICK LOWE COVER BAND) SAT, JUNE 7, 9PM ROCK

SCARLET AND THE HARLOTS PLUS CHARM & CHAIN MON, JUNE 9, 8PM ENGLISH FOLK ROCK

SKINNY LISTER PLUS ONWARD, ETC. TUES, JUNE 10, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

MATT BOOTH QUARTET 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

C.S. KIM KARATE SPAGHETTI DINNER FUNDRAISER. 3-7 p.m. White Oak Athletic Association. 412-758-6342. VERONA 5K WALK & RUN. Benefits Verona’s Streetscape Revitalization Program. 7:45 a.m. Railroad Park, Verona. VINCENTIAN ACADEMY NATURAL HEALTH FAIR. Benefits the Vincentian Academy Royals Football Team. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Vincentian Academy, Ross. 412-720-5322.

HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F O R B R A IN IMAGI NG ST UD I ES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks.

SUN 08 5TH ANNUAL PANERA PUP WALK. 1-mile riverfront walk w/ special guests Charlie & Latasha Batch. Benefits the Western PA Humane Society. Begins at the Waterfront, Homestead. 9 a.m. 412-321-4625. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. JAMMING FOR WISHES. Live music, art, games, more. Benefits the Make-A-Wish Foundation. 4-9 p.m. Guardian Self Storage, Shadyside. 412-720-5315. PITTSBURGH RUN FOR BABIES. Starts outside Heinz

Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

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REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

Field. Benefits the March of Dimes. www.marchofdimes.com 8 a.m. Starts outside Heinz Field. Benefits the March of Dimes. www.marchofdimes.com 8 a.m. TAKE STEPS FOR CROHN’S & COLITIS. Family-friendly community walk, live music, kids’ entertainment, more. 3:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-823-8272 x 4.

XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 06 - SUN 08 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Six adolescents compete for the coveted Spelling Bee Championship. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Fri, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 8 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

MON 09

RAISE THEIR SPIRITS. Whiskey tasting, heavy hors d’oeuvres, live music, silent auction, more. Benefits Pressley Ridge’s Project Pinnacle. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 240-357-7666.

TUE 10 PITTSBURGH FRACTRACKER ALLIANCE FUNDRAISER 2014. www.fractracker.org/donate/ pgh-fundraiser/ 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-802-0273.

POLITICS SAT 07

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

KARL MARX WAS RIGHT! Discussion on how & why to build a Socialist alternative. 2:30 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-589-2558.

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

LITERARY

www.livelinks.com

THU 05

Teligence/18+

FRIDAY, JUNE 13TH

CLAUDIA MONET 11:30PM & 1:30AM

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. LISA KIRCHNER. Book launch for Hello American Lady Creature. 7 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. WRITERS LIVE @ CLP MAIN: JACOB BACHARACH. Talk & book signing w/ the author of The Bend of the World. 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-6688.

FRI 06

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

1635 West Carson St. • 412-471-5764

OPEN LATE Thursday 7pm-2am Friday-Saturday 7pm-4am

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

PUNK ROCK, MENTAL ILLNESS & RECOVERY W/ CRAIG LEWIS. Q&A, book signing & discussion of Better Days: A Mental Health Recovery Workbook. 7 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. WORD=LIFE. Feat. performances by poets/artists Black Ice, Vanessa German & B-Tree, plus an open mic. 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321.

Calling all art-lovers, music fans and pinball wizards:

Artists Image Resource’s AIRcade party offers something for almost

everyone. This year’s summer fundraiser for the nonprofit printmaking studio includes 10 pinball machines, a video-game lounge, printmaking activities, food trucks, craft beer and an exhibit of donated work by AIR artists, which will be raffled off at the end of the night. And if that isn’t enough, there’s music by Naked Spirit, PERMANENT, DJ David Pohl and others. 4–11 p.m. Sat., June 7. 518 Foreland St., North Side. $10 (plus $5 for a play-all-night pinball pass). 412-321-8664 or www.artistsimageresource.org

SAT 07

AUTHOR & ARTIST. An evening w/ author Dave Borland & artist Karen Larson. 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-571-0180. BOOK SIGNING W/ KAILYN LOWRY. Kailyn Lowry of MTV’s Teen Mom 2 will be signing copies of her memoir Pride Over Pity. 6 p.m. Barnes & Noble - South Hills, Bethel Park. 412-835-0379. DAVE BORLAND. Reading & book signing w/ the author of In a Moment’s Time: A Novel of Oakland & Forgiveness. Presented by The People’s University. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. The Dinner by Hermann Koch. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 09 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 10 GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MICHAEL ALBRIGHT, ZIGGY EDWARDS, BERRY GOVENOR,

GENE HIRSCH, JOE KALDON, KATHY MCGREGOR, EDWARD MURRAY, STEVE PUSATERI. Poetry reading. 8 p.m. Hemingway’s Cafe, Oakland. 412-621-4100. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 05 - WED 11

OTAKU LEBO. For middle & high school students who are ardent fans of anime, manga & J-pop culture. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH DRAGONBOATING. Ages 12-18. Presented by Paddlers for Peace. Thu, 6-8 p.m. Thru July 31 TRRA Millvale Boathouse, Millvale. 412-366-3528.

THU 05

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. FATHER’S DAY CD CARD MAKING. Audio card workshop w/ the Saturday Light Brigade. Thru June 15, 1-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SOAR! Free-flight bird show. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. TAKING FLIGHT: AN AERIAL ADVENTURE. Rose garden freeflight bird show w/ live narration & music. Thru Sept. 1, 12 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

SAT 07 GETTING STARTED IN MUSIC & DANCE: AN OPEN HOUSE FOR FAMILIES W/ YOUNG CHILDREN. Presented by Hope Academy Arts. 1:30-3:30 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. WILD THINGS FAMILY DAY ADVENTURE TO THE WILD SIDE. Collect stamps for your Wild Side Passport while completing games, workshops, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SUN 08 14TH ANNUAL SUMMER READING EXTRAVAGANZA. Musical & theatrical performances, book sale, 3D printer demo, puppet show, science experiments, airbrush tattoos, more. 12-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114. SKETCHING & STORY MAKING W/ THE HAPPY CRAB. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 10

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. PRESCHOOL SCIENCE FUN. Ages 3-6. 10:30 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE FRI 06 - SAT 07 WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. June 6-7, 8:50 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

SAT 07 EMERALD VIEW PARK BIOBLITZ. Plant & animal inventory, crafts, hikes, more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Emerald View Park - Olympia Park Entrance, Mt. Washington. 412-481-3220 x 200. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors. org Sat. Thru June 14


RUN OR DYE. 5K feat. plant-based powdered dye stations at every kilometer. www.runordye.com 9 a.m. Camp Lutherlyn, Butler.

TUE 10

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 11 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 05 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BRINGING IT HOME. Documentary screening on industrial hemp & why we aren’t growing it in the U.S. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-242-3598. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EASTSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD EMPLOYMENT CENTER JOB FAIR. 80+ employers from banks, retail, healthcare, social services, more. 4-6 p.m. Eastminster Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-362-8580. GROWING WELLNESS: HOW CONNECTING TO NATURE KEEPS KIDS HEALTHY. w/ Melissa Harding. Part of Biophilia: Pittsburgh. 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: PITTSBURGH RESOURCES FOR SENIORS - LIFE PITTSBURGH. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 06

PRIDE SHABBAT. Members of the Jewish community & LGBT allies are invited to join Rodef Shalom & Bet Tikvah for a special service kicking off Pittsburgh’s Pride week. 5:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

conversations, more. Sat, 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MANUP PITTSBURGH DADS’ CONFERENCE. Speakers: Steeler’s Head Coach Mike Tomlin, Tunch Ilkin, Pastor Ed Glover, & Dr. Tony Evans. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Orchard Hill Church, Wexford. 412-321-3811 x 104. ALLEGHENY WEST TOUR & MARRIAGE EQUALITY & FAMILY TASTING. Guided walking tour CELEBRATION. 12-2 p.m. West & progressive wine tasting. Park, North Side. 412-302-3528. June 6-7 1-888-718-4253. PENNSYLVANIA CONVENT CRAWL. Hosted MICROBREWERS’ FEST. Sample by the Pittsburgh beer from 25+ microbreweries. Religious Vocation Council. 1-9 p.m. Penn Ages 18+. prvc.info@ Brewery, North Side. gmail.com June 6-7 412-237-9400 x 100. 412-821-2200 x 430. THE SANDBOX: HAUNTED TIME & PLACE. www. per PITTSBURGH Artist talk w/ Nicholas pa pghcitym .co DOWNTOWN Muellner. 2-3 p.m. WALKING TOUR. Fri, Carnegie Museum of Art, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 Oakland. 412-622-3131. City-County Building, Downtown. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. 412-302-5223. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing SUMMER CYCLE CELEBRATION. follows. No partner needed. Demo rides, sidewalk sale, custom Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace bike show, more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. and Sat., June 7, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 412-683-5670. West Hills Honda, Coraopolis. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. 412-262-2200. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 2014 FATHER’S DAY SOUTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN CRUISARAMA CLASSIC CAR CHURCH FLEA MARKET. 9 a.m.SHOW. 2 p.m. Mt. Nebo Pointe 2 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Shopping Center, Ross. Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. SPANISH CONVERSATION Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 GROUP. Friendly, informal. At Friends Meeting House, Oakland. the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 412-362-9880. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. CITY OF CHAMPIONS! 412-362-6108. THE PITTSBURGH SPORTS SWING CITY. Learn & practice HISTORY TOUR. Begins at swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Duquesne Incline, 1220 Grandview Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. Ave, Mt. Washington. 9-11:30 a.m. 412-759-1569. 412-323-4709. DOG GONE! SCAVENGER HUNT. Dog-friendly hunt testing AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL animal knowledge & giving HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. clues to collect treats & toys. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, www.thrillscavengerhunt.com/ 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. event 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Shadyside. 412-683-3727. 412-841-2433. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES EMPATHY FIRST. A SALE. 7:30 a.m. Historic Hanna’s compassionate communication Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. & conflict transformation study ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second group based on the work of peace and Third Sun of every month, activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. First Sat of every month, 2 p.m. and 412-622-3151. Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Thru Sept. 19 412-271-7660. Second and Fourth Sun of FATHER’S DAY CAR CRUISE. every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. 2 p.m. Mt. Nebo Pointe Shopping Carnegie Library, Oakland. Center, Ross. 781-418-6254. 412-622-3151. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. I MADE IT! MARKET. Nomadic WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. indie craft market. www. Begins outside of Monongahela imadeitmarket.com 10 a.m.Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 2 p.m., Sun., July 13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223. and Sun., Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced Whole Foods Wexford, Wexford. students will engage in debates, 724-940-6100. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. THE YOUNG TURKS PITTSBURGH MEETUP. 7 p.m. Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville. 412-965-1828.

FRI 06 - SAT 07

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 07

SUN 08

Celebrating 20 Years! Military Mondays FREE ADMISSION WITH MILITARY ID

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

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COMPLIMENTARY FULL BAR FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB!

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2 FOR 1 ADMISSION

(412) 771-8872

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PENGUIN PAINTING PROGRAM. Choose colors & watch penguins create a work of art. 3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

MON 09

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR ERA - U.S. GRANT AND HIS LIEUTENANTS - FROM CAIRO TO APPOMATTOX. w/ Rodger Duffy. Second Mon of every month, 10 a.m. Thru July 14 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. CENTER FOR WOMEN’S ENTREPRENEURSHIP SPRING OPEN HOUSE. 5:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 10

CURRENTLY SEEKING ENTERTAINERS TO BE

KEY GIRLS 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarksof General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. THE CIVIL WAR IN PENNSYLVANIA. Speaker: Michael Kraus, Curator of Collections at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

Presented by the Western PA Unit of The Herb Society of America. 7 p.m. Mellon Park, Shadyside. 724-384-8184. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE NEED FOR FARM SANCTUARIES. Discussion w/ Karen Phillips, VMD & Executive Director of Hope Haven Farm Sanctuary. Presented by the East End Food Co-op. 6:30 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Auditions for Gilbert & Sullivan’s The Sorcerer. June 4 & 23. Prepare a song that best showcases your voice, either Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), standard musical theater, or classical. Accompanist will be provided, no a capella selections. auditions@pittsburgh savoyards.org Our Lady of Victory Maronite Catholic Church, Carnegie. 412-734-8476.

SUBMISSIONS THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

BE A BUDDY

Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force is seeking caring, compassionate volunteers to help with its Be a Buddy program, which connects HIV-positive individuals with companions who provide emotional support, some general day-to-day assistance and a listening ear. Time commitments vary, but average between two and six hours per week. Act 33/34 clearances required. Call 412-345-7456 or visit www.patf.org.

PGC LECTURE SERIES: ED SCHMID + CAPPY THOMPSON. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions

for Shrek the Musical. June 7-8. Prepare a modern Broadway or pop song to sing a capella, cold readings, dance audition. The role of Shrek requires a Hollywood-ized Scottish accent. Few children’s roles available, otherwise cast is teens & adults. www.comtraplayers.com BEATS-N-EATS MIDDAY DANCE Cranberry. 724-591-8727. PARTY. Special lunch & drink DAY ROOM WINDOW. Auditions menus & dancing. 12-2 p.m. for Day Room Window. June 24, Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Call backs East Liberty. 412-363-3000. the following evening. BEREAVEMENT Multiracial cast. Women SUPPORT GROUP. ages 35-55. Men ages For Widows/Widowers 35-60. Prepare 2 minute over 50. Second and w. w w dramatic contemporary Fourth Wed of every er hcitypap g p monologue. Bring head month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. .com shot & resume. Equity & Sebastian Church, Ross. Non-Equity actors welcome. 412-366-1300. Schedule audition w/ Kathryn BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE Kelly at kskelly412@gmail.com. YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every More info at www.dayroom other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru June 25 window.com New Hazlett Mount Lebanon Public Library, Theater, North Side. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOPE ACADEMY TEEN THEATER ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). COMPANY. Open auditions Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon for the 2014-15 season. June 7. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Seeking committed singers, 412-531-1912. dancers, actors & musicians in FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Farmers’ grades 6-12. Prepare 1-min poem market. Wed, 2:30-6:30 p.m. Thru or monologue & perform a song of Oct. 29 Phipps Conservatory & your choice. cathedralofhope.org/ Botanical Garden, Oakland. event/hat-co-auditions/ East Liberty 412-622-6914. Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. LAVENDER WAND WORKSHOP & ELIZABETHAN GARDEN TOUR. 412-441-3800 x 11.

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FULL LIST E N O LIN

in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG’S SUMMER IN THE CITY. Seeking artists, crafters & makers for the annual citywide outdoor festival. $15.00 for a 8’ x 17’ parking space to display & sell your work. For further information & application, call or email greensburgba.info@gmail. com 724-689-0040. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prize-forshort-fiction.html. MIDLAND ARTS COUNCIL. Seeking artwork in any 2D medium for the 9th Annual Midland Arts Council Show. Carry-in art deadline is June 8, online & CD entry deadline is May 26. midland-artscouncil-pa.com Thru 724-643-9968. THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. http://www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com/ SHALER GARDEN CLUB GREAT LOCAL GARDENER CONTEST. All types of gardens will be considered. Submit 5 photos of your garden w/ description of what makes it special. Registration forms available at Shaler North Hills Library. Deadline: July 8. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

A few months ago, I started getting hangup calls from numbers I didn’t recognize. Then weird texts started showing up, trying to set up “dates.” After the fourth or fifth call/text, Google informed me that my phone number is identical, except for area code, to a trans escort. I’m getting one or two calls or texts per week meant for this other woman. They’ve started to get more explicit, and they come at weird hours. I can ask my phone company to block each number individually, but that’s a pain in the ass. I can text the correct area code to the men looking for the trans escort, but I don’t want to help people too stupid to read a phone number correctly. I suppose I could report the whole thing to the police, but I doubt they’d care, and I don’t have any moral objections to sex work: I just don’t want people to call/text me asking for it. Aside from changing my phone number, anything you can suggest? STUPID PHONE AND MESSAGES

You claim to have no moral objections to sex work. But you’re thinking of siccing the police on a sex worker — for one or two calls or texts per week. As pains in the ass go, SPAM, that sounds like a piddling one. You know what constitutes a major pain in the ass for a sex worker? Being swept up in the criminaljustice system. You’re right: The police are unlikely to drop everything to solve your problem. But if your call were answered by a cop who would rather hassle trans sex workers than go after criminals who are hurting people, this woman — who hasn’t really harmed you — could wind up getting badly hurt. The criminal-justice system is rough on sex workers, and it’s absolutely brutal to trans women who do sex work. Here’s a better idea: Call the trans escort and have a conversation with her. As distressed as you are to receive these calls and texts, that sex worker will probably be more distressed to learn that she’s losing potential clients. I have known and loved a few sex workers — loved in a strictly platonic sense — and most changed their professional phone numbers regularly to rid themselves of time-wasters and clients they didn’t want to see again. The sex worker whose calls you’re getting may be willing to change her number, or at least emphasize the correct area code in her ads. The best way to demonstrate that you don’t have a moral objection to sex work is to assume sex workers are human beings and treat them accordingly. Because sex workers are human beings, and most human beings are reasonable. If we were talking about a Fox News personality, my advice might be different — but we’re not talking about a Fox News personality, are we?

ing me and wants to start with toys and plugs. But I want to jump right in. In all honesty, I take shits that are longer and thicker than his erect penis. Do you think we need to start slow? ANAL NOVICE ANXIOUSLY LUSTING

When I hear from straight couples starting to explore buttsecks, it’s usually the boy who wants to “jump right in” and the girl who is afraid of getting hurt. I tell these straight boys that they are obligated to take their partner’s feelings into account — they must take it slow, they must use lots of lube, they must start with fingers and toys and plugs, etc. Those are Buttsecks Best Practices. My advice for you is the same: You are obligated to take your partner’s feelings into account. His fear of hurting you is just as valid as a woman’s fear of being hurt. So while you may not need plugs and toys for your own comfort, ANAL, you should use them for his. It’s possible, of course, that his concern is misplaced. But unless you’ve taken shits that have jumped out of the toilet and jammed themselves back into your ass, and then proceeded to pound away at you for 20 minutes, you really don’t know what it’s like to get buttfucked.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

THE CRIMINALJUSTICE SYSTEM IS ROUGH ON SEX WORKERS, AND IT’S ABSOLUTELY BRUTAL TO TRANS WOMEN WHO DO SEX WORK.

I’m a happily married woman. My husband and I are interested in exploring anal sex. We enjoy finger play, but we haven’t tried anything larger. He’s afraid of hurt-

I am a 43-year-old female in a relationship with a 26-year-old male. We explore many things that he wasn’t able to explore with younger women. But he does not orgasm from vaginal or anal sex. He comes only if he masturbates. He agreed to stop masturbating to see if that would help. No change. I suggested a urologist, but he’s a college student with no insurance. Please help me to help him. He’s going to need to be able to do this when he gets married and wants to start a family. HE CAN’T COME

He can so come — he just needs to crank himself over the edge using his fist. That may be the result of death-grip masturbation techniques, and he could retrain his dick with some time and effort. But it’s not fair to say “he can’t come.” If a woman can’t come from vaginal intercourse alone, which 75 percent of women can’t, but can come during oral sex or when mixing fingers or a vibrator into vaginal intercourse, we don’t say, “She can’t come.” We say, “This is what she needs to come.” This is what he needs to come. Maybe that will change with time, experience and some effort to mix up his masturbatory routine (get that boy a Fleshlight), but it’s possible that this is how his dick works. And when it comes time to have kids, he fucks his wife until she’s satisfied, pulls out, jacks himself past the point of no return (a.k.a. “orgasmic inevitability”), shoves his dick back in and blows his load all over her egg(s). No problem. On the Lovecast, the special rage of men who can’t get laid: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

06.04-06.11

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Marcel Proust’s novel Swann’s Way, the narrator speaks of how profoundly he is inspired by an older writer named Bergotte: “Each time he talked about something whose beauty had until then been hidden from me, about pine forests, about hail, about Notre Dame Cathedral … with one image he would make that beauty explode into me.” I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because in the coming days I suspect a great deal of beauty will explode into you. Why? I think it’s because you’re more receptive than usual to being delighted and enchanted. The triggers could be anything: exciting people, eavesdropped conversations, good books, surprising music and who knows what else?

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“Little horses cannot carry great riders.” So says a Haitian proverb. N ow, in accordance with the astrological omens, I’m urging you to meditate on its meaning for your life. Here are four possible interpretations: 1. Are you a “little horse” trying to carry a “great rider” who’s too much for you? 2. Are you a little horse that could grow into a bigger, stronger horse worthy of a great rider? 3. Are you a “great rider” who is in need of a horse that is big and strong enough to serve your big, strong ambitions? 4. Would you like to be a “great rider,” but you can’t be one as long as you have a horse that is too small and weak?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

Declare victory, Leo. Even if victory is not quite won yet. Even if your success is imperfect and still a bit messy around the edges. Raise your arms up in elated triumph and shout, “I am the purified champion! I am the righteous conqueror! I have outsmarted my adversaries and outmaneuvered my obstacles, and now I am ready to claim my rightful rewards!” Do this even if you’re not 100-percent confident, even if there is still some scraping or clawing ahead of you. Celebrate your growing mastery. Congratulate yourself for how far you’ve come. In this way, you will summon what’s needed to complete your mission and achieve final, total victory.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Give special attention to what will last the longest. That’s my main recommendation for you in the coming weeks. Devote less of your energy to transitory pleasures and short-term hopes. Turn away from the small obsessions that demand far too much of your energy. Withdraw from the seemingly pressing concerns that will soon start to fade because they really aren’t that important. Instead, Virgo, devote your love and intelligence to the joys and dilemmas that will animate your life well into the future. Express reverence and care for the mysteries that will teach you and teach you and teach you for years to come.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

My favorite bridge in the world is the Golden Gate Bridge. In the hundreds of times I have driven on it over San Francisco Bay, it has never let me down. I’ve always gotten from one side to the other without any problem. In addition to its reliability, it uplifts me with its grandeur and beauty. What’s your most beloved bridge, Libra? I suggest that in the coming weeks you make it your lucky charm, your magical symbol. Why? Because the next chapter of your life story requires you to make a major crossing. You will traverse a great divide. Having your favorite bridge as a shining beacon in your imagination will inspire your strength and courage as you travel.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

U2’s Bono has called Leonard Cohen’s song “Hallelujah” “the most perfect song in the world.” It is mournful and triumphant, despairing and uplifting. It’s a riddle that improbably offers cathartic release. Over 300 recording artists have done cover versions of it, and it has even been the subject of books. And yet it was a challenge for Cohen to compose. He wrote more than 80 verses before choosing the few he would actually include in the final version, and in one famous session he resorted to banging his head on the floor to stimulate his creative flow. “To find that urgent song,” he said, took “a lot of work and a lot of sweat.” I nominate “Hallelujah” to be one of your sacred symbols for the next 12 months, Scorpio. From your strenuous effort, I predict, will come masterful creations.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Let me outline the breakthroughs I hope to see for you in the coming months. First, what is pretty good about you will not interfere with what is potentially great about you, but will instead cooperate with it and boost it. Second, your past accomplishments won’t hold back your progress; you will not be tempted to rely on them at the expense of your future accomplishments. And third, the brave ideas that have motivated you so well won’t devolve into staid old dogmas; you will either renew and reinvigorate them or else move on to a new set of brave ideas.

essay on the mythology of the rabbit as trickster, go here: http://tinyurl.com/rabbittrickster.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

The Buddhist meditation teacher Chogyam Trungpa said that one of the best ways to become fearless is to cultivate tenderness. As you expand your heart’s capacity to feel compassionate affection for the world, you have less and less to be afraid of. That’s the opposite of the conventional wisdom, which says you become brave by toughening up, by reinforcing your psychic armor. Of all the signs of the zodiac, you Pisceans are best set up to benefit from Trungpa’s method — now even more than usual.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires and comets inside us,” writes novelist Robert R. McCammon. “We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out,

spanked out, washed out and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow path and told to be responsible.” That’s the bad news, Aries. But now here’s the good news: The next 12 months will offer you a series of excellent opportunities to re-magic yourself. If you have not yet caught wind of the first invitation, I bet you will soon.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

“When given a choice between owning an object and having an experience,” says art critic Holland Cotter, “I always choose the experience.” He prefers to spend his money on adventures that transform his sense of self and his understanding of the world. I recommend that approach to you in the coming weeks, Taurus. The most valuable “possessions” you can acquire will be the lessons you learn, the skills you hone and the relationships you ripen. What other sign would you want to be if you could take a vacation from your actual sign? Why? Write: uaregod@comcast.net.

get your yoga on!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

If you are in even moderate alignment with cosmic rhythms during the next 12 months, you will be a connoisseur and master of recycling. I’m speaking metaphorically here. What I hope is that you will reanimate worn-out inspirations and convert faded dreams into shiny new fantasies. You will find ways to revive alliances that went off track. A once-vibrant shtick or trick that lost its cool could be retrieved from the ash heap of history and turned into a fresh, hot asset. Gear yourself up for some entertaining resurrections.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

I wish I could tell you that your power animal this month is the eagle or dolphin or panther. Having a glamorous creature like that as your ally might boost your confidence and charisma. To be paired with one of them might even activate dormant reserves of your animal intelligence. But I can’t in good conscience authorize such an honor. That’s not what the astrological omens are suggesting. In fact, your power animal this June is the bunny rabbit. Please understand that there is no shame in this. On the contrary. You should be charmed and appreciative. It signifies that you will be fertile, fast, a bit tricky and very cute. (To read an

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Sodexo

located at the University of Pittsburgh Now Accepting Applications for the 2014-2015 school year!

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

PAGE WORK

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STUDIES

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SERVICES

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LIVE

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HELP WANTED

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$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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AVON - Earn extra income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888-770-1075 (M-F 9-7 & Sat 9-1 central.) (Ind Sls Rep)

Models:

for campus map. A full listing of all postings is available in our office.

HELP WANTED Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

We are accepting applications M-TH from 9:00am- 3:00pm

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

in our HR office in McCormick Hall.

Women wanted for photo figure modeling. Good pay, same day.

724-553-9766 leave message

Please contact 412.624.2347 or sodexoupitt@gmail.com with any questions. Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer

Your ad could be here

HELP WANTED COUPON CLIPPERS NEEDED! Trade extra grocery coupons for $$$$$. All national brands requested. Free details. Please visit www.cashforcashoffs. com (AAN CAN)

PAGE WELLNESS

Looking for candidates with great customer service to join our team! Openings include cooks, bakers, food service workers, baristas, catering drivers, banquet servers and set up, and utility. We also are recruiting for bake shop and retail bakery supervisors, catering, culinary and retail dining supervisors.

412.316.3342

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area! Company Drivers:

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• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

800-871-4581 TheKAG.com Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


STUDIES

STUDIES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

UTERINE FIBROIDS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS STUDIES

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA?

STUDIES

CALL TODAY!

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LOOKING FOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE WOMEN’S HEALTH? The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study to better understand the effects of birth control on the immune system. You may be eligible if you are: *18-34 with regular periods *Healthy *Not currently pregnant or breastfeeding *Not currently using birth control

For more information call: 412-641-5496

Participants may receive birth control at no cost and be compensated up to $470, over 3 to 4 office visits.

Help Women Around the World Are you a woman between 45 and 65 years old? The University of Pittsburgh center for Family Planning Research is looking for postmenopausal women who want to help women through an important research safety study of a vaginal ring to prevent HIV. Women will have 5 visits at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and complete 2 phone calls over approximately 5 months. Call 412-641-5496 today to see if you are eligible or visit www.birthcontrolstudies.org Eligible participants will be compensated up to $500 for their time an travel.

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GENERAL FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

DEUTCHTOWN'S "NEW URBAN VILLAGE" SPACE FOR LEASE

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LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

STORAGE

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SERVICES 502 E. Ohio St.

Ideal For: Art Gallery - Museum Restaurant - Cafe Music Venue Fresh Grocery Store

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

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BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

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AIRLINE JOBS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES LOSE WEIGHT & KEEP IT OFF! Up to 30 pounds in 60 days. Once Daily, Maximum Prescription Strength - No Prescription Required! Free Shipping. Call 877-7612991 (AAN CAN)

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PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406 Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 06.04/06.11.2014

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Recovery Without Judgement™


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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

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www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

massage

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BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?  Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 MASSAGE

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Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Downtown

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TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Open 24 hrs

Chinese Bodyworks

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(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

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Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

(across from Eat n’ Park)

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$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

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76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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START YOUR WEEKEND

EARLY

THURSDAYS 2 FOR $25 MENU

2 Entrées PLUS 1 Appetizer & Dessert to Share for $25!

Limited menu.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM Rivers Casino is celebrating its 5th Anniversary. In the first five years of operation, Rivers has become a proud community partner, strong economic engine and a great place to work.

RIVERS CASINO FIRST FIVE. THANKS TO THE TEAM, COMMUNITY AND YOU!

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

June 4, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 23

June 4, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 23