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REPTILE DYSFUNCTION: GODZILLA RETURNS TO SCREENS IN YET ANOTHER REMAKE 96


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


EVENTS 5.30 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

6.13 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH VINCENT FREMONT AND GERALYN HUXLEY This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

6.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NAT BALDWIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SLEEP EXPERIMENTS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

WRAP dress 1974

7.20 – 6:30pm SOUND SERIES: BAND OF HORSES, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MIDLAKE Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets are $36/ $40 day of show; for tickets visit www.ticketmaster.com

8.1 – 7pm IN DISCUSSION: HALSTON AND WARHOL: SILVER AND SUEDE, WITH LESLEY FROWICK AND NICHOLAS CHAMBERS This program is presented in connection with the exhibition, Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede. FREE with museum admission

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in chiffon. Halston AND Warhol: Silverand Suede / May18 –August24, 2014 $QG\:DUKRO+DOVWRQ GHWDLO i7KH$QG\:DUKRO)RXQGDWLRQIRUWKH9LVXDO$UWV,QF

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


{EDITORIAL}

05.21/05.28.2014

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DAVID POHL}

VOLUME 24 + IISSUE S UE SS U 2211

[PULLOUT]

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Living in a bubble: ubble: Our 2014 Summer er Guide offers plenty to do,, see and hear this summer.. Details in City Paper’s preview of summer activities. vities.

[NEWS]

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“Gay bars in Pittsburgh didn’t just appear out of vice and ether.” — Historian Harrison Apple on what “queer archeology” can teach us about the city’s LGBT community

“When we’re talking about health and safety and whether someone has safe drinking water, that’s tough to place a price tag on.” — Clean Water Action’s Steve Hvozdovich on the need for better regulation of fracking

“Samsa, chopped meat and onion in a flaky pastry, was like an excellent, savory croissant.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Uzbek restaurant Kavsar

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC]

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“I think 20 to 30 years ago, people were more apt to say, ‘Oh, that person sold out because they licensed a song to a commercial.’” — El Ten Eleven’s Kristian Dunn on evolving opinions on pop music and advertising

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

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“It has all the heaving bosoms, overheard secrets and upper-class side-eye you’d expect from a quality period parlor drama.” — Al Hoff on the new film Belle

STEEL CITY MEDIA

“The small sculptures run a gamut of quirkiness, from tiny clay spaceships to a tower of plastic bottlecaps to whatnots of wood scraps left over from cutting out other shapes.”— Robert Raczka on Tom Sarver’s The Occasional Market

[LAST PAGE]

sax was like a drug. I couldn’t put it 118 “The down.” — Jazz musician Lou Schreiber on his lifelong obsession

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 102 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 110 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 111 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 112 N E W S

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{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

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Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

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{ART}

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[VIEWS]

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ZACH BRENDZA, DAN WILLIS

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

Win a Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro, and other great rides Every Thursday, Friday, & Saturday in May

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“IT’S A PITTSBURGH HISTORY OF GAYNESS; YOU JUST CAN’T SEPARATE THE TWO.”

INCOMING Lost Bill: As a city councilor, Bill Peduto fired a shot for gun control. Was he shooting blanks? (May 14) “One solution to the gun violence could be as simple as the easy access to the bullets. Only licensed gun-owners would be able to purchase limited bullets from state stores, the same as booze. Military and police must sign for their allotment of ammo, why not the licensed gun owners? Stop the sale of bullets at Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods. We make it too easy to kill on our streets.” — Web comment from “Ella LaScola”

GAY OLD TIME

Doubt, A Parable at Stage 62 (May 14) “This review is absurd. I saw this play last weekend and was absolutely moved. It was the best community theater production I have yet seen. The acting, the design and the directing all deserve a much bigger stage and I’ve been telling everyone I know to go see it this weekend. Outstanding.” — Web comment from “Dminor7th”

Local historian to open exhibit dedicated to “queer archaeology” studying Pittsburgh’s LGBT past

In HD-36 race, Molchany fires back with response ad (May 13, online only): “Rather than firing back with an ad that seems to accept [state Rep. Harry] Readshaw’s basic premise for criticism of a gas tax, I’m very surprised [Erin] Molchany didn’t spend the airtime to explain the clear need for investment in all basic transportation infrastructure crucial to our communities and economies across the entire state.” — Web comment from “HelenGerhardt”

EDITOR’S NOTE This edition of City Paper was going to press as Democratic voters across the state were deciding who will face incumbent Gov. Tom Corbett in this November’s general election. Check us out online at www.pghcitypaper.com for Election Day coverage of this and other races.

“I like ‘Million Dollar Arm’ better than the initial title of the movie: ‘Seriously, Pirates?’” — May 16 tweet from “D.J. Gallo” (@DJGalloEtc)

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{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

T

O GET A SENSE of the type of archeology that Harrison Apple is involved in, think Indiana Jones in the opening scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark. Now, replace the booby-trapped cave with the remnants of a dark, abandoned after-hours club in East Liberty … and replace the coveted golden idol resting on a pedestal with a DJ booth full of old records, cigarette packs and condoms. Apple is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon, artist-in-residence at CMU’s Center for the Arts in Society and a public historian. For the past two years, he’s been engaged in “queer archeology,” studying gay social life in Pittsburgh between the 1960s and early 1990s. Along with his adviser, CMU’s Tim Haggerty, he developed the Pittsburgh Queer History Project, an oral-history and archival project focused on the local LGBT community. Apple’s work took a groundbreaking turn in 2012, when he was given the chance by new building owners to “excavate” a former gay after-hours club at 6119 Penn Ave. “I went to the back of the building and walked up two flights of stairs and there was a big black door with a sliding eye peephole,” Apple recalls. “They opened the door and it was like

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Harrison Apple, of the Pittsburgh Queer History Project, with some of the items that will be part of his upcoming exhibit, Lucky After Dark, an archival look at the city’s earliest after-hours gay social clubs

a time capsule of an after-hours joint. There were drinks on the bar and there was oil in the kitchen and rotten juice and soda everywhere. There were tinfoil stars and a DJ booth filled with empty CD cases and records and Newports and condoms and whatever.” Judging from membership cards he found on the site, the venue was known as “Upscale Private Night Club.” But if the name itself was a blank slate, Apple saw

the club as a trove of information. “I brought in my plastic gloves and respirator and I bagged and tagged everything,” he says. “I basically knew how many cigarettes and condoms were in the space. But we also found membership lists and cards and police reports and all these things that talked about what this space really was, both legally and socially.” And that was just the beginning. In


a space between a stage and a concrete wall, Apple’s boyfriend found an old wallet that had been there for probably more than two decades. Inside it was a membership card for a place called the Travelers Club. “I did research and found that the Travelers was a gay after-hours club that was run by a guy named Lucky,” Apple says. “Lucky not only ran that club, but two clubs before that and a bar. It showed that gay bars in Pittsburgh didn’t just appear out of vice and ether.” That discovery led Apple to delve into the history of the city’s gay afterhours clubs, the people who orbited around them, and their significance in shaping the city’s present-day LGBT community. Some of the research and material he recovered will be part of a month-long exhibit entitled Lucky After Dark at Future Tenant. The show, the gallery promises in a statement, “challenges existing interpretations and assumptions about the development of an LGBT culture in Pittsburgh.” The exhibit will focus mainly on material from the three clubs operated by Robert “Lucky” Johns between the 1960s and early 1990s: the Transportation Club, the House of Tilden and the Travelers. By focusing on those three clubs, Apple says he was able to document that Pittsburgh’s LGBT community evolved much differently than those in larger cities. “This is not a story of New York, where people come there from their hometown and use sexual identity to meet people in a new city,” Apple says. “This is a place where your sexuality is operating amongst family relationships, ethnic relationships and neighborhood relationships. All of these things are very closely intertwined, and if you’re going to do anything in this city, it’s going to involve your family at some point. “What we’re trying to do is to take a history that’s not just a gay history, but it’s a Pittsburgh history. It’s a Pittsburgh history of gayness; you just can’t separate the two.” Haggerty, who came to the city in the late 1980s, agrees. Haggerty says that during the period Apple is studying, Pittsburgh was a city facing economic decline and out-migration. Many in the LGBT community were leaving Pittsburgh for larger cities, where they found

gay enclaves in places like Dupont Circle, in Washington, D.C., and The Castro, in San Francisco. “But the people in this history stay here,” Haggerty says. “It provided a new wrinkle in gender-identity politics: You not only had to negotiate your gay identity, but you also had to negotiate your familial identity. For Lucky, the two things worked hand-inhand. He had these family connections in the world of private clubs and liquor licenses, and he used them to open up these gay social clubs.” And that, he says, “became the real engine for the community — which, unlike other large cities, was spread out all over Pittsburgh.”

“THEY OPENED THE DOOR AND IT WAS LIKE A TIME CAPSULE OF AN AFTER-HOURS JOINT. THERE WERE TINFOIL STARS AND CONDOMS AND WHATEVER.”

APPLE SAYS THIS exhibit

is not the culmination of his research, but just a beginning. Lucky’s clubs, he and Haggerty acknowledge, offer a narrative that focuses largely on white, gay men. But they say their research should open up other lines of inquiry, focusing on a range of issues encompassing race and gender. Apple says Lucky’s clubs weren’t the first in the city, but they were among the earliest to be owned by a gay proprietor. The clubs that previously made up the scene, he says, were there strictly to make money: “[M]aybe you could find a trick or two, but you don’t talk, you don’t touch, the drinks were watered down, there’s no music and there’s certainly no dancing.”

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GAY AND LESBIAN NIGHTLIFE IN PITTSBURGH 1960-1990

The new clubs weren’t being run as public trusts, either: “Make no mistake: Profit wasn’t the bottom line, it was the only line,” Apple says. “But [Johns’] clubs were a little bit funkier; you could let your hairpins down. Here came someone who was a part of this burgeoning afterhours club scene. … Did he make money? Yes. But he also cared very much for his patrons.”

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The clubs attracted members for all kinds of reasons. Some were just out for a good time in a place they could be uninhibited. But others used the clubs as a gathering place to talk politics. The leadership of groups like the Persad Center and the Lambda Foundation were born out of meetings at the clubs, and with support from club owners. “These clubs became the center of community organization,” Haggerty says. “A lot of the people there became politically active, and when the AIDS epidemic hit, the clubs became crucial for disseminating information.” The clubs themselves could become political causes. In 1988, East Liberty’s Travelers club closed after a Valentine’s Day raid by state police, who cited it for serving alcohol to minors. Patrons accused police of being abusive and shouting gay slurs; protests ensued, and the club asked a federal judge to bar police from entering the club again. “The purpose of this search was to close down a club catering to homosexuals and to chill and deter the patrons from associating with other homosexuals,” their lawsuit alleged, according to a 1988 Pittsburgh Press account. The judge ultimately rejected the suit. A lot of the material in the exhibit

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

will come from the proprietor himself, who could not be reached for comment. “Lucky was very happy with a camera,” Apple explains. “He liked everyone to have their picture taken in the club, which is kind of strange because this is obviously a world going on behind closed doors.” Identifying the subjects in as many pictures as possible was a key part of the curatorial process. The photos — some of which are on display at www.pittsburghqueerhistory.com — will be used in the exhibit and displayed from a slide projector, just as they were in the clubs themselves. Apple and Haggerty hosted identification sessions with former customers and club employees. One person who attended those ses-

sions was Douglas Rehrer, a former bartender at area clubs who today works at CMU. Rehrer says he began to work in the clubs while in grad school in the late 1980s, because “my work-study had fallen through.” Rehrer says that Apple’s research into the era is “extremely important, not just because I was part of it, but so future generations know what it was like, because it was a different world back then.” Rehrer says the photo-identification sessions were both fondly and painfully nostalgic. “It’s bittersweet,” he says, “to see someone [like] your best friend pop up on that screen, and they’re no longer here. But this is a great project because our memories — good and bad — are all we have.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Tickets and infomation: www.pittsburghparks.org/mellonsquare Thanks to BNY Mellon for support of the rededication events.

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ROUTE CHANGE Expert panel recommends technology, cultural changes at Port Authority {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

INTERACTIVE BUS shelters. Expanded late-night service. A mobile app that can allow users to buy rides with a credit card. Those were among the improvements suggested to Port Authority by experts who studied the transit system for a week. The panel of nine experts, culled by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Urban Land Institute, laid out a vision for Port Authority that included pushing for transit-oriented development projects and getting real-time information about buses and trains into riders’ hands. The panel also suggested ideas for finding new revenues — including a $2-per-day fee at park-and-ride lots and a new 1 percent multicounty sales tax. “The customer must be the focus of the entire strategic plan,” said David Leininger at the May 16 presentation of the panel’s findings. “The riders here feel a little bit left out.” Leininger, who chaired the ULI advisory panel and who serves as vice president and chief financial officer for Dallas Area Rapid Transit, joined other panelists by stressing the Port Authority should aggressively pursue younger riders. Key to transit’s future, they argued, are the 20-to-34-year-olds who make up about 30 percent of the city’s population — and who have a reputation for eschewing driving in favor of walking or biking. Younger riders, they argue, increasingly see robust public transit as a necessity. “It’s pretty clear that this audience is growing in number,” agrees Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie. “They have a growing voice as transit riders. We want to focus on the kinds of things they’re talking about and asking about.” The panel’s recommendations are not binding. But rider advocate Molly Nichols thinks it’s important to appropriately balance appealing to “choice” riders — those who can afford other transit options — with serving “captive” riders, who have little option but to take

public transit. “That was definitely more the focus: the choice riders, getting the new millennials who are coming here,” says Nichols, community organizer for Pittsburghers for Public Transit. “That’s a worthwhile thing for sure, [but] it’s really interesting how little time they spent talking about the huge needs around the county that are not being met at all.” To Chris Sandvig, regional policy director for the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, the importance of the ULI panel wasn’t so much that it uncovered ideas that had never been floated before. Instead, he says, its real impact may lie in changing the culture from one in which local politicians decide, in a top-down fashion, what transit projects have merit. “It’s not like these aren’t things people have been asking for decades,” S a n dv i g s ay s , n o t i n g the importance of an independent group of experts affirming some of the conventional wisdom, especially around transitoriented development. “Getting the Port Authority to do this stuff won’t be easy, and it won’t happen overnight.” On a few fronts, though, Port Authority is already making improvements encapsulated in some of the ULI panel’s recommendations. The agency will likely increase service on existing routes by about 2.7 percent system-wide, for example, in a bid to ease overcrowding. Port Authority has also been pilot-testing its delivery of real-time arrival information since late last summer; that project will be rolled out several routes at a time this summer, giving riders up-to-the-minute updates on how far away their ride is. As for the larger improvements and system changes, Ritchie says, “We’re not going to know what direction we head in with this until we come together as a staff and board, and figure out what we want to tackle. We’re clearly going to do something, but we need time to figure out what our next move is.”

YOUNGER RIDERS “HAVE A GROWING VOICE AS TRANSIT RIDERS,” SAYS A TRANSIT AGENCY SPOKESMAN. “WE WANT TO FOCUS ON THE KINDS OF THINGS THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT”

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Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

[GREEN LIGHT]

DRILLING DOWN John Stolz warns of danger when past, present drilling practices collide {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} JOHN STOLZ BEGAN researching the effects of gas-drilling in 2010, not long after the hydrofracturing boom took hold in Pennsylvania. These days, the Duquesne University microbiologist regularly serves as an independent expert on how fracking — in which large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected underground under high pressure to break up rock formations containing gas — can affect well water. His best-known research involves the Woodlands, a rural Butler County community where residents began complaining of declining well-water quality shortly after gas drilling began there in 2010. Many still rely on donated water to survive. Recently, Stolz — director of Duquesne University’s John Stolz Center for Environmental Research and Education — completed a three-year study, including water testing and surveys of Woodlands residents. A summary released in April reported that 56 of the 143 households surveyed (39 percent) had seen changes in their water quality, most often involving the water’s color or smell. Though the findings are complex, the study concluded that it’s “quite plausible” that drilling and related activities — including some 65 horizontal wells in the immediate area — had affected the local hydrology. (The full report is due in June.) Contamination isn’t unique to the Woodlands: Statewide, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has confirmed more than 250 cases where drillingrelated activities damaged water supplies. And recently, Stolz’s research team collected samples from a Washington County community where fracking is occurring. “It’s red water, it’s brown water, it’s black water,” he says. Stolz has been informing public debate on hydrofracturing for a while. Pittsburgh City Council requested his input before approving a citywide ban on fracking. In 2012, Stolz was part of the energy and environment “visioning team” of newly elected Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. And earlier this month, Stolz was among a handful of presenters invited to speak at a special meeting of county council, prior to council’s controversial vote on permitting drilling beneath Deer Lakes Park. Councilor Sue Means called the meeting out of concern that industry voices were dominating the discussion. But the May 1 meeting was lightly attended, and despite environmen-

tal and health concerns raised there by Stolz and other experts, council approved the drilling proposal, which Fitzgerald signed. Stolz also contributes to a lower-profile initiative: He’s technical adviser to a coalition of environmental groups that has been meeting with state officials in Harrisburg to try to improve how the state deals with drilling-related water-quality issues. The group includes representatives from six groups, including the Sierra Club and Penn Environment. “I’m glad to have John in the room” to explain technical points, says Steve Hvozdovich, who represents Clean Water Action on the coalition. “Our goal is to help DEP do their job better,” says Stolz. Among other issues, the coalition notes that when citizens complain of fouled water, the state routinely tests for only a narrow range of contaminants — usually leaving out dangerous toxins like mercury, chromium, cadmium and beryllium. “They could be reporting on more stuff,” says Stolz. The coalition’s key Harrisburg contact has been Scott Perry, the deputy secretary of DEP’s Office of Oil and Gas Management. “We very much value their input,” says Perry of the coalition. But Perry sounds unlikely to back a change in testing standards. He says that unless other contaminants are suspected, the DEP tests only for substances likely to indicate contamination related to drilling. To “test for everything under the sun every single time,” he tells City Paper, is both inappropriate and a strain on resources. “When we’re talking about health and safety and whether someone has safe drinking water, to me that’s tough to place a price tag on,” argues Hvozdovich. “If it’s a resource issue, then our state needs to step up.” Stolz also worries that drillers and regulators pay too little attention to “legacy issues” — the presence of old coal mines and conventional gas wells drilled before the fracking arrived on the scene. He believes contaminants associated with mine drainage that are found in some water wells are caused by new “conduits” in the rock created by fracking. He says old mines in places like the Deer Lakes Park area might well cause problems if drilling happens. “The damage,” he says, “is gonna start popping up in places it’s never popped up before.” D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


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PA I D A D V E RT I S E M E N T

Q&A with The Dog Stop

®

Summer is just around the cornerr and your long-awaited travel plans are just within sight! Plane tickets are booked; hotel is reserved; itinerary planned to perfection. But there is one last thing to do… who will take care of Fido (or Spot, or Rover, or the ever-growing-popular Kevin?) Whatever your canine companion’s clever calling card is, one thing is in common for all dog owners – while you sip your Mai Thai’s and dance the hula, you want to know your pup is being taken care of. Enter The Dog Stop®. From the beginning, The Dog Stop® was bred to be Pittsburgh’s top all-inclusive indoor/outdoor dog care facility offering boarding, in-home services (including pet sitting), day care, grooming, obedience training, and dog walking. In addition to their full range of canine services and care, each location also boasts a large retail store packed to the brim with the best selection of premium dog foods, treats, supplements, toys, grooming supplies, and more.

Where is The Dog Stop® located? The Dog Stop® has multiple stores conveniently located in and around the Pittsburgh area. They currently include the East End, located at 1140 Washington Boulevard (412-361-0911); the Strip District, located at 2530 Smallman Street (412-315-7050); and the South Hills, located at 2858 Banksville Road (412-343-1171). The Dog Stop® has a fourth location opening by July 1st. The new location will open in Sewickley, located at 8325 Ohio River Boulevard (412-776-3647).

What do pups do during an overnight stay at The Dog Stop®? The Dog Stop® focuses on offering a clean, fun, and safe environment to let dogs do what they do – whether it’s running in their backyards, playing with friends, or just lounging around. If your dog passes a temperament test, is spayed/neutered, and is up-to-date on its vaccinations (including Rabies, DHLPP, and Bordetella), your pup will be able to run and play with its friends and The Dog Stop®’s own canine companions from sun up to sun down. Our facilities offer over 5,000 square feet of indoor play space with multiple locations offering safe and secure outdoor play areas. At bedtime your pup will be taken to its private boarding kennel, where it will be given dinner and tucked in for a restful night of sleep. In the morning, after a hearty breakfast, they are escorted to the play areas for another day of fun! If your dog prefers the company of humans over that of other dogs, or is not day care friendly, don’t fret! The Dog Stop® offers overnight boarding that includes personal playtime with our canine companions.

The Burgh’s Best AWARD-WINNING Indoor/Outdoor Dog Care Facility

®

The Dog Stop provides bedding, bowls, and a high quality grain-free house food for your pooch. However it is recommended that you bring your pup’s own food, bedding, and toys in order to avoid upset stomachs and to make it feel at home.

Can owners check on their dogs during their stay at The Dog Stop®? They most certainly can! Each day The Dog Stop® posts pup cams to their website (thedogstop.net) of the dogs at play in day care. In addition, owners can call at any time during regular business hours to check and see how their furry loved ones are doing, including getting up to speed on eating habits, bathroom habits, playtime habits, and more.

For owners who prefer that their pups stay at home while they’re away, what services does The Dog Stop® offer? The Dog Stop® also offers overnight pet-sitting and dog walking. Pets can stay in the comfort of home while being cared for by one of The Dog Stop®’s trained professionals. Pet sitting and walking is great for owners with multiple dogs, elderly dogs, cats or other small pets, or pets with special needs. The Dog Stop®’s pet sitters will also bring in the mail, take out the trash, water plants, and give your home the feel that someone is home while owners are away.

DAY CARE Full Day of Day Care (No Overnight) - $24/day (packages available!) 1/2 Day of Day Care (No Overnight) - $15/day (packages available!) Hourly Day Care (No Overnight) - $5/hour

For additional services and pricing check www.thedogstop.net

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South Hills

1140 Washington Blvd.

2858 Banksville Rd.

COMING SOON! Sewickley 8325 Ohio River Blvd.

412-315-7050

412-361-0911

412-343-1171

412-766-DOGS (3647)

DAYCARE • BOARDING • GROOMING• WALKING • TRAINING • IN-HOME SERVICES • RETAIL

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Grooming Service

Discount applies to one dog per family. Limit 1 coupon per family. See website for daycare requirements. Offer expires 8/30/14.

Limit 1 coupon per family. See website for boarding requirements. Reservation required. Expires 8/30/14.

Discount applies to one dog per family. Limit 1 coupon per family. Appointment required. Offer expires 8/30/14.

CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE

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10% OFF

Full Day of Daycare

GROOMING Full Service Groom – start at $40/dog Full Service Bath – start at $25/large dog, $15/small dog

PET SITTING & WALKING

N E W S

Strip District 2530 Smallman St.

Online Reservations, Pup Cams, & More @ www.TheDogStop.net

BOARDING Overnight Boarding with Day Care - $34/night (7th night free with stays of 6+ nights!) Overnight Boarding without Day Care - $28/night (7th night free with stays of 6+ nights!) Homecoming Baths - $15/large dog $10/small dog (Free with stays of 7+ nights!)

Overnight Stays – start at $50/night Dog Walking - $17/walk, $5/each additional dog

Where Tails Go to Wag!

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ON

A RICHLY FLAVORED BEEF BROTH AMPED UP THE SAVOR IN MANY OF OUR DISHES

CHICAGO-STYLE ROAST BEEF {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Having spent time in Chicago and downstate Illinois, I discovered what I consider to be the greatest sandwich on earth — the Italian beef. The sandwich consists of sliced roast beef, which has been marinating in jus, on a hard roll. The entire thing is dipped back in the jus, then smothered in a pickled hot-pepper mixture called giardiniera. Usually, I can only get this sandwich in Chicago, but recently I stumbled across Yovi’s Hot Dogs in the basement of a Market Square building. Owner Lee Yovanof moved to Pittsburgh in 1983 after running his own dog and beef shop in Chicago after college. For 19 years, he operated a hot-dog shop on Liberty Avenue Downtown, before moving to his current location a couple of years ago. At Yovi’s, I ordered the Italian beef, and when I asked Yovanof if it came dipped, he smiled at me: We were on the same delicious page. The sandwich was as good as, if not better than, many I’ve had in the Windy City, and the giardiniera was among the best I’ve eaten. Most of Yovi’s business is selling Chicago-style hot dogs. When Pittsburghers want a “hoagie,” they want it “real dry” and loaded with lettuce. But converts can be made. “I’ve asked some of the folks, ‘Just try it with the peppers on top, just a little,’” Yovanof says. “After that taste, they get hooked on it.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

477 Graeme St., Market Square, Downtown. 412- 628-4943

the

FEED

Among the first fruits of the season, rhubarb winds up in a lot of desserts, preserves and other things that rely on sugar to mitigate its tartness. But you can use rhubarb in savory dishes, too: Chopped up and stewed, its sourness adds just the right touch of brightness to soup and stews, such as spicy lentil or chickpea dishes that call for fresh lemon.

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JOURNEY TO

UZBEKISTAN {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

UDDENLY, OPTIONS abound for

Central Asian dining — a category which did not even really exist in Pittsburgh before last year. It began with a mini-wave of Nepalese restaurants; now Kavsar, an Uzbek restaurant on Mount Washington, brings us yet another tantalizing new cuisine to discover. Like Nepal, Uzbekistan’s location along the old Silk Road made it a crossroads for disparate cultures and cuisines. Kavsar’s menu clearly reflects both Uzbekistan’s recent history as a former Soviet Socialist republic, with beef stroganoff and blini-like crepes rolled around savory fillings, and its proximity to China, evident in many dishes based upon noodles and dumplings. We started with bread, which, as per the menu, is called non and baked in a clay tandyr. Yet, it in no way resembled naan from a tandoor. Instead, the loaf was nearly donut-shaped, with a flattened middle surrounded by a ring of hearty, crusty, risen dough, brushed with butter, browned in the oven and sprinkled with sesame seeds. It was so good, we ordered

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

Palov with beef

two more loaves to enjoy at home with coffee and/or wine. (Like other Muslimrun establishments, Kavsar does not serve or permit alcohol.) In addition to capitalizing on Uzbekistan’s primary agricultural product — grain — the cuisine prominently features meat. Historically that means mutton, thanks to a tradition of sheep farming, but

KAVSAR 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-488-8708 or 412-488-8709 HOURS: Daily noon-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $2-9; entrees $7-13 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED Kavsar appears to have adapted its dishes to American tastes by substituting plenty of beef. A richly flavored beef broth amped up the savor in many of our dishes. Samsa, chopped meat and onion in a flaky pastry, was like an excellent, savory croissant, intensely flavored from within by the broth

that bound the filling and soaked into the bread without making it soggy or limp. Meat pancakes, served blini-style with sour cream, featured a simpler groundbeef filling, but again the flavor was bigger than the meat, while the crepes were both tender and sturdy enough for the filling. The crepes made a beautiful presentation in julien, gathered like purses around a stroganoff-like filling of meat, mushrooms and vegetables in a sophisticated, sour-cream-infused sauce. Salads ranged from simple — long, julienned strips of carrot with onion in a bold dressing of garlic, vinegar and hot paprika — to meal-worthy, with additions of chicken, beef or eggs. A half-dozen soups covered a similar range. We enjoyed the hearty “borsch” with beans in addition to potato, cabbage and beef in a crimson beef-beet broth. We detected Indian influence in nuhot shurak, a dish of chickpeas in Kavsar’s delicious beef broth, topped with hunks of slow-cooked chuck roast and lively spiced onions. And manti — big dumplings


available with meat, spinach or pumpkin filling — appeared linked directly to the momos of Nepal. Ours featured wonderful, delicate wrappers around pumpkin that was full of warm spices and earthy flavor. A dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of dill reminded us, though, of Uzbekistan’s relationship with Russia. Then there is the Middle Eastern influence evident in kebabs. The chicken was juicy dark meat, heady with smokiness. Beef cubes were a bit well done for our tastes, but tender and flavorful nonetheless. An unexpected treat were little salads that were far tastier than their garnishlike proportions suggested, with tomatoes quite good for May, onion softened by vinegar or a touch of heat, and a bright, nearly fruity, dressing. A side of garlic-herb fries was scanty on seasoning, but perfectly golden crisp without and fluffy within. At first, we thought it odd that the stroganoff is served on fries, but having tried them, we understood better.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TAPPED FOR SUCCESS Long-awaited Braddock brewery opens this week The Brew Gentlemen — Asa Foster and Matthew Katase — made a big splash in 2012, when they introduced their own beer for a Carnegie Mellon University class project. But after a stint spent pouring at dinners and street festivals — always in their charcoal-gray logoed jackets — the duo basically disappeared. The reason is simple: Because their marketing efforts had to (literally) make the grade, Katase says, “We were forced to be more public than we wanted to. We weren’t ready for that.” So they backed off the promotional campaign, and focused on raising money from private investors and a Kickstarter campaign. That financed a move to Braddock, where they built a brewhouse and taproom. Now they’re ready to go public again: Their brewery is set to open the day this issue hits the streets. “I think we have everything dialed in right now,” says Katase. “It’s not as variable batch-to-batch as it used to be.” Brew Gentlemen will serve four flagship beers: White Sky, a chai-spiced wheat; General Braddock’s, an East Coast IPA; Business Casual, a low-alcohol red ale; and Build and Destroy, a wheat stout. It’s also producing special releases and experimental brews in what the brewers call their “Rapid Prototype Factory Series.” An example of that is Chipotle Mango IPA. But don’t let the untraditional blend fool you, says head brewer Brandon Capps, who moved from Georgia to work with Foster and Katase. “It’s always, always, always at its core beer,” he says. “But sometimes I like adding complexity.” The brewers are betting that beer enthusiasts will make a trip to Braddock, where their polished taproom is open 4-10 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and features smart details like USB chargers under the bar. All this is just the beginning, Katase says: “Who knows how long it will take, but in the next few years we want to build a production facility in Braddock that’s larger in scale, and then start distributing outside of the state.”

“I THINK WE HAVE EVERYTHING DIALED IN RIGHT NOW.”

Carrot salad

Lagman was a stir-fry dish in which clearly homemade noodles, their pliant chewiness evoking udon, were topped with diced red and green peppers, chopped green beans and, of course, beef — here thinly sliced across the grain for a melting texture. The menu promised Asian spices, and the dish’s Chinese origins were apparent, but it was distinctly Uzbekistan’s own. Finally, we tried Uzbek palov, the national dish, traditionally prepared by men. This simmered dish of beef and carrots over pilaf-style rice was perhaps the meal’s only disappointment. It was not overtly flawed, but a little bland compared to the other dishes we sampled. Perhaps a shake of the white-vinegar cruet on the table would have enlivened it. We ordered as much Uzbek food as we could possibly try, and were rewarded with a dining experience that has, truly, expanded our palates. Kavsar is a welcoming and wonderful introduction to a delicious cuisine. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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512 Braddock Ave., Braddock. 412871-5075 or www.brewgentlemen.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

THE BLIND PIG TAVERN. 2210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-5865936. This South Side bar, whose name derives from Prohibition slang, offers a satisfying, pigcentric menu of pub grub. Look for the pig in pulled-pork sliders and pepperoni rolls. Or branch out with pizza, grilled cheese sandwich (add bacon!) and other popular bar fare. Wash it all down with legal beverages. JE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sit-down venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, of fresh-cooked Cambodian cuisine. Kabobs, fried wontons, chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum

600 Grant Street

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE

CALL C ALL F FOR OR D DETAILS ET TAILS S

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DINETTE. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thincrust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck

Savoy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE ECHO. 1740 Route 228, Cranberry. 724-779-3246. The menu at this sophisticated restaurant offers a tour de force of modern American cuisine. It focuses on central ingredients and adds layers of flavor, sometimes in unexpected forms, such as a purée of tuna alongside grilled steak, or golden trout served on a bed of orzo with a fennel-cream sauce. But even a simpler dish, such as fettuccini Alfredo, is perfectly executed. LE

Il Pizzaioli {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu

of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412262-2920. This stylish and cheery diner offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-3444123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE CONTINUES ON PG. 20


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE

SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5656/ 412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE

SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount restaurant’s offerings include Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. tapas, hearty meat dishes with 412-745-3663. There’s still an array of international pleasure to be had in seasonings, and a old-fashioned breaded mix-n-match, createchicken and veal, your-own section for served up at this classic mixed grill. KE Italian-American . w w w restaurant. Indulge aper p ty ci h g p STAGIONI. 2104 E. in old-school comfort .com Carson St., South Side. foods, such as manicotti 412-586-4738. This cozy (made with crepes) and storefront restaurant offers beans and greens (with a marriage of traditional sausage), as well as chicken and ingredients and modern, pastas specials. KE sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF ingredients and house-made SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 pastas to flavorful meat entrees Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. and vegetarian plates, the fare 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills exhibits a masterful combination venue offers straight-up Southern of flavors and textures. KF barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d STATION STREET. 6290 Broad expect, such as greens (cooked St., East Liberty. 412-365-2121. in pork broth), mac-and-cheese A neighborhood hot-dog joint and corn-filled corn bread. Get with exotically dressed dogs, the sauce on the side to savor including: chili cheese (with the smokiness of the meat. KF curds), Hawaii (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, sweetbreads SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip and “devil” (egg salad, Tabasco District. 412-281-0660. The Strip and potato chips). Also District now has a swanky spot for offers tacos. JF brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South between current fine-dining Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique culture (locally sourced foods, décor you can buy and a massive, sous vide meats), lounge favorites convivial Sunday brunch make this (sliders and fish tacos) and a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For Southern comfort (chicken with the tea snob, the multi-page list black-eyed peas and greens, is not to be missed. FJ watermelon salad). LE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


LOCAL

“I DON’T HAVE TO HAVE A DAY JOB FOR TWO MORE MONTHS AND I CAN WORK ON MY ART.”

BEAT

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

“Years ago this land was green — we put money in the soil,” sings T. Mitchell Bell on “Freedom Rust.” “Tide has turned and we learned to trade blood for oil. / Fill the air and skies above with mystery cocktails, / Chase it down with a shot of carbon to forget that it was there.” The song’s the keystone track on Bell’s new album, Witness, in which the local singer-songwriter expands upon environmental concerns broached on his 2008 release, The Ballad of Philo Paul. Bell has served on the board of the Center for Coalfield Justice and performed at benefits for environmental causes. He jokes about preparing to “lock down” in protest if the fracking trucks ever roll in Peters Township, where he lives in an old farmhouse with his wife and three children. Witness, however, mostly avoids preaching. Instead, it’s a rich and varied song cycle featuring a full band of local talent (including Bob Banerjee and Steve Sciulli) dealing out folk- and blues-inflected rock. Thematically, says Bell, it’s “one big long song.” The Celtic-accented “Valley Below,” about mountaintop-removal coal-mining, forges the link between economic and environmental injustice. “Empty Inside” explores the spiritual hollowness of planet-eating consumerism; in the harmonica-driven “Give and Take,” personal wholeness can’t survive nature’s exploitation. “Iron Bird” tunefully excoriates political fecklessness. “Freedom Rust” is an elegy for America’s mid-century industrial heyday … whose fossil-fueled brawn Bell nonetheless well understands drove climate change. “We have to evolve or we’re gonna live on a dying planet,” he says. Still, “I wanted the record to be kind of a hopeful thing rather than a downer,” he says. “We need to focus on the future generations. They’re going to inherit what we … dump everywhere.” Speaking of kids, an upcoming concert is a family affair. On July 25, T. Mitchell Bell and the Wandering Coalition perform live on the WDVE Coffeehouse. And that night, the band plays the Rex Theater with: The Steamshovel Blues Band (featuring Bell’s dad); The Weathered Road and The Rusty Haywhackers, each of which features one of Bell’s adult sons; and The Recipe, featuring Bell’s niece.

T. Mitchell Bell {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

GREEN SOUNDS

making THE brand

{ILLUSTRATION BY MICAH BENSON}

In the wake of the music-industry collapse, some artists walk a fine line promoting brands while pursuing art.

A

T THIS YEAR’S South By Southwest festival in March, Lady Gaga, the epitome of pop stardom, partnered with Frito-Lay — a deal that didn’t endear her to some critics. As the festival began, music writer John Pareles slammed Gaga in a New York Times blog post: “My face, physical presence, and social media accounts are not a snack-food marketing tool,” wrote Pareles, who said he’d skip Gaga’s performance at SXSW. “Lady Gaga, feel free to scarf down my promotional bag of chips. As if.” But in a keynote speech at the indie-centric fest, Gaga gave critics something more to think about — and spelled out a mindset that a lot of musicians, including some based in Pittsburgh, are echoing. “[W]hoever is writing or saying all of

those things, you don’t know fuck about the state of the music industry,” Gaga said. “I think it’s also about how the artist chooses to engage in these sorts of relationships. What’s the type of relationship? What’s the philosophy behind the collaboration? Do you have things in common?”

A MARKETING DEAL CAN COVER EVERYTHING FROM A FEW MONTHS’ RENT TO A FEW YEARS’ SALARY. The controversy highlighted an industry-wide trend: While marketing partnerships have drawn a backlash from some musicians and fans, among many others

there’s been a gradual shift in opinion about partnering with corporations. And festival season, the extended spring-to-summer music-industry holiday, is the most obvious reflection of the change. From Ultra to Coachella to SXSW, advertisers keen on reaching the coveted millennial audience have capitalized on the festival format. But beyond the branded stages, branded parties and branded dinners, there’s been a change of ownership and power — from major labels to big brands. And plenty of artists are cool with that. “I think 20 to 30 years ago, generally speaking, people were more apt to say, ‘Oh, that person sold out because they licensed a song to a commercial,’” says Kristian Dunn of the band El Ten Eleven. “I think these

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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MAKING THE BRAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

ALIA MUSICA Pittsburgh at the PFNM

Berio Folk Songs with Jamie Jordan New Hazlett Theater Friday May 23, 7:30pm

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

days, people aren’t as critical in that regard because it’s just harder to make money as a musician.” El Ten Eleven is comprised of Dunn and drummer Tim Fogarty (a Pittsburgh native). The pair creates a unique blend of postrock-influenced indie music, with Dunn on a double-neck bass that he loops over Fogarty’s electronic drums. While experimental in its approach, the band has gained a lot of experience making original music for film scores and commercials, so it can slip into a pop aesthetic on a whim. “There’s not really CD sales anymore,” Dunn explains. “I think the general public is more forgiving of musicians licensing their music to commercials because they know they’ve got to pay the rent. In one shot, you can sell a song and it’s like, ‘OK, cool: I don’t have to have a day job for two more months, and in that time I can work on my art.’”

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Local rapper Kellee Maize appears in a TV commercial for Toyota’s Prius.

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Local rapper Kellee Maize has also found success with a brand partnership. She signed a three-year contract with Toyota to promote the company’s hybrid model, Prius. Maize, who’s built a career on unconventional marketing techniques, admits that the offer initially blindsided her. But she has nothing but good things to say about working with the brand. “It’s definitely helping me, because I’m really committed to my music being free and continuing to learn and kind of be a guinea pig for this whole new way of copyrighting music to creative commons,” she explains. “I’m not heavily distributed in normal channels. [The Toyota deal] pretty much funded my last album. And it continues to give me the opportunity to just make more music, and not be quite as concerned with selling in order to make it.” A marketing deal can cover everything from a few months’ rent to a few years’ salary, depending on the brand — and on the authenticity of the partnership. Maize, whose contract includes commercial face time and driving a Prius as a “brand advocate,” says she has a lot of affinity with Toyota. “For me to promote something that I really believe in, with the environment, there’s so many fucking issues,” she explains. “If we can get people to start thinking about it and their everyday choices, then it’s all a wash.” JUST BECAUSE some brands and artists are working toward an authentic outcome in a partnership, that doesn’t mean they all do. According to one advertising professional, it takes all kinds. “I’ve worked with many artists who will do anything for money,” says Bonny Dolan, executive producer at Comma Music. “But CONTINUES ON PG. 26


NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

CONNECT & FTDUB NEED MORE FASTER (SURFACE LEVEL)

Connect — who also performs with Fortified Phonetx — gets self-reflective on eight tracks (plus a bonus track), produced by FTdub. A lot of Connect’s rhymes deal with hip hop itself, language and power dynamics; he’s the contemplative counterpart to Phonetx bandmate Moemaw Naedon, who guests on a track here, spitting more aggressively. But both are thoughtful, and indignant about the right stuff: rappers who “rap stupid shit,” aggro South Side dudes and the like. FTdub’s production — sparse samples of often heavy or psychedelic-sounding rock, giving Connect space to work — is appropriate for the project, and at times downright hooky. Good stuff.

LOCKS & DAMS CASA (SELF-RELEASED)

EP of country tunes from the local sixpiece. That the first two songs are called “Carolina” and “Tennessee” should give an indication of where this one is coming from: raucous, sometimes tender, with banjo foregrounded. These are mostly oldstyle honky-tonk tunes, with a dose of rock ’n’ roll injected — the album closer, “I Want to Find You,” is more rock than country — and are largely catchy, if conventional. There are some sweet vocal harmonies here, but also some moments where the lead vocals feel a little put-on. A nice EP all in all, though, and a good taste of what this band is capable of. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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MAKING THE BRAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

I’ve had some pass up a million dollars because they don’t believe in the product. My job is to always give them the offer.” Dolan, who moderated a panel discussion titled “The Shifting Brandscape” at SXSW this year, says she’s watched brands infiltrate the music industry over the past decade. Having worked at Leo Burnett Chicago for seven years as a music producer, she’s seen artists and fans alike take a more forgiving approach to partnerships. “At Comma, I’ll do a showcase when bands come through,” she says. “These artist showcases happen with advertising agencies in New York and Chicago. And what we do at Comma is invite all the agencies, so the band can get in front of all the agencies to let them know they’re interested in getting their music out there.” Dolan says the roster of bands interested in such partnerships spans the spectrum from indie to mainstream. And while El Ten Eleven, for example, may not be getting sponsorships with American Express a la Jay Z, Dunn and Fogarty have found balance in making art and a living simultaneously. Having toured the festival circuit for years, they’ve landed spots at North Coast Music Fest and What the Festival, just to name a few, alongside names like Wu Tang Clan and Afrojack.

As for Gaga, her actual performance at SXSW was just about the last thing you’d expect to see in a commercial from the Frito-Lay brand. She spun around on a spit like a pig while singing songs from last year’s album Artpop, as her backup dancers completed the tableau of rebellious revelry around her. To finish off her performance, she had fellow performance artist Millie Brown vomit paint on her. Vomiting in relation to a snack brand? The Internet went crazy. In her keynote afterward, Gaga praised the experience of “watching the fans have an experience with me and then having Doritos support that to its core, not telling me how to do the show, what it should be like, or putting chains around my neck.” Frito-Lay, she added, “just said, ‘We just want to support you in having a great experience [at the festival]. We want to help your foundation. We want to help spread the message. How do we do that?’ And they came up with ‘Bold Bravery,’ and it all came together.” “The truth is, without sponsorships, without these companies coming together to help us, we won’t have any more artists in Austin,” she added. “We won’t have any festivals, because record labels don’t have any fucking money.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN BRACKBILL}

“Inuksuit,” as performed in Brooklyn [NEW MUSIC] + THU., MAY 22

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

Robert Ashley’s opera Perfect Lives is a bit different from most pieces of music; for one thing, it’s not meant to be performed in one place. The nomadic composition goes indoors and out, here and there. Performed as part of this week’s Pittsburgh Festival of New Music, it’ll take place everywhere from Market Square to Marty’s Market (in the Strip District) and James Simon’s sculpture studio (Uptown). It’s the first Pittsburgh performance of the piece, and it’ll be carried out by Varispeed, a Brooklyn group that has performed the piece before, with praise from Ashley (who died this past March). Also featured at the festival, put on by Alia Musica: Frederic Rzewski in a rare performance of his own work (Sat., May 24); the outdoors-set piece “Inuksuit,” by John Luther Adams (Sun., May 25, at Lake Elizabeth on the North Side); and more. Andy Mulkerin 11 a.m. Continues through Sun., May 25. Multiple venues; most performances at New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. Individual concert tickets range from free to $15; festival pass $40. 412-361-0194 or www. pghnewmusic.com

[POST-ROCK] + SAT., MAY 24 Phil Manley, Nathan Means and Sebastian Thomson of Washington, D.C.-based Trans Am were paving the way for post rock well before the likes of Caspian or Explosions in the Sky; the band just released its 10th studio album, Volume X. Trans Am’s relevance in the music world comes from the band’s range in sound, using effects on every instrument, which creates fuzzy, distorted guitar and spacey, sometimes menacing keyboards. At times using heavily modified vocals reminiscent of Peter Frampton, the band doesn’t stay static, and keeps the listener tuned

in to its soundscapes. The band plays the Smiling Moose tonight with Microwaves and The Lopez. Zach Brendza 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10.80-$14. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[EMO] + SUN., MAY 25 Coming up in the DIY scene, Old Gray has a sincere style with heartfelt lyrics and intensity in each instrument, with chords slammed out of guitars and drums pounded to a breaking point. Its sound is reminiscent of better-known hardcore acts like La Dispute, The Saddest Landscape and Caravels. The New England-based band released a new song, “An Epitaph,” earlier this month and it embodies its sound Ingrid Michaelson and who the members are: a passionate band playing genuine music with somber words to go along. The band plays The Mr. Roboto Project tonight with Frameworks, Annakarina, Driver and Sorta Lonely. ZB 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. All ages. www. therobotoproject.org

[POP] + SUN., MAY 25 The latest from Ingrid Michaelson, Lights Out, features collaborations with everyone from indie group A Great Big World to singer-songwriter Mat Kearney and Michaelson’s husband, musician Greg Laswell. So far, though, the biggest hit from the record has been from Michaelson alone: The pop tune “Girls Chase Boys” has climbed the charts since its release in February. Tonight, Michaelson, who’s made a name with lots of TV placements (and that orange-juice commercial where she sang a Beatles tune while floating with a piano), brings her show to Stage AE tonight. AM 6:30 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25-27. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

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31ST STREET PUB. Abigail Williams, Lecherous Nocturne, Wrought Iron, Horse Drawn Death Machine. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Man Overboard, Forever Came Calling. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Bombadil. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Husky Burnette, Broke Stranded & Ugly, Bill Jasper. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. For All I Am. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Bruce Springsteen, Joe & the Houserockers. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

FRI 23 31ST STREET PUB. Invisible Things, Martin Bisi, Outlander, Radon Chong. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Primal Fear. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Steelesque, Addison Steele (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Saddest Landscape, Driver, Worn Colors, 3 Man Cannon, Kite Party. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE���S. Misfit Toys, Shaun McIntyre. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Red Elvises. Station Square. 412-481-7625. REX THEATER. Green River Ordinance. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. THE DANZAS, Crooked Cobras, The Anti-Psychotics. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Bruce Springsteen, Joe & the Houserockers. Oakland. 412-621-4253. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Backstabbing Good People, Between Two Rivers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FISHER’S BAR & RESTAURANT. Brian Lisik. Zelienople. 724-452-1350. GOOSKI’S. Man Forever. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Working Breed. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Supervoid, Lost Realms Valley of the Sun, Supervoid, Lost Realms. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. MOONDOG’S. Nied’s Hotel Band w/ Miss Freddye. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Joy Ike. Strip District. 412-566-1000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Rudy & the Professionals. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCK ROOM. Camp Element, Lycosa, Tab-You-Larasa, Old Lords. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. SMILING MOOSE. Trans Am. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Zoey Burger. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Devonian Gardens, Shaky Shrines, Dazzletine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TIKI BAR. Patti Spadaro Band. Washington. 724-348-7022.

SUN 25 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. King’s Ransom. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. BEACH HOUSE RESTAURANT. The Dave Iglar Band. BRILLOBOX. Grateful Dead Night. Hosted by Ryan Emmett & Dan Ward. Bloomfield. 412-537-8058. HAMBONE’S. Stephanie Nilles, Faithful Sinners. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HAMILTON PARK. Johnny Angel & the Halos, Dancing Queen, Tony Janflone Jr., The Stickers. Castle Shannon Community Day. Castle Shannon. NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Clocks in Motion, Duo Scordatura, the East Liberty Community Engagement Orchestra. Part of the Pgh Festival of New Music. www. pghnewmusic.com. North Side. SMILING MOOSE. Bane. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Ingrid Michaelson, Storyman, Sugar & The Hi-Lows. North Side. 412-229-5483. TUGBOAT’S. Drowning Clowns, Five 6 Band. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

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31ST STREET PUB. Thunder Vest, The Cheats, The Strutting Cocks, Mother Hawk, Del Rios. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Shannon & the Merger, Carolyn Hawk (Early) Wine & Spirit, John & Brittany feat. J.R. (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Delaneys. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering: a brand-new tune from indie-rock outfit Nevada Color. Stream or download “1962” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com CONTINUES ON PG. 93


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


{PHOTO COURTESY OF TONY KATAI}

MUSIC VENUES

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas, June 1

31ST STREET PUB. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-391-8334 ALTAR BAR. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-206-9719 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 BACH, BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH. Mellon Park. Fifth Avenue at Shady Avenue, Shadyside. 412-255-2493

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.bayardstown.com BENEDUM CENTER. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-456-6666 BILL CHISNELL PRODUCTIONS. 1111 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-251-5601 BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 BYHAM THEATER. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL OF HOMESTEAD. 510 E. 10th St.,

The Apache Relay, The Weeks. Stage AE Stag

Devonian Gardens. Thunderbird Cafe Devo

MAY 25 MA Conor Oberst, Dawes es. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall

MAY 22 Abigail Williams. 31 Street Pub Man Overboard. Altar Bar Animals as Leaders. Rex Theater For All I Am. Smiling Moose Rusted Root, The Wailers. Stage AE st

MAY 22-25 Pittsburgh Festival of New Music. New Hazlett Theater

MAY 23 Invisible Things, Martin Bisi. 31st Street Pub Primal Fear. Altar Bar Steelesque, Addison Steele. Club Cafe (early show) Artistree. Club Cafe (late show) The Saddest Landscape. Garfield Artworks Red Elvises. Hard Rock Cafe Trespassers. Mr. Roboto Project Green River Ordinance. Rex Theater Backstabbing Good People. Thunderbird Cafe

MAY 24 Shannon and the Merger. Club Cafe (early show)

Wine and Spirit. Club Cafe (late show) Rise. Latitude 360 Nied’s Hotel Band. Moondog’s Joy Ike, Cello Fury. Pittsburgh Winery Trans Am. Smiling Moose

Nonstandard. Garfield Artworks Stephanie Nilles. Hambone’s mbone’s Pub Old Gray, Frameworks ks. Mr. Roboto Project

Nothin 2 Lose Tour 2014 014. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Dr. Nasty & the Mountain Men. Rex Theater

Bane. Smiling Moose Ingrid Michaelson. Stage AE

MAY 26 Black Star Riders. Altar ar Bar Pure Disgust. Mr. Roboto oto Project Aesthetic Perfection. Rex Theater

MAY 28 Autarch. Mr. Roboto Project oject The Monkees. Palace Theatre Steel Panther. Stage AE

MAY 29 Murder Junkies. 31st Street treet Pub Jen Chapin, The Damaged aged Pies. Club Cafe Mia Z. Mellon Square Hounds of Hate. Mr. Roboto oboto Project Death in June. Rex Theater eater R5. Stage AE Ultraviolet Hippopotamus amus. Thunderbird Cafe

Munhall. 412-368-5225 CATTIVO. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CITY OF ASYLUM/PITTSBURGH. 318 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-323-0278 CLUB CAFE. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-642-1800 FIRE K STUDIOS. 5001 Curry Road, Suite 3, Baldwin. 412-655-3030

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400 FLAGSTAFF HILL. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-422-6426

THE FRIC FRICK CK AR A ART T & HISTORICAL H ST HI TORIC I AL L CENTER R. 722 7227 22 Reynolds SSt., 227 22 t., Po Point oiint n Br B Breeze. eeze. CENTER. 412-371-0600

GARFIELD GARFIE EL LD DA ARTWORKS. R WORK RT KS. 493 4931 31 P Penn enn n A Ave ., Garfield.. 41 4 2-361-226 2 2 Ave., 412-361-2262

GATEWAY GA ATEWA AY CLIPPER. 350 W W.. Station n Squa SSquare qu re Drive, Station Square. 412-355-7980 Square a .4 12--355-7980

HAMBONE’S PUB. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318 HARD ROCK CAFE. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. 412-481-7625 HARTWOOD ACRES. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 HEINZ FIELD. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-322-9662 HEINZ HALL. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900 HIGHLAND PARK. Highland Park. 412-255-8975 HOWLERS. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-0320 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 103 Slade Lane, Warrendale. 724-799-8333 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-3000 LATITUDE 360. 200 Quinn Drive, Robinson. 412-693-5555 MARTY’S MARKET. 2301 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-586-7177 MEADOWS CASINO. 210 Racetrack Road, Washington. 724-503-1200 MELLON SQUARE. Smithfield Street at Sixth Avenue, Downtown. MOONDOG’S. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-828-2040 MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.org MR. SMALL’S THEATRE. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 NEW HAZLETT THEATER. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. 412-320-4610 PALACE THEATRE. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. 724-836-8000 PEOPLES NATURAL GAS PARK. 90 Johns St., Johnstown. 888-222-1889 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-622-6914 PITTSBURGH WINERY. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 REX THEATER. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 RIVERS CASINO. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. 412-231-7777 RIVERVIEW PARK. Perry North. 412-255-2539 ROUND CORNER CANTINA. 3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279 SCHENLEY PLAZA. Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-255-8975 SHADYSIDE NURSERY. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5845 THE SHOP. 3813 Main St., Bloomfield. 412-951-0622 SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668 SOUTH PARK. South Park. 412-835-4810 STAGE AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 ST. CLAIR PARK. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. 724-838-4323 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-6070 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177 THE WATERFRONT. 149 Bridge St., Homestead. 412-476-8889

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

Atmosphere. Mr. Small’s Theatre Zomboy. Rex Theater Chvrches. Stage AE Amos Lee. Three Rivers Arts Festival

MAY 30 Gibbzmatik. Altar Bar Broken Fences. Club Cafe Stranger Convention. Garfield Artworks The Mavens. Moondog’s Katie Hate. Mr. Small’s Theatre America. Palace Theatre Vic and Gab. Smiling Moose Joe Grushecky and the House Rockers. South Park The Head and the Heart. Stage AE Mike Medved Band. Thunderbird Cafe

JUNE 12 Stryper. Altar Bar Ratking, Show Me the Body. Brillobox Mother Falcon. Club Cafe Indigenous. Hard Rock Cafe Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution. Mellon Square

Jazz in the Garden: Benny Benack Jr. and Benny Benack III. Phipps Conservatory The Smithereens. Three Rivers Arts Festival

MAY 31 Klaymore. 31st Street Pub Kalin and Myles. Altar Bar Pitchblak Brass Band. Brillobox Bill Toms and Hard Rain present A Tribute to Chuck Berry. Club Cafe

JUNE 13 Hellstompers. 31st Street Pub World’s Fair. Altar Bar Nitty Scott, MC; Alex Wiley. Cattivo David Wilcox. Club Cafe Andy D. Howlers Ron & the Rumpshakers. Moondog’s Grand Piano. Rex Theater The Clintones. Rivers Casino Jennel Garcia. Smiling Moose Pittsburgh Opera. South Park Lindsey Stirling. Stage AE Gedeon Luke & the People. St. Clair Park Curtis Harding. Three Rivers Arts Festival

(early show) Influx, Velvet Heat. Club Cafe (late show) The Traditional. Garfield Artworks The Red Western, Lowly the Tree Ghost, Satin Gum, Andre Costello. Howlers theCAUSE. Moondog’s Round Two, Restricted Highways. Mr. Small’s Theatre Mark Dignam & the House of Song. Rex Theater

JUNE 01 Unearth. Altar Bar Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas. Club Cafe Skye Steele. Garfield Artworks Mon River Ramblers, Hart Kline Read (& Young). Shadyside Nursery Bastille. Stage AE

JUNE 02

JUNE 14 Club Cafe

Backstreet Boys, Avril Lavigne.

JUNE 06

Quiet Company, Driver Friendly.

Jeremy Messersmith. Club Cafe (early show) The Black Six, Discount Guns.

Curtis Harvey. Howlers Eyehategod. Rex Theater

Club Cafe (late show) Tim McGraw. First Niagara Pavilion

JUNE 03

Meeting of Important People.

Sage Francis. Altar Bar JD McPherson. Club Cafe Saintseneca. Brillobox Needtobreathe, Foy Vance. Stage AE

The Frick Art & Historical Center Lily Wine Affair. Hard Rock Cafe

Lil’ Ed and the Blues Imperials. South Park

JUNE 04

Ray LaMontagne.

Hit the Lights. Altar Bar

Stage AE (outdoor)

Matt Munhall. Club Cafe

Nicole Atkins.

The Trews.

St. Clair Park

Hard Rock Cafe Old 97’s, Lydia Loveless. Mr. Small’s Theatre

Jeff Tweedy.

Dailey & Vincent. New Hazlett Theater Pablo Cruise. Palace Theatre

Three Rivers Arts Festival Dianne Reeves at Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival, June 20-22

Tyler, the Creator. Stage AE Oumar Konate. Thunderbird Cafe

JUNE 05 The Menzingers. Altar Bar Titus Andronicus. Cattivo Diana Chittester. Club Cafe The Black Lillies, Arlo Aldo. Pittsburgh Winery

The Naked and Famous. Stage AE Cory Henry. Thunderbird Cafe

The Cheats. 31st Street Pub Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express.

The Red Western, May 31, June 28, July 25 and Aug. 3

JUNE 07 Beauty Slap, Memphis Hill. Altar Bar

Whitney Ann Jenkins and Her Platonic Guy Friends. Club Cafe (early show)

Jazz and Jokes with One Eye Callowood. Club Cafe (late show) 9Sundays. Hard Rock Cafe Mikey Riot. Moondog’s Cabinet. Rex Theater Roger Humphries. Riverview Park No Mames: DJ Thornato, Pandemic. Round Corner Cantina

Smiling Moose Sam Bush. Three Rivers Arts Festival Scarlet and the Harlots. Thunderbird Cafe

First Niagara Pavilion Terry Bradshaw. Meadows Casino

Doug Demming with the Jewel Tones. Moondog’s

Melinda. Pittsburgh Winery Chaka Khan. Pride in the Street, Downtown

JUNE 08

(www.pittsburghpride.org)

Screeching Weasel, The Queers. Altar Bar Blitzen Trapper. Club Cafe Michael Logen. Fire K Studios Wreck Loose, Andre Costello and the Cool Minors, Round Black Ghosts, The Big Bend. Gateway Clipper 28 North, 7Horse. Hartwood Acres The Hills and the Rivers, Cousin Boneless. Shadyside Nursery Colonizing the Cosmos, Twnsppl, Brooke Annibale.

Johnny Angel & the Halos. Rivers Casino Reggie Watkins. Riverview Park Pity Sex. Smiling Moose Lucinda Williams. Three Rivers Arts Festival

Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 09 Skinny Lister. Thunderbird Cafe

JUNE 10 The Features. Brillobox James McMurtry. Club Cafe Hellbound Glory. Hard Rock Cafe Polica, Reputante. Mr. Small’s Theatre Andy Irvine, Callan. Pittsburgh Winery Tweak Bird. Smiling Moose Dr. Dog. Stage AE Kaiser Chiefs. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 11 DevilDriver, Whitechapel. Altar Bar Eagulls. Brillobox King Kahn & the Shrines. Club Cafe Center Stage Band. Flagstaff Hill Crown Larks. Mr. Roboto Project

JUNE 15 Allegheny Brass Band. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch The Jaggerz. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Moldies and Monsters, Essential Machine. Shadyside Nursery Modern Baseball. Smiling Moose Jake Bugg. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 16 Crystal Stilts. Cattivo

JUNE 17 Asher Roth. Altar Bar Reuben and the Dark. Club Cafe Arctic Monkeys, White Denim. Stage AE (outdoor)

JUNE 18 The Fuckies. Club Cafe Gramsci Melodic. Flagstaff Hill O.A.R., Philip Philips. Stage AE (outdoor)

JUNE 19 Betty Who. Altar Bar Lowdown Brass Band. Bayardstown Social Club CONTINUES ON PG. 12

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

“Stars at Riverview” jazz concerts in the park, Saturdays, June 7-Aug. 30

Miranda Sings. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall Sol Cat. Club Cafe Average White Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Ethel. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater Charm & Chain. Mellon Square Sharon Van Etten. Mr. Small’s Theatre Matt Kerekes. Smiling Moose Tegan and Sara. Stage AE

Man With a Mission. Cattivo Sonny Landreth. Hartwood Acres Heather Kropf. Pittsburgh Winery The Armadillos, Shelf Life String Band, Tom Moran. Shadyside Nursery The Wild Feathers. Stage AE Wild Child, Shakey Graves.

JUNE 20

MAX. Altar Bar Joe Purdy. Rex Theater Wild Cub. Stage AE

Very Be Careful. Bayardstown Social Club The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall

ALL SHOWS BEGIN AT 7PM ALL EVENTS ARE FREE MURTHA AMPHITHEATER

Bobby Long. Club Cafe (early show) White Hinterland. Club Cafe (late show) Big Leg Emma. Rex Theater Pissed Jeans. Smiling Moose Buckwheat Zydeco. South Park Everclear, Soul Asylum, Eve 6, Spacehog. Stage AE (outdoor) Cello Fury, Joy Ike. St. Clair Park

OPENING ACT: AMANDA JONES AND THE FAMILY BAND

July 19 Verb Ballet August 23 Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes OPENING ACT: THE JENTS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Blood on the Dance Floor. Altar Bar Ziggy Marley. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall Scott Stapp. Latitude 360 Andy C. Rex Theater

JUNE 25

more. Multiple venues Downtown. (www.pittsburghjazzlive.com)

JUNE 26

Jamestown Revival. Altar Bar Deutschtown Music Festival fundraiser with Brewer’s Row, Paddy the Wanderer, more. Bill Chisnell Productions

Pandemic. Brillobox Masters of the Universe, B-Side Basterds, The Nightly Standard, Roma. Club Cafe Luke Bryan. Heinz Field Songwriters in the Cellar, hosted by Tim Mulhern. Pittsburgh Winery Big Sam’s Funky Nation. Rex Theater Paul Thompson. Riverview Park Masked Intruder, Direct Hit! Smiling Moose

Pinata Protest. Thunderbird Cafe Chet Vincent & the Big Bend, Jester Jenkins. The Waterfront

JUNE 22 Pittsburgh Philharmonic. Bach,

ARTSONTHEALLEGHENY.ORG

JUNE 24

Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Dianne Reeves and many

JUNE 21

June 28 Marty Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives

JUNE 23

Black Flag. Altar Bar Gemini Club. Club Cafe Justin Fabus Band. Flagstaff Hill Foghat. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

JUNE 20-22 RIVERFRONT PARK KITTANNING

Thunderbird Cafe

Beethoven and Brunch

Weapons of Choice. 31st Street Pub Xavier Rudd. Altar Bar Simone Felice. Club Cafe Nightrain. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Bill Ali Band. Mellon Square Bonerama, Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds. Rex Theater Clairy Browne & the Bangin’ Rackettes. Stage AE

JUNE 27 Thunder Vest. 31st Street Pub The 65s. Club Cafe Journey, Steve Miller Band. First Niagara Pavilion

Michael Stanley and the Resonators. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Shelf Life String Band. Marty’s Market The Bo’Hog Brothers. Moondog’s Instead of Sleeping. Mr. Small’s Theatre Drymill Road, Gary Antol. Pittsburgh Winery The Stickers. South Park CONTINUES ON PG. 14


CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

13


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Counting Crows, Toad the Wet Sprocket. Stage AE (outdoor) Leroy Justice. St. Clair Park Chuck Mead & the Grassy Knoll, The Mavens. Thunderbird Cafe

JULY 04 The Goddamn Gallows. 31st Street Pub No Bad JuJu. Rivers Casino The Idol Kings. St. Clair Park

JULY 05

JUNE 28 Sloppy Seconds. 31st Street Pub Guttermouth. Altar Bar Nat Baldwin. Andy Warhol Museum Speedy Ortiz. Club Cafe Dave Matthews Band. First Niagara Pavilion Chevy Woods. Mr. Small’s Theatre Gordon Lightfoot. Palace Theatre

Aaron “The Uke Slinger” Jones. Club Cafe The Clintones. Hard Rock Cafe Elysium. Latitude 360 Oak Ridge Boys. Meadows Casino EOE Reunion. Mr. Small’s Theatre Broken Road. Rivers Casino Thomas Wendt. Riverview Park No Mames: Pandemic. Round Corner Cantina

Tania Grubbs Quartet.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Riverview Park

WYEP Summer Music Festival. Schenley Plaza

South Park {PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN RIDDLE DUKE}

Sam Roberts Band, Valerie June, Elizabeth and the Catapult, The Red Western.

Valerie June, June 28

Polish Hillbillies, The Beagle Brothers.

7 7Springs.com Sp

Oswego t Visi County

AllStar Refugee Band and Archa Theater. City of Asylum Pittsburgh

JUNE 29 Edgewood Symphony Orchestra. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch

JULY 07 Circa Survive. Mr. Small’s Theatre

JULY 08

JUNE 30

JULY 09

Hartwood Acres

JULY 01 Delta Rae. Altar Bar Andy Grammer. Mr. Small’s Theatre

JULY 02 John Hiatt & The Combo, Robert Cray Band. Altar Bar Bear Hands. Cattivo Darryl & Kim. Flagstaff Hill

JULY 03 The Living Deads. 31st Street Pub Fall Out Boy, Paramore. First Niagara Pavilion

P l a n yo u r t r i p u s i n g t h e N E W i M a p ! w w w. v i s i t o s w e g o c o u n t y. c o m 1-800-248-4FUN

Mr. Small’s Theatre

The Beagle Brothers, Turpentiners, Broke Stranded & Ugly. Shadyside Nursery

Crobot. Smiling Moose

Shadyside Nursery

Call for FREE Guides today! (315)349-8322

Hartwood Acres

Maxwell. Heinz Hall The Cordovas feat. Joe Firstman. Club Cafe James Hunter Six. Rex Theater Barcelona. Smiling Moose

Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers.

Neko Case, Laura Veirs. Byham Theater Melodime. Hard Rock Cafe Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine. Mr. Small’s Theatre The Pressure, Alba Flamenca.

World-class fishing Beautiful sandy beaches Intriguing museums Hundreds of historical spots Sp pec ecta tacu cu a b d g Spectacular birding T Th Thousands hou ousa usa sand nds of of c campsites am mps psit psit itess Exci Ex xc ciiti iti ting ng e vent ve vent ntss Exciting events

West Hills Symphonic Band. Bach,

Say Anything.

Thunderbird Cafe

JUNE 28-29

JULY 06

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Smiling Moose

800.452.2223 23 2 3

AE (outdoor)

Beethoven and Brunch

Wild Moccasins, The Eastern Sea.

Conveniently located ocat cated ed at exi exits ts 91 and 11 110 0 of of tthe he PA Turnpike

Fitz & the Tantrums. Stage

Live at the Fillmore. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Holy Ghost Tent Revival. Pittsburgh Winery Swans, Xiu Xiu. Rex Theater Beatlemania Magic. Rivers Casino The Kansas Bible Company. Thunderbird Cafe

L’Lamint Dance Band. Flagstaff Hill Peter Frampton. Palace Theatre Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth. Stage AE

JULY 10 Big Smo. Altar Bar Snowmine. Brillobox Caravan of Thieves. Club Cafe Kiersten Kelly. Mellon Square Yarn. Pittsburgh Winery Brand New. Stage AE

JULY 11 Mike Stud. Altar Bar 10,000 Maniacs. Palace Theatre Vulvapalooza (benefit for the Women’s Center & Shelter), night one. The Shop Pentimento, Have Mercy. Smiling Moose Ha Ha Tonka. South Park The Neighbourhood. Stage AE Hollis Brown. St. Clair Park

JULY 12 Deutschtown Music Festival. Many local bands at various venues. North Side. (www.deutschtownmusicfestival.org) CONTINUES ON PG. 16

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Bruce Hornsby

Joe Gruschecky & The Houserockers (Rock) Lil’ Ed and the Blues Imperials with Jill West & Blues Attack (Blues) Pittsburgh Opera

The Abby Lee Dance Company’s Kick-Off to Summer! 28 North with 7Horse (Rock)

Buckwheat Zydeco (Zydeco)

Father’s Day Car Cruise followed by Pure Gold (Oldies-Cruise 2-7 pm Concert 7:30 pm)

The Stickers with Christian Beck Band (Country)

Sonny Landreth with Kevin Garrett (Delta Blues/Guitar)

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (8:00 pm)

Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers (Pop/Folk/Jazz/Jam)

Ha Ha Tonka with Townsppl (Indie Rock) Sister Hazel (Alternative Rock)

Serena Ryder

Lake Street Dive

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (8:00 pm)

South Park Gospel Music Night

BNY Mellon Jazz Presents Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra with Special Guest Paquito D’Rivera

Serena Ryder with The Harlan Twins (Pop/Rock)

Lake Street Dive with Brooke Annibale (Indie Pop/Jazz/Soul)

The Hitmen featuring original members of Tommy James and the Shondells, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, and other mega-hit acts

Pittsburgh Blues Festival featuring Bernard Allison, Dr. John, JJ Grey & Mofro, and more! For times and tickets visit pghblues.com

Lovebettie (Swagger Pop)

Jerry Douglas with Nameless in August (Bluegrass)

BNY Mellon Jazz Presents Gloria Reuben and Caribbean Jazz Ensemble

Macy Gray (R&B/Soul)

River City Brass Band

All Concerts are free and begin at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted NEW this year- food trucks at the concerts!

Pittsburgh Ballet Theater

Gloria Reuben

Macy Gray

Duquesne University Tamburitzans Allegheny County Music Festival featuring a hometown favorite! (5:00 pm, $20 donation benefiting Dept. of Human Services)

Sister Hazel

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

15


A 30 year collaboration between Jerome Augustyniak, Steven Gustafson and Dennis Drew joined by guitarist Jeffery Erickson and vocalist Mary Ramsey for an incredible live show! Hits include: More Than This, These Are Days, Hey Jack Kerouac, Don’t Talk, What’s the Matter Here, and Candy Everybody Wants.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER CHURCH}

SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

Swans, July 3

FRIDAY• JULY 11• 8PM Orchestra seating only, $40

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

ow Folls! U

PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

The Putz. 31st Street Pub Zac Brown Band. First Niagara Pavilion Vulvapalooza, night two. Howlers Digital Getdown. Latitude 360 Owls. Mr. Small’s Theatre Songwriters in the Cellar, hosted by Ben Shannon. Pittsburgh Winery Women of Metal Fest. Rex Theater The Brydge. Riverview Park

JULY

28-30 7 EXCITING CAMPS

CAMP PÂTISSERIE: Culinary, Hospitality, Baking

CAMP ENERGY: Electronics, Oil & Gas, Energy Tech CAMP TECHNOLOGY: Information Sciences and Technology, Programming CAMP CSI: Criminal Justice

CAMP MED: Surgical Technology, Medical Assisting, Massage Therapy, Patient Care

CAMP TRADES: HVAC, Welding, Smart Building CAMP DESIGN: CAD, Multimedia, Web, Graphics, Photography, Screen Printing

3 days, 2 nights of action-packed, fun-filled career exploration and activities on PTI’s Campus.

Who’s Bad. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Nied’s Hotel Band. Mellon Square The Donkeys. Smiling Moose

JULY 18 The Gimme Gimme Yeah Yeahs.

JULY 13 Tom Roberts. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Zepparella. Hard Rock Cafe Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra with Paquito D’Rivera. Hartwood Acres Zach Schmidt, Arlo Aldo. Shadyside Nursery Caspian. Smiling miling Moose Blues Traveler elerr, Sugar Ray y, Uncle Kracker kerr, Smash Mouth. tdoor) Stage AE (outdoor)

JULY 14 311, Sublime me with Rome.

$100 COVERS EVERYTHING YOU NEED...

JULY 17

tdoor) Stage AE (outdoor)

31st Street Pub AppalAsia. Marty’s Market Lord Huron. Mr. Small’s Theatre Mike Dillon. Rex Theater Sister Hazel. South Park BeauSoleil. St. Clair Park

JULY 19 Marissa Nadler. Cattivo Kopecky Family Band. Club Cafe Tobacco. Mr. Small’s Theatre The Charlie Thomas’ The Drifters, The Coasters, The Cry Crystals. Palace Theatre

Stacia Abbott. Rivervi Riverview Park Olga Watkins Band, M Mikey Yurik. The h Waterfront

JULY 15

JJULY ULY 20

Deltron 3030 30, Kid Koala.

Th Matt M The Murchison Mutiny Mutiny. Ba Bach,

Altar Bar

Oliver Lake e. City of

Beethoven Be thoven and Brunch Bee Yes Y Ye s. Carn Carnegie Library L rary of Lib o Homestead Music M ic Hall Mus Ha Lake L La ke St Street Dive. Hartwood H two Acres Har Band o of Horses, Midlake. Stage AE Midla (outdoor) (outdo

burgh Asylum Pittsburgh

Vans Warped ed Tour. First ion Niagara Pavilion

makeFRIENDS. exploreCAREERS. haveFUN. discover REGISTER TODAY @ w w w. p t i . e d u / s u m m e r c a m p OR CALL: 1 . 800. 784. 9675 EXT . 53 8 1 For graduation rates and other important consumer information, please visit us online at www.pti.edu/disclosures.

Tony Lucca, n. Tyler Hilton afe Hard Rock Cafe

Boston. Stage ge AE (outdoor)

JULY 16 Shinizyn. Flagstaff Hill

Andy Grammer, July 1

JULY 22 Touche Amore. Altar Bar CONTINUES ON PG. 18

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Spring Hits DEVIL YOU KNOW

EPICA

ABORTED

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD

THE NECROTIC MANIFESTO

PHOSPHORESCENT HARVEST

THE BEAUTY OF DESTRUCTION

THE QUANTUM ENIGMA

INSOMNIUM

KILLER BE KILLED

MICHAEL JACKSON

MICHAEL STANLEY

SHADOWS OF THE DYING SUN

KILLER BE KILLED

XSCAPE

THE JOB

MUSHROOMHEAD

NEED TO BREATHE

THE STRING CHEESE INCIDENT

WHITECHAPEL

THE RIGHTEOUS AND THE BUTTERFLY

RIVERS IN THE WASTELAND

SONG IN MY HEAD

OUR ENDLESS WAR

LIKE E US S ON

SQUIRREL HILL, 5862 Forbes Ave. 412-422-2123 DORMONT, 2904 West Liberty Ave. 412-341-6591 ROSS TOWNSHIP, 4864 McKnight Rd. 412-635-3170 SOUTH SIDE, 1709 E. Carson St. 412-488-7001 ROBINSON TOWN CTR., 6533 Robinson Ctr. Dr. 412-787-5134 MONROEVILLE, 4053 William Penn Hwy. 412-373-1000 OAKLAND, 3613 Forbes Ave. 412-482-9026 DOWNTOWN, 416 Smithfield St. 412-261-1007 CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST STORE! DOWNTOWN, 967 Liberty Ave. 412-391-3065 CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

17


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

CIGARETTES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MELISSA MADISON FULLER}

© SFNTC 2 2014

The Apache Relay, May 24

Natalie Merchant. Carnegie Library of Homestead Music Hall

Matthew Sweet Rock Show. Club Cafe Katy Perry. CONSOL Energy Center Nickel Creek. Stage AE (outdoor)

JULY 23 Gas House Gorillas. Club Cafe Jimmy Buffett & the Coral Reefer Band.

JULY 31

Frank Sinatra Tribute. Flagstaff Hill Runaway Dorothy. Hard Rock Cafe Milk Carton Kids. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater Camera Obscura. Mr. Small’s Theatre Subhumans. Rex Theater

JULY 24 Sevendust. Altar Bar Clap Your Hands Say Yeah. Club Cafe Scott and Rosanna. Mellon Square Corey Smith. Rex Theater Tropidelic. Thunderbird Cafe

visit www.sfntc.com

JULY 30 Bruce Katz. Flagstaff Hill Cheers Elephant. Smiling Moose Jurassic 5. Stage AE

First Niagara Pavilion

For more information on our organic growing programs,

Jenny Lewis. Mr. Small’s Theatre Jack White. Stage AE

JULY 25 Slaid Cleaves. Club Cafe RX Bandits. Mr. Small’s Theatre Lost in the Trees. Schenley Plaza Oathbreaker, Cult Leader. Smiling Moose South Park Gospel Music Night. South Park Clutch. Stage AE Glenn Miller Orchestra. St. Clair Park Richard Buckner, Kevin Finn, The Red Western. Thunderbird Cafe

JULY 25-27 Pittsburgh Blues Festival feat. Dr. John, many more. Hartwood Acres

Black Finger. 31st Street Pub Briar Rabbit. Club Cafe Dave Arcari. Howlers 7 Bridges. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

AUG. 01 Natural Vibrations. Altar Bar Pandemic. Brillobox Girlz in Black Hats. Club Cafe Wiz Khalifa, Jeezy, Tyga. First Niagara Pavilion

Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra. The Frick Art & Historical Center

Billy the Kid and the Regulators. Rivers Casino

Serena Ryder. South Park Panic! at the Disco, Walk the Moon, Magic Man. Stage AE (outdoor) The Duhks. St. Clair Park

AUG. 01-03 Flood City Music Festival. feat. Boz Scaggs, Leftover Salmon, Lee Fields & the Expressions, many more. Peoples Natural Gas Park

AUG. 02

Harlan Twins. Bayardstown Social Club Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival.

Smokey Robinson. Meadows Casino Pittsburgh Jazz Legends Show. Rivers Casino Poogie Bell. Riverview Park No Mames: Pandemic. Round

First Niagara Pavilion

Corner Cantina

Shake Shake Shake. Latitude 360 Sean Jones. Riverview Park Farewell My Love, Jamies Elsewhere.

AUG. 03

JULY 26

The Amadeus Trio. Bach, Beethoven

Carnegie Brass. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Jerry Douglas. Hartwood Acres Maureen Budway. Highland Park Manchester Orchestra. Mr. Small’s Theatre The Red Western, Grand Piano.

and Brunch

Shadyside Nursery

Smiling Moose

JULY 27

CONTINUES ON PG. 20

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

ASSOCIATED Artists of pittsburgh 103 rd annual exhibition

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

UPCOMING SHOWS

Thu jun 19 wed jun 25 fri jun 27

june 1 st - August 31 st, 2014 4764 State Route 30 • Greensburg 724-837-1500 • wmuseumaa.org Visit our website for hours and directions

SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 5.21 PITTSBURGH ACOUSTIC CHALLENGE-RD. 2 // 8 pm // no cover Thu 5.22 ROB & GREG OF THE CLARKS featuring Skip and Jeff from Good Brother Earl // 8 pm // $5 Fri 5.23 FATHERTIME // classic rock // 9 pm // $8 Sat 5.24 JUKEBOX // all genres // 9 pm // $8 Sun 5.25 THE GRANATI BROTHERS / ROCK SCHOOL // 7 pm // $5 CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

19


SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

We Sell Adventure!

Local Guided Trips for a Day or an g (Moonlight) ( g ) Paddles includes: Evening

• Beaver River • Visit our online calendar for our specialty trips • Connoquenessing Creek including: Wine + Cheese • Slippery Rock Creek or Beer + Cigar Parties • Lake Arthur at Moraine State Park

WE RENT, SELL + SERVICE KAYAKS, CANOES + SUPS BOAT + PFDS + PADDLES + SHUTTLE there and back $45 PER DAY BOAT + PFDS + PADDLES you take $35 PER DAY PADDLE ONE BEFORE YOU BUY Lessons Just $35 PER PERSON

Weekend and Multi-Day Trips + Rates Available.

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AUG. 04

AUG. 19

Miley Cyrus. CONSOL Energy Center

Bob Log III. 31st Street Pub

AUG. 05

AUG. 20

MKTO. Stage AE

Doyle. Altar Bar Matt Nathanson. Carnegie Library of

AUG. 06

Homestead Music Hall

Tyler Ward. Altar Bar The Grid. Flagstaff Hill

Ferla-Marcinizyn Guitar Duo. Flagstaff Hill

AUG. 21

AUG. 08

Skid Row. Altar Bar Eric Sommer. Club Cafe The System. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kung Fu Radio. Mellon Square

OneRepublic. First Niagara Pavilion Future Islands. Mr. Small’s Theatre The Hitmen. South Park Dark Star Orchestra. Stage AE The Horse Flies. St. Clair Park

AUG. 22 J. Roddy Walston and The Business.

AUG. 09

Mr. Small’s Theatre

Toby Keith. First Niagara Pavilion Red Wanting Blue. Mr. Small’s Theatre Salsamba Latin Jazz Group. Riverview Park

AUG. 10 Klezlectic. Bach, Beethoven and Brunch Macy Gray. Hartwood Acres Salsamba Latin Jazz Group. Highland Park

AUG. 11 Steely Dan. Benedum Center

Those Mockingbirds. Smiling Moose Gloria Reuben and Caribbean Jazz Ensemble. South Park Grendel. Thunderbird Cafe Birds of Chicago. St. Clair Park

AUG. 23 Chancellor Warhol. The Andy Warhol Museum Lady Antebellum. First Niagara Pavilion .38 Special. Meadows Casino Jevon Rushton. Riverview Park

AUG. 12

AUG. 24

Powerman 5000. Altar Bar Strand of Oaks. Club Cafe Jesus Christ Superstar Arena Spectacular. CONSOL Energy Center

AUG. 13 The Presidents of the United States of America. Altar Bar Motley Crue, Alice Cooper. First Niagara Pavilion

At The Riverplex Live Irish Music Featuring

Scythian

The Screaming Orphans

ALSO Socks in the Frying Pan | Makem and Spain Bros. Matt and Shannon Heaton | Tom Sweeney | Evans and Doherty | Moxie

$2.00 OFF

ONE ADULT ADMISSION

20

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 Present this coupon and receive $2.00 OFF the price of ONE regular adult admission purchased for Sunday, September 7, 2014 ONLY. May not be combined with any other discounts or offers. NO CASH VALUE.

AUG. 27

AUG. 14

Bridgette Perdue. Flagstaff Hill Slightly Stoopid. Stage AE (outdoor)

New Hazlett Theaterr Tesla. Stage AE

AUG. 29 9 RATM2. Altar Bar Kings of Leon. First Niagara Pav Pavilion Corbin Hanner Band.

AUG. 15 Lovebettie. South Park Chris Smither. St. Clair Park

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Tom Brousseau, Simone Fel Felice. Schenley Plaza River City Brass Band. South P Park Alternate Routes. St. Clair Park

AUG. 16 RANT Lawrenceville ille. Many local bands at various venues in w. Lawrenceville. (www. m) rantlawrenceville.com) The Gutter Ghouls ls. 31st Street Pub Kevin Gates. Altar Bar Benny Benack III. Riverview Park DJ Digital Dave,

Meeting of Important People.

AUG. 30 Lisa Ferraro and Erika Erik Luckett. Club Café Roby Edwards. Riverview Park

AUG. 31 X. Altar Bar Allegheny Count County Music Festival. Maxwell, July 8

AUG. 17

PGHIRISHFEST.ORG 412-422-1113 1000 SANDCASTLE DRIVE | WEST HOMESTEAD (PITTSBURGH), PA 15120

Shadyside Nursery

Hartwood Acres

Cross Currents. Highland Park Pure Gold. Rive Rivers ve ers r Casino The Harlan T Twins win wi n . Nurse sery r ry Shadyside Nursery

The Waterfront

Dr. Alton Merrell & Impact. Highland d Park C Street Brass.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

AUG. 26 Shoji Tabuchi. Palace Theatre Austin Mahone. Stage AE (outdoor)

Muddy Kreek Blues Band. Flagstaff Hill Federico Garcia-DeCastro DeCastro.

SEPTEMBER 5, 6, & 7, 2014

KISS, Def Leppard. First Niagara Pavilion The Horn Guys. Highland Park Molly Alphabet, Machete Kisumontao. Shadyside Nursery

SEPT. SE EPT. 0 011 Shining Shin Sh nin ing g St Star ar. Riv vers Casino C sin Ca sino o Rivers {PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC JOHNSON}


6/20/2014

Buzz Poets

+ Gene The Werewolf 6/27/2014 Ten + One Sweet Burgh 7/4/2014 Joe Grushecky + Time Tested 7/11/2014

Marshall Tucker Band

+ Sick Sense 7/18/2014 Bastard Bearded Irishmen + Good Brother Earl 7/25/2014

Are you ready to get your “Summer Jam” on? Station Square will be rocking the riverfront every Friday night with a red hot lineup of local and national acts from the 70’s, 80’s 90’s and today. Best of all - its totally FREE! So grab your air guitar and get ready to spend your Friday nights at Station Square - all summer long. Presented by Trib Total Media. For updates, follow us at facebook.com/stationsquare

Molly Hatchet

+ River Trail 8/1/2014 Bruce In The USA + Traffic Jam 8/8/2014 Classic Rock Experience + Lily Wine Affair 8/15/2014 Jill West And Blues Attack + Silent Partner 8/22/2014

Gathering Field + Mercury

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

23


HELLO SUMMER!

HELLO ERIE PA!

Bring the family for a week or a weekend!

800.524.3743

|

VisitErie.com VISITERIE MAJOR SPONSORS:

Get your FREE Visitors Guide today!

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Smile, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our 50th! Port Authority is proud to partner with Eatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Park in celebrating our 50th anniversary, thanking our loyal riders with Smiley Cookies at various locations throughout our system. Look for more events and pop-up specials throughout the year as we celebrate the past and look forward to a new era of transportation in the region.

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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Immunization...

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, July 11

the Power to Protect

May is Hepatitis can be caused by viruses that attack your liver. Hepatitis B virus can be spread by intimate contact. Each year in the U.S., viral hepatitis kills 5,000 people and sends many to the hospital. You can protect yourself from Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B infections with vaccines. Talk to your health care provider about these immunizations that protect your liver, or contact the Allegheny County Health Department at 412-687-ACHD or www.achd.net.

Immunization strengthens what the body does naturally!

WE’VE BARELY finished complaining about

Murph Dogg • “SCROLL” • 2014 Image on paper

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

the snow, and soon we’ll be seeking the relief of an air-conditioned movie theater. Here’s what you can expect to see this summer while enjoying a cool-down. Some of your favorites are back: XMen: Days of Future Past opens May 24; catch up with the amusing fire-breathers in the animated How to Train Your Dragon 2 (June 13); and in what we can only hope is the end, Transformers: Age of Extinction drops on June 27. On July 11, it’s Dawn of the Planet Boyhood, of the Apes (July 11), Aug. 1 a.k.a. now the apes are in control; July 18, get ready for murder day, in The Purge: Anarchy. Bruce Willis is back in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (Aug. 22), four tales adapted from Frank Miller’s graphic novels, and all the other old-guy action stars just keep on ticking in The Expendables 3 (Aug. 15). Two comedies also return: 22 Jump Street (June 13), in which undercover cops

pose as college students, and Think pos Like a Man Too (June 20), where planned weddings are sure to the p hit snags. Lots of fantasy action and adventure this summer, starting with Maleficent (May 30), Disney’s take on the Sleeping Beauty villainess, starring Angelina Jolie. On July 18, see Jupiter Ascending (July 18), a sci-fi actioner from Lana and Andy Wachowski (The Matrix); Dwayne Johnson stars as the Greek he-man in Hercules, opening July 25. Guardians of the Galaxy hits the big screen on Aug. 1; Chris Pratt stars in this comics-based action adventure. Aug. 8 is when you can meet Lucy; Scarlett Johansson is a juicedup warrior in Luc Besson’s actioner. Thrillers opening this summer include: Edge of Tomorrow (June 6), set in a war-torn, time-looping future, and starring Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt; Life of Crime (Aug. 29), adapted from Elmore Leonard’s The Switch; and The Most Wanted Man (August), a John Le Carré spy tale starring the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. Summer laughs kick off cowboy-style with A Million Ways to Die in the West (May 30), from Seth McFarlane (Ted). On July 2, Susan Sarandon and Melissa McCarthy take a trip to Niagara Falls,


Cold in July, May 30

in Tammy; Sex Tape, a comedy starring Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel and — oops — a viral video, opens July 25. For law-enforcement chuckles, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Aug. 8) are still keeping the crime rate low in NYC, and two guys dressed as cops for a costume party are mistaken for real police in Let’s Be Cops (Aug. 13). Other light fare includes: Jersey Boys (June 20), Clint Eastwood’s adaptation of the popular musical; Begin Again (July 18), a sentimental tale of musical redemption starring Mark Ruffalo, from John Carney (Once); and Magic in the Moonlight (July 25), a rom-com from Woody Allen, set in the French Riviera.

Maleficent, May 30

On Aug. 1, check out Wish I Was Here, Zach Braff’s Kickstarter-funded follow-up to Garden State, and Chadwick Boseman steps into the shoes of the hardestworking man in show biz, James Brown, in the biopic Get on Up. And while it will be sweet and funny, be sure to bring plenty of hankies to the much-anticThink Like ipated The Fault a Man Too, in Our Stars, the June 20 teens-with-cancer dramedy shot in Pittsburgh; it opens June 6. In early June, Pittsburgh Filmmakers will host a series of eight free art-related documentaries (subjects range from photography to puppetry) in conjunction with the Three Rivers Arts Festival. Also booked for Filmmakers: the Texas-set drama Cold in July (May 30); For No Good Reason (June 6), the doc about illustrator Ralph Steadman; the restored version of the 1964 Beatles’ comedy A Hard Day’s Night (July 4); Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case (July); and Richard Linklater’s document of a childhood, Boyhood (Aug. 1). The warmer weather means area drive-ins are open, and Pittsburghers can also walk to several city parks for outdoor films: The Cinema in the Park series returns on June 7, with recent and classic family faves including Frozen and E.T. And at the Oaks Theater, in Oakmont, the annual Moonlit Matinee series of classic films mostly from the ’80s (Stand By Me, Lethal Weapon) begins this week.

COMING

THIS SUMMER TO A SHELTER

NEAR YOU

Want to cuddle some kittens for a few weeks? Summer means litters of kitties, and that means they need foster homes! Call 412-345-0343 or e-mail

cklingensmith@animalrescue.org.

www.animalrescue.org/volunteer/foster

B Y AL H O F F

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

27


C A V A N A U G H ’ S

BrideShow SUNDAY, JULY 20

SHERATON STATION SQUARE BRIDESHOW.COM

DISCOUNT ONLINE TICKET CODE: CITYP6

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Sculptures by Alexandre Arrechea at Three Rivers Arts Festival, June 6-15

$49.99/ hour

Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

CURRENT Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Junk Collector & Scrabble King (collage by Robert Pollard), through Fri., May 23. Gallery 4. On the Prowl (paintings by Rick Schmiedlin), through Sat., May 24.

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden. Discovery Garden Day, Sat., May 24; Party in the Tropics, June 6; Tropical Forest India Mango Festival, July 12; Butterfly Forest, through Sept. 1; Summer Flower Show, through Oct. 5; plus permanent exhibits. 707 Penn Gallery. Digital Hand (digitally fabricated works by Penn State art students), through May 25. Frick Art & Historical Center. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting, through May 25.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Mark Yanza and Rachel Yoke: New Work

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

(photography), through May 25. Carnegie Museum of Art. Architecture + Photography, through A May M 26; The Sandbox: At Play With the th Photobook, through July 28; David Da Hartt: Stray Light (exhibit on Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Co. Ch building), through Aug. 11; Outtakes bu (photo (pho and film works by Carnegie International artists, but that were Inter out of the exhibition), through Sept. 1; left o and Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in an Pittsburgh, through Sept. 22. P Associated Artists of Butler County. 84th Annual Spring Show; Shane Parcell exhibit; and Floral Design Show, all through May 30. Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts. 2014 Regional Juried Exhibition, through May 30. Boulevard Gallery. Touch of Class II (watercolors from adult art students, jewelry by Georgie Nix and painted glassware by Ilona Ralston), through May 30; multimedia art by Ed Rickus and photography by Elizabeth Jones, through June 30. Assemble Artspace. Picture Pals (exchange program with Pittsburgh and Haitian grade-schoolers), through May 31. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery. Greensburg Salem Art Club (juried show), through May 31. Gallerie Chiz. Nature and the Metaphysical (sculptures by Caroline Bagenal and drawings by Don Dugal), through May 31. Garfield Artworks. Artists Against

Fracking, through June 1.

Morgan Contemporary Glass. Teapots! 8th Invitational, through June 1.

UnSmoke Artspace. Terrestrial (multimedia exhibit from Nashville-based curatorial collective COOP), through June 1. fieldwork. CSA PGH show (exhibit by local artists in subscriber service), through June 6. Gallery on 43rd Street. Observations (paintings by Maura Doern Danko), through June 6.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. The Art of Healing Exhibition: Reflections 2014 (works created by patients in a residency program at the John P. Murtha Neuroscience and Pain Institute), through June 6. ModernFormations Gallery. Death Masked (water colors by Stephen Tuomala), through June 20.

Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Wild Things Juried Art Exhibition, through June 21.

709 Penn Gallery. The Occasional Market (installation by Tom Sarver), through June 22.

Wood Street Galleries. Electrified (Edwin van der Heide and Alexandre Burton’s homage to Nikola Tesla), through June 22. Space Gallery. Psychic Panic (group show curated by Olivia Ciummo), through June 29. Mattress Factory. Detroit Artists in Residence (Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orland and Frank Pahl), through June 30 (Hocking through June 1 only); Trace of Memory (house-wide installation by


Our First Shipment of Trees & Shrubs Have Arrived!

ARTS+EXHIBITS VENUES 707 PENN GALLERY. Downtown,

412-231-3169

709 PENN GALLERY. Downtown, Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010

MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER AND HISTORIC VILLAGE. Avella, Pa., 724-587-3412 MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY.

THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM.

Garfield, 412-362-0274

North Side, 412-237-8300

MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS.

ASSEMBLE ARTSPACE. Garfield,

Shadyside, 412-441-5200 NATIONAL AVIARY. North Side, 412-323-7235 NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Ross Township, 412-364-3622 PANZA GALLERY. Millvale, 412-821-0959 PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. North Side, 412-231-7881 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY. Oakland, 412-622-6914

412-281-8723

AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM.

www.assemblepgh.org

ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF BUTLER COUNTY. Butler, 724-283-6922 BE GALLERIES. Lawrenceville, 412-687-2606

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Verona, 412-721-0943

BOX HEART GALLERY. Bloomfield, 412-687-8858

CARNEGIE MUSEUMS OF ART AND NATURAL HISTORY. Oakland, 412-622-3131

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. North Side, 412-237-3400

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-322-5058 CLAY PLACE AT STANDARD. Carnegie, DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY.

Strip District, 412-454-6000

Greensburg, 724-219-0804 FEIN ART GALLERY. North Side, 412-321-6816 FIELDWORK. Garfield, www.fieldworkgallery.com FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. North Oakland, 412-681-5449 FORT PITT MUSEUM. Downtown, 412-281-9284

SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Strip District, 412-261-7003 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY.

GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Lawrenceville, 412-683-6488 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Garfield, 412-361-2262

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. South Side, 412-431-1810

Downtown, 412-261-7003

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT JOHNSTOWN.

724-837-1500

WOOD STREET GALLERIES.

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Duets (botanical art paired with items created between the 16th and 21st centuries), through June 30. Toonseum. Looney Tunes, a Pop-Up Mini-Exhibition, through June 30. Golden

ERIK GRIFFIN JUNE 19-22

412-325-7723

IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Bloomfield, 412-924-0634

of Prague and Budapest: David Aschkenas (photographs), through June 30.

PITTSBURGH, PA

SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sewickley, 412-741-4405 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL.

412-268-2434

American Jewish Museum. Synagogues

Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

724-238-6015

WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Greensburg,

Chiharu Shiota), ongoing.

100 51st st STREET • L AWRENCE VILLE • 4126872010

SPACE GALLERY. Downtown,

HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Oakland,

HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT LIGONIER VALLEY.

New Castle, 724-652-2882

Greensburg, 724-837-6791

All Annual Flowers Have Arrived PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS You Must See Our Variety of Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants

814-269-7234

Downtown, www.3riversartsfest.org TOONSEUM. Downtown, 412-232-0199 UNSMOKE ARTSPACE. Braddock, www.unsmokeartspace.com

GREENSBURG ART CENTER.

Spring Has Sprung!

Friendship, 412-365-2145 REVISION SPACE. Lawrenceville, www.revisionspace.com

SEN. JOHN HEINZ PITTSBURGH REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER.

Point Breeze, 412-371-0600 FUTURE TENANT. Downtown, 412-325-7037 GALLERIE CHIZ. Shadyside, 412-441-6005 THE GALLERY 4. Shadyside, 412-363-5050

Garden Center

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Shadyside, 412-361-0873 PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER.

412-489-5240

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER.

Cavacini

MATTRESS FACTORY. North Side,

412-325-7017

Downtown, 412-471-5605

Legacy: 65 Years of Original Art from Golden Books, through July 5. Box Heart Gallery. Modern+Contemporary (paintings by Mark Loebach, Cara Livorio, Melissa Kuntz and Jennifer Satterly and assemblage by Daria Sandburg), through July 18. Silver Eye Center for Photography. Here and Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography (group show), through July 19.

$

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ADMISSION WITH COUPON CODE: CITY THAT’S 75% OFF ADMISSION (NO SERVICE FEES) EXPIRES JUNE 22, 2014

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CONTINUES ON PG. 30

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

CRAWL in the in the Cultural Cultural District District

F id Friday, J July l 11, 11 2014 5:30-10pm

{IMAGE COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART, PITTSBURGH}

GALLERY

TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl #CrawlPGH

CR AWL AFTER DARK

PITTSBURGH CULTUR AL TRUST PARTNERS' BOARD PRESENTS:

Outtakes continues through Sept. 1 at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Art by Zoe Strauss

2014

FRIDAY, JULY 11 AUGU S T W I L S O N C E NT E R

01&/# "3s'00% s%" / $ */ (  s $ 0 .& %: s . 6 4* $  s  " 3 5 5 3645"35403($0 4 .0 1. 7*1â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.  ( & /& 3 " -

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Least Livable City (by 2014 Artist of the Year Hyla Willis); 2014 Emerging Artist of the Year Mia Tarducci Henry; My Black Hole (video installation by Jennie Thwing); Small Pieces Tied to Something Bigger (sculpture and prints by Jake Beckman); and Betwixt and Between â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Liminal Objects (sculpture and prints by Jeanne Jaffe), all through July 20. Pittsburgh Glass Center. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward (work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky and Nadine Saylor), through July 20. Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt, through Aug. 3. Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of The Arabia, through Jan. 4. Plus From Slavery to Freedom and other permanent exhibits.

Society for Contemporary Craft Satellite Gallery. Penny Mateer: Protest Series (quilts inspired by 1960s protest songs), through Aug. 3.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. Scrap Redefined: Works by Mei Greer and Ronald Nigro, through Aug. 10. The Andy Warhol Museum. Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede (about parallels between Warhol and the iconic fashion designer), through Aug. 24. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum of Pittsburgh. XOXO (exhibit about love and forgiveness) and other permanent interactive exhibits, through Sept. 21. Clay Place at Standard. Independent Pittsburgh Area High School Students Exhibition, through September. Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Race: Are We So Different?, through Oct. 27. Plus Dinosaurs in Their Time and other permanent exhibits. CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Y T R A P N E D R URBAN GA AT THE MF

14 0 2 , 0 2 E N U J , Y A D I FR ticket info at www.mattress.org

Allegheny General Hospital Allegheny Health Network Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Amcom Office Systems Anonymous Audiocare Systems Avaya CA Technologies CleanCare Crawford Ellenbogen LLC Day Automotive Highmark Hilbish McGee Lighting Design HP

Susan + Scott Lammie Level 3 Communications Logix Guru LLC Maher Duessel Marilyn Coleman Consulting NACR One World Labs, Inc. Nancy + Woody Ostrow Pittsburgh Steelers PNC Bank Radiant Hall Studios Schell Games LLC Stoltenberg Consulting Inc. Tier 1 Verizon

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

31


Summer with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra It’s a sizzling line-up at Heinz Hall this summer. Grab family and friends and chill to the music of Boyz II Men, the music of gladiator and a tribute to the Bee Gees. We’ll wrap up the season with a unique performance of classical, pops and contemporary pieces. It’s the music of summer, every way you like it. For tickets, call 412-392-4900 or visit pittsburghsymphony.org

14SYM201_SummerProgram_DoubleTruck_FINAL.indd 1

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


Check out what’s hot at Heinz Hall this summer! June 17 . 7:30 PM Acura/ELS Presents

The Ben Folds Orchestral Experience featuring his new piano concerto & his pop hits

Ben Folds is joined by your Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra to bring his first-class melodies and ironylaced lyrics to Heinz Hall for one performance only!

June 23 . 7:30 PM

Happy Together tour Flash back to the ’60s with The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie, Chuck Negron (of Three Dog Night), Gary Lewis & The Playboys, Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels, and Mark Farner (of Grand Funk Railroad)!

July 17 . 7:30 PM

Stayin’ Alive

One Night of the Bee Gees with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Join the Pittsburgh Symphony for Stayin’ Alive: One Night of the Bee Gees, a tribute featuring all of your Bee Gees favorites.

July 19 . 2:30 PM

Music of John Williams Soar to new heights with your Pittsburgh Symphony and the music from legendary composer John Williams’ well-known movie scores, including “Star Wars,” “E.T.” and “Harry Potter.”

Happy Together is not a performance with the Pittsburgh Symphony.

June 24 . 7:30 PM WDVE Presents

The Music of Queen performed

with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Queen’s epic masterpieces, including “We Will Rock You,” “Bohemian Rhapsody” and more, performed live by the Pittsburgh Symphony and vocalist Brody Dolyniuk.

July 23 . 7:30 PM

Boyz II Men

live at Heinz Hall with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra See one of the most truly iconic R&B groups live in concert accompanied by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

June 28 . 8:00 PM

July 25 . 7:00 PM

Play It Again, Marvin!

A Symphonic Celebration

Written and produced by pianist Kevin Cole, this world premiere celebrates the award-winning music of Marvin Hamlisch through song, family videos and personal memories.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Resident Conductor Lawrence Loh and the Pittsburgh Symphony throw ˇ a summer symphonic celebration featuring Dvorák’s Carnival Overture. Enjoy a breathtaking performance of Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 2 for Piano featuring Olga Kern and Brahms’ Symphony No. 3.

A Marvin Hamlisch Celebration with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

July 12 . 7:30 PM

august 2

. 7:30 PM

Gladiator LIVE

Triple Play!

The Pittsburgh Symphony with Clara Sanabras and a full choir will bring Hans Zimmer’s score to life accompanied by the film in HD.

Join the Pittsburgh Symphony, conductor Christian Capocaccia and Xiayin Wang for a one-of-a-kind summer concert with light classical favorites, virtuoso piano fireworks, and music from the silver screen.

featuring Clara Sanabras with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

5/15/14 6:22 PM

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

33


*

* *

SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

May 25 3-11pm

On Sunday, May 25, Kaya® takes over Smallman Street for our biggest block party ever! Join us as we welcome summer with:

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Investigations in Terraforming opens Aug. 1 at the Irma Freeman Center for the Imagination. Art by New Academy Press

Society for Contemporary Craft. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics (group show), through Nov. 1. Carnegie Science Center. Highmark SportsWorks, roboworld and other permanent exhibits. National Aviary. Taking Flight: An Avian Adventure Free-Flight Bird Show, Penguin Encounter and other ongoing and permanent exhibits. Photo Antiquities. Ongoing exhibit of historic images from daguerrotypes on, as well as cameras and other paraphernalia.

MAY Revision Space. Nugent Kos: Savage Elements, Fri., May 23June 22.

Greensburg Art Center.

show with 11 artists from the U.S., Israel and Palestine), June 1-July 27. Filmmakers Galleries. Sites of Passage: Borders, Walls & Citizenship (collaborative group show involving 11 artists from the U.S., Israel and Palestine), June 1-July 27. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery. Sculpted Paintings (recycled colors and new images by Elisabeth Minningham), June 1-July 31.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh 103rd Annual Exhibition, June 1Aug. 31; The Way and the Wayfarers (art by Joshua Hogan, Jay Knapp and Kuzana Ogg, inspired by Khalil Gibran’s The Prophet), June 4June 29.

Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts.

Pittsburgh Pastel Artists Color!!! Juried League and Exhibit (2-D and On The Prowl (art by ceramics by 3-D work), Sat., Rick Schmiedlin), through Sat., May 24, at Christian Kuharik, May 24-June 27. The Gallery 4 both June 3-July 25. Toonseum. 8-Art: Gallerie Chiz. An The 8-Bit Art of Victor Illustrious Age (oil Dandridge, Sat., May 24-July 6. paintings of Pittsburgh’s past Future Tenant. Lucky After Dark: by Fritz Keck) and Alchemy: Turning Clay into Gay and Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh, Glimmering Metal (work by Nancy McNary 1960-1990 (first exhibition of Harrison Smith), June 5-July 12. Apple’s Pittsburgh Queer History Project), Three Rivers Arts Festival. Multiple venues, May 30-June 29. Downtown, June 6-15. be Galleries. Of Crayons, Cats, Dolls and Assemble Artspace. Transformed Linearities Monsters (paintings and installation with (work by Julie Mallis), June 6-28. stuffed animals and dolls, by Tara ZalewskyPanza Gallery. In Good Company Part 2 Nease), May 31-June 28. (group show featuring Zivi Aviraz, Lila Carnegie Museum of Art. Small Pieces, Hirsch-Brody, Joel Kranich, Lilli Nieland, Phiris Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance Sickels and Susan Sparks), June 7-July 5. to the Baroque, May 31-Sept. 15. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Blind Intersections: A Stadiumstrash Group Show, June 6-July 4; also Summer Soiree Mattress Factory. Sites of Passage: Borders, (free festival), June 19. Walls & Citizenship (collaborative group

JUNE

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


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SUMMER FLOWER SHOW May 10 through Oct. 5

Come see room after room of miniature trains and summer blooms at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Follow our newly expanded Garden Railroad as it travels in, around and through the most beautiful ямВowers the season has to offer. For more information, or to plan your visit, go to phipps.conservatory.org.

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Saltsburg River & Trail

SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

0

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Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings Investigated opens June 28 at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

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709 Penn Gallery. Portraits of Air

Investigated, June 28-Sept. 15.

(Susan Goethel Campbell’s crowd-sourced exhibition of locally distributed air filters), June 6-July 13. Fort Pitt Museum. History Inspires (prints and paintings from local artists inspired by the history of 18th-century Western Pennsylvania), June 6-July 14. Morgan Contemporary Glass. synthesis 2 (fusing & kilnforming group show), June 6-Sept. 13. Gallery 4. RAW Artists Pittsburgh Regional Winner 2013: Mixed Moss Media works with Ashley Hickey, June 7-28. Boulevard Gallery. Chasing the Sun (oil paintings by Nadya Lepets and Vicki Schilling), plus pottery by Gloria Tsang, June 7-28.

Frick Art & Historical Center. Edgar Degas: The Private Impressionist: Works on Paper by the Artist and His Circle, June 28-Oct. 5. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Artist Interrupted: The Art of Tess Senay b. 1992 d. 2012, June 29-Aug. 2.

Associated Artists of Butler County. Regional Woodturners Show, June 13-July 11.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Johnstown. Face of India: Photography of Donald M. Robinson, June 13-Aug. 22. Carnegie Science Center. BLUE! (new exhibit in which visitors can build structures from blue foam blocks ), opens June 14. Future Tenant. Drive By Drag on Public Performance (street-drag presentation by Dani LaMorte and Veronica Bleus), June 14. Meadowcroft Rock Shelter. Annual Atlatl Competition, June 21. Insider tour of the Rock Shelter (with paleoanthropologist James Adovasio), June 28. Mattress Factory. Urban Garden Party (annual fundraiser), June 20, and Community Day (free activities), June 22. Showcase Noir. Gallery and market for artists and crafters of the African diaspora, June 21 and 22, Downtown, www.trustarts.org Revision Space. Great Waves: Summer Show, June 27-Sept. 7. Carnegie Museum of Art. Faked, Forgotten, Found: Five Renaissance Paintings

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

JULY DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery. Window installation by Mark Barill, July 1-Aug. 31; recent paintings by Marcia Koynok, July 1-Sept. 30. Assemble Artspace. Digital Divide: Art and Communication in a Virtual World (work by online artist collective Manifesto-ish), July 3-26. Meadowcroft Rock Shelter. Independence Day Celebration, July 4. Boulevard Gallery. Nancy Smith and Jeanne Adams: New Work (watercolor), July 5-26. Gallery 4. New Paintings by Anthony Purcell, July 5-26. Future Tenant. Window installation by Dakotah Konicek (kinetic, interactive 2-D and 3-D works), July 7-26. Associated Artists of Butler County. Invitational Art Show (Cranberry), July 9-18. Gallery Crawl. The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s summer crawl, plus an after-hours Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh fundraiser party, July 11. www.trustarts.org 707 Penn Gallery. Some Begins (Meg Shevenock and Jamie Boyle’s collaborative exploration of “the lives of objects”), July 11-Aug. 31. Space. Cataloguing Pattern (group show by regional and national artists), July 11-Aug. 31. Wood Street Galleries. La Cour des Miracles (robotic installations by Bill Vorn and Louis Philippe Demers), July 11-Sept. 7. be Galleries. Collecting: Woods to Water (mixed media, fiber and paintings by Sharon McCartney), July 12-Aug. 16.


Toonseum. Cartoons Are the Best Medicine:

Boulevard Gallery. Elaine Bergstrom:

a Healthy Dose of Bizarro by Dan Piraro, July 12-Oct. 12. North Hills Art Center. Summer Artisan Bazaar (hand-crafted items by local and regional artisans), July 19-Aug. 9. Greensburg Art Center. Retrospective: Betty & Allen Reese (pastels, oils, pen and ink), July 19-Aug 29. Carnegie Museum of Art. The eight-venue Pittsburgh Biennial begins with the Carnegie’s portion, the solo exhibit Corey Escoto: Sleight of Hand, July 19-Sept. 29.

New Work (botanical and oriental art) and Charles Sawyer: New Work (woodturnings), Aug. 2-29. Gallery 4. Surreal Minimalist Landscapes With Thomas Frontini, Aug. 2-30. Box Heart Gallery. Jay Knapp: New Work (photography and sculpture), Aug. 5-Oct. 3. Future Tenant. What Will Her Kids Think? (prints, body prints and figure drawings by Sally Deskins), Aug. 8-31.

Associated Artists of Butler County. Invitational Illustrators

Associated Artists of Butler County. Invitational Art Show

Show (motorcycle theme), Aug. 8-Sept. 5 Filmmakers Galleries. The eight-venue 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial continues with Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ portion, Aug. 15-Oct. 19.

(Butler), July 23-Aug. 2. Toonseum. Comic Uni-versus (original artwork of Marvel and DC superheroes, displayed in matchups for public to decide the victor), July 26-Sept. 20.

AUGUST

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. The eight-venue 2014

Gallerie Chiz. Life in Mexico City:

Pittsburgh Biennial continues with the PCA portion, Aug. 15-Nov. 2.

Drawings (Jason Schell) and Handmade Artist Books (Todd Sanders), Aug. 1-30.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art at Ligonier Valley. Retrospective: William

Irma Freeman Center for Imagination.

M. Hoffman Jr., Aug. 22-Nov. 9. be Galleries. Mary M. Mazziotti: New Work (mixed media and fiber), Aug. 23-Sept. 13.

Investigations in Terraforming (with New Academy Press), Aug. 1-Sept. 5. Pittsburgh Glass Center. The eight-venue 2014 Pittsburgh Biennial continues with the Glass Center’s portion, featuring new work by Bob Beckman, Jeremy Boyle, Toby Fraley, Vanessa German, Ayanah Moor, Will Schlough and Kara Skylling, Aug. 1-Oct. 26.

SEPTEMBER DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery. Window installation by Gabe Felice, Sept. 1-Oct. 31. Gallery 4. Dreamlike Creatures of Great Beauty with Hannah Clark, Sept. 6-24.

July 3, 4, 5, & 6, 2014 FREE ADMISSION

11 a.m. to 8 p.m., daily Twin Lakes Park, near Greensburg Shuttle bus service available from St. Vincent College and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

www.artsandheritage.com

724-834-7474 CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

37


Big BLUE summer begins June 14! At our BLUE! exhibit, use enormous blue foam blocks to build mini-cities! Be an engineer as you tinker with small and medium-size blue blocks. Fun for all ages! Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for more details.

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EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITIES OF

G N I D A E R R E M SUM

Adults, teens, kids… Read books s Win prizes s Enjoy programs Summer Reading is for everyone! Hustlebot, May 31 at Arcade Comedy Theater

Join us for Summer Reading Extravaganza Outdoor Family Festival Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh – Main, Oakland Sunday, June 8, 2014 [ 12 – 5 pm

1938 comedy follows a British couple who on their 25th anniversary learn they are not legally married le after all, May 22-June 7 (Little a LLake Theatre). Ring of Fire. Jukebox musical built R around the songs of Johnny Cash, ar May Ma 22-Aug. 17 (Pittsburgh CLO).

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CURRENT Hope & Gravity. The lives of nine characters overlap in this “comedy about fate” by Michael Hollinger (Opus), through Sun., May 25 (City Theatre). Peter & The Starcatcher. Touring version of the hit Broadway musical that’s a sort-of prequel to Peter Pan, through Sun., May 25 (Byham Theater). Comfort Zone. Local playwright Marlon Erik Youngblood’s drama about the aftermath of a neighborhood shooting, through May 31 (Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.). A Love Affair. Jerry Mayer’s romantic comedy about a 38-year marriage, through May 31 (South Park Theatre).

MAY Saudade: a senseplay. A new “devised” play by Dylan Marquis Meyers and Connor Pickett that explores storytelling “through personal sensory experience,” May 22-31 (Alarum Theatre). When We Are Married. J.B. Priestley’s

show sho featuring theme songs from the 1960s and ’70s, May 24-31 (CLO Cabaret). 1 Too Many Crooks. Comedy by Douglas E. Hughes and Marcia Kash, set in 1932 Niagara Falls, about some restaurateurs whose singing chef vanishes on opening night, May 29-June 8 (Apple Hill Playhouse). Noises Off. Michael Frayn’s neo-classic farce, a play within a play, May 29-June 29 (Pittsburgh Public Theater). Singin’ in the Rain. Musical, based on the screen classic, about the transition to talking pictures, featuring the title tune, “Make ’Em Laugh” and “Good Mornin’,” May 30June 8 (Pittsburgh CLO).

JUNE Pride Fest. Annual Laura Woyasz stars in Noises Off, May 29June 29 at Pittsburgh Public Theater

festival of one-acts by local playwrights on LGBT themes, June 5-13 (Pittsburgh Playwrights).

A Piece of Cake. Lucy

Bennett’s comedy about a London girl who wants to open a cake shop, June 5-21 (South Park). Orlando. Acclaimed playwright Sarah Ruhl’s new adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s comic novel about a poet who lives 200 years as a man, before waking to find himself a woman, June 5-22 (Unseam’d Shakespeare). Angels in America. Parts I and II of Tony Kushner’s epic drama set during the 1980s


onslaught of AIDS, June 6-15 (Throughline Theatre Co.). OJO. Following its acclaimed STRATA, Bricolage Productions presents another intimate, immersive theater experience, this one evoking a “travel agency,” June 7-15 (Bricolage). Waiting for Godot. Beckett’s epochal existential vaudeville, June 7-21 (PICT Classic). Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Spike. Christopher Durang’s hit Broadway comedy about rivalrous siblings, one from Hollywood and two from the sticks, June 12-28 (Little Lake). Legally Blonde. Musical based on the film about an apparent ditz who tries law school, June 13-22 (Pittsburgh CLO). Evil Dead: The Musical. Pittsburgh premiere of George Reinblatt’s adaptation of Sam Raimi’s gory cult-classic horror film, June 13-28 (No Name Players). Prisoner of Second Avenue. Neil Simon’s comedy about a New York couple whose lives spin into disaster, June 19-29 (Apple Hill). Iphigenia and Other Daughters. Pittsburgh premiere of Ellen McLaughlin’s 1994 reinterpretation of the Orestes myth, June 20-29 (Alarum). Footloose. Dean Pitchford, Walter Bobbie and Tom Snow’s stage-musical adaptation of the hit movie, June 24-29 (Pittsburgh CLO). Suds. Jukebox musical featuring hits of the ’60s, about finding love at the Laundromat, by Melinda Gilb, Steve Gunderson and Bryan Scott, June 25-July 12 (South Park). Cactus. Philip Real’s new drama, about young lovers in present-day Arizona, a Romeo & Juliet story with a supernatural twist, June 27-July 13 (Twelve Peers). City of Asylum/Pittsburgh. Two Prague-based groups, the music-theater collective Allstar Refugee Band and the Archa Theater, join collaborators from Pittsburgh’s refugee community for an original production, June 28 and 29.

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Brighton Beach Memoirs. Neil Simon’s 1983 Broadway hit about growing up in Brooklyn in the ’30s, July 3-19 (Little Lake). Evita. The Rice/Webber musical, July 8-13 (Pittsburgh CLO). The Lion in Winter. James Goldman’s oft-revived 1966 drama about those 12th-century British royals, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, July 10-18 (The Summer Company). Summer of Love. Roger Bean’s musical about a runaway bride in late-1960s Haight-Ashbury, featuring hits of the era, July 10-27 (Apple Hill). SummerFest. Opera Theater of Pittsburgh’s annual three-weekend showcase includes Franz Lehar’s The Merry Widow; Strauss’ Ariadne on Naxos; legendary off-Broadway hit The Fantasticks (in collaboration with Attack Theatre); a series of newly commissioned arias set in bars, titled Happy Hour!; and workshop performances of A New Kind of Fallout, a new opera about the life of Rachel Carson by composer Gilda Lyons and librettist Tammy Ryan. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland, July 11-27. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

Woman & Scarecrow. Pittsburgh premiere of Marina Carr’s 2006 play about a dying Irishwoman and her mysterious companion, July 12-Aug. 20 (PICT). Side Show. Bill Russell and Henry Krieger’s cult-favorite 1997 musical about Daisy and Violet Hilton, the conjoined twins who gained fame as stage performers in the 1930s, July 17-27 (Stage 62). Five Tellers Dancing in the Rain. Mark Dunn’s dramatic comedy about five Mississippi bank tellers reflecting on their lives, July 17-Aug. 2 (South Park). A New Death. Pittsburghbased playwright C.S. Wyatt’s play envisioning the afterlife as an incompetent corporate bureaucracy, July 18-26 (Throughline). Cats. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s big cat hit, July 18-27 (Pittsburgh CLO). Ubu King! Premiere of Jordan Matthew Walsh and Connor Pickett’s new adaptation of Alfed Jarry’s classic political satire about a bloodthirsty monarch, July 18-27 (Alarum). Fixing King John. Pittsburgh premiere of Kirk Lynn’s contemporary adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John, July 18-Aug. 2 (No Name). Children of Eden. The 1991 Stephen Schwartz and John Caird musical based on the book of Genesis, July 18-Aug. 3 (The Theatre Factory). Romance. David Mamet’s 2005 courtroom farce, July 19-Aug. 3 (Phoenix — A Theatre Company).

Dancing at Lughnasa. Brian Friel’s 1992 Tony-winner about five sisters sharing the same house in rural Ireland in the 1930s, July 24-Aug. 9 (Little Lake). Monty Python’s Spamalot. Monty Python’s Eric Idle and composer John Du Prez’s musical adaptation of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, July 29-Aug. 3 (Pittsburgh CLO).

AUGUST Tamara. In this production of John Krizanc’s 1981 play about art and politics in 1927 Italy, audiences follow the character of their choice through an “estate” (Shadyside’s Rodef Shalom) and even dine as part of the experience, Aug. 2-Sept. 14 (Quantum Theatre). Suite Surrender. Michael McKeever’s farce finds two Hollywood divas accidentally assigned the same Palm Beach hotel suite before a 1942 wartime show, Aug. 7-17 (Apple Hill). Things My Mother Taught Me. Katherin DiSavino’s comedy about newlyweds whose families show up at their new apartment halfway across the country, Aug. 7-23 (South Park). The Foursome. Norm Foster’s audiencepleasing golf comedy, Aug. 14-30 (Little Lake). The Gospel Singer. C.S. Wyatt’s drama about a singer and a jazz club emcee who has lost his faith, Aug. 14-31 (The LAB Project). Offending the Audience. Austrian playwright Peter Handke’s 1966 “anti-play” gets its Pittsburgh premiere, Aug. 15-24 (Alarum). CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CHILDREN’S THEATER CURRENT The Wind in the Willows. Musical adaptation of Kenneth Grahame’s classic about Mr. Toad, Badger, Ratty and Mole, through Sun., May 25 (Playhouse Jr.).

Hush: An Interview with America. James Still’s play about a pre-teen girl with the ability to see what others cannot, through Sun., May 25 (Playhouse Jr.).

MAY The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Tony-winning musical focusing on four awkward juvenile contestants, Fri., May 23-June 8 (Playhouse Jr.).

JUNE Beauty Is a Beast. Play about a spoiled princess, June 16-25 (South Park Children’s Theatre). Cinderella. A new take on the classic, with a mischievous cat and added comic relief, June 16-July 2 (Johnny Appleseed Children’s Theatre). Charlotte’s Web. Joseph Robinette’s adaptation of the E.B. White classic about a girl, her pig and a special spider, June 25-July 12 (Looking Glass Theatre). Rose Red. Comedy about the adventures

of Snow White’s less-famous teenage sister, June 30-July 9 (South Park).

JULY Aladdin. A musical version of the favorite tale about a youth, a princess, a genie and a lamp, July 7-16 (Johnny Appleseed). The Princess and the Pea. The classic fairy tale, July 14-23 (South Park). The Cat in the Hat. Stage version of the iconic Dr. Seuss book, originally produced by the National Theatre of Great Britain, July 16-Aug. 2 (Looking Glass). The Further Adventures of Maid Marian. Comic version of the Robin Hood myth in which Marian takes charge (and picks kids from the audience for her gang), July 21-30 (Johnny Appleseed). No Strings Attached. Comic musical adaptation of Pinocchio, July 28-Aug. 6 (South Park).

AUGUST The Truly Remarkable Puss-inBoots. The adventures of the amusingly arrogant and well-shod feline, Aug. 4-13 (Johnny Appleseed). James and the Giant Peach. David Wood’s adaptation of the Roald Dahl story about a boy who takes refuge in an outsized fruit, Aug. 6-23 (Looking Glass).


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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

Much Ado About Nothing. Shakespeare’s

A Pale Blue Jazz, June 19-23 at The Pillow Project

comedy, performed outdoors, Aug. 16-24 (South Park). Bus Stop. William Inge’s 1966 drama about folks stranded at a small-town Kansas diner, Aug. 21-30 (Summer Company). Devised. Experimental project, incorporating acting troupes and audiences into the process of creating two workshop productions of new works, Aug. 21-30 (Bricolage). Squabbles. Marshall Karp’s domestic comedy about a married couple, the wife’s curmudgeonly father-in-law and the husband’s suddenly homeless mother, Aug. 28-Sept. 7 (Apple Hill). Southern Comforts. Kathleen Clark’s romantic comedy about a Yankee widower and a Tennessee grandmother stuck inside together during a big storm, Aug. 28-Sept. 13 (South Park). Doubt, A Parable. John Patrick Shanley’s Pulitzer-winner about accusations of child sexual abuse in a 1960s Catholic school, Sept. 4-20 (Little Lake). Dixie’s Tupperware Party. The popular audience-participation comedy returns to Pittsburgh, Sept. 4-Oct. 12 (Pittsburgh CLO).

Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Toward the Somme. Frank McGuinness’ lyrical 1985 play about Irish soldiers in World War I, Sept. 6-20 (PICT).

DANCE Bodiography Center for Movement. The dance school’s spring performance includes classical and contemporary works, June 7 (Byham Theater).

Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Stardust (year-end student recital), May 31 and June 1. Carnegie, 412-279-8887.

Steve Trevino, May 23-25 at Pittsburgh Improv

Maree ReMalia/ merrygogo. The Ubiquitous Mass of Us

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA RIAL}

(premiere as part of the New Hazlett’s Community Supported Art series), June 14 (New Hazlett Theater). The Pillow Project. Haunting Nagoya (in collaboration with Crusic Percission), Sat., May 24; A Pale Blue Jazz, June 19-23; and A One Night Stand on a Broken Piano (dance and experimental percussion), July 26. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze, www.pillow project.org.

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. The PBT’s student and pre-professional divisions perform new and classic works in the annual showcase, Fri., May 23 (Byham).

PrideFest Dance Showcase. Annual day-long program featuring Jasmine Hearn, The Pillow Project, Reed Dance, Staycee Pearl Dance Project, Taylor Knight, Texture Contemporary Ballet and True T Entertainment, June 15. Downtown, www.pittsburghpride.org.

COMEDY Amish Monkeys. Improv comedy, June 14 and July 13. Point Breeze, www.amishmonkeys.com Arcade Comedy Theater. Champagne Hierarchy, Fri., May 23. John Evans and Danny Palumbo, Fri., May 23, and Sat., May 24. Arcade Hootenany, Sat., May 24, and June 14. Comedy Royale, May 30 and June 28. Your Life: The Musical, May 30. Hustlebot, May 31. Knights of the Arcade: Epic D&D Comedy Adventure, May 31 and June 28. The Live Show with Aaron Kleiber, June 6. Blue Light Special, June 6. Dinner with the Nolens, June 7. Penny Arcade, June 14. Funnelcakes Not Included, June 21. Downtown, 412-339-0608.

Club Café. Steel City Comedy Tour (Ed Bailey, Gio Attisano, Allan Lee, Jeff Schneider, Brad Ryan and Chuck Krieger), May 30. Michael Ian Black, June 14. An Evening of Comedy with Andy Picarro, John Dick Winters, Tim Ross and Molly Sharrow, hosted by Matt Light, July 5. South Side, 412-431-4950. Erin Foley. June 6. Cruze Bar, Strip District, www.facebook.com/cruzebar. Eddie Izzard. May 31 and June 1 (Byham). Bill Maher. July 26. Heinz Hall, Downtown, 412-392-4900. Latitude 360. Louie Anderson, Thu., May 23, and Fri., May 24. Kevin White with Krish Mohan, May 30 and 31. Dwayne Gill with Mike O’Keefe, June 6 and 7. Frankie Paul with M Dickson, June 13 and 14. Jody Kerns with Dan Ellison, June 20 and 21. Robinson, 412-693-5555. Miranda Sings. June 19. Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, Munhall, 412-368-5225. Pittsburgh Comedy Showcase. Hosted by Mike Wysocki, every Friday. Corner Café, South Side, 412-488-2995. Pittsburgh Improv. Wednesday Night Live with Aaron Kleiber, Wed., May 21. Let’s Talk About It, Thu., May 22. Steve Trevino, Fri., May 23-Sun., May 25. Mick Foley, Wed., May 28 (sold out) and July 24. Russell Peters, Thu., May 29-June 1. Craig Shoemaker, June 6-8. Ralphie May, June 12-15. T-Robe, June 18. Erik Griffin, June 19-22. Aries Spears, June 26-29. Pablo Francisco, July 10-13. Pauly Shore, July 18-20. Funny Mammoments with Mark Mammone, July 23 and Aug. 27. Rickey Smiley, July 25 and 26. Chris D’Elia, July 31-Aug. 2. Tom Segura, Aug. 7-10. Loni Love, Aug. 15-17. Josh Wolf, Aug. 22-24. Kevin Nealon, Aug. 2930. West Homestead, 412-462-5233. Slapsticks Productions. David Kaye and Matt Stanton (The Rose Bar & Grille, White Oak). 412-920-5653. Steel City Improv Theater. A Gun Called Christopher Walken, Thunderpants, and Ocho Dik Dik every Thursday. Steamer, every Friday. Musical Improv, every Sunday. The Draft (improv teams), Fri., May 23. Almost Infamous, Fri., May 23. The Death Show, Sat., May 24. Yo! Gloria! and The 5950 Experience, May 30. Law Prov, Character Box and BYOT, May 31. Champagne Hierarch, June 7. The Orson Welles 1978 4th of July Spectacular, Fri., July 4. Shadyside, 412-404-2695. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

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SUMMER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

WDVE Comedy Festival. DVE’s Randy Baumann hosts an evening featuring Harland Williams, Brian Callen, Nikki Glaser, Tommy Johnagin and Bill Crawford. June 27 (Byham).

LITERARY+ SPOKEN WORD Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Fizz, Boom, READ @ Your Library: 14th Annual Summer Reading Extravaganza (free family activities and entertainment), June 8 (Oakland). Experience Your New Library: Hazelwood Branch re-opening Community Day, June 21. Cave Canem Poets. Popular annual reading series by this Elizabeth collective for AfricanWein, American poets July 16 at Pittsburgh and City of Asylum/ Arts & Pittsburgh, this year Lectures featuring Patricia Smith, Tim Seibles and Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon. North Side, June 19.

City of Asylum/ Pittsburgh. Writers in the

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Bring the Family Enjoy the great outdoors. Over 600 miles of hiking & biking trails. Camping, Cabins & Lodges

Gardens (with Craig Bernier, Leslie Ann McIlroy, Dave Newman, Wendy Paff and Jamar Thrasher), July 12. Poetry Reading by Jeffrey Oaks and Jenny Johnson, Aug. 6. Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Michele Battiste, Joy Katz, Leslie McIlroy and Lauren Shapiro, Tue., May 20; John Grachalski, Yona Harvey, Peter Oresick, Judith Vollmer and Michael Wurster, June 3; Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange (Michale Albright, Ziggy Edwards, Barry Govenor, Gene Hirsch, Joe Kaldon, Kathryn McGregor, Ed Murray, Steve Pusateri and Judith Robinson), June 10; Sheila Carter-Jones, Todd Davis, Diane Kerr, Wendy Scott and Robert Walicki, June 17; Caliban Books and Low Ghost Press (Jason Baldinger, M. Callen, Kristofer Collins, Bob Pajich, Daniel M. Shapiro and The Mystery Poet), June 24; Judith Brice, Daniela Buccilli, Rina Ferrarelli, Steve Murabito and Joanne Samraney, July 1; Lori Jakiela, David Newman, Sarah Shotland and Adam Matcho,

Kinzua Sky Walk Enjoy the thrill of “Walking the Tracks Across the Sky”.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

All workshops held @ The Mine Factory, 201 N Braddock Ave, 15208

July 8; Introducing Free State Review (Joan E. Bauer, Jason Irwin, Karen Lillis, Scott Silsbee, Brian Tierney, Meghan Tutolo and Barrett Warner), July 15; Jimmy Cvetic, Kevin Finn, Walt Peterson, Kayla Sargeson, Christine Telfer and special guest Tony Norman, July 22; and Celebrating The New Yinzer (Holly Coleman, Mike Good, Kurt Garrison, Taylor Grieshober, Mark Mangini, Don Wentworth and Carolyne Whelan), July 29. Hemingway’s Café, Oakland, jbauer103w@aol.com. Jason Baldinger Book Release. June 7. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield, www.modernformations.com. Moth Mainstage. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures presents this annual showcase for winners of Pittsburgh’s monthly StorySlams; this year’s theme is “Don’t Look Back.” Aug. 27 (Byham). {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID HO}

Mystery Lovers Bookshop.

Robert K. Musil (Rachel Carson and Her Sisters), Sat., May 24; Summer Solstice Soiree (free talks and signings by Pittsburgh authors), June 21; Susan Elia MacNeal (Maggie Hope mysteries), July 8; James Browning (The Fracking King), July 10; Brynn Chapman (Boneseeker), July 12; and Tom Bouman (Dry Bones in the Valley), July 15. Oakmont, 412-828-4877. Penguin Bookshop. Charlie Lovett (The Bookman’s Tale), June 11. Sewickley, 412-741-3838. Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Young-adult author Elizabeth Wein (Code Name Verity), July 16. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District, 412-622-8866. WordPlay. Quarterly show blending true stories with live DJ, hosted by Alan Olifson, July 18 (Bricolage). Writers LIVE. Pittsburgh-based novelists Jacob Bacharach (The Bend of the World), June 5; Kathleen George (The Johnstown Girls), June 26; and Thomas Sweterlisch (Tomorrow and Tomorrow), Aug. 7. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Oakland, 412-622-8866.


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JUNE 21 JUN Atlatl Competition. Atla Meadowcroft, Avella. Try your hand M at the ancient sport. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

ONGOING Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. Held throughout the city through fall. 412-422-6405 or www.citiparks.net for complete list

MAY 24

Head for the biggest fair ’round these parts. 724-865-2400 or www.bigbutlerfair.com

JUNE 28 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

MAY 26

JUNE 29

Memorial Day Celebration. Soldiers & Sailors Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253

JUNE 01 Animal Friends Mutt Strut. South Park. Games, activities and pooches. 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org

JUNE 04 Riverview Park Heritage Day. Nature, kids’ activities,

Classic Car Show. Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org

JULY 02-04 Three Rivers Regatta. North Side and Downtown. Boat races, fireworks, food, fishing. www.threeriversregatta.net

JULY 03-06 Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival. Twin Lakes Park, Greensburg.

“frontier” expo. North Side. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

724-834-7474 or www.artsandheritage.com

JUNE 06-15

JULY 04

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown. Visual-art exhibitions, public art installations, music and dance performances, and arts-and-crafts market. 412-471-3191 or www.3riversartsfest.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Big Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds.

www.pyrofest.com

Pyrofest. Fireworks festival. Hartwood Acres.

54

JUNE 27-JULY 05

Independence Day Celebration. Meadowcroft, Avella. Games, food and demonstrations of 19th-century rural celebrations. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org


JULY 11-20

Agricultural Fair. Washington.

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Various

724-225-7718 or www.washingtonfair.org

locations. Vintage car races and shows. www.pittsburghvintagegrandprix.com

AUG. 11-16

JULY 12 Doo Dah Days: Stephen Foster Music and Heritage Festival. Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville. www.doodahdays.com

Westmoreland County Fair. Greensburg.

Vintage Grand Prix Car Show. Walnut

AUG. 16

Street, Shadyside. 412-682-1298 or www.think shadyside.com

Bedford County Fair. Bedford County

Jam on Walnut.

{PHOTO BY AL HOFF}

JULY 26 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands perform. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

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140 Annual Rain Day. Waynesburg, Greene County. 724-627-8111 or www.raindayfestival.com

JULY 31-AUG. 03 Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront Park, Kittanning. Arts and crafts, food, music and other entertainment. www.armstrongfestival.com

AUG. 01-03 Black Family Reunion. Schenley Park Oval. 412-422-6426

AUG. 02-03 Regatta at Lake Arthur. South Shore, Moraine State Park. www.lakearthurregatta.org g

AUG. 03-09 Greene County Fair. Waynesburg. 724-627-4752 or www.greenecountyfair.org

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AUG. 29-SEPT. 01 Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Colonial Festival. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 724-863-4577 or www.familyfestivals.com

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Calling all Movie Buffs! Celebrate the “Hollywood of the East”, where movies and film crews abound! Interactive tour through city backdrops of movies such as The Dark Knight Rises, Flashdance, Inspector Gadget, Striking Distance and dozens more! Treats included. Portion of proceeds goes to Pittsburgh Film Office. (2.5 HOURS)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Skateboarding. Go boarding at these

City of Play. Try a smorgasbord of games from cards to Tchoukball (which involves a ball and a trampoline) to one that centers on scavenging and bartering in a post-apocalyptic economy. Various locations around the city. www.cityofplay.org

Spray Parks. From May 24 until early fall, enjoy the movement sensors that cause sprayers to turn on and off in East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Beechview. 412-323-7928

City Pools. Citiparks pools are open June 10 through Labor Day. Programs include swimming lessons and swim teams. Purchase seasonal pool tags or pay a daily entrance fee. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

in Banksville Park; Marmaduke Playground, Brighton Heights; Lewis Playground, Hazelwood; Ormsby Playground, South Side; and Brookline Memorial Park

NOW THROUGH OCTOBER

Pittsburgh Sports League. Year-round adult co-ed sports, including basketball, kickball, volleyball, softball. Various city locations. 412-338-2133 or www.pump.org

kids include baseball, softball, soccer and track and field. Co-sponsored by Citiparks and the Pittsburgh Pirates. 412-488-8585

Dek Hockey. Available at outdoor rinks

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Lawn Bowling. Open lawn La bowling and league play, bow plus ffree lessons. Frick Park, Regent Square. 412-782-0848 or Rege www.lawnbowlingpittsburgh.org w

Inline Skating. Weekly through September. Offers beginner, intermediate and advanced skates throughout the week around the city and on the Eliza Furnace Trail. www.skatepittsburgh.com

city-run skate parks: McKinley, West Penn and Sheraden. 412-255-2539

Tennis. Regional tennis courts are open in Arsenal, Frick, Highland, Moore, Schenley, Washington’s Landing and West parks. Summer programs include camps and lessons. 412-244-4188 Venture Outdoors. Venture Outdoors sponsors hundreds of outdoor events at area parks, including family fun walks, plus beginner-to-advanced sessions in hiking, backpacking, mountain-biking, rock-climbing, horseback-riding, canoeing, kayaking, yoga and much more. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

MAY 23 Two-Player Golf Scramble. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545


MAY 31 Walk to Cure Arthritis. South Side Works. arthritiswalkpittsburgh.kintera.org

JUNE 01

Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808 x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

JULY 17 Men’s Golf Championship. North Park

City Spree. A city-wide 5K race without a

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

course. Runners and walkers create their own course throughout the city, traveling between checkpoints to discover connections between neighborhoods. www.cityspreerace.com or info@cityofplay.org

JULY 18-SEPT. 19

Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk over a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. 412-255-2493 or www.greenfieldglide.com

JUNE 06 Riverview 5K Run and Walk. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.riverview5k.com

JUNE 06-27 Market Square Area Downtown Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet at PNC Triangle Park in front of the Fairmont Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808 x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

JUNE 14 Annual Pittsburgh Walk NOW for Autism. Heinz Field. www.walknowforautismspeaks.org

JUNE 14-22 Bob O’Connor Summer Tennis Classic. Tennis tournament open to all ages and abilities. Schenley Park Tennis Center and Highland Park courts. 412-244-4188

JUNE 19 Men’s Golf Championship. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

JUNE 21 Annual Rachel Carson Trail Challenge. A 34-mile endurance hike from North Park to Harrison Hills County Park. Two shorter events — the 16-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge — also take place that day. www.rachelcarsontrails.org

Summer Natural History Tours/Walks. Boyce Park, Deer Lakes Park, Harrison Hills Park, Hartwood Acres and White Oak Park. 724-733-4618

JULY 19 South Hills Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-12. Wave Pool, South Park. 412-351-0512 Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. www.efwp.org

AUG. 01-29

Firefly Festival

AUG. 02-03 Pittsburgh Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an internationalor sprint-distance triathlon, or the “Adventure” tri featuring a 2-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. www.piranha-sports.com

AUG. 08-24 Bikefest. A celebration of life on two wheels in Pittsburgh. Various events and locations. www.bike-pgh.org

AUG. 09 Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Plus non-competitive 1-mile “Mini-Breeze” fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. 412-571-3222

North Park Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-15. Pool, North Park. 412-351-0512

AUG. 12 Women’s Golf Championship. North Park

AUG. 13 Juniors Golf Championship. South Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

AUG. 15

Paul G. Sullivan Championship. Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts. 412-244-4188

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

JULY 08

AUG. 16

JULY 09 Juniors Golf Championship. North Park

Fifth Annual Bocce Tournament & Festival. Sen. John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6405

AUG. 23

JULY 11-25 Grant Street and Mellon Square Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon.

SEPT. 04

Meet at the entrance of the Omni William Penn Hotel on Sixth and Grant streets,

Saturday, June 28

July

Corn Roast Kick-off Sunday, July 13

August

Peach Festival

Saturday, Aug. 9 & Sunday, Aug. 10

Farm-to-Fork Dinner Saturday, Aug. 16

Two-Player Golf Scramble. North Park

Run Around the Square 5K Run/Walk. Henrietta and Milton streets, Regent Square 412-246-9506 or www.runaroundthesquare.com

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

with Pick-Your-Own Berries

front of Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel. Free. 412-471-5808 x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park. 412-244-4188

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

Strawberry Festival

(date to be determined by strawberry crop)

JUNE 23-29

Women’s Golf Championship. South Park

June

Bridges & River Shores Walking Tour. Each Friday at noon. Meet in

Golf Course. 412-835-3545

JULY 07-20

It’s Summer @ Soergel’s!

Seniors Golf Championship. North Park Golf Course. 412-835-3545

PLUS...

Amish-made Donuts the first Saturday of every month!

Soergels.com CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

57


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


BRIAN CULBERTSON LIVE IN CONCERT JUL Y 17 , 2014 DOORS OPEN AT 7PM FOR THIS 8PM CONCERT SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL 4141 FIFTH AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA RESERVED SEATING $55 $45 $35

V.I.P. TICKET PACKAGE ($150) V.I.P. SEATING + PRE-SHOW MEET & GREET 5PM-7PM IN THE GRAND BALLROOM Purchase Tickets at www.showclix.com

VLH PRODUCTIONS

are we so different?

NOW ON VIEW! See the exhibition that examines the complex issues of race and racism in the US through the lenses of science and society.

you’ll never see race the same way again.

Presented by

A project of American Anthropological Association. Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation.

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

One of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

59


from June 11-Aug. 13. Highland Park. 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

Tyke Hikes. Venture Outdoors presents relaxed, inexpensive weekday-morning nature hikes in city and county parks, for parents with children up to 5 years old. www.ventureoutdoors.org

Citiparks Roving Art Cart, June 17-Aug. 29

SUMMER CAMPS Assemble. This Garfield “community space for arts and technology” offers weekday camps in everything from DJing and computer programming to rainbow looms, for kids in grades 3-8. www.assemblepgh.org

Carnegie Museums. The Museum of Art and Museum of Natural History hold camps for kids ages 4-13, with activities ranging from hands-on “dino digs” to art classes. Kids 5-12 can also spend full-day sessions at the Carnegie’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector, Pa. Oakland. 412-622-3288 or www.artand naturalhistory.org/camps/ Carnegie Science Center. Kids ages 4-14 can participate in half- or full-day sessions in a variety of science themes: exploring rivers, building bridges, programming robots. North Side. 412-237-1637 or www.carnegiescience center.org/programs/summer-camps/ Frick Art and Historical Center. In

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

explore love, forgiveness and other emotions with interactive art and activities (through Sept. 21). There are also plenty of interactive programs, including a garden, a garage-themed playroom, and Waterplay, a water exhibit. North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

ONGOING G Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Branches of the library citywide offer kids’ and teens’ programs — from storytime and crafting to children’s yoga — throughout the summer. www.carnegielibrary.org

Carnegie Science Center. Lots of youthfriendly ongoing science exhibits, including roboworld, the Highmark SportsWorks and the traditional Miniature Railroad & Village. Opening June 14 is BLUE!, in which visitors can build mini-cities from foam blocks. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. This season’s exhibit is XOXO, which lets kids

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Citiparks Dek Hockey. Full-size Dek hockey rinks are open at Banksville Park, Brookline Memorial Park, Marmaduke Playground in Brighton Heights, Hazelwood’s Lewis Playground and South Side’s Ormsby Playground. www.citiparks.net Citiparks Recreation Centers. Ten rec centers all over town offer sports and outdoor programs; beginning June 16, Summer Food Service program provides breakfast, lunch and snacks to children up to age 18. Most centers are open 1-9 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. 412-422-6542 or www.citiparks.net Citiparks Swimming Pools and Spray Parks. The city offers 18 outdoor swimming pools from June 10 through Labor Day; swim lessons and swim team events are available at each. Spray parks, where you can get soaked without opening a fire hydrant, open May 24 in Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill and —

new this year — Beltzhoover. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

Heinz History Center. In addition to ongoing kid-friendly exhibits in the lobby and on the third floor, the history center offers three “Hop Into History” events (June 18, July 16 and Aug. 20) in which kids ages 2-5 can engage in hands-on exploration of the past — with music, dance and games. Strip District. www.heinzhistorycenter.org or 412-454-6000

Kids Open Mic. Local club Hambone’s has launched a monthly all-ages/family open mic event where kids can sing, play an instrument or dance. Lawrenceville. For scheduling, see www.facebook. com/HambonesPittsburgh

Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library. Kids up to age 6 can hone their social and motor skills in this indoor art- and play-space, which also features a toy-lending program for members. Call for hours. Shadyside. 412-682-4430 or www.pghtoys.org Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. In addition to the hands-on Kids Kingdom area, the zoo offers family-friendly events all summer long. Specially themed programs take place during Eat’n Park Family Week (June 14-22), the UPMC Summer Kids’ Zoofari (Aug. 16-29) and on “Wild Wednesdays”

August, the Frick offers two week-long day camps: a half-day program for kids ages 4-6, and a full-day program for kids entering grades 2-5. The Frick grounds and collections are the backdrop for artwork and activities. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.the frickpittsburgh.org

Girls Rock! Pittsburgh. This camp, in which girls ages 8-18 learn to play in a rock band, expands dramatically this year to two full-day/full-week sessions: June 23-28 and Aug. 4-9. Girls will form bands that perform in a showcase at week’s end. Regent Square and Shadyside. www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Week-long, halfday classes expose kids to a range of creative activities — often using recycled/upcycled materials — in fields ranging from jewelry-making and drawing to gardening and standup comedy. For ages 4-13. Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org

Monologues and Movement. Kids from grades 6-8 learn voice, movement, acting and improvisational careers at this camp, presented by Prime Stage Theater and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. June 16-10. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. www.primestage.com National Aviary. Camps for ages 4-18, where kids can do everything from meeting penguins to learning the basics of falconry. North Side. 412-258-9439 or www.aviary.org/ summer-camps


Phipps Conservatory. Kids ages 2-7 learn about plants and bugs, gardening and cooking, in a series of camps throughout the summer. Oakland. 412-441-4442 x3925 or phipps.conservatory.org

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Summer art camps in a range of disciplines are offered all summer long for kids ages 4-13, plus high school immersion camps that teach arts like web design and ceramics. Shadyside. 412-361-0455 or www.pittsburgharts.org/summerartcamps Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. Kids ages 2-13 can attend half-day and fullday Animal Adventures summer zoo camps, studying animals and participating in activities that include nature photography and zoo-design workshops. Highland Park. www.pittsburghzoo.org

Saltworks Theatre Company. Aspiring actors ors ages 4-16 can learn role-playing, movement, improv and other stage techniques echniques at day camps held in Sewickley, ckley, the North Hills and nd Oakland. 412-621-6150 0 x201 or www.saltworks.org/ rks.org/ yassummer14.php 4.php

Steel City Rowing Club. Summer mer camps in rowing, fishing ng and other aquatic activities ities are offered to kids ages 8-18 in halfand full-day sessions. Verona. steelcityrowing.org/ lcityrowing.org/ adventure-camps/ amps/

JUNE 07 Artists Image Resource Fundraising Party. An annual family-friendly

TRY US OUT FOR A DAY.

event to support this local printshop, which provides numerous opportunities for individual students and organizations throughout the summer. North Side. www.artistsimageresource.org

JUNE 12 Fizz, Boom, READ @ Your Library. The Carnegie Library main branchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14th annual summer reading extravaganza features science-related games, crafts and other free family activities from noon to 5 p.m. Oakland. www.carnegielibrary.org

JUNE 14-15 Deep Blue Sea Weekend. Coinciding with the launch of its BLUE! exhibit, the Carnegie Science Center offers a weekend of hands-on activities and children childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ss books focused on ocean exploration. exploration www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

JUNE 17-AUG. 29 Citiparks Roving Art Cart. The A Art Cart provides free art-creation projects proje from around the world â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Amazon Amaz rain sticks and Chinese dragons â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for fo kids at different city parks each Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. p Opening celebration at Highland Park Super Playground June 17. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net www.citipa

MAY 29-31 -31 Allegheny County Marbles Tournament ournament. One ring to rule them all â&#x20AC;Ś the County Courthouse Courtyard hosts osts the finals for the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marbles competition. Winners head to the national competition in June. Downtown. wntown. 412-260-7278 8 or www.alleghenycounty.us/parks enycounty.us/parks

IF YOU LIKE US AND WANT UNLIMITED SUMMER FUN UPGRADE TO A SANDCASTLE SEASON PASS!

sand sandcastlewaterpark.com ssandc dcastlewaterpark.com com o

JULY 28-30 Pittsburgh Technical In Institute Summer Camp 2014. 20 2014 and 2015 high-school grads can attend an overnight careerdiscovery camp at PTI campus camp for fields including design and a crime-scene investigation. Oakdale. O www.pti.edu/summercamp

Penguins at National Aviary summer camp

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TING EBRA CEL

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CP SUMMER GUIDE 2014

61


DOES YOUR HOUSING SEARCH SOUND FAMILIAR? “YOU’RE OU’RE PREGNANT? ANT? YOU HAVE TO MOVE TO A LARGER UNIT. T. THAT’S THE RULE.”

“THIS UNIT T IS NOT E SUITABLE OR FOR EN.” CHILDREN.”

“YOUR “YOU BABY BAB IS CRYING CR T TOO M MUCH.”

“ “THIS ISN’T A GOOD PL PLACE TO HAVE CHIL CHILDREN.”

WHEN SEARCHING FOR HOUSING, HAVE YOU FELT DISCOURAGED FROM, OR DENIED, A UNIT BECAUSE YOU HAVE CHILDREN OR ARE PREGNANT? THE FAIR HOUSING ACT PROHIBITS HOUSING DISCRIMINATION AGAINST FAMILIES WHO HAVE CHILDREN OR ARE PREGNANT.

www.pittsburghfairhousing.org Contact THE FAIR HOUSING PARTNERSHIP at: 412-391-2535 or at victoria@pittsburghfairhousing.org 62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

SMILING MOOSE. Brief Lives, The Filthy Lowdown, Six Speed Kill. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Back Alley Blues. Monroeville. 412-372-3046. WALKER’S BAR. The Satin Hearts. Ambridge. 724-457-0662.

TUE 27

SAT 24

MON 26

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. De/ Vision, Standard Issue Citizen. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Jeff Berman Group. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 28 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Body of Light, Polar Scout, Ivory Weeds. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PALACE THEATRE. The Monkees. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

DJS THU 22

CLUB 46 - CLAIRTON VFD. The Satin Hearts. Clairton. 412-233-7302. IRMC PARK. Sonny Landreth, Jukehouse Bombers, more. Westsylvania Jazz & Blues Festival. 724-422-3991. KOPPER KETTLE. Kings Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. THE OLDE SPITFIRE GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Greensburg. 724-205-6402.

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

SUN 25

w paper pghcitym .co

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight. Oakland. 412-874-4582. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 23 ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. Bamboo & SMI. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 24 DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

WED 28 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 23 CLUB CAFE. Artistree, Gina Yohe (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. ONE 10 LOUNGE. Grimey Click, DJ Goodnight. Downtown. 412-874-4582.

SUN 25 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Rockwell, Suge B, E-Mac, Huck Pesci, Chief Lou & La Rocc, Joey Fattz, more. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BLUES FRI 23 LOKAY LANES. Bobby Hawkins

N E W S

EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The South Side Groove Squad feat. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090.

MON 26

BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Shot O’ Soul. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640.

& Ron Wilson. Downtown. 412-338-6463. PANZA GALLERY. Lee Robinson Trio. Millvale. 412-821-0959. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-691-0536.

SUN 25 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Nonstandard. Monthly jazz series with Nathan Frink’s Nu Artet playing works by Erik Lawrence. Garfield. 412-361-2262. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

27 7 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

MON 26

House-Made Liquor Infusions:

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. Marty Ashby Trio w/Jeff Bush. North Side. 412-322-1850. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

VODKAS: PINEAPPLE E - CUCUMBER CUCUMBE BER R - GRAPE - ESPRESSO - PEAR-OLIVE - MIXED BERRIES. RUMS: PEACH. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO - CHILI PEPPER.

––––––– –– –––––– Friday, May 23rd –– ––––––– ––––––

TUE 27

JAZZ THU 22 ANDYS. Joe Negri. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

SCOTCH TASTING::

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Eric DeFade. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Ardbeg A db 10 - Corryvrecken - Uigeadail Glenmorangie10 - La Santa- Quinta Ruban Nectar D’or

WED 28

8-10pm - Cheers!

ANDYS. James McClellan & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

19088 C LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

CONTINUES ON PG. 94

FRI 23 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Trio, Kristan Mancini. Downtown. 412-325-6769. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SAT 24 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Samantha St John, Howie Alexander, John Smith. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. GREENDANCE - THE WINERY AT SAND HILL. RML Jazz. 412-370-9621. IRMC PARK. Poogie Bell Band w/ Sean Jones, The ChopShop, Dad Band, The Electromotives, more. Westsylvania Jazz & Blues Festival. 724-422-3991. LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NINE ON NINE. Charlie Sanders

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93


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 93

FRI, MAY 23, 9PM ROCK/SOUL

BACKSTABBING GOOD PEOPLE PLUS BETWEEN

TWO RIVERS SAT, MAY 24, 9PM ROCK

DEVONIAN GARDENS WITH

SHAKY SHRINES

THU 22 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 23

MON, MAY 26, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH S G D

ELWOOD’S PUB. Wendy & The Lost Boys. 724-265-1181.

SAT 24 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. THE R BAR. Barbara Ray & The Sting Rays. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

THE JEFF BERMAN GROUP

MON 26

WE ARE NOW A SMOKE FREE VENUE!

WED 28

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

An Evening of Music JUNE 13

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

CASA RASTA. Gena y Pena, Cha Miguel. Beechview. 412-344-4700.

SUN 25

REGGAE

thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044 94

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

THE TUCSON GIRLS CHORUS. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

WED 28

THU 22

abkmusic.com/coh-events

Leap Year

CLASSICAL

JUNE 27

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Roots of a Rebellion, The Pressure. Oakland. 412-904-3400.

Grand Piano

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

THU 22

ICPLAYERS. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-336-8199.

FULL LIST ONLINE

COUNTRY THU 22 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. 724-265-1181.

SAT 24 BOSTON WATERFRONT. Moonshine Steel. McKeesport. 412-751-8112. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Steeltown Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, The Neon Swing X-Perience. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

Re-Build

{JUNE 17}

WED 28

WORLD

The Weathered STAGE AE. The Wailers, Root. North Side. Road w/Heidi Rusted 412-229-5483. Jacobs SAT 24

{MAY 31}

Mark Dignam & the House of Song

Hey Nostradamus

Presented By

Instead of Sleeping

LEAF & BEAN. Bill Toms. Strip District. 412-434-1480.

PENN BREWERY. Autobahn Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

Brooke Annibale w/Jesse Lafser & Angela Mignanellie

{MAY 22}

Young Lungs

Can’t Dance w/ FRI 23

JULY 11

Local album release dates

ACOUSTIC

AND DAZZLETINE

TUES, MAY 27, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

EARLY WARNINGS

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CJ’S. Stevee Wellons. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

OTHER MUSIC

www. per pa pghcitym .co

THU 22

MARKET SQUARE. Perfect Lives (Varispeed). Miniature operas staged in everyday locations. Starting at Market Square, venues across the city. Part of Pgh Festival of New Music. www. pghnewmusic.com. Downtown. 412-471-1511. NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Bugallo-Williams piano duo. Music by Kurtág, Williams, Garcia-De Castro, & more. Part of the Pgh New Music Festival. North Side.

FRI 23 NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Alia Musica Pittsburgh. Part

of the Pgh Festival of New Music. www.pghnewmusic.com. North Side.

SAT 24 NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Pittsburgh Soundpike. www.pghnewmusic.com Frederic Rzewski. Part of the Pittsburgh Festival of New Music. pghnewmusic.com. North Side.

SUN 25 LAKE ELIZABETH PARK. Inuksuit by John Luther Adams. A piece for 99 musicians. Part of the Pittsburgh Festival of New Music. www.pghnewmusic. com. North Side. PENTECOSTAL TEMPLE COGIC. Memorial Day Workshop Concert. Gospel event presented by James Ziegler. Email studiojz@yahoo.com for more information. East Liberty.

WED 28 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http:// trustarts.culturaldistrict.org/ event/3941/hello-donny-a-showtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.


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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

May 21 - 27 WEDNESDAY 21 Swear and Shake

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

THURSDAY 22

Ring of Fire The Music of Johnny Cash CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. 412-456-6666. Tickets: clocabaret.com. Through August 17.

Pittsburgh Festival of New Music MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. For more info & tickets visit pghnewmusic.com. Through May 25.

Rusted Root STAGE AE North Side. With special guests The Wailers & Adam Ezra. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Animals As Leaders

Allegheny Square. Tickets: pghnewmusic.com. 7:30p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Ingrid Michaelson

Steve Trevino

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Storyman, Sugar & The Hi Lows. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh.improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through May 25.

Man Overboard ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Transit & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Primal Fear ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Arctic Flame & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 23 Comedian Louie Anderson

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 8p.m. Through May 24.

Red Elvises HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-7625. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Green River Ordinance REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Alia Musica Pittsburgh NEW HAZLETT THEATER

Pyro Fest

HARTWOOD ACRES Allison Park. All ages event. Tickets: pyrofest.com. 3p.m.

SATURAY, MAY 24 HARTWOOD ACRES

MONDAY 26

Black Star Riders “The New Thin Lizzy” ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Bad Mother Trucker & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 27 Rod Stewart and Santana

SATURDAY 24 PYRO FEST

SUNDAY 25

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800745-3000. 7:30p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Complete your Memorial Day weekend with Sandals from

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes N E W S

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GODZILLA SEEMS TO BE ON MANKIND’S SIDE, THOUGH WHO KNOWS WHY?

{BY AL HOFF} In late-18th-century Britain, mixed-race Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is raised in genteel wealth by her white father’s family, headed by Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson). But while she enjoys tremendous privilege, her coming-of-age is complicated by both her gender and her race. Amma Asante’s film Belle is an historical fiction, inspired by a painting of real people (Dido and her cousin, Elizabeth) and incorporating a significant legal case regarding slavery, presided over by Lord Mansfield.

Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Dido

As such, it’s a swirl of larger issues — the legal and cultural limitations of gender and race, and the burgeoning abolition movement — intertwined with domestic melodrama (love and marriage). The film also works to draw parallels between the state of slaves and women, vis-à-vis their lack of agency: “We are but their property,” bemoans Elizabeth. But marriage isn’t enslavement, and it’s a tougher sell when we only see rich people courting and none of slavery’s visceral ugliness. Belle can get a bit soapy: It has all the heaving bosoms in gorgeous dresses, overheard secrets and upper-class side-eye you’d expect from a quality period parlor drama. So it’s entertaining in that respect, if a bit lifeless: Its heroes and villains are clear, as its outcome, and its predictable romantic travails tend to reduce the film’s meatier issues to mere obstacles along the path of true love. Starts Fri., May 23 AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

R A E H ME

R OA R F

EW MONSTERS have made as many trips to the

big screen as Godzilla (né Gojira), and viewers love to see the super-sized irradiated sea lizard stomp cities and battle other giant beasties. Gareth Edwards delivers that in his new Godzilla … but be prepared to endure a lot of filler. There’s a muddled backstory about mining disasters and a nuclear-plant meltdown in Japan before we get to the present day, in which we pretend to care about the barely sketched-in characters: a bland Navy guy (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), his wife (Elizabeth Olsen), his nuclear-engineer dad (Bryan Cranston) and a Japanese researcher hep to the unexplained (Ken Watanabe).

July is full of lazy summer days, but not for those who sign up for the

GODZILLA Directed by: Gareth Edwards STARRING: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Bryan Cranston, Ken Watanabe In 3-D in select theaters

48 Hour Film Project. On July 11-13, those folks will be rushing to write, shoot, edit and score a short film in just 48 hours. Registration is now open, and early birds save: $140 before June 16; $160 before July 1; and $175 for the last-minute johnnies. Full details at www.48hourfilm.com/pittsburgh

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Old G takes his time showing up, arriving after his opponents: huge praying-mantis-like creatures known as MUTOs (an acronym for “WTF is that?”). They feast on radiation, popping nuclear missiles like Tic Tacs. Frankly, these bugs sound useful — one

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is gobbling up nuclear waste in Nevada — but they’re the bad guys. The big brawl goes down in San Francisco, where Godzilla has easy on-off access from the Pacific. It also takes place during a power outage, which makes everything dark and murky. This is a good-looking monster, though; too bad the special-effects work doesn’t look as impressive for all the fake buildings he’s smashing. Hitting screens just a few years after the first nuclear bombs inflicted unprecedented devastation on Japan, 1954’s Gojira offered unmistakable and sobering commentary about that event — and more broadly, about the morality of humans tampering with nature’s deepest secrets. While Edwards’ film nods toward the Fukushima disaster and loads up on Sept. 11 imagery (pierced skyscrapers collapsing), it’s too incoherent to make any larger point. (It doesn’t help that this is a global crisis which seemingly affects fewer than 10 people.) Godzilla seems to be on mankind’s side, though who knows why? Suffice it to say, Godzilla is back, and if enough of you go see his new movie, he’ll surely return again. AH O F F @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BLENDED. It starts as a blind date gone wrong (at Hooters, natch) between Jim (Adam Sandler) and Lauren (Drew Barrymore) and ends up in the happily ever after. In between, our two love matches — each a single parent — take their broods on an awkward shared vacation to a South Africa resort, where common ground is found at the all-you-can-eat buffet. Frank Coraci’s comedy employs the kinder, gentler Adam Sandler, though you should not infer a recommendation; it’s less vulgar than usual, but for plot and wit, it barely rises above those exotically located Brady Bunch episodes. (The audience did laugh agreeably, but it was Terry Crews, as a manic Greek-chorus-style entertainer, who stole the show.) Curiously, the film whiffs its best feature: visiting a scenic place. The gang barely leaves the hotel! Nearly 30 years ago, Little Steven Van Zandt sang about how we shouldn’t support Sun City, the South African resort featured in this film. Apartheid is no more, but this cheesily themed resort looks like “Africa, Orlando’s newest place for fun in the sun.” I’d still stay away. Starts Fri., May 23. (Al Hoff) CHEF. Jon Favreau writes, directs and stars in this road comedy about a food truck. Starts Fri., May 23.

Ernest and Celestine AND CELESTINE. This sweet CP ERNEST animated family film from Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner is a welcome antidote to the frantic toy commercials that frequently appear as kids’ movies. (It was nominated for a 2014 Oscar, but lost to Frozen.) Illustrated in a charming watercolor style, it tells the simple story of a young mouse, Celestine, who befriends a bear, Ernest, each defying the world order in which bears and mice are enemies. The film is whimsical and gently funny throughout, with many nods to other works that even kids will recognize (Madeleine, Bugs Bunny). Even its gentle but engaging style recalls a storybook come to life (it is adapted from Gabrielle Vincent’s books), and its emotional subplot about two oddballs who find each other should resonate with both young and old. In French, with subtitles, and dubbed in English (weekends only). Regent Square (AH) FED UP. Stephanie Soechtig’s documentary takes a look at the state of America’s diet (with a special focus on added sugars) and the related health crises. AMC Loews X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. Alas, not a film of The Moody Blues’ similarly titled concept album, but a new set of adventures for the Marvel Comics crew of mutants. Starring Hugh

Blended Jackman, Jennifer Lawrence, Patrick Stewart and scores more; Bryan Singer directs. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 23.

REPERTORY CLEVELAND/ROCKS FILM FESTIVAL. The Parkway Theater in McKees Rocks is presenting seven films that screened earlier this year at the Cleveland International Film Festival. Screenings continue through Sun., May 25, and include: Awful Nice, a comedy about two brothers; Amka and the Three Golden Rules, a coming-of-age story from Mongolia; a comedy about Hollywood, He’s Way More Famous Than You; a stoner comedy, Oliver, Stoned; and Grantham & Rosie, in which two troubled teens take a road trip. Also playing is a pair of shorts: “Young Americans,” about teens planning a robbery, and “Shipbreakers,” an eye-opening documentary about laborers who dismantle ships by hand. All films screen multiple times; see website for complete schedule. 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 or www.parkwaytheater.org. $7 single ticket, or various passes ($11-45)

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DONNIE DARKO. Writer/director Richard Kelly’s debut is a hard-to-categorize tale about a

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HORROR REALM FILM FESTIVAL. The fourday festival of horror films begins tonight with a reception; screenings and other events follow Fri., May 23, through Sun., May 25. Full details at www. horrorrealmcon.com, with advance tickets at www. showclix.com. 8 p.m. Thu., May 22. Hollywood THE NEVERENDING STORY. A book leads a bullied boy into a fantasy land where he has a chance to be the hero. Wolfgang Petersen directs this 1984 family adventure film. 10 p.m. Fri., May 23, and 10 p.m. Sat., May 24. Oaks

THE MOVIE THE FOOD INDUSTRY DOESN’T WANT YOU TO SEE “THE MOST IMPORTANT MOVIE TO BE MADE SINCE ‘AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH’.”

GHOSTS OF AMISTAD: IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE REBELS. This new hour-long documentary

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“EYE-OPENING. PULLS NO PUNCHES IN ITS INFORMED OUTRAGE.”

Dan Savage's

LOS ANGELES TIMES

TOUR WORLD’S BEST AMATEUR DIRTY MOVIE FESTIVAL!

Donnie Darko (2001)

-Horror - - - - - - -Realm - - - - - - -Film - - - - -Festival -------------------5/21 @ 7:30pm

FROM LAURIE DAVID PRODUCER OF AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH AND KATIE COURIC

5/22 @ 8pm, 5/23 10am-Midnight, 5/24 10am-10pm, 5/25 11am-2pm with closing ceremonies at 2:30pm Horror Realm expands its support of independent filmmakers with the Horror Realm Film Festival!

JUNE 13TH 7PM & 9:30PM JUNE 14TH 5PM, 7PM, 9PM & 11PM

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doomed teen. Over 28 days, Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) struggles to understand his suburban world, which is tilting toward madness, steered by a giant rabbit named Frank. Kelly excels at capturing Donnie’s dread with verve, yet he and Gyllenhaal ground this anxiety so firmly in the confusion and inarticulateness of ordinary adolescence that there’s no easy fantasy loophole. A hybrid of time-travel treatise, ’80s snapshot, troubled-kid drama and dark comedy. The 2001 film kicks off a series of films featuring Patrick Swayze. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 21. Hollywood (AH)

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-Back - - - - -to- - -the- - - -Future - - - - - - -(1985) --------------------

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EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

5/26 @ 4pm & 7pm - 4pm showing only $5!

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT SINKLER}

Fed Up from local filmmaker Tony Buba is based on The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom, Pitt historian Marcus Rediker’s book about a 1839 slave revolt. The film follows a 2013 journey to Sierra Leone, in which historians sought out living descendants of those taken aboard the Amistad, as well as the site of Lomboko, the former slave-trading depot. Buba and Rediker will be on hand to present the film, which continues a series of monthly screenings of films related to labor issues. 1:30 p.m. Sat., May 24. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free

at times seems to dash about like one of the story’s over-excited party guests. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., May 28. Melwood (AH) THE SOUND OF MUSIC. These hills are alive … with the sound of music. Julie Andrews stars in Robert Wise’s 1965 musical dramedy about the singing Von Trapp family. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 28. AMC Loews. $5

EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE! The gang at the found videotape repository have put together two new compilations, “Comic Relief Zero!” (featuring standup, natch) and “Everything Is Terrible! Does the Hip-Hop” (corporate rap). Films will be introduced live, and with lots of fake fur and glitter. 8 p.m. Sat., May 25. Melwood. $10 LABYRINTH. This cultish 1986 film from Muppetmaster Jim Henson spins a fairy-tale-ish yarn about a teenage girl (Jennifer Connelly) who must navigate a strange world in order to rescue her baby brother from a goblin king (David Bowie). Featuring one of the Thin White Duke’s worst hair-dos ever. The film concludes a month-long series of 1980s adventure films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 25. Regent Square BACK TO THE FUTURE. Through the use of a kicky time machine, young ’80s dude Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) finds himself back in the 1950s, where he’s tasked with getting his parents to hook up, lest he never be born. Christopher Lloyd, Crispin Glover and Lea Thompson also star in Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 comedy. 4 and 7 p.m. Mon., May 26; 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 28; 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 30; and 3 p.m. Sat., May 31. Hollywood THE RULES OF THE GAME. Jean Renoir’s scathing 1939 critique of contemporary French society is set in a country estate, topped with all the requisite hallmarks of a farce. The ensemble cast comprises the wealthy set, assorted guests and various servants. It’s a self-absorbed society Renoir called “rotten to the core.” Rules is the study of that world; there is no central character, and likewise no clearly defined heroes or villains. In this realm of moral relativism, betrayals and cruelties are fine — as long as all parties adhere to the rules: He who is sincere is not, in fact, playing by the rules — and must be excised in order to restore the perverse, but preferred, corrupted order. The film is well-composed, with an innovative use of deep space and a lively camera that

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The Rules of the Game RETURN OF THE STREET FIGHTER. It’s Sonny Chiba versus a phony charity set up by the Yakuza, in this 1974 martial-arts actioner from Shigehiro Ozawa. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 28. Hollywood DEAD MAN. Johnny Depp stars in Jim Jarmusch’s 1995 Western (of sorts), in which an accountant from Cleveland finds the frontier a complicated and deadly place. Also stars Crispin Glover, Gary Farmer and Gabriel Byrne, and features the last screen appearance of Robert Mitchum. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 29; 10 p.m. Fri., May 30; and 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., May 31. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[BOOKS]

IT’S A STYLE THAT A FEW YEARS AGO SUDDENLY SEEMED TO BE EVERYWHERE

MOTHERS NATURE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PICNIC AT RACHEL’S with author Robert K. Musil 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., May 24. Rachel Carson Homestead, 613 Marion Ave., Springdale. Free; reserve at 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com N E W S

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[ART REVIEW]

Robert K. Musil

Convention labels Rachel Carson as the mother of modern environmentalism. But Carson, too, had a mother — and plenty of spiritual grandmothers, sisters and granddaughters. Fifty years after her death, Robert K. Musil’s book Rachel and Her Sisters: Extraordinary Women Who Have Shaped America’s Environment (Rutgers Press) honors Carson, even while dismantling the myth that she was “a lone literary genius.” “I wanted to show that she was not just a lone figure … but that she stood on the shoulders of other women, starting with her mother,” says Musil, an environmental scholar who heads the Maryland-based Rachel Carson Council. Maria Frazier Carson was a teacher who, Musil says, surely introduced her daughter to the work of 19th-century nature writer Susan Fenimore Cooper, whose stylistic influence Musil locates in books like Silent Spring. Other foremothers included conservationist and birding pioneer Florence Merriam Bailey and physician Alice Hamilton, who pioneered occupational and environmental medicine in the U.S. Nor was biologist Carson a solitary researcher, even while exploring the effects of pesticides for the paradigm-shifting Silent Spring. “She was very proud to work with a whole set of scientists around the country,” as well as groups like the Sierra Club, says Musil in a phone interview. Yet Carson broke new ground. Previously, “environmentalists” were either conservationists — protectors of the land — or anti-pollution campaigners. Carson showed how nature’s health is also ours. Though Silent Spring is recalled for its role in banning DDT to protect birds, notes Musil, “Most of the book is about human health.” Musil, a former executive director of Physicians for Social Responsibility, teaches about climate change and environmental politics at American University. He says Carson’s combination of writing skill and scientific knowledge was also rare: “That’s what made Rachel powerful and unique,” he says. Women following that dual path today include Terry Tempest-Williams, Devra Davis and Sandra Steingraber. Musil visits Springdale’s Rachel Carson Homestead this week for a book talk and signing. (The free event includes a catered picnic.) He’ll emphasize that the scientist and author knew that mere knowledge wasn’t enough. “Her real legacy is in reaching out to the public and saying, ‘This is the science. … We have a duty to do something about this.’”

MARKETING

STRATEGIES {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

What’s in store: Wooden puppets by Tom Sarver

T

OM SARVER’S art is characterized by a satire so gentle that it can be hard to tell whether it’s meant as criticism. Often, an established institution, in the broader sense of the word, is adapted to fit Sarver’s artistic program. For example, The Tom Museum (2006-2008), though sponsored by the Mattress Factory museum and located in one of its satellite row houses, was not actually a museum. Rather, it toyed with the idea of “museum” as a nexus for the collection, presentation and even production of art. Throughout, the tone was light and open and generous, as Sarver extended to other artists some opportunities to exhibit. That symbiotic relationship is typical of contemporary art museums, which provide such opportunities while also needing the artists’ products to fill their galleries. But The Tom Museum was mostly an evolving installation of artwork made

by Sarver himself. It was an artist’s project that, though low-key and uncontentious, felt like a gentle rejoinder to the (somewhat beleaguered) view of curators as indispensible arbiters of taste.

TOM SARVER: THE OCCASIONAL MARKET continues through June 22. 707 Penn Gallery, 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7017 or www.trustarts.org

Similarly, Sarver presented on numerous occasions between 2007 and 2013 the Art Olympic Theatre, in which teams of artists raced against the clock to produce works that were judged competitively by a panel of arts professionals. This combination of art, performance and social interaction also underlay Sarver’s Bait & Tackle (2009), a paean to fishing, rural life and the bait store as community center. For his cur-

rent exhibit, The Occasional Market, Sarver again adapts the concept of “store,” though in this case riffing on art-gallery-as-store. In 707 Penn Gallery, which is a storefront, Sarver combines the concept of nonprofit art gallery with the concept of store in a sendup of commercial art galleries, some of which are present in Pittsburgh but don’t exactly dominate the scene. Sarver, who grew up in the area, builds on his background and experience, as his grandfather owned a grocery store in Pittsburgh. If anything, the “store” element seems underplayed, as most aspects of the display are in line with conventional gallery display — grey walls (white walls seem so yesterday), professionally framed works, and paintings on stretched canvas nicely spaced and hung at eye level. The nods toward an actual market include a roll of butcher paper, some shallow shelves and a couple of tables in lieu of pedestals. But those elements feel CONTINUES ON PG. 100

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misogyny and misanthropy. Whether handmade or bricolaged, the small sculptures run a gamut of quirkiness, from tiny clay spaceships to a tower of plastic bottlecaps to whatnots of wood scraps left over from cutting out other shapes. (It’s the “hamburger strategy” pioneered in art by Frank Stella’s sculptures: No scrap goes to waste.) The puppet-like painted wooden figures are delights, each a small sculpture representing a distinct character. (A group of similar pieces was exhibited in the 2013 Carnegie International under the auspices of invited artist Paulina Olowska.) For me, Sarver’s drawings such as “Good & Plenty” (2012) stand out, combining a multitude of images yet cohering through being rendered in a single medium. By comparison, the collages are cacophonous, layering paint upon images, though we can extract tidbits of humor, grace, imagination and environmental concern. While The Occasional Market doesn’t feel much more store-like than most galleries, it evokes the kind of store I prefer to patronize. Fresh, local and amiable, it’s mercantilism with a touch of humanity.

SARVER AGAIN ADAPTS THE CONCEPT OF “STORE,” IN THIS CASE RIFFING ON ARTGALLERY-AS-STORE.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[ART REVIEW]

ECLECTIC COMPANY {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

Don Dugal’s “Vantongerloo at Wilmerding”

minor and are overshadowed by, for example, the track lighting dear to art galleries. With art in various mediums, there is some sense of miscellany that could suggest that we are perusing the goods of multiple suppliers; one visitor to the gallery did ask the attendant who the artists are. But most of what’s present are Sarver’s drawings, assemblages and mixed-media collages in his signature style of loose, slightly wacky cartoonish expressionism. It’s a style that a few years ago suddenly seemed to be everywhere, but Sarver had a deep claim to it, having spent decades making figurative puppets, while also being a core organizer of Pittsburgh’s long-running (and now defunct) Black Sheep Puppet Festival. This exhibit’s press release promises interactivity, which might occasionally be true when the artist is in the gallery “making alterations, playing records, performing puppet shows, and pawning his wares,” but for most visitors the experience is not one of social interaction. It’s art to be looked at, pure and simple, and fortunately, Sarver’s artwork is rewarding and varied. Canvases feature homey stories — Richard Prince-like texts but without the

It’s always surprised me that there are so few commercial galleries in Pittsburgh. While it’s not uncommon for mid-sized cities to lack a robust art trade, Pittsburgh is so culturally rich that it seems it could support more than a few. While commercial galleries are not the only key to a thriving visual-art scene, the Art Fair phenomenon has made them essential features of the current art “market.” To quote critic A.O. Scott in a recent New York Times article, “money is now an important measure — maybe the supreme measure — of artistic accomplishment.” Because the current market-driven system favors recognizable names, commercial ventures tend to avoid underrecognized or experimental work. But commercial galleries both support and exhibit artists, making them essential components of that system. And many of them do show under-the-radar artists who deserve our attention. Housing a unique and eclectic mishmash of mediums and styles, Shadyside’s Gallerie Chiz is a far cry from a pristine white-cube gallery. Its owner/director, Ellen

Chisdes Neuberg, displays paintings, drawings, jewelry, ceramics and the odd three-dimensional creature in one big cacophonous floor-to-ceiling array. And there are definite gems amidst the clutter. In addition, Neuberg has carved out a traditional white-walled space in the middle of her gallery to showcase specific artists for her monthly changing exhibitions. The current exhibition, Nature & the Metaphysical, includes sculptures by Caroline Bagenal and drawings by Don Dugal. Although Bagenal often creates large-scale sculptures, on display here are smaller, delicate abstracts from her Marsh Poems series. Made from bamboo and marsh reeds wrapped in paper from books and magazines, the pieces were inspired by the manmade objects she sees on walks near her Massachusetts home. One is a tiny cage painted an iridescent Yves Klein blue, another a jumble of cast-off sailing rope. While many of Dugal’s drawings also reflect his surroundings, they often spill into the surreal while exploring the range of shades and textures possible with charcoal. “Nitelites,” a nighttime landscape of a tree-covered hill, teeters on the edge of abstraction, while “Polar Reversal” combines both recognizable and abstract components. Using different mediums and methods, both Bagenal and Dugal strive for that transcendent space between realism and abstraction, temporality and the sublime. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NATURE & THE METAPHYSICAL continues through May 31. Gallerie Chiz, 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

This is your family photo album, Pittsburgh. A People’s History of Pittsburgh is your place to share the pictures and stories that make this region great. Submit your photos at nowseethis.org or in person on one of our scanning days, and we’ll share them all online in a collective photo album. Scanning Days at Carnegie Museum of Art 10 a.m.–8 p.m.  May 22 • June 26 • July 24  

Museum admission is free for anyone bringing in a photo to be scanned. Plan to spend a few hours with us, and create some new Pittsburgh memories.

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Sean Stewart, Untitled XI (Cool Car)


[PLAY REVIEWS]

CORNER STORY {BY TED HOOVER} THERE’S A GREAT deal of pleasure to

be had from Marlon Erik Youngblood’s Comfort Zone, at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company. Foremost is Playwrights’ nurturing of this local playwright and his play. Comfort Zone debuted as a one-act in the company’s 2012 Theatre Festival in Black & White, and now appears in a fulllength version. The play opens the morning after two young man have fought — and one died — in a Pittsburgh corner store. The community is on edge, with everyone wondering whether the proprietor, Checkers, has “snitched” to police about the murderer’s identity.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC A. SMITH}

From left: Cheryl El-Walker, Kevin Brown and Jamilah Chanie in Comfort Zone, at Pittsburgh Playwrights

But, like PPTC, I can see that this playwright has considerable talent, and that his is a voice that needs to be heard. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

COMFORT ZONE continues through Sat., May 24. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-25. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

AFFAIR PORTRAIT

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{BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

A LOVE AFFAIR

RELATIONSHIPS ARE a work in progress. That sentiment is at the heart of A Love Affair, a romantic comedy by former television writer Jerry Mayer that follows Jimmy and Alice Diamond across four decades of marriage. The story opens after a string of bad

continues through May 31. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $12. 412-831-8552 or www.southparktheatre.com

The play alternates between the present and the past, and the two versions of Jimmy and Alice occasionally interact

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

AN APOLOGY TO OUR READERS Unbeknownst to City Paper, the freelance writer assigned last week’s review of Stage 62’s production of Doubt, A Parable, had unsuccessfully applied to direct the show. Had we known, CP would not have assigned this reviewer, and we regret the error.

TA S T E

John MacInnis in Pittsburgh CLO’s Singin’ in the Rain | Photo: Matt Polk

Checkers has spent the past several decades going along to get along, cultivating friends and avoiding creating enemies … but with this death, he’s wondering whether having lived his life in that “comfort zone” has harmed the neighborhood around him. He remembers a time when people in this predominantly African-American community looked out for each other, and he sees, for the first time, how far people have slipped from that ideal. He must choose to speak up or disappear into insularity. Youngblood is a good old-fashioned storyteller, and in his first act especially, it’s a joy to watch him work; the characters are finely drawn and the plot moves forward with a compelling logic. Director Mark Whitehead leads a very solid company through Youngblood’s tale. The always-powerful Kevin Brown is even stronger here as Checkers; Brown does great work making us understand Checkers’ struggle. Bryant Bently’s turn as best friend and cold-eyed realist Slick Atkins helps keep the play rooted in the here and now. Mark Clayton Southers, Cheryl ElWalker, Monn Washington and Jamilah Chanie are given detailed supporting roles and each brings color and immediacy to the characters. I have to say that Comfort Zone goes a bit haywire in the second act. Here Youngblood can’t resist the temptation to get a bit preachy, and his plot suddenly feels stagey and muddied.

luck and bad investments forces the middle-aged couple, played in this South Park Theatre production by Bob Scott and Cindy Swanson, to sell their beloved home. As they clean out the attic, they begin reminiscing, and soon the audience meets the couple as young newlyweds (Noah Zamamiri and Erin McAuley).

— first with the older pair giving guidance to their younger selves, and ultimately the younger duo dispensing the wisdom. Both sides offer shrewd counsel, but whether Jimmy and Alice will take their own good advice is never quite so straightforward. Rounding out the cast is Genie Evanko, who portrays six diverse characters who shape the couple’s life together over the years. From the femme fatale who almost breaks up the marriage to a gynecologist who diagnoses Alice with a “normal” case of menopause, Evanko handles each of her roles with aplomb. Adrienne Fischer’s scenic design makes effective use of the limited stage, and between acts, the small crew did a terrific job converting the set from a run-down attic to the almighty bedroom. This might not be a Broadway-scale production, but the attention to detail is just as meticulous. Likewise, Melissa Hill Grande’s direction keeps the laughs moving at a quick pace, but encourages the audience to ponder the little moments that make a marriage. Alice and Jimmy’s sprightly dialogue mixes touching insights about relationships with crass commentary in which partner intends to amuse, and sometimes wound, the other. Though the older couple shares more on-stage chemistry than the younger pair, this works in the play’s favor, dovetailing with the theme that while age might not bring security, it does foster devotion. The end result is a story that’s sweet but never saccharine.

THE GREALTTEIMSET, LMIVOEVOINE MUSICAL STAGE! OF AL May 30 - June 8‡%HQHGXP&HQWHU

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org GROUPS 412-325-1582 +

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“A SHIMMERING TREASURE” DENVER POST

FOR THE WEEK OF

talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio* *on your computer!

LYNN CULLEN LIVE

05.2205.29.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., MAY 22 {STAGE} Let’s make this plain — because Johnny Cash would have. Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash, getting its Pittsburgh premiere courtesy of the CLO Cabaret, is not a bio of the Man in Black, nor does it mimic a concert. Rather, performers in

Pittsburgh-based literary magazine that has won the support of writers from Dave Eggers to Dear Sugar’s Cheryl Strayed, hosts its first annual Creative Nonfiction Writers’ Conference starting today at Oakland’s University Club. Along with discussions of craft, an entire day will be devoted to independent and digital publishing. Featuring

PHOTO CREDIT: JENNY ANDERSON

TALK RADIO without all the static

{DANCE}

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am

MAY 28

only on www.pghcitypaper.com

Janusz Pozniak at Pittsburgh Glass Center

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday and Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Friday

The Neverland you never knew... until now.

THROUGH SUNDAY ONLY! HEINZ HALL TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

412-392-4900 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

Richard Maltby Jr.’s 2006 show use Cash songs like the title tune, “Folsom Prison Blues” and “Daddy Sang Bass” to illuminate scenes of characters moving through life. The first performance of this summerlong production at the Cabaret at Theater Square is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Show continues through Aug. 17. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $39.75-44.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

+ FRI., MAY 23 {TALK} Creative Nonfiction, the

PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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modern classic about geeky kids on the edge. The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is William Finn and Rachel Sheinkin’s Tony-winning 2004 musical about six kids trying to put all the letters in the right order for cash, all while seeking to please their parents. Four selected audience members also get in on the fun in a show the New York Times called “irresistible” and “refreshingly hand-crafted.” Zeva Barzell directs this new production, recommended for audiences ages 13 and older, which opens tonight. BO 7 p.m. Show continues through June 8. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $7. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

lectures from magazine founder Lee Gutkind and National Book Prize winner Dinty W. Moore, the conference hopes to put some control back into the hands of unpublished writers. Dan Willis 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 25. 123 University Place, Oakland. Single-day registrations start at $125. 412-688-0304 or www.creativenonfiction.org

{STAGE} Point Park University’s Playhouse Jr. has spent 65 seasons entertaining young people. Appropriately, it’s closing this big anniversary year with a

Brand-new dance troupe fireWALL Dance Theater presents its first full-length show. On the Rox depicts six characters in a cocktail lounge, each of whom tells his or her story in dance. The work, created by the dancers and choreographer/dancer Elisa-Marie Alaio, is one of the first to take place at the likewise newly rebranded Off the Wall Performing Arts Center (formerly Off the Wall Theater). On the Rox will be performed six times over two weekends, starting tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through May 31. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-20. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

{SCREEN} “The Race to the Coffin Comedy Tour,” goes its press release, “is the collective efforts of five young comics from Pittsburgh who believe their ambition and potential exceed their life expectancy.” The DIY tour boasts that it “has yet to make a dime.” But John Dick Winters, Alex Stypula, Jesse Irvin, Tim Ross and Shannon Norman have made a DVD. And tonight they premiere this standupcomedy special, titled Social Suicide Pact, at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room. The ticket price includes a DVD and (for those of age) complimentary beer —


sp otlight

We are currently at peak ’90s nostalgia. We also have no shortage of artists sampling and recontextualizing ready-made bits of audiovisual material from every time and place they can think of. But very few of these artists can maintain the balance between humor and intelligence quite as well as the gang behind YouTube sensation and unlikely touring company Everything Is Terrible! Nic Maier, a.k.a. Commodore Gilgamesh, is one of the video artists for the project. “We take old VHS tapes from the ’80s and ’90s and remix them into a psychedelic and comedic mashup,” he says. But in most cases, the majority of the psychedelia comes from the source material itself. Nic and his band of plunderers just make tweaks, stretching out highs and tightening lows to point out just how hilariously absurd these clips are. This tour, they’re presenting two new compilations, a collection of so-bad-it’s-good stand-up comedy called Comic Relief Zero and EIT! Does the Hip Hop, a retrospective of what Nic describes as “corporate rap, used to sell stamps and Egg McMuffins,” where the commercialism and the history of the music “cancel each other out in kind of a yin and yang situation.” It should be smart, funny, subtly political and, well, terrible! Dan Willis 8 p.m. Sun., May 25. Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10. 412-681-5449 or theaters.pittsburgharts.org

always helpful in social-suicide situations. BO 8 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10. racetothecoffin@gmail.com

+ SAT., MAY 24 {FIREWORKS}

{ART} Tonight, Box Heart Gallery holds its reception for modern+contemporary, an exhibit exploring the multiplicity of modern artistic vision through works by five very different emerging visual artists from across the country. New York’s Jennifer Satterly presents selections from her solo exhibit Luxe, a collection of photorealistic oil paintings that depict luxury goods ranging from tastefully under-

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and Jason Snyder, displayed on bus shelters and even on the sidewalks in Downtown’s Triangle Park, just across from the hotel. Using special durable materials, Hepner offers her series “Code Words”; Spradlin bases her “The Oval Portrait” on an Edgar Allan Poe story; and Snyder makes a “Wetplate Portraiture Statement.” The work’s up — and down — all summer. BO Liberty Avenue, Downtown. www.downtown pittsburgh.com

Art by Ivette Spradlin and Jason Snyder

+ TUE., MAY 27 {MUSIC}

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Pyrofest returns for Memorial Day weekend. Not to be confused with Pyrotopia (the fire-arts festival earlier this month), Pyrofest is straight-up fireworks and live music. The Hartwood Acres gates open at 3 p.m.; fireworks start at 5:30 p.m. with some daylight displays. Bands including Johnny Angel & The Halos and Brooklynbased alt-country act The Defibulators lead to the big after-dark shows, which include a production by Spain’s Ricardo Caballer Ricasa Fireworks. The capper is the world premiere of “Whole Lotta Love,” a “pyromusical” set to popular love songs. BO 3-11 p.m. $14-70 (free for children under 6). Hampton Township. 800-854-4705 or www.pyrofest.com

stated to downright ostentatious. Meanwhile, Pittsburgh artist Mark Loebach offers a retrospective of his panAmerican pastel-colored landscapes. Also showing works are Cara Livorio, Melissa Kuntz and Daria Sandburg. DW 5 p.m. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

MAY

On the

+ SUN., MAY 25 {ART} You don’t normally see art photography displayed outdoors, but some local photographers and the folks at Toronto’s Magenta Foundation, the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and Fairmount Pittsburgh have found a way. The second installment of Magenta POP: Pittsburgh features work by Lori Hepner, Ivette Spradlin

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BNY Mellon’s JazzLive concert series and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust present jazz saxophonist and flautist Eric DeFade 23 tonight at the Theater Rox Square Backstage Bar. The Grammy-winner and Carnegie Mellon Jazz Ensemble director is seasoned, to say the least. Born and raised by musicians in Pittsburgh, he has gone on to tour with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, the Artie Shaw Band and legendary bluesjazz vocalist Nancy Wilson. He’s returning to his hometown to showcase his improvisatory prowess in a quartet featuring local talents Tom Wendt, Alton Merrell and Tony DePaolis. DW 5 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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Workshops with visiting lecturers are also available throughout the summer. DW 6 p.m. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. 412-365-2145 or www. pittsburghglasscenter.org

throughout the summer, and tonight, you can hear Carol Milner discuss her “knitted glass” technique, where interwoven strands of wax are casted to produce glass sculptures where filaments appear to be knitted together. Also speaking is Janusz Pozniak (pictured), who will describe his work with artists around the world, including Dale Chihuly.

+ THU., MAY 29 {SCREEN} From indie touchstones like

MAY 24

modern+contemporary ode d rn+c +con nte

+ WED., MAY 28

Art by Mark Loebach

{TALK} Is there anything more relaxing than knitting? What about knitting with 2500°F glass? The Pittsburgh Glass Center hosts a series of free weekly lectures

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Down by Law to his latest, the witty contemporaryvampire film Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch has long proffered a distinctive vision. Still, he might never have topped Dead Man, the 1995 revisionist Western starring Johnny Depp as a clueless Cleveland accountant who finds himself pursued by hired killers on the 19thcentury frontier. Gorgeously shot in black and white, with a haunting electricguitar score by Neil Young, the film is by turns surreal, hilarious, frightening and poetic, and features a terrific performance by Gary Farmer as a Native American named Nobody. The Hollywood Theater screens Dead Man four times this weekend, starting tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. Also 10 p.m. Fri., May 30, and 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., May 31. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. 412-563-0368 or www.the hollywooddormont.org

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The Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous Karaoke Every Tuesday & Thursday Night starting at 9:30 Daily Beer & Drink specials 2 8 95 W. Lib erty Avenue Dormont Look us up on Facebook!

Erik Youngblood about the aftermath of a shooting & how it impacts a community. www. pghplaywrights.com/zone Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 24. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. HOPE & GRAVITY. Nonlinear comedy about fate. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. A LOVE AFFAIR. Romantic comedy about a couple clearing out their attic & reliving moments from a 38-year marriage. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. PETER & THE STARCATCHER. Prequel to Peter Pan. Thru May 22, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 23, 8 p.m., Sat., May 24, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., May 25, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RING OF FIRE. Tribute to Johnny Cash. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater

Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SAUDADE: A SENSEPLAY. Two to four short performances of stories focusing on events of separation. Presented by Alarum Theatre. 33 Watson Blvd., Perry North. www.alarumtheatre.com Wed-Sat, 7 p.m. Thru May 31. WHEN WE ARE MARRIED. On an evening in 1908 when 3 upstanding couples gather to celebrate their 25 years of wedded bliss, a secret is revealed that hilariously upends the party: none of them are legally married. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru June 7. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

COMEDY THU 22 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hamboneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square,

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Slide Into Summer Sat., 5/24 8 - 10 PM Meet Abby from Oakland at $2 pints, $5Ă&#x20AC;LJKWV VOLGHUSDLULQJVDQG IUHHVFKZDJ

Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 23 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru July 25 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DRAFT. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. RACE TO THE COFFIN COMEDY DVD PREMIERE. www.facebook. com/RaceToTheCoffin 8 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-682-4111. STEAMER. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Thru May 30 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Now pouring 20 Craft & Specialty draftss

THEATER COMFORT ZONE. Play by Marlon

FRI 23 - SAT 24 JOHN EVANS, DANNY PALUMBO. May 23-24, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LOUIE ANDERSON. May 23-24, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 23 - SUN 25 STEVE TREVINO. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., May 24, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., May 25, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 24 ARCADE HOOTENANNY. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BAR PROV. 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE DEATH SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. FAST & SLOW PROV. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. JEFF KONKLE, DAY BRACEY, KRISH MOHAN, MIKE SASSON, RON RENWICK, RAY ZAWODNI. Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Comedy Showcase. 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

SUN 25 EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE! LIVE! Live & video sketch comedy. www. showclix.com/event/eitpittsburgh 8 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-682-4111.

MON 26 UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru May 26 Hamboneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 27 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 28 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, CONTINUES ON PG. 105

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Revolutionary War graves. Scott. cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. 412-851-9212. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Large collection of automatic This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion roll-played musical instruments site features log house, blacksmith and music boxes in a mansion shop & gardens. South Park. setting. Call for appointment. 412-835-1554. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Forest. Watch butterflies emerge Are We So Different? Text, from their chrysalises to flutter photographs, interactive among tropical blooms. Summer audiovisual components, & Flower Show. Feat. a variety of related artifacts challenge imaginative railroad displays perceptions about race. Oakland. enhanced by flowers, plants 412-622-3131. & interactive features. 14 indoor CARNEGIE SCIENCE rooms & 3 outdoor gardens CENTER. Ongoing: feature exotic plants Buhl Digital Dome and floral displays (planetarium), from around the Miniature Railroad and world. Oakland. . w w w Village, USS Requin 412-622-6914. aper p ty ci h g p submarine, and more. PINBALL PERFECTION. .com North Side. 412-237-3400. Pinball museum & COMPASS INN. Demos players club. West View. and tours with costumed guides 412-931-4425. featuring this restored stagecoach PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG stop. 724-238-4983. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 CONNEY M. KIMBO animals, including many GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh endangered species. Highland Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Park. 412-665-3639. Awards from the International Hall SENATOR JOHN HEINZ of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s DEPRECIATION LANDS Lost Steamboat: Treasures MUSEUM. Small living of the Arabia. Exhibit feat. history museum celebrating the nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures settlement and history of the exploring Pittsburgh’s important Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. role as a Gateway to the West & 412-486-0563. a national hub for the steamboat FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ,

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“Chimera,” by Julie Mallis, from her solo exhibit at 720 Music, Clothing & Café, in Lawrenceville

NEW THIS WEEK GREENSBURG ART CENTER. COLOR!!! Juried exhibition feat. regional artists. Opening reception: May 24, 6-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. REVISION SPACE. Savage Elements. Work by Nugent Kos. Opening reception: May 23, 6-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-728-4916.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Digital Hand. Digital fabrication works by students at the Penn State School of Visual Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Art of Julie Mallis. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. ARTDFACT. Timothy Kelley. Paintings & sculpture. North

Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Touch of Class II. Watercolors by Marci Evancho Mason. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Nia Quilt Guild Member Show. Meet the Quilters reception: May 25, 1-3 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Antonio Puri. Large-scale contemporary pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Bryan C. Mickle:

Recent Watercolors. Lawrenceville. 814-419-9775. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Greensburg Salem Art Club Juried Art Show. Curated by Gabby Walton, Laura Rosner & Sarah Thomas. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Nature & the Metaphysical. Work by Caroline Bagenal & Don Dugal. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. On the Prowl. Paintings by Keith Schmiedlin. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. CONTINUES ON PG. 107

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building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. 412-621-4253. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910. CONTINUES ON PG. 106

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FESTIVALS

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FRI 23 - SUN 25 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND HOME & CRAFT FESTIVAL. Music, food, vendors, more. 6-9 p.m., Sat., May 24, 11 a.m.8 p.m. and Sun., May 25, 11 a.m.7 p.m. Meadows Casino, Washington. 724-503-1200.

EVENT: The

Andy Warhol Museum 20th Anniversary Community Day,

DANCE

CRITIC: Chris Williams, 29,

North Side

FRI 23

case worker and teacher from Shadyside

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE SCHOOL SPRING PERFORMANCE. 7 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 23 - SUN 25 ON THE ROX. Performance by fireWALL Dance Theater. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 25, 3 p.m. Thru May 31 Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 1-888-718-4253.

SUN 25 PARANGAL: A TRIBUTE TO THE PAST, A GIFT FOR THE FUTURE. Performance showcasing the diversity of Philippine culture & the richness of its history through dance. Presented by the FAAP Dance Troupe. 3-5 p.m. Bellefield Hall, Oakland. 724-498-6757.

WED 28 HAWAII IN THE HIGHLANDS. Performance of traditional music & dance of Hawaii. Presented by Latshaw Productions. 2 & 7:30 p.m. Ligonier Theater. 724-238-6514.

FUNDRAISERS THU 22 POWER PROMISES: A NIGHT OF HOPE. Dinner, music, auction, & a brief program by emcee Brenda Waters. Benefits POWER. 5:30-9 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-243-7535 x 223. A TRIBUTE TO VETERANS. Hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, tribute program, more. Benefits the Veterans Leadership Program of Western PA. 5 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 1-888-718-4253.

SUN 25 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 22 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-621-6880.

KIDSTUFF THU 22 - FRI 23 LITTLE SPROUTS SINGLE SERVINGS: OUR BUTTERFLY FRIENDS. Ages 2-3. May 22-23, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. TWIST RESIST. Twist, paint, & unfold to reveal a one-of-a-kind painting. Thru May 23, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 22 - WED 28 I’ve been to The Andy Warhol Museum several times; I just wanted to come and visit to see if they updated anything. It’s in Pittsburgh and it’s a free event, so why not? He did a lot, from his commercials to his fashion. I liked seeing all the commercials that he did from 1970 to 1986. He did a lot of things; he didn’t just paint or draw or take photographs. He did video and fashion and computer art and all these different things. He was a very talented man and I’m glad we have this space for his art. There should be more places like this. There are a lot of artists out there, inner city and outer city, and we should have museums displaying everyone’s particular interests and talents. BY DAN WILLIS

THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 23 - SUN 25 THE THE 2014 CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITERS CONFERENCE. Workshops & presentations on writing memoir, personal essays, more. May 23-25 University Club, Oakland. 412-688-0304.

SAT 24 BOOK SIGNING W/ JASON GRILLI. The Pittsburgh Pirate will be signing copies of his autobiography Just My Game. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743.

MON 26 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S INSULTS. An informal scene night in which professional actors & non-actors alike take a crack at their favorite Shakespeare pieces. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

TUE 27 GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 79 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 23 - SUN 25 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Six adolescents compete for the coveted Spelling Bee Championship. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Fri, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru June 8 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

SAT 24 DISCOVERY GARDEN DAY. Games, hands-on crafts, storytelling, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

SUMMER READING EXTRAVAGANZA

Start the summer off in a literary fashion by lending a hand at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s 14th annual Summer Reading Extravaganza on June 8. The family event features theatrical performances, educational activities and a book sale, among other things. Volunteers are needed to set up, direct guests, distribute refreshments and more. Email schwalla@carnegielibrary.org for information.

PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

WED 28 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing The Drowned River 7:30 p.m.

Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru May 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. MEET THE BEES! Master Beekeeper Joseph Zgurzynski will introduce thousands of his bees (safely behind glass), explain why bees make honey, how they help put food on your table,

more. 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 24 - SUN 25 HUSH: AN INTERVIEW W/ AMERICA. A reporter thinks she’s found a great story about a young girl w/ mystical visions from Hush, Kansas, but the attention has uncomfortable consequences. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. The story of four animal friends exploring the English countryside. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

TUE 27 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

PHOTOGRAPHING HISTORY. w/ Pittsburgh Tribune Review photojournalist, Justin Merriman. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 22 - SUN 25 HORROR REALM FILM FESTIVAL. http://www. horrorrealmcon.com/ May 22-25 Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-215-6317.

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AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

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FRI 23 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru June 6 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 24 LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70-mile trail. www.venture outdoors.org Sat. Thru June 14

TUE 27 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 28 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 22 CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: JOB COUTURE & HOW TO DRESS TO GET THE JOB YOU WANT. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

FRI 23 - SUN 25 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

SAT 24 BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-362-9880. CELEBRATION OF THE PITTSBURGH PIRATES AUTOGRAPH & MEMORABILIA SHOW. Feat. signings by Andrew McCutchen, Gerrit Cole, Pedro Alvarez, Bill Mazeroski, more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 610-524-0822. FASHIONED BY HIS GLORY. A musical fashion show fundraiser to benefit students wanting to attend Virtuous Academy. 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. FRUGAL GARDENING: REDUCE, REUSE & RECYCLE. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH MT. WASHINGTON WALKING TOUR. Begins outside of Monongahela Incline on W. Carson St. Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 412-302-5223.


I MADE IT! NEW. Marketplace celebrating new indie crafters & designers. www. imadeitmarket.com 4-9 p.m. SouthSide Works, South Side. ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced students will engage in debates, conversations, more. Sat, 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAGIC MIKE MALE REVUETOUR. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400. REFRESH PGH SNEAKER SWAP. Vendors, vintage apparel, more. 1-7 p.m. Pittsburgh Obama 6-12, East Liberty. 412-708-9129. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SUN 25 2014 PITTSBURGH AUTOGRAPH SHOW. Presented by the Universal Autograph Collector’s Club. 9 a.m. Wyndham Pittsburgh University Center, Oakland. 626-304-2492. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HOMEWOOD CEMETERY MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE CEREMONY & CEMETERY TOURS. 10 a.m.3 p.m. Homewood Cemetery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1822.

MON 26 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry.

VISUAL ART

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GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Pittsburgh Artists Against Fracking. Group exhibit feat. Rick Bach, Gabe Felice, Carolina Loyola-Garcia, Laura Jean McLaughlin, James Simon, more. Benefits Protect Our Parks. By appointment through June 1. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Ligonier Oak Grove Art Club Exhibit. Greensburg. 724-836-3074. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Robert Pollard:Junk Collector & Scrabble King. Collages by Robert Pollard. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Work by 11 contemporary artists, each w/ a physically unique interpretation of “the constructed” by nature or human. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol R. Brode. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MINE FACTORY. Origins & Gravity. Work by Ryan Lammie. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Criminal Damage. A mixed-media project based on street art, & street art themes, showcasing authentic graffiti pieces & ‘inspired’ pieces, photography & instillations. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. The 2014 Regional Show. Juried exhibit feat. works by regional artists in various media, including watercolor, pastel, oil, acrylic, pottery, mixed media, more. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Generations. Works by Anthony & Philip Kram. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/ Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the

TUE 27 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. QUILT IN A DAY. w/ Patricia Knoechel & Eleanor Burns. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341.

WED 28 CIVICS FOR GROWN UPS. Wed, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 28

American landscape. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIAL STATUS. impe’kyoonees. Contemporary work by NY-based photographer Applecubed. Downtown. 412-456-2355. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Encounters: Art in the City. The culminating event showcasing artwork by Pittsburgh SciTech students from an experiential learning course offered by the History of Art & Architecture department. Oakland. 412-648-2394. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Terrestrial. Work by Alex Blau, Paul Collins, Rocky Horton, Ron Lambert, Jonathan Rattner, Thomas Sturgill, & Willard Tucker. Braddock. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition: Mark Panza & Rachel Yoke. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-681-7736 x 322. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ISRAEL - A STUDY IN IRONY. Lecture w/ Dan Ben-David. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh, Sennott Square Building, Oakland. 412-992-5247.

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[KIDSTUFF] LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. PGC LECTURE SERIES: JANUSZ POZNIAK + CAROL MILNE. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Millvale Community Center, Millvale. 412-408-3830 x 3216.

AUDITIONS DAY ROOM WINDOW.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

An Interview With America

This month, Playhouse Jr. kicked off its 65th season. You could try to calculate how many youngsters — and parents and grandparents — have been entetained by Point Park’s children’s theater company over the years, but the numbers might get astronomical. This weekend is the last chance to catch the two season openers: a musical version of

Auditions for Day Room Window. June 24, 5:30-9:30 p.m. or Call backs the following , evening. Multiracial cast. James Still’s play about a young girl who sees things others Women ages 35-55. Men ages can’t. Both plays: 2 and 7 p.m. Sat., May 24, and 2 p.m. 35-60. Prepare 2 minute dramatic contemporary Sun., May 25. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., monologue. Bring head shot & Oakland. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com resume. Equity & Non-Equity actors welcome. Schedule audition w/ Kathryn Kelly at kskelly412@ gmail.com. More info at PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. by Blast Furnace guest reviewers, www.dayroomwindow.com Auditions for Gilbert & Sullivan’s by poets who have previously New Hazlett Theater, North Side. The Sorcerer. June 4 & 23. been published in his/her own HOPE ACADEMY TEEN Prepare a song that best chapbook. Visit https://blast THEATER COMPANY. Open showcases your voice, either furnace.submittable.com/submit auditions for the 2014-15 Gilbert & Sullivan (preferred), for submission guidelines. season. June 7. Seeking committed standard musical theater, or Deadline: June 2. singers, dancers, actors & classical. Accompanist will be THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY musicians in grades 6-12. provided, no a capella selections. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking Prepare 1-min poem or auditions@pittsburghsavoyards. submissions in all genres for monologue & perform a song org Our Lady of Victory Maronite fledgling literary magazine of your choice. cathedral Catholic Church, Carnegie. curated by members of the ofhope.org/event/ 412-734-8476. Hour After Happy Hour hat-co-auditions/ ROBERT MORRIS Writing Workshop. afterhappy East Liberty UNIVERSITY hourreview.com Presbyterian COLONIAL THEATRE. Church, East Liberty. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY www. per Auditions for Damn a p 412-441-3800 x 11. PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. pghcitym Yankees. May 28-29. o .c JUNIOR Open to new, emerging & Prepare 32 bars of a MENDELSSOHN CHOIR. established writers. No theme musical theater song (be Auditions for the 2014 restriction. Submit one original, sure to bring piano music) & come session. May 29. Call for unpublished work, 10 pages ready to do some movement. more information. Third max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ Robert Morris University, Moon. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. jean-toomer-literary-prize-for724-466-2204. 724-263-5259. short-fiction.html MEMORIAL DAY MIDLAND ARTS COUNCIL. WORKSHOP CONCERT. Seeking artwork in any 2D ART IN ACTION. Seeking Seeking 100 voices to participate medium for the 9th Annual artists for a one-day interactive in James Ziegler’s Memorial Midland Arts Council Show. art show on June 1. More Day Workshop Concert, to be Carry-in art deadline is June 8, information & application performed at the Pentecostal online & CD entry deadline is at www.artinaction-hf.com. Temple on May 25. Rehearsals May 26. midland-arts-council-pa. 724-413-4648. are May 22-24. $15 workshop com 724-643-9968. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking registration & registration fee poems for Blast Furnace’s 1st THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR required. Participants are not annual poetry chapbook SOCIETY. Seeking entries required to attend all rehearsals. competition. Submit one for 68th Annual International Email studiojz@yahoo.com manuscript. No manuscripts Aqueous Open exhibition. for information. May 22-24. permitted by current Chatham New Hope Church, http://www.pittsburghwater University staff, alum, or students, Brighton Heights. colorsociety.com/ Thru July 14.

The Wind in the Willows Hush: An Interview With America

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.21-05.28

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): During the next 12 months you will have exceptional opportunities to soak up knowledge, add to your skill set and get the training you need to pursue interesting kinds of success in the coming six to eight years. What’s the best way to prepare? Develop an exciting new plan for your future education. To get in the mood, try the following: Make a list of your most promising but still unripe potentials; meditate on the subjects that evoke your greatest curiosity; brainstorm about what kinds of experiences would give you more control over your destiny; and study three people you know who have improved their lives by taking aggressive steps to enhance their proficiency.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The moon shows us a different phase every 24 hours, which makes it seem changeable. But in fact, not much actually happens on the moon. It has no atmosphere, no weather, no wind, no plant life, no seasons. There is some water, but it’s all frozen. Is there anything like this in your own life, Cancerian? Something that on the surface of things seems to be in constant motion, but whose underlying state never actually shifts or develops? According to my analysis, now would be an excellent time for you to revise the way you understand this part of your world, and then update your relationship with it.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you thought of organizing a crowdfunding campaign to boost your pet project or labor of love? I suggest you get serious about it in the next four weeks. This coming phase of your cycle will be a favorable time to expand your audience, attract new allies and build a buzz. You will have a sixth sense about how to wield your personal

charm to serve your long-term goals. More than usual, your selfish interests will dovetail with the greater good — perhaps in unexpected ways.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Years ago I had a Virgo friend who was a talented singer. She had technical skill, stylistic flair and animal magnetism, making her worthy of being a lead vocalist in almost any great band. And yet when she was asleep and had dreams of performing, she often found herself standing in the shadows, barely visible and singing tentatively, while her back-up singers hogged the spotlight at center stage. Moral of the story: Some of you Virgos are shy about claiming your full authority. It doesn’t always come easy for you to shine your light and radiate your power. And yet you can most definitely learn to do so. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in this direction.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “There is always an enormous temptation in all of life,” writes Annie Dillard, “to diddle around

get your yoga on!

making itsy-bitsy friends and meals and journeys for itsy-bitsy years on end … I won’t have it. The world is wider than that in all directions, more dangerous and bitter, more extravagant and bright.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Libra, is to transcend whatever is itsy-bitsy about your life. The alternative? Head toward the frontier and drum up experiences that will thrill your heart and blow your mind.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “We are all searching for someone whose demons play well with ours,” writes novelist Heidi R. Kling. That’s good advice for you to keep in mind these days, Scorpio. Those little imps and rascals that live within you may get you into bad trouble if they feel bored. But if you arrange for them to have play dates with the imps and rascals of people you trust, they are far more likely to get you into good trouble. They may even provide you with bits of gritty inspiration. What’s that you say? You don’t have any demons? Not true. Everyone has them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “When people tell you who they are, believe them,” writes blogger Maria Popova (Brain pickings.org). “Just as importantly, however, when people try to tell you who you are, don’t believe them.” Those suggestions are especially crucial for you to keep in mind these days. You are entering a phase when your best relationships will be up for review and revision and revitalization. To foster an environment in which intimacy will thrive, you’ve got to be extra receptive, curious, tolerant and tender. That’s all! Not hard, right? A good place to start is to proceed as if your allies know who they are better than you do — even as you ask them to return the favor.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Kludge” (pronounced klooj) is a slang word that refers to a clumsy but effective fix for an engineering problem. It’s a cobbled-together solution that works fine, at least temporarily, even though it is inelegant or seems farfetched. Let’s use this concept in a metaphorical way to apply to you. I’m guessing that you will be a kludge master in the coming days. You will be skilled at making the best of mediocre situations. You may have surprising success at doing things that don’t come naturally, and I bet you will find unexpected ways to correct glitches that no one else has any idea about how to fix.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I hesitate to compare you to your fellow Aquarian Kim Jong-il. When he was alive and ruling North Korea, he was an egomaniacal tyrant. You’re definitely not that. But there are

certain descriptions of him in his official biography that remind me of the kinds of powers you may soon exhibit. He was called The Great Sun of Life and Highest Incarnation of Revolutionary Comradely Love, for instance. Titles like that might suit you. It is said that he invented the hamburger. He could command rain to fall from the sky. He once shot eleven holes-inone in a single round of golf, was a master of gliding down waterslides and never had to use a toilet because he produced no waste. You may be able to express comparable feats in the coming weeks. (Do it without falling prey to excessive pride, OK?)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Even if you had a sensitive, nurturing mommy when you were growing up, and even if she continues to play an important role in your life, now would be a good time to learn how to mother yourself better. You are finally ready to appreciate how important it is to be your own primary caregiver. And I’m hoping you are no longer resistant to or embarrassed about the idea that part of you is still like a child who needs unconditional love 24/7. So get started! Treat yourself with the expert tenderness that a crafty maternal goddess would provide.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I believe your persuasive powers will be stronger than usual in the weeks ahead. The words coming out of your mouth will sound especially interesting. I also suspect that your intelligence will get at least a temporary upgrade. The clarity of your thoughts will intensify. You will see truths you have been blind to in the past. Innovative solutions to long-running dilemmas are likely to occur to you. The only potential snag is that you might neglect to nurture your emotional riches. You could become a bit too dry and hard. But now that I’ve warned you of that possibility, let’s hope you will take steps to ensure it won’t happen.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If there was a Hall of Fame for scientists, physicist Isaac Newton (1642-1727) would have been the charter member. He was like Elvis Presley and Chuck Berry were to rock ’n’ roll, like Babe Ruth was to baseball. The theory of gravity and the three laws of motion were his gifts to the world. He made major contributions to mathematics and optics, and was a central figure in defining modern science. There is also a legend that he invented the cat door, inspired by his pet felines. Whether or not that’s true, it serves as an excellent metaphor for this horoscope. It’s an excellent time for you to apply your finest talents and highest intelligence to dream up small, mundane, but practical innovations. Name a beautiful thing you were never capable of doing until this past year. http://RealAstrology

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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STUDIES

STUDIES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

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123 Shiloh St

LOOKING FOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ADVANCE WOMEN’S HEALTH? The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study to better understand the effects of birth control on the immune system.

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You may be eligible if you are: *18-34 with regular periods *Healthy *Not currently pregnant or breastfeeding *Not currently using birth control

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Participants may receive birth control at no cost and be compensated up to $470, over 3 to 4 office visits.

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Family Doctors Accepting New Patients Downtown Pittsburgh

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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For more information call: 412-641-5469

355 5th Avenue, Suite 1125 • Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Phone: 412-434-4749 • Fax: 412-434-4798

Accepting All Insurances TA S T E

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For Summer & Beyond

Telephone Sales Representatives National fundraising company seeks team members to represent our internationally respected clients.You can play a key role in the continuing success of environmental protection, human rights, public broadcasting, performing arts, and public interest groups. The ideal candidate is articulate, motivated, an active listener, a quick thinker, and interested in current events • Paid training/Bonuses • Flexible AM and PM hours • Supportive Mgmt • Healtcare Plan/ 401k • $9.00 Guarantee / $10.75 Office Avg.

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• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

800-871-4581

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Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

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massage Therapy

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Superior Chinese Massage

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303

Shadyside Location

Credit Cards Accepted

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412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

Open 24 hrs

Xie LiHong’s

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MASSAGE

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TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

MASSAGE

Chinese Bodyworks

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

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Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

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New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.21/05.28.2014

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SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION LF SEAY P

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412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com N E W S

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SERVICES

Adoring Family, Loving Attorney, Beautiful Home yearns for 1st baby to LOVE & Cherish forever.

Expenses Paid Rose 1-800-561-9323

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

REAL ESTATE SERVICES Looking to find a new tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

STORAGE

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

ABC SELF STORAGE

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on June 3, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Clayton Academy 1901 Clayton Avenue, Pgh, PA 15214 Installation of Security System Electrical Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on May 19, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

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MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us TA S T E

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

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NOTE WORTHY

The life and times of legendary local jazz sideman Lou Schreiber {BY ABBY MENDELSON} IT’S A FETID Tuesday night at the North Side Elks, and the air inside is redolent with fried shrimp. People are filling the long tables in the Allegheny Room: moms ’n’ pops, grammers ’n’ grampers, kids giggling and running about. Up on stage, the members of the Pittsburgh Banjo Club unsheathe their instruments: banjoes, sure, but also brass — trumpet, tuba, trombone — in the service of simple, centuryold tunes. Sitting by himself, a short man with a shaved head fingers a metal clarinet. Wearing a green zippered jacket, plaid shirt and blue pants, he runs scales between sips of a Penn Pilsner, seemingly almost oblivious to his surroundings. But as the band launches into “Yes, Sir, That’s My Baby,” the leader comes over and whispers to the clarinetist, who, at the appropriate time, stands and rips off a solo. He ranges from lows to highs as easily as mountain goat ascending a sheer cliff. Perfectly ducking in and out of the melody, he takes the ending high, his timing and phrasing exquisite.

was like a drug. I couldn’t put it down.” He hit all the Hill District hot spots, sitting in at the legendary Hurricane and Crawford with George Benson, Jimmy McGriff and Richard “Groove” Holmes. But when Kloss split for New York to cut blistering jazz sides, Schreiber elected to stay home. “Pittsburgh was enough for me,” he recalls. “I knew the place.” And the place certainly knew him. A sideman rather than a leader, Schreiber became a Zelig-like musical chameleon. He fit in everywhere, and nowhere better than in the lobby of the William Penn hotel, where for 18 years he laid down some of the most exquisite sounds in local memory. No surprise that when vocal superstar Jimmy Sapienza fronted Five Guys Named Moe — one of the hardest-driving bands on the planet — Schreiber was one of the Moes. Or that two weeks after his Banjo Club appearance, Schreiber found himself a mile away, playing at the North Side’s Emmanuel Episcopal Church.

“THE SAX WAS LIKE A DRUG. I COULDN’T PUT IT DOWN.” The audience applauds. The soloist nods slightly, barely smiling, and sits. “We’re fortunate tonight to have the great Lou Schreiber with us,” the leader tells the audience. “Pittsburgh’s premier jazz musician.” “There are very famous people — you only have to say their first name and everyone knows who they are,” offers Henry Shapiro, a guitarist and frequent Schreiber bandmate. “Miles, for instance, or Madonna. In Pittsburgh jazz circles, Lou is one of those. “He has a harmonic depth that most players don’t,” Shapiro adds. “Perfect intonation. Perfect timing. When I play with Lou, I have to bring my ‘A’ game.” Schreiber has been bringing his own ‘A’ game since childhood. Blind from birth and a pianist since second grade, Schreiber was a musical prodigy at the Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children: By the time he was 10, he was playing in a band with classmate Eric Kloss, the sax colossus. As a teen, he demonstrated an encyclopedic memory for melodies, an incredible gift for harmony, rhythm, time. After switching to reeds, Schreiber played six hours a day, gigged around the city four nights a week, all jazz all the time. “It had fire when I started playing it,” he recalls. “And the sax

The church’s jazz series, which has been running since the early ’80s, draws jazz luminaries and a decidedly ecumenical crowd. Tonight the audience is small, but includes a mix of ages and races. “Living the question: What’s the next thing that I should be doing?” Father Donald Youse says, by way of introducing the spiritual side of two jazz classics. The band begins to play “Walkin’,” a tune that first appeared on a mid-’50s Miles Davis release. The melody — which prowls about, both physically and spiritually — is a good bouncy line to lead into evening. Schreiber’s tenor recalls Sonny Rollins, a strong, self-assured player in his prime. Schreiber is not a blower, not a John Coltrane. He’s softer, more pensive. This is church, after all; we’re on a spiritual quest, not at a prize fight. The musicians segue into Herbie Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage,” the familiar, legato chords of the jazz classic just right for a trek into the spiritual self. Schreiber gently moves in, a man hesitantly sliding into uncharted waters. As a storm picks up, he plays with more intensity; there is much to be cleansed, much to be accomplished. The tenor reasserts the theme, the depth of the soul’s quest. People nod, heads bobbing in time with the music. “I can feel an audience when I play,” Schreiber says. “I can feel when they’re happy. I like that.” INF O @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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May 21, 2014 - Summer Guide