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SHOOTING BLANKS? PEDUTO WARY OF PULLING TRIGGER ON CITY GUN-CONTROL ORDINANCE 06


EVENTS 5.16 – 5-10pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

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5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

Her life was a Cabaret.

He provided

5.30 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

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Join us in Market Square on Friday May 16th from 7 to 9:30 am for a pop up commuter café, with BikePGH and Port Authority. The Market Square Commuter Café will have free breakfast snacks and coffee for all people riding bikes to celebrate and encourage bicycle commuting in Pittsburgh. BikePGH members get the added perk of a locally made Aero Tech Designs musette bag filled with swag.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

Anyone can join BikePGH at a discounted rate on Bike to Work Day and get a bag of swag at any of the 5 Commuter Cafés: Market Square, PNC Park, Schenley Plaza, Friendship Park, SouthSide Works. When you're out on your ride it's good to know Port Authority has your back, all Port Authority buses are now equipped with bike racks.

So we’re ready to help get your bike on. Bikes can now be used on Port Authority’s Light Rail System seven days a week. Bikes can also be taken on the Mon incline at any time with no restrictions.


{EDITORIAL}

05.14/05.21.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, DAN WILLIS

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 20

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[NEWS] we try it, we’ll be sued, and under 06 “Ifpresent state law, we will probably lose.” — Mayor Bill Peduto on why he hasn’t yet enforced the city’s lostand-stolen-gun ordinance that he helped write as a city councilor

[VIEWS]

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

funny that the place that gave 14 “It’s me my voice tried to silence me.” — Chatham University alum Sarah Ford on her school’s handling of a campus protest

[TASTE]

idea is to give anyone a chance to 18 “The ‘get reintroduced or familiarized in what’s going on in Pittsburgh’s food scene.’” — Kit Mueller on the newly launched Cornucopious market

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

not something I’d ever say — 23 “It’s ‘I’d love to play with a saw player’ —

THE BIGGEST CAR GIVEAWAY IN PITTSBURGH

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but it ended up working out great.” — Andrew Marlin of Mandolin Orange, on running into a saw player

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[SCREEN] shifts in tone from black comedy to 32 “Itinferior Tom Waits song to kitchen-sink drama to Sopranos-lite.” — Al Hoff on the new film God’s Pocket

[ARTS] want anyone, especially 35 “Ianynever young person, to feel like there’s something that they can’t say.” — Actor and volunteer educator Edwin Lee Gibson

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 49 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 50 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 51 +

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

N E W S

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Win a Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro, and other great rides Every Thursday, Friday, & Saturday in May

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“NOBODY SHOULD BE AFRAID OF ENFORCING A LAW.”

INCOMING Dan Stiker gives Pittsburgh its first Fringe Festival (April 30) “Oh Fringe, thank you for taking me through the back-channels of the city I love, walking from venue to venue, sometimes through the pouring rain. Discovering exciting, unpredictable, ya-get-what-ya get theater, and visiting galleries and eateries and meeting awesome people along the way. The four shows I saw (for about the price of a movie ticket) were quirky, funny and thoughtprovoking. I ended up buying an album from one of the shows. I don’t even own a turntable, but the music was awesome. I even had one of those moments in theater that I love ... when the ‘what am I doing here?’ turns into the ‘where are the tissues, this was amazing!’ … I am thankful to all involved for finally bringing the Fringe to Pittsburgh. To have our own festival of this nature, without having to travel to New York or Philly, is something many of us have been waiting for.” — Web comment from “Karen Hannon”

CORRECTION City Paper’s May 20 election chart on the State House District 36 race stated that Erin Molchany’s previous house district was already tapped to be merged with Harry Readshaw’s before she sought the seat in 2012. However, while the seat was to be lost to redistricting, the new boundary lines had not been finalized.

“My last day in Pittsburgh. Thanks again for being such a hospitable place to stay and work. Great people in Pittsburgh. Go Pens!!” — May 8 tweet from actor Russell Crowe (@russellcrowe)

{ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

LOST BILL W

HEN BILL PEDUTO talked about fighting crime during his run for mayor last year, he touted a measure he’d supported while on Pittsburgh City Council — a 2008 ordinance requiring gun-owners to report the loss or theft of handguns. On his campaign website, “Enforcing the Lost and Stolen Gun Laws” was listed as one of Peduto’s 100 Policies to Change Pittsburgh, under a section on “Making Our Streets Safe.” The law was intended to curtail gun violence by targeting illegal gun-trafficking: Felons who are barred from purchasing guns directly sometimes acquire them through “straw purchasers,” who may later claim the

gun “disappeared.” As the campaign site explained, “Most guns used to commit crimes were purchased legally and were lost or stolen, eventually ending up in

As a city councilor, Bill Peduto fired a shot for gun control. Was he shooting blanks? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} the hands of a criminal. If a gun is lost or stolen, the police should be informed. Aggressively implementing this law gives police tools they need to get illegal

guns off the streets.” Peduto stood by the bill throughout the campaign. In an April 2013 response to the Pittsburgh Black Political Convention, he wrote, “My first order of business as Mayor will be to fully implement the Lost and Stolen Handguns legislation I authored and passed through Council.” Just days after Peduto was elected mayor in November, he again pledged to enforce the legislation, at a public-action meeting of the Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network. But four months after taking office, no one has been charged under the ordinance. And Peduto tells City Paper that’s CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014


Photography from every angle! May 16–18, 2014 Culture Club David Hartt: Stray Light

The Sandbox: Meet the Artists Friday, May 16; 5:30–9 p.m.

Friday, May 16; 5:30–9 p.m.

Meet artists-in-residence Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar who have transformed Carnegie Museum of Art’s Coatroom Gallery into a playful, hybrid space for encounters with the photobook.

Hear David Hartt, Felix Burrichter (editor and creative director of PIN-UP), and curator Dan Byers discuss the exhibiton’s forensic investigation into the power of cultural icons. Exhibition opens at 5:30 p.m., artist talk begins at 6:30 p.m., reception follows at 7:30 p.m.

The Sandbox: At Play with the Photobook is part of the Hillman Photography Initiative.

Culture Club is sponsored by

Artist Talk: Eline Mugaas with Curator Tina Kukielski

PGH Photo Fair

Saturday, May 17; 2–3 p.m.

Saturday, May 17– Sunday, May 18; Noon–5 p.m.

Free with museum admission Registration required at nowseethis.org

Hall of Sculpture; Free

Eline Mugaas is an artist based in Oslo and cofounder and maker of the zine series with a cult-following called ALBUM#. Join Mugaas in an intimate conversation with curator Tina Kukielski on the subject of ALBUM#’s recurring themes of desire, melancholy, motherhood, nudity, and lonely men.

Now in its third year, PGH Photo Fair is Pittsburgh’s first art fair promoting the discussion of photography within the contemporary and fine art market. Twelve internationally known dealers will exhibit museum-quality prints and photo-based art spanning the history of the medium.

This event is part of the Hillman Photography Initiative.

visit cmoa.org for a full list of photography-based exhibitions. visit nowseethis.org for more information about the hillman photography initiative. Upper left: David Hartt, Lounge (detail), 2011, Edition of 6 + 1 AP, Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago. Lower right: André Kertész, Muguet-Seller, Champs-Élysées, Paris, May 1st, 1930 (detail), Permission Estate of André Kertész. Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery

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LOST BILL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

presents

PofE T the WEEK

unlikely to change. “If we try it, we’ll be sued, and under present state law, we will probably lose,” Peduto says. Under the ordinance, individuals who do not report their guns lost or stolen within 24 hours of discovering they are missing can be fined $500 — and $1,000 for each subsequent offense. Peduto wouldn’t entirely rule out fining people: The city “may still try to make a couple cases” down the road, he says. But he says his focus will be on replicating an awareness campaign started in Philadelphia — which also has an unenforced lost-and-stolen ordinance on the books — urging g u n - ow n e r s t o r e p o r t missing firearms. Critics of Pittsburgh’s ordinance, though, say Peduto’s shift proves that the bill was never enforceable. Kim Stolfer, chairman of Firearms Owners Against Crime, says the legal landscape hasn’t changed since the law was passed, let alone since Peduto’s 2013 campaign. During the debate over passing the bill, says Stolfer, “I said it wouldn’t be enforced because it’s illegal. … It’s just as illegal today as it was then.”

“IF WE TRY IT, WE’LL BE SUED, AND UNDER PRESENT STATE LAW, WE WILL PROBABLY LOSE.”

PITTSBURGH CITY Council passed lost-

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this as a reasonable thing to do,” says former City Councilor Doug Shields, one of the ordinance’s authors. Nor, he says, should the city back down from a court battle. “If someone wants to bring an action in the court of law, they have every right to do that, and why would you be afraid of that?” Shields says. He argues — as does Peduto — that the ordinance doesn’t infringe on the rights of gun-owners because once a gun is lost or stolen, it is no longer in an owner’s possession. And he says that although Peduto might want to do some additional analysis before moving ahead, “Nobody should be afraid of enforcing a law. … We have to enforce the laws that are already on the books.” In the past, Peduto has sounded a similar note. “If we as a city were to be sued by the NRA for enforcing the lost-and-stolen handgun [law], I’d welcome that lawsuit,” Peduto said during a January 2013 mayoral debate. “Because if it saved one life, it’s worth the dollars of hiring a few lawyers in order to fight it.” But today he says, “I thought a common-sense approach to be able to lessen the amount of violence that’s happening throughout the state of Pennsylvania would be welcome in Harrisburg, instead of this ridiculous response that anything that has to do with a gun we must automatically fight.” When asked why the administration has changed its position on what enforcement of the law will look like, spokesperson Tim McNulty said, “What [Peduto is] doing is finding other ways, in the face of an aggressive state law, to reach the same end result,” which is to get illegal guns off the streets. City Council President Bruce Kraus, who also helped author the 2008 legislation, agrees. “I believe that our lostand-stolen legislation is a commonsense approach to addressing one of the root causes of gun violence,” he says, “but the state has effectively kept us and our police from using the crimefighting tool.” “I’m working with the police and the mayor to do all we can within the state’s restrictions,” Kraus adds, citing efforts that range “from tracking guns used in crimes to pushing public-education efforts for law-abiding gun owners to self-report when their firearms are lost or stolen.”

and-stolen legislation in December 2008 by a 6-1 vote. It became law in 2009 but was never signed by then-Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. The law has been in limbo ever since. Ravenstahl didn’t enforce it, arguing that Pennsylvania state law prohibits local regulation of legal gun ownership. Nor has the law’s constitutionality ever been decided: Courts have held that, until someone is prosecuted under the ordinance, no one has a legal basis for challenging it. While precise information on current straw purchasers was not available, police say that they come across such cases every year. And Peduto has previously criticized Ravenstahl’s inaction: In his letter to the Black Political Assembly, Peduto called the ordinance “yet another piece of legislation that has never been implemented by the current administration.” Some of the ordinance’s original supporters, meanwhile, still say it could be a useful tool. “I think for Pittsburgh and the other places in the Mon Valley having problems with gun violence, they saw

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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ones having second thoughts about lostand-stolen laws. Thirty municipalities throughout Pennsylvania have passed bills similar to Pittsburgh’s, according to gun-control advocacy group CeasefirePA. Not one of these municipalities has enforced it. Rob Conroy, Western Pennsylvania director of CeasefirePA, cites fear of litigation as the cause. “A lot of these communities were scared,” he says. Against an opponent backed by a powerful group like the National Rifle Association, “They could basically be bankrupt from a lawsuit.” Conroy doesn’t blame municipal leaders for their apprehension, especially since the state legislature is already weighing a measure to make it easier for groups like the NRA to sue. House Bill 2011 would let such organizations sue municipalities who have passed lost-and-stolen gun laws, even if no one has been charged under them. The bill passed the House Judiciary Committee in March and is currently pending in the House. “This is designed to basically bankrupt the towns that have passed lost-orstolen laws,” Conroy says. “They’re giving a special-interest group and all their

members the power to file a lawsuit.” But Stolfer, of Firearms Owners Against Crime, says there’s never been a reason to put such laws on the books in the first place. “These laws have never worked anywhere,” Stolfer says. “It’s of no value to law enforcement. It’s a demonization of the vast majority of the public who own firearms legally.” There are already laws on the books to punish a gun-owner whose weapon is used in a crime, he says: The lost-and-stolen ordinance was “a political statement,” rather than a measure “meant to increase public safety. It’s a publicrelations stunt.” S o m e P e dut o s up porters, however, hold out hope the mayor will enforce the law. In 2011, members of Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network marched on Ravenstahl’s office to demand he enforce the legislation. Jane Siegel, who cochairs PIIN’s gun-violence taskforce, says the group isn’t ready to do the same with Peduto. “What he has said is he’s going to move forward with getting the statute implemented in as timely a way as possible,” says Siegel. “It’s a complicated matter. It’s in the process of happening. He is not doing nothing.”

“IT’S A COMPLICATED MATTER. IT’S IN THE PROCESS OF HAPPENING.”

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TRANSIT ROUTE PAT looking for input on the agency’s future direction {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} FOR THE FIRST time in years, the conver-

sation about Port Authority’s future is no longer about service reductions or fare hikes — it’s about what kind of public-transportation system the region should have and how to get there in the next few decades. And this week, the authority is tapping experts from around the country — as well as members of the general public — to begin formulating that vision. “ We’ve had s o mu c h s er vic e t o communities reduced over the years due to the funding issue we’ve experienced,” says Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie. “This is the moment to decide, ‘Where do we want to go as a region?’” Port Authority kicked off two different efforts at answering that question this week. One involves inviting nine experts from around the country, with backgrounds ranging from transit to architecture, to tour the system and meet with dozens of community groups to formulate a set of recommendations, which will be publicly released May 16. The other involves launching a web platform to ask the public what kind of transit system it wants. The advisory panel of experts is expected to look at transit-oriented development potential in the region, the possibility of public-private partnerships, and more specific projects like Bus Rapid Transit and light rail. That process is organized through the Urban Land Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, which is charging $125,000 for the process (funded partially by the Heinz Endowments, Allegheny Conference and Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership). During the week, though, the ULI advisory panel will not meet with members of the general public, which has raised some eyebrows among rider advocates. They will address rider concerns only by meeting with organizations like Pittsburghers for Public Transit and the Allegheny Transit Council. For David Leininger, chair of the ULI advisory panel as well as vice president and chief financial officer for Dallas Area Rapid Transit, public input “really deserves its own process that I would expect once the [ULI] report is provided. What’s being provided is a set of views from people who don’t have a bias.” Separate from the ULI advisory panel and its recommendations, the Port Au-

thority launched a “MindMixer” website to explicitly solicit input from the general public. It will be monitored by Port Authority senior management (including CEO Ellen McLean) as well as some Port Authority board members and politicians, according to Ritchie. “I really am looking to see if there are any good suggestions there that people have,” Port Authority board member John Tague says of the website. He adds that he is planning to check the site regularly and chime in to ask questions or offer responses. The site, which cost the authority $10,000 for a year-long subscription, essentially works like a discussion board, where anyone can answer questions posed by Port Authority or anyone else on the site. The first batch of questions range from “What is your vision of a modern publictransit system for Allegheny County?” to “What discourages people from riding the Port Authority system?” For transit advocates like Breen Masciotra, ULI and MindMixer are positive signs the Port Authority is being proactive in setting a long-term agenda. What remains to be seen is how effectively that feedback will be incorporated. “A lot of the projects [like the North Shore Connector] have been one-off … and the project isn’t generated with a lot of community input,” says Masciotra, regional outreach manager for the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group. “And that hasn’t always worked out in the court of public opinion.” Molly Nichols chalks up Port Authority’s historic lack of collective decision-making to its funding situation. Before the legislature passed Act 89 late last year, providing more state funding for transit by upping fees and a wholesale gasoline tax, “the money just wasn’t there,” says Nichols. “It didn’t matter how many people came in and said, ‘You can’t cut my bus.’” Nichols, community organizer for Pittsburghers for Public Transit, is generally supportive of Port Authority’s approach to ULI and MindMixer, but stresses that even if the current conversation revolves around longterm planning, there are still short-term issues — the result of cutting service to the bone — that need to be addressed. “People in Penn Hills can’t take the bus to get food from the food pantry,” she says. “These are immediate needs.”

“THIS IS THE MOMENT TO DECIDE, ‘WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO AS A REGION?’”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

CLASS WARFARE Is campus protest a sign of things to come? {BY CHRIS POTTER} BY THE TIME she graduated from Chatham University in 2008, Sarah Ford says, she’d learned “how to speak up for what I believe in.” After returning to campus May 1, however, she wondered how serious Chatham was about the lesson. Ford was one of roughly 20 alumnae protesting a Board of Trustees decision to admit male undergraduates, for the first time in the school’s 145 years. (Men already attend its graduate programs.) But Ford says that when she returned to the grounds she once called home, “There was a corral put up with ropes and a sign that said ‘freespeech zone.’ We were roped into a pen. I don’t know why they felt we would behave aggressively.” “It’s funny that the place that gave me my voice tried to silence me,” she says. The trustees, meanwhile, were meeting in the Eddy Theater: There, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported, they “deliberated behind closed doors … then left quietly by a side exit blocked by campus security.” “There were students and faculty on a patio nearby, watching us like we were a zoo exhibit,” recalls another protester, 2007 grad Christina Griffin. “This was the school that educated us: Shouldn’t they expect more from us?” An April 23 protest had gone without incident, she notes: Demonstrators left campus when security told them to. “The important thing is that we respect [dissenting alumnae’s] right to free speech,” says Chatham spokesman Bill Campbell. “We wanted to accommodate it, and we did.” The school designated the speech zone, he says, because it didn’t know how many demonstrators would come: “We’re a small campus, and we have to make sure we manage things as best we can.” Campbell notes that the university held “town hall” meetings about the school’s future; Griffin says administrators spoke with demonstrators on April 23, and even sent down “snacks and hot cocoa” — once they left campus. Still, for a university to be worthy of the name, shouldn’t pretty much the entire campus be a “free-speech zone”? It’s hard not to recall Pittsburgh’s 2009 experience with the G-20 economic summit: There, too, security measures often sent a darker message than the trifling protests they

were meant to police. And just as the G-20 took place against a backdrop of global recession, the Chatham debate came at a time when higher ed is running scared. Chatham President Esther Barazzone has touted several upsides to going coed, including a future in which Chatham “educates both men and women about gender equality.” But the school is also warning about the threat of what Campbell calls “enrollment megatrends.” Highschool graduating classes are shrinking, and crushing college-loan debt is scaring students who do graduate. Chatham cites a Bloomberg News report warning “that as many as half of the more than 4,000 universities and colleges in the U.S. may fail in the next 15 years.” Barazzone has noted a Standard & Poor’s survey warning that risks are “greater for small private institutions” — especially single-sex schools and religiousaffiliated colleges. Actually, there’s danger for any school that can’t rely either on government subsidies or big endowments. Alarms are already sounding at Point Park University, which is struggling with lagging student satisfaction and a unionization bid by adjuncts. In an address to faculty this winter, university President Paul Hennigan warned that, “Somewhere between 10 and 20 percent of the schools that exist today in our market segment will not exist within 10 years.” Worst-case economic scenarios can be used to justify austerity policies that hurt workers, of course. Or to distract attention from mistakes made by global bankers and college administrators alike. Despite the headlines, it’s hard to imagine any local college disappearing. Then again, people once felt that way about the Homestead Works. Pittsburgh hosted the G-20 because it offered a heartening success story: a postindustrial city whose “eds and meds” sector had supposedly created a recession-proof economy. These are supposedly kinder, gentler employers, who heal our bodies and nourish our minds. Now they may face a storm as well. And when their own institutional prerogatives are at stake, the new bosses can act a lot like the old ones. That’s a painful lesson — one that disgruntled Chatham alumnae may not be the last to learn.

IT’S HARD TO IMAGINE ANY LOCAL COLLEGE DISAPPEARING. THEN AGAIN, PEOPLE ONCE FELT THAT WAY ABOUT THE HOMESTEAD WORKS.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SERIES IDEATION & PROGRAMMING Thursday, May 15, 6 -7:30 p.m. Topics will include: ¡ What do you need or want to design your house ¡ Gathering reference materials and information ¡ How to draw a rendering

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SALUD’S CUBANO SANDWICH MET OUR HIGH EXPECTATIONS

TEST MARKET {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} There’s little doubt the Pittsburgh food scene has grown in size and sophistication, but breaking into it without much knowledge or cash can be tricky. That’s partly why Kit Mueller has set up an open-air “pop-up artisanfood flea market” called Cornucopious, which will feature food from some of the city’s trendiest chefs at more reasonable prices. (It’s the same event as last year’s Smorgasburgh, which only happened intermittently). The idea, Mueller says, is to give anyone a chance to “get reintroduced or familiarized in what’s going on in Pittsburgh’s food scene. It just seemed like a no-brainer.” Located in a parking lot at 23rd and Smallman Streets in the Strip District, Mueller has teamed up with Marty’s Market to host 30 vendors each week from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., one Saturday a month through November. (The first will be May 17.) Some notable restaurants have already agreed to participate, Mueller notes, including Fukuda and Butcher and the Rye. There will also be plenty of perennial favorites from vendors offering pierogies, juices and empanadas. Additionally, local craft brewers will be on hand with samples. It’s a chance for chefs to experiment with dishes that might not be ready for a prime-time dinner service, Mueller says, and engage with a different food audience. “It’s a pretty easy low-risk platform for anybody in the food space to try new things, and frankly, get their name out.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

One of the perks ks of working king Downtown wn during summer er is stopping by the weekly farmer’s r’s markett at Market Square. are. It opens Thu., May 15, with more e than 30 vendors (food, d, plants, produce). Market is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Grab and go, or take a people-watching break on one of the many available chairs.

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NEIGHBORHOOD

CUBAN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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ES, PITTSBURGH does now have a spot for Cuban cuisine: Salud, in Lawrenceville. Occupying a traditional deep, narrow bar along Butler Street, its decor makes a few nods to the Cuban pastimes of cigars and small cups of coffee, but bypasses the whole Miami Vice vibe. And while Cuban cuisine can be quite refined, there’s a comfort and conviviality to such late-night fare as the medianoche (a variation on the Cuban sandwich served around midnight), and that’s the target of Salud’s short and focused menu. You’ll find no detours into other cuisines here, unless you count a burger with Cubansandwich toppings. Eager to try Salud’s scratch recipe for empanadas, we put in our order practically before our pants met our chairs. The baked pockets were modestly sized and wrapped in a smooth, crisp, golden-brown dough with a hint of orange, perhaps from annatto. The beef within was savory and well seasoned, with just enough melted mozzarella to round out the flavor and texture. It was plenty tasty, but given that

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Empanadas

picadillo — a beef hash which is also a common empanada filling — is on the menu as an entrée, we were a bit surprised that it was not an empanada option. We also ordered black-bean soup and a Cuban salad. The soup was thick and hearty, with whole beans and a garnish of sofrito, the blend of diced onion and green

SALUD CUBAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 4517 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-605-0233 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat.11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: $4-14 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED peppers that’s the foundation of much Cuban cooking. Its flavor was dominated by a distinct sweetness that, while not foreign to Cuban cuisine, was too prominent in a dish with neither overt spice nor plain rice. The simple salad of toma-

toes, avocado and red onion also featured sweet top notes, but this fruity sweetness was better balanced against the vinaigrette’s tang and blend of fine, dry herbs. The avocado was admirably ripe, and the tomatoes surprisingly good for this time of year. Vegetables aren’t a big part of Cuban menus, nor Salud’s, so this was a welcome foundation. No Cuban meal would be complete without a Cubano sandwich, and Salud’s met our high expectations. Cuban bread — a thin-crusted version of a baguette — was unavailable, but the hoagie roll substitute, properly toasted in a press, was hard to distinguish from the real thing. One could quibble with the choices of Dijon mustard and kosher dill pickles instead of yellow mustard and garlic-free dill. But any complaints were washed away by the marinated, slow-cooked, shredded pork. The meat was moist, tender and flavorful, yet mild enough that the ham and Swiss both played their part. This pork — called lechon — also got to star in its own sandwich. This one was also


pressed on a roll, but topped with shredded cheddar and mojo, a butter condiment containing thinly sliced garlic slow-cooked until it’s sweet and leeched of any harshness. This was so good, we ate some with a spoon. Both this sandwich and the Cubano came with hand-cut fries, which ranged from shoestring-thin to steak-cut planks. They were far too pale, with only occasional corners of crispness, but they had two merits: The interior was light and fluffy, and they were tossed with what looked like the herb blend from the vinaigrette, which was tasty enough that no ketchup or other dipping sauce was necessary. If they were only double fried, these would be a standout item.

Chef Zachariah Reyes and owner Terry Hirci

Entrees include a platter of lechon as well as a Cuban version of Asian lettuce wraps, here combining pork belly and mango. Our choices were jerk chicken and papas rellenos, which were more lechon encased in mashed potatoes, then breaded, fried and coated with cheddar cheese. We found the shredded cheddar too scant to create a gooey layer, and too mild to offer sharp flavor. But more of that luscious mojo butter pumped up the flavor of the simple potatoes. Fresh-fried plantain chips were thick enough that the interior was still soft and earthy-sweet, while the edges were plenty crisp. Jerk chicken was marvelously moist and flavorful in its pan-seared coating of seasonings. Sides of rice and beans were typically Cuban. Plentiful sweet bell peppers were added to the sofrito, and again the balance tipped too sweet; a little more black pepper and cumin would go a long way toward rounding out this dish. Bustelo coffee, cooked on the stove top Cuban-style, rounds out Salud’s dining experience, along with either flan or deep-fried cheesecake. Salud is the Cuban restaurant we have been waiting for. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TOP CHOICE Mount Washington’s The Summit popular with neighbors and pros alike I’m sorry, Mount Washington. I started writing this weekly column in September 2011, and I’ve never once mentioned your neighborhood. No excuses. However, over the last few months, quite a few bartenders and chefs who live in Mount Washington told me that I needed to visit The Summit. The yearold bar at the corner of Shiloh and West Sycamore, they said, was a must-go. It’s a good idea to listen to the professionals. The Summit is a welcoming place to hang out, so much so that on a brilliant spring afternoon , co-owners Shane Witt and Logan Persun (fellow co-owners Daniel Peach and Daniel Gralish had the afternoon off) even unlocked the doors a little before opening time to let a couple of neighborhood revelers in for an early drink. Speaking of drinks, the bar is stocked with a terrific selection of fine spirits … and a refreshing lack of horrifically flavored vodkas. The beer list is one of the best I’ve seen in Pittsburgh: The 12 taps tip heavily toward local brews, and there’s a really deep American craft list of cans and bottles. Many of the cocktails feature housemade infusions, including the Cucumber Press (cucumber-infused vodka, lemon, soda) and the Peach Manhattan (peachinfused bourbon, sweet vermouth). “We try to rotate our cocktails every month or two, but a few hits always stay on the menu,” says Witt. The owners say that the bar straddles the line between a neighborhood watering hole and a party destination. “Sundays through Thursdays. we always know at least half of the people who are in here,” says Witt. But, according to Persun, “On Fridays and Saturdays, we never know what’s going to happen.” Persun concedes that, “Mount Washington needs more stuff up here. It needs a younger vibe.” But it’s also a neighborhood that we non-residents should visit more often. Especially when we aspire to reach all the way to The Summit.

“ON FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, WE NEVER KNOW WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

200 Shiloh St., Mount Washington. 412-918-1647 or www.hesummitpgh.com

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BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE

Handle Bar and Grille {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hotdoggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE

CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multi-leveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be

Pastitsio {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE. 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-7464227. A motorcycle-themed venue offers mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — prepared from scratch. The menu also offers a modest South of the Border section, and the kitchen’s creativity shows in unique items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday, a roast-turkey sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. KE JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub,

including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE LA CUCINA FLEGREA. 100 Fifth Ave., No. 204, Downtown. 412-521-2082. The specialties of Italy’s Campi Flegrei are featured at this Downtown restaurant. The cuisine of this coastal region naturally offers seafood, but also vegetables and cured meats. Thus, a pasta dish might be laden with shellfish, or enlivened with radicchio and prosciutto. LE LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-2510031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-481-4414) and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to endless preparations CONTINUES ON PG. 22


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Monterey Pub {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and dressings, the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE

pub grub: Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy. Or be your own chef, with the checklist-style, build-your-ownsalad option. For dessert, try a custom ice-cream sandwiches. KE

MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey St., North Side. 412-322-6535. A welcoming neighborhood bar with a menu of classic pub grub and Irish standards (such as “bangers and mash”) But there is also the occasional Asian flourish or unexpected ingredient mash-up, such as Thai red curry wings, fried green beans, an IrishCuban sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, . w ww per yet just-right blendings a p ty ci h pg such as cilantro, lime .com and feta. LE

FULL LIST ONLINE

PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J

POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. This Duquesne University venue is a decided cut above student dining. The dining room is spacious, with a handsome fieldstone bar. The fare is contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of internationally inflected classics like chipotle barbecue pork tenderloin and blackened chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches like a side dish of “chef’s grains” complete the picture. KE SOCIAL. 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234. This casual eatery at Bakery Square offers upscale

THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the casual, no-nonsense and no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian themes with diner kitsch in a delightful way. JF VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated store-front venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF


LOCAL

“YOU CAN ONLY REALLY WRITE ABOUT THE TIMES THAT YOU HAVE TO BE LIVING IN.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Having a name like Bastard Bearded Irishmen can present a few issues for a band. Beyond the obvious (like occasionally being asked to censor your name for radio or for the more prudish family-friendly events), there’s the existential: What if Bastard Bearded Irishmen want to shave? Or, more importantly, what if they want to play something that’s not entirely … Irish? “That’s the biggest problem we have,” says frontman Jimmy Bastard (real name: Jim Smerecky). “We’re Bastard Bearded Irishmen, and we always feel like, ‘Man, we have to be doing just Irish music.’ But we kind of crossed that border and said, ‘People are gonna have to accept us for what we are. We can do what we want.’ As long as we’re doing it from our hearts, I think they’re gonna like it.” What they decided they wanted to do was a second full-length, Rise of the Bastard, which mixes the Irish-inflected punk sound they’ve become known for with a bit of traditional music — there are three interpretations on the album alongside 12 originals — and other stuff, like the Gypsy folk found on the album-opener, “Mama.” One change in the band does help it more closely resemble its namesake: the departure (on good terms) of viola player Rachel Karras, who was replaced by fiddler Paul Dvorchak, also of bluegrass band The Mon River Ramblers. He can at least pass as bearded. “He brings a completely new ingredient,” says Bastard. “You’ll hear that on the record.” The life of an Irishman isn’t exactly a walk in the park. While the seven members all have day jobs, the band is a time-consuming pursuit; it’s on the road most every weekend. “I’ve spent 20 years doing this, and I’ve always held to: ‘We’re gonna play anywhere, with anyone, anytime,’” says Bastard. “We like to do the outdoor shows for the families, the all-ages and stuff. But we get to hit it all — everything from nursing homes to the Carnegie Libraries to biker festivals, and every gritty bar in between.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN CD RELEASE with TRIGGERS, THE MISERY JACKALS. 7 p.m. Sat., May 17. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com N E W S

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Bastard Bearded Irishmen

BACK WITH MORE BEARDS

{BY JULIA COOK}

Intermittently shod: Mandolin Orange

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MILY FRANTZ, sundress-clad and barefoot, squinted in the afternoon sunlight, crooning over her fiddle. On the last day of the Spoleto Festival, in Charleston, S.C., the sun was roasting an audience too bloated with barbeque to dance. Frantz’s voice melted over the plantation treetops, and Mandolin Orange — Frantz and Andrew Marlin — collapsed onto a picnic table, exhausted. Songwriter Marlin had a metal background when he met Frantz at a jam session in 2009. What drew him to folk, he says, was the unabashed emotion behind it. When he plays the mandolin,

there are still some metal vibes; “I really beat the hell out of it,” he admits. But three albums later, the band has

MANDOLIN ORANGE WITH WILLIE WATSON

7 p.m. Thu., May 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

inherited the wisdom and honesty of its Appalachian plucking forefathers. Mandolin Orange is pure feeling — stripped down and sometimes shoeless.

The band’s latest album, This Side of Jordan, cultivates mountain folk for a new generation. Marlin and Frantz are accompanied by several of their contemporaries from Chapel Hill, who have also joined the band on tour. The electric guitar and bass on the song “Morphine Girl” bring to mind a high school band playing at the local dive bar for their fathers’ drinking buddies. It moves straight into “Hey Adam,” a comfortable ballad that feels like the whimsical sadness of Jack’s Mannequin’s “The Last Straw,” rolling down an Appalachian foothill. “It feels like we hit a nice stride with CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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FOLK FOR TODAY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

that record.” Marlin says. “The songs just really came together this time, and we recorded them all in the same place, with a bunch of guys that have played with us a bunch. Everyone who played on the record brought their own flavor to it, and it all meshed together really well.” Mandolin Orange walks all of the right lines with This Side of Jordan. The songs lead each other without sounding the same, with instrumentals that are composed without being formulaic. The lyrics prove that, in an age when emotions are often diffused by screens, the rawness of bluegrass can still resonate. The music of ’30s and ’40s North Carolina influences Frantz and Marlin, but it by no means dates their approach. “Regardless of what era you’re being inspired by, you can only really write about the times that you have to be living in,” says Marlin. “And I think that’s very true for what we’re doing and for a lot of bands that are doing what we’re doing. They’re being inspired by these old styles of music, but it’s hard not to write about your own time. And if you’re not writing about your own time, you’re kind of, maybe, trying a little bit too hard.” This Side of Jordan articulates an emotional consciousness present on the band’s

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

earlier work, though less accessible. True folk has a vulnerability many bands find difficult to manufacture. Marlin explains that honesty in songwriting comes from being flexible, and open to unfamiliar ideas. “I was at the Open Eye [in Carrboro, N.C.]; just me and a buddy were jamming,” Marlin recalls. “This guy comes up with a fiddle case and asks if he can jam, and he opens up the fiddle case and pulls out a saw, and is bowing the saw, and it has this amazing sound. So it’s not something I’d ever say, you know, ‘I’d love to play with a saw player,’ but it ended up working out great.” Marlin does his songwriting much like his outdoor jam sessions. “I’m usually writing at home, in the wee hours of the night, and Emily’s kind of listening as it’s going down. And then when we sit down to actually work on the tunes, she’s heard them enough times to where she’s kind of got her head wrapped around the melodies, and the vibe of the tune. We’ll sit down and arrange them together, and then just go out and try it at shows, and that’s usually how we end up finalizing them, is just reading people’s reactions on the road.” The two alternate their voices the same way in songs: “We’ll try a couple different arrangements, and whichever one feels most comfortable, that’s the one we go with.” Inspired by the music of Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, Marlin and Frantz want their music to reflect not only their heritage, but the flexible nature of their performances. Frantz’s voice, sometimes drawling, sometimes tiptoeing down the D string of her violin, is always full, consistently rounding out Marlin’s choppy diction. A favorite show, Marlin says, was outside a winery in Portland, Ore., where the band coaxed the audience to its feet without any amplification. That, Marlin adds, was “the kind of music I really want to be playing. I want people to walk away saying, ‘Wow, that felt natural. It’s easy to listen to, and I got a good sense of what they’re about, and who they are as people.’ I hope that comes across.” It’s certainly getting them somewhere. On the heels of two sold-out shows in the Midwest, and two music festivals in its home state of North Carolina, Mandolin Orange just announced a set at Newport Folk Festival, this July. Fans can also look forward to a collaboration with songwriter Tim O’Brien. But with all of the band’s achievements, don’t expect a change in style. At Club Café, Frantz will probably be wearing shoes, but Mandolin Orange will by no means be out of its element. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


ON THE RECORD

with Robert Pollard {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

Guided by Voices (Robert Pollard, center)

Guided by Voices plays Pittsburgh on Sat., May 17. Robert Pollard, the Ohio band’s über-prolific songwriter, currently has Junk Collector and Scrabble King, an exhibition of his collage art, on display at the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD SOME DESIRE TO HAVE YOUR WORK EXHIBITED? Not until recently did I think it would be possible, or that anyone would care. I had a similar apprehension, or even fear, in the early days of writing, recording and playing music. To tell you the truth, I never received a great deal of support for my art and music from friends and family when I was younger. WHAT DID YOU DO FIRST: MUSIC OR ART? I’m sure they both happened simultaneously in a very crude form at a very young age. I drew, cut out pictures and made up songs which I would sing a cappella into an old, small reel-to-reel tape player. Later in junior high and high school, I began to make fake album covers, so art and rock went hand-in-hand from the beginning. TELL ME ABOUT SOME OF THE PIECES IN THE SHOW. I am very fond of the process and have pretty much become addicted to it; finding interesting source material, dissecting it and then re-assembling or re-combining the images I’ve just removed into much more interesting or eye-catching combinations. Giving them higher culture or greater import. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GUIDED BY VOICES. 7 p.m. Sat., May 17. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com JUNK COLLECTOR AND SCRABBLE KING runs through May 23. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-924-0634 N E W S

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Writer in Kentucky: Wooden Wand’s James Jackson Toth

THE ART OF WORDS {BY BRIAN TAYLOR} LAST DECEMBER, NPR’s music blog ran an essay titled “That’s a Bad Lyric and You Know It.” In it, writer James Jackson Toth (who releases music under the name Wooden Wand) calls out songs by several contemporary acts, including Best Coast, Haim and The Black Keys: “I don’t know the writers of these songs personally, but I am positive they can do better because almost anybody could,” he writes. He ultimately blames overly permissive music criticism. “I don’t believe these lyrics are the products of trivial, impoverished minds,” he writes, “but of thoughtful, intelligent people who, fearless of critical castigation, just don’t give a damn.” “It just sorta bugs me when people don’t try,” Toth explains via phone, from his current hometown of Lexington, Ky. “Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins — I still like those bands, [and] they wrote some horrible lyrics. The difference is they were trying to write good lyrics. You listen to ‘Disarmed’ by Smashing Pumpkins; it’s not a very strong song lyrically. I feel like there was a sense of profundity that they were reaching for and just failing to grasp.” “I just think at a time where it’s really difficult to get people to pay attention to anything, it’s sort of important, if you have a mouthpiece to say something of value, to communicate something,” he adds. “It doesn’t have to be political or especially personal, but say something that’s gonna change somebody’s day. Or their life.” It’s one goal, but not the only one, that Toth aims for in his own songwriting. “Lyrics are really important to me,” he says.

“I wouldn’t say they’re more important than anything else. Maybe when I was younger, I believed that, and I think some of the music I made when I was younger suffers as a result.” Wooden Wand songs are evocatively specific in their lyrics and timbre, and their twists repay your attention. He avoids the trap of solipsistic blandness that so much contemporary Americana music falls into — maybe because of the broad range of his own musical tastes. “I don’t sit at home and listen to Townes Van Zandt or Dylan,” Toth says. “I love that stuff. It’s part of my DNA. But I try to avoid that stuff as much as possible. I try to listen to things that couldn’t possibly influence, for lack of a better descriptor, singersongwriter music.”

WOODEN WAND

WITH STONE JACK JONES, COUPLER, LYLAS, MICHAEL DAWSON 7 p.m. Tue., May 20. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Wooden Wand’s music may turn out folky, like 2014’s Farmer’s Corner, or take the form of a sludgey, psychedelic freakout like 2013’s Wooden Wand and the World War IV, but there’s always nuance. A turn of lyrical or musical phrase, a resigned wink, a reminder: James Jackson Toth has a sense of humor. He may be ironic, but he’s never superior; world-weariness comes from being of the world, not above it. “I get tired of being described as this real dark dude,” he says. “When I have my existential crises I start thinking, ‘Maybe I’m just not funny,’ because I really am trying, not to sell a joke, but to temper these things with silver linings.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Angela Perley & the Howlin’ Moons

[FREE JAZZ] + THU., MAY 15

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM SHEA}

Some books lend themselves to being made into musicals. James Joyce’s Ulysses may not generally be considered to be one. But it all depends on the kind of music you’re looking to set it to: Michigan-based Kirsten Carey, who studied jazz at the University of Michigan, had the right idea when she decided to put together a free-jazz suite based on the avant-garde novel. The Ulysses Project, as it’s simply known, was bankrolled with a crowdfunding project and was released as an album last fall. Carey brings the show — compositions inflected with a good bit of improvisation — to Garfield Artworks tonight. Christine Hedden opens. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfield artworks.com

803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $49.50-59.50. All ages. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

[NEW MUSIC] + MON., MAY 19 In recent years, the Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival has scaled back from a multi-day fest to a single presentation each year, but that doesn’t make it any less interesting. This year’s featured production: Anne Frank: A Living Voice, a contemporary composition by Linda Tutas Haugen that sets Anne Frank’s writings to music. Featured singer Elizabeth Shammash will be joined by the Pittsburgh School for Choral Arts and members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra; the featured piece will be supplemented by compositions by John Prine Jonathan Berger, Joan Zymko and others. AM 7:30 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $10-20. All ages. www.pjmf.net

[FOLK] + FRI., MAY 16 John Prine came of age musically writing songs while working as a mailman in Chicago. In the early ’70s, he became a hot commodity, writing songs for and performing with artists from Kris Kristofferson to Bob Dylan; Prine’s biting commentary (especially, early on, dealing with the Vietnam War) is tempered with a sense of humor that helps him transform country ditties into masterpieces. After a cancer scare last year (his second), he’s back on the road, and playing at the Benedum Center tonight; Austin-born country songwriter Sarah Jarosz opens. AM 8 p.m.

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[ROCK] + WED., MAY 21 Dealing largely in country-inflected ballads and hard rockers, Ohio’s Angela Perley & the Howlin’ Moons don’t try to do anything too new — they just try to do something well. Perley’s songs are written with a level of care that’s a notch above a lot of other countryrock types, and the band’s performances have gained some renown around Ohio and beyond. The band plays tonight at Rock ’n’ Bowl, at Arsenal Bowling Lanes, tonight. AM 9 p.m. 212 44th St., Lawrenceville. $8 includes bowling. 412-683-5992 or www.arsenalbowl.com

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UPCOMING SHOWS

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5.15 5.16 5.17 5.18

Y108 COUNTRY NIGHT W/CHRISTIAN BECK BAND // 8 pm // $8 DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s dance // 9 pm // $8 IN TRANSIT // up tempo; dance // 9 pm // $8 DJ JUAN DIEGO, INC // salsa; dance // 6:30 pm // no cover

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

31ST STREET PUB. The Cheats, Sniper 66, Scratch ‘N Sniffs. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Fuel. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BREWSTONE. Tony Janflone Jr. 412-825-6510. CLUB CAFE. Willie Watson, Mandolin Orange. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Ulysses Project, Christine Hedden. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Steve Moakler. Station Square. 412-481-7625. LAVA LOUNGE. These Lions, Kevin Garret. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Shell Corporation, Stabbed in Back, Black Bear Mute, Remainders. Bloomfield. 412-706-1643. REX THEATER. Bernie Worrell Orchestra. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. I Am Heresy. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Black Label Society. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe & the Pay Day Loners, ATS (acoustic), Iron & Rope. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 16 31ST STREET PUB. Xander Demos, Vilifi, The Filthy Lowdown. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BENEDUM CENTER. John Prine, Sarah Jarosz. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLUB CAFE. Nora Jane Struthers & the Party Line, Lone Wolf Club (Early) Scott & Rosanna, The Getaway (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Real Deal, Idasa Tariq, Kid A, Verbs, Proseed. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Kiley Rothfield w/ Chris Hannigan. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HARD ROCK CAFE. Maggie Rose. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HEINZ HALL. Tony Bennett. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Erika Hughes & The Well Mannered,, Broke, Stranded & Ugly, Loves It! Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOLLAR CLUB. Patrick Maloney w/ Wil Kondrich, The Triggers. South Side.

LEMONT. Donna & Mark Groom. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Mercedez. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Donna the Buffalo. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Rhubarb. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Hidden Hospitals Tabyoularasa, Post Mortal Possession, Victims of Contagion. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen, The Turpentiners. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. 724-494-1578.

SAT 17 31ST STREET PUB. Whiskey Daredevils, The Stents, Boiled Denim. Strip District. 412-391-8334.

ALTAR BAR. The Misery Jackals Bastard Bearded Irishmen. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BALTIMORE HOUSE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. The Mavericks. 412-368-5225. CIP’S. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. The Billy Price Band (Early) Matrimony, Essential Machine (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. D’IMPERIO’S. Bobby Nicholas, Bernadette DeVault, Dave Crisci. Monroeville. 412-823-4800. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Clear Plastic Masks, Harlan Twins, Fly Golden Eagle. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HEY ANDY’S. Fungus. 724-258-4755. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Chris Trapper, Ariel Strasser (early) The Redlines, The Semi Supervillians,

MP 3 MONDAY HOUSEHOLD STORIES

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Household Stories; stream or download “North by Northwest” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


The Paint31 (Late). Bloomfield. CLUB CAFE. Maia Sharp, 412-682-0320. Garrison Starr, AG. South Side. KOLLAR CLUB. Mother’s Little 412-431-4950. Helpers, South Side All-Stars. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Darren South Side. Keen, Weird Paul, 8 Cylinder, MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. 2020K. Garfield. 412-361-2262. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Guided Horseshoes & Handgrenades, Dead By Voices, Death Of Samantha. Horses. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Swear & Shake. PALACE THEATRE. The South Side. 412-431-4668. Fabulous Hubcaps. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Dancing Queen. Greensburg. DJ missmungo. Lawrenceville. 724-552-0603. 412-252-2337. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ The Spin Doctors, Brandon hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. & Leah, Donora. Untucked 412-687-2555. Festival. Benefits Family CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & House. Fox Chapel. Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-968-3160. 412-969-0260. THE SHOP. Crooked Cobras, Steve Jasper, Flat Broke, Six Speed ONE 10 LOUNGE. Kill. Bloomfield. www. per DJ Goodnight, 412-951-0622. typa ci h g p DJ Rojo. Downtown. TEDDY’S. Lenny .com 412-874-4582. Smith & The Ramblers. ROUND CORNER North Huntingdon. CANTINA. The Gold Series. 724-863-8180. Large Professor & Bamboo. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. New York Funk Exchange. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. South Side. 412-431-2825. VILLAGE TAVERN RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night & TRATTORIA. Bill Couch, w/ DJ Connor. South Side. Moose Tracks. West End. 412-381-1330. 412-458-0417.

DJS

THU 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 16

SUN 18

SAT 17

ALTAR BAR. Balance & Composure. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE BEACH ROOM. EZ Action. 724-348-8888. BRILLOBOX. Chad VanGaalen, Cousins, Bry Webb. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARSON CITY SALOON. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. 412-481-3203. CLUB CAFE. The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart, Fear Of Men, Ablebody. South Side. 412-431-4950. SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY. Shadows of Eve. CD Release. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. SMILING MOOSE. Onward, Etc. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: 3M Mid-Month Mayhem. DJ Soy Sos, DJ Miss Mungo, Pandemic Pete. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CULTURE CLOZ. AFROHEAT! Dance Party Tribute to Fela Kuti & Afrobeat Music. w/ DJ Reese Vex Brown & DJ Smi Swig-Art. East Liberty. 412-482-7479. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

MON 19 SMILING MOOSE. Eternal Summers. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 20 31ST STREET PUB. God Module, Die Sektor, Mordacious. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BYHAM THEATER. Gino Vannelli. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLUB CAFE. Stone Jack Jones, Wooden Wand, Coupler, Lylas, Michael Dawson. South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 21 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moon. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993.

SAT 17 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Ron & The RumpShakers. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE R BAR. Sweaty Betty. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Eldorado Kings. 724-433-1322.

SUN 18 MOONDOG’S. Chris Duarte Group. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ THU 15 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 16 ANDYS. Maureen Budway Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. OLIVES & PEPPERS. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. 724-444-7499. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Max Leake. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 17 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ortner/Marcinizyn Duo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Music from the Early Ages. A variety of music performed by young people. Calvin Stemley, John Smith, Cliff Barnes. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

SUN 18 WESTINGHOUSE RECREATION CENTER. Lee Robinson. Forest Hills. 412-731-5430.

MON 19 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 21 SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

TUE 20

HIP HOP/R&B THU 15 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. S.I.N Features. Kid A, Hubbs, Shad Ali, Vaig, Blakk Rapp Madusa, Parker Webb, Jon Quest, Chris Mitchell. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

FRI 16 ALTAR BAR. Kid Ink. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

BLUES FRI 16 MOONDOG’S. Felix & the Hurricanes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Nelson Harrison. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Choro No Vinho. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 21 CJ’S. Fred Pugh. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Tarentum. 724-226-3301. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Ortner/ Strickland Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

ACOUSTIC

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THU 15

SBU

RGH

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FES

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FRI 16

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IC

ASPINWALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Broken Fences. Aspinwall. 412-781-2884. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Avi Diamond. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181. NEW CITY CHURCH. Mark Williams. Downtown. 412-726-4217. PARK HOUSE. Herb & Hanson, Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

www.pghnewmusic.com

Inuksuit / Perfect Lives Rzewski plays Rzewski Different Trains (Reich) Cage / Haas / Kurtág Folk Songs (Berio) Agon (Stravinsky)

transforming Pittsburgh’s soundscape May 22-25 New Hazlett Theater, Bugallo-Williams Lake Elizabeth, Frederic Rzewski and everywhere Trillium Ensemble Alia Musica / Freya Varispeed (NY) / ELCO Black Orchid / Directions 99 percussionists at a park

Pujol Happy Dog

BALTIMORE

Damon Albarn

PALACE THEATRE. Vince Gill. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WED 21

FRI 16

Rams Head Live

PHILADELPHIA {SUN., JUNE 15}

tUnE-yArDs Union Transfer

BUTLER FARM SHOW ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE GROUNDS. Doug Moreland. #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Butler. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open PALACE THEATRE. Stage. Blawnox. Ronnie Milsap, Gary 412-828-2040. w. w w Pratt. Greensburg. PARK HOUSE. er hcitypap g p 724-836-8000. Bluegrass Jam w/ The .com Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SUN 18 FULL LIST E ONLIN

WED 21

WORLD SAT 17

BENEDUM CENTER. Celtic Woman. Downtown. 412-456-6666. DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran & Friends. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

CLASSICAL FRI 16

WED 21

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Wilkinsburg High School, Wilkinsburg. 412-371-9500.

ANDYS. Michael Griska. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

SAT 17

REGGAE KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. The Flow Band. 724-728-0222.

COUNTRY THU 15 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

{SUN., MAY 25}

COACH’S BOTTLESHOP AND GRILLE. Acoustic Daze. Dormont. 412-207-9397. HAMBONE’S. Che Zuro David & Pappy. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Brett Wiscone. North Side. 412-237-9400 x120. SONNY’S TAVERN. The Unknown String Band. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. STARLITE LOUNGE. The Night Tones. Blawnox. 412-828-9842. WILKINS SCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTER. Stu Fuchs. Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

FRI 16

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CLEVELAND

{TUE., JUNE 10}

SAT 17

ALIA MUSICA PITTSBURGH

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip.

FREYA STRING QUARTET. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-223-7873. PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. Upper St. Clair Theater, Upper St. Clair. 412-279-4030. PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4872. RENAISSANCE CITY WINDS. 391 Woodland Rd. 412-681-7111.

SUN 18 FREYA STRING QUARTET. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-223-7873. IL DIVO. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. RENAISSANCE CITY WINDS. Kresge Theatre. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-681-7111.

TUE 20 CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH. Bar Marco, Strip District. 917-363-6089.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 17 LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 19 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Jazz Standards & Showtunes w/ Pianist Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 20 RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Nava Tehila. Oakland. 412-621-6566.

WED 21 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

May 14 - 20 WEDNESDAY 14

FRIDAY 16

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests ZEALE & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Neon Trees

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 15 I AM Heresy

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Revolver Golden Gods Tour

STAGE AE North Side. Featuring Black Label Society. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Celtic Woman

John Prine

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Brad Paisley

2014 Black River African Dance Conference

FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Burgettstown. With special guests Randy Houser, Leah Turner & more. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. All ages event. For tickets & more info visit balafon.org or 724543-1017. Through May 18.

Tony Bennett in Concert HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 8p.m.

Pittsburgh Power vs. Los Angeles Kiss

PHOTO CREDIT: JIM SHEA

Blue October

SATURDAY 17

Steve Rannazzisi

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through May 18.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800745-3000. 6p.m.

SUNDAY 18

Il Divo - A Musical Affair

Comedian Cal Verduchi LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 8p.m. Through May 17.

BRAD PAISLEY

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. Tickets: trustarts.org or 412-456-6666. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 17 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION

newbalancepittsburgh.com

Balance & Composure / Kevin Devine & the Goddamn Band

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MONDAY 19

Wil Haygood - Author of The Butler

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghlectures.org. or 412-622-8866. 7:30p.m.

TUESDAY 20 Gino Vannelli - Live in Concert

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412456-6666. With special guest Carla Bianco. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Peter and the Starcatcher

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through May 25.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

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PORTRAYING BROKEN MEN WAS A SPECIALTY OF HOFFMAN’S

WEAK PITCH {BY AL HOFF} A struggling sports agent named J.B. Bernstein (Jon Hamm) works a gimmick: Hold a contest in India to recruit a pitcher or two from among the country’s cricket enthusiasts, then reap the publicity in two countries when these newly trained Indian players are signed by an American baseball team. This is the plot of Craig Gillespie’s overly long Million Dollar Arm, yet another underdog sports tale that hits every predictable base, but fails to score.

Jon Hamm takes the field.

The focus is on Bernstein, which deprives the viewer of the potentially more interesting stories at the periphery. I’m less interested in a sports agent learning to be a marginally better person than I would be to watch this tale from the perspective of the nascent ball players. (2008’s indie drama Sugar delivers a much more provocative look at what it means to be beamed from the Third World to play baseball.) Likewise, Bernstein’s love interest (Lake Bell) has little to do except work on his self-actualization, with the odd sideline in nurturing the two young players. It’s “based in real events” and promoted as a “feel-good” tale, so there’s not much suspense about the outcome. Though if you know the real story, you’ll be a bit amused how Arm disingenuously wraps up, with no update on what the two Indian recruits are doing today. Starts Fri., May 16 AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Love bad movies? Love surprises? Then consider

Bad Movie Nite at the

???

Oaks Theater, in Oakmont. You’ll get a hilariously bad B-movie — to be revealed when the curtain opens — plus goofy shorts, from lame commercials and how-to videos to clips from other poorly produced films. For “mature audiences,” though immature laughing and mocking are encouraged. 10 p.m. Fri., May 16, and 10 p.m. Sat., May 17

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THE DOWN BEAT {BY AL HOFF}

G

OD’S POCKET opens during a

funeral, while a voiceover sets the stage: “The working men of God’s Pocket are simple men. They work, they follow their teams, they marry and have children, who rarely leave the Pocket. Everyone here has stolen something from someone else, or when they were kids, they set someone’s house on fire, or they ran away when they should have stayed and fought. … And whatever they are is what they are. The only thing they can’t forgive is not being from God’s Pocket.” Then we flash back three days and meet a few residents: Mickey (the late Philip Seymour Hoffman), married to Jeanie (Christina Hendricks), drops her son Leon off at work — where Leon is killed at lunch. Then Mickey and a buddy (John Turturro) steal a truck full of meat and discuss betting on horses. Beyond the Pocket, we meet Shelburn (Richard Jenkins), the booze-addled newspaper columnist responsible for the opening soliloquy. Leon’s death sets the wobbly

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

Ride-along: John Turturro and Philip Seymour Hoffman

plot in motion: It feels like not much happens, though there are fights, corpse abuse, an affair and some more deaths. Set in Philadelphia, God’s Pocket is adapted from Peter Dexter’s 1983 novel, and is the directorial debut from John Slatterly (Mad Men’s Roger Sterling). It self-consciously portrays “real” working-class life, heavy on the murk. I suspect the recitation

GOD’S POCKET DIRECTED BY: John Slatterly STARRING: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christina Hendricks, John Turturro Starts Fri., May 16. Harris

of Shelburn’s column was a bit of meta-text meant to critique those from the outside, such as Shelburn, who would deign to understand the “colorful” working class. Yet God’s Pocket falls into the same trap, never once feeling authentic. It shifts in tone from black comedy to inferior Tom Waits song to kitchen-sink

drama to Sopranos-lite. What passes for meaning is fleeting and not particularly revelatory: People could make an effort, but don’t; there’s a thin dignity in wallowing among fellow losers; alcohol is the cause of, and solution to, most problems; and if you’re not from God’s Pocket, as Mickey isn’t, fuhgeddaboutit. God’s Pocket has a great cast — which also includes Peter Gerety and Eddie Marsan — but you’re mostly watching a slate of your favorite quality-TV and indie-movie actors pretending to be hardedged folks. Hoffman’s Mickey looks appropriately lost, but portraying broken men was a specialty of his. This isn’t your last chance to see Hoffman in a film: He stars in a spy thriller this summer, and somehow his half-completed work will be incorporated into the new Hunger Games. But if you’re a fan, you might add God’s Pocket to your list, if only as a memorial: Think of it as sitting in a depressing bar with an unsatisfying cheap beer, remembering that great guy you knew who isn’t here anymore. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW GODZILLA. It’s baaaaaccck. This time, that giant irradiated sea lizard with a penchant for stomping out major cities is hitting the United States. Gareth Edwards directs; Aaron TaylorJohnson, Ken Watanabe and Elizabeth Olsen star. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 16.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com Sync’d 6

LOCKE. Tom Hardy stars in this drama, in which during a drive between Birmingham and London he tries to work out his life’s troubles through imaginary conversations with his dead father. Steven Knight directs. Starts Fri., May 16.

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL. Join King Arthur and the Knights of Camelot on their fruitless but hilarious search for the Holy Grail in Monty Python’s 1974 cult hit. (Pythons Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones co-direct.) From the demented opening credits (in pidgin Swedish, and with an earnest indebtedness to a certain moose) through numerous sketches, one-liners, and delicious jabs at medieval history and its heroes of legend, past two unforgettable rabbits, and right through lovely scenery to an unexpected conclusion, the endlessly quotable Holy Grail remains the Python gang’s funniest feature. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. Hollywood (Al Hoff)

“Black White Blue Magik,” whose first half is a slightly surreal, vaguely disturbing montage mostly featuring interactions between objects (like an electric toothbrush polishing a small stone sphere), and whose second features beautifully lit sequences depicting interactions between smoke, liquid and various pyramidal shapes. Andrew Daub and Bryan Heller’s “Giorgio!” is a goofily amusing piece depicting a guy and his boombox tooling around town. Alex Knell’s “La Fuite” is a shadowy melodrama featuring two masked performers. Padraic Driscoll’s “Untitled” is a trippy assembly of manipulated found footage. Kyle Van Noy’s “On the Prowl” appears to be built from home-video footage, and is by turns amusing, pensive and puzzling. See what local bands The Garment District and Casual Male can do with the footage at the May 16 event. Other filmmakers or filmmaker teams include Gena Salorino, Joseph F. Flatley, Rem Lezar (of Everything Is Terrible), Bruce Meyers and Jonathan Ottie, and Susan Houseman. 8 p.m. Fri., May 16. The New Bohemian, 887 Progress St., North Side. $8. syncdpgh@yahoo.com (Bill O’Driscoll)

STEEL MAGNOLIAS. Herbert Ross directs this 1989 melodrama in which a group of Southern women bond at a funeral. Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis, Julia Roberts and a lot of big hair star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. AMC Loews. $5

VAGABOND. Sandrine Bonnaire stars as a French woman who wanders through the South of France one winter, before bring found frozen in a ditch. Arnes Varda directs this 1985 drama. Chosen by guest programmer actress Gillian Jacobs. In French, with subtitles. 10 p.m. Fri., May 16. Hollywood

WOMAN OF THE YEAR. Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn star in George Stevens’ 1942 romantic comedy about a couple who meet working at a newspaper. The twist: She’s a modern woman, and he’s not so sure that’s a good thing. 2 p.m. Thu., May 15. Hollywood

CLEVELAND/ROCKS FILM FESTIVAL. The Parkway Theater in McKees Rocks is presenting seven films that screened earlier this year at the Cleveland International Film Festival. (The fest’s title is an amusing portmanteau-slash-nod to the old Ian Hunter tune.) Things kick off Sat., May 17, with an openingnight party: $15 gets you live music, snacks, beer and wine, and admission to one of the night’s films (Amka or Awful Nice).

REPERTORY CP

DONNIE DARKO. Writer/director Richard Kelly’s debut is a hard-to-categorize tale about a doomed teen. Over 28 days, Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) struggles to understand his suburban world, which is tilting toward madness, steered by a giant rabbit named Frank. Kelly excels at capturing Donnie’s dread with verve, yet he and Gyllenhaal ground this anxiety so firmly in the confusion and inarticulateness of ordinary adolescence that there’s no easy fantasy loophole. A hybrid of time-travel treatise, ’80s snapshot, troubled-kid drama and dark comedy. The 2001 film kicks off a series of films featuring Patrick Swayze. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 15; 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., May 17; 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 18; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 21. Hollywood (AH)

CP

GARDENS OF THE NIGHT. This 2008 drama from Damian Harris follows the lives of two children who are abducted and forced into prostitution and child pornography. The film features John Malkovich, Tom Arnold and Gillian Jacobs (Britta on TV’s Community). Jacobs, a Mount Lebanon native, chose the film as this month’s celebrity guest programmer. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 16. Hollywood SYNC’D 6. Eleven local artists offer new work in the latest installment of the series pairing short silent films with live musical soundtracks. Five of the shorts were available for preview (sans soundtrack, of course). Dadpranks offers

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

“EYE-OPENING. PULLS NO PUNCHES IN ITS INFORMED OUTRAGE.” LOS ANGELES TIMES

“HERE IS SOMETHING RARE AT THE MULTIPLEX: A MOVIE THAT MATTERS.” ROLLING STONE

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

-Woman - - - - - - of- - -the- - -Year ----------------------------Donnie - - - - - -Darko ----------------------------------Gillian - - - -Jacobs - - - - - Presents... - - - - - - - Gardens - - - - - - - -of- - the - - - -Night ---------5/14 @ 7:30pm

FROM LAURIE DAVID PRODUCER OF AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH AND KATIE COURIC

(1942)

5/15 @ 2pm

(2001) 5/15 @ 7:30pm, 5/17 @ 7pm & 10pm, 5/18 @ 7:30pm (2008) 5/16 @ 7:30pm - Drama starring Gillian Jacobs & John Malkovich

-Gillian - - - -Jacobs - - - - - Presents... - - - - - - - Vagabond -----------------------(1986)

5/16 @ 10pm - French drama.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 16

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CHECK DIRECTORIES WEST HOMESTEAD FOR SHOWTIMES AMC Loews Waterfront 22 NO PASSES ACCEPTED (888) AMC-4FUN

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

Neighbors Screenings continue through Sun., May 25, and include: Awful Nice, a comedy about two brothers; Amka and the Three Golden Rules, a coming-of-age story from Mongolia; a comedy about Hollywood, He’s Way More Famous Than You; a stoner comedy, Oliver, Stoned; and Grantham & Rosie, in which two troubled teens take a road trip. Also playing: a pair of shorts, “Young Americans,” about teens planning a robbery, and “Shipbreakers,” an eye-opening documentary about laborers who dismantle ships by hand. All films screen multiple times; see website for complete schedule. 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 or www.parkwaytheater.org. $7 single ticket, or various passes ($11-45).

in the next three decades of sci-fi films, starting with Star Wars. Now a lively 85, Jodorwosky (El Topo) is generous and phlegmatic about the outcome of his never-to-be masterwork. “From this supposed failure came a lot of creation,” he says, referring to the team he assembled who went on to other projects. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Regent Square (AH)

BRAZIL. Terry Gilliam’s dystopian, gloriously quirky 1985 adventure finds a fantasy-driven government drone (Jonathan Pryce) crashing into reality after a Big Brother-ish computer malfunctions. Michael Palin and Robert DeNiro co-star. Screens as part of a monthlong, Sunday-night series of 1980s adventure films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 18. Regent Square HORROR REALM FILM FESTIVAL. The fourday festival of horror films begins tonight with a reception; screenings and other events follow Fri., May 23, through Sun., May 25. Full details at www. horrorrealmcon.com, with advance tickets at www. showclix.com. 8 p.m. Thu., May 22. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

ONGOING JODOROWSKY’S DUNE. An entertaining and fascinating documentary from Frank Pavich about “the greatest movie never made,” Alejandro Jodorowsky’s mid-1970s adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune. But because it was a film that got planned — and a project full of ambitious ideas and images that lived on in other films — there’s a valid argument for one participant’s claim that “It was the greatest movie ever made … even though it was never made.” Pavich’s documentary takes us through the planning stages — the visions, fortuitous encounters and mad obsessions that gave shape to Jodorowsky’s film. Today, studying the artifacts of pre-production and getting swept up in Jodorowsky’s enthusiasm, this Dune looks fantastic — full of grand ideas and even grander visuals. But in mid-1970s Hollywood, there was no market for an expensive sci-fi headtrip, though it’s clear that Jodorowsky’s evocative storyboards made the rounds and were noted: Explicit scenes and visual themes from Dune would surface

CP

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

Fading Gigolo NEIGHBORS. After Seth Rogen and buddies made last year’s meta-comedy This Is the End, which combined a vulgar bro comedy with a critique of the same, I hoped that Rogen (who has shown his sensitive side in indies) would move on. Well, color me wrong. Nicholas Stoller’s R-rated college kegger stars Rogen and Rose Byrne as new parents who engage in an all-out pranks war with the boozy frat house, headed by Zac Efron, that has moved in next door. It’s Animal House + The Hangover + Ridiculousness – Efron’s shirts = Same Stupid Jokes. Oops, my bad: Proving that there’s always something new to be scraped out of the bottom of the comedy barrel, we get extended jokes about DIY dildos and milking your wife. (AH) FADING GIGOLO. This new film from writer-directoractor John Turturro offers at its heart a gentle if predictable light comedy, which is unfortunately wrapped in a very bad concept. Turturro plays Fioravante, a Manhattanite at loose financial ends — he loses one of his part-time jobs when his buddy Murray (Woody Allen) is forced to close his used bookstore. But Murray has a proposition: Fioravante can be a $1,000-a-go gigolo for rich professional women. Only in a world of movies made by men does any of this make sense. It’s too bad your mind will be consumed with these skeevier aspects, which will likely overshadow the sweeter story about a relationship Turturro develops with a lonely Hasidic widow (Vanessa Paradis). Manor (AH)


[BOOK REVIEWS]

“HE AMPS US UP, INSPIRES US, AND THEN WE GET INTO IT.”

LIT BRIEFS

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Two recent chapbooks by local poets deal extensively with different sorts of filial trauma. Many of the 25 poems in Jessica Server’s Sever the Braid (Finishing Line Press) depict domestic disorientation. In poems like “Dorothy Moves to 866 E. Turquoise,” the narrator describes a family’s move to Arizona in terms of an alien landscape possessing “a new, living heat.” “Tiny Living, 1987” (“for my father”) details a man’s obsessive construction of an elaborate dollhouse for his daughter, just before he leaves the family; it’s devastating. “Domesticity” tartly and amusingly summarizes the narrator’s prickly relationship with her mother. Yet Server (a former CP food writer) shows plenty of range, as in the lovely “Cooking Lessons” (set in Costa Rica). “The Cantab Lounge” sensually encapsulates a youthful crush on a musician. And “How to Build an Empire” has a visionary edge: “Teach your language to ensure understanding. / Leave out certain words.” Throughout, the language is vivid, with similes almost palpable, as when Server writes, in “Monteverde,” “The sea to the west expanded / like an orthodoxy.” Robert Walicki’s A Room Full of Trees (Red Bird Chapbooks) is both more austere and more cohesive conceptually. The childhood sexual abuse of the narrator — foreshadowed in the lead poem, “Red” — echoes throughout, even in a collection of poems full of phenomena the poet labels difficult to define or quantify. “It’s like the moment someone reaches for your hand, but stops / short. Like the space between the tree branches, a piece of sky, / blue and visible,” he writes in “The Moment,” about an abusive husband. In “When the Sunlight,” told from the perspective of a chilld being abused, Walicki writes, “When he touches you, think of the wind. / Think of the hard voices of birds / through the open trees, / their wardrobe of leaves — / the leaves falling like cloth like a thousand hands / softly.” Indeed, A Room Full of Trees is full of absences, defined by them. Especially missing is the narrator’s mother, who is depicted suffering dementia, and memorialized by her possessions in “The Way Back.” The haunting “What the Light Wants” eerily evokes a dead father through the crafting of a scarecrow. Outside the family circle, Walicki succinctly evokes a friend’s dead lover in “Matt,” and, in “Touch,” the shame of being a social outsider at a friend’s house. All in all, it’s a deeply moving collection.

[STAGE]

PLAYS

WELL WITH

OTHERS {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELA SUICO}

Edwin Lee Gibson

F

ROM JANUARY through April of this year, actor Edwin Lee Gibson has spent only about a month total in his Hill District apartment. It lacks any furniture except for an air mattress. Gibson has been working in New York City, doing some TV work or performing in shows like Minetta Lane Theatre’s recent production of Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information. Then he catches a bus to spend Mondays and Tuesdays in Pittsburgh before circling back to NYC. The reason: He’s volunteering here with Service Access for Youth Engaged in Service. SAY YES is a Gay and Lesbian Community Center drop-in program for “all GLBTQIA youth who are currently experiencing or are in danger of becoming homeless.” It caters to adults age 25 and under, offering services like health care, job-search assistance and education. (The SAY YES coalition also includes the Homeless Children’s Education Fund, UPMC and

other organizations.) Gibson got involved after initially contacting HCEF to become a tutor. When organizers saw his resume, they suggested he teach theater classes instead.

“I THINK ABOUT … WHAT THESE YOUNG PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO DO BECAUSE THEY’RE SO MUCH SMARTER THAN WE ARE.” “I think about … what these young people are able to do because they’re so much smarter than we are,” says Gibson. “What they’re able to do, potentially, is great, and if I can have a hand in that, I’m all the better for it.” Gibson’s acting credits include gueststarring on Law & Order and winning an

OBIE award, in 2006, for his performance in Will Power’s The Seven. With GLCC, he started out teaching an acting class, but switched his focus to play-reading and creative writing. He sensed that acting wasn’t holding his students’ interest. Printing out readings that students could look over on their own time lent itself better to the casual nature of a drop-in class. And by encouraging them to write their own plays, he could help students make their voices heard. That’s important to Gibson, who is a stutterer. “When I was 6 years old, I was having a really intense stuttering block with my parents and one of my brothers one night,” he says. “And I said, ‘Ah, forget it.’ My dad, who was a garbage man [with a] fourth-grade education, said, ‘No, say what you have to say. We’ll wait. Your voice is important.’ “I never want anyone, especially any young person, to feel like … there’s something that they can’t say. Or that

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

A musical comedy written and directed by Brian Edward; musical arrangements by Jace Vek and Lisa Harrier.

MAY 16, 17, 18, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m.

TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS • GROUP RATES AVAILABLE HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE • 1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT

For reservations please visit our website at www.mckeesportlittletheater.com or call 412-673-1100.

ROLE MODEL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

there’s not space for them to say what they want to say, however they want to say it.” EARLIER THIS SPRING, his class was reading

Stephen Adly Guirgis’ raw, raucously funny drama The Motherfucker With the Hat. (Gibson starred in Pittsburgh-based barebones productions’ staging of the play last November, at the New Hazlett Theater.) Class attendance at GLCC’s Downtown headquarters has ranged from one to 11. On a sunny Tuesday in early April, three people were attending — 22-yearold Aaron, and a couple: Carly, 19, and Ralph, 26, who came to SAY YES as a 25-yearold and remains because of Carly. When students share their ideas on what they’d like to write about — child abuse, alcohol addiction, a pastor who’s hooked on cocaine — Gibson asks each of them to write down the following questions: Where is the protagonist? Is she speaking to someone? Is he speaking to himself? What does the protagonist want to change? “You can’t write page one, without word one,” he tells the students. Then they turn to Motherfucker, scene six. Each student is assigned a character, and Gibson grins as they get into it, their tone and inflections changing line by line.

Gibson’s initial move from New York to Pittsburgh traces back to 2012, when he starred in barebones’ Jesus Hopped the A-Train (also by Guirgis). He landed the role of an incarcerated killer-turned-Christian after sending an audition tape to director Derrick Sanders and producer Patrick Jordan. “His performance was very still and understated,” recalls Jordan, “but [he] had a lot of intensity and fire in his eyes. There was a little bit of vulnerability. It wasn’t just someone being scary. … Edwin rang true. He was just sitting at a chair at a laptop.” Gibson moved to Pittsburgh later that year, charmed by the city’s architecture and laid-back vibe. But the biggest draw was the city’s ties to August Wilson. A passionate Wilson fan, Gibson has been writing out his ideas on the playwright’s “artistic philosophy” since 2009. He hopes to introduce this philosophy to high school students in the Hill District, where Wilson lived. Students in his play-reading class (a new session starts in June) have high praise for Gibson. “It’s definitely a lot of fun,” says Aaron. “We come in, he amps us up, inspires us, and then we get into it. We could really just take it anywhere.” “We try to faithfully be here,” adds Ralph. “Because he really tries to inspire us to be beyond ourselves.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

David Hartt: Stray Light Don’t miss this opportunity to hear David Hartt in conversation with Felix Burrichter, editor and creative director of PIN-UP Magazine, and curator Dan Byers as they discuss David Hartt: Stray Light and its forensic investigation into the power of cultural icons. This Friday, May 16 5:30–9 p.m.: Exhibition open, Forum Gallery 6:30–7:30 p.m.: Artist talk, CMOA Theater Free; Reception follows (cash bar)

Culture Club is sponsored by

Parking is available for a $5 flat rate.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 drop-in tours daily | call 412.622.3289 to schedule a group tour one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014


[ART REVIEW]

FRACKED OFF {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

THE EXHIBIT Pittsburgh Artists Against

Fracking was organized in support of Protect Our Parks, a coalition fighting to prevent hydrofracturing for gas in Allegheny County’s public parks. Protect Our Parks distributes information, speaks out, meets with officials and circulates petitions. It’s not surprising that many local artists support the group, and a portion of all sales from this Garfield Artworks show will be contributed to Protect Our Parks. (Last week, Allegheny County Council voted to permit fracking beneath Deer Lakes Park.) Art exhibits addressing significant issues are a tradition, and the fracking of local parks is certainly a significant issue. Exhibit organizer Bob Ziller wanted to be inclusive, so he didn’t require artworks to address fracking directly, though he encouraged participants to exhibit works relating to nature. With more than 80 artists — almost all from Pittsburgh currently or previously — and more than 100 artworks, the exhibit makes a dramatic statement through quantity alone.

Thommy Conroy’s “Diagram F” and Bob Ziller’s “Unicorn Loves Cheney”

Some works explicitly address environmental concerns. In Sandy Kaminski Kessler’s “Danger Danger,” the robot famous for warning “danger, danger” on the television show Lost in Space appears to issue an environmental warning, as it’s drawn on a topo-

graphical map. Kyle Milne’s “Untitled

PITTSBURGH ARTISTS AGAINST FRACKING continues through June 1. Garfield Artworks, 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-361-2262 or www. garfieldartworks.com

Maps” features a mound of what appear to be gobs of tar on a mining map, creating an unnerving depiction of the waste left over from resource extraction. Thommy Conroy’s “Diagram F” shows a cross-section in which sci-fi creatures battle on the surface while drilling contaminates the water supply. Most compelling in the context of the exhibit are those works that address fracking more or less directly. David Pohl’s “Let them drink benzene, toluene, xylene, and ehtylbenzene” is graphically strong, and the Marie Antoinette-inspired statement clearly condemns recklessness regarding the public’s health. In “Fracking the Body,” Maritza Mosquera likens the slow healing of the body after invasive surgery to the healing the earth requires after being cut into for fracking. Also directly related to fracking is Bob Ziller’s “Unicorn Love Cheney,” ridiculing Dick Cheney’s infamous “Halliburton loophole,” which exempts fracking from regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. And Paul Kuhrman’s modified baseball card “Ickey Rivers” manages to contain a fracking rig, a stream of chemical pollution, “oops,” “ickey rivers,” and “anger.” That pretty well sums up the concerns here. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

STARTS

MATYSBU1R4GH-’S18

WEDNESDAY!

PIT T CULTURAL DISTRIC

7art installation! Sensational shows plus an interactive

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“YOU MUST EXPERIENCE IT FOR YOURSELF!” NEW YORK TIMES

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

From left: Robin Abramson, Federico Rodriguez and John Feltch in City Theatre’s Hope and Gravity

[PLAY REVIEWS]

CONNECTIONS {BY TED HOOVER}

3+272&5(',7-(11<$1'(5621

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LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am

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vGROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

I’M NOT SURE how people who’ve never

tried writing a play might feel, but Michael Hollinger’s Hope and Gravity, receiving its world premiere at City Theatre, is a lovely piece of playwriting.

HOPE AND GRAVITY continues through May 25. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Hollinger imagines a group of people moving through life never understanding how connected they are to the stranger standing beside them. He writes nine scenes which seem self-contained but prove otherwise. For example: A school secretary in one scene turns out to be a pick-up by a dentist in another who, in another, rides an elevator with two grad students, the professor of whom, in another scene, shares a conversation with a woman who is the wife of the boss of the school secretary. The “message” might not be the freshest thing ever to come down the theatrical pike, but Hollinger continually surprises with the sly connections and, most notably, the tightrope he walks. This could have been a frightfully precious script, but Hollinger provides the exact note of melancholy to keep it grounded. He balances frequent, and unabashedly, poetic language with shameless low humor and seasons the whole enterprise with intelligence, compassion and just good old-fashioned quality playwriting. He never allows the reveals to become the story, by which I mean the

mystery of how each person is connected isn’t made the climax of each scene. I could wish the actual stories being told were a little less … familiar. But while Hollinger is breaking no ground with the lives of his characters or their troubles, how he tells their tale is wonderful. Tracy Brigden’s direction is a sinewy silhouette of Hollinger’s writing: She follows him down every dramaturgical street but can still stretch and bend the outline of the production to enlarge the image he’s meaning to project. Watching this top-notch cast is particularly rewarding, especially comparing and contrasting how they attack the couple of roles each plays. They are also completely in tune with Hollinger’s style: Robin Abramson, John Feltch, Rebecca Harris, Daniel Krell and Federico Rodriguez give fiercely intelligent yet understated performances, ultimately enticing us to come live in Hollinger’s absorbing world for a while. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

HISTORY LESSON {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

IS THE HOLOCAUST becoming forgettable?

At first, I questioned Lisa Ann Goldsmith’s director’s notes about the need for “Holocaust education,” as printed in the program for Prime Stage Theatre’s world premiere of The Devil’s Arithmetic. But then, I’m old — old enough to have grown up with children of camp survivors, and to have had the privilege of learning some of the stories first-hand. But in an age that has cheapened the Holocaust into a metaphor for anything


more fretful than a bad hair day, I applaud the company’s decision to commission a new play, by Barry Kornhauser, based upon the 1988 book by Jane Yolen. The project is ambitious, not least because of the difficulty for a family-friendly theater to approach the historical horrors. The magic-realism plot is sprawling, with a large multigenerational cast and unusual demands on make-up/wig designer Ricky Gindlesberger and crew. Yolen begins in “present-day” suburbia (i.e. 1988), when it’s credible that the privileged, spoiled granddaughter of Holocaust survivors would be a fairly young girl. Hannah lacks piety as well as respect for her elders and their past. At an appropriate point in the family’s Passover dinner, she is sucked through a door in the space-time continuum and dropped into a Polish shtetl at a very nasty time: right before Nazi soldiers transport every Jew in town to Auschwitz. The struggle begins. No plot spoilers. The 14-year-old shoulders of Julia Zoratto are amazingly up to the heavy-duty demands on the central character. Hannah whines, stumbles and then credibly grows into a wiser, stronger and much more pleasant person. Zoratto makes her a truly winning heroine. Other notable young

ladies in the 1942 scenario are Chelsea Calfo as the experienced survivor; Lily Lauver and Victoria Perl as playmates turned prisoners; and Megan Krull as the tragic “second best” friend. Dana Hardy heads the adult cast as the mother (1988) and aunt (1942) who teaches Hannah about duty and laughter.

THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC continues through Sun., May 18. Prime Stage Theatre at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-20. www.primestage.com

Johnmichael Bohach’s set beautifully evokes the everyday pathways and nightmarish railways the characters follow. Yes, the Holocaust has to be somewhat sanitized for modern audiences, but The Devil’s Arithmetic does not prettify the pain. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SECRETS {BY F.J. HARTLAND}

IN THE SERMON that opens John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt, A Parable, Father Flynn says, “Only God knows our secrets.”

And secrets abound in this drama, the current offering from Stage 62. Did Father Flynn molest the Muller boy? Why does Sister Aloysius suspect him when there is no proof? Why do Sister James and Mrs. Muller defend the priest? But perhaps the best part of Doubt is that the riddles are never truly solved. Only God knows. Matthew J. Rush does a fine job capturing the anguish of the accused Father Flynn, but does not exude the charisma and charm that makes the young priest so popular with the parishioners. As Sister Aloysius, the principal of the St. Nicholas school, Cindy West provides the correct tone of the judgmental and opinionated nun. At times, however, the combination of her accent, speaking rate and the amplification system garbles some of her lines. Anna Dorosh brings just the right amount of innocence and sweetness as Sister James, never crossing into saccharine. Dorosh has the challenge of playing the “weak” character, torn between the personalities of Flynn and Aloysius, and she does a wonderful job. Cheryl Bates-White, while limited to a single scene, gives a powerful and memorable performance. But I think costumer

Dustin Wickett short-changed BatesWhite a purse and some gloves. This is 1964, and she has been called in for a meeting with her son’s principal. Director JP Welsh has paced the individual scenes well, but the final confrontation between Flynn and Aloysius lacked a cat-and-mouse quality — where the audience is never sure who is the cat and who is the mouse. But on opening night, the balance of power was not a tug-of-war between equals.

DOUBT continues through Sat., May 17. Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $12-15. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.com

Rob James’ set beautifully captures the various locations for Doubt; but why, when all the various locations fit onto the stage of the Carnegie Music Hall simultaneously, are there set changes? Waiting for the changes slows the play and diminishes the building tension it requires. Garth Schafer’s lighting design is uneven; hot and dark spots abound. While this production is not perfect, Stage 62 deserves credit for attempting such a powerful and thought-provoking play. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Downtown Wireless II

(NEW LOCATION! Now Open!) 547 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh Downtown 412-391-2000

East Liberty Wireless 6006 Broad St. East Liberty. 412-362-0405

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Buy • Sell • Trade. We buy gift cards.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.1505.22.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

MAY 20

Peter and the Starcatcher

+ THU., MAY 15 {TALK} U.S. Marine Corps Col. Mark Mykleby believes national security requires a sustainable energy strategy. Tonight, Mykleby joins Mayor Bill Peduto — who just returned from studying sustainability nability in Germany — at the Inspire Speakers Series, co-sponsored ponsored by the Green Building g Alliance and Phipps Conservatory. atory. Also hear from the schoolkids kids in the GBA’s Green & Healthy hy Schools Academy. Bill O’Driscoll scoll 6 p.m. Phipps Conservatory, vatory, One Schenley Park, Oakland. $15-45. www.go-gba.org .org

Carson St., South Side. Free. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereye.org

+ FRI., MAY 16 {TALK} Women in Film and Media Pittsburgh was founded in 2005 to improve the status

{ART} At Silver Eye Center for Photography, seven ven photographers or artist tist teams from around the U.S. explore what it means to be queer today. The exhibit Here ere & Now finds artists on n physical and emotional nal journeys including: Zackary Drucker, of Los Angeles; Molly Landreth, of Seattle; and Brooklyn’s We Are the Youth. “Images ges become the spaces where new maps are imagined and created,” says curatorr Rafael Soldi. Tonight’s ’s free opening reception on features a curator talk k with Soldi. BO 6-8 p.m. m. (talk at 6 p.m.). 1015 E.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

MAY 20 Have You Seen Me? Art by Alexi Morrissey

and portrayal of women in all screen-based media. This weekend, at Downtown’s Westin Convention Center, the group hosts the 2014 Women in Film and Television International Summit. Starting today, hundreds of members from 40 chapters worldwide are expected for three days of speakers, panel talks and screenings. Presenters include Twilight director Catherine Hardwicke, Ghost Whisperer producer Kim Moses and CNN anchor Martin Savidge. BO Continues through Sun., May 18. Three-day pass: $275325. One-day pass: $99-125. www.wiftisummit.org

{ART} Tonight, Space opens its new multi-media exhibit, which organizer and lead artist Olivia Ciummo dubs Psychic Panic. The show examines the intersections between the fantastic and mundane, the body and labor, by isolating that evoke desire objects th American culture. Pieces within Am include a copper pipe wrapped in fur and video of a totaled wagon. Work by local station w Selima M. Dawson, Elina artists Sel and Ross Nugent, will Malkin an featured alongside that be featur visiting artists. Dan of six visit 5:30-8:30 p.m. Willis 5:3 Continues through June 29. Continue Liberty Ave., Downtown. 812 Liber 412-325-7723 or Free. 412 www.spacepittsburgh.org www.spa

{DANCE} {DANC Pittsbur Pittsburgh’s Balafon West African Dance Ensemble holds its i fourth annual Black River African Dance R Conference this weekend. Confe The conference includes co dance and drumming workshops for all ages work and experience levels, e at Obama Preparatory Ob Academy, and talks on the Acad history histo of dance in Guinea by Hamidou Bangoura, Ha artistic artist director of that nation’s natio Les Ballets Africains. Tonight and Africa tomorrow’s headlining tomo performances, at the perfor Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, Kelly-S


MainEvent

The Andy Warhol Museum turns 20, and celebrates with what’s made it a cultural linchpin: a big party, late-night fun and more Andy. Based on visitor feedback, says museum director Eric Shiner, the seven-story venue has been overhauled to spotlight a chronological portrait of Warhol: Over its top four floors, says Shiner, “You walk through his life,” starting with his 1920s Pittsburgh childhood. Rare new pieces include a 16-year-old Warhol’s first known self-portrait. The museum’s long-private archival study area has re-opened, displaying artifacts from Warhol’s famed time capsules. In the screening room, a new biographical documentary will loop, while Warhol’s own films, with new on-demand video capability, move upstairs. Also opening is Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede, an exhibit exploring the interconnected lives and work of Warhol and his good friend Halston, the iconic fashion designer. First to glimpse all this will be the 650 guests from around the world attending the museum’s swanky May 17 anniversary gala. But directly afterward, starting at midnight, comes a free, 17-hour museum-wide Community Day. It begins with a set by New York City’s DJs AndewAndrew and includes hands-on Warhol-themed artmaking and author Bob Colacello’s reading and signing of Holy Terror, his newly reissued 1990 book on Warhol. Bill O’Driscoll Gala: 6 p.m. Sat., May 17 ($500). Community Day: Midnight, Sat., May 17-5 p.m. Sun., May 18 (free). 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

feature master drummers Fode Moussa Camara, Mamadouba Mito Camara and Assane M’Baye. BO Performances: 8 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sat., May 17. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-25. 724-543-1017 or www.balafon.org

Noon-5 p.m. Also noon-5 p.m. Sun., May 18. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org g

{SCREEN} Sync’d uniquely combiness local filmmaking, live music and the lost art of silent moving pictures. For the series’ sixth installment, organizer Michael Maraden invited 11 artists to contribute silent shorts (narrative or non-narrative, abstract or representational) to be screened and receive live soundtracks courtesy of the Garment District or Casual Male. The filmmakers include Kyle Van Noy, Dadpranks and Gena Salorino. It all happens tonight at The New Bohemian, on the North Side. BO 8 p.m. 887 Progress St., North Side. $8. syncdpgh@yahoo.com

+ SAT., MAY 17 {ART} Photography galleries from all over the world converge for the third annual PGH Photo Fair. The two-day event at the Carnegie Museum of Art boasts docent tours of exhibits, photobook raffles and consultations with photography experts. The main gallery offers classic and contemporary works on loan from Brooklyn’s Blind Spot, Berlin’s Only Photography and Pittsburgh’s Concept Gallery, to name just a few. 10X10, a curated display of 100 photobooks, also returns, exclusively featuring postwar Japanese photography, DW

MAY 19 Wil Haygood

percent are women. Women in nonprofits also, coincidentally, earn 74 cents for every dollar men earn. The latest attempt of Pittsburgh’s 74% project to explore such inequities is tonight’s reading at Bricolage Productions. At the behest of the Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management, Bricolage’s Tami Dixon has B compiled stories from an c archive of one-on-one interviews with women in nonprofits. The stories are presented by performers Dixon, Laurie Klatcher and Bria Walker. A talkback and reception follow. BO 5-7 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. RSVP at 412-397-6000.

MAY 15

Here & Now

{TALK} {STAGE} If Morose and Macabre’s House of Oddities promises a Museum of Dreams, you can bet they’re not the sweet kind. The group’s sixth annual Atrocity Exhibition is “a 360-degree living-art installation” from the dark side, featuring sideshow, cabaret, burlesque and performance art, plus an artisan market. In this evening’s narrative at the Rex Theater, host Cheri Baum plays The Boogeyman, co-host Lilith Deville is The Sandman, and local talents Phat Man Dee, Andrew the Impaled, Penny De La Poison and Lita D’Vargas are joined by visiting artists like Vinsantos, Satori Circus, Zander Lovecraft and the Rev. Decay. BO 10 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-17 (21 and over). www. moroseandmacabre.com

The Hill House Association is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and together with Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, it’s bringing in Wil Haygood to discuss his latest book, The Butler. The cultural historian and biographer, whose previous subjects include Sugar Ray Robinson and Sammy Davis Jr., wrote the Washington Post article that inspired Lee Daniel’s popular film of the same name. Now, he’s here

+ TUE., MAY 20

to present his historical account of the man who worked in the White House under eight separate presidencies. DW 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $15-55. 412-6228866 or www.pittsburgh lectures.org

{ART} In Alexi Morrissey’s Have You Seen Me?, an old-fashioned porcelain milk bottle is emblazoned with the image of Oluaka, age 16, who was kidnapped from her village of Umudim … centuries ago. “Missing. Have You Seen Me?” the bottle reads, in English and Igbo. The images are drawn from historical slave archives; the handmade bottles are Morrissey’s play on the old milk-carton missing-kids campaign. Tonight, at the Society for Contemporary Craft, Morrissey speaks about his “alternate history of missing-person advocacy in 18th-century Africa” along with University of Pittsburgh historian Marcus Rediker, author of several acclaimed books on the Atlantic slave trade. BO

MAY 17 PGH Photo Fair

+ MON., MAY 19 {STAGE} Among employees of nonprofit organizations, 74

7 p.m. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

Art by Richard Barnes

{STAGE} Spring is finally here, so brush off those last shreds of Seasonal Affective Disorder and embrace your inner child. The producers behind Broadway favorite Peter and the Starcatcher bring the first national tour of this musical play to Heinz Hall for eight performances as part of PNC Broadway Across America. This Peter Pan prologue, based on a novel by Ridley Pearson and Dave Barry, has received rave reviews since opening on Broadway two years ago for its childlike whimsy, irreverent humor and intricate choreography. DW 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 25. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-68. 412-3924900 or www.trustarts.org

{COURTESY OF FOLEY GALLERY, NEW YORK}

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AMISH BURLESQUE. Musical comedy. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. BLITHE SPIRIT. Following a séance, Charles Condomine finds that his late wife Elvira is back & determined to have him to herself-much to the dismay of his current wife. Thu-Sat. Thru May 17. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-PLAY. CANDIDA. Comedy by George Bernard Shaw. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru May 18. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. COMFORT ZONE. Play by Marlon Erik Youngblood about the aftermath of a shooting & how it impacts a community. www. pghplaywrights.com/zone Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru May 18. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC. An

adaptation of the book by Jane Yolen. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru May 18. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 724-773-0700. DOUBT, A PARABLE. Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects the young Father Flynn of improper relations w/ a male student. Presented by Stage 62. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. GENE KELLY: THE LEGACY. Presentation by Patricia Ward Kelly combining rare & familiar film clips, previously unreleased audio recordings, personal memorabilia, more. Wed., May 21, 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. HEE HAW JAMBOREE. Tribute to America’s longest-running syndicated TV program. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru May 17. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

HOPE & GRAVITY. Nonlinear Park. 412-831-8552. PETER & THE STARCATCHER. comedy about fate. Tue, Wed, Prequel to Peter Pan. May 20-22, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 23, 8 p.m., 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Sat., May 24, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., May 25. City Theatre, South Side. May 25, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, 412-431-2489. Downtown. 412-392-4900. I REMEMBER MAMA. POLYESTER THE MUSICAL. Heartwarming family story about The story of the Synchronistics, an early 1900s immigrants. Presented over-the-hill ABBA wannabe group by the Indiana Players. Fri, Sat, that reunites after 20 years to 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. perform at a public access Thru May 18. Philadelphia TV telethon. Thu-Sat, Street Playhouse. 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. 724-464-0725. Thru May 18. The INKY. A love-starved Theatre Factory. Manhattanite husband www. per pa 412-374-9200. & wife struggling to pghcitym .co PRESENT LAUGHTER. satisfy their child-like Comedy by Noel Coward. desire to “have it all” Presented by the Bobcat during the 1980s hire Inky, a Players. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru young Slavic nanny who’s obsessed May 17. Beaver Area High School, with Muhammad Ali. Thu-Sat, Beaver. 724-494-1680. 8 p.m. Thru May 17. Off the Wall RUN FOR YOUR WIFE. Comedy Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. by Ray Cooney about a cab driver A LOVE AFFAIR. Romantic who juggles two wives until he comedy about a couple clearing ends up in the hospital. Fri, Sat, out their attic & reliving moments 8:15 p.m. and Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m. from a 38-year marriage. Thu-Sat, Thru May 15. Butler Little Theatre, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Butler. 724-287-6781. May 25. South Park Theatre, Bethel TONY AWARDS CELEBRATION. Songs from every Best Musical winner in Tony Awards history, feat. Broadway singer Lenora Nemetz. The Strand Broadway Concert Series. May 16-17, 8 p.m. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400. THE UNDERPANTS. Steve Martin’s farce about young bride who is met with instant celebrity after her bloomers drop to her ankles at a parade for the king. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 17. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

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COMEDY THU 15 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. POETRY.COM HAPPY HOUR STYLE. Where poetry meets comedy. Feat. Pittsburgh’s premiere poets & comedians. Third Thu of every month, 6-9 p.m. Thru May 15 The Lounge on Verona, Verona. 412-871-5521. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 16 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014


Untitled (detail) by Bryan C. Mickle, from Recent Watercolors, at Constellation Coffee in Lawrenceville

VISUALART

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. 20th Anniversary Collection Rehang. Redesign of collection galleries feat. pieces from the collection alongside rarely seen artworks & archival material. Halston & Warhol: Silver & Suede. Exhibition integrating Halston’s garments & accessories w/ photography, video & paintings by Warhol. Opens May 18. North Side. 412-237-8300. BOXHEART GALLERY. modern+contemporary. Work by Melissa Kuntz, Cara Livorio, Mark Loebach Jennipher Satterly, & Daria Sandburg. Opening reception: May 24, 59 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. David Hartt: Stray Light. Feat. color photographs, sculptures, & video installation. Opening reception & artist talk: May 16, 5:30-9 p.m. PGH Photo Fair. Feat. 12 internationally known dealers exhibiting museum-quality prints & photo-based art. Opens May 18. Oakland. 646-436-4698. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Greensburg Salem Art Club Juried Art Show. Curated by Gabby Walton, Laura Rosner & Sarah Thomas. Opens May 21. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JAMES GALLERY. Response. Group show feat. 11 artists creating abstracted reactions to the natural & built worlds. Opening reception: May 16, 6-9 p.m. 412-922-9800. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Legacies: The Merrick Masters Art Exhibition. Juried by Carol

R. Brode. Opening reception: May 18, 1-4 p.m. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Rae Gold, Norman Brown. New paintings by Norman Brown & paper/fiber by Rae Gold. Opening reception: May 16, 5:30-8:30 p.m. South Side. 412-431-3337. MWFA AT THE WATERFRONT. Most Wanted Fine Art at the Waterfront Art Opening. Opening reception: May 16, 610 p.m. Homestead. 412-440-8923. RENZIEHAUSEN PARK. 56th Annual McKeesport Art Group Spring Show. Work by John Roulic, Nikki Noll & Emmy Boczar, Rich Ermlick, Mango West, Anthony Horner, Charleigh Box, Abbie Cypher, Mose MacGuffin, Luis Enrique Castillo Jr., more. Opening reception: May 16, 5-9 p.m. McKeesport. 412-469-2710. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Here & Now: Queer Geographies in Contemporary Photography. Group show feat. work of artists embarking on physical & emotional journeys to define & discover queerness across the American landscape. Opening reception & curator talk w/ Rafael Soldi: May 15, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. SPACE. Psychic Panic. Feat. 25+ artworks by 9 artists working in a range of media. Opening reception: May 16, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. The

Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Digital Hand. Digital fabrication works by students at the Penn State School of Visual Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 720 RECORDS. The Art of Julie Mallis. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Downtown. 412-291-6499. ARTDFACT. Timothy Kelley. Paintings & sculpture. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Touch of Class II. Watercolors by Marci Evancho Mason. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Antonio Puri. Largescale contemporary pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Bryan C. Mickle: Recent Watercolors. Lawrenceville. 814-419-9775. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century

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May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. CAFE AU LAIT NIGHT. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DUO SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 16 - SAT 17 CAL VERDUCHI. May 16-17, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. THE ORACLE OF TRUTH. Sketch comedy presented by Spinster Comedy. May 16-17, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 16 - SUN 18 STEVE RANNAZZISI. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., May 17, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., May 18, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 17 THE LUPONES. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MAKE NICE BOOM. 8 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE: MONDO! W/ JOHN FETTERMAN. 9:30 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-212-7061.

MON 19 UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru May 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

ANDREW O’NEILL, MARC BURROWS. Comedy at The Manor. 8 p.m. Trundle Manor, Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 21 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix.

VISUAL ART

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American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Nature & the Metaphysical. Work by Caroline Bagenal & Don Dugal. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. On the Prowl. Paintings by Keith Schmiedlin. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Ligonier Oak Grove Art Club Exhibit. Greensburg. 724-836-3074. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Robert Pollard: Junk Collector & Scrabble King. Collages by Robert Pollard. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008.

Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting.

MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Actual Size: 2014 Senior Art Exhibition. Feat. work by 40+ students graduating w/ BFA & interdisciplinary art degrees. Oakland. 412-268-2409. MINE FACTORY. Origins & Gravity. Work by Ryan Lammie. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Criminal Damage. A mixed-media project based on street art, & street art themes, showcasing authentic graffiti pieces & ‘inspired’ pieces, photography & instillations. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. The 2014 Regional Show. Juried exhibit feat. works by regional artists in various media, including watercolor, pastel, oil, acrylic, pottery, mixed media, more. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Generations. Works by Anthony & Philip Kram. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/ Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SOCIAL STATUS. impe’kyoonees. Contemporary work by NY-based photographer Applecubed. Downtown. 412-456-2355. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Encounters: Art in the City. The culminating event showcasing artwork by Pittsburgh SciTech students from an experiential learning course offered by the History of Art & Architecture department. Oakland. 412-648-2394. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Terrestrial. Work by Alex Blau, Paul Collins, Rocky Horton, Ron Lambert, Jonathan Rattner, Thomas Sturgill, & Willard Tucker. Braddock. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition: Mark Panza & Rachel Yoke. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad


and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Harmonious couplings of botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants & interactive features. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature

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exotic plants and floral displays FOUR DIRECTIONS CENTER GRAND OPENING & from around the world. Oakland. FUNDRAISER. Feat. live music, 412-622-6914. poetry readings, art, more. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG 4-10 p.m. Four Directions Center, AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 Gibsonia. 724-443-2410. animals, including many HUSH FASHION BENEFIT SHOW. endangered species. Highland Showcase of local designers & Park. 412-665-3639. boutiques. Benefits Project Safe RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. Shoe & Dress for Success. 7 p.m. A Reverence for Life. Photos Union Project, Highland Park. and artifacts of her life & work. 412-265-6200. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on HELLO BULLY’S 6TH ANNUAL the Homestead Mill. Steel industry LOVERS NOT FIGHTERS GALA. and community artifacts Benefits Pit Bull Rescue. from 1881-1986. Homestead. www.hellobully.org 412-464-4020. 7-11 p.m. Soldiers & SENATOR JOHN HEINZ Sailors Memorial Hall, HISTORY CENTER. Oakland. 412-204-7482. Pittsburgh’s Lost HIGHMARK WALK Steamboat: Treasures w. w w FOR A HEALTHY of the Arabia. Exhibit er hcitypap g p COMMUNITY. 5K feat. nearly 2,000 .com walk, 1-mile fun walk once-hidden treasures benefiting 69 health & exploring Pittsburgh’s human service organizations. important role as a Gateway to 7:45 a.m. Stage AE, North Side. the West & a national hub for the 412-771-6460 x 305. steamboat building industry in the HOSANNA INDUSTRIES’ 10TH mid-19th century. From Slavery to ANNUAL SPRING TRAP SHOOT. Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s 8 a.m. North Side Sportsmen’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Association, Warrendale. Ongoing: Western PA Sports 724-770-0262. Museum, Clash of Empires, and MAKERDATE. Skills auction, exhibits on local history, more. maker stations, more. Benefits Strip District. 412-454-6000. Assemble. 7-10 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. ROYAL BALL FUNDRAISER. Dancing, storybook characters, musical numbers, games, prizes, MOROSE & MACABRE’S silent auction, more. Benefits ATROCITY EXHIBITION: the Gemini Theater Company. MUSEUM OF DREAMS. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Syria Shriners Neo-Victorian horror inspired Pavilion. 412-243-5201. art, oddities & performances. UNTUCKED FESTIVAL. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. Feat. The Spin Doctors, 412-381-6811. Brandon & Leah, Donora. Benefits Family House. 5 p.m. Shady Side Academy, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3160. WARHOL 20TH ANNIVERSARY BLACK RIVER AFRICAN DANCE GALA. Black tie dinner, special CONFERENCE COMMUNITY entertainment, more. 6 p.m. PERFORMANCE. Feat. the Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. Dilworth Children’s African Dance 412-237-8300. Workshop. 10 a.m. Dilworth Traditional Academy, Highland Park. 724-543-1017. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, BLACK RIVER AFRICAN pack ‘em or database ‘em! DANCE CONFERENCE FEATURE Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. PERFORMANCES. w/ Master Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. Drummers Fode Moussa Camara, 412-361-3022. Mamadouba Mito Camara, & Assane M’Baye. May 16-17, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, LET’S MISBEHAVE. 1920s East Liberty. 724-543-1017. speakeasy-themed party. Benefits City Theatre. 5:3010 p.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-431-4400 x 278. COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE. NKF GOLF CLASSIC. Benefits Benefits Planned Parenthood of the National Kidney Foundation. 10:30 a.m. Valley Brook Country Western PA. 5 p.m. Double Wide Club, McMurray. 412-261-1405. Grill, South Side. 412-258-9540. SPAGHETTI DINNER. 4-6:30 p.m. Calvary United Church of Christ. GOD LOVES UGANDA. Film 412-823-4347. screening benefiting those who have left Uganda & declared asylum in the U.S. w/ legal COCKTAILS & CUISINE. Benefits expenses & basic needs. 7 p.m. Crisis Center North. 6-10 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, The Woodlands, Wexford.

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Oakland. 412-681-5449. SOCIAL TECHNOVATION 412. Hors d’oeuvres, networking, panel discussion on the marriage of technology & social issues in Pittsburgh. Benefits GTECH Strategies’ Social Capital Council. 5:30-8:30 p.m. TechShop, East Liberty. 412-361-2099.

An Evening of Music

FRI 16 RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. Blacklist by Sara Paretsky. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

LITERARY THU 15 AUTHOR TALK W/ LEAH VINCENT. Author of Cut Me Loose: Sin & Salvation After My Ultra-Orthodox Girlhood. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. How It All Began by Penelope Lively. 1-2 & 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

MON 19

abkmusic.com/coh-events

COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month,

The Weathered Road w/Heidi Jacobs

thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

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AUTHOR TALK & BOOK SIGNING W/ BOB COLACELLO. Author of Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up. Part of The Warhol’s 20th Anniversary Community Day. 3 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. BLACK HOLES, BEAKERS, & BOOKS. The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance by David Epstein. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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[LITERARY] 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WIL HAYGOOD. Lecture w/ journalist & author of The Butler. 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-392-4474.

THURS, MAY 15, 9PM COUNTRY/ROCK

GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 79 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

ATS ACOUSTICC & I RO N A N D RO P E FRI, MAY 16, 9PM IBMA AWARD WINNING BLUEGRASS ARTISTS

FRANK SOLIVAN AND

DIRTY KITCHEN WITH THE TURPENTINERS SAT, MAY 17, 9PM FUNK/R&B

N E W YO R K FUNK EXCHANGE MON, MAY 19, 9PM

WED 21

OPEN STAGE

THE BURIED RETURN CHAPBOOK RELEASE PARTY & READING. Readings by Christine Stroud, Robert Walicki, Carolyne Whelan, & Gerry LaFemina. 7:30 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

“There is little room for the single girl in Yeshivish life. For a woman, the rhythm of observance is tied to family. One is either a daughter or a wife. When my sisters had lived in New York, they’d spent Shabbos and holidays with friends from seminary who had family in New York. My sisters were extroverted girls who attracted new relationships like magnets. I had no friends from seminary, and I was not bold enough to make friends with strangers or approach distant cousins and ask if I could join them for a meal. What’s next, I wondered. If there is no world of dating and marriage waiting to pull me in, why am I here?” FROM LEAH VINCENT’S MEMOIR CUT ME LOOSE: SIN AND SALVATION AFTER MY ULTRA-ORTHODOX GIRLHOOD

Leah Vincent speaks at 6:30 p.m., Thu., May 15. Carnegie Library, 5801 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650 or www.clpgh.org

THE 28TH ANNUAL PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL. Feat. performers from Canada, Denmark, Israel, Netherlands, Spain, United Kingdom & the United States, plus hands-on activities. www.pghkids.org Thru May 18 Cultural District, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

crafts, artist demos, more. 4-7 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. MARS AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY DAY. Model train display, petting zoo, story time, more. 10 a.m.3 p.m. Mars Area Public Library, Mars. 724-625-9058.

THU 15 - WED 21

SAT 17 - SUN 18

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

HUSH: AN INTERVIEW W/ AMERICA. A reporter thinks she’s found a great story about a young girl w/ mystical visions from Hush, Kansas, but the attention has uncomfortable consequences. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. The story of four animal friends exploring the English countryside. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

SAT 17

www.livelinks.com

THU 15

TUE 20

SLIM FORSYTHE & THE PAY DAY LONERS,

WITH

OTHER STUFF

7TH ANNUAL TOUCH-A-TRUCK. 15th & Smallman St., Strip District. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 412-849-5793. ATTACK THEATRE’S GAME DAY. New takes on classic schoolyard challenges. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-281-3305. FIDDLESTICKS: A SALUTE TO AMERICA. Presented by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. 11:15 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. LITTLE GOLDEN BOOKS CELEBRATION. Read-along party w/ guest readers, hands-on

SUN 18 I LOVE DANCE. Performance by the Winchester Thurston Dance Program. 1 & 2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTERS WHEEL. Sun, 12-2 p.m. Thru May 25 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 19 - WED 21 TWIST RESIST. Twist, paint, & unfold to reveal a one-of-a-kind painting. May 19-23, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE FRI 16 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru June 6 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 17 ECO EXPERIENCES. Behind-thescenes laboratory tours of the bird banding station & bioacoustics lab, nature hikes, taxidermy demos, kid-friendly activities, more. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Powdermill Nature Reserve. 412-622-3131. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors. org Sat. Thru June 14

TUE 20 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 21 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. BACKYARD COMPOSTING WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Churchill Borough Building. 412-488-7490 x 247. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Third Thu of every month, 5-9 p.m. Thru May 15 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. NETWORKING FOR A CAUSE. 8:30 a.m. Providence Family Support Center, Brighton Heights. 412-766-3860. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 16 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BAG IT: IS YOUR LIFE TOO PLASTIC? Film screening & discussion. 6:30 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-600-0738. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GAME NIGHT & THE SEVENMINUTE DANCE SERIES. 7-minute dance performances between playing old school games like Four-Square, Connect Four, Atari, more. Presented by Attack Theatre. 7-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-281-3305. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. URBAN IMPACT ARTS NIGHT. A night of art, drama, music, & presentation by Rev. Dr. Ed Glover, founder of Urban Impact. 6:309 p.m. Allegheny Center Alliance Church, North Side. 412-321-3811.


FRI 16 - SAT 17 HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 16 - SUN 18 PRACTICAL HERBALISM WORKSHOP. May 16-18 Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 814-516-2634. WOMEN IN FILM & TELEVISION INTERNATIONAL SUMMIT. Feat. film & TV professionals from across the country for panel discussions, screenings, more. May 16-18 Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 412-973-9799.

SAT 17

Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PHOTO SAFARI SATURDAY: SKYDECK. Exclusive access to the Aviary’s birds for photo opportunities. 9-10 a.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-258-9439. POP UP PITTSBURGH’S BRIGHT NIGHT. Interactive exhibits, live music, laser light show, more. Larimer Ave. between Auburn & Meadow St. 6-9 p.m. 412-392-4505. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

SUN 18 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. www.pittsburghtangueros.org Every other Sun, 5-6 p.m., Sun., June 1, 5-6 p.m. and Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru June 22 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458. KEEP LOOKING UP: A STAR-GAZER’S VIEW. w/ Donna Greco. Theosophical Society of

HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F O R B R A IN IMAGI NG ST UD I ES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks.

23RD ANNNUAL HISTORIC SOUTH SIDE HOME TOUR. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Self-guided walking tour of homes in the Historic South Side Neighborhood. Begins at UPMC Mercy South Side, 2000 Mary St. www.southsidecommunitycouncil. org/south-side-home-tour Get out your gardening gloves and join Lawrenceville 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 412-467-6735. United for the Lawrenceville Flower Planting. On Sat., ARTIST TALK: ELINE MUGAAS May 31, volunteers of all ages will spend the morning W/ TINA KUKIELSK. Part of the filling Western Pennsylvania Conservancy flower beds. Hillman Photography Initiative. No experience necessary, and breakfast will be provided. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Call 412-802-7220 or visit www.lunited.org. Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. BALD EAGLE TOUR. Up-close observation of the Bald Eagle SPANISH CONVERSATION Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. exhibit & bus ride to the Hays Bald GROUP. Friendly, informal. At Chatham University, Shadyside. Eagle nest site. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 412-462-4200. National Aviary, North Side. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. OPEN MIC & CRAFT BEER SWAP. 412-258-9463. 412-362-6108. Sun, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 18 BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Folk SWING CITY. Learn & practice Bridgeville Public Library, dance lessons, live music, more. swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Bridgeville. 412-221-3737. Third Sat of every month, Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21 Bulgarian412-759-1569. education & advocacy for the Macedonian National Education UKULELE WORKSHOP. 3 p.m. LGBTQ community, family & and Cultural Center, West Wilkins School Community Center, friends. Third Sun of every month, Homestead. 412-461-6188. Swissvale. 412-244-8458. 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. URBAN ART TOUR & Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 WORKSHOP. Tour & workshop PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW Friends Meeting House, Oakland. focusing on graffiti found on site. & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ 412-362-9880. 11 a.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. Harmar House. 724-516-0441. BUTLER COUNTY HISTORY DAY. 412-464-4020 x 32. SUSAN WINICOUR ARTIST Tour 3 historic sites. Location LECTURE. Lecture about Susan information at www.butlerhistory. Winicour’s prints inspired by the com/butler-county-history-day/ AFRICAN DANCE & DRUMMING German expressionism movement. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 724-283-8116. WORKSHOPS. Part of the Black 5-7 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate River African Dance Conference. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. communication & conflict 8 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., May 18, WARHOL 20TH ANNIVERSARY transformation study group based 1-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Obama COMMUNITY DAY. Hands-on on the work of peace activist, 6-12, East Liberty. art making & studio programs Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. 724-543-1017. exploring Warhol’s artistic practices. First Sat of every month, AFRICAN 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Andy Warhol 2 p.m. and Third Sat MARKETPLACE. Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. of every month, Part of the Black 2 p.m. Thru Sept. 19 www. per a p River African Dance pghcitym 412-271-7660. .co Conference. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. COFFEE W/ THE GUEST GEEKSDANZ. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 18, 1-4 p.m. CURATOR: SEAN GIBSON TALKS Steel City Improv Theater, Pittsburgh Obama 6-12, BASEBALL & TEENIE HARRIS. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. East Liberty. 412-622-5980. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Carnegie Museum ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced EAGLES OF THE WORLD of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. students will engage in debates, WEEKEND. Flight demos, crafts, MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE conversations, more. Sat, multi-media presentation, more. & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins May 17-18, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Mount Lebanon Public Library, School Community Center, Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Swissvale. 412-478-2681. FARM & GARDEN FOOD FEST. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, Classes, tastings, more. May 17-18, Meet w/ the Roboto board 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie 11 a.m.-4 p.m. McGinnis Sisters, of directors to find out what’s Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. Adams Twp., Mars. 724-779-1212. happening at the space & help KOREAN II. For those who KICK OFF TO SUMMER. Wine guide it’s future. Third Mon already have a basic understanding tastings, food pairings, live music, of every month, 7 p.m. The of Korean & are interested in more. May 17-18, 12-5 p.m. Ripepi Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.Winery & Vineyard. 724-292-8351. 412-853-0518. 12:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 30 Carnegie

LAWRENCEVILLE FLOWER PLANTING

Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

SAT 17 - SUN 18

FULL LIST ONLINE

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Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: E.L.C.O. and Shana Simmons Dance’s

We Sing the Body Eclectic, Pittsburgh Fringe Festival, Shadyside CRITIC: Rob and Ginger Pillar, 51

TUE 20

and 49, architect and nurse from Butler

ALEXI MORRISSEY: HAVE YOU SEEN ME? Artist lecture exploring an alternate history of missing person advocacy in 18th century Africa. 7-8 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-261-7003. PITTSBURGH CAREER FAIR. 6-8 p.m. DoubleTree Monroeville, Monroeville. 847-428-1118.

WHEN: Sun., May 11 GINGER: It was so unpredictable. Usually in music you can predict where things are going, but this always managed to surprise me. It was very good, though, and the dancing was excellent. Some of the moves they did were just incredible, lifting each other up into the air and tumbling around. And for how strange it was, it was still very fun to watch.

WED 21

CURRENTLY SEEKING ENTERTAINERS TO BE

KEY GIRLS 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarksof General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

WATCH THE HOCKEY PLAYOFF GAMES HERE! 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

CELEBRATE THE RAIN! WATERSHED AWARENESS/RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. Presented ROB: I’m glad that we have a fringe festival here in by Nancy Martin, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh. It’s great that there’s a venue for some of these Resources Council. Call to RSVP more out-there groups to perform. Really, the more arts 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, and culture we have in the city, the better off we are, and Point Breeze. 412-488-7490 x. 247. CIVICS FOR GROWN UPS. Wed, the more we understand our culture, and the more we 6:30 p.m. Thru May 28 Carnegie understand ourselves. Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-681-7736 BY DAN WILLIS x 322. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, submit for submission guidelines. 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions.org Lincoln Deadline: June 2. 412-622-3151. Park Performing Arts Center. BRICOLAGE PRODUCTION PGC LECTURE SERIES: DANTE 724-259-6443. COMPANY. Seeking two MARIONI, JANUSZ POZNIAK, MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. playwrights-in-residence for In LIBBY LEUCHTMAN. 6 p.m. Ongoing auditions for actors ages the Raw Festival. The focus of Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 18+ for murder mystery shows this year’s festival is devised work, 412-365-2145. performed in the Pittsburgh area. developed in collaboration w/ THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. 412-833-5056. professional directors, actors, & a A meeting of jugglers & spinners. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF dramaturg. www.bricolagepgh. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the org/content/submissions Union Project, Highland Park. 2014-2015 season. May 13THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 412-363-4550. 18. All voice parts for HOUR REVIEW. Seeking SPANISH II. Geared volunteer singers & submissions in all genres for toward those who Professional Core fledgling literary magazine curated already have a basic singers. www.the by members of the Hour After understanding of mendelssohn.org Happy Hour Writing Workshop. Spanish & are www. per a p ty Third Presbyterian afterhappyhourreview.com. interested in increasing pghci m .co Church, Oakland. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE proficiency. First and 724-263-5259. FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to Third Wed of every month, THE THEATRE FACTORY. new, emerging & established 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Auditions for Children of Eden. writers. No theme restriction. Oakland. 412-622-3151. May 17-18. Males ages 8+ & Submit one original, TABLE TALK FOR HEALING females ages 12+, prepare 32 bars unpublished work, 10 pages max. FROM VIOLENCE. Sharing of music. tfauditions@gmail.com. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ experiences of violence & needs 724-454-7193. jean-toomer-literary-prize-forfor healing. Light dinner will be short-fiction.html . provided. 6-8 p.m. South Side MIDLAND ARTS COUNCIL. Presbyterian Church, South Side. ART IN ACTION. Seeking artists Seeking artwork in any 2D medium 412-431-0118. for a one-day interactive art show for the 9th Annual Midland Arts WATERSHED AWARENESS/RAIN on June 1. More information & BARREL WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Council Show. Carry-in art deadline application at www.artinaction-hf. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. is June 8, online & CD entry com. 724-413-4648. 412-488-7490 x 247. deadline is May 26. midlandBLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems WEST COAST SWING arts-council-pa.com 724-643-9968. for Blast Furnace’s 1st annual WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR poetry chapbook competition. lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, SOCIETY. Seeking entries for Submit one manuscript. No South Side. 916-287-1373. 68th Annual International manuscripts permitted by current Aqueous Open exhibition. www. Chatham University staff, alum, or pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com students, by Blast Furnace guest LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING VERONA CREATIVE reviewers, by poets who have ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors COMPANY. Auditions for The previously been published in his/ for marketplace in June. Space is Sound of Music. May 17-18. her own chapbook. Visit https:// limited. Call for more information. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp blastfurnace.submittable.com/ 412-721-0943.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUBMISSIONS

AUDITIONS


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 21-year-old straight male. I’m mildly autistic and have difficulty picking up on social cues. I’ve learned to manage my disability in most areas, but I’ve become concerned about how it pertains to hooking up. My approach to hooking up is how I imagine most other people’s must be: find someone I can have a conversation with, attempt to flirt, and then awkwardly make a move. But a few weeks ago at a party, I was flirting with a girl when I realized that she was wasted. I had suspected that she was tipsy like myself, but I didn’t understand how far gone she was until she invited me outside and was unable to keep her balance while walking. I struggled to leave, she kept insisting that she wasn’t drunk, and kept pressing against me. By the time I got away, she was angry, people were staring, and I had history’s most shameful erection. Prior to that night, I thought I could tell when someone was too drunk. Now I have doubts. Taking advantage of someone that impaired is the same as rape in my mind. Am I a rapist? Was it wrong to participate in hookup culture as I struggle to read social signals? MORAL BLUE SCREEN OF DEATH

asking questions (“OK, I got the condoms out — you still wanna fuck?”). My best friend is in a relationship with a great guy who is a loving father to their kids. There are no issues in their relationship other than this: zero sex in 10-plus years. She is DESPERATE. She is in contact with a former lover and wants to hook up with her ex. Is she required to disclose? If so, what do you recommend she say? Or does 10-plus years of sexlessness constitute a free pass? Ten years without sex frees your friend from an obligation to disclose, but for her peace of mind — and for butt-cover should the affair be discovered — she should sit her husband down and say something like this: “I love you and I want to stay married to you forever. We both know that sex has never been an important part of our connection. If you should ever seize an opportunity to get it elsewhere, I trust you’ll be considerate and discreet and leave me in the dark. I promise to do the same.”

THE LINE BETWEEN BUZZED ENOUGH TO GO FOR IT AND TOO DRUNK TO CONSENT CAN BE FUZZY AND SUBJECTIVE.

If your description of events is accurate, that erection of yours — which was nowhere close to being history’s most shameful erection (that distinction belongs to the Catholic priest who raped the most kids) — was an innocent, unconscious, physiological response to unwelcome bodily contact. Again, if your recap is accurate: You were struggling to leave, and this drunk wouldn’t stop pressing her body against yours? You were the victim, not the perp. As for other women you’ve hooked up with … The line between buzzed enough to go for it and too drunk to consent can be fuzzy and subjective. Some people argue that one drink renders a person incapable of consent. By that standard, nearly all of us are guilty of raping people. But sensible people recognize that alcohol functions as an effective way to overcome social or sexual inhibitions, and that it’s possible to have consensual sex after a drink or two or even three. You’re worried you may have misread a previous hookup’s ability to consent. I’m sorry to say that it’s possible you hooked up with a girl who was completely shitfaced but, unlike that girl at the party, was not giving off cues that you could pick up on. Since you can’t unfuck the buzzed/ tipsy/drunk girls with whom you’ve hooked up, you can only be more cautious going forward. If drunkenness is a cue that you have a hard time reading, ask a friend for his or her read on the girl you met. Better still, stick to dance-floor make-out sessions at parties and reserve getting naked for sober/soberer second or third dates. And when you decide to go for it, err on the side of making active, ongoing, explicit requests for consent. You’re not going to “make moves”; you’re going to ask questions (“I’d like to kiss you — OK?”) and keep

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

HER BEST FRIEND

I’m a gay male who was diagnosed with ADHD. The prescription I’ve been taking has turned my life around, from the evaporation of my paralyzing academic anxiety to the willpower to practice better hygiene. A side effect of this medication is a drastically increased libido. While I’ve always had kinky tastes in porn, it is only while on Dexedrine that I look for men to tie me up and dominate me. Part of me feels like I should be wary of my kinky self, because “sober” me wouldn’t make these choices. The other part wants to embrace my kinks, because the same high that makes me kinky also made it possible for me to graduate from college and practice good hygiene. Are my concerns valid? AROUSED DISTRACTIBLE DOMINATED

You were looking at kinky porn before you got on meds, so your meds didn’t make you kinky. Instead, your meds have had the same impact on your sex life that they had on your college career and your personal hygiene. Sober You couldn’t get your ass to class or into a hot top’s dungeon. Medicated You gets shit done. The question you should be asking isn’t “Is my meds-enhanced ability to make my kinky fantasies a reality a bad thing?” but “Am I being reckless about how I realize my kinky fantasies?” If you’re not taking unreasonable risks, and if you’re employing best online hookup practices — you meet in public first; you know their real names and phone numbers; before heading to someone’s place to get tied up, you tell a trusted friend where you’re going, who you’re with, and when they can expect to hear from you again — this isn’t a problem.

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

On the Lovecast, Dan chats with filmmaker David Thorpe about gay voices: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.14-05.21

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I see you as having more in common with a marathon runner than a sprinter. Your best qualities tend to emerge when you’re committed to a process that takes a while to unfold. Learning to pace yourself is a crucial life lesson. That’s how you get attuned to your body’s signals and master the art of caring for your physical needs. That’s also how you come to understand that it’s important not to compare yourself constantly to the progress other people are making. Having said all that, Taurus, I want to recommend a temporary exception to the rule. Just for now, it may make sense for you to run fast for a short time.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you fling handfuls of zucchini seeds on the ground of a vacant lot today, you shouldn’t expect neat rows of ripe cucumbers to be growing in your backyard in a couple of weeks. Even if you fling zucchini seeds in your backyard today, you shouldn’t expect straight rows of cucumbers to be growing there by June 1. Let’s get even more precise here. If you carefully plant zucchini seeds in neat rows in your backyard today, you should not expect ripe cucumbers to sprout by August. But here’s the kicker: If you carefully plant cucumbers seeds in your backyard today, and weed them and water them as they grow, you can indeed expect ripe cucumbers by August.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “If we want the rewards of being loved,” says cartoonist Tim Kreider, “we have to submit to the mortifying ordeal of being known.” How are you doing with this trade-off, Cancerian? Being a Crab myself, I know we are sometimes inclined to hide who we really are. We have mixed feelings about becoming vulnerable and available enough to be fully known by others. We might even choose to live without the love we crave so as to prop up the illusion of strength that comes from being mysterious, from concealing our depths. The coming weeks will be a good time for you to revisit this conundrum.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There’s a piece of art on the moon: a ceramic disc inscribed with six drawings by noted American artists. It was carried on the landing module of the Apollo 12 mission, which delivered two astronauts to the lunar surface in November 1969. One of the artists, Leo maverick Andy Warhol, drew the image of a stylized penis, similar to what you might see on the wall of a public restroom. “He was being the terrible bad boy,” the project’s organizer said about Warhol’s contribution. You know me, Leo. I usually love playful acts of rebellion. But in the coming weeks, I advise against taking Warhol’s approach. If you’re called on to add your self-expression to a big undertaking, tilt in the direction of sincerity and reverence and dignity.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planet we live on is in constant transformation. Nothing ever stays the same. To succeed, let alone survive, we need to acclimate ourselves to the relentless forward motion. “He not busy being born is busy dying,” was Bob Dylan’s way of framing our challenge. How are you doing with this aspect of life, Virgo? Do you hate it but deal with it grudgingly? Tolerate it and aspire to be a master of it someday? Whatever your current attitude is, I’m here to tell you that in the coming months you could become much more

comfortable with the ceaseless flow — and even learn to enjoy it. Are you ready to begin?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “It isn’t that I don’t like sweet disorder,” said English author Vita Sackville-West, “but it has to be judiciously arranged.” That’s your theme for the week, Libra. Please respect how precise a formulation this is. Plain old ordinary disorder will not provide you with the epiphanies and breakthroughs you deserve and need. The disorder must be sweet. If it doesn’t make you feel at least a little excited and more in love with life, avoid it. The disorder must also be judiciously arranged. What that means is that it can’t be loud or vulgar or profane. Rather, it must have wit and style and a hint of crazy wisdom.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

I have three sets of questions for you, Scorpio. First, are you anyone’s muse? Is there a person who draws inspiration from the way you live? Here’s my second query: Are you strong medicine for anyone? Are you the source of riddles that confound and intrigue them, compelling them to outgrow their narrow perspectives? Here’s my third inquiry: Are you anyone’s teacher? Are you an influence that educates someone about the meaning of life? If you do play any of these roles, Scorpio, they are about to heat up and transform. If you don’t currently serve at least one of these functions, there’s a good chance you will start to soon.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There’s a slightly better chance than usual that you will have a whirlwind affair with a Bollywood movie star who’s on vacation. The odds are also higher than normal that you will receive a tempting invitation from a secret admirer, or meet the soul twin you didn’t even know you were searching for, or get an accidental text message from a stranger who turns out to be the reincarnation of your beloved from a previous lifetime. But the likelihood of all those scenarios pales in comparison to the possibility that you will learn big secrets about how to make yourself even more lovable than you already are.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Author Eva Dane defines writer’s block as what happens “when your imaginary friends stop talking to you.” I suspect that something like this has been happening for you lately, Pisces — even if you’re not a writer. What I mean is that some of the most reliable and sympathetic voices in your head have grown quiet: ancestors, dear friends who are no longer in your life, ex-lovers you still have

feelings for, former teachers who have remained a strong presence in your imagination, animals you once cared for who have departed, and maybe even some good, old-fashioned spirits and angels. Where did they go? What happened to them? I suspect they are merely taking a break. They may have thought it wise to let you fend for yourself for a while. But don’t worry. They will be back soon.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): When the path ahead divides in two, Aries, I am hoping you can work some magic that will allow you to take both ways at once. If you do master this riddle, if you can creatively figure out how to split yourself without doing any harm, I have a strong suspicion that the two paths will once again come together no later than Aug. 1, possibly before. But due to a curious quirk in the laws of life, the two forks will never again converge if you follow just one of them now. What’s the thing you lost that should stay lost? What’s the thing you lost that you should find? FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): According to my reading of the astrological omens, you should draw inspiration from this Chinese proverb: “Never do anything standing that you can do sitting, or anything sitting that you can do lying down.” In other words, Sagittarius, you need extra downtime. So please say NO to any influence that says, “Do it now! Be maniacally efficient! Multi-task as if your life depended on it! The more active you are the more successful you will be!” Instead, give yourself ample opportunity to play and daydream and ruminate.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In Raymond Chandler’s pulp-fiction novel Farewell, My Lovely, his main character is detective Philip Marlowe. At one point Marlowe says, “I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a home in the country. What I had was a coat, a hat and a gun.” In accordance with your astrological omens, Capricorn, I’m asking you to figure out how you might be like Marlowe. Are there differences between what you think you need and what you actually have? If so, now is an excellent time to launch initiatives to fix the discrepancies.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

WORK

WORK

PAGE STUDIES

SERVICES

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LIVE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

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DIRECTV

Shiloh Grill

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WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

is currently recruiting for the following position in Pittsburgh:

Ad Sales Assistant If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112.

412-969-2626

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

HELP WANTED

ARTISTS WANTED

Carpenter Wanted

CALLING ALL ARTISTS!!

for carpentry work, Full or Part Time. Drivers license required.

Decorate Kegerators!! 2 free Big Pour tickets, Email for details: info@constructionjunction.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES $1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014 www.publicallies.org/apply

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

is Hiring Cooks! Experience in multiple kitchen line positions preferred. Fast-paced upscale casual dining. Apply in person M-F btw 2-5pm. 123 Shiloh St Mt Washington

Your ad could be here

Company Drivers:

Owner-Operators:

• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

To apply online, visit: www.directv. com/careers. EOE.

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

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HELP WANTED Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

PAGE WELLNESS

HELP WANTED AVON - Earn extra income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888-770-1075 (M-F 9-7 & Sat 9-1 central.) (Ind Sls Rep)

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

412-657-5558

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HELP WANTED Helper wanted for small trucking company in Monroeville Area. Some cleaning and paperwork. 1 day/wk.

800-871-4581 TheKAG.com 412.316.3342

Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program / Kit. Effective results begin after spray dies. Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

GENERAL FOR SALE

LIVE

STORAGE

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

SERVICES

CLASSES

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

STUDIES

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICES

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

CAR FOR SALE

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396

A DO P T I O N

REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

FOR SALE

Protect Your Home-ADT Authorized Dealer: Burglary, Fire, and Emergency Alerts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! CALL TODAY, INSTALLED TOMORROW! 888-6413452 (AAN CAN)

Low original miles, 4 speed manual,

$9500 jensey5@outlook.com

717-508-7142

Adoring, Financially Secure Couple Yearn for 1st Baby to Love, Adore, & Devote our lives. Expenses Paid Christine & Greg

1-800-562-8287

Rent -A- Bay for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

GRASS FED BEEF LOCALLY RAISED

ORGANIC CUSTOM ORDER PITTSBURGER HIGHLAND FARM

412-585-2227 PITTSBURGHERHIGHLANDFARM.COM

STUDIES

STUDIES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

STUDIES

UTERINE FIBROIDS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

/ PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

LEGAL NOTICES

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD

Your ad could be here

Regular Board Meeting Location Change Tuesday 05/27/14 @ 6:00 p.m. Hazelwood Senior Center 5344 Second Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15207

LOCATION CHANGED TO: Saint Stephen Catholic Church 5115 Second Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15207

SAME DATE AND TIME Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

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MASSAGE

MASSAGE

China Massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy

$60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

MASSAGE

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

WELLNESS

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077 MASSAGE

STAR

MASSAGE

massage BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown

WELLNESS CENTER

412-401-4110

Chinese Bodyworks

322 Fourth Ave.

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Open 24 hrs

Grand Opening

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

Xie LiHong’s

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Xin Sui Bodyworks

Therapy

Superior Chinese Massage

MASSAGE

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

Monessen Office Now Open! 1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Please Call: 724-684-4890 Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.14/05.21.2014


Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Recovery Without Judgement™

SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION LF SEAY P

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406

Let Us Help You Today!

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

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412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Help is Available!

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Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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May 14, 2014