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2014 DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION GUIDE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014


{EDITORIAL}

05.07/05.14.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO, DAN WILLIS

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[NEWS] EWS] think this is bad, what happens 06 “Ifwhenwehe’s up against Tom Corbett and the Republican smear machine?” — Chris Zurawsky of the 14th Ward Independent Democrats on negative attacks against gubernatorial frontrunner Tom Wolf

[TASTE]

soubise featured some of 20 “Scallops the most succulent, tenderly seared scallops we have ever tasted.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Hartwood Restaurant

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“We are simultaneously dependent on and flagrant with water; we enjoy it and neglect it.” — Al Hoff on Edward Burtynsky and Jennifer Baichwal’s new film essay Watermark

[ARTS] photography that tells us 39 “The the most about architecture is the photography that is not really about architecture at all.” — Charles Rosenblum on the Carnegie’s Architecture + Photography exhibit

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 N E W S

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INCOMING

“TOM WOLF HAS A GREAT STORY TO TELL AND HE’S GOT THE MONEY TO GO OUT AND TELL IT.”

Tickets for Rides: PUC cites ride-share drivers (April 30) “Anyone who can pass a simple background check should get a license at little or no expense. The taxi monopoly is strangling this city, and forcing people to own cars who might not otherwise do so.” — Web comment from “Dan Sullivan”

The Callery pear tree has come ... when it will finish is another question (April 25, online only) There is a whole corridor of these trees in Regent Square and the stench is appalling. I pity the restaurants with outdoor dining in that area.” — Web comment from “Tim Schwarz”

The much-maligned grasshopper bounces back at Pittsburgh bars (April 9) “A grasshopper walked into a bar. The bartender said, ‘You know there’s a drink named after you?’ The grasshopper said, ‘There’s a drink named Steve?’” — Web comment from “Sean Hart”

“For the conspiracy buffs out there, I stepped on a Toynbee Tile on Smithfield Street while finishing up my part of the #pittsburghmarathon”

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Wolf tours Bloomfield with Allegheny County Chief Executive Rich Fitzgerald and Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto last month.

WOLF AT THE DOOR T

HE TOM WOLF on the other end of

— May 4 tweet from “Joey Pittsburgh” (@joey_pittsburgh)

“Mile 19.2-ish: I really wish that purple unicorn would stop following me. #PGHMarathon” — May 4 tweet from John Wenskovitch (@wickedsweetcake) as he ran the Pittsburgh Marathon

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the phone line May 2 was markedly different from the happy-go-lucky Democratic frontrunner who had been campaigning for governor in Bloomfield 10 days earlier. There he’d been enjoying a pepperoni roll from the Groceria Italiana while talking to veterans, small-business owners and community stakeholders. “I admire what you’ve built here,” he told them, noting that he wants to redevelop struggling communities into walkable mixeduse neighborhoods like Bloomfield. “And what’s great is you’re not just sustaining: You’re still building.” In attendance were two of his earliest

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

and most important backers: Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, who lauded Wolf

Polls have Tom Wolf running away with Democratic primary, but is he the right candidate to take down Corbett in November? {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} for “sharing our values when it comes to hard work, rewarding work. And that’s what attracted Bill and I and many others to support Tom.”

But over the next 10 days, Wolf’s campaign would be accused, with reason, of plagiarizing portions of its policy plan. He’d be criticized for ties to a former state rep caught up in the “Bonusgate” scandal, while having his business practices called into question by U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz, one of his opponents. Then another rival, state Treasurer Rob McCord, would accuse him of coddling a racist former mayor in his own hometown. “I think I expected more of this type of thing in the general election than I did in the primary,” Wolf told City Paper a day after McCord aired an ad focusing on the allegation. “I guess this model of politics is the standard fare right now.”


Some big-name Democratic Party leaders, including former Gov. Ed Rendell, have come out swinging to defend Wolf. But for some Democrats, the allegations raise concerns about Wolf’s unlikely rise, which was launched with TV ads bought with the help of $10 million in self-financing. Chris Zurawsky, secretary of Squirrel Hill’s 14th Ward Independent Democratic Club, says he had heard good things about Wolf early on, and that Wolf came across as “a breath of fresh air.” Still, “I am bothered by the fact that he is financing his own campaign,” Zurawsky says. “It’s undemocratic and it has that feeling of allowing the person with the most money to simply step into public office.” And Zurawsky worries what else may be in store. “If we think this is bad, what happens when he’s up against [Republican incumbent] Tom Corbett and the Republican smear machine?” Zurawsky wonders. “I just don’t know if he’s up for that kind of fight. He seems tired of it already.” Can a political outsider — one who has never run statewide and who comes off more like a high school science teacher than a politician — stand up to the rigors of a general election? The answer may be irrelevant, some experts say, because Wolf’s momentum may be impossible to overcome … at least in May. Even after days of negative ads and debate attacks, a May 1 a poll from the Allentown Morning Call still showed Wolf a whopping 25 points ahead of Schwartz, his closest competitor. And while one-third of Democratic voters remained undecided, the consensus behind Wolf has been building: 42 percent said they were leaning toward Wolf. “Even after all of this, Tom Wolf is still 25 points ahead,” says G. Terry Madonna, pollster and director of the Center for Politics and Public Affairs at Franklin & Marshall College. And there may be fewer undecided votes up for grabs than it appears, he says: “One thing we know traditionally about undecided voters is that a large percentage of them will not vote.” “In order to beat Wolf, you have to find something to pull him back into the pack, and that’s tough to do when you have a group of candidates who agree on 90 percent of the issues,” Madonna adds. “Then, you have to do something to pick up a good chunk of that support in order to overtake him. At this point, with three

weeks left to do it, I don’t know if it can be done.” ALTHOUGH IT seems funny to say that a

frontrunner with a 25 percent lead came out of nowhere, that’s the case with Wolf. As of Jan. 26, when Wolf appeared as one candidate among eight at a Carnegie Mellon University debate, Wolf was as anonymous as Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski or minister/businessman Max Myers. While he answered all the questions fully and confidently, he did little to set himself apart from the crowd, especially compared to others on the stage. Shortly afterward, though, Wolf began running television commercials highlighting his story. He was a Jeep-driving businessman who’d run and rescued a family-owned furniture company, and whose employees participated in a generous profit-sharing program. Making the ads even more effective was the fact that no one challenged them. His opponents stayed off television for weeks. “Tom Wolf has a great story to tell and he’s got the money to go out and tell it,” Rendell tells CP. “He got on TV early and by the time anyone else did, it was pretty well over. “That was a gigantic political blunder by McCord and Schwartz. They let him go on TV for seven or eight weeks unanswered. The momentum you can build is amazing.” Duquesne law professor and political pundit Joseph Sabino Mistick says Wolf followed the playbook that Rendell himself used against Bob Casey during his 2002 gubernatorial run. “He bought broad and deep,” Mistick says. “But what’s refreshing here is [Wolf] actually had a story to tell, and it’s a story that people find appealing. That’s why so many politicians and voters were drawn to him so quickly.” Mistick says he was skeptical of Wolf at first, but people “told me I had to check him out. So I met with him and I said, ‘How the hell do you expect to get elected with zero experience and no political infrastructure?’ He said, ‘I have a message and a story to tell.’ Well, it’s been working.” Republican political consultant Bill Green agrees that Wolf has delivered his message better than any of the other candidates — in either party. “His timing was perfect,” Green says. “In January and February, we were all locked inside and frozen and he had the airwaves all to himself. No one responded. And it worked. I’ve had

ALL ABOARD!

“IF WE THINK THIS IS BAD, WHAT HAPPENS WHEN HE’S UP AGAINST TOM CORBETT AND THE REPUBLICAN SMEAR MACHINE?”

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CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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WOLF AT THE DOOR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

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people recite that commercial back to me word-for-word.” Another plus for Wolf has been the broad support he’s received from politicians across the state. On March 8, a huge coalition of local politicians showed their support for Wolf, with backers crossing factional lines. Fitzgerald and Peduto were there, of course, but so were some of their occasional political opponents, like state Rep. Jake Wheatley and state Sen. Jim Ferlo. “That Saturday was really a big deal for Tom Wolf,” adds Green. Still, it’s not like Wolf commands all the leverage in the party. Schwartz, who was the frontrunner in the race’s early days, has a strong mix of support from labor as well as from women’s groups like Planned Parenthood and Emily���s List. And what major labor endorsements Schwartz doesn’t have likely belong to either McCord or Katie McGinty, who served as the top environmental official in Rendell’s cabinet. McCord especially spent time early in the race setting up infrastructure in southwest Pennsylvania, and reaped some support of his own. The Pittsburgh Firefighters backed him, as has City Controller Michael Lamb and the 14th Ward Club. Firefighters political director Darrin Kelly says Democrats “have four great candidates,” but McCord earned support due to “passionate support for workers and his belief that defined-benefit plans [as opposed to 401ks] actually save taxpayers money in the long run.” Wolf has “a great story,” Kelly says, but the fact that his company’s workforce was non-union “spurred curiosity” among members. And McCord “resonates best with the membership.” By comparison, the soft-spoken Wolf is short on experience as a retail politician. And it remains to be seen whether he’ll have the fire to engage in an all-out battle with the extremely vulnerable Corbett. National pundits consistently rank Corbett among the country’s most vulnerable governors. But Mistick says it would be a mistake to take him lightly: “Tom Corbett has horribly sagging poll numbers, but the incumbent is the one guy with the power to actually do something for the voters that could actually fix those numbers.” So far, the Corbett campaign has focused on trying to bring Wolf’s numbers down. The campaign has been raising

questions about Wolf’s business dealings and demanding he produce 10 years of personal- and corporate-tax returns. The company had stumbled after Wolf cashed out, in 2006; he repurchased it in 2010, and stabilized the business. So far, Wolf has met the challenges head-on. Asked about Corbett’s demands during his Bloomfield visit, Wolf replied, “What did I put out, four years? I’ve tried to be as open and as transparent as I possibly can. I have a private company and I’ve opened up the books. People wanted to see the profit-sharing, I’ve opened that up. I’ve opened up the tax returns, I’ve opened up my loan [Wolf borrowed $4.5 million to help fund his campaign]. … I’m doing everything I think I ought to be doing to be transparent.” And if the response to attacks from fellow Democrats are any indication, Wolf has some fire beneath the gentle appearance.

“WHILE WE ARE ACCUSTOMED TO MUCH BOLDER APPROACHES TO A CAMPAIGN, HIS LAID-BACK STYLE HAS CAUGHT THE IMAGINATION OF THE PUBLIC.”

THE SHARPEST criticism

has come from McCord, who has blasted Wolf’s relationship with former York Mayor Charlie Robertson, a former police officer in the city. Back in 2001, Robertson was an incumbent, running for re-election; Wolf chaired his campaign. Two days after winning the 2001 primary, Robertson was arrested and charged along with two others in the death of a young African-American woman during a 1969 race riot. Robertson, who admitted to holding racist beliefs at the time, was ultimately acquitted; the other men were convicted of seconddegree murder. “Why would he chair the campaign of a man arrested for his role in a race riot,” the ad asked — “one that left a black woman dead?” McCord has said that while he doesn’t believe Wolf is racist, he should have severed ties with the campaign immediately. (Robertson dropped out of the race soon after being arrested.) His campaign points to a statement attributed to Wolf in the York Daily Register after Robertson’s address: “I was his campaign chairman during the primary and if he wants me to do it in the general, I am willing to,” the paper quotes Wolf saying. Wolf says he was involved with a York civic group, Better York, and that in 2001 he was the honorary chair of Robertson’s campaign. Within two days after the primary, Robertson was arrested and CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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WOLF AT THE DOOR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

presents

PofE T the WEEK

the campaign ended, “and that was my so-called relationship with him.” Wolf says he had no knowledge of Robertson’s alleged connection to the 1969 murder until the arrest. “In 1969, I was in the Peace Corp in India,” Wolf says now. Wolf has launched counter-ads featuring prominent African Americans in the York community — like current Mayor Kim Bracey — and outside it. During a conference call with reporters May 2, state Rep. Jake Wheatley, who represents the Hill District, said that he finds McCord’s attack “very problematic” and that when “someone wants to willy-nilly apply [race] as a political maneuver and for political gain, it really upsets me and angers me.” And so far, at least, McCord’s attack seems to have solidified political support behind Wolf. Although Rendell is not endorsing any of the Democrats, he held a May 3 press conference calling McCord’s ad “one of the worst I have ever seen.” “This ad is offensive,” U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, who is also not endorsing a candidate, said in a statement. “I hope it will be taken down.” Fitzgerald also released a statement May 5 saying, “The actions of the McCord campaign are disappointing, desperate and will backfire with the voters who know better.” For his part, McCord held a press conference to say he would continue to use the ad. According to the website PoliticsPA, McCord said, “I, for one, worry about his

[Wolf’s] ability to make the tough calls.” Madonna says McCord is “trying to make it an issue of judgment,” rather than one of racism. But Wolf sounds stung either way. “I have always focused myself and my company on diversity and moving the cause of racial justice forward,” he says. “I don’t know what Rob is trying to do with this. But what he’s saying is not true and it makes me angry.” Adding to the pain, Wolf says, is the fact that he and McCord had an amiable relationship before. McCord has “eaten dinner in my home,” Wolf says, and in 2008, during McCord’s first run for state treasurer, Wolf and his wife contributed $50,000 to McCord’s campaign, according to campaign-finance records from the Pa. Department of State. “Am I more hurt by the face value of the accusations or who they’re coming from?” Wolf asked. “That’s a good question.” It’s uncertain about whether the attacks will have an effect on Wolf. But it does bring up the question lurking in the back of Democrats’ minds: Do we know enough about Wolf, and does he have what it takes? “I’ve heard the question: ‘Does he have the gravitas?’” Mistick says. “While we are accustomed to much bolder approaches to a campaign, his laid-back style has caught the imagination of the public. He’s got a great story to tell.” There’s a lot more yet to be written. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

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★ PENNSYLVANIA GOVERNOR ★

THE KIDS ARE ALL LEFT

The four Democrats in this race are all starkly different from incumbent Republican Tom Corbett, but share a lot of similarities with one another. They all skew to the left, and all pledge to reverse cuts to education under Corbett’s tenure. But there are some differences that help distinguish them.

ALLYSON SCHWARTZ

TOM WOLF

One of 10 siblings from northeast Philadelphia, McGinty was the first in her family to graduate from college, ultimately getting a law degree from Columbia University. She has worked on environmental policy for thenSen. Al Gore and President Bill Clinton, later heading the Pa. Department of Environmental Protection under Gov. Ed Rendell.

Schwartz served as executive director of a Philadelphia women’s clinic for 13 years before her election to the state Senate in 1990, where she helped to establish CHiP, which offers health insurance to low-income kids. A Phillyarea congresswoman since 2004, she’s touting her support of the Affordable Care Act, though she previously faulted some provisions of it.

Born and raised in York, Pa., Wolf joined the Peace Corps at 19, attending Dartmouth and the University of London before getting a Ph.D. from MIT. Along with two cousins, he bought the family kitchen-cabinet business; after retiring to serve as state revenue secretary under Gov. Ed Rendell, he repurchased the struggling operation in 2010.

McCord says he’d seek to raise the minimum wage to $10.70 an hour with annual 10-cent increases; wages for tipped workers would rise to $5 from $2.83, at the same rate. McCord favors tightening tax loopholes that businesses can enjoy by incorporating out of state.

McGinty is the only candidate proposing the same minimum wage for both hourly and tipped workers: $10.10 an hour for each. She’d also increase the income threshold for receiving forgiveness on state income taxes, helping lower-income families by granting a $12,000 exemption for each child.

Schwartz argues the minimum wage should be increased to $10.10 an hour, and $7 for tipped workers. She’d also seek to establish a “$30 million capitalized loan pool to provide manufacturers and other businesses with access to growth capital.”

Wolf supports a minimum-wage hike to $10.10 per hour, $7 for tipped workers. He also favors “shift[ing] the tax burden to wealthier Pennsylvanians”: Much like a homestead exemption for realestate taxes, he’d provide personal exemptions to the state’s income tax, excluding a portion of earnings while raising the rate overall.

McCord says he’d seek to increase funding for pre-K and restore full-day kindergarten in all districts. He’s also a critic of standardized testing, saying students should not be “marching to the drummer of the testing industry.” As for the Keystone Exams students need for graduation, “I’d scrap ’em.”

McGinty favors earmarking revenue from her proposed drilling tax for education, and would increase funding for pre-K programs. Says there “may be some good things in Common Core” — a controversial effort to establish nationwide academic standards — but says “we should just get out of the way” of teachers.

Schwartz says standardized tests should not be the only factor in measuring achievement, but favors keeping the Keystone Exam; Common Core standards “should be given a chance to work.” She says she’d also develop a fair-funding formula for all districts, though she has provided few details.

Wolf says education should be focused from the “cradle to the career” with private/public funding for expanded pre-K programs. He says he’d increase state funding to districts, both to provide property-tax relief, and to help institute a fairfunding formula that would help “disadvantaged schools.”

McCord favors a 10 percent severance tax on drillers and would eliminate the current impact fee; he’s against fracking in state forests. He’d seek to repeal and replace Act 13, the state drilling law found flawed by the state Supreme Court, and he’d bar the DEP from issuing exceptions to environmental regulations.

McGinty backs a 5 percent severance tax on drillers, but would keep impact fee, which benefits local municipalities where drilling occurs. She opposes fracking in state forests, and would repeal a “gag order” on doctors who, under a currently challenged law, are constrained in speaking about issues relations to fracking-chemical exposure.

Schwartz favors a 5 percent severance tax on drillers while keeping the current impact fee, earmarking the new revenue for education, transportation and clean energy. She opposes fracking on state lands, and favors an independent office to handle citizen complaints about fracking. Still, she’d encourage training veterans to hold jobs in the shale industry.

Wolf would swap the current impact fee on drillers for a 5 percent severance tax. Like the other candidates, he opposes fracking in state forest lands, while pledging to increase funding of DEP to increase enforcement. Wolf says he’d leverage the shale industry to bring spin-off manufacturing jobs to spur job creation.

McCord is backed heavily by unions, from trade locals to the state teachers union. Local supporters include City Controller Michael Lamb, the 14th Ward Independent Democrats and LGBT advocates Steel City Stonewall Democrats. He also boasts some big donors like Al Lord, a former Sallie Mae head and Penn State trustee, who gave $500,000.

McGinty is endorsed by former Vice President Al Gore and the union representing Allegheny County transit workers. Some of McGinty’s contributions come from energy companies — not just those dealing in renewables, but also coal, oil and gas and electricity. She returned $40,000 from an exec tied to a West Virginia chemical spill.

Schwartz is backed by women’s rights groups Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania and Emily’s List, which has donated more than $350,000. Supported by labor from Teamsters locals, several trade unions and the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers. Among local supporters are state Sen. Jay Costa and former Mayor Tom Murphy.

Wolf is a favorite of local politicians, including the Peduto-Fitzgerald alliance and some of its foes, like state Sen. Jim Ferlo and state Rep. Jake Wheatley. Wolf self-funded his campaign with a $10 million bank loan, but has also received help from the likes of York businessman Thomas Grumbacher, who contributed $1 million.

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS

MARCELLUS SHALE

BIOGRAPHY

Educated at Harvard and the Wharton School of Business, McCord co-founded two firms that invested in technology. In 2008, he was elected state treasurer, making him the only Dem to have won a statewide contest. He boasts of streamlining the office, and used his post to fight Corbett’s attempt to privatize the state lottery.

ECONOMY

ROB MCCORD

KATE MCGINTY

EDUCATION

CANDIDATE

{COMPILED BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014


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at 30 participating locations ! See what’s new for Spring. Be inspired and stay refreshed at our tour’s Take a Break spots. This is a free & family-friendly event. Hours vary by stop location.

Sunday, May 11 10:30AM - 8:00PM $24.99 + tax

QUESTIONS? Call 412.683.6488 for more info or visit lvpgh.com.

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GRAND OPENING MAY 5 - 10

★ STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 20 ★

BOUNDARY DISPUTE

In a city/suburban match-up, school teacher Tom Michalow is challenging two-term incumbent Adam Ravenstahl, the brother of Pittsburgh’s former mayor. The district includes the suburbs of Avalon and Bellevue, along with the city’s North Side and Lawrenceville, plus portions of Ross Township. The winner is slated to face Republican Tom Fodi in November. {COMPILED BY CHRIS POTTER}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

BIOGRAPHY

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SOCIAL ISSUES

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Ravenstahl, of Summer Hill, hails from a political family — his grandfather was a state legislator too — but originally worked in the private sector, holding down a financial post at UPMC. He was first elected in 2010, and while some have faulted his lack of visibility, colleagues say he is being unfairly tarred by association with his often-disengaged brother.

Michalow has long been a vocal supporter of abortion rights and same-sex marriage rights. That track record has ensured his repeated success garnering the Gertrude Stein Political Club endorsement, as well as support from the Steel City Stonewall Democrats, a local LGBT advocacy organization.

Ravenstahl is opposed to abortion except in cases of rape, incest or a threat to the health of the mother. But while he previously opposed gay marriage while favoring civil unions, he now favors same-sex marriage rights. He’s earned the backing of statewide LGBT group EqualityPA.

Though Michalow was not in office when the legislature voted for Act 89, last year’s transportationfunding bill, he calls Ravenstahl’s vote against it “a vote against his district.” State roads get poor grades for upkeep, Michalow notes, and “there are neighborhoods that depend on public transportation.”

Ravenstahl voted against last year’s transportation-funding bill, because, he says, he objected to taxing drivers instead of corporations, and to a provision limiting “prevailing wage” requirements on smaller construction projects. While the change will effect only a handful of small-dollar projects, Ravenstahl says “a compromise could have been reached” instead.

While Michalow allows that Ravenstahl has voted in line with teachers, he pledges to “give you a vote and a voice.” He promises to be a vocal advocate for public education, while opposing the state’s growing reliance on standardized testing.

Ravenstahl has opposed funding cuts to public education and voted in line with teachers unions; that, and the fact that he’s an incumbent, have led the city’s teachers, and a statewide union of educators elsewhere, to endorse him.

Michalow has received backing from some progressive groups aligned with Mayor Bill Peduto, including Clean Water Action, the Gertrude Stein Political Club and the Laborers (who have long opposed all things Ravenstahl). But many local officials and groups have either backed the incumbent or remained on the sidelines.

Ravenstahl narrowly won the backing of the Allegheny County Democratic Committee, and has won backing from the Allegheny County Labor Council and other unions. A handful of Ravenstahl’s Democratic colleagues have backed him, and his brother has helped too, forgiving a $26,000 loan that helped finance the 2010 campaign.

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A teacher in the Northgate School District, Michalow has served as a borough councilor in Avalon, where he lives. While he and Ravenstahl share some convictions, Michalow contends that Ravenstahl is too often a “non-entity”; Michalow says that even as a part-time official, he’s been highly engaged on issues like pollution from a nearby coke plant.

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W NOPEN O

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Reservations being taken for the following times: 11-1pm, 1-3pm, and 3-5pm

$25 per person Required deposit covers you and mom, studio fee for two (normally $9 each) and all you can eat catered specialty teas, pastries and hors d’oeuvres! Additional guests $12 each. Price does not include pottery.

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Reserve your table for this event

at either of our TWO locations today!! South Hills Village Squirrel Hill Pittsburgh, PA 15241 5887 Forbes Ave. 412-835-1074

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Pittsburgh, PA 1527

412-421-2909

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★ STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 36 ★

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

GOING SOUTH

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: MONDAY, MAY 12, 6:00 -7:30PM

HOME BUYING BY DOLLAR BANK

The redrawn boundaries of the 36th District, which includes Pittsburgh’s South Hills as well as Baldwin and Brentwood, have brought Rep. Harry Readshaw a challenger for the first time in his 20-year career. First-term Rep. Erin Molchany is running as a new, progressive alternative in a district that is mostly Readshaw’s turf … and she’s getting some help.

Join us for a FREE HOME BUYING WORKSHOP. We’ll show you how you can own your own home. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

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THERE IS LIFE AFTER LIFE Visit i i the upcoming i SPIRIT FAIR 2014 for a SOUL adventure!

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BIOGRAPHY

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A Carrick native and Marine veteran who also runs a familyowned funeral home, Readshaw was first elected in 1995. He has generally shunned the spotlight in office, but touts his expertise at bringing home tax dollars to support park development and other public projects.

SOCIAL ISSUES

CLINICAL TRIALS

Molchany, of Mount Washington, was elected to the 22nd District in 2012, when it was already clear her district would be combined with Readshaw’s. Prior to taking office, she worked in nonprofits including Planned Parenthood, and later ran the Pittsburgh Urban Magnet Project, which focused on attracting young professionals to the city. The lone female legislator from Allegheny County, Molchany has been a vocal proponent of genderequality and women’s health legislation: In January, for example, she sponsored a measure tightening equal-pay requirements for female workers. She backs same-sex marriage rights and legislation firming up access to women’s health clinics.

While Readshaw has co-sponsored Molchany’s equal-pay measure, he’s generally opposed abortion rights, and at one point sponsored a controversial “forced ultrasound” bill. (He later withdrew his backing.) Though he supports a bill to prohibit discrimination against LGBT Pennsylvanians, he opposes same-sex marriage, citing “spiritual” reasons.

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In this campaign’s highest-octane issue, Molchany backed Act 89 of 2013, which funded mass transit and road repair by raising fees on drivers and a tax on gas wholesalers. Molchany notes that without the vote, Pittsburgh faced a one-third cut in bus service, which many communities in the district rely on.

Readshaw opposed Act 89, saying Democrats should have pushed to tax natural-gas drillers instead, despite opposition to such a tax among Republicans, who control state government. Readshaw has drawn fire for airing ads characterizing Act 89 as a tax hike to boost transit in Philadelphia, without mentioning benefits for Pittsburgh and other areas.

Molchany has previously been backed by gun-control advocacy group CeaseFire PA, and she has co-sponsored a bill, HB1010, that would expand mandatory background checks to cover rifles and other “long guns.” State law currently exempts the private sale of such guns from background checks.

Readshaw, who has been endorsed by the National Rifle Association, has generally been hostile to gun-control legislation. Asked about expanding background checks at an April 15 forum, Readshaw said, “When you’re sworn to uphold the Constitution, nowhere does it say, ‘Harry, do whatever you want to.’”

Molchany launched her campaign with backing from Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, and other members of the county’s ruling coalition. She has also been backed by progressive unions like SEIU, as well as socially liberal groups like Planned Parenthood and EqualityPA.

Readshaw has been endorsed by the Allegheny County Democratic Committee and the Allegheny County Labor Council, as well as by more moderate unions including Electrical Workers Local 5, which gave him $10,000 in March. He’s also been helped by fellow funeralhome directors.

Private readings available with celebrated local mediums Healing Arts, Gifts, Books, Oils and Herbs Aura Photography Sponsored by the 1st Spiritualist Church of Greater Pittsburgh www.facebook.com/PittsburghSpiritualistChurch

The Royal Place Banquet Hall • 2660 Library Road • Pittsburgh, PA 15216 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

FRIENDS AND SUPPORTERS

$10 Admission includes gallery readings, workshops and Flower Séance

16

ERIN MOLCHANY

HARRY READSHAW

GUNS

Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2014

{COMPILED BY CHRIS POTTER}

412-471-5808

CANDIDATE

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Tuesday, May 20 7- 9Pm

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Location: Color Me Mine Date: Friday, May 23rd Time: 6:30pm - 8:30pm Attire: Wear your favorite Tutu & Tiara! Cost: $35 Per Person More: Ages 6+, Siblings recieve $5 discount

Invited

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Color Me Mine

The Paint-It-Yourself Ceramics Studio

www.pittsburgh.colormemine.com 5887 Forbes Avenue, 15217 412-421-2909 www.southhill.colormemine.com 301 South Hills Village, 15241 412-854-1074

BABUSHKAS, HARD HATS & CARRIE FURNACES TOUR Enjoy the magical mix of immigrants and industry! Tour highlights include a historic steel mill Pump House, a steel-heritage museum, awe-inspiring blast furnaces and much more!

SATURDAYS: JULY 12, AUGUST 9,

SEPTEMBER 6 AND OCTOBER 11

www.coachride.com 1-800-342-2349

CARRIE BLAST FURNACES TOUR

Experience the scale and awe-inspiring Carrie Blast Furnaces! Learn the entire iron-making process, with a tour led by a retired steelworker, and why Pittsburgh was once the steelmaking capitol of the world! Shuttle service provided by Lenzner 10:30 a.m. Saturdays.

WWW.RIVERSOFSTEEL.COM N E W S

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

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AT THE NUIN CENTER 5655 Bryant Street, Highland Park THURSDAYS: MAY 22, 29, JUNE 5, 12 - 6:30PM - 8:30PM OR SATURDAYS: MAY 31, JUNE 7, 14 & 21 - 10:00AM - 12:00PM

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DE

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HARTWOOD IS A RESTAURANT THAT PULLS OFF BEING BOTH UPSCALE AND CASUAL

PRESS FOR JUICE {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Opening a juice store was a logical step for Naomi and Zeb Homison, two siblings who were raised vegetarian. Their new endeavor, Pittsburgh Juice Company, opened in February, in the same Lawrenceville building as Zeb Homison’s Bikram yoga studio. “This setup is very common in a lot of cities, and it’s something Pittsburgh has been behind on,” Naomi Homison says of the store’s paring with the studio. PJC specializes in cold-pressed juices instead of using heat and highpressure processes. Their products only have a three-day shelf life, because they are made from raw ingredients with no preservatives. “There are a lot of nutrients and enzymes available to us in raw foods,” Naomi Homison says. “Anytime you actually preserve the shelf life of a juice, you actually kill the enzymes which are the essence of our juice.” Their menu includes the refreshing Berry Watermelon drink and vegetablepacked Super Green with a cucumber base, kale, celery, lemon and ginger. But the store isn’t all about juice: PJC also offers coconut water and almond milk. Drink prices range from $6-7. “The idea is, it doesn’t have to taste bad to be good for you,” Naomi Homison says. The store also offers two juice-cleanse programs, one for beginners and the other for more experienced juicers. Both programs include six drinks per day such as a Power Berry Smoothie, Carrot Apple Ginger and Almond Milk. Program prices vary depending on duration. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3418 Penn Ave, Lawrenceville. 412-5865060 or www.pittsburghjuicecompany.com

the

FEED

Mark ark the calendar for Food ood

Revolution tion Day, held 3-66 p.m.

Fri., Mayy 16, at Obama Academy emy for International Studies, Studies in East Liberty. The free event will feature 20 of Pittsburgh’s top chefs working with Obama students to create a better school lunch (tastings available), plus loads of demonstrations, exhibits and activities. Eat better, live better — learn how. More info at www.foodrevpgh.com

CUISINE WITH CHARM {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

D

ECOR IS A slippery variable in the equation of memorable dining. Many restaurants have been designed with great care to ensure that the surroundings complement the meal; in others, a lack of decor seems to secure the experience almost to the same extent — who doesn’t have a favorite “hole in the wall” they’ve returned to repeatedly? And then, occasionally, a great space comes first, seeming to beg for the right restaurant for people to visit. In this category is Hartwood Restaurant in Glenshaw. Built to house the headquarters of the Harmar Coal Company, the building’s Victorian charm attracted a bookstore and café in the late 1980s, along with a lovingly curated collection of architectural salvage: mantels, stained-glass windows, even wrought-iron fences, all brought indoors to furnish a series of rooms that now serve as the restaurant’s dining rooms, each with its own unique character. Ours had real tree trunks rising from the flagstone floor to the vaulted ceiling, giving us the feeling of dining al fresco (which is possible, too, on Hart-

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Grilled flat-iron steak with mojo sauce, potato hash and spring vegetable medley

wood’s outdoor patio, in warmer weather). The shelves from the building’s bookstore days remain, complete with an eclectic library, and it’s fun to peruse the titles while waiting for menus, food and drinks.

HARTWOOD RESTAURANT 3400 Harts Run Road, Glenshaw. 412-767-3500 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. lunch 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; dinner 5-9:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads and sandwiches $8-15; entrees $14-34 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED To this idiosyncratic setting, chef Jonathan Holzer has brought something far more ambitious than a cafe, creating seasonal menus that are fresh and original. Hartwood is one of a few restaurants that can pull off being both upscale and casual at the same time, offering fare as elemental as shepherd’s pie (called “cottage pie” and made with shaved ribeye and Guinness) or as refined as scallops soubise.

The menu was lengthy, but the starters were few enough that we quickly chose two: pork dumplings and scallop tacos. The former were as stripped down as the latter were dressed up. Good, meaty, traditional Chinese-style pot stickers were served steamed with a black-pepper soy sauce, which could have used a little ginger or ponzu for brightening. We set them aside to focus on the tacos, which came in tiny, crisp shells filled with chopped sea scallops, eggplant “caviar” — a savory puree — and bright lemon crema. The tacos were accented with bits of chorizo cooked to the crispy texture of bacon, but with more intense flavor, and a bit of spicy piri piri sauce on the side really made these tasty morsels sing. If the tacos left any doubt as to Hartwood’s expertise with scallops, scallops soubise put it firmly to rest. Named after its sauce, which is essentially an onioninfused bechamel, this dish featured some of the best, most succulent, tenderly seared scallops we have ever tasted, enhanced by a complex sauce infused with smoked CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014


NEW FRESH MENU MADE

it Tastes as good as it sounds FIND D OUT WHAT ELSE IS PLAYING:

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CUISINE WITH CHARM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

onions and nutty Parmesan. A sweet-pea risotto was perfectly done, creamy with firm grains and bright green peas creating highlights. Sweet peas also made an appearance as filling, along with ricotta, in housemade ravioli. These were served in a simple brown-butter sauce with shaved Parmesan, sunflower seeds and balsamic-glazed carrots that stole the show with their almost citrusy astringency. A sea-salt-roasted beet and asparagus salad over peppery arugula, dressed with a white-truffle vinaigrette and scattered with earthy roasted pepitas and tangy gorgonzola cheese, tasted like a plate of pure spring.

Coconut-cream pie

We had quibbles with two basically successful dishes: fennel-crusted salmon, while crisp and flavorful without and beautifully translucent within, was unbalanced by too much salt, while a tender glazed pork chop was simply too rare. We were intrigued by the promise of a ginger-beer barbecue glaze on the chop, but sweet flavors dominated the rest. What rescued the dish were slivers of candied ginger, which offered ample zing to each bite. The bed of buttermilk mashed potatoes was superb, creamy and flavorful enough to hold up against the sauce. Unfortunately, roasted Brussels sprouts could have used a bit more time under the broiler; they were too lightly browned for really intense flavor. One of Hartwood’s rooms serves as Whispers Pub, an attractive tavern, and we tried a burger from its menu. Though served on a good Kaiser roll and made with beautiful Angus beef, it was seasoned too lightly; a sprinkle of salt helped a lot. Like the entrée list, the sandwich menu covered quite a bit of ground, from grilled salmon with pesto to a comforting classic tuna melt and that local institution, turkey Devonshire. At Hartwood Restaurant and Whispers Pub, both the food and the ambience are memorable. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TIME TRIALS At Cure, good things come to drinkers who wait Colin Anderson, the head bartender at Cure restaurant, is practicing patience. Here’s an example: The 27-year-old started experimenting with crafting his own amaro over a year ago, while he was still working at Bar Marco. I tried some a few weeks back, and it was magnificent. But Anderson isn’t ready to share it yet: “Give in another six months or a year,” he says, “and it’s going to blow your mind.” Indeed, much like his boss Justin Severino, Anderson’s alchemy hits the sweet spot at the crossroads of homespun techniques, contemporary vision and molecular gastronomy. “I’ve watched [Severino] so much, and I feel I’m at the point where I do what I’m doing and I’m confident that it fits with his vision,” Anderson says. Anderson says that a well-crafted drink should strike a balance between flavor, potency and visual appeal. “It’s best when you build with layers,” he says.

“I’VE BEEN LUCKY TO WORK AT PLACES THAT REALLY LET ME EXPLORE WHAT I WANT TO DO.” You can both taste and see that in his new spring cocktails. “Gin” is an artful blend of house-made vermouth that Anderson then infused with violets, roses and pansies, as well as fernet and an apricot liqueur made from last summer’s fruit. It’s garnished with a royal purple flower and caviar-like pearls of lime juice. In “Rum,” a dehydrated apple is “glued” to the side of the glass with a reduction of Negroni; a blood-orange foam adds a welcome jolt of acidity. Anderson credits his growth to Severino’s trust, and to the encouragement he found at his previous places of employment (Cross Keys Inn, Bar Marco). He also considers iconic Washington, D.C., barman Derek Brown a mentor. “Most bartenders never get the chance to fool around with this kind of stuff,” he says. “I’ve been lucky to work at places that really let me explore what I want to do.” And that’s why he can afford to be a little patient. “At this point I know what I want,” he says. “I’m really focused.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-2522595 or www.curepittsburgh.com


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Best Pizza in the’Burgh!

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections have included piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweetpotato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF BAR MARCO. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900. At this former firehouse-turnedrestaurant, a small but wellcurated menu makes a perfect complement to this venue’s wine and cocktail list. The tapasinspired roster ranges from charcuterie plates and classics, like patatas bravas, to smoked-pork tamales and grilled radicchio and endive salad. KE CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE

GATTO CYCLE DINER. Wood Street and Seventh Avenue, Tarentum. 724-224-0500. This lovingly restored 1949 vintage diner, now appended to a motorcycle shop, serves breakfast,

sandwiches and burgers, all re-named in honor of motorbikes. Nitro chili gets its kick from onions, hot sauce and sliced jalapenos; the Bar-B-Q Glide sandwich is topped with bacon, barbecue sauce and cheddar; and the Sportster is a delicious tuna melt. J HABITAT. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8800. Located in the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with a marvelously open kitchen — utilizes local and seasonal ingredients. The emphasis is on the kitchen’s ability to adapt and update traditional dishes from around the world, such as tandoori chicken tacos and rare-tuna-andavocado spring rolls. LE

Bar Marco {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412-683-4004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends in sophisticated casual dining while still offering an atmosphere of off-the-beaten-path funkiness. While some dishes emphasize unusual juxtapositions of ingredients, such as a lobsterand-white-bean purée alongside fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala

sauce,” other dishes are of the moment, with pistachio dust atop duck cannoli or deepfried gnocchi. KF KOUS KOUS CAFÉ. 665 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-563-5687. This small Moroccan restaurant mostly eschews clichés like kebab and falafel, instead offering sophisticated preparations such as lamb osso bucco and salmon in sharmoula. Worthy starters include harira (meat and lentil soup), eggplant zaalouk (similar to ratatouille) and grilled sardines. KF LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE MAURAMORI CAFÉ. 5202 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-4083160. This café-style breakfastlunch spot serves, as expected, bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, burgers and fries. This is still down-home cooking, but better-quality ingredients (applewood-smoked bacon) are emphasized, and care that goes into their assemblage (hand-formed burger patties). J MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them lessfamiliar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF

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Famo uss, BBQ R i bt & Br i s k e r i a n Ve ge t al t ie s! Sp e c i a

Supplying Pittsburgh with Locally Grown, All Natural Garden Seedlings for over a Decade.

Wintzell’s Oyster House {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF

Garden d D Dreams

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412. 412.281.6836 2 281.6 6836 6

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MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM

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TREAT MOM to a margarita for Mother’s Day! Remember, you’re the reason she drinks!

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

one of the Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

Olives and Peppers {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} OLIVES AND PEPPERS. 6052 William Flynn Highway (Route 8), Bakerstown. 724-444-7499. This casual Italian spot that offers pizza, pasta and sandwiches as well as more refined entrees. The meat-and-cheese sandwiches are a forte, with ciabatta “panini” and hoagies options. The lasagna is enormous, its homemade noodles laden with a creamy five-cheese mix and a savory Bolognese sauce with meatballlike chunks of beef. KE PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional creamwine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE

sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is highend, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates. KE

TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular Bloomfield institution, set in an old neighborhood corner bar, has built its reputation on enormous wood-fired hamburgers: choice meat, ground in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, and, on busy . w ww per weekends, diners line a p ty ci h pg up to get in. KE .com

FULL LIST ONLINE

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

SOUTH SIDE • CRANBERRY • GIBSONIA

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100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF

PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 2208 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-7200) and 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown (412-562-1710). These two fish restaurants fill the gap between humble lunch counter and snooty steakhouse — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches, sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of higherend dishes, particularly at the Downtown location. KF SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza,

WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Downtown (412-434-5600) and 1505 E. Carson St., South Side (412-904-4620). Big beefy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this an above-average bar stop, whether Downtown or on Carson Street. Burger toppings range from standard cheese and fried onions to arugula and truffle oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its excellent crust. JE WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. 530 E. Bruceton Road, West Mifflin. 412-650-9090. An Alabama seafood chain claims a welcome northern outpost in the Pittsburgh suburbs. The menu is dominated by seafood, with a few steak, burger, and chicken options, prepared in a Southern style — mostly fried, and accompanied by grits, gumbo, hushpuppies and okra. And oysters, naturally, served in a variety of ways. EK


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OPEN DAILY MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY AT 4 PM FRIDAY 11AM - 2AM · BAR TILL 2AM WEEKEND BRUNCH STARTING @ 10AM

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LOCAL

“WE’RE PULLING OUT SOME OLDIES THAT WE HAVEN’T PLAYED IN A LONG TIME.”

BEAT

{BY JULIA COOK}

A success in his own right on Pittsburgh’s hard-rock scene, Chip DiMonick is used to writing songs consciously, without any outside inspiration. Such was not the case with his latest output, “Touch Me in My Dreams.” The song, and his new band, Londona, “started with a dream,” he says. “One of my favorite singers is Lzzy Hale, from Halestorm — I had a dream she was helping me write a song, she was saying what to do, what not to do, and we were working out the melody and the lyrics. It was very, very detailed. She was very serious, like this sage adviser. And I woke up, and the words, and the melody, and the chords were so clear in my head, I came down here and plucked out the melody on the guitar, and I just put it onto a tangible format.” All he needed was a strong female voice, so he took to the Internet, and found Jenn Neish via Craigslist. Neish, whom DiMonick calls a “needle in a haystack,” had recently signed on with a different band, but was so inspired by DiMonick’s ideas — and very possibly their mutual admiration for pop singer P!nk — that she decided Londona was where she wanted to be. Neish brought a consciousness of doo-wop, and vocal experience ranging from church cantoring to contemporary rock. “It went so well, I was inspired to write a second song and a third song, and so on,” DiMonick explains. “It has a little bit of a guitar-driven edge to it, but it wouldn’t be out of place on pop radio.” The guitarist grins and adds: “This project has taken us places, rather than us taking it places.” With a 150 percent match on an Indie Go Go crowdfunding project toward its first music video, and an album cranked out in a matter of months, Londona has definitely taken the initiative. “To hear the final outcome of it, I’ve been shocked that I’ve been capable [of doing] something like that,” Neish says. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LONDONA CD RELEASE with MISFIT STARS, STARK. 10 p.m. Sat., May 10. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5-7. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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Inspired by Halestorm: Londona (Chip DiMonick, left, and Jenn Neish)

POP GOES DIMONICK

MASTERS OF METAL {PHOTO COURTESY OF CINDY FREY}

{BY BRIAN CONWAY}

A

SK MASTODON’S drummer, Brann

Dailor, about his band’s current tourmates, Gojira and Kvelertak, and he’ll give you a response that could easily apply to his own outfit: “I think that [they’re] equipped with some kind of intelligence. It seems like there’s some thought put behind the songwriting and the riffage. It’s not your run-of-the-mill heavy metal.” Mastodon has been among the most consistent and innovative metal acts in America since emerging from Georgia’s flourishing sludge-metal scene in the early 2000s with its debut album, Remission. 2004’s Leviathan is widely considered to be one of the great metal albums of that decade, and it marked the start of a series of highly acclaimed concept albums that includes 2006’s Blood Mountain and 2009’s prog-oriented Crack the Skye. Each earned the band a herd of new fans, some of whom might not have ordinarily listened to heavy metal. Three years removed from the chart-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

Once more, with feeling: Mastodon

topping (by metal standards), mainstream (by metal standards) success of the band’s fifth studio album, The Hunter, Mastodon has just finished recording a new album, Once More ’Round the Sun, produced by Nick Raskulinecz (Deftones, Rush, Foo Fighters).

MASTODON

WITH GOJIRA, KVELERTAK 6:30 p.m. Fri., May 9. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25-28. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

“It’s another slab of Mastodon,” says Dailor. “It’s heavy and simple. It’s fast and chaotic, and involved. It kind of covers all the bases. It’s a proper Mastodon album, as in: It’s super-varied and sort of all over the place, as far as styles are concerned. It draws from every album that we’ve done in the past and then treads

some new ground.” The album’s debut single, “High Road,” is indeed a fast, chaotic, unwearying four minutes that picks up where The Hunter left off. Chugging, jagged guitar riffs clear the way for a belt-along chorus before blasting off into the gnarliest reaches of the metalverse. Fans won’t be able to hear Once More ’Round the Sun for themselves until June 24, when it’s released on Reprise. But in the interim, they can catch a preview of what’s to come when Mastodon headlines a short North American spring tour. Just don’t expect more than a tease: “We’re playing a couple new songs, but that’s about it,” says Dailor. “We’re going to be pulling out some oldies that we haven’t played in a long time, because basically we’re in between records. We already finished The Hunter touring cycle, and we haven’t started the Once More ’Round the Sun cycle yet, because the album won’t be out, so mainly CONTINUES ON PG. 29


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MASTERS OF METAL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

[we’ll play] old stuff we haven’t done in years and years.” The band’s decision to dip into its back catalog might be consciously aimed at appeasing longtime fans who have witnessed, tolerated and even resented Mastodon’s explosion in popularity and evolution in sound over the past decade. Strained relationships between a band and its earliest supporters are nothing new, but there’s no denying that the set lists for Mastodon’s past two stops in Pittsburgh (in 2012, with Opeth, and in 2013 on Mayhem Fest) were almost exclusively devoted to material from The Hunter, its newest, and most accessible, work to date. “You don’t want to play the same set you played the last time, ’cause then [the fans] start hearing about it, and they say, ‘Eh, I’m gonna skip it,’ ’cause they already saw it,” says Dailor. Even if the prospect of hearing “Iron Tusk” doesn’t excite Mastodon traditionalists, the opening acts should give even the most dour heavy-metal purist reason to circle pit. French technical death-metal band Gojira visited Pittsburgh last year, when it opened for Slayer. Onstage, lead singer Joe Duplantier has one of the best snarls in metal, and his brother, Mario, plays the drums like a modern-day John Henry, with double kicks fast enough to take on some sort of steam-powered drum machine. The band’s most recent album, 2012’s L’Enfant Sauvage, is so heavy that the fracking industry could use it as an excuse for why there have been so many earthquakes lately. Norwegian six-piece Kvelertak, too, visited Pittsburgh in 2013, headlining a tour that included Black Tusk and Cancer Bats. Touring with Mastodon might be akin to being called up to the big leagues. The band, whose name translates to “Stranglehold,” has only two studio albums to date, but its latest offering, Meir, has garnered the same levels of hype that Mastodon encountered early in its career. Erlend Hjelvik, the band’s vocalist, is the centerpiece, combining the raw punk ferocity of Fucked Up’s Damian Abraham with the cataclysmic yells of Deafheaven. The tour makes fewer than 20 stops nationwide, skipping even Mastodon’s hometown of Atlanta. The fact that Pittsburgh made the cut partially salves the pain of being left off the band’s monumental 2010 Blackdiamondskye tour, with Deftones and Alice in Chains. But while that tour had the star power, this bill acquits itself with sheer ferocity. “It’s just one of those ‘planets align’ type of tours,” says Dailor. “It really works, you know. It’s the perfect bill.”

TOBACCO’S RETURN {BY IAN THOMAS} The years will bear it out, but let’s just get it in print now: Tobacco, best known as the mastermind of Black Moth Super Rainbow, is a visionary. His is a generational voice, the generation being one that came of age under a shroud of Internet anonymity and used the benefit of boundless information to catalog an unhappy childhood’s worth of broken toys, culling from this newfound power a mandate to outstrip and outshock, pissing on the sacred in service to some unnameable otherness. (It’s nothing so banal as Evil, but something stickier and more shameful.) In general, Tobacco’s sound has always embodied this state of arrested adolescence, but he’s never captured it so succinctly as on Ultima II Massage, his third solo outing.

This time around, Tobacco applied his trademark methodology of damage and obfuscation to produce a work of meditative cohesiveness. He returned to his analog roots, recording on the cassette decks he used to launch his career, ensuring any sheen the album might have is one of grime, not polish. Despite Tobacco’s best efforts to uglify the endeavor, though, Ultima II Massage features passages that are as infectious and danceable as the best pop. Moreover, it’s hard to turn an ear from the more obtuse passages, which offer the audio equivalent of creeping centipedes and time-lapsed decay. The zone-out quality he aspired to is achieved, only insofar as the sound he created has some ambient qualities. Listeners who find some emotional resonance in Ultima II Massage will want to pore over the music, puzzling it out for insight into the mind of its creator. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX PAPKE}

Just a little different: Nevada Color (clockwise from left: Adam Valen, Chris Cichra, Quinn Wirth, Max Kovalchuk, Jeremy Westhead)

COLOR BY NUMBERS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} IT WOULD be any entertainmentmanagement student’s dream to have an up-and-coming indie-rock band to work with: hands-on experience and the chance for big success right from the start. Point Park students Adam Valen and Max Kovalchuk fell into exactly that situation ... but the band, in this case, was their own. Nevada Color — for which both Valen and Kovalchuk play guitar — shot onto the local scene in 2012, picking up speed with an EP last year. Now the five-piece (rounded out by singer Quinn Wirth, bassist Chris Cichra and drummer Jeremy Westhead) is set to release its first full-length album, an immaculate set of catchy guitar tunes called Adventures, with a show at a somewhat unorthodox spot: a record store. The in-store release show is just one facet of the band’s commitment to being a little bit different. Kovalchuk works doing marketing for Sony Music, and had connections at Dave’s Music Mine on the South Side. “They really haven’t had a show there in quite a while,” says Valen. “That’s one of my favorite record stores in Pittsburgh.” The band will release Adventures with a show at the store on Fri., May 9; it’s sure to be a packed room, with a capacity limit of just 75 people. Kovalchuk and Valen also hold down part-time work with Drusky Entertainment, a helpful connection to have for a new band. “Anytime their boss was in a pinch and needed someone on a show, he would hit them up,” notes singer Wirth. “We really hopped on the opportunity to try and play as many shows as we could

with national touring acts,” adds Valen, noting that the band has also integrated into the DIY community. “With the Pittsburgh DIY scene, the bands are very supportive of one another.” (That’s how Nevada Color hooked in with Legs Like Tree Trunks, whose guitarist, Dave Cerminara, recorded Adventures at Treelady Studios.) While Adventures is being released physically, at the Dave’s Music Mine show as a CD, it’s also seeing a digital release … a few tracks at a time, over the course of three weeks. It’s a tactic Nevada Color came up with to help make the excitement of a full-length release last.

NEVADA COLOR CD RELEASE 6 p.m. Fri., May 9. Dave’s Music Mine, 1210 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-488-8800

“A good analogy that Max brought up to me,” Valen says, is: “Think of the last movie you saw: How long were you talking about it after you saw it? Probably a couple weeks to a month. Then think of your favorite TV series: You watch a season and you think, ‘Wow, that was great, I can’t wait to see the second one!’” “I was kind of the last man on that train,” Wirth says with a smile. “I was skeptical when I first heard it, because they were really into doing something that was different — but I wasn’t sure if that was the thing. But the digital market is so vast: How many other people are going to be releasing an album that same day? How do you cover that much ground? If you can stretch it out over a month, you’re letting that newness last as long as possible.” “I definitely think we’re a band that likes to take risks,” adds Valen, “and do things that set us apart from other bands.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

†††

[EXPERIMENTAL] +THU., MAY 08

[ELECTRONIC] + MON., MAY 12

Oneohtrix Point Never (Daniel Lopatin) has built a name as one of the great contemporary sound artists by creating everything from ambient tracks to an eight-minute spliced-together take on “I Only Have Eyes for You.” His work is at once relaxing and jarring; it replicates the anxiety of life in the age of electronics, and the dull numb that we engender in trying to deal with that anxiety. Tonight, he plays The Andy Warhol Museum with video artist Nate Boyce; Dutch E Germ opens. Andy Mulkerin 7:30 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www. warhol.org

An outlet for Chino Moreno of Deftones to get his quieter tendencies expressed was the basis for †††. (You can just say “Crosses.”) After two EPs, in 2011 and 2012, Moreno’s dark electronic project released its first, self-titled full-length earlier this year; it’s full of slightly creepy, post-goth pop and rock that nods as much to the new crop of electronic music as to the heavy alternative stuff Moreno has given us for so many years. The band plays at Altar Bar tonight with Nostalghia and Death Valley High. AM 6:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $19-21. All ages. 412206-9719 or www.the altarbar.com

[DANCE POP] + WED., MAY 14 Brothers Robert and David Perlick-Molinari mix a few things that don’t generally go together: programmed beats, new jack swing, classical training and French horns. French Horn Rebellion, as the pair is known, has gained notoriety and opened for some of the big synth-pop names (MGMT, Cut Copy) since forming seven years ago; the brothers can lay down dance grooves, but also retain the ability to bust out some Bach. The band plays Brillobox tonight along with another electronic-pop-fusion outfit, Hey Champ. AM 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $12-14. 412-621-4900 or www.brillbox.net

French Horn Rebellion

[HIP HOP] + FRI., MAY 09

This summer, Round Corner Cantina is presenting a new weekly series: Friday nights are the Gold Series, featuring local and national-level DJs spinning material from the golden age of hip hop. Tonight, Detroit producer Waajeed, who came up working with Slum Village and has worked with the likes of Cee-Lo, appears; future dates will feature names like Large Professor and Grandmaster Flash. Also appearing tonight: Pittsburgh Track Authority and host DJ Bamboo. AM 9 p.m. 3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-9042279 or www.roundcornercantina.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ALIA MUSICA PITTSBURGH

www.pghnewmusic.com

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Inuksuit / Perfect Lives Rzewski plays Rzewski Different Trains (Reich) Cage / Haas / Kurtág Folk Songs (Berio) Agon (Stravinsky)

transforming Pittsburgh’s soundscape May 22-25 New Hazlett Theater, Bugallo-Williams Lake Elizabeth, Frederic Rzewski and everywhere Trillium Ensemble Alia Musica / Freya Varispeed (NY) / ELCO Black Orchid / Directions 99 percussionists at a park

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412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

ALTAR BAR. Fozzy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Aqua Nebula Oscillator, Shaky Shrines. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Dan Bern, Akrasia. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sablowskis, Dead Batteries, Lockland Brakes, Playoff Beard. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. SMILING MOOSE. Trioscapes. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Alabama Shakes, The Deslondes. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Consider the Source, Les Racquet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WOOLEY BULLY’S. Erica Blinn, The Handsome Machine. New Brighton. 724-843-4702.

FRI 09

CLUB CAFE. Southside American, Demos Papadimas & His Band (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. DAVE’S MUSIC MINE. Nevada Color. CD Release Show. South Side. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Voltaire, Ego Likeness, Patricia Wake. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOD TIME BAR. Dr. J’s Mojo Hand. Millvale. 412-821-9968. HAMBONE’S. Union Rye, As Ladders, Kayla Schureman, Bryan McQuaid. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Badlees. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Brewers Row, JMac & Junior. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. Riff Mitch & the Soul Survivors. The Meow Prowl: Benefit for the Homeless Cat Management Team. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Action Camp, Drowning Clowns, Atlas, Pet Clinic. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. No Bad JuJu. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Robben Ford. South Side. 412-381-6811. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Shades of June. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SMILING MOOSE. Floor Busy Living. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Mastodon, Gojira, Kvelertak. North Side. 412-229-5483. TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Hackensaw Boys, The Trainjumpers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 10 31ST STREET PUB. Leather Strip, Standard Issue Citizen, Boxed Warning. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576. BRILLOBOX. The Features, Michigan. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Rake, The Lampshades (Early) Londona, Misfit Stars, Stark (Late). Londona CD release. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Howler, Frankie Teardrop, White Like Fire, Ouais. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. SixSpeedKill, Weapons of Choice, The Bestevers. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HEINZ CHAPEL. Daphne Alderson. Oakland. 412-624-4157. THE HOP HOUSE. Neutral Loss. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Mud City Manglers, Volcano Dogs. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LEMONT. Night Star. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Thee Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra, Total Life. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. The Rockit Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Softwinds. 412-487-6259. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Bridgeville. 412-212-7808. SMILING MOOSE. Truckfighters. South Side. 412-431-4668. SUB ALPINE CLUB. EZ Action, Deliverence. 412-823-6661. TEAMSTER TEMPLE. Vanessa Campagna, Slim Forsythe, Nied’s Hotel Band. Boys & Girls Club Benefit Concert. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. BIG Something, Broccoli Samurai. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VFW POST 418. Bill Couch, Moose Tracks. McKees Rocks. 412-904-2842.

SUN 11 ALTAR BAR. Mad Caddies. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Boys on the Radio, Black Six, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Tera Melos, Legs Like Tree Trunks, Yes Yes 1000 Times Yes. Bloomfield. 412-862-5670. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Uh Huh Her, DJ Kim Anh. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Nothing. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MP 3 MONDAY CITY LOVE STORY

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from City Love Story; stream or download it for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Les Jupes, Butterbirds, Wicked Chief. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. UPPER ROOM WORSHIP. The Upper Room Worship Band. Brookline. 412-502-5052.

MON 12 SMILING MOOSE. Electric Citizen. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 13 CLUB CAFE. Little Hurricane, Lincoln Durham. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Joseph Huber, The Hills & The Rivers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Seahaven. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 14

DJS

HIP HOP/R&B

THU 08

SUN 11

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

BLUES FRI 09

FRI 09 ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROUND CORNER CANTINA. The Gold Series. w/ Waajeed, PTA, DJ Bamboo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2279. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THE R BAR. The Midnite Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BRILLOBOX. French Horn Rebellion, Hey BRILLOBOX. Title Champ. Bloomfield. Town Soul & Funk www. per 412-621-4900. a p ty ci Party. Rare Soul, Funk pgh m CLUB CAFE. Matt .co & wild R&B 45s feat. Pryor, Blue Of Colors, DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bob Nanna, Mark Rose. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. South Side. 412-431-4950. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. PALACE THEATRE. Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. South Side. 412-431-2825. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. GRILLE. Alex Talbot. Ross. 412-481-7227. 412-364-8166. STAGE AE. Neon Trees, Smallpools, Nightmare & the Cat. North SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day Side. 412-229-5483. chill. House music. aDesusParty. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. TAUK. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 10

WED 14

PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 10 INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Jimmy Adler. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-233-9800.

WED 14 THE R BAR. Ron & The RumpShakers. Dormont. 412-561-9634.

JAZZ THU 08 ANDYS. Jessica Zaminska. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

EARLY WARNINGS

FRI 09 SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 10 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NINE ON NINE. Dane Vannatter & Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. RESTAURANT ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

CODE: JL35

Ha Ha Tonka South Park Ampitheater, Buffalo Drive, South Park {SUN., JULY 20}

Lake Street Drive Hartwood Acres, Middle Road, Hampton Township {FRI., AUGUST 01 - SUN., AUGUST 03}

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Clint Holmes. Downtown. 412-325-6769. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

PENN BREWERY. T&A (Terry & Alex). North Side. 412-237-9400. RIPEPI WINERY & VINEYARD. Bob Podash. 412-292-8351.

TUE 13

SAT 10

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Dan Wasson. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 14

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Tracy Grammer, The Early Mays. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Honey Spine. North Side. 412-237-9400.

FULL LIST E N O LwIN w.

ANDYS. Paul Consentino & Daniel w paper May. Downtown. ALLEGHENY ELKS pghcitym .co 412-773-8884. LODGE #339. Pittsburgh ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Banjo Club. Wednesdays. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, North Side. 412-321-1834. James Johnson III. Downtown. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. 412-818-5604. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ Downtown. 412-338-6463. The Shelf Life String Band. North RIVERS CLUB. Roger Barbour Side. 412-224-2273. Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 08 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Brian Belonzi. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 09

All pricing in U.S. dollars and subject to change without notice. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Personal Check or Money Order. *Prices shown are for the equivalent generic drug if available.

{FRI., JULY 11}

Peoples Natural Gas Park, 90 Johns St., Johnstown

MON 12

Drug Name Viagra 100mg Viagra 50mg Cialis 20mg Cialis 5mg Levitra 20mg Celebrex 200mg Zetia 10mg Spiriva 18mcg Combivent 18/103mcg Advair 250/50mcg Cymbalta 30mg Flomax 0.4mg Nexium 40mg Crestor 10mg Colchicine 0.6mg Entocort 3mg Proscar 5mg Tricor 145mg Diovan 160mg Asacol 400mg Pristiq 50mg Ventolin 100mcg

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SUN 11

CALL NOW & SAVE UP TO 84% ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TOBIN VOGGESSER}

LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

THE BEER MARKET. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-322-2337. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Greg Trooper, Matthew Ryan. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181. OAKMONT TAVERN. American Honey. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. PARK HOUSE. Tristan Omand, The Grifters. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WED 14

WED 14 LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

CLASSICAL SAT 10 EDGEWOOD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-473-8880. FESTIVAL OF BACH. Presented by the Pittsburgh Music Alliance. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120.

OTHER MUSIC THU 08 ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Oneohtrix Point Never, Nate Boyce. North Side. 412-237-8300.

FRI 09

WORLD

LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

THU 08

SAT 10

CASA RASTA. Gena y Pena, Cha Miguel. Beechview. 412-344-4700. FERRANTE’S LAKEVIEW. Cahal Dunne’s Grand To Be Irish. Presented by Latshaw Productions. Greensburg. 724-853-4050.

SAT 10 ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Corned Beef & Curry. Ross. 412-364-8166.

COUNTRY FRI 09 HEY ANDY’S. Moonshine Steel. 724-258-4755.

EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Pittsburgh Gospel Choir. East Liberty. 412-613-5825.

SUN 11 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Faithful Sinners. Oakland. 412-622-3151. HAMBONE’S. Steel City Ukulele Group Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 14 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

May 7 - 13 WEDNESDAY 7

com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

CHARITY RANDALL THEATRE Oakland. Tickets: picttheatre. org. Through May 17.

SOUND SERIES: Oneohtrix Point Never

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 84 Lady Gaga

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: livenation. com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

Dan Cummins

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through May 11.

Alabama Shakes

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.

PHOTO CREDIT: JOSHUA BLACK WILKINS

Blackberry Smoke “Fire in the Hole Tour”

GREY BOX THEATRE Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. All ages show. Tickets: showclix.com. For more info visit playgroundproductions. net. 8p.m.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Featuring Video Artist Nate Boyce & Dutch E Germ. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 95

SATURDAY 10 Pyrotopia Festival of Fire Arts

ALABAMA SHAKES

2014 Zoo Brew: Spring Hops

THURSDAY, MAY 8 STAGE AE

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM Highland Park. Over 21 event. Tickets: pittsburghzoo.org. 6p.m.

Comedian Myke Herlihy LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 8p.m. Through May 10.

Mastodon

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

SUNDAY 11

CHELSEA HANDLER

Hope and Gravity

SATURDAY, MAY 10 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

CITY THEATER MAINSTAGE

The Carnivalesque Roadshow REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Art For Change: Art Auction & Party to Benefit Persad Center

Chelsea Handler, Uganda Be Kidding Me Live Tour CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

South Side 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through May 25.

MONDAY 12

WESTFIELD PARK Munhall. All ages event. Tickets: pyrotopia.net. 8p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: MELISSA HOLT

Blithe Spirit

You Can't Have An Orgasm With Me

WYNDHAM GRAND Downtown. For more info & tickets visit persadcenter.org. 6p.m.

TUESDAY 13 Seahaven

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

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MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND GET $20 OFF

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ANY SANDAL MINIMUM PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE. N E W S

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NIGHTS ON EARTH

“DUNE IS IN THE WORLD LIKE A DREAM, BUT DREAMS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD.”

{BY HARRY KLOMAN} In Jim Jarmusch’s exquisitely filmed Only Lovers Left Alive, the otherwordly Tilda Swinton is a millennia-old vampire named Eve, and Tom Hiddleston is the centuries-old Adam, a reclusive musician and her husband of 148 years. They’re deeply in love and deeply humane, buying their meals from blood banks rather than taking it from live victims. Their culture has evolved far beyond the “zombies” (i.e., humans), who are destroying the world because they fear their own imaginations, and who “will only figure it out when it’s too late.”

LOST IN

SPACE

Together, forever: Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston

CP APPROVED

How do you keep love alive when you’re dead? With a mutual passion for art, music, culture — and each other. When Eve’s bratty sister (Mia Wasikowska) visits, she upsets their balance, especially when she zeroes in on Ian (Anton Yelchin), Adam’s affable zombie factotum. Who knew history’s greatest scientists and artists — including the (finally) dying Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt) — were vampires? In the dryly witty world that Jarmusch creates, it only makes sense. Moving between Tangier and Detroit, Only Lovers is a tender romantic tweak of the genre. Turns out it’s not eternity that depresses a vampire: It’s having to share it with the culturally and environmentally suicidal zombies who run things, and who poison the blood they all need to stay alive. Manor INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s orothy’s Return. Adventures es in Oz never end, it seems. eems. This new 3-D animated mated musical is adapted from the books of Roger Staunton Baum (great-grandson eat-grandson of Oz creator reator Frank L. Baum). In this film, Dorothy y goes back to the Emerald merald City to save her friends from a villain named amed Jester. Starts ts Fri., May 9.

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{BY AL HOFF}

T

IME HAS A way of clarifying whether crazy ideas from the past were, in fact, genius ideas not yet ready for prime time. That’s certainly the case made in Jodorowsky’s Dune, Frank Pavich’s entertaining and illuminating documentary about a science-fiction film that never was. But it was a film that got planned — and a project full of ambitious ideas and images that lived on in other films. So there’s a valid argument for what one the participant claims: “It was the greatest pa movie ever made … even though it was m mo never made.” ne In 1974, Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky bought the rights to Frank Jod Herbert’s sci-fi novel Dune. It was He perhaps an odd purchase: Jodorowsky pe was wa known for his loopy, surreal cult features tur El Topo and The Holy Mountain, and he hadn’t read the book. But Jodorowsky wanted to create a film that would “be a wa prophet to change the young minds of the pro world,” and the complex Dune would be wo his vehicle. It sounds nutty, but the more Jodor-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

Filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky today; 1976 illustration from H.R. Giger for a Dune set piece (inset)

wosky and his colleagues (dubbed at the time as “spiritual warriors”) talk now about their vision for Dune, the cooler it sounds. Pavich’s film takes us through the planning stages: Jodorowsky’s visions, fortuitous encounters and mad obsessions that gave shape to the film.

JODOROWSKY’S DUNE DIRECTED BY: Frank Pavich In English, and several languages, with subtitles Starts Fri., May 9. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Jodorwosky re-wrote the story, and hired French comics artist Moebius to illustrate storyboards. (“I use Moebius like a camera,” Jodorowsky explains.) A lightly animated recreation of the proposed opening scene — in which the camera tracks in from outside a galaxy to a close-up of dead men in a spaceship — is stunning, even in pencil sketches. Other warriors were added: a special-effects guy (Dan O’Bannon); artists (Chris Foss and

H.R. Giger); actors (David Carradine, Mick Jagger, Orson Welles and Salvador Dali); and musical acts (Pink Floyd and French art band, Magma). Today, studying the artifacts of preproduction and getting swept up in Jodorowsky’s enthusiasm, this Dune looks fantastic — full of grand ideas and even grander visuals. But in mid-1970s Hollywood, there was no market for an expensive sci-fi head-trip. It’s clear, though, that Jodorowsky’s evocative storyboards made the rounds and were noted: Explicit scenes and visual themes from Dune would surface in the next three decades of sci-fi films, starting with Star Wars. (A differently realized Dune was filmed in 1984, by David Lynch.) Now a lively 85, Jodorwosky is generous and phlegmatic about the outcome of his never-to-be masterwork. “From this supposed failure came a lot of creation,” he says, referring to the team members he assembled, who went on to other projects. “Dune is in the world like a dream, but dreams can change the world.” A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

Vegas Strip. We are, the film surmises, simultaneously dependent on and flagrant with water; we enjoy it and neglect it. It’s fair to say we rarely truly think of it, but Watermark suggests we’d be advised to — and sooner rather than later. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., May 9. Harris (AH)

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW FADING GIGOLO. This new film from writerdirector-actor John Turturro offers at its heart a gentle if predictable light comedy, which is unfortunately wrapped in a very bad concept. Turturro plays Fioravante, a Manhattanite at loose financial ends — he loses one of his parttime jobs when his buddy, Murray (Woody Allen), is forced to close his used bookstore. (“It takes rare people to buy rare books.”) But Murray has a proposition: Fioravante can be a $1,000-a-go gigolo for a wealthy dermatologist (Sharon Stone) and perhaps her buddy (Sofia Vergara). Fioravante demurs — he doesn’t want to be “a ho” — but ultimately, he takes the job. And surprise — he’s super-great at it! Only in a world of movies made by men does any of this make sense: Who casts current tabloid-fodder Allen as a pimp, especially one arguing that younger women desire older men? Why do any women, much less beautiful, successful ones, need a pimp or a pricey giglo, anyhow? This isn’t 1914. Even accepting this — and no disrespect to Turturro — but can a shlubby, middle-aged guy really get $1,000? It’s too bad your mind will be consumed with these queries, which will likely overshadow the sweeter story about a relationship Turturro develops with a lonely Hasidic widow (Vanessa Paradis). But even that gets derailed by some comedic nonsense involving a Hasidic neighborhood watchman (Liev Schreiber). It’s all enough to Neighbors make you want to shake a pair of old pros like Turturro and Allen and remind them: With small tales of the human heart, you don’t need a bunch of window-dressing about vengeful Hasidim, or skeevy shots of our protagonist aimed through Vergara’s legs. Starts Fri., May 9. Manor (Al Hoff) NEIGHBORS. After Seth Rogen and buddies made last year’s meta-comedy This Is the End, which combined a vulgar bro comedy with a critique of the same, I hoped that Rogen (who has shown his sensitive side in indies) would move on. Well, color me wrong. Nicholas Stoller’s R-rated college kegger stars Rogen and Rose Byrne as new parents who engage in an all-out pranks war with the boozy frat house, headed by Zac Efron, that has moved in next door. It’s Animal House + The Hangover + Ridiculousness – Efron’s shirts = Same Stupid Jokes. Oops, my bad: Proving that there’s always something new to be scraped out of the bottom of the comedy barrel, we get extended jokes about DIY dildos and milking your wife. Besides the rampant vulgarity — never a substitute for wit, gentlemen! — the comedy fails because there isn’t anybody to root for. The frat guys are obnoxious, and nobody wants to live next door to a bunch hooting drunkards. But the usually likable Rogen and Byrne are one-noted here as quite obnoxious, self-absorbed aging-hipsters-withall-consuming-baby. In their own way, they’re just as bratty and unappealing as the frat brothers. Maybe that’s the point, but I was sure rooting for a giant flaming space rock, as previously seen in This Is the End, to take them all out. Starts Fri., May 9. (AH)

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REPERTORY GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL. The re-release of 1954’s Godzilla is notable for the elimination of the infamous Raymond Burr footage, and the restoration of scenes ensuring the return of the film’s anti-nuclear sermonizing. Yet while the irradiated Godzilla might be a 150-foot-tall pot-bellied menace, he’s also got a lot in common with the Japanese of the 1950s. That might explain the feelings of director Ishiro Honda, who renders Godzilla’s underwater death sequence like the tragic finale of a surreal opera. Godzilla, like Hiroshima, ends up skeletized, a victim of a super-weapon, and his portrayal here foreshadows his transformation in future films into a beloved if amoral defender of Japan. In this film, he’s both Japan itself and what threatens Japan’s fragile existence; a past the country is reluctant to discard; and a scapegoat for nuclear anxiety, his thunderous footsteps tolling like distant ordnance. In Japanese, with subtitles. Through Thu., May 8. Regent Square (Bill O’Driscoll)

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Fading Gigolo WATERMARK. Besides breathable air, there is nothing more critical to human life on this planet than water. And man’s journey from sea to land, from subsistence to civilization, from agriculture to industry has been deeply entwined with water. And while our planet is mostly water, many of the fresh-water resources we depend on are imperiled because we misuse them. Canadian photographer and filmmaker Edward Burtynsky is known for both his largeformat photography and his interest in how the built environment impacts the natural (and vice versa), so a film highlighting the current state of water seems inevitable. He co-directs with filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal, with whom he also teamed for 2006’s Manufactured Landscapes. “How does water shape us, and how do we shape water?” Burtynsky asks early on, in a film that relies chiefly on gorgeous visuals to tell its story. It begins at the end of the Colorado River, a precise spot in Mexico where the water stops flowing (because developments and deals north of border have resulted in most of the flow being

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dammed or diverted). Burtynsky also visits a giant dam and an abalone farm in China; in Dhaka, he takes his camera to a tannery, which not only uses massive amounts of water, but also disgorges toxins into a river. Industrial use looks bad, but most water is diverted to agriculture, much of it not renewed at the same rate it is used.

MRS. DOUBTFIRE. Robin Williams stars as a divorced dad who doubles as the wacky but lovable nanny Mrs. Doubtfire in Chris Columbus’ 1993 comedy. And who says there are no good roles for middle-aged women? 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 7. AMC Loews. $5 MULHOLLAND DRIVE. In his best films, David Lynch seizes a theme and attacks it with a dream logic that pries the child-proof lid off your subconscious, revealing the anxiously quivering

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Watermark Water is so omnipresent in human life that Burtynsky takes a few side trips — to Greenland, to examine ancient ice, and to witness spiritual dips in the Ganges and the dancing fountains of the

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

-Mulholland - - - - - - - Drive ---------------------------------Fido- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Rocky - - - -Horror - - - - -Zombie - - - - - Show! -------------------------5/7 @ 7:30pm, 5/9 @ 7:30pm, 5/10 @ 4&7pm

(2001) 5/8 @ 7:30pm, 5/9 @ 10pm, 5/11 @ 7pm

(2006) - 5/10 @ 9:30pm - Part of a double feature with Rocky Horror. See one or both! - 5/10 @ Midnight A special zombie version of the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Double feature with Fido! Special pricing at www.showclix.com/event/RockyHorrorMay2014

-Woman - - - - -of- -the- - Year -------------------------------Silents, - - - - -Please! - - - - - The- - - Pawnshop ---------------------------

(1942) - 5/11 @ 11:30am Breakfast and a Movie! Doors for breakfast open at 11am. Tickets at www.showclix.com/event/breakfastandamoviemay2014

Live music by Tom Roberts!

(1916) - 5/11 @ 3pm

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RUSSIAN FILM SYMPOSIUM

goo beneath. He did it in Eraserhead and Blue Velvet, and did it again in 2001’s Mulholland Drive, a nightmarish exhumation of Hollywood mythology and corruption centering on a couple of aspiring actresses, a seemingly naïve blonde (Naomi Watts) and a glamorous but amnesiac brunette (Laura Elena Harring). Eventually, the film becomes a Möbius strip of both narrative and identity, and Lynch begins to peel back the seductive illusions that comprise cinema itself as he traps the two women in a world of users, lies and mirrors. Screens as part of the Hollywood’s year-long celebration of David Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 8; 10 p.m. Fri., May 9; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 11. Hollywood (BO) MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL. Join King Arthur and the Knights of Camelot on their fruitless but hilarious search for the Holy Grail in Monty Python’s 1974 cult hit. (Pythons Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones co-direct.) From the demented opening credits (in pidgin Swedish, and with an earnest indebtedness to a certain moose) through numerous sketches, one-liners, and delicious jabs at medieval history and its heroes of legend, past two unforgettable rabbits, and right through lovely scenery to an unexpected conclusion, the endlessly quotable Holy Grail remains the Python gang’s funniest feature. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 9; 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., May 10; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. Hollywood (AH)

{BY AL HOFF}

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BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL. This touring, Philadelphia-based festival makes a stop in Pittsburgh, offering a full day’s worth of films — shorts, features and documentaries — and programs. These are new works by and about people of African descent worldwide that reflect the global black experience, and that might not otherwise be screened at more conventional festivals. Films will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker, and the festival will also feature dramatic readings, a panel discussion, a marketplace and music. Films include a selection of recent African shorts (4 p.m.); Things Never Said, about an aspiring spokenword performer (5:45 p.m.); and Diary of a Decade, a documentary that looks at soul music and its spinoffs from the late 1980s through the early 2000s (8 p.m.). 1-11 p.m. Sat., May 10. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-3000 or www.kellystrayhorn.org $5 per screening or $15 festival pass

Film Kitchen body is in the clutches of a villainous science teacher called Prof Terry. The arch comedy — sample dialogue: “Sometimes, to increase science, you need to break the rules of what’s morally good” — is winningly perverse. Bursch, who now lives in Pittsburgh, has credits on Anderson films dating back to The Darjeeling Limited; he was formerly Anderson’s executive assistant, and most recently did the animated storyboards for The Grand Budapest Hotel. Also at Film Kitchen, series curator Matthew Day offers diverse work from Michael Pisano, including a partly-animated educational piece on Rachel Carson that explains why pesticides are dangerous, and a trippy music video for the group Goathelper + Austra, made for Pittsburgh’s 2011 VIA Festival.

WOMAN OF THE YEAR. Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn star in George Steven’s 1942 romantic comedy about a couple who meet working at a newspaper. The twist: She’s a modern woman, and he’s not so sure that’s a good thing. 11 a.m. Sun., May 11, and 2 p.m. Thu., May 15. Hollywood THE PAWNSHOP. In this 1916 silent film, Charlie Chaplin’s mishaps as a pawnshop employee provide the laughs. Tom Roberts provides the live musical accompaniment. 3 p.m. Sun., May 11. Hollywood

FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent film and video is highlighted May 13 by the return of Edward Bursch, a Latrobe native who’s worked on several Wes Anderson films. Bursch visits to screen “Half Dead,” labeled “Part 4” of his own comedic Somersault Waltz trilogy. The trilogy is a sort-of science-fiction thriller as filtered through a selfparodying after-school special. “Half Dead” follows a dimwitted high school student named Tim and his artificially intelligent robot (a talking repurposed desktop computer) as they try to rescue — and hopefully revive — Tim’s dead friend, Will, whose

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ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

ONGOING

FIDO. The adventures of a boy and his pet zombie Fido are the focus of this 2006 Canadian comedy, directed by Andrew Currie. 9:30 p.m. Sat., May 10. Hollywood

THE GOONIES. A treasure map! A spooky cave! A group of kids embark on an adventure in this 1985 comedy from Richard Donner. Screens as part of a month-long, Sunday-night series of adventure films from the 1980s. 8 p.m. Sun., May 11. Regent Square

doomed teen. Over 28 days, Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) struggles to understand his suburban world, which is tilting toward madness, steered by a giant rabbit named Frank. Kelly excels at capturing Donnie’s dread with verve, yet he and Gyllenhaal ground this anxiety so firmly in the confusion and inarticulateness of ordinary adolescence that there’s no easy fantasy loophole. A hybrid of time-travel treatise, ’80s snapshot, troubled-kid drama and dark comedy. The 2001 film kicks off a series of films featuring Patrick Swayze. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 15; 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., May 17; 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 18; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 21. Hollywood (AH)

The 16th Russian Film Symposium continues through Sat., May 10. The theme for this year’s symposium, co-presented by the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Filmmakers, is “Gendering Genre.” Recent Russian cinema mostly comprises romantic comedies and gritty dramas, two genres commonly associated with female and male audiences, respectively. And whereas rom-coms pursue the successful coming together of individuals, the darker, frequently violent dramas are more apt explore issues of alienation and disintegration. Film scholars and critics will be on hand to introduce the films and lead discussions. INTIMATE PARTS. Sex — and all the secrets, subterfuge and hypocrisy it can generate — is the focus of this ensemble drama from Natasha Merkulova and Aleksei Chupov. Interlocking stories include: a polyamorous photographer (who snaps close-ups of genitalia), a moralistic public censor who can’t quiet her own desires, and a ménage-a-trois between a couple and a circus performer. It’s all a mess, if a very human one. (7:30 p.m. Wed., May 7)

Godzilla: The Japanese Original Finally, Film Kitchen takes an unusual approach to writer-director Zachary Cline’s Natural Prey, a 72-minute thriller shot in black and white that starts out like a stalker movie but has some twists up its sleeve. The first 20 minutes of the film will screen, then there’ll be a break for a filmmaker Q&A, after which attendees can decide whether to watch the remainder of the film. 8 p.m. Tue., May 13 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. $5. 412-682-4111 (BO) STEEL MAGNOLIAS. Herbert Ross directs this 1989 melodrama in which a group of Southern women bond at a funeral. Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis, Julia Roberts and a lot of big hair star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. AMC Loews. $5

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DONNIE DARKO. Writer/director Richard Kelly’s debut is a hard-to-categorize tale about a

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THE RAILWAY MAN. Some parts of war are a tragedy, and some parts are a crime. That’s one of the several good ideas raised in The Railway Man, a stirring drama that demonstrates how stories told many times can be told well again if you just keep it clear and simple. Jonathan Teplitzky’s film is about imperialism: by the British in Singapore, which defeated its colonizers in 1942, and then by the Japanese, who captured the defeated British soldiers and imprisoned them in Thailand, forcing them to build a trans-national railroad under merciless conditions. So yes, this is The Bridge on the River Kwai, David Lean’s 1957 classic, retold through the experience of Eric Lomax (portrayed here by Colin Firth), a British veteran of World War II, who lived through it and wrote a book about it. Firth is superb as an everyday fellow who can’t overcome the memories of his unspeakable past. But the war story is agonizing, and the confrontations between the elder Lomax and his captor, though toeing the line of melodrama, are naked with emotions that few of us can fathom. Manor (Harry Kloman) THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2. In this sequel, Spidey handily trounces everyone: After all these years, action is still his reward. But his battles come with losses that almost take him out of the swing of things, and together they tell a plaintive story about the fatal consequences of feeling alone in the world. Marc Webb’s film is indeed pretty amazing in the FX department — the best money can buy. Even more amazing, though, is its tenderness as Peter Parker (an affable Andrew Garfield) tries not to lose his down-to-earth humanity. This involves his beloved Gwen (Emma Stone), his beloved aunt (Sally Field) and his beloved long-dead father (Campbell Scott). As the movie draws to its protracted climax, we know what won’t happen. We just don’t know what will. The plot is super-fanciful but silliness aside, it’s good to see that the heart of Spider-Man is still beating. (HK)

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THE CONVOY. Aleksei Mizgirev’s drama follows an army captain as he goes to Moscow to retrieve a deserter, a cheerful if doomed young man partial to silly jokes. Wallowing in urban grit, the film explores issues of corruption, masculinity and various outlets for dealing with emotional pain. (7:30 p.m. Thu., May 8) BREAK-UP HABIT. A familiar if slightly parodic rom-com from Ekaterina Telegina in which a pretty, lively girl dates a series of good-looking prospects, but finds herself dissatisfied with them all. Being a modern gal, she’s also prone to much self-reflection and blogging, and reunites with her exes to find out why they broke up. Turns out Eva is in charge of her story, but has abdicated her love life to chance. (7:30 p.m. Fri., May 9) LIVING. With death, a lot of the misery is borne by those left behind. Vasilii Sigarev’s bleak drama tells three intercut stories in which a wife, a child and a mother attempt to process the sudden loss of a loved one, including hallucinating the deceased’s return. Grim subject matter, but handsomely filmed. (7:30 p.m. Sat., May 10) AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

All films in Russian, with subtitles. Melwood. www.rusfilm.pitt.edu.


ARCHITECTURE, PARADOXICALLY, DISAPPEARS BEHIND PHOTOGRAPHY

[FESTIVAL]

FIRED UP

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

Originally, Eric Singer thought he might get a few hundred people in a parking lot. Singer, an engineer, roboticist and artist with an affinity for fire, wanted to showcase works by students in his class at DIY engineering space Hack Pittsburgh, titled “How to Build Your Own Personal Flamethrower.” He reached out to the other branch of fire arts, performers who spin pois and swirl flaming hula hoops, and Pyrotopia was born. The first festival was held in April 2012, on a patch of land outside Homestead’s historic Pump House. The free day-long event drew 4,000 people, with cars filling the lots of the neighboring Waterfront shopping plaza. “It blew [my expectations] out of the water wildly,” says Singer. The second Pyrotopia comes to Munhall this week. “If you had asked me a week before [2012’s festival] if I would do it again, I would have said, ‘No way,’” says Singer. He notes that days before that festival, it seemed as if the insurers would back out. “But after seeing the response, it felt like we had created this great beast and we needed to feed it.”

[ARCHITECTURE]

BUILDING ING IMAGES {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

Pyrotopia 2014 has attracted performers from as far away as Boston, Toronto and Indianapolis. New installations will include Riskee Ball — some Toronto designers’ adaptation of skee ball made to spout flames to celebrate high scores — and Katy Perry the Unicorn, a former carousel horse rigged to sneeze glitter, pee lemonade and shoot fire from her horn. (She’s apparently popular at New York City hipster weddings.) Returning is Singer’s own Flaming Simon, a version of the Milton Bradley memory and repetition game in which players tap drums that spout flames from tiki-like torches. The festival, which Singer says will now be annual, has a permanent home in Westfield Park. “Munhall has told us we can stay for as long as we like.” Though the first festival was successful, insurance is still “the biggest cost issue for us,” says Singer (and one reason Pyrotopia now charges admission). “Most of us have been doing this for 10, 15 years, so we know what we are doing. And if there is ever an incident, we will be done forever, so there won’t be any incidents.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PYROTOPIA Noon-4 p.m. Kids’ “Volcano Village” (free) and 8 p.m.-midnight Sat., May 10 ($10-15; $50 VIP party). Free for kids under 5. Westfield Park, 1900 West St., Munhall. www.pyrotopia.net N E W S

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Famous flames: One of the attractions at the 2012 Pyrotopia {PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

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HOTOGRAPHY whispers seductively

at architecture: “You look terrific. I can make you famous.” Architecture responds in a sigh, “I’m ready for my close-up.” Get a room, you two. Actually, at the Heinz Architectural Center, architecture and photography have four rooms — or sections, really — as part of an exhibition of the same name, with Tracy Myers as curator and Alyssum Skjeie as curatorial assistant. Notably, all the material for Architecture + Photography comes from collections within the Carnegie Museum of Art. You could have imagined that such a topic would be too sprawling for a single exhibition. After all, photography so pervasively influences our perception of architecture that we claim substantively to know buildings that we have seen only through photomechanical reproduction. “Aha,” I said with self-satisfied recognition in the section of work by photographer Ezra Stoller. “There is his photo of Alvar Aalto’s iconic Finnish Pavilion from New York’s 1939 World’s Fair. I know it well.” Actually, I know only the image well. The building is long gone. But Stoller’s exquisite black-and-white image captures light and shadow as if they were orchestral tones. For this and works from other iconic modernist architects, Stoller’s work helped

{IMAGE COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. © EZRA STOLLER/ESTO, YOSSI MILO GALLERY}

Ezra Stoller’s “TWA Terminal Interior, 1962”

define an era of mid-century Modernism. Richard Meier’s intricate Atheneum, in New Harmony, Ind. (which I have also never visited), never looked so good. We love some of these images so much that we can forget to wonder about the rest of the building. Architecture, paradoxically, disappears behind photography.

ARCHITECTURE + PHOTOGRAPHY continues through May 26. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

Yet, simultaneously, just like Mick and Bianca Jagger, architecture and photography have an either titillating or creepy resemblance to each other. “Camera,” we know from the shopworn definition,

means “chamber.” When you describe a device by which an image, beamed through a lens, appears on the wall of a darkened chamber to create some kind of electrochemical stimulation, you could be describing a camera, an eyeball or an art-history lecture room. Accordingly, it’s all the more brilliant to see in one of the exhibition’s sections images from the Carnegie Art Reference Set. Andrew Carnegie sponsored these cardboard-mounted images of the great buildings of the world for reproduction and use as study aids at learning institutions everywhere. Then, at some point in the 1990s, the Carnegie Library encountered the Internet. “I’ve met someone else,” we can almost hear the library saying to the forlornly discarded stack of architectural photographs. Now, though, the Heinz Architectural CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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By Noel Coward

May 1–17 4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland A hauntingly good time!

DISCOUNT CODE: CP5OFF picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

JUST LIKE MICK AND BIANCA JAGGER, ARCHITECTURE AND PHOTOGRAPHY HAVE AN EITHER TITILLATING OR CREEPY RESEMBLANCE TO EACH OTHER. Of course, the relationships between revealing and concealing are always contradictory. We share the stoops and gateways with Johnston in such delicious privacy — where is everyone? — that we could forget to ask about her remarkable career as a high-powered Washington, D.C., portrait-taker. And issues of race in 1930s Charleston? They are effaced, not emphasized, in this kind of black and white. The photography that tells us the most about architecture is the photography that is not really about architecture at all, as curatorial text indicates in well-observed fashion. These images are more likely to have people portrayed humanely, as in Harold Corsini’s “Parking Lot at Bigelow Boulevard and Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA” of 1953. Or to have buildings and spaces used for social value, as in Barbara Morgan’s “Peace March–Madison Square– New York” (1940). Or maybe to have photography used with a greater degree of subtle, masterful manipulation than you thought possible, as with Tetsugo Hyakutake’s “Nihonbashi #2, Tokyo, Japan” (2010). The four chapters of this exhibition are compelling individually, but they also add up to much more than the sum of their parts. Whether the images are distant and objectifying or intimate and personal, this show welcomes a contemplative viewer, novice or expert, to whom architecture and photography’s best secrets are exposed. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[ART REVIEW]

TOWN PORTRAIT {BY DAVID BERGER}

Cynthia Cooley’s “The Head of the Ohio”

Blithe Spirit

Center is seeing them, and they’ve become a pin-up all over again. Unlike Stoller’s works, these come from unheralded photographers. And they are handled as reference material rather than adulated as artifacts. Why such a difference, the exhibit encourages the viewer to ask. And why is architectural photography so special? If it’s the work of Frances Benjamin Johnston in Charleston, S.C., the answer seems clear. With funding from the Carnegie Corporation, Johnston brought the values of historic preservation to a project of capturing Charleston’s architectural heritage in a series of nuanced gelatin silver prints. The perspectives are especially close and human-scaled. The aging textures, all chipping paint and gathering moss, make the passing centuries seem physically palpable.

Cynthia Cooley’s current exhibit at BorelliEdwards Galleries captures the essence of modern Pittsburgh while contrasting the landscapes of today with those of an earlier era. Now that the industrial soot has mostly vanished, Pittsburgh is revealed as a cosmopolitan city with breathtaking views of rivers, bridges and hills. Cooley, a nationally acclaimed painter who moved here in 1964, has the unique ability to integrate the ravages of the past with the charm of the present. Cooley admires the work of Aaron Gorson, known a century ago for his iconic images of Pittsburgh steel mills. She is stimulated by form but also incorporates a feeling of nostalgia. The paintings in Pittsburgh Evolves: Looking Back, Looking Forward, mostly in acrylics, witness the forging of steel, follow meandering rivers, inventory rotting old mills, showcase houses perched on the hills like glittering necklaces, and investigate the world of human activity with its coal barges, conveyor chutes and plumes of curling smoke. Viewers can easily relate to these landscapes featuring Pittsburgh as an oasis and a mecca. In “Back Channel,” the artist shows two scullers navigating a stretch of the Allegheny bordered by heavy foliage. A winter scene, “Northside Survivor,” shows the bare branches of a tree bent in the cold. There are views of empty city streets towered over by glass buildings. Other paintings depict Panther Hollow Lake, Troy Hill, the quaint houses of Greenfield and more. Although we might lament vanished jobs, Cooley believes Pittsburgh is “evolving for the better.” In an interview, she appeared pleased with the work of Riverlife, which works to make the rivers accessible. Cooley’s best paintings involve seeing a mundane scene from an uncommon angle. She cleverly organizes the evidence she sees, then distills her image with convincing perspective and lively colors. It is interesting how Pittsburgh casts a spell on the viewer. Somehow the complexity of the landscape is rendered simple in these paintings. In the exhibit, smaller photos of earlier paintings are hung below the newer ones to show how the landscape has evolved. Sometimes a factory turns to rust, a church is razed or the brownfields are left to go wild. But it is always the same hills, the same rivers that are left for us to enjoy. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH EVOLVES: LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD continues through Sat., May 10. Borelli-Edwards Galleries, 3583 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606 or www.begalleries.com


people to get them to feel anything. They seemingly can’t even be bothered to come up with a name for their newborn son, the reason for Inky’s installation in the household. His fashionable bassinet enjoys pride of place on set, but baby is little more than a sound effect (courtesy of Ryan McMasters).

[PLAY REVIEWS]

MEDIUM WELL {BY TED HOOVER}

HERE’S NEWS — Pittsburgh Irish & Classical

Theatre has announced a name change. Henceforth the company will be known as PICT Classic Theatre. Some of you may recall the tumult from last season, when artistic director (and company cofounder) Andrew Paul was forced out and Alan Stanford assumed the post. So it’s out with the old and in with the new — which makes the selection of Noël Coward’s Blithe Spirit as the season-opener especially ironic. In this 1941 comedy, our hero, Charles Condomine, is having his own old/new troubles. Seven years ago, Charles’ wife, Elvira, died and he’s now married to Ruth. As research for his new novel, he’s invited a local psychic over so he can study her lingo and techniques. The psychic, Madame Arcati, turns out to have more enthusiasm than sense and brings back Elvira “from the other side.” Unfortunately, only Charles can see and hear her. Which doesn’t sit at all well with Ruth.

BLITHE SPIRIT

INKY continues through May 17. Off The Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 724-873-3576 or www.insideoffthewall.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Daina Michelle Griffith (left), Vera Varlamov and Dan Rodden in PICT’s Blithe Spirit

get off. The jokes to be made in this slender set-up are made early and then often, and I found the play to be over about 40 minutes before Coward did. But, then again, 40 extra minutes of Coward isn’t exactly the worst thing in the world.

family. The character’s obsession with Muhammad Ali in particular, boxing in general, demands a physicality well realized with the help of fight director Randy Kovitz. Reality does indeed have to punch these

To be perfectly honest, everybody in Inky is reprehensible (including the adorable little daughter, played alternately by Evangelina Paul and Layla Wyoming). Tony Bingham portrays a nice array of levels of desperation (not all of them quiet) as the husband, Greg. Adrienne Wehr shows off Preffer’s costume design to nice effect in a portrait of the grasping woman willing to destroy all in her quest to get ahead. The Little Foxes meet Wall Street. All this venality does not undercut the comedy. There be many a chuckle and guffaw. A few jibes draw blood. If the story doesn’t quite cohere, at least it is pleasantly brief. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM CONTINUES ON PG. 42

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

continues through May 17. Stephen Foster Memorial Theatre, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

LOVE AND GREED

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

{BY MICHELLE PILECKI} At its core, Blithe Spirit is a drawing-room comedy about a house guest who won’t leave. And when it comes to drawing-room comedies, it’s pretty hard to top Coward. That Blithe Spirit plays out exactly how you think it will, and that Stanford has directed a very smooth production, isn’t a complaint. It’s fun and funny, with highly enjoyable performances. As Arcati, Mary Rawson’s a delightful mix of hocus-pocus kookiness and tweedy, prototypical British matron. Daina Michelle Griffith gives Ruth a Maggie Smith spin and is wonderfully funny. Charles is rather one-note — he mostly whines about how put-upon he is — but Dan Rodden finds enough variation to not just hold our interest but make us care about his fate. And Vera Varlamov, as Elvira, can slink across a stage like nobody’s business. Johnmichael Bohach has designed the quite-handsome set for the company to play on. And on. And on. The problem is that Coward just doesn’t know when to

A musical comedy written and directed by Brian Edward; musical arrangements by Jace Vek and Lisa Harrier.

WHAT A STRANGE little play. Off The Wall

MAY 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 2014

Productions’ staging of Inky echoes today’s talk of economic inequality, Thomas Piketty’s rock-star economics bestseller Capital in the 21st Century and the whole American love affair with greed. As in “Greed is good.” So ’80s, where playwright Rinne Groff sets her 1999 comedy. Direc t ed b y I n g r id Sonnichsen, Inky is snarky, funny, rather ugly and right on the money. Love and greed get all mixed up in an upscale family immediately drawn as dysfunctional by Rich Preffer’s scarred, monochromatic set. Their First World problems of always-more and neverenough are thoroughly skewed yet absorbed by the title character, a Second (Third?) World refugee au pair. Resigned that yuppies can’t bother to pronounce her real name, she answers to a nickname that portends a dark future. A strong comic presence, Abby Quatro dominates the play as Inky does the

Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m.

TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS • GROUP RATES AVAILABLE HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE • 1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT

For reservations please visit our website at www.mckeesportlittletheater.com or call 412-673-1100.

WHEN IT COMES TO DRAWINGROOM COMEDIES, IT’S PRETTY HARD TO TOP NOËL COWARD.

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PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

BARNSTORMING

[ART REVIEW]

SHARP SHOW

{BY F.J. HARTLAND}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

— billed as “the cleanest dirtiest show in town” — four Amish folks put on the naughtiest show they can imagine. The current offering at McKeesport Little Theatre is set in Jebadiah’s barn, located somewhere in the farmlands of central Pennsylvania. The 2006 comedy features parodies of Broadway classics including Chicago and West Side Story, and songs written in a Weird Al Yankovic style (i.e., familiar tunes set with new lyrics by Edward) with an “Amish” twist. For example, ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” becomes “Harvest Queen,” and the B-52’s “Love Shack” is transformed into “Hog Shack.” Edward also serves as director and has assembled an excellent cast. Andy Coleman plays Jebadiah, the emcee. Katelyn Nee portrays Goody Plenty, Mandie Russak is Apple Betty, and Kimberly Janosko is cast as Jezebel Jones. All four move well and nail all the jokes (even the bad ones). Also, they sing beautifully — so brava to music director Lisa Harrier!

AMISH BURLESQUE continues through May 18. McKeesport Little Theatre, 1614 Coursin St., McKeesport. $18. 412-673-1100 or www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

Opens May 22!

Featurin g such assongs :

Directed & Choreographed by Guy Stroman

“I Wa “I’ve Be lk the Line” en “The M Everywhere” “Folsom an in Black” Prison B lues”

Troy Burgess, Trenna Barnes & John Marshall in Denver Center Theatre Company's Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash| sh| Photo: Terry Shapiro

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com

THE CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE IS A PROJECT OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

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Groups 412-325-1582

Even in this high-energy, talented cast, Janosko stands out. With her facial expressions and perfect comedic timing, she wrings every drop of humor out of her role. Individual scenes and musical numbers are well paced. Sometimes, though, there are long pauses between scenes, and that hurts the momentum the cast has built. After one such lull in the action, the cast is forced back to square one to re-build the energy. The set (also by Edward) is non-descript. Had the narrator not told us it was a barn, the show could be taking place almost anywhere. However, the lighting, by George Schlict and Dylan Baker, is some of the best I’ve ever seen at McKeesport in years. Edward has created a unique — and often funny — evening of theater. However, the bad puns, the “daring” glimpses of ankles and the “quilt humor” are not deep enough to sustain a show of more than two hours in length. Edward should consider gleaning the best of the show and paring it down to a tight and seamless 60-75 minutes without an intermission. Definitely on the “keep” list should be the “Ye Olde Dating Game” scene (which features audience participation) and the musical number “Send in the Cows.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Courtney Cormier’s “Play Like You Mean It” {PHOTO COURTESY OF EARL AUSTIN}

IN BRIAN EDWARD’S Amish Burlesque

A segment of the lowbrow-art movement, led by once-underground names like Mark Ryden and Tara McPherson, seeks to disquiet by combining innocence and villainy. In Art Is Violent, at Revision Gallery, Courtney Cormier and Miss Dingo follow that lead. Cormier, a self-taught painter from Greensboro, N.C., sets her sights on the objects of childhood recreation, reinventing toys as tools of mayhem and instruments of warfare, occasionally pitting plaything against plaything to cast the toys as victims, too. She sidesteps the now-traditional atmospheric cast of quirky darkness and eerie spookifying, avoiding shadows and gloom as moodsetters. Instead, she utilizes rich color and vibrant clarity, allowing the danger to speak for itself. A piñata bludgeoned by a Louisville Slugger bursts to release not candy but shrapnel; a suicide bomber’s vest replaces plastic explosives with Play-Doh; a musical chimp awaits his solo clutching saw blades instead of cymbals. Cormier’s choice to swap out the PTA-approved without even a wink of complicity elevates her works steps above what the standard dosage of self-aware creepiness would permit. The toys that locally based Miss Dingo fiddles with in her paintings, meanwhile, are true to their manufactured form. Plastic and flat-hued, olive soldiers ready rifles, and pink babies crawl naked on all fours; festive, multicolored animals dangle from vibrant yarn. Elsewhere, children play and point and look beyond our view. There’s nothing particularly foreboding in the images themselves. But an edge is present, and not just metaphorically: Miss Dingo paints not on canvas, but on cleavers. The blades themselves are identical in size and shape, and while the handles vary a bit from knife to knife, the overall uniformity lends a tinge of mass-assembly. Some of the images are keenly unsettling in their own right, particularly those of costumed children kitted out for Halloween: They are costumed not in the homogenized store-bought regalia of the present, but in the cobbled-together, often viscerally disturbing gear we’ve seen in Depression-era photographs. But even when the pictures are gentle, we can’t escape the threat of the steel. Frequent gallery-goers are accustomed to the union of innocence and the sinister: Teddy bears whose fuzzy paws hoist Kalashnikovs no longer surprise us. But by eschewing shock value, the works allows us to go beneath the surface — and Art Is Violent provides ample depth. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ART IS VIOLENT continues through May 18. Revision Space Gallery, 5262 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201 or www.revisionspace.com


Live Premiere! Part 2 of The Invisible Photograph documentary series

an incubator for innovative thinking about the photographic image

Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments May 10, 2014 Join us as we reveal how an intrepid team retrieved more than 20 images made by Andy Warhol on a Commodore Amiga computer drawing program in 1985. 7–7:15 p.m. Documentary screening

nowseethis.org

7:15–8:15 p.m. Conversation with Cory Arcangel, Jon Ippolito, Golan Levin, and the Carnegie Mellon Computer Club. Reception follows.

Co-sponsored by

The Invisible Photograph, a project of the Hillman Photography Initiative, is a five-part documentary series investigating the expansive realm of photographic production, distribution, and consumption by way of the hidden side of photography.

$20 ($12 for members and people under 30 years old) to register visit www.nowseethis.org

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust presents

TRUST

Cabaret Cabaret at Theater Square TrustArts.org/CabaretSeries

ACCESSIBLE

SERVICES

412-456-6666 • Groups 10+ Tickets: 412-471-6930 N E W S

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“YOU MUST EXPERIENCE IT FOR YOURSELF!”

FOR THE WEEK OF

05.0805.15.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

NEW YORK TIMES

{SCREEN}

MAY 10 BlackStar ck kStar Fi kSt kS Fil Film lm Festival

+ FRI., MAY 09 PHOTO CREDIT: JENNY ANDERSON

{GARDENING}

The Neverland you never knew... until now.

MAY 20-25 • HEINZ HALL TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

412-392-4900 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

It’s not easy being green … except when it is. Today and tomorrow, shoppers at the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens’ May Market will find organic herbs, tropical plants, rain-garden varieties and sustainable shrubs and perennials for sale. Held on the conservatory’s front lawn, May Market offers hand-dipped fondant strawberries for snacking, and Phipps employees ees will be on hand to talk shop. op. Guests can also enjoy half-off off Phipps admission during ng event hours, to mark National Public Gardens Day. Angela Suico 9:30 a.m.7 p.m. Also 9:30 0 a.m.5:30 p.m. Sat., May 10. One Schenley Park, Oakland. Free. 412-622-6914 914 or www. phipps.conservatory.org atory.org

{ART} book Eat Your Roses, by local horticultural consultant Denise Schreiber, covers 51 edible flowers and ways to use them in your cooking. Schreiber — the Allegheny County Parks greenhouse manager — gives a talk and signs copies of Eat Your Roses today at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. Make a reservation via phone or the contact form on the store’s website. AS 1 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

+ SAT., MAY 10 {TALK} Flowers and food od are always nice gestures. When n you combine the two, it’s a double whammy. The

Today only, Kelly-Strayhorn Theater hosts the Philadelphiabased BlackStar Film Festival. The day-long event strives to illuminate the black experience by showcasing both short and feature-length works from filmmakers around the world. Among the many offerings are Boneshaker, a drama about the cultural struggles of a Ghanaian family living in Louisiana, and Diary of a Decade, a documentary about 1990s soul music. The latter film will be followed by a Q&A with director Jason Orr. Dan Willis 1-11 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15 festival pass or $5 per screening. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BECKY THURBER}

In April, artists associated with Unsmoke Systems ArtSpace, in Braddock, exhibited their work at COOP Gallery, a venue belonging to the Nashvillebased curatorial collective of the same name. Now, seven COOP members are returning the favor, with their show Terrestrial debuting tonight here. The work ranges from painting and sculpture to video, with inspiration drawn from the artists’ influences like “their personal home or work environment” and “the strange environment of land.” An ope opening a foreign land. reception for the show, curated by Virginia Griswold and Karen Seapker, is tonight. AS S 6 p.m. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Bra unsmoke@gmail.com or Free. unsmoke@gmail.c www.unsmokeartspace.com www.unsmokeartspace

{ART} Ryan Lammie e is an up-a up-andarts coming local artist and a entrepreneur; ventures ent trepreneur; his ventu include launching and managing Radiant Hall, a artists studio space for a Lawrenceville. in Lawrencev tonight, But tonig find you’ll fi Lammie and Lamm MAY 10 his art ar in Kendra d McLaughlin another anot space: spa Point Po Breeze’s Br


MainEvent Photo by Hyla Willis

Hyla Willis grew up mostly in Yuba City, Calif. In 1985, Rand McNally’s Places Rated Almanac named Pittsburgh “America’s Most Livable City” … and little Yuba City its least. The Sacramento Valley town, a prune and rice capital, responded with both indignation and imagination. “People burned Places Rated,” recalls Willis. “They started a prune festival.” (A Yuba prune orchard is pictured.) While Yuba lacked cultural amenities, Willis says it was welcoming: economically and ethnically diverse, with, for instance, a huge population of Punjabis — and a place where her own divorced mom raised three kids with lots of help from other women. Willis became a graphic designer and artist; she’s now also a media-arts instructor at Robert Morris University. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts named her its Artist of the Year; her exhibit, America’s Least Livable City and Other Works, opens May 9. While the mixed-media installation includes past work from subRosa — the internationally exhibited art collective of which Willis is a founding member — it focuses on video, photography and drawings telling historical and personal stories about “a place where no one is really from there or belongs there.” The opening reception also marks an exhibit of new work by the PCA’s Emerging Artist of the Year, painter Mia Tarducci Henry. Bill O’Driscoll Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Fri., May 9. Exhibits continue through July 20. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

Mine Factory, for the opening of Origins & Gravity, his first Pittsburgh solo show. The exhibit presents 45 pieces of new work in sculpture, assemblage, painting and collage. Bill O’Driscoll 7-10 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 22. 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. Free. www. ryanlammie.com

8 p.m. 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-15. 412779-4449 or www.playground productions.net

+ SUN., MAY 11 {OUTDOORS} It’s been rainy, yes, but the fat part of biking season is upon

{TALK} Especially since 2006’ss The Omnivore’s Dilemma, author Michael Pollan has Art by staked out his place Alex Blau as a sage of the real-food revolution. Pollan’s still at it, with his new book, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. And tonight he’ll be MAY 10 interviewed onstage Terres Terrestrial at the Hillman Centerr by Big Burrito Group chef Bill Fuller. A nonetheless. If not knowing us nonetheless book-signing follows. BO basic bike-repair skills is holding 7:30 p.m. 423 Fox Chapel you back from more road or Road, Fox Chapel. $55. trail time, check out Bike www.thehillman.org Maintenance 101. Today’s

free class, out by Dippy at Oakland’s Carnegie Library, is courtesy of both the Free Ride bike-recycling and education outfit and The Big Idea Bookstore, which will bring cycling zines and other literature. BO 3 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. www. thebigideapgh.wordpress.com

+ MON.,

MAY M 12

MAY 09

{FOOD} {F Th local-food season The begins in earnest today at be 3:30 p.m., when Citiparks’ 3:3 East Liberty Farmers Ea Market opens. The six Ma other Citiparks markets ot take their seasonal bows tak daily all week, in South da Side, Carrick, Bloomfield, Sid Beechview, Downtown Be (at the City-County Building) and North Side. Bui They’re joined on Thursday The a.m.-2 p.m.) by the (10 a Pittsburgh Downtown Pittsbur Partnership’s popular market in Market Square — and by plenty of other markets this week and in the weeks to

Phipps Conserv Conservatory ato t and Botanical Gardens’ May Market

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL G. WIEGMAN}

come. Local produce this time of year is largely limited to greens, but lots of markets have prepared foods. And can tomatoes really be that far away? BO www.citiparks.com

and Ryan Nicodemus, the blogger/author duo known collectively as The Minimalists, don’t necessarily endorse loincloths and subsistence farming. But they have written several bestselling books about their journey from six-figure, sports-car hedonism to a minimalist lifestyle with, as

{TALK} Ever consider surrendering all your worldly possessions? Joshua Fields Millburn

they put it, “less stuff, and more meaning.” Tonight, the pair stops by Downtown’s Amazing Books to talk about the dangers of materialism, the wonders of letting go, and their latest book: Everything That Remains. DW 7 p.m. 929 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-471-1899 or www.amazingbookspgh.com

{STAGE}

sp otlight

Local actress and playwright Kendra McLaughlin used to be a therapist, helping women work through emotional trauma. That experience inspired her one-woman show You Can’t Have an Orgasm With Me. On a Tuesday evening, three women visit their therapists. “One woman loves snakes, one woman talks on the phone and one woman believes in the transforming power of butterflies,” says the show’s synopsis. The show explores “universal truths about vulnerability.” The play, presented by McLaughlin’s company Playground Productions, debuts tonight at the Grey Box Theatre. AS

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The Pittsburgh International Children’s Festival, which this year moves from Oakland to Downtown, features kid-friendly theater from all over the world, as well as an array of free activities for the whole family, in spots including the outdoor LilyPad Park. Featured performances, at venues including the Byham Theater and the Trust Arts Education Center, include: Animals, a show that turns ordinary objects into creatures, from Spain’s El Retablo; Invisi’BALL, a live-action soccer game played without a ball, by Israel’s Nadine Animato Theater Dance Company; Hands Up, featuring Dutch puppeteer Lejo using his hands to create different characters (pictured); Little Steps, the story of a small child’s memories of family and friends, from Denmark’s Teater My; and Pinocchio, the classic story of the puppet who wants to be a real boy, by Quebec’s Théâtre Tout à Trac. Miracoco, an art installation from the U.K.’s Architects of Air, offers immersion into a colorful world created by an inflatable structure forming various tunnels and domes. Free activities like face-painting, hula-hooping and art shows will also be held throughout the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust festival, presented by EQT. For more details on show times, locations and activities, visit www.pghkids.org. Angela Suico 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Wed., May 14 through Sun., May 18. Cultural District, Downtown. $8 for performances, $5 for Miracoco. 412-456-6666 or www.pghkids.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AMISH BURLESQUE. Musical

$4 Straub Lager Cans on baseball game days at

comedy. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. BLITHE SPIRIT. Following a séance, Charles Condomine finds that his late wife Elvira is back & determined to have him to herself-much to the dismay of his current wife. Presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thu-Sat and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 17. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-PLAY. BOTTOMS UP! Confusion sets in in this farce as an earnest aerobics instructor unknowingly acquires the cash filled suitcase of two money launderers from Cleveland. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 10. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. CANDIDA. Comedy by George Bernard Shaw. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru

May 13. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. COMFORT ZONE. Play by Marlon Erik Youngblood about the aftermath of a shooting & how it impacts a community. www.pghplaywrights.com/zone Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru May 18. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., May 10, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC. An adaptation of the book by Jane Yolen. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru May 18. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 724-773-0700. DOUBT, A PARABLE. Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects the young Father Flynn of improper relations w/ a male student. Presented by Stage 62. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. Andrew

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, HOPE & GRAVITY. Nonlinear comedy about fate. Tue, Wed, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE. 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Absurdist exploration of Thru May 25. City Theatre, Aristotelean cosmology & South Side. 412-431-2489. physics. Presented by Paul I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE William Kruse & Luke Niebler. PERFECT, NOW CHANGE. Sun., May 11, 7 & 8 p.m. Joe DiPietro’s popular Pulse Gallery, Garfield. comedic look at 651-212-0791. relationships. Presented HAPPILY NEVER by The Legacy AFTER. Interactive Lineup. Sat, 7:30 p.m. murder mystery . and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru www per dinner theater. Fri., a p ty May 11. The Legacy pghci m May 9, 6:30 p.m. .co Theatre, Allison Park. Lamplighter Restaurant. 412-635-8080. 724-468-4545. I REMEMBER MAMA. HAPPILY NEVER AFTER. Heartwarming family story Interactive murder mystery about early 1900s immigrants. dinner theater. Sat., Presented by the Indiana May 10, 5:30 p.m. Mt. Hope Players. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Presbyterian Church, Penn Hills. Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru May 18. 412-793-0227. Philadelphia Street Playhouse. HEE HAW JAMBOREE. 724-464-0725. Tribute to America’s longestIF THERE WERE SUCH A running syndicated TV program. THING AS HAPPINESS. Play by Presented by Pohl Productions. Jennifer Schaupp. Part of the Fri, Sat. Thru May 17. Crowne Pittsburgh Fringe Festival. Sat., Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. May 10, 11 a.m. & 4 p.m. and 724-746-1178. Sun., May 11, 11 a.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 412-578-7500. INKY. A love-starved Manhattanite husband & wife struggling to satisfy their child-like desire to “have it all” during the 1980s hire Inky, a young Slavic nanny who’s obsessed with Muhammad Ali. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru May 11. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. NUNSENSE. Presented by The Baldwin Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 11. Baldwin Community United Methodist Church. 412-881-1002. POLYESTER THE MUSICAL. The story of the Synchronistics, an over-the-hill ABBA wannabe group that reunites after 20 years to perform at a public access TV telethon. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. PRESENT LAUGHTER. Comedy by Noel Coward. Presented by the Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 17. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. RUN FOR YOUR WIFE. Comedy by Ray Cooney about a cab driver who juggles two wives until he ends up in the hospital. Fri, Sat, 8:15 p.m., Sun., May 11, 2:30 p.m. and Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 15. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. THE UNDERPANTS. Steve Martin’s farce about young CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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KARAOKE THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the

“Best Party in Town”!

VISUALART

9:30PM to 1:30AM

$2.25

tles Yuengling Bottles

9:30pm-1:30am OVER 21 ONLY

1314 EAST CARSON ST.£- S O U T H S I D E W W W. D E E S C A F E . C O M

POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

$

“Mudra 5,” by Antonio Puri, from his show at Christine Frechard Gallery, in Squirrel Hill

NEW THIS WEEK 720 RECORDS. The Art of Julie Mallis. Opening reception: May 9, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Ligonier Oak Grove Art Club Exhibit. Opening reception: May 8, 7-9 p.m. Greensburg. 724-836-3074. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year/ Emerging Artist of the Year. Work by Hyla Willis & Mia Tarducci Henry. Opening reception: May 9, 5:30-9 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH ART GALLERY. Encounters: Art in the City. The culminating event showcasing artwork by Pittsburgh SciTech students from an experiential learning course offered by the History of Art & Architecture department. Opening reception: May 9, 6-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-648-2394.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

709 PENN GALLERY. Digital Hand. Digital fabrication works by students at the Penn State School of Visual Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Opening reception: May 9, 5-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-291-6499. ARTDFACT. Timothy Kelley. Paintings & sculpture. North Side. 724-797-3302. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by

Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Evolves: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Work by Cynthia Cooley. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Touch of Class II. Watercolors by Marci Evancho Mason. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232.

MOON TOWNSHIP

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$

3

LITE 20 DRAFT OZ

SATURDAYS

$

4

REDDS BEER OF THE MONTH IN MAY

$

3.50 LITE DRAFTS

ALL DAY FRIDAY FOLLOW @M2THIRD #ITSMILLERTIME #PITTSBURGH

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

WED, MAY 7, 8PM ROOTS ROCK

DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS THURS, MAY 8, 9PM ROCK/JAZZ/MIDDLE EASTERN

CONSIDER THE SOURCE PLUS LES RACQUET FRI, MAY 9, 9PM AMERICANA/FOLK/BLUEGRASS

THE HACKENSAW BOYS PLUS THE TRAINJUMPERS SAT, MAY 10, 9PM ROCK/JAZZ/JAM

BIG SOMETHING PLUS

BROCCOLI SAMURAI SUN, MAY 11, 8PM BRITISH ROCK/AMERICAN FOLK

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MON, MAY 12, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, MAY 13, 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

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T A U K 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

bride who is met with instant celebrity after her bloomers drop to her ankles at a parade for the king. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 11. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. YOU CAN’T HAVE AN ORGASM WITH ME. One-woman play by Kendra McLaughlin. Fri., May 9, 8 p.m. and Sat., May 10, 2 & 8 p.m. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744.

COMEDY THU 08 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 26 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MIKE STANKIEWICZ, MATT STANTON, DAVID KAYE. Funny Fundraiser. 5:30 p.m. Harrison Room, Jeannette. 724-837-1630. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 09 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

DAVON MAGWOOD, DILLON WESTON, OLIVIA TRAINI, BLAIR PARKER, CHRIS EDISON (LATE). 10:30 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MIKE STANKIEWICZ, MATT STANTON, DAVID KAYE. Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Franklin Park Banquet Hall, Sewickley. 412-980-5904. MIKE WYSOCKI,TERRY JONES, MATT WOHLFARTH, BRAD RYAN. Schitz & Gigglz Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Level 20 Sports Lounge, Bethel Park. 412-595-7953.

FRI 09 - SUN 11 DAN CUMMINS. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., May 10, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., May 11, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 10 AMISH MONKEYS’ MOTHER’S DAY SHOW. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. MIKE STANKIEWICZ, MATT STANTON, DAVID KAYE. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Monessen Elks #773. 724-684-9898.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG UNPLANNED HOUSE. Historic homes COMEDY IMPROV. open for tours, lectures Mon, 9 p.m. Thru www. per and more. Monroeville. pa May 26 Hambone’s, pghcitym 412-373-7794. .co Lawrenceville. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer 412-681-4318. church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. Flower Show. Feat. a variety of imaginative railroad displays enhanced by flowers, plants COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by & interactive features. Opens Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. May 10. Butterfly Forest. Watch Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. butterflies emerge from their 412-431-9908. chrysalises to flutter among STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN tropical blooms. 14 indoor rooms MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, & 3 outdoor gardens feature Strip District. 412-904-4502. exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. PINBALL PERFECTION. An eclectic showroom of fine Pinball museum & players club. art sculpture & paintings from West View. 412-931-4425. emerging artists. North Side. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ 724-797-3302. HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s AUGUST WILSON CENTER Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN Arabia. Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, once-hidden treasures exploring Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, Pittsburgh’s important role film & oral history narratives to as a Gateway to the West & a explore communities, cultures, national hub for the steamboat & innovations. Downtown. building industry in the mid-19th 412-258-2700. century. From Slavery to Freedom. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Are We So Different? Text, Western PA Sports Museum, photographs, interactive Clash of Empires, and exhibits on audiovisual components, & local history, more. Strip District. related artifacts challenge 412-454-6000. perceptions about race. Oakland. SOLDIERS & SAILORS 412-622-3131. MEMORIAL HALL. War in CARNEGIE SCIENCE the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital collection of military artifacts Dome (planetarium), Miniature showcasing photographs, Railroad and Village, USS Requin uniforms, shells & other related submarine, and more. North Side. items. Military museum dedicated 412-237-3400. to honoring military service COMPASS INN. Demos and tours members since the Civil War with costumed guides featuring through artifacts & personal this restored stagecoach stop. mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. 724-238-4983. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic University of Pittsburgh Jazz saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history MOTHER’S DAY BOOZY museum celebrating the settlement and history of the BRUNCH. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-486-0563. 412-224-2827.

SAT 10 - SUN 11

FORK FULL OF NOODLES: LIVE! Monologues, characters & video sketches that relate to current events & news. Hosted by Krish Mohan. Part of the Pittsburgh Fringe Festival. 2 & 8:50 p.m. and Sun., May 11, 7:20 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STUNT LAB COMEDY & VARIETY FESTIVAL. Featuring regional & national touring acts seen on late night talk shows & America’s Got Talent. 8 p.m. and Sun., May 11, 2 p.m. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

MON 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 13

WED 14

EXHIBITS

HOLIDAY SUN 11

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH AT THE NATIONAL AVIARY. Call to register. 10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-258-9445. MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH BUFFET. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-594-5304. MOTHER’S DAY BUFFET. 9 a.m.6 p.m. The Claddagh Irish Pub, South Side. 412-381-4800. MOTHER’S DAY MANSION TOURS. 12-3 p.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-767-9200. PAINT WITH YOUR MOTHER ON MOTHERS DAY!. Paint a Pittsburgh landscape. Bring a photo to recreate; there will also be scenes of the city on hand to use. No experience necessary. Geared towards those 18+. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

FESTIVALS THU 08 - SUN 11 PITTSBURGH FRINGE FESTIVAL. Performance art, theater, 1-person shows, puppetry, more. Various locations. Schedule at www. pghfringe.org Thru May 11

SAT 10 FRIENDSHIP FLOWER & FOLK FESTIVAL. Plant sale, arts & crafts vendors, live music, more. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Baum Grove, Friendship.

DANCE SAT 10 - SUN 11 UP TO CHANCE: A DANCE OF DRAGONS & DUNGEONS. Presented by Geeksdanz, part of the Pittsburgh Fringe Festival. 12:40 & 5 p.m. and Sun., May 11, 5:40 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 412-573-9387.

FUNDRAISERS THU 08 HOPE HAVEN HAPPY HOUR FUNDRAISER. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Franktuary, Lawrenceville. 740-317-1327.

THU 08 - SAT 10 CARRICK LIBRARY BOOK SALE. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. and May 9-10, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick. 412-882-3897.

FRI 09 GLOBAL SOLUTIONS PITTSBURGH BENEFIT YOGA SESSION. 6:30 p.m. BYS Yoga, South Side. 412-471-7852. WOMEN OF DISTINCTION AWARDS LUNCHEON. Benefits the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, Western PA & West Virginia Chapters. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-823-8272.

SAT 10 BOYS & GIRLS CLUB BENEFIT CONCERT. Feat. Vanessa Campagna, Slim Forsythe, & the Nied’s Hotel Band. 7 p.m.


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Antonio Puri. Largescale contemporary pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Bryan C. Mickle: Recent Watercolors. Lawrenceville. 814-419-9775. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Nature & the Metaphysical. Work by Caroline Bagenal & Don Dugal. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. On the Prowl. Paintings by Keith Schmiedlin. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Robert Pollard:Junk Collector & Scrabble King. Collages by Robert Pollard. Garfield. 412-924-0634.

Teamster Temple, Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. MT. WASHINGTON HOME TOUR. Benefits the Junior League of Pittsburgh. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. St. Mary of the Mount, Mt. Washington. 412-488-9270. YOUGH RIVER TRAIL 5K/10K & 2-MILE FUN WALK. Benefits

LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. MCG Invitational Arts Exhibition. Juried exhibition for students in Pittsburgh Public Schools. Awards reception: May 8, 6-9 p.m. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Actual Size: 2014 Senior Art Exhibition. Feat. work by 40+ students graduating w/ BFA & interdisciplinary art degrees. Oakland. 412-268-2409. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Criminal Damage. A mixed-media project based on street art, & street art themes, showcasing authentic graffiti pieces & ‘inspired’ pieces, photography & instillations. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. The 2014 Regional Show. Juried exhibit feat. works by regional artists in various

trail maintenance. www.bikewytc. org 9 a.m. Youghiogheny River Trail, Arthur H. King Access Area. 724-872-5586.

SAT 10 - SUN 11 SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY SPRING BOOK SALE. May 10-11, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

media, including watercolor, pastel, oil, acrylic, pottery, mixed media, more. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Generations. Works by Anthony & Philip Kram. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SOCIAL STATUS. impe’kyoonees. Contemporary work by NY-based photographer Applecubed. Downtown. 412-456-2355. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. Pop-Up Exhibition: Mark Panza & Rachel Yoke. Opening reception: May 9, 5-8 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

SUN 11 22ND ANNUAL SUSAN G. KOMEN PITTSBURGH RACE FOR THE CURE. Flagstaff Hill. 6:30 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-342-0500. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

27 CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. ROCK, RAGE, & SELFDEFENSE: AN ORAL HISTORY OF SEATTLE’S HOME ALIVE. Documentary screening & Q&A w/ filmmakers. Benefits Girls Rock! 5 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-440-8241.

MON 12 ART FOR CHANGE AUCTION. Verbal & silent auction feat. 200+ works of art & honorary chair Billy Porter. Benefits the PERSAD Center. 6-11 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-441-9786.

House-Made Liquor Infusions: VODKAS: PINEAPPLE E - CUCUMBER CUCUMBE BER R - GRAPE - ESPRESSO - PEAR-OLIVE - MIXED BERRIES. RUMS: PEACH. BOURBON: BACON - PEANUT. TEQUILA: MANGO - CHILI PEPPER.

––––––– Friday, May 9th –––––––

TUE 13

CHATLINE TM

FULL PINT BREWERY TASTING: GUS IPA - PERC E BUST COFFEE PORTER Complimentary Pint Glass with purchase. 8-10pm - Cheers!

1908 CARSON STREET l SOUTHSIDE l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

412.566.1861

Try for FREE Ahora en Español

THE ‘SPIRITS’ OF LIBERTY: WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA’S WHISKEY REBELLION. Whiskey tasting, dramatic readings of contemporary poetry & prose, live music, more. Benefits the Battle of Homestead Foundation. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 202-256-6116.

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

POLITICS

www.livelinks.com

WED 14

Teligence/18+

CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LITERARY THU 08

$2.50 MILLER LITE FIREBALL WHISKEY SPECIALS DJ QWIK 9PM TO CLOSE MUST BE 21 YEARS OLD WITH VALID ID.

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

SAT 10 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

MON 12 GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TALK & BOOK SIGNING W/ THE MINIMALISTS. Meet Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus, authors of Everything that Remains. 7-9 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

TUE 13

ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. Communication, leadership & public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. GET YOUR WORKSHOP ON. Creative writing workshop. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru June 24 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

www. per pa pghcitym .co

GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

Friday, May 9th

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 15

Costume Party

FRI 09

3 POEMS BY . . . Poetry discussion group feat. work by Anthony Hecht. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 08 - WED 14 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.


SAT 10 BREAKFAST W/ DINOSAURS. Breakfast, hands-on activities, more. 8-10 a.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. KIDS OPEN MIC. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. NATIONAL AVIARY: UNFEATHERED. Meet the mammals that share the birds’ world: Sloths, bats & rats. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical ecosystems & learn about conservation efforts using museum dioramas & collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Thru May 10 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

SAT 10 - SUN 11 HUSH: AN INTERVIEW W/ AMERICA. A reporter thinks she’s found a great story about a young girl w/ mystical visions from Hush, Kansas, but the attention has uncomfortable consequences. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. The story of four animal friends exploring the English countryside. Presented by Playhouse Jr. Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25 Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

TUE 13 HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. MOVE W/ ME. Ages 3-4. Second Tue of every month, 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. Thru May 13 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. OLIVIA THE PIG’S ADVENTURES. Games, stories, crafts. 6:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 116.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Orphée at Pittsburgh Opera, Benedum Center, Downtown CRITIC: Sarah Ivins, 23, a web developer and theater production manager from Fox Chapel WHEN: Sun.,

May 04 I am a long-time fan of the Pittsburgh Opera and I had to come see this production. I thought it was great; it was very modern, of course, considering the composer [Philip Glass]. But it was lovely. The music was fantastic, and all of the performers did a wonderful job. I really enjoyed the leads: Orphée and Heurtebise, and the Princess as well. I’ve been a supernumerary actor for the opera a number of times now. They’re certainly trying to reach out to a younger audience, and they’re always trying to include more people, which is a nice thing. With this production in particular, they’re working hard to keep growing opera and to let people know how wonderful it really is, and that it isn’t an old, stodgy thing. It’s accessible to all ages and cultures, and it’s more than just for the old folks. BY DAN WILLIS

SAT 10 KUNKLE PARK STAR PARTY. Presented by The Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 8 p.m. Kunkle Park, Washington. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70-mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors.org Sat. Thru June 14 WOODLANDS GOLF TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS & MUSIC FEST. www.mywoodlands.org 10 a.m. The Woodlands, Wexford. 724-935-6533.

SUN 11 SPRING WILDFLOWER WALK. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 13

WED 14 THE 28TH ANNUAL PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL. Feat. performers from Canada, Denmark, Israel, Netherlands, Spain, United Kingdom & the United States, plus hands-on activities. www.pghkids.org May 14-18 Cultural District, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

OUTSIDE FRI 09 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. 10:30 a.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

BEGINNER PADDLE. Ages 12+. 6-8:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 412-255-0564. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 14 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 08 ADVANCED ITALIAN

CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BALLROOM DANCE LESSON. Wine tasting to follow dance lesson. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DESIGN THINKING: A NEW “LANGUAGE” FOR SOLVING THE PROBLEMS CONFRONTING THE WORLD. w/ Kathleen Sullivan. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. HOUSING INFORMATION FAIR. 6:30-8 p.m. Landmarks Housing CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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[BURLESQUE] Resource Center, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LECTURE W/ MOSHE TAUBE. Holocaust survivor & acclaimed vocalist. 5:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1286. LUNCH & LEARN: START, MANAGE, AND GROW YOUR BUSINESS W/ REFERENCEUSA WEBINAR. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. PGH PHOTO FAIR SPEAKER SERIES. Feat. Sam Berkovitz of Concept Art Gallery. 7 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 646-436-4698. RELATIONSHIPS ARE THE FABRIC OF EVERY BUSINESS SUCCESS. Presented by the Institute for Entrepreneurial

HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F OR BR A IN I M AG I N G S T U D IES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks. Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

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Excellence. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Hilton Garden Inn, Canonsburg. 412-648-1389. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SKIN CANCER: SPOT IT & STOP IT. w/ Laura K. Ferris, MD. 6-7:30 p.m. UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. 412-784-4022. SPIRITS MOVING. Breath & movement prayers & play, for mind-body-spirit wellness. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru July 31 South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 09 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION MEETING: YOU CAN ALMOST TOUCH THE STARS. Guest speaker: Tom Field. www.3ap.org 7:30-9:30 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB OPENING PARTY. Food trucks, live music, outdoor games, more. bayardstown.com 6 p.m. Bayardstown Social Club, Strip District. CARNEGIE SCIENCE AWARDS. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-237-3400. CELEBRATE PITTSBURGH! Multicultural heritage event showcasing Italian culture in 2014 in addition to 30+ other cultures from around the Pittsburgh area. www.celebratepittsburgh.org 4-10 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. CRAFT HAPPY HOUR. 6-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. INTUITIVE EYE READINGS BY SHAY. Fri, 7 p.m. Thru June 27 Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 323-839-6866. MARKETING TO MILLENNIALS: BREAKING ALL THE RULES. Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series. 7:30-9 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SEAN RAYFORD}

Let the prudish or faint of heart beware; everyone else, step right up, because the

Carnivalesque Roadshow is coming to town. Featuring a variety of selfdescribed “acrobats, freaks, roustabouts, barkers, dandies and women of questionable virtue,” the Baltimore-based touring show aims to capture all the subversive charm of a 1930s-era traveling sideshow. See — among other spectacles — vaudevillian comedy duo Hot & Bothered, cabaret star Armitage Shanks, and burlesque performers Talloolah Love, Maria Bella and Pittsburgh’s own Elizabeth Couteau. 7 p.m. Sun., May 11. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-17. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603. YOUTH INVASION 2014. Teens take over the Warhol! DJs, fashion show, art activities, more. 5-10 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

FRI 09 - SAT 10 78TH ANNUAL MAY MARKET. Feat. horticulturists, local garden clubs, nurseries & farms, & other vendors. 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., May 10, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. HAUNTED PITTSBURGH DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR. Fri, Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 25 City-County Building, Downtown. 412-302-5223.

FRI 09 - SUN 11 ALL ABOUT THE BURGH, THE CULTURE TO KETCHUP TOUR! Fully guided 2-hour tour presented by Molly’s Trolleys. Fri, Sun, 12:45 p.m. and Sat, 10 a.m. Thru Sept. 27 Station Square.

SAT 10 BEGINNING TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9-10 a.m. Thru June 28 Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-362-9880. BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL. Film screenings, Ujamaa Collective Marketplace, panel discussion, more. kelly-strayhorn.org/events/ blackstar-film-festivalpittsburgh/ 1-11 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. A CONVERSATION W/ MICHAEL POLLAN. Lecture & book signing w/ the author & food guru. 7:30 p.m. Hillman


Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3040. FOLK FESTIVAL REUNION PARTY. Live music, food, festival artifacts & memorabilia, more. 8 p.m. Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-310-5737. HIGHLAND PARK HOUSE TOUR. Self-guided walking tour. hpccpgh.org 10 a.m.-3 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-980-4208. ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced students will engage in debates, conversations, more. Sat, 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. ITALY & ITALIAN FOR TOURISTS. Sat, 9 a.m. Thru May 24 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PSYCHIC MEDIUM LISA WILLIAMS. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: CARRIE FURNACE. 11 a.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. 412-391-2060 x 237. PYROTOPIA: FESTIVAL OF FIRE ARTS. Feat. fire performers, interactive fire games, flaming sculptures, more. www.pyrotopia.net 12 p.m. Westfield Park, Homestead. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. 8 a.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 x 130. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library,

Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FOR THE BIRDS. A visual SPANISH CONVERSATION symphony bringing together GROUP. Friendly, informal. At live performances w/ birds, the Starbucks inside Target. dancers, video, music, & Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, abstract puppetry. Sun, 6 p.m. East Liberty. 412-362-6108. Thru May 11 National Aviary, SPRING SKETCH CRAWL. North Side. 412-268-2409. 6-hour drawing marathon. OPEN MIC & CRAFT Bring a sketch book, drawing BEER SWAP. 6:30 p.m. instruments & a bag lunch. Bridgeville Public Library, Locations throughout the Bridgeville. 412-221-3737. Cultural District. trustarts. PENGUIN PAINTING culturaldistrict.org/event/6584/ PROGRAM. Choose colors pittsburgh-sketch-crawl & watch penguins create 10 a.m.-4 p.m. a work of art. 3 p.m. SPRING TEA. Tea & pastries, National Aviary, North Side. learn how tea came to the 412-258-9445. 18th century American frontier, WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET children’s activities, more. WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. 1-3 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Support group for life goals. Jeannette. 724-972-7396. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117. BOUNDARIES & SELF SWING CITY. Learn & practice CARE. A support group swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. for women 30+. Second Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. and Fourth Mon of every 412-759-1569. month Anchorpoint TRAPPED: ANDY Counseling Ministry. WARHOL’S AMIGA HOME BUYING EXPERIMENTS. WORKSHOP. Documentary 6 p.m. Landmarks premiere, part of The www. per Housing Resource Invisible Photograph pa pghcitym Center, Wilkinsburg. documentary series. .co 412-727-7855. 7-9 p.m. Carnegie MORNING SPANISH Lecture Hall, Oakland. LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. 412-622-3131. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FLY FISHING LESSONS. SCOTTISH COUNTRY Sat, Sun, 9-11 a.m. Thru June 14 DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., Orvis Retail Store, Mt. Lebanon. social dancing follows. No 412-343-1612. partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. SPRING WORKSHOPS: and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal GLASS FLOWERS. Thru Church, Mt. Washington. May 11, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 412-683-5670. Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. SPELLING BEE WITH 412-721-7812. DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL 412-431-5282. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. 412-683-3727. Fourth and Second Tue of ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Second and Third Sun Anchorpoint Counseling of every month, 2-3 p.m. Ministry. 412-366-1300. Carnegie Library, Oakland. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 412-622-3151. 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center BELLA AWARDS. Celebrating for Imagination, Garfield. excellence in beauty, hair, 412-924-0634. & fashion. 6:30 p.m. Soldiers & DRINK & PAINT! 6-9 p.m. Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. The BeerHive, Strip District. 404-519-1906. 412-904-4502. THE CARNIVALESQUE HISTORY OF RANDALL’S ROADSHOW. 8 p.m. TOY STORE. w/ Jack Cohen. Rex Theater, South Side. Presented by the Squirrel Hill 412-381-6811. Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Church of the Redeemer, Second and Fourth Sun Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. PITTSBURGH STRESS Carnegie Library, Oakland. MANAGEMENT GROUP. 412-622-3151. 5:30 p.m. Grace Wellness Center, CONTRA DANCE. Skibo Greenfield. 412-853-3189. Gym. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie WATERSHED AWARENESS/ Mellon University, Oakland. RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. 412-506-7998. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon ESSENTIALS OF A BELLYDANCE Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. DRUM SOLO. Intensive dance 412-488-7490 x 247. workshop. Sun. Thru May 18 Fitness with a Twist, South Side. 412-225-3302. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

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SAT 10 - SUN 11

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Celebrating 20 Years!

SHOW THIS AD FOR

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

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Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

CURRENTLY SEEKING ENTERTAINERS TO BE

KEY GIRLS 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarksof General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. CIVICS FOR GROWN UPS. Wed, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 28 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-681-7736 x 322. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FITNESS CONSULTATIONS. Wed RDL Fitness, McCandless. 412-407-0145. GARDENING THYME: LAND OF ABUNDANCE: PITTSBURGH & THE AMERICAN GARDEN. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. RESEARCHING PATENT & TRADEMARK INFORMATION. 9:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. LITTLE LAKE THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for its 2014 Looking Glass Theatre summer season of plays for young audiences. May 12 & 14. Seeking adults, teens & children, age 8 +. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

content/submissions. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FIRST TRINITY HOMELESS MINISTRY

Every Sunday afternoon, First Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church’s Homeless Ministry facilitates “Sunday Rounds,” where volunteers provide lunch and company to homeless and marginally housed people in the Oakland area. Volunteers work in groups of two or three, between 12:30 and 3 p.m. For information, email fthmdirector@ gmail.com or visit www.firsttrinity.net.

MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. May 13-18. All voice parts for volunteer singers & Professional Core singers. www.themendelssohn.org. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259.

SUBMISSIONS ART IN ACTION. Seeking

artists for a one-day interactive art show on June 1. More information & application at www.artinaction-hf.com. 724-413-4648. BLAST FURNACE. APPLE HILL Seeking poems for PLAYHOUSE. Blast Furnace’s Auditions for the 1st annual poetry Johnny Appleseed chapbook competition. Children’s Theatre ww. r w Submit one 2014 Season. pape pghcitym manuscript. No May 10. Male/female .co manuscripts permitted age 7-adult. Cold by current Chatham readings, 16-32 bars of a University staff, alum, or students, song to be considered for by Blast Furnace guest reviewers, musicals. www.applehill by poets who have previously playhouse.org/2014jactauditions. been published in his/her html. 724-468-5050. own chapbook. Visit https:// ARCADE COMEDY blastfurnace.submittable.com/ THEATER. Auditions for house submit for submission guidelines. improv teams. May 5, 7-8. Deadline: June 2. arcadecomedytheater.com/ BOYD COMMUNITY auditions. Downtown. CENTER. Seeking vendors for 412-339-0608. Gardenfest & Artist Market. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. info@boydcommunitycenter.org. Auditions for the annual O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. Summer Broadway Revue. BRICOLAGE PRODUCTION May 9-10. Seeking ages 13-19. COMPANY. Seeking two Prepare a song, & a monologue playwrights-in-residence for if possible. Schoolhouse In the Raw Festival. The focus Art Center, Bethel Park. of this year’s festival is devised 412-254-4633. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING work, developed in collaboration ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL w/ professional directors, COMPANY. Auditions for The actors, & a dramaturg. Sound of Music. May 17-18. www.bricolagepgh.org/

AUDITIONS

FULL LIST ONLINE

the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prizefor-short-fiction.html. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to sell plants & products at the annual Garden Mart. For more info & registration, call or email c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com. VERONA CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors for marketplace in June. Space is limited. Call for more information. 412-721-0943.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 26-year-old lesbian 18 months out of an eight-year relationship. I do not want to be in another monogamous relationship. I want to have a couple of sex buddies or, preferably, a couple of friends with benefits. In the last 18 months, I have had three FWB “arrangements” with different girls. The problem is, about two or three months in, each girl developed serious feelings and began talking about wanting to be with me exclusively. Each time, I had to reiterate my feelings and wound up feeling like an asshole. I don’t want to hurt their feelings, but I told them the situation from the start. Am I a bad person? Or are FWB impossible? FEARS WILTING BOUNDARIES

Friends-with-benefits arrangements might not be committed relationships, but they are relationships and — you might want to sit down for this — people have been known to develop feelings for folks they’re fucking on a regular basis. So if “a relationship” is something you want to avoid, and you don’t want anyone developing feelings, you should have one-night stands or NSA sex instead. (Those are also relationships, in my opinion, but they’re extremely short-term ones.) On to your questions: You are not a bad person. FWB are not impossible — there are a lot of successful FWB arrangements — and a desire for exclusivity or a future together is not proof someone entered into a FWB arrangement under false pretenses. And reiterating your disinterest in a committed relationship isn’t assholery. I tend bar with a hot girl who has a boyfriend. Hit on her anyway because I’m that guy. She says I can fuck her, but only if her boyfriend gets to watch and eat her out after. I was down for some traditional cheating, not this kinky shit. But I’d still like to fuck this girl. Any advice? BLUE-BALLED BALLER

Nope. I’m a 28-year-old straight female. I’ve only ever been able to orgasm if I self-induce while alone or if I’m on top during sex with a guy and my clit is being rubbed on the guy’s abdomen. (This works best with bigger guys.) When there is no abdomen rubbing my clit, I fake it. Do you have any suggestions? WANTS REAL ORGASMS

You’re having real orgasms, WRO. When your clit is fully engaged — using your hands or toys, rubbing against the abdomen of a big guy — you get off. Some women’s clits are fully engaged during intercourse without any extra effort (they can come “just” from fucking), but they’re in the minority. If climaxing during intercourse is important to you, you’ll have to sleep with big guys exclusively, rub your own clit during sex or instruct skinny dudes to rub your clit for you. My boyfriend and I have been together for two years. We were long-distance for the first year-and-a-half. When we were longdistance, he complained that it was hard to have a relationship over the phone. Now that we’re in the same city, he says our relationship has gone “stale” and he feels “trapped.” I’m sick of his complain-

ing. Does he want to be with me? What is he really trying to say? CONFUSING LAD IS NAGGING GIRL

“I’m intolerable and you should break up with me.” My fiancé is 35 years old. Between the ages of 20 and 30, he was in and out of jail. He has admitted that while in prison, he had sex with a [trans woman]. I know he loves having sex with [cis] women, but I found out that he watches [a porn genre that features trans women who have penises]. To be fair, he watches tons of porn featuring [cis] women. He loves watching [cis] women and having sex with [cis] women. My worry is that he wants to have sex with [trans women]. Is this a legitimate worry?

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

FIANCÉ LUSTS AFTER [TRANS WOMEN] HOTTIE

You would be foolish to waste time wondering whether your fiancé wants to have sex with trans women, as it’s clear he does. The question is: Can your fiancé be trusted to honor the monogamous commitment he’s (presumably) about to make to you? Or is he going to cheat with other trans or cis women? If you trust that he’ll honor the commitment, his taste in porn and his fantasies about other partners is irrelevant. I’m a married straight man. My wife and I have been married for five years. I thought my wife was GGG, so six months ago I brought up my desire to wear lingerie — she did not react well. We struggled a bit but gradually got back to normal, with me just not mentioning it again. My birthday is in May, so I proposed a weekend of indulgence of my fetish as a birthday present. I thought that would be easy enough to accommodate. I got totally and uncomfortably denied. I’m at a loss: I don’t want to destroy a marriage over a small sexual interest, but I don’t want to be locked into vanilla sex forever. Any advice on getting her to come around? PARTNER AGAINST NIGHTIES THAT INTRIGUE EAGER SPOUSE

Someone can be “open to new things” without being “open to everything.” So your wife might be up for exploring other sexual kinks, positions and circumstances, but seeing you in panties could be a “libido killer,” a term coined by Emily “Dear Prudence” Yoffe. If that’s the case, PANTIES, she may never come around. But if it’s just something she hasn’t had time to wrap her head around, your best course of action is to drop the subject for now. Let the wife see that your interest isn’t all-consuming and you still enjoy vanilla sex in gender-conforming underpants, and indulging this particular kink may come to seem less threatening.

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

Where can straight women find men who won’t make odd sexual requests? DUMPED ONE AGAIN

Graveyards. On the Lovecast, Dan chats with graphic novelist Ellen Forney about dating when you’re bipolar: www.savagelovecast.com

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.07-05.14

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20): Free jazz is a type of music that emerged in the 1950s as a rebellion against jazz conventions. Its meter is fluid and its harmonies unfamiliar, sometimes atonal. Song structures may be experimental and unpredictable. A key element in free jazz is collective improvisation — riffing done not just by a featured soloist, but by the entire group of musicians playing together. To prepare for your adventures in the coming days, Taurus — which I suspect will have resemblances to free jazz — you might want to listen to music by its pioneers, like Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus and Sun Ra. Whatever you do, don’t fall prey to scapabobididdilywiddilydoobapaphobia, which is the fear of freestyle jazz.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Apple and Exxon are the most valuable companies in America. In third place, worth more than $350 billion, is Google. Back in 1999, when the future Internet giant was less than a year old, Google’s founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page tried to sell their baby for a mere $1 million. The potential buyer was Excite, an online service that was thriving at the time. But Excite’s CEO turned down the offer, leaving Brin and Page to soldier onward by themselves. Lucky for them, right? Today they’re rich and powerful. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Gemini. An apparent “failure” may, in hindsight, turn out to be the seed of a future success.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “You can’t have your cake and eat it, too” is an English-language proverb. It means that you will no longer have your cake if you eat it all up. The Albanian version of the adage is “You can’t go for a swim without getting wet.” Hungarians say, “It’s impossible to ride two horses with one butt.” According to my analysis, Cancerian, you will soon disprove this folk wisdom. You will, in effect, be able to eat you cake and still have it. You will somehow stay dry as you take a dip. You will figure out a way to ride two horses with your one butt.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I know this might come as a shock, Leo, but … are you ready? … you are God! Or at least godlike. An influx of crazy yet useful magic from the Divine Wow is boosting your personal power way beyond normal levels. There’s so much primal mojo flowing through you that it will be hard if not impossible for you to make mistakes. Don’t fret, though. Your stint as the Wild Sublime Golden Master of Reality probably won’t last for more than two weeks, three tops. I’m sure that won’t be long enough for you to turn into a raving megalomaniac with 10,000 cult followers.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In your imagination, take a trip many years into the future. See yourself as you are now, sitting next to the wise elder you will be then. The two of you are lounging on a beach and gazing at a lake. It’s twilight. A warm breeze feels good. You turn to your older self and say, “Do you have any regrets? Is there anything you wish you had done but did not do?” Your older self tells you what that thing is. (Hear it now.) And you reply, “Tomorrow I will begin working to change all that.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Over 100 years ago, the cattle industry pressured the U.S. government to kill off wolves in Yellowstone National Park. By 1926 the wolves had all but vanished. In the following decades, elk herds grew unnaturally big, no longer hunted

by their natural predator. The elk decimated the berry bushes of Yellowstone, eating the wild fruit with such voracity that grizzly bears and many other species went hungry. In 1995, environmentalists and conservationists got clearance to re-introduce wolves to the area. Now the berry bushes are flourishing again. Grizzlies are thriving, as are other mammals that had been deprived. I regard this vignette as an allegory for your life in the coming months, Libra. It’s time to do the equivalent of replenishing the wolf population. Correct the imbalance.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I have no problem with you listening closely to the voices in your head. Although there might be some weird counsel flowing from some of them, it’s also possible that one of those voices might have sparkling insights to offer. As for the voices that are delivering messages from your lower regions, in the vicinity of your reproductive organs: I’m not opposed to you hearing them out, either. But I hope you will be most attentive and receptive to the voices in your heart. While they are not infallible, they are likely to contain a higher percentage of useful truth than those other two sources.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Kangaroo rats live in the desert. They’re at home there, having evolved over millennia to thrive in the arid conditions. So well adapted are they that they can go a very long time without drinking water. While it’s admirable to have achieved such a high level of accommodation to their environment, I don’t recommend that you do something comparable. In fact, it’s probably better if you don’t adjust to some of the harsher aspects of your environment. Now might be a good time to acknowledge this fact and start planning an alternate solution.

convince you to lounge around in fantasyland as you empty your beautiful head of all compulsions to prove yourself and meet people’s expectations? Will you listen to me if I suggest that you take off the mask that’s stuck to your face and make funny faces in the mirror? You need a nice long nap, gorgeous. Two or three nice long naps. Bake some damn cookies, even if you’ve never done so. Soak your feet in Epsom salts as you binge-watch a TV show that stimulates a thousand emotions. Lie in the grass and stare lovingly at the sky for as long as it takes to recharge your spiritual batteries.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Dear Pisceans: Your evil twins have asked me to speak to you on their behalf. They say they want to apologize for the misunderstandings that may have arisen from their innocent desire to show you what you had been missing. Their intent was not at all hostile or subversive. They simply wanted to fill in some gaps in your education. OK? Next your evil twins want to humbly request that you no longer refer to

them as “Evil Twin,” but instead pick a more affectionate name, like, say “Sweet Mess” or “Tough Lover.” If you promise to treat them with more geniality, they will guarantee not to be so tricky and enigmatic.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Fireworks displays excite the eyes and lift the spirit. But the smoke and dust they produce can harm the lungs with residues of heavy metals. The toxic chemicals they release may pollute streams and lakes and even groundwater. So is there any alternative? Not yet. No one has come up with a more benign variety of fireworks. But if it happens soon, I bet it will be due to the efforts of an enterprising Aries researcher. Your tribe is entering a phase when you will have good ideas about how to make risky fun safer, how to ensure vigorous adventures are healthy, and how to maintain constructive relationships with exciting influences. Homework: Upon waking up for the next seven mornings, sing the song that fills you with feisty hope.

get your yoga on!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Those who control their passions do so because their passions are weak enough to be controlled,” said writer William Blake. I think you will challenge this theory in the coming weeks, Capricorn. Your passions will definitely not be weak. They may even verge on being volcanic. And yet I bet you will manage them fairly well. By that I mean you will express them with grace and power rather than allowing them to overwhelm you and cause a messy ruckus. You won’t need to tamp them down and bottle them up because you will find a way to be both uninhibited and disciplined as you give them their chance to play.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Would you please go spend some quality time having non-goal-oriented fun? Can I

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES $1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

WORK

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014 www.publicallies.org/apply

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GENERAL HELP

GENERAL HELP

Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Network Radio Company Seeking PT Sports Anchor

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GENERAL HELP

HELP WANTED

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Carpenter Wanted

412-657-5558

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

ARTISTS WANTED

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WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

CALLING ALL ARTISTS!!

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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PITTBURGH CITYPAPER Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS!

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

A minimum of three years on-air experience is a must. Duties include commercial production, show preparation, remote broadcasts and personal appearances at both client and charity events. Working knowledge of broadcast equipment is required, including computer software for audio editing. Please email resume and demo to: Q929fmjobs@steelcitymedia.com dia.com Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

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SERVICES

Broadcasting Experience Pro and College Sports Knowledge Required

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Great Summer Job!

Telephone Sales Representatives National fundraising company seeks team members to represent our internationally respected clients.You can play a key role in the continuing success of environmental protection, human rights, public broadcasting, performing arts, and public interest groups.

STUDIES

The ideal candidate is articulate, motivated, an active listener, a quick

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Immunization... the Power to Protect

May is Hepatitis can be caused by viruses that attack your liver. Hepatitis B virus can be spread by intimate contact. Each year in the U.S., viral hepatitis kills 5,000 people and sends many to the hospital. You can protect yourself from Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B infections with vaccines. Talk to your health care provider about these immunizations that protect your liver, or contact the Allegheny County Health Department at 412-687-ACHD or www.achd.net.

Immunization strengthens what the body does naturally!

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MASSAGE

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

WELLNESS

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park (in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

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Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Downtown Massage 412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Open 24 hours 7 days a week

MASSAGE

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Grand Opening

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Forever Relaxation

Xie LiHong’s

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Bring this ad in and get a discount

Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Shadyside Location

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-441-1185

330-373-0303

412-798-1700

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.07/05.14.2014

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week!

Judy’s Oriental Massage

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GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Chinese Bodywork

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology

WELLNESS CENTER

TIGER SPA

Credit Cards Accepted


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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

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Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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GENERAL FOR SALE

FOR SALE

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WELLNESS

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LOCALLY RAISED

ORGANIC ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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REAL ESTATE SERVICES

REHEARSAL SPACE

ADOPTION

AUTO SERVICE

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Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

A DO P T I O N

Rent -A- Bay

ABC SELF STORAGE

Adoring, Financially Secure Couple Yearn for 1st Baby to Love, Adore, & Devote our lives. Expenses Paid Christine & Greg

1-800-562-8287

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

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COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

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DEUTCHTOWN'S "NEW URBAN VILLAGE" SPACE FOR LEASE

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

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Ideal For: Art Gallery - Museum Restaurant - Cafe Music Venue Fresh Grocery Store

PITTBURGH CITYPAPER

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412-261-3640 ›ùÄÊăė‘Ê.‘ÊÃ

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

Please Call: 724-684-4890 Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

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WORK

Find your next job in the Marketplace Work section.


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& 35 WINNERS EVERY SATURDAY!

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May 7, 2014