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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 04.30/05.07.2014

SHARE OF TROUBLE: AS PROMISED, PUC SLAPS RIDE-SHARING DRIVERS WITH TICKETS 12

PILLBOX HAT 1961

EVENTS 5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.9 – 5-10pm YOUTH INVASION 2014 Teens take over The Warhol! Tickets $5 students & adults/Members Free

5.16 – 5-10pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

She was the queen of Camelot.

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5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

her crown. Halston AND Warhol: Silverand Suede / May18 –August24, 2014 $QG\:DUKRO+DOVWRQ GHWDLO i7KH$QG\:DUKRO)RXQGDWLRQIRUWKH9LVXDO$UWV,QF

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THE HISTORY OF TRANSIT IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

This year marks Port Authority’s 50th anniversary of connecting Pittsburghers to destinations throughout the region. As we celebrate the past, we also look forward to a new era of transportation in Allegheny County. An interesting milestone in Allegheny County Transit: Back in the 1840’s, horse-drawn omnibuses first moved passengers between Downtown and Lawrenceville.

{EDITORIAL}

04.30/05.07.2014 04.30/05

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME V VO LUME 24 + ISSUE 18 {CO {COVER PHOTO OF DAN STIKER BY HEATHER MULL, WITH ADDITIONAL WI ARTWORK AR FROM FRINGE FRO FESTIVAL EVENTS} FES

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS] to see a greater commitment to 06 “Ithishope strategy and how we can make it work in Pittsburgh.” — Jay Gilmer of the Pittsburgh Initiative to Reduce Crime on the future of the program

[VIEWS] offer doesn’t seem right, and the 14 “One other doesn’t add up.” — Union official Shawn Foyle on two competing visions for the August Wilson Center

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE] goal is to get as many different 17 “Our textures, flavors, and as much glassware as we can on one menu.” — John Wabeck, of Spoon’s new cocktail-tasting menu

[MUSIC] section is named for a mode of 23 “Each transportation, from ‘Incline’ and ‘Bumper Car’ to ‘Dromedary.’” — Mike Shanley on Ben Opie’s new concerto

[SCREEN] Firth is superb as an everyday 40 “Colin fellow who can’t overcome the memories of his unspeakable past.” — Harry Kloman on Jonathan Teplitzky’s film The Railway Man

[ARTS] have all these theater companies, 43 “We but the community isn’t necessarily here.’” — Dan Stiker on one motivation for founding the Pittsburgh Fringe Festival

[LAST PAGE] I am back in neighborhoods! And 63 “Here having the best time.” — Communityrevitalization expert Dave Feehan on getting back to the Pittsburgh communities where his career began

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 N E W S

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

REAL FLAVOR. REAL FRESH.

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

The Carvery takes you to delicious new heights. This endless dining experience offers a full menu of comforting, mouthwatering favorites. It begins with an abundance of soup, salad, and antipasti. Then, visit our carver and choose from the finest slow-roasted rotisserie meats. Finally, you’ll complete your feast at the tastiest dessert station in town. The Carvery – it’s a culinary adventure like no other.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“VERY FEW OTHER STRATEGIES CAN PRODUCE ANY RESULTS; THIS REALLY IS ALL THERE IS.”

Re: Arbitration gives officers a method of fighting termination, but what recourse does the public have when they’re rehired? (April 23) “Like any legal process, arbitration requires update and clarification — and protection from those looking for a scapegoat.” — Web comment from “C. Bosetti”

New Filmmakers Galleries exhibit captures last breath of fading ads (April 23) “I went last night, it is really remarkable and well done. It does seem a bit sad to realize that many of these faded ghost signs are gone already, but it is uplifting that Kelly [Bogel] and Will [Zavala] have spent the time to [document] what is left of them. It definitely makes me remember times in Wilkinsburg as a child, or speeding images seen from the window of a train as it went between Greensburg and McKeesport on to Pittsburgh.” — Web comment from “sean.nolan”

PIRC

UP

Languishing crimereduction program getting new life from new administration {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

“Many are upset about the Joe Paterno on a bench statue. I’m not. Joe sitting around doing nothing forever seems appropriate to me.” — April 23 tweet from sportstalk host Tim Benz (@TimBenz970ESPN)

“Glad it’s not my job to try to persuade women to vote for anti-public-school, pro-vaginal-probe Tom Corbett.” — April 27 tweet from

Susan Spicka (@SusanSpicka)

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HEN THE Pittsburgh Initiative to

Reduce Crime was launched in 2010, it offered the hope of reducing Pittsburgh’s rising homicide rate. Cities where similar programs were implemented have seen decreases in homicides of as much as 30 percent. But since PIRC’s inception, Pittsburgh’s homicide rate has barely declined — two years in, the number of homicides was roughly the same as it was the year before the program began — and the initiative itself has stagnated since 2012. That could change under the administration of Mayor Bill Peduto, who will be hiring a new public-safety director and chief of police, two positions integral to PIRC’s future. And PIRC is already moving forward with new components of its program, having recently launched a support group for ex-offenders. “Since its inception, PIRC has been largely ignored both by the administration and the police themselves,” Peduto says. “We want to enhance it … and work with outreach directly to those that have been involved in crime and try to find opportunities to get them out of crime.” PIRC is a homicide-deterrence strategy,

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

PIRC Director Jay Gilmer

designed to reduce gang- and group-related homicides by directly engaging with the offending population at call-in sessions. PIRC is based on the “Ceasefire” model developed by City University of New York professor David Kennedy, who first implemented the model in Boston. During his time there, youth homicides took a 70 percent dive and the city’s overall homicide rate decreased by 30 percent. In January 2012, PIRC produced a report on the program’s progress. According

to the report, homicides fell by 20 percent and gun violence fell by 16 percent in Pittsburgh between the start of 2010 and the end of 2011. PIRC began operations in July of 2010. But according to the annual report by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, the city’s homicide rate didn’t actually change from 2009, the year before PIRC started, to 2012. In both years, homicides numbered 40. However, that number is lower than the 10-year average homicide rate of 54. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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presents

PofE T the WEEK

The program was first supported in Pittsburgh by District 9 Councilor Rev. Ricky Burgess, whose district suffers from the highest crime rates. PIRC receives $300,000 annually; the funds are split between its service-provider partner, Goodwill, and community-outreach partner, Youth Opportunities Development. YOD is tasked with street outreach and finding at-risk individuals or those already engaging in criminal activity to connect them with social services. Goodwill is tasked with providing those services such as education, employment opportunities and housing assistance. “[Our partners] help us to get a greater understanding of street dynamics and get people to call in,” says Jay Gilmer, PIRC’s director. “They know who the hottest people on the street are so they can encourage them to call us.” But one component of PIRC was largely absent long before leadership in the publicsafety department was shaken up. Since 2011, PIRC has stopped doing “call-ins,” a tactic in which police, community groups and service providers meet with gangs to provide them with an alternative to criminal activity by connecting them to employment and education opportunities offered through PIRC’s socialservices provider. Call-ins are the crux of the Ceasefire model. During these sessions, members of the city’s various groups involved in criminal activity are given an option to accept help, and are told if they choose not to accept, they and their entire group will be punished. Two call-ins were done in 2010 and another was done in 2011. “When we started, we recognized those groups responsible for most of the violence in the city,” says public-safety director Michael Huss. “We called those people who were involved in these groups and they had an opportunity to take the services that PIRC provides. Not all these folks want to change, but the ones that do, we’ve had some success.” Nineteen in-

dividuals from the first call-ins contacted PIRC looking for services. But neither Huss nor Gilmer would say why PIRC hasn’t continued to do call-ins, beyond blaming it on uncertainty in public-safety leadership and changes with the police chief. “We’ve talked about doing another callin at some point, [but] we’re just not ready to do that,” Huss says. “We’re waiting for the leadership in public safety to be decided,” says Gilmer. “Once that’s done, we’re optimistic down the road we’ll be able to be more effective.” Police involvement is critical to PIRC. After the call-ins, law enforcement must follow through with their threat and respond if a homicide involves an individual from the groups brought in. Responses include checking in on individuals in the identified groups for probation and parole violations. From May 2011 to October 2012, the police conducted nine responses following homicides and several arrests were made. “Every time there’s a homicide, it’s reviewed [to see] whether it’s group- or gang-related,” Huss says. “When you realize one group is involved, we’ll go out and focus on that group, the groups they associate with.” But the responses have also stopped. The last was done in October 2012. While PIRC’s impact on homicides is hard to determine, Gilmer says, “If we have prevented even a few homicides, I think that’s good.” He also contends the Ceasefire model is the best homicide-reduction model because of the reduction in homicides it has produced in cities like Boston. “I do believe the Ceasefire strategy is the best one in the world,” Gilmer says. “Very few other strategies can produce any results; this really is all there is.” Others have been critical of the program. In a subcommittee of Mayor Peduto’s transition team members recommended changing the PIRC program. “All of the discussion and ideas that our subcommittee heard stressed proactive

“THERE HAS BEEN A LOT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS, A LOT OF ACHIEVEMENT.”

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CONTINUES ON PG. 10

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: SATURDAY, MAY 3, 10:00-11:30 AM

WOOD WINDOWS - MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR

Regis Will, member of Western Pennsylvania Woodworkers Association and historic preservation enthusiast, will give a presentation on maintenance and repair of wood windows.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

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rather than reactive presence in the community,” says David Garrow, co-chair of the committee. “Their view was that PIRC was more reactive.” The committee recommended refashioning PIRC after models used in Chicago and Baltimore, where law-enforcement officials target criminal-activity “hot spots” and high-risk individuals to prevent gun violence. It differs from PIRC because police responses, where officers check for parole and probation violations, would happen before a shooting occurs, not after. Peduto says he supports a more proactive approach. Meanwhile, PIRC launched a new component of its program in January: a support group open to any ex-offender. Dubbed the Positive Initiative to Reinforce Change, the support group of around 20 individuals meets every Tuesday. “Services alone weren’t getting the job done,” Gilmer says. “Until you change the peer group, you’re not really changing anything. The attitude adjustment is the hardest part.” The goal of the support group is to surround ex-offenders with positive influences (it’s led by ex-offenders who have turned their lives around) and connect them to the social services offered through PIRC. Ex-offenders are asked to develop a kind of life plan to help them achieve their goals in education and employment. “A lot of times, people get out of jail and they have no idea how to find work

that can help to sustain them,” Peduto says. “They either find work that provides them little opportunity and an inability to pay bills, or they find the most lucrative career that they can which is going back to crime.” Through its community-outreach partner YOD, PIRC is also shifting its focus to working more with community members. “We do try to get more facts out to community members about what they can do in their streets,” Gilmer says. “Most of the people who are committing homicides have prior arrests, so they aren’t allowed to be hanging out with the wrong people. So if they’re doing that, I’m sure their parole officer would like to know about it.” In this way, individuals can be active participants in keeping their communities safe. They can report parole violations to law-enforcement officials and put individuals engaging in criminal activity in jail before they commit a homicide. And despite how PIRC has changed, Gilmer believes the program has had an impact. In the first seven months of the program, PIRC received 27 calls from at-risk individuals requesting services. While four dropped out and two didn’t require services, the rest received help with employment, emergency financial assistance and obtaining their GED. “There has been a lot of accomplishments, a lot of achievement,” Gilmer says “There are a lot of people who have done really well who have gotten services from us.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{BY DAN SLEVA} WHEN THE STATE Public Utilities Commission announced in February that it would be cracking down on drivers working for local ride-sharing businesses, it garnered little concern from the companies, the drivers and even public officials who supported the services. Last Tuesday, the PUC stayed true to its word and issued 23 citations to ride-sharing drivers, following through on the agency’s promise when Lyft and Uber launched their services without applying for the proper licenses. Sting operations were conducted by an undercover PUC enforcement agent who used ride-sharing apps to hail rides around the city. All of the citations were filed at district magistrate Gene Ricciardi’s office in the South Side. A clerk at that office says they were in the process of mailing out the citations late last week. They were all summary offenses for the unauthorized operation by carriers and brokers. The citation carries a fine of between $25 and $300 and will be set by Ricciardi. PUC spokeswoman Jennifer Kocher says that more citations are possible. “Anyone who is providing transportation for compensation without having the proper license from the PUC is at risk for being cited,” Kocher says. Kocher says the PUC is reviewing applications for experimental service by Lyft and Uber, and one from Yellow Cab that would be called Yellow X. Yellow Cab was actually the first to apply for the new license on March 13. Lyft and Uber followed a month later. According to Yellow Cab’s application, drivers would be equipped with iPads and would operate the ride-share service from their own vehicles. They would also be dispatched by Yellow Cab to help handle overflow calls during peak times. The next meeting of the PUC is May 22, but the agenda for that date has not yet been set. Mayor Bill Peduto has come out strongly in favor of ride-sharing. His spokesman, Tim McNulty, says that the mayor’s office has not looked into the citations, but says they reinforce the need for Harrisburg to allow the new business model. Peduto met last week with Yellow Cab CEO Jamie Campolongo, a meeting that the mayor says was productive and in which he and the Yellow Cab head agreed to work together to allow ride-sharing as long as there are common-sense safety rules, Mc-

{PHOTO BY KEVIN SHEPHERD}

A Lyft car en route

Nulty said. As word of the citations spread, both Lyft and Uber promised to pay any driver’s citation. “We have received reports that local Lyft drivers have been cited in Pittsburgh. We are … covering the cost of the citations and any necessary legal assistance,” Lyft spokeswoman Paige Thelen says. On April 25, Uber spokesperson Natalia Montalvo said that no Uber driver had yet said they were cited. Still, the company’s public-relations team went into action, sending an email to customers with the names of the PUC commissioners and their email addresses and phone numbers. The email stated “some prefer the old status quo of limited choice in transportation options: The Public Utility Commission has been ticketing our drivers in an attempt to keep Pittsburgh from moving forward.” Montalvo says that language was proactive to get everyone involved. “At times, it takes the public voice to get officials to act in the best interests of their citizens and not special interests,” Montalvo says. Kocher says the PUC welcomes the feedback and adds, “Everyone’s comments will be filed as part of the public comment in the case.” Cited drivers could not be reached for comment, but other drivers for the two companies say the reassurances offered by their employers have eased their minds. Marc Stern, an Uber driver, reached out to local managers. “My general manager said if I get any citation, Uber will cover it,” Stern says. “They said not to worry about it and told me that the mayor is on board and the PUC commissioner is on board. “I think it would be political suicide to shut us down.”

“I THINK IT WOULD BE POLITICAL SUICIDE TO SHUT US DOWN.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

TOO MUCH DRAMA? Wilson Center furor may be missing the point {BY CHRIS POTTER}

pyrot pia arts festival of rfithre e Waterfront)

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HERE’S ONE THING that makes August Wilson’s legendary “Pittsburgh Cycle” a great work of art: In the 10 plays comprising it, Wilson never pretends there are easy answers. It’d be nice if we could say the same of efforts to rescue the Downtown cultural center that bears his name. Right now, though, there’s a lot of melodrama over whether to make a stock villain of Judith Fitzgerald, the court-appointed receiver charged with clearing the August Wilson Center’s $10 million debt. The subplot emerged when the Pittsburgh Foundation and two other charitable enterprises abandoned their $4 million bid to acquire the center. In a statement, the foundations faulted Fitzgerald for seeking to “transfer [the] iconic facility to a commercial enterprise” — an investment group offering $9.5 million in exchange for being allowed to build a hotel above the center. The group’s spokesman, Matthew Shollar, says the bid is a chance to shore up the center’s finances, turning a “national story of failure … into a story of success.” But days after the foundations withdrew, Mayor Bill Peduto and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald asked Judge Lawrence O’Toole to remove the receiver before she could pursue that bid. Judith Fitzgerald, they alleged, was downplaying the “public interest of preserving the [center’s] mission” and failing to engage in “meaningful interaction with the local African-American community.” Then, at an April 28 hearing before O’Toole, attorneys for the foundations and the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority charged that Fitzgerald had ignored possible alternatives to a sale. Fitzgerald, alleged foundation attorney Carolyn Duronio, gave her clients the impression “they were not to interfere” in her plans. It’s hard to know if there’s a villain here: Much of the dialogue has taken place offstage, in closed-door talks. Fitzgerald hotly insisted that when she sought financial support from foundations, she was “flatly denied.” Some bankruptcy experts, meanwhile, say she’s being miscast. Fitzgerald’s job is “to maximize the value of the property for the creditors. That’s it,” says Mark D. Yochum, a Duquesne University professor who teaches bankruptcy law. And that’s the rub. As proposed, the foundations’ plan involves not just of-

fering their own money, but requiring creditors to become philanthropists, too. Dollar Bank, for one, would lose $3 million of a $7 million mortgage; other creditors would likely get nothing. For example, the Wilson Center owes stagehands some $30,000 in back wages, dues and benefits, according to Shawn Foyle, the secretary-treasurer of the union representing them. Foyle worries about both proposals. While the hotel operators have pledged to provide a home for the center, they’re an unknown quantity; Foyle worries they might curtail use of the center’s theater space. By contrast, while the foundations have a long history of supporting the arts — including cultural facilities where Foyle’s members work — their bid “doesn’t offer anything to creditors. And that includes us.” In the end, Foyle says, “One offer doesn’t seem right, and the other doesn’t add up.” Would it dishonor Wilson’s legacy if his center ends up in a hotel’s shadow? Maybe. But stiffing center workers and vendors (some of which are black-owned) risks tarnishing that legacy too. Maybe it’s too glib — too easy — to say those who oppose the hotel plan should just raise their bid. Foundations and taxpayers have already donated some $30 million to the center. But the tragic irony here is that the difference between the offers — $6 million — is chump change for a public-private bailout. In 1997, government agencies spent twice that on Civic Arena improvements for the Pittsburgh Penguins. And the whole building was later scrapped anyway. Foyle, for one, says his union might contribute to a solution, if invited to the table. “Plenty of us might put in a couple cents, if we know what you’re talking about.” Maybe the rest of us would, too. So far, though, civic leaders have been a day late as well as $6 million short. O’Toole noted that April 28 was the first time either the URA or the foundations had appeared before him. “I’ve heard a lot of orations,” O’Toole said, but “nothing has happened.” That’s the definition of a poorly written play. And if civic leaders want to rewrite the ending, they may need a better script.

“ONE OFFER DOESN’T SEEM RIGHT, AND THE OTHER DOESN’T ADD UP.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

Spring

Mom

CINCO DE MAYO Blossom Weekend Celebration! Celebrate

and

in Lawrenceville!

Tour 2014 Fri. TO Sun.

*

May 5th- Music, Drink Specials and prizes!

May 9-11

PICK UP FREE PACKETS OF SEEDS

at 30 participating locations ! See what’s new for Spring. Be inspired and stay refreshed at our tour’s Take a Break spots. This is a free & family-friendly event. Hours vary by stop location.

QUESTIONS? Call 412.683.6488 for more info or visit lvpgh.com.

Original Design by Jay Bernard

Sponsored by

PRESENTS

THE ROBINSON INTERNATIONAL

SHORT FILM COMPETITION AWARDS GALA

* No taco night on Cinco de Mayo

Seven short films will be screened followed by an awards ceremony and reception with the winning filmmakers. Tickets: $10, available at www.JFilmPgh.org or at the door beginning at 7 p.m. JFilm is a program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh.

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Shenanigans

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

DE

SI

the

ON

THE MEATBALL SECTION OF THE MENU IS ARRANGED IN A BUILD-YOUR-OWN FASHION

CHEESE US {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Food truck. Mac-and-cheese. Pittsburgh. What could go wrong? So thought Tim Tassone. The seasoned chef (Sewickley Hotel, Map Room, Café Phipps) was primed to realize his dream of delivering creamy, gourmet starch-and-dairy curbside. But even this former mortgage-industry worker couldn’t get banks behind him. Eventually, Tassone turned to private investors. His golden Mac & Gold truck rolls this week. Mac-and-cheese is classic comfort food, and Tassone, 36, touts his proprietary sauce made from four local cheeses. But he also recognizes the allure of toppings. He’s got Lobster Mac (“the ‘prime rib’ on the menu”), Eggplant Parmesan and a Pittsburgh Cheesesteak Mac. There’ll be other a la carte protein and veg options, and even gluten-free pasta and, for dairy-avoiders, flavored olive oil instead of cheese. Sides include rosemary-garlic frites and a salad accented with quinoa and grapefruit. Tassone, of Mount Washington, and co-founder Athena CE will staff the 23-foot truck (a 2008 Ford step van) at “a healthy rotation of lunch spots,” he says. They’ll also cater and hit events and private parties. As of last week, before spooning a noodle, he had more than 1,000 Twitter followers. But isn’t mac-and-cheese a little sloppy for street food? Mac & Gold will serve in snack-size cups or meal-size containers — paper-based, leak-proof, microwavable and single-flapped for convenience. “You can walk away one-handed,” says Tassone. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More at www.facebook.com/MacAndGold or on Twitter @macandgoldtruck

the

FEED

Opa! It’s time e for the annual al

St. Nicholas’ s’ Greek Food od Festival, held h ld Sun., May 4, through Sat., May 10. The week-long event offers homemade Greek food (entrees, quick bites and pastries), music and dancing, and, hopefully, a chance to enjoy the fare in the warm spring air. You can even pre-order online. 419 S. Dithridge St., Oakland. 412-682-3866 or www.stnickspgh.org

MEATBALL MEDLEY

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE MODEL for expanding restaurants

keeps evolving. While the first restaurant chains were comprised of replicas of an original, popular restaurant, the latest trend in culinary empire-building is to have several related establishments at different points on the spectrum between casual and fine dining. A local case in point is Sienna Mercato, a new venture of the restaurant group that brought the rustic Italian restaurant Sienna Sulla Piazza to Market Square, led by execuS tive t chef Matthew Porco. Rather than spend years building an Italian dining empire y across the city, Sienna Mercato aims to syna chronize and centralize, with three distinct c establishments occupying a floor each of e one o building in the Cultural District. But just as Rome was not built in a day, Sienna Mercato is opening in stages. The “Mezzo” level will soon house a woodfire pizza oven, charcuterie and wine bar, and the rooftop will have a beer garden. The first floor has opened as “Emporio: A Meatball Joint.” In a revisionist gourmet-food culture

Spaghetti with Bolognese sauce and spicy pork meatballs

that has recently elevated mac-and-cheese and the hamburger, a celebration of the lowly meatball was perhaps inevitable. Yet this is exactly what it is; Emporio doesn’t try to tart up meatballs with fancified ingredients or preparations as much as lavish love and attention on its humble subject. Not that there is no inventiveness. Cleverly, in addition to meatballs, there are a number of other spherical items, from the traditional arancini (cheesy rice balls) to round ricotta donuts.

SIENNA MERCATO EMPORIO

942 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-281-2810 HOURS: Sun.-Tue. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Wed.-Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight PRICES: $3.50-11 LIQUOR: Full bar

Special mention goes to buffalo-chicken balls, served with long, curling “noodles” of celery and a chunky bleu cheese sauce that created an ersatz bowl of spaghetti and meatballs. And the pleasure didn’t stop with

the presentation: The balls were moist with a suitably crisp exterior, the buffalo sauce assertively spicy, and the celery arguably better in this format than the traditional sticks, with plenty of crunch but less work for your teeth and more surface for bleu cheese and buffalo sauce, deliciously, to meld. Tater tots have become a minor trend, and Emporio employed them as part of a major trend, poutine, in this case made with chicken gravy. The crunchy exterior of the tots held up very well to the sloppy poutine and protected the tender interior. The meatball section at the heart of the menu is arranged in a sort of build-yourown fashion. There is a choice of classic beef, pork, chicken or vegetarian balls, plus one daily special; an array of sauces; and a selection of preparations: sliders, panini, hoagie, or sauced on a plate. Additionally, there are sides — mostly starches — to round out your meal. To support this versatility, the balls themselves are a mid-size three ounces, a couple inches in diameter. Unfortunately, our meatball experience went from bland to worse. A classic beef CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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MEATBALL MEDLEY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

ball in “creamy Parmesan” sauce tasted basically like ground beef in bechamel, with nothing to distinguish the meatball and none of the intense, nutty flavor of Parmesan cheese. Tomato risotto was at least an effective side, the creamy, tender-firm Arborio rice brightened with fresh-tasting tomato sauce, not chunks. The spicy pork wasn’t particularly fiery, but at least it offered the flavor that was missing from the beef meatball. A toasty ciabatta roll and well-melted provolone made for a nice sandwich. But disappointment struck again with a Bolognese sauce redolent of sugar and spices we associate more strongly with curry. Bolognese is famous for being meaty, just held together with a scant bit of tomato, and faintly sweet with minced onion and carrot. But Emporio’s was overwhelmingly sweet, with hints of cumin and cinnamon and the odd hunk of carrot.

House-cut herb-and-cheese fries with malt vinegar aioli

Then there was the Sunday gravy, perplexingly offered as a vegetarian tomato sauce. We were perplexed because Sunday gravy is defined, like most gravies, by its origin in meat. Nomenclature aside, this simple tomato sauce was tart, particularly in comparison with the Bolognese; tossed with spaghetti and ball of finely ground chicken, it was adequate. The special meatball was pepperoni, paired with a tomato sauce simmered with the meatball’s cooking oil. The kitchen had the good sense to grind the pepperoni finely so that its flavor was subtle and pervasive, and the sauce, though oily, was a good flavor match. Things finished satisfyingly with those rich ricotta donuts, delivered hot and dusted with powdered sugar. This and our appetizers were satisfying bookends to our middling meatball meal. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TASTING SPOON East Liberty’s Spoon offers new cocktail-tasting menu East Liberty’s Spoon was already one of Pittsburgh’s most satisfying — if underthe-radar — cocktail destinations. And it just became even more enticing. Beverage director John Wabeck and his team of bartenders (Holly Fridley, Diego Byrnes, Ivan Provias) have introduced a cocktail-tasting menu. Mondays through Thursdays, $25 gets you five cocktails; a taster teaser (three cocktails for $16) is also available. “We wanted to do something interesting on a day when the bar was a little soft,” Wabeck says. “How could we get people in and do something other than a happy hour, or something else we didn’t want to do?” The menu is a sensory journey. “Our goal is to get as many different textures, flavors, and [as much] glassware as we can on one menu,” Wabeck says. Last week’s “That’s Gintastic” menu — a tour of five different brands of gin — began with a refreshing Antibes Royale, grew savory with a smoked-ramp-flavored “I Found a Gibson in the Woods,” cleansed the palate with a cucumber-forward gin and tonic, and ended strong and slightly sweet with “Berlin Station Chief.” Don’t worry about getting blitzed on a weekday night: The cocktails are roughly half the size of a standard drink. Smaller drinks offer some advantages for bartenders. For example, the Berlin Station Chief is best served icy cold; all the easier to keep it that way when you’re serving only one ounce of booze. But there are challenges, too. “You really need to pay attention to how much ice you’re using and how big the garnishes are,” Wabeck says. Wabeck says the tasting menus are an opportunity for his bartenders to flex their creative muscles, and allows the bartenders to collaborate on a wide array of drinks. Which is why Wabeck and Byrnes spent some downtime last Wednesday night making sure this week’s menu would be have the right ebb and flow. “We always have at least three notepads behind the bar,” he says. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001 or www.spoonpgh.com

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;]VLIa5Ia\W ;I\]ZLIa5Ia SERVING HOURS Sunday: Noon to 8p Monday to Thursday: 11a to 9p Friday & Saturday: 11a to 10p (music till midnight) Œ?WVLMZN]T/ZMMS.WWL Œ4][KQW][/ZMMS8I[\ZQM[ a O Œ4Q^MTa/ZMMS,IVKQVO

Take-out service available M d th h SSaturday t d Monday through Visit the FOOD FESTIVAL section of our website stnickspgh.org to place your ORDER ONLINE! *St. Nicholas Cathedral is located on the corner of S. Dithridge St. and Forbes Ave., across from The Carnegie Museum.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

ALL INDIA. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600. With more than 200 items, All India’s menu is both epic and exciting, including novel choices such as Goan coconut shrimp and green jackfruit curry alongside the old denizens, chicken curry and the tandoor. Here, a thali, or combination platter, is a great option for the culinary explorer who wants the experience of multiple tastes. KF AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern California-style Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE

Butcher and the Rye {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} starters and a dozen pastas. Don’t expect classic sauces, but rather ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes. Don’t miss the fresh mozzarella, pulled to order. LF CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, woodfired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-ofthe-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J

BUTCHER AND THE RYE. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-3912752. Amid the twee décor, diners can find outstanding food (and house-recipe cocktails). Starters might be a remade Caesar salad with baby kale, roasted Brussels sprouts or rich mac-andcheese. Game dishes, such as quail and rabbit, are available as entrees, as are popular standbys such as burgers, with fries and pickles. KE THE CARLTON. 500 Grant St., Downtown. 412-391-4152. A mainstay of Downtown dining for two decades, The Carlton delivers the hallmarks of fine dining in an atmosphere refreshingly free of attitude or affectation. The menu is neither stodgy nor cutting-edge; while dishes may verge on the decadent — risotto with lobster and brie? — the flavor and ingredient combinations offer a classic Continental cuisine with contemporary inflections. LE CENACOLO. Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983. Local pasta-maker Fede runs this Italian restaurant highlighting its fresh noodles: Aside from platters featuring some cold meats and cheeses, there are half-a-dozen

GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including in-house chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely among European, American and Asian influences. LE KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

Cenacolo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. The ambience conjures the nostalgia of Route 66 road trips. Much of the reasonably priced fare is in the “goes well with beer” category, and the beer list includes a couple of house brews. But there’s plenty that’s new: Pizza, baked in a woodfired brick oven, comes with everything from Jamaican jerk chicken to hummus; entrees include glazed salmon and “truck-stop sirloin.” KE

MISS SAIGON 88. 256 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-802-6388. This restaurant offers a full sushi bar and some Thai curries, but its Vietnamese specialties are the real reason to go. For appetizers, try shrimp mini-crepes or banh uot, a chicken and noodle dish. The salted lemongrass tofu entrée is a standout, as is the Spicy Miss Saigon soup, a wonderfully flavored pho. KF OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. This two-wheel-

Now Accepting Mother’s Day Reservations! Menu’s featuring our Italian Favorites, Seafood, Chicken, Steak & Chef Specialties!

All India {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} themed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF

memorable salads. Entrees include a Southwest surf-n-turf with chipotle peppers, and slowbraised short ribs with risotto and multi-colored carrots. LE SEVICHE. 930 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-3120. This upscale Latin American-style tapas restaurant specializes in citrus-cured fish, while also offering a small selection of Latin-inspired tapas and finger sandwiches. And what better to wash down an empanada or mini taco than a refreshing capirinha cocktail? KE

SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes professionals alike. The Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. seasonal menu offers lively What’s not to love about a big updates on comfort food from steaming bowl of wheat noodles, lobster mac-n-cheese to braised flavorful homemade broth short ribs. Gourmet burgers and plenty of meat and and pizzas make for vegetable add-ins? quick meals. Linger Besides the traditional for homemade offerings, Ramen Bar desserts, or stop by also has an intriguing after the show. KE www. per pa penchant for applying pghcitym .co the ramen technique to TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 a variety of classic dishes Murray Ave., Squirrel from across Asia, such as Hill. 412-521-8888. This Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, REYNA RESTAURANTE but also less-common dishes. The MEXICANO. 2031 Penn Ave., menu has a section of com tam Strip District. 412-904-1242. The (“broken rice”) dishes, including city’s oldest Mexican grocery some topped with a fried egg; brings a serious, sit-down there is also a jellyfish salad exploration of moles, rellenos with pickled carrot and daikon. and other mainstays of Mexico’s Another worthy entrée was regional cuisines. There are tacos banh xeo, savory crepes filled (albeit Mexican-style), but the with shrimp, sautéed pork and more adventurous should check vegetables, or try the make-yourout more fare such as tamal own summer roll option. FK Oaxaqueno (lime-soaked corn dough filled with chicken in THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Oaxaca mole sauce, wrapped in Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. a banana leaf) or a relleno made This Thai restaurant in the with ancho chiles. EK heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes SAVORY HILL. 988 Brodhead with warm, friendly service. Road, Moon. 724-457-7109. The restaurant also offers an This “eclectic bistro” offers updated vegetarian menu that a fortifying menu of locally features mock duck, vegetarian sourced, creatively prepared pork and other meat substitutes, fine dining. The starters span as well as the more familiar rarefied (scallops) to comforting non-meat offerings of tofu (nachos), and include truly and vegetables. KF

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Happy Hour

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New Menu Items!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

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LOCAL

BEAT

“I WANTED TO DO SOMETHING BIG, AND THIS SEEMED LIKE THE BEST OPPORTUNITY.”

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

BRASS IN THE GRASS When Pete Spynda discovered Balkan brass music a decade ago, it was a personal revelation. “I was like, ‘This is what I’ve been searching for my whole life,’” he says. “I was just struck.” Since then, he’s worked to bring others the same experience, first through the long-running global-music dance night Pandemic and, more recently, bringing live Balkan brass bands to Pittsburgh. On Sat., May 3, Spynda hosts Pittonkatonk: A Pittsburgh May Day Brass BBQ. Modeled loosely on similar festivals in other cities — Honk in Boston and Pronk in Providence (Pittonkatonk is a localized play on those names) — the event features eight national and local brass ensembles. The Pittonkatonk lineup represents the genre’s variety. A band like Chicago’s Black Bear Combo, for example, tends toward the traditional, while Detroit Party Marching Band and Providence’s What Cheer? Brigade — with 30 and 18 members, respectively — bring in elements of contemporary pop, ’90s hip hop and jazz. Spynda describes locals C Street Brass Band, a group of CMU students, as “virtuoso musicians,” while the May Day Marching Band has a niche playing political events, like protests. In the future, Spynda would like to expand the range further, including some New Orleans brass or even a high-school marching band. “If I was 16, 17, in the high-school marching band and heard this kind of music,” he says, “I think it would have changed my whole opinion on brass music, on what you can really do with it.” While Spynda has hosted similar events in the past, this is the first time he’s put together something of this scale. “I felt like it was time that we gave Pittsburgh its own festival.” He set up an Indie Go Go fundraising campaign to help cover food, venue fees, travel costs and other expenses, but ultimately, Pittonkatonk is a labor of love. “I wanted to raise awareness of this type of music and get people out to kind of celebrate that,” he says. “Pittsburgh has a lot of Eastern European roots, and I wanted to tap into that, to say, “Hey, there’s more to this style of music than just polka bands and bingo.”

“I FELT LIKE IT WAS TIME THAT WE GAVE PITTSBURGH ITS OWN FESTIVAL.”

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTONKATONK: A PITTSBURGH MAY DAY BRASS BBQ. 3 p.m. Sat., May 3. Vietnam Veterans Pavilion, Schenley Park. Free. All ages. BYOB; potluck contributions encouraged. www.pandemicpgh.com N E W S

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OPIE’S OPUS {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

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S BEN OPIE’S 50th birthday was on the horizon last year, he started thinking about a performance that could mark the milestone. He continues to work with OPEK, an ensemble that generally numbers between nine and 12 musicians and devotes itself to the music of jazz composers like Sun Ra and Thelonious Monk. Additionally, he plays with the acoustic Thoth Trio, the electric experimental group Flexure and a handful of other projects. But the saxophonist set his sights on something he had never tried: an original concertlength piece for a large ensemble. “I wanted to do something big, and this was the idea that seemed like the best opportunity,” he says. “Part of it being [the question of] could I pull it off, and did I have the ability to actually do it?” As he started sketching out musical ideas, Opie applied to the Pittsburgh Foundation’s Investing in Professional Artists grant program, which the foundation sponsors along with the Heinz Endowments. “I made the argument that [the composition] is a way for me to prove myself, hopefully continue to promote myself as a composer [and] performer,” says Opie, who submitted some musical ideas with his application. The Foundation accepted his proposal, which yielded a $10,000 grant that will result in the performance this weekend of Concerto for Orkestra, with 16 local musicians, plus a conductor. Not only does the piece take its composer into new territory, it represents a bold leap for local jazz. Large-scale jazz compositions themselves are nothing new. Charles Mingus,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Ain’t it nifty? Ben Opie marks 50 with a concerto.

another composer who has inspired Opie, created the highly personal epic Epitaph, which was never performed in its entirety during his lifetime (in part because he kept revising it). Duke Ellington also wrote a series of highly regarded suites, some of which had connections beyond the music. “[Elling-

BEN OPIE’S CONCERTO FOR ORKESTRA WORLD PREMIERE 8 p.m. Fri., May 2. New Hazlett Theater, 8 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $15. All ages. 412-320-4610 or www.newhazletttheater.org

ton’s] Such Sweet Thunder is supposed to all be dedicated to Shakespeare characters. But there really [aren’t] musical ideas that run through the whole piece,” Opie explains. “They’re a series of pieces tied together based on something that’s non-musical.” Opie didn’t try to write something with an over-arching theme, nor did he simply string together a set of compositions under one title. “The first thing [I wanted was] to have a certain amount of flow and a certain amount of contrast at any given time,” he says. “How does one piece contrast with another? How do they relate on musical issues, how does one thing break from previous things?” CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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MISTER OPIE’S OPUS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

A few ideas recur in the work. Except for the opening and closing movements, each section is named for a mode of transportation, ranging from “Incline” and “Bumper Car” to “Dromedary.” There are also a few musical elements that reappear. “When I was really launching into this, I was hearing these sort of strange melodies — repeated notes layering on top of each other and combining in different ways,” Opie says. “So you can imagine those overlapping and creating a kind of shape, but the rhythm is sort of static. That idea pops up either directly or indirectly in a number of the movements of the work.” While one section is built that way, on a series of staccato notes played by brass and reeds in layers, other sections have an almost lush swing to them. The harmonies sometimes recall the best moments of Sun Ra, tipping the hat to a more traditional era while clearly playing music for modern times. For that reason, Opie doesn’t shy away from calling some of the music “jazz.” The closing “Recessional” is pretty traditional, in fact. “It’s a melody and a set of chord changes,” he says. With the grant money lined up, Opie made sure that he could stage the piece in the proper manner. He called upon current bandmates, a former student and a least one musician not necessarily connected to the city’s experimental jazz scene. For ease, he also enlisted a conductor. “The average OPEK gig involves me standing around trying to play and wave at people at the same time,” he says. “Now I can just sit and play and relax and someone else is involved with making sure that things run smoothly.” Since improvisation factors into the concerto, conductor Nizan Leibovich helps shape the direction of the piece. “The second movement, ‘Fiat,’ starts with what is effectively a kind of improvisation for the conductor,” Opie says. “The brass and the winds are in two groups, and the conductor gets to cue a set of events at his own timing. Saxophones play one chord and brass plays another, and maybe he can do one or the other, change the timing. So while there’s a series of events, he has the ability to choose how it is played through.” In constructing Concerto for Orkestra, Opie felt the urge to utilize all the directions he likes to explore in music. But “I gave up on that idea,” he says. “The piece started to take shape and it had to be about writing this work. And there were ideas that I wanted to try and get in there, and I thought, ‘No, it’s not working.’” Narrowing his scope allowed him to see things clearly. “At a point I had to step back and say … ‘I think it’s done,’” he says. “There’s plenty of material in it. I’m satisfied with it being what it is.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

ROB ELDRIDGE ROOMS FULL OF GARDENS (SELF-RELEASED)

Rob Eldridge, known for his band Steelesque, departs a bit from his classic-rock roots to present Rooms Full of Gardens. One might guess that in preparation for this solo effort, Eldridge has been listening to more Wilco and The Kinks than The Rolling Stones. The vocals are soft, the lyrics introspective and poetic, and while the percussion is primarily of the machine variety, it adds an edgy element rather than cheapening the experience. Definitely worth a spin or two. More: robeldridgemusic.bandcamp.com

STEVE PELLEGRINO IL ETUDE DE HYPNO UND … DRAGGING THE STONE (SELF-RELEASED)

The prolific local accordionist and provocateur returns with his band on nine tracks, eight of which he composed himself and one of which is a collaborative effort. They range from dancey and jazzy to a surf-rock tune on which Pellegrino ditches the accordion in favor of a guitar. (That song, by the way, is called “Einzinger Anruf (Pa. One Call),” and is “dedicated to the new millennial conquistadors — the frackers and their leader — El Corbatto,” according to the liner.) Some fun tracks on here, and quite well arranged for accordion, sax (Phil Bergen) and drums (Mike Yaklich). More: www.accordionanarchy.com AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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Beats and history: Action Camp (Maura Jacob, left, and Bengt Alexsander)

MINING DISASTERS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} DISASTER BALLADS are nothing new — they’ve been a part of folk and popular music for as long as there’s been both music and disasters. But disaster ballads with electronic beats and riffs that sometimes verge on metal? That’s the province of Action Camp, and not too many others. “It all started when [bandmate Bengt Alexsander] read this book about modern ghost towns,” explains singer and multiinstrumentalist Maura Jacob. “And he read about Centralia,” the town in eastern Pennsylvania where an underground mine fire has been burning for more than 50 years. “That started an interest in looking at these disasters. As someone who grew up in Pittsburgh, I feel like you’re just aware of all this history related to unions and steel, but also lots of disasters — both man-made and natural, but usually man-made. It’s part of growing up here.” That was the impetus for PA, the duo’s new album, which focuses on historic disasters set in Pennsylvania. Jacob grew up in Pittsburgh and graduated from CAPA High School; she moved to Boston in 2003, and started Action Camp with Alexsander, who hailed from the Boston area. In 2008, they moved to Pittsburgh. “We kind of wanted to incorporate our own experiences here, too — mine from growing up here, his from moving here,” Jacob explains. “I left in 2003 and came back in 2008, and even in that small window, things were immensely different.” The stories of the fire in Centralia, the Johnstown flood, the Donora smog, the “Picnic Train Disaster” (which occurred near Camp Hill, Pa., in 1856), and the general lifestyle of the coal-mining families of Pennsylvania all serve as jumping-

off points for songs on the new album. The tunes aren’t all transparently about disasters — “Turn of the Blade,” for example, was written from the point of view of a boy who watched his home being destroyed in the Johnstown flood, but there’s little that indicates that directly. The song deals more with his psychological state later on, wanting to move on from the disaster. Where Action Camp once walked a line between electronic pop and surf-rock with a somewhat dour disposition, PA finds the pair branching out, still making pop sounds on tracks like “Come Clean,” but also exploring something like stoner metal on “Turn of the Blade.” (Jacob and Alexsander recognize everything from Portishead to Kyuss as influences.)

ACTION CAMP CD RELEASE

WITH DROWNING CLOWNS, ATLAS, PET CLINIC 7 p.m. Fri., May 9. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. Free (21 and up); $2 (under 21). 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

In many cases, sounds follow ideas on the album. In “Thirst,” about the Donora smog, “the song has this big explosion at the end, where my vocal has this feedback loop on it that builds up and just stops dead,” mimicking a death by suffocation, explains Alexsander. It’s not all doom and gloom, though. “We didn’t plan to write a really morbid record,” says Jacob, with a laugh. “In our minds, it’s impossible to write about these things and have it be happy, obviously, but part of what I was hoping to accomplish was finding beauty and humanity in these dark experiences. Not emphasizing strictly the dark — I think you can’t avoid it — but the main thing I wanted to communicate more is, I think there’s beauty in clarity, and beautiful moments in these insane experiences.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

CRITICS’ PICKS

Marisa Anderson {PHOTO COURTESY OF JODI DARBY}

[METALCORE] + FRI., MAY 02

The Ohio-based metalcore band Miss May I has been active since 2006 — its debut album was released while most of the band was still in high school. The band’s third album, Rise of the Lion, just came out on April 29; on the cover is a picture of a fan with a tattoo of the band’s lion design — which the fan got at the band’s request, expressly for the cover shot. Check the group out tonight at The Smiling Moose along with guests For the Fallen Dreams. Kayla Copes 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4668 or www. smiling-moose.com

[MATH ROCK] + SAT., MAY 03 Call it math rock, pre-post-rock or what have you, San Francisco trio A Minor Forest made some influential and ahead-of-its-time music before breaking up in 1998. At times chaotic and at times epic, the band left us two full-lengths of complex but not show-offy guitar rock on Thrill Jockey, then disappeared … until last year, when the members reunited, eventually getting together for the tour that brings them to Brillobox tonight. Microwaves and Adult Field Trip open. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[FOLK] + TUE., MAY 06

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[ALT-COUNTRY] + TUE., MAY 06

The refined, beautiful country songs of Doug Paisley impress without overwhelming; if you’re not familiar with him, chances are one of your favorite musicians is. The Toronto native has worked with Will Oldham and Matt Sweeney before, and has that Canadianmusic connection with Feist and others. Tonight, Paisley brings his understated but emotional tunes — in the form of his new album Strong Feelings — to the Rex Theater. AM 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-14. All ages. 421-381-6811 or Doug www.rextheater.com

Paisley

[POSTHARDCORE] + WED., MAY 07

The latest from Portland-based guitarist Marisa Anderson is Traditional and Public Domain Songs, a collection that sounds a bit like the soundtrack to Ken Burns’ The Civil War, filtered through an amplifier. Anderson is a master of traditional American folk and blues music, often played on electric guitar, but in a style

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that’s more in line with the American Primitive guitarists than any electric-blues outfit. Tonight, Anderson plays Garfield Artworks along with Plankton Wat, Psychic Frost and Pairdown. AM 7:30 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $7. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

Dance Gavin Dance is a loud, aggressive band, but it’s not all metal: The band incorporates rock, pop, punk and soul elements. Its most recent, Acceptance Speech, was issued last fall, and for a moment it looked like the band’s future was in jeopardy, as members were starting side projects and Dance Gavin Dance’s contract with Rise Records was up. The band re-signed with the label before the year was out, though. The group plays tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre, along with guests Capture the Crown, Palisades and Bleach Blonde. KC 7:30 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave. Millvale. $15. all ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM / 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 01 ALTAR BAR. Pop Evil, Escape The Fate. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Chrome Sparks, Infinity Shred, Rivka. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Joe Crookston & the BlueBird Jubilee w/ Peter Glanville, Brad Yoder, The Squirrel Hillbillies. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Mike Pinto. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Keith Kenny, Kevin Finn, Colin Baxter, Los Monster Trucks. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Band Of Skulls, Sacco. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Sons of Hippies, Murder for Girls, Aurora. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Rumpke Mountain Boys. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 02 ALTAR BAR. letlive., Architects. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. CLUB CAFE. The NewLanders (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. 1-800-BAND, The Lampshades. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Low Cut Connie, Working Breed, Carny Stomp. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. A.T.S., Raised by Wolves, Robert Pollard. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Wye Oak, Braids. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Dancing Queen. Ross. 412-364-8166. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. The Clintones. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SMILING MOOSE. Miss May I. South Side. 412-431-4668. TARENTUM EAGLES. Daniels & McClain. Tarentum. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chad Sipes Stereo, Beagle Brothers, Inside/Outside. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 03 31ST STREET PUB. Brimstone Coven, Gran Gila, Doctor Smoke. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 565 LIVE. Tony Janflone Jr. & Curtis Swift Duo. Bellevue. 412-522-7556.

BALTIMORE HOUSE. Gone South. Pleasant Hills. BRILLOBOX. A Minor Forest, Microwaves, Adult Field Trip. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. BROTHERS GRIMM. Daniels & McClain. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CLUB CAFE. Steve Forbert (Early) Charm & Chain, Brothers & Sisters, Mark Natural (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Montford. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Nervous Aggression, Surrounded By Ignorance, Crisis In America, Mindless Chaos. 724-375-5080. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Miss Massive Snowflake, The Love Letters, Scott Fry Experience. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Jude Benedict, Chelsea Nicole & The Northside Vamps. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Distant Signals. Rush tribute band. Station Square. 412-559-1039. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Deceptions, Backstabbing Good People, Larkin Mayberry IV. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Aquabats, Koo Koo Kanga Roo. Millvale. 866-468-3401. MUGSHOTS. Trainwreck. Crafton. 412-921-7474. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Capital Jam feat. CK Chance. Ross. 412-364-8166. SCHENLEY PARK. What Cheer Brigade, Lungs Face Feet, Detroit Party, Black Bear Combo, Timbeleza, C Street Brass, more. Pittonkatonk: A May Day Brass BBQ. Vietnam Veteran’s Pavilion. Oakland. 412-251-6058. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Doppler Affect. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 04 ALTAR BAR. Skindred. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Jay Farrar, Peter Bruntnell. South Side. 412-431-4950. ROCK ROOM. Vampirates. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418.

MON 05 ALTAR BAR. The Composure,

Trophies. Strip District. 412-263-2877. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Both (Aimee Mann & Ted Leo), Nick Diamonds. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PETER B’S. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge. 724-353-2677.

BLUES

TUE 06

MOONDOG’S. Angelina Blue, Them Blue Cats, more. Barks & Blues Benefit. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

ALTAR BAR. Buckcherry. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Mutual Benefit, Sleep Experiments, Cold Weather. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Eric Himan, Mike Robinson. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Marisa Anderson, Psychic Frost, Plankton Wat, Pairdown. Garfield. 412-361-2262. REX THEATER. Doug Paisley. South Side. 412-381-6811.

Mutiny / Erin Yanacek, Trumpet, feat. Koichiro Suzuki, Baritone. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Mahones. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lost In Society, Before You, Billy Pontius. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Outlaws. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Dance Gavin Dance, Capture The . www per Crown, Palisades, a p ty ci pgh m Bleach Blonde, THE .co R4 PROJECT. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Dead Winter Carpenters. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 07 ALTAR BAR. Peelander-Z. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Blackberry Smoke. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Matt Murchison

MP 3 MONDAY NO BAD JUJU

DJS THU 01 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night Fifteen. South Side. 412-431-5282. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Hiro Kone, Relative Q, Slinky. Downtown. 412-456-2962.

FRI 02 BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. w/ BOOGAT. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 03 CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

MON 05 WINGHART’S - SOUTH SIDE. Gene Stovall, DJ Hotnix, Ben Alper, DJ Magic Mike. South Side. 412-608-3410.

WED 07 SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from No Bad JuJu; stream or download

“One True Love” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 03 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Regina Belle. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

THU 01 MOONDOG’S. Shot O’ Soul. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

FRI 02

SAT 03 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. HEY ANDY’S. Shot O’ Soul. 724-258-4755. MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye & Nicole B. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler & Charlie Barath. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. OLIVES & PEPPERS. The Olga Watkins Band. 724-444-7499. TEDDY’S. King’s Ransom. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

JAZZ THU 01 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 02 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

SAT 03 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Lee Robinson Trio. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FOX CHAPEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Big Band & Beyond. Fox Chapel. 412-635-7654. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Regina Belle. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LITTLE E’S. Sophia K. Duo. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Cassandra Wilson. North Side. 412-322-1773. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-338-6463. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. 412-370-9621. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621. CONTINUES ON PG. 37

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST SAVE THE DATE

Saturday

Sponsored by

May 10, 2014 (Mother’s Day Weekend) from 10:00am - 4:00pm

Community Partner

Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children 6-18 years old A Cocktail Party will be held Friday, May 9, 2014 at The LeMont from 6:30pm-10:30pm Cocktail Party tickets are $60 per person which includes heavy hors d’oeuvres and two drink tickets

*Tickets for the Home Tour and Cocktail Party will go on sale on April 1, 2014 at www.jlpgh.org

All funds raised through this event and auctions will further support the mission and community initiatives of the Junior League of Pittsburgh. For additional information, call 412-488-9270

BUYING OR SELLING A HOME? Choose a pro who lives and works in the city. Rick Schweikert 412-352-3417 KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY 5425 Baum Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15232 rickschweikert@ rickschweikert @gmail.com Find me on Facebook!

The city of Pittsburgh has a place for everyone when it comes to luxurious living. After all, Pittsburgh was voted America’s most livable city by the Economist Intelligence Unit. Each neighborhood in this city has something unique to offer. Downtown provides close proximity to the Cultural District and the bustling business world. The exciting South Side shows just how much fun Pittsburghers have, while neighborhoods like Shadyside, Squirrel Hill and Lawrenceville are trendy and vibrant. But these are just a few of the exciting neighborhoods that you have to choose from in Pittsburgh. If you are looking for a new place to call home, flip through these pages and you will find what you are looking for.

www.rickschweikert.kwrealty.com A D V E R T I S I N G

Cover photo: Bakery Living, across from Bakery Square S U P P L E M E N T

Luxury Boutique Condos with a

VIEW

River View Ridge –––––––––––– C O N D O M I N I U M S –––––––––––– 1825 ARCENA STREET • PITTSBURGH, PA 15219 • 412-831-3800 • RIVERVIEWRIDGECONDOS.COM

• Panoramic Protected Views • Conveniently Located – minutes from downtown wntown • Custom Kitchens, flooring and Granite • Choose your own custom finishes • Interior Designer included with purchase • Rooftop Deck • Private Garage and on street parking • Beautiful Terrace with Gardens

d e t i v n I e r u ’ o Y

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TAS , 5-7pm E N I W ay 2nd uired.

• Reasonable HOA fee

M

req SVP is -2020. R , t n e Free ev ris at 412-853 h Call C

• Tax Abatement For more information contact Chris Ivory at Keller Williams at 412-853-2020. A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

walnut capital We can’t wait to help you find the perfect place! The new Bakery Living community will offer studio, one and two bedroom units equipped with top of the line appliances including in unit washer and dryer. A large variety of floor plans are available – to meet your expectations and budget. Many apartments will offer balconies or patios. A swimming pool, fitness center, movie theater/gaming room, and stunning views are just a few features. Onsite there is a bike/walking path that will lead you straight to the heart of Shadyside. The apartments will have a smoke free and pet friendly environment.

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST 151 First Side

Allegheny Center

151 Fort Pitt Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-901-6900 www.151firstside.com This is the first new condominium constructed in Pittsburgh’s Golden Triangle since 1968 and has 82 residences. It offers luxurious urban living combined with spectacular views of the city.

Ten Allegheny Center Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-231-6688 www.alleghenycenter.com/ apartments Allegheny Center offers residents a fully equipped exercise facility and beautiful rooftop sun-decks with a spectacular view of downtown Pittsburgh.

201 Stanwix

Bakery Living Amenities: • On-Site Management and Maintenance • Online Service Request • Full-service concierge • Courtesy Package acceptance and storage • Walnut Perks – Resident Discount Program • Common area Wi-Fi • Parking garage with direct access to all floors and two EV car charging stations • Smoke-free building • 24 hour fully equipped fitness center with direct access to bike path • Secure indoor bike storage room and repair station • Three distinct, stylish lounges complete with a fireplace, billiard table and bar • Sun Deck, outdoor bar & grilling stations • Pet-friendly community • Business Center

• Spectacular indoor/ outdoor swimming pool for year round use • Meditative courtyard with water and fire elements • Conference facilities • Movie theater and gaming room with comfortable seating • Convenient access to parks, bike paths, coffee shops & retail technologyrelated employers • Stunning gourmet kitchens include Quartz countertops, Kohler faucets, Whirlpool ICE line appliances and dark Espresso cabinets • Nine-foot ceilings in most residences • In unit washer and dryer • Fully operational TRACO energy efficient windows • Many residences have spacious private balconies or private walk out patios

We can’t wait to help you find the perfect place! To speak with a leasing specialist or to make an appointment please call 412-683-3810. A D V E R T I S I N G

201 Stanwix Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-584-4072 www.201stanwix.com This former Bell Telephone Building now features 158 luxury one-two-bedroom apartments in downtown Pittsburgh and is part of the National Register of Historic Places.

526 Penn Avenue Apartments 526 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-227-0959 pmcpropertygroup.com These newly-renovated apartment homes have kept their historic charm. Located in the Cultural District, these apartments are perfect for entertaining.

900 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.trekdevelopment.com This former printing factory is now 25 luxury-loft apartments located in the heart of the Cultural District.

941 Penn 941 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-855-8419 Kathy@newcitymarketing.com This luxurious condominium is located in the Cultural District and has a private balcony with a beautiful view. S U P P L E M E N T

The Carlyle 306 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-325-1190 www.carlylecondo.com Choose from six unique floor plans at this classic 1920s downtown building. With a completely renovated interior, the charm does not stop when you walk through the door.

Carson Street Commons 2529 East Carson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-1183 www.morgancommunities.com Situated side-by-side with the South Side shops and restaurants, the Carson Street Commons has a 24-hour fitness center, walking trails and is petfriendly.

Century Building 130 Seventh Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.centuryon7th.com This restored 1907 building located in the Cultural District has 60 residential lofts, commercial, retail and amenity spaces.

Chatham Tower Condominiums 112 Washington Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-8040 www.chatham-tower.com Located just across from the Consol Energy Center, Chatham Tower is surrounded by the pulse of the city and defines downtown living.

The Cork Factory Lofts 2349 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3176 www.thecorkfactory.com This historic Strip District structure is one of Pittsburgh’s most popular urban residences due to unmatched building amenities and services. It is complemented by beautiful landscape, a pool deck and spectacular views of the city.

Crane Village Apartments 651 Oaklynn Court Pittsburgh, PA 15220 877-292-8321 www.cranevillageapts.com Choose from a studio, one-two-three-bedroom apartment homes, or a two-bedroom townhome on this 15-acre property.

Crawford Square Apartments 510 Protectory Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-281-9955 www.crawfordsquareapts.com Crawford Square Apartments offer a range of floor plans and modern amenities conveniently located to a number of downtown attractions.

Devon Tower  Apartments 4920 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-4030 www.ndcrealestate.com Devon Tower is located in the center of the city and is within walking distance to the campuses of CMU, Carlow College and University of Pittsburgh, as well as with university-related hospitals.

Doughboy Apartments 3400 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-683-3230 www.desmone.com/project/ doughboy-square-apartments

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST Doughboy Apartments is an urban infill project in Lawrenceville. Units will range in size from 850-square-foot one-bedroom units to 1600-square-foot two-bedroom units.

The Encore on Seventh 100 Seventh Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-200-1237 www.theencoreon7th.com Located in the heart of the Cultural District, The Encore on Seventh has picture windows featuring the most breathtaking views of Pittsburgh and its three rivers.

Ecocraft 1-800-274-6198 www.ecocraft-homes.com Inspired by West Coast modern architecture, the EcoMod Home harmonizes energy efficiency and modern urban design. Its advanced Systems-Built approach allows virtually any home plan to be built in as little as 90 days.

The Fairfax Apartments 4614 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-4030 www.forrent.com The Fairfax Apartments are just a short walk from most of Pittsburgh’s colleges and feature newly remodeled spacious floor plans.

Fifth Avenue School Lofts 1800 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15219 412-242-0273 5thlofts.com This renovation of the historic Fifth Avenue School building offers the best of loft living with 65 large sunny units with distinctive layouts, high-quality finishes and great views.

Franklin West 272 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15206 412-661-1151 www.franklinwest.com Franklin West has superior apartments and townhouses in Shadyside, Butler, Oakmont and Gibsonia.

Gateway at Summerset Apartments 1876 Parkview Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15217 855-202-0609 www.gatewayatsummerset.com The high-end touches here provide all the perks of upscale apartment living joined with the charm of a traditional neighborhood. It is just minutes from The Waterfront, Frick Park and Squirrel Hill.

Gateway Towers Condominiums 320 Fort Duquesne Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-471-3400 www.gatewaytowerspittsburgh.com Experience a neighborhood in a high-rise at Gateway Towers, in downtown Pittsburgh. Here you will find all the amenities that include fine living at its best.

Grandview Pointe Luxury Apartments 1411 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15211 855-825-0717 www.grandviewpointe.com Centrally located atop Mount Washington, enjoy a breathtaking view of the city of Pittsburgh while living in a spectacular apartment.

Heinz Lofts 300 Heinz Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 877-821-7207 www.heinzlofts.com Heinz Lofts offer a

majestic view of the Allegheny River and downtown Pittsburgh. Expect apartments that are expansive-feeling, with up to 16-foot ceilings and generous square footage.

downtown living is the new thing

Hyland Hills Apartment Homes 275 Oakville Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15220 412-921-4416 www.hylandhills.info Hyland Hill has exciting amenities both inside and outside. The prime location provides city convenience in a country setting.

J.B.T. Properties 2020 Smallman Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-261-0101 Located in the Pittsburgh’s Strip District. JBT Properties manages both commercial and residential properties.

stunning 2400 sf Strip District penthouse • private 30’ rooftop terrace with city skyline views • 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 covered parking spaces • highest quality finishes, fixtures, and cabinetry • tax abatement • $999k

Keller Williams– Rick Schweikert 4208 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 rickschweikert.kwrealty.com 4BR, 3BA House – As close to the University of Pittsburgh as you can get! This solid brick home boasts a large outdoor dining area, sunroom, and tremendous gardening area. ALL of which have stunning views of the Cathedral and surrounding Oakland.

Kenmawr Apartments 401 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-361-2774 www.kenmawrapartments.com Located in vibrant Shadyside, the recent multi-million-dollar renovation has left these fine apartments better than ever.

luxurious 2100 sf condo in the Cultural District • private balcony overlooking treelined street • 2 BR, 2 BA • large open living/kitchen area perfect for entertaining • near sidewalk cafes, galleries, stadiums, shops, river trails • tax abatement • $725k

contact

Kathy Wallace p. (412) 288 2566, e. kathy@newcitymarketing.com

10 n meadows drive, wexford, pa 15090

Continued >> A D V E R T I S I N G

*actual unit views

S U P P L E M E N T

RE/Max Realty Pittsburgh is a New City!

As an urban living enthusiast and real estate professional at RE/MAX Select Realty, Kathy Wallace has handled the marketing and pre-sales for the city’s sold-out 941 Penn condos (downtown), the Otto Milk building (Strip District), Glass Lofts (Friendship) and LoLa Lofts (Lawrenceville). She remains active in the marketing and sales of these and other buildings in the city. For information on re-sales of existing units or upcoming projects and listings,

contact her by phone (412-855-8419) or email (kathy@newcitymarketing.com). Kathy: “The development of condos in Pittsburgh has created vertical neighborhoods of stakeholders who want to live exciting, active lives in an urban environment with diversities of culture, entertainment, outdoor and social activities. I love living and working downtown. These days Pittsburgh really does feel like a brand new city.”

Housing Authority City of Pittsburgh

HACP will help address the city’s growing demand for affordable housing by opening its Housing Choice Voucher Program to new applicants, with the goal of adding 5,000 families to its waiting list through a lottery system. Applications will be accepted online between April 28 and May 11, 2014. As rental prices continue to rise and the city’s stock of affordable housing becomes increasingly scarce, HACP anticipates that up to 20,000 applications will be submitted for the lottery. In order to accom-

modate the high volume of applications, HACP will be using an online-only application system, housed at: www.hacp.org. Applications can be submitted from any public or personal computer, tablet, or smart phone with internet access.   “Pittsburgh families are in dire need of affordable housing options and re-opening the HCV Waiting List should provide relief to the thousands of individuals struggling to find an affordable place to call home,” HACP Executive Director Caster D. Binion said.

River View Ridge Condominiums

A Boutique Living Experience — Where Tremendous Views Abound! Tired of feeding the rent monster and gaining no equity? Fifty or more residents sharing limited common areas and elevators? Limited or no parking? Cheap concrete floors, cheap engineered flooring, and builder grade appliances?

with a private balcony. There is also a private garage with abundant storage. The building is located at the end of a quiet street where there is ample and safe on-street parking and is steps away from the beautiful Cliffside park.

Why throw money away on rent when you can build equity in one of Pittsburgh best condo developments?

The developer is offering the units at a very competitive price point, with tax abatement and innovative financing options. Why waste money on rent when you can own at the same price!? Home ownership is a fantastic investment, and this area is sure to appreciate in value due to large investments happening. Get in from the ground floor!

If you are faced with any of these questions or inconveniences, you should definitely check out The River View Ridge Condominiums. The condos provide an awesome and protected panoramic view of the downtown skyline, the Strip District and North Shore. Nearby highway arteries provide quick and easy access, while downtown and the Strip are steps away.

The River View Ridge condominiums are your opportunity for luxury living, real estate appreciation at an affordable price. Come see these luxurious condos at our wine tasting event May 2nd, 5-7.

The boutique condo building offers privacy not attained in large condo buildings. The elevator brings you up to your own private vestibule for easy and private entry to your unit

For more information you can visit the website at riverviewridgecondos.com or contact Chris Ivory, Keller Williams Realty, at (412) 853-2020.

A D V E R T I S I N G

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST The Locomotive Lofts 4840 Harrison Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-621-1133 www.locomotivelofts.com With a prime location adjacent to vibrant Butler Street in Lawrenceville, these one-two-bedroom apartments are great for anyone looking for an exciting, greener urban lifestyle.

Lot 24 2404 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3186 www.lot24inthestrip.com This newly renovated 96-unit apartment property is located in the Strip District and boasts sustainable living. The amenities do not fall short as they have a terrace, club room, heated pool and much more.

Market Square Place Lofts 222 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-281-7675 www.marketsquareplace.com The 46 loft-style rental apartments define “urban chic” with the open floor plan, huge windows and exposed bricks and beams that date back to the turn of the century.

Morgan at North Shore Apartments

412-476-3377 www.morgancommunities.com This pet-friendly community lies along the Monongahela River in the historic Homestead area. The river view and trails create ample green space.

Mountvue Apartments 5 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15211 412-488-6863 Mountvue Apartments is located in the beautiful Mount Washington with a view of the entire city.

Otto Milk Condominiums 2434 Smallman Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-288-2566 www.ottomilkcondos.com Otto Milk features one-two-bedroom lofts in the historic Strip District with high ceilings, rooftop decks, terraces, two-story units, gathering areas and a fitness center.

Penn Garrison Lofts 915 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-227-0959 www.penngarrison.com Located in the heart of downtown’s Cultural District, these stylish lofts have 117 units ranging from studios to two-floor penthouses.

100 Anderson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-321-2300 www.morgancommunities.com This riverfront location offers spectacular views of the city, private balconies and entrances, a 24-hour fitness center and a heated swimming pool.

The Pennsylvanian

Morgan Communities – The Waterfront

Piatt Place

611 E. Waterfront Drive Munhall, PA 15120 S U P P L E M E N T

1100 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-391-6730 www.thepennsylvanian.com The Pennsylvanian guarantees elegant living in this historical building located downtown.

301 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-434-1181 www.piattplace.com Situated downtown, the

Piatt Place is a majestic redesign of the former Lazarus department store. Private access to the upper levels reveal luxury rooftop condos with outdoor terraces.

Portal Place Apartments 2633 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-403-5037 www.portalplaceapartments.com Spacious and modern one-two-bedroom apartments in Oakland feature fully equipped kitchens with breakfast bars, walk-in closets and plush neutral carpeting.

River View Ridge 1825 Arcena Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-831-3800 www.riverviewridgecondos.com These three luxury high-rise condos offer stunning panoramic views of the Allegheny River, the Strip District and the downtown Pittsburgh skyline from the roof-top deck and private balcony.

River Vue 300 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412- 434-5700 www.rivervuepgh.com Located at the Point, this sophisticated downtown residence features 218 unique one-two-bedroom apartments, as well as two-story homes.

The Standard Life Building 345 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-339-0352 www.standardlifepittsburgh.com This exquisitelydesigned landmark has been reinvented with 36 spacious, modern one to three bedroom apartments in vibrant downtown.

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST Starr Lofts 4115 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-450-0053 www.boterodevelopment.com This green renovation of a historic Lawrenceville building features airconditioning, in-unit laundry, exposed brick and 11-foot ceilings.

Pittsburgh PA 15232 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut Capital is one of Pittsburgh’s largest and fastest growing real-estate management companies. When you are ready to buy or sell a home, the professionals here have the expertise and sales tools to help.

Walnut Capital 5500 Walnut Street, Suite 300

IN THE

4th Floor 10,000 SqFt Available 6,700 SqFt Class A Office 2,500 SqFt Raw Open Space

7070 Forward Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut Towers, in Squirrel Hill, offers an urban location nestled near the beautiful green space of Frick Park.

Walnut on Highland

3rd Floor 6,000 SqFt Available 2,000 SqFt Class A Office 2nd Floor 6,000 SqFt Available Street Access to Showroom

Washington Plaza Luxury Apartments

121 S. Highland Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut on Highland is an urban housing and retail complex in heart of revitalized East End featuring gourmet kitchens, breathtaking views, custom-wood cabinets and so much more.

1420 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-9833 www.washingtonplaza.com This high-rise features tennis and volleyball courts, a swimming pool, 24-hour fitness center, sauna/tanning beds, floor-to-ceiling windows and shuttle services.

STRIP

2020 SMALLMAN SREET

Walnut Towers at Frick Park

University Commons 382 S. Bouquet Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com University Commons is located in the heart of Oakland and features one-two-three-bedroom apartments.

OFFICE SPACE

Opportunity Available T.C.I. Property Management

Call 412 261 0101 eMail reception@tcipm.com Beth or Michael

New Windows - Lots of Light Interior Light Well Close to Transportation Elevator Access ADA Restrooms Great Amenities (Pancakes) Renovated Historical Site Pressed Tin Ceilings Architectural Molding/ Trim Great Views Off Street Parking

D ON ’ T

MISS YOUR CHANCE TO FIND RENTAL HOUSING YOU CAN AFFORD . Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh HCV (Section 8) Waiting List Lottery Opening The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh (HACP) will open our Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCV) waiting list on:

Monday, April 28, 2014 (8:00 a.m.) through Sunday, May 11, 2014 (11:59 p.m.)

www.hacp.org 200 Ross Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Applications will be accepted ONLINE ONLY. You can submit your application from any laptop, tablet, computer or smartphone at any location, anytime during the two-week period. We will be accepting applications online at www.hacp.org.

For more information visit us at www.hacp.org or call us at 1-855-781-8894.

https://twitter.com/hacp1

Caster D. Binion, Executive Director A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

SUN 04 INGOMAR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Big Band & Beyond. 412-635-7654. SONOMA GRILLE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip.

MON 05 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 06 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. George Heid III. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

COLUMBUS {THU., JUNE 19}

Broken Bells LC Indoor Pavilion

WED 07 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

PHILADELPHIA {SAT., JUNE 21}

Jolie Holland Milkboy

ACOUSTIC

UPPER DARBY, PA.

THU 01 THE BEER MARKET. Jason Kendall. North Side. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

FRI 02 ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Common Threads. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

{SAT., OCT. 04}

Bryan Ferry Tower Theater

Finale feat. Sunhae Im, soprano & Lucas Meachem, baritone. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

REGGAE SAT 03 THE VALLEY HOTEL. The Flow Band. 412-233-9800.

SAT 03 RIVER CITY BRASS. Some Like it Hot. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

COUNTRY

SAT 03 OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Joel Lindsay Trio. North Side. 412-237-9400.

THU 01

SUN 04

FRI 02

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. James Ferla, Roger Zahab. Oakland. 412-622-3105.

WED 07 THE ACME CLUB. Alex Meixner. ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SAT 03 BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Gringo Zydeco. West Homestead. 614-296-2655.

WED 07 FERRANTE’S LAKEVIEW. Cahal Dunne’s Grand To Be Irish. Presented by Latshaw Productions. Greensburg. 724-853-4050.

N E W S

SUN 04

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Neely. Harmony. 570-294-6450. NIED’S HOTEL. The Slim Forsythe Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SAT 03 RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Timothy Earl. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808.

WED 07 LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart Festival Finale feat. Sunhae Im, soprano & Lucas Meachem, baritone. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SEWICKLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CHANCEL CHOIR. Works by Felix MendelssohnBartholdy. Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, Sewickley. 412-741-4550.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 03

CLASSICAL

FOX CHAPEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Big Band & Beyond. Fox Chapel. 412-635-7654.

THU 01

SUN 04

OVREARTS. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

INGOMAR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Pittsburgh Concert Chorale. Big Band & Beyond. 412-635-7654.

FRI 02 BLACK ORCHID STRING TRIO. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-478-9695. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart Festival

+

TA S T E

WED 07 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

30 - May 6

WEDNESDAY 30 Iron Reagon

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 25 Bill Engvall

VOLBEAT

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Seussical the Musical

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghmusicals.com/tix-seuss. Through May 11.

Pop Evil / Escape the Fate

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 6:30p.m. & 9:30p.m.

Comedian Coleman Green

THURSDAY 14

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Avatar & Glamour of the Kill. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7:30p.m.

Pittsburgh Real Ale Festival

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 8pm. Through May 3.

HIGHMARK STADIUM Station Square. Over 21 event. Tickets: pghrealale.com. 1p.m.

The Composure / Trophies

SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL

Wye Oak

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447.

Pittsburgh Power vs. Philadelphia Soul

THURSDAY, MAY 1 BYHAM THEATER

letlive. / Architects

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Glass Cloud & I The Mighty. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Nightbeast, Wicked Chief & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Rankin. Over 21 event. For more info & tickets visit furnacebash.com. 5p.m.

SATURDAY 36

¡Salsita!

Furnace Blast

CARRIE BLAST FURNACE

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 47 The Smash Bros: Cory & Chad

PITTSBURGH OPERA Strip District. Over 21 event. Tickets: showclix.com/event/

IMPROV Waterfront. Over

newbalancepittsburgh.com 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

salsita2014. 9p.m.

Rumpke Mountain Boys THE CAT IN THE HAT – TIM HARTMAN PHOTOGRAPHER: PATTI BRAHIM

April

MONDAY 58

The Both (Aimee Mann & Ted Leo) MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 69 Joe Bonamassa

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Buckcherry ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Fozzy, Adelita’s Way & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

NEW BALANCE

Spring Event

NOW – SUNDAY, MAY 4

FINAL DAYS OF NEW BALANCE SPRING EVENT. ENDING THIS SUNDAY MAY 4. Mark Fallecker our Certified Pedorthist will be at: OAKLAND Wednesday, April 30th. 10am-6pm WEXFORD Friday, May 2 from 10an-6pm; WATERFRONT Saturday, May 3 from 10am-8pm and WATERFRONT Sunday, May 4 from noon-6.pm Valid thru May 31, 2014

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

20

on any regular priced New Balance, Aravon, Dunham or Cobb Hill purchase.

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS

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WEB OF LIVES {BY HARRY KLOMAN}

FIRTH IS SUPERB AS A MAN WHO CAN’T OVERCOME THE MEMORIES OF HIS PAST

OMG! Look who’s trying to kill Spidey now! He says “hi” to a lonely milquetoast electrical engineer (Jamie Foxx) from Oscorp, and the guy becomes Electro! He won’t give his blood to his lonely pal Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), so Harry turns into the Green Goblin! In The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Spidey handily trounces everyone: After all these years, action is still his reward. But his battles come with losses that almost take him out of the swing of things, and together they tell a plaintive story about the fatal consequences of feeling alone in the world.

CP APPROVED

Spider-Man (right) meets a fan.

Marc Webb’s film is indeed pretty amazing in the FX department — the best money can buy. Even more amazing, though, is its tenderness as Peter Parker (an affable Andrew Garfield) tries not to lose his down-to-earth humanity. This involves his beloved Gwen (Emma Stone), his beloved aunt (Sally Field) and his beloved long-dead father (Campbell Scott). As the movie draws to its protracted climax, we know what won’t happen. We just don’t know what will. The plot is super-fanciful, although it’s somehow easier to believe Electro exists than to swallow a magical hidden Manhattan subway car. Silliness aside, it’s good to see that the heart of Spider-Man is still beating. Starts Fri., May 2. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Those Who Kill Mid-Season Update: Pittsburgh continues to represent hard, with dead bodies popping up under the 31st Street Bridge and on Exchange Way, while a live body goes off the 40th Street Bridge. Everybody’s talkin’ Pitt, Pirates and pierogies. Too bad our

town is plagued with serial killers. And too bad, this show is a complete dud, plot-wise. Sundays on Lifetime Movie Network

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{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

Walking through history: Colin Firth as Eric Lomax

SAY IT AGAIN S

OME PARTS of war are a tragedy, and some parts are a crime. That’s one of the several good ideas raised in The Railway Man, a stirring drama that demonstrates how stories told many times can be told well again if you just keep it clear and simple. The Railway Man comes from Australia, the home of its director Jonathan Teplitzky and one of its stars (Nicole Kidman), but it has nothing to do with Australian history. It’s about imperialism: by the British in Singapore, which defeated its colonizers in 1942, and then by the Japanese, who captured the defeated British soldiers and imprisoned them in Thailand, forcing them to build a trans-national railroad under merciless conditions. So yes, this is The Bridge on the River Kwai, David Lean’s 1957 classic, retold through the experience of Eric Lomax, a British veteran of World War II, who lived

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

through it and wrote a book about it. The drama begins in 1980, when the mature Lomax (Colin Firth), a railroad enthusiast, falls in love with Patti (a tranquil Kidman), whom he meets on a train. He won’t tell her about parts of his wartime past, which he continues to relive through

THE RAILWAY MAN DIRECTED BY: Jonathan Teplitzky STARRING: Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Jeremy Irvine MANOR

CP APPROVED nightmares and flashbacks, so she asks his old Army buddy (Stellan Skarsgård) to tell her what so thoroughly traumatized him. The story then flashes back to scenes of internment and torture (Jeremy Irvine is fine as the young Eric), finally moving forward when Lomax tracks down the Japanese

translator — as young as Eric was at the time — who watched as it happened. In a way, I prefer the middle story of Railway Man to the ones that surround it. Firth is superb as an everyday fellow who can’t overcome the memories of his unspeakable past, not even for the love of a woman who quietly yet desperately wants to rescue him. But the war story is agonizing, and the confrontations between the elder Lomax and his captor, though toeing the line of melodrama, are naked with emotions that few of us can fathom. This all makes for a very old-fashioned movie, albeit one more violent than the times permitted Lean in the 1950s. Along the way, we’re asked to consider why we fight, and how we can put our humanity aside to do it. It’s an old story that — in more ways than one — never seems to go out of style. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE. Jim Jarmusch directs this offbeat romantic drama about two vampires (Tilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston) living in modern-day Detroit. Starts Fri., May 2. Manor THE OTHER WOMAN. Ugh. Is Nick Cassavetes’ comedy really the state of on-screen female empowerment in 2014 — three women in skintight clothing babbling on about the one awful man they share? The predictable plot finds the wife (a particularly shrill Leslie Mann), the sleek age-appropriate mistress (Cameron Diaz) and the bikini-babe mistress No. 2 (Kate Upton) of Mr. Mark King (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) discovering one another and forging an alliance to take revenge. It’s painful to sit through — not very funny (oh, explosive diarrhea jokes!), a conspicuous waste of talent and jaw-droppingly tone-deaf about its gender politics. Women, in case we’ve forgotten despite endless iterations of this stereotype on screen, are defined by their (1) relationship to men, (2) hysterical nature and (3) shoes. And so it is in The Other Woman, a film you should not bother getting involved with in the first place. (Al Hoff) RUSSIAN FILM SYMPOSIUM. The 16th annual symposium offers 12 recent Russian films tied to this year’s theme, “Gendering Genre.” Films screen on the University of Pittsburgh campus and at the Melwood Screening Room, in Oakland. A complete schedule is at www. rusfilm.pitt.edu. Mon., May 5, through Sat., May 10

The Other Woman exile who returns to his homeland (Fri., May 2); the Japanese gangster tale Why Don’t You Play in Hell? (Fri., May 2, and Sat., May 3); and Things Left Behind, a documentary about remembering Hiroshima and other large-scale tragedies (Fri., May 2, and Sat., May 3). A complete schedule is at www.silkscreenfestival. org. Various venues

ATTACK OF THE KILLER TOMATOES. Everybody loves fruits and vegetables now, but who remembers when they grew sentient and started killing people? See how it all goes down in John DeBello’s 1978 lowbudget horror-movie spoof featuring gardens gone wild. 10:30 p.m. Fri., May 2. Hollywood SHORT PEACE. A new fantasy animation film from Japan consists of four shorts, all overseen by legendary anime director Katsuhiro Otomo (Akira, Steamboy). 1 p.m. Sat., May 3, and 7 p.m. Sun., May 4. Hollywood

REPERTORY TWISTER. Get your high-velocity funnel-shaped thrills on with this 1996 actioner from Jan de Bont about scientists who chase tornadoes. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 30. AMC Loews. $5 ROPE. Two college friends undertake an experiment in superior morality, by killing an “inferior” classmate, and throwing a dinner party immediately after. Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 film was based in part on the notorious Leopold-Loeb case of the 1920s, but was also notable for the film’s “single take”: It was shot in real time and in one room, with reel jumps cleverly concealed, heightening the claustrophobic suspense. Farley Granger and John Dall portray the student killers; James Stewart is their professor. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 1. Hollywood

CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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Confession of Murder SILK SCREEN ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL. The film fest spotlighting recent features and documentaries from Asia, the Middle East and the U.S. continues through Sun., May 4. Among the films: With You, Without You, a Sri Lankan romance (Wed., April 30); Confession of Murder, a South Korean crime thriller about a serial killer (Wed., April 30, and Fri., May 2); Red Obsession, a documentary about China’s demand for Bordeaux wine (Thu., May 1, and Sun., May 4); Jadoo, a romantic comedy set in London’s Indian community (Thu., May 1); Zinda Bhaag, a sliceof-life set in Lahore, and Pakistan’s first Oscar entry in 50 years (Thu., May 1 and Sat., May 3); A Respectable Family, a drama about an Iranian

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Featuring Frames by Mattisse

Godzilla: The Japanese Original RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. In Steven Spielberg’s film, our square-jawed hero, archeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), tackles everything from giant boulders to snakes and conniving Nazis. The 1981 film kicks off a month-long, Sunday-night series of 1980s adventure films. 8 p.m. Sun., May 4. Regent Square GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL. The re-release of 1954’s Godzilla is notable for the elimination of the infamous Raymond Burr footage, and the restoration of scenes ensuring the return of the film’s anti-nuclear sermonizing. Yet while the irradiated Godzilla might be a 150-foot-tall pot-bellied menace, he’s also got a lot in common with the Japanese of the 1950s. That might explain the feelings of director Ishiro Honda, who renders Godzilla’s underwater death sequence like the tragic finale of a surreal opera. Godzilla, like Hiroshima, ends up skeletized, a victim of a super-weapon, and his portrayal here foreshadows his transformation in future films into a beloved if amoral defender of Japan. In this film, he’s both Japan itself and what threatens Japan’s fragile existence; a past the country is reluctant to discard; and a scapegoat for nuclear anxiety, his thunderous footsteps tolling like distant ordnance. In Japanese, with subtitles. Mon., May 5, through Thu., May 8. Regent Square (Bill O’Driscoll)

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MRS. DOUBTFIRE. Robin Williams stars as a divorced dad who doubles as the wacky but lovable nanny Mrs. Doubtfire in Chris Columbus’ 1993 comedy. And who says there are no good roles for middle-aged women? 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 7. AMC Loews. $5

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MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL. Join King Arthur and the Knights of Camelot on their

fruitless but hilarious search for the Holy Grail in Monty Python’s 1974 cult hit. (Pythons Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones co-direct.) From the demented opening credits (in pidgin Swedish, and with an earnest indebtedness to a certain moose) through numerous sketches, one-liners, and delicious jabs at medieval history and its heroes of legend, past two unforgettable rabbits, and right through lovely scenery to an unexpected conclusion, the endlessly quotable Holy Grail remains the Python gang’s funniest feature. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 7; 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 9; 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., May 10; and 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. Hollywood (AH) MULHOLLAND DRIVE. In his best films, David Lynch seizes a theme and attacks it with a dream logic that pries the child-proof lid off your subconscious, revealing the anxiously quivering goo beneath. He did it in Eraserhead and Blue Velvet, and did it again in 2001’s Mulholland Drive, a nightmarish exhumation of Hollywood mythology and corruption centering on a couple of aspiring actresses, a seemingly naïve blonde (Naomi Watts) and a glamorous but amnesiac brunette (Laura Elena Harring). Eventually, the film becomes a Möbius strip of both narrative and identity, and Lynch begins to peel back the seductive illusions that comprise cinema itself as he traps the two women in a world of users, lies and mirrors. Screens as part of the Hollywood’s year-long celebration of David Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 8; 10 p.m. Fri., May 9; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 11. Hollywood (BO)

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ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[DANCE]

“YOU HAVE AN IDEA, YOU WANT TO CREATE THEATER, WE’LL GIVE YOU THAT PLATFORM.”

IN DARKNESS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Alexandra Bodnarchuk presents CONNOTATIONS: UNKNOWN 8 p.m. Fri., May 2, and 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 4. PearlArts Studios, 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. $10 ($5 artist tickets May 4 only). www.alexandrabodnarchuk.org/tickets N E W S

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THE FRINGE

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Alexandra Bodnarchuk’s CONNOTATIONS: unknown {PHOTO COURTESY OF LINDSAY DILL}

The fleeting nature of interpersonal relations is the theme of dancer and choreographer Alexandra Bodnarchuk’s latest production, CONNOTATIONS: unknown. The 45-minute modern-dance work will be performed May 2 and May 4 at PearlArts Studios. Bodnarchuk, 24, is a Pittsburgh native who graduated from Ohio University in 2012 with degrees in dance and French. A new dancemaker on the local scene, Bodnarchuk says she likes to create choreography with her dancers using structured improvisation exercises. She adds that her movement language has a sense of weightiness to it. She was inspired to create CONNOTATIONS: unknown by her experiences as a performer in Bricolage Productions’ 2012 show STRATA. In that immersivetheater work, Bodnarchuk portrayed “the last girl left at prom”: In one-on-one encounters with audience members, she briefly slow-danced with them in a darkened room. It was one of a series “refitnessing tests” at the fictitious STRATA center, aimed at achieving the worry-free state of “iConsciousness.” Bodnarchuk says she wanted to recreate the sense of “blind connection” she felt as the prom girl, dancing with strangers she could barely see. CONNOTATIONS: unknown is arranged in three sections. It’s set to a soundscape edited by Steve Hudock and featuring music by Pittsburgh’s Dave Bernabo, along with recorded dialogue and sound effects. In the first section, which was previewed at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s 2013 newMoves Festival, Bodnarchuk and four other dancers perform in and out of the spotlight, being briefly glimpsed and then disappearing into darkness. Bodnarchuk likens this section to “going through life within yourself.” The second part is an emotional duet, performed and co-choreographed by Bodnarchuk and dancer Zek Stewart. Bodnarchuk and Stewart dance while wearing blindfolds, and their duet goes from nurturing to violent. “We allow ourselves to be pushed to the brink in order to come back from it,” says Bodnarchuk. The work’s final section is a solo in which Bodnarchuk explores the emotional void after Stewart’s character departs. Says Bodnarchuk: “I work through everything that has happened to me, to once again adjust to being on my own.” The show’s May 2 performance features a guest performance by students from Factory Street Studio in Athens, Ohio.

TO TOWN {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

“I

.LOVE good theater,” says Dan

Stiker. “It makes you think. It challenges you, and challenges what you think you know.” At the moment, what local audiences know about theater itself might not include the pleasures of fringing. With Stiker’s help, that’s about to change. This weekend, Pittsburgh joins cities like San Francisco, Philadelphia, New Orleans, Washington, D.C., and the greatgrandaddy of them all — Edinburgh, Scotland — by hosting the first Pittsburgh Fringe Festival. The festival for edgy and below-the-radar work takes place May 2-11, with 26 individuals and troupes performing at various venues in Shadyside. Stiker, a North Hills High graduate, studied theater at Point Park University before moving to New York City. After working as a performer, stage manager and director with street-theater troupe The Beggars Group, he returned to Pittsburgh. Here he co-founded Blankspace Arts, and {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} worked as an actor, director or lighting Theatrical outlier: Fringe Festival founder Dan Stiker poses earlier this month with musicians in Schenley Plaza. designer for Stage 62, the Black Sheep Puppet Festival and more. But he believed that Pittsburgh needed a Fringe, and last production values. One-person shows, each usually running less than an hour. storytelling, puppetry and original pieces Patrons dash from venue to venue, seeing year, he decided it was time. Fringe fests, which started in 1947 with compose the majority of fringe offerings, as many as a dozen pieces in a weekend. Pittsburgh’s is an unjuried fringe, Edinburgh’s inaugural event, cram mulgiving all prospective applicants an equal tiple theatrical presentations into several PITTSBURGH chance for inclusion. “You have an idea, locations during a short period of time. FRINGE FESTIVAL you want to create theater, we’ll give you Because of the event’s turn-and-burn naFri., May 2-May 11. Various venues, that platform,” says Stiker. Hopefuls were ture, with a single venue potentially housShadyside. Tickets to individual shows: $12 plus Fringe Fest button, not selected based upon the merit of their ing multiple shows daily, fringe works a $3 one-time purchase. Complete work. Rather, at January’s kick-off party, tend to be self-contained, with minimal schedule at www.pghfringe.org CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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THE FRINGE COMES TO TOWN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

A KINETIC WORLD PREMIERE BY THE AUTHOR OF OPUS

Lives overlap and elevators stop on random floors as nine characters are compellingly revealed in this comedy about fate. Fringe Festival performers, clockwise from top left: The Darling Cores {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRENT D. PENNINGTON}, Krish Mohan, No Name Players’ [best imitation] {PHOTO COURTESY OF NO NAME PLAYERS}, Stephen Pellegrino {PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY RIPPEL}, Mad Muse’s “A Well-Balanced Madness” and Brawling Bard’s A Compleat Guide to Murder and Mayhem

applicants’ names were simply pulled out of a hat (specifically, a vintage top hat provided by Eons Fashion Antique owner Richard Parsakian). A good many names pulled were local. Producing companies Cup-A-Jo and Thoreau NM, and dance troupes including the Murphy/Smith Dance Collective, will contribute, and known area playwrights Andrew Huntley and Michael McGovern are on the roster. There are also visiting artists like San Francisco-based musician and monologist Joe Medina (see sidebar). Much of what will be seen can be categorized as traditional plays, like No

A play about the healing power of vulnerability.

“YYoouu CCaann’t’tt HHaavvee A Ann OOrrggaassm m W Wiitthh Mee”” Written by Kendra McLaughlin Directed by Lora Oxenreiter

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

Mother Mo er’s ’s Day May 8 at 8pm Wee We ekend May 9 at 2pm & 8pm Grey Box Theatre • 3595 Butler St. • Lawrenceville Go to www.showclix.com for tickets or go to www.playgroundproductions.net for more information.

Name Player’s [best imitation], by Jeremy F. Richter. Other solo acts include veteran local musician and performance artist Stephen Pellegrino’s The Accordion Monologues, about growing up in the Mon Valley, and the classic Irish tale of Cuchullain, as told by Alan Irvine. Also in the lineup are Fork Full of Noodles — Live — based on the political-satire video series by comic Krish Mohan’s Raman Noodles Company — and a concert by the Allegheny Bilge Rats Shanty Choir, singing songs of the seafaring life. And even a fringe fest can embrace traditional theatrical source material: Shakespeare’s fights, for instance, take the spotlight in the stage-combat work by Brawling Bard Theater; his words inspired the Mad Muse’s musical monologue “A Well Balanced Madness”; and Footlight Players revises A Midsummer Night’s Dream for younger viewers. Also for younger audiences is Tasty Monster’s adaptation of the classic “Ferdinand.” Visiting artists from as far as the U.K. and as close as Altoona introduce themselves with vaudevillian antics and coming-of-age stories. Shows are staged up to four times each. Fest venues, all along the Ellsworth Avenue corridor, include Steel City Improv Theater, Gallerie Chiz, the Boys & Girls Club and Winchester-Thurston School. In addition to contributing two unique and jam-packed weekends for audiences, the Fringe — supported in part by the Sprout Fund — seeks to enhance relationships between artists. While Pittsburgh is climbing

FRINGE FEST SPOTLIGHT {BY LISSA BRENNAN} Joe Medina completed what he describes as a “particularly grueling” tour with his San Francisco-based psychedelic rock band Merch, with his bandmates bowing out early, one by one. “By the end,” he says, “the last tour cellist fell off, and it was just me for the last few shows.” The songs he was touring with did not all lend themselves to solo interpretation, so he started replacing sung words with spoken ones, telling a story of the horrors of the road, singing a piece, telling another story. It wasn’t the original plan. But it worked. When it came time to support the latest Merch album, 2012’s This Betrayal Will Be Our End, Medina knew a typical music tour was not going to work. The deeply personal material on the album, penned in response to a toxic relationship and its dissolution, was not something that he wanted to revisit on the road. His agent suggested developing a monologue show to support the rock album. “It seemed out of left field,” Medina says in a phone interview. But remembering the final stops of the tour that ended as a one-man evening, it made sense. Looking to the works of famed monologuists like Spalding Gray and Eric Bogosian for inspiration, Medina began to develop his one-man

Joe Medina’s This Betrayal Will Be Our End

the ladder of international credibility with contributions to food-and-beverage culture, museums and galleries, and outdoor pursuits, it has yet to make similar leaps in the performing arts. It’s not that what’s offered on stage falls short: The theater community, after all, has grown slowly and surely in recent decades, with dozens of maverick companies bridging the gap between the “Let’s put on a show!” mindset of community troupes and the “Let’s put on a show with a fuck of a lot of money!” mentality of theaters that are as much business as show. Yet as Stiker says, “We have all these theater companies, but the community isn’t necessarily here.” One mission in progress is creating shared audiences by enlisting established theaters to offer discounts to festival patrons. Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre has signed on, and other companies might follow, Stiker says. Stiker wants the Fringe Fest to grow Pittsburgh’s sense of collectivity, strengthening the environment in which we create and experience art for everyone. While the Fringe can easily stand alone, Stiker hopes that it will also help local artists stand together.

performances into something more definite and concrete. The monologue he ended up with — though it includes portions of the album, and the disintegrating and painful relationship that launched it — goes deeper and further back into his life. “I talk about having a severe bout of meningitis as a teenager and learning to walk again,” he says. “How that may relate to the choices I made, and how that influenced everything else.” While there was a conscious choice to avoid retelling the album as a whole, exploring the material as a monologue wasn’t taking the easy way out. “It was like pulling teeth for me to actually speak about any of this stuff,” Medina says. Numerous studio sessions in front of interns dulled the edge, while sharpening skills. Straying further from the well-traveled path of record promotion, the initial performances will be not at music venues but at fringe festivals. “I think I’ll get some of the record-store and vinyl enthusiasts,” he says of the change not only in format but market. “But a big reason for me doing fringe was to expose myself to people who are interested in the arts.” Eventually he will take the monologue on a proper tour of its own. Despite the initial anxiety and trepidation when first exploring this aspect of creativity, he now enjoys the process enough that he intends to continue writing monologues. Medina world-premieres This Betrayal at Pittsburgh Fringe Festival, in four shows May 9-11. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@ PGHC ITY PA PER.CO M

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nowseethis.org Marilyn Monroe during the filming of The Misfits, 1960 © Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos

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FINAL WEEKEND! THE HIPPEST OPERA YOU’LL SEE THIS YEAR.

[ART REVIEW]

BIRD CALLS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

“ A STUNNER”

- Albany Times-Union

“LYRICAL, EVEN SEDUCTIVE” - Washington Times

FINAL DAYS: MAY 2 & 4 75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! English texts projected above the stage.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

Art by Irina Koukhanova

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: David Beloff for Virginia Opera.

Philip p Glass’s

Panoptic Landscape is Irina Koukhanova’s assemblage of individual but connected works in varying media. Viewed singly, they’re sometimes stirring, frequently jocular, and often potent. Experienced together, they construct a society where proud rebellion confronts subjugation, meeting it head to head, subverting it behind its back, delighting in success and grinning at failure as it kicks against the pricks. In this BoxHeart Expressions Artist of the Year show, Russian-born Koukhanova explicitly references her native soil as well as Italy in titles; her imagery also draws from German Expressionism and classical Greco-Roman sculpture. Depicted are the trappings of industry, machinery of war, suggestions of architecture and maps of city planning. Lines and angles are sharp and stark, thick dark scratches on creamy ivory paper; hydrostone pieces are muted white, with sculptural relief. Human forms appear briefly and secretively, mummy-wrapped and faceless, bound by sheets and sightless. The figure chiefly populating this world is a bird, with scythe-shaped beak and coal-black feathers, a crow or raven. It’s a flawless choice, crisply communicative and richly evocative. Corvids are known tricksters, imps and keenly intelligent jokers combining honed senses of humor with extreme acumen and cleverness, as well as a will difficult to break. It’s the perfect spirit animal to embody oppressed, yet irrepressible, citizens, standing straight to meet the boot that tramples them. The birds are shown at play, at mischief, and at odds with their surroundings. In bronze sculptures, they sport with the fruits of luxury — literally, lying supine to balance artichokes and pomegranates on their talons like a circus seal spinning a beach ball — or straddle hobby horses. They battle nets and ropes, don disguises and stand sentry. They get defeated, temporarily, and cackle back to triumph. There are glimpses of the world that lacks life, but which often bears evidence of its existence: banners wave with no one to salute them. The “White Landscape” series offers deserted streets, with objects abandoned in a hurry. The “Cradle” works present lush, smoky clouds swelled red with blood, the soft roundness of their forms contrasting the harsh slashes of charcoal and black that surround them. Crows caw and peck; they preen, prance and flap. But most of all, they fly, and as the occupants of a world downcast by oppression, they give us hope of rising. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PANOPTIC LANDSCAPE continues through May 16. BoxHeart Expressions, 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

Presents

Grammy award winner

Regina Belle May 3, 2014 • 7:30 PM

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER.}

Tickets start at $40 For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records, Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com Kelly –Strayhorn 5941 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa 15206

Shaw thing: Gretchen Egolf and Jared McGuire in the Public’s Candida

[PLAY REVIEW]

SHAW AT PLAY {BY TED HOOVER} I WAS SLIGHTLY worried going into Pittsburgh Public Theater’s production of George Bernard Shaw’s Candida. After all, Shaw never willingly passed up a chance to lecture his audience. And, too, in nearly three decades of reviewing I’d never seen Candida and, usually, there’s a reason a play goes unproduced for 30 years. I’m very happy to say that I exited the Public (before 10:30!) in a much more pleasant frame of mind, because Candida ends up being an Edwardian sitcom. (Who knew Shaw had it in him?)

CANDIDA continues through May 18. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

The Rev. James Morell is upright, downright committed to his faith and his socialist politics. He loves his congregation and they love him back — especially the female parishioners and his secretary, Miss Prossie. But these gals are barking up the wrong tree, because Morell is achingly in love with his loving wife, Candida. Then here comes Eugene Marchbanks, an intensely artistic young poet so profoundly enchanted by our title character he can barely speak in her presence. Two other characters appear as well, a curate and an industrialist; both are funny, but neither has anything to do with the story. As with most sitcoms, a flimsy string of events brings us to the plot: Morell comes to believe that Candida might be in love with Marchbanks. To tell you the truth, it’s

not very plausible, and certainly the least interesting aspect of the evening. What is interesting is the breezy and charming manner in which Shaw unspools the whole thing. It’s a skillful, smartly crafted piece of puffery which is no less entertaining for its puffery-ness. I especially enjoyed the intelligence and savvy Shaw gives to Candida and the surprisingly contemporary relationship, considering when the play was written (1894), that she has with Morell. It does get a little twee toward the end, and there is an unmistakable desire to kick Morell in the head, since he’s the only one in a five-mile radius who thinks Candida might be looking elsewhere. But thanks to Ted Pappas’ fleet and facile direction, it’s hardly an issue; Pappas knows precisely when to push in and when to pull back to achieve maximum effect. Gretchen Egolf is a fascinating presence as Candida, with a look in her eyes letting us know that she misses nothing and, when Shaw requires it, that she will reveal everything. Playing the loony-tunes poet Marchbanks, Jared McGuire luxuriates in a looselimbed physicality as telling as it is funny. It’s the showiest role, and McGuire’s more than up to the task. David Whalen’s rockribbed sincerity as Morell goes a long way toward making this slightly contrived character believable, and his dawn of understanding at the play’s end is quite moving. Contributing lots of fun in supporting roles are Meghan Mae O’Neill, Matthew Minor and John O’Creagh. Also adding to the evening are James Noone’s beautiful set and Andrew B. Marlay’s attractive costumes. It’s Shaw. And it’s fun. Who knew?

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

A musical comedy written and directed by Brian Edward; musical arrangements by Jace Vek and Lisa Harrier. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

MAY 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 2014

Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Blithe Spirit By Noel Coward

05.0105.08.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

May 1–17

{COMEDY}

4301 Forbes Avenue, Oakland MAY 01 Ron Fi Finley i l

A hauntingly good time!

DISCOUNT CODE: CP5OFF picttheatre.org 412.561.6000

+ THU., MAY 01 {ART} It makes sense that the eight sculpture students in Carnegie Mellon’s “Simulation and Perception” class are exhibiting their work in 20-foot U-Hauls: Nothing provokes thought like driving an orange-andwhite behemoth for miles on end. The students’ work will inhabit that same space when Cluster Truck debuts with a one-night showing on the College of Fine Arts lawn. Students were each given their own trucks and asked to design around a theme of their choosing. At tonight’s reception, they’ll field questions about their art and the mechanics of U-Haul exhibiting. Angela Suico 5 p.m. 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-268-2409 or www.cmu.edu/art

therapeutic and defiant act that you could do, especially in the inner city. Plus, you get strawberries.” Tonight, the Heinz Endowments hosts Finley at “Planting Seeds of Change,” a community dialogue at the Hill House Association’s Kaufmann Center. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. (refreshments at 5:30 p.m.). 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. Free. Register at www.heinz.org.

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{STAGE}

Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre resurrects the world’s best-known play about the afterlife. It’s the first professional staging here since 1971 of Blithe Spirit, Noël Coward’s comedy set in the 1930s. The classic finds author Charles Candomine, in need of material for a book,

MAY 05

Matthew C. Lamanna

{TALK} In 2010, fed up with bad eating habits and poor health on his home turf of South Central Los Angeles, Ron Finley started planting curbside strips with fruits and vegetables. Now, thanks to a wildly popular TED Talk, his volunteer group LA Green Grounds is nationally known, and so is his gospel of gangsta gardening. “Growing your own food is like printing your own money,” he says. “Gardening is the most

Not only does Pittsburgh now have its own Fringe Festival (covered elsewhere in this section), but come August, we’ll get the Pittsburgh Comedy Festival. That event, created by Brian Gray, holds its launch party tonight, at Arcade Comedy Theater. Comic and WDVE regular Mike Wysocki emcees; the evening’s entertainment includes: Arcade house improv troupe Player One; storytelling troupe Mondo, featuring Ali Spagnola and a team of improvisers; and standup comics Jeff Konkle, Terry Jones and Sally Brooks. BO 7 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-25 (includes two drink tickets). www. pittsburghcomedyfestival.org

Illustration by Mark A. Klingler

Free!Event Art by Robert Po

llard

While he calls his new show of artwork Junk Collector and Scrabble King, you know Robert Pollard better as the singer and prolific songwriter behind cult-favorite indie rock band Guided by Voices. He’s also a life-long collage-maker whose work has been featured in a hardbound Fantagraphics collection and in Manhattan galleries — as well as on GBV album covers. Junk Collector opens at the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination tonight as part of the Penn Avenue Arts District’s Unblurred gallery crawl. Pollard, who lives in Dayton, Ohio, will attend the opening (which features musical guest ATS), but there’s much more to this crawl. Across the street from IF, at Most Wanted Fine Art, check out two new shows: (topo)GRAPHIC vs APP-lication, a study in contrasting painting styles by Darrell Kinsel and Richard Jackley, and Criminal Damage, a mixed-media show celebrating street art, curated by Tara Fay Coleman. Up toward Negley, Pittsburgh Glass Center opens Breaking Through: Moving 4ward, a showcase for emerging artists Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky and Nadine Saylor. Up and down Penn, an additional 20 venues feature more art, live music and more. Also look for the Garfield Night Market (food, crafts) and, late night at Brillobox’s Pandemic, global-dancehall beats and Montreal-based MC Boogat. Bill O’Driscoll 7-10 p.m. Fri., May 2 (times vary by venue). 4100-5400 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield/Friendship. Most events are free. 412-441-6950 or www.pennavenue.org

attending a séance by clairvoyant Madame Arcati. When Arcati reaches Charles’ deceased wife Elvira, his former lover wreaks havoc on his second marriage. Mary Rawson stars as Arcati. Alan Stanford directs a cast that also includes Daina Michelle Griffith and Dan Rodden. The first performance at the Charity Randall Theatre is tonight. AS 8 p.m. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-38. 412-5616000 or www.picttheatre.org

+ FRI., MAY 02 {ART} While his gallery is among the longest-running in town, owner Steve Mendelson has been plying the trade even longer: Mendelson Gallery was in Paris, for instance, before it settled in Shadyside. Along the way, there were shows featuring everyone from local luminaries Thad Mosley, David Lewis and Rob Rogers to Man Ray; shows highlighting erotic art and edible arts; and countless other events. Tonight, Mendelson celebrates his “Forty-Year Love Affair With the Arts.” Sip some wine and enjoy works by many of the gallery’s long list of artists. BO 5:30-8:30 p.m. 5874 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-8664 or www.mendelsongallery.net

Madwomen on stage in Oakland to kick off the annual Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series, which includes an open mic and a book-signing. BO 7:30-10 p.m. (67 Bedford Square, South Side; $10; beattyjp@aol.com). Hemingway’s: 8 p.m. (3911 Forbes Ave., Oakland; free; Jbauer103w@aol.com)

MAY 04

“For the Birds”

{STAGE} “Comfort Zone” was popular enough as a one-act at the 2012 Theatre Festival in Black & White that local playwright Marlon Erik Youngblood expanded it into a full-length work. Comfort Zone, which explores how a shooting affects a community, features a cast including Kevin Brown and Cheryl El Walker; Mark Clayton Southers, whose Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. stages the work, also stars. Mark Whitehead directs. Tonight’s opening-night fundraiser includes a postshow talk featuring Young-

blood, Alliance for Police Accountability activist Brandi Fisher and former Allegheny County coroner Cyril Wecht, plus a reception. BO 8 p.m. Continues through May 24. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-25 (May 2 fundraiser: $35). www.pghplaywrights.com

+ SAT., MAY 03 {STAGE} A “jigsaw puzzle of a play” is

show at City Theatre, which also launched his Opus and Incorruptible. AS 5:30 p.m. Continues through May 25. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

how Tracy Brigden, the director of Michael Hollinger’s new comedy Hope and Gravity, describes the show, which peers at nine characters and their individual but connected stories. One event triggers a series of encounters, like an “impromptu house call” and an “unlikely hotel hookup.” See how they piece together when the show has its first performance tonight. Hope and Gravity is Hollinger’s third

+ SUN., MAY 04 {STAGE} Video, puppetry, live music, dance and … birds? That’s not a combination you see every day. The Pittsburgh National Aviary’s “For the Birds” features all of these things in celebration of International Migratory Bird Day. The birds will interact with the dancers and puppeteers at the Helen M. Schmidt Flight Zone Theatre. Directed and created by Carnegie Mellon students Daniel Allende and Tucker Marder, the show debuts today, with another performance on May 11. Come an hour early to explore the aviary for the show’s cost of admission. AS 6 p.m. Also May 11. 700 Arch St., North Side. $10. 412-323-7235 or www.aviary.org

{WORDS}

It’s a Madwomen in the Attic kind of week. Tonight, the venerable Carlow Universitybased poetry initiative holds a book launch for Voices From the Attic: Volume XIX, a party and fundraiser at WYEP Community Broadcast Center hosted by Jan Beatty and Sarah Williams-Devereux. And on Tue., May 6, Williams-Devereux joins Kayla Berkey, Bonita Lee Penn and six other

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kids might ask. But scientists wonder, too. One expert in the field is right here in Pittsburgh: Matthew C. Lamanna, assistant curator of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Vertebrate Paleontology section. Lamanna and his teams have scoured the world for fossils, and tonight, at the Carnegie Science Center’s Café Scientifique, he presents his findings from evidence dating back 100 million years ago and more. (Pictured is a life reconstruction of gansus yumenensis.) The talk and informal discussion, “The Origin of Modern Birds: New Evidence From the Cretaceous of China and Antarctica,” is free, with food and drink available for purchase. BO 7-9 p.m. North Side. RSVP at 412-237-3400 or www. CarnegieScienceCenter.org

+ WED., MAY 07 {TALK} Today the ACLU begins its free, four-session Civics for Grownups series at Squirrel Hill’s Carnegie Library. First up is “What Were They Thinking? The Constitution and Bill of Rights,” led by Anthony Infanti. An associate dean at the University of Pittsburgh Law School, Infanti will examine the “strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation,” explain how the Constitution shapes our government and discuss “how our form of government changed from the Articles of Confederation to the U.S. Constitution.” Participants receive a free pocket Constitution. AS 6:30 p.m. 5801 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. 412-422-9650 or www.carnegielibrary.org/ locations/squirrelhill

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ACCOMPLICE. Thriller/comedy by Rupert Holmes. Presented by Greensburg Civic Theatre. May 2-3, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 4, 2 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. AMISH BURLESQUE. Musical comedy. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. BOTTOMS UP! Confusion sets in in this farce as an earnest aerobics instructor unknowingly acquires the cash filled suitcase of two money launderers from Cleveland. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru May 10. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. CANDIDA. Comedy by George Bernard Shaw. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru May 13. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. COMFORT ZONE. Play by Marlon Erik Youngblood about the aftermath of a shooting & how it

impacts a community. www.pghplaywrights.com/zone Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru May 18. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. GROUNDED. One-woman show following a gutsy fighter pilot whose unexpected pregnancy puts her career on hold. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 4. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. HEE HAW JAMBOREE. Tribute to America’s longest-running syndicated TV program. Presented by Pohl Productions. Fri, Sat. Thru May 17. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. HOPE & GRAVITY. Nonlinear comedy about fate. Sat., May 3, 5:30 p.m., Sun., May 4, 7 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 25. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE. Joe DiPietro’s popular comedic look at relationships. Presented by The Legacy Lineup. Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 11. The Legacy

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Theatre, Allison Park. 412-635-8080. INKY. A love-starved Manhattanite husband & wife struggling to satisfy their child-like desire to “have it all” during the 1980s hire Inky, a young Slavic nanny who’s obsessed with Muhammad Ali. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru May 11. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. NUNSENSE. Presented by The Baldwin Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 11. Baldwin Community United Methodist Church. 412-881-1002. ORPHÉE. Philip Glass’ twist on the myth of Orpheus & Eurydice. Presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Fri., May 2, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 4, 3 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. POLYESTER THE MUSICAL. The story of the Synchronistics, an over-the-hill ABBA wannabe group that reunites after 20 years to perform at a public access TV telethon. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 18. The Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. THE UNDERPANTS. Steve Martin’s

Meet the Brewer Friday, 5/2 • 5-7 PM Sample a Rare Mango-Infused version of IPL, plus be among the first to try Straub’s newest Craft Specialty Straubweizen. raubwe aubw weizeen..

farce about young bride who is met with instant celebrity after her bloomers drop to her ankles at a parade for the king. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 11. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE VILE VETERINARIAN OR HOW MUCH IS THAT DOGGIE WITH THE WIDOW. Annual Opera House Production. May 2-3. Waverly Presbyterian Church, Regent Square. 412-242-0643.

COMEDY THU 01 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru May 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH COMEDY FESTIVAL LAUNCH PARTY. Hosted by Mike Wysocki. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL. Thu, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 02 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BILL ENGVALL. 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. DAVID KAYE, JAY BOC, LISA DAPPRICH. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Sokol Club, South Side. 412-760-2377. HI-FI MUSIC IMPROV MIX. Hosted by Missy Moreno. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LEVEL ONE CLASS SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LEVEL TWO CLASS SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MISSY MORENO & FRIENDS STAR WARS SPECIAL: MAY THE 4TH BE W/ YOU ON MAY 2ND. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SHOWCASE OF LOCAL COMEDY. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. THE SMASH BROTHERS: CORY Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (plan& CHAD. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., May 3, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., May etarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and 4, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. more. North Side. 412-237-3400. 412-462-5233. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II DAVID KAYE, MIKE WYSOCKI, iron-making technology. Rankin. MATT GEORGE. Funny Fundraiser. 412-464-4020 x.21. 5:30 p.m. West Deer VFD No. 1, CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL Tarentum. 724-265-1632. HISTORY. Explore the complex LEVEL ONE CLASS SHOW. interplay between culture, nature 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, and biotechnology. Open Fridays Shadyside. 412-404-2695. 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. MIKE JONES, AUGGIE COOK, Garfield. 412-223-7698. RAY ZAWODNI. Funny Fundraiser. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed 6:30 p.m. Allenport Municipal Frank Lloyd Wright house. Building. 724-326-9980. 724-329-8501. WHEN I’M NOT A PERSON. FORT PITT MUSEUM. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Unconquered: History Theater, Shadyside. Meets Hollywood at 412-404-2695. Fort Pitt. Original movie YANNIS PAPPAS. props, photographs, 8 p.m. Carnegie Library www. per & costumes alongside pa Of Homestead Music pghcitym .co 18th century artifacts Hall. 412-368-5225. & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. LEVEL ONE CLASS SHOW. Reconstructed fort houses museum 7 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, of Pittsburgh history circa French & Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. UNPLANNED COMEDY IMPROV. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Mon, 9 p.m. Thru May 26 HamboClayton, the Frick estate, with ne’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Duets. Harmonious couplings of Washington. 412-592-7869. botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY Oakland. 412-268-2434. SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by 724-329-8501. Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. more than 600 birds from over 412-431-9908. 200 species. With classes, lectures, STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. demos and more. North Side. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip 412-323-7235. District. 412-904-4502. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military 412-624-6000. artifacts and exhibits on the OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Allegheny Valley’s industrial heriThis pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion tage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. site features log house, blacksmith AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR shop & gardens. South Park. AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. 412-835-1554. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral MUSEUM. Trolley rides and history narratives to explore comexhibits. Includes displays, walking munities, cultures, & innovations. tours,gift shop, picnic area and Downtown. 412-258-2700. Trolley Theatre. Washington. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large 724-228-9256. collection of automatic roll-played PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & musical instruments and music BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly boxes in a mansion setting. Forest. Watch butterflies emerge Call for appointment. O’Hara. from their chrysalises to flutter 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. among tropical blooms. 14 indoor Preserved materials reflecting the rooms & 3 outdoor gardens industrial heritage of Southwestfeature exotic plants and floral ern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. displays from around the world. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Oakland. 412-622-6914.

FRI 02 - SAT 03

COLEMAN GREEN. May 2-3, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 02 - SUN 04

VISUAL

SAT 03

ART

Photograph by David Aschkenas, from Synagogues of Prague and Budapest, at the American Jewish Museum, in Squirrel Hill

NEW THIS WEEK 429 BROAD ST. Exposure. Showcase of student photographers from Robert Morris University’s Media Arts Photography BFA & BA programs. Opening reception: May 2, 6-9 p.m. Sewickley. 5139 PENN AVE. Day of the Painter: A Seriously Serious Painting Show. An investigation of the role of painting by artists working outside the canon of painting. Presented by Carnegie Mellon University. May 2, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-268-2409. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Inspired Life: The Art, Craft, Vision, & Inspiration of Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni. Feat. 30 artists in a variety of mediums. Opening reception: May 9, 5-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-291-6499. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Touch of Class II. Watercolors by Marci Evancho Mason. Opening reception: May 3, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Cluster Truck. Outdoor art installation feat. 8 artists using 8 U-Haul trucks as a gallery to showcase performances, sculptural installation, & participatory works. May 1, 5-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-2409. CONSTELLATION COFFEE. Bryan C. Mickle: Recent Watercolors. Opening reception: May 2, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 814-419-9775. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Hello World. Photographs by Bill Rizzo. Opening reception: May 2, 7:30-10 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. GALLERIE CHIZ. Nature & the Metaphysical. Work by Caroline Bagenal & Don Dugal. Opening reception: May 2, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. On the Prowl. Paintings by Keith

Schmiedlin. Opening reception: May 3, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Robert Pollard:Junk Collector & Scrabble King. Collages by Robert Pollard. Opening reception: May 2, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MENDELSON GALLERY. 40 Year Love Affair with the Arts. Work by Not Vital, Harry Schwalb, Thaddeus Mosley, Jane Katselas, Rob Rogers, Elaine Morris, Jack Weiss, more. Opening reception: May 2, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Actual Size: 2014 Senior Art Exhibition. Feat. work by 40+ students graduating w/ BFA & interdisciplinary art degrees. Opening reception: May 2, 6-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-268-2409. MINT SALON & GALLERY. Mint Salon & Gallery Grand Opening Art Show. Work by Kara Zuzu. Opening reception: May 3, 7:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-404-7673. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Death Masked. Paintings by Stephen Tuomala. Opening reception: May 2, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Criminal Damage. A mixed-media project based on street art, & street art themes, showcasing authentic graffiti pieces & ‘inspired’ pieces, photography & instillations. Opening reception May 2, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. The 2014 Regional Show. Juried exhibit feat. works by regional artists in various media, including watercolor, pastel, oil, acrylic, pottery, mixed media, more. Opening reception: May 3, 7-9 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

PANZA GALLERY. Generations. Works by Anthony & Philip Kram. Opening reception: May 3, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. May 2, 6-10. Garfield. 412-441-6147 ext.-7. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Breaking Through: Moving 4ward. Work by Lisa Demagall, Laura Beth Konopinski, Anna Mlasowsky, Nadine Saylor. Opening reception: May 2, 6-9 p.m. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Penny Mateer: Protest Series. Quilts & fiber pieces inspired by protest songs from the 1960s & current political debates. Opens May 5. Downtown. 412-261-7003. SUBROSA. What Remains. Mixed media paintings by Tony Cavalline. Opens May 2, 5-10 p.m. Garfield.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Digital Hand. Digital fabrication works by students at the Penn State School of Visual Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Longterm exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Timothy Kelley. Paintings & sculpture. North Side. 724-797-3302. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

FULL LIST ONLINE

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KING DJANGO & THE VERSION CITY TOUR PLUS THE PRESSURE THURS, MAY 1, 9PM BLUEGRASS/JAMGRASS

RU M P K E M O U N TA I N B OYS FRI, MAY 2, 9PM ROCK

CHAD SIPES STEREO PLUS BEAGLE BROTHERS & INSIDE/OUTSIDE SAT, MAY 3, 9PM JAM ROCK

T H E CAU S E PLAYING THE MUSIC OF THE GRATEFUL DEAD

MON, MAY 5, 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH

SGD

TUES, MAY 6, 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE S E R I E S WED, MAY 7, 8PM ROOTS ROCK

DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TUE 06

WED 07

EXHIBITS

CONTINUES ON PG. 53

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DEE’S DE MAYO A MONTH LONG FIESTA XXXXXXXXXXXX

12 OUNCE

CORONA $2

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1314 EAST CARSON ST. SO UTHSI DE POOL + PING PONG + DARTS C L A S S I F I E D S

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Friday, May 2 8PM

“the voice of Daughtry, the heart of Evanescence, and the guitar of 3 Doors Down”

Presented By

Tickets-$15 presale ale abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Evolves: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Work by Cynthia Cooley. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Walls that Soak. Large scale installation by Caroline Record & Leah Wulfman. South Side. 240-793-8935. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh.

Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Antonio Puri. Large-scale contemporary pieces. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner

Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. 412-371-0600. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists.

Downtown. 412-392-8008. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. 19th Century Photographs in the USA. Showing the largest collection on display feat. Civil War, historic persons, Cowboys & Indians. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo.

Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SOCIAL STATUS. impe’kyoonees. Contemporary work by NY-based photographer Applecubed. Downtown. 412-456-2355. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia Exhibit feat. nearly 2,000 once-hidden treasures exploring Pittsburgh’s important role as a Gateway to the West & a national hub for the steamboat building industry in the mid-19th century. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

FESTIVALS FRI 02 - SUN 04 MAYFAIR ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL. May 2-4 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275.

SAT 03 PITTSBURGH REAL ALE FESTIVAL. Feat. 60 local, regional, & national breweries, soccer match, DJ, more. pghrealale.com 1-5 p.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square.

DANCE

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Dance Africa Pittsburgh at the August Wilson Center, Downtown CRITIC: George Lee, 66, retired, from Point Breeze DATE: Sat., April 26

PLAYGROUND MATERIAL: LAYERED MOTIVATION – DYNAMIC ACTION. Performance by the Staycee Pearl Dance Project. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

FUNDRAISERS THU 01 CAPA BENEFIT AT THE PITTSBURGH WINERY. Wine, live

N E W S

instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 02 I wanted to see the Hill Dance Academy Theatre, and it was performing, and I heard that there were all these other dancers that’d be performing as well. [There was] multicultural dance from Cuba, and [Philadelphiabased Illstyle & Peace] made an old man like me feel as if I could be young again, so it was great. It’s a shame that the August Wilson Center is closing down like it is, because there’s so many beautiful, cultural things that go on down in this building that we need to be aware of. The dance was absolutely fantastic. The dancers and the guy [emceeing] the show did a great job of incorporating the audience into the program. The Cuban dancers— I wish somebody had been able to interpret what was going on, because I know there’s a story there, but I couldn’t put together what the story was. B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

SAT 03

18TH ANNUAL CHILDREN’S LITERATURE CONFERENCE. Feat. keynote speakers author/illustrator John Rocco & author Steve Sheinkin. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-836-7170.

ARTKIDS: NOT SO STILL. A lively look at the still life paintings in the exhibition, An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. 11-11:45 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. PLANET BOUNCE GRAND OPENING STELLARBRATION. www.planetbouncepgh.com 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Planet Bounce, Canonsburg. 724-485-9474. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical ecosystems & learn about conservation efforts using museum dioramas & collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Thru May 10

SAT 03 A GATHERING OF AUTHORS. Mystery, memoir, self-help & history authors will speak for 5-min. each, followed by Q&A. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MEET THE AUTHOR: MICHAEL SIMS. Author of The Adventures of Henry David Thoreau: A Young Man’s Unlikely Path to Walden Pond. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

SUN 04 art, more. 6:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Winery, Strip District. 412-566-1000. ST. BARNABAS FOUNDER’S DAY GALA. Silent auction, dinner, & guest speaker Mike Huckabee. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Marriott North, Cranberry. 724-625-3770.

FRI 02

tasting competition, more. Benefits La Escuelita Arcoiris. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-421-4787. SOUTH ARTS CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATION. Dinner, art show, more. 5-8 p.m. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-831-8156.

SUN 04

30TH ANNUAL GREAT PLANT AUCTION. Hors d’oeuvres, live 5TH ANNUAL AFTERNOON & silent auctions, more. 6 p.m. TEA. 1:30-3:30 p.m. St. Ferdinand Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. Church, Cranberry. 724-779-3986. 412-441-4442 x 3925. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO BOOTY IS THE NEW PINK. PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Hors d’oeuvres, goodie Read & code letters, pick bags, more. Benefits Jill books, pack ‘em or Kelly’s Breast Cancer database ‘em! Sundays Warriors & Susan G. 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Komen Pittsburgh. Thomas Merton Center, www. per pa 6-9 p.m. Savoy ResGarfield. 412-361-3022. pghcitym .co taurant, Strip District. UNSEAM’D 412-281-0660. SHAKESPEARE WOMEN’S CENTER COMPANY ANNUAL & SHELTER’S 40TH FUNDRAISER. Food, drinks, ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. trivia, more. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Smiling Hors d’oeuvres, silent auction, live Moose, South Side. 412-621-0244. music, self-guided tours of the museum, presentation to survivors, more. 6-9:30 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-687-8017 x 350. STATE & LOCAL POLITICAL DEBATE. Feat. committee members, political interest groups, GLSEN PITTSBURGH’S GALA TO candidates from all affiliations. CHANGE THE GAME. Strolling 3 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church, buffet, silent auction, more. BenPenn Hills. 412-723-2414. efits the Gay, Lesbian, & Straight Education Network. glsen.org/ chapters/pittsburgh 7-10 p.m. Museum Cafe, Oakland. 412-622-3225. ANDRE DUBUS III. Presenting the SALSITA! Tapas, live music, salsa

FULL LIST ONLINE

POLITICS

SAT 03

keynote at Carnegie Mellon’s 2014 Adamson Student Awards. 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 04

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LITERARY THU 01

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Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

TUE 06 CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. First Tue of every month, 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

WED 07 ROBOTS! A LEARNING PARTY. Fun, hands-on activities led by local makers, scientists, artists, & technologists. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE FRI 02 - SAT 03 MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. May 2-3, 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. May 2-3, 8:15 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

ROBERT STUTZMAN. Book signing w/ author of The Ligonier Valley Rail Road. Part of Historic Hanna’s Town Opening Weekend. 2-4 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210.

MON 05 OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. Those wishing to present a poem for discussion should bring multiple copies. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. WORDS @ WIGLE. Literary happy hour feat. readings by Jacob Bacharach, Rachel Ann Brickner, & Kirk Nesset. 5 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

TUE 06 KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 01 - WED 07 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered

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REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

SAT 03 LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors. org Sat. Thru June 14 SPRING NATURE WALK. 10 a.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584.

TUE 06 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 07 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 01

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

Teligence/18+

ALBRIGHT-DEERING LECTURE: HEALING & HOLINESS. w/ Andrew S. Park, Professor of Theology & Ethics. 2 & 3:45 p.m. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1345. BIOPHILIA: PITTSBURGH. Introduction of the new BETA (Biophilia Enhanced Through Art) Project w/ Richard V. Piacentini, Sonja Bochart, & Nicole Capozzi. 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. COMMUNICATING W/ PINK DOLPHIND OF THE AMAZON. w/ Dave Bonnett. 7 p.m. Shaler N. Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-484-0211.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. SPRING RENEWAL & REJUVENATION SERIES W/ JIM DONOVAN. Thu. Thru May 1 The Center of Harmony, Harmony. 724-400-6044. TWO-SIDED STORY. Documentary screening about a group of 27 Palestinians & Israelis who meet under the frame of a unique project peace & reconciliation. Post-film discussion to follow. 7 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-805-5069. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 01 - SUN 04 SILK SCREEN FILM FESTIVAL. Visit www.silkscreenfestival.org for full schedule. Thru May 4 724-969-2565.

FRI 02

[LITERARY]

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

“Two days before my brother’s wedding, I slather my body with self-tanner, barely catch my flight to the Midwest (I can’t tell you where for the sake of anonymity, obviously), throw up on the plane in the puke bag (the trip coincided badly with me having a hangover), and see them staring at me as I wait for my connecting flight in Denver. My arms, legs, and feet have turned into a mosaic of orange and white splotches, the self-tanner leaving me half-tabby, half-human. Go ahead and look, I think. Let me make your fucking day.”

ALLOMORPH. A mixed media event feat. a fashion performance, installations, a music video debut & dance party. 8 p.m. 5118 Penn FROM “EFFIGY OF A PRINCESS,” Ave., Garfield. BY RACHEL ANN BRICKNER ART NOW. Creativity workshop. 7 p.m. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. reads with 412-681-4222. Jacob Bacharach and Kirk Nesset as part of FARM TO COMMUNITY CONFERENCE. Workshops & Words @ Wigle: A Literary Happy Hour. speakers discussing healthy food 5 p.m. Mon., May 5. Wigle Whiskey, 2401 access in communities & schools. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. DoubleTree Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-224-2827 Hotel - Green Tree, Green Tree. 412-420-2290. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Commuand friends. Music, games, movies, versalist Church of the North Hills. nity Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. entertainment and more. Unitar412-366-0244. GARFIELD NIGHT MARKET. Feat. ian Universalist Congregation, HISTORIC HANNA’S TOWN local vendors. Part of Unblurred. Smithton. First Fri of every month OPENING WEEKEND. Drilling & N. Pacific Ave. between Penn & 724-872-5056. firing demos, full tea, tours, more. Dearborn, Garfield. 6-10 p.m. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, HENDERSON LECTURE: NETWORK. Meetup to help Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. GALAXIES, GENES, AND seniors get & stay involved in social PITTSBURGH REAL ALE FESTIVAL. THE GLORY OF GOD: & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. CarnFeat. 60 local, regional, & national INTERSECTIONS OF SCIENCE & egie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel breweries, soccer match, DJ, more. CHRISTIAN FAITH. w/ Deborah Hill. 412-242-8603. pghrealale.com 1-5 p.m. Highmark Haarsma, President, The BioLogos Stadium, Station Square. Foundation. 11 a.m., 2 & 4 p.m. THE SANDBOX: OPENING THE Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, BEGINNING BEEKEEPING PHOTOBOOK. Presentation & East Liberty. 412-924-1345. CLASS. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Beechconversation introducing the art LAWRENCEVILLE CARB wood Farms, Fox Chapel. of the photobook w/ artists-inCRAWL. Visit www. 412-225-0930. residence Melissa Catanese & Ed pittsburghmarathon. EMPATHY FIRST. A Panar. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum com/pastadinner for compassionate comof Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. participating restauwww. per munication & conflict SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. rants. 412-586-7785. a p pghcitym transformation study Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing MEN TAKING THE .co group based on the follows. No partner needed. STAGE. Men speaking on work of peace activist, Dr. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace love, fatherhood, domestic Marshall Rosenberg. First Sat of Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. violence, commitment, more. every month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat 412-683-5670. Presented by One Accord Events. of every month, 2 p.m. Thru May SWING CITY. Learn & practice 7-9:30 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theswing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. 17 412-271-7660. ater, East Liberty. 571-357-5663. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. GIRL SHY. A Harold Lloyd silent ONE-ON-ONE CONVERSATION 412-759-1569. movie screening w/ pipe organ W/ PHAROAHE MONCH. WHISKEY & LIBERTY: WHEN accompaniment. Presented by The Presented by The Pittsburgh Hip PENNSYLVANIANS RESISTED Pittsburgh Area Theatre Organ Hop Collective. 7-10 p.m. The Alloy THE NATION’S FIRST BAILOUT. Society. 2 p.m. Keystone Oaks High Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. w/ Historian Peter Gilmore. School, Dormont. 412-241-8108. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House. GROVE OF GAIA BELTANE FEST. HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual 202-256-6116. 11:45 a.m.-7 p.m. Unitarian Uniand transgendered individuals

Rachel Ann Brickner

SAT 03

FULL LIST ONLINE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

SAT 03 - SUN 04 SPRING WORKSHOPS: GLASS FLOWERS. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Thru May 11, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-721-7812.

SUN 04 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ESSENTIALS OF A BELLYDANCE DRUM SOLO. Intensive dance workshop. Sun. Thru May 18 Fitness with a Twist, South Side. 412-225-3302. FOR THE BIRDS. A visual symphony bringing together live performances w/ birds, dancers, video, music, & abstract puppetry. Sun, 6 p.m. Thru May 11 National Aviary, North Side. 412-268-2409. HOW SPIRIT WORKS IN THE 21ST CENTURY. w/ Kitsy Higgins. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200.

MON 05 DEMENTIA: A POSITIVE APPROACH TO CARE. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. & 6-8 p.m. Asbury Heights Nursing Home, Mt. Lebanon. 412-571-5661. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 06 DRAG QUEEN TRIVIA NIGHT. First Tue of every month Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 07 CIVICS FOR GROWN UPS. Wed, 6:30 p.m. Thru May 28 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-681-7736 x 322. LIVING & LEARNING: TRANSITIONING TO ADULTHOOD ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM. 7 p.m. Temple David, Monroeville. 412-372-1200. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME LECTURES: MUSIC 101. Feat. Noah Bendix-Balgley, Concertmaster. Dorothy Parker Simmons Regency Rooms. 12:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. ROBINSON INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM AWARDS. Seven

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short films from around the world will be screened followed by awards ceremony & reception. Presented by JFilm. 7:30 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-992-5203. STRENGTHENING OUR COMMUNITY-BASED RESPONSE TO ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP ABUSE. 12-1 p.m. Labor Zionist Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-3800. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. URBAN BIKING FORUM. An informal educational opportunity on the basics for confident city cycling w/ Dan Yablonsky, BikePGH. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS CHICAGO AUDITIONS. Auditions for Chicago The Musical. May 3, noon-3 p.m. Bring sheet music in an appropriate key for singing. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 800-747-5599.

Free & Reduced Lunch program. www.pbt.org/community-engagement/pbt-school-scholarships Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. 412-454-9105. R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Murder on the Mesa. May 3-4. Casting 4 men & 4 women, readings from the script. www.ractproductions.com. 724-775-6844.

SUBMISSIONS BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER.

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

Seeking vendors for Gardenfest & Artist Market. info@boydcommunitycenter.org O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. BRICOLAGE PRODUCTION COMPANY. Seeking two playwrights-in-residence for In the Raw Festival. The focus of this year’s festival is devised work, developed in collaboration w/ professional directors, actors, & a dramaturg. www.bricolagepgh.org/content/ submissions FROM WEEKS TO MINUTES: 2014 NATIONAL ROAD FESTIVAL JURIED EXHIBITION. Seeking work from artists in Allegheny, Fayette, Greene, Washington, & Westmoreland counties. Details at patrickdaugherty.com/public/2014_ Juried_FLMAM.pdf . 724-785-9331. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking art work for the juried

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If all the new blossoms and buds have you thinking about local plant life, why not join Garfield-based nonprofit Tree Pittsburgh in caring for trees throughout the city? From participating in “Mulching Parties” and tree-plantings in various communities to helping in the Tree Pittsburgh Seedling Nursery, there are lots of ways to lend a hand this spring. Call 412-362-6360 or visit www.treepittsburgh.org for information.

LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for The Sound of Music. May 17-18. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. LITTLE LAKE THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for its 2014 Looking Glass Theatre summer season of plays for young audiences. May 12 & 14. Seeking adults, teens & children, age 8 +. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. May 13-18. All voice parts for volunteer singers & Professional Core singers. www.themendelssohn.org Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE SCHOOL. Auditions for the Children’s Division Scholarship. May 4. Pittsburgh-area children ages 5-8, no previous dance experience is required, but must qualify for the

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exhibit Color. Entry deadline May 3. Visit greensburgartcenter.org for information. Greensburg. 724-396-6699. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly. com/jean-toomer-literary-prize-forshort-fiction.html. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to sell plants & products at the annual Garden Mart. For more info & registration, call or email c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www.pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com

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55

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’ve heard your calls for bisexuals to come out to their friends and family, and I think it’s a great idea. But I’m not sure I classify as “bisexual.” I’m a 40-year-old guy who strongly prefers sex with women to men. I’ve had sex with dudes in the past (five or six times) and loved it, though I’ve never had the same emotional attachment that I’ve had with women. Most people seem to think that bisexuals are equally attracted to both genders — sexually and emotionally. So am I bisexual or just a juicy boner hobbyist?

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

JUST UNDERSTANDING IDENTITY CAUSING EROTIC DELIRIUM

A quick word about my calls for bisexuals to come out to their friends and family … Bisexuals complain about anti-bi stereotypes and misconceptions — about biphobia and bierasure — and quite rightly. It’s awful, it sucks, it’s gotta stop. But just as coming out has been the most effective way to combat homophobia, coming out is the most effective way to combat biphobia. And while 77 percent of gay men and 71 percent of lesbians are out to “most of the important people in their lives,” according to a 2014 Pew Research survey, only 28 percent of bisexuals are. Some argue that most bisexuals won’t feel safe enough to come out until straight and gay people get over their biphobia. That’s bullshit. Yes, biphobia makes it more difficult for bisexuals to come out — in the same way that homophobia makes it difficult for gays and lesbians to come out. The culture is less homophobic today, but that wouldn’t be the case if gay people hadn’t risked coming out when “insanely homophobic” was the near-universal default setting. I’ve been accused of “blaming the victim” when I make this point. I’m not blaming bisexuals for biphobia any more than I’m blaming gay people for homophobia. But biphobia will thrive so long as most bisexuals remain closeted. On to your question, JUICED: I get letters like yours every day. Guys tell me they enjoy fucking men and women but they’re not interested in relationships with men. Some aren’t even into kissing men — getting fucked by men, yes; swapping spit with men, no. These guys invariably say they’re confused about their orientation. They know they’re not straight, and they’re pretty sure they can’t be gay, but they’re convinced they can’t be bisexual — aren’t bisexuals open to sex and relationships with men and women? The popular definition of bisexuality, “someone who is equally attracted to men and women,” excludes guys like you. But there’s an improved definition coined by bisexual activist Robyn Ochs: “I call myself bisexual because … I have in myself the potential to be attracted — romantically and/or sexually — to people of more than one sex and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way and not necessarily to the same degree.” So congratulations, you’re bisexual. But that might not be all you are … “Of all of the bi guys I’ve known,” gay journalist Charles Pulliam-Moore wrote in a post at Thought Catalog, “the majority have been what

I would describe as bi-sexual but hetero-amorous. … While they’d certainly get into some sweaty bro-on-bro action, guys simply couldn’t provide the kind of emotional satisfaction necessary for a romantic relationship.” So if identifying as bisexual feels dishonest, say you’re “bi but heteroamorous,” and rest assured that you’re not the only guy like you out there. I am a 58-year-old gay man. I have never been attracted to women sexually. However, I stumbled across some trans man porn and was incredibly turned on. I would totally go down on or fuck a hot trans man. Am I still gay? TRANSMEN HAVE RIPPED OPEN WONTED NOTIONS

“I get this question all the time,” says Buck Angel, a trans male porn star. “You are still gay, my friend. Trans men like myself who present ‘male’ consider ourselves men. So THROWN is still attracted to a man — just one who happens to have a different set of ‘balls.’ It does not make him any less gay. He’s attracted to the masculinity of the trans man. Some people think that genitals are the deciding factor in gender. This is far from the truth! So don’t stress it, and go have some fun!”

BIPHOBIA WILL THRIVE SO LONG AS MOST BISEXUALS REMAIN CLOSETED.

I’m a guy in a long-distance relationship with my boyfriend. Before I met him, I had a history of anonymous sex with men on Craigslist. I’ve recently been having urges to have anonymous sex again and urges that are hard to satisfy in a longdistance relationship. We tried an open relationship but it left us feeling unhappy. I’m only comfortable with both of us having anonymous hookups, while my boyfriend is only comfortable hooking up with people he knows. GAY BOY PROBLEMS

Unless you guys have a concrete plan that lands you in the same city soon, your best course of action is to break up, do whatever/whoever you wanna do, keep in touch while sparing each other the details of your (now separate) sex lives, and then pick up where you left off if and when you’re living in the same city. If you can’t bear the thought of breaking up and you can’t resist your urges for immediate, inperson sexual contact, the second-best course of action is a don’t ask/don’t tell arrangement. You do whatever/whoever you wanna do (safely!), he does whatever/whoever he wants to do (safely!), while sparing each other the details. The way your boyfriend wants to hook up — with people he knows — discomforts you, most likely because a familiar hookup could easily turn into a relationship, right? But the gay world is filled with couples in long-term relationships who met during anonymous or nearly anonymous sexual encounters. So demanding that your boyfriend adopt your preferred model of hooking up is no guarantee that he won’t fall in love with someone else — or that you won’t either. On the Lovecast: How to answer the question “Honey, should I get breast implants?” at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.30-05.07

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20): “My personal philosophy is not to undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible.” So said Taurus-born Edwin Land, the man who invented the Polaroid camera. I have a feeling these might be useful words for you to live by between your birthday in 2014 and your birthday in 2015. In the coming 12 months, you will have the potential of homing in on a dream that will fuel your passions for years. It may seem to be nearly impossible, but that’s exactly what will excite you about it so much — and keep you going for as long as it takes to actually accomplish.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wish there was a way you could play around with construction equipment for a few hours. I’d love it if you could get behind the wheel of a bulldozer and flatten a small hill. It would be good for you to use an excavator to destroy a decrepit old shed or clear some land of stumps and dead trees. Metaphorically speaking, that’s the kind of work you need to do in your inner landscape: Move around big, heavy stuff; demolish outworn structures; reshape the real estate to make way for new building projects.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the Transformers movies, Optimus Prime is a giant extraterrestrial warrior robot. His body contains an array of weapons that he uses for righteous causes, like protecting Earth’s creatures. His character is voiced by actor Peter Cullen. Cullen has also worked extensively for another entertainment franchise, Winnie the Pooh. He does the vocals for Eeyore, a gloomy donkey who writes poetry and has a pink ribbon tied in a bow on his tail. Let’s make Cullen your

role model for now. I’m hoping this will inspire you to get the Eeyore side of your personality to work together with the Optimus Prime part of you. What’s that you say? You don’t have an Optimus Prime part of you? Well, that’s what Eeyore might say, but I say different.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do you finally understand that you don’t have to imitate the stress-addled workaholics and selfwounding overachievers in order to be as proficient as they are? Are you coming to see that if you want to fix, heal and change the world around you, you have to fix, heal and change yourself? Is it becoming clear that if you hope to gain more power to shape the institutions you’re part of, you’ve got to strengthen your power over yourself? Are you ready to see that if you’d like to reach the next level of success, you must dissolve some of your fears of success?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Beauty is the purgation of superfluities,” said Michelangelo. Do you agree? Could you make

get your yoga on!

your life more marvelous by giving up some of your trivial pursuits? Would you become more attractive if you got rid of one of your unimportant desires? Is it possible you’d experience more lyrical grace if you sloughed off your irrelevant worries? I suggest you meditate on questions like these, Virgo. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, experiencing beauty is not a luxury right now, but rather a necessity. For the sake of your mental, physica, and spiritual health, you need to be in its presence as much as possible.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’m pretty sure God wants you to be rich. Or at least richer. And I know for a fact that I want you to be richer. What about you? Do you want to be wealthier? Or at least a bit more flush? Or would you rather dodge the spiritual tests you’d have to face if you became a money magnet? Would you prefer to go about your daily affairs without having to deal with the increased responsibilities and obligations that would come with a bigger income? I suspect you will soon receive fresh evidence about these matters. How you respond will determine whether or not you’ll be able to take advantage of new financial opportunities that are becoming available.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The U.S. military budget this year is $633 billion. In comparison, the United Nations’ peacekeeping budget is $7.8 billion. So my country will spend 81 times more to wage war than the U.N. will spend to make peace. I would prefer it if the ratio were reversed, but my opinion carries no weight. It’s possible, though, that I might be able to convince you Scorpios, at least in the short run, to place a greater emphasis on cultivating cooperation and harmony than on being swept up in aggression and conflict. You might be tempted to get riled up over and over again in the coming weeks, but I think that would lead you astray from living the good life.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Actor Matthew McConaughey prides himself on his willingness to learn from his mistakes and failures. A few years ago he collected and read all the negative reviews that critics had ever written about his work in films. It was “an interesting kind of experiment,” he told Yahoo News. “There was some really good constructive criticism.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, now would be an excellent time for you to try an experiment comparable to McConaughey’s. Be brave!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Dear Oracle: I might be hallucinating, but recently I swear my pet iguana has been getting turned on whenever I disrobe in front of it.

My naked body seems to incite it to strut around and make guttural hissing sounds and basically act like it’s doing a mating dance. Is it me, or is the planets? I think my iguana is a Capricorn like me. Captivating Capricorn.” Dear Capricorn: Only on rare occasions have I seen you Capricorns exude such high levels of animal magnetism as you are now. Be careful where you point that stuff! I won’t be shocked if a wide variety of creatures finds you extra alluring.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Eat like you love yourself,” advises author Tara Stiles. “Move like you love yourself. Speak like you love yourself. Act like you love yourself.” Those four prescriptions should be top priorities for you, Aquarius. Right now, you can’t afford to treat your beautiful organism with even a hint of carelessness. You need to upgrade the respect and compassion and reverence you give yourself. So please breathe like you love yourself. Sleep and dream like you love yourself. Think like you love yourself. Make love like you love yourself.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If blindfolded, most people can’t tell the difference between Pepsi and Coca-Cola. But I bet you could, at least this week. Odds are good that you will also be adept at distinguishing between genuine promises and fakes ones. And you will always know when people are fooling themselves. No one will be able to trick you into believing in hype, lies or nonsense. Why? Because these days you are unusually perceptive and sensitive and discerning. This might on occasion be a problem, of course, since you won’t be able to enjoy the comfort and consolation that illusions can offer. But mostly it will be an asset, providing you with a huge tactical advantage and lots of good material for jokes.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Dear Astrologer: We Aries people have an intense fire burning inside us. It’s an honor and a privilege. We’re lucky to be animated with such a generous share of the big energy that gives life to all of nature. But sometimes the fire gets too wild and strong for us. We can’t manage it. It gets out of our control. That’s how I’m feeling lately. These beloved flames that normally move me and excite me are now the very thing that’s making me crazy. What to do? — Aries.” Dear Aries: Learn from what firefighters do to fight forest fires. They use digging tools to create wide strips of dirt around the fire, removing all the flammable brush and wood debris. When the fire reaches this path, it’s deprived of fuel. Close your eyes and visualize that scene. Think of the last person you cursed, if only with a hateful thought if not an actual spell. Now send them a free-hearted blessing.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 59 + WELLNESS 60 + STUDIES 62 + LIVE 62 + SERVICES 62

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APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014

Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

MIND & BODY

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Downtown Massage

WELLNESS CENTER

Shadyside Location

412-401-4110

Chinese Bodyworks

412-441-1185

322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Open 24 hours 7 days a week

Xie LiHong’s

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION LF SEAY P

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation Chinese Bodywork Bring this ad in and get a discount 7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

Recovery Without Judgement™

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Pittsburgh Office

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

4424 Penn Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15224

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Now Open!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Monessen Office Now Open!

1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Please Call: 724-684-4890

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA www.myjadewellness.com

Let Us Help You Today!

www.newleafsuboxone.com

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

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SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

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Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

412-380-0100

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

SERVICES STORAGE

MUSICAL INSTRUCTOR

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

EXPERT HARMONICA LESSONS www.clinthoover.com 612-721-6579

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

UTERINE FIBROIDS?

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

Follow us on

CLASSES EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool. com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program / Kit. Effective results begin after spray dies. Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot. com (AAN CAN) Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper. Protect Your HomeADT Authorized Dealer: Burglary, Fire, and Emergency Alerts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! CALL TODAY, INSTALLED TOMORROW! 888-641-3452 (AAN CAN) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ADOPTION REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

FOR SALE

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION Art Classes to Zoo Trips, Everything in between, 1st baby will be our King/Queen

1-800-966-3065 Expenses Paid

GRASS FED BEEF LOCALLY RAISED

ORGANIC

@PGHCityPaper PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.30/05.07.2014

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

CUSTOM ORDER

Rent -A- Bay

PITTSBURGER HIGHLAND FARM

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-585-2227

412-403-6069

PITTSBURGHERHIGHLANDFARM.COM

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AUTO SERVICES

STREET PREACHER Dave Feehan evangelizes for urban streetscapes {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

DAVE FEEHAN HUNCHES a bit deeper into his coat and, hands

in pockets, nods across the street toward a parking lot at the corner of Liberty Avenue and Gross Street. Come next month, he envisions the lot being choked with people and vendors ranging from urban farmers to blood-pressure screeners, breakfast baskets to CAPA buskers. Feehan is betting that over the spring and summer, hundreds and maybe even thousands of people will spend their Saturdays enjoying a new Bloomfield open-air market. When Feehan talks, people listen. He’s got chops all over the place — in community organizing, neighborhood revitalization and downtown redevelopment — with success stories that stretch across the country and beyond. He’s practiced his art and alchemy from Des Moines to Detroit, from Kalamazoo to Kingston, Jamaica. For more than 40 years, the bearish, avuncular Feehan has worked from street-level up and from the boardroom down, making cities more humane, more livable, more financially stable.

Nationwide, trends are bringing investment back to cities, and local neighborhoods like Lawrenceville and Friendship are already witnessing strong growth. Others need a bit of a kickstart, a jolt from the jumper cable. “We’ve figured out how to fix downtowns,” Feehan says. “But we haven’t yet figured out how to fix struggling neighborhoods. “This,” he gestures, “is the new frontier. This is the place that’s exciting and challenging.” “Bloomfield is an important, iconic Pittsburgh neighborhood,” Feehan adds, “one of the 10 best Little Italys in the United States.” For so many Pittsburghers, Bloomfield is familiar yet alien. Although there are new Asian eateries, coffee shops and bookstores the elderly stay put, and housing stock decays. Time and tide take their toll on shingles and sidewalks; seniors living on Social Security can’t afford necessary fixes. “This neighborhood,” Feehan says, “deserves better.” If he has his way, better is upon us. First, he has helped find

“BLOOMFIELD IS AN IMPORTANT, ICONIC PITTSBURGH NEIGHBORHOOD — ONE OF THE 10 BEST LITTLE ITALYS IN THE UNITED STATES.” The Minnesota native cut his teeth working in Pittsburgh and McKeesport in the late ’60s, an era when cities could depend on massive federal grants to jumpstart change. Not any longer. Now it takes good old-fashioned elbow grease — and wise investing — to get things moving. In Des Moines, for example, Feehan found a moribund town, but one with a great deal of potential. Starting with a few ground-level ideas, like an open-air market, Feehan was able to attract some $3 billion in new development. “It was dead,” he says of Des Moines. “It’s a nice little city now.” By 2009, Feehan found himself perusing big pictures and cajoling investors. But the work felt too high-up, too distant: “I wanted to get back to working with people again,” he recalls. Serendipitously, Pittsburgh’s Urban Redevelopment Authority hired him as a consultant, asking him to look at eight Main Streets. How, the authority asked, can we attract more customers and businesses to Lawrenceville, Friendship, the Strip, Mount Washington, West End, South Side, North Side — and today’s lesson, Bloomfield? Feehan, who was living in Washington, D.C., at the time, jumped at the chance. “Here I am back in neighborhoods!” he says. “And having the best time.”

money for Liberty Avenue sidewalks and facades — amazing what a spit-shine and spiff-up will do for an urban streetscape. Second, there’s his Saturday market, what Feehan predicts will be “the social event of the week.” Pulling fresh produce from a 25-mile radius around Bloomfield, the market will be the perfect spring-summer draw, Feehan predicts. With booths for banks, housing, health care, “everything will be here that makes people — and neighborhoods — healthy,” Feehan says. “It’ll be the place you want to be on a Saturday morning.” When the market opens in mid-May, Feehan expects 30, perhaps 50 vendors. By season’s end, he predicts there could be as many as 100. “We started small in Des Moines, too,” he says. “It grew to eight city blocks, 300 vendors, 20,000 people a week. If we draw 5,000 people a week here, times 26 weeks, that’s more than 100,000 people. That’s a lot of foot traffic. That’s a lot of cabbage changing hands.” “If this works — and I know it can work — it will be a cornerstone for a revitalized Bloomfield.” Feehan stares at the wind-swept lot. “We’ve got one chance. I don’t want to screw it up.” INF O @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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April 30, 2014