Issuu on Google+

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 04.23/04.30.2014

BINDING WOUNDS: MURKY POLICE ARBITRATION PROCESS INCREASES DISTRUST, SOME SAY 06

EVENTS 5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.9 – 5-10pm YOUTH INVASION 2014 Teens take over The Warhol! Tickets $5 students & adults/Members Free

YOU MAY NOT KNOW, ANDY HAD HIS MOTHER LIVE WITH HIM UNTIL HE WAS 42.

5.16 – 5-10pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

Learn this and more at the world’s most comprehensive single-artist museum. 5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District. image: Andy Warhol and his dog Lucy, ca. 1947-48

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

EXPLORE THE LIFE THAT INSPIRED THE WORK.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3

THE 12th ANNUAL

PITTSBURGH W I N E F E S T I VA L KICKS OFF at HEINZ FIELD THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 VIP tasting $250

GRAND tasting $125

PURCHASE TICKETS AND GET INFORMATION AT PITTSBURGHWINEFESTIVAL.COM

PRESEN T ED BY

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

SPONSORS

{EDITORIAL}

04.23/04.30.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 17

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

{COVER ARTWORK BY SAM THORP}

[NEWS] arbitrators aren’t accountable. 06 “These They never have to give an interview; they never have to answer in the form of an election.” — Pittsburgh Public Safety Director Mike Huss on the arbitrators who hear policeunion grievances

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[NEWS]

14

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

“We think winning here is inevitable.” — United Steelworkers organizer Randa Ruge on a potential vote to unionize adjuncts at Point Park

[TASTE] menu is almost exclusively from the 18 “The sea; even the pastas are seafood-centric.”

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

— Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Off the Hook

[MUSIC]

in general is sort of this 24 “Touring sustained adolescent state.” — Andy Stack of Wye Oak on the musician’s life

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[SCREEN]

36

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“It’s a film for the patient, those content to indulge a filmmaker flexing his experiential and existential muscles.” — Al Hoff on Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin

[ARTS] company has gone so far as 39 “The to incorporate into its creative process a form of artificial intelligence called ‘Becoming.’” — Steve Sucato on the unusual approach of British choreographer Wayne McGregor

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 54 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 56 N E W S

+

WIN UP TO $25,000 CASH CELEBRATING 5 YEARS OF THRILLS Every Saturday night in April, you could win $500 in Slot FreePlay SM. Plus, one lucky player during the month will take home $25,000 cash. It’s all at the place with the biggest jackpots. THE ONE. THE ONLY.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

E X I T 41 O F F I -7 9 • M E A D O W S G A M I N G . C O M

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL (800) 848-1880 +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5

INCOMING

“BY THE TIME THE PROCESS IS OVER, NO ONE IS DISCIPLINED UNLESS THEY’RE SITTING IN JAIL.”

Re: The Unknown Known: Filmmaker Errol Morris points his lens at Donald Rumsfeld (April 9) Editor, Noting the picture of the Darwin frog sitting on my dining-room table reminds me that I want to write and thank Chris Potter for his review of The Unknown Known. The film literally made me sick for its failure to deal with [Donald Rumsfeld’s] criminality; some in the audience [were] even giggling, seeming to enjoy [Rumsfeld’s] attempts at standup/charm. He should be in jail for the millions of deaths he caused, not to mention the enemies created. The frog may be extinct, but the military-industrial-petrochemicalnuclear complex that helped it disappear remains, thanks to the greed of Rumsfeld and friends. — Liz Hughes, Oakland

Re: Green Routes: Can we talk about our environmental woes in a way that actually leads us to fix them? (April 16) “While I think it’s unfortunate, I do believe that most people don’t tend to change behaviors based on facts. If that were true, we would have begun aggressively reducing our oil consumption years ago. Sadly, it’s only when their emotions are engaged and it becomes personal, that most people act. I think when we start to see cities submerge in the rising sea levels, and people lose their homes, suddenly they will want to fix the problem urgently (perhaps too late), because then they will be feeling it, not just processing it cerebrally. … Sadly, I think humans need the equivalent of an intervention to change our addiction to oil, to our cheap disposable possessions, to easily accessed food and water.” — Web comment from “Mieke”

UPMC workers begin fasting to protest low wages (April 11, online only) “As someone who works at one of the UPMC facilities where you are forced to join the union (WPIC), unionization isn’t worth it. We get paid less than staff doing the same job across the street ($1-5 less an hour), and then we have to pay part of what we do make to SEIU.” — Web comment from “WPICnurse” “Forced to join the union, oh my. It must be awful to know your employer can’t fire you without a reason!” — Web comment from “Nothisagain”

6

I

IN A BIND

N JUNE 2008, after downing six drinks as

part of his wife’s birthday celebration on the South Side, Paul Abel was accused of accidentally shooting a 20-year-old man he was trying to pistol-whip. In December 2009, Eugene Hlavac was accused of slapping his ex-girlfriend (and his son’s mother) so hard that he dislocated her jaw. And in November 2010, Garrett Brown was accused of running two delivery-truck drivers off the road in a fit of rage — an allegation similar to those made against Brown in at least one other late-night traffic encounter. Each of these men, who were all Pittsburgh Police officers at the time of the incidents, shares a common experience: They all were fired, charged criminally, cleared of those charges … and then got their jobs back through arbitration. And they’re not alone. Nine officers were fired by the city between 2009 and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

2013, but five of those terminations were overturned by an arbitrator, according to Pittsburgh Public Safety Director Mike Huss. (In all, says Huss, the city filed 269 disciplinary-action reports in that period, 33 of which involved suspensions.) In the cases

Arbitration gives officers a method of fighting termination, but what recourse does the public have when they’re rehired? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} where terminations were appealed by the police union through arbitration, officers got their jobs back close to 70 percent of the time, according to figures provided by Huss. “We have seen egregious misconduct,” says Vic Walczak, the Pennsylvania American Civil Liberties Union’s legal director. “By

{ILLUSTRATION BY PAT LEWIS}

the time the process is over, no one is disciplined unless they’re sitting in jail.” Since public-safety unions can’t strike, arbitration plays a central role in settling disputes with management. Under the city’s contract with The Fraternal Order of Police (the police union), officers have the right to appeal discipline imposed by the city through an arbitration process. A panel, usually comprised of one representative each from the city, the union and a third “neutral” arbitrator, decides whether the city’s decision was justified. Police unions are successful in overturning about 62 percent of disciplinary decisions nationwide, according to Will Aitchison, director of Labor Relations Information System, an organization that tracks trends in public-sector unions and holds police discipline seminars. But if the neutral arbitrator is indeed neutral, why do police unions have so much success reversing terminations? There’s CONTINUES ON PG. 08

Three Events in One!

Welcome to the GREAT INDOORS.

1 2

EVENT

EVENT

The Southern Tier of New York State is known for its scenic beauty and outdoor activities. But nearby, only 20 minutes from Ellicottville, NY, there’s another experience awaiting you—the great indoors at Seneca Allegany Casino & Hotel. At this one-of-a-kind destination, you’ll

Stay from just $55/night.

find something for everyone—from the

3

excitement of the hottest slots and table

EVENT

games to dining choices for every taste to the ultimate relaxation and luxury of the hotel and spa. And even when the weather calls for you to be outdoors, sometimes it’s nice to play inside. Come and experience it for yourself.

BRIDAL TRUNK SHOW & SALE Meet Designers Jeff Cooper, Penny Preville and Maylin K Special Pricing. Massive Selection. April 25, from 9:30am to 5:00pm April 26, from 9:30am to 6:00pm 412-421-6777 (Squirrel Hill Showroom only)

RESTYLE-REFRESH-REDESIGN Ok to admit it, after wearing your original engagement ring for years, you’d love a new look. We have thousands of designer mountings for you to see, or we can design a ring to your specifications and reset your diamond into something entirely new. There are lots of ways to restyle or upgrade your ring, so come to Orr’s Jewelers, April 25th and 26th and we’ll show you how!

THINK BIGGER-DIAMOND TRADE-UP* We’ve assembled a huge selection of GIA and certified loose diamonds at special pricing available only during this event. Now is the best time to trade in your old diamond for a new one. You can trade in your diamond studs too. April 25th and 26th. *All diamonds are welcome regardless of where they were originally purchased.

Seneca Allegany Casino & Hotel. A Four Diamond resort destination.

1 - 8 7 7- 8 - S E N E C A ( 8 7 3 - 6 3 2 2 ) | S E N E C A C A S I N O S . CO M N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7

IN A BIND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

there won’t be blowback. “These arbitrators aren’t accountable,” he says. “They never have to give an interview; they never have to answer in the form of an election. They’re kind of hidden; no one even knows their names.” What’s more, arbitrators don’t want to ruin the livelihoods of police officers, Huss says. If an arbitrator upholds a termination, it is next to impossible for the officer to land another law-enforcement job. Huss also argues a slightly more cynical position: that arbitrators have a financial incentive to side with the union. Since grievances are initiated by the union, if arbitrators start siding with cities, there might be fewer cases to hear — and less money to be made. Bryan Campbell, a veteran lawyer for the Pittsburgh’s chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police who has handled numerous arbitration cases, has a different take. He argues the city often overreaches when disciplining officers — especially when the allegations are sensationalized in the media. In the cases the FOP appeals, Campbell says, “we have a basis to say that either there should be no discipline, or if there should, it should be short of firing. The idea of discipline isn’t to punish people; it’s to make you a better employee.” And, Camp-

no simple answer to that question, and it divides city and union officials. Is it because police unions cherry-pick their cases, only appealing terminations for disciplinary issues that clearly warrant some lesser punishment? Or do arbitrators skew their findings in hopes that favorable rulings will encourage the union to challenge decisions more often? Such questions are hard to resolve, in part because the opinions arbitrators write to justify their findings are not considered public under state law. And that, some experts suggest, both undermines public confidence in the police force and helps keep troubled officers on the streets. PUBLIC SAFETY Director Huss — who held

the position during the Hlavac, Brown and Abel cases — says one of the most frustrating parts of the job has been an inability to keep officers he thinks are unfit off the force. “The city needs the ability to terminate officers,” Huss says. “Why would you employ a police officer that pistol-whipped and accidentally shot someone on his night off? The common person says, ‘This is crazy.’ And they’re right: It is crazy. It’s just never gotten enough attention.” Huss argues one reason arbitrators rule in favor of the FOP is because they know OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

OPEN

HOUSE

EVENT STARTS TODAY PRICES GOOD THRU THE WEEKEND

FURNITURE BROUGHT IN FROM ALL PARTS OF THE USA. CONTRACTED BY ASHLEY, SYMBOL, BENCHCRAFT, SERTA AND AMERICAN FURNITURE FACTORIES FOR VIEWING IN OUR SHOWROOMS FOR A ONE-TIME SPECIAL EVENT SALE!

$4,000,000 OF INVENTORY MUST GO!!! FREE LAYAWAY!!! BRAND NEW IN FACTORY WRAP!

SPECIAL 5-PIECE PACKAGE AVAILABLE

3-PIECE TABLE

from

MICROFIBER SECTIONAL $199

199

$

2- PIECE SECTIONAL

599

$

ea. pc.

bell adds, since personnel issues are often in play at arbitration hearings, it wouldn’t be appropriate to make them open to the public. Abel has been widely held up as an example of an officer who shouldn’t have gotten his job back, but Campbell says the picture is more complicated. Though Abel was off duty when he shot someone on the street, Campbell explains, he was suckerpunched and was only trying to arrest the culprit. It just didn’t turn out to be the guy he shot. “All he was trying to do is arrest somebody who was guilty of an assault,” Campbell says, although he adds, “Should he have taken his gun out in those circumstances? Probably not.” IN AN EFFORT to gauge the outcomes of

arbitration, City Paper filed a right-to-know request for the last 12 years of arbitration records from the city. The documents provided in response, which covered awards in 54 cases, didn’t just fail to explain how arbitrators arrived at their decisions. They often failed to answer even the most basic questions about what the cases involved. The identity of the officers involved is often difficult or impossible to determine, as is the issue under discussion. That makes it impossible to determine how often cases concerned discipline, as opposed to “interest” arbitration — cases in which the dispute involves contract provisions like time off or benefits. It’s unclear what kind of discipline was being imposed, how often the FOP was able to overturn it, or what rationale led to the decision. Some cases appeared to be missing entirely, a matter the law department has said is “under legal review” — though months later, it still hadn’t offered an explanation. One of the longest-serving chiefs in recent Pittsburgh police history, Robert McNeilly, knows the ins and outs of arbitration. During his 10-year stint as chief of the Pittsburgh police, he frequently sparred

with the FOP, fired an unprecedented number of officers, and earned a vote of no confidence from the union. McNeilly says that even though some arbitrators make “excellent decisions,” the opacity of the process undermines public confidence in policing. “Every single case should be tracked: what the chief decided, what the publicsafety director decided, what the arbitrator decided […] the final decision should be public,” says McNeilly, now chief of the Elizabeth Township police. “[Officers] do some really bad things and they get away with it; it’s little wonder the public loses faith.” “We give a lot of credit to Chief McNeilly to improving the professionalism and accountability in that department,” says the ACLU’s Walczak. “He was reviled by the union precisely because he was that kind of disciplinarian.” Chuck Bosetti, who held FOP leadership positions during McNeilly’s reign, was one of those revilers. Bosetti stresses arbitration isn’t to blame for all police discipline issues: “[The media] create the image that arbitration is all about putting bad cops back to work,” he says. “A lot of the coverage has blindly excused everybody above the rank of lieutenant,” meaning that poor discipline often comes from lax standards at the highest levels within the police bureau. During his tenure as chief, McNeilly estimates about two-thirds of the officers fired under his watch got their jobs back — and he echoed Huss’ point that arbitrators want to rule in favor of unions because they have an interest in getting more arbitration cases. But arbitrator Michael Zobrak says that notion is “pure bologna.” “I don’t know any good arbitrator who keeps score,” says Zobrak, who has served as a “neutral” on several panels — including panels that reviewed terminations of Pittsburgh Police officers. “The idea that we CONTINUES ON PG. 10

COMPLETE SET

99

QUEEN SIZE BED

229

5-PIECE SET COMPLETE

199

$

Famous brand name mattresses starting from

size QueenSets Queen mattresses

298 $299

only $

29

$

Free Layaway! Until Tax Refund

MON-FRI 10-8 SAT 9:30-7 SUN 12-6

1601 LIBERTY AVE PITTSBURGH (THE STRIP) (412) 281-9730

Take 279 or 376 to the Grant-Liberty Exit. In the Strip District between 16th & 17th.

F R E E L AYAWAY & F I N A N C I N G AVA I L A B L E • S A M E - DAY P I C K U P A N D D E L I V E RY • www. h d O u t l e t s .co m

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Saturday, April 26 at the

AFRICA

CONVERTS TO TWIN BEDS!

COMPLETE SET

Sleep CHIRO Complete

Dance

SOLID WOOD BUNKBED $

$

Purchase tickets online www.legacyartsproject.org

Connecting the world through Dance

• Baba Chuck Davis, Dance Africa Founder • The Legacy Arts Project Community Ensemble • IllStyle and Peace Productions, Productions, Hip Hop Dance Ensemble • Oyu Oro, Oro , Afro-Cuban Experimental Dance Ensemble Childrens Matinee@1pm

Feature Performance @8pm

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: 720 MUSIC, 4405 BUTLER ST. • UJAMAA BOUTIQUE, 1901 CENTRE AVE. • KING OF KINGS, 8326 FRANKSTOWN AVE.

HERE’S THE PLAN FOR WHAT MATTERS MOST.

With some things, second best just isn’t good enough. Like when it comes to your family’s health coverage. With UPMC Health Plan, you and your family will always be able to receive the top-ranked care of UPMC doctors and hospitals. And you’ll also have access to a broad network of community hospitals, physician practices, behavioral health centers, cancer centers, and urgent care centers. So the people you hold most dear in life have the quality of care they deserve.

Visit our site to find a plan that comes with access to the top-ranked care in the state. UPMCHealthPlan.com #HeresThePlan

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9

Enjoy the hilarious Harold Lloyd silent comedy

Women In Film & Television International 2014 Summit - Pittsburgh, PA. May 16, 17 & 18 Westin Convention Center Hotel REGISTRATION NOW OPEN To register and for additional information www.wiftisummit.org | info@wifmpit.org

Catherine Hardwicke Martin Savidge “Twilight,” “Thirteen,” “CNN,” Director News Anchor

Kim Moses “Ghost Whisperer,” Executive Producer

Girl Shy

with live Accompaniment by the world renowned Clark Wilson at the Wurlitzer theatre organ! ““Girl Girll S Gi Shy” hy y”” will ill b be e screen screened ed d on Sa S Saturday, atu turd tu rday, d May 3 at 2PM at Keystone Oaks High School Auditorium in Dormont.

Tickets

$15 in advance, $20 at the door. Students free.

Go to www.theatreorgans.com/PATOS for details.

IN A BIND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

make money so we rule in one way or the other is just ridiculous.” Asked whether making the proceedings more transparent would assuage public concerns about the outcome, Zobrak says that’s not his place to decide: It’s a matter of state law, and the particulars of the contract between the city and FOP. “We have access to all the information during the course of the hearing. I understand there are situations that on the surface appear to be very egregious. But we balance the facts. What you don’t hear about are the cases where the firing is sustained. You only get really about half the story.” ON THAT MUCH, at least, parties on both

sides can agree. Bosetti, for one, argues that when an officer is facing termination or felony charges, hearing transcripts should be publicly available after an arbitrator or judge makes a ruling. Walczak, too, supports a more open process. “These are public officials who have the ability to take away your liberty or even your life in some circumstances,” he says. “So what happens to them is of utmost public interest.” As it stands, though, the parties involved in arbitration cases often don’t talk. The police contract does not permit the city to “divulge the reasons for any disciplinary action that is not appealed beyond arbitration.”

City Solicitor Lourdes Sanchez-Ridge says there’s no law requiring the city to turn over anything more than a piece of paper that says whether a particular grievance was sustained or denied. The city is not even required to specify what the grievance was for. Sanchez-Ridge says it can be tricky to predict how a particular arbitrator will rule and has asked for a review of the city’s arbitration cases. “It’s not like a litigation case where there’s usually a whole bunch of research and case law on the topic,” she says. “It’s usually how the arbitrator interprets the law or the contract.” Asked whether the process should be more open, Sanchez-Ridge says, “Obviously the more open a procedure, the more everybody is held accountable. On the other hand, you’re dealing with personnel issues that shouldn’t be public.” For his part, Mayor Bill Peduto has signaled the importance of police discipline as the FOP’s contract with the city expires this year. At a press conference held March 13 — the day an arbitrator reversed the city’s residency requirement for police officers — Peduto said: “My biggest concern with our police isn’t where they sleep at night but that we have a very professional police bureau. […] I should have the power to fire [officers] […] Those are things that could be negotiated in collective bargaining.” “The FOP negotiations are coming up very soon,” labor lawyer Mike Healey adds. “And it’s going to be a very big issue.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

Trek back to the future and bust some ghosts at our tribute to all things Sci-Fi. Befriend a Stormtrooper, gawk at a replica of the DeLorean from Back to the Future fame, snack on a DIY edible light saber, and pose for a photo beside a 21-foot LQçDWDEOH6WD\3XIW0DUVKPDOORZ0DQ Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for more details and to register. Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

IDIOTBOX

© 2014 EWC Prices may vary by region

HEAVENLY SKIN IS ALWAYS IN

PITTSBURGH - FORBES AVE 5854 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Next to Little’s Shoes

europeanwax waxcenter.com

Whirlpool® Ice Collection

$2,899 “Pure Approachability. Easy Interaction. Better Visibility. Rich Finishes” WMH53520CE 2.0 cu. ft. Microwave Hood Combination with CleanRelease® Non-Stick Interior WFE540H0AE Whirlpool® 6.2 cu. ft. Capacity Electric Range with AquaLift® Self-Clean Technology WDT710PAYE Whirlpool Gold® Series Dishwasher with Sensor Cycle WRS526SIAE 26 cu. ft. Whirlpool® Side-by-Side Refrigerator with In-Door-Ice® Plus System

H WHERE PITTSBUIARNGCES! SHOPS FOR APPL 2335 2 335 33 W Washington ashing as ngton to R Rd. d. Canonsburg, PA 15317 (724) 916-0100

11759 75 759 N N.. High Highland hlan land R Rd. d d. Pittsburgh, PA 15241 (412) 835-2300

5958 5 958 8 Baum B B Bl Blvd. vd. d. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 661-7550

www.donsappliances.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

enter

Don’s Experience C

son!

bin Opening Soon in Ro +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

780 Co Commerce Park k Dri D Drive ve Cranberry Twp, PA 16066 (724) 779-9393

+

www.hillmonappliance.com E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11

Featuring Frames by Mattisse

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Gardener and activist Ayanna Rauf poses at The Murtland Avenue Garden near Westinghouse High School, in Homewood.

Schedule an OFO Wellness Exam today!

O AKLAN D FASH ION O PT ICAL 311 South Craig Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213

30

412.621.2523 www.oak-opt.com Celebrating

f 12

Find us on

Facebook PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Years

Quality Eyewear to Frame Your Face

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Social justice and environmental issues intersect at MOSAIC convergence {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} AYANNA RAUF became an activist back in

1964, at age 16. Walking past a storefront on her way to Schenley High School one day, the Homewood girl spotted signs seeking volunteers for the Student NonViolent Coordinating Committee and the

Congress of Racial Equality. “I went into that building and my life has never been the same,” says Rauf. Her time with iconic civil-rights organizations — she says she was also a Midwest organizer for Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign — presaged Rauf’s work with the Black Panther Party, life on a Butler County farming commune and jobs with more mainstream social-service organizations. Today, the Perry South resident’s focus remains radically fundamental: rebuilding communities by restoring people’s ability to feed themselves properly. Rauf co-hosts New York City-based Ecosocialist Horizons’ fourth annual

MOSAIC Convergence, an event linking social justice to environmentalism, and urban gardening to political resistance. The Movement of Oppressed Sectors Acting In Concert takes place April 25-27 at Homewood’s Community Empowerment Association. The convergence includes forums with titles like “Fighting Fracking and Frisking, Mass Incarceration and Mass Extinction,” but also a day-long garden-raising — like an Amish barnraising — in Homewood. And there’s live music. The agenda is intentionally broad, says Kanya D’Almeida, of Ecosocialist Horizons. The group considers injustices like economic inequality and the U.S. imprisonment rate — the world’s highest — as products of the same industrial capitalism that’s produced climate change and deforestation. “We see things as being very holistic,” says D’Almeida. “No struggle is isolated from the others.” One goal is linking the environmental movement, long identified with affluent white folks, with prison activism, environmental justice and other causes disproportionately affecting people of color: “People who care about one should sort of care about the other as well.” Socialist countries like Soviet Russia have brutalized the planet, too, acknowledges D’Almeida. But ecosocialism isn’t just about workers retaining the fruits of their labor; it also places environmental stewardship “at the center of that debate,” she says. Prison issues, meanwhile, are central to the convergence — previously held in upstate New York, Vermont and Amherst, Mass. — coming to Pittsburgh. Rauf first met Ecosocialist Horizons activists in April 2013, at a New York event dedicated to freeing Russell Maroon Shoatz, the former Black Panther serving two life sentences for the 1972 murder of a Philadelphia police officer. Of Shoatz’s four decades in prison (which include two escapes), he’d spent a total of 22 years in solitary confinement. Now at the State Correctional Institution in Graterford, Pa., Shoatz was released from solitary in February. But supporters consider the 70-year-old as a political prisoner for his prison activism. His release from isolation became a cause for advocates including the Pittsburghbased Abolitionist Law Center and Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Rauf, who first met Shoatz in 1977, was inspired by his writings on issues including community self-reliance, food security

and freeing ourselves from the “poison” peddled by the processed-food industry. “I can live in a decent house, but if I’m eating bad food, it won’t matter,” sums up Rauf. Noting Pittsburgh’s urban-gardening renaissance, she suggested holding the 2014 convergence here. “Pittsburgh just seemed like a great location to do it,” says D’Almeida. “There’s a huge number of empty lots. … There’s so many spaces food can be grown that’s just lying fallow.” Rauf says she expects about 200 attendees at the convergence, including out-of-towners. Registration costs $ 25-100, on a sliding scale, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds, and free child-care is available. Convergence sponsors include urban-gardening advocates Grow Pittsburgh and Mama Africa Green Scouts, a Hill District-based group that teaches gardening to kids. Speakers include civil-rights veteran Colia Clark as well as author, educator and Ecosocialist Horizons co-founder Joel Kovel. Friday evening’s concert, sponsored by consciousness-raising arts collective Scientific Soul Sessions, features local rappers including Blak Rapp Madusa and New York hip-hop artists Prince Akeem and Brian Anthony. Saturday night, the internationally touring Villalobos Brothers perform.

“PEOPLE WHO CARE ABOUT ONE ISSUE SHOULD SORT OF CARE ABOUT THE OTHER AS WELL.”

10 HANDS FOR $10 THURSDAYS|6PM

MOSAIC CONVERGENCE

TOTAL BUY-IN MONIES AWARDED

Fri., April 25-Sun., April 27. Community Empowerment Association, 7120 Kelly St., Homewood. $25-100 sliding scale; includes meals (no one turned away for lack of funds). Soul Sessions: $10. prefiguration@gmail.com

Saturday’s work teams will improve the raised beds and pathways at two Community Empowerment Association plots: a vegetable garden and a pollinator garden. “We want the community to feel, ‘That’s our garden,’” says Rauf. Gardening, says Rauf, grows community as well as food, connecting elders to kids: “Not only are you building a relationship, you’re nurturing a person.” By the window of Rauf’s small apartment sit containers of seedlings planted by her grandchildren: lettuce, carrots, pumpkin. On the wall hang two framed 2013 letters from the still-incarcerated Shoatz, both proposing marriage. Rauf said yes. “I love him a lot,” she says. “I love him for the importance he places on our community.”

Registration begins at 5:45pm next to Levels. • $10,000 in challenge chips • Top 6 scorers win cash • 10 hands of blackjack Visit Rush Rewards Players Club for complete details.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13

CALLING THE QUESTION

Point Park adjuncts eyeing summer unionization vote {BY CHRIS POTTER}

presents

PofE T the WEEK

Samson Samson has a big personality and loves to show-off to his admirers at Animal Friends. If you’re looking for a charismatic companion, come in and meet Samson! Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 14

LAST YEAR, Duquesne University drew a firestorm of criticism after a longtime adjunct professor, 83-year-old Mary Margaret Vojtko, died in poverty. Vojtko’s death made Duquesne a lightning rod in the national debate over the fate of part-time faculty. But Jon Manning, who works as an adjunct at both Duquesne and Downtown’s Point Park University, says there’s little doubt about where adjuncts would rather work. “Duquesne is much better,” says Manning, who teaches composition classes. “The conditions are better, the pay is better. We make $3,500 per class at Duquesne. At Point Park, I make $2,190.” That may be about to change. Manning and others spent last winter organizing to get a union of their own. And the United Steelworkers, which is fighting to get a contract for Duquesne’s adjuncts, is poised to call for an election at Point Park, too. Adjuncts make up about threequarters of Point Park’s faculty, according to the National Center for Education Statistics — close to the national average. Roughly half of those 300-plus adjuncts have already signed union cards, USW organizer Randa Ruge says. The union plans to file for an election under the National Labor Relations Board next week; Ruge predicts adjuncts will be able to vote by mail this summer. It may not easy: Point Park has already held off another union for more than a decade. But Ruge says, “We think winning here is inevitable.” POINT PARK largely declined comment for this story, although university President Paul Hennigan has spoken about the campaign in campus emails. According to a statement, the school said it “prefers to … keep communication on this matter between leadership, its adjunct professors and other involved parties.” Spokesman Louis Corsaro added that Point Park’s “ultimate calling is to provide a high-quality education,” and that it “takes pride in providing a positive and healthy atmosphere for our faculty and staff.” Indeed, to outward appearances, Point Park is thriving. Its dance program is nationally recognized, and in 2008, it launched a $ 200-million campaign to create a “multi-block living and learning hub” Downtown. Features include a new

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

performing-arts theater and an alreadycompleted “Urban Corner Park” built on an old parking lot. Internally, though, there are signs of strain. In a February address to the Faculty Assembly, Hennigan warned the school was “very near a crisis of integrity.” Surveys showed dwindling student satisfaction, he said, while recruiting was down and graduation rates were below average. While the school’s finances were sound, he warned that Point Park “needs to find [its] way,” according to a transcript. Hennigan’s solutions included more rigorous teacher evaluations, and additional counseling for students. But union supporters have another answer. “Building a park is not going to educate me,” says Samantha Lee, a global cultural studies major who will graduate next winter. “What will educate me is spending more money to allow my professor to focus on his classes.” U n io n b ac ker s s ay that adjuncts are seeking better wages — at most, they say, a Point Park adjunct can hope to earn $ 13,440 a year — along with enhanced job security, and a shot at full-time teaching jobs. Point Park claims that adjuncts “often continue for years on end” without fear of job loss, and that 15 percent of its full-time faculty were adjuncts. But Manning says full-time posts are hard to come by: “Most of us are juggling classes at multiple schools.” Lee is a member of the Student Solidarity Organization, which supports the union bid. Generally happy with her education, Lee says it’s been marred by the fact that some instructors “don’t have offices or computers on campus.” Adjuncts often can’t provide office hours, she says, because “they are forced to work multiple jobs, and can’t give us all that we need outside the classroom.” Not everyone agrees. Lee’s group is circulating petitions to support unionization, and while Lee says most students are receptive, “some people say, ‘It will drive up tuition.’” In February, Point Park’s student-governing body rejected, by one vote, a resolution supporting the

union. University administrators urged a no vote, and Point Park’s student paper, The Globe, quoted the student-body president saying there was too much uncertainty about “the real implications of unionization.” Support among adjuncts may also be uneven. Manning says unionization is most popular among adjuncts in humanities and the performing arts. The toughest sledding has been in the criminal-justice and business programs, where adjuncts are most likely to hold down careers outside of teaching. Point Park claims, in fact, that it seeks “adjunct faculty who are fulltime professionals in the fields in which they teach,” which gives students “exposure to realworld experience.” Ruge acknowledges that’s true in some cases, but estimates that 60 percent of Point Park part-timers are “what we call full-time adjuncts.” Not that Ruge is giving up on the others: “Their time is worth money, too.”

“WE THINK WINNING HERE IS INEVITABLE.”

THIS ISN’T Point Park’s first union fight.

The school’s full-time faculty organized under the Communications Workers of America in 2004, but Point Park has refused to bargain with them. The school has filed a legal challenge arguing that full-time faculty are managerial employees — and thus not eligible for union membership — because they guide university decision-making through the Faculty Assembly. “They fight unionization in every way they can,” says the CWA’s Marge Krueger. “This has been well beyond what employers usually do.” By contrast, Point Park is extending an open hand to adjuncts: Hennigan recently urged them to join an advisory group to discuss adjunct concerns this summer. Manning calls it a “stall tactic” and says an advisory group “seems like a waste of time.” Ruge predicts that this labor fight should be resolved more quickly. In fact, she says, “We expect to move on to other local colleges and universities that use adjuncts very soon” — perhaps as early as this summer. C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

GRAND OPENING MAY 5 - 10 BEFORE

Join Us! Ribbon Cutting Discounts | Giveaways 10AM - 4PM DAILY

www.LuTress www. LuTress.com .com

AFTER

4707 LIBERTY AVE., SUITE B, PITTSBURGH, PA 15224 • 412.322.HAIR (4247)

SEV

REALLY? sexually active young people will get an STD by age 25.

SPR

INGS

Most won’t know it.

MO

Get yourself tested today.

1.800.230.PLAN

U N TA I N

R

Friday Saturday

APRIL APRIL 25 26

BREWERIES INCLUDE: Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

ES

OR

T

1 in 2

EN

www.ppwp.org

Mountain State Draai Laag White Horse Great Lakes Southern Tier Flying Dog Boulder Rogue Anchor Goose Island Full Sail Widmer Bros. Kona Brewing Redhook Magic Hat Jones Flatrock Ithaca And More!

Festival Hours: Fri. 8-11 p.m. | Sat. 7-10 p.m. Sample more than 100 microbrew, craft and import beers from a wide variety of breweries. Admission includes sampling glass, beer samples, dinner buffet from 6-8:30 p.m. and live entertainment by Joe Grushecky (Friday) and Good Guys (Saturday).

T I C K EGTAST

Purchase tickets now at

7Springs.com or 888.718.4253

STARTIN

$65!

*You must be at least 21 years old to attend this event. ID will be checked at the door.

This event historically sells out early - get your tickets today!

g

Brewski lodging startin at $159 per night!

Brewers and beers subject to change.

866.437.1300

7Springs.com

Conveniently located off exits 91 or 110 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15

KENT SCHMOR CHAMPAGNE PARTIES PRESENTS

ESCAPE the MATRIX Private Mansion Party Friday, April 25

Join Morpheus, Neo & the Oracle for an “Escape the Matrix” Private Mansion Party at the Smart House Mansion, in support of the environment and the spread of global peace. TICKETS: ESCAPE-THE-MATRIX.EVENTBRITE.COM

8pm-midnight

Spring Fling Pittsburgh

Lingerie & much more

SELECT LINGERIE 30-50% OFF

SALE Clicking

2904 W. LIBERTY AVE, 412-668-3637 7775 McKNIGHT RD., 412-548-3384

PLEASURE PRODUCTS BOGO 50% OFF!* *some restrictions apply

adamevepittsburgh.com

CALL NOW & SAVE UP TO 84% ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION Drug Name Viagra 100mg Viagra 50mg Cialis 20mg Cialis 5mg Levitra 20mg Celebrex 200mg Zetia 10mg Spiriva 18mcg Combivent 18/103mcg Advair 250/50mcg Cymbalta 30mg Flomax 0.4mg Nexium 40mg Crestor 10mg Colchicine 0.6mg Entocort 3mg Proscar 5mg Tricor 145mg Diovan 160mg Asacol 400mg Pristiq 50mg Ventolin 100mcg

Qty (pills) 16 16 16 90 30 100 100 90 600 doses 180 doses 100 90 90 90 100 100 84 90 90 100 100 600 doses

Price* $ 89.99 $ 69.99 $ 89.99 $ 119.99 $ 99.99 $ 94.99 $ 99.99 $ 159.99 $ 109.99 $ 174.99 $ 104.99 $ 39.99 $ 99.99 $ 119.99 $ 79.99 $ 99.99 $ 26.99 $ 109.99 $ 94.99 $ 54.99 $ 124.99 $ 54.99

Drug Name Flovent 125mcg Boniva 150mg Januvia 100mg Symbicort 160/4.5ug Premarin Cream 625mg/g Abilify 5mg Vytorin 10/40mg Avodart 0.5mg Evista 60mg Propecia 1mg Quinine 300mg Xifaxan 200mg Ranexa ER 1000mg Rapaflo 8mg Lipitor 20mg Plavix 75mg Vagifem 10mcg Florinef 0.1mg Benicar 40mg Singulair 10mg Namenda 10mg Protonix 40mg

Qty (pills) 360 doses 3 90 360 doses 42 grams 100 90 100 90 100 84 100 100 90 84 90 24 100 90 100 100 100

Price* $ 104.99 $ 94.99 $ 199.99 $ 184.99 $ 74.99 $ 129.99 $ 124.99 $ 144.99 $ 114.99 $ 62.99 $ 54.99 $ 129.99 $ 104.99 $ 194.99 $ 35.99 $ 26.99 $ 88.99 $ 53.99 $ 104.99 $ 86.99 $ 104.99 $ 31.99

All pricing in U.S. dollars and subject to change without notice. We accept Visa, MasterCard, Personal Check or Money Order. *Prices shown are for the equivalent generic drug if available.

 Over 1500 Medications Available  Price Match Guarantee  Call for Free Price Quote  Prescriptions Required Toll Free Phone

1-800-267-2688

 CIPA Certified Toll Free Fax

1-800-563-3822

Shop: www.TotalCareMart.com or Call Now! 1-800-267-2688 Mailing Address: ORDER PROCESSING CENTER, PO BOX 121 STN L

WINNIPEG MANITOBA, R3H 0Z4 CANADA

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

CODE: JL35

“reload” makes the workday go faster

THE HISTORY OF TRANSIT IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY

1960

During the 1960’s, Pittsburgh had the largest, surviving streetcar system in the United States.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17

DE

SI

the

ON

THE SALMON WAS RARE AND MELTINGLY TENDER, YET WITH A HINT OF CHAR

READY TO ROLL {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Steve Reid has been cooking in professional kitchens most of his life. Then four years ago, he made a career switch into the health-care industry for a job with more reasonable hours and better pay. “But it was so depressing and I missed working in the kitchen,” says Reid. He now cooks at the Wexford Ale House, but he also wanted to do something “to secure my family’s future.” So Reid bought an old school bus in an online auction and had it outfitted into his own food truck, Reid’s Fresh Express. The truck sells scratch-made hot sandwiches, salads and a soup of the day. His specialty sandwiches include: Reid’s Steak (slow roasted, seasoned beef), the Pittsburgh Porker (slow-roasted pulled pork in homemade barbecue sauce) and the Mother Clucker (a giant marinated chicken breast with garlic aioli or chipotle ranch). “I make it all, right down to the garlic aioli,” says Reid. Currently, Reid serves every Monday at Ross Township’s Coffee Buddha, a supporter of local food trucks. (Track other locations on Facebook or Twitter.) Reid says he has been working to position the truck at suburban office complexes to give workers access to good, hot, fresh food. Beginning April 25, he’ll set up at Greentree Parkway Associates every other Friday. “That’s the target market and I believe one that’s underserved,” Reid says. “We’ll set up anywhere from outside your office to your Grandma’s birthday party.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.reidsfreshexpress.com. Twitter: @reidsfreshX

the

FEED

Consider the family cat this growing season, and plant catnip. This member of the mint family is an easy, fast-growing plant, and a perennial. (Also does well inside.) Most cats love it (fresh or dried), and it’s useful to humans, too: It can be brewed as a tea, and help repel aphids.

18

PRIME FISHING SPOT {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

BOUT 15 years ago, Pittsburgh had

a minor renaissance of seafood . restaurants. The old style was to hide fish or shrimp beneath plenty of butter and breadcrumbs, but the ready availability of a variety of fresh, flown-in seafood changed the game. Even in inland Pittsburgh, a new generation of chefs could now focus on preparations that let fish and shellfish be the stars of the plate. At the fore of that movement were Glenn and Lisa Hawley, founders of Monterey Bay Fish Grotto. While that flagship restaurant is still going strong atop Mount Washington, the Hawleys have started a new venture in the far northern suburbs, a recent epicenter of upscale and of-themoment restaurants. Off the Hook, as its name suggests, takes the focus on fish to a whole new level. The menu is almost exclusively from the sea, with only a handful of other meat dishes, plus one vegetarian; even the pastas are seafood-centric. The freshfish section is, naturally, the most extensive, and organized by type and origin of

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Rodi salmon

species (e.g. Farroe Islands salmon, Hawaiian escolar). For each fish, a variety of preparations are suggested. These range from classics like meuniere, Oscar and almondine, through more recent trends such as miso and blackened Cajun, to seeming innovations like mojito (marinated in mint and lime, char-grilled and finished with fresh chimichurri). In all, this makes for more than 30 choices of fresh fish alone.

OFF THE HOOK 98 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale. 724-719-2877 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m., dinner 5-9:30 p.m.; Fri. lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m., dinner 5-10 p.m.; Sat. dinner 5-10 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, and salads $5-15; entrees $17-36 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Our first bite came from a simply grilled skewer of tuna, salmon and swordfish that comprised the Ichiban appetizer. The salmon, in particular, was truly extraordinary: rare and meltingly tender, yet with a hint

of char and seasoning on the exterior — quite an impressive achievement in a bitesized morsel. The tuna and swordfish were also excellent, and the ancho-chili aioli was such a tasty combination of spice, tang and savor that Angelique slathered it on our crab cake as well. That crab cake, all jumbo lump, was finished under a broiler so that the top surface remained loose and uneven, creating crags that browned up beautifully even as the meat within remained moist and succulent. The accompanying remoulade was thick and straightforward, with pickled flavorings reminiscent of tartar sauce. Cajun shrimp, flash-seared in a skillet for instant crust, were served on a puddle of orange horseradish marmalade. Its fruitiness complemented the Cajun spice, while a jolt of horseradish prevented it from being cloying. A similar trick was repeated in the Maces Bay salad, a simple and appealing combination of tender lettuces dressed so lightly in raspberry vinaigrette that its sweetness was perfectly offset by pungent red onion and

tangy bleu cheese. An entree of Alaskan halibut Parmesanstyle didn’t involve tomato sauce or a chewy blanket of molten cheese, but rather a thin, nutty Parmesan crust and a pool of rich white-wine lemon cream. The crust brought just a hint of crispness to the halibut’s firm, pliant flesh while protecting it from the peril of overcooking, and the combination of cheese and cream was intense, not overwhelming. We noted a similar approach with an entrée of salmon atop fettuccine Alfredo. The sauce was light and creamy, not heavy and gloppy, with enough cheese to flavor it richly without weighing it down. The salmon was in rare morsels not unlike the ichiban skewer, with a topping of big, glossy beads of roe. Four jumbo sea scallops, adorned with a crosshatch of grill marks, were stuffed with crab and herbs, and drizzled with a lemon aioli similar to that in the halibut Parmesan, but a little fruitier. The scallops were firm and sweet, and the crab was judiciously proportioned so that it added distinct flavor notes without going over the top.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TAP ROOTS

New beer festival celebrates hometown brewing

Only one dish did seem to go too far, and that was a special of Florida big-eye tuna, stuffed with crab and cream cheese, tempura-fried, and served on a bed of sushi rice with a sweet chili sauce. This combination is not without precedent; it reminded us of crab rangoon or a deconstructed Philadelphia roll. However, those dishes are small enough to ration such richness in manageable portions. This one was, well, off the hook, with nothing to cut the unctuous flavors and textures. Off the Hook also offers a fresh-oyster bar, expertly curated wine selection and impeccable service. All this doesn’t come cheap, but for a top-notch seafood experience, you can’t do better than Off The Hook.

It’s starting to feel like craft-beer festivals are ubiquitous, and it’s no longer necessarily breaking news when a new brewery opens. Still, Grace Miller and Marc Turic’s inaugural Beers of the Burgh Festival, which took place in Lawrenceville on April 12, was notable for a couple reasons. For one thing, the festival exclusively celebrated Western Pennsylvania beer, drawing more than 1,000 people to sample beer from 30-plus breweries and homebrew clubs. Perhaps even more incredibly: through it all, you never had to wait more than a minute to hit a portable toilet. The festival offered a chance catch up with some of the local stalwarts of the brewing industry, including Penn Brewery, East End Brewery and Meadville’s Voodoo. Newer — but already popular — brew houses like Hop Farm and Roundabout also poured impressive offerings. Millvale’s Draii Laag brewery was clearly popular with beer enthusiasts: The line for its yeast-forward, Old World-style beer stretched significantly longer than anyone else’s. For me, it was especially exciting to sample from some of the soon-to-open breweries I’ve been following for awhile. Strip District-based Milkman Brewery, for example, offered Dahntahn Brown and Peppercorn Rye, both of which were really tasty. Aurochs Brewing Company, the gluten-free startup whose beer features a quinoa base, is sure to be a hit with those looking for alternative brews. But my favorite brewery at the festival was one that was totally off my radar: Jones Brewing Company. All six of its beers were stellar, with the Saison and Marzen as particular standouts. Brendan Jones says that he and co-owner Christian M. Restifo are in the process of building out a 1,000-square-foot, five-barrel brew system in Crescent Township; they hope to open in July or August. Turic says he expects the festival will happen again next year, but there’s opportunity to sample the region’s local beer much sooner than that: Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week, which offers scores of events big and small, starts on Friday.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Raw oysters

N E W S

+

1,000 PEOPLE, 30-PLUS BREWERS ... AND NEVER MORE THAN A ONE-MINUTE WAIT FOR A PORTABLE TOILET.

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Now Open Mondays!

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Garden d D Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery

SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS 10:30AM  4PM

BUILD YOUR OWN BLOODY MARY BAR & SPECIAL BRUNCH MENU

Supplying Pittsburgh with Locally Grown, All Natural Garden Seedlings for over a Decade.

----- HAPPY HOUR ----HALF OFF SNACKS, $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Wednesday y y Thursday y Friday y Saturday y Sunday

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ------------------------------------------

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE 412-224-2163

806 Holland Ave. Wilkinsburg, PA 15221

mygardendreams.com

BenjaminsPgh.com

Drink Specials!

Great Music!

! g in n e p O d n a r G d n la k a O

2 floors, the , BEST BURGERS whiskey loft, and 24 beers on tap.

OAKLAND • 226 MEYRAN AVENUE Monroeville e illllee Ma eville evi Mall • 4412 Mall 412.372.5500 122 3372 722 55500 5000 15 50 1505 150 5505 05 E CCarson 05 arso ar s n St son St. • 412 4412.904.4620 41 2 9900

winghartburgers.com 20

10am to 6pm 10am to 6pm 10am to 6pm 9am to 6pm 9am to 5pm

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

BOB’S DINER. 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400. Well-prepared fare and a warm atmosphere distinguish this local diner chain. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-toyour-ribs dinner platters. The fried chicken is a winner, with a skin that is deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. J CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-9695. This Euro-style bistro is “openkitchen cozy” with a quaint courtyard for intimate outdoor dining. A modestly sized yet thoughtful menu offers smallto-large plates, highlighting Mediterranean- and Europeaninfluenced California cooking with an emphasis on fresh, seasonal produce and excellently prepared meats. KF

Bob’s Diner {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the charred-pepper pimenton. KF GRIT & GRACE. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748. Small plates with plenty of unexpected ingredients and designed for sharing mark this Downtown venue. The menus offers updates on classics (Rueben, ramen) and eclectic Asian fusion fare to dim sum and “pork face” sandwich. Fortunately, the kitchen brings a confident approach to a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes. KE

COCA CAFÉ. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171. This café is somehow hip but not pretentious. Variety predominates: The omelets alone include smoked salmon, wild mushroom, roasted vegetable, sun-dried tomato pesto and four-cheese. (Coca also caters to vegans, with options like scrambled tofu in place of eggs.) JF FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything: No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE GAUCHO PARRILLA. 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412709-6622. Wood-fired meat and vegetables, paired with delectable sauces, make this tiny Argentine-barbecue eatery worth stopping at. The beef, chicken, sausage and seafood is all infused with flavor from the wood grill. Add-on sauces include: chimichurri; ajo (garlic

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Grit & Grace

HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-325-2227. An urbane wine bar and tapas restaurant, Ibiza is the sister restaurant to its next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but includes delicacies from Portugal, Argentina and other countries. Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Ibiza offers a transportive dining experience. KE JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An old-school continental menu and a well-restored train station make this restaurant a destination. The menu leans toward Italian fine dining, plus steaks and chops. But well-charred chicken Louisiana and dishes featuring habañero and poblano peppers denote some contemporary American updating. LE JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412-968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This upscale eatery delivers what Americans expect from a Chinese restaurant, plus fare with a modern, pan-Asian approach, complete with Japanese and French influences. Wan’s offers inventive appetizers such as sashimi ceviche, traditional and creative sushi, dim sum and Chinese-American entrees both familiar (Peking duck) and less so (dan dan noodles). KE LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual neighborhood taqueria offers classic Mexican-American fare sprinkled with more authentic options such as tinga (saucy stewed pork) and sopes, thick cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos excels with Americanized Mexican dishes, imbuing them CONTINUES ON PG. 22

Presents:

Sample all the Sandwich Week sandwiches and vote for your favorite!

Tickets available ON LINE ONLY starting May 1. NO tickets sold at the door.

Tickets $30 Includes sandwich samples & 2 Penn Brewery Beers Must be 21 or older to consume alcohol. This is a non-smoking event.

Northside Sandwich Week

#SandwichWeek

http://sandwichweek.pittsburghnorthside.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21

DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Sushi Bar and Thai Cuisine

Best Pizza in the’Burgh! Try any one of our

Sandwiches Sandwiches

5

for $

00 00

Coupon not redeemable for cash. Limit one (1) coupon per order. Offer expires 5/07/14.

Mon-Fri • 7AM 7AM-3 -3PM PM

Dine-In or Take-Out

336 Fourth Avenue

Takeout • Call for FREE Delivery! Lunch and Dinner Monday-Saturday

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH www.CityOven.com

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

3608 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 • (412) 621-1100

www.facebook.com/cityoven

724-553-5212

www.thaihana99.com th ih h 99

412.281.6836

doublewidegrill.com 2008 Readers -2013 ’ Choice

The Best In Twisted American Cuisine Kitchen Open Daily Until 1 am

____________________________________________________

Best Mex Restauraican nt

Gift s Certificate Available!

HAPPY HOUR AT BZ’S

Family Owned wned and Serving g Pit Pittsburgh Pittts tsburg rg gh for 15 Years Years! s

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 5pm-7pm

Come Celebrate O! CINCO DE MAY

Wednesday Hump Day 5pm-9pm

Don’t miss the Pa

AY 1 AY, MAY SDAY THURSD ING TH RTTIIN ART SSTTTA rty!

Friday Early Recess 3pm-5pm *Game Day Happy Hour starts at first pitch or kick off and runs for its scheduled duration Join us Sunday’s starting at 10 am during all home games for Kids Day! Special kids menu and activities.

BZ Bar and Grill 140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

THURSDAY MAY 1: LIVE MARIACHI 6-9PM FRIDAY MAY 2: Drink Specials All Day SATURDAY MAY 3: Tequila Tasting + Specials All Day MONDAY MAY 5: Prizes + Giveaways! Northview N th h i Plaza • North Pl N th h Hills Hill • 412-366-8730 412 366 8730

www ellcampesi www.elcampesinospgh.com p inospgh pgh com MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM

Southern Hospitality {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} with authentic ingredients and preparations that recalls the fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s prepared in Mexico. JF MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of Cal-Mex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE

focuses on fried chicken and fish, along with beef ribs, turkey and burgers, plus an extensive selection of appetizers and sides. Good picks are the hash browns, the fried wings with sweet-hot mumbo sauce, savory blackeyed peas and greens with smoked turkey. JF

SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national www. per pa dish) may be the best pghcitym o .c you ever have without a tourist visa. JE

FULL LIST ONLINE

MENDOZA EXPRESS. 812 Mansfield Road, Green Tree. 412-4298780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY. Edgewood Towne Center, 1763 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. 412-518-9556. The pork-free menu at this soul-food restaurant

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE UP MODERN KITCHEN. 5500 Walnut St., Shadyside. 412688-8220. This contemporary restaurant offers a sophisticated sensibility and eclectic approach to fresh, local and seasonal cuisine. The globally influenced menu ranges from “bites” to “small plates” to entrees, as well as soups, salads and sandwiches. The variety is such that it’s hard to imagine a diner unable to find something enticing. KE WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, contemporary, candle-lit cottage, the Italian- and Mediterraneaninspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF

PRESENT THIS AD FOR

h” urg e “OLLB SONeeLENth S UR ZNER TR EY TO

5 OFF $

iighhbborrhhoods

$

25

Ne t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods $25 ge rita He #2 UR TO a P ittsBUR GH ER ” “A rriv e a V isito r; De par t

PER PERSON

Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2014

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW 42-2349 L -3 CAL 00 NS 1-8 RESERVATIO

BEER DIST. INC.

SEMPLE STREET OAKLAND 406 SEMP 402-406 402

ock it, If we don’t stfo r you! it r de we’ll or

h’s 1st IMPORT urggh’s sbur ttsb PiPitt Distributor Beer ft cra and and still the best! With over 550 Beers in stock, how could you go wrong? Molson Canadian & Golden

12 oz. cans $

17.29

+TAX

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com

412.682.4396

like us on Facebook!

@MellingerBeer

*-/:--3.7:)?--3 St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral

53ZL)VV]IT

;]VLIa5Ia\W ;I\]ZLIa5Ia SERVING HOURS Sunday: Noon to 8p Monday to Thursday: 11a to 9p Friday & Saturday: 11a to 10p (music till midnight) Œ?WVLMZN]T/ZMMS.WWL Œ4][KQW][/ZMMS8I[\ZQM[ a O Œ4Q^MTa/ZMMS,IVKQVO

Take-out service available M d th h SSaturday t d Monday through Visit the FOOD FESTIVAL section of our website stnickspgh.org to place your ORDER ONLINE! *St. Nicholas Cathedral is located on the corner of S. Dithridge St. and Forbes Ave., across from The Carnegie Museum.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23

LOCAL

“IT WAS IMPERATIVE THAT WE MAKE A DIFFERENT-SOUNDING RECORD.”

BEAT

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

THINKING AHEAD

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More on Elevator Music Team: www.elevatormusicteam.com

24

HANGING UP THE GUITAR

DJ Afterthought, a.k.a. Ryan Haynes

If you grew up across the street from Les Paul — and if he once compensated you for shoveling his driveway by giving you a signature guitar — you might say the gods of music success and creativity would be due to later smile upon you. Such has been the case for Ryan Haynes, better known in hip-hop circles as DJ Afterthought … although as Haynes will tell you, the gods won’t do you any good without the hard work. In just two years, Haynes (a New Jersey native now living in Pittsburgh) and business partner Jordan Lyles have established one of the more reputable promotional teams in town. Their Elevator Music Team recently partnered with Opus One Productions and began booking shows at Mr. Smalls; it also represents producer Tree Jay of the Most Dope Family, and Prince Rock, who will be releasing a Tree Jay-produced album in June. Haynes is also a minority partner of Daily Bread, a Pittsburgh-based clothing line often sported by hometown hero Mac Miller. Haynes doesn’t stray too far from the performance aspect of the business, either. On April 20, he was in Denver for the Cannabis Cup (a festival sponsored by High Times), representing Elevator Music Team as well as DJing the performance breaks of a show headlined by Action Bronson. With all of this success and hard work, some might take it as a sign that Pittsburgh’s hip-hop scene is on the rise. Haynes and Lyles would agree. “I saw the scene firsthand a year ago,” says Haynes, “and I’m optimistic” about where it’s gone since. That’s not to say that it will be an easy ride getting Pittsburgh recognized as a hip-hop town. Haynes laments the competitive nature of hip hop, and says Pittsburgh is no exception to that rule. “The one thing we need is more support from within the scene itself — more people working together and working harder.” “With limited opportunities,” he adds, “there comes this power struggle, and everyone just starts to look after themselves instead of the community.” “We just want to put Pittsburgh on the map,” Lyles asserts. “And we want to do it the right way.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

T

hough it wasn’t the two-piece’s first album, 2011’s Civilian was Wye Oak’s breakout — the one that got the band on plenty of year-end best-of lists, and nabbed a number of TV and movie placements for its rumbling, rambling title track. It also sent the Baltimore band on a pretty lengthy tour … and was almost its undoing. “We did at least 300 shows of that material over two years,” explains drummer and multi-instrumentalist Andy Stack, who collaborates with singer and multiinstrumentalist Jenn Wasner in the band. “Touring in general is sort of this sustained adolescent state of traveling all over, getting fed everywhere you go, sleeping in your clothes a lot — after that cycle, we both decided to step away a little bit and reclaim our lives. Or, in a sense, create our lives, because we basically let them lapse.” Stack moved across the country. Wasner pursued a solo project (Flock of Dimes) for a time. “For both of us, it meant going off the map a little bit,” Stack says.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

{PHOTOS BY SHERVIN LAINEZ}

Still cathartic: Wye Oak

When they began to get it back together, Wye Oak had changed some — as is evident in the band’s new album, Shriek. While Wye Oak hasn’t made two albums that sound quite alike, and had already been moving from a folky sound to more hard-driving (if instrospective) rock, Shriek represents a radical departure. For one thing, Wasner plays bass instead of guitar

WYE OAK

WITH BRAIDS 8 p.m. Fri., May 2. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

on the record, and wrote the songs that way. (Previously, any bass parts had been held down by Stack, who plays drums with one hand and plays keys and triggers samples with the other.) There are also a lot more synths on Shriek; it’s a shocker for those who came to know Wye Oak as a

guitar band. But it was the only option that Wasner and Stack, burnt out on playing the same kind of material for so long, saw. “I think when we started recording [Shriek], it was imperative that we make a different-sounding record,” says Stack, “and that we use different instrumentation, different stylistic touch-points. And if we weren’t going to do that, if all we could do is be a guitar band doing neofolk or whatever people want to call it, I don’t think we’d still be a band. I think we would’ve just called it a day.” Of course, anytime a band makes a significant change, there’s the risk of losing fans who have come to follow the band based on how it’s sounded in the past — an issue that’s never more apparent than in the bifurcation between acoustic and electronic music. That wasn’t lost on Stack and Wasner. “We made comments when we were initially recording the record about how there was going to be virtually no guitar on the record, and instantly, people were like, CONTINUES ON PG. 26

M

HANGING UP THE GUITAR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

PITT

N F

SBU

RGH

P

FES

www.alia-musica.org

TIVA

L of N

EW

MUS

IC

John Luther Adams Luciano Berio John Cage Steve Reich Eric Moe

transforming Pittsburgh’s soundscape May 22-25 Fred F red R Rzewski zewski Alia Musica | NY’s Varispeed ELCO | Freya String Quartet Trillium | Black Orchid directionsduo New Hazlett Theater, Lake Elizabeth, and other locations ALIA MUSICA

Pittsburgh

‘This record sucks!’” Stack says with a laugh. “Obviously, that kind of thing crosses your mind, but that’s such an immature way of viewing the world, such artistic suicide to think about stuff that way.” When Wye Oak was touring behind Civilian, the stage set-up centered around Wasner as a guitarist; she sang and played guitar, with pedals and all, but didn’t play other instruments. Stack (who sang on early Wye Oak material but doesn’t anymore) played drums and keys primarily, a feat in itself. While most bands, once they have a big record, are more likely to hire touring musicians to help out and simplify things for themselves, Wye Oak seems to have moved in the opposite direction; now both players have to play some synths (Stack uses trigger pads), and Wasner switches from bass (on the new material) to guitar (when they play older stuff). “We’re definitely asking more of ourselves,” Stack says. “We talked early on about possibly bringing other people in for the live show. And we approached it like we always have: If we felt we actually physically couldn’t make the show work in a way we were happy with, then we would probably get somebody else. But that didn’t end up being the case. “In the past, our live arrangements have been somewhat subtractive in the sense of making these souped-up studio recordings, then having to pare them down and figure out the essentials. These new songs, we didn’t really do that. We worked really hard to make it so that they’re textured and layered and all the elements in the recording can stand up and still be there in the live show. But still have a sense of two people playing it, in real time, interplaying off of one another, and having a sense of vitality to the performance — not just like hitting the space bar.” And while the new Wye Oak might take some getting used to for those who had grown fond of Wye Oak with guitars, Stack says not to worry: It’s still Wye Oak. “The new material sounds to me like a Wye Oak record — just as much as the old stuff does,” says Stack. “There’s still the same tension between ugliness and beauty, and this cathartic quality to it. That’s the thing that has always defined our music, for me. “Obviously, it’s the two of us — it’s always been this collaborative spirit. Individually and interpersonally, we have ways of working and ways of listening and sensibilities with regard to writing melodies, and creating arcs, and the kind of production that we tend towards. I don’t think what that is is dependent on being a guitar band, or being an Americana band. It’s more unclassifiable than that.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

ON THE RECORD

with Robert Glasper {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEYL}

Robert Glasper

Pianist Robert Glasper won the Best R&B Grammy for 2012’s Black Radio, which skillfully combined his jazz pedigree with hip-hop grooves. The follow-up, Black Radio 2, takes label Blue Note even further into R&B, with guests like Snoop Dogg and Jill Scott. But don’t call Glasper a crossover artist: He’s playing what he feels. HOW DO YOU RECREATE THE ALBUM LIVE? For the most part it’s just my band, the four of us. [Saxophonist Casey Benjamin] also plays vocoder. So we choose certain songs that sound good with the vocoder. We like to feed the [audience’s] brain with stuff that they’re not used to, show that we understand and love all the genres. We want to give you a little jazz, R&B, hip hop and a little rock. HOW ARE YOU ABLE TO BLEND THESE STYLES? I started off with jazz before I played hip hop. You already have to study your instrument for years and be pretty damn good to play jazz. A lot of other people start off with hip hop or R&B and then get into jazz. But you just can’t get into it and scrape the surface. If you’re not an actual jazz musician, I can tell by the first measure that you play. HOW DOES IT FEEL BEING ON BLUE NOTE, WHICH BROUGHT US PEOPLE LIKE THELONIOUS MONK AND ANDREW HILL? Those are people who shaped who I am. To take what they have given me and produce my own thing with their influence is amazing. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROBERT GLASPER. 8 p.m. Tue., April 29. Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $35.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

UPCOMING SHOWS

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu Fri Sat Sun

4.24 4.25 4.26 4.27

ROCKET QUEENS // Ticketed Event // 8 pm show // $13/$18 NO BAD JU JU // up tempo; dance // 9 pm // $8 VELVEETA // 80's covers // 9 pm // $8 STEEL CITY ROCK SCHOOL // 7:30 pm // no cover N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN LANTRY}

Gambling on one another: Aimee Mann and Ted Leo as The Both

THE SUM OF BOTH {BY MARGARET WELSH} ANY ARTISTIC partnership requires some

give and take, and The Both — a new collaboration between Aimee Mann and Ted Leo — is no exception. “I was just telling Ted that [we fit] because he’s a really hard worker and makes up for my essential laziness,” Mann explains, as Leo laughs. “I’m an exacting task-master but I’m also lazy,” she continues. “It’s not a great combination!” For anyone paying attention to Mann and Leo’s respective solo careers, news of The Both was no big surprise. The two had been orbiting each other for some time — constantly tweeting back and forth (this project was originally called #Both), appearing in the same music videos and, about a year-and-a-half ago, going on tour together. “That tour was just a suggestion from my booking agent that came kind of randomly,” Mann recalls. “[Leo] traveled with us by bus and that’s how our friendship peaked. That’s how we started writing together.” After tour was over, they continued to write songs long-distance. In any supergroup, there’s the risk of creating a “less-than-the-sum-of-its-parts” situation. Mann and Leo aren’t wildly dissimilar, but some fans might wonder how well Leo’s frenetic major-chord punk could mesh with Mann’s mopey Beatlesesque pop. But with her mellow, measured approach, Mann meets Leo’s rambunctiousness and grounds it. In turn, Leo’s fervor draws Mann out of her seemingly natural gloom, without sacrificing edge. Each of their songwriting idiosyncrasies show up on the self-titled record — the opener, a last-straw send-off called “The Gambler,” sounds like an “Aimee song” and the power-

pop anthem “Milwaukee” might be more of a “Ted song” — but together they’ve made something both comfortingly familiar and fresh enough to justify its existence. “I think there’s an essential kind of energy and verve that [Leo] has that I often feel like I wish I had more of, so I really enjoy borrowing from him when we write songs,” Mann says. “There’s a harmonic sense that he has that is different from me. If I start the stem of a song and hand it to him, it always comes back having gone in a very interesting direction, one that I never would have thought of.” “I think that entering into a project with someone you respect as much as I respect Aimee,” Leo adds, “it really helps me up my game. I learn from her all the time.”

THE BOTH

WITH NICK DIAMOND 8 p.m., Mon., May 5. Mr. Small’s Theatre. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20-22. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Musical compatibility aside, it’s Mann and Leo’s friendship that makes The Both work. “I feel like Ted and I have shared goals,” Mann says. “This is going to sound very hokey, but these are the kind of things we talk about: the idea of doing the right thing in the circumstance and what is the right thing and how to trust the other person to give you the sense of perspective.” Power struggles and inflated egos can become an issue in any band, particularly when more than one member is used to being in charge. “Even down to like, ‘Oh, you didn’t like that line?’ or ‘Oh, that chorus wasn’t good enough for you?’” Mann laughs. “Of course it’s very easy to get bent out of shape. But I feel like my friendship with Ted motivates me to try to deliberately set that stuff aside.” M W E L S H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

CRITICS’ PICKS

Wolf Eyes

[NOISE] + FRI., APRIL 25

[NOISE ROCK] + SUN., APRIL 27

Any account of the past 20-odd years of noise would by necessity mention Wolf Eyes; the collective, which started as a trio and has since morphed countless times, was at the head of a resurgence in noise as music and art in the 2000s. Playing with improvisation, toying with ideas of rhythm, testing the limits of what might be thought of as music and performance, and putting eardrums at risk along the way, the legendary group released its latest, No Answer: Lower Floors earlier this year. Tonight, Wolf Eyes plays an especially intimate show at the Rock Room, on the heels of an appearance at Moog Fest in Asheville, N.C. Also playing: Jovontaes, Slices and Blood Pressure. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. $7. 412-683-4418

Since the emergence of Deerhoof well over a decade ago, it’s been tough to characterize the band accurately. Though the band had been releasing material since the mid-’90s, 2002’s full-length Reveille came out of nowhere for many: a weird combination of noisy cacophony, damaged pop, high-pitched vocals and often absurd lyrics that captured a confused but entranced indierock audience. Since then, the band has slowly expanded its repertoire without losing that energy and drive; tonight, the four-piece plays the Rex Theater with Awkwafina and Celestial Shore. AM 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $13-15. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

[HIP HOP] + MON., APRIL 28

[JAM ROCK] + FRI., APRIL 25 The Werks have their own brand of music that they call “psychedelic dance rock” — an accurate description given that the tunes transport you back to the ’70s (tie-dye shirt included). The Ohio-based band, which has been active for 9 years, is part of a movement that allows people to tape its shows and share the recordings — which has helped it gain a following. The band plays tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre along with guests Chris Vipond & the Stanley Street Band, and Mixing Numbers With Sounds. Kayla Copes 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

N E W S

+

M.I.A. is known to make a statement Deerhoof with her music. Some consider her too controversial at times, but to others, she is standing for social justice. For example, in her song “Double Bubble Trouble,” the lines “Battling with heads / Based on a story that nobody read” are reputedly about the many refugees in the U.K., confronting the government. Beyond rap, she’s influenced by world music and straight-up pop. You likely know her popular songs: “Paper Planes” (from the movie Pineapple Express), “Bad Girls” and “Y.A.L.A.,” recently featured in a Nissan commercial. Check her out tonight at Stage AE along with guest A$AP Ferg. KC 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $29.50. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 24 CLUB CAFE. Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Horse Feathers, Emily Rodgers. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Mathew Tembo, Batamba. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. allinaline, Kat De Lac, The Molecule Party, Two Muffin Rabbit, Agnes Wired For Sound. South Side. 412-431-5282. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Sontag Shogun, Aaron Martin, Dream Weapon, Vox Robotica. Garfield. 412-362-0274. SMILING MOOSE. Betrayal. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Mantras, KR3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 25 1810 TAVERN. Tony Janflone Jr. 724-728-5282. 31ST STREET PUB. AntiSeen, Filthy Lowdown, Dead Federation. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Five Iron Frenzy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Standing Wave, Universal Beat Union, Morgan Erina. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CLUB CAFE. The Wreckids, Greg Dutton, Frank Spadafora (Early) Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers, Influx, Road Runner (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. FAWN TAVERN. Ironhorse. Tarentum. 724-889-7216. HAMBONE’S. Mark Cyler & The Lost Coins. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Gary Prisby. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HARD ROCK CAFE. Emperors & Elephants. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MARTY’S MARKET. Phat Man Dee. Strip District. 412-586-7177. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Werks, Chris Vipond & the Stanley Street Band, Mixing Numbers With Sounds. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Loyal Hanna. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Ron Pope. South Side. 412-381-6811.

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Blake & Dean. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. THE SHOP. Weed, Ouais, Blød Maud, KMFD. Bloomfield. 201-675-7902. SOUTH SIDE VFW POST 6675. The Dave Iglar Band. South Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Randall Baumann Band, City Dwelling Nature Seekers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WASHINGTON LEGION. Daniels & McClain. Washington. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Jason Kendall Band. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SAT 26 ALTAR BAR. Leon Russell. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BILL BUDA’S. Sound Servent. McKeesport. 412-228-7140. BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Sweaty Betty. Monaca. 724-728-7200. THE BULLPEN. Trainwreck. 724-356-3000.

CLUB CAFE. The Routines (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Game Face. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Black Black, South Seas Sneak, John Boyle, Eyeless Face. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Filthy Low Down, Bottle Rat, Latecomer. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HOP HOUSE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. High Spirits, Mud City Manglers, Carousel, Argus High Spirits, Mud City Manglers, Carousel, Argus. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOLLAR CLUB. Southside All Stars: Tributes to the Doors & Led Zeppelin. South Side. MOONDOG’S. 8th Street Rox. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Josh Verbanets, Good Brother Earl, BEAM, Truth & Rites, Jasiri X. Hanger Jam: Legalize PA. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

MP 3 MONDAY JASMINE TATE

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local musician. This week’s artist is Jasmine Tate; stream or download “Vows,” from her forthcoming Life and Love album, for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. 13 Stories. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Lita Ford, 11After. South Side. 412-381-6811. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Walk of Shame. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Joe Grushecky & the Houserockers. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Masters of The Universe, The Me Toos, Those Manic Seas, Ferdinand The Bull. South Side. 412-431-4668. SONNY’S TAVERN. Son of Bitch, The Weird Paul Rock Band. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Weber Brothers, Jude Benedict & The Last Drop. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SMILING MOOSE. Iron Reagan. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. King Django & The Version City Tour, The Pressure. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 24 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 25

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. . www per RUGGER’S PUB. 80s a p ty ci pgh m Night w/ DJ Connor. .co South Side. 412-381-1330.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 27

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Giada Valenti. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CARSON CITY SALOON. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. 412-481-3203. CLUB CAFE. Bronze Radio Return, Hey Monea! South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Acoustic Punk Rock Karaoke. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Cave Needles, Adult Field Trip, The Lopez. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Deerhoof, Awkwafina, Celestial Shore. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. All Boy All Girl. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 28 STAGE AE. MIA, A$AP Ferg. North Side. 412-229-5483. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton.

TUE 29 31ST STREET PUB. Erotics, The Cheats, Prophets of Addiction. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. I See Stars. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Lily & Madeleine, Shannon Hayden. South Side. 412-431-4950. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ultraviolet Hippopotamus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 30 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Walker & the Rebellion. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. Patrick Park, Tony Hoyer. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Order of the Owl, Volume IV, Pentacost. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Devil’s Cut, Conemaugh Trio, Bryan McQuaid, Jerry Lorenz. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. VNV Nation. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

SAT 26

CJ’S. DJ Mighty Man. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 27 SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 29

CIGARETTES

JAZZ

© SFNTC 2 2014

THU 24 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Craig Davis. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 25 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Brad Mehldau Trio. North Side. 412-322-1773. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Uptown Rhythm & Brass. Ross. 412-364-8166.

SAT 26

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Hot Club of Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NINE ON NINE. Charlie Sanders & Ron Bickel. Downtown. 412-338-6463. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 27

SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. LATITUDE 40. Country Night. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Nonstandard. Monthly event of new jazz composers feat. John Petrucelli & the Nu Artet. Garfield. 412-361-2262. LATITUDE 40. Sean Jones. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

BLUES

MON 28

WED 30

FRI 25 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. MOONDOG’S. Studebaker John. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 26

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

TUE 29 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Roger Humphries. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Robert Glasper. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker 3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Martha Redbone Roots Project. Oakland. 412-361-1915. THE LOOSE MOOSE. The Witchdoctors, Johnny Smoothe. 412-655-3553. RICH’S PARKSIDE TAVERN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Clairton.

WED 30 ANDYS. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CONTINUES ON PG. 32

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

CJ’S. Etta Cox. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. All-Star Jazz Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

MAY 2

Neely 8pm - $15 presale “the voice of Daughtry, the heart of Evanescence, and the guitar of 3 Doors Down”

MAY 16

Erisa Rei w/ Ferdinand the Bull

THURS, APRIL 24, 9PM JAM ROCK

THE MANTRAS WITH K R 3 FRI, APRIL 25, 9PM ROCK RANDALL BAUMANN'S

R A M B L E WITH CITY DWELLING NATURE SEEKERS

ACOUSTIC THU 24

SAT, APRIL 26, 9PM ROCK N ROLL LEGENDS THE WEBER BROTHERS

CLUB ZOO. Shelf Life String Band. Strip District. 412-201-1100. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Marshall Lowry. Washington.

(FORMERLY OF RONNIE HAWKINS & THE HAWKS)

PLUS JUDE BENEDICT

JUNE 13

Can’t Dance w/ Hey Nostradamus Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

& THE LAST DROP MON, APRIL 28, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH

SGD

FRI 25

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH CHRIS PARKER 3 WED, APRIL 30, 8PM SKA/ROCK/READY

KING DJANGO & THE VERSION CITY TOUR PLUS THE PRESSURE 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. B & the Ksters. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Bejae Fleming & Chad Elliot. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181. KOLLAR CLUB. Brad Yoder, Jimbo Jackson. South Side. SYNOD HALL. Allegheny Drifters, Fern Hollow Boys, Mac Martin & The Dixie Travelers, Border Ride, The Roustabouts. Oakland. 412-471-0666 x 227.

SAT 26 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Butterflies & Rocks. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. ROMAN BISTRO. James Hovan. Forest Hills. 412-871-3704. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Shane Speal “King of the Cigarbox Guitar”. 724-433-1322.

THE

BLUE

Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown D {TUE., JULY 22} {TUE

Na Natalie M Merchant

FRI 25

Paul McCartney

PENN BREWERY. Autobahn Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SUN 27

Ca Carnegie Library Music Hall of M Homestead, Ho 510 E. 10th St., 51 Munhall M

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Alba Flamenca. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 26

SUN 27

PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Joseph Sisters. Washington.

AHREUM HAN, ORGANIST. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart festival feat. Robert Levin, piano & William Caballero, horn. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 30

MON 28

COUNTRY FRI 25

DOUG LEVINE & SUSANNE ORTNER-ROBERTS W/ RAQUEL WINNICA. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart Extravaganza. Scottish Rite Cathedral, New Castle. 412-392-4900. www.

FULL LIST ONLINE

paper pghcitym .co

FRI 25 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart festival feat. Robert Levin, piano & William Caballero, horn. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Maxwell

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Matthew Tembo, Batamba. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

THE ARTEMIS QUARTET. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

32

{TUE., JULY 08}

THU 24

THU 24

WAVEVODKA.COM | PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY ©2014 WAVE™ FLAVORED VODKA 30% ALC/VOL (60 PROOF) BOTTLED BY BARTON DISTILLING COMPANY, LOUISVILLE, KY. PRODUCT OF USA.

Con Energy Consol Center, 1001 Fifth Ce Ave., Uptown Av

WORLD

CLASSICAL

VODKA

Paul Mc McCartney

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ian McFeron. Downtown. 412-325-6769. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

Give your next cocktail a delicious jolt. Mix WAVE Baja with blue raspberry citrus soda and plug into great flavor.

{MON., JULY 07}

WED 30

REGGAE

DO

EARLY WARNINGS {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY MCCARTNEY}

An Evening of Music

SAT 26 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Mozart festival feat. Robert Levin, piano & William Caballero, horn. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Barber & Brahms.

WED 30

DAVID BENNETT & DANIEL MAY. Andys, Downtown. 412-773-8884. FAYE D’IPPOLITO, EDITH HUMPHREY. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-441-3304x2196. WYSO PHILHARMONIC. Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-834-2200.

OTHER MUSIC THU 24 PALACE THEATRE. Mark Lowry. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 26 CCAC ALLEGHENY CAMPUS. Pittsburgh Gospel Choir w/ the CCAC Allegheny Campus Music Dept. North Side. 412-613-5825. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The Three Rivers Ringers. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. HARVEY WILNER’S. Dueling Pianps w/ Hermie & Harry. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. KEARNS SPIRITUALITY CENTER. North Hills Chorale. Allison Park. 724-601-5667. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SUN 27 KEARNS SPIRITUALITY CENTER. North Hills Chorale. Allison Park. 724-601-5667.

MON 28 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing- Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 30 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donnya-showtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

COLLABORATIONS SUNDAY FUNDAYS

REAL ALE FESTIVAL BEER FESTIVALS

BEER PAIRINGS

BEER BREWING

FIRKIN TAPPING

FOOD PAIRINGS

ART SHOWS

OFFICIALLY CRAFTY

APRIL 26 - MAY 4, 2014 Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week will highlight the Pittsburgh region’s craft beer culture, expanding the reach of craft beer through education, collaboration, cooperation and responsible libation.

ASSOCIATE OF HOPS

INDUSTRY INSIDER

VISIT

PITTSBURGHCRAFTBEERWEEK.COM N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

FOR INFO

C L A S S I F I E D S

33

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do April

IN PITTSBURGH

23 - 29

WEDNESDAY 23

Ron Pope

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 9p.m.

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guests Drowning Clowns & Good Thing. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

THURSDAY 24

Gallery Crawl

Toubab Krewe

Betrayal

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY 25 Brewski Festival

SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. 866-437-1300. Over 21 event. Tickets: 7springs.com or 888-718-4253. Through April 26.

Comedian Mike McCarthy LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through April 26.

Tickets: trustarts.org/dance. 8p.m.

GoodTaste! Pittsburgh Food & Cooking Extravaganza! PITTSBURGH MARRIOTT NORTH Cranberry Twp. Tickets: goodtastepittsburgh.com. 10a.m.

CULTURAL DISTRICT. 412456-6666. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org/ crawl. 5:30p.m.

Dance Africa AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE Downtown. Tickets: legacyartsproject.org. 8p.m.

Five Iron Frenzy ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Before You & Fiveunder. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

LEON RUSSELL

Leon Russell

SATURDAY, APRIL 26 ALTAR BAR

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through April 26.

Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. Through May 4.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Derek Woodz Band & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 8p.m.

Corey Holcomb

SATURDAY 26 ORPHÉE

Wayne McGregor | Random Dance

SUNDAY 27

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

REX THEATER South Side.

The Werks

IMPROV Waterfront. Over

BENEDUM CENTER

Deerhoof

newbalancepittsburgh.com 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

MONDAY 28 M.I.A.

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

TUESDAY 29 Robert Glasper Experiment

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. Tickets: trustarts.org or 412-456-6666. 8p.m.

I See Stars “Red, White & Black Tour” ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Like Moths to Flames, Ghost Town & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH NEW BALANCE

Spring Event

FRIDAY, APRIL 25 – SUNDAY, MAY 4 Certified Pedorthist Mark Fallecker will help you match your foot type with the right shoe. See Mark at WEXFORD April 25, 10am-7pm; WATERFRONT April 26, 10am-8pm; WATERFRONT April 27, Noon-6pm; OAKLAND April 30, 10am-6pm. We will have Gene Decristafaro our Cobb Hill, Aravon, Dunham Factory Rep at WEXFORD April 25th 10am-7pm and WATERFRONT April 26 10am-5pm and Scott Green our New Balance Factory Rep will be at the WATERFRONT April 25 10am-5pm, and WEXFORD April 26 10am-5pm. Valid thru May 31, 2014

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

20

on any regular priced New Balance, Aravon, Dunham or Cobb Hill purchase.

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

TWENTY DOLLARS

GIFT CERTIFICATE

$

Minimum purchase $100.00. Limit to one certificate per customer. Certificate must be presented at time of purchase. Can not be combined with other offers and discounts. Some exlusions may apply. MAILRNB

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

FACEBO O K.CO M / N EWBAL AN CEPG H

MADE

NEW FRESH MENU Starring

The

FIESTA BURGER topped with fresh

guacamole PICO - DE - GALLO

FIERY JALAPENO SALSA On a Toasted

BRIOCHE

BUN

it Tastes as good as it sounds FIND OUT WHAT ELSE IS PLAYING:

N E W S

+

TA S T E

#THISISHARDROCK

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35

SERIOUSLY, GIRL — WHEN YOUR MAN STARTS ACTING LIKE HAL, GET OUT.

ALLURING {BY AL HOFF} You don’t want to see Jonathan Glazer’s sci-fi thriller Under the Skin if you’re looking for plot or action. It’s a film for the patient, those content to indulge a filmmaker flexing his experiential and existential muscles. Glazer (Sexy Beast, Birth) adapts Michel Faber’s novel about an alien (Scarlett Johansson) who takes on the form of an attractive human female and entices men to their deaths. (Or at least, an end of life as we understand it: The men appeared to be stored for fuel or sustenance in a house full of shiny black goo.)

Beautiful, but not human: Scarlett Johansson

CP APPROVED

Much of the languid, often obtuse film features the alien driving around Glasgow, Scotland, in a van — observing street life and occasionally picking up men. (She is occasionally helped by a man on a motorcycle, who seems to be an alien colleague.) There’s also a mesmerizing and horrifying scene at a beach, and the film’s final third finds the alien pursuing more personal interests in the moody, foggy wilds of the Scottish highlands. From its very first scene — perhaps a spaceship docking that morphs into an eyeball that grows? — Under the Skin is unsettling, but gorgeously filmed, with provocative imagery and Mica Levi’s interesting soundtrack of electronic music and ambient noise. Thematically, Under the Skin is interested in just that — what exists beneath, whether it’s skin under clothes (there is ample nudity), unseen but deadly ocean currents, or ugliness hidden within the soul of an ordinary-looking person. The alien is truly not of this world, as she struggles to understand humans and how they function. She is initially impassive beyond her man-luring task, but slowly tries on aspects of human behavior, which in turn makes her increasingly vulnerable. Ironically, the more humanlike she grows, the less intriguing the film becomes, as the alien becomes the subject of more typical plot devices. It was much more fascinating watching her drive around watching us, in all our incomprehensible and mundane states. Not a film for everyone, but if you liked the weird parts of 2001, The Man Who Fell to Earth or Shane Carruth’s head-scratchers, you should dig this. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

36

BIG BRAIN THEORY

{BY AL HOFF}

I

F A SUPER-SMART guy and the Inter-

net merged into a massive artificially intelligent entity, what would happen? According to Transcendence, a bunch of questionable God-playing before the whole world goes off the grid. As artificial-intelligence researcher Dr. Will Caster (Johnny Depp) faces death, he lets his wife, Evelyn (Rebecca Hall), and buddy (Paul Bettany) upload his brain into his AI thingamabob. (This mind-draining hook-up takes place in an abandoned school gym because ruin porn.) Once booted up, “Will” merges with the entire Internet. Then, the World’s Biggest Brain builds itself an underground lair in the desert. It gets the money from hacking banks (naturally), and an enhanced labor force from inventing new nanotechnologies. To stay human, it stalks Evelyn. (Seriously, girl — when your man starts acting like HAL, get out.) The former Will has achieved singularity (or “transcendence”), the point at which machines can become sentient, omniscient and ever-expanding. (When I

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Inside the mind: Johnny Depp hovers above Morgan Freeman, Cillian Murphy and Rebecca Hall.

attain omniscience, I hope to learn if the Internet is, in fact, a gigantic screen that constantly scrolls numbers.) It’s hardly a new concern: The streets are strewn with Philip K. Dick novels and Matrix sequels, and cautionary tales about accelerating technology are perennial sci-fi thrillers. But there can be fun in exploring the idea, especially as our real life grows more tech-enabled.

TRANSCENDENCE DIRECTED BY: Wally Pfister STARRING: Johnny Depp, Rebecca Hall, Paul Bettany

Unfortunately, Transcendence is the worst thing a thriller with a provocative premise can be: dull. It has little interest in exploring existential concepts, and the plot consists of predictable set-pieces stacked together. (The two best weapons in this film are a dioxin-laced cake and a radioactive bullet; the two stupidest are

Morgan Freeman’s patented gravitas and a deus ex machina virus.) Characters are stick figures, moved about by the necessary plot points rather than by any sort of larger logic. (Something is building hybrid people in the desert, and there is one FBI agent assigned to the case?) Transcendence is directed by Wally Pfister, Christopher Nolan’s Oscar-winning cinematographer, who brought a lot of visual panache to the Dark Knight trilogy and Inception. But what this film could use is more words and better structure, rather than exquisite close-ups of water drops or various CGI effects. Much of the story’s tension pivots around Evelyn, who must decide whether to accept Will via love (faith) or reject him via reason (science). Similarly, the larger question of how to deal with such a machine is binary: It’s either Will’s World or the Stone Age. Grubby humanity trumps perfect tech here because there can be no gray in a simplistic set-up. But the real answer is all around us — our imperfect but productive alliance with technology. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

8gi`c),$DXp+#)'(+

NEW BRICK MANSIONS. In this American remake of the 2004 French film District 13, criminals in a dystopian Detroit hole up in abandoned properties, which the police have walled off. The late Paul Walker stars as an undercover cop; the film also stars David Belle, the parkour whiz, who was the highlight of District 13. Camille Delamarre directs. Starts Fri., April 25

Film Festival

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER. It’s the stuff of legend: A man buys a box of negatives at auction and discovers the lifelong work of an unknown but extraordinarily talented photographer who had lived a quiet life as a Chicago nanny. John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s documentary recounts the tale of Vivian Maier, filling in as much detail as Maloof, the purchaser of the negatives and other portions of Maier’s estate, could uncover. That is supplemented with contemporary interviews with Maier’s former employers and charges.

J@CBJ:I<<E=<JK@M8C%FI>

Finding Vivian Maier It’s a story riddled with holes and unanswered questions, but still pretty fascinating. The film is mostly speculation, based on anecdotal evidence, about who Maier was and why she pursued photography. We may never know how or why this woman, described as aloof and brusque, had such a sensitivity for photographing Chicago’s invisible multitudes (winos, children, workers, the elderly). Even uncovered facts, such as evidence of her solo trip around the world in 1959-60, just add to the mystery. In the end, one is left with a few, but irrefutable truths: Maier took fantastic photos, and through a lucky twist of fate, they were rediscovered for us to enjoy. That’ll have to do. Starts Fri., April 25. Harris (Al Hoff) THE OTHER WOMAN. Three women team up to take down the man who is cheating with and/ or on all of them. Cameron Diaz, Kate Upton and Leslie Mann star in Nick Cassavetes’ comedy. Starts Fri., April 25 THE QUIET ONES. John Pogue directs this British horror thriller about a college professor (Jared Harris) who tries to create a poltergeist. Starts Fri., April 25 THE RAILWAY MAN. Colin Firth stars in Jonathan Teplitzky’s adaptation of Eric Lomax’s CONTINUES ON PG. 38

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37

FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

SILK SCREEN {BY AL HOFF}

The Quiet Ones autobiography, about a Englishman who, years after World War II, returns to confront the Japanese officer who tortured him in a POW camp. Starts Fri., April 25. Manor

REPERTORY ASHES AND DIAMONDS. Andrzej Wajda’s 1958 realist drama, set at the very end of World War II, is considered among the greatest films of Polish cinema. It screens as part of Pittsburgh Filmmakers Essential Cinema series. In Polish, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., April 23. Melwood. $2 SACCO AND VANZETTI. Peter Miller’s 2006 documentary looks at the infamous case of Sacco and Vanzetti, two Italian immigrants in Boston who, in the 1920s, were tried and convicted of murder. Their case drew international attention, with protesters claiming the men were victims of ethnic and political prejudice. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 24. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www.battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free APRIL GHOULS DRIVE-IN MOSTER-RAMA. Now that the air is relatively warm, get chilled with this two-night event offering four classic horror films (on 35 mm) each night. Fri., April 25, it’s The Town That

April 27, 2pm

The Butcher Boy with Buster Keaton and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, plus more short films. Live accompaniment on piano by Tom Roberts.

$8, $6 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/butcherboy

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

38

The Black Six

(1974) 4/23 @ 7:30pm Part Blaxploitaton, part outlaw biker flick! Starring Mean Joe Greene

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Steel City Secret Cinema! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Rope ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------House of Forbidden Secrets

4/25 @ 7pm Bill Murray Edition. Tickets at steelcitysecretcinema.com

(1948) 4/26 @ 3pm & 7pm, 4/27 @ 7pm

(2014) 4/26 @ 9pm Cult Horror director Todd Sheets returns to the genre with an ambitious, shocking film that is sure to please fans of Horror everywhere.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Silents, Please!

4/27 @ 2pm The Butcher Boy, with Buster Keaton and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, plus more short films. Live accompaniment on piano by Tom Roberts.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Dreaded Sundown, Carrie, Suspiria and The Hills Have Eyes. On Sat., April 26, catch: the original Halloween, The Beast Within, Phantasm and Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things. Films begin at dusk (gates at 7 p.m.). Riverside Drive-In, Route 66, North Vandergrift. $10 per person each night (kids under 12 free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein.com ROPE. Two college friends undertake an experiment in superior morality, by killing an “inferior” classmate and throwing a dinner party immediately after. Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 film was based in part on the notorious Leopold-Loeb case of the 1920s, but was also notable for the film’s “single take.” It was shot in real time and in one room, with reel jumps cleverly concealed, heightening the claustrophobic suspense. Farley Granger and John Dall portray the student killers; James Stewart is their professor. 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., April 26; and 7 p.m. Sun., April 27. Hollywood HOUSE OF FORBIDDEN SECRETS. A new horror feature from Todd Sheets depicts the troubles that occur when a shopping-mall security guard discovers the property has been built on the site of a massacre. 9 p.m. Sat., April 26. Hollywood THE BUTCHER BOY. This 1917 silent comedy starring Fatty Arbuckle (and Buster Keaton, in his first film) highlights a program of silent shorts. Live piano accompaniment proved by Tom Roberts. 2 p.m. Sun., April 27. Hollywood SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS. Stanley Donan directed this lively 1954 musical comedy starring Howard Keel and Jane Powell — barn-raisin’ in the Old West has never had so much singing and dancing! Concludes a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about brides. 8 p.m. Sun., April 27. Regent Square JUSTICE IS MIND. In this new thriller from Mark Lund, a man is accused of a double murder he doesn’t remember committing, and he is subject to advanced MRI examination to decode his thoughts. The premise of the film is inspired by “thought-identification research” being done at Carnegie Mellon. Both Lund and CMU researcher Marcel Just will lead a Q&A after the film to discuss the scientific, legal and ethical issues such advanced technology raises. 5 p.m. Mon., April 28. Baker Hall A51, CMU campus, Oakland. Free (includes pizza) TWISTER. Get your high-velocity funnel-shaped thrills on with this 1996 actioner from Jan de Bont about scientists who chase tornadoes. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 30. AMC Loews. $5

Pittsburgh’s Silk Screen Asian American Film Festival returns for its ninth year, beginning Fri., April 25, with a gala party, and running for 10 days. The festival will present more than two dozen films, recent features from Asia, the Middle East and the U.S., at several area theaters. The films begin Saturday, including the opening feature, Omar, Palestine’s first Oscar-nominated film (7 p.m. Regent Square; $20). Tickets for regular screenings are $10. For the complete schedule, see www.silkscreenfestival.org. Below are reviews for some of the festival’s offerings. HANK AND ASHA. An Indian woman studying in Prague and a New York aspiring filmmaker meet online, and develop a friendship. James E. Duff’s film plays out like a Before Sunrise via video diaries, with its rom-com sweetness undercut by the couple’s cultural differences. 4:30 p.m. Sat., April 26, and 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 3. Melwood

HIde and Seek

GARDEN OF WORDS. Makoto Shinkai’s 48-minute anime depicts two misfits — a student who dreams of shoemaking, and a troubled woman — who meet in the park, and become confidantes. The animation is gorgeous, capturing the garden’s natural attributes in exquisite and evocative detail. Screens with “Cheong,” a 17-minute Korean film. 7 p.m. Sat., April 26, and 9 p.m. Mon., April 28. Melwood HIDE AND SEEK. A professional man’s life unravels when he tries to determine if his long-estranged, troubled brother is a killer, in this tense thriller from Jung Huh. It’s a decent premise that is most interesting in the film’s first half, when viewers are unsure who to trust. In Korean, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sun., April 27, and 9 p.m. Thu., May 1. Melwood APUR PANCHALI. Kaushik Ganguly’s bio-pic tells the story of Subir Banerjee, the child actor who played “Apu” in Satyajit Ray’s Pather Panchali. The film intercuts footage from Ray’s 1955 film with scenes of Banerjee’s life as a young man and as a retired recluse. A bit choppy (especially if you’re unfamiliar with the Apu trilogy), but it still stands as an account of a life in rapidly changing modern India. In Bengali, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Tue., April 29, and 2 p.m. Sun., May 4. Regent Square AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

[COMEDY]

“YOU CAN LISTEN TO THE WORDS WHEN I AM SPEAKING OR THE HISS IN MY VOICE”

DIE ON STAGE

{BY ANGELA SUICO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE 8 p.m. Sat., April 26. Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www.arcadecomedytheater.com N E W S

[DANCE]

From left: Brad Stephenson, Joe Lyons and Missy Moreno at last month’s Knights of the Arcade {PHOTO BY ANGELA SUICO}

One Saturday night last month at Arcade Comedy Theater, a dwarf, an elf, a gnome and a human tossed bags of Doritos into a crowd of 60 people, while battling a stallion-sized dragon, a 30-foot dragon and three cats dressed like dragons (but not in that order). It was the fifth Knights of the Arcade, a monthly improv show in which actors and comedians play Dungeons & Dragons on stage. Patrons submitted suggestions for the players’ mission. (That’s where the dragon-cats came from.) The evening’s quest? To rescue gems from a dragon — the larger one. Jesse LandisEigsti, who was a gnome named Bardley, played keyboard, cranking out improvised songs and tunes like “Jesus Christ Superstar.” As Bardley’s ambiguously gendered sibling, Mardley, Missy Moreno sported a duct-tape soul patch and moustache. Other adventurers included: the human Abbot Costello (Joe Lyons); the sword-toting dwarf Stone Cold (Brad Stephenson); and Liz’bethenion the elf (Liz Labacz). Show creator Fred Betzner was the Dungeon Master. And performers periodically tossed out bags of chips — just because. Using modified rules to speed the game, the show is meant to attract D&D players and non-players alike. When players decide on an action, like singing to the dragon or kicking the cat, the roll of a virtual 20-sided die — displayed on a projection screen — decides how effective the actions are. “Characters have numbers attached to skills, say a +10 bonus to their ability to climb things,” explains Betzner in an email. “When they attempt to climb something in the game,” the Dungeon Master produces a number reflecting the difficulty of the climb. When the combined die number and “stats bonus” exceed the difficulty number, the move is successful. You didn’t need to know all of that to enjoy the night, however: Much of the evening involved ribbing and story-telling, and raucous cheering if the die landed on 18 or above. At one point, Dungeon Master Betzner said, “I’m going to assume that’s an automatic hit, because I don’t know the rules that well.” Later, Labacz said, “I give the cats treats to befriend them again. ... But it’s poison.” After about 45 minutes, the show began to drag a bit — Lyons joked that the parking garages were going to close. But Knights of the Arcade isn’t a bad knight out.

THE SCIENCE OF

DANCE

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

D

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RAVI DEEPRES}

Wayne McGregor/Random Dances’ FAR

ANCEMAKERS HAVE always sought

to take the art form in new directions. Developing new techniques and styles, pushing the boundaries of what is considered dance … and even, in recent decades, beginning to view dance as “creative science.” Choreographer Elizabeth Streb, for instance, has worked with engineers at MIT to find new ways of testing the human body’s physical limitations, while choreographer William Forsythe has worked with scientists and architects at Ohio State University to develop a form of “physical thinking.” Another artist looking to science and technology to inform dance is British choreographer Wayne McGregor. Since 2004, his work with cognitive scientists and neuroscientists has shaped the way he and the dancers in his London-based company, Random Dance, think and move. Random Dance returns to the Byham Theater on Sat., April 26, to conclude the

Pittsburgh Dance Council season with McGregor’s celebrated 2010 work Far. Recognized as one of the elite choreographers working today, McGregor has created works for the U.K.’s The Royal Ballet (where he’s resident choreographer), New York

WAYNE MCGREGOR/ RANDOM DANCE PERFORMS

FAR

8 p.m. Sat., Apr. 26. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

City Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet and many others. He has received numerous awards, including several of Great Britain’s Critics’ Circle National Dance Awards. In 2011, McGregor was awarded a CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) for Services to Dance. He also provided choreography for the movie Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire, the 2012 London

Olympics Festival and Radiohead’s Grammynominated “Lotus Flower” video. Before he became a dance-world superstar, McGregor says, in the early 1990s, he spent some time in Pittsburgh as a collegestudent intern, at the Benedum Center and with Dance Alloy. It’s an experience he says he loved and utilized after founding Random Dance, in 1992. The globe-trotting troupe made its Pittsburgh debut in 2006, in a Dance Council program that featured AtaXia, its first work stemming from research with Cambridge University neuroscientists. “When we think about images, we tend to only think about visual images,” says McGregor, via Skype from Zurich, Switzerland, where he was creating a new work for Ballet Zurich. “There are different types of images: acoustic, kinesthetic. So if I were to say to you, ‘You can listen to the words when I am speaking or the hiss in my voice,’ those are two very different things to attend to, and they give you different types CONTINUES ON PG. 40

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39

THE SCIENCE OF DANCE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

OPENS SATURDAY! THE HIPPEST OPERA YOU’LL SEE THIS YEAR.

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: David Beloff for Virginia Opera.

Philip p Glass’s

“ A STUNNER”

- Albany Times-Union

“LYRICAL, EVEN SEDUCTIVE” - Washington Times

APR 26, 29; MAY 2, 4 75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! English texts projected above the stage.

of information. What we concentrate on when we are making choreography is how we can do things differently. That is what the neuroscientists have been helping us with.” The company has used as a tool in its creative process a form of artificial intelligence, called “Becoming,” based on research by McGregor and the scientists: A large, in-studio computer monitor shows a ghostly dancer that moves independently. The dancers in the studio can react to it as if it were another dancer. “Becoming” and other cognitive-research tools are helping McGregor to realize the “random” in Random Dance, by suggesting how the dancers can disrupt the ways they typically think and move. McGregor says that this approach generates new forms of creative thinking across a variety of artistic and scientific disciplines. For Far, set to a forceful original score by Australian composer Ben Frost, McGregor dug into his decades of curiosity about the mind and body. He took inspiration from the age of the Enlightenment and 18thcentury French philosopher Diderot’s very first set of encyclopedias, representing humanity’s first concerted exploration of the inner workings of the human body. The hour-long contemporary dance work for 10 dancers is awash in McGregor’s rapid, aggressive movement aesthetic, which he says was stimulated by anatomical images found in Diderot’s encyclopedia. Watching online clips of Far and other works by McGregor, it might seem unclear how his choreography and his dancers’ movement style differ markedly from those in top-flight contemporary works created without the direct influence of scientific study. But there are hints in how the dancers’ bodies, as McGregor says, “slightly misbehave.” In one instant, a pair of dancers can be engaged in fluid contemporary ballet technique; an instant later, they begin flailing their heads and arms in a random pattern, as if in the throes of some poetic seizure. In any case, his works, like those of all great choreographers, are damned impressive. “Our central tenet [for Far] involved putting the body in question from a physical and emotional point of view — exploring the technology of the body and pushing it to its physical limits,” says McGregor. Another trademark of McGregor’s recent works is their stunning visual elements. In Far, the dancing is complemented by a computerized pin-board of 3,200 LED lights. McGregor views all aspects of his works, including lighting and sound, as elements of his choreography. As he says, “I make as many decisions about lights as I do about what the body is doing.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Bill Murray-inspired art by Matt Denton (left) and Dave Slebodnick

[ART]

MOVIE MYSTERY {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

GHOSTBUSTERS. Groundhog Day. Rush-

more. One of these movies might be the feature attraction for the April 25 Steel City Secret Cinema, at the Hollywood Theater. So far, however, all that’s been revealed about the evening’s film is that it stars Bill Murray. Not until the lights go down and the opening credits appear will audience members discover which of the comedian’s classics they’re about to enjoy.

STEEL CITY SECRET CINEMA: BILL MURRAY EDITION 7 p.m. Fri., April 25. The Hollywood Theater, 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $15-40. 412-563-0368 or www.steelcitysecretcinema.com

While the mystery is part of the fun, Secret Cinema is more than just a movie kept under wraps. Founder Colin Matthews, a Hollywood patron, selects a new theme for each of these semiannual events and recruits a dozen Pittsburgh artists to participate. Each artist chooses a movie to illustrate that dovetails with the theme, but which is otherwise unrelated to the secret title (which Matthews also selects). The resulting artwork, which is displayed during the event, interprets popular films in inventive ways.

“You get the chance to take preexisting characters and ideas from things people already know and put your own twist on it,” says Seth Storck, who’s designed artwork for all four editions of Secret Cinema. “It’s great to see what scenes and little details inspire the pieces.” Last spring’s 1980s-themed event screened George Romero’s Day of the Dead and showcased paintings and mixed media that ran the gamut from Gremlins to Dirty Dancing. In November, the subversive Wristcutters: A Love Story was selected for the Dark Comedy edition; the accompanying art spotlighted an eclectic group of titles that included Inglourious Basterds and Murray’s own The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou. At Secret Cinema, almost anything goes, and that applies to the art as much as the clandestine movie. All proceeds benefit the Hollywood Theater and the Arts for Autism Foundation of Pittsburgh. For artist Dave Slebodnick, this is what sets Secret Cinema apart from other art shows in the region. “[People] come to enjoy the movie, the beer, the food and the art while simultaneously helping nonprofit organizations and smaller businesses throughout Pittsburgh.” The local brewery featured for the event rotates every six months; this time, it’s Roundabout Brewery. Eat’n Park and Market District will provide the food. So Caddyshack or Stripes? Lost in Translation or Broken Flowers? The artists aren’t telling. That would spoil the surprise. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALARUM THEATRE}

Jenny Malarkey in Alarum Theatre’s Slowly

[PLAY REVIEWS]

DEBATE SOCIETY {BY GWENDOLYN KISTE}

FOR SOME FANS, theater means elaborate sets and musical numbers. But many of the best stories require no top hats or frills. To kick off its second season, Alarum Theatre presents the Pittsburgh premiere of Slowly, a bare-bones 2010 play that ups the ante on heartrending. The setup is simple yet devastating: As conquering barbarians overrun an unnamed city, four abandoned women must decide what to do next. Cultural tradition dictates suicide, but left to their own devices, the decision rips the women apart.

Presents

Grammy award winner

Regina Belle May 3, 2014 • 7:30 PM Tickets start at $40 For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records, Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com Kelly –Strayhorn 5941 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa 15206

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

With a cruel and unwavering resolve, the loquacious Sign (Cynthia Sulemana) orders adherence to the tenets of their society. But Paper (Amanda Montoya) is unwilling to die for a conquered civilization, and jockeys to persuade young and impres-

SLOWLY

continues through Sat., April 26. Alarum Theatre at Flagstaff Hill, Schenley Park, Oakland. $10-15. www.alarumtheatre.com

sionable Bell (Lauryn Thomas) to join her in embracing a new, though unwelcome, way of life. Meanwhile, Calf (Jenny Malarkey), seemingly the most level-headed of the group, harbors a plan more devastating than any of the others can imagine. Guided by director Jordan Matthew Walsh, each performer taps into an innate part of human nature, and all four actresses captivate with their frantic and commanding performances. Playwright Howard Barker knows how to explore fear and psychological longing with dialogue that liberally mixes the pithy with the verbose. The women are eloquent and crass, abstract and raw, and those everoscillating emotions bring their dilemma into sharper focus. Arrayed in white, including face paint, the actresses look equal parts earthbound and otherworldly. Abby Lis-Perlis’ meticulous costumes recall aspects of both modern and ancient cultures, encouraging the audience to home in on the play’s universal themes.

Like other site-specific companies, Alarum Theatre rotates locations; for Slowly, the troupe utilizes Flagstaff Hill, in Schenley Park. As with any outdoor show, especially one in a well-traveled area, there are trade-offs. While the austere staging enhances the stripped-down production, overhead jets and backfiring cars did overwhelm a few of the actresses’ lines. A philosophical sucker-punch, the play clocks in under an hour. But if you’ve got the fortitude to tackle this material, you’ll be pondering it far longer than that. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

SKETCHY {BY TED HOOVER}

THE PROGRAM notes for the Carnegie

Mellon University School of Drama’s production of Lives of the Saints calls it a “comedic masterpiece.” But I’d say the general opinion regarding this 1999 compilation of comedy skits by David Ives isn’t quite so euphoric. In his other collections — Times Flies, Mere Mortals and All in the Timing — Ives imagines quirky, smart people and plops them into absurd situations. At his best (i.e., All in the Timing), there’s enough

jazzy idiosyncrasy to keep the evening moving at a humorous clip.

LIVES OF THE SAINTS continues through Sun., April 26. Philip Chosky Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. $25-29. 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu

But Saints, directed by Gregory Lehane, never reaches that level; each of the seven sketches, to various degrees, strains for funniness rather than achieving it. This isn’t a bad evening, by any means, but Ives’ interestingly nutty concepts are marred by flat jokes and flabby writing. Believe me, if David Ives had written a show in 1999 even remotely as entertaining as his cash cow All in the Timing, I wouldn’t be seeing it for the first time in 2014: Every theater company in the region would have produced it by now. “The Mystery at Twickham Vicarage,” an Agatha Christie parody, starts funny but gets mired in sophomoric sex jokes. “Soap Opera,” in which the Maytag repair-

man falls in love with a washing machine, greatly overstays its welcome, as does a nonsensical bit about building the Tower of Babel. A few others miss the mark as well. “Enigma Variations” is an interesting roundelay, with Lehane’s precise, impeccable direction: A therapist and patient are doubled by another therapist and patient who themselves double … there’s no way to explain it, but Bridget Peterson, Michelle Veintimilla, Jimmy Nicholas, John Garet Stoker and Thomas Constantine Moore give terrific, detailed performances. Also enjoyable in other pieces are Rachel Keller, Michael Reep and Antonio Marziale. My favorite skit, “Lives of the Saints,” finds two church ladies preparing a funeral breakfast. It’s a quiet, gently endearing little piece, making the subtle but sincere point that such women are really the miracles of the church, bringing sustenance and love to the grieving. Ives almost screws it up with such mood-shattering gimmicks as on-stage created sound effects, but performances by Veintimilla and Taylor Rose keep it human and rewarding.

DAVID IVES’S INTERESTINGLY NUTTY CONCEPTS ARE MARRED BY FLAT JOKES AND FLABBY WRITING.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

ELECTRIFIED ALEXANDRE BURTON EDWIN VAN DER HEIDE WOOD STREET GALLERIES 04.25–06.22.14 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, April 25th, 5:30–10pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of: Alexandre Burton, IMPACTS, 2012

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43

FOR THE WEEK OF

04.2405.01.14

SAVE-MOR Beer & Pop Warehouse

+ FRI., APRIL 25

Bell’s 2 HeartPeadckAsle and Variety LES $ 24 12 OZ. BOTT Offer ends 4/30/14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

32

.99 PLUS TAX

PITTSBURGH’S

EFSBTEER! RG LCATIO NO

SELE

4516 BROWNS HILL ROAD 412.421.8550

SAVEMORBEER.COM PITTSBURGH’S ULTIMATE

ROOFTOP LOUNGE

GRAND OPENING SUNDAY, APRIL 27 8PM TO MIDNIGHT

APRIL 25

Suspiria at April Ghouls Drive-In Monster-Rama

{ART} Tonight, the Society for Contemporary Craft opens Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Showcasing work by 31 artists, the exhibit asks artists to “push the boundaries of time-honored craft materials.” A sculpture of a woman’s worn face and an overweight male body topped with a skull are just a few of the pieces in the show. During the opening reception, the SCC will also announce the winner of its Raphael Prize, which comes with $5,000. Angela Suico 5:30 p.m. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

{ART} The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Spring Gallery Crawl features 30 venues full of visual art, live music, comedy and more. New shows include Edwin van der Heide and Alexandre Burton’s Electrified, celebrating cult-hero inventor Nikola Tesla at Wood Street Galleries (pictured), and The Occasional Market, Tom Sarver’s installa-

tion/shopping experience at 707 Penn Gallery. The Harris Theater has locally made short films, and Bricolage has live immersive theater. Outdoors, at Eighth and Penn, do karaoke and contribute a complaint for the Three Rivers Arts Festival’s Complaints Choir; browse the Night Market; and hear live music by Formula 412. The later-night Crawl After Dark inhabits nine venues, with activities including a whiskeytasting, a dance party, and a reading and book-signing by local novelist Jacob Bacharach (The Bend of the World). Bill

Art by Tom Sarver

APRIL 25

Spring Gallery Crawl

DECK PARTY AND CHARITY FUNDRAISER $4 Svedka Drinks, $2.75 Coors Light Drafts, $3 Coors Light Bottles Benefits DJ Mike Ley’s Man of the Year for Leukemia and Lymphoma Society DJ Showcase and prize package giveaway

1014 FIFTH AVENUE • 412.281.2583 (BLUE)

WWW.PGHUPTOWN.COM • WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/UPTOWNPGH 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

O’Driscoll 5:30-9 p.m. (free). CrawlAfterDark: 9:30-midnight (some events ticketed). Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{SCREEN} Spring is no respite from getting spooked: The second annual April Ghouls Drive-In Monster-Rama, at the Riverside Drive-in, presents eight classic horror films over two nights. Tonight, catch The Town That Dreaded Sundown, Carrie, Suspiria and The Hills Have Eyes. Saturday, shiver to the original Halloween, The Beast Within, Phantasm and Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things. Films screen in 35 mm; the horror begins at dusk. Al Hoff Gates at 7 p.m. Also, 7 p.m. Sat., April 26. $10 per person each night (kids under 12 free with adult). Overnight camping available for additional charge. Route 66, North Vandergrift. 724-568-1250 or www.riversidedrivein.com

{WORDS} The true-storytelling revival continues. The latest incarnation hitting town is Risk!, the touring spinoff of the popular live show and podcast from Kevin Allison, of MTV comedy troupe The State. Advertised as like The Moth, but rawer, Risk! features seasoned performers and regular folks alike telling stories “they never thought they’d dare share in public.” Garfield Artworks hosts the critically acclaimed show’s

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

sp otlight Following last weekend’s Conservatory Dance Company’s marquee showcase at the Byham Theater, the student company of Point Park University closes out its season with Point Park Connections, the annual program of dance works by dance-department adjunct faculty, April 25-27 at the university’s George Rowland White Performance Studio. Of these six works encompassing a range of styles, five come from former Point Park students, including 2008 graduate Laura Warnock’s “Starts at Goodbye.” The seven-and-ahalf-minute work for 10 dancers is set to music by Olafur Arnalds, and looks back on several interpersonal relationships by beginning where they ended. Also on the program is an expanded version of a contemporary-dance work that choreographer Kellie Hodges originally created for Thodos Dance Chicago. Danced to music by Helios and Nicolas Jaar, the 12-minute “Afterall, Even Now, Even If” explores “the daily struggle each of us go through to maintain individuality in our relationships,” says Hodges. Joining those works are Heather Goelz-Carpenter’s jazzy “Swing & Sing,” Daniel Karasik’s “Vantage Point” (with dancer Shonnita Johnson, pictured), Mariah McLeod’s “(mis)Connect” and Ernest Tolentino’s “Meron.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., April 25; 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., April 26, and 2 p.m. Sun., April 27. 201 Wood St., Downtown. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $12.75-160.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghopera.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID BELOFF}

Pittsburgh stop, featuring Allison and local ’tellers Matt Bower, Stacy Keene, Jordan Sargent and Dalia Shevin. BO 7:30 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $20. www.risk-show.com/tour

+ SUN., APRIL 27

APRIL 26 Orphée

{PARTY} {MUSIC} The BNY Mellon Grand Classics Mozart Festival begins this weekend, as pianist Robert Levin and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra present a program including Piano Concerto No. 20, “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” and Symphony No. 1, “Jupiter.” On Tue., April 29, the PSO and Chamber Music Pittsburgh perform Mozart’s chamber music at Carnegie Music Hall. Next weekend, the orchestra again visits Heinz Hall, this time with

+ SAT., APRIL 26 {ART} Ready to Art All Night? In its 17th year, the Lawrenceville tradition remains the only place in town that anybody, of any skill level, can display an artwork he or she has made, in

2 p.m. today to drop off ready-to-display single works at the warehouse called Willow Street Development. The volunteer-run show is uncensored (except for the kid-friendly-art area) — and it really does run all night, and into tomorrow. BO 4 p.m.-2 p.m. Sun., April 27. 4001 Willow St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-2351950 or www.artallnight.org

Though the status of the cultural center bearing his name is in question (for now), the late playwright August Wilson’s legacy is secure. The Hill District native’s great Pittsburgh Cycle of plays like Fences and The Piano Lesson live on stages, and Broadway’s August Wilson Theater host events like the national August Wilson Monologue Contest. Today, at the Hill’s Kaufmann Center, The Dramatists Guild and Pittsburgh’s Dr. Goddess Arts celebrate Wilson’s 69th birthday with cake, music, performances from Wilson’s writings and more. Reservations are

poet, falls in love with Death, ignoring his wife Eurydice and listening obsessively to strange messages on the radio. Sam Helfrich directs, Antony Walker conducts, and Matthew Worth and Caroline Worra star in Pittsburgh Opera’s seasoncloser. It’s sung in French, with English texts projected above the stage. The first of four performances at the Benedum Center is tonight. AS 8 p.m.

{DANCE} Two different takes on African culture occupy the August Wilson Center during Dance Africa: Pittsburgh 2014. Oyu Oro, an Afro-Cuban experimental dance ensemble from New York City, has performed sold-out shows in its hometown and played festivals around the U.S. Illstyle and Peace, a hip-hop group from Philadelphia, combines traditional African movement with tap, ballet and beatboxing. Dance Africa presenter Legacy Arts Project requests semiformal attire. AS 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-20. 412-452-3847 or www.legacyartsprojects.org

APRIL 26

Dance Africa: f Pittsburgh 2014

N E W S

any medium … and know that some 15,000 people will attend. Add activities for kids and adults — think chalk art, group improv — plus an art auction and live music, for one of the year’s biggest free art parties. Artists have until

+

TA S T E

+

Jean Cocteau’s 1949 film Orphée, which retells the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, is set in modern-day Paris, with motorcycle-riding angels of death dressed in leather. In 1993, Phillip Glass adapted the film into an opera: Orpheus, a French

M U S I C

+

+ WED., APRIL 30 {GARDENING} If you’re feeling left out of gardening season because you don’t have much room, don’t despair: With the right knowledge, a patio, sidewalk or even windowsill can yield a surprising harvest of fruit, vegetables and more. In tonight’s free Small Space Gardening class, at East End Food Co-op, Bob Madden, of Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery, reveals how using vertical space, containers and other techniques can help, indoors and out. BO 7 p.m. 7516 Meade St., Point Breeze. Registration required at 412-242-3598. www.eastendfood.coop

+ THU., MAY 01 {WORDS}

APRIL 25

Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics

{OPERA} the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh and selections from Don Giovanni and The Magic Flute. AS 8 p.m. (600 Penn Ave., Downtown.) Festival continues through Sun., May 4. $25.75109.75. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

required; search Eventbrite.com for “Happy Birthday August Wilson Party.” BO 3 p.m. 1835 Centre Ave., Hill District. 412392-4400 or www.hillhouse.org

Art by Thaddeus Erdahl

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

New York Times best-selling author Andre Dubus III gives a keynote at Carnegie Mellon’s 2014 Adamson Student Awards. An author of both fiction and non-fiction, Dubus’s oeuvre includes his novel The House of Sand and Fog, which was made into an Oscar-nominated film in 2003. His latest work is Dirty Love, a collection of novellas featuring the fractured relationships of Massachusetts’ working class. Kirkus Reviews called the book “first-rate fiction by a dazzling talent.” Dubus’s talk at this ceremony honoring excellence in student fiction, non-fiction, poetry and screenwriting is free. AS 8 p.m. Adamson Auditorium, Baker Hall, CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-268-285 or www.cmu.edu/hss/english

C L A S S I F I E D S

45

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

in this farce as an earnest aerobics instructor unknowingly acquires the cash filled suitcase of two money launderers from Cleveland. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., April 27, 2 p.m. Thru May 10. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. CANDIDA. Comedy by George Bernard Shaw. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru May 13. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE DEVIL’S ARITHMETIC. Prime Stage Theatre will perform select scenes from the adaption based on the book by Jane Yolen. Sat., April 26, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GROUNDED. One-woman show following a gutsy fighter pilot whose unexpected pregnancy puts her career on hold. Sun, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 4. City

Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE - A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice is now in session w/ “real” cases involving zombies, spaceships, furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE MUSIC MAN: CONCERT VERSION. Concert staging of the classic musical. April 24-26, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., April 27, 2 p.m. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. ORPHÉE. Philip Glass’ twist on the myth of Orpheus & Eurydice. Presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Sat., April 26, 8 p.m., Tue., April 29, 7 p.m., Fri., May 2, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 4, 3 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PANTAGLEIZE. Adaptation of Michel de Ghelderode’s 1931 avant garde play. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru April 27. Lexington Technology Center, Point Breeze. 412-362-1713.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Meet the Brewer Saturday, 4/26 • 2-5 PM Sample a Rare Mango-Infused version of IPL, or wash down some Oysters from the Bar with w ith a pint pint of tthee O Original. iggina .

THE PRISONER OF SECOND AVENUE. Play by Neil Simon. Presented by R-ACT Theatre Productions. April 25-26, 7 p.m. and Sun., April 27, 2 p.m. The Avenue Theater. 724-775-6844. SLOWLY. Howard Barker’s play about 4 women waiting in their besieged city for the arrival of the conquering forces. Thu, Fri, 7 p.m. Thru April 25. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-255-2539.

PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 25

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BILLY ELMER. 9 p.m. Nied’s Hotel, Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. DENNIS PIPER, MISS GAYLE BARRENS, DAVID KAYE. 6 p.m. Broughton Fire Hall, South Park. 412-655-4844. THE DRAFT. 8 p.m. . w ww per Steel City Improv a p ty ci h pg Theater, Shadyside. .com 412-404-2695. COMEDY OPEN ELECTRIC SLIDEZ: MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. POWERPOINT THROWDOWN. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru May 29 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. Downtown. 412-339-0608. 412-681-4318. JOE BRONZI, AUGGIE COOK, MARK LOWRY. 7:30 p.m. LISA DAPPRICH. 7 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. Natrona Heights VFW Post 894, 724-836-8000. Natrona Heights. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. LAFF YOUR CA$H OFF. Benefits Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. LifeSpan. 6-11 p.m. Broughton Fire 412-251-0097. Hall, South Park. 412-464-1300. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. RISK! Live storytelling tour featuring Kevin Allison, based on the podcast. 8 p.m. Garfield Artworks, Garfield. 412-361-2262. STEAMER. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Thru April 25 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 24

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER BOTTOMS UP! Confusion sets in

FRI 25 - SAT 26

COREY HOLCOMB. 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., April 26, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. MIKE MCCARTHY. April 25-26, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 26 BYOT (BRING YOUR OWN TEAM). 10:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DEATH SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. JOHN EVANS, TUCKER, RAY ZAWODNI. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE: EPIC D&D COMEDY ADVENTURE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

GALLERY CRAWL UE

1. Wood Street Galleries* 601 Wood Street

212 Ninth Street

ELECTRIFIED | Alexandre Burton and Edwin van der Heide Artists Edwin van der Heide and Alexandre Burton pay homage to Nikola Tesla’s pioneering work in electricity, X-rays and wireless communication. Their installations are North American premieres.

Process Masters| High School Students from the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild

2. SPACE*

2nd floor:

812 Liberty Avenue

The Orange Experience Sound Elevator explores the psychological effects of color through music.

The Secret Life of Robots | Toby Fraley Music by DJ Gordy Purchase treats from Sweet Peaches and The Pittsburgh Pie Guy.

11. 937 Liberty Avenue

29. Arthur Murray Dance Studio 136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

Come complain with the Office of Public Art as we collect complaints for the Complaints Choir, a public art program of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. 5:30 to 7:30pm.

3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery:

Therapy and The Muse | Ernest McCarty

Digital Hand | Penn State University School of Visual Arts

22. 707 Penn Gallery* The Occasional Market | Tom Sarver

23. Katz Plaza

Teenie “One Shot” Harris The August Wilson Center Collection

Live Music by Formula 412, 6:30 to 9pm Carnegie Library Button-making and Books WYEP Music Station

13. Tonic

24. Backstage Bar People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers | Robert Villamagna Live music by Jevon Rushton, 5:30 to 7:30pm

Music by J. Malls.

14. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

25. PNC Legacy Project

SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

Interioractive, 10pm, $5

111 Ninth Street

Print Power | Pittsburgh CAPA 9-12 Visual Art Students 819 Penn Avenue

Scene and Song Revue In partnership with Pinnacle Productions, Point Park University.

17. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council* 810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

*open until 9:30pm

Reflective Locations An Art on the Walls exhibit curated by D.S. Kinsel.

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating Black History Month.

+

Meeting of Important People and The Telephone Line, 10pm, $5

Wood Street Galleries, 2nd floor,

539 Liberty Avenue

Party inside a live exhibit with interactive artworks. Desserts by Bluebird Kitchen. Music by DJ Pete Butta.

Dream flavor of ice cream for the month of April is banana cream pie, benefitting G3 Entertainment USA.

Uber will provide free rides (up to $20) with promo code: WOODSTGALLERIES. New users only.

27. Boutique 208*

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Throwdown 10pm, $10 or $5 Student Rush, BYOB

208 Sixth Street

9. Arcade Comedy Theater

N E W S

Keep It Moving | Official After-Crawl Dance Party, 10pm, $5, Cash Bar

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show Live music by The Willful Souls

16. Future Tenant

811 Liberty Avenue

Tasting and the history of local whiskeys, gins, and rums, with Eric Meyer, co-owner of Wigle Whiskey.

Trust Arts Education Center, Peirce Studio, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

15. CAPA Gallery

The Way | Sarah VanTassel

Whiskey Tasting, 9pm, 21+, No Cover

937 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor

655 Penn Avenue

7. Trust Arts Education Center

Pittsburgh Filmmakers presents regionally made short films.

Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Reading & Book Signing, The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach 9:30pm, No Cover

7th St. and Penn Avenue

26. Dream Cream Ice Cream

809 Liberty Avenue

107 Sixth Street

August Henry’s Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

707 Penn Avenue

symbols of self | Urban Pathways Students Live music by The Sounds of Steel band.

8. Harris Theater

30. Renaissance Hotel

Dane Vannatter, Jazz at Andy’s 8pm-12am, No Cover

709 Penn Avenue

914 Penn Avenue

Pittsburgh Public Schools 2014 All-City Showcase of Arts & Cultures

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

Live Music by James Graff, 6 to 8pm.

20. Night Market VIII

Historic Pittsburgh, 1900-1920 Painstakingly re-produced digital prints by Mark Muse. 805-807 Liberty Avenue

AY

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

600 Liberty Avenue

805 Liberty Avenue

YW

crawl after dark

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

6. Shaw Galleries*

UE

21. 709 Penn Gallery*

Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

VEN

Presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership.

Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh | Leslie Ansley

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti

HA

Echoloco, an immersive experience for one, 6 to 8:30pm. Sign up begins at 5:30pm.

980 Liberty Avenue

5. Tito Way

ERR

ENT

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

12. August Wilson Center

Impe’kyoonees | applecubed

WB

SEV

First Floor: Bricolage

610 Wood Street

717 Liberty Avenue

TRA

P

*open until 11pm

3. Urban League

4. Social Status*

11

10 8 9 67 2 S 3

12

18. Bend Yoga Craft Market at Bend Yoga

10. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

13

P

P

25

14

16

5

WO OD STR EET

1

UE

VEN TY A

19. Penn Avenue & 8th Street Venues with an * are open until 10pm.

18 17

4

27

REET

20

DUM BENETER CEN

Z HEINL HAL

26

CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

23

AVEN

R LIBE

Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

19 22 21

H ST

P

REET

Sponsors:

H ST

REET

PENN

P

T

TER THEAUARE SQ ILLY O’REEATER TH

24

29 28

NINT

P

30

REET

IX ST TANW

A Production of:

M BYHTAER THEA

H ST

All information and locations are subject to change.

SIXT

P

P

T TREE TH S

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS

P

TREE TH S EIGH

TD

FOR

P

ARD ULEV

E BO

ESN UQU

N SEVE

Friday, April 25 5:30-9pm Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

E RENC LAW NTER D L. TION CE I V A D VEN CON

15

TENT

in the Cultural District

Meet Your Makers Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

28. Verve Wellness

Salsa Fridays 10pm Free Lesson; 10:30pm-1:30am No Cover, Cash Bar

142 Sixth Street, Third floor

New contemporary dance works in progress. 7:30, 8:30 & 9:30pm

S C R E E N

Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

Dancing with DJ Paul Mitchell.

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

THE LUPONES. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. NOTHING IS PERMANENT. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Pittsburgh Holi Festival of Colors 2014,

TUE 29 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

Last Sunday of every month! 8 to 11pm

CRITIC: Steven Angelo, 48, a

WED 30

software-implementation specialist from Mount Washington

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

$2 Yuengling rafts 16oz Dr 9 :30 pm — 1 :30 am

EXHIBITS ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery.

Joe Cheeta’s High Energy Personality, Quick Sense of Humor, combined with his Ability to get Everyone Involved makes Game Show Junkiessm a Fantastic Time to be Had by All! OVER 21 ONLY

Flagstaff Hill, Oakland

sponsored by

1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOUTHSIDE W W W. D E E SCA F E .C OM POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Are We So Different? Text, photographs, interactive audiovisual components, & related artifacts challenge perceptions about race.Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of

WHEN: Sat.,

April 19 I have always wanted to go to Holi in India and I’ve never seen a local event. I figured it would be fun to come and see. It’s not quite what I expected — it’s more of a music fest than a cultural fest. [I’m surprised that there are] so few non-Caucasians. Predominantly, I’d say 95 — if not more — percent white kids. I thought there’d be more people of different cultures out here. [Event sponsor Hare Krishna] is about the same as any other religion to me. I’m an atheist. If it gives you comfort, go with it, as long as you’re not forcing anyone else to live by your rules. BY ANGELA SUICO

Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Harmonious couplings of botanical art w/ items created between the 16th & 21st centuries from the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212.

PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Opens April 26. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. 412-621-4253.

Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

DANCE SAT 26 DANCE AFRICA: PITTSBURGH. The nation’s largest festival dedicated to African dance. Presented by The Legacy Arts Project. 1 & 8 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-452-3847. WAYNE MCGREGOR: RANDOM DANCE. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS THU 24 BOWTIES & BUTTERFLIES GALA. Live entertainment, hors d’oeuvres, sneak peak of Summer Flower Show, more. 6:30-10 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-651-5281.

THU 24 - SUN 27

NCJW DESIGNER DAYS. Upscale clothing resale benefiting the National Council of Jewish Women Pittsburgh. 6-9 p.m., Fri., April 25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat., April 26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sun., April 27, 12-4 p.m. Home Consignments, Swissvale. 412-421-6118.

FRI 25 DANCE & DUOS BENEFIT SHOW. Feat. classical & contemporary ballet, vocal duos, African drums, more. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-576-0898. SILK SCREEN OPENING GALA. Live music, live auction, dance performances, more. Benefits Silk Screen: Asian Arts. 9:30 p.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 724-433-4480.

SAT 26 2ND ANNUAL BARK SHADYSIDE PUP WALK. 1-mile walk benefiting the Animal Rescue League. 9 a.m. Liberty Elementary School, Shadyside. 412-682-1298. 4TH ANNUAL GREAT SHADYSIDE YARD SALE. Helps benefit the Animal Rescue League. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Liberty Elementary School, Shadyside. 412-682-1298. 8TH ANNUAL FUR BALL. Live music, dinner, auctions, more. Benefits the Butler County Humane Society. 6 p.m. Butler Country Club, Butler. 724-789-1150. PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS DRESS BALL. Performances by individual artists of The Pittsburgh Savoyards, hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, silent auction, more. 8-11 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 49

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-916-8131. THE WESTMORELAND COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY SPRING FROLIC. Prohibition theme feat. a Prohibition-themed courtroom drama, music by the Susanne Ortner-Roberts trio, a basket raffle & a dessert auction. Reservations required. 6-9 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x215.

SUNDAY SCHOOL 2.0: RED LIGHT CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH PARTY. Benefits the Red Cross. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Seviche, Downtown. 412-471-2058.

WED 30 ELIZABETH SMART: BE INSPIRED! Dinner & program w/ the child abduction survivor & advocate for change & recovery programs. Benefits Bethlehem Haven. 5:30 p.m. Circuit Center and Ballroom, South Side. 412-391-1348 x 228.

SAT 26 - SUN 27 NIGHT AT THE WARHOL: HOLOCAUST CENTER OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Benefits four nonprofit organizations dedicated to Holocaust education. April 26-27 Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

FULL LIST ONLINE

“Raisins,” by Maura Doern Danko, from Observations, at Gallery on 43rd Street in Lawrenceville

NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. The Occasional Market. Work by Tom Sarver. Opens April 25. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Digital Hand. Digital fabrication works by students at the Penn State School of Visual Arts. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 937 LIBERTY AVE. The Orange Experience. Sound Elevator explores the psychological effects of color through music feat. work by 20+ local artists. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPA GALLERY. Print Power. Work by CAPA 9–12 visual art students. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Process Masters. Art in various mediums by students from the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6999. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Antonio Puri. Large-scale contemporary pieces. Opening reception: April 26, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CLUB ZOO. Spectrum. Local artist showcase feat. Jess Paul, Madeleine Crawford, Elody Gyekis, Ricky Pirozzi, Bruce

Reynolds, Brinx, Nathan Doverspike, more. Opens April 24, 7 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 412-339-0917. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Free, festive showcase of arts & entertainment at galleries & arts spaces. April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Observations. Paintings by Maura Doern Danko. Opening reception: April 25, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GREATER PITTSBURGH ARTS COUNCIL. Reflective Locations. Feat. work reflecting modern black masculinity. Curated by D.S. Kinsel. Gallery Crawl: April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. HARRIS THEATER. The Way. Photographs by Sarah Van Tassel. Opens April 25, 5:309 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-682-4111. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The Life & Times of Abraham Lincoln. Photographs following Lincoln’s rise to the United States presidency from 1847-1865. Opens April 30. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE. Therapy & The Muse. Paintings & sculpture by Ernest McCarty. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SOCIAL STATUS. impe’kyoonees. Contemporary

work by NY-based photographer Applecubed. Part of the Downtown Gallery Crawl, April 25th, 7-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-2355. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics. Feat. work by 31 artists. Opens April 25. Strip District. 412-261-7003. TONIC BAR & GRILL. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. All-City Visual Art Exhibition. 300+ works by Pittsburgh Public School students. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. THE URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh. Paintings & murals by Leslie Ansley. Opens April 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-227-4802. WILLOW STREET DEVELOPMENT. Art All Night. All-night community art show. Starts on April 26 at 4 p.m., ends on April 27 at 2 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-235-1950. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Electrified. Interactive installations by Edwin van der Heide & Alexandre Burton. Opening reception: April 25, 5:30-10 p.m. Part of the

THU 24

EQUAL PAY RALLY 2014. pittsburghequalpayday. wordpress.com 12-1 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-258-2563.

www. per pa pghcitym .co

SUN 27

VISUALART

POLITICS

FRI 25

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. SILVER EYE BENEFIT AUCTION. Brunch & live auction feat. vintage & contemporary photographs. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Clear Story Studio, South Side. 412-431-1810.

ELECTIONS IN INDIA & THE IMPACT ON PITTSBURGHINDIA TRADE RELATIONS. Live digital video conference from India. pittsburgh.netip.org 7 a.m. Spilman Thomas & Battle, Downtown.

SAT 26 THE FIGHT FOR MEANINGFUL IMMIGRATION REFORM. Program presented by United

Steelworkers’ Guillermo Perez & Steffi Domike. 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House. 412-831-3871.

LITERARY THU 24 BOUND TOGETHER BOOK CLUB. TransAtlantic by Colum McCann. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FAIR HOUSING PARTNERSHIP’S 8TH ANNUAL POETRY SLAM. Local poets speak out about the need to create communities that are built on inclusion, diversity & fairness. 7:30 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-391-2535 x 213. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every CONTINUES ON PG. 50

April 26th | Pittsburgh Marriott North

CONTINUES ON PG. 51

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

49

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

[KIDSTUFF]

WED 30

BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. L & J MATH CLUB. For students in grades 4-7. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FRI 25

BOOK CHAT. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. JACOB BACHARACH. Book signing w/ author of The Bend of the World. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 9:30 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PNC LEGACY PROJECT. Oral histories celebrating Black History Month by Billy Porter, Rod Doss, Swin Cash, Alma Speed Fox, & Sean Jones. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 5:30-9 p.m. 600 Liberty Ave, Downtown. 412-456-6666. TONY & LAUREN DUNGY. Book signing by the authors of Uncommon Marriage. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743.

OUTSIDE FRI 25

WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru April 25 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 26 LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL. 7 Saturday hike of the 70mile trail. www.ventureoutdoors. org Sat. Thru June 14

SAT 26

DOMINIC A. BIANCO. Book signing w/ the author of The Apparition. 2 p.m. Rickert & Beagle Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444.

SUN 27 DUAL BOOK RELEASE CELEBRATION. Almost Dreams by Jean-Joseph Rabearivelo, translated by Robert Ziller & Yield to the Willow by Don Wentworth. 5 p.m. Percolate, Wilkinsburg. 412-327-5719.

MON 28 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S STAR WARS. An informal scene night in which professional actors & non-actors alike take a crack at their favorite Shakespeare pieces. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

TUE 29

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 24 - MON 28 STUFFED ANIMAL CARE & REPAIR. Thru April 28, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com 50

Teligence/18+

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

If you haven’t had a chance to join Gemini Children’s Theater for a trip down the rabbit hole, there’s one more weekend to catch its production

Alice in Wonderland

of . The story might be familiar (to parents and older children, at least), but this original, interactive musical is sure to provide surprises (which — fair warning — might grow curiouser and curiouser) for the whole family. 1 and 3:30 p.m. Sat., April 26, and 1 and 3:30 p.m. Sun., April 27. 7501 Penn Ave., Point Breeze. $12. 412-243-6464 or www.geminitheater.org Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: LOVE LETTERS PROJECT. Using traditional hand letter writing materials including postcards, stamps, & even a manual typewriter, craft a message to someone or something you love. Thru April 30, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 26

3RD ANNUAL ARTS & CHOCOLATE SPECTACULAR. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Face painting, Musical swing set, brownie eating contest, er p a p ty ci pgh m sandbox, solar-powered crafts, more. 11 a.m..co instruments, more. 4 p.m. Boyce-Mayview Ongoing Children’s Park, Upper St. Clair. Museum of Pittsburgh, 412-831-9000. North Side. 412-322-5058. AMERICAN GIRL MOVIE BALL. 500 beach balls, larger NIGHT: SAIGE PAINTS THE SKY. inflatable balls, a disco ball Movie & craft night. Grades K-6. & music. Ongoing Children’s 6:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Museum of Pittsburgh, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. North Side. 412-322-5058. FAMILY FUN: GET CRAFTY TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks FOR EARTH DAY. Sing-a-long & by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, interactive craft session. 2:30 p.m.

THU 24

CHATLINE TM

TUE 29

FULL LIST E ONwLwIN w.

Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru April 27 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. KIDS OPEN MIC. 5 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical ecosystems & learn about conservation efforts using museum dioramas & collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Thru May 10 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

SAT 26 - SUN 27

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru April 27 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

SUN 27 THE ULTIMATE PLAY DAY. Outdoor activities for kids of all ages. 1-5 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

MON 28

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 30 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 24 BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DRUM & CHANT WORKSHOP W/ JIM DONOVAN. 7 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. FRENCH CONVERSATION. 7:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LUNCH & LEARN: THE ART OF WIN-WIN NEGOTIATION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. OPEN HOUSE AT THE MIDWIFE CENTER. 4:15-6:15 p.m. The Midwife Center, Strip District. 412-321-6880 x 208. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from CONTINUES ON PG. 52

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

ONGOING AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Timothy Kelley. Paintings & sculpture. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. The Drop Project. Interactive exhibit designed by Kristen Reynolds, Ann Payne, & Molly Mehling to personify aquatic ecosystems in order to create relatability to our everyday lives. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Evolves: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Work by Cynthia Cooley. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Hot Paint & Cold Glass. Multimedia exhibit by Patti & Al Middlemiss. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Walls that Soak. Large scale installation by Caroline Record & Leah Wulfman. South Side. 240-793-8935. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Between Abstraction & Realism. Work by Bettina Clowney. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work

N E W S

by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2014. Group show. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. STRUCTURE. Work

+

TA S T E

+

by Ron Copland, Steve Ehret, Megan Herwig, Joseph Mruk, Gian Romagnoli, Andy Scott, & Megan Shalonis. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. MASH: Mansion Apartment Shack House. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Closing reception: April 27, 3-6 p.m. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. 19th Century Photographs in the USA. Showing the largest collection on display feat. Civil War, historic persons, Cowboys & Indians. North Side. 412-231-7881. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SHAW GALLERIES. Historic Pittsburgh. Photographs by Mark Muse. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Waterworks 2014. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Vex Kelpie’s Fairy World. Sculptures of mythical creatures & hidden beasts. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TULA ORGANIC SALON & SPA. One Cloud Per Sky. Work by Amy DiPlacido. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-2230. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF THE NORTH HILLS. The Marriage Project: Faces of Equality. Traveling photographic exhibit of local same-sex couples in long-term committed relationships who would like to marry one day in PA or have their existing out-of-state marriage recognized by our state. On view Sun. mornings, & Tues. through Fri., 9-4, by appointment. 412-366-0244. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TOO MANY PILLS! HOW TO MANAGE MEDICATIONS & STAY HEALTHY. 6-7:30 p.m. UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. 412-784-4022. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 25

Celebrating 20 Years!

BASEBALL SEASON IS HERE! DISCOUNT AT DOOR WITH GAME TICKET!

FREE DRINKS! FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB! CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

show this ad for

$5

off admission

92 NEIGHBORHOOD SERIES: UPTOWN. Food, cocktails, & speaker on how a grass roots street art & literature effort changed a community. 7-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BURLESQUE IN THE ‘BURGH: PERMIERE OF STEEL CITY CABARET. 9:30 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. ECHOLOCO. Immersive experience for one. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 6-8:30 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. INTERIORACTIVE. Interactive art party following the Gallery Crawl. 10 p.m. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 419-631-0320. INTUITIVE EYE READINGS BY SHAY. Fri, 7 p.m. Thru June 27 Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 323-839-6866. LUNCH & LEARN EVENT: THE BUSINESS OF MAKING MOVIES IN SOUTHWESTERN PA. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. NIGHT MARKET VIII. Pop-up market feat. handcrafted arts & crafts. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Penn Ave.& Eighth St., Downtown. 5:30-11 p.m. 412-456-6666. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

FRI 25 - SAT 26 WADE IN THE WATER. Indigenous African & Western identities collide in a performance feat. photos, video, & sound by Mukwae Wabei Siyolwe & Daniel Bernard Roumain. April 25-26, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

FRI 25 - SUN 27 SOUTH HILLS HOME SHOW. 5-9 p.m., Sat., April 26, 10 a.m.8 p.m. and Sun., April 27, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Southpointe Iceoplex, Canonsburg. 412-310-7781.

SAT 26 824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks 52

(412) 771-8872

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

cluberoticapittsburgh.com

BALLROOM, LATIN, & SWING

DANCE. 8-11 p.m. Arthur Murray AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Monroeville. 412-373-2101. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. FIFTH ANNUAL ROOT BEER Weekly letter writing event. Sun, TASTING. 5:30 p.m. Village Candy, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. Sewickley. 412-741-1490. 412-683-3727. GOODTASTE! PITTSBURGH. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Celebrity chefs, wine tasting, Second and Fourth Sun of every food demos, more. http://www. month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie goodtastepittsburgh.com/ 10 a.m.Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. 4 p.m. Pittsburgh Marriott North, END OF LIFE EXPO. Tabletop Cranberry. 724-772-3700. exhibits w/ information about ICONIC BEAUTY HAIR SHOW. caskets, cremation, hospice, 7 p.m. WHIM, Station Square. veterans benefits, coping w/ 412-424-0379. grief, cemeteries, green burial, ITALIAN BOOT CAMP. Advanced more. 2:30-4 p.m. East Liberty students will engage in debates, Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. conversations, more. Sat, 412-241-0705. 11:15 a.m. Thru June 21 Wilkins ENLIGHTENMENT. w/ Andrew School Community Center, Nesky. Theosophical Swissvale. 412-478-2681. Society of Pittsburgh. KOREAN FOR 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham BEGINNERS. Sat, University, Shadyside. 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie 412-462-4200. . w Library, Oakland. ESSENTIALS OF A ww per a p ty ci 412-622-3151. BELLYDANCE DRUM pgh m o .c KOREAN II. For those SOLO. Intensive dance who already have a basic workshop. Sun. Thru understanding of Korean & May 18 Fitness with a Twist, are interested in increasing South Side. 412-225-3302. proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. OFF ON OUR OWN: LIVING Carnegie Library, Oakland. OFF-GRID IN COMFORTABLE 412-622-3151. INDEPENDENCE. off-on-ourTHE PITTSBURGH RECORD & own.eventbrite.com 1 p.m. CD CONVENTION XXXVIII. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. Record vendors, memorabilia, 412-600-0738. more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Clarion Hotel, Green Tree. 412-331-5021. BACKYARD COMPOSTING PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Baldwin Borough Public Library. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-488-7490 x 247. 412-770-4961. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA A support group for women CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by 30+. Second and Fourth Mon dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina of every month Anchorpoint Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. Counseling Ministry. SATURDAY SIPPER: SPRING GERMAN CONVERSATION SIPPERS. 2 p.m. Dreadnought CLUB. Fourth Mon of every Wines, Strip District. 412-391-1709. month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. April 28 Carnegie Library, Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Oakland. 412-622-3151. follows. No partner needed. LAUGH FOR THE HEALTH OF IT! Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace w/ Julie Ann Sullivan, Certified Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. Laughter Leader. 7 p.m. 412-683-5670. Mount Lebanon Public Library, SPANISH CONVERSATION Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GROUP. Friendly, informal. At LIVING & LEARNING: RELAX, the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, REFOCUS, REVITALIZE. Learn 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. how to manage caregiver stress & 412-362-6108. practice self-care when caring for SWING CITY. Learn & practice aging parents or older loved ones. swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. 7 p.m. Temple David, Monroeville. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-372-1200. 412-759-1569. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, SILK SCREEN FILM FESTIVAL. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Visit www.silkscreenfestival.org PGH PHOTO FAIR SPEAKER for full schedule. April 26-May 4 SERIES. Feat. Daile Kaplan of 724-969-2565. Swann Galleries. 7 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 646-436-4698. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. 5220 ART EXPO. Art & craft fair Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing feat. photography, jewelry, wood follows. No partner needed. workings, stained glass, handmade Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace soaps, more. A portion of the Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. proceeds will benefit the Officer 412-683-5670. James Kuzak Benefit Fund. SELF-GUIDED OLD 12-6 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL 412-401-2165. MUSEUM TOUR. Call for AMERICAN HERITAGE reservations. Mon. Thru CHOCOLATE DEMONSTRATION April 28 Old Allegheny County & TASTING. 12-4 p.m. Jail Museum, Downtown. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-471-5808. 412-221-0348.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 28

SAT 26 - WED 30

SUN 27

SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 29 FILM FORWARD: ADVANCING CULTURAL DIALOGUE. Film screening & discussion of Circles. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. PITTSBURGH STRESS MANAGEMENT GROUP. 5:30 p.m. Grace Wellness Center, Greenfield. 412-853-3189. URBAN POWER TO PROSPER PROGRAM: HUMAN RESOURCES. 5:45-8:45 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-624-1544. WATERSHED AWARENESS/RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. 7 p.m. Whitehall Public Library. 412-488-7490 x 247.

WED 30

BIDDER 70. Film screening & discussion about a Utah college student who derailed a widely protested Bush Administration federal oil & gas land sale. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-600-0738. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345.

Nursery. 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS CHICAGO AUDITIONS. Auditions for Chicago The Musical. May 3, noon-3 p.m. Bring sheet music in an appropriate key for singing. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 800-747-5599. DISCOVER ME! Seeking 2 caucasian women & 2 caucasian men age 18-30 for the movie production Discover Me! Call Robert at 412-209-9868. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for The Sound of Music. May 17-18. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. May 13-18. All voice parts for volunteer singers & Professional Core singers. www.themendelssohn.org Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

SUPERHERO 5K & 1K RUN/WALK

The annual Superhero 5K & 1K Run/Walk, at the North Park Pool in Allison Park, isn’t just an opportunity to dress up as your favorite superhero. A benefit for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of Allegheny County, it’s also a chance to help prevent, and raise awareness of, child abuse in the region. Volunteers are needed to help with various tasks the day of the event, Sat., April 26. Email mgay@pgh-casa.org or visit www.pgh-casa.org for information.

ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FILM FORWARD: ADVANCING CULTURAL DIALOGUE. Film screening & discussion of Twenty Feet From Stardom. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PARENT’S CIRCLE FAMILIES FORUM. Feat. Israeli & Palestinian spokespeople. 7 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-805-5069. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SMALL SPACE GARDENING. Workshop w/ Bob Madden, Garden Dreams Urban Farm &

N E W S

MONYOUGH COMMUNITY SINGERS. Seeking singers of all ages, especially baritones & basses. www.mycsingers.com 814-460-1731. NEW CASTLE PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for State Fair. April 27-28. Be prepared to sing a vocal selection. New Castle. 724-654-3437. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. Auditions for As You Like It. April 26. Open to AEA & non-union actors, prepare a brief comedic Shakespearean monologue. info@pittsburghshakespeare.com. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 412-404-8531. STAGE 62. Auditions for Side Show. April 28-29. 32 bars of a contemporary musical theater song, bring legible sheet music, accompanist will be provided. Be prepared to do a movement audition. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262.

+

TA S T E

+

THE THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for Alice In Wonderland. April 25. Men, women & children age 6+; cold readings from the script. tfauditions@gmail.com The Theatre Factory. 724-454-7193.

SUBMISSIONS ART ALL NIGHT: LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit one (& only one) piece of artwork or sign up to perform. Registration & other info at www.artallnight.org. 412-235-1950. ART IN ACTION. Seeking artists for a one-day interactive art show on June 1. More information & application at www.artinaction-hf. com. 724-413-4648. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems for Blast Furnace’s 1st annual poetry chapbook competition. Submit one manuscript. No manuscripts permitted by current Chatham University staff, alum, or students, by Blast Furnace guest reviewers, by poets who have previously been published in his/ her own chapbook. Visit https:// blastfurnace.submittable.com/ submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: June 2. BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER. Seeking vendors for Gardenfest & Artist Market. info@boyd communitycenter.org O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking art work for the juried exhibit Color. Entry deadline May 3. Visit greensburgartcenter. org for information. Greensburg. 724-396-6699. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prizefor-short-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to sell plants & products at the annual Garden Mart. For more info & registration, call or email c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www.pittsburgh watercolorsociety.com. VERONA CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors for marketplace in June. Space is limited. Call for more information. 412-721-0943.

M U S I C

+

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

CURRENTLY SEEKING ENTERTAINERS TO BE

KEY GIRLS 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarksof General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

WATCH THE HOCKEY PLAYOFF GAMES HERE!

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

My son is 19, but due to some physical and social disabilities, his emotional maturity level is closer to 14, though he is quite intelligent. After a lifetime of therapists, specialized education and other interventions, he is now a freshman in college far from home. His lack of social skills makes him dependent on alcohol and cigarettes to form his social life, and that plus his immaturity means he went through his money quickly. But he is still drinking and smoking and getting high. I asked him how he affords this, and he wouldn’t tell me. I asked if it was safe and legal, and he said yes. After some snooping, I learned that he is using a webcam service for chats with men who offer “tips” for sexual viewing. I suppose this is technically safe and legal, but I don’t know if he is putting himself at risk emotionally or if screenshots can be captured that can affect his future career, relationships, etc. I’m a longtime follower of yours, and hope that someday my son and I will be as close as you and your mother were. So what would Judy Savage do? WORRIED OVER REPERCUSSIONS REGARDING INCRIMINATING EMPLOYMENT DEAL

Webcamming — a.k.a. camwhoring — is widely regarded as the safest form of sex work. Webcammers aren’t in the same room with their clients, and have the ability to block creepy, rude or abusive viewers. But there are risks, WORRIED, chief among them how easily viewers can take screengrabs and record videos of a cammer’s sessions. So if your son is planning on a career as a teacher or a cop or a politician, it’s possible that pics and videos could come back to haunt him. But with so many young people out there swapping dirty pics and videos (and so many old people doing it, too), and with so many students camming their way through college (getting naked online is arguably less of a risk to someone’s future than crushing student-loan debt), a time when everyone will have a few incriminating images circulating online is quickly coming. And at that point — which will likely coincide with your son’s entry into the workforce — a few stray dirty pics, videos or GIFs won’t be the career-ending scandal that it is today. Now here’s what Judy Savage, my late mom, would’ve said if she discovered that one of her four kids was camwhoring to pay college expenses: “You’re an adult, and I can’t tell you what to do. You are going to make your own choices and your own mistakes. But you do have to listen to my concerns. You owe me that.” Hesitating to hear Mom out would result in a raised eyebrow — a move that had a paralyzing effect on me and my siblings — and then Mom asking if we would rather talk about her C-section scars instead. We always chose to hear her out. So have a conversation with your son, but first familiarize yourself with the technology and the phenomenon that is camming. The N ew York Times wrote a great story on the

risks and rewards of camming (“Intimacy on the Web, With a Crowd,” Sept. 21, 2013), and the first episode of HBO’s Real Sex reboot, Sex// Now, focuses on camming. Checking out both might help you have a more informed, less freaked conversation with your son. My fiancée and I have a lovely GGG relationship. Recently we discovered a shared fantasy of unconscious sex — basically, one of us would be unconscious while the other would do whatever they like. Both of us are interested in both roles. Our question is how we go about fulfilling this fantasy. Are there safe ways to put each other to sleep? GGG TO ZZZ

Try C-SPAN. If C-SPAN doesn’t work, try golf — playing it, watching it, reading about it. If golf doesn’t work, try Ambien. I’m a girl in my mid-20s. After listening to some of your older podcasts, I decided to hop on Craigslist to see if there were any boys that might like to buy my used undies. I posted a few ads and got tons of responses. Money has been tight, so why not? I met up with a guy and exchanged a pair for $50. I met another guy the next morning for another $50. Both guys seemed nice, but once I got home, I was paranoid about being followed. I was up most of the night and constantly looking out the windows to make sure no one was there. I think I was pretty safe. I set up a separate email account, and I met them in public in the daytime. I looked into the sites that allow you to sell goods online and mail them, but you have to pay to use all of those sites, and to set up a PO box and have a way to accept payments. (PayPal also displays some of your personal info.) So is there anything else I could do to feel a little safer? And exactly how dangerous is this?

A TIME WHEN EVERYONE WILL HAVE A FEW INCRIMINATING IMAGES CIRCULATING ONLINE IS QUICKLY COMING.

PENSIVE AND NEW TO INTENSE EXCITING SALACIOUSNESS

There are thousands of women selling their used panties online, and you never read about one being stalked or murdered by a collector, PANTIES, but the news is full of stories of women being murdered by their boyfriends and husbands. I don’t mean to downplay the risks — or play fast and loose with the math (there are tens of millions of women with boyfriends and husbands) — and most women who sell their panties online aren’t meeting customers face-to-face. But if you don’t want to go the website route, here’s how you can sell your panties in person more safely: Get a ridsesharing app on your phone and order a car after you make a sale. Having a driver drop you a mile away will cost you $5 or $10, but the peace of mind will be worth the price. Get a whole year of Savage Lovecast magnums at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Ink Well

PLAY

CONVERSE SHOES

MASSAGE

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

Sensual Massage 412-322-5140 Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

ADULT PHONE HOT LOCAL SINGLES Listen to Ads FREE! 412-920-5566 Use Code 3250, 18+

Man 2 Man

Where Local Girls Go Wild! Call 412-894-0205 Try FREE! redhotdateline.com

Massage by Lee

Advertise Here Today!

Professional and Discreet 24/7

412-628-1269

Gorgeous, Prompt, Discreet.

ACROSS

Get a Rub Now. Lite Dom/Role Play

1. Trampoline sound 6. Certain white powder, casually 10. Teammate of James and Wade 14. Put in prison 15. State with low alcohol content limits 16. Pronoun from way back 17. November 24, 1963 assassination victim 20. “Dallas” channel 21. ___ arthur mountains pizza (as-described photocollage Tumblr page) 22. Pick 23. Fix so that everything breaks your way 24. “Found ya!” 25. Pairing with vin 27. Financial crisis designation 32. Car accident evidence 33. Chevron competitor 37. Have a nasty bug, say 38. “Sweet” ancestor 41. Show flow 42. Grabs a snooze 45. One in a dependent relationship? 48. Breakfast in bed, say, that’s almost always eaten in disgust 51. Pop singer born in Barbados 54. Pop singer born in the Bronx, to fans 55. “We ___ the 99 percent!”

56. McKellen in a bromance with Patrick Stewart 57. Ammo in a harmless shooter 58. Test before a Ph.D. program 61. Mated for specific traits 65. ___ one (beer) 66. Site with tech reviews 67. Miscalculated 68. Half of the first couple 69. Popular jams 70. Goofily conspicuous

DOWN

1. Smack hard, as a baseball 2. A black cat carrying a mirror under a ladder, say 3. “Sure seems like it” 4. Expression of disinterest 5. “Don’t let that male thief get away!” 6. Russian republic known for “throat singing” 7. Absorbed, as a cost 8. Axe 9. Deepak with a holistic approach to being very rich 10. “Oh, forgot 2 mention ...” 11. Butler’s bride 12. MLB commissioner Bud 13. Waffle 18. “Star Wars” president 19. Unemotional

N E W S

+

24. About to get a Ph.D., definitely, if not this year then sometime in the next five 26. 1051, to Romans in 1051 27. Old autocrat 28. Merle Haggard or Woody Guthrie 29. Some are essential 30. Three, to Romans in 2014 31. Congolese beast that looks like a zebra 34. The Dude, Walter, and Donny, e.g., at least as a bowling team 35. Mouser of Madrid 36. Times piece 39. Ink, as it were 40. Cold sore relief option 43. Lil Wayne’s “___ Carter V”

TA S T E

44. Available for a hearing? 46. Soothed 47. Site of the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash: Abbr. 49. Yoink 50. Pressed Italian sandwich 51. Believer decked out in green, yellow, and red, often 52. “According to this article ...” 53. Very, slangily 57. Cats and dogs, e.g. 58. Angry puppy’s sound 59. Be foul 60. It’s totally out of the mainstream 62. Light lumber source 63. One finished with service 64. Fratty sort

412-277-1589

Steel City Escorts out call only 24/7 All major CC

Outcall Only 24/ 7

412-771-2473

412-306-1773

FREE PARTYLINE! 712432-7968 18+ Normal LD Applies

TS Layla

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL Women! Call 412-566-1861 Try FREE! livelinks.com

visiting

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper! Meet Hot Black Singles Now Call FREE! 412-235-6296 vibeline.com WHERE SINGLES MEET. Browse & Reply FREE! 412-920-5566 Code 3249 Curious? 412-9379999, 18+

TINA

Magic Touch & Such

TS

Find a new place to “WORK” in City Paper!

www.adorableplaymates.com

Sugar ... and Everything Nice 412-805-2557

MEET GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 412937-9999 Use FREE Code 2653, 18+

ADULT PHONE

24-23 36d

760-580-3496 actual photo

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

412.316.3342

All major cc’s acct’d.

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. +

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.23-04.30

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You remind me of a garden plot that has recently been plowed and rained on. Now the sun is out. The air is warm. Your dirt is wet and fertile. The feeling is a bit unsettled because the stuff that was below ground got churned up to the top. Instead of a flat surface, you’ve got furrows. But the overall mood is expectant. Blithe magic is in the air. Soon it will be time to grow new life. Oh, but just one thing is missing: The seeds have yet to be sown. That’s going to happen very soon. Right?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s an excerpt from “Celestial Music,” a poem by Louise Gluck: “I’m like the child who buries / her head in the pillow / so as not to see, the child who tells herself / that light causes sadness.” One of your main assignments in the coming weeks, Gemini, is not to be like that child. It’s true that gazing at what the light reveals may shatter an illusion or two, but the illumination you will be blessed with will ultimately be more valuable than gold.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Would you like to forge new alliances and expand your web of connections and get more of the support you need to fulfill your dreams? You are entering the Season of Networking, so now would indeed be an excellent time to gather clues on how best to accomplish all that good stuff. To get you started in your quest, here’s advice from Dale Carnegie: “You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Does Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt run faster than any person alive? As far as we know, yes. He holds three world records and has won six Olympic gold medals. Even when he’s a bit off his game, he’s the best. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, he set the all-time mark for the 100-meter race — 9.69 seconds — despite the fact that one of his shoelaces was untied and he slowed down to celebrate before reaching the finish line. Like you, Bolt is a Leo. I’m making him both your role model and your anti-role model for the foreseeable future. You have the power to achieve something approaching his levels of excellence in your own field — especially if you double-check to make sure your shoelace is never untied and especially if you don’t celebrate victory before it’s won.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

In his unpublished book The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, John Koenig coins new words that convey experiences our language has not previously accounted for. One that may apply to you sometime soon is “trumspringa,” which he defines as

get your yoga on!

“the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin.” To be overtaken by trumspringa doesn’t necessarily mean you will literally run away and be a shepherd. In fact, giving yourself the luxury of considering such wild possibilities may be a healing release that allows you to be at peace with the life you are actually living.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The supreme pleasure we can know, Freud said, and the model for all pleasure, orgasmic pleasure, comes when an excess tension built up, confined, compacted, is abruptly released.” That’s an observation by philosopher Alphonso Lingis. I bring it to your attention, Libra, because I expect that you will soon be able to harvest a psychospiritual version of that supreme pleasure. You have been gathering and storing up raw materials for soulmaking, and now the time has come to express them with a creative splash. Are you ready to purge your emotional backlog? Are you brave enough to go in search of cathartic epiphanies? What has been dark will yield light.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The potential turning points that will possibly erupt in the coming days will not become actual turning points unless you work hard to activate them. They will be subtle and brief, so you will have to be very alert to notice them at all, and you will have to move quickly before they fade away. Here’s another complication: These incipient turning points probably won’t resemble any turning points you’ve seen before. They may come in the form of a lucky accident, a blessed mistake, a happy breakdown, a strange healing, a wicked gift or a perfect weakness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you happen to be an athlete, the coming week will not be a good time to head-butt a referee or take performance-enhancing drugs. If you hate to drive your car anywhere but in the fast lane, you will be wise to try the slower lanes for a while. If you are habitually inclined to skip steps, take short cuts and look for loopholes, I advise you to instead try being thorough, methodical and bythe-book. Catch my drift? In this phase of your astrological cycle, you will have a better chance at producing successful results if you are more prudent than usual. What?! A careful, discreet, strategic, judicious Sagittarius? Sure! Why not?

message you can send to the universe is to fly a pair of underpants from the top of a flagpole. You heard me. Take down the flag that’s up there, and run the skivvies right up to the top. Whose underpants should you use? Those belonging to someone you adore, of course. And what is the deeper meaning behind this apparently irrational act? What exactly is life asking from you? Just this: Stop making so much sense all the time — especially when it comes to cultivating your love and expressing your passion.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You need to take some time out to explore the deeper mysteries of snuggling, cuddling and nuzzling. In my opinion, that is your sacred duty. It’s your raison d’être, your ne plus ultra, your sine qua non. You’ve got to nurture your somatic wisdom with what we in the consciousness industry refer to as yummy warm fuzzy wonder love. At the very least, you should engage in some prolonged hugging with a creature you feel close to. Tender physical touch isn’t just a luxury; it’s a necessity.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your body contains about four octillion atoms. That’s four with 27 zeroes after it. Believe it or not, 200 billion of that total were once inside the body of Martin Luther King Jr. For that matter, an average of 200 billion atoms of everyone who has ever lived and died is part of you. I am not making this up. (See the mathematical analysis here: http://tinyurl.com/AtomsFromEveryone.) As far as your immediate future is concerned, Pisces, I’m particularly interested in that legacy from King. If any of his skills as a great communicator are alive within you, you will be smart to call on them. Now is a time for you to express high-minded truths in ways that heal schisms, bridge gaps and promote unity. Just proceed on the assumption that it is your job to express the truth with extra clarity, candor and grace.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

If for some inexplicable reason you are not simmering with new ideas about how you could drum up more money, I don’t know what to tell you — except that maybe your mother lied to you about exactly when you were born. The astrological omens are virtually unequivocal: If you are a true Aries, you are now being invited, teased and even tugged to increase your cash flow and bolster your financial know-how. If you can’t ferret out at least one opportunity to get richer quicker, you might really be a Pisces or Taurus. And my name is Jay Z.

My interpretation of this week’s astrological data might sound eccentric, even weird. But you know what? Sometimes life is — or at least should be — downright unpredictable. After much meditation, I’ve concluded that the most important

Some people ask, “What would Jesus do?” Others prefer, “What would Buddha do?” Who’s your ultimate authority? Testify at FreeWill Astrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 57 + STUDIES 57 + LIVE 57 + WELLNESS 60 + SERVICES 62

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Africa, Brazil Work/ Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter. org (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Network Radio Company Seeking PT Sports Anchor Broadcasting Experience Pro and College Sports Knowledge Required Send Demo, Resume and Contact Info to: tmiller@sbnol.com

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Your ad could be here

HELP WANTED

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

412.316.3342

STUDIES

LIVE

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

UTERINE FIBROIDS?

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Apply in person weekdays 2-4. 123 Shiloh St Mt Washington

5747 Ellsworth Ave, Shadyside

Great wages + benefits + discounts

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

Harris and Shiloh Grills seek quality applicants for all FOH and BOH positions.

ABC SELF STORAGE

Now Seeking Professional Drivers in your area!

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES $1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014

Company Drivers:

Owner-Operators:

• Competitive pay • Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans • Paid vacations & holidays • 401K with company match • Paid training on safe driving & product handling • Well-maintained equipment • Driver referral incentive pay • And so much more!

• Competitive pay • Health Insurance Plans Available • Paid Orientation and Training • Paid Weekly • Driver referral incentive pay *Some Restrictions Apply • And so much more!

We require Class A or B CDL, 1-2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record.

800-871-4581 TheKAG.com

www.publicallies.org/apply

Kenan Advantage Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

57

We are NOW HIRING at a location near you! • School Bus Drivers • Van Drivers and Monitors Transporting students in Allegheny, Butler, Westmoreland, and Armstrong Counties.

goodwillswpa.org

• Two Pittsburgh locations • Competitive Wages • Free CDL training • Family driven since 1945 • Come be a part of our family

www.wlroenigk.com

www.wlroenigk.com Please visit our web site. The application process is easy. First, review our list of qualifications. Then simply fill out an application and bring it to any of our locations.

Lincoln Heritage

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

tmilesgroup.com www.riverscasino.com

THE MILES GROUP Now Hiring Agents & Managers!! Make $500 A WEEK to start. Come work for the #1 agency within the #1 Final Expense Co. in the Nation! The Miles Group is a Million Dollar A Month Agency. We will help you get your insurance license, will train. You can write your own paycheck. First Year Agents make over $100k!

CountryMeadows.com/ careers

www.alleghenycounty. us/parks

www.TheKAG.com

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

Here are just a few reasons why you should join the Lincoln Heritage sales team: • • • • • • •

Get paid Daily $$ Proven lead system 98% of clients approved 1 Page application Exotic Incentive trips Extraordinary home office support Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family

6 & 7 Figure Income Earners

Our $25K Cash Give-A-Way

Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance has an A.M. Best Rating of A (excellent) and a BBB Rating of A+, specializing in Final Expense Insurance. Call Now: Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

1yr Agent with his new Jaguar

LIFEGUARDS (AGE 16 & OVER) Needed during the 2014 Swimming Season at Allegheny County facilities in Boyce, North, South, and Settler’s Cabin Parks. Interested applicants are required to complete an Aquatics Examination given on Saturday May 3, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. At the NORTH ALLEGHENY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, 10375 PERRY HIGHWAY, WEXFORD, PA. 15090 SALARY STRUCTURE: • Junior Lifeguards: $8.25 • First Year Lifeguards: $9.25 • Senior Lifeguards (2 or more seasons) $9.50 Candidates must have physical examination PRIOR to participation in Aquatics Exam on May 3, 2014. No test given without doctor’s certification on physical examination form. CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT FOLLOWING AT TEST SITES: • Complete physical examination form. • Completed Employment Application from Lifeguard Packet. • Minimum of four references on back of application.

“When you love what you do, everything is better.” Life advice from Brandi L. - co-worker since 2006

At Country Meadows, our customers make each day better for us, just as we make it better for them. We’ve been ranked as one of the Best Places to Work, and we focus on a culture of respect. At Country Meadows, life gets better…for everyone.

PRIOR TO MAY 26, 2014 ALL CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT: • Current Lifeguard Training certification • Current First Aid certification • Current Adult, Child and Infant CPR certification

Current Openings: Personal Care Associate Home Care Associate Housekeeping Associate Certified Nursing Assistant

Excellent Benefits! Apply online or call 412-257-7910

** Not On Busline**

Contact the Central Park Office at 412-350-2478 to obtain forms and additional information.Forms and driving directions may also be obtained from the Parks Department Home Page @ www.alleghenycounty.us/parks

OPENING DATE FOR 2014 SWIMMING SEASON:

May 31, 2014

CountryMeadows.com/careers CountryMeadowsAtHome.com/careers

(Weather & Conditions Permitting)

EOE N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

59

WELLNESS MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results! Advertise Here Today!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Xie LiHong’s

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

412-401-4110

Chinese Bodyworks

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Learn do Aiki Beginner’s classes T, Th 7-8 pm (16 yrs or older) For more information go to

www.alleghenyaikido.com

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Open 24 hours 7 days a week

Forever Relaxation

massage

Chinese Bodywork

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

Therapy

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

TIGER SPA

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 $49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

Pittsburgh Office Now Open!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

4424 Penn Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15224

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Monessen Office Now Open!

1295 Grand Boulevard Monessen, PA 15062

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

Please Call: 724-684-4890

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Let Us Help You Today!

www.newleafsuboxone.com

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

+

M U S I C

+

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

+

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

Recovery Without Judgement™

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

C L A S S I F I E D S

61

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

SUBOXONE/ZUBSOLV OPIATE ADDICTION LF SEAY P

PRIORITY OR RITY HEALTHCARE LTHCARE 412-681-1406

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

AUTO SERVICES

ADOPTION

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Rent -A- Bay

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

SERVICES

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

412-403-6069

ADOPTION Art Classes to Zoo Trips, Everything in between, 1st baby will be our King/Queen

CLASSES EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool. com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

1-800-966-3065 Expenses Paid

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MUSICAL INSTRUCTOR EXPERT HARMONICA LESSONS www.clinthoover.com 612-721-6579 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

FOR SALE

GRASS FED BEEF LOCALLY RAISED

ORGANIC CUSTOM ORDER PITTSBURGER HIGHLAND FARM

412-585-2227 PITTSBURGHERHIGHLANDFARM.COM

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on April 29, 2014 for Arsenal and May 6, 2014 for Various Schools until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Pittsburgh Arsenal Toilet Room Renovations and Miscellaneous Work General, Asbestos, Plumbing, HVAC and Electrical Primes • Various Schools Extraordinary Electrical Repairs Electrical Prime • Various Schools Integrated Access Control, Intrusion Detection and CCTV Repairs Electrical Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on April 14, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.23/04.30.2014

rethink home

1 and 2 bedroom upscale urban rentals

BakeryLiving

Coming Soon at Bakery Square - Pre-leasing now

412-683-3810 â&#x20AC;˘ BAKERYLIVING.COM THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

63

OVER

CASH & FREE SLOT PLAY

DRIVE TO THE DERBY

OVER $20K DRAWINGS

EVERY HOUR 2PM - 8PM

VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB OR RIVERSCASINO.COM FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.

Ford Mustang速 GT is a registered trademark of Ford Motor Company.

GIVEN AWAY EACH SATURDAY IN APRIL! GRAND FINALE

SATURDAY, MAY 3 | 8PM

WIN A 2014 FORD MUSTANG速 GT!

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


April 23, 2014