Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 04.16/04.23.2014

FOR THE RECORD: HIGHLIGHTS OF RECORD STORE DAY SPECIAL OFFERS AROUND TOWN 30


EVENTS 5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.16 – 5-10pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

5.30 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

Youth Invasion 2014 5.9 – 5-10pm Tickets $5 students & adults/Members Free | Warhol entrance space

Teens take over The Warhol! This multi-faceted project features teen’s unique take on Andy Warhol, with their points of view, ideas, and creative expressions infusing the energizing the entire museum – its programming, interpretation, and display. Highlights of the program include a fashion show, performances by local teen bands, dance party, and more. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


CELEBRATING:

ESTATE PLANNING & TRUST LAW

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Pittsburgh’S Finest 2014

We present 100 Pittsburgh professionals who demonstrate excellence in the fields of law, healthcare, education, technology, social services & business for 2014.

NURSING HOME ABUSE & NEGLECT ROBERT PEIRCE & ASSOCIATES knows that when you place a loved one in the care of a nursing home, you expect their needs to be met. Although state and federal regulations have been established to protect the elderly in these settings, violations occur every day. The nursing home group at Robert Peirce & Associates is headed by Bob Daley and includes six full time attorneys and staff. Together they represent injured nursing home residents and families in cases involving bed sores, falls, wandering & elopement, assault, malnutrition and dehydration, as well as other incidents that lead to serious injury or death. 707 Grant St, #2500 In and out of the courtroom, their attorneys are leading the charge to create an Pittsburgh environment where substandard care will not be tolerated. They have successful(412)281-7229 ly resolved cases on behalf of hundreds of victims of abuse and neglect over the past 10 years. If you believe that a loved one may be the victim of nursing home neglect or abuse, you should take action quickly and contact them to set up a free consultation. Visit: www.peircelaw.com

A HIGHER STANDARD IN-HOME CARE BRIGHTSTAR CARE is owned by Uday & Jana Roy, RN, who’s goal is to provide quality home care, caregivers & medical staffing solutions to families and businesses in Allegheny County. Their comprehensive services include in-home blood draws & injections, medication reminders, wound care, Alzheimer’s & dementia care, light housekeeping/meal prep, 24-hour high tech care for adults, children & infants, bath visits, CNA/caregivers, respite care, shopping 300 Mt. Lebanon Blvd & transportation, newborn/multiples care, sitting/companion service, live-in #210A, Pittsburgh arrangements, nanny service and much, much more. (412)561-5605 BrightStar is available to you 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week. They provide a way for people to remain in their homes, including those with dementia & paralysis, or those who simply need help with bathing, eating or doing their laundry. Staff may spend as little as one hour a day with a client or provide live-in services for clients with dementia. Embraced by the local community more than 20 years ago arriving from India, Uday & Jana give back daily through their free “clinic in the lobby” programs at numerous senior housing centers throughout the region. Visit: www.brightstarcare.com/pittsburgh

RESULTS-DRIVEN COACHING What is Executive Presence? Hard to describe; you know it when you see it. It’s almost a feeling. Leadership is being able to have a powerful presence and communicate effectively to achieve results. It’s the same if you’re a professional person who wants to grow your business when you are the business. How can you bring yourself forth in a way that sparks and inspires someone else’s commitment? Often, the key to producing results is who you are, what you do, and how you communicate with others and with yourself. What do you really want? More focus? More time? More money? More balance? PO Box 15893 More satisfaction and fulfillment? For more than 25 years, David Goldman at THE Pittsburgh GOLDMAN ORGANIZATION has coached hundreds of business owners, (412)377-6200 executives, professionals, and sales people to achieve outrageous results. A division head became the President. A company treasurer became the CFO. Sales people have experienced 50% to 257% growth in one year. Sound good to you? Contact David and at least have a conversation. What do you have to lose? Visit: www.goldmanorg.com

A UNIQUE, SPECIALIZED APPROACH TO RECOVERY Lawrence E. Balbach, MSCP, NCC, LPC of BASIC STEPS COUNSELING SERVICES is an experienced psychotherapist who offers individual adult, families & couples counseling – tailored to his client’s unique needs. A Pittsburgh native, Larry grew up in an addictive family and, at the age of eleven, began his own journey into the depths of addiction. After Larry began his recovery, he obtained a Master’s Degree in Counseling Psychology and became a Licensed Professional Counselor. Larry’s clients learn to master their life by developing an in-depth understanding of who they are, what they have to offer, knowing how others perceive them and developing the confidence to take consistent action. Larry’s motto: “The journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step.” Visit: www.basicstepscounseling.com

9200 Perry Hwy Pittsburgh (412)366-6140

HEARTLAND HOSPICE - ENRICHING LIFE

750 Holiday Dr, #110 Pittsburgh (412)928-2126

HEARTLAND HOME HEALTH CARE & HOSPICE seeks to comfort people who have been diagnosed with a life-threatening illness and also to help their families. Their team of professionals & trained volunteers consist of a hospice medical director, doctors, nurses, social workers, therapists, home health aides, counselors, clergy and the patient’s physicians. They all work together to relieve the physical, emotional & spiritual pain of the patient and family. Administrator Laura Wright, RN emphasizes that her hospice program is designed to meet the needs of patients with life-threatening illness and to help their families cope with the problems and feelings related to this difficult time. Medicare, Medicaid & CHAP (Community Health Accreditation Program) Certified. Offices in Irwin & Cranberry. Visit: www.heartlandhospice.com

Shop Local and Support Small Businesses in Pittsburgh!

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

//

Partner Kenneth E. Lewis & his staff at FOX ROTHSCHILD, LLP are dedicated to providing estate planning services to individual clients and the businesses in which they are involved. Prompt delivery of work product is their priority, as is responsiveness to client concerns & inquiries. Ken has significant experience in the areas of estate and trust law, advising fiduciaries & beneficiaries in various aspects of estate and trust administration, Orphans’ Court litigation and estate planning. Ken & his staff provide services in the routine to the very complex, such as 625 Liberty Ave drafting wills, powers of attorney, transfers of wealth, asset protection, trusts, 29th Fl, Pittsburgh drafting trusts for estate tax planning, education funding, advice on appropriate (412)391-1334 form of business entity (corporation, partnership or limited liability companies or partnerships), drafting life insurance & long-term trusts, charitable contributions, family business transfers and executive estate planning. He & his staff are also involved in numerous aspects of estate & trust administration. Ken is the past chairperson of the Allegheny County Bar Association, Probate and Trust Law Section. Visit: www.foxrothschild.com

HOME CARE & STAFFING SUNRISE AGENCY HOMECARE & STAFFING has built their reputation by having highly-qualified RNs, LPNs, live-ins, home health aides & homemakers available on short notice, seven days-a-week for accident injury recovery, Alzheimer’s, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), cardiovascular problems, well mom/well baby nursing visits, dialysis, joint replacement, neurological disorders, post surgical recovery, sports injury treatment and stroke rehabilitation. Providing peace of mind for more than 6 years, President /CEO Lisa Fulbright 100 Lavern St & her staff coordinate all aspects of the delivery of professional health care. They Pittsburgh painstakingly check & verify references, licenses, credentials & perform criminal (412)616-4446 background checks. All medical/non-medical staff are insured with malpractice, Workers’ Comp, liability & are bonded. Where your loved ones are concerned, the only choice you have is to look to one of the leaders in the home health care field. Sunrise Agency is the right choice for home health care services. Visit: www.sunriseagency.net

QUALITY IN-HOME CARE MORIARTY CONSULTANTS, INC. is a community-based service that provides an important non-medical resource to help families and caregivers. Their service is an affordable solution for families, older individuals, couples or disabled adults capable of managing their physical needs but who require non-medical assistance. Moriarty Consultants assists with personal care (dressing, bathing, grooming & incontinence care), medication reminders, light housekeeping, laundry, cooking & meal preparation, shopping & errands, incidental transportation, escorting to various events and friendly companionship. Their sister company - Moriarty 3904 Perrysville Ave Certified - provides a full team of nurses available for in-home skilled nursing Pittsburgh services, adding to their effectiveness as a comprehensive in-home provider. (412)732-9584 Moriarty Consultants’ services can be arranged for as little as three hours, or as (866)303-1156 many as 24 hours-a-day. Care is available seven days-a-week, including holidays. One-on-one services are performed by caregivers who are screened, trained, bonded, insured & VA approved. Headquarters in Pittsburgh with eight locations nationally. Visit: www.moriartyconsultants.com

PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO REAL PROBLEMS Day-to-day pressure on people has increased tremendously with recent world events. The continued demands placed on us cause excessive stress on individuals and families, creating problems too overwhelming with which to cope. PAULA J. MORECI, MSW, LCSW offers assistance in many aspects of lifestyle management. She is a psychoanalyst, psychotherapist & consultant. The majority of her practice is undergraduate & graduate students; however, she also works with adolescents & adults in mid and later adulthood. Prior to beginning her private practice full time, Paula was a psychotherapist & clinical coordinator at 161 North Dithridge St a local Carnegie Mellon University Counseling Center for 12 years. She mostly works with individuals who need long-term intensive psychotherapy or psychoPittsburgh analysis. She also works with couples and provides consultations with parents. (412)621-4843 Most of her clients have difficulties in relationships, anxiety/stress, depression & bi-polar disorders, eating disorders, sexual identity/orientation issues. Since June of 2013, Paula has been a Faculty member at the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center as well as being on the Board of Directors, Analyst Member. Visit: www.paulamoreci.com

CERTIFIED EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP COACH Janice Manzi Sabatine, PhD, at AVANTI STRATEGIES, LLC is a certified Executive Coach and educator who helps scientific & healthcare professionals become stronger, more effective leaders. Avanti Strategies uses an evidencebased coaching approach to help clients make positive changes in their behavior that accelerate their career development and advancement. With a PhD in biochemistry and more than 30 years’ experience in biomedical research, Dr. Janice Sabatine is uniquely positioned to help her clients. Recognizing the need among her technically trained peers for stronger leadership and interpersonal skills, she is determined to provide this support to women in science and medicine. 313 Kerry Court Dr. Sabatine believes these professionals deserve the same support that Cranberry Township corporate executives have enjoyed for years—executive coaching. She coaches (412)585-1187 her clients to leverage their strengths to improve performance with a special emphasis on balancing the demands of administration while maintaining active research programs. She offers individual and group coaching and workshops designed to enhance coaching skills for leaders. Dr. Sabatine is passionate about helping to close the gender gap in executive leadership in science and medicine. Visit: www.avantistrategies.com

View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/041614


{EDITORIAL}

04.16/04.23.2014 {COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY BOGEL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 16

[NEWS]

sales, they have a tougher sell to the foundations.” — City Controller Michael Lamb on the effect council control will have on securing land-bank funding

[VIEWS]

who’ll separate their recyclables 14 “People won’t necessarily take to the streets for a carbon tax. … But they definitely won’t … if they don’t hear about it.” — Bill O’Driscoll on the importance of communicating environmental challenges

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE]

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

“Last week, I checked a Japanese hot pepper out of the library.” — Al Hoff on the Seed Library at the Carnegie Library, in Oakland

[MUSIC]

OK, so, the squeaking sound: 26 “Um, It’s a toy train.” — London singer

{ADMINISTRATION}

and producer Lyla Foy on using some unconventional instruments

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

Gareth Evans’ penchant for 38 “Tapping shooting action in teeny-tiny spaces, the

first brawl takes place in a toilet cubicle.” — Al Hoff on the martial-arts actioner The Raid 2

[ARTS]

41

{ART}

{ADVERTISING}

that they’ve amended the bill to 12 “Now allow council to have final say over the

20

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

“This show has some real successes in demonstrating that lesser-known works can be as provocative as their more iconic partners.” — Charles Rosenblum on An American Odyssey at the Frick

[LAST PAGE]

extend a city up into space 63 “Skyscrapers … but the ghost signs in their shadows extend it back in time.” — Chris Potter on Pittsburgh’s “ghost sign” phenomenon

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 57 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 N E W S

+

REAL FLAVOR. REAL FRESH.

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

The Carvery takes you to delicious new heights. This endless dining experience offers a full menu of comforting, mouthwatering favorites. It begins with an abundance of soup, salad, and antipasti. Then, visit our carver and choose from the finest slow-roasted rotisserie meats. Finally, you’ll complete your feast at the tastiest dessert station in town. The Carvery – it’s a culinary adventure like no other.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

E X I T 41 O F F I -7 9 • M E A D O W S G A M I N G . C O M GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL (800) 848-1880 +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


“THEY SHOULD ACCEPT THE BID THAT WANTS TO KEEP ITS MISSION INTACT.”

INCOMING RE: Neighborhood Watched: Residents say negative picture of Homewood painted at Miles’ trial is a ‘shame’ (April 11) “It’s awesome that everyone tries to paint this picture of this neighborhood like it’s a day walk through Schenely Park, but I’m sorry, it just isn’t. It’s dangerous and no one feels safe. People don’t like being there or driving through there for a reason. And investment? How about we start with neighborhoods that actually need it, and will appreciate it. The reason investors pulled out of Homewood was because it’s worthless to waste money on a community that won’t actually appreciate it.” — Web comment from “Johnathan” “Johnathan, Have you ever even been in Homewood? It’s not a terrible place at all. It has more history than many communities in Pittsburgh and [has] more potential than most communities in Pittsburgh! The Media is ruining that image and the police play right along with it. Most residents in Homewood love Homewood and want to see nothing but positive created here! I was born and raised in Homewood and have returned to it!” — Web comment from “Garvey”

“16.5 km bike ride (what’s with the strip district bike path?) 100 reps x 100 pounds bench 100 x 100 lat pull down, shoulder routine” – April 13 tweet from actor Russell Crowe (@russellcrowe) in Pittsburgh filming Fathers and Daughters

“My sister lives in Pittsburgh and it’s 75 degrees ... I live in Texas and it’s 46 degrees ... What’s wrong here?!” — April 14 tweet from “Michaela Morgan” (@michaelanicolem)

6

GAINING OPTIONS {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Pittsburgh Foundation has made a bid to take over the financially distressed August Wilson Center.

S

UPPORTERS OF the August Wilson

Center for African American Culture breathed a sigh of relief last week when the Pittsburgh Foundation announced it had joined with other local foundations in a bid to purchase the ailing institution. Most importantly for advocates, the foundations say they plan to maintain the center’s original mission: preserving and celebrating local black culture. “When I heard the foundations were coming together to make a bid, I was thrilled,” says Tim Stevens, chairman of the Black Political Empowerment Project. “We specifically pushed for that.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

“The foundation consortium’s primary objective is to explore opportunities to save the August Wilson Center in the

Several bidders show interest in August Wilson Center, but only one reveals identity, plans {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} hope that it may re-open and remain operating for the long term, fulfilling its essential role as the community’s hub for

African-American arts and culture,” said John Ellis, Pittsburgh Foundation spokesperson, in a statement. While the announcement is good news for those who want to see the August Wilson Center continue its focus on African-American culture, nothing is certain. The foundation wasn’t the only bidder for the center, and so far, neither the number nor identities of the other bidders has been released by Judith Fitzgerald, the court-appointed conservator charged with resolving the center’s debt. Also not known is what other bidders might do with the center. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


THE 12th ANNUAL

PITTSBURGH W I N E F E S T I VA L KICKS OFF at HEINZ FIELD THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 VIP tasting $250

GRAND tasting $125

PURCHASE TICKETS AND GET INFORMATION AT PITTSBURGHWINEFESTIVAL.COM

PRESEN T ED BY

SPONSORS

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


GAINING OPTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

Join us for

E AST E R SUNDAY BUFFET

APRIL 20 | 10:30AM - 8:00PM $24.99 + tax Carved Prime Rib, Turkey, Honey Baked Ham, Roast Leg of Lamb, Glazed Yams, Sausage Gravy, Asparagus, Crab Benedicts, Quiche Lorraine, Stuffed French Toast, Blueberry Orange Ricotta Pancakes, Smothered Pork Chop, Steamed Crab Legs, Roasted Mussels, Crab and Spinach Fritatta & MORE No reservations necessary.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

“I appreciate the interest of the press and public in the status of affairs at the August Wilson Center,” Fitzgerald said in a statement. “I am not ready to issue a formal announcement as my team and I are still actively working on a variety of possible solutions. When we have something final to report, I will let you know. I anticipate making an announcement in the near future.” Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge Lawrence O’Toole will have to approve any final settlement. Right now, even Dollar Bank, which holds the mortgage on the property and initiated foreclosure proceedings last September, is in the dark about who else has bid on the center. “We communicate with the receiver and receive some information [but] I have not seen [the bids],” says Dollar Bank attorney Eric Schaffer. “I’ve heard about them, but I don’t think I know any more than [what] the receiver has announced.”

Some observers are expressing concern about the lack of transparency, The center is burdened with nearly $ 10 million in debt, $ 7 million of which belongs to Dollar Bank. Fitzgerald declined an earlier foundation-led bid, offering $ 4 million for the center, because it didn’t cover the amount owed. Some worry that this bid, too, could be turned down if it doesn’t pay off the center’s obligations — and that other, competing bids might not aim to keep the center’s mission intact. “I’m hoping the conservator and Dollar Bank will do everything they can to make that bid work,” Stevens says. “Obviously Dollar Bank contributed greatly and needs to get their money back, but there is a greater calling here. The August Wilson Center was designed as the hub of African-American culture in our city and it is vital for it to remain so.” Fitzgerald has repeatedly stated her preference to sell the center to an entity that would keep its mission intact. However, if a bid does not meet the debt owed to Dollar Bank, as previously reported by City Paper, the bank can counter-bid the $7 million owed to them, says Schaffer, and potentially claim the building. To place a bid, interested parties were required to sign a confidentiality agreement, in order to keep details of the center’s finances under wraps. But these kinds of confidentiality agreements are customary in the bidding process. “There are restrictive covenants involved,” says Kimberly Ellis, niece of the center’s namesake (and no relation to the Pittsburgh Foundation spokesman). “I think the process should be more transparent, but if someone wanted to express interest, they had to sign a confidentiality agreement.” Ellis has also cited the fees paid to Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald and her staff charge $ 350 an hour and claim to work 12-to16-hour days; the charges have reached $ 150,000 as of February, according to court documents. “The lack of transparency, her fees, are troubling,” says Ellis, who has raised questions about how Fitzgerald is benefitting financially from the sale. “The story’s not over yet.” Ellis wasn’t the only one expressing concerns. Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who represents the public’s

“THE AUGUST WILSON CENTER WAS DESIGNED AS THE HUB OF AFRICANAMERICAN CULTURE IN OUR CITY AND IT IS VITAL FOR IT TO REMAIN SO.”

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


$24.99

+ tax

FRIDAYS IN APRIL 3PM - 10PM ENJOY: Fresh Fish, Fried Shrimp, Mussels, Clams, Crab Legs, Seafood Chowder, Stew & MORE

O F F

UPMC Eye Center Optical Shops LOCATIONS Oakland-Forbes Ave. 412-647-PITT(7488) Oakland-UPMC Presbyterian 412-647-2145 Uptown-UPMC Mercy 412-232-8520 UPMC McKeesport 412-673-8444 UPMC Children’s Pine Center 724-940-6160

UPMC.com/EyeCenter

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

Excludes Maui Jim and Oakley brands. Applies to prescription or non-prescription glasses and sunglasses.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


GAINING OPTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

interest in the center’s sale, objected to a $ 50,000 bill submitted by Fitzgerald in February. In a court document filed Feb. 18, Kane wrote, “The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by its Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, in her capacity as parens patriae, respectfully requests that this Honorable Court not grant at this time, the Conservator for the August Wilson Center for African American Culture First Allowance and Payment o f C o n s e r va t o r s F e e s and Expenses ….” According to that document filed by Kane, portions of Fitzgerald’s bill were redacted. In order to resolve the matter, Fitzgerald agreed to let the court review the original bill, but did not allow the original to be entered into court documents, where it would be available for public view. “The redactions that are in the Receiver’s detailed fee entries were made for the sole purpose of protecting the attorney-client privilege, or other confidential information that is subject to confidential and non-disclosure agreements, such as the name of parties interested in purchasing the August Wilson Center facility,” Fitzgerald said in her response to the objection.

Wish you were here!

s g n i s y t l i H n a g e M Ol’ Blue Eyes

In the meantime, many are relieved to know there is at least one option on the table to keep the center’s mission. “That sounds great to me,” says Paradise Gray, who hosted a Feb. 8 townhall meeting and March 7 rally to save the center, along with his wife, Renee Gray, another August Wilson relative. “From what I’ve heard about it, [their bid] sounds satisfactory to me. That’s what I want — that the center continues to serve as an African-American cultural center.” Gray hopes the public and local politicians can put some pressure on the conservator and Dollar Bank to ensure they accept the foundations’ bid. “They are supposed to be working for the good of the center, and if that’s what they’re working for, they should accept the bid that wants to keep its mission intact,” Gray says. “I would love to know more about who the other bidders were. I’d also like it if more local politicians would get behind maintaining the August Wilson Center for the reason it was created.” Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald has said he and Mayor Bill Peduto are working on ways to save the center, but neither has come forward with a plan to date.

“I THINK THE PROCESS SHOULD BE MORE TRANSPARENT.”

JUNE 19-22

RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

y: luc k be a lad sinatr a and more megan hilty sings

The new princess of Broadway, Megan Hilty, joins acclaimed conductor Steven Reineke to pay homage to the tunes of Frank Sinatra, including “The Lady Is a Tramp,” “Moon River” and “I’ve Got You Under My Skin.” FOR TICKETS: CALL

THU, JUN. 19 FRI, JUN. 20 SAT, JUN. 21 SUN, JUN. 22

412.392.4900 OR VISIT pittsburghsymphony.org TITLE SPONSOR

10

7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 2:30 PM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

IDIOTBOX


Whirlpool® Ice Collection

$2,899 “Pure Approachability. Easy Interaction. Better Visibility. Rich Finishes” WMH53520CE 2.0 cu. ft. Microwave Hood Combination with CleanRelease® Non-Stick Interior WFE540H0AE Whirlpool® 6.2 cu. ft. Capacity Electric Range with AquaLift® Self-Clean Technology WDT710PAYE Whirlpool Gold® Series Dishwasher with Sensor Cycle WRS526SIAE 26 cu. ft. Whirlpool® Side-by-Side Refrigerator with In-Door-Ice® Plus System

H WHERE PITTSBUIARNGCES! SHOPS FOR APPL 2335 2 335 33 W Washington ashing ngton to R Rd. d. Canonsburg, PA 15317 (724) 916-0100

11759 75 759 N N.. High Highland hlan land R Rd. d.. d Pittsburgh, PA 15241 (412) 835-2300

5958 5 958 8 Baum B B Bl Blvd. vd.. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 661-7550

www.donsappliances.com

W NOPEN O

enter

Don’s Experience C

n! ing Soon in Robinso

Open

SKY ZONE INDOOR TRAMPOLINE PARK

ALL AGES “ACTIVE FUN” FAMILY CENTER LEETSDALE/SEWICKLEY 740 BRICKWORKS DRIVE, LEETSDALE, PA Follow us!

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

ULTIMATE 3D PLAY EXPERIENCE

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE! SKYZONE.COM/LEETSDALE

+

www.hillmonappliance.com

PITTSBURGH’S TRAMPOLINE PARK!

CALL 724-251-6100 AND BOOK YOUR SPECIAL EVENT TODAY! N E W S

780 Co Commerce Park k Dri D Drive ve Cranberry Twp, PA 16066 (724) 779-9393

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Monday- Closed Tuesday- Thursday: 4:00pm - 8:00pm Friday: Toddler Time (Ages walking to 5)- 2:00pm - 3:00pm, Open Jump 3:00 pm - 9:00pm SkyMania $18* (ages 10-15) every Friday night from 9:00pm - 11:00 pm Saturday: 10:00 am - 10:00 pm SkyJam $18 every Saturday night from 10:00 pm - 12:00 am for ages 16+ Sunday: 12:00pm - 7:00 pm

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


CONTROL ISSUES Will council oversight of the city’s land bank cause more problems than it solves? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} IN A COMPROMISE that seemed unlikely

presents

PofE T the

WEEK

Muppy Meet Muppy, a shy but sweet Pit Bull mix living at Animal Friends. She is patiently waiting for her forever home. Could it be yours? Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 12

just a few weeks ago, Pittsburgh City Council overwhelmingly passed land-bank legislation that could change the way the city deals with thousands of troubled properties. But the concessions that made an 8-1 final vote on April 14 possible could stall the land bank for years, and jeopardize the startup funding stream its supporters were banking on. The compromise — partly hashed out in a recent Tuesday meeting that went well into the night — guarantees that city council will have final approval over who gets to buy property from the land bank for at least two years, and for as many as four. “I do not believe it’s a best practice,” says Deb Gross, the city councilor who introduced the land-bank bill in January. “I was weighing the [council-control] amendment that would make them comfortable against the possibility of not having a land bank.” Mayor Bill Peduto’s policy manager Matt Barron makes the case that getting the land bank up and running would have taken a couple years anyway, so there was little downside in trying to build a broader political coalition. “We didn’t want this to be a 5-4 vote,” he says. The concession undoubtedly represents significant compromise on both sides. Councilors Daniel Lavelle and Ricky Burgess, who were vocal about decisions needing to pass through a political weighstation, secured that protection for at least the near future, but will ultimately give it up. And councilors Corey O’Connor and Gross conceded their ability to give control to independent expert appointees outside the political process in the short-term. And while the compromise may ultimately ensure an effective land bank, experts say council control could push that functionality years down the road. Frank Alexander, an Emory University law professor who helped write Pennsylvania’s authorizing land-bank legislation, says Cleveland’s original land bank fell apart largely because of city -council control. Cleveland’s land bank required approval for disposition of each parcel which “meant that the city-council person whose ward the property was located in essentially gave city council a veto,” Alexander says. “When you had micromanaging by the local governing entity, it was not able to be successful.” A better practice, Alexander says, would

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

be if city council were involved in setting the land bank’s priorities, but left decisions about what to do with individual parcels up to board members who have their finger on the pulse of community interests. Some observers also warn that the council-control provision won’t just push the land bank’s ability to turn communities around into the future; it could also jeopardize the foundation-based funding stream the bill’s supporters seem to be relying on. “Now that they’ve amended the bill to allow council to have final say over the sales, they have a tougher sell to the foundations,” says City Controller Michael Lamb, who says he’s generally supportive of land-banking. The upshot, Lamb says, is that foundations may be wary of a process that could be overly politicized, and adds that other funding streams need to be discussed. “We have understated the real cost of doing this kind of work and someone’s got to pay for that. Foundations aren’t going to pay for it all.” Lamb points out that everything from staff (whose nu m b e r s we r e s c a l e d back in the amendments) to maintenance costs of property in the land bank’s inventory and legal costs associated with clearing up potentially conflicting claims of ownership can cost thousands of dollars. Gross has been tight-lipped about exactly which foundations are being pursued and what aspects of the land bank’s operations they’re interested in funding. “I think we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it,” Gross says, noting that it will be the yet-to-be-seated land-bank board’s responsibility to figure out how to get funding. (For his part, Barron says the startup costs could be around $ 3 million to $5 million, and the Richard King Mellon Foundation and Heinz Endowments have asked the city to submit funding proposals for the land bank.) But foundations are “not a significant source of funding for land banks nationally,” Emory’s Alexander says. However, he continues, “There are examples where a philanthropic community has played a role in initial start-up costs for personnel […] more often, a philanthropic community has made a grant to deal with a specific

piece of property.” Kim Graziani, a vice president at the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Community Progress, agrees that foundation funding is often not a primary revenue stream. But she used to be the director of neighborhood initiatives in Pittsburgh, and says the financial power of the foundation community here shouldn’t be underestimated. “There’s no other city that I’ve been working in that has the level of philanthropic support Pittsburgh does,” she says. Asked whether reliance on foundation funding might create conflicts to the extent that foundations have interests that might not always align with the public, Graziani says: “I don’t want to say that that’s not an issue, but there’s nothing unique about this situation,” adding, that organizations that receive third-party funding always have to evaluate the interests of their donors. It isn’t just city or foundation money that the land bank can use, though. Under state law, the land bank can take advantage of a tax-recapture system that allows it to recoup half of the tax revenue from properties it helps add to the tax rolls for a limited time. Additionally, there are grants from other government agencies and the revenue the land bank gets from selling property in its inventory — which, in theory, can make land banks self-sustaining. Gus Frangos, the president and general counsel of the Cuyahoga Land Bank (which includes Cleveland), stressed the importance of having a consistent funding stream that can’t be pulled. (The Cuyahoga model helps sustain itself through millions of dollars in added penalties on delinquent real-estate taxes). “It’s like any business,” Frangos says. “If you have a steady identifiable stream, whatever it might be, you can at least plan into the future. […] Who would take a job here if I said, ‘This year I have funding; next year I don’t know’?” And perhaps foreseeing the complicated process of turning policy into change on the ground, Lavelle (once a vocal critic of the bill) took a moment before casting a vote in favor of the land bank: “It has great intent. What our job will be is to move past intent — this is where I see government often stumble.”

“NOW THAT THEY’VE AMENDED THE BILL TO ALLOW COUNCIL TO HAVE FINAL SAY OVER THE SALES, THEY HAVE A TOUGHER SELL.”

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


SPR

INGS

MO

BREWERIES INCLUDE:

Mountain State Draai Laag|Rogue White Horse | Kona Great Lakes |Anchor Full Sail | Boulder Southern Tier| Jones Flying Dog | Flatrock Magic Hat|Ithaca Goose Island Widmer Bros. Redhook And More!

ES

OR

T

SEV

EN

U N TA I N

R

APRIL 25 APRIL 26 Festival Hours: Fri. 8-11 p.m. | Sat. 7-10 p.m. Admission includes sampling glass, beer samples, dinner buffet from 6-8:30 p.m. and live entertainment by Joe Grushecky (Friday) and Good Guys (Saturday).

S T IC K EGTAT STARTIN

$65!

Purchase tickets now at

7Springs.com or 888.718.4253 *You must be at least 21 years old to attend this event. ID will be checked at the door.

Brewers and beers subject to change.

Brewski lodging startin at $159 per night!

866.437.1300

g

7Springs.com

Conveniently located off exits 91 or 110 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike

the science of psychology the art of helping people Learn more. Do more. Be more. Combine your passion for helping others with your interest in psychology at Chatham University. In our graduate psychology programs, you’ll study theoretical foundations, learn about human development, and work side-by-side with faculty on original research. Plus, you may also have the opportunity to

master of arts in psychology

participate in field placement. All of this leads to valuable knowledge you can put into practice for a

master of science in counseling psychology

fulfilling career in healthcare, private practice or corporate settings.

doctor of psychology in counseling psychology

N E W S

+

Visit chatham.edu/gradpsych for more information. TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


[GREEN LIGHT]

GREEN ROUTES Can talking about our environmental woes actually lead us down a path that fixes them? {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

SATURDAY, April 26 at 8pm Tickets start at $20*

SATURDAY, May 24 at 8pm Tickets start at $25*

IF THERE’S A WAY to discuss environmental problems and actually get everyone busy fixing them, we haven’t found it. Climate change, deforestation, depleted fisheries, toxic dumping — despite years of talk, and floods of text and images, all these woes and more proceed apace. Too few of our leaders lead, and too many of us remain apathetic, or even unconvinced the problems are real. Nonetheless, some ways of communicating green are more helpful than others. Take Pittsburgh-based literary journal Creative Nonfiction’s themed spring issue, “The Human Face of Sustainability,” and a recent talk at Pitt by author and blogger Vanessa Farquharson, “Sleeping Naked and Showering in the Dark: The Fun Path to Green Living.” Environmental sustainability means living in a way that doesn’t prevent future generations from doing likewise. Instead, we’re depleting the earth’s resources and weakening the ecosystems that support us to the point of collapse; almost nothing our society does is sustainable. The Creative Nonfiction issue, guest-edited by Donna Seaman, includes nine essays by an international array of writers tackling sustainability from angles as diverse as: the rise in childhood cancer; water shortages in Northern Sudan; organic farming to relieve urban food deserts; and Wendy Rawlings’ visionary piece linking her niece’s life-threatening E. coli infection to the globalized economy, worker rights,

consumerism and more. Farquharson, a journalist with the Toronto-based National Post, spun her April 1 talk off of her 2009 book Sleeping Naked Is Green, which documents the year she spent making one green change in her life daily. Farquharson’s user-friendly approach echoes how most Americans think about sustainability — and that’s the problem. Inspired (that is, alarmed) by Al Gore’s climate-change film An Inconvenient Truth, she made changes as small as buying fewer magazines and as seemingly radical as selling her car, unplugging her fridge, and washing her hair with vinegar … in the dark. Like most of us, she focuses on voluntary, individual green actions: To create your own successful green plan, she advised the Heinz Distinguished Lecture audience, “Acknowledge who you are and what you can do and what you want to do.” Trouble is, sustainability is a rigorous standard that doesn’t really care “what you can do and what you want to do.” Greening your own life is ethically correct, but it’s not nearly adequate to fix global environmental crises. If greener living is merely an option, most people won’t bother themselves nearly as much as Farquharson did, and some won’t bother at all. Indeed, Farquharson herself admits she can’t even convince her own sister to live greener. Farquharson’s solution in the face of such intractability: “Focus more on yourself” and hope a “ripple effect” will inspire others, as it has with the trend

IT’S A LONG WAY FROM WANTING TO RUN ME OFF THE ROAD TO CHOOSING TO CASH IN YOUR NAVIGATOR.

CONTINUES ON PG. 16

Dance

SATURDAY, SAT A URDAY, June 7 at 8pm Tickets start at $20*

Tick Ti cket e s availabble online at MOREatMo Mountaineer.com, m, etix.co com m or by calling 8000-80 8044 04 0468 68 ext xt. 82 8 977. Ti Tick cket etss ca cann al also so be purcha hase sedd in person att the INClub. b * + tax andd $2.50 5 etix service fee. FREE PARKINGŏđŏFor tickets call 1-800-80-40-HOT (800-804-0468) visit our website, , or the INClubTM RT 2 S NEWELL WV MOREatMountaineer.com

Saturday, April 26 at the

AFRICA Purchase tickets online www.legacyartsproject.org

Connecting the world through Dance

• Baba Chuck Davis, Dance Africa Founder • The Legacy Arts Project Community Ensemble • IllStyle and Peace Productions, Productions, Hip Hop Dance Ensemble • Oyu Oro, Oro , Afro-Cuban Experimental Dance Ensemble Childrens Matinee@1pm

Feature Performance @8pm

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: 720 MUSIC, 4405 BUTLER ST. • UJAMAA BOUTIQUE, 1901 CENTRE AVE. • CULTURE CLOZ, 117 N. HIGHLAND AVE.

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


sponsored sored by

Invades South Side

THIS SATURDAY! Pre Register Today Online $9.99 at facebook.com/SouthSideBarCrawl or Register the day of $20.00 at... 1601 E Carson

White Eagle

1601 E Carson n

1222 E Carson

— SALOON—

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


WE KNOW

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

GREEN LIGHT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

toward reusable grocery bags. Creative Nonfiction’s palette is much broader. Seaman’s lead interview with author and New Yorker journalist Elizabeth Kolbert sets the tone. “[S]ustainability is not recyling, nor bringing cloth bags to the supermarket,” say Kolbert, whose new book is The Sixth Extinction. “It is fundamentally rethinking everything that we do, and it is living very, very differently.” True, other CN essayists second Farquharson’s thoughts about individual initiative. Sarah Gilbert, for instance, writes thoughtfully about life in reputedly green Portland — where the mere sight of her cycling on a busy street fills motorists with reflexive rage. Gilbert argues that, merely by suggesting that there’s another way to live, her public example might help break the social and psychological feedback loops that keep people living so unsustainably. As a bike commuter myself, I empathize. But it’s a long way from wanting to run me off the road to choosing to cash in your Navigator. And even in the unlikely event that every 10th person, say, stopped driving, it would still solve only a tiny fraction of our fossil-fuel problem.

We need to ask more basic questions about why we live like we do, and seek more thorough solutions. Matthew Ferrence does the former in his essay about the leasing of his family’s southwestern Pennsylvania farm for gas-drilling. Ferrence interrogates our culture’s conception of value, asking why the land above — with its complex relationships of water, soil and plant and animal life — counts for less than the gas below: “Money is the only way to accurately render my economic, aesthetic, and emotional reaction to … well, to anything. Right?” Curiously, though, that’s the closest anyone in this 86-page issue comes to directly challenging our culture’s fundamentalist faith in economic “growth” — a faith that, unfortunately, produces at least as much destruction as it does benefits. And while these essayists colorfully illuminate our unsustainability, they’re short on solutions beyond the smallscale and personal. None of them, for instance, suggests implementing something so basic as a federal tax on carbon, which would surely get us using less fossil fuel, individual initiative or no. But how to get political support for

such a tax (aside from breaking oil lobbyists’ stranglehold on Congress)? When I asked Farquharson, after her talk, whether voluntary actions can really solve global problems like climate change, she acknowledged that “We need much bigger changes on a policy level” and that political activism is necessary to make such change happen. But if we’re going to change individual minds, they need to be changed toward such ends, not just toward using better lightbulbs. True, people who’ll separate their recyclables won’t necessarily take to the streets against fossilfuel extraction, or for a carbon tax. But they definitely won’t do such things if they don’t hear about them, or if they think lowering the thermostat is sufficient contribution to the cause. Still, it’s important to remember that facts aren’t everything. In her essay “The Seep,” centering on a California oil spill, Mieke Eerkens suggests that our environmental crises are a matter not of too little knowledge, but of imperfect compassion. Recalling birds dying in squandered petroleum, she writes, “I don’t believe people can understand why facts matter until their hearts know it, too.”

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

have asthma? Use Symbicort, Advair, or Dulera? Frequently feel short of breath?

You may qualify for a clinical research study for people with moderate to severe asthma. Compensation provided.

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

TRICKS OF THE TRADE

THURSDAY, APRIL 17 6:00 — 7:30 P.M.

Construction and masonry industry expert Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting presents a workshop on the trick of trade in masonry construction. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

CTRS

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

Currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

HOT FLASHES UTERINE FIBROIDS CONSTIPATION GOUT BIRTH CONTROL HIGH CHOLESTEROL HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS FOR WOMEN’S STUDIES

Do you have a medical condition which is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call

412-363-1900 for more information.

INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

412-471-5808

www.CTRSLLC.com


Featuring Frames by Mattisse

Schedule an OFO Wellness Exam today!

O AKLAN D FASH ION O PT ICAL 311 South Craig Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213

30

412.621.2523 www.oak-opt.com Celebrating

f N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

Years

Find us on

Quality Eyewear to Frame Your Face

Facebook +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS: SATURDAY, APRIL 19 10:00 A.M.—11:30 A.M.

+

TRADE INSTITUTE MASONRY DEMONSTRATION Construction and masonry industry expert Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting holds a Q/A session for the whole masonry series and other related questions. The audience could also get chance to try out the tools during the masonry demonstration. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PRESENT THIS AD FOR

urgh” SONeeLENZNthEReTR“OLLB EY TOURS

5 OFF $

ds hooods iighhbborrho

Ne t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods $25 ge TOUR #2 Herita a P ittsBUR GH ER ” “A rriv e a V isito r; De par t

PER PERSON Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2014

$

25

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW L 1-800-342-2349 CAL NS ATIO ERV RES

Star

Electronic Cigarettes E-Liquids Full Tasting Bar Accessories LIKE US ON

412-471-5808

FOLLOW US ON

ter K 10% O it wi FF th th is

ad

2420 E.Carson St Pittsburgh Pa, 15203 412.381.VAPE Hours of Operations Mon to Sat 11am-9pm Sun 12 noon-7pm

www.vapeinnoncarson.com • www.facebook.com/Vape-Inn-On-Carson

OUR FIRST SHIPMENT OF TREES & SHRUBS HAVE ARRIVED!

Cavacini Garden Center CHECK OUT THE GORGEOUS BLOOMING TULIPS, HYDRANGEAS, AZALEAS, DAFFODILS, LILIES & PANSIES! GREAT SPRING COLOR FOR ALL YOUR EASTER NEEDS! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

100 51st St. • Lawrenceville • 412-687-2010 Off Butler St/Across from Goodwill 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

The Formula One circuit is generally thought to attract fans as a showcase of motor-car technology and racing skill, but organizers of the Australian Grand Prix (the first of the 19 races on the annual circuit) threatened a lawsuit in March against Formula One management because the races should also be showcases of noise. Formula One has softened cars’ power this year in order to make breakthrough achievements in fuel efficiency, but that also tamped down Formula One’s “trademark ear-shattering roar,” according to a Business Insider report. Fans are less likely to buy tickets, the organizers fear, if they lose the deafening, 100-decibel vroom that is a “visceral element of the fan experience.”

+

Amelia Boomker, 36, of Bolingbrook, Ill., celebrated her acceptance into the Guinness Book of World Records in March, recognized for donating more than 127 gallons of her own breast milk to critically needy babies in the Midwest. The donations came on top of supplying breast milk for her own four sons, three of whom were born during the 2008-2013 period in which she pumped out her excess for the Indiana Mothers’ Milk Bank.

+

James Chatten, 46, pleaded guilty in January to several Commandment violations stemming from a July incident at the Christian Horizons church in Peterborough, Ontario. Chatten brought a prostitute inside the church, for sex, after hours, and stole money to pay her from a church drawer, then lied to police about being forced to raid the drawer.

+

Jason Bourcier, 33, reached a deal with the Virginia Department of Transportation in November to eventually pay down the $200,000 in highway tolls he had ignored for more than three years. He told a judge that, originally, a friend had told him that traveling the Dulles Toll Road to Washington, D.C., was free if the toll collectors had gone home for the evening. (Not true.) (Bourcier told the judge he is now working as a “financial consultant” — surely after rehabilitating his attention to detail.)

+

In some cultures, and now in Florida, apparently, the act of urination carries no special modesty protection. A judge ruled in March that video of Justin Bieber expelling for a urine test following his January dragracing arrest in Miami Beach was a “public record” and had to be released to the press under Florida law. (A perhaps overly generous black box was edited into the video to make it somewhat less explicit.) In the video, only one officer is present, observing, based on protocol that respects the suspect’s “privacy” — though the Florida judge in essence invited the entire world to watch Bieber urinate, as the video quickly made the Internet.

+

Oops! (1) Kentucky state Rep. Leslie Combs, unloading her .380 semi-automatic handgun in her Capitol office in Frankfort in January, accidentally fired a shot into her furniture. Said Combs, “I’m a gun owner. It happens.” In fact, she praised herself for being “particularly careful” to point the gun

away from people while “unloading” it. (2) In March, an unnamed man was rescued by bystanders who heard screaming from a mazelike storm drain, which runs 12 feet below the street in Lawton, Okla. The man had accidentally dropped a $20 bill through a grate and climbed in after it, wandering underground for two days searching for his way out. (He never found the $20.)

+

The Lakemaid brewery based in Stevens Point, Wis., acknowledged in January that it has been testing drone technology, with an eye to eventually delivering beer to isolated ice fishermen on Lake Waconia, Minn. The brewery reportedly found that a six-bladed drone would be necessary to carry a 12-pack for up to a half-mile. (The Federal Aviation Administration bans commercial drones, but is thought to be reconsidering the rule — though not just yet, as it quickly ordered Lakemaid to cease the flights.)

+

Richard Wright, of Canada’s Prince Edward Island, was busy in March handing out $50 and $100 bills to strangers during a visit to Halifax, Nova Scotia, urging the recipients to “thank God” for the gift and to pass it along to others if they could not use it themselves. Wright’s spree was soon broken up as Mounted Police detained him for a “wellness check,” which led to his transfer to a mental-health facility. Wright’s daughter Chelsea told reporters that her dad worked hard for his money, had no mental-health issues and simply wanted to help people, and a friend described him as a “generous individual wrapped up in the acts of kindness.” However, at press time, Wright was still hospitalized.

+

Yo N o Quiero: The Phoenix suburb of Maryvale was “overrun,” according to February reports, with several “packs” of up to 15 Chihuahuas each, roaming neighborhoods, frightening schoolchildren. Coincidentally, two months earlier, in Hobart, Australia, the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals announced that it was overwhelmed by massive recent donations of Chihuahuas, most from one couple. Said a spokesman, “We were up to our knees in little Chihuahuas.”

+

England’s Manchester Evening News reported in March that local police had handled 19 cases of “clown-related” crimes in the area in 2013, ranging from a clown in the town of Bury peering into the windows of at least two homes, to a boy’s report in Rochdale that a clown holding balloons had tried to grab him on the street. The secretary of Clowns International lamented the “stupid people” who damage the reputation of the clowning “profession.”

+

Christopher Miller, 40, was arrested in March a few blocks from a Stride Rite shoe store in Ocean County, N.J., minutes after it had been robbed by a man resembling Miller. Police said Miller had just been released from N ew Jersey’s South Woods State Prison after serving 15 years for robbing the same Stride Rite store and apparently had taken a bus from the prison directly to the store in order to rob it again.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RTH L I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM


THE HISTORY OF TRANSIT IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY

This year marks Port Authority’s 50th anniversary of connecting Pittsburghers to destinations throughout the region. As we celebrate the past, we also look forward to a new era of transportation in Allegheny County. Inside this edition is a brochure highlighting our past 50 years, with some insight into where we’ve been and where we’re going.

1964 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


DE

SI

the

ON

JAVANESE FRIED NOODLES INCLUDE CHICKEN, LAMB, SEAFOOD AND VEGETARIAN

GONE TO SEED {BY AL HOFF} Last week, I checked a Japanese hot pepper out of the library. Actually, what I took were three santaka seeds, from the Seed Library at the Carnegie Library’s Main Branch, in Oakland. They are among the nearly 150 seed varieties available — everything from flowers and herbs to Yugoslavian finger fruit squash and heirloom tomatoes. The Seed Library, which resides in a handsome wooden card catalog, is designed as a self-sustainable community resource, explains librarian Jude Vachon, one of the project’s three facilitators. Ideally, users will replenish the seeds they take after the plant has grown. Newcomers to growing are encouraged. Users can: check out seeds (a library card is not required); collect information on seed-starting and seed-collecting; join a Facebook page with other seeders; and attend upcoming informational sessions with Grow Pittsburgh. Folks can also donate seeds to the library, including leftovers from commercially grown seeds. (The library cannot accept hybrid or genetically modified seeds.) Envelopes are provided for both seed check-out and donation. The benefits are obvious: Users can grow a variety fresh food; learn about and help maintain critical heirloom seeds; and be part of a supportive growing community — all for free. It’s a resource, Vachon says, that can make a difference when “someone becomes excited and competent about growing.” Seeds truly are about promise. As such, I couldn’t resist picking up a creeping cypress — the hand-written note accompanying the donated seeds enthused, “This plant is great to watch.” AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Main Library (first floor), 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. www.facebook.com/CLPFirstFloor

FriedFish

Report ST. ALPHONSUS

201 Church Road, Wexford 724-759-8659 or 412-799-4042

4:30-7:30 p.m. on Good Friday A simple meal that’s all about the hand-breaded fresh fish. $9 gets you a generous portion of fish, creamy mac-and-cheese, tomato Florentine soup or clam chowder, and fantastic coleslaw.

20

A TRIP TO

INDONESIA {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE COUNTRY of Indonesia is comprised of more than 10,000 islands, which has given rise to a thrillingly vibrant and diverse culinary culture. But Indonesian cuisine was not on the menu in Western Pennsylvania until last year. Then, like so many immigrant-borne cuisines, it debuted quietly in a suburban strip mall. Fortunately, Kusuka Indonesian Cuisine’s location — right on Route 30 in North Huntingdon — meant that it caught our eye, and we made it a point to return. Recreating the ambience of an Indonesian eatery in wintry Western Pennsylvania isn’t easy, but Kusuka does its best with verdant spring-green paint, colorful posters and shelves of bazaar handicrafts to examine while you wait for your food. The decor is pleasant, but simple; the focus is on the food. Wisely, Kusuka’s menu provides plenty of photographs to assist diners exploring Indonesian dishes for the first time. While the country’s indigenous ingredients and preparations have been influenced by

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Stewed chicken with yellow rice, anchovies, shredded egg, crackers and hot chili sauce

neighboring China, India and the Muslim traditions of the Middle East, as well as European trade partners and colonial occupants, diners will find little replication of other cultures’ cuisines and much that is new, and distinctly Indonesian, to discover. And while the “Spice Islands” are part of the Indonesian archipelago, Indonesian cooking is not all that spicy, although seasoning is a complex and important part of every dish’s flavoring.

KUSUKA INDONESIAN CUISINE Ponsi Plaza, 13380 Lincoln Highway, North Huntingdon. 724-382-4968 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun. noon-8 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $3-5, entrees $7-12 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED We began with several appetizers and a cup of soto ayam, described on the menu as simply “Indonesian chicken soup.” Colored yellow with turmeric, the soup con-

tained — in addition to chicken — vermicelli noodles, a quartered hard-boiled egg, and a few vegetables and herbs. It was more brothy than dense, with top notes of flavor and little underlying savor. Arabic-derived martabak, a popular Indonesian street food served here as an appetizer, folded a straightforwardly flavored, satisfying combination of beef, egg and scallion in a thin, crisp-fried pancake. Tahu goreng — fried tofu prepared in the style of the west Java city of Sumedang — had a robust, crunchy exterior which provided good contrast to the soft, almost creamy interior. A tartly pickled little salad served alongside, consisting of finely diced carrot, cucumber and onion, was a good counterpoint to the tofu’s mildness. Shumai dumplings were dense, firm little fish cakes, and pleasantly savory. They were served with a coarse, deepbrown peanut sauce for dipping that was just a little spicy and not at all sweet. Small morsels of beef satay were tender but meaty and grill-charred. Instead of the peanut sauce that typically comes with CONTINUES ON PG. 22


MADE

NEW FRESH MENU

it Tastes as good as it sounds FIND D OUT WHAT ELSE IS PLAYING:

N E W S

+

TA S T E

#THISISHARDROCK

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


A TRIP TO INDONESIA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Thai satay, Kusuka served a sweet soy sauce studded with tomato and red onion, which provided good balance against the savory meat. Several variations of mie goreng, or Javanese fried noodles, were on offer, including chicken, lamb, seafood and vegetarian. Thinking of the abundant seafood in the waters around Indonesia’s islands, we chose mie goreng with shrimp and calamari. There were lots of vegetables, too — carrot strips, cabbage and bok choy — as well as scrambled egg mixed in with the thick, slightly chewy noodles. The textural pleasures of this dish were great, and the ingredients so plentiful and well distributed that even bites without seafood were satisfying. The overall flavor, however, was perhaps a bit too subtle. Udang goreng mentega, a fried-shrimp dish without either noodles or rice, was prepared in a sweet, smoky, soy-based sauce, rich with butter.

Owners Pribadi and Nurbaiti Karbono

Though not as famous for its curries as India, Indonesia has adapted the Indian spicy stews to its own tradition, with gulai consisting of a rich spice paste cooked in coconut milk. Not surprisingly, different variations are found in different parts of the archipelago. Kusuka’s gulai kambing, or lamb curry, had an almost soup-like consistency, in the Javanese tradition, and was full of small chunks of bone-in lamb. While this lent the meat wonderful flavor and tenderness, the bones themselves were difficult to separate, and some fragments were small and sharp. This didn’t affect our enjoyment of the dish so much as remind us that there is good reason many Indonesians prefer their eating with their hands. (In fact, in Indonesia, most tables are set with a spoon and fork, a combination which would have made it near-impossible to eat this gulai kambing.) In a region waking up to the flavors of a variety of Asian cultures, Kusuka provides a palatable introduction to Indonesian cuisine. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SPINNING THE BOTTLE After Bridge Ten closes, owner Dave DeSimone tries again in Shadyside Shortly after his Bridge Ten Brasserie shuttered in February, Dave DeSimone decided to follow T.H. Palmer’s famed advice: “’Tis a lesson you should heed / if at first you don’t succeed / try, try again.” DeSimone’s new space — Open Bottle Bistro on Ellsworth Avenue in Shadyside — is a much cozier interpretation of a French-style restaurant than Bridge Ten’s South Side space. “It’s a little more casual, like you might find in a wine bar in Paris or Madrid or Rome,” says DeSimone. “We don’t have white tablecloths.” A big draw of Open Bottle Bistro is the highly curated wine list, with every bottle selected by DeSimone. He’s a credible guide, too: DeSimone’s weekly wine column in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review has been a source of local wine knowledge for more than 20 years. DeSimone says customers can expect a rotating list of about 15 reds and 15 whites. He says that he favors wines that are either un- or lightly oaked, which lets the true expression of the grapes shine through. In line with the vibe of the restaurant, the selections tip quite heavily toward France — DeSimone’s area of expertise — but also branch out to Italy, Spain, Austria and Australia. “It’s fun for me to dig out wines that you’re not going to find at other places,” he says. The wines are organized into categories like “Robust, Dark Fruit” and “Elegant and Refreshing.” However, DeSimone says he also plans on being on hand to help steer people in the right direction. “I love talking about wines,” he says. Although the wine is the prime focus of the drinks list, DiSimone also retained John White, a single-malt expert I wrote about in January, to enlighten customers on the finer points of brown spirits. DeSimone says that his plan for his new venture is pretty straightforward: “We’re going to offer people great wine, great food and great service — and hope they’ll want to come back.”

“IT’S FUN FOR ME TO DIG OUT WINES THAT YOU’RE NOT GOING TO FIND AT OTHER PLACES.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5884 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-450-8217 or www.open-bottle.com


TUESDAY NIGHTS “BURG NIGHT”

HALF OFF ERS BURG 6-11PM

Garden d D Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery

HEISENBURGER

EVERY SUNDAY VAPE NIGHT

Supplying Pittsburgh with Locally Grown All-Natural, Kitchen Garden Seedlings for over a Decade. Wednesday y y Thursday y Friday y Saturday y Sunday

BRING YOUR MODS AND JUICE IN A VAPE FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT.

THE “HEISENBURG

ER” 1/2lb Burger, Pepper corn Crusted, Blue Cheese, Caram elized Onions

HOPPY HOUR

RESTAURANT AND BAR

10am to 6pm 10am to 6pm 10am to 6pm 9am to 6pm 9am to 5pm

Gluten Free · Vegetarian · Vegan Offerings OPEN DAILY LUNCH & DINNER · BAR TILL 2AM WEEKEND BRUNCH STARTING @ 10AM

MON–FRI 4-6 PM

HALF OFF TAPS

4717 Butler St. · LAWRENCEVILLE · 412 315-7271 · facebook.com/Gusscafe

mygardendreams.com

Attention Hockey Fans! FREE EVENT PARKING

*

*WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

SPECIAL!

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on

$

3.50

event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum purchase!

Wings, Arancini, Fries and More!

Happy Hour Specials 5-7pm Live Music Every Friday 5pm 600 Grant Street

Downtown Pittsburgh N E W S

+

412-434-0800

TA S T E

16 OZ DRAFTS ALL DAY SATURDAYS!

NOW SERVING

It’s like eating or parking for FREE!

+

OPEN DAILY 11:00 am - 1:00 am FRI & SAT 11:00am- 2:00am www.pghgrille.com M U S I C

+

2128 MURRAY AVENUE

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

Watch all the PEN’S PLAYOFF action at Mineo’s Pizza House’s

NEW FULL SERVICE BAR! SQUIRREL HILL

E V E N T S

+

412-521-9864

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Great Music!

Drink ! Specials

! g in n e p O d n a r G d n la k Oa

2 floors, the , BEST BURGERS whiskey loft, and 24 beers on tap.

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

RS E E B T F A 40 CR N TAP! O NS CREE 8 BIG TVSPSORTS FOR

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111

OAKLAND • 226 MEYRAN AVENUE

100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

winghartburgers.com

doublewidegrill.com

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

one of the Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

724-553-5212

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beer-friendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t diner-cheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallops-three-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-377-0916. This neo-traditional Japanese restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired as much by modern American cuisine as it is by ancient Japanese tradition. Here, roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets its own entrée. It offers a tapas-like, a la carte approach, ideal for sampling a menu that spans traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. LF

Pino’s Contemporary Italian {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. This fine-dining restaurant offers the bold flavors and confident preparations of classic Portuguese cuisine — from thick, meaty Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage flambéed en route to the table. Entrees include steak in a red-wine sauce, chicken cooked with Portuguese peppers, pork with clams and, of course, fish. LE

Café Notte {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www.noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky atmosphere, Noodlehead offers an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few “snacks,” among them fried chicken and steamed buns with pork belly. The freshly prepared dishes are garnished with fresh herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. 412-281-6595.

You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE PINO’S CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu at this Italian eatery spans from sandwiches that hearken back to its pizzeria days, through pastas of varying sophistication, to inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF


Now Open Mondays! SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS 10:30AM  4PM

Papaya {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-2434348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE

Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brown-sugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique four-course dinner just for you. LE TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and friedrice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF

SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact menu reflects a hybrid style, combining TRUTH LOUNGE. 51 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-381cutting-edge techniques 9600. A Mediterraneanwith traditional inspired menu spans ingredients to create cocktail-hour noshes unique flavor and and light meals to texture combinations. www. per a p pghcitym full entrees. Pleasing Salt erases distinctions .co appetizers include — between fine and saganaki (Greek flaming casual dining, between facheese) and the novelty miliar and exotic ingredients, “lambsicles.” Flatbreads fill the between your party and spot for upscale pizza, with adjacent diners. LE hearty meat and pasta dishes, such as short-rib ragu, rounding SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 out the entrees. LE Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412741-1918. This little restaurant TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market has the charm of a bygone era St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers above-average The Continental menu offers fare, reasonably priced. Alongside chestnuts like duck á l’orange the contemporary American and Virginia spots, as well as flavors are numerous Asianmore distinctive dishes, such as inspired dishes, such as soup made tournedos dijon bleu and French from kabocha pumpkin. From Acadian porterhouse. LE po’boy oyster appetizers to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth each dish is carefully conceived Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. and prepared. KE Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push VILLAGE TAVERN & past the familiar at this charming TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West Homestead café. The emphasis is End. 412-458-0417. This warm, on fresh, local and unexpected, welcoming, and satisfying Italian such as asparagus slaw or beet restaurant is a reason to brave the risotto. In season, there’s a West End Circle. The menu offers charming rear patio. JE variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. pizza and pasta, with the pasta 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. section organized around seven 412-224-2579. In this intimate noodle shapes, from capelli to restaurant, the emphasis is rigatoni, each paired with three on local, seasonal ingredients or four distinct sauces. KE simply yet inventively prepared.

BUILD YOUR OWN BLOODY MARY BAR & SPECIAL BRUNCH MENU

----- HAPPY HOUR ----HALF OFF SNACKS, $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ------------------------------------------

+

TA S T E

+

Sushi Bar and Thai Cuisine

Try any one of our sandwiches for $ !

5

Coupon not redeemable for cash. Limit one (1) coupon per order. Offer expires 4/23/14.

Mon-Fri • 7AM 7AM-3 -3PM PM

Dine-In or Take-Out

336 Fourth Avenue

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE 412-224-2163

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

Takeout • Call for FREE Delivery!

www.facebook.com/cityoven

3608 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 • (412) 621-1100

BenjaminsPgh.com

412.281.6836

www.thaihana99.com th ih h 99

FULL LIST ONLINE

N E W S

Best Pizza in the’Burgh!

Lunch and Dinner Monday-Saturday

www.CityOven.com

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

The Best In Twisted American Cuisine Kitchen Open Daily Until 1 am

____________________________________________________

Happy Hour M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

HAPPY HOUR AT BZ’S

ibizatapaspgh.com

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 5pm-7pm Wednesday Hump Day 5pm-9pm Friday Early Recess 3p-5p

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine MONDAY: FREEE TTAPAS APAS

*Game Day Happy Hour starts at first pitch or kick off and runs for its scheduled duration

$10 value with purchase of a bottle of wine TUESDAY: Buy 1 flight of wine get 2nd 50% OFF of equal or lesser value

Join us Sunday’s starting at 10 am during all home games for Kids Day! Special kids menu and activities.

UPCOMING EVENTS: FRIDAY, APRIL 18 & SATURDAY, APRIL 19 Award-winning artist

Chris Shutters 10:30 pm – Close No Cover

412-488-1818

BZ Bar and Grill

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com

140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge) +

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


LOCAL

BEAT

“I CHOPPED UP THE RECORDING AND SAMPLED IN A WAY THAT SOUNDS A BIT DEMENTED.”

{BY KAYLA COPES}

Things haven’t been easy recently for Pittsburgh-born DJ Orlando “Buscrates” Marshall. In February, Buscrates — who now lives in Atlanta — was hit by a car while riding his bike. (He was riding on a bike trail, and collided with the driver where the trail met the road.) He sustained fractured bones in his neck, vertebrae and foot, and was in a neck brace for weeks, missing a few weeks of work. During his years in Pittsburgh, the DJ and producer worked with many local MCs, including Beedie and Ensilence; he’s also a member of electro-funk outfit East Liberty Quarters. “Pittsburgh will always be home,” he says. And in fact, “I appreciate Pittsburgh so much more now.” That’s because Pittsburghers have been helping Buscrates cover the cost of some big hospital bills — and are holding a fundraiser in his honor on Fri., April 18, at 720 Music. J. Malls is one of those organizing the “Cash 4 Crates” event. “I’ve known Buscrates most of the time that I’ve been DJ’ing,” he explains. “I remember meeting him circa ’95 in Stedeford’s Records on the North Side.” “Buscrates is one of my closest friends for several years now,” says Michelle LeMenager, the fundraiser’s lead organizer. “I just wanted to be able to do something to assist him.” LeMenager also ran an online campaign to raise funds for Buscrates; that project, which ended last Friday, raised more than $5,000. “We’re hoping to supplement that with the live fundraiser that is happening on April 18,” she explains. Buscrates will travel to Pittsburgh to attend the event, and numerous local artists will be performing: hosts Gene Stovall and Smilo, Divine Seven, Billy Pilgrim, Mave Sami and many more. “I asked Crates to give me a list of who some of his favorite local performers were and asked them if they would be willing to donate their time,” says LeMenager. “Honestly, everybody we approached, unless they had a scheduling conflict, immediately agreed. I think that is a testament to the kind of person Crates is, and how many people he touches and affects.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CASH 4 CRATES FUNDRAISER. 9 p.m. Fri., April 18. 720 Music, Clothing and Café, 4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10 suggested donation. 412-904-4592 or www.720records.com

26

Orlando “Buscrates” Marshall

HELPING CRATES

SOUND WEAVER {PHOTO COURTESY OF VEANNE TSUI}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

T

HERE’S A SONG called “I Only,” appearing early in Lyla Foy’s debut full-length, Mirrors the Sky (released last month by Sub Pop). It’s a chill synth-pop tune, upbeat and happy, but not a dance track. It develops largely like you’d expect — some keys, some electronic beats, beautiful vocals by the London songwriter. Then at the first instrumental break, a little over a minute in, there’s a solo by an instrument that sounds something like … a bird call? A laughing gibbon? “Um, OK, so, the squeaking sound,” she says with a laugh, “It’s a toy train. It belongs to my friend; we were recording at his house, and I was trying to record some interesting sounds. We found this squeaky old train and I was just moving it back and forth across the floor and it was making this amazing sound. So we recorded it, and then I kind of chopped up the recording a little and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

Self-starter: Lyla Foy

sampled it in a way that sounds a bit, kind of, demented.” Foy, who’s 25, started playing guitar as a teenager, like so many. Entirely selftaught, she first made a splash with some home recordings she released under the name Wall in 2012. “When I put my first song out as Wall, I only had one song —

LYLA FOY

WITH KEVIN GARRETT, SOME KIND OF ANIMAL

8 p.m. Wed., April 23. Pittsburgh Winery, 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. $10. 412-566-1000 or www.pittsburghwinery.com

it wasn’t a planned project or anything,” she explains. “It was literally a song, and I wanted to put it online so my friends could hear it, and I just chose a random name. It wasn’t really a band. There was kind of a nice mystery behind it, but then

when we were going to put out the debut album, it was like — I’ll put my name to this now. I’m ready. It wasn’t just a bedroom project anymore.” Those early Wall tracks were beautiful but starkly quiet; they were literally bedroom recordings, and Foy’s vocals were usually little more than a whisper. As she’s found her confidence, the vocals have blossomed, and while she certainly doesn’t belt on Mirrors, she doesn’t whisper so much, either. One thing that hasn’t changed, though: Foy does most of the writing, playing and production herself, without much input from her band or anyone else. “I did most of the recording at home or on different locations, with a really simple studio setup which I travel around with,” she explains. “Once I brought the songs to my band to do some final touches, they were on the way to being ready, and I think it was good to write CONTINUES ON PG. 28


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


SOUND WEAVER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

most of the parts myself. I felt like the direction was kind of sorted. It’s good to get other bits and bobs, it wasn’t going to be anything drastic.” “It’s a bit lonely doing everything yourself,” she quickly adds. “It’s good to work with the band.” Foy tends to downplay her instrumental proficiency. “I’m not an amazing keyboard player by any stretch of the imagination,” she says at one point. “It doesn’t take much to get OK at guitar,” she later adds. “You can get by with five or six chords, so it’s fun to write songs [on guitar]. I got by for a long time. I’ve added a few more, but I’m still not a wizard.” But that belies the fact that she played the majority of the instruments on her debut record, and what she didn’t play, she arranged pretty specifically. “Even if other people were playing, I was arranging or writing the parts, or I’d already written them,” she says. “I played bass on the album, and guitar, and bits of keyboard … I designed a lot of the drum patterns on my computer.” What Foy does exceedingly well is create texture and rhythmic complexity, and not always just by using the programmed drum beats. Throughout Mirrors the Sky, there are moments in which bass guitar and keyboards are being woven together to create percussive parts, even more so than to convey melody. “I think it was kind of slightly planned when I started writing this batch of songs,” she explains. “I really like the bass as a percussion instrument. On the track ‘No Secrets,’ the bass is keeping time, that sort of four-to-the-floor, mellow, dancey thing going on, which I kind of like. I do like experimenting with percussion … I wouldn’t say it was planned on a lot of tracks, it just kind of happened, but I do like interesting drum beats.” After the release of Mirrors last month, Foy began touring the U.K., and now the U.S., on a trip that brings her to Pittsburgh for the first time, on April 23. She and her band continue to work out the best ways to bring something that started as a bedroom project, and was a pretty complex studio undertaking, into a live atmosphere. “It’s difficult,” she says. “It’s music for a very certain head-space, a certain environment, and we certainly can do well in a theater, in a quiet situation, but we’ve learned to get by in a noisy crowd as well. We’re trying to pick the right venues for us as well, rather than turning up in any old bar. “It’s about picking the right songs when we’re playing in certain situations — and that’s been good to learn.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

ON THE RECORD Dominic Cipolla of The Phantom Family Halo {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

The Phantom Family Halo (Dominic Cipolla, center)

Avant-psych outfit The Phantom Family Halo, which centers on multi-instrumentalist Dominic Cipolla, began in Louisville, Ky., but moved four years ago to Queens; the band’s latest, Raven Town Witch, is out now on Sophomore Lounge Records. YOU WENT BACK TO LOUISVILLE TO RECORD THIS ALBUM, RIGHT? Yeah, this one and the last one were both done with Kevin Ratterman at a place called La La Land. He’s done those last few My Morning Jacket records, and did pretty well with them. So he could invest pretty heavily in a really amazing studio there. THE LINEUP OF THE BAND HAS CHANGED A FEW TIMES; WHAT’S THE FORMAT NOW? It changes around; on the recordings, I generally play most everything — which, by the next record, will probably change. I’m looking to do a full-on live recording situation with the guys I play with up here. Years ago, I played drums and sang, standing up. Since I’ve been up here, I just play guitar and sing. We’re a five-piece now. SOME OF YOUR NEW STUFF IS FORMATTED LIKE PSYCH-POP SONGS, BUT SOME SOUNDS LIKE IMPROV — WHICH SEEMS LIKE IT’D BE HARD TO DO, RECORDING EVERYTHING YOURSELF. There are occasionally a few people on some of those songs, but even some of the stuff that is improvised, I would do drum parts first, with the idea of leaving some stuff open, to see what would happen when we go back over top of it. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PHANTOM FAMILY HALO with QUEEN KRALLAR. 8 p.m. Thu., April 17. The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $6. All ages. 412-951-0622


NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

NO BAD JUJU NO COVERS (SELF-RELEASED)

The title of this local party-pop stalwart’s new full-length is self-explanatory; while the polished eight-piece has a full repertoire of other people’s songs it plays as part of its live show, those don’t take up space on the CD. Instead, we get 11 well-produced, danceable tracks written by co-leaders Mark Matteo and Sabrina de Matteo, with tight playing all around. The album starts strong with the funky “Swept Away,” which hits that perfect balance: a party rocker with lyrics that work, and that aren’t trite. Some of the other tunes go a little overboard — “Hell Yeah!” brings the party, but also a handful of lyrical clichés, and some of the more serious and introspective songs can be melodramatic. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NO BAD JUJU CD-RELEASE PARTY. 8 p.m. Fri., April 18. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


Some new releases and re-releases that are specific to Record Store Day 2014

RECORD STORE DAY ROUNDUP {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT} THE EIGHTH ANNUAL Record Store Day

takes place nationwide on Sat., April 19. Here’s a list of some of the deals and events taking place around town.

ATTIC RECORD STORE 513 Grant Ave., Millvale. 412-821-8484 or www.atticrecordstoreinc.com Fred Bohn Sr. opened his Millvale store in November 1980; it’s now co-operated with his son, Fred Jr. The volume of records available for sale here is vast. Not only is the location itself stocked from floor to ceiling, so are its two basements and a warehouse across the street, with five rows of 30-foot-high shelves packed with 45s. If you need something obscure, Attic most likely has it. RSD DEALS: 20 percent off all used, 10 percent off all new, plus giveaways, raffles (including a USB turntable) and plenty of food and drink.

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE 1210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-8800 or www.davesmusicmine.com Dave’s, which previously had an Oakland location, opened its current South Side residence in May 2000, and store clerk Dave Whaley has seen firsthand the expansion of vinyl culture. “One day [owner] Michelle Panasiuk saw a bunch of people crowding around a tiny display of records in the back, ignoring the CDs,” he explains. “She said, ‘We have to do something about this.’” Dave’s has been expanding its vinyl section ever since. RSD DEALS: RSD releases, RSD/Dave’s Music Mine T-shirts, door prizes, ticket giveaways every hour, and each customer draws from the RSD fishbowl. There will also be light refreshments and a guest DJ.

JERRY’S RECORDS 2136 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4533 or www.jerrysrecords.com Jerry’s Records is about as Pittsburgh as you can get. This statement took on even

more gravity on April 14, when Pittsburgh City Council officially declared it to be “Jerry’s Record Store Day.” RSD DEALS: Jerry’s will be giving away 25,000 free records. They will be offered in boxes of 250 — limit one box per person, and you can’t look inside before selecting one. Also: $1 records, $2 CDs.

SOUND CAT RECORDS 4526 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-3256 or www.soundcatrecords.com Previously known as Paul’s CDs and before that Jim’s Records, Sound Cat has been at this location since 1978. Current owner Karl Hendricks bought the store in 2012. If you’re the type of collector who balks at someone placing your copy of Paul Simon’s Graceland right next to Zeppelin, then this is the store for you; it’s well organized and genres are easy to find. RSD DEALS: Many RSD releases.

MIND CURE RECORDS 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. 412-621-1715 or www.mindcurerecords.com Owner Mike Seamans is more than a recordstore owner; Mind Cure is also a label, and in June will begin releasing a song and video each month featuring Mind Cure acts. Seamans once worked at Paul’s CDs and credits Jerry Weber (of Jerry’s Records) with inspiring him to own a store himself. RSD DEALS: Storewide sale on new and used.

720 MUSIC, CLOTHING AND CAFÉ 4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592 or www.720records.com The night before Record Store Day, this mainstay will be open for a party benefitting ex-Pittsburgher DJ Buscrates. (See Local Beat, page 26.) Then it’s open at 9 a.m. Saturday to serve up food and RSD releases, with local DJs spinning all day. RSD DEALS: Many RSD releases; half off used vinyl, plus café specials. Other locals offering RSD releases and specials include: Desolation Row, 410 S. Craig St., Oakland; Eide’s Entertainment, 1121 Penn Ave., Strip District; Stedeford’s, 425 E. Ohio St., North Side; and The Exchange, multiple locations throughout the area. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS

Laugh with the Pittsburgh Improv this April & May!

APRIL 17-19

Riff Raff

All things punk, pop-punk, folk-punk and in between converge this weekend around Bloomfield and Lawrenceville at Don’t Give Up the Ship! Fest, a new multiple-venue festival featuring dozens of acts, most local but some national. Tonight’s show at The Mr. Roboto Project features Brightside, Philadelphia’s Radiator Hospital, Save Ends and more; Mikey Erg, The Holy Mess, World’s Scariest Police Chases and others headline shows the rest of the weekend at Roboto, Kickback Pinball Café, Howlers, Hambone’s and Thunderbird Café. It It’ss all put together by the Don’t Let the Scene Go Down on Me Collective. Festival passes are available for the fantastic price of $25, and nd individual shows go for $6 apiece. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. Continues at various venues throughout the he weekend. 5106 Penn Ave., e., Bloomfield. $6. www.theghostwrite.org hostwrite.org

E. Carson St., South Side. $12. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

MAY 1-4

MAY 8-11

BRAD WILLIAMS

COREY HOLCOMB

THE SMASH BROTHERS

DAN CUMMINS

Mind do off Men Me M Mencia, e Live at Gotham, The Tonight Show

Tyler Pe Perry’s err rry’ rry y’s H y’s House of Pain, Half and Half, Fox’s Mad TV

Comedy meedy dy CCentral, ent Tours with Ralphie May

Late Show, Last Comic Standing, Crazy with a Capital F, Top 10 on Billboard Comedy Chart, HBO Comedy Festival

TICKETS $17

TICKETS $20

TICKETS $17

Seen on

[PUNK] + THU., APRIL 17

APRIL 25-26 Seen on

Seen on

TICKETS TI ICK CKET ETS ET TS $1 $17 7

[HIP HOP] + SAT., APRIL 19

With Riff Raff, the question always seems to be, “Is this guy for real?” The Houston rapper — who brings his Neon Icon tour to Altar Bar tonight — has made it clear that he is, sort of: As he told Rolling Stone, “I’m not, like, ‘comedy rapping.’” There may be a method to his madness, but between his steady blitz of goofy music videos, his drolly perplexing selfdescriptions (he’s the Rap Game Herman Cain Manson), and his and the Rap Game Marilyn Man deranged social-media presence (sample tweet: iNSiDE “OLD NEW WAVE MUSiC iNTALLED iNTAL MY BRAiNiUM” ), trying to “get “g it” might be missing the point. With Wit Grand Theft. Margaret Wel Welsh 7 p.m. 1620 District. $25-27. Penn Ave., Strip Dist All ages. 412-206-9719 or 412-206www.thealtarbar.com www.thealtarba

Order Tickets online at improv.com or by calling the box office at 412-462-5233 Text PITTSBURGH to 82257 for promotions and giveaways!

O OFF any one Appetizer Item.

The Waterfront | 166 E Bridge St Homestead, PA 15120 | (412) 462-5233

Limit One Coupon per Party Expires May 31, 2014

[POP/ROCK] + TUE., APR. 22 2

[JAM ROCK] K] + SAT., APRIL 19

Jessica Lea Ma Mayfield just second album, released her se Make My Head Sing, mixing pop with just a touch of punk single from this rock. The first si “Oblivious,” has a ’90s album, “Obliviou another tune, “I grunge sound; ano You,” is a love Wanna Love Y with a dark twist. song wit Another notable Anot Ohioan, Dan Oh Auerbach of The A Black Keys, B produced her first album, Tell Me. Check her out tonight at Club Café along with a special guests spe Gambles. KC Gam p.m. 56 S. 12th St., 8 p.m South Side. $12. 412-431-4950 or 412-43 www.clubcafelive.com www.c

Brooklyn-based d Turkuazz is a group that is not easily defined: Rock, jazz, funk, k, reggae and pop all come out in its tunes. The nine-piece band nd makes sure that all its memberss are heard, which could explain why its style isn’t easily asily summed up in one word. The e band plans to release a new album, Future 86, very soon. In the meantime,, check them out tonight at the Rex Theater with special guests Alan Evans Jessica Lea Mayfield Trio. Kayla {PHOTO COURTESY OF LEANN MUELLER} Copes 8 p.m. 1602

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31


32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

VISIT

PITTSBURGHCRAFTBEERWEEK.COM FOR INFO

Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week will highlight the Pittsburgh region’s craft beer culture, expanding the reach of craft beer through education, collaboration, cooperation and responsible libation.

APRIL 26 - MAY 4, 2014


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

33

www.pghrealale.com

TICKETS WILL SELL OUT! Get on it.

ADMISSION - $65 with a portion of the proceeds benefitting The Pittsburgh Craft Beer Alliance and Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week. Admission includes a logo tasting glass, live ale samples and food, Tartan Devils soccer match and that fun stuff mentioned earlier that will be posted as details are confirmed.

MUSIC - a local DJ will be providing the tunes.

FOOD - finger food buffet & specialties from Piper’s Pub and The Pub Chip Shop and maybe a couple other local vendors – we’ll let you know when we do.

BEER - 5 of our local Homebrewers and their contest winning live ales, at least 60 other local, regional and national breweries featuring their live ales. All properly vented and gravity poured at the proper temperature.

65 (at least) 10.8 Gallon Full Metal Firkins, all available for your sampling pleasure. Presented by Piper’s Pub, The Pittsburgh Real Ale Festival is Pittsburgh’s ONLY beer festival exclusively featuring Live Ales, gravity poured from custom built cradles. Live ales. Served right. One session. One admission price. One totally amazing day of beer and food in a venue with a breathtaking view of the city!

10.8 GALLON FULL METAL FIRKIN

PITTSBURGH REAL ALE FESTIVAL

Highmark Stadium

Saturday, May 3rd 1pm-5pm

BEER SAMPLINGS  REAL ALE FESTIVAL  TAP TAKEOVERS  BEER FESTIVALS  BEERS  BEER BREWING  BEER GAMES FOOD PAIRINGS  TAP FEATURES  ART SHOWS  FLOATING BEER AND MUSIC FESTIVAL  BEER PAIRINGS  HOME BREWING FIRKIN TAPPING  BEER RELEASES  COLLABORATIONS  SUNDAY FUNDAYS  SO MUCH MORE...

INDUSTRY INSIDER

ASSOCIATE OF HOPS

OFFICIALLY CRAFTY


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 17 Presents

Grammy award winner

Regina Belle May 3rd, 2014 • 7:30 PM For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records, Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com Kelly –Strayhorn 5941 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa 15206

HOME PROTECTION NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

Learn to shoot ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

– as little as 1 day notice

THOUSANDS OF GUNS IN STOCK HUGE SELECTION B U Y- S E L L - T R A D E

FREE RANGE PASS 1 hour range time. Expires 8/31/14.

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

31ST STREET PUB. Mount Carmel, Outside/Inside, Patton. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Markus Schulz. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Cadaver Dogs, The Filthy Lowdown, Substitute for Quality. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Twin Guns, Nox Boys, Curt Oren. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Cabaret Runaway, B-Side Avenue. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Until We Have Faces, Lions Among Us, Like Father Like Son, Kid Durango. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Brightside, Radiator Hospital, Save Ends, Somos, Costanza, Brutal Cherie. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Badfish, A Tribute to Sublime, Tropidelic, Jesse Mader & the Urban Rock Project. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. SMILING MOOSE. Lazy Ass Destroyer. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe BigBand, ATS, Squid Vicious, Laurel, Kip Ruefle Party of Ten. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Scrap Kids, Oklahoma Car Crash, more. Lawrenceville. 412-682-3200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. World’s Scariest Police Chases, Worship This!, Barons, One if By Land, HRS. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Start Making Sense (Talking Heads tribute), Backstabbing Good People, Hard Money. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Elmoz Fire. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Leif Vollebekk William Fitzsimmons. South Side. 412-381-6811. THE SHOP. Divtech, Decide Today, 8Cylinder, Cutups. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. With All My Strength, Bury Thy Kingdom, At Fault, New Vegas, Dorsia. (early). Incinerate Creation, Irukandji, Hericide, Horrid Ordeal (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Ghost, King Dude. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The

Armadillos, The Grifters. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 19 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. The Turbosonics, The Tumblers, Yinz2. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BRILLOBOX. Raya Brass Band, Lungs Face Feet, Pandemic. Bloomfield. 412-251-6058. BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CLUB CAFE. Nathan Angelo, Jesse Ruben (Early) Light Waves, Atlas, Before You (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Reign of Kindo, The Joy of Painting, Miist, Save Us From The Archon. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Liquified Guts, Edhochuli, Radium Girls, No Reason To Live. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. The Hills & the Rivers, Al Scorch, Dogjaw, Fine Wives, Remainders, Stage Hands. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MP 3 MONDAY RED HANDS

FRI 18

31ST STREET PUB. Del Rios, Volcano Dogs, Thundervest. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 720 RECORDS. DJs Nicerec & Geeman, Gene Stovall, Smilo, Divine Seven, Kid A, Melodiq, Billy Pilgrim, Omar-Abdul, Carlos Pena, more. Cash 4 Crates: A Benefit for DJ Buscrates. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. CLAIRTON AMERICAN LEGION. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-400-1141. CLUB CAFE. No Bad Ju Ju. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Wildhoney, Barlow, Brightside. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Acrylic Clouds. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Joel Lindsey. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Telltale Signs, Blackwolf Beach, Ferdinand the Bull, Whoovez, Brazilian Wax, Broke Stranded & Ugly, More AM Than FM. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KICKBACK PINBALL CAFE. Matt Pless, Unraveler, Blankets for Laura,

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Red Hands, who celebrate the release of their new EP, There’s No Growth If There’s No Rest, at the Smiling Moose Sat., April 19. Stream or download “The Worth of Water” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sunk MR. SMALLS THEATER. Chuck Heaven, Married to the Wolf, Ragan & the Camaraderie, Rivka, Joey Molinaro. Bloomfield. The White Buffalo, Jonny Two. 412-682-0320. Millvale. 866-468-3401. KICKBACK PINBALL CAFE. SMILING MOOSE. Shilpa Ray. The Homeless Gospel Choir, South Side. 412-431-4668. Douglas Fur, Jon Creeden, The One and Only Matt Miller, Black ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Mo Bear Mute, more. Lawrenceville. Nelson Experience. Lawrenceville. 412-682-3200. 412-683-5993. THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar CLUB CAFE. Toubab Krewe, Band. 412-384-3080. ChopShop. South Side. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 412-431-4950. The Holy Mess, Chumped, Kill HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lincoln, Still Alive, Mace Ballard, King Fez, Universal Beat Union. Seas We Fear to Sail, Relationships. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Phat Man PITTSBURGH WINERY. Lyla Foy. Strip District. 412-566-1000. Dee, Chaibaba, Belove, Miguel Sague Jr & Miguel Sague III, David Apocalypse & His Traveling Museum of Oddities. Phat Man Dee Cavalcade of Stars N’At. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ Millvale. 866-468-3401. hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. NIED’S HOTEL. Scheer Element. 412-687-2555. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta RAMADA INN HOTEL & Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. CONFERENCE CENTER. Twisted Fate. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Turkuaz, CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Alan Evans Trio. South Side. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae 412-381-6811. w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR 412-362-1250. & GRILLE. Ugly Blondes. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. Goodnight, DJ Rojo. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE Downtown. MEADOWS. Velveeta. 412-874-4582. Washington. ROWDY BUCK. SMILING MOOSE. . w ww per Top 40 Dance. South Red Hands. South Side. a p ty ci h pg Side. 412-431-2825. 412-431-4668. .com RUGGER’S PUB. 80s SONNY’S TAVERN. Night w/ DJ Connor. Wreck Loose, Chet South Side. 412-381-1330. Vincent, Zack Schmidt. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Chris Nacy & DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Gary Prisby. 724-433-1322. 412-431-8800. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE REMEDY. Push It!. DJ Huck Finn, RESTAURANT. Tony Janflone Jr. DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. 412-781-6771. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Don’t Give ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Up the Ship! Fest. Grey Gordon, South Side. 412-431-2825. Thin Lips, Endless Mike and the S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Beagle Club, more. Lawrenceville. 412-481-7227. 412-682-0177.

WED 23

MON 21

ALTAR BAR. Toadies, Supersuckers, Battleme. Strip District. 412-263-2877. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Tongue Oven, Passerine, Pairdown. Garfield. 412-361-2262. REX THEATER. Lacuna Coil, Eve to Adam, Cliver. South Side. 412-381-6811.

TUE 22

ALTAR BAR. Blessthefall, Silverstein, The Amity Affliction, Secrets, Heartist. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Natalie Merchant. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Jessica Lea Mayfield, Gambles. South Side. 412-431-4950.

ALTAR BAR. Riff Raff. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Proud To Be Local - The Big Payback Edition w/ Mista Scrap & Holly Hood. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 22

SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 23

SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

WED 23

LAROCHE COLLEGE. Mike Stud. Wexford. 800-838-4572.

FRI 18

SUN 20

all day-every day

SAT 19

THU 17

SAT 19

MR. SMALLS THEATER. A Day To Remember. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Frameworks & Gates, Tiny Moving Parts. South Side. 412-431-4668.

ALTAR BAR. Twiztid. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

BLUES

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 20

FRI 18

DJS

FRI 18

We buy

Clic, Overdost, Lazy Ass Destroyer, Natti Rosco, Klark Kentt. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. LOKAY LANES. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Monroeville. 412-372-3046. MOONDOG’S. Ron Yarosz & the Vehicle. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. WINGHART’S. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-5500.

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm

SAT 19

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Vince Agwada. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MOONDOG’S. Billy Price. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. 412-233-9800.

www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

JAZZ THU 17 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PENN HILLS LIBRARY. Frank Cunimondo. Penn Hills. 412-795-3507.

FRI 18

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LITTLE E’S. The New View Trio feat. George Jones. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Daniel May. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAVE-MOR Beer & Pop Warehouse

24 12 OZ. BO

THU 17

AVA CAFE & LOUNGE. Awol One, Gel Roc, Apostropheus, Proseed, Fortified Phonetx, Eraserface, Mine+Us. Oakland. 412-687-2157. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Pittsburgh Underground Music Awards Audition Showcase. Garfield. 412-583-2760. SMILING MOOSE. Afficial Family

PITTSBURGH’S

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Kea Michaels. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CJ’S. Brother to Brother, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JOHNNY’S. Southside Jerry & Friends. Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. LITTLE E’S. The Ken Karsh Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs

EFSBTEER! RG LCATIO NO

SELE

4516 BROWNS HILL ROAD 412.421.8550

SAVEMORBEER.COM

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

PLUS TAX

Offer ends 4/30/14

SAT 19

HIP HOP/R&B

27

.99

Magic HaTTt LE#S9 $

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

LOCAL TWEETS

& Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

SUN 20

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

@DJBonics (DJ Bonics) Sometimes the thing that got you to where you are now, won’t take you to the next level. I’m sure it’s that time to take it next level. grow

MON 21

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

TUE 22 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Tony DePaolis. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Christian McBride Trio. Downtown. 412-325-6769. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Nonstandard. Monthly event of new jazz composers feat. John Petrucelli & the Nu Artet. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Carolyn Perteete. Shadyside. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Book Exchange. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

@donora (Donora) As much as I love all the good press pgh is getting from ppl like @huffingtonpost, I would also like it to remain our little secret

@wizkhalifa (Wiz Khalifa) Turkey Burgers Always and forever

WED 23

CJ’S. Michele Benson. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604.

ACOUSTIC THU 17

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Jason Kendall. Washington. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. John Marcinizyn. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 18 THE BEER MARKET. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. North Side. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Broke Stranded & Ugly. Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

SAT 19

DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran & Friends. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

SUN 20

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

w paper pghcitym .co

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Joel Lindsay Trio. North Side. 412-237-9400.

MON 21 MOUNT LEBANON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Adam Miller. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 23 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MELLON INSTITUTE. Carnegie Mellon University Guitar Ensemble. Oakland. 412-268-2383.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

WORLD

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Ishtar, Carnegie Shpil Company, DJ Vadim. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SAT 19

36

MOONDOG’S. Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WED 23

ANDYS. Gerdan. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

REGGAE SAT 19

THE R BAR. The Flow Band. Dormont. 412-942-0802.

COUNTRY THU 17

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

FRI 18 RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Aimee Jane Willer Band. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Dallas Marks. Washington.

SAT 19

CHRISTINA’S. Steeltown. 412-673-0199.

WED 23

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

CLASSICAL FRI 18 SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CHANCEL CHOIR. An Evening of Music and Readings. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

WED 23 CARNEGIE MELLON PHILHARMONIC. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383. WIND SYMPHONY CHAMBER CONCERT. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 19

LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 21

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing- Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 23 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.


What to do April

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

16 - 22

WEDNESDAY 16

SATURDAY 19

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

SOUTH SIDE. Over 21 event. Tickets: facebook.com/ southsidebarcrawl. 2p.m.

Pigeons Playing Ping Pong

Bar Crawl Nation Invades South Side

Festival of Colors

THURSDAY 17

Conservatory Dance Company at the Byham Theater BYHAM THEATER Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com or 412-392-8000. Through April 19.

Markus Schulz ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Khomha & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Cabaret Runaway / B-Side Avenue HARD ROCK CAFE Station

ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX.7:30p.m.

FLAGSTAFF HILL, SCHENLEY PARK Oakland. Tickets: festivalofcolors.us. For more info visit facebook.com/ festivalofcolor. 11a.m.

FESTIVAL OF COLORS SATURDAY, APRIL 19 FLAGSTAFF HILL, SCHENLEY PARK

FRIDAY 18

Square. 412-481-ROCK. Limited all ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 8:30p.m.

Brad Williams

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 8p.m. & 10:15p.m.

Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Scooby-Doo Live! Musical Mysteries

Comedian Jim Florentine

William Fitzsimmons REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Blessthefall

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Silverstein & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

Chuck Ragan and the Camaraderie / The White Buffalo MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7:30p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 3p.m. & 6p.m.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburghpa. 7:30p.m. & 10p.m. Through April 19.

TUESDAY 22

Ghost

MONDAY 21

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800745-3000. Doors open at 7:30p.m.

Toadies

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Supersuckers and Battleme. All ages show. Tickets:

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: livenation. com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Earthkeepers Hookset Handcrafted Collection at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

For Men and Women

www.gordonshoes.com

$74.95 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

Facebook.com/GordonShoes +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


DOM’S DAY {BY AL HOFF}

IT’S HAND-TO-FOOT MARTIAL ARTS, BUT SUPPLEMENTARY WEAPONS ARE ENCOURAGED

The new British dark comedy Dom Hemingway offers a catch-up with one of those flashy, mouthy villains from one of those flashy, word-packed ’90s crime thrillers. Except now our titular anti-hero — just out of prison after 12 years — is moving a bit slower, and the film with it.

GANG FIGHT

Partners in crime: Jude Law and Richard E. Grant

I don’t miss all that jumpy rizzrazz, and director Richard Shepard only occasionally indulges in a bit of cinematic winking (dryly funny intertitles, and a slo-mo party scene). But these flourishes are almost as nostalgically quaint as the 1980s and ’90s pop tunes that give the film some bounce. (Dom leaves prison in an ill-fitting suit to the cheesy strains of The Alarm’s “The Stand.”) The plot is simply Dom (Jude Law, with a few extra pounds) trying to get his groove back. He meets his old buddy (Richard E. Grant), and hits up the crime boss (Demain Birchir) for his payout. He also hopes to reconnect with his daughter (Emilia Clarke, Game of Thrones’ Khaleesi), and maybe get a new safe-cracking gig. Most of it goes comically awry, with Dom vacillating between self-destruction and self-improvement. It’s mostly a showcase for Law to unleash blistering streams of words, most profane. Like Deadwood’s Al Swearingen, this is a low-rent bad guy with an astonishing facility for soliloquies and poetically vulgar takedowns. (Dom dismisses the scenery of the French countryside as looking “like a barmaid’s snatch after a World Cup weekend.”) It’s amusing but it all feels a bit slight, with much of the extravagant dialogue recalling the archness of a post-modern gangster flick rather than lived-in realness. But Grant is never not funny, even playing the slightly dour straight man here. Law seems to relish playing somebody other than his usual well-coiffed and well-bred playboys and lawyers, and his fun is infectious enough to keep this bubbling along.

DOM IS A SHOWCASE FOR LAW TO UNLEASH BLISTERING STREAMS OF WORDS.

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

38

It’s about to get real: Rama (Iko Uwais) and a broom handle

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HE RAID 2, the sequel to the ultraviolent 2001 Indonesian mixed-martial-arts hit The Raid: Redemption, opens rather pastorally, as the camera hovers above a dirt road in a green field. But when a car pulls up, you notice the human-sized hole dug in the road, and sure enough, the pleading guy with the bag over his head is summarily dispatched into it via a headshot. The message the killer delivers — a warning about “ambition and limitation” — will resonate throughout writer-director Gareth Evans’ film. The earlier Raid had a rather straightforward set-up designed to maximize the skills of its martial-arts star and Evans’ gift for shooting intimate fight scenes in complicated spaces: Young cop Rama (Iko Uwais) has to fight his way through a grubby Jakarta high-rise to vanquish a gangster. Raid 2 has a lot more plot, all of it reminiscent (if not derivative) of scores of crime thrillers. Here, Rama (Uwais,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

again) goes deep undercover, joining a prominent gang just as one ambitious member is breaking a longstanding truce and causing a three-way gang war.

THE RAID 2

DIRECTED BY: Gareth Evans STARRING: Iko Uwais In Indonesian and Japanese, with subtitles

Expect double-crosses, and lots of chatter about loyalty and revenge, but story isn’t the overly long film’s strength. The plot is frequently confusing; the minimal character development is perfunctory; and even the settings are standard-issue (sleek offices, nightclubs). (I did get a laugh when the gang visited a porno factory, where DVDs were being labeled with universal restroom-style icons: two ladies, a lady and two men, a lady and a dog.) Let’s face it: Viewers are coming for

the action scenes, and they are plentiful and appropriately “balletic.” All involve hand-to-foot martial arts, but supplementary weapons are encouraged: knives, heavy objects, guns. Tapping Evans’ penchant for shooting action in teeny-tiny spaces, the first brawl takes place in a toilet cubicle, and the film’s showpiece is a fiveman fight in a speeding car, which is also being shot at and rammed by other vehicles. The violence is bloody and graphic, if inventive: A man pulls a knife out of his own back and uses it stab another guy’s leg; a man gets his face stirfried; and one woman can do a lot of damage with two hammers. But Evans’ has an eye and ear for better-than-average style — the sound of a metal baseball bat dragging on concrete is nervetingling — and the fighting is shot without visual gimmicks. If you’re a fan of martial-arts films, can stomach the garroting and don’t mind a choppy plot, then get your Raid 2 on. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BEARS. A coming-of-age story starring bears from Disney Nature. Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey’s doc follows an Alaskan bear family for one year, as its two cubs learn important life skills. Starts Fri., April 18. A HAUNTED HOUSE 2. Michael Tiddes directs this horror-film spoof, starring Marlon Wayans as the dude who moves out of one spooked house into another. Starts Fri., April 18. HEAVEN IS FOR REAL. Greg Kinnear stars in this adaptation of the popular book, in which a young child claims to have visited heaven during a near-death experience. Randall Wallace directs.

April 27, 2pm

TRANSCENDENCE. A dying scientist uploads his brain into a computer, making him suddenly super-powerful, with alarming consequences. Johnny Depp and Morgan Freeman star in this sci-fi thriller from Wally Pfister. Starts Fri., April 18. UNDER THE SKIN. An alien masquerading as a female hitchhiker preys on men. Scarlett Johansson stars in Jonathan Glazer’s sci-fi thriller. Starts Fri., April 18.

REPERTORY THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. The basis of Judeo-Christian values, at last writ large on the big screen starring Charlton Heston as Moses, and directed by spectacle master Cecil B. DeMille. “Let my people go!” 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 16. AMC Loews. $5

Bears of Record Store Day (April 19). 7:30 and 10 p.m. Fri., April 18; and 3 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., April 19. Hollywood THE KID / A DOG’S LIFE. Catch of double-feature of classic Charlie Chaplin silent comedies. In “The Kid” (1921, 54 min.), Chaplin’s Little Tramps partners with a young foundling (Jackie Coogan). And in “A Dog’s Life” (1918, 33 min.), Chaplin’s sidekick is a helpful mutt named Scraps. 3 p.m. Sat., April 19, and 3 p.m. Sun., April 20. Oaks

The Butcher Boy with Buster Keaton and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, plus more short films. Live accompaniment on piano by Tom Roberts.

$8, $6 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/butcherboy

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST. Mel Gibson’s 2004 film follows Jesus (Jim Caviezel) through his final hours, from his crisis of faith in Gethsemane through his arrest, scourging and crucifixion. In Aramaic, Latin and Hebrew, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 19. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 BREADCRUMB TRAIL. This new film from Lance Bangs profiles the late-1980s Louisville, Ky., band Slint. 7 p.m. Sat., April 19. Hollywood FRANCESCO. Learn about the 12th-century man St. Francis of Assisi (whose name the current pope adopted), and his journey from wealthy heir to ascetic humanitarian, in this 1989 docu-drama. Directed by Liliana Cavini, and starring Mickey Rourke and Helena Bonham Carter. 8 p.m. Sat., April 19. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668

Ashes and Diamonds EASTER PARADE. Judy Garland and Fred Astaire star in “the happiest musical ever made,” a buoyant tale of nightclub performers in the early 20th century. Charles Walters directed the 1948 musical comedy, with songs by Irving Berlin. 2 p.m. Thu., April 17; and 3 and 7 p.m. Sun., April 20. Hollywood ENEMY. Denis Villeneuve adapts Jose Saramago’s 2002 novel The Double in this thriller about a man who pursues his look-alike after spotting him in a film; Jake Gyllenhaal stars. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 17. Hollywood HIGH FIDELITY. John Cusack stars in Stephen Frears’ 2000 comedy, an adaptation of N ick Hornby’s novel about records and relationships, and various lists thereof. Screens in celebration

THE PRINCESS BRIDE. Rob Reiner’s 1987 film is that rare bird — a film to delight children and adults alike, an upbeat fairy tale with romance, comedy, swordplay and deliciously quotable lines. (“Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”) And what a cast: Cary Elwes, Robin Wright Penn, Mandy Pantinkin, Billy Crystal, Peter Falk, Wallace Shawn, Christopher Guest and professional wrestler Andre the Giant. William Goldman wrote the clever script. Screens as part of a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about brides. 8 p.m. Sun., April 20. Regent Square (Al Hoff)

CP

Now playing at RANGOS OMNIMAX THEATER

THE BLACK SIX. Matt Cimber’s 1974 exploitation flick features a black motorcycle gang out to avenge a member’s killing at the hands of a white-supremacist biker gang. The “six” were portrayed by NFL players Gene Washington, Mercury Morris, Lem Barney, Willie Lanier, Carl Eller and Pittsburgh Steeler “Mean” Joe Greene. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 23. Hollywood

Film sponsored locally by

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

travel guide Advertising Supplement

Heaven Is For Real WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY. Mel Stuart’s 1971 adaptation of Roald Dahl’s story is heartwarming without being gooey, and still deliciously weird. It’s a slow set-up while we wait out all the winners of the trip into Wonka’s secret candy factory — but once inside, the wonder, wackiness and even danger begin! The sets are wonderful color-saturated structures, free from the dumb special effects that date other older fantasy films. As Wonka, Gene Wilder is a delight, warm yet somehow malevolent. He doesn’t seem to care at all when bratty kids disappear. Sure, he says they’re coming back …

CP

LOVELY, LETHAL AND OUT OF THIS WORLD.”

What wicked pleasure to see irksome kids just vanish into psychedelic machinery. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 23. AMC Loews. $5 (AH) ASHES AND DIAMONDS. Andrzej Wajda’s 1958 realist drama, set at the very end of World War II, is considered among the greatest films of Polish cinema. It screens as part of Pittsburgh Filmmakers Essential Cinema series. In Polish, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., April 23. Melwood. $2 SACCO AND VANZETTI. Peter Miller’s 2006 documentary looks at the infamous case of Sacco and Vanzetti, two Italian immigrants in Boston who, in the 1920s, were tried and convicted of murder. Their case drew international attention, with protesters claiming the men were victims of ethnic and political prejudice. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 24. The Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront Drive, Munhall. 412-831-3871 or www. battleofhomesteadfoundation.org. Free ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Getaway ideas to help you plan your next vacation Arrives April 23 Easter Parade (1948) - 4/17 @ 2pm, 4/20 @ 3 & 7pm All seats $5! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Enemy

(2014) - 4/17 @ 7:30pm A man seeks out his exact look-alike after spotting him in a movie. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

High Fidelity (2000) - 4/18 @ 7:30 & 10pm, 4/19 @ 3 & 9:30pm John Cusack and Jack Black in a knowing take on men, messed-up romance, and music. In 35mm! A FILM BY

JONATHAN GLAZER

Soundtrack available on Milan Records

©Seventh Kingdom Productions Limited, Channel Four Television Corporation and The British Film Institute.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, APRIL 18!

PITTSBURGH PITTSBURGH WEST HOMESTEAD SouthSide Works The Manor Theatre AMC Loews Waterfront 22 Cinema (412) 381-7335 (412) 422-7729 (888) AMC-4FUN

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Breadcrumb Trail (2013) - 4/19 @ 7pm

Presented by Drusky Entertainment Film Series,

a documentary about the rock band Slint. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rocky Horror Picture Show - 4/19 @ Midnight! 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org


[DANCE]

AMERICA ITSELF, HE WOULD REALIZE, IS HOLY ENOUGH

POINT PERKS

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Conservatory Dance Company presents AT THE BYHAM 8 p.m. Thu., April 17; 8 p.m. Fri., April 18; and 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., April 19. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $18 -20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com N E W S

+

[ART REVIEW]

Point Park University dance alumni seem to be everywhere: on Broadway, and in national touring shows and dance companies, on television and in the movies. So You Think You Can Dance finalist Neil Haskell, for instance, recently appeared on an episode of Glee, while Luke Murphy stars in the movie Five Dances. They are just two of the dancers and choreographers who’ve come out of Point Park’s prestigious dance program. For the program’s 245 students, a highlight of their performance opportunities at Point Park is At the Byham. Performed by the Conservatory Dance Company, this annual marquee showcase, celebrating its 10th anniversary, runs April 17-19 at the Byham Theater. The show features works by David Parsons and Dwight Rhoden and masterworks by Martha Graham and George Balanchine. One student looking to follow in the footsteps of notable alumni is senior dance major Kathryn Van Yahres. In two of the program’s four performances, the 22-year-old from Philadelphia will dance the lead role of the waltz girl in Balanchine’s “Serenade” (1935). Perhaps the most famous of his ballets, “Serenade” — set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings in C, Op. 48 — is a demanding and visually stunning neoclassical ballet originally created for students of the School of American Ballet. Unconventionally, the waltz girl arrives late to one scene, and in another, she falls down. “I am completely enjoying this role,” says Yahres. “It challenges my stamina and technical ability.” Yahres calls this year’s At the Byham one of the best she has been a part of, thanks also to works including Rhoden’s “Mercy” (2009). Familiar here for his work with Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Rhoden says via email that “Mercy,” set to music by Steve Reich and others, “revolves around world issues of violence, and unrest.” CDC will perform an excerpt of the two-act ballet. Graham’s “Steps in the Street,” an excerpt from 1936’s Chronicle, was also inspired by a darker subject: the rise of fascism prior to World War II. The work “deals with isolation after great tragedy, but also suggests the endurance of the human spirit,” says Point Park associate professor Judith Leifer-Bentz. Completing the program is Parsons’ vigorous “Wolfgang,” (2005) danced to music by Mozart.

David Parsons’ “Wolfgang,” at Point Park’s Conservatory Dance Company {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

AMERICAN

Winslow Homer’s “Picking Flowers”

PROSPECTS {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

“T

HAT’S GEORGE Washington? That’s George Washington!” You say it for the first painting out of surprise, and for the second one out of visceral recognition. The two works hang at the entrance to An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting, a touring show organized by the Warner Foundation and now at the Frick Art & Historical Center. Fifty works from the 19th and early 20th centuries are on display as highlights from a collection of American art based in Tuscaloosa, Ala. From the outset, and throughout, the show gives us American artists and subjects, while establishing a program of affirmation and rethinking intertwined. Daniel Huntington’s circa-1840 portrait of Washington and Christopher Gist crossing the Allegheny is a medium-sized oil on canvas work that places the young British officer and his guide on a makeshift raft in

transit. The history lesson about their failed attempt to eject the French from Britishclaimed territory in 1753 is familiar, but has never been iconic in the way that this artist seems to desire.

AN AMERICAN ODYSSEY: THE WARNER COLLECTION OF AMERICAN PAINTING

continues through May 25. Frick Art & Historical Center, 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

Maybe Huntington would have been more successful if Washington’s body were choreographed with a less-stiff relationship with Gist’s and a more precise conjunction with his own head. The lack of notoriety of Huntington’s work comes from the unmythical tale of a small military failure, but

the compositional irregularities don’t help. But if this show’s valuation of artistic quality is in question, just look at the adjacent Gilbert Stuart portrait of Washington, a miniature watercolor on ivory. The image is familiar from every elementary school hallway in the country, but this particularly gauzy and Olympian version comes straight from the artist’s hand, and the Father of Our Country’s gravitas seems freshly earned, even though the artist was producing these works with brisk consistency long after the first one. So are we a nation of feckless hinterland incompetents, or one of steel-eyed republican patriarchs? Clearly, each is more meaningful with some acknowledgement of the other. We are invariably more compelling in a state of being incomplete, unresolved or oddly out of bounds, none of which is perceptible without some version of the ideal in mind. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


AMERICAN PROSPECTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

May 30 - June 8

July 8 - 13

June 13 - 22

1/2 Price

for Children 3-14!* Sponsored by

June 24 - 29

JJuly 18 - 27 July 29 - Aug 3

* 1/2 price tickets for children are available iin P Price i S Scale l C only.

pittsburghCLO.org ‡ 412-456-6666 Groups 412-325-1582

At the Benedum Center

Theater that moves you.

Buy S Tickets eason & Save See 3 Sh o for und

ws

412-28er $100! 1-2822

Through April

27 LEXINGTON TECHNOLOGY CENTER 400 N. Lexington Street, behind Construction Junction in N. Point Breeze For directions, dining options, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com or call 412.362.1713

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

[BOOKS]

FEAT OF CLAY {BY ANGELA SUICO}

Dave Wachter’s cover art for Breath of Bones: Tale of the Golem

All Shows On Sale Now!

Just look at Frederick Edwin Church’s “Moses Viewing the Promised Land” (1846). Church places Moses on a rocky promontory before a compellingly verdant landscape at a yearning sunset. Only 20 years old at the time of painting, Church had considerable skills in rendering light and landscape, but not yet his full mastery of the roiling, polychromed cloudscapes of his later works, which are usually much larger and also lacking specific biblical references. America itself, he would realize, is holy enough. We know that Church himself made it to the Promised Land of accomplishment and notoriety. But his rumination as a young man on the failure to do so here is poignant, a singular and nuanced reward in what might previously have been construed as a lesser work by the artist. Indeed, the gnawing question of greater and lesser works persists throughout this exhibit, posited but never answered definitively. For example, we get a series of delicate and masterful child or motherand-child portraits from Mary Cassatt in drypoint and aquatint, each barely 8-by6-inches, all produced in 1923. Cassatt distinguished herself as an artist on her own terms (not simply as a Degas protégé) in both the Paris Salon and the Impressionist exhibitions in the 1860s and ’70s. But by 1923, the woman who was once at the cutting edge of Western art had sat still for a few rapid revolutions in painting, and was, like numerous colleagues, resting on her laurels. Works of this size and period, while showing her skills, hardly indicate what her achievements meant in their crowning moments and continuing legacy. The arc of art history is toward the encyclopedic and inclusive. So no apologies are necessary for works that are smaller, earlier or lesser known than those in museums down the street or the turnpike. Indeed, this show has some real successes in demonstrating that such works can be at least as provocative as their more iconic partners, and elicit substantive interactions in juxtaposition with them. The arc of art history has also trended toward reassessment of icons and thoughtful examination of lesser figures, which this show does to good effect. That same arc has trended, moreover, toward more thoughtful and critical assessments of race, class and gender, which this exhibition seems to shy away from — apparently not because of the capable installation here but more due to the values of the Tuscaloosa-based collection. Plenty more rethinking is due in order to fulfill both the initial promise of this show and the initial promise of American itself, for which more justice is always the ideal.

When Dave Wachter was approached to illustrate Steve Niles and Matt Santoro’s World War II comic Breath of Bones: Tale of the Golem, several things appealed to him. The first was the chance to work with Niles, a noted comics horror writer. The second was the story — another period piece for the locally based artist’s portfolio, which includes narratives set during the Viking era, the Depression and the 1960s. The third was the title character. “I like drawing monsters,” says Wachter. “I like seeing a monster as a hero.” Set in an unnamed Jewish village, Breath of Bones (Dark Horse) follows a young boy who witnesses a British plane crash. Nazi soldiers investigate; for protection, the villagers assemble a golem, a voiceless creature from Jewish folklore. Formed from mud and obedient to human commands, their creation is a massive being that suggests The Thing from The Fantastic Four. But unlike The Thing, the golem has twigs and plant roots sticking from his back. For realism’s sake, Niles wanted the golem to be only partially formed, assembled hurriedly by people working on different parts of the body at the same time. And Wachter drew the golem’s face in a minimalistic style, “because it’s more of a reflection. [The golem is] not really its own person.” The black-and-white drawings were Wachter’s idea, too. He believes the look fit the time period, but allowed him to deviate from a comics norm. “A lot of publishers won’t take the risk of something in black and white,” says Wachter, whose work has earned Russ Manning Award and Will Eisner Award nominations. “It lets me establish a different kind of mood that wouldn’t be possible in color. Instead of limiting me, it gave me more opportunities.” The biggest challenge was representing the time period accurately; Wachter used Google image searches and The Smithsonian’s Flickr account to capture early-20thcentury Europe. Fan communities helped, too. “There’s a lot of groups of aficionados — people who are World War II buffs,” he notes. “They have websites and message boards where they get together and share photographs.” Last month, Wachter celebrated the release of Breath of Bones at The Toonseum. Originally from Cincinnati, Wachter moved from Chicago to Pittsburgh four years ago. Pittsburgh, he says, has “all the things I liked about Chicago, [but it’s] not quite as expensive and not quite as overwhelming.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


GALLERY CRAWL UE

AVEN

Z HEINL HAL

CAR FREE FRIDAYS Walk, bike, bus or carpool to the Gallery Crawl and celebrate another Car Free Friday with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Port Authority, and BikePGH.

1. Wood Street Galleries* 601 Wood Street

212 Ninth Street

ELECTRIFIED | Alexandre Burton and Edwin van der Heide Artists Edwin van der Heide and Alexandre Burton pay homage to Nikola Tesla’s pioneering work in electricity, X-rays and wireless communication. Their installations are North American premieres.

Process Masters| High School Students from the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild

2. SPACE*

2nd floor:

812 Liberty Avenue

The Orange Experience Sound Elevator explores the psychological effects of color through music.

The Secret Life of Robots | Toby Fraley Music by DJ Gordy Purchase treats from Sweet Peaches and The Pittsburgh Pie Guy.

11. 937 Liberty Avenue

29. Arthur Murray Dance Studio 136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

Come complain with the Office of Public Art as we collect complaints for the Complaints Choir, a public art program of the Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. 5:30 to 7:30pm.

3rd floor: Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery:

Therapy and The Muse | Ernest McCarty

Digital Hand | Penn State University School of Visual Arts

22. 707 Penn Gallery* The Occasional Market | Tom Sarver

23. Katz Plaza

Teenie “One Shot” Harris The August Wilson Center Collection

Live Music by Formula 412, 6:30 to 9pm Carnegie Library Button-making and Books WYEP Music Station

13. Tonic

24. Backstage Bar People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers | Robert Villamagna Live music by Jevon Rushton, 5:30 to 7:30pm

Music by J. Malls.

14. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

25. PNC Legacy Project

SPACE, 812 Liberty Avenue

Interioractive, 10pm, $5

111 Ninth Street

Print Power | Pittsburgh CAPA 9-12 Visual Art Students 819 Penn Avenue

Scene and Song Revue In partnership with Pinnacle Productions, Point Park University.

17. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council* 810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

*open until 9:30pm

Reflective Locations An Art on the Walls exhibit curated by D.S. Kinsel.

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating Black History Month.

+

Meeting of Important People and The Telephone Line, 10pm, $5

Wood Street Galleries, 2nd floor,

539 Liberty Avenue

Party inside a live exhibit with interactive artworks. Desserts by Bluebird Kitchen. Music by DJ Pete Butta.

Dream flavor of ice cream for the month of April is banana cream pie, benefitting G3 Entertainment USA.

Uber will provide free rides (up to $20) with promo code: WOODSTGALLERIES. New users only.

27. Boutique 208*

Electric Slidez: PowerPoint Throwdown 10pm, $10 or $5 Student Rush, BYOB

208 Sixth Street

9. Arcade Comedy Theater

N E W S

Keep It Moving | Official After-Crawl Dance Party, 10pm, $5, Cash Bar

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Alumni & Student Show Live music by The Willful Souls

16. Future Tenant

811 Liberty Avenue

Tasting and the history of local whiskeys, gins, and rums, with Eric Meyer, co-owner of Wigle Whiskey.

Trust Arts Education Center, Peirce Studio, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

15. CAPA Gallery

The Way | Sarah VanTassel

Whiskey Tasting, 9pm, 21+, No Cover

937 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor

655 Penn Avenue

7. Trust Arts Education Center

Pittsburgh Filmmakers presents regionally made short films.

Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street

Reading & Book Signing, The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach 9:30pm, No Cover

7th St. and Penn Avenue

26. Dream Cream Ice Cream

809 Liberty Avenue

107 Sixth Street

August Henry’s Saloon, 946 Penn Avenue

707 Penn Avenue

symbols of self | Urban Pathways Students Live music by The Sounds of Steel band.

8. Harris Theater

30. Renaissance Hotel

Dane Vannatter, Jazz at Andy’s 8pm-12am, No Cover

709 Penn Avenue

914 Penn Avenue

Pittsburgh Public Schools 2014 All-City Showcase of Arts & Cultures

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Swing at 7:30pm, Bachata at 8pm, Salsa at 8:30pm.

Live Music by James Graff, 6 to 8pm.

20. Night Market VIII

Historic Pittsburgh, 1900-1920 Painstakingly re-produced digital prints by Mark Muse. 805-807 Liberty Avenue

AY

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd floor

600 Liberty Avenue

805 Liberty Avenue

YW

crawl after dark

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery

6. Shaw Galleries*

UE

21. 709 Penn Gallery*

Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

VEN

Presented by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership.

Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh | Leslie Ansley

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti

HA

Echoloco, an immersive experience for one, 6 to 8:30pm. Sign up begins at 5:30pm.

980 Liberty Avenue

5. Tito Way

ERR

ENT

Penn Avenue & 8th Street

12. August Wilson Center

Impe’kyoonees | applecubed

WB

SEV

First Floor: Bricolage

610 Wood Street

717 Liberty Avenue

TRA

P

*open until 11pm

3. Urban League

4. Social Status*

11

10 8 9 67 2 S 3

12

18. Bend Yoga Craft Market at Bend Yoga

10. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

13

P

P

25

14

16

5

WO OD STR EET

1

UE

VEN TY A

19. Penn Avenue & 8th Street Venues with an * are open until 10pm.

18 17

4

27

26

20

DUM BENETER CEN

REET

23

R LIBE

Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

19 22 21

H ST

P

REET

Sponsors:

H ST

REET

PENN

NINT

TER THEAUARE SQ ILLY O’REEATER TH

24

29 28

P

T

P

30

REET

IX ST TANW

A Production of:

M BYHTAER THEA

H ST

All information and locations are subject to change.

SIXT

P

P

T TREE TH S

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS

P

TREE TH S EIGH

TD

FOR

P

ARD ULEV

E BO

ESN UQU

N SEVE

Friday, April 25 5:30-9pm Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

E RENC LAW NTER D L. TION CE I V A D VEN CON

15

TENT

in the Cultural District

Meet Your Makers Live Music by Jonathan Dull.

Arcade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Avenue

28. Verve Wellness

Salsa Fridays 10pm Free Lesson; 10:30pm-1:30am No Cover, Cash Bar

142 Sixth Street, Third floor

New contemporary dance works in progress. 7:30, 8:30 & 9:30pm

Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

Dancing with DJ Paul Mitchell.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


{PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER MULL}

Tony Bingham (left) and Weston Blakesley in Quantum’s Pantagleize

[PLAY REVIEWS]

FARCICALLY SAD {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} QUANTUM THEATRE’S enthralling production of Michel de Ghelderode’s Pantagleize mixes media, politics, comedy, pathos and a subversion of the space-time continuum. The Belgian playwright subtitled his 1929 work “a farce to make you sad,” a pretty good description of the political process at any time. This world premiere, a very free adaptation/collaboration between playwright Jay Ball and director Jed Allen Harris, uses the original as a framework to poke at revolution, right-wing despots, left-wing dreamers and the world at large.

PANTAGLEIZE

continues through April 27. Quantum Theatre at the Lexington Technology Center, off North Lexington Avenue, North Point Breeze. 888-718-4253 or www.quantumtheatre.com

Don’t expect realism. The ever-optimistic title character (the name means “ever shining”) of Harris-Ball’s iteration is supposedly based on beat poet Allen Ginsberg, especially his pomposity. As charmingly portrayed by Randy Kovitz, Pantagleize is a hippie parasite and aggressive heterosexual, in a teddy-bear sort of way. He lives an astonishing adventure. Perhaps he learns. Let’s not spoil the plot, which doesn’t make much sense anyway. Much of the show is the tour de force by Tony Bingham,

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

primarily as the right-eyed Prezidente of the unnamed Eastern European microstate that provides the setting and intrigue. But Bingham also has to play against himself in his video portrayals of four 1980-ish historical figures, supposedly his cronies in extreme-right rule. Bingham’s characterizations range from a brutally coarse Idi Amin to a solipsistic (and absolutely hilarious) Margaret Thatcher. There’s a lot to admire: Lisa Ann Goldsmith as a femme fatale with a past; Erika Strasburg as the achingly innocent idealist; Abdiel Vivancos as a would-be revolutionary leader and fantasist; Sam Turich as the blunt commie; and especially Weston Blakesley as the Prezidente’s bumbling enforcer and pawn. The design team has made much of the former North Point Breeze office space/warehouse: scenic designer Tony Ferrieri and assistant Jeff Fuga; Kevin Ramser, video; C. Todd Brown, lighting; RJ Romeo, production; and Elizabeth Atkinson, sound. Costume designer Susan Tsu and assistant Emily Chalmers relieve the Iron Curtain gray with a mix of Ruritania, Carnaby Street and Haight-Ashbury. The political commentary aims at the past several decades, with the occasional bullseye, but Pantagleize also delivers plenty of real chuckles. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SYNGE ALONG {BY TED HOOVER} FUNNY HOW plays come in and out of

fashion. Several years back, it seemed


everybody was producing John Millington Synge’s comedy/drama The Playboy of the Western World … and then it disappeared from local stages. Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre Company leaps in to fill the void with a new student production, directed by Kim Martin. In a remote backwater in Ireland, we find ourselves in the village public house, run by Michael Flaherty and his daughter Pegeen. In the way of these things, Pegeen is young and beautiful, pining for the love she doesn’t feel from her would-be finance, the nerdy Shawn Keogh. Cue a light change as the door bursts open and in rushes Christy Mahon, a man on the run because he just killed his father. He’s hot, he’s dangerous, he’s single … and soon the village women are flocking around, in love with the swashbuckling story he relishes telling. The plot, as they say, thickens and soon Synge’s piling incident on top of event until — in a not altogether believable way — he draws it all to a close. There’s a lot to like about Playboy, its antic good humor and the slight melancholy perfuming the work. But there’s a musty quaintness to it as well. It doesn’t reach high enough to achieve “classic” status and

is, perhaps, too dated to be relevant. So Martin — and bless her for it! — directs with the two elements essential for a successful production: She’s assembled a top-flight cast of actors willing to fling themselves into every corner of Synge’s loopiness, and she directs the play like an addict chasing a fix. The propulsion she brings, while never ignoring nuance, helps land this script in the most entertaining way.

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

WAYNE MCGREGOR | RANDOM DANCE

THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD continues through April 19. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Nik Duggan plays Christy with just about as much charm as could be humanly possible, and his scenes with Amanda Lee Hawkins — in a fully realized performance as Pegeen — are tender and heartfelt. We know they’re star-crossed, but we can’t help rooting for them any less because of that. Jenny Lester and Ashton Guthrie provide deeper shadings in supporting roles, and Corwin Stoddard’s hangdog Shawn brings humanity and warmth as well.

|

TICKETS START AT $19

10 hot dancers 3200 LED lights

SEE VIDEO O

SAT

TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666

TrustArts.org/random

APR 26, 2014 BYHAM THEATER

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

8 PM

Michael Kenna, Homage to Brassaï, London, England, Negative 1983/Print 1984

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Explore the relationship between architecture and photography with works from Ezra Stoller, Frances Benjamin Johnston, the “Carnegie Art Set,” and contemporary photographers in the museum’s collection.

ON VIEW THROUGH MAY 26

immerse yourself in photography! visit cmoa.org for a full list of photography-based exhibitions.

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


FOR THE WEEK OF

04.1704.24.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

APRIL 17

Dancing i iin JJaffa f

SATURDAY, APRIL 19 • 3 & 6PM • BENEDUM CENTER TRUSTARTS.ORG • BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456 - 6666 • G ROU PS 10+ TICKETS 412-47 1 - 6930

+ THU., APRIL 17 {SCREEN}

The Shaler North Hills Library is one of 22 libraries in Pennsylvania hosting Film Forward, an international touring program backed by the Sundance Institute that promotes cultural understanding. Tonight’s offering is Hilla Medalia’s documentary Dancing in Jaffa, which follows famed ballroom dancer Pierre Dulaine to his Israeli hometown, where he teaches 150 Israeli and Palestinian children to dance together. A post-screening discussion about facing political and cultural differences is facilitated by artist and educator William Rock. Film Forward continues with five more films through April 30. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 1822 Mount Royal Blvd., Glenshaw. Free. Register at 412-486-0211

Eugene, the show is directed by Ted Pappas. The first performance of this Pittsburgh Public Theater production is tonight. Angela Suico 8 p.m. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $23-55 ($15.75 for students). 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

{WORDS}

Tonight’s TNY Presents features three poets and a writer known for her comedy. Local poets Stephanie Brea, Jason Baldinger (who has a Fashion by Mureaux

+ FRI., APRIL 18 {DANCE}

{STAGE}

Love triangles can make good drama, but George Bernard Shaw’s Candida shows they can make a good comedy, too. In this take on love and marriage in the late 19th century, Candida is caught between Rev. Morrell, her socialist husband, and Eugene Marchbanks, a young poet. Starring Gretchen Egolf (pictured) as Candida, David Whalen as Morrell and Jared McGuire as

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

collection and chapbook forthcoming) and Bob Walicki — who just published his debut chapbook, A Room Full of Trees — are joined by Andrea Laurion. Laurion, who calls herself “a big fan of libraries, gin & tonics, staying up late, and my cat, Harold,” is an improv performer with credits including the Upright Citizens Brigade, and publication credits including McSweeney’s. BO 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5 or free with potluck contribution. www.tny presents.blogspot.com

APRIL 24

Spectrum t

The Pitt African Music and Dance Ensemble celebrates African culture with drumming and dancing tonight at Bellefield Hall Auditorium. The ensemble, which is both a course and a student organization, explores the continent’s artistic traditions through vocal performance, music and visual art. The group is led by Yamoussa Camara, a native of Guinea who toured with American ensembles and taught at Yale for 10 years before sharing his skills at Pitt and Carnegie Mellon. Directing the ensemble is Gavin Steingo, a professor who specializes in South African music. AS 8 p.m.


sp otlight

Heels on Wheels, the New York-based group of queer femme artists touring the Northeast, rolls into town with its multilayered Glitter Roadshow. The show, co-founded by performers Damien Luxe and Heather Ács in 2010, mixes multimedia, readings and performance art to examine “femme/inine-positive queer embodiment.” As Ács says in a video about the show, “There are certain assumptions that get made about feminine people. We wanted to create a space where it was safe to be feminine in all kinds of ways for all kinds of genders.” In her “Welcome to the Waldorf Hysteria,” Ács combines sound effects and hysterics to explore the anatomy of losing control. Luxe’s “Femme Footprints” presents both video footage and queer femmes in mermaid costumes to insist on solidarity within the working class. Shomi Noise reads from her zine series “Building Up Emotional Muscles,” detailing her life as a Bolivian immigrant who found her niche in alternative music. Alvis Parsley shares a “heartfelt confession draw[ing] on ... experiences as a genderqueer Asian.” Angel Nafis reads poetry, detailing “her black girl brilliance in its vastness and depth.” And both karaoke and Sex in the City figure into Sabina Ibarrola’s tale of breaking up and moving on. Hear it at The Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Angela Suico 8 p.m. Thu., April 17. 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7-15 (sliding scale). 412-924-0634 or www.heelsonwheelsroadshow.com

315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $5-12. 412-624-7529 or www.music.pitt.edu

+ SAT., APRIL 19

a discounted fee of $125. Fees include the mandatory bus shuttle from Monroeville to the trailhead and back. BO 8 a.m.6 p.m. $33. Series continues through June 14. Register at www.ventureoutdoors.org

dancing and eating desserts, celebrants throw colored powders into the air, covering each other with different hues. Pittsburgh’s own Holi Festival of Colors, which is non-denominational, non denominational, takes

{EXPO}

Snap a photo with R2-D2, you must: The e robot is one of the attractions at the Pittsburgh Comic & Collectibles Show, sponsored by New Dimension Comics and held at its store in Pittsburgh Mills Mall. Chris Burnham, who illustrated Batman Incorporated d — and who frequented the comic chain’s Cranberry Township store as a kid — is the show’s guest of honor. Also appearing are Night of the Living Dead co-writer John Russo and actor George Kosana, who played Sheriff McClelland. The show will hold door prize drawings every half hour, as well as offering free giveaways. AS 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 590 Pittsburgh Mills Circle, Tarentum. Free. 412-965-1487 or www.ndcomics.com

vegetarian food. The Holi Festival is sponsored by The Palace of Gold, the Hare Krishna temple in West Virginia. AS 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Frew Street and Schenley Drive, Schenley Park, Oakland. $2035. www.festivalofcolors.us.

Free with admission ($12-13; children under 2 admitted free). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

+ MON., APRIL 21

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHILDREN’S MUSEUM}

{EXHIBIT}

APRIL 21 XOXO: The Love Letters Project

{{FESTIVAL}}

Every spring, Hindus in India welcome the season, honor Lord Krishna and temporarily suspend the rigid caste system with the Holi Festival. Besides

place at Flagstaff Hill today. Colors will be thrown hourly from noon until 6 p.m. In between, this family-friendly event offers live music, yoga sessions, dancing and

For a minute, set aside those love emails, those love tweets, those Facebook posts of love. As part of XOXO, its exhibit about love and forgiveness, The Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh hosts the monthlong XOXO: The Love Letters Project. From 11 a.m.-2 p.m. every weekday (and noon3 p.m. on weekends), join artist-in-residence Dalia Shevin to produce a hand-written letter or postcard to someone (or something) you love. Letters by past participants are on exhibit. Holding such a profession in your hand, Shevin says, really does make all the difference. BO 11 a.m-2 p.m. 10 Children’s Way, North Side.

APRIL 17 Candida

+ TUE., APRIL 22 {GREENING}

If you’ve traversed East Liberty lately, you’ve likely noticed the dug-up front yard of East Liberty Presbyterian Church. That was sewer work — but not in the conventional sense. This project is about keeping rainwater out of the city’s overburdened sewer lines. This morning’s Stormwater Reclamation Project Earth Day Dedication culminates a fouryear initiative to disconnect the rain spouts on the front of the church and redirect water for absorption by new trees, bushes and other plants — a plus for both ALCOSAN and our rivers. The church calls the reclamation system, with its rain garden, the largest of its kind in the region. BO 10 a.m. 116 Highland Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-441-3800 or www.CathedralofHope.org

{OUTDOORS}

If you’re up for an upland challenge, Venture Outdoors is ready for you. Today’s the first leg of the group’s Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail quest, a seven-Saturday series that’ll take you the length of the 70-mile trail. Hike leader Bruce Cridlebaugh guides today’s 11.2-mile jaunt; while the pace is moderate, the climbs are long and steep, so participants must be in good physical shape. You can do any of the hikes, or take on all seven for

N E W S

APRIL 18

Pitt African M Music i and Dance Ensemble +

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

{MUSIC}

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s

+

E V E N T S

+

JazzLive marks National Jazz Appreciation Month with a special series of concerts. Tonight’s features the Christian McBride Trio, named for the Grammy-winning bassist and composer. Though still in his early 40s, McBride has collaborated with everyone from Sonny Rollins, McCoy Tyner and Pat Metheny to James Brown, The Roots and Queen Latifah. McBride’s new trio, with pianist Christian Sands and drummer Ulysses Owens Jr., takes the stage at the Cabaret at Theater Square. The series concludes on April 29, with pianist Robert Glasper. BO 8 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30.75. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

+ THU., APRIL 24 {SHOWCASE}

RAW: Pittsburgh holds its latest showcase for local artists in everything from visual art, fashion and film to music, hair and make-up, and dance. RAW: Pittsburgh (the local incarnation of a nationwide, Los Angeles-based RAW network) calls this event Spectrum. Organizer Leigh Yock promises to fill Club Zoo with work by 26 visual artists; fashion shows by Mureaux (pictured), Unique Impression, Hyena and Biome; and more. Alexandra Bodnarchuk, Infra Dance Company, and Janim (of Pittsburgh Bellydance Academy) perform; the live music is by Solarburn, Shelf Life String Band, Velvet Heat, and The Wave. BO 7 p.m.-midnight. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $15-20. 21 and over. www.rawartists.org/pittsburgh

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER CANDIDA. Comedy by George Bernard Shaw. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru May 13. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat. Thru April 19. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. FIFTH WALL - TRANSIT TALES. A multimedia storytelling project about how public transit affects our lives in Allegheny County. Thu., April 17, 7 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. GROUNDED. One-woman show following a gutsy fighter pilot whose unexpected pregnancy puts her career on hold. Sun, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 4. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The courtroom of Judge Jackie

Justice is now in session w/ “real” cases involving zombies, spaceships, furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PANTAGLEIZE. Adaptation of Michel de Ghelderode’s 1931 avant garde play. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru April 27. Lexington Technology Center, Point Breeze. 412-362-1713. THE PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD. Classic Irish comedy by John Millington Synge. Presented by Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre Company. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. Thru April 19. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. SHAKESPEARE UNLEASHED. A collection of seldom heard Shakespearean monologues & scenes. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Fri., April 18, 7 p.m. Max’s Allegheny Tavern,

comedy. Feat. Pittsburgh’s premiere poets & comedians. Third Thu of every month, 6-9 p.m. Thru May 15 The Lounge on Verona, Verona. 412-871-5521.

COMEDY

BRAD WILLIAMS. 8 p.m., Fri., April 18, 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., April 19, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

THU 17

This Unique Beer combines Traditional IPA Malts and American Hops as a Tribute to Our 140 Year Lager Brewing Legacy. Available now at better beer taverns, restaurants and retailers.

THU 17 - SAT 19

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru May 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. www. per BEST OF THE pa 412-681-4318. pghcitym BURGH COMEDY .co LAUGHS AT THE SHOWCASE. LAVA LOUNGE. 9 p.m. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Lava Lounge, South Side. May 30 Corner Cafe, 412-431-5282. South Side. 412-488-2995. OPEN STAGE COMEDY DAHRI FERKS & YEAH NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, THOSE GUYS. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. Arcade Comedy Theater, PITTSBURGH IMPROV Downtown. 412-339-0608. JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at LAST CHANCE TO SEE Theater Square, Downtown. COMEDY SHOW. LGBT 412-325-6769. comedy show hosted by POETRY.COM HAPPY HOUR Abby Denton. 10 p.m. STYLE. Where poetry meets Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. LAWPROV. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. STEAMER. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 18

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

North Side. 412-231-1899. SLOWLY. Howard Barker’s play about 4 women waiting in their besieged city for the arrival of the conquering forces. Thu, Fri, 7 p.m. Thru April 25. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-255-2539.

SAT 19 ARCADE HOOTENANNY. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE DEATH SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. TOM MUSIAL, MATT LIGHT, TOMMY KUPIEC, DILLON WESTON, COLLIN CHAMBERLIN. Pittsburgh’s Finest Comedy Showcase. 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

TUE 22 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 23 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


VISUAL

DO

“Worldly Dreams,” by Samira Shaheen, from Waterworks 2014, at the Spinning Plate Gallery, in Friendship

NEW THIS WEEK AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Synagogues of Prague & Budapest. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Opening reception: April 23, 6-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 105. THE BREW HOUSE. Walls that Soak. Large scale installation by Caroline Record & Leah Wulfman. Opening reception: April 18, 6-9 p.m. & by appointment. South Side. 240-793-8935.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ASSEMBLE. The Drop Project. Interactive exhibit designed by Kristen Reynolds, Ann Payne, & Molly Mehling to personify

aquatic ecosystems in order to create relatability to our everyday lives. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. People Who Live in Tin Houses Shouldn’t Throw Can Openers. Assemblage & metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Hot Paint & Cold Glass. Multimedia exhibit by Patti & Al Middlemiss. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis

between architecture & photography. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Between Abstraction & Realism. Work by Bettina Clowney. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair CONTINUES ON PG. 51

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

THE

ART

BLUE

Give your next cocktail a delicious jolt. Mix WAVE Baja with blue raspberry citrus soda and plug into great flavor.

VODKA

WAVEVODKA.COM | PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY ©2014 WAVE™ FLAVORED VODKA 30% ALC/VOL (60 PROOF) BOTTLED BY BARTON DISTILLING COMPANY, LOUISVILLE, KY. PRODUCT OF USA.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

49


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

WED, APRIL 16, 9PM FUNK/JAM

PIGEONS PLAYING

MONDAYS 9-11PM

PING PONG WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

INDUSTRY NIGHT

DELTANINE THURS, APRIL 17, 9PM COUNTRY/ROCK

SLIM FORSYTHE AND THE PAYDAY LONERS,

ATS AND LAUREL (MEMBERS OF RED WESTERN)

FRI, APRIL 18, 9PM ROCK

THE ARMADILLOS PLUS THE GRIFTERS SAT, APRIL 19, 9PM ROCK

DON'T GIVE UP THE SHIP PUNK ROCK MUSIC FESTIVAL MON, APRIL 21, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH

SGD

$2

16oz Drafts

$3 Fireball Shots

ALL DAY EVERY DAY $3.50 24oz Bottles

KARAOKE THURSDAY Y Come sing your

JAZZ

head off at the “Best Party in Town! n!”

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

9:30pm-1:30am OVER 21 ONLY LY

TUES, APRIL 22, 9PM

MATT BOOTH QUARTET 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7

1314 EAST CARSON ST.

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

S OU T H S IDE POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

: ATTENTION Yuengling Fans

NOW AVAILABLE at Your Local Tavern, Six Pack Shop or Distributor. Available In Six Packs, Cases, ½ Barrels and Quarters.

Enjoy! 50

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

EVENT: Sister Spit reading and performance at The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. CRITIC: AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN , 35, CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, an IT professional Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, from Coraopolis film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, WHEN: & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic I was interested in the scene. I really had no idea roll-played musical instruments exactly what to expect. I expected more of an overt and music boxes in a mansion feminist kind of [focus] but there were a lot of different setting. Call for appointment. perspectives, and I thought it was really representative. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. [The] best part for me was Beth Lisick. The humor of Preserved materials reflecting [her reading] transcended. I don’t know what it’s like to the industrial heritage of be in Japan [or have] that experience, but I felt it with Southwestern PA. Homestead. her. And there was the intensity of the emotion of the 412-464-4020. others, but she was the highlight for me. I know a lot CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: of writers in the area, like the Girls With Glasses [and] Are We So Different? Text, Mad Women [in the Attic], and I was really interested photographs, interactive to see the difference of the vibe, specifically from the audiovisual components, & West Coast to East Coast. But people are people. Some related artifacts challenge of the cultural things are slightly different, but it was perceptions about race. Oakland. 412-622-3131. really good. CARNEGIE SCIENCE BY ANGELA SUICO CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and FRICK ART & HISTORICAL the story of Pittsburgh’s Village, USS Requin submarine, CENTER. Ongoing: tours of immigrant past. University and more. North Side. Clayton, the Frick estate, with of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-237-3400. classes, car & carriage museum. 412-624-6000. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. OLD ST. LUKE’S. with costumed guides featuring HUNT INSTITUTE Pioneer church features this restored stagecoach stop. FOR BOTANICAL 1823 pipe organ, 724-238-4983. DOCUMENTATION. Duets. Revolutionary War graves. CONNEY M. KIMBO Harmonious couplings Scott. 412-851-9212. GALLERY. University of of botanical art w/ items OLIVER MILLER Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: created between the 16th & HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Memorabilia & Awards from 21st centuries from the Hunt Whiskey Rebellion site the International Hall of Fame. Institute collections. Oakland. features log house, Oakland. 412-648-7446. 412-268-2434. blacksmith shop & gardens. DEPRECIATION LANDS KENTUCK KNOB. Tour South Park. 412-835-1554. MUSEUM. Small living the other Frank Lloyd PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY history museum celebrating Wright house. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and the settlement 724-329-8501. exhibits. Includes displays, and history of KERR MEMORIAL walking tours, gift shop, picnic the Depreciation MUSEUM. Tours area and Trolley Theatre. Lands. Allison Park. of a restored Washington. 724-228-9256. 412-486-0563. www. per a p 19th-century, PHIPPS CONSERVATORY FALLINGWATER. pghcitym o .c middle-class home. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Tour the famed Frank Oakmont. 412-826-9295. Spring Flower Show. Showcase Lloyd Wright house. MARIDON MUSEUM. of musical genres through 724-329-8501. Collection includes jade whimsical sculptures made FIRST PRESBYTERIAN and ivory statues from out of up-cycled instruments CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany China and Japan, as well alongside thousands of vibrant stained-glass windows. as Meissen porcelain. tulips, daffodils, hyacinths Downtown. 412-471-3436. Butler. 724-282-0123. & other seasonal favorites. FORT PITT MUSEUM. MCGINLEY HOUSE & 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor Unconquered: History Meets MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. gardens feature exotic Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original Historic homes open for plants and floral displays from movie props, photographs, tours, lectures and more. around the world. Oakland. & costumes alongside 18th Monroeville. 412-373-7794. 412-622-6914. century artifacts & documents, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home PINBALL PERFECTION. comparing & contrasting to more than 600 birds from Pinball museum & historical events w/ Hollywood over 200 species. With classes, players club. West View. depictions. Reconstructed fort lectures, demos and more. 412-931-4425. houses museum of Pittsburgh North Side. 412-323-7235. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG history circa French & Indian NATIONALITY ROOMS. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 War and American Revolution. 26 rooms helping to tell animals, including many Downtown. 412-281-9285.

Michael Wargula

Fri., April 11

FULL LIST ONLINE

endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY FRI 18 - SUN 20 EGGSTRAVAGANZA. Egg hunt, photos w/ Easter bunny, more. Sat, Sun, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and Fri., April 18, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru April 20 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

SAT 19 VENTURE OUTDOORS EASTER EGG GEOCACHING. Follow the Easter Bunny’s trail through the woods searching for baskets of eggs using GPS receivers. 1:30 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 412-255-0564.

SUN 20 EASTER BRUNCH AT THE NATIONAL AVIARY. Call for reservation. 10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-258-9445.

FESTIVALS SAT 19 CHATHAM SPRING CARNIVAL & HARVEST GRAPE FESTIVAL. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-2990. FESTIVAL OF COLORS. Feat. music, dance & throwing of


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

(1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2014. Group show. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific

organic colored powders. festivalofcolors.us 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-255-2539.

installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Lossless. Carnegie Mellon School of Art’s MFA Thesis Exhibition feat. large-scale installations, video & generative sound art. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. STRUCTURE. Work by Ron Copland, Steve Ehret, Megan Herwig, Joseph Mruk, Gian Romagnoli, Andy Scott, & Megan Shalonis. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapotsƒ Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. MASH: Mansion Apartment Shack House. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. 19th Century Photographs in the USA. Showing the largest collection on display feat. Civil War, historic persons, Cowboys & Indians. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. A Mind of Winter. Installation by Meghan Olsen. Past Presence. Installation by Keith Lemley. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Plume. Installation by Ian Brill. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SHAW GALLERIES. Historic Pittsburgh. Photographs by Mark Muse. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Auction

FRI 18

FUNDRAISERS

YOGA DANCE BENEFIT CLASS. Benefits Focus On Renewal. 6:30-8 p.m. BYS Yoga, South Side. 412-771-6460 x 305.

THU 17

SAT 19

VEGETARIAN BENEFIT DINNER. Benefits the Peace Corps. 5 p.m. Verde, Garfield. 412-404-8487.

Preview Exhibition. Preview of work being sold in the 2014 Benefit Auction. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Waterworks 2014. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Vex Kelpie’s Fairy World. Sculptures of mythical creatures & hidden beasts. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. TULA ORGANIC SALON & SPA. One Cloud Per Sky. Work by Amy DiPlacido. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-2230. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF THE NORTH HILLS. The Marriage Project: Faces of Equality. Traveling photographic exhibit of local same-sex couples in long-term committed relationships who would like to marry one day in PA or have their existing out-of-state marriage recognized by our state. On view Sun. mornings, & Tues. through Fri., 9-4, by appointment. 412-366-0244. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

SALUTE TO THE TROOPS PRO WRESTLING EVENT. A portion of the proceeds

MON 21

APRIL 18

NO MENU MONDAY. Feat. the Barack Obama Academy Food Revolution Cooking Club. Benefits the CORO Fellows Program. 5-11 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-201-5772.

Dylan Jane W/ Heidi Jacobs MAY 2

LITERARY

Neely

THU 17 AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Every other Thu, 9:15 a.m. Thru April 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien. 1-2 & 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS. Bob Walicki, Jason Baldinger, Andrea Laurion, Stephanie Brea. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. TOUCH..5 POSTERS, 5 POEMS (STREET POETRY). Artwork & poetry by Edward Murray. 6-8 p.m. Braddock Carnegie Library, Braddock. 412-351-5357.

MAY 16

Erisa Rei w/ Ferdinand the Bull Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

See Pg. 15 for more information.

THU 17 - SAT 19 FRIENDS OF SOUTH PARK LIBRARY BOOK SALE. April 17-19 South Park Library, South Park. 412-833-5585.

FRI 18

will benefit the Post-9/11 Scholarship Fund at the Foundation for California University. 7 p.m. California University. 724-938-4600.

RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. The Apostate’s Tale by Margaret Frazer. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WORDPLAY. Actors, comedy writers, & everyday people read their own true stories with a live DJ score. 8 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999.

SUN 20

SAT 19

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em!

An Evening of Music

Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

HOMUNCULUS: VOLUNTEER SPECTACULAR. Literary readings celebrating National Poetry Month & CONTINUES ON PG. 52

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Literary Arts Boom volunteers. 7-9 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-906-9522. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. TERRANCE HAYES,TOI DERRICOTTE, JOAN BAUER. Poetry reading, part of the Versify Reading Series. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

MON 21 COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 22 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

MAZEN MAAROUF & RACHIDA MADANI. Joint reading by Palestinian & Moroccan poets. 7-9 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. 412-323-0278. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT BIG READ IN ABOUT LOVE & PITTSBURGH FORGIVENESS. CLOSING Explore love & www. per a p CELEBRATION. forgiveness through pghcitym o .c 6 p.m. Soldiers & interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Sailors Memorial Hall, Children’s Museum Oakland. 412-469-6301. of Pittsburgh, North Side. CONVERSATION SALON. 412-322-5058. Second Fri of every month, XOXO: LOVE LETTERS 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of PROJECT. Using traditional every month, 1 p.m. Northland hand letter writing materials Public Library, McCandless. including postcards, stamps, 412-366-8100. & even a manual typewriter, PITTSBURGH POETRY craft a message to someone EXCHANGE. Discussing or something you love. Thru Simor J. Ortiz, from Sand Creek April 30, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-621-6880. North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO STORY TIME. Mon-Fri, 2 p.m. Thru April 30 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Side. 412-322-5058. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s 8TH ANNUAL EGG-CELLENT EGG HUNT. Take a scavenger Museum of Pittsburgh, hunt map & interact w/ North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 23

FULL LIST E N O LIN

KIDSTUFF

THU 17 - WED 23

SAT 19


[VISUAL ART] museum nature experts, answer intriguing egg-related riddles, & earn stamps & small prizes. Ages 12 & under. 10:30 a.m.1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. BREAKFAST W/ DINOSAURS. Breakfast, hands-on activities, more. 8-10 a.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru April 27 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. SCOOBY-DOO LIVE! MUSICAL MYSTERIES. 3 & 6 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical ecosystems & learn about conservation efforts using museum dioramas & collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Thru May 10 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

SAT 19 - SUN 20 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru April 27 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

MON 21 - WED 23 STUFFED ANIMAL CARE & REPAIR. April 21-28, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

WED 23 BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. L & J MATH CLUB. For students in grades 4-7. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE FRI 18 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru April 25 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 19 PITTSBURGH WILD HALF. 5k/10k /Half Marathon 9 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-327-0338.

TUE 22 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 23 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or

Art by Mike Mangiafico & Ed Pinto

There’s something delightful about seeing a new take on an old form — which is probably why the annual Teapots! Invitational, at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery, remains such a popular event. Now in its eighth year, the exhibit features vessels by more than 60 artists, from silversmiths and ceramists to woodworkers and fiber artists. Some veer toward the traditional and whimsical, while others take the concept of the teapot in previously unheard-of physical and philosophical directions. Exhibit continues through May 31. 5833 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-5200 or www.morganglassgallery.com

shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 17 ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. BEEMPATHY: ENRICHING HUMAN EXPERIENCE OF THE NATURAL WORLD THROUGH THE ART OF BEEKEEPING. w/ Christina Joy Neumann. Part of Biophilia: Pittsburgh. 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. BURLYPICKS! - 2014 PENNSYLVANIA REGIONAL BURLESQUE. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FILM FORWARD: ADVANCING CULTURAL DIALOGUE. Film

screening & discussion of Dancing in Jaffa. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. HEELS ON WHEELS GLITTER ROADSHOW. Cabaret presented by queer artists of femme-inine spectrum genders. 8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MASONRY WORKSHOP. Trick of the trade in masonry construction w/ Stephen Shelton. 6 p.m. Landmarks Housing Resource Center, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-2700. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Third Thu of every month, 5-9 p.m. Thru May 15 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. PGH PHOTO FAIR COLLECTOR’S PANEL. Hear how a broad range CONTINUES ON PG. 54

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

of collectors have started their collections, have changed their strategies over time, & hear their views on the market today. Panel discussion will be followed by audience Q & A. 7 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 646-436-4698. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPRING RENEWAL & REJUVENATION SERIES W/ JIM DONOVAN. Thu. Thru May 1 The Center of Harmony, Harmony. 724-400-6044. URBAN HOMESTEADING SERIES: VEGETABLE GARDENING. Learn about planning, soil prep, seed selection, pest & disease issues, harvesting, more. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WOMEN’S SEDER. 6 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

Teligence/18+

FRI 18 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for

Imagination, Garfield. Comics - Pittsburgh Mills, 412-924-0634. Tarentum. 724-758-1560. A BEAUTIFUL SCANDALOUS SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA NIGHT. Acoustic music, CRAZE. Free lessons, visual art, & written followed by dancing. Sat, contemplations focusing on 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, the passion of the Christ. Downtown. 412-708-8844. 7 p.m. New City Church, SCOTTISH COUNTRY Downtown. 412-726-4217. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA social dancing follows. DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. Swisshelm Park and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Community Center, Church, Mt. Washington. Swissvale. 412-945-0554. 412-683-5670. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE HUMANITIES & CLUB. Free Scrabble games, HUMAN SCIENCES all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. SYMPOSIUM. Keynote Mount Lebanon Public Library, speaker: Don Mitchell, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Ph.D. 12-5:30 p.m. Point SPANISH CONVERSATION Park University, Downtown. GROUP. Friendly, informal. 412-391-4100. At the Starbucks inside PUBLIC ART Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. WALKING TOUR: Target, East Liberty. DOWNTOWN. 412-362-6108. 7 p.m. David SWING CITY. . w w w Lawrence Convention Learn & practice aper p ty ci h g p Center, Downtown. swing dancing skills. .com 412-391-2060 x 237. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE School, Squirrel Hill. SENIORS NETWORK. 412-759-1569. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 412-242-8603. 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BALKAN DANCE PARTY. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Folk dance lessons, live music, Second and Third Sun of every more. Third Sat of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, month, 7:30 p.m. Thru Oakland. 412-622-3151. June 21 Bulgarian-Macedonian CHINESE II. First and Third National Education and Cultural Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Center, West Homestead. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-461-6188. 412-622-3151. EMPATHY FIRST. A PFLAG GREENSBURG. compassionate communication Support, education & advocacy & conflict transformation study for the LGBTQ community, group based on the work of family & friends. Third Sun peace activist, Dr. Marshall of every month, 2 p.m. Rosenberg. First Sat of every Trinity United Church of Christ, month, 2 p.m. and Third Sat Greensburg. 412-518-1515. of every month, 2 p.m. Thru May 17 412-271-7660. MORNING SPANISH GEEKSDANZ. 8 p.m. Steel LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. City Improv Theater, Shadyside. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon 412-404-2695. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. HOW MARGARET 412-531-1912. FROM DENNIS THE ROBOTO MONTHLY MENACE ENRICHED MEETING. Meet w/ the MY LIFE. Presentation w/ Roboto board of directors to Dr. Ann Ruben. Part of the find out what’s happening Wonder Woman: On Page at the space & help guide and Off exhibit. 2 p.m. its future. Third Mon of The ToonSeum, Downtown. every month, 7 p.m. The 412-232-0199. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. 412-853-0518. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. Oakland. 412-622-3151. First and Third Mon of KOREAN II. For those every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. who already have a basic Carnegie Library, Oakland. understanding of Korean 412-622-3151. & are interested in increasing SCOTTISH COUNTRY proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, social dancing follows. Oakland. 412-622-3151. No partner needed. Mon, OFF THE WALL CABARET 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. NIGHT. 8 p.m. Off the Grace Episcopal Church, Wall Theater, Carnegie. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. 1-888-718-4253. SELF-GUIDED OLD PITTSBURGH COMIC ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL & COLLECTIBLES SHOW. MUSEUM TOUR. Call for 10 a.m.-5 p.m. New Dimension

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 20

SAT 19

MON 21

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

reservations. Mon. Thru April 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. WATERSHED AWARENESS/ RAIN BARREL WORKSHOPS. 7 p.m. Upper St. Clair Township Library, Upper St. Clair. 412-488-7490 x247.

TUE 22 BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. Every other Tue, 7 p.m. Thru April 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. EARTH DAY DEDICATION OF ELPC STORMWATER PROJECT. 10 a.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. FILM FORWARD: ADVANCING CULTURAL DIALOGUE. Film screening & discussion of The Rocket. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. YOUNG PRESERVATIONISTS ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH SPEAKER SERIES. Feat. Dr. Matt Mehalik, Program Manager at Sustainable Pittsburgh. info@youngpreservationists.org 6-7:30 p.m. Gulf Tower, Downtown. 412-236-6000.

WED 23 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru April 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN. Pittsburgh Speakers Series. 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OMG: JUST THE CLASSICS! Discussion w/ Tim Sommers about the “classic” philosophical arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the question of miracles, more. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. PARENTING BY CONNECTION. This interactive workshop will include open discussion, questions, and the opportunity to practice listening. Presented by Karen Bernard, EEFC Book


Buyer. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-242-3598. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

singers. www.themendelssohn. org. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. MONYOUGH COMMUNITY SINGERS. Seeking singers of all ages, especially baritones & basses. www.mycsingers.com 814-460-1731. NEW CASTLE PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for State Fair. April 27-28. Be prepared to sing a vocal selection. New Castle. 724-654-3437. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. Auditions for As You Like It. April 26. Open to AEA & non-union actors, prepare a brief comedic Shakespearean monologue. info@pittsburghshakespeare.com Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 412-404-8531.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

SHERWOOD ACERS CAMP WEEKEND WORK DAYS

Each year, Hosanna House provides the summer-camp experience to Wilkinsburg youth with Sherwood Acres, a 14-acre green site about a mile from the main campus. To get the site in shape for this summer’s campers, volunteers are needed Saturdays in April and May to help with painting, cleaning, landscaping, construction and more. Call 412-243-7711 or visit www.hosannahouse.org for information. WOMEN’S BUSINESS NETWORK – DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH CHAPTER. A networking group whose mission is to provide personal & professional resources to advance the presence of aspiring & successful businesswomen. Call Kathleen Fratangeli for info. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 12-1 p.m. Sonoma Grille, Downtown. 412-803-4502.

AUDITIONS APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Auditions for the 2014 mainstage season. April 19. Cold readings, 2 min. monologue optional. www.applehillplayhouse.org. 724-468-5050. DISCOVER ME! Seeking 2 caucasian women & 2 caucasian men age 18-30 for the movie production Discover Me! Call Robert at 412-209-9868. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for The Sound of Music. May 17-18. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions. org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. May 13-18. All voice parts for volunteer singers & Professional Core

N E W S

PITTSBURGH UNDERGROUND MUSIC AWARDS AUDITION SHOWCASE. Hip-hop audition showcase for performance slot at the Pittsburgh Underground Music Awards. April 17. Set times are 4-min., bring song for DJ. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-583-2760. SHINE YOUR LIGHT - A BROADWAY CANTATA CELEBRATING FAITH, HOPE & LOVE. Seeking principle & ensemble singers for a Benefit Concert/Cantata at the New Hazlett Theater. April 19. Prepare 32 measures of a musical theater song & bring sheet music. Email Mark.corbin@alleghenycourts.us for info/list of suggested songs. Bethany Baptist Church, Homewood. THE THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for Alice In Wonderland. April 25. Men, women & children age 6+; cold readings from the script. tfauditions@gmail.com The Theatre Factory. 724-454-7193.

SUBMISSIONS ART ALL NIGHT: LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit one (& only one) piece of artwork or sign up to perform. Registration & other info at http://www.artallnight.org/ 412-235-1950. ART IN ACTION. Seeking

+

TA S T E

+

artists for a one-day interactive art show on June 1. More information & application at www.artinaction-hf.com. 724-413-4648. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems for Blast Furnace’s 1st annual poetry chapbook competition. Submit one manuscript. No manuscripts permitted by current Chatham University staff, alum, or students, by Blast Furnace guest reviewers, by poets who have previously been published in his/her own chapbook. Visit https:// blastfurnace.submittable.com/ submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: June 2. BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER. Seeking vendors for Gardenfest & Artist Market. info@ boydcommunitycenter.org O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail. com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking art work for the juried exhibit Color. Entry deadline May 3. Visit greensburgartcenter.org for information. Greensburg. 724-396-6699. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prizefor-short-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to sell plants & products at the annual Garden Mart. For more info & registration, call or email c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com VERONA CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors for marketplace in June. Space is limited. Call for more information. 412-721-0943.

M U S I C

+

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

CURRENTLY SEEKING ENTERTAINERS TO BE

KEY GIRLS 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarksof General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

WATCH THE HOCKEY PLAYOFF GAMES HERE!

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


GET ON TO GET OFF Try For Free

412-325-0019

More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en Español /18+ The #1 social network for men who like men

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 26-year-old girl, and my boyfriend is bi. He accuses me of having slept with my male friends in the past, and makes negative comments about how many people I’ve hooked up with. Whenever I won’t divulge something, he says, “Well, that means you did hook up with that guy before we met/ you do think that waiter was cute/you were looking at porn on your phone.” If I admit I was involved with someone (or that I think someone is cute), he gets really upset. He knows he’s insecure. He says he’s working on it. But do people grow out of this kind of thing? This is especially unfair given that I don’t object to the shirtless snapchats he gets from guys he used to hook up with. TORN IN RE ENVIOUS DRUDGERY

Your boyfriend is not insecure, TIRED, your boyfriend is an asshole. You shouldn’t have to put up with slutshaming or emotionally abusive behavior. Your boyfriend is not the tormented victim of his own psychic demons. He is tormenting you — he is abusing you — and conning you into giving him a pass by crying about his bullshit insecurities. While some people overcome these strains of assholery, it usually takes being dumped several dozen times before a guy starts to do the hard work of dismantling his assholery. The longer someone like your boyfriend gets away with this kind of assholery, the longer he’ll be an asshole. So do your boyfriend and yourself a favor, and DTMFA. Lastly: I have a hunch your boyfriend is playing a “good offense is the best defense” game. He’s probably doing more than just swapping shirtless pics with guys he “used to” hook up with. His jealous fits about your imaginary infidelities may be meant to distract you from his actual ones.

compromise on the only-one-night-stands-withwomen thing if you want to be with me. Because I’m simply not willing to sacrifice that. Not even for you.” The risk, of course, is that your boyfriend will dump you. But if he doesn’t want what you want, then he’s not the right guy for you, is he? I am a heterosexual woman. There is no doubt in my mind that my boyfriend loves women. Or that he loves me. My boyfriend says he is straight, but I sometimes think he is attracted to men. My gay best friend also thinks my boyfriend is attracted to men. Example: My boyfriend loves getting attention from this one gay waiter. My boyfriend goes out of his way to talk to him, the waiter responds with flirtation and is rude to me. I asked my boyfriend if he had a crush on this waiter, and he got mad. What does this mean? WORRIED OVER REALLY REPRESSED YEARNINGS

Your boyfriend could be straight and comfortable with his sexuality and attracted to the occasional (rude) gay waiter. Some (rude) gay waiters are simply irresistible, and some straight-identified guys aren’t 100 percent straight, just as some gay- and lesbian-identified folks aren’t 100 percent gay or lesbian. While some folks are bi and closeted, lots of people are only so rarely attracted to someone of the same or opposite sex that the straight label (or the gay/lesbian label) feels more accurate than the bi label. As for your gay best friend: Some (dumb) gay men are convinced that all straight-identified men are gay, bi or persuadable. The fact that some straight-identified men have been known to fuck the odd (rude) gay waiter or (dumb) gay best friend only fans the flamers.

IT USUALLY TAKES BEING DUMPED SEVERAL DOZEN TIMES BEFORE A GUY STARTS TO DO THE HARD WORK OF DISMANTLING HIS ASSHOLERY

I am a 22-year-old bisexual female, and I have a boyfriend who I love. He says he wouldn’t mind if I hooked up with other girls, as long as it was a one-night thing. That’s not what I want. I want to have a boyfriend and a girlfriend. He is not keen on the idea. He says he feels like he is not enough for me. I reassure him constantly that this is not the case. He is everything I want in a man, but I still crave a woman’s company. How can I approach this subject so that he will understand and accept it? FEELING EMOTIONALLY MALIGNED

Your boyfriend may be everything you want in a man, but he’s not everything you want. If you won’t sacrifice having a woman in your life, then stop encouraging him to hope otherwise. When he says, “I worry that I’m not enough for you,” you should be saying, “You’re all the man I need, but it’s true: You’re not enough for me.” Instead, you’re saying, “You’re everything I want! But, um, I totally need a girlfriend, too!” N o more mixed messages. Say this to him: “I don’t wanna have one-night stands. I wanna have a relationship with one woman and a concurrent relationship with one man. You’ll have to

I’m a 23-year-young woman, and I’ve been with my boyfriend for more than five years. We have a toddler. I love him very much. However, now he’s just not doing it for me in the bedroom. I think I want to have sex with other people. It’s not that I’m not sexually attracted to my boyfriend anymore. I just want something different. But I don’t want to break up with my boyfriend. What do I do? SHE’S HORNY AND GROWING

You start by telling your boyfriend that the things you’ve been doing in bed for five years aren’t doing it for you anymore. Tell him you don’t want to break up, tell him you’re still attracted to him, but also tell him you’re bored by your routine. Get to work on expanding your repertoire, developing some new moves, and sharing your fantasies. One fantasy you can toss on the table: your desire to have sex with other people. If he’s opposed, ask him how he feels about you two being with other people together, e.g., threesomes, sex parties and swingers clubs. On the Lovecast, a scientific study on Facebook creeping: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


Ink Well

PLAY

ODDS AND EVENS

MASSAGE

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

Karamel Kitty 412-251-4679 Sensual Massage 412-322-5140 Hot n Hvy $95 724-612-0861

Man 2 Man Massage by Lee Professional and Discreet 24/7

412-628-1269

ADULT PHONE FREE PARTYLINE! 712-432-7968 18+ Normal LD Applies HOT LOCAL SINGLES Listen to Ads FREE! 412-920-5566 Use Code 3250, 18+

MEET GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 412937-9999 Use FREE Code 2653, 18+

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL Women! Call 412-566-1861 Try FREE! www.livelinks.com

Meet Hot Black Singles Now Call FREE! 412-235-6296 www.vibeline.com

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

WHERE SINGLES MEET. Browse & Reply FREE! 412-920-5566 Code 3249 Curious? 412-937-9999, 18+

TINA

Gorgeous, Prompt, Discreet.

Magic Touch & Such

ACROSS

1. Philosopher with a razor 6. Rock tool? 9. Tapioca relative 13. Via ___ (important Roman road) 14. Key and Peele, e.g. 15. Shocking response at the altar 17. *Teddy bear’s quality or, alternately, cooks vases in oil? 19. Slacker’s sin 20. This evening, in ads 22. ___ effort 23. Purrer on a lap 27. *Greek poetry muse or, alternately, trim off some soothing leaves? 29. *Family gettogether or, alternately, destroy the career of the co-producer of “Achtung Baby”? 31. Site of English relief 32. Sworn rival 33. Chicago/L.A. rock band famous for viral videos 34. Arrest 36. Arrests 38. Friend of Dorothy 42. Confused 45. Si across the Pyrenees 46. Get old 50. Parking space 51. Fluid deliverers, in the hosp. 54. *Small European warbler or, alternately, a wreath for the rear? 56. *Wart-covered and hungry for flies or, alternately, have a meeting about one of Jon’s pets? 59. Speedy Gonzales exclamation

60. Wiesel who came to the United States in 1955 61. NCAA basketball coach Rick with two national championships 63. Option for those who are anti-Russian and anti-French? 65. *Kid’s trains or, alternately, chocolate snack peddled by Ms. Chanel? 70. Word before power or punk 71. “___ Rand is one of those things that a lot of us, when we were 17 or 18 and feeling misunderstood, we’d pick up”: Barack Obama 72. Surprising way to be taken 73. Ice cream known as Dreyer’s on the West Coast 74. Txted word of polite request 75. “Dear me!”

12. Straddling 16. Low poker pair 18. Zip, nada, zilch 21. “Xanadu” band 23. Old hand 24. “STEP ON THAT THING!!!!” 25. Jerk 26. Start of a major scale with no sharps or flats 28. “Livin’ La Vida ___” (Ricky Martin song in which he really sells his passion for the ladies) 30. Longtime jazz writer Hentoff 35. Short version of a life story? 37. On the market, in a way 39. Part of a shout-out to Satan 40. Core 41. Oval Pepperidge Farm cookie 42. Tweaks to fit

43. “I already made plans” 44. *Besmirched or, alternately, dressy item for the beach? 47. When you think you’ll be there, for short 48. Feel like garbage 49. Way to go: Abbr. 52. Baller’s lounge letters 53. Mountain top? 55. Defunct oil company with a “76” logo 57. Emulate a compost pile 58. Antiknock fluid 62. Some atoms 64. Pinafore letters 66. “Game of Thrones” network 67. Propeller in a sound, say 68. Anal, casually 69. Kite’s milieu

Get a Rub Now. Lite Dom/Role Play

412-277-1589

Steel City Escorts

Where Local Girls Go Wild! Call 412-894-0205 Try FREE! www.redhotdateline. com

out call only 24/7 All major CC

Outcall Only 24/ 7

412-771-2473

412-306-1773

ADULT VIDEO Adult Video! Vintage & Rare Erotica 412-469-1347

PERSONALS Female Companion wanted 30-40 y.o. Waist length hair. Permanent Position 724-229-8868 Wash. Co

TS TS Chemistry 412-952-9835 Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper

www.adorableplaymates.com

Sugar ... and Everything Nice 412-805-2557

ADULT PHONE

412.316.3342

All major cc’s acct’d.

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN

1. One tripping over his own feet 2. Computer part often metaphorized as a brain: Abbr. 3. Course taken before receiving one’s whistle 4. Inspired stuff? 5. Tiki bar beverage 6. Yemeni seaport 7. Genesis creation? 8. Delivery-related, in a way 9. Bro’s counterpart 10. Two-time loser to Dwight 11. *Act the fool or, alternately, act the fool?

N E W S

+

TA S T E

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section. +

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

57


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

04.16-04.23

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s Compensation Week. If you have in the past suffered from injustice, it’s an excellent time to go in quest of restitution. If you have been deprived of the beauty you need to thrive, now is the time to get filled up. Wherever your life has been out of balance, you have the power to create more harmony. Don’t be shy about seeking redress. Ask people to make amends. Pursue restorations. But don’t, under any circumstances, lust for revenge.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

“Our brains are no longer conditioned for reverence and awe,” said novelist John Updike. That’s a sad possibility. Could you please do something to dispute or override it, Taurus? Would it be too much to ask if I encouraged you to go out in quest of lyrical miracles that fill you with wonder? Can I persuade you to be alert for sweet mysteries that provoke dizzying joy and uncanny breakthroughs that heal a wound you’ve feared might forever plague you? Here’s what the astrological omens suggest: Phenomena that stir reverence and awe are far more likely than usual.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20):

I wonder if it’s time for you to modify an old standby. I’m getting the sense that you should consider tinkering with a familiar resource that has served you pretty well. Why? This resource may have some hidden weakness that you need to attend to in order to prevent a future disruption. Now might be one of those rare occasions when you should ignore the old rule, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” So be proactive, Gemini. Investigate

what’s going on beneath the surface. Make this your motto: “I will solve the problem before it’s a problem — and then it will never be a problem.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“Do you really have what it takes or do you not have what it takes?” That’s the wrong question to ask, in my opinion. You can’t possibly know the answer ahead of time, for one thing. To dwell on that quandary would put you on the defensive and activate your fear, diminishing your power to accomplish the task at hand. Here’s a more useful inquiry: “Do you want it strongly enough or do you not want it strongly enough?” With this as your meditation, you might be inspired to do whatever’s necessary to pump up your desire. And that is the single best thing you can do to ensure your ultimate success.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

I swear my meditations are more dynamic when I hike along the trail through the marsh than if I’m pretzeled up in the lotus position back in my bedroom. Maybe I’ve been influenced by Aristotle’s

get your yoga on!

Peripatetic School. He felt his students learned best when they accompanied him on long strolls. Then there was philosopher Friedrich N ietzsche, who testified that his most brilliant thoughts came to him as he rambled far and wide. Even if this possibility seems whimsical to you, Leo, I invite you to give it a try. According to my reading of the current astrological omens, your moving body is likely to generate bright ideas and unexpected solutions and visions of future adventures.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Throughout North America and Europe, there are hundreds of unused roads. Many are former exit and entrance ramps to major highways, abandoned for one reason or another. Some are stretches of pavement that were parts of main thoroughfares before the latter were rerouted. I suggest we make “unused roads” your metaphor of the week, Virgo. It may be time for you to bring some of them back into operation, and maybe even relink them to the pathways they were originally joined to. Are there any missing connections in your life that you would love to restore? Any partial bridges you feel motivated to finish building?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Karma works both ways. If you do ignorant things, ignorant things may eventually be done to you. Engage in generous actions, and at some future date you may be the unexpected beneficiary of generosity. I’m expecting more of the latter than the former for you in the coming days, Libra. I think fate will bring you sweet compensations for your enlightened behavior in the past. I’m reminded of the fairy tale in which a peasant girl goes out of her way to be kind to a seemingly feeble, disabled old woman. The crone turns out to be a good witch who rewards the girl with a bag of gold. But as I hinted, there could also be a bit of that other kind of karma lurking in your vicinity. Would you like to ward it off? All you have to do is unleash a flurry of good deeds. Anytime you have a chance to help people in need, do it.

healthy, would it? Obstacles keep you honest, after all. They motivate you to get smarter. They compel you to grow your willpower and develop more courage. Please understand that I’m not taking about trivial and boring obstacles that make you numb. I’m referring to scintillating obstacles that fire up your imagination; rousing obstacles that excite your determination to be who you want and get what you want. So your assignment is to acquire at least one new interesting obstacle. It’s time to tap into a deeper strain of your ingenuity.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

In 1937, physicist George Paget Thomson won a Nobel Prize for the work he did to prove that the electron is a wave. That’s funny, because his father, physicist J.J. Thomson, was awarded the N obel Prize in 1906 for showing that the electron is a particle. Together, they helped tell the whole story about the electron, which as we now know is both a wave and a particle. I think it’s an excellent time for you to try something similar to what George did: Follow up on some theme from the life of one of your parents or mentors; be inspired by what he or she did, but also go beyond it; build on a gift he or she gave the world, extending or expanding it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

You have been a pretty decent student lately, Aquarius. The learning curve was steep, but you mastered it as well as could be expected. You had to pay more attention to the intricate details than you liked, which was sometimes excruciating, but you summoned the patience to tough it out. Congrats! Your against-the-grain effort was worth it. You are definitely smarter now than you were four weeks ago. But you are more wired, too. More stressed. In the next chapter of your life story, you will need some downtime to integrate all you’ve absorbed. I suggest you schedule some sessions in a sanctuary where you can relax more deeply than you’ve allowed yourself to relax in a while.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Comment on the following hypothesis: “You know what to do and you know when to do it.” Freewillastrology.com

As they lie in the sand, African crocodiles are in the habit of opening their jaws wide for hours at a time. It keeps them cool, and allows for birds called plovers to stop by and pluck morsels of food that are stuck between the crocs’ molars. The relationship is symbiotic. The teeth-cleaners eat for free as they provide a service for the large reptiles. As I analyze your astrological aspects, Scorpio, I’m inclined to see an opportunity coming your way that has a certain resemblance to the plovers’. Can you summon the necessary trust and courage to take full advantage? Are you sure you have enough obstacles? I’m afraid you’re running low. And that wouldn’t be

You have the power to shut what has been open or open what has been shut. That’s a lot of responsibility. Just because you have the power to unleash these momentous actions doesn’t mean you should rashly do so. Make sure your motivations are pure and your integrity is high. Try to keep fear and egotism from influencing you. Be aware that whatever you do will send out ripples for months to come. And when you are confident that you have taken the proper precautions, by all means proceed with vigor and rigor. Shut what has been open or open what has been shut — or both.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 59 + STUDIES 59 + LIVE 59 + SERVICES 60 + WELLNESS 62

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Africa, Brazil Work/ Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter. org (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Network Radio Company Seeking PT Sports Anchor Broadcasting Experience Pro and College Sports Knowledge Required Send Demo, Resume and Contact Info to: tmiller@sbnol.com

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Your Classified Ad printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $1,150! To run your ad in papers with a total circulation exceeding 6.9 million copies per week, call 412-3163342. No adult ads.

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

STUDIES

LIVE

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

UTERINE FIBROIDS?

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Your ad could be here

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

STORAGE

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes.

Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com

412-316-3342

www.tmilesgroup.com

(2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

412.316.3342

“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES $1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

PGHCityPaper

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014 www.publicallies.org/apply

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

59


SERVICES Getaway ideas to help you plan your next vacation Arrives April 23

AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Estate Sale

ADOPTION

Saturday April 19th

At-Home mom, Financially secure couple, LOVE and Laughter awaits 1st Baby

412-403-6069

Advertising Supplement

ADOPTION

ESTATE SALE

for DYI Auto Mechanic Lift and Compressor

guide

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Rent -A- Bay

travel

REHEARSAL

Furn. (100pieces) Antiques, Collectibles, Etc. For information/pictures go to:

thereclamationnation.com

CLASSES

Your ad could be here

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

MUSICIANS WANTED Drummer wanted for est. rock band. Must be under 30 yo. extremely dedicated and able to tour. Call John 724-971-1094

EXPENSES PAID SHIRA & JUSTIN 1-800-598-4594

412.316.3342

advertise your business in pittsburgh city paper 412.316.3342

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on April 29, 2014 for Arsenal and May 6, 2014 for Various Schools until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Pittsburgh Arsenal Toilet Room Renovations and Miscellaneous Work General, Asbestos, Plumbing, HVAC and Electrical Primes • Various Schools Extraordinary Electrical Repairs Electrical Prime • Various Schools Integrated Access Control, Intrusion Detection and CCTV Repairs Electrical Prime Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on April 14, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014


WELLNESS MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

China Massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy

$60/hr FREE Table Shower

Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results! Advertise Here Today!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Xie LiHong’s

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

412-401-4110

MIND & BODY

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

Learn do Aiki Beginner’s classes T, Th 7-8 pm (16 yrs or older)

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

www.alleghenyaikido.com

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

For more information go to

Chinese Bodyworks

MIND & BODY

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Forever Relaxation

massage

Chinese Bodywork

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

Therapy

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Grand Opening

Female Massage Available Open 24 hours/7 days a week

JADE

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

412.316.3342

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

61


SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Cranberry Office Now Open!

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz 62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.16/04.23.2014

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Let Us Help You Today!

Call Erin at:

412-434-4798

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

SUBOXONE • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others


GHOST TOWN

New exhibit exhumes our fascination with ghost signs {BY CHRIS POTTER} PITTSBURGHERS, the legend goes, are the type of people who give directions based on “where the Isaly’s used to be.” Maybe that’s why we cling to the city’s peeling “ghost signs” — those fading, painted advertisements for businesses that are no longer here. Where else, after all, would you see an exhibit like Palimpsest, a documentary project by Will Zavala and Kelly Bogel on display through May 16 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers? A “palimpsest” is a page on which an early text is overwritten, obscured but not obliterated, by a later one. That makes it a perfect title for a ghost-sign exhibit … and maybe for the city itself. Pittsburgh is its own palimpsest, a place that clings to old stories while writing new ones. Glimpses of the past can be found in the back alleys and secondfloor windows of the present, in the process making a small town seem larger, more mysterious. Skyscrapers extend a city up into space … but the ghost signs in their shadows extend it back in time. Even today there’s no telling when a ghost sign might rise from the dead. And while the Filmmakers exhibit offers little documentation about the signs depicted, local archives and news accounts sometimes yield long-dormant secrets from even the most faded inscription. Take Bogel’s photograph of a long-defunct Polish Hill grocery store, whose ghost sign became visible after a 2008 fire burned down the structure next door. The sign advertises Ward’s Mother’s Bread, a brand you haven’t been able to find in Polish Hill — or anywhere else — for years. But Ward, it turns out, was once a widely known brand, with

{PHOTOS COURTESY OF KELLY BOGEL}

upward of 20 bakeries operating from Chicago east, according to a promotional 1919 survey of Pittsburgh businesses published by First National Bank. After his father ran a neighborhood bakery in New York City in 1849, the survey explains, Robert Ward came to Pittsburgh to begin baking on an industrial scale, offering housewives “rapid emancipation … from the cares of kitchen drudgery.” Maybe the emancipation wasn’t that rapid, but from their Strip District bakery, the Wards made Pittsburgh “a leader in scientific baking,” as a later newspaper account boasted. But the bakery closed in 1966 amidst a labor dispute, and the Ward name ended where it began: on a local storefront. Other ghosts leave fresher traces. The barely-visible demon inscribed on an electrical battery at 825 West North Ave., for one, recalls the legacy of Hipwell Manufacturing. The North Side company’s history dates to 1887, when the Hipwells founded the Pittsburgh Sheet Metal Tool Company. “This is the only establishment of its kind in this section of the country, and its facilities are in every respect unsurpassed,” enthused the Pittsburgh and Allegheny Illustrated Review in 1889. In later years, the firm would pioneer designs for batteries and phone equipment before focusing on flashlights, which were manufactured on site until a decade ago. Often, however, a ghost sign is the only memorial a business might leave. Despite having one of the most visible signs in Pittsburgh, for example, the Strip District’s Wolfe Publishing barely leaves a trace. The green sign for Downtown’s Penn Bowling Lanes, meanwhile, is visible only from an alley between Penn and Liberty avenues, and its history is almost as easy to overlook. Post-war-era newspaper records suggest the alley was once owned by Robert Hendel, whose numerous alleys made him one of the region’s bowling kingpins. But by the 1970s, newspaper reports suggest, the alley had been replaced by a gay bar known as the Loose Balloon. But even the obscure signs haunt us, sometimes more than the corporate brands which once loomed so much larger. Jones & Laughlin, Gulf Oil, Rockwell International … they were once as central to Pittsburgh’s identity as they were to its industry. But today, their mark on the city’s landscape is less visible than, say, Blake’s Garage and Fiore’s Home-Dressed Meats. The corporate logo that is hoisted atop a skyscraper can be taken down just as easily. For the rest of us, meanwhile, the ghost sign confers the promise of a kind of fugitive immortality. Whatever else they advertise, they remind us that in Pittsburgh, anyone can leave a lasting trace. Even without intending to. C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

63


April 16, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 16

April 16, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 16