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SPLIT DECISION: MIXED VERDICT IN MILES CASE LEAVES CITY DIVIDED, CRITICS SAY 06


EVENTS 4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

5.9 – 5-10pm YOUTH INVASION 2014 Teens take over The Warhol! Tickets $5 students & adults/Members Free

5.17 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS AT THE WARHOL The Warhol will be closed

5.18 – 12am-5pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMUNITY DAY In celebration of the kickoff of The Warhol’s 20th anniversary and American Art Museum Day, the museum will be open free to the public Tickets FREE

Oneohtrix Point Never

5.18 – 3pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: HOLY TERROR: ANDY WARHOL CLOSE UP BY BOB COLACELLO Tickets FREE

Featuring video artist Nate Boyce 5.30 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH THE WARHOL’S TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUER ERIN BYRNE, CHIEF ARCHIVIST MATT WRBICAN, ASSISTANT ARCHIVIST CINDY LISICA AND SPECIAL GUEST BENJAMIN LIU Tickets $10/$8 Members & students

5.8 – 8pm Warhol entrance space | Tickets $15/$12 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival | Media Sponsor: WPTS Radio

The Warhol welcomes Brooklyn-based artist and electronic music composer, Daniel Lopatin (aka Oneohtrix Point Never) to its entrance space, on a tour supporting his latest release R Plus Seven on Warp Records. Lopatin is often praised for his delicate balance of the experimental and the accessible, particularly reflected in his 2011 release, Replica, built around samples of television commercials; that the New Yorker referred to as “music that gently triggers a series of images and feelings, none of which you can name and all of which seem entirely common.” Artist and collaborator, Nate Boyce, will provide live visual accompaniment. Doors open at 7:30pm.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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For 35 years, ATTORNEY MICHAEL H. MARKS has been committed to helping seniors; families & individuals with disabilities make informed choices and navigate life’s most important decisions. He listens to you. Highly qualified in elder law & special needs planning, Michael assists clients with nursing home Medicaid eligibility and long-term care planning, special needs trusts, wills, powers of attorney and estate planning. His professional staff also handles all kinds of real estate matters including tax assessment appeals. For a beneficiary with a disability receiving or in need of government benefits such as Medicaid or SSI, special arrangements are needed to keep both their 4231 Murray Ave benefits and their own money. Michael favors integrated solutions combining Pittsburgh Medicaid, Veterans’ benefits, private long-term care insurance, protective (412)421-8944 annuity solutions and more. He unites sophisticated cutting edge techniques with sound basic estate planning. Michael is a member of National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. Visit: www.marks-law.com

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View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/040914


{EDITORIAL}

04.09/04.16.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 15

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{ART}

[NEWS] not a war zone … and we know 06 “It’s what living there is like as opposed to the caricature they painted.” — Homewoood resident and artist Vanessa German on the neighborhood’s portrayal during the Jordan Miles civil trial

[VIEWS] has really changed in our 16 “Something body politic, if someone this extreme can get a nomination.”— Activist Michael Morrill on rumors that conservative attorney David J. Porter may be seated as a federal judge in Western Pennsylvania

“Don’t miss the pies and pasties, which feature a hearty, savory crust that is flaky yet bakes up tender, thanks to its traditional ingredient: lard.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth on The Pub Chip Shop

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC] is probably our favorite activity, 24 “Reading aside from making music.” — Justin Finch of Fanfarlo on the rock ’n’ roll lifestyle

[SCREEN]

is a portrait not of the banality of 36 “This evil, but the evil of banality.” — Chris

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

“Fraley’s work strives to further humanize robots that are already doing human things.” — Angela Suico on artist Toby Fraley

[LAST PAGE] guys might get nervous. But I’ve 62 “Some already fought on the biggest stage anybody can be on.” — Local boxer and Iraq War veteran Sammy Vasquez Jr. on his cable-TV debut

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 54 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 56 +

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

N E W S

{ADMINISTRATION}

{PUBLISHER}

Potter on The Unknown Known, Errol Morris’ film about Donald Rumsfeld

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“HOMEWOOD IS NOT THE COMMUNITY MOST PEOPLE THINK IT IS.”

INCOMING RE: Name Game: Incumbent Adam Ravenstahl faces suburban challenger, brother’s past in new 20th District (April 2) Editor, In his “Name Game” column of 2 April 2014, editor Chris Potter notes the interesting race for the State House 20th District, which pits incumbent Adam Ravenstahl against Northgate School District teacher and community activist Tom Michelow. In addition to the difficulty in differentiating himself from his brother, Luke Ravenstahl — the “accidental mayor” who was not equipped or inclined to handle the job — I do not know how Rep. Ravenstahl gets past having unconscionably voted against the omnibus transportation bill, the signature achievement within what has been a largely do-nothing session of the House. By seeking to kill the bill, Ravenstahl voted against public safety, the creation and maintenance of tens of thousands of family-sustaining jobs, and public transit: causes that are traditionally near and dear to the hearts of Democrats. To my knowledge, he has not sought to explain his vote or to apologize for it. I assume that is because there is no legitimate explanation for thumbing his nose at his constituents. Why would Ravenstahl fail to support such key legislation which benefits every state resident who ever leaves their home? Since he has not addressed the issue or had the courtesy to respond to my attempt to communicate with him, I must assume that he answered to party bosses who sought to deny Gov. Corbett a victory, choosing to play politics while playing Russian roulette with public safety. Ravenstahl’s endorsement in the upcoming election by fellow Rep. Dom Costa is worthless as he, too, voted against the transportation legislation. — Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair

EDITOR’S NOTE: City Paper asked Ravenstahl about his transportation vote during an interview, but didn’t include his response due to space constraints. Ravenstahl said he voted against the bill because it included a provision that excluded smaller construction projects from prevailingwage requirements, which he viewed as an “attack on the middle class.” He also objected to a provision that raised taxes on gasoline wholesalers, which he said would be passed along to drivers: Ravenstahl said he’d have preferred revenues to come from elsewhere, such as closing the “Delaware loophole” that allows companies to reduce their tax burden by shifting revenues to businesses incorporated outside of Pennsylvania.

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Jordan Miles leaves the U.S. District Courthouse Downtown during his civil trial against three police officers last month.

NEIGHBORHOOD WATCHED W

HEN A FEDERAL jury issued

its verdict in the Jordan Miles trial against three police officers on March 31, some hoped it would provide closure. “The arrest of Jordan Miles was a troubling and divisive event for the entire community,” said U.S. Attorney David Hickton hours after the jury handed down a split verdict. “The jury has spoken. It’s time to heal.” “Our community must start healing, and must start rebuilding the trust we must have for safe communities and a better police force,” said Mayor Bill Peduto. “I am ready to start that now.” But healing might be difficult —

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

especially in Homewood, where Miles had his 2010 encounter with police “To just tell people to heal is fucked up,” says Vanessa German, an artist and Homewood resident who attended the trial. “How

Residents say negative picture of Homewood painted at Miles’ trial is a ‘shame’ {BY REBECCA NUTALL} do you heal when the police never came out and said they did anything wrong?” This was the second civil trial stem-

ming from a January 2010 altercation between Miles and three city police officers on Tioga Street. Miles claims he was walking to his grandmother’s house when three police officers jumped out of a car and assaulted him before taking him to jail. He says the officers didn’t identify themselves and, at first, he thought he was being robbed. For their part, officers David Sisak, Michael Saldutte and Richard Ewing say they approached Miles because they saw him lurking on the side of a house. They say they identified themselves before Miles ran, and that he had a bulge in his coat they believed to be a gun. (The officers alleged that they saw a soda bottle, a claim Miles denies.) CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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neighborhood had three of the 43 city homicides in the city; in 2012, Homewood accounted for three homicides out of 40 citywide. (Figures for 2013 were not available.) In the first trial, Miles himself testified to hearing gun shots on a daily basis, a statement defense attorneys repeated to the jury throughout the second trial. “I know most of you aren’t used to … hearing gunshots every day in your neighborhood,” defense attorney James Wymard said in his opening arguments. Later, Wymard would note that in 2011, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow designated Homewood as the nation’s “most dangerous neighborhood.” “This is Homewood, home of the drive-by … home of the gangbangers,” Wymard told the jury. In his closing argument, he praised the officers for being “out there putting their lives on the line, patrolling streets you and I wouldn’t dare drive on.” Miles’ attorneys objected to such labeling. Despite Wymard’s characterizations of Homewood, Joel Sansone argued, “The only persons who ever bothered Jordan Miles in this neighborhood are these three men.” “Homewood is not as bad as people say,” says Jerome Jackson, president of

“I BELIEVE IN SOME COMMUNITIES, LIKE HOMEWOOD, THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN POLICE AND THE COMMUNITY IS AT CRISIS LEVEL.”

THERE’S NO question that Homewood

can be dangerous. In 2010, the year of Miles’ altercation with police, there were 10 homicides in the neighborhood, out of 57 citywide. But in the following years, the number has decreased. In 2011, the

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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In the first trial, a jury found for the officers on a claim of malicious prosecution, but could not agree on the charges of false arrest and use of excessive force. This time, the jury found that the officers falsely arrested Miles, but did not use excessive force; jurors awarded Miles roughly $119,000. While the verdict was a partial victory for Miles, it’s cold comfort to some residents of Homewood, which defense attorneys labeled the “home of the drive-by.” And while crime statistics do bear out concerns about violence in the neighborhood, members of the Homewood community say numbers don’t tell the whole story. “To hear the way the defense would portray Homewood through statistics, and through the lens of the police, was discordant to me, because I live in Homewood,” German says. “It’s not a war zone. I was sitting with my neighbors, and we know what living there is like as opposed to the caricature they painted.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

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NEIGHBORHOOD WATCHED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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Fight over Jordan Miles’ jury award is likely just beginning

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The court battle that partially vindicated Jordan Miles’ claim that his civil rights were violated by three Pittsburgh Police officers may be over, but a new legal fight seems likely to emerge over how much of the jury’s $119,016.75 award he will ever see. Under federal rules, experts say, Miles could be on the hook for legal costs associated with defending the same officers he accused of falsely arresting and beating him back in 2010 — and that’s in addition to his own legal fees. And Mayor Bill Peduto hasn’t ruled out the possibility that the city could try to recoup some defense-related costs from Miles, though he said that would be unlikely “unless there’s a severe cost to the taxpayers.�

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“At this point, our goal is to try to find ways to learn from this and to have policies in place that will help to deter it from happening in the future,� Peduto says. But the costs to the city are not insignificant. Mayoral spokesman Tim McNulty says that from 2010 to part of 2013, the city spent $195,789 to defend officers Richard Ewing, David Sisak and Michael Saldutte. That doesn’t include the defense costs in the most recent civil trial, McNulty says, meaning the final bill will be higher. Complicating the matter is a series of settlement talks between Miles and the city before a jury ever heard his case. In 2011, the city offered a reported $180,000 to settle the case. Miles rejected that offer, but in 2012 he agreed to a partial settlement: He accepted $75,000 to drop the city itself from the lawsuit, even as the city continued to pay for its officers’ defense. It is possible that the $75,000 could be CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

Homewood nonproďŹ t Operation Better Block. “We have great residents, great people. I think it’s a shame because we do have a lot of good things here.â€? While defense attorneys referenced Homewood “gang membersâ€? and “gang bangersâ€? repeatedly during the trial, Jackson says Homewood’s problem with violent crime has decreased since its peak in the 1990s. “Homewood is not the community most people think it is.â€? Even a police commander, Rashall Brackney, took issue with Wymard’s depiction of the community. “I don’t know why they would’ve characterized it that way,â€? says Brackney, who grew up in Homewood and continues to be involved with the neighborhood. “Characterizing any community that way without a lot of intimate knowledge of that community and how disenfranchised and underrepresented it is can be dangerous.â€? Policing the area can be dangerous as well. In an April 2013 incident, OfďŹ cer Morgan Jenkins was shot and OfďŹ cer Michelle Auge was beaten by a suspect police have identiďŹ ed as James Robert Hill, who’d allegedly escaped from a Braddock halfway house. A trial in that case is pending. Later that summer, an unknown person shot at a police ofďŹ cer standing on a Homewood porch during a call; no suspect was apprehended. But in court, Brackney testiďŹ ed that in the months before the Miles altercation, Homewood had fewer cases of attacks on police ofďŹ cers than some other communities. In 2009 and 2010, Homewood had fewer cases of aggravated assaults on ofďŹ cers than South Side, the Hill District and the North Shore area. “When you start to look at the numbers, the likelihood of citizens assaulting [police ofďŹ cers] is much lower. Homewood is actually at the lower end of the scale,â€? Brackney told City Paper after the trial. “Because there’s violence perpetrated on the community, [police] think that will translate to harm on ofďŹ cers, but that’s not necessarily true.â€? Neither Pittsburgh police nor publicsafety ofďŹ cials returned calls for comment. But Mayor Peduto told City Paper that “[T]here should never be a rush to judgment on any person,â€? based on where they live. “You can use statistics in order to try to create policies of policing, but that should not be a broad brush that is delivered to each person who lives there.â€? STILL, ACTIVISTS say police use the neigh-

borhood’s high crime rate to justify their own behavior. “What I am seeing far too often in the court of law, is being in a high-crime area is CONTINUES ON PG. 12


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

subtracted from Miles’ jury award, legal experts say. McNulty did not confirm whether that would happen in this case. Miles’ legal team was still looking into the issue, according to Brandi Fisher, president of the Alliance for Policy Accountability. So why might Miles be on the hook for some of these costs? “It’s really complicated,” says University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris. At issue are two competing objectives enshrined in the law and the rules that govern federal lawsuits. On the one hand is a desire to encourage plaintiffs to file civil-rights lawsuits; on the other, a desire to settle cases before they consume scarce judicial resources. Without some financial incentive, it would be tricky to get lawyers to take up civil-rights complaints. “In the American system, every party [usually] bears their own fee,” says Ed Olds, a lawyer who has been involved in civil-rights lawsuits. And that means the fight can be one-sided.

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NEIGHBORHOOD WATCHED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10 UNSETTLED ARGUMENTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Government officials, including police officers, often have the financial backing of their municipality for their legal defense. And civil-rights violations are also “very difficult to prove,” says Harris. Even if you win, he adds, the “actual damages are often not great enough so you would get an attorney to take the case.” In order to give civil-rights laws some teeth, Congress gave plaintiffs’ attorneys a financial incentive. In 1976, Congress passed the Civil Rights Attorney’s Fees Award Act, which says that if a plaintiff prevails, the defense will be on the hook for the winner’s legal fees. “This was intended to have the effect of bringing lawyers into these cases,” adds Harris. “And sometimes it works.” But Congress also allows the federal court system to set its own rules, known as the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. And under Rule 68, which governs offers to settle a case, when one party refuses a settlement offer, he or she “must pay the [court] costs incurred after the offer was made,” should a verdict yield less money than a final settlement. Experts say the goal is to encourage both sides to reach an agreement before a case comes to trial. In this case, the jury awarded Miles roughly $60,000 less than he was offered in 2011. As a result, Miles could be on the hook for defense costs like paying for court transcripts, filing fees and the cost of expert witnesses hired to testify against him. Still, it’s almost impossible to predict what Miles will end up getting — or owing. The full settlement agreement has never been made public, and calculating a CONTINUES ON PG. 14

... justification to add on to [justify] reasonable suspicion,” says Brandi Fisher, president of the Alliance for Police Accountability. “They state that if you live in an area that’s high crime, it’s OK for the officers to do what they want.” In the years since the Miles incident, tension between police and Homewood residents has surfaced in a handful of incidents. Among them is a June 2013 encounter involving a local teacher, Dennis Henderson, who was arrested outside of a community meeting on improving relations with police. Henderson raised his voice after police officer Jonathan Gromek drove close to him with his patrol car. Gromek turned his car around and later arrested Henderson, while also handcuffing a bystander who shot footage of the scene. The incident sparked outrage; Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala later dropped the charges against Henderson. Last month, the Citizen Police Review Board, which reviews complaints of police misconduct, recommended the city fire Gromek, but he remains on the force. (Review-board recommendations are not binding.) A month after the Henderson incident, brothers Beyshaud El and Will El were detained by police after leaving a Homewood convenience store. Though neither man possessed drugs or weapons, a confrontation ensued, and the brothers were charged with aggravated assault of an officer. In March, Zappala reduced those charges after Fisher’s group released a video of the incident, which appeared to show one brother being Tasered and another being slammed against the wall. The Miles case is “nothing new in terms of the criminalization of the black community and African-American men,” says Rashad Byrdsong, whose organization Community Empowerment Association hosted the June 2013 meeting where Henderson was arrested. “What we’re talking about with Jordan Miles is a smaller subset of what’s going on in the larger community.” Part of the problem, says review-board Executive Director Beth Pittinger, is that officers out on the street may not know Homewood except by reputation. She said the neighborhood tends to have an influx of younger officers — all three of the officers who arrested Miles were under 30 years old at the time, for example — because police with seniority choose to work in other, less crimeridden zones. “They have a very high violent-crime rate and they have the least experienced officers out there patrolling it,” Pittinger says. “I think there’s anxiety going into a neighborhood with the kind of reputation CONTINUES ON PG. 14


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NEIGHBORHOOD WATCHED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12 UNSETTLED ARGUMENTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

price tag may be determined in post-trial motions and arguments, Harris says. “None of this stuff is definitive; it’s all subject to argument,” says Olds. For his part, Miles’ lawyer says the trial wasn’t about money. “Jordan Miles did not care about the amount awarded today,” Joel Sansone told reporters immediately following the March 31 verdict. “The only thing he wanted to hear was that these officers did the wrong thing.” Sansone did not respond to requests for further comment on this story. But some activists worry that the city will be sending the wrong message if it goes after Miles for the legal costs of defending the officers or appeals the jury award. “I think it’s disheartening for this to even be a topic, or a possible consideration,” says Fisher, of the Alliance for Police Accountability. Fisher notes that, although Peduto says he hasn’t ruled out seeking payment from Miles, after the trial was over, he issued a statement saying “Our community must start healing,” and rebuilding trust between the community and police. “I am ready to start that now,” the statement added. How, Fisher asks, “can you heal if you’re talking about pursuing action [against Miles]? If they do, I hope they’re ready for the community’s response.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

Homewood has,” and younger officers “can be quick to use force because they don’t have the maturity.” Pittinger also faults police tactics like the “jump out,” in which officers leap from unmarked cars to surprise suspected criminals, including Miles. During his trial, Miles claimed that police didn’t identify themselves as officers, and that the sudden appearance of three white men caused him to run from, and struggle with, the officers involved. “The end question I hear ringing around the halls is, ‘How did he end up looking like that?’” Pittinger says, about the extent of Miles’ facial injuries. “And there will never be an answer to that.” PITTINGER SAYS that if there’s a bright side

to the case, it’s that, “In light of the Miles verdict, I think perhaps people see the police aren’t enjoying as much impunity.” She continues, “The fact that they actually found them liable, I think will pique supervisors’ interest” and perhaps change police tactics. Byrdsong, for one, isn’t so optimistic. “How many black men are stopped and frisked for no apparent reason at all?” he asks. “I think [the verdict] is going to be an isolated case. When you look at law enforcement in this country, you see more of a military occupying police force then we did before.” Repairing Homewood’s reputation and improving relationships between the community and police is critical to the neighborhood’s future, says Pittsburgh City Councilor Ricky Burgess, who represents Homewood. He’s been working to increase development, but says it will rely on decreasing violence in the neighborhood. “What killed the investment is the violence, so as we try to rebuild it the perception of violence puts daggers in the heart of development,” Burgess says. Burgess says he doesn’t place the blame solely on police officers: The problem, he says, is a culture of mutual distrust. “You have a belief from the police that the community hates them, the community disrespects them,” Burgess says. “On the other hand, you have the belief from the community that the police hate them. Those two false narratives play out in police-community relations.” He’d like to see officers more actively involved in the community before the animosity becomes even more pronounced. “I suggest they come and meet the people,” Burgess says. “We have to get away from the mindset of occupying the community. I believe in some communities like Homewood, the relationship between police and the community is at crisis level.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014


[POTTER’S FIELD]

CAPITOL OFFENSES

Are Toomey and Casey dumbing down the justice system? {BY CHRIS POTTER} YOU MIGHT not have heard, but Pennsylvania Senators Bob Casey and Pat Toomey may be forging a new bipartisan consensus on who should run our justice system: either people who hold deeply conservative principles, or no one at all. Last month, Casey and Toomey led a Senate vote rejecting President Obama’s nominee to head the Justice Department’s civil-rights division, Debo Adegbile. Adegbile’s sin? While at the NAACP, he wrote a legal brief for Mumia AbuJamal, who was convicted of murdering Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner. Adegbile’s argument — that Abu-Jamal’s jury was discriminatory — was ultimately seconded by a judge. Before the Senate’s vote, the head of the American Bar Association said Adegbile’s brief “should be commended, not condemned.” But not, apparently, if you’re defending the rights of unpopular people: Casey explained his opposition to Adegible by noting Faulkner’s death “and the events that followed … have left open wounds.” Adegbile “promoted division among the American people, and blocked justice for [Faulkner’s] family,” said Toomey. But according to liberal group Keystone Progress, Toomey and Casey have been planning to grant a federal judgeship to a Pittsburgh attorney … despite criticism that he may be divisive, too. In late March, Keystone Progress raised flags about a purported “backroom deal” to make David J. Porter a federal district court judge. Citing unnamed sources, it claimed that Republicans agreed not to block three Democratic judicial nominees if Casey signed off on Porter — whom Keystone Progress calls a “Tea Party lawyer.” (While the full Senate must approve judicial nominations, it typically defers to senators from the state where a judge will serve.) Such horse-trading happens all the time, Keystone Progress head Michael Morrill acknowledges, and a three-for-one deal doesn’t sound bad. But he argues Porter is a special case — one whose career “is almost a mirror image of the work I do” as an activist. “And I know I don’t have a judicial temperament.” Porter, an attorney with Buchanan Ingersoll, heads a Pittsburgh chapter of the Federalist Society, a self-described “group of conservatives and libertarians” opposed to “orthodox liberal ideology” in the law. He’s represented former Sen. Rick Santorum and

penned a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette editorial dubbing “Obamacare” unconstitutional. Morrill also notes that Porter’s name appears on a website touting the “Pennsylvania Justice Network,” whose members opposed the nomination of Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. There’s been no official confirmation of a Porter deal: Casey and Toomey aren’t commenting. Neither is Porter. “It’s a confidential process,” he told City Paper. “Or it’s supposed to be.” Porter’s online corporate biography also boasts of representing The New York Times — hardly a Tea Party journal — and it’s unclear if the “Pennsylvania Justice Network” amounted to anything more than a webpage. Still, Porter’s conservative credentials seem clear, and online petitions opposing his nomination have garnered 32,000 signatures. “People realize that something has really changed in our body politic, if someone this extreme can get a nomination,” Morrill says. Not everyone agrees. “Even if everything they say about [Porter] is true, it’s not that significant,” says Bruce Ledewitz, a Duquesne University law professor who often comments on law and politics. The real power in the federal judiciary, he said, is on appeals courts: “You don’t make law at the district court level” where Porter would serve. “You apply it as written.” If anything, he surmises, “I think [Porter] has come up because of anger over [Adegbile]: ‘Why are we making deals with these people, when they turn on an honorable man this way?’” Ledwitz himself calls Adegbile’s treatment “despicable. … The idea that a lawyer is tainted by representation in death-penalty cases is disgusting.” But as Congressional gridlock has left empty federal courtrooms across the state, Ledewitz says, “I can understand Sen. Casey making this deal.” Trading sacrificial lambs may be less worthwhile than swapping judges. But if Adegbile can be dismissed for taking on a divisive case — which is what lawyers do — why should Porter get a pass? Casey was elected largely because he wasn’t Rick Santorum: If he’s worried about “open wounds,” why grant a judgeship to Santorum’s lawyer? After all, Porter could always run for elected office himself, where voicing strong principles can actually help. As long as you’re a Republican.

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Visit www www.furnacebash.com furnacebash for more details. 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.


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HERE, BEER-BATTERED HADDOCK MEANT THICK, MEATY PIECES IN A LIGHT, CRISPY SHELL

LOCAL MEAT {BY CHRIS POTTER}

When Butcher on Butler opened in the former Lawrenceville home of Foster’s Meats this February, the most obvious part of the inheritance was the awning, which still advertises the family butcher shop. But while Rob Voigt, a co-owner of the new shop, says the awning will be replaced “eventually,” he plans to hold onto other aspects of the family legacy. Like its famous kielbasa. Acquiring the Fosters’ kielbasa recipe “was a big part” of the deal to purchase the shop from the family, says Voigt. “It’s a neighborhood favorite.” That’s just one of the ways Voigt and his three partners are preserving, and strengthening, community ties. The shop’s display cases are filled with regionally sourced meat: lamb from Elysian Fields, steaks from Jubilee Hilltop Ranch and poultry from Gerber Farms. Even closer to hand is what Voigt calls “the largest smokehouse in Western Pennsylvania”: a 60-year-old, two-story smokehouse behind the store. Voigt is planning a grand-opening event for mid-May. But judging from the foot traffic on a recent Saturday morning, the shop’s neighbors are already returning its embrace of all things local. “I couldn’t be happier,” says Joe Kelly, a Lawrenceville business-owner who’s helped guide Lawrenceville’s revitalization — and who was visiting the store for the third time that week. “The smoked Scottish salmon is off the charts. We wanted artisans, and these guys are artisans.”

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Chicken-curry pie: vindaloo-braised chicken, with lentils, eggplant, potato and carrot

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CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FriedFish

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CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION 1100 Creedmoor Ave., Brookline 412-563-4400 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. Fridays during Lent, except Good Friday Beer-battered fried fish is the star (baked is available too), but the supporting cast — homemade sides including mac-and-cheese and pierogies — place this fry a notch above many others. Nothing from the freezer here.

T

HE PUB CHIP SHOP is a new venture

by the proprietors of Pittsburgh’s hub of British dining, Piper’s Pub. It’s situated in an adjacent storefront, and is dedicated to the street and takeaway food of the U.K. Though the Britishisms here are thick — “chips,” of course, are what we call “fries,” Parma sausages are called “bangers” and bacon, “rashers” — the shop’s Sweeney Todd-esque logo of a cleaver dripping blood rebukes any twee preconceptions. And, best of all, the fare, which purports to be authentic, is prepared with extraordinary care evinced by every item — from pastry crusts to beer-battered haddock to housemade sauces. Part of the treat was that, in addition to the real-deal versions of fish, chips and pasties, Pub Chip Shop also offers a taste of some more modern British flavors. These days, Indian and Pakistani places

are apt to outnumber fish-and-chip shops on the streets of Britain, and accordingly, Pub Chip Shop serves not only meat and Stilton pies, but those with fillings of chicken curry and vegan vindaloo. Another immigrant favorite is doner kebab.

THE PUB CHIP SHOP 1830 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-2447 HOURS: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: $4-9 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED A few cross-cultural hybrids, like a chili dog with Welsh cheddar sauce, and steak and mac-and-cheese on a roll, round out the locally unique menu. Sandwiches here are known by the term for the bread they’re made with

— “bap,” a big, buttery, yeasty, lightly crusty roll that would probably do for a small bread bowl for soup. Jason tried bap with a banger. The mildly-flavored link was tender and savory without being heavy. A single piece of sausage, halved and crisped on the griddle, was still a bit overwhelmed by the enormous bap. The menu suggested gravy, but for portability we swapped in that Welsh cheddar sauce, which was decidedly not sharp enough. Sage sausage was more than ample wrapped in puff pastry in the sausage roll. The pastry, extraordinarily tender and flaky around the meat, was a real treat, but the proportions of the roll were off, and by halfway through, things started getting heavy. Some spicy mustard might have helped liven up the flavor, but the real issue was the realization that sometimes, there can be such a thing as too much sausage. CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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STREET FARE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

But what, you say, about the fish and chips? Pittsburgh, especially this time of year, is a town that knows its fried fish. Here, beer-battered haddock meant thick, meaty pieces in a light, crispy shell that might not win a city-wide contest, but probably beats most of what you’ll get on East Carson. The fresh, housemade tartar and cocktail sauces were a clear step above, and the chips — well, let us linger a while upon the subject of the chips. In the States, we’re used to three basic styles: shoestring, thin and crisp with a hint of fluffiness; thick-cut, with dark, crisp edges; and steak fries, wedges that aspire to a fluffy, not mealy, interior. These chips didn’t fit in any of these categories. They were thicker than thick-cut, very fluffy within, with a color deeper than shoestring-golden, yet similarly light exterior crust. If you care at all for fries, you owe yourself an order.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

NOT EASY BEING GREEN

The much-maligned grasshopper bounces back

And while you’re there, don’t miss the pies and pasties (rhymes with dynasties), which feature a hearty, savory crust that is flaky yet bakes up tender, not crunchy, thanks to its traditional ingredient: lard. (A vegan version is also available). It was good enough that we didn’t mind the occasional bite with too little filling. Not to malign the fillings: In addition to the aforementioned curries and traditional Scotch (lamb), Cornish (steak, with hearty morsels of root vegetables that retained their individual flavors) and English (pork topped with a layer of tangy Stilton), you can try steak and oyster (alas, out the night we visited), salmon au gratin and, inevitably, pierogie. Another dish adapted to local ingredients was the Lake Erie perch taco. The two filets of cornmeal-breaded fish were excellent in themselves, but more than filled the taco, which was a bit scant on other ingredients — cabbage, cilantro and Baja sauce — which would’ve given it depth and moisture. Taco notwithstanding, The Pub Chip Shop serves food invented by and for British commoners, but the quality in Pittsburgh is distinctly uncommon.

When Sean Rosencrans, a bartender at Tender in Lawrenceville, suggested a few weeks ago that I try a grasshopper, my initial reaction was, “You’re joking, right?” But he’d just made one for a big fan of the drink seated nearby: Brian Mendelssohn, principal at Botero Development. “People make fun of you for ordering a grasshopper,” Mendelssohn said, “but they secretly want to drink the grasshopper.” For me, there were no secrets: I didn’t want to drink the grasshopper. But I ordered one anyway, because I believe in trusting my bartender. And although I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, I found the grasshopper delightful. It’s a dessert and a drink together, and it’s much more enjoyable than the boozy milkshakes that were all the rage in recent years. As Mendelssohn described it, “The flavor is like an Andes candy in a drink. Who doesn’t like that?” It’s thought that the cocktail tha was created in wa Louisiana in the Lou 1940s, though it 1940 really rose to prominence as a groovy promine cocktail in the 1970s. It’s a shamrock-green blend shamrock-g equal parts crème made from eq crème de cacao and de menthe, crè The ingredients heavy cream. Th violently over ice are shaken viole frothy into a and strained fro martini glass. The grasshopper seems tto be having a moment in Pittsburgh. momen In addition to Tender, it’s on the menu at Kelly’s, where it’s shaken table-side. Spencer Warren served the drink in miniature glass jugs and picnic straws at one of his pop-up Embury nights. Rosencrans did offer one caveat: “If you want to make a good grasshopper, you need quality ingredients.” When made with a bottom-shelf spirit, the drink is overly sweet, something better suited for a TGI Friday’s nightmare than a lovely nightcap. That’s why Rosencrans prefers Tempus Fugit spirits, a high-end brand that’s relatively new to the state. So don’t be scared to step back into the 1970s. As Mendelssohn told me, “It’s not a flavor you always want, but sometimes it’s something that you crave.”

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Fish and chips

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On the RoCKs


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

savor authentic flavors

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

BITES AND BREWS. 5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-4425. The concept is simple: 30 beers on tap, more in bottles, and two menu items — pizza and sandwiches. You construct your own creation using a checklist, and there is plenty of variety in ingredients and preparation. What the kitchen does, it does well, serving some of the best pizza and custom sandwiches in town. JE CASA RASTA. 2056 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-918-9683. This casual storefront taqueria combines the tropical, sometimes spicy flavors of Caribbean and Mexican cuisines in tacos, burritos and tortas. Thus, jerk chicken might be a wing appetizer, or taco filling. Also broaching both cultures: fruit salsa and citrusmarinated fried pork. JF GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

Lola Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying upto-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE

HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookish-themed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-3221106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar

PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. www.pamelasdiner.com. There are many reasons to recommend this popular local diner minichain: the cheery atmosphere; the old-fashioned breakfasts featuring raisin French toast, fried potatoes and corned-beef hash; and light, crispy-edged pancakes so good that President Obama had them served at the White House. J PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-7586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776- 7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and tender within. Add in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as macand-cheese or baked beans. JF

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NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF

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Mon-Fri • 7AM 7AM-3 -3PM PM

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

336 Fourth Avenue

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SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests

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Try any one of our sandwiches for $ !

Dine-In or Take-Out

The Library {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} PUSADEE’S GARDEN. 5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-7818724. Traditional Thai sauces and curries from scratch are among the reasons to stop by this charming eatery, which boasts an outdoor patio. Don’t miss the latkelike shrimp cakes, the classically prepared tom yum gai soup or the spicy duck noodles. KF

Best Pizza in the’Burgh!

Coupon not redeemable for cash. Limit one (1) coupon per order. Offer expires 4/23/14.

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Make Your Easter Reservations Today!

New Menu Items! Add to a meal or take a bag home.

The Smiling Moose {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

POTATO CHIPPERS

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Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

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humble and down-home, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Best of all, each meat has its own custom rub and is dry-smoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-281-6888. This fine-dining spot brings an elegantly casual, European vibe to the renovated Market Square, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE

technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE

TOMATO PIE CAFÉ. 885 East Ingomar Road, Allison Park. 412-364-6622. Located on the verdant edge of North Park, Tomato Pie is more than a pizzeria. THE SMILING It offers other simple MOOSE. 1306 E. Italian specialties www. per Carson St., South including pasta a p pghcitym Side. 412-431-4668. and sandwiches, and .co The Carson Street bar the chef uses plenty and nightclub offers a of fresh herbs grown top-notch sandwich and salad on the premises. FJ menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and VERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. a knack for well-selected 412-404-8487. The menu here isn’t ingredients to the burgers, straight Mexican, but presents sandwiches and appetizers. some traditional items, including Options include: shrimp skewers tableside-prepared guacamole with smoked peppers, cornand grilled corn-on-the-cob, with and-black-bean fritters and a reconceived classics, invented, roster of inventive sliders. JE fusion-y dishes like tacos with roasted sweet potatoes, fried STEELHEAD BRASSERIE chickpeas and Mexican-style AND WINE BAR. Marriott City tzatziki. There is also an extensive Center, 112 Washington Ave., tequila list and a patio for Downtown. 412-394-3474. In warm-weather dining. KE this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. promises that the aquatic name 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton holds more than brand value. (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson While entrées include seafood St., South Side (412-301-1763). and other meat in almost equal The fresh-made waffles here are proportion, the soups and starters a marvelous foil for sweet and are dominated by the former, with savory toppings. Sweet options old favorites like jumbo shrimp include the Funky Monkey cocktail matched with more (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut contemporary offerings. LE butter and chocolate sauce). The Breakfast Magic has bacon, STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight cheddar and green onions inside, Road, Ross Township. 412-369topped with a fried egg and sour 5380. There is an art to making cream. Or customize your waffles a really good sandwich, and the with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J

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HAPPY HOUR AT BZ’S Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 5pm-7pm Wednesday Hump Day 5pm-9pm Friday Early Recess 3p-5p *Game Day Happy Hour starts at first pitch or kick off and runs for its scheduled duration

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BZ Bar and Grill 140 Federal Street (next to PNC Park) 412-323-BZBG(2924) • bzbarandgrill.com

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LOCAL

“I ADMIT WE AREN’T EXACTLY THE SEX PISTOLS.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

DREAMING BIG The summer free-concert season is still a way off, but the folks at Omicelo and Dream Cream Ice Cream are teaming up this weekend to present a three-day outdoor event that will bring lots of music to Market Square. The first-ever DreamOn Festival starts at noon on Fri., April 11, and continues through Sunday, bringing Grammynominated duo The Foreign Exchange (Phonte Coleman and producer Nicolay) along with a long list of Pittsburgh musicians. Besides the all-day music, there will be a lot of ice cream, supplied by Dream Cream, and a film premiere at Wood Street Galleries: The End Again, whose cast includes Scandal’s Columbus Short, and whose soundtrack features The Foreign Exchange. The festival is the brainchild of Omicelo, a startup music and lifestyle company that hopes to eventually work in both education and music promotion. DreamOn is the company’s first big project; festival producer Jasu Sims explains that while she’s based in New York City, some of her business partners are from Pittsburgh, and the company believes in the city’s potential. “We thought we could highlight Pittsburgh and all the assets that it has,” Sims says. “One of the best ways we know that everyone connects with each other is through music — it’s a universal language.” Local acts appearing in the three-day lineup range from Smooth Tutors to The Big Bend and Rivka. Jazz and soul are represented by the likes of The Groove Aesthetic; Formula 412 delivers hip hop, while Falling Andes bring up the indie-rock end. Hosts for the event include: Pittsburgh native and Boardwalk Empire actress Margot Bingham; comedian J. Russ; model Tunisha Hubbard; and Wendy Heimann, a former radio host who Omicelo found in an unlikely place — she works with the company as a lawyer. As always, proceeds from Dream Cream ice-cream sales will go to helping individuals and small businesses pursue their goals, whether they be personal or charitable. Sims says Omicelo hopes to make DreamOn an annual event — and hopes for a warm weekend. “I’ve been asking everyone on Twitter to pray for nice weather!” she says with a laugh.

“WE THOUGHT WE COULD HIGHLIGHT PITTSBURGH AND ALL THE ASSETS THAT IT HAS.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DREAMON FESTIVAL. Noon-11 p.m. Fri., April 11; continues noon-11 p.m. Sat., April 12, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., April 13. Market Square, Downtown. www.omicelo.com

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{BY NICK KEPPLER}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HELEN WOODS}

Music by the books: Fanfarlo

LIBRARY LIBRARY OF OF SOUND SOUND T

HE SMOOTH and semi-psychedelic

sound of chamber-pop quintet Fanfarlo might lead one to imagine their tour bus as a rolling cannabis hotbox, with cough-syrup cocktails in the cup holders. But it’s actually more like a library reading room on wheels. “Reading is probably our favorite activity, aside from making music,” says Justin Finch, bassist of the eight-year-old British band. “We tend to share books.” Anything related to sociology or science tends to be a hit: Multi-instrumentalist Cathy Lucas has a degree in sociology, with a focus on gender studies, and keeps up with both disciplines in the vast hours between gigs. Finch and lead singer Simon Balthazar are into vintage science fiction. Even the band’s name

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

comes from a book: French writer Charles Baudelaire’s 1847 novel La Fanfarlo. “I admit we aren’t exactly the Sex Pistols,” says Finch. The literary lifestyle definitely permeates the band’s music. Its 2012 album

FANFARLO

WITH LILLIES ON MARS 8 p.m. Sat., April 12. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $14. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Rooms Filled With Light somehow made shoegaze-style art-pop out of the mechanisms of the mind. (A sample lyric: “Motives and means, now they seem like a dream within a dream / Concepts and

ideas starting soon to be making any sense.”) The follow-up, Let’s Go Extinct, released in February, takes a more macro view of the human experience. The album’s first words ease listeners into an exploration of cosmic harmony and the smallness of humans in the vastness of the universe: “Coming from afar and heading for the sun / I think of us when we were molecules,” sings Balthazar, in his hiccup-y voice. The sound is trippy, but not in a jagged, distorted way. Think Flaming Lips’ The Soft Bulletin. “People ask, ‘Are you trying to be deep by asking all these questions?’ Not really,” says Balthazar, the band’s central creative force. “‘Who are we?’ ‘Where are we going next?’ I just think that in the same way these questions make good CONTINUES ON PG. 26


LIBRARY OF SOUND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

science fiction, they can also make good pop music.” Balthazar says he has always been more influenced by writing and ideas than the music of others, something he attributes to his upbringing in the tiny village vaguely near Gothenburg, Sweden. “There wasn’t much music there,” he says. “My parents had some folk music, some orchestral stuff and some cheesy crooner-pop. That was it for me. I don’t think I was influenced by that much.” He took six months of piano lessons at age 12, but that was his only formal training. The rest of his musical upbringing came from toying with a slew of instruments that, like those records, were just lying around. “There was a piano, a ukulele [and] a glockenspiel,” recalls Balthazar. “I’m not sure why it was there. No one [in the family] was serious about music.” That scattered, multi-instrumental approach would later be applied to Fanfarlo’s albums, all of which feature about 20 or so instruments. As a young man, Balthazar moved to London without much of an aim: “I moved to London the same way people moved to Berlin or New York City,” he says. He started working on music alone in his bedroom, but “London is the kind of place where you can’t go five minutes without starting a band. People started asking me to play their clubs or parties, so I put together a band.” Finch saw Balthazar lead a precursor to Fanfarlo at “a hot and sweaty bar called Nambutu.” Immediately impressed by the musicality and original songs, Finch asked to join as a keyboard player, later switching to bass to fill a void in the ever-evolving lineup. “It took a while to get the band we have today,” says Balthazar. “People came in and out.” Once the band had a (somewhat) permanent lineup, Fanfarlo self-issued a series of EPs, singles and albums while racking up tour dates on both sides of the Atlantic. Fanfarlo’s songs have been featured in everything from an episode of Grey’s Anatomy to The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. Still the band members’ lives consist largely of reading, communal dinners and occasional retreats into the Welsh countryside, which is where Let’s Go Extinct was recorded. “We put ourselves in isolation,” says Balthazar. “I think that’s when your art really blooms. … You need to be in that bubble and not care what the world thinks to get a sense of how you [as an artist] really think.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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ON THE RECORD

with Matt Zeoli

of Household Stories

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE REINHART}

Household Stories

Household Stories, based in Greensburg, has made a name for itself with a series of ’90s-alt-rock-style EPs. Guitarist Matt Zeoli spoke with CP about the band’s new No. 3 EP and its evolving lineup. YOU WERE A SMALLER BAND UNTIL RECENTLY, RIGHT? Yeah, we added two members — [bassist] John Perry and [vocalist] Lianna Ankney. They’re individual songwriters themselves; John plays in a band called Antimony, and Lianna is a songwriter with a new project coming out. YOU WORKED WITH J VEGA AT WILDERNESS STUDIO, AND HE PLAYED ON THE EP — HE EVEN PLAYED LIVE WITH YOU SOME. He’s so smart, such a funny guy, he really puts us at ease — it feels like home, going to his studio. And he’s definitely into what we’re doing, which makes it awesome: that the person recording us is digging our stuff. WHY A THIRD EP, AND WHY DO IT THE WAY YOU DID, RELEASING IT ONLINE LAST YEAR, THEN ON A CD WITH A BONUS TRACK THIS WEEKEND? A lot of bands are doing Kickstarterfunded things; we decided to take care of it all ourselves, even if it took some extra time — maybe we’ll do a Kickstarter when we do a full-length. We had released four of the songs in the original batch, then we wrote [the new song] “NXNW”; we decided we wanted to record it immediately, and we feel like it fits in properly with the sequencing on the EP. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HOUSEHOLD STORIES EP RELEASE with SEA RIGHTS, THE RED WESTERN. 6 p.m. Sat., April 12. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


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{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH WEHLE}

Split personality: Danny Brown

TWO SIDES OF DANNY BROWN {BY JOHN LAVANGA} DIVIDED BY THE self-explanatory tracks

“Side A (Old)” and “Side B (Dope Song),” Danny Brown’s latest, Old, is a record with a split personality. One half is a collection of harsh drug raps that offer a jarring glimpse of the horrors of Brown’s days on the crumbling Motor City streets. The other half is a pulsing barrage of electronic beats that carry listeners through the simultaneous euphoria and panic of molly-popping revelry. It’s an illustration of Brown’s evolution as a person and a musician, as well as a way to expose his quickly growing fan base to the rapper’s harsh roots. “For fans of the side-B tracks, you have to get through side A,” Brown says, explaining that by showing off his streetrap pedigree, he’s “showing you that I’m going to be able to still grow.” Brown’s time in the limelight, after all, is far exceeded by his years in obscurity. At 30 years old, Brown made his breakthrough with 2011’s XXX, an album that Brown described as being all about impressive “punchlines,” and eliciting chuckles and gasps with his unabashedly graphic, undeniably funny verses. And even that record took time to catch on. “To be honest, when I put XXX out, it took like a year,” Brown says. “It didn’t happen right away.” Once it did, Brown developed a reputation as a chameleon on tracks, shifting pitch, tone and tempo at will to perfectly match any beat he’s given. If XXX was his audition for the hip-hop talent show, Old is a tough-to-watch documentary film series. As Brown puts it, “Old is just straight up.” On side A, in tracks like

“25 Bucks” and “Torture,” he drops bars on getting fronted for drugs by the same dealer who jumped him, or watching crack fiends face humiliation from a dealer’s pit bull for owing cash. The newfound recognition also gave Brown the opportunity to push his versatility to its limit on Old, which he did by making personal pleas to artists he admires, like Canadian electronic duo Purity Ring (which appears on “25 Bucks”) and British electronic act Charlie XCX (on the album’s closing track, “Float On”).

DANNY BROWN

WITH BODEGA BAMZ, ZELOOPERZ 7 p.m. Tue., April 15. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $18-20. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

“It’s one thing to hit someone up on Twitter, but when you meet them in real life and look them in the eye, it’s different,” Brown says. “That’s how it happened with Charlie and Purity Ring. When I work with somebody, I like to go into their world and bring them into mine.” The resulting work was a surprising marriage of electronic pop and rap — all of it anchored by Brown’s painfully descriptive and discerningly detached verses. The success of both records has only bolstered Brown’s confidence. He’s emphatic about continuing to push the limits of the genre, going so far as to mention Spencer Pollard — of hardcore band Trash Talk — as a future collaborator, and name-dropping Stanley Kubrick as an inspiration for his upcoming work. Such brash announcements would be a big surprise — if this weren’t Danny Brown we were talking about. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

CRITICS’ PICKS

The Julie Ruin

There are few rappers more legendary than KRS-One: The Bronx native cofounded Boogie Down Productions in the ’80s, arguably setting the stage for the rise of gangsta rap, then quickly moved from violent imagery to socially conscious and politically radical lyrics. He’s uncompromising on everything from race relations to vegetarianism, and never shies away from controversy; KRS-One plays Mr. Small’s Theatre tonight in a show presented by 1Hood and 720 Music. Jasiri X and Smilo open. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. 18 and over. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[PUNK] + FRI., APRIL 11 Kathleen Hanna is well known in feminist circles; the original al Riot Grrrl’s life was chronicled in last year’s documentary The Punk Singer. Hanna grew ew to fame with Bikini Kill, and her current primary vehicle, The Julie Ruin, has a similarr punk-rock vibe; these songs pack a punch. ch. Take the lyrics from the band’s single “Ha Ha Ha”: “You’re a roadblock, ock, dressed like a solution / an n ambush with no ammunition.” tion.” Not all of the band’s nd’s songs are like that, at, though; “Just My y Kind” is a love song with a ’50s vibe. If punk rock is your ur thing, check out tonight’s show att Mr. Small’s Theatre with special guests ts Screaming Females. Kayla Copes s 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. vale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

going treatment for pancreatic cancer. By November, though, the energetic performer was back onstage; Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings released their sixth full-length in January of this year, and tonight they play the Byham Theater in a show that celebrates the 40th anniversary of local public radio station WYEP-FM. AM 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $32.25-42.25. All ages. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., APRIL 15 British singer-songwriter Dan Croll just released his debut album, Sweet Disarray, and now he’s making his way stateside for a headlining tour. Croll went to the Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts, where he h had a chance to study directly with LIPA founder Paul McCartney. Croll recently performed rec on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Li and has previously toured with Bastille and Imagine Ba Dragons. Check him out tonight at Club Café é with special guests Panama Wedding. Weddin KC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South SSide. $12. 412-431www.clubcafelive.com 4950 or www.

[FOLK] + W WED., APRIL 16

Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings

[SOUL] + SUN., ., APRIL 13 Last year, things didn’t look great for soul phenom Sharon Jones: In the summer, the 57-year-old, who reached fame well ell into her 40s after years working ng jobs like corrections officer, r, was under-

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The Tillerss ha have been through before — including Pittsburgh be on a tour with Pokey LaFarge but the Cincinnati last year — b three-piece’s show tonight is at Howlers in Bloomfield, an intimate and a fitting venue for the old-timey string old band. They’re on their way The to the Brooklyn Folk Festival Broo number of midand hitting a n on the way; we’re Atlantic towns o lucky to get them on a Wednesday Vermont’s Waylon night with Vermo notable Jayke Speed and local no Orvis. AM 8 p.m. 4 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com www.howlerscoyo

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The Palace Theatre Highlights! Apr 11/12 Apr 13 Apr 24 Apr 26 May 2 May 3 May 7 May 14 May 15 May 16

Fr/Sa 7:30PM Sun 2PM Thu 7:30PM Sat 7:30PM Fri 6:30&9:30PM Sat 7:30PM Wed 6:45PM Wed 8PM Thu 8PM Fri 7PM

May 17 Sat

7PM

May 18 May 28 May 30 May 31

Sun Wed Fri Sat

3PM 8PM 8PM 7:30PM

Jun 4 Jun 14 Jun 28 Jul 1 Jul 9 Jul 11 Jul 19

Wed Sat Sat Tue Wed Fri Sat

8PM 2&7PM 8PM 8PM 8PM 8PM 7:30PM

Aug 26 Sep 17 Sep 18 Sep 19

Tue Wed Thu Fri

2&6PM 7:30PM 8PM 8PM

S C R E E N

PalacePA

[HIP HOP] + THU., APRIL 10

Stage Right presents Children of Eden * Stage Right presents Children of Eden * Latshaw Productions presents Mark Lowry * Westmoreland Symphony: Barber & Brahms # Latshaw Productions presents Bill Engvall * River City Brass presents Some Like It Hot! + John Noble’s Westmoreland Night of the Stars Ƈ Elko: Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience * Latshaw Productions presents Vince Gill * Columbus 500 presents Lee Alverson’s Tribute to Elton John & Billy Joel * Big Brothers Big Sisters/Laurel Region present The Fabulous Hubcaps * Latshaw Productions presents Ronnie Milsap * Elko Concerts presents The Monkees * Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents America * WSO presents An Evening of Pink Floyd - The Wall and The Dark Side of the Moon * Elko Concerts presents Pablo Cruise * Laurel Ballet presents Don Quixote * Elko: Gordon Lightfoot 50 Yrs/Carefree Hwy * Elko Concerts presents Move Live On Tour * Elko Concerts presents Peter Frampton * Westmoreland Cultural Trust: 10,000 Maniacs * Latshaw: Night Of Doo Wop - Charlie Thomas’ Drifters, The Coasters and The Crystals * J.B. Productions presents Shoji Tabuchi * Elko Concerts: The British Invasion Tour * Latshaw: Kenny Vance and the Planotones * Elko Concerts presents Steven Wright *

BILL ENGVALL

JASON BONHAM’S LZE

AMERICA

The Palace Theatre, Greensburg 724-836-8000 • www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014


Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

Nameless In August (Late). Rattie & the Brush Valley Rumblers, Grievous Angels, The Turpentiners. South Side. 412-431-4950. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. HAMBONE’S. Nomadx, Frankie Lee & The Allstars. Lawrenceville. ALTAR BAR. Ballyhoo. 412-681-4318. Strip District. 412-263-2877. MARKET SQUARE. The Foreign HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Roger CLUB CAFE. Open Air Stereo, Exchange, Margot Bingham, Harvey & The Wild Life, Caspar & Miggs, Man On Earth, Mike Suley. 28 North, Formula 412, Smooth The Cookies, Butterbirds, Bishops. South Side. 412-431-4950. Tutors, more. DreamOn Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. GSL Festival. www.omicelo. MOONDOG’S. Jimmy (Gone South Light). Robinson. com. Downtown. Thackery & the Drivers. 412-489-5631. 412-471-1511. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. MR. SMALLS Dead Dawls, Bible Belt Sinners, THEATER. The Julie www. per pa Hills & Rivers, LRad. Bloomfield. 31ST STREET PUB. Ruin, Screaming pghcitym .co 412-682-0320. Spirit Caravan, Females. Millvale. LAVA LOUNGE. Ports, Impossible Pilgrim, Molasses 866-468-3401. Colors, Working Breed. South Side. Barge, Brimstone Coven. RAMADA INN HOTEL 412-431-5282. Strip District. 412-391-8334. & CONFERENCE CENTER. ALTAR BAR. La Dispute. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE Mercedez. Greensburg. Strip District. 412-263-2877. MEADOWS. Tony Janflone Jr. 724-552-0603. ANCIENT ORDER OF Washington. SILKS LOUNGE AT HIBERNIANS. Brad Wagner THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The THE MEADOWS. Airborne. & the Barflys, Paddys Drunken Manhattan Project. Lawrenceville. Washington. Uncles. 412-829-2399. 412-682-0177. SONNY’S TAVERN. Locks & BEAVER FALLS TURNERS Dams, Andre Costello & the Cool CLUB. The Dave Iglar Band. Minors, Union Rye. Bloomfield. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576. CLUB CAFE. Gramsci Melodic 412-689-6828. THE BRONZE HOOD. Daniels THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chris (Early) The David Mayfield Parade, & McClain. Robinson. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Arsena Schroeder. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CLANCY’S PUB. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. CLUB CAFE. Household Stories, Sea Rights, The Red Western (Early). EP Release Show. Formula412. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Albion Jack White Cross. Robinson. 412-489-5631. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Essential Machine, The Duskwhales, Xavier in the Doghouse. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. GOOSKI’S. The Silver Thread, The Olympus Mons, Matt King. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Bad Teenage Moustache, Danny Rocket. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. US, Aurora, Cerebral Collapse, No Exception. Bloomfield. {SUN., JUNE 08} 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. th Club Café, 56 S. 12 St., South Side 724-225-5221. LAMPLIGHTER RESTAURANT. {TUE., JULY 22} The Holidays. 724-468-4545. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, MR. SMALLS THEATER. th 510 E. 10 St., Munhall Fanfarlo, Lilies On Mars. Millvale. 866-468-3401. {SUN., JULY 27} RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Stage AE (outdoors), 400 North Shore Drive, ROYAL PLACE. The Wurms. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. North Side

Calendar

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 10

FULL LIST ONLINE

Venue Tour

FRI 11 - SUN 13

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

UPCOMING SHOWS

SAT 12

TUE Apr 15 THU apr 24 wed may 7

FRI 11

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY ELLEN MATTHEWS}

EARLY WARNINGS

Blitzen Trapper

Natalie Merchant Jack White

SHOWS THIS WEEK Wed 4.9 Thu 4.10 Fri 4.11 Sat 4.12 Sun 4.13

TIME TESTED // rock covers // 8 pm // no cover CHASING MOIRA // rock // 8 pm // no cover DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s dance // 9 pm // $8 FERRIS BUELLER’S REVENGE // 80’s covers // 9 pm // $8 DJ JUAN DIEGO, INC // salsa; dance // 6:30 pm // no cover

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

: ATTENTION Yuengling Fans

An Evening of Music APRIL 12

Arsena Schroeder W/ Angela Mignanellie APRIL 18

NOW AVAILABLE at Your Local Tavern,

Dylan Jane W/ Heidi Jacobs MAY 2

Neely

Six Pack Shop or Distributor. Available In Six Packs, Cases, ½ Barrels and Quarters.

Enjoy!

Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

SHERADEN VETS CLUB. Bill Couch, Moose Tracks. Sheraden. 412-331-9149. THE SHOP. Manual Labor, PIPEWRENCH, T-Tops. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Eaglemania (Eagles Tribute). Washington. STAGE AE. Excision, Dirtyphonics, ill.Gates. North Side. 412-229-5483. STRAND THEATER. Chris Collins w/ members of Boulder Canyon-Kevin Delmolino & Paul Swanton. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Chrome Moses, The Derek Woodz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 13

BRILLOBOX. X Ambassadors, Parade Of Lights. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. BYHAM THEATER. Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLUB CAFE. Cloud Cult Neighbours, Bipolaroid, The Telephone Line. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Rubriks. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOT METAL DINER. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. KEYNOTE CAFE. Primer 55, PIPEWRENCH, The Black Order, Divine Tragedy, After The Fall, Stratega, Blood Union. Jeannette. 412-638-5263.

WED 16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 11

FULL LIST ONLINE

CLUB CAFE. Dan Croll, Panama Wedding. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Satan’s God, Sneaky Creeps, Bat Zuppel, Requiem. Satyr/Elfheim. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Tempest, Chuck Owsten, Gypsy Ribbon Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SMILING MOOSE. Cruel Hand. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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THU 10

BRILLOBOX. LAZERCRUNK. w/ Jaw Jam, Cutups & Keebs. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. . w ww per 412-431-2825. a p ty ci h pg RUGGER’S PUB. 80s .com Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

TUE 15

See Pg. 11 for more information.

DJS

ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Weird Paul Rock Band. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. River Bottom Quartet. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Nick Millevoi, Eric Carbonara, Mike Tamburo. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Waylon Speed, Tillers, Jayke Orvis. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Onward Progress, Fiasco Jones. Bloomfield. SMILING MOOSE. Ovid’s Withering, Delusions of Grandeur, Save us from the Archon, Bury thy Kingdom, Mutilist. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, DELTAnine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 12 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 13 SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 15 SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 16 SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 10 MR. SMALLS THEATER. KRS-One w/ MCs Smilo, Jasiri X. Millvale. 866468-3401.

SAT 12 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & the Blues Attack. 412-487-6259. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

JAZZ THU 10 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 11 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. Jonathan Butler, Kevin Howard. Hill District. 412-392-4474. LITTLE E’S. Adam Osmianski Trio, Paul Scea, Tony DePaolis. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossly. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 12 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. John Smith, Larry Estes, Howie Alexander. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. Tubby Daniels Band, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Jenny Wilson Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 13

BLUES

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

THU 10

MON 14

TUE 15 ALTAR BAR. Danny Brown. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Original Blues Jam w/ Pat Scanga. South Side. 412-431-4090.

FRI 11 AMERICAN LEGION GOLD STAR POST 820. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. THE R BAR. Ron & The RumpShakers. Dormont. 412-561-9634.

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Jazz Guitar Ensemble. Uptown. 412-396-4632.

TUE 15 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Tim Stevens. Downtown. 412-456-6666. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Jazz Chamber Groups. Uptown. 412-396-6000.


FRI 11 DUO SCARLATTI. Zion Lutheran Church. 412-225-4101. PITT-GREENSBURG CHORALE & CHAMBER SINGERS. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II. Feat. George Daugherty, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip:

SAT 12 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II. Feat. George Daugherty, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WASHINGTON, D.C. {FRI., MAY 01}

SUN 13

Future Islands 9:30 Club

WILMINGTON, DEL. {FRI., MAY 16}

Built to Spill World Café Live

PHILADELPHIA {FRI., JUNE 13}

Peter Murphy Trocadero

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Book Exchange. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 16 ANDYS. Kathy Connor. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Sean Jones Quartet. CD Release Party. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CJ’S. Fred Pugh. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB CAFE. River Bottom. South Side. 412-431-4950. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Susanne Ortner-Roberts & Mark Strickland. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

TUE 15 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Guy Russo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

WED 16 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage w/ Cherylann Hawk & The Live to Love Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Onder Ozkoc. Oakland. 412-268-2000.

SUN 13

CLASSICAL THU 10

MON 14

WED 16

N E W S

OTHER MUSIC

CHARTIERS VALLEY INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL AUDITORIUM. The Harmony Singers of Pittsburgh. Scott. EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH. Malcolm Williams & the Area Wide Mass Choir. Hill District. HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Group Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 11

565 LIVE. Brian Belonzi. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Dan McCoy. North Side. 412-237-9400.

PITT-GREENSBURG STUDENT RECITAL. Feat. piano & voice students. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg.

CHARTIERS VALLEY INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL AUDITORIUM. The Harmony Singers of Pittsburgh. Scott.

THU 10

COUNTRY

SAT 12

WED 16

SAT 12

WORLD

ACOUSTIC BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Tom Panei & Friends. Harmony. 724-452-0539. PENN BREWERY. T&A (Terry & Alex). North Side. 412-237-9400. RIPEPI WINERY & VINEYARD. Bob Podash. 412-292-8351.

THE CHATHAM UNIVERSITY CHOIR. Campbell Memorial Chapel. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. DRAMATIC SCENES FOR MEZZO SOPRANO. Excerpts from Saint Saens Samson & Delilah & Verdi’s Aida. Campbell Memorial Chapel. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Downton/Dahntahn Abbey Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II. Feat. George Daugherty, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SIMONE DINNERSTEIN. Kresge Hall. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. SUNDAY AFTERNOON MUSIC SERIES: UNDERCROFT OPERA. Feat. selections from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Magic Flute. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

PITT-GREENSBURG CHORALE & CHAMBERS SINGERS. St Mark’s Lutheran Church, Youngwood. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II. Feat. George Daugherty, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

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HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing- Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 16 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

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What to do April

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

9 - 15

WEDNESDAY 99

Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

DreamOn Pittsburgh Ice Cream & Music Festival

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY 11

MARKET SQUARE Downtown. Free event. For more info & to RSVP visit omicelo.com. Through April 13.

Iced Earth STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 10 Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through April 13.

Ballyhoo ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Manhattan Project THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Pantagleize

LEXINGTON TECHNOLOGY CENTER, QUANTUM THEATRE Point Breeze. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412362-1713. Through April 27.

TM & Š WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. (S14)

Down With Webster

Pittsburgh Power vs. New Orleans VooDoo CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m.

BUGS BUNNY AT THE SYMPHONY II

The Playboy of the Western World RAUH THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through April 19.

The Julie Ruin MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 HEINZ HALL

Don Quixote

468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Comedian Dava Krause LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Tickets: latitude360.com/pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through April 12.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pbt.org. Through April 13.

Sister Spit ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

SATURDAY 12

The Dirty Ball

JANE STREET WAREHOUSE South Side. Over 21 event. Tickets: attacktheatre.com or 1-888-71-TICKETS. 8p.m.

Egg Hunts with the Bunny TRAX FARMS South Hills. 412-835-3246. $7, advance ticket purchase recommended. 10:30a.m.

The Excision Tour 2014 STAGE AE North Side. Featuring Excision, Dirtyphonics & ill Gates. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 8p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

SUNDAY 13 Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

John Witherspoon IMPROV Waterfront. Over 18 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

An Evening with Cloud Cult MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 15 Danny Brown

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Bodega Bamz. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

BOLD COLORS FOR SPRING IN THE NEW BALANCE WEXFORD

574 LIFESTYLE

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT

WOMENS

112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

MENS

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

WOMENS


MADE

NEW FRESH MENU

it Tastes as good as it sounds FIND OUT WHAT ELSE IS PLAYING:

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THE STORY OF O

DONALD RUMSFELD PROVES DESPERATELY SHORT ON SELF-REFLECTION

{BY HARRY KLOMAN} When last we saw the young woman Joe (Stacy Martin), in Vol. I of Lars von Trier’s cinematic double orgasm Nymphomaniac, she’d just had sex with the guy (Shia LaBeouf) to whom she’d lost her virginity years before. The older Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) vividly recalls the encounter to Seligman (Stellan Skarsgård), and at the end of her story, she declares, in agony: “I can’t feel anything.”

Touching: Charlotte Gainsbourg and Jamie Bell

Vol. II continues her story, with Gainsbourg now squarely in the saddle (so to speak), and at least one of von Trier’s purposes becomes clearer. Joe had her first orgasm spontaneously at age 12, but none after that; Seligman (“blessed man”) is a 60-year-old virgin intellectual whose life experience comes from books. They were, it seems, born this way, and now they have to help each other back from the extremes to find balance in a world where, “for a human being, killing is the most natural thing.” Good luck with that. Von Trier’s austere dialogue touches upon themes of culture, history, language, storytelling, desire, psychology and religion. The sex in Vol. II is little more copious than in Vol. I, if at times more outré. But it’s all played so coolly that it affects your head — if it affects anything at all — much more than your heart or body. Starts Fri., April 11. Harris INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Take a break from watching the Pittsburgh bald-eagle cam, and feast your eyes on another bird family: The macaws Blu, Jewel and their kids leave Rio de Janiero for the wild Amazonian jungle. The digitally animated comedy, Rio 2, opens Fri., April 11. In 3-D, in select theaters.

UNKNOWABLE {BY CHRIS POTTER}

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HEN WE LEFTIES recall Ameri-

ca’s misbegotten wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, we often rely on a shorthand explanation: George W. Bush, famous for his intellectual disengagement, led us into a quagmire by following his gut. But as Errol Morris’ profile of Donald Rumsfeld reminds us, plenty of Bush advisers led with their heads … and brought us to the same place. The Unknown Known consists primarily of Rumsfeld, Bush’s Secretary of Defense from 2001 to 2006, answering questions posed off-camera by Morris: No one else is interviewed. The film also draws from the 20,000 memos that Rumsfeld dictated over a four-decade-long political career. Rumsfeld himself gamely reads excerpts from the memos, which recipients nicknamed “snowflakes.” Over its 142 minutes, the film captures Rumsfeld’s unique blend of folksy aggression — when he says “goodness!” in response to a question, you can tell he means “go fuck yourself” — and fortunecookie epistemology. (The film’s title itself riffs on a famous Rumsfeld dictum:

“Time will tell”: Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld

that there “known unknowns,” where you are aware of needing more information, and “unknown unknowns,” where you are ignorant of your own ignorance.) Morris does call out some of Rumsfeld’s more glaring obfuscations. When Rumsfeld claims the Bush administration never linked Saddam Hussein with Al-Qaeda, for example, Morris rolls archival footage of Rumsfeld himself doing precisely that.

THE UNKNOWN KNOWN DIRECTED BY: Errol Morris Manor

And some of the snowflakes are intriguing: In one early-1980s missive, Rumsfeld described the Middle East as a murderous “swamp” and suggested America consider lowering its profile. But snowflakes melt away when you try to touch them, and Rumsfeld proves desperately short on self-reflection. Here he is on the lessons learned from

Vietnam: “Some things work out, some things don’t.” Was Iraq worth it? “Time will tell.” This is a portrait not of the banality of evil, but the evil of banality. Morris perhaps hoped to reprise his 2003 film The Fog of War, in which Vietnam War architect Robert McNamara agonized over his mistakes. But when Rumsfeld chokes up, it’s while recalling a grievously wounded U.S. soldier who — spoiler alert! — survives his injuries. No need for self-examination here! Morris tries to pin Rumsfeld with the camera’s gaze, but Rumsfeld stares right back — coolly, even amusedly, radiating a certain Mephistophelean charm. Morris might have done better to call on some other talking heads, who could’ve offered more forceful critiques than he was able to muster. Or he might have interviewed the soldiers and innocent Iraqis who paid for Rumsfeld’s miscalculations. As it is, both the film and its subject generate little more than frustration. Not because Rumsfeld walks away unscathed, but because it’s not clear he was ever there at all. C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW BRASSLANDS. Every year in a tiny village in Serbia, half a million people gather for an international musical contest between brass bands that play Balkan music. This somewhat shaggy documentary, filmed by a collaborative known as the Meerkat Media Collective, is your ticket to the show. The film tracks three competitors: last year’s winner, who lives nearby; another local, a Roma, who plays in a slightly different style; and a teacher from Brooklyn. All these men play trumpets and, it seems, these instruments are the “stars” of the bands. (I wish the film had spent a little more time explaining what exactly constitutes Balkan brass music, as opposed to other brass-based acts.) The film briefly touches on more complicated issues beneath the surface, such as the lingering ill feelings from the Kosovo conflict and how closely music is (or should be) tied to national identity. In English, and Serbian, with subtitles. Fri., April 11, through Tue., April 15. (Al Hoff) CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER. For me, most of the films based on the superheroes of Marvel Comics are pulpy and cartoonish. The Avengers, Iron Man, Spider-Man and even The X-Men have left me wanting the dark broodiness of Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy, which showed how a movie based on a comics-based superhero can still be menacing, tense and meaningful. Thankfully, the new Captain America film, from Anthony and Joe Russo, captures that spirit. The film focuses on Captain America (Chris Evans), working for global defense agency S.H.I.E.L.D. and getting caught up in an insider double-cross that threatens to bring about the deaths of millions of people, all in the name of security. Without revealing plot points, suffice it to say that in keeping with the new trademark of the superhero genre, this sets up multiple sequels for the franchise, as well as several other Marvel titles. The subject matter — losing our freedoms in the name of security — is heady stuff, and Evans brings a level of conviction and believability to the title role that he was sorely lacking in the first Captain America film. Evans portrays Captain America as a troubled, outof-time hero, living with 1940s sensibilities in a far more complicated modern world. The supporting cast is also good, with Anthony Mackie as Falcon, Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury, Sebastian Stan as The Winter Soldier and Scarlett Johansson as The Black Widow. Captain America: The Winter Soldier is definitely the best sequel to come out this latest batch of superhero films, and might be the best standalone feature to date. In 3-D, in select theaters. (Charlie Deitch)

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DRAFT DAY. Ivan Reitman’s enjoyable comedy takes place over 12 hours during one of America’s more recently minted sporting “events”: the annual NFL college draft. Sonny Weaver (Kevin Costner) is the new general manager of the struggling Cleveland Browns, and he’s under pressure to pick the right prospect — a hot young QB? The son of a legacy player? A brash up-and-comer? Squawking in both his ears are the team owner (Frank Langella) and head coach (Dennis Leary). Then, there are the other teams’ GMs, eager to make deals. And Weaver’s one source of calm, the team’s number-cruncher (Jennifer Garner), just told him they’re having an unexpected baby. Draft Day isn’t about football per se, but

Captain America: The Winter Soldier the backroom deals — the feinting, the on-the-fly adjusting, the rapid calculations that could make or break a team for a decade. These folks are scrambling over football players, but it could be any other high-pressure deal-making. Thus, the film resembles Moneyball more than any Sunday game, and its low-key pleasures lie in watching Costner and a raft of character actors verbally spar. It’s openly manipulative, crafting Weaver as the flawed but decent underdog we want to root for. (This might be the only time you hear a Pittsburgh audience cheer openly for the Cleveland Browns.) The eventual outcome isn’t much of a surprise, but the film takes a twisty road that’s quite fun to travel. Starts Fri., April 11. (AH)

THE LUNCHBOX. The gentle drama is nominally about two lonely people living in Mumbai, India, who meet via a mixed-up lunchbox. Ila (Nimrat Kaur) prepares meals for her emotionally distant husband, but they are mistakenly delivered to an older accountant named Saajan (Irrfan Khan). At first, he returns the tins with notes about the cuisine, but soon the two strike up a friendship via letters. Both are reserved and private — unlike Saajan’s garrulous new assistant — and find relief in sharing their confidential thoughts in such an anonymous fashion. But writer-director Ritesh Batra’s film is also about troubling social aspects of modern India, where busy city life and career-oriented residents have become disengaged from traditional relationships and cultures. It’s a job bracketed by rush hours, and perhaps some TV in the evening. The industrious bustle becomes cover for emotional disengagement — at least until a lunchbox is sent to the wrong desk. A film both sweet and bittersweet about two strangers who help each other emerge from their acceptable, but moribund, lives. In Hindi, with subtitles. Starts Fri., April 11. Manor (AH)

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Oculus

OCULUS. It’s kind of an ugly mirror, and that’s reason enough to not drag it home, but tightly wound Kaylie (Karen Gillan) does, and invites her brother Tim (Brenton Thwaites), just out of a mental institution, over to look at it. See, 11 years ago, this mirror was in their dad’s office, and, as we see in an extended flashback narrative, it might have caused some horrific abuse and killings. Or maybe Kaylie and Tim share some kind of false-memory syndrome, perhaps in response to long-ago family troubles. (Oculus is reminiscent of old EC Comics stories, which often used mundane objects and family tensions as a springboard for horror.) For a while, Mike Flanigan’s film flirts with this tension between reality and perception before committing to a side. Along the way, there’s a bit of grossness (biting into a light bulb, always a bad idea!), but this horror film is fairly restrained, and doesn’t rely on cheap gimmicks like jump-outs and frenzied behavior. The ending is a bit of a letdown, and expect to see Oculus 2. Starts Fri., April 11. (AH)

ENEMY. Denis Villeneuve adapts Jose Saramago’s 2002 novel The Double in this thriller about a man who pursues his look-alike after spotting him in a film; Jake Gyllenhaal stars. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 10; 10 p.m. Fri., April 11; 9:30 p.m. Sat., April 12; 7 p.m. Sun., April 13; and 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 17. Hollywood

PARTICLE FEVER. Mark Levinson’s documentary about the launching of the Large Hadron Collider and its use in searching for the Higgs (or “God”) particle is a lot more fascinating than 90 minutes spent with badly coiffed physicists would have you believe. The LHC is situated in Switzerland, but its development and personnel

April 27, 2pm

The Butcher Boy with Buster Keaton and

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$8, $6 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/butcherboy

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is a global effort. Particle Fever is pretty hard science (with a dash of philosophy), but is quite accessible for the layman. You’ll leave the theater smarter than you went in, as well as hopeful and inspired about those who pursue knowledge simply for its own sake. And Particle Fever is truly an action film for science nerds: Thrill to scribbled formulae and a 17-mile-long accelerator; pick a side (experimental or theoretical physics); groan at setbacks (stupid hydrogen leak!); pick another side (supersymmetry vs. metaverse); and hold your breath waiting to see if the smallest bit of matter thought to exist shows up in the final reel. As with most action films, a sequel seems inevitable. In English, and several languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., April 11. Regent Square (AH)

nationally known names. But in the 1960s he left the road for family life. He’s since made his living not only by playing out constantly, but also as a teacher at Pittsburgh’s High School for the Creative and Performing Arts; James Johnson, of the AfroAmerican Music Institute, calls Humphries “the grand master teacher.” While the film at one point leaves Humphries behind to explore what jazz is about, and the music’s future, it’s still a nice tribute, with testimonials from musicians including Sean Jones, Dwayne Dolphin, Jevon Rushton — and Lou Stellute, who calls Humphries “the father of the jazz music scene here in Pittsburgh.” The screening benefits groups including the AAMI. 6 p.m. (5 p.m. VIP reception). Sat., April 12. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-125. www.rhpassiton.com (Bill O’Driscoll)

THE RAID 2. In this sequel to the hit 2012 martialarts actioner The Raid: Redemption, Jakarta cop Rama (Iko Uwais) has to subdue a new batch of criminals, this time by going undercover as a gangster. Gareth Evans directs. In Indonesian, with subtitles. Starts Fri., April 11.

LONG LIVE FREEDOM. Tom Servillo stars in this 2012 dramedy from Roberto Ando, in which a prominent political figure disappears and is secretly replaced by his twin brother, recently released from a psychiatric hospital. Screens as part of the Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sat., April 12. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org

REPERTORY E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL. See this muchloved, feel-good alien story about the greenishbrown space traveler who befriends some suburban kids on the big screen. Steven Spielberg directs this 1982 film starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and a wrinkly, long-fingered dude from space. 7:30 p.m. Wed. April 9. Hollywood SINGING IN THE RAIN. Hollywood’s transition from silent film to talkies is lovingly skewered in this rousing musical from Stanley Donen. The 1952 film stars Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor, Pittsburgh’s own Gene Kelly and a very important lamppost. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 9. AMC Loews. $5

Particle Fever three recent documentaries, as well as provide a forum for Q&A with the filmmakers. (Also included: lunch and a closing reception.) Two of the films are by Julia Ramos: Return to Havana with Guillen Landrian, about the Afro-Cuban filmmaker and poet, and Detroit’s Rivera, about murals painted in that city by Diego Rivera. The third film is Chigualeros, by Alex Schlenker, about an Ecuadorean band trying widen its appeal. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fri., April 11. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. amigoscinelatinoamericano@gmail.com

THE WOMEN WORKERS’ WAR. Massimo Ferrari’s recent documentary recounts two contemporary stories from the factories: in one, a women owner encourages cultural growth among her workers, and in the other, a woman leads a lengthy sit-in protest. Screens as part of the ongoing Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 10. Room 24, Cathedral of Learning, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org

Draft Day PERFECT SISTERS. In this new Canadian thriller from Stanley M. Brooks, two sisters (Abigail Breslin, Georgie Henley) plot to kill their abusive mother (Mira Sorvino). 7:30 p.m. Fri., April 11. Hollywood

9:30pm, 4/13 @ 7pm - Starring Jake Gyllenhaal. A man seeks out his exact look-alike after spotting him in a movie.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Perfect Sisters (2014) - 4/11 @ 7:30pm - Tired of

their mother’s alcoholism and her string of abusive boyfriends, two sisters plot to kill her. Starring Abigail Breslin.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Straight Story (1999) - 4/12 @ 4pm & 7pm, 4/13 @ 4pm ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Reefer Madness! - 4/12 @ Midnight - JCCP presents Reefer Madness, the movie musical! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Easter Parade (1948) - 4/13 @ 11:30am 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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CITY LIGHTS. Charlie Chaplin’s 1931 feature is a self-described “comedy romance in pantomime” that finds The Tramp falling for a blind flower girl and setting about earning the funds for an operation to restore her sight; his turn as a prize-fighter is especially hilarious. A subplot about The Tramp’s friendship with a millionaire offers some sharp social commentary. This poignant, beautifully realized film, which even takes time to make fun of the talkies, is among Chaplin’s best. 3 p.m. Sat., April 12, and 3 p.m. Sun., April 13. Oaks (Bill O’Driscoll)

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THE STRAIGHT STORY. In this 1999 film based on a true story, the elderly and frail Alvin Straight travels hundreds of miles by lawn tractor through two Midwestern states to visit his ailing brother and to patch up their longstanding riff. Straight is portrayed marvelously by Oscar-nominated Richard Farnsworth, with just the right mix of poignancy and foolish pride. Director David Lynch, who had previously depicted the twisted underneath of small-town life in Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks, here delivers a sentimental, gently paced valentine to a disappearing rural America — from the physical (empty two-lane roads winding through corn fields unsullied by suburban sprawl, the simple pleasures of roadside camping, starry nights and humming grain elevators) to the less tangible beauty of friendly folk and a shared simple honesty. 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., April 12, and 4 p.m. Sun., April 13. Hollywood (AH)

FACING ALI. This 2009 documentary from Peter McCormack looks at the boxing career of Muhammad Ali, using archival footage and the perspectives of some of his notable opponents (George Foreman, Ken Norton, Joe Frazier, among others). 7:45 p.m. Sat., April 12. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 EASTER PARADE. Judy Garland and Fred Astaire star in “the happiest musical ever made,” a buoyant tale of nightclub performers in the early 20th century. Charles Walters directed the 1948 musical comedy, with songs by Irving Berlin. 11 a.m. Sun., April 13; 2 p.m. Thu., April 17; and 3 and 7 p.m. Sun., April 20. Hollywood

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THE POETICS OF REDISCOVERY: NEW PATHS IN LATIN AMERICAN DOCUMENTARY. This symposium presented by Amigos del Cine will screen

ET (1982) - 4/9 @ 7:30pm ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enemy (2014) - 4/10 @ 7:30, 4/11 @ 10pm, 4/12 @

might help. Screens as part of the Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Fri., April 11. Posvar Hall, Room 1700, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org (AH)

THE VENICE SYNDROME. Venice, set atop the water, is one of the iconic cities of Europe, historically significant in art, architecture and commerce, and beloved in popular culture, from song to film. Yet its popularity as a tourist destination is another blow to an already fragile place, as documented in Andreas Pilcher’s 2012 film essay, equals parts critique and elegy. Fewer than 58,000 people now actually live in the old Italian city, but that many also visit each day. (Venice is no longer a leisurely destination where one might spend a week; now tourists arrive by bus and cruise ship to spend only the day.) Unchecked real-estate speculation has driven housing costs to astronomical heights, forcing out Venice’s longtime residents. And an industry geared to quick-buck tourism is rendering Venice an attraction (like Disneyland), and no longer a functioning city with citizens and necessary infrastructure. The film doesn’t offer any solutions, though the scenes of Venice packed with tourists and ornate classical buildings dwarfed by “skyscraper” cruise ships give one pause about visiting. As if one less tourist

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST. Mel Gibson’s 2004 film follows Jesus (Jim Caviezel) through his final hours, from his crisis of faith in Gethsemane through his arrest, scourging and crucifixion. In Aramaic, Latin and Hebrew, with subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 12, and 11:15 a.m. Sun., April 13. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668 ROGER HUMPHRIES: PASS IT ON. This new documentary from local filmmaker Billy Jackson doesn’t need to make a case for drummer Humphries as a musician: No one questions his chops, or his decades of experience with talents from Stanley Turrentine to Ray Charles. Rather, the hour-long film focuses on Humphries as teacher, mentor, family man and all-around keystone of Pittsburgh’s contemporary jazz scene. By the time he was in high school, Humphries — who grew up on the North Side as part of a large, closeknit and musical family — was getting gigs with

The Venice Syndrome THE BRIDE WORE BLACK. In this 1968 drama, director François Truffaut paid double homage: to the American noir crime novels (Bride is adapted from the Cornell Woolrich tale) and the suspense films of Alfred Hitchcock. After a woman (Jeanne Moreau) survives a suicide attempt, she sets out to meet five specific men — but why? The black-and-white film continues a monthlong, Sunday-night series of films about brides. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Sun., April 13. Regent Square THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. The basis of JudeoChristian values, at last writ large on the big screen starring Charlton Heston as Moses, and directed by spectacle master Cecil B. DeMille. “Let my people go!” 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 16. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[DANCE]

“YOU HAD VACUUM CLEANERS THAT LOOKED LIKE ROCKETS.”

KNIGHT MOVES {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performs DON QUIXOTE 8 p.m. Fri., April 11; 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., April 12; and 2 p.m. Sun., April 13. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25.75-96.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org N E W S

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DADDY {BY ANGELA SUICO}

Nurlan Abougaliev in Pittsburgh Ballet Theater’s Don Quixote {PHOTO COURTESY OF RICH SOFRANKO}

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre closes its 44th season with an updated production of the comedic classic Don Quixote, to be performed with the orchestra April 11-13 at the Benedum Center. Last staged in 2007, PBT’s production of Miguel de Cervantes’ familiar story of young Spanish lovers Kitri and Basilio, and their encounter with the eccentric Don Quixote on his quest to find Dulcinea, gets a facelift with new sets and costumes. Echoing the newness of Kitri and Basilio’s love, all six dancers sharing those lead roles will be first-timers, offering a fresh perspective on the 145-year-old ballet. One dancer is newly promoted soloist Gabrielle Thurlow. She describes Kitri’s relationship with Basilio as flirtatious and teasing. “We both know that we want to be together; we just kind of play at each other during the ballet,” says Thurlow, who will be paired with soloist Luca Sbrizzi as Basilio for the 2 p.m. performance on April 12. Another newly promoted soloist, 26-year-old Alejandro Diaz, is tasked with the lively Basilio, a role demanding great leaping ability plus a sense of comedic timing. “Although he is penniless, he is full of himself and relies on his ability to BS his way through life,” says Diaz. “I am playing off that in my interpretation.” Diaz will partner with principal dancer Alexandra Kochis, as Kitri, in both the April 11 performance and the April 13 matinee. The other soloists are Amanda Cochrane and newly promoted principal dancer Yoshiaki Nakano. While much will be new, the ballet retains its traditional choreography, by Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky, and will again be staged by PBT Artistic Director Terrence Orr. Meanwhile, veteran dancer Stephen Hadala will conclude his 16-year PBT career by reprising, in three of the ballet’s four performances, the slapstick role of Gamache, a wealthy suitor of Kitri’s often played as clumsy and effeminate. “The character takes a lot of thought,” says Hadala. “You can’t just go out there and flail around and think it is going to be funny.” Playing straight man to all these comedians is PBT ballet master Steven Annegarn, reprising his role as Don Quixote in all performances. Says Annegarn: “It’s a wonderfully lighthearted production filled with some very exciting new talent.”

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at the sight of an old man shifting his weight onto a cane as he bends down to pick something up. Or at an exhausted worker who’s fallen asleep on the couch watching Johnny Carson. But when those figures happen to be robots … well, that might cause a blink or two. At least that’s the effect Toby Fraley hopes his new exhibit at Space gallery has on people. The Secret of Life of Robots features robot sculptures made from electronic parts and refurbished vintage items, including Thermoses, vacuums, picnic jugs and shoe lasts (wooden molds used for forming leather shoes). Collectively, the robots present 13 scenes of domestic life, set in time periods ranging from the 1940s to the early 1960s. Fraley, who lives in Bridgeville, is a selftaught artist whose work includes photography, paintings and ceramics. He first lit up circuits with his 2011 pop-up exhibit Fraley’s Robot Repair, which featured an abandoned robot finding ways to pass the time in an empty repair shop. Now the robot is back, but instead of unhappily waiting for something that never seems to come, here he is a father. He sits on a chair and moves two cardboard silhouettes — one a squid, the other a whale — in front of a lamp, creating shadow puppets against the wall. His son reclines on a bed next to him, mouth open in amazement. This scene — which Fraley says people often deem their favorite — was a lastminute addition to the Space exhibit. It was originally in Fraley’s sketchbook as

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Meet Your Maker: Toby Fraley (right, with beard) and one of his creations at Space gallery

something to include if he had the time. He finished it just two hours before the show went up, back in January. “The space totally freaked me out,” he admits. Having never exhibited in such

THE SECRET LIFE OF ROBOTS continues through April 27. Space, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-3723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

a large space before, he hadn’t planned on setting up so many robots. And when the show was ready, he wanted to fill a void near the gallery’s back wall. “I was frantically working … to get that thing up.” “I didn’t want to do it if I couldn’t have it animated,” Fraley adds. “I just didn’t want them statically holding the squid and the whale.” Fraley’s work strives to further humanize robots that are already doing human CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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things. Many people can relate to the father eavesdropping on his teenage daughter’s phone conversation from the other side of the wall, or to the elderly robot gripping a table for leverage after falling. But the doodles on the girl’s notebook, and the bowl of hard candies on the old bot’s table, make Fraley’s subjects more man than machine.

Some of the props are from Fraley’s own home, which he says is filled with “vintage household items” he and his wife collect. As a kid growing up in Washington, Pa., Fraley was fascinated by flight; today, the 36-yearold is obsessed with the space-race era. The time period “brought forth streamlined design in a lot of appliances. You had vacuum cleaners that looked like rockets.

We have an ice-crusher with a base on it that has fins on the bottom, for no reason [other] than to make it look cool and atomic.” Other sculptures are an homage to Fraley’s friends and family — like a piece in which an older robot sits at a kitchen table, looking through a magnifying glass to read the text on a pill bottle. The 1949 copy of Popular Science on the table belongs to Fraley’s father; the footage playing on the television is from his mother’s favorite show, the 1960s spy series The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Similar winks made their way into the earlier Robot Repair pop-up. On Fraley’s birthday, the lonely robot held a sign reading “Happy birthday mom!” Other parts of the exhibit stemmed from fan suggestions. One man contributed a “retro spray gun” that remained until the show ended. Another wanted to give his girlfriend a

special birthday present, and emailed Fraley a list of things she liked. Walt Whitman was one of them, so the artist made the robot look like he’d received a Walt Whitman book as a gift. On top of these things, the shop’s website boasts more than 150 pictures of “satisfied customers” standing in front of the store; the store even has a few Yelp! reviews. That the public got so involved fits well with Fraley’s goal for making public art in the first place. “[I like] making it so that people don’t have to go to a gallery to see art. Those kind of people might not usually go to a gallery. They might be intimidated by going to a gallery. So if they have something just thrown in their face, they might not get it, but it might make them want to visit more galleries in the future.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY

Byham at the

BYHAM THEATER, CULTURAL DISTRICT

April 17 - 19, 2014

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING DIRECTOR

PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014


PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

Theater that moves you.

WAYNE MCGREGOR | RANDOM DANCE

Opening Night

April

11

(runs through April 27)

LEXINGTON TECHNOLOGY CENTER 400 N. Lexington Street, behind Construction Junction in N. Point Breeze

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TICKETS START AT $19

10 hot dancers 3200 LED lights

SEE VIDEO O

APR 26, 2014 BYHAM THEATER

Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

8 PM

or call 412.362.1713

Artist Talk: Kenneth Snelson Thursday, April 10 6:30–7:30 p.m. Free Installation view of Kenneth Snelson, Forest Devil, 1977

SAT

For directions, dining options, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com

TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666

TrustArts.org/random

Join us for this exclusive event with Kenneth Snelson, a New York City–based contemporary sculptor and photographer. Learn about Forest Devil (1977), a sculpture recently relocated to the museum’s grounds from Mellon Square Park, and the principle of “tensegrity”—the joining of geometry and engineering—which makes Snelson’s sculptures “constellations of form.”

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

The Kenneth Snelson artist talk is generously supported by Alice R. Snyder.

guided tours daily | members visit free shop the museum stores for creative gifts one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

[ART REVIEW]

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

HISTORY OF MASONRY

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 6:00-7:30 P.M.

Construction and masonry industry expert Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting will present a workshop on the history of masonry.

MASONRY DESIGN & IMPLEMENTATION

SATURDAY, APRIL 12 10:00-11:30 A.M.

Construction and masonry industry expert Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting will present a workshop on the masonry design and implementation with an overview of materials. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

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{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

PAST PRESENCE, by Keith Lemley, and A

Mind of Winter, by Meghan Olsen, are two autonomous installations, each artist working individually on his or her own project. But exhibited side-by-side at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, the synchronicity in the artists’ materials and philosophies allows each work to boost the others’ impact. Both Lemley and Olsen work with wood and light. Lemley begins with rough, raw cedar and hemlock, root systems gathered from trees uprooted from the Appalachian woods where he lives and works. Following the roots’ growth, he envisions further maturation, connecting white neon to imagine the course of development. The light he uses to suggest the trees’ continuance is blindingly bright, initially jarring; at first, it seems an affront, parasitical upon its host. But quickly, the manufactured settles into the organic, and evolves from an assault upon the natural world into an enhancement of it. Olsen’s utilization of the same primary elements takes them on an utterly different path. Lumber is stacked against the gallery wall, 2-by-4s of varying lengths, their upward ends festively painted. On other walls, cardboard has been mounted several inches out rather than flush, its inner side similarly colored. Underneath the ordinary lighting of the gallery, the tints bounce against

Keith Lemley’s Past Presence (detail)

the plain, flat white of the walls. The eye is tricked, perceiving additional luminosity that is really only the reflection of the coated surfaces. We’re also fooled by the lush quality of the hues into bestowing movement and vibration. Both artists play with natural forms. Illumination is prominent in each installation. In one room or the other, botanical elements are incorporated that either mimic their pure state, or display in their shape the results of human interference. But despite their sharing of so many components, both tangible and intellectual, the outcomes of each process are wildly divergent. Seeing one next to the other gives the viewer another level of engagement, adding a layer of comparison and that wouldn’t necessarily exist without the juxtaposition.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

continue through April 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

These separate exhibitions are not parts of a whole, so nothing can be said about their sum. But their ability to complement one another within their contrast does add up to something great. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


This Saturday it’s time to get up, get down. It’s time for...

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

Kelly McAndrew in Grounded, at City Theatre

[PLAY REVIEWS]

FLIGHT PATHOLOGIES {BY TED HOOVER}

AMERICA JUST ended the longest war in our history: After 12 years of fighting, the war in Afghanistan is officially over. How many knew that? More to the point, how many even knew it was going on? The sole purpose of our great military minds, who are aching to avoid another Vietnam, has been to sanitize war: eliminating the draft, embedding journalists, forbidding photos of military coffins and, most horrifically, introducing drones.

GROUNDED continues through May 4. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $35-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Playwright George Brant explores how technology has ushered in a brave new world of warcraft with Grounded, now at City Theatre. At the top of this one-woman show we meet the Pilot, an unnamed F-16 flying ace. She’s full of bravado, spinning stories filled with the romantic iconography of the fighter pilot — a female version of Tom Cruise in Top Gun. An unexpected marriage and child lead to a desk job, but after a few years, she finds she’s missing the wild blue yonder and dons her flight suit again. However, the world has changed, and she’s now fighting a new war: piloting drones over Afghanistan with orders to kill the guilty, as determined by a committee of voices talking in her headset. Brant’s genius as a playwright is on

full display here. The Pilot’s transition from cockpit to armchair allows the play to present one of the most devastating depictions of war I’ve ever seen. Our heroine sits in a trailer on the outskirts of Las Vegas, remotely launching rockets at people halfway around the world … and when her shift is over, she drives home and has dinner with her husband and kid. The “romance” of war is gone — no high-flying, banner-waving moments of bravery or danger. Grounded shows war for what it is, and always has been: people killing people they don’t know for vaguely defined reasons. The cold, mechanical nature of the warfare revealed by Grounded was actually making me queasy. And that’s a testament to Brant’s extraordinary achievement with this play. Or at least the first two-thirds. There are several different ways this play could have ended, and I feel like Brant chose the least interesting. But even if the final 25 minutes weren’t as blisteringly original as the first 65, they’re written with the same strength and seamless, accumulating power. And with the absolutely riveting direction provided by Jenn Thompson, I don’t think I’ve ever seen an actor working so completely in sync with a playwright. Kelly McAndrew turns in one of the most fully realized, in-the-moment, harrowingly thought-through performances I’ve ever had the privilege to see. One of the joys of Brant’s writing is how he moves us from Point A to Point Z without any discernible transition; McAndrew’s characterization is similarly gifted, sliding obliquely from high in the sky to somewhere quite far below. Thompson keeps actor and playwright in perfect lockstep, and the result is one helluva night of theater.

The Dirty Ball This Saturday, April 12th, 2014 Jane Street Warehouse, 2120 Jane Street, Southside TICKETS: www.attacktheatre.com/TDB14 or call 1.888.71.TICKETS Infamous Attack Theatre performances Art installations, dance-offs and fashion throwdowns Food trucks, local fare and libations TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party bringing the beats Pirates vs. Robots Ages 21 and over only Made possible in part by:

Berger Investment Group

Image Design: Rob Henning, Photo: Jonathan Greene

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

04.1004.17.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., APRIL 10 {TALK} Call him a pilgrim for the environment. In 1971, when John Francis was 26, a massive California oil spill convinced him to make two big changes: It would be 17 years before he spoke again, and 22 before he rode in motorized transportation. During that time, the Philadelphia native walked the country, earned a master’s degree and, most importantly, he says, he learned to listen. Francis, author of the books Planetwalker and The Ragged Edge of Silence, speaks tonight (loud and clear) at the Green Building Alliance’s sustainability-themed Inspire Speakers Series, at Phipps Conservatory. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $15-45. 412-7736005 or www.go-gba.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANCIS BENJAMIN JOHNSTON}

APRIL 12 Architecture+ Photography Workers includes “Home on the Range”: “Mix a drink of stock lot: vermouth and the water table. And the bar will smell of IBP. And you will lick my Laura Ingalls.” Angela Suico 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Building, 650 Schenley Plaza,

APRIL 11

{COMICS}

Sister Spit

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SIRIUS BONNER}

{WORDS} Two poets round out this year’s Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. Dana Ward is the author of This Can’t Be Life, a reflection on art and life based on “the relationship between mortality and politics.” He appears tonight with Anne Boyer, whose collection The Romance of Happy

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Caldecott-winning children’s books written by Leo Lionni. See Swimmy use his smarts to escape from danger, hear Frederick recite poetry, and follow an unnamed inchworm with a penchant “for measuring absolutely everything.” Part of the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater’s Family Series, the show is performed by Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia. Tonight’s show at the Byham Theater is followed by two performances tomorrow. AS 7 p.m. Also 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sat., April 12. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $9.50-11. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries. wordpress.com

+ FRI., APRIL 11

It’s another Copacetic Comics release party for local underground comics artists. Highlights include issue No. 6 of Andy Scott’s quarterly Andromeda, featuring great new work — ranging from funny or poignant to perverse — by artists including Nils Balls, Caitlin Rose Doyle, Shannon Durbin and Boris Bayo. There’s also a new publication by Danny Mac, and It’s a Tough Economy!, an illustrated novella by Nate McDonough and Jarod Shanahan. BO 7 p.m. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. 412-251-5451 or www.copaceticcomics.com

{STAGE} A fish, a mouse and an inchworm star in Swimmy, Frederick, and Inch by Inch. This puppet play features three

{WORDS} Sister Spit is a collective of authors, performance artists and filmmakers who focus


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALAN RESNICK}

Though the performers on the Wham City Comedy Tour aren’t exactly household names, you might have seen one of them in your household. Alan Resnick’s parody commercial that aired on Adult Swim featured him infotaining a studio audience: Hire him for free to create a talking 3-D avatar of your face, and you can live forever! Touting a subpar and quite creepy product, the commercial is cheesy and over-the-top; Resnick’s satisfied customers include a sick, bedridden child who says, “People don’t die. People’s bodies die. He taught me that,” before lapsing into a coughing fit. The short was originally developed for the Wham City Comedy Tour, which sprang from Baltimore art collective Wham City. The group’s comedians have been making rounds on the East Coast since 2010; this year they’ll also venture into the Midwest. Spin called Wham City “a collective of hilarious weirdos that dig on the absurd. It’s performance art, oddball and experimental theater, film, comics, and, yes, Wham City is comedy.” Resnick, Ben O’Brien, Robby Rackleff and Mickey Freeland will incorporate skits, monologues, standup and videos into this week’s performance at the Melwood Screening Room. Appropriate for all ages, the show opens with Baltimore-based Stavros Halkias, local comic Molly Sharrow and Rem Lezar (of found-footage comedy website Everything Is Terrible). Angela Suico 8 p.m. Wed., April 16. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $10. 412-681-5449 or www.whamcity.com

on queer living. Performing and reading at The Andy Warhol Museum are: writer Ali Liebegott, whose novel The Beautifully Worthless won the 2005 Lambda Literary Award for Debut Lesbian Fiction; Virgie Tovar (pictured), a “fat activist” who has shared her body-image expertise on MTV, Al Jazeera and NPR; and Lanelle Moïse, whose new release, Haiti Glass, was deemed “a magnificent collection of poetry and prose” by author Edwidge Danticat. AS 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $15 ($12 students/ museum members). 412-2378300 or www.warhol.org

garde writers like Ionesco. De Ghelderode’s madcap satire on revolution and militarism has been reimagined by Jay Ball, and the new version worldpremieres starting tonight at Quantum Theatre. The adaptation — partly inspired by the 1965 episode that found Allen Ginsberg briefly crowned Prague’s “King of May” — is set in an unnamed Eastern European country. The big cast includes such comedic luminaries as Randy Kovitz, Tony Bingham and Lisa Ann Goldsmith. Jed Allen Harris directs the show, staged in an office building in North Point Breeze. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through April 27. 400 N. Lexington Ave., North Point Breeze. $18-49. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com

{COMEDY} If your dad were a profane but lovable raconteur — and who says he isn’t? — he might remind you of John Witherspoon. Witherspoon is less a joke-teller than a scene-stealer, which talent has gotten him dad roles in the Friday movies and on The Wayan Brothers series. He’s also a veteran of standup comedy, and his latest tour takes him to the Pittsburgh Improv for five shows starting with two tonight. BO 8 and 10:15 p.m. Also 7 and 9:15 p.m. Sat., April 12, and 7 p.m. Sun., April 13. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead (The Waterfront). $25 (21 and over). 412-462-5233 or www. pittsburgh.improv.com

at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, benefits groups including The Afro-American Music Institute. BO 6 p.m. (5 p.m. VIP reception.) 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-125. www.rhpassiton.com

APRIL 11 Copacetic i Comics

+ MON., APRIL 14 {RIDES} Art by Boris Bayo

including Mark Cronin, from Cleveland’s Small Victories Press, and Dan Shapiro, from Buffalo’s SunnyOutside Press. Other readers at Modern Formations Gallery include Karen Lillis, and event organizer Chris Bowen, of Cleveland’s Burning River Press. BO 8:30-11 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. www.burningriver.info

which the Carnegie Corporation of New York donated to schools across the nation to promote free education for all, and pictures from the museum’s own photography department. AS 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 26. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-$17.95. 412622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

in Roger Humphries: Pass It On. Independent filmmaker Billy Jackson’s new hour-long documentary is a tribute to Humphries, a one-time sideman to Stanley Turrentine, Ray Charles, et al., whose greatest legacy might nonetheless be as a mentor and role model for countless area musicians. Jackson places Humphries both within his large extended family and within the Pittsburgh jazz community whose linchpin he arguably is. Tonight’s screening,

{SCREEN}

+ SAT.,

APRIL 12

“He’s a patriarch to us all,” says bassist Dwayne Dolphin about drummer Roger Humphries

Both the young and the young at heart can take a turn on the PNC Carousel, which reopens for the season today at noon in Schenley Plaza. Though operation is currently limited to afternoons, carousel hours will be extended to 10 p.m. from Mother’s Day through Aug. 11. From June until October, free rides will be offered between noon and 6 p.m. on the second Sunday of each month. The carousel is just one way to enjoy Schenley Plaza, whose summer programming also includes lunchtime yoga and Sunday tai chi. AS Noon-6 p.m. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $1.25 per ride. 412-682-7275 or www.pittsburghparks.org

{ART}

APRIL 12 Roger Humphries: Pass It On

{STAGE} Pantagleize is a 1929 play by Michel de Ghelderode, a French playwright who some say prefigured avant-

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A new exhibit opening today at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Architecture+ Photography, spotlights storied buildings and the lenses that love them. Featured are the noted 20th-century photographer Ezra Stoller, whose work educated aesthetes on architectural Modernism, and Frances Benjamin Johnston, whose photos of Charleston, S.C., buildings highlight the link between photography and historic preservation. Also included are photos from a 1920s Carnegie “art set,”

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} THURS, APRIL 10, 8PM ELECTRONIC/JAM

THE MANHATTAN PROJECT

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

FRI, APRIL 11, 9PM FOLK ROCK/ALT COUNTRY

CHRIS RATTIE & THE BRUSH VALLEY RUMBLERS PLUS THE TURPENTINERS

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

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$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

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D E LTA N I N E 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

THEATER CHILDREN OF EDEN. Heartfelt & humorous look at the age-old conflict between parents & children, loosely based on the book of Genesis. Presented by Stage Right Greensburg. April 11-12, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., April 13, 2 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. GROUNDED. One-woman show following a gutsy fighter pilot whose unexpected pregnancy puts her career on hold. Sun, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 4. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. IN THE HEIGHTS. Story of a vibrant community in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood. Presented by University of Pittsburgh Dept. of Theatre Arts. Tue-Sun. Thru April 16. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-7529.

JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE THE PLAYBOY OF THE A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. WESTERN WORLD. Classic The courtroom of Judge Irish comedy by John Jackie Justice is now Millington Synge. Presented in session w/ “real” cases by Point Park University’s involving zombies, spaceships, Conservatory Theatre furries, more. Wed-Fri, Company. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., 2 p.m. Thru April 27. April 13, 2 p.m. Thru April 19. Cabaret at Theater Square, Pittsburgh Playhouse, Downtown. 412-456-6666. Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE MUSICAL SHREK THE MUSICAL. OF MUSICALS Thru April 12, 7 p.m. (THE MUSICAL!). Baldwin High Five musicals within School. 412-885-6767. one show. Presented STRINDBERG . www per by Stage Right. ONE ACTS. Feat. a p ty ci pgh m Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. two plays by August .co Thru April 12. Boyd Strindberg. Presented Community Center, by the Red Masquers. O’Hara. 412-228-0566. Thru April 12, 8 p.m. PANTAGLEIZE. Peter Mills Theater Adaptation of Michel (Duquesne, Rockwell Hall), de Ghelderode’s 1931 Uptown. 412-396-6429. avant garde play. Presented by Quantum Theatre. WedSat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru April 27. Lexington Technology Center, COMEDY NIGHT. HOSTED Point Breeze. 412-362-1713. BY GIO ATTISANO. 9 p.m.

COMEDY THU 10

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Garfield Artworks, Garfield. 412-361-2262. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru May 29 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OPEN STAGE COMEDY NIGHT. Thu Eclipse Lounge, Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 11 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 30 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. EMIL FRY, CHRIS SMITH, CHUCK KRIEGER. Freeport Youth Football Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Peter B’s. 724-353-2677. JAY GILLIGAN. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOANNE BURROWAY, LINDA DUTY, CHRIS KEMP, SHARON DALY, MATT WOHLFARTH, TOM MUSIAL, MORE. Laugh Out Loud 2. Benefits Shaler North Hills Library. 7 p.m. Shaler Area Middle School, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 116. LONG & BALDING: AN ATTEMPT AT COMEDY. 8-11 p.m. Cafe au Vineyard, Bridgeville. 412-921-4174. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. RESET LIST: IMPROV ROCK EXPERIENCE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE REVEREND BOB LEVY. 10 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. STEAMER. Fri, 9:30 p.m. Thru April 25 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 12 THE AMISH MONKEYS: BRING-A-PROP NIGHT. Improv sketch comedy. Bring a prop for the actors to use. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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ART

“IV,” by Matt Gatto, from Diametric Forces, at ImageBox, in Garfield

NEW THIS WEEK CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Architecture + Photography. Feat. works from the Heinz Architectural Center & Carnegie Museum of Art’s photography collection, demonstrating the symbiosis between architecture & photography. Opens April 12. Oakland. 412-622-3131. THE TOONSEUM. Golden Legacy: Original Art from 65 Years of Golden Books. Collection of original illustration art from the Little Golden Books series. Opens April 11. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Porous Sediments. Installation by Haylee Ebersole. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Dream Body. Video installation by Blaine Siegel. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ASSEMBLE. The Drop Project. Interactive exhibit

designed by Kristen Reynolds, Ann Payne, & Molly Mehling to personify aquatic ecosystems in order to create relatability to our everyday lives. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. You Can’t Be Serious. Abstract minimalist paintings by Rose Duggan. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BE GALLERIES. Flow: Recent Iterations in Clay. Work by Laura Jean McLaughlin & Kevin Snipes. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOKSENBAUM FINE ARTS GALLERY. Final Show at the Morrowfield. Paintings by Steve Boksenbaum, Lorin Boksenbaum, Danielle Robinson, & ceramics by Sandy Smith. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1960. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Hot Paint & Cold Glass. Multimedia exhibit by Patti & Al Middlemiss. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the

greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Between Abstraction & Realism. Work by Bettina Clowney. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Tin Can Tramp Folk Art. Mixed media by Steph Neary. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. CONTINUES ON PG. 49

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PABST CANS DURING ALL BUCCO’S GAMES

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BARPROV. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE BRIDGE: STORYTELLING & MUSIC. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. EMIL FRY, MIKE WYSOCKI, CHRIS SMITH. Verso Room. 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. 724-379-7100. FAST & SLOW PROV. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Downtown. 412-471-3436. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage ALAN RESNICK, museum. Point Breeze. BEN O’ BRIEN, BOBBY 412-371-0600. RACKLEFF, MICKEY HARMONY MUSEUM. Out FREELAND. Wham City of the Attic. Furniture, Comedy Tour. 8 p.m. Melwood clothing, photographs & artwork Screening Room, Oakland. from collections rarely or not 412-681-5449. previously displayed. Harmony. COMEDY OPEN MIC. 724-452-7341. Hosted by Ronald HUNT INSTITUTE Renwick. Wed, FOR BOTANICAL 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s DOCUMENTATION. Place, Mt. Washington. Duets. Harmonious w. w w 412-431-9908. couplings of er hcitypap g p STAND-UP COMEDY botanical art w/ items .com OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. created between the The BeerHive, Strip District. 16th & 21st centuries from 412-904-4502. the Hunt Institute collections. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY other Frank Lloyd Wright house. HERITAGE MUSEUM. 724-329-8501. Military artifacts and exhibits KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. on the Allegheny Valley’s Tours of a restored 19th-century, industrial heritage. Tarentum. middle-class home. Oakmont. 724-224-7666. 412-826-9295. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. MARIDON MUSEUM. An eclectic showroom of fine Collection includes jade and art sculpture & paintings from ivory statues from China and emerging artists. North Side. Japan, as well as Meissen 724-797-3302. porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. AUGUST WILSON CENTER MCGINLEY HOUSE & FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Historic homes open for tours, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, lectures and more. Monroeville. film & oral history narratives to 412-373-7794. explore communities, cultures, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to & innovations. Downtown. more than 600 birds from over 412-258-2700. 200 species. With classes, lectures, BOST BUILDING. Collectors. demos and more. North Side. Preserved materials reflecting 412-323-7235. the industrial heritage of NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Southwestern PA. Homestead. rooms helping to tell the story 412-464-4020. of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF University of Pittsburgh. NATURAL HISTORY. RACE: Oakland. 412-624-6000. Are We So Different? Text, PHIPPS CONSERVATORY photographs, interactive & BOTANICAL GARDEN. audiovisual components, & Spring Flower Show. Showcase related artifacts challenge of musical genres through perceptions about race. Oakland. whimsical sculptures made 412-622-3131. out of up-cycled instruments CARNEGIE SCIENCE alongside thousands of vibrant CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital tulips, daffodils, hyacinths Dome (planetarium), Miniature & other seasonal favorites. Railroad and Village, USS Requin 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor submarine, and more. North Side. gardens feature exotic plants 412-237-3400. and floral displays from CARRIE FURNACE. Built in around the world. Oakland. 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are 412-622-6914.

TUE 15

WED 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

EXHIBITS

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

HOLIDAY SAT 12 ANGORA GARDENS’ ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT. Egg hunt, photos w/ the Easter Bunny, face painting, more. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Angora Gardens. 412-675-8556. KIDGIT EASTER EGG HUNT. 1-4 p.m. Ross Park Mall, Ross. 412-369-4401.

SAT 12 - SUN 13 EGGSTRAVAGANZA. Egg hunt, photos w/ Easter bunny, more. Sat, Sun, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and Fri., April 18, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru April 20 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

SUN 13 48TH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN EASTER EGG SALE. 11 a.m.4 p.m. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359. EASTER EGG HUNT. 3 p.m. Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Ross. 412-366-9899.

FESTIVALS FRI 11 - SUN 13 DREAMON FESTIVAL. Feat. 25 musical acts & 75 flavors of ice cream. Presented by Omicelo & DreamCream Ice


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2014. Group show. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Recent Work by Lindsay Dill & Aldona Bird. Visions & Revelations. Work by members of the National Association of Women Artists. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on

the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Lossless. Carnegie Mellon School of Art’s MFA Thesis Exhibition feat. large-scale installations, video & generative sound art. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. Nine at the Mine. Point Park Senior Thesis show. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. STRUCTURE. Work by Ron Copland, Steve Ehret, Megan Herwig, Joseph Mruk, Gian Romagnoli, Andy Scott, & Megan Shalonis. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Ceres Rangos, Rae Gold, Meryl Ruth, Ronit Dagan, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. MASH: Mansion Apartment Shack House. Paintings by Megan Shalonis. Bloomfield. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. 19th Century Photographs in the USA. Showing the largest collection on display feat. Civil War, historic persons, Cowboys & Indians. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Plume. Installation by Ian Brill. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Art is Violent. Work by Courtney Cormier & Miss Dingo. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SHAW GALLERIES. Historic Pittsburgh. Photographs

by Mark Muse. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Auction Preview Exhibition. Preview of work being sold in the 2014 Benefit Auction. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Waterworks 2014. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. Friendship. 412-441-0194. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Wild Things. Exhibit feat. 2D, 3D & kinetic artworks. Juried by Cynthia Shaffer. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. A Looney Pop-Up Exhibit. Original artwork & rare musical scores from Warner Bros. animated films. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Vex Kelpie’s Fairy World. Sculptures of mythical creatures & hidden beasts. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TULA ORGANIC SALON & SPA. One Cloud Per Sky. Work by Amy DiPlacido. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-2230. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF THE NORTH HILLS. The Marriage Project: Faces of Equality. Traveling photographic exhibit of local same-sex couples in long-term committed relationships who would like to marry one day in PA or have their existing out-of-state marriage recognized by our state. On view Sun. mornings, & Tues. through Fri., 9-4, by appointment. 412-366-0244. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

Cream. www.omicelo.com April 11-13 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

8 p.m. and Sun., April 13, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

DANCE

FUNDRAISERS

FRI 11 - SUN 13

THU 10

SAT 12

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. April 11-12, 8 p.m. and Sun., April 13, 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-279-8887. DON QUIXOTE. Presented by the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. April 11-13, 8 p.m., Sat., April 12, 2 &

ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY GATSBY PARTY. Benefits the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 5 p.m. Tender Bar + Kitchen, Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

ART ON THE VINE. Silent art auction, wine & food pairing, more. 6-9 p.m. Greensburg Art Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791. CONNECTED: A PRESENTATION ON COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT. Panel discussion benefiting the Coro Fellows. 12-2 p.m. Pittsburgh

FRI 11 CELEBRATE LA ROCHE! Dinner & program showcasing La Roche & its many contributions

to the community, the Pittsburgh area, & the world. 5:30 p.m. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Pittsburgh, McCandless. 412-536-1092.

Filmmakers, Oakland. 425-772-4857. THE DIRTY BALL. Dance performances, music by Title Town Soul & Funk Party, art installations, more. Benefits Attack Theatre. 8 p.m. Jane Street Warehouse, South Side. 412-281-3305. MARS AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK IT 5K & 1 MILE FUN WALK. Benefits the Mars Area Public Library. 9 a.m. Treesdale Community Center, Gibsonia. 724-625-3500. WASHINGTON PA FILM FESTIVAL. Independent film festival benefiting the Highland Ridge CDC. 1-7 p.m. The George Washington Hotel, Washington. 724-678-4225.

SUN 13 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. EN POINTE: AN EVENING IN MADRID. Live music, traditional flamenco dancing, more. Benefits Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. 4:30 p.m. Larrimor’s, Downtown. 412-454-9138.

MON 14 DRINKS & DRUMMING. Feat. Western African drummer Yamoussa Camara. Benefits Clash International. www.clashinternational.org 6-8:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

Great Music!

Drink Specials!

WED 16 3RD ANNUAL SALUTE YOUR TROOPS GALA. Presented by Pittsburgh Social Exchange. Benefits the Wounded Warrior Project. 6 p.m. Omni William Penn, Downtown. 412-265-2315.

POLITICS

NEW LOCATION IN OAKLAND!

SAT 12 DEMOCRACY & SOCIAL JUSTICE: PITTSBURGH & BEYOND. All-day workshop to discuss the connections of capitalism’s grip on our society. Presented by the International Socialist Organization of Pittsburgh. 9:30 a.m. AVA Cafe & Lounge, Oakland. 412-860-4586.

226 Meyran Avenue 2 floors, whiskey loft and 24 beers on tap. Kitchen & Bar open 11am Mon-Fri, and noon on Sat and Sun

MON 14

Visit All Of Our Locations

WAGMAN LUNAR ECLIPSE PARTY. Begins at 2 a.m. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Wagman Observatory, Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

Monroeville Mall • 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620 Westmoreland Mall • 724.830.8810

LITERARY

(Behind Macy’s)

THU 10

winghartburgers.com

3 POEMS BY . . Poetry discussion group feat. work by Edna

Like us on www.facebook/wingharts

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

CODE: JL35

St. Vincent Millay. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DANA WARD & ANNE BOYER. Pittsburgh Contemporary Writer’s Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

THU 10 - FRI 11 PITT-GREENSBURG WRITERS FESTIVAL. Feat. Terrance Hayes, Joy Katz, Julie Sokolow, Michael Cox, Deb Olin Unferth, more. Thru April 11 University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

FRI 11 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SISTER SPIT. Queer-centric performance artists, poets, filmmakers, more. 8 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

SAT 12 AKHIL SHARMA. Reading feat. author of An Obedient Father. 6-8 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. 412-323-0278. THE MINOR BIRD LAUNCH PARTY. Undergraduate literary magazine launch w/ guest speaker Salvatore Pane, student readings & raffle. 5-7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 724-777-3834. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. SHAKESPEARE’S 450TH BIRTHDAY BASH. Familyfriendly activities in the afternoon, & adult-themed, site-specific performances in the evening to celebrate the 450th birthday of William

Shakespeare. 2-10 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11.

SUN 13 KEVIN FINN, MIKE BEGNAL, CHE ELIAS, RENEE ALBERTS. Poetry reading. 2-4 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

MON 14 FRANK GAGLIANO: MY CHEKHOV LIGHT. The playwright reads/performs his play. 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown.

TUE 15

FRI 11 OVERNIGHT ADVENTURES: ALL-IN-ONE ADVENTURE. Explore the museum at night by going on a hands-on adventure of exhibitions & get a look at collections that are not normally on display. Ages 6+. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FRI 11 - SAT 12 SWIMMY, FREDERICK & INCH BY INCH. Learn about a tiny fish, a poetic mouse, and a loveable inchworm through puppetry & gentle storytelling. Presented by the Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia. Ages 3-10. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. and Sat., April 12, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

HANK MORRIS, NATHAN KUKULSKI, DANIEL PARME, JESSICA SIMMS, JOSEPH CASTELLANO, ELIZABETH ABELING & OLIVIA MANCING. 2nd Annual Rahnd Table Reading. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. LET’S MOVE! FAMILY JAPANESE CONVERSATION DANCE PARTY. Music, dancing, CLUB. First and Third Tue & craft activities. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. of every month, 6-7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, Carnegie Library, Oakland. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. 412-622-3151. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Practice conversational Marty’s Market, Strip District. English. Tue, 6 p.m. 412-586-7177. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. MT. NEBO POINTE 412-422-9650. SPRING FESTIVAL. MYSTERY READER’S Face painting, photos BOOK CLUB. 7 p.m. w/ the Easter Bunny, Mount Lebanon touch a truck, crafts, Public Library, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mt. Lebanon. www. per Mt. Nebo Pointe pa 412-531-1912. pghcitym Shopping Center, Ross. .co PITTSBURGH 781-418-6254. CONTINENTAL PENNY ARCADE: PHILOSOPHY READING FAMILY COMEDY SHOW. GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, East End Book Exchange, Downtown. 412-337-6875. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. YOUTH NATURALIST INSTITUTE: TROPICAL TREK. Investigate diverse tropical CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. ecosystems & learn about Informal knitting session. First conservation efforts using and Third Wed of every month, museum dioramas & 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, collections. Ages 10-13. Sat. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Thru May 10 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

SAT 12

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 16

KIDSTUFF

THU 10 - WED 16

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 12 - SUN 13 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru April 27 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

MON 14 AMERICAN GIRLS BOOK CLUB. For students in grades 2-4. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 15 KENDAMA, PILL & YO YO -SKILL GAMES. For middle & high school students. Tue, 3:15 p.m. Thru April 15 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 16 BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru


[CONVENTIONS]

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SPRING RENEWAL & REJUVENATION SERIES W/ JIM DONOVAN. Thu. Thru May 1 The Center of Harmony. 724-400-6044. WATERSHED AWARENESS/ RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Churchill Borough Building. 412-488-7490 x 247. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 10 -FRI 11 9TH ANNUAL HIP-HOP CONFERENCE: POLITICS & IMAGERY IN HIP-HOP CULTURE. April 10-11 California University. 724-938-4000.

FRI 11 Where — besides maybe the Internet Movie Database — can you find The Six Million Dollar Man, Lieutenant Commander Data and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, all in one place? The Steel City Con, happening this weekend, includes celebrity guests Lee Majors, Brent Spiner and, yes, that 21-foot marshmallow, plus Cindy Williams, Travis Love, Nicholas Brendon and others. And, of course, the Con features costume contests, gaming, celebrity Q&As and more than 700 vendor tables. Fri., April 11, through Sun., April 13. Monroeville Convention Center, 209 Mall Boulevard, Monroeville. Visit www.steelcitycon.com for information.

April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. JUST FOR GUYS BOOK CLUB. For boys ages 10-13 & their dads (or other caring adult). 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. L & J MATH CLUB. For students in grades 4-7. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE FRI 11 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru April 25 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 12 - SUN 13 EARTH DAY AT FRICK PARK. Nature walks & hikes, community campfire, more. www.pittsburghparks.org/ earthday April 12-13 Frick Environmental Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-6538.

SUN 13 ORIENTEERING AT BOYCE PARK. Locate control points by using a map & compass to navigate through the woods. Bring a compass if you have one, some available for loan. Wear

appropriate footwear to walk in the woods. www.wpoc.org/boyce. doc 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Boyce Park, Monroeville. 724-327-0338.

TUE 15 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 16 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 10 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ARTIST TALK: KENNETH SNELSON. Discussion on the process of “tensegrity” — the joining of geometry & engineering to create dynamic, force-filled sculptures. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ARTIST TALKS W/ IAN BRILL & JOHN BURT SANDERS. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. THE BIBLE: SON OF GOD TOUR 2014. Multimedia presentation.

7 p.m. Victory Family Church, Cranberry. 888-483-0018. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LOW INCOME TAXPAYER CLINIC. 10-11:30 a.m. Jewish Family & Children’s Service, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7200. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FILM SCREENING & TALK BACK: THE END AGAIN. Film screening & discussion w/ the filmmakers & The Foreign Exchange. Part of the DreamOn Festival. 6 p.m. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 646-820-3859. SQUIRREL HILL ACTIVE SENIORS NETWORK. Meetup to help seniors get & stay involved in social & civic activities. Fri, 3-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-242-8603.

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FRI 11 - SUN 13 STEEL CITY CON. Toy, comic & pop culture convention. Special guests: Lee Majors, Jonathan Frakes, Cindy Williams, Travis Love, Nicholas Brendon, more. www.steelcitycon.com 1-9 p.m., Sat., April 12, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun., April 13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 724-502-4350.

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SAT 12 FINDING HAPPINESS: A MINDFULNESS WORKSHOP FOR MEN. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 412-953-2716. GARDEN & LANDSCAPE SYMPOSIUM OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA. Speakers, Penn State Master Gardeners

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marketplace, more. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Shady Side Academy, Fox Chapel. 412-473-2602. GIRLY SHOW FEAT. JOANNA LOWE, LISS VICKERY, SARA MACKO, CHARMAINE EVONNE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LEADING LEGACY PITTSBURGH WOMEN IN BUSINESS BRUNCH. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. UPMC Montefiore, Oakland. 202-321-0633. MASONRY WORKSHOP. Learn about masonry design & implementation with an overview of materials. 10 a.m. Landmarks Housing Resource Center, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-2700. PHOTO SAFARI SATURDAY – PENGUINS. Call to register. 9-10 a.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-258-9439. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VINTAGE PITTSBURGH. Vendor fair. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000.

SAT 12 SUN 13 GLASS EGG WORKSHOP. April 12-13 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-721-7812.

SUN 13 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Jeff Sharlet at the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, Frick Fine Arts Building, Oakland CRITIC: Joey Murphy, 43, a student from Crafton Heights WHEN: Thu.,

April 03 I’m a second-year non-fiction master’s candidate here at the university [Pitt], and [Sharlet is] a nonfiction writer that I really admire. I really liked his book on The Family and the people of C Street [who were implicated in three political sex scandals in 2009]. I’d seen him on [The Rachel Maddow Show], and I read the book and I really enjoyed it. It was the exposé that really appealed to me. There’s this silent and really pervasive, cancerous growth in Washington. He is just a really articulate, really observant immersion journalist. I thought he was very personable, and very generous with his observations. He was very relaxed. B Y A N G E L A S UI C O

CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DEATH & LIFE AFTER DEATH: THE POSSIBILITIES & PROBABILITIES. w/ Theodore L. Kneupper, Ph.D. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. DRAWING CLASS W/ JENNIFER MYERS. 1-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PENGUIN PAINTING PROGRAM. Choose colors & watch penguins create a work of art. 3 p.m. National www. per a p Aviary, North Side. pghcitym .co 412-258-9445.

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MON 14 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Call for reservations. Mon. Thru April 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 15 HIKING IN PENNSYLVANIA: THE LAUREL HIGHLANDS TRAIL. Educational program presented by Mike Mumau, Park Operations Manager, Laurel Hill State Park. 7 p.m. Calvin E. Pollins Library, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x210. PITTSBURGH STRESS MANAGEMENT GROUP. 5:30 p.m. Grace Wellness Center, Greenfield. 412-853-3189.

WED 16 BACKYARD COMPOSTING WORKSHOP. 6:30 p.m. Blueberry Hill Park. 412-488-7490 x 247. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.


FREE HEALTH CARE DECISION MAKING SEMINAR. 6:30-8 p.m. Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8747. GETTING TO KNOW GARDEN HERBS. Workshop w/ Bob Madden of Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery. 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for Guys & Dolls. April 12-13. Rhawk6278@yahoo.com Cranberry. 724-591-8727. DISCOVER ME! Seeking 2 caucasian women & 2 caucasian men age 18-30 for the movie production Discover Me! Call Robert at 412-209-9868. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for The Sound of Music. May 17-18. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. www.centerauditions. org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for the 2014-2015 season. May 13-18. All voice parts for volunteer singers & Professional Core singers. www.themendelssohn.org Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259. MONYOUGH COMMUNITY SINGERS. Seeking singers of all ages, especially baritones & basses. www.mycsingers.com 814-460-1731. PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for the Pittsburgh Pride Theatre Festival. April 13. PPTF13@gmail.com Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-256-8109. PITTSBURGH UNDERGROUND MUSIC AWARDS AUDITION SHOWCASE. Hip-hop audition showcase for performance slot at the Pittsburgh

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Underground Music Awards. April 17. Set times are 4-min., bring song for DJ. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-583-2760. SHINE YOUR LIGHT - A BROADWAY CANTATA CELEBRATING FAITH, HOPE & LOVE. Seeking principle & ensemble singers for a Benefit Concert/Cantata at the New Hazlett Theater. April 19. Prepare 32 measures of a musical theater song & bring sheet music. Email Mark.corbin@alleghenycourts. us for info/list of suggested songs. Bethany Baptist Church, Homewood. SOUTH PARK THEATRE. Children’s Theatre Auditions for 2014 Season. April 12. Cold readings from script. Those interested in preforming in a musical will also be asked to sing a little of a favorite song. No appointment necessary. Bring photo & resume. Thru April 12. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552.

in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@ hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Seeking art work for the juried exhibit Color. Entry deadline May 3. Visit greensburgartcenter.org for information. Greensburg. 724-396-6699. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JEAN TOOMER LITERARY PRIZE FOR SHORT FICTION. Open to new, emerging & established writers. No theme restriction. Submit

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

HISTORIC HANNA’S TOWN

The Westmoreland County Historical Society is seeking volunteers to serve at the reconstructed Historic Hanna’s Town, which was founded in 1773. It held the first English court west of the Allegheny Mountains, and was destroyed during the Revolutionary War. Positions are available for tour guides and gift-shop personnel; the next volunteer open-house is Sat., April 26, from 10 a.m. until noon. For information, call 724-532-1935 x212 or visit www.westmorelandhistory.org.

SPLIT STAGE PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Avenue Q. April 14. Auditioning in 1 hour time slots (6-7, 7-8, 8-9). Email splitstage@gmail.com w/ a time slot preference, headshot & resume. Walk-ins will be seen as time permits. Prepare 32 bars of an up-tempo musical theater piece & 32 bars of a ballad if a second song is requested. You may be asked to read/sing something additional from the show. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-836-1757.

SUBMISSIONS ART ALL NIGHT: LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit one (& only one) piece of artwork or sign up to perform. Registration & other info at http://www.artallnight.org/ 412-235-1950. BOYD COMMUNITY CENTER. Seeking vendors for Gardenfest & Artist Market. info@boydcommunitycenter.org O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art

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one original, unpublished work, 10 pages max. cathleenbailey.weebly.com/ jean-toomer-literary-prize-forshort-fiction.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to sell plants & products at the annual Garden Mart. For more info & registration, call or email c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www.pittsburghwatercolor society.com VERONA CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking vendors for marketplace in June. Space is limited. Call for more information. 412-721-0943.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

I’m an old guy, fast approaching geezerdom. After 45 years of marriage, the sex has fallen off to zero. We otherwise have a great and comfortable relationship. If I want any at all these days, the only options are masturbation or professional serviceproviders, and paid sex has become a regular thing. You stress honesty and communication for a long-term relationship to work. In our case, honesty would mean the end to a great friendship that provides us both with deeply satisfying companionship. I don’t want to hurt her, but revealing my outside activities would do so, as she thinks men using prostitutes is disgusting. Any comments from a young gay guy? SIN OR SALVATION

There aren’t any young gay guys around at the moment, so you’ll have to settle for my advice … Honesty and communication are important, SOS, but there are limits. No long-term relationship would survive a strict regime of full disclosure enforced with depositions, regularly scheduled lie-detector tests, etc. Knowing what to omit is just as important as honesty and communication. And married people get to have some zones of privacy. There are limits to privacy, autonomy and subject avoidance, as well. If your inner life amounts to a double life, that’s a problem. If your secrets place your spouse at risk of physical or emotional harm, that’s a problem. If your zones of privacy grow so large that your spouse doesn’t know who you are, that’s a problem. But I don’t think what you’re doing is necessarily a problem. If your wife is truly content — if you’re not cheating her out of anything she values, if you’re not taking risks with her health, if you’re not depleting your retirement savings to finance your activities — then your visits to sex workers are covered by my standard advice to people in sexless but otherwise fulfilling marriages: Do what you gotta do to stay sane and stay married. You sound like a decent, loving husband. To make sure you’re also a courteous client — for tips on communication, hygiene, tipping and avoiding women who have been trafficked — check out the sex-worker panel we convened for the Savage Lovecast. Go to savagelovecast. com and listen to episode 387.

ries of fucking my ex. Is that a sign I’m not into the new guy? I don’t want to hurt this new guy by telling him I’m not attracted to him. Should I do the brutally honest thing, or lie about why we’re breaking up? SUPERFICIAL AND PREVARICATING

You say Mr. Fortyish took your breakup as a sign that you wanted to be with him. If that was a faulty assumption, why did you start dating him? Maybe you felt like you had no choice, and you had to play along to spare his feelings. But you did have a choice. And while you intend to get out of this relationship — you don’t list staying together as an option — you’re gonna have to learn to advocate for yourself, or you’re gonna be in this position again, i.e., manipulated into relationships that leave you feeling panicky, annoyed and unfulfilled. As for how to break up, there’s no reason to tell him you’re not attracted to him. A person can advocate for herself without being cruel. Just use the standard-issue little white breakup lies: “I’m not ready for a serious commitment.” “It’s not you, it’s me.” “We’re in very different places right now.” And commit those lies to memory for use on any guy who starts talking about marriage and kids four months into a relationship.

THE WORLD IS FULL OF PEOPLE DERIVING ALL SORTS OF SECRET THRILLS FROM ALL SORTS OF SHIT.

I’m a 23-year-old woman. I was in a relationship with a guy who I loved but who was immature. The sex was out of this world. About six months before we broke up, I met a guy who is 20 years older than me, and we bonded over a lot of mutual interests. When I broke up with my boyfriend, this fortysomething guy took it as a sign that I wanted to be with him. We’ve now been dating for four months. This guy wants to get married and have babies. I love him — I think — but I am not physically attracted to him. I often feel angry and suffocated by his attention. Are these feelings normal in “serious” relationships? I’m also physically aching at memo-

One of the boys at the restaurant where I work met up with a dominant gay couple in a bar. They told him to go to the bathroom and strip in a stall. Then one of the guys came in and took his clothing from him. He didn’t know when or even if they would be back. While he was trapped there naked, other men were coming in and out. Knowing that other people didn’t know he was in his stall gave my coworker a big thrill. My problem: This couple and my friend involved other people — without their knowledge or consent — in their little game. I say, “Not OK!” We got into a heated argument and decided to ask you for a ruling. COWORKER’S RECENT ESCAPADE ENTIRELY PERVERTED

Let’s say a straight couple comes into your restaurant and they’re seated in your section, CREEP. They order, they eat, they tip, they leave. All good? Now let’s say that, unbeknownst to you, the man was wearing a locking male chastity device and the woman was wearing the key around her neck. And a big part of the turn-on was being in public and interacting with, say, a waiter who had no idea. Is that OK? Of course it is — just like it’s OK for a businessman to get a secret thrill out of wearing panties under his suit at an important meeting. The world is full of people deriving all sorts of secret thrills from all sorts of shit. So long as the thrill-derivers don’t actively involve others without their prior consent, there’s nothing “Not OK!” about it. Bisexuals, grab your pitchforks: Dan interviews writer Benoit Denizet-Lewis at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014


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1. “Un momento, ___ favor” 4. Sites for skateboarding tricks 9. Mugged, say 14. Google Maps suggestion, for short 15. It may be poached 16. Crosswise, on a ship 17. Anthem contraction 18. Woman with a killer voice? 19. [Turn to the next pg.] 20. Refreshments at many a 57-Across, represented in two of this puzzle’s corners 23. “Invisible Man” author 24. Bearish? 26. Fifths, on musical scales 27. “___ 99 problems ...” 30. Lousy ballplayer, to an old-timey fan 31. Fish and chips fish 34. NBA or NFL part: Abbr. 36. Units of wax that aren’t actually wax 37. Refreshments at many a 57-Across, represented in the other two corners 40. Nation where most Mormons and Scientologists live 42. Sperm’s destination 43. “Roger, Rèmy” 44. Muscle exercised by push-ups, casually 45. Modernist

composer Charles 47. Brazilian football megastar with a reduplicated name 51. Plants from which chocolate is derived 54. ___ Meow (Internet meme cat with extremely long fur) 57. Event featuring new work, and where the items in the corners might be found 60. Put on 61. Words before lunch? 62. [You should try some of this grass] 63. Pixar film with a longbow-shooting protagonist 64. Caesar’s tongue 65. Very much unlike the OED 66. Outright 67. One of Puff Daddy’s clothing labels 68. Say that this clue is 69-Across, say

11. Like a car that’s safe, gets good gas mileage, etc. 12. Devoured 13. DDS alternative (they essentially mean the same thing) 21. San Jose company in the Dow Jones Industrial Average 22. Quarterback’s call 25. Half of moms? 28. Bearded garden dwarf 29. Neanderthal 32. Brand sold at Bed Bath & Beyond 33. Dream up 35. Chinese-American actress Lucy 37. Casino game for Bond 38. Kia Sportage, e.g. 39. Big name in lenses

40. Bars that allow you to buy a drink, e.g. 41. Ritzy Jersey Shore town 46. Enterprise engineer 48. Muppet drummer in Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem 49. Jedi Master Obi-Wan 50. Noted beard grower of 2001 52. Advil alternative 53. More ancient 55. Word before nerve or disc 56. Sierra ___ 58. What one might get typecast in 59. Chinese cabbage? 60. ___ Ghraib (Iraqi prison)

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.09-04.16

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Freedom is the most important kind of joy you can seek right now. It’s also the most important subject to study and think about, as well as the most important skill to hone. I advise you to make sure that freedom is flowing through your brain and welling up in your heart and spiraling through your loins. Write synonyms for “freedom” on your arm with a felt-tip pen: liberation, emancipation, independence, leeway, spaciousness, carte blanche, self-determination, dispensation. Here’s one more tip: Connect yourself with people who love and cultivate the same type of freedom you do.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s Love Your Messes Week, Taurus. In accordance with the astrological omens, you are authorized to love the hell out of the messes in your life — from the small, awkward knots of confusion to the big, beautiful heaps of fertile chaos. This is not a time to feel embarrassed or apologize for your messes; not a time to shy away from them or ignore them. On the contrary, you should explore them, celebrate them and even take advantage of them. Whatever else they are, your messes are untapped sources of energy. Learn to love them for the mysterious lessons they keep teaching you. Love them for the courage and willpower they compel you to summon. Love them for the novelty they bring your way and the interesting stories they add to your personal legend.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “A snowball’s chance in hell” is an American idiom that’s equivalent to saying “it probably won’t happen.” After all, a snowball would instantly melt if exposed to the scorching fires

that rage in the underworld. But what if there’s an exception to this axiom? Let’s call on another American idiom: “when hell freezes over.” It’s another way to say “it probably won’t happen.” But the truth is that now and then a cold front does indeed sweep through the infernal region, icing its flames. When that happens, a snowball’s prospects of surviving there improve dramatically. And that’s exactly what I predict will happen for you in the coming week.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 2007, J.K. Rowling finished writing the seventh volume of her seven Harry Potter books, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The day it was published it sold 11 million copies. But Rowling had actually written the final chapter of this last book way back in 1990, when she first conceived the story she was to spend the next 17 years working on. She knew the climax right from the beginning. I foresee a similar theme unfolding for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. As you plot a project you will be developing for a long time to come, you will

get your yoga on!

have a vision of what it will be when it becomes fully mature.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22):

When you see your shadow, it’s usually right next to you. It’s there on the ground or floor, a fuzzy black shape that follows you around closely. But today I saw my shadow waving back at me from afar. I was standing on top of a hill, and the sun’s rays created a dusky version of me in the meadow way down below. I think this is a useful metaphor for an opportunity that’s available to you. In the coming days, you will be able to view the shadowy, undeveloped parts of your personality as if from a distance. That means you will have more objectivity about them, and thus greater compassion. You can get a calm, clear sense of how they might be mucking with your happiness and how you could transform them.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “You cannot use butterfly language to communicate with caterpillars,” said psychologist Timothy Leary. That’s good advice for you to keep in mind in the near future. You might want to find a way to carry on constructive dialogs with people who have a hard time understanding you. It’s not necessarily that they are stupid or resistant to your charms. The problem is that they haven’t experienced some of the critical transformations you have. They can’t be expected to converse with you in your butterfly language. Are you willing and able to speak caterpillar?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Are you thinking of linking your fortunes to a new ally? Or deepening your collaboration with a familiar ally? Have you fantasized about bonding intensely with a source that may be able to give you more of what you want and bring out more of the best in you? These prospects are worth contemplating, Libra. But I suggest you let your connection ripen a bit more before finalizing the shift. I’m not necessarily saying there’s a potential problem. I simply suspect that you need further exploration and additional information before you can make the smartest move possible.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Saturn has been in the sign of Scorpio since October 2012 and will be there until the end of 2014. (It will make another visit from June to September 2015.) What does that mean? I have a view of Saturn that’s different from many astrologers. They regard it as the planet of limitation, struggle and difficulty. Here’s what I think: While Saturn may push you to be extra tough and work super hard, it also inspires you to cut away extraneous desires and home in on your deepest purpose. It motivates you to build strong structures that free you to express yourself with maximum efficiency and grace.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When I took an intermediate painting class in college, our first assignment was to imitate an old master. My choice was the Flemish painter Pieter Breugel the Elder (1525-1569). I worked on reproducing his painting The Fight Between Carnival and Lent as precisely as I could. It was tedious and liberating. I invoked Breugel’s spirit and prayed for his guidance. I sank my psyche deeply into his. By the end of the four-week process I’d learned a lot about painting. Given the current astrological omens, Sagittarius, I suggest you try something similar. Pick someone who excels at a way of working or a state of being that you would like to master yourself, and copy that person for a while. For best results, have fun with it. Play!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author J.R.R. Tolkien spent 14 years working on The Lord of the Rings. In using a typewriter to produce over 1,200 pages, he relied solely on his two index fingers. He never learned the 10-finger typing method. I suppose it didn’t matter in the end. Presumably, his impediment didn’t affect the quality of his work, but only made it harder to accomplish and required him to spend a lot more time. Is there a fixable limitation on your own ability to achieve your dream, Capricorn? Is there some handicap you could, with effort, overcome? If so, now would be an excellent time to begin.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The truth’s superb surprise,” wrote poet Emily Dickinson, may be “too bright for our infirm delight.” Sometimes we’ve got to be careful about articulating what’s really going on. “The truth must dazzle gradually,” she said. If it hits us too fast and hard, it may be difficult to digest. So did Emily suggest that we should lie and deceive? No. “Tell all the truth,” she declared, “but tell it slant.” This is excellent advice for you in the coming days, Aquarius.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Here’s my report on your progress. You are not struggling to embody a delusional state of perfection as it is imagined by other people. Rather, you are becoming an ever-more soulful version of your idiosyncratic self, evolving slowly but surely. You are not dazedly trudging along a narrow track laid down by thousands of sheep. Instead, you are lively and creative as you bushwhack a path for yourself through the wilderness. To celebrate this ongoing success, Pisces, I suggest you get yourself a new power object that symbolizes your inventive devotion. Write a short essay on “How I Created Something Out of Nothing.” Go to FreeWillAstrology. com and click on “Email Rob.”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 57 + STUDIES 58 + LIVE 59 + SERVICES 59 + WELLNESS 60

WORK HELP WANTED

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!!

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Africa, Brazil Work/ Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter. org (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

• Make $500 a week to start. • The Miles Group is a Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

Act 235 Courses Basic Class: May 17, 18, 22, 21, 23 and 24, 2014 Renewal Classes: May 22, 2014

Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required

Your ad could be here

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WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

(10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour

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Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

(20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

412.316.3342

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

“ Everybody can be great... becuase anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS -WILL YOU ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE? 10-month Public Allies program runs from 9/2014 - 6/2015 Must be at least 17 years old by September 2, 2014 Possess a high school diploma/G.E.D. by September 2, 2014 Passionate about the issues facing Southwestern PA

BENEFITS TO PUBLIC ALLIES $1,400/month Living Stipend Health Care Coverage Childcare Reimbursement Training and Professional Development Opportunites $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of program

PGHCityPaper

APPLY TODAY: Application Deadline May 15, 2014 www.publicallies.org/apply

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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LIFEGUARDS

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

(AGE 16 & OVER)

CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT FOLLOWING AT TEST SITES: • Complete physical examination form. • Completed Employment Application from Lifeguard Packet. • Minimum of four references on back of application. PRIOR TO MAY 26, 2014 ALL CANDIDATES MUST PRESENT: • Current Lifeguard Training certification • Current First Aid certification • Current Adult, Child and Infant CPR certification Contact the Central Park Office at 412-350-2478 to obtain forms and additional information.Forms and driving directions may also be obtained from the Parks Department Home Page @ www.alleghenycounty.us/parks

OPENING DATE FOR 2014 SWIMMING SEASON:

May 31, 2014 (Weather & Conditions Permitting) 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.09/04.16.2014

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

HIGH CHOLESTEROL? CONSTIPATION?

Needed during the 2014 Swimming Season at Allegheny County facilities in Boyce, North, South, and Settler’s Cabin Parks. Interested applicants are required to complete an Aquatics Examination given on Saturday April 19 at 9:00 a.m. At the NORTH ALLEGHENY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, 10375 PERRY HIGHWAY, WEXFORD, PA. 15090 SALARY STRUCTURE: • Junior Lifeguards: $8.25 • First Year Lifeguards: $9.25 • Senior Lifeguards (2 or more seasons) $9.50 Candidates must have physical examination PRIOR to participation in Aquatics Exam on April 19, 2014. No test given without doctor’s certification on physical examination form.

STUDIES

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Find your next job in the City Paper’s “WORK” section.

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

2014 WHERE: Hyundai Club West Lounge WHEN: Thurs. April 10: 2pm-8pm Park at the Carnegie Science Center for $6 or take the “T” to Allegheny Station

Concessions Catering Kitchen Ticket Takers Ticket Sellers Seat Attendants Maid/Porter Club Attendants Event Security Merchandise Guest Services Elevator Operators Suite Attendants

Gain valuable stadium operations experience in a fast-paced, exciting environment. Come to the Heinz Field Job Fair to apply for event day positions for Pittsburgh Steelers games, Pittsburgh Panthers games, concerts and other exciting events!


LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES 20 Acres. $0 Down, Only $119/mo. NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas. Beautiful Views! Money Back Guarantee 866-8825263 Ext.81 www. sunsetranches.net (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

STORAGE

SERVICES

NORTH FOR RENT

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

AUTO SERVICES

Advertise Here Today! ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE 25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations: Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

SOUTH FOR RENT

House for sale Ross Twp North Hills Well kept , newly updated 1n 1/2 story cape cod 3br. New furnace and whole house a/c smooth top range and double door fridge providedw/w carpet nice yard and covered back porch 10x24 Priced Right Call John 412 491 0411

Newly renovated Apartment in Mount Washington

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

overlooking city. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, w/d hookups. Stove and refrigerator.

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

$1,800 per Month gas and water included. No pets. Call John 412-580-6550

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

ADOPTION At-Home mom, Financially secure couple, LOVE and Laughter awaits 1st Baby

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)

MUSICIANS WANTED Drummer wanted for est. rock band. Must be under 30 yo. extremely dedicated and able to tour. Call John 724-971-1094 Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

EXPENSES PAID SHIRA & JUSTIN 1-800-598-4594

ESTATE SALE

ADOPT

Estate Sale

A loving, financially secure, safe happy home awaits your newborn.

1-877-492-8811 Expenses Paid Karen

Saturday April 19th Furn. (100pieces) Antiques, Collectibles, Etc. For information/pictures go to:

thereclamationnation.com

NOW HIRING FOR

Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson. If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE N E W S

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results! Advertise Here Today!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Xie LiHong’s

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

412-401-4110 Male Massage Available 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor) Open 24 hours/7 days a week

Chinese Bodyworks

Learn do Aiki Beginner’s classes T, Th 7-8 pm (16 yrs or older) For more information go to

www.alleghenyaikido.com

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Shadyside Location

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-441-1185

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation

massage BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Chinese Bodywork

Therapy

MIND & BODY

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.246.8965, ext. 9

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Let Us Help You Today!

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

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412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Help is Available!

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Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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BACK IN THE FIGHT After Iraq, the ring holds few terrors for Sammy Vasquez Jr. {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

MOST BOXERS might be nervous about their first fight on a nationally televised cable program — a bout promoted by former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson, no less. But Monessen native Sammy Vasquez Jr. is not most fighters. Sure, he’s slated to appear April 18 on Showtime’s ShoBox, a showcase for up-andcoming fighters. But as far as stressful situations go, this isn’t even at the top of the list. “It will be great to fight on Showtime, but I don’t feel any extra pressure,” says the 27-year-old southpaw, who spent eight years in the U.S. Army National Guard and served two tours in Iraq. That, he says, is where he really learned what pressure was: “It was a life-changing experience. You’re in a war zone, wondering if today’s the day I’m going to die.” In Iraq, Vasquez served as a member of a Quick Response Force on his first tour, and as a Cavalry Scout — a reconnaissance specialist — on his second. “If there was a bombing or some kind of attack, we were sent out into the field,” he says. “We had a strong team, I had my buddies’ backs and they had mine. It was the only way to survive.” “Some [fighters] might get nervous; this stage might be too big for them,” Vasquez adds. “But I’ve already fought on the biggest stage anybody can be on. Here, maybe we get a black eye or a busted nose, but at the end of the night we’re both going home.” “Sammy served our country doing some real fighting,” Tyson said during an April 7 conference call with reporters. “You don’t get a rematch in that kind of fighting.” Vasquez (13-0, 9 KOs) is scheduled for the opening fight against fellow undefeated welterweight Juan “The Beast” Rodriguez. The fight, scheduled for 10:45 p.m., takes place at the Monroeville Convention Center. Tyson is fairly new to the promotion game; Vasquez’s previous fights have all been promoted by his family, led by his father, Sam Vasquez Sr. But as Vasquez’s profile and professional record has grown, he knew it was time to hook up one of the “big dog” promoters. Tyson wasn’t the only suitor. Vasquez was also recruited by Oscar De La Hoya’s Golden Boy promotion. But at the end of the day, Vasquez says, Tyson was the best fit. “Mike Tyson’s promotion is new and they didn’t have a lot of fighters in my weight class, so I know that with him, I can

get six fights a year rather than maybe three with Golden Boy,” Vasquez says. “That’s a big difference when the goal is to get to that magic number of 20-0, get ranked and get a major title shot. “I’m starting to build a following, and in this game, that’s important.” Vasquez’s boxing career began in childhood; his father got him lessons after he’d been bullied on the school bus. The younger Vasquez put his boxing career on hold for the military, where he served from 2003 to 2012. He was a stellar amateur, during which time he fought in the Army’s World Class Athlete Program, and was a two-time gold medalist at the national Armed Forces tournament. He was selected as an alternate to the 2012 U.S. Olympic team, but passed it up to go pro. Since then, Vasquez has fought tough opponents. In a fight last year in Las Vegas, for example, the promoter switched Vasquez’s younger opponent at the last minute to a fighter who was 16-2. Despite not preparing for that particular fighter, Vasquez entered the ring. “What am I going to do, say no?” Vasquez asks. “I TKO’d him in the second round.” Asked what drew him to Vasquez, Tyson said that a friend told him he needed to see Vasquez fight: “My friend kept talking and talking about Sammy and he said, ‘You got to check him out — he’s a white guy with a Spanish last name.’” Tyson booked Vasquez to fight Berlin Abreu at the Sands Resort near Philadelphia. In the second round, Vasquez hit the canvas for the first time in his career. But what happened next impressed Iron Mike. “Sammy went down hard, and then got back up and continued to fight through the adversity,” Tyson explained. “He knocked the guy out in the fourth round, and I said, ‘I gotta have him on the team.’ That sold me right away. Plus he’s a real crowd-pleaser.” One of the main reasons that Monroeville was selected for the fight, in fact, was because of Vasquez’s ability to draw and electrify crowds. A lot of that has to do with his family: The extended Vasquez family will travel far and wide to see Sammy fight, tailgating outside the arenas. Vasquez’s Uncle Arthur even sells “Sammy Margaritas” and “Knockout Salsa.” Now that Vasquez lives in Colorado with his fiancée and three children, fighting has become the best way to get his family together. “Every time I fight, it’s like a family reunion. It always has been” says Vasquez. “They have always been out hustling and supporting me by selling tickets and bringing buses to the fights. “That’s why I do this: for my family.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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rethink home

1 and 2 bedroom upscale urban rentals

BakeryLiving

Coming Soon at Bakery Square - Pre-leasing now

412-683-3810 • BAKERYLIVING.COM THE BEST IN CITY LIVING

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OVER

CASH & FREE SLOT PLAY

DRIVE TO THE DERBY

OVER $20K DRAWINGS

EVERY HOUR 2PM - 8PM

VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB OR RIVERSCASINO.COM FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.

Ford Mustang速 GT is a registered trademark of Ford Motor Company.

GIVEN AWAY EACH SATURDAY IN APRIL! GRAND FINALE

SATURDAY, MAY 3 | 8PM

WIN A 2014 FORD MUSTANG速 GT!

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

April 9, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 - Issue 15