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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 03.19/03.26.2014

OUR BEHIND-THE-SCENES LOOK AT LOCAL MUSIC AND MUSICIANS


EVENTS 3.21 – 5-10pm FREE GOOD FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN Every Good Friday in March with cash bar and DJ Shawn Watson, specializing in an all vinyl set of Funk, Punk, Reggae and Rock. FREE admission

4.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TINARIWEN Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

YOU MAY NOT KNOW WARHOL ATTENDED CHURCH ALMOST EVERY DAY.

4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Learn this and more at the world’s most comprehensive single-artist museum.

5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.17 – 6pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY GALA The Warhol & The Warhol Parking Lot Tickets $500; visit www.flywarhol.com

EXPLORE THE LIFE THAT INSPIRED THE WORK.

image: Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait (detail), 1963, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CELEBRATING:

Pittsburgh’S Finest 2014

MEDIATION & COLLABORATIVE DIVORCE ATTORNEY DEBORAH L. IWANYSHYN has 30 years of legal experience. In

We present 100 Pittsburgh professionals who demonstrate excellence in the fields of law, healthcare, education, technology, social services & business for 2014.

IMMIGRATION & NATURALIZATION The immigration attorneys at GOLDSTEIN & ASSOCIATES are committed to helping you find your best immigration options, and to working with you to execute that plan. Attorney Mark Goldstein has over twenty years of experience with complex immigration issues. He and his staff – associates Mark Seewald & Sarah Beaver, business manager David Kim and paralegals Anaid Rios, Ana ValeroSilva & Erendira Corral – can access their collective wealth of experience and apply it to your unique situation. They have learned the lessons of experience and can it to your situation. 1125 Penn Ave, 3rd Fl apply Sometimes a case is simple and requires filing a few applications with USCIS Pittsburgh and tracking progress. Sometimes a case is complex, and involves many people, (412)258-8080 requiring applications to several different agencies. Mark & his team have extensive experience with USCIS, ICE, CBP, Department of Labor, Department of State, representing clients before the Immigration Judge, BIA and Federal Court. They have achieved success in all settings and have built the experience and relationships necessary to achieve success in your case. Spanish, Korean, Chinese & French spoken. Visit: www.mglaw.com

DEVELOPING DIVERSE LEADERS

addition to being a CPA and offering forensic accounting and valuation services for closely held businesses, she is a trained mediator whose practice is dedicated to restoring sanity to the divorce process through mediation and the collaborative divorce process. Court battles can be emotionally and financially devastating, as Deborah knows from her experience as a divorce litigator and divorce survivor. 2100 Legendary Ln Deborah and her team of executives and financial analysts know there are effective Allison Park alternatives that allow for healthier transitions for the separating couple and their (412)487-1576 children, while providing the couple with more control over the outcome. Both mediation and the collaborative divorce process focus on solutions rather than conflict and are based on a shared commitment to minimize emotional and financial damage, respect the needs of each individual, and create a foundation for effective co-parenting. Deborah will also litigate on her clients’ behalf when necessary. Visit: www.iwanyshyn.com

TRUSTS, ESTATE PLANNING & ASSET PROTECTION ATTORNEY WILLIAM V. TAYLOR is experienced in the complex areas of probate, asset protection and estate planning. In his 15 years of experience, he has handled a variety of probate and related matters, including clearing real estate titles, transferring family businesses, guardianships and homestead determination. William will travel to you and makes house, nursing home & hospital calls. He works closely with his clients to understand their individual needs and 5912 Beacon St prepares wills, powers of attorney, living wills and health care directives designed Pittsburgh specifically to meet those needs. In many instances the establishment of a trust, (412)256-8822 either revocable or irrevocable, detailing the timing and distribution of assets to beneficiaries, is also part of the planning process. His services range from simple estate plans, where tax planning is not a factor, to combination business-and-estate plans that may encompass succession planning, exit strategies, charitable giving, comprehensive tax analyses and more. William holds his LLM in Taxation from Boston University. Visit: www.wvtlaw.com

DIVORCE MEDIATION & COLLABORATIVE LAW

LEADERSHIP PITTSBURGH, INC is the leading multi-disciplinary leadership identification, enrichment and networking organization in Southwestern PA. LPI hosts two selection-based programs each year: Leadership Pittsburgh (LP) for senior level professionals and Leadership Development Initiative (LDI). Applications for LP are due first Friday in May and for LDI are due first Friday in June. The LDI program is a 10 month program for high-potential emerging leaders and serves as a retention and engagement tool for the region. It builds leadership 535 Smithfield St, #500 skills and expands professional networks – all within the context of neighborhood Pittsburgh awareness. The LDI class each year engages in a full year project – PopUp! (412)392-4505 Pittsburgh; it serves as a learning lab for the participants. PopUp! utilizes the neighborhood’s open spaces to surprise and bring together the community to encourage appreciation of the neighborhood’s assets, offer opportunities to envision its potential and challenge all to see the neighborhood in new ways. In 2013, PopUp! was held in Mount Washington; the 2014 PopUp! will be held in Larimer on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Visit: www.lpinc.org

ATTORNEY JOHN K. FOSTER, III is a Pittsburgh area domestic relations lawyer who practices Collaborative Family Law and divorce mediation. John has 22 years of legal experience, and explains that Collaborative Law is the shared belief by participants that it is in the best interest of spouses and their families to avoid litigation and arrive at outcomes privately and respectfully. In Collaborative Process, spouses, attorneys, financial professionals, and trained 428 Forbes Ave, #103 the facilitators commit to settle each case without judicial intervention; give prompt Pittsburgh and thorough disclosure of all relevant information; and engage in face-to(412)434-6442 face conferences to resolve all issues. If either party chooses to go to court, the Collaborative team must withdraw and the spouses retain new counsel. Litigation is not an option in Collaborative Law. John is also available for the full spectrum of divorce & family law issues and will litigate on his clients’ behalf when necessary. Community oriented, he is an active volunteer in Scouting and is an Eagle Scout himself. Visit: www.fglaw.com

A PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYER ORGANIZATION

EMPLOYMENT & DISCRIMINATION LAW

PAY-A-WAY, INC is a Professional Employer Organization (PEO) that co-manages human resources administration for all types of businesses. They help you to focus on what you know best - running your business. Payroll processing, certified payroll, filing payroll taxes, employee administration, benefit administration, 1410 Frey Rd unemployment compensation, workers compensation and COBRA are just part Pittsburgh of the services that Pay-A-Way, Inc provides while you continue to hire, set wages, (412)372-6414 promote, terminate and manage your employees. Pay-A-Way provides excellent employee benefits at no additional cost to your company. Worker’s Compensation is on a Pay-As-You Go premium. They process payroll more quickly and efficiently because of significant capital invested in state-of-the-art payroll processing systems that most smaller organizations cannot afford. Companies can rely on their expertise in labor, health care reform, tax and other laws that influence human resources management decisions. Pay-A-Way is a member of the National Association of Professional Employer Organization. Visit: www.pay-a-way.com

SCHOOL FOCUSES ON SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION SPECTRUM CHARTER SCHOOL provides school-to-work transition instruction in the classroom, on-site business, and community-based work sites for students aged 13 through 21. It’s an independent public school and its program is structured to meet the needs of students who do not learn well in typical classroom settings due to unique cognitive, communication, and sensory challenges, including students with autism spectrum disorder. The Curriculum is designed to address traditional academics, independent 4369 Northern Pike life skills, vocational skills and transition from school-to-work. Research indicates Monroeville that given the skills in the academic arena, as well as in the life management and (412)374-8130 vocational areas, students will be better equipped to meet with success upon graduation. Spectrum also provides character education, mentoring, social skills, interagency collaboration, volunteering opportunities, and an enrichment program that includes photography, jewelry making, a student caring team and weekly yoga classes. Celebrating 15 years of Education and Community Service & Founding Member Green Building Alliance-Pittsburgh Green Schools Academy. Visit: www.spectrumcharterschool.org

REAL FOOD • REAL CHEF BISTRO & COMPANY is a full-service bistro-style restaurant and caterer in the historic northside.  Its chefs create a variety of hearty cross-cultural gourmet comfort foods, healthy favorites, vegetarian/vegan & gluten free selections as well as fresh sandwiches, salads and homemade soups. Enjoy your meal in one of their dining rooms, garden courtyard or call for take-out. Catering with Bistro To Go guarantees an extraordinary culinary experience! 415 E Ohio St Bistro caters anytime - anyplace, delivery to staffed full service events. The freshest Pittsburgh ingredients are locally grown when possible to prepare delicious food for any (412)231-0218 special occasions, corporate gatherings, weddings and galas. The Bistro is offering Easter pick up pans to go, fish dishes every Wed & Fri during Lent. It’s a “No-Fry-Zone” at the Bistro – healthy AND delicious!!! Visit: www.bistroandcompany.com and www.bistro-togo.com

Shop Local and Support Small Businesses in Pittsburgh!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

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650 Smithfield St #1110, Centre City Twrs Pittsburgh (412)325-0170

Attorney Margaret (Peggy) Fried at FRIED LAW OFFICES has a strong belief that all employees have a right to work in a safe & healthy environment free from such unlawful practices as discrimination, wrongful termination and sexual/ disability/age/race harassment. Peggy handles a wide variety of employment & civil rights issues for her clients, including the issues relating to severance contracts, Family & Medical Leave, retaliation, reasonable accommodations, noncompete agreements, minimum wage & overtime pay, class actions, the Fair Labor Standards Act, unemployment compensation, hostile work environment, employment benefits & civil rights violations in employment & housing. Peggy works closely with clients to endeavor to provide sound & accurate advice in employment law and in other areas of her practice including, housing construction problems, land use & zoning disputes, home renovation problems & foreclosures, consumer & credit card debt and general civil litigation. Visit: www.friedlawoffices.com

DIVORCE WITH DIGNITY

ATTORNEY SHARON SMITH is a respected Pittsburgh attorney who practices collaborative divorce law and mediation to help parting couples restructure their families without the added pain often involved in going to court. Sharon has 13 years of legal experience and is trained as a critical care nurse. She explains that the collaborative divorce process considers the interests and priorities of both spouses and their children. In the collaborative model, both spouses and 20 Cedar Blvd, #404 their attorneys commit in writing to share all pertinent information which remains Pittsburgh confidential to the process, to communicate respectfully, constructively and (412)306-9921 creatively and to file nothing unilaterally in court until a final settlement is reached. If either party goes to court sooner, both attorneys have to withdraw and the parties retain new counsel. Sharon is quick to point out that collaborative divorce settlements continue to grow as parties learn about the many benefits this option provides, especially where children are involved. Visit: www.smithlawcares.com

ASSISTING THE ELDERLY & DISABLED

HANDS-2-HELP SENIOR SERVICES, INC consists of people who care about people. Their experienced team, who never missed an appointment in this rough winter, place companions & homemakers with individuals to help them remain independent in their homes. They provide non-medical services to people of all ages, including those who need help with activities of daily living, the elderly, people who are alone or at-risk, disabled people or post-hospital patients. Hands2-Help allows the terminally ill or people who need long-term care to remain with their families rather than be placed in a hospital or nursing home. 3075 Clairton Rd Hands-2-Help’s caring & comprehensive service philosophy sets them apart from West Mifflin other home care agencies. With backgrounds that include experience with many (412)653-2535 medical conditions, their caregivers offer supportive assistance with medications, lifting, housekeeping & bookkeeping, cooking & meal prep, pet care, shopping & errands, transportation & friendly companionship. Geriatric counseling, relocation services & nursing home visits are also available. Visit: www.hands-2-help.com

View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/031914


{EDITORIAL}

03.19/ 03.26.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 12

cover: On the Michelle l e d x o M Brillobo Pacis atmfield o in Blo

{ART}

BY {PHOTOER MULL} HEATH

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[MAIN FEATURE]

{ADVERTISING}

behind the scenes to learn why 22 Go musicians do what they do — and

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

what they think of Pittsburgh — in our annual Music Issue

[NEWS]

short and owned a violin.” 06 “I—was Ted Pappas on his choice of youthful extracurricular activity, one of the musical pasts of some well-known Pittsburghers

[VIEWS] should get on a bus and go picket 12 “We his house.” — State Sen. Jim Ferlo on Norristown-based arbitrator John Skonier, whose ruling voided the residency requirement for Pittsburgh police

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

[TASTE] don’t just slap a salad and 21 “We some steamed veggies on a plate.” — Mindy Heisler on Piper’s Pub’s vegan menu

[MUSIC]

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

The War on Drugs on songwriting

[SCREEN]

“It shows all the symptoms of a director imitating himself.” — Harry Kloman on Wes Anderson’s film The Grand Budapest Hotel

FRIDAY, MARCH 21 Turnstiles Tribute to Billy Joel

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

— Lissa Brennan describes an installation work in Erwin Redl’s Structures of Time and Space

[LAST PAGE] friend served me some. It was love at 70 “A first slurp.” — A satisfied customer at Wigle Whiskey, in the Strip District

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 52 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 62 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 64 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 67 TA S T E

Dan Bubien

STEEL CITY MEDIA

and Turns’ is capricious 48 “‘Twists and thrilling by its random nature.”

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THURSDAY, MARCH 20

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

NEWS

THIS WEEKEND!

{ADMINISTRATION}

I don’t know what I’m going 32 “Sometimes to end up with.” — Adam Granduciel of

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ENTERTAINMENT

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

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SATURDAY, MARCH 22

Beatlemania Magic

MARCH 21 & MARCH 22

DJ AJ Fresh GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL (800) 848-1880 ©2014 Cannery Casino Resorts, LLC. Management reserves all rights. All Rights Reserved.

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“WHO WANTS TO PLAY ‘SURREY WITH A FRINGE ON TOP’?”

INCOMING Local CSA programs are open for sign-ups — and registering early is a good idea (March 12)

anPiettsburgh Public Schools LinerdinatenLden t, rdion

“It’s important to participate in a farm-direct CSA. Co-ops and alliances purchase from many farms. When you buy a farm-direct CSA, all of that money goes directly to the farmer. No middle people are involved. Experience a fresher product, too.” — Web comment from “Bill”

Sup Acco TRUMENT: oven FIRST INS van Beeth e,” Ludwig is El r d ü AGE: 5 an “F : n RE PIECE e accordio SIGNATU d her rawn to th d ce y n rl vi n la co cu ’t parti n who iano? Lane wasn up piano. The perso n before p ok e accordio th n ar le quickly to to e needed parents sh n teacher. io rd co ac The

Reform sought on antibiotic use in food animals (Feb. 26)

Tracy Brigden en

“We should be concerned by the use of antibiotics in farms even if it can’t be definitively linked to antibiotic resistance in humans. Bacteria evolve very quickly, and complex interactions between different species can be hard to unravel. Given the growth of resistant strains of tuberculosis and other difficult-to-treat infections, we risk the loss of antibiotics as a powerful tool for treating disease. Do we really want to see that happen?” — Web comment from “harryh”

ne, mom Linda La circa 1964 r and siste

INSTRUMENT

PANEL

“Penguins D-Man Kris Letang cleared to return to practice after suffering stroke in Feb. RELATED: NBA player to miss 3-4 months with papercut” — March 16 tweet from parody account “Evil Mike Tomlin” (@EvilMikeTomlin)

“@graveytrain loving your work Pat, but I promise you I am not single handedly destroying the state of Pennsylvania from my home in London.” — March 17 tweet from U.K. musician “Tom Corbett” (@tomcorbett) in response to a tweet tagging him as the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania

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Artistic Director, City Theatre atre FIRST INSTRUMENT: Guitar tar AGE: 11 SIGNATURE PIECE: “Desperado,” The Eagles Brigden grew up not particularly enjoying guitar lessons, but once she discovered she could learn to play her favorite tunes, she was hooked. “Who wants to play ‘Surrey With a Fringe on Top’?”

Leading Pittsburghers recall their first experiences making music {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} Theater TeduciPngaAprtpistiacsDirector, Pittsburgh Public

Prod Violin TRUMENT: Vivaldi FIRST INS or, Antonio rto in A Min ce AGE: 11 n o C : e E at C st E PIE olin in the SIGNATUR play the vi ned how to us for basketball and ar le as p p o Pa er, a place “fam y he pursued the latt of Indiana, olin.” sked wh vi A a .” as ed tr n w es its orch rt and o , “I was sho Pappas says

diak Natalia Rudiak

strict 4 City Councilor, District FIRST INSTRUMENT: T: Flute AGE: 8 FIRST COMPOSITION: “My Little e Bird” An avid member of the school band, Rudiak wentt on to play the guitar, saxophone, steel drums and xylophone. phone. “If someone were to sponsor a Really Terrible Orchestra, hestra, I’d definitely be interested,” she says. (For the unfamiliar, amiliar, an RTO is an orchestra created for those who ho are kept from playing music “through lack of talent or some other factor,” according to its Wikipedia page.)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

Holidays Rosemary with Welsch

Rosemary W elsch

WYEP Aft ernoon Ho st/Prod FIRST INS TRUMENT: ucer Guitar SIGNATU RE PIECE: AGE: 10 “old pop h that were it favorites o s f her chain from the ’40s” -smoking Welsch co teacher n ce d es her mo accomplish st noted m ment may usical playing, h h av e been chas er gu ing, n after it go itar. She lunged for t caught o the instrum ot n th en Christmas Pageant an e curtain at her scho t ol’s d careened off the stag e.

AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR Monroeville $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

GETAWAY CAFÉ Brookline $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

BIRMINGHAM BRIDGE TAVERN South Side $2.50 Yuengling Bottles - All Day Saturday

BREWTOPIA TAVERN AND BOTTLE SHOP Dormont $1.75 Yuengling 12oz drafts all March

HULA BAR Verona $6.50 Yuengling Pitchers during March Mania

BELLA LUNA TRATTORIA Monroeville $2.75 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

BREWSTONE BEER COMPANY Wilkins $2.50 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

CARSON CITY SALOON South Side Yuengling March Mania specials

HOUGH’S TAPROOM AND BREWPUB Greenfield $3 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day, Every Day

SOCIAL Bakery Square $6.00 Yuengling Buckets of 3 Lager, Light Lager, Black & Tan 12oz cans

WEST END BOTTLE SHOP Washington $2 .00 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday

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SIDELINES BAR AND GRILLE Millvale $1.75 Yuengling Lager Draft & Bottles during all College Hoops ALIOTO’S Etna $2.15 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania SMOKEHOUSE GRILL Downtown $2.50 Yuengling pints all March

NEW AMSTERDAM Lawrenceville $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

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PIZZA ROMA McCandless $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All day Saturday & during all College Hoops POMODORO PIZZERIA AND RISTORANTE Wexford $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All day Saturday & during all College Hoops WESTWOOD BAR AND GRILL West Mifflin $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts all March

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BUBBA’S GOURMET BURGERS AND BEER Bridgeville $2.75 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops THE HOP HOUSE Crafton $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday THE URBAN TAP South Side Yuengling March Mania specials

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presents

PofE T the WEEK

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Sophomore violinist Rachel Woodhall, a member of the Brashear High School orchestra, performs during the school’s production of Bye Bye Birdie March 15.

SOUR NOTES When school funding is slashed, music education often suffers Diana & Prince

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL} WHEN PITTSBURGH Public Schools

Diana is a beautiful and friendly three-year-old Pit Bull mix. This lucky girl has already met her “Prince Charming” in the unlikely form of Prince, a Chihuahua/Daschund mix! They are so enamored with each other, they must spend their happily ever after together. Come meet this royal pair at Animal Friends!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 8

parent Molly May testified at a public hearing in February, she used song to convey the importance of arts education in public schools. “Where has all the music gone?” she sung. A former PPS music teacher who has also taught music in the PineRichland school district, May has been a champion for increased music education in the district. “This wasn’t the first time I have sung at the school board,” May says. “And it won’t be the last.” Around the country, finding funding for music education is difficult for urban school districts like Pittsburgh. Under Gov. Tom Corbett, education funding has dropped significantly; Pittsburgh alone has lost $27 million since 2010. These cuts, combined with the district’s other budget restrictions, have left little room to increase musiceducation offerings. According to figures from the district, in 2011 there were 68 teachers for all musical programs across the district,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

including those teaching music at the city’s Creative And Performing Arts High School. In 2012, that number was cut to 56, and in 2013 it was trimmed again, to 53 teachers. A breakdown of where and what courses those instructors teach was not available, nor were staffing levels before 2011. “We’ve had all these budget cuts and our students have lost a lot of music and art education,” says Jessie Ramey of Yinzercation, a member of the Great Public Schools Pittsburgh educationadvocacy coalition. “The state is choosing to take money out of education, and the district has had to make some really tough choices.” District students in grades K-8 receive general music education once every six days. During this time they learn basic music skills, music history, critical analysis and music vocabulary, and receive handson experience with basic instruments. The once-every-six-days rotation for students in grades K-8 is far less than the three times per week recommended by the National Association for Music Education.

“Research shows that students who are exposed to music education do better in other subjects,” Ramey says. “So this is one of those things that’s a no-brainer. We’ve heard over and over again from parents who want art and music back in our classrooms.” “The time spent on music, or time allowed for music, has greatly decreased,” May says. “The number of students who are allowed to participate [has] greatly decreased.” While the music-education offerings are meager for younger students, opportunities expand once students enter fifth grade, which is when students can begin learning an instrument. In high school, music offerings include band, choir, orchestra and even guitar in some schools. District representatives say its music program has actually improved in recent years. At one time, while some schools offered music education more than once every six days, others offered it less frequently, if at all. The district reorganized its resources for the 2012-2013 school year to ensure that each school CONTINUES ON PG. 10


FANCY A FREE WAX? FOR FIRST-TIME GUESTS

© 2014 EWC You must be a state resident.

March Mania Specials at These Locations! NICO’S RECOVERY ROOM Bloomfield $2.50 Yuengling 16oz drafts for March Mania

THE SALOON OF MT. LEBANON Mt. Lebanon Yuengling March Mania specials

ALEXION’S BAR AND GRILL Carnegie $2.00 Yuengling pints every Saturday

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BIG DOG’S SALOON Plum $2.25 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

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PITTSBURGH - FORBES AVE COMING SOON 5854 Forbes Ave. Next to Little’s Shoes

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ALL AGES “ACTIVE FUN” FAMILY CENTER

DUKE’S UPPER DECK Homestead $3.75 Yuengling drafts all March

NEWS

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ULTIMATE 3D PLAY EXPERIENCE

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE! SKYZONE.COM/LEETSDALE

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HOP HOUSE North Hills $2.50 Yuengling Lager drafts – All Day Saturday

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SKY ZONE

LEETSDALE/SEWICKLEY 740 BRICKWORKS DRIVE, LEETSDALE, PA

TOLERICO’S Monroeville $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

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Monday- Closed Tuesday- Thursday: 4:00pm - 8:00pm Friday: Toddler Time (Ages walking to 5)- 2:00pm - 3:00pm, Open Jump 3:00 pm - 9:00pm SkyMania $18* (ages 10-15) every Friday night from 9:00pm - 11:00 pm Saturday: 10:00 am - 10:00 pm SkyJam $18 every Saturday night from 10:00 pm - 12:00 am for ages 16+ Sunday: 12:00pm - 7:00 pm

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SOUR NOTES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

PARKING AT PIT AIRPORT ON-SITE & BETTER RATES

NO HIDDEN FEES, ALL TAXES INCLUDED (NOT LIKE THOSE OTHER GUYS)

EZPARK

was receiving the same level of education in music and the arts, and access to a librarian. “This is an art city, and we know parents value having their kids have access to music and art,” says Ebony Pugh, district spokesperson. School principals also have a say in the music education offered at their schools. They have a set of discretionary funds, which can be used for programs or services they believe are needed at their schools. Pugh says some principals have used these funds to increase musiceducation offerings. A graduate of CAPA High School, the district’s arts-and-music school, May was fortunate to have music education as a primary component of her curriculum. But she says that because of limited music preparation, other students aren’t afforded the same opportunity. “It’s unfortunate that now, more and more kids aren’t going to get into CAPA,” May says. “We have a lot of great programs in the city that are prohibitive for many families to send their kids there.” Students must audition to get into CAPA’s instrumental-music program, but entry is tough unless the student already has a strong background with

that instrument. Students apply to CAPA in the fifth grade, the first year they are eligible to receive instrument instruction at their schools. However, there are just four teachers available to give these lessons across 26 schools, and that limited instruction might not be enough to get a student past his or her CAPA audition. “Some of these kids don’t know enough or their parents don’t know enough to get them lessons — or they can’t afford it,” May says. But there are also alternatives for students wanting to learn an instrument. Last year, PPS launched the Summer Instrumental Jumpstart Program. The program gave students in grades 5-8 the opportunity to receive free music lessons once a week from July 15 to Aug. 9. There’s also a Saturday program in partnership with the River City Brass Band at CAPA High School. “There’s no doubt we’ve lost some time with students because of budgetary cuts,” says Angela Abadilla, senior program officer of arts education in the district. “But I’m always looking for ways to prepare them for their audition.” Not all districts are suffering from a reduction in music education. Some

“RESEARCH SHOWS THAT STUDENTS WHO ARE EXPOSED TO MUSIC EDUCATION DO BETTER IN OTHER SUBJECTS.”

{BY MATT BORS}

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT US AT

FLYPITTSBURGH.COM OR DOWNLOAD OUR NEW APP FROM iTUNES OR GOOGLE PLAY OFFICIAL ON-SITE PARKING OF PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Services provided by

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

IDIOTBOX


suburban districts, many of which have more resources than their urban counterparts, are still able to offer arts education at a higher level. And while urban districts like PPS are still able to offer some level of music education, experts say the reduction of programs can be just as problematic. “The real question is how the instruction looks when it’s delivered,” says Christopher Woodside, assistant executive director of the National Association for Music Education. “It’s not necessarily the shuttering of the program, but the hollowing-out of a program where teachers are getting far less access to kids.” The National Association for Music Education is working to appeal to state and federal legislators whom they believe have the power to increase funding for music education. “We teach teachers to build coalitions, change the conversation, so when budget cuts need to be made, music and arts aren’t on the chopping block,” Woodside says. “We have the problem of music education being considered less than a core subject. “Particularly in the city where resources are so limited to begin with, I think it becomes a foregone conclusion. “ RNUTTA LL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

WE KNOW

GUITARS

March Mania Specials at These Locations!

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED!

MOHAN’S BAR AND RESTAURANT Penn Hills $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

GROUND ROUND Moon $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops CAIN’S SALOON Dormont $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops 1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE

UGLY DOG SALOON Greentree $3.25 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager bottles all March

ROCKY’S Route 8 $2.00 Yuengling bottles during March Mania

CANDLE-LITE LOUNGE Freedom $2.25 Yuengling 23oz drafts during March Mania

JOHN ANTHONY’S Plum $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania DOUBLE WIDE GRILL Cranberry $2.50 Yuengling Lager drafts – All Day Saturday

THE ROSE BAR AND GRILLE White Oak $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts all March

DOUBLE WIDE GRILL South Side $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday

PIZZA ROMA Sewickley $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All day Saturday & during all College Hoops MIKE’S WIFE’S PLACE Oakmont $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

CARLOW UNIVERSITY PRESENTS

An Evening with Edna O’Brien A Life of Writing Saturday, April 5, 2014 7:30 p.m. Book signing immediately following.

”There was that search in me for ... words, as if these words that I would, with difficulty, find, were the generators of some kind of magic. Or transformation from the dull world, as I might call it, to the ascendant world.” _ Edna O’Brien

$15 General Admission $ 5 Student Admission (with ID)

For more information, please visit carlow.edu.

Carlow University | Rosemary Heyl Theatre | Antonian Hall 3333 Fifth Avenue | Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 NEWS

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

NO PLACE LIKE HOME Pittsburgh at risk of losing control of more than its police {BY CHRIS POTTER} WHEN AN arbitrator decided last week that

Pittsburgh police no longer have to live within city limits, the uproar was predictable: We’re giving our tax dollars — and the power to enforce our laws — to people who won’t even live here? Get used to it. Pittsburgh may have big-city problems with crime and policing, but it’s the suburbs and small towns that are calling the shots. We’re not just talking about, say, the case of former Homewood student Jordan Miles, whose federal civil-rights case against Pittsburgh police is being heard by jurors drawn mostly from rural and suburban areas. (Except for a lone juror hailing from Mount Washington, the all-white jury comes from communities including North Huntingdon and Daisytown — places where blacks make up less than 5 percent of the population.) The residency decision could affect the entire city, including residents who’ve never gotten a parking ticket. And it was driven by people with almost no connection to Pittsburgh at all. Police labor disputes are heard by arbitration panels made up of three members: one chosen by the city, one by the union and an “impartial” arbitrator who usually casts the deciding vote. In this case, that was Joseph F. Quinn of Norristown, just outside Philadelphia. As Quinn’s ruling noted, state law required Pittsburgh police to live in the city until the passage of Act 195 of 2012. Act 195 softened the requirement to say that Pittsburgh “may” require residency … which Quinn interpreted to mean that, in fact, the city may not do so. Pittsburgh police, he ruled, could live up to 25 “air-miles” away, “air miles” being a useful measurement if you plan on parachuting in. “We should get on a bus and go picket [Quinn’s] house,” complains state Sen. Jim Ferlo, a Lawrenceville Democrat. That’d be a long ride, and you’d probably want to make some stops along the way. As City Paper first noted last summer, Act 195 was originally sponsored by Senate Republicans who themselves hail from outside the city. Ferlo, like most Senate Democrats, voted for the bill, because he thought Act 195 “would be a matter of local decision-making” by elected officials. But eventually, fears rose that the bill

might have unintended consequences. On the floor of the state House, Democrats worried the measure, as written, might put the decision in the hands of “an unelected arbitrator,” but Republicans refused to amend it. Republican whip Stan Saylor insisted that “[w]ith the support of the Fraternal Order of Police,” Harrisburg should change the decades-old requirement “as soon as possible.” “This is an issue that’s broader than residency,” says Ferlo. After all, he notes, city voters favored the residency requirement by 4-to-1 margins in a referendum last year. “It’s about democracy.” Ferlo thinks Mayor Bill Peduto should appeal Quinn’s ruling in court; Peduto was mulling his options as this issue goes to press. But gun-control advocates are already warning about another GOP effort to disenfranchise city residents: House Bill 2011. H B2011 would undermine any local gun ordinance, including a Pittsburgh law compelling gun owners to report when their firearms are lost or stolen. Of the bill’s more than three dozen co-sponsors, all but four are Republicans, most of whom live far beyond the city limits. And the bill would allow their constituents — even the ones who aren’t arbitrators — to interfere with Pittsburgh’s law-and-order efforts. Usually, courts require you to be harmed by a law before challenging it in court. But HB 2011 would let any Pennsylvanian “who may legally possess a firearm” sue to overturn the law, even if they lived in, say, Norristown. Under the bill, anyone could shape the law in Pittsburgh — without even spending the night here. Just like an arbitrator, or a Pittsburgh cop! Shira Goodman, of gun-control advocacy group CeaseFire PA, says “We hope this is something legislators are just bringing up around primary time” to curry favor with gun-owners. “But we’re concerned.” And let’s remember: Republicans ordinarily claim to hate government overreach and heavy-handed unions. These are the guys who are usually waving those “don’t tread on me” flags. But they’re happy to step all over the residents of Pittsburgh, apparently. Especially when they’re helping local cops walk away.

“THIS IS AN ISSUE THAT’S BROADER THAN RESIDENCY. IT’S ABOUT DEMOCRACY.”

SPRING FLOWER SHOW

March 22 through April 20 Celebrate the return of warmer weather at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, where our Spring Flower Show pairs beautiful music with beautiful ¾owers that will make your heart sing. It’s sure to be a treat for your ears and a reward for your eyes. For more information, or to plan your visit, go to phipps.conservatory.org.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Learn About Infant Adoption

March Mania Specials at These Locations! PAYNE HILL GRILL West Mifflin Yuengling March Mania specials

Join Us For A Free Informational Meeting

SOUTH PARK CLUBHOUSE South Park $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

STACK’D Shadyside Yuengling March Mania special’s

Monday, April 7th @ 7:00pm in Greensburg

Begin Your Adoption Journey Today: (724)853-6533 Ɔ Ɔ www.afth.org

PIZZA SOLA Oakland $5.00 Yuengling Pitchers all day everyday

FIREHOUSE LOUNGE Ambridge $1.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all Tourney Games

PATTY JO’S BAR Baldwin $1.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

Domestic Infant Adoption Ɔ Home Study Services Ɔ Available 24 hours/ 7 days a week Ɔ Office in PA & VA

RUGGERS PUB South Side $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday

WEST VIEW VFW West View $1.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All day Saturday & during all College Hoops

BADO’S PIZZA GRILL AND ALE HOUSE Mt. Lebanon $3 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

THE LOFT Regent Square $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

GORMAN’S PUB Brentwood $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All Day Saturday & during all College Hoops

THE HIGHLAND BAR West View $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts – All day Saturday & during all College Hoops

Whirlpool® Ice Collection

$2,948 “Pure Approachability. Easy Interaction. Better Visibility. Rich Finishes” WMH53520CE 2.0 cu. ft. Microwave Hood Combination with CleanRelease® Non-Stick Interior WFE540H0AE Whirlpool® 6.2 cu. ft. Capacity Electric Range with AquaLift® Self-Clean Technology WDT710PAYE Whirlpool Gold® Series Dishwasher with Sensor Cycle WRS526SIAE 26 cu. ft. Whirlpool® Side-by-Side Refrigerator with In-Door-Ice® Plus System

H WHERE PITTSBUIARNGCES! SHOPS FOR APPL 2335 2 335 33 W Washington ashing as ngton to R Rd. d. Canonsburg, PA 15317 (724) 916-0100

11759 75 759 N N.. High Highland hlan land R Rd. d d. Pittsburgh, PA 15241 (412) 835-2300

5958 5 958 8 Baum B B Bl Blvd. vd. d. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 661-7550

www.donsappliances.com NEWS

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780 Co Commerce Park k Dri D Drive ve Cranberry Twp, PA 16066 (724) 779-9393

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EXECUTIVE PANEL DISCUSSION:

Acquire Credibility by Enabling and Delivering Results MARCH 27, 5:30 – 7:30 PM PNC FIRSTSIDE CENTER, 500 FIRST AVE. Women of ALPFA Executive Panelists: Jennifer LaClair Chief Financial Officer, Retail Banking and Asset Management Group at PNC Bank

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Candi Castleberry-Singleton Chief Inclusion & Diversity Officer at UPMC

Melanie Harrington Chief Executive Officer at Vibrant Pittsburgh All business professionals are invited. REGISTRATION REQUIRED Event organized organiized db byy ALPFA Pittsb Pittsburgh i burgh h iin collaboration ll b ti with ith

PITTSBURGH.ALPFA.ORG

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The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.


March Mania Specials at These Locations!

WING SPECIAL

PAPA ROCKS PIZZA PUB Monroeville $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

NORTH PARK LOUNGE McCandless Yuengling March Mania specials

CALIENTE PIZZA AND DRAFT HOUSE Bloomfield $3.50 Yuengling 23oz drafts on Saturdays

LOCAL BAR + KITCHEN South Side Yuengling March Mania specials

THE BRIDGE TAP HOUSE AND GRILL Versailles $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts all March

OLIVE OR TWIST Downtown $3.50 Yuengling 16oz drafts on Saturdays

CARL’S TAVERN Wilkin’s Twp $2 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Bottle – All Day Saturday SPARKY’S SPOT Glenshaw $2.25 Yuengling 16oz bottles and drafts during March Mania WENZEL TAVERN Springdale $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania 99 BOTTLES Scott Township $2.00 Yuengling pints all March

PENN MONROE Monroeville $2.00 Yuengling 20oz drafts during March Mania

Wing Special runs during Tournament Game Dates and Times.

CONWAY LOUNGE Conway $2.00 Yuengling 16oz drafts during March Mania

50¢ WINGS March 18 - 23 & 27 - 30

Attention Hockey Fans! FREE EVENT PARKING

During all Tournament Games

*

25¢ WINGS April 5 & 7

*WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

For the Final 2 Tournament Rounds Serving size is 6 to 24 wings per person at a time. One flavor per order. Flavors offered mild or hot only. No carry outs and no to go orders. Must be seated in the restaurant to participate in the special. Special valid during tournament games only.

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum purchase! It’s like eating or parking for FREE!

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD

Happy Hour Specials 5-7pm Live Music Every Friday 5pm

RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. 600 Grant Street

MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

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Go faster with Port Authority’s ConnectCard. Get a card and load Stored Cash Value at most Giant Eagle stores or the Downtown Service Center. And it’s easy to reload at any one of our dozens of ConnectCard machines. Forget the cash, get a ConnectCard.

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MOMOS ARE LARGE DUMPLINGS WITH A VARIETY OF FILLINGS SERVED STEAMED OR FRIED

DRINK YOUR VEGGIES {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Juice Up 412 isn’t just trying to capitalize on the increasingly popular juicing trend. The East Liberty establishment’s mission is to bring juicing to those who might need it most: individuals in low-income communities with little access to fresh foods. “When I travelled to other urban areas, seeing health-food stores in other black neighborhoods, I wanted to be able to have something like that here,” says Majestic Lane, one of the venue’s owners. “When you look at the health disparities, to me it’s a no-brainer that we want to give people healthy alternatives.” But getting people who are unaccustomed to health foods to embrace juicing is a special recipe, one that combines increasing awareness of the benefits and making the drinks taste appealing. To that end, Juice Up 412 offers group demonstrations to educate the community about juicing, and also takes its juice mission to demos at local schools. “People have to remember fruits have natural sugar and natural flavors,” Lane says. “So by combining fruits and vegetables, we’re able to provide a high-quality taste and maximum health benefits.” The menu at Juice Up 412 includes: the Green Machine (Granny Smith apples, grapes, spinach and lemons), Orange Sunrise (oranges, carrots and lemons), Blush (beets, carrots, and ginger), and Aloe Zinger (aloe juice, lemon, lime and ginger). Prices for a cup range from $4 to $6.50. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

124 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. Open Mon.-Sat., 11a.m.-3 p.m. www.juiceup412.com

the

FEED

It’s a sign of spring: the annual Farm to Table conference. Meet local farmers and purveyors, attend lectures and demos, nibble at the food tasting, and generally get excited to begin the eat-local-eat-fresh time of year. Fri., March 21, and Sat., March 22. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. For info and tickets, see www.farmtotablepa.com.

A NEPALESE

JOURNEY

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

H

IMALAYAS RESTAURANT in Cran-

berry is a marriage of Indian and Nepalese cuisines — literally. A pair of doctors, one Indian and the other Nepalese, dreamed of starting a restaurant, but the necessary time investment led to the business becoming a family affair. The night we visited, a cousin was serving while a sister served as chef. The friendly, family-run ambience was palpable and most welcome on our first foray into Nepalese cuisine. (The menu features plenty of Indian dishes, too, but we were there for a Nepalese dining experience, and managed to sample nearly everything on the Nepalese list.) This was the first time in a long time that we found ourselves navigating a menu without any frame of prior experience. But our convivial server was a worthy guide, sharing both general knowledge about Nepalese food (vegetables are always cooked; salad is anathema) and specifics about Himalayas’ recipes and preparations. As geography might suggest, Nepalese cooking turned out to be recognizably

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Butter chicken with rice and garlic naan

related to that of both China and India, with the spicing leaning heavily toward the subcontinent. For instance, Himalayas’ chow mein — a dish of thin noodles sautéed in a sauce with super-tender morsels of dark meat chicken — looked like a Chinese stir fry, but the flavor was completely different from Chinese chow mein. The sauce that unified the ingredients was savory and slightly sweet, with just a hint of chili-based spice.

HIMALAYAS 20445 Route 19, Excel Center Plaza, Cranberry. 724-779-4454 HOURS: Tue.-Sun. lunch 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; dinner Tue.-Thu. 4:30-9:30 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 4:30-10 p.m.; Sun. 4:40-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers and soups $4-8; Nepalese dishes $6-11; Indian dishes $11-16 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Our starters were more reminiscent of India, but a number were nonetheless distinctive. For instance, the interior of a samosa was bright green from mint

blended into the creamy, mashed-potatolike filling. Vegetable pakora — fritters — were the best we’ve had at any restaurant, Indian or otherwise, with just enough batter to hold together just-cooked vegetables and chopped greens. Best of all was the texture, with well-fried, crispy crags formed by the rustic mix of ingredients. Strips of chicken and paneer (cheese) came coated in a chickpea-flour-based batter that was puffy and golden, like beer batter; some had a reddish hue that suggested a dash of hot sauce had been added. Hot sauce came on the side with a bowl of noodle soup, allowing us to customize the fieriness of its flavor. The broth, though aromatic with fresh herbs, benefited from the salt as well as the spice of the mixedin sauce. A staple of Nepalese food is momos, large dumplings with a variety of fillings served steamed or fried. Chicken is a standard version, and the vegetable selection at Himalayas changes according to the mood of the maker. We found the wrappers to be exceptionally tender, like CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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A NEPALESE JOURNEY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

good pasta rather than an obligatory casing for the goods within. Our chicken momo featured moist, tasty meat studded with a bit of crunchy vegetable. We ordered it bathed in a chili sauce whose flavor was distinctive and addictive: It started out sweet, even fruity, but developed a late bloom of spice on the palate. Even at a table overburdened by dishes, it was hard not to keep coming back to this one. The vegetarian momo the night we were there was filled with minced onions, cooked very soft, in an intensely flavorful blend of warm spices, almost like a savory chutney. Playing against this, the nuttiness of the ground sesame “momo chutney” dipping sauce took on another dimension: With each dumpling, we scooped up more chutney, savoring the interaction of the tender wrapper, creamy chutney and faintly crunchy, barely spicy onions. While each of the components was familiar — dumplings, onions, sesame — it was a rare treat to experience them composed into an utterly novel taste experience.

Momo dumplings with Himalayan sauce

Though hot dishes are the norm in Nepalese cuisine, one exception on Himalayas’ menu was the aalu ko achar. This was texturally similar to an American potato salad (minus the mayo), but the cucumbers were pickled in sesame-lemon paste, and hot red chilies burned away any notion of bland picnic food. A hearty hot potato dish, aalu dam, featured chunks of tender potato in a thick, chili-spiked sauce studded with an array of spices, including such treats as whole onion and mustard seeds. Himalayas was an excellent introduction to a cuisine we hope to get to know better. Our only regret is that we were too stuffed with noodles, potatoes and momos to try Himalayas’ Black Forest cake, a confection apparently wildly popular in Nepal. Still, the food of Nepal is now wildly popular with us. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SCHOOL SPIRIT New distillery operates from a Munhall schoolhouse Lee Ann Sommerfeld and Peter Streibeg are two craft distillers who dance to their own tune. While Pittsburgh’s emerging distillery scene has clustered in neighborhoods alongside the Allegheny River, their Stay Tuned Distillery occupies a former Munhall schoolhouse. And the Mon Valley ZIP code isn’t the only unexpected thing about it. After beginning to offer rye and single-malt whiskies in November, Stay Tuned released its second spirit this month: a gin called Pathogin. Pathogin starts with a base spirit — white whiskey from unsmoked barley — from Virginia-based Copper Fox Distillery. But Stay Tuned adds botanicals that have hometown roots — literally. Sommerfeld grows much of the blend in her Penn Hills garden, and Wild Purveyors’ Cavan Patterson forages for nearly all of the rest of it. Sommerfeld says the only ingredients that aren’t locally sourced are the juniper and citrus peels. “It looks like a Harry Potter experiment,” Sommerfeld says of the botanical mix. Early on in the creative process, she says, she decided she didn’t want to produce a market standard juniper-forward gin. “I’m sure I could create a gin like Bombay, but then what’s the point of that?” she says. “You could just go buy Bombay and it would be a lot less expensive.” Instead, you’ll taste anise, herbs and barks, with juniper as a faint note in the background. Sommerfeld adds that Pathogin isn’t designed for some traditional drinks, like a gin and tonic. “Why blow out all these flavors we created? Just say no to quinine,” she says. Instead, she suggests, add a dash of orange bitters to accentuate the flavor. Pathogin can be found in cocktails at Kelly’s, Social, Acacia and a handful of other Pittsburgh bars; bottles can be purchased directly by visiting the distillery. Sommerfeld plans to change the botanical blend with the seasons. For spring and summer, for example, expect that the gin will become less earthy and more floral. “I’m trying to be instinctual about it,” she says.

“I’M SURE I COULD CREATE A GIN LIKE BOMBAY, BUT THEN WHAT’S THE POINT OF THAT?”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

810 Ravine St., Munhall. 412-206-9759 or www.staytunedstills.com


Grandma Rose’s CATERING & PASTRY

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Best Mex Restauraican nt Gift s Certificate Available!

Sushi Bar and Thai Cuisine

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

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1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

grandmarosespastryshop.com Takeout • Call for FREE Delivery! Lunch and Dinner Monday-Saturday 3608 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 • (412) 621-1100

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Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh!

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2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge) NEWS

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savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

New Menu Items! Add to a meal or take a bag home.

POTATO CHIPPERS

Sweet Potato “Build your own” HASH

BREAKFAST

BURRITOS

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd, Glenshaw, PA 15116 • (412) 486-5513 S MAKE U YOUR P O ONE STP! SHO

Kitchen Hours: Monday-Saturday 6am - 3pm Sunday 6:30am - 2:30pm

LE CATERT US UPCOMYOUR G EVENTIN !

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2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex now open 7 days a week!

Authentic Thai Cuisine

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THAI CLASSICAL DANCE EVERY SUN AND THUR EVENING

LUNCH SPECIALS

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30AM-3:00PM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

CREE 8 BIG TVSPSORTS FOR

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soul-food restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chicken-and-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF

Sushi Tomo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} marinara, fluffily battered calamari and legitimately spicy arrabiatta. KE

MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines CHINA STAR. 100 several current trends, McIntyre Square, including revisiting 7900 McKnight www. per staples of the Road, North Hills. pa pghcitym American pantry, the 412-364-9933. .co gastro-pub and noseThough a standard to-tail cooking, all in a Chinese-American menu lively Downtown space. Expect available, the real action is on everything from marrow bones the humbly Xeroxed Sichuan to burgers, flatbreads and menu that’s all in Chinese. chicken pot pie, as well as pots Fortunately, there is a translated of rhubarb jam and handversion available, and the crafted cocktails. LE names read like a gourmand’s exotic fantasy: duck with devil’s tongue yam, rabbits in flaming pan. These authentic dishes may sound mysterious, but they’re delicious. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE The Porch {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} JOHNNY’S. 112 Westinghouse Ave., Wilmerding. 412-824-6642. This Wilmerding institution offers well-prepared ItalianAmerican cuisine and a welcoming atmosphere around a horseshoe bar. The menu offers the expected standards in the pasta, veal, chicken, meat and seafood categories. But overall, the preparations are fairly up-to-date: exceptionally bright and slightly chunky

NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can explore the depths of Syrian cuisine as well as a few Middle Eastern favorites, such baba ghanoush. Among the entrees: samaka harrah (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma served with rice pilaf, and lamb in a fruit sauce paired with mashed potatoes. KF

NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredientfocused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM. 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700. This cozy Downtown spot offers a menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Some cheeses and pasta are housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti than to pub grub.


SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-247-4848. A neighborhood pizza place and more, Salvatore’s offers something even rarer than good pizza: fast food of the finest quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

A DIFFERENT TUNE Vegan offerings a welcome surprise on Piper’s Pub menu FROM THE sidewalk of East Carson Street, you could glance inside Piper’s Pub and assume that what you see is what you get: the tin ceiling, dark-wood bar and simple highboys of the classic English pub. You’d never guess that Piper’s is also a destination for vegan eating … unless you looked at the menu. There, expected British Isle favorites such as bangers and mash and Guinness beef stew mingle with vegetable vindaloo curry and seitan Thai chili wrap. “We don’t just slap a salad and some steamed veggies on a plate and call it vegan,” says Mindy Heisler, the general manager. “We make an effort to make our vegan offerings as good as or better than our carnivorous ones.” Case in point: the seitan shepherd’s pie, which features seitan braised with root vegetables in a rich mushroom stock, topped with browned cauliflower smash.

SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue, where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from ultra-traditional offerings like crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant updates like duck with orangeapricot balsamic glaze. LF SUSHI TOMO. 4812 McKnight Road, North Hills. 412-630-8666. This North Hills restaurant offers a full range of Japanese cuisine beyond sushi that is more representative of everyday fare, including various appetizers, noodle soups, hot pots and rice bowls. But, as the name suggests, there is also plenty of well-prepared sushi, including specialty maki. KE

“WE DON’T JUST SLAP A SALAD AND SOME STEAMED VEGGIES ON A PLATE AND CALL IT VEGAN.” Fifteen years ago, owner Drew Topping, whose family hails from the British Isles, longed to create an “authentic pub experience” stateside. Piper’s has been serving British Isles cuisine ever since, along with cask ales and soccer — err, football — games. Inspired by staff and customer preferences, veggie items began working their way onto the menu seven years ago. “We employ people that have all kinds of preferences and restrictions when it comes to their diets,” Heisler explains. “And we had a great customer response to the vegetarian items.” Five years ago, Piper’s added its own tradition to the mix: Vegan Tuesdays. Each week, the kitchen highlights a vegan soup and entrée special — like the recent grilled portabella tacos with savoy cabbage, salsa verde and seasoned refried beans. Popular weekly specials sometimes work their way onto the regular menu. Those options are also featured at Piper’s “Pub Chip Shop” next door — a fish ’n’ chips joint with late-night weekend hours and more unexpected veggie options. As the weather transitions, so will Piper’s seasonal menu. Starting mid-March, the Buddha Bowl (saffron quinoa, herb-roasted vegetables and a cashew tahini) will become a regular, while Tuesday nights will continue to surprise.

TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: macand-cheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

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Ramen Bar

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TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE

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BACKSTAGE

PASS Every profession has its secrets: a special language no one else fully understands, a code by which everyone operates, rules of thumb you learn only as you go along. Music is no different. What really goes on behind the scenes at band practice? Why do musicians sometimes leave town — and why do they sometimes return? Why do so many musicians flock to certain neighborhoods to live? And how do bands end up getting gigs in the first place? Do they have to pay for those opening slots? This year’s City Paper music issue looks to illuminate some of the secrets of the local music scene. We hope to solve some mysteries — and start some conversations about what we’re doing right around here, and what we could do better. B Y A NDY MULKERI N

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Pulling Back the Covers {BY MARGARET WELSH}


“Asking gets you far”: The Gotobeds (from left: Cary Belback, Read Connolly, Gavin Jensen, Tom Payne, Eli Kasan) {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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IKE MANY Pittsburgh bands, The Gotobeds practice at ABC Rehearsal Rooms, a converted storage warehouse in Allentown. As drummer Cary “Parryman” Belback leads the way through the grim, fluorescent-lit halls, clashing instrument sounds pound out from various directions. Belback says he’s heard the building described as “the band factory,” but with its many stairways and long, door-lined corridors, it feels more like the stuff of Shining-esque nightmares. The actual practice room feels safer — cozy, even. It’s a small concrete box, with one lonely light socket that the band has outfitted with a red bulb. The space is crammed with two drum kits, amps, lamps and a Miller Lite-filled, stickercovered mini-fridge. “The sixth band member,” quips bassist Gavin “G$” Jensen, who is already inside when Belback arrives. Belback begins discussing his apprehension over letting his mom watch the music video for their song “New York’s Alright” — specifically the lyric “New York’s all right if you can get your dick sucked.” Meanwhile, the rest of the band arrives:

singer and guitarist Eli “Hazy Lazer” Kasan, guitarist Tom “Cool U” Payne and honorary/temporary member Read Connolly. Connolly, a member of The Beagle Brothers (and The Gotobeds’ “brother from a Beagle mother,” according to Payne) will be filling in for Jensen during parts of the upcoming trip to Austin’s South by Southwest music festival, which on this particular evening is still days away. Practice tends to be heavy on the socializing: “A lot of times we’ll play songs for an hour and then talk for an hour-and-a-half,” Jensen says. But today, they have some work do to. On Friday, they’ll play a show at Gooski’s, kicking off their mini-tour and journey to SXSW. The five of them gather around red painter lights (“like a True Detective cult,” Kasan says) and begin ripping through their catalog, stopping occasionally to distribute another round of beers, which they are also ripping through. “We usually try to play under duress,” Kasan says with a laugh. “We bop around in the dark, drinking beer, just like at a show.” The chemistry between members is visible — no squabbling over missed cues, no subtle power struggles — and things click easily into place.

MUSICALLY, The Gotobeds fit under a kind of catch-all slacker indie-punk umbrella. Early Pavement is one of the most obvious comparisons — the bands share the same kind of defiant looseness — but the group also recalls the freneticism of The Gun Club, the slipshod orderliness of Gang of Four, the brattiness of The Buzzcocks and the punk minimalism of Wire. (The band’s name, in fact, is borrowed from that band’s drummer, Robert Gotobed.) In a later email conversation, Kasan mentions The Fall and Swell Maps, and nods to The Replacements as an influence on The Gotobeds’ live shows. “We definitely rely heavily on antics ’cause we just aren’t the tightest band,” he explains. “We want the songs to roam free … and sometimes that means deconstructing them in front of other peeps.” The Gotobeds were born around 2009, when Kasan — then a member of now-defunct punk band Kim Phuc — returned from SXSW with no job. (“How’s that for full circle?” he asks.) Belback was similarly unoccupied, and the two old friends

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COMING AND GOING

Why some musicians leave town ... and others move back {BY ANDY MULKERIN} The ages-old tale is that of the musician from Pittsburgh who lights out for somewhere else — Nashville, New York City, Los Angeles — because he or she can’t make a living playing music here. But it doesn’t always work exactly that way. Some musicians have moved to Pittsburgh and settled down, like saxophonist Erik Lawrence, who’s made a career playing with rock and jazz groups including a notable stint with the Levon Helm band. Others, like Brooke Annibale, leave Pittsburgh only to return. We talked to a handful of artists who either moved in, moved out or boomeranged, in order to find out what Pittsburgh lacks — and what it has that some cities don’t.

Erik Lawrence Erik Lawrence grew up in Nyack, N.Y., the son of famed saxophonist Arnie Lawrence. Besides New York, he lived in Vermont for a time; in 2012, he moved to Pittsburgh with his girlfriend, musician Brooke Smokelin (see page 28). “I had been playing with Levon Helm for years, and in 2012, he passed away,” Lawrence recalls. “Honestly, for that time period, I was satisfied being the saxophone player in my favorite band I’d ever played in, and doing original projects with my friends. … It seemed like a good time to leave; [New York] is an expensive place, and a lonely place, especially when the woman you love has already moved back to Pittsburgh.” “I didn’t want to stress the situation by coming in and pretending to be a big fish in a small pond” as a sax player with a global reputation, Lawrence explains. “And I’m not, in Pittsburgh. I have a lot of favorite saxophone players in this town, and I just love their playing.” As a seasoned musician, what would Lawrence like to see change here? “The thing that I feel needs some attention is — every place you go to see music, there’s no cover charge,” he says. “I’ve played with some of the upperechelon-type players here in Pittsburgh. And when you can only make ‘X’ amount of money per night, despite the quality that you’re bringing to the table, it’s really difficult. I’m not so much thinking about myself — although I’d love to make a living where I live — but I’m thinking of some of these great young musicians who are going to have to move out of the city in order to make a living, because 10 years

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started playing a couple times a week with guitarist Kathy Horne, who Kasan and Belback joke was “too smart and talented” to stay in the band. Payne, another Kim Phuc alum, eventually took over on guitar, and Jensen offered his services as a bassist. “We just wanted to find musicians who would goof around,” Kasan says. “All of my close friends who didn’t really know each other became good friends at once. It was pretty magical.” Band members claim that at first, no one liked The Gotobeds — not even their girlfriends. That is no longer the case. In the next few months, the group releases a record on 12XU, a label run by Matador Records co-owner Gerard Cosloy. Cosloy heard the band when it appeared on DJ Terre T’s Cherry Blossom Clinic, one of the most popular shows on New Jerseybased independent radio station WFMU. Terre T “said we were the nicest boys who have ever been on the show,” Kasan recalls with a grin. (“Weren’t we also the drunkest?” Payne asks “They made a beer run for us halfway through.”) Cosloy called into the show to find out more. There’s no mistaking the Gotobeds’ slacker aesthetic: “We know we’re not going to crack the charts” is Kasan’s attitude. But the key to their success might lie in asking for what they want, and knowing whom to ask. “Asking gets you so far,” Kasan says. “When Gerard said he liked our band, I said, ‘Will you put out our record?’” And when Cosloy asked what he could do for the band that they couldn’t do for themselves, Kasan was straightforward. “I said, ‘You have money and influence. We don’t.’ He said, ‘Gotcha. I can help.’ He wanted to make sure that we had realistic expectations.” For any band, there’s a challenge in negotiating the space between being accessible and pandering, between playing it cool and being assholes, between taking things too seriously and not taking them seriously enough. The Gotobeds are a lot of fun to listen to, but its ability to walk those fine lines might be its greatest asset. Maybe it all comes down to getting into the rock game for the right reasons. “We’ve already gone further than we dreamed of,” Kasan says. “I’ve been in other bands that were not fun. I want this to be as fun as possible. We all have stressful jobs, stressful relationships. This should be the least of it.” Cosloy asked the band to play a showcase at SXSW, one of the many unofficial events that crop up alongside the official festival schedule. “We stupidly booked this one show for free in the middle of the day, and then reverse-engineered the trip around it,” Kasan laughs.

But, again, asking came in handy. The band got in touch with an old Kim Phuc associate, booking agent Timmy Hefner, of the Chaos in Tejas festival. He put The Gotobeds on an official showcase with acts like Destruction Unit, Perfect Pussy and Back to Back. And while the members are grateful — “Some bands would kill to be part of the official thing,” Payne says — they’re not overly impressed with themselves. “We’re the only band going to SXSW who doesn’t think they’re going to make it big,” Kasan jokes. “We’re going to make it medium.” Anyway, he adds, the official festival isn’t that cool: “The unofficial thing has wilder parties and cooler times.”

“I want this to be as fun as possible.” A COUPLE DAYS after their Allentown practice session, band members load their gear into Gooski’s for their mini-tour sendoff show. In between carrying guitars and drum pieces, Kasan greets friends and wellwishers with the warmth of a rock ’n’ roll mayor. The Beagle Brothers are the openers, and while the inclusion of the country band is mildly confusing to some, several people agree that it’s nice to have only two bands on a show once in awhile. Belback notes that most bands play too long and that he can’t even think of any band he’d like to see play for more than 45 minutes. The Gotobeds, naturally, plan to stick to a 20- or 25-minute set. By the time they take the stage, the bar’s back room is crowded, though not too packed to dance, or slam yourself into other people, or dodge other flailing bodies. On stage, The Gotobeds have the same goofy, brotherly chemistry they had at practice, and seem to implicitly count audience members as co-conspirators in their antics. When someone buys the band shots, much of the audience spontaneously joins in on the toast. The band spends a lot of time grinning. So does the crowd. Kasan chugs beers between verses and plays guitar from all angles; all four band members climb around on their equipment. This is the kind of band that makes youngsters say, “That looks fun. I want to do that.” But any young would-be rockers would do well to take Kasan’s words to heart: “We work really hard, but it’s not work when it’s fun.” M W E L S H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


To Pay or Not to Pay {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Sometimes you’ve got to give a little to get a gig {ILLUSTRATION BY WAYNO}

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HETHER YOU’RE a relatively new band hoping to make the move from your parents’ garage, or a well-established band looking to grow your audience, getting out and playing live is key. For local bands in Pittsburgh, there are several options for getting a gig. Working with a promoter can get you on bigger shows at bigger venues; dealing directly with smaller bars and clubs can yield a better payday; and doing it yourself has an appeal all its own. In any case, there are, of course, pitfalls and controversies to be encountered along the way. One of the most controversial matters: the practice of “pay-to-play,” wherein venue owners and promotion companies charge

a fee for the opportunity to play a show. This includes forcing bands to sell a certain number of tickets to the show or else eat the cost of the tickets. “Pay-to-play is a bad word” among many musicians, says Jonathan Dowling, a local musician and board member of the Mr. Roboto Project, a local DIY venue. “Pay-toplay takes money out of the hands of local bands who are playing the show — and if anyone should be getting money, it should be the bands.” He and fellow Roboto board member Pam Hanlin, who are in the band Dumplings together, say some Pittsburgh promoters prey on young bands from suburban areas, whose members are under 21 and unable to CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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from now, they’ll be competing for the exact same gigs, because Pittsburghers don’t like to pay a cover charge. There’s a disparity there that needs to be addressed.”

Brooke Smokelin Brooke Smokelin of Vox Lumina grew up in Pittsburgh and moved to New York City in 2001 after separating from her husband. She returned a decade later and began playing music here again. “The first thing I found really interesting in New York was how brief the time slots were,” she says. “You’d get a gig in the city and there would be eight more bands on the gig, and you had a 40-minute slot. Coming from Pittsburgh — we’d definitely share bills, but people would get to play longer, the whole relaxed nature of it. “Coming up in the Pittsburgh music scene, I didn’t really realize how much of a family vibe there was. People go out to support each other. I was surprised by, I guess, the efficiency of the New York scene, but I don’t think the musicians really benefit from that.” Smokelin cites the cost of living as her reason for returning to Pittsburgh from New York; she says since coming back, she finds that one obstacle Pittsburgh presents is a smaller scene for the type of music she plays. (Originally more of a singer-songwriter, she now concentrates on healing music and music associated with yoga, which she teaches.) “In New York, there was a whole scene of music events happening at yoga studios,” she says. “It wasn’t just meditative music; it was DJs playing at yoga studios. That doesn’t happen here in Pittsburgh. I wouldn’t outright say that’s a disadvantage, because it could be an opportunity, and I’m definitely trying to bring that here. But sometimes you’re working against the tide.”

Brooke Annibale Singer-songwriter Brooke Annibale grew up in Pittsburgh, went to school in Nashville, and has moved back and forth twice since. (“I went back [to Nashville] in 2011 because I had just made a record there and had a great experience,” she explains. “I just wanted to be in that creative environment all the time.”) Now she’s back in Pittsburgh. “There is obviously an overwhelming amount of talent in Nashville,” she notes. “And that can be both inspiring and discouraging, depending on the day.” What, to Annibale, is good about Pittsburgh? “Generally, audiences are more responsive here, mostly because there’s not much that the Nashville audience hasn’t seen before,” she explains, via email. “But obviously, Nashville really appreciates good music, too. I’ve really CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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play at venues serving alcohol. They argue that the practice has a negative impact on up-and-comers. “If you can’t sell all the tickets or you can’t get the money together to pay for the tickets, you probably get discouraged,” Hanlin says. “I never personally ran into the pay-toplay thing,” Dowling adds, “because I never thought rationally it was a good idea and I didn’t have the money to shell out.” However, some musicians say pay-toplay isn’t necessarily all bad. For some, it can be a way to secure a spot opening for a national act or a band with a larger following. “To get in front of a large group of people is more valuable than money,” says Vince Cuneo, who plays guitar with and manages his sister, singer Cait Cuneo. “Especially if you’re playing original music.”

“If you can’t sell all the tickets, you probably get discouraged” But even those who see the benefits of pay-to-play say there are other options out there for bands looking to grow their audience. While many venues do hire a promoter to do their booking, and some of these promoters make ticket sales a condition of playing, there are venues that cut out the middle man. “I got my first show when I was 16,” says Dowling. “It’s always been sort of easy for me. I’ve just sent out tapes and if [promoters] liked me, they booked me.” That’s how it works at Howlers and Hambone’s, two venues in the East End. Mary Jo Coll, who does the booking for both, says booking a show is pretty straightforward, and bands typically take home the majority of earnings from the take at the door. At Howlers and Hambone’s, bands set their own cover price and pay the venues only if they don’t bring their own person to work the door. At other venues, owners require their own staff to work the door and bands pay a fee for that service. Bands might also have to pay for a sound technician. “We make our money selling booze; the band makes their money selling music. Most of the small venues that do their own in-house booking, that’s how we all operate,” says Coll. “Some have different rules, but mostly bands play for the door minus fees venues take away.” CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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Notes on Location

Local musicians sound off on why they live where they do {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Sure, there are plenty of venues in, say, Lawrenceville. But there’s also inspiration to be found in the nature of Frick Park, and the sweeping vistas of Mount Washington. Where’s a musician to settle down in Pittsburgh? A few local singers and players let us know why they choose to stay where they stay.

NORTH SIDE

Alex Sands, Coronado My parents moved to the North Side in 2007 while I was living abroad. Broke, I ended up back home. I started meeting some new friends, mostly at The Park House, and was also doing some project recording at Mr. Small’s North Side studio at the time. Eventually, I found a giant space of my own near Allegheny General Hospital in 2008, [which] Coronado started playing out of in 2012. I like the location because it is centrally located, and it’s easy to get anywhere else within the city and region. It’s also really laidback, including on weekends. Venues like The Park House and James Street have no cover charge, and feature a wide range of musical genres and top-quality performers. I tend to think that most people who play at these places are “North Side musicians,” or at least a part of the story and character of the area.

André Costello, André Costello and the Cool Minors

BLOOMFIELD

Nathan Zoob, Wreck Loose

Brookline is a sweet little town where by day, you can grab a great cup of coffee, a paczki (when in season), a book at the library, a taco at Las Palmas, and certainly, a haircut ... you can even visit a cobbler. Since Cannon Coffee opened (in 2010), there’s been this huge revitalization effort of community, art and walkability. I know my neighbors and they know me: We shovel snow together, wrangle stray cats together, shout niceties across the street, and cook out some Sundays. The place is residential, so at night, all is quiet and calm, except for [Brookline] Boulevard, where you might hear a Frank Sinatra song creeping from a bar, and the sound of an occasional passing car. Oh, and another thing: Cannon Coffee’s open mic is the only one I’ve been to where it’s normal for everyone to be quiet and attentive. You don’t have to be in the clique for people to pay attention to you, like at some places. Brookline is our little secret, and no one knows about it but us. Where is this going to be printed, again? NEWS

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Anqwenique Wingfield

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NOAH PURDY}

BROOKLINE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

HOMEWOOD

I live in Homewood, and spent much of my childhood here as well. For me, living in Homewood is a lot about being close to family and a community I’m familiar with. It’s also close to East Liberty, where I currently work as a teaching artist and soloist at East Liberty Presbyterian Church. I occasionally perform in Homewood at venues like 7101 2nd Time Around, for a spoken-word open-mic event called Eargasm, and at Cabaret, a beautiful venue run by Simone Godson. I’ve always known Homewood to have a vibrant community of musicians and artists, in part due to the Afro-American Music Institute, where I first took music lessons as a kid. There is also The Jazz Workshop and jazz performances that happen year-round at the Homewood Carnegie Library. This only scratches the surface of venues and businesses that have historically supported and promoted local artists.

Bloomfield, Lawrenceville, Garfield, Friendship and even Polish Hill are part of a constellation of neighborhoods that fit together quite nicely, I think. But while Lawrenceville has the nightlife and Garfield has the art galleries, I’d much rather rest my head in Bloomfield at the end of the day. Where else but Liberty Avenue would you find three independent bookstores? The music scene is likewise stubborn and scrappy. We make venues of record shops, art galleries and even our own homes. We perform on found instruments. We learn crafts like glassblowing and then trade our lopsided vases for studio time. We are harder on ourselves than we need to be, because we try to invent what we can easily buy. There is a quixotic heart that beats in Bloomfield, and that’s why I’m so proud to call it my home. Also, the seitan wings at Spak Brothers in Garfield are bomb. I cannot stress this enough.

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CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

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been excited about how much the music/ art scene has grown in Pittsburgh in just the past few years. I’m excited to be a part of it.” Annibale writes that she ultimately decided to come back to Pittsburgh to be close to family. “As a musician, I can do my job from anywhere — in fact, most of it is done either on the road or on a laptop (and obviously on a guitar).” “I know I can always go down to Nashville to work on recordings,” she notes. “Plus, things just kept falling into place here that made me have to keep making trips back quite often.”

MH the Verb {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN MASON}

Marcus Harris, a.k.a. rapper MH the Verb, grew up all over, going to high school in Florida. He came to Pittsburgh in the mid-2000s for college, and spent seven years here before leaving for Philadelphia and then New York, where he lives now. One of his pet projects at Pitt, where he was hip-hop director at WPTS, was bringing the city and the college together. “Unlike a lot of the students, I embrace the city a lot more, I think,” he says. “I wanted people from the college to embrace the arts community. There was, and I think unfortunately, there still is, a disconnect between the university and the rest of the community.” Harris still recalls his first off-campus venture: a trip to an open mic at Shadow Lounge with “a bunch of people who wanted to venture a little off the Safe Rider,” he says with a laugh, referencing the university shuttle service. At the Lounge, he read poetry for the first time on a public stage. “I got offstage and immediately people said, ‘Hey, you did good, young fellow, here’s what you did good’ — it was very natural. After that, we started going there a lot.” Later Harris and his friends formed The BnVz, a hip-hop band with live instrumentation. He left for Philadelphia and then New York in order to be closer to the music industry, which doesn’t have much of a presence in Pittsburgh. But he’d like to help change that, and sees a few ways in which Pittsburgh can encourage the growth of a healthy music scene. “Public transportation: That could lead to a lot more collaborative efforts between different parts of Pittsburgh,” Harris says. “I also think the education systems, Pitt and Duquesne, could do a lot more integrating with the local arts community to help develop those industries. Drexel, for instance, has a music-industry program through their business school that promotes a lot of young people with that interest to come to [Philadelphia]. Pitt is a place where you have a strong business school; they already have interdisciplinary majors. If they had that kind of program, it would be killer.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For under-21 bands who can’t play at bars, there are DIY venues like The Mr. Roboto Project. Here, a member-promoter (who may be a member of one of the bands playing) pays a $65 fee to rent the space and retains the money from ticket sales. Its members say the venue offers an inexpensive alternative to newer bands looking for a way to put themselves out there without having to sell tickets or be forced to pay the remaining balance for unsold tickets. “That’s the whole reason Roboto exists,” says Hanlin. She also recommends looking into booking shows at local festivals like Art All Night in April. While bands aren’t paid, the event is attended by thousands of people, making it a great place to gain exposure. Muscian Max Somerville, of Wreck Loose, sees both sides of the pay-to-play debate. His band recently gained exposure at Altar Bar, opening for local rock veteran Joe Grushecky. “We had to pay; we had to sell a lot of tickets; but a lot of people were excited to see us,” Somerville says. “It can be a problem if you’re opening with a really big act and they want $30 a ticket. But you just want to get in front of as many people as possible. It’s a price you have to pay sometimes to get in front of that many people.” Not every show at a venue with a promoter requires pay-to-play, of course; some local openers play for a percentage of the door, depending on the show. City Paper reached out to Drusky Entertainment, Altar Bar’s promoter, but wasn’t able to speak with representatives before press time. Opus One Productions, another major local promoter, historically does not speak to press on the record. Others say pay-to-play is a necessary cost for bands just starting out. Rachel Vigliotti, of Touchfaster Entertainment and Media Services, says she’s seen bands sell 50 to 75 tickets to earn a slot at larger venues in Pittsburgh. “For those bands who don’t have the exposure, they’re doing pay-to-play not to open for a national tour, but to say they played at a big local venue,” Vigliotti says. Whether the band chooses to go DIY, work with a promoter or contact a venue directly, the musicians agreed that presentation is key. “There’s so many bands out there, that you have to stand out,” says Cuneo. “I’m a big fan of self-promotion and marketing yourself.” “If you want to make money for your music, you have to take the steps,” says Somerville. “Make yourself look professional before you go out there and start knocking on all these venues’ doors.” RN UT TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LOCAL

BEAT

“WHAT I STRUGGLED MOST WITH THIS TIME AROUND WAS NOT OVERTHINKING EVERYTHING.”

{BY JULIA COOK}

LIVE FROM AUSTIN You could say South by Southwest is the perfect place to be for a band like The Winter Brave. After achieving a respectable number of plays for its EP, Metaphors, the band earned a spot in the top 100 of the Jansport Sonicbids Battle of the Bands competition, even breaking the top 10 before losing out to fellow Pittsburgh rock band White Like Fire. The band, composed of two brothers (Jake and Sam Scarpino) and a best friend (Chris Beaulieu), have come a long way from meeting in the junior-high lunch line in Upper St. Clair. Their hard yet melodic sound is akin to early Fall Out Boy and Foo Fighters, whom they cite as influences. By the time the band was accepted as a SXSW showcasing artist, it had been praised by the likes of Dave Grohl himself, in a Reddit AMA session last year. But as much as SXSW is now focused on apps and communication, at its core, personal interaction is most important, and The Winter Brave attended the festival with that in mind. “We’re trying to build more of a physical following, instead of an Internet following,” says bassist Beaulieu. Guitarist Jake Scarpino agrees. “Being in a band and playing music was something that we all kind of wanted to do, as a living, but [the SXSW showcase] gave us the confidence to go ahead and do it. It was a golden opportunity; you can’t just let that go to waste.” Jake is a power crooner — maybe as well suited to a disco club as a rock band — and at the festival showcase, his voice reached pitches likely only known to SXSW. One audience member from Australia said the band sounded like the rockers back home, “a lot of sound for just being a three-piece.” The Winter Brave played music from its EP as well as new material, filling the Irish pub with classic ’90s-style grunge pop. Jake, Chris and Sam, all in their early twenties, now pursue music full time, and hope to provide an inspiration to teenagers playing in suburban basements everywhere. From the bar you could see, just outside of the open windows, a growing crowd of underage Austinites snapping pictures and bobbing their heads.

UNDER PRESSURE

“IT WAS A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY; YOU CAN’T JUST LET THAT GO TO WASTE.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More on The Winter Brave: www.facebook.com/thewinterbrave

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{BY IAN THOMAS}

F

OR ADAM Granduciel, mastermind of Philadelphia rock outfit The War on Drugs, the challenge in compiling m at e r i a l f o r h i s t h i rd a l b u m wa s convincing himself that the quality of his output matched the loftiness of his intentions. With two critically acclaimed albums (2008’s Wagonwheel Blues and 2011’s Slave Ambient) under his belt, and a fervent fan base, each subsequent War on Drugs album is released to higher expectations and increased scrutiny. “What I struggled most with this time around was just letting it happen and not overthinking everything,” Granduciel says. “Getting there was just a journey … I wanted to make something as good as I could for the fans, and for the canon of contemporary music. I also was constantly second-guessing whether the decisions I was making were bad decisions.” Given the stakes, his concern is legitimate. Lost in the Dream was brought to light under different conditions than his debut and sophomore efforts. Finding the courage to change a successful formula

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DUSDIN CONDREN}

Timeless but pragmatic: The War on Drugs’ Adam Granduciel

can be intimidating. While it took multiple years to compile material for both Wagonwheel Blues and Slave Ambient, Lost in the Dream’s gestation period was markedly shorter, coming together in just over a year. For all his self-doubt, Granduciel’s third effort under the War on Drugs flag stands as proof that the experience he acquired in the past decade has given him greater control, if not mastery, of his creative process. Tightening his timeline has had the effect of bringing Granduciel’s vision into tighter focus.

THE WAR ON DRUGS WITH WHITE LACES

7:30 p.m. Sat., March 22. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $13-15. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

Lost in the Dream stands with the best of the War on Drugs discography, taking the characteristically urgent and expansive sound and adding lyrical elements that offer greater insight into Granduciel’s

worldview. Where previous releases featured stream-of-consciousness snippets of poetry, here his ideas are more fully formed. While they may not amount to a specific narrative, they speak to the process of coming to terms with the intractable and the unknowable. Recent interviews with Granduciel allude to struggles with depression, as well as coping with loneliness after returning from a long time out on the road with his band. “You were raised on a promise / But found that over time / You better come around to the new way / Or watch as it all breaks down,” he sings on album opener “Under the Pressure.” Given the free-wheeling expansiveness, the out-to-the-edges fullness, of the War on Drugs sound, it is hard to imagine the songs arriving into the world anything other than fully formed. This sense of immediacy is actually the result of careful deliberation, scrutiny and patience. It may ruin a little bit of the band’s magic to learn, but The War on Drugs’ characteristic fullness is pieced together like all art is pieced together: bit by grueling bit. CONTINUES ON PG. 34


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UNDER PRESSURE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

“All the songs on the record were built upon ideas that started at home. I have a home studio, which isn’t very extravagant, but I have a tape machine and I have a console,” Granduciel says. He is content to let the songs take shape of their own volition and at their own pace. “All the songs on the record are built with that kind of idea: just me having an idea and working on a song for maybe a few weeks, sometimes, or maybe just at night.” When he’s satisfied with the frameworks he’s constructed, after the joists, the beams, and the rafters have been tested and proven sufficiently sturdy, he brings them to the band for embellishment. “I spent most of 2013 putting the band on it. It was kind of like going into the studio with this stuff already presented in bare-bones form and just building it up,” Granduciel says, “To me, that’s the most exciting time. … You give yourself a grid and you can kind of go in and shape it, throw paint around.” Ultimately, Granduciel still reserves his right to have the final say over his bandmates’ contributions. “I think that I have ideas for certain songs to where I can play to their strengths best,” he says. “At least for now, the best I can do as a bandleader is let people know that I think they’re perfect for something. … I love playing keyboards and synth. It’s not that I don’t want to give up control; I just love doing that stuff. I don’t want to, all of a sudden, just be a songwriter.” For all of the talk of the band’s timelessness — for all the allusions made to Springsteen, Petty, Dylan and the War on Drugs’ lush sound, which seems to be the product of a bygone era — Granduciel remains pragmatic in his approach, using every tool at his disposal, timeless and otherwise, to craft the perfect sound. At a certain stage in the process, “I transfer all the tapes into ProTools, which is cool,” he says. “I can record in my house in this weird little analog world, and get a really subtle beauty going, but then I can also just say, ‘Let’s just do one more bridge.’ You’re moving structure; you’re not just copying and pasting.” Granduciel’s consistent delivery is the result of faith in his instinct and in the methodology of his creative process. Granduciel cites that interim period — the time spent between framing the songs, then revisiting them — as the most crucial part of the whole process. He likens it to photography. “Sometimes I don’t know what I’m going to end up with. One of my favorite parts of taking pictures is when you drop it off at the photo lab and wait to get it back. [It’s] that moment where you look through the package for the first time to see how the shit ended up.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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GROUPLOVE TIGHTENS UP {BY JULIA COOK} Grouplove missed the sophomore slump with its latest album, Spreading Rumors, an emotional, accelerated piece that takes the energy of the band’s earlier work and compresses it into tight pop anthems that sound composed without being formulaic. Every track enters a unique world in terms of pacing and narrative, and like the band’s performances, every one is different.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAMELA LITTKY}

Cathartic grooves: Grouplove

Between rehearsals, Grouplove vocalist and guitarist Christian Zucconi opened up about how excited he was to revive the band’s buzzed-about live shows. “The feedback from the crowd is what dictates the show,” he says. “We switch it up and don’t even play the same songs every night. You never know what’s going to happen onstage. You need to be out of control, but so in control that it works.” There’s plenty of dancing, and the opportunity for stage-diving. “You don’t plan it; if it happens and feels right, we definitely go for it.” As far as the improved production on Spreading Rumors, Zucconi explains: “When we went to record this record, we were much tighter as a unit, so we wanted to capture the live energy that we bring onstage.” He compares the live performances to a big dance party, “pretty special, super cathartic.” Coming off an acoustic tour of smaller venues, he promises the shows will also bring a greater sense of intimacy. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GROUPLOVE. 6 p.m. Sun., March 23. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


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IT’S NOT EASY being an urban bluegrass ensemble. Just ask Shelf Life String Band. Lead singer and guitarist Derek Dysart and fiddler Rocky Youhon recently stood outside Pitt’s Petersen Events Center, handing out show flyers. The crowd was mostly dismissive. “Local bluegrass, can you dig it?” Dysart asked a Pitt student, extending a flyer. “No, absolutely not,” she said, looking him dead in the eye. Ironically, the show was that of the Avett Brothers, who have become wildly popular with a sweetened, rock-like take on old-school Americana. “There is just something about the bluegrass label,” says Dysart. Meanwhile, at bluegrass festivals, the five-member band has divided crowds with its brisk pace and rock ’n’ roll covers. Some older attendees have walked off (apparently, that’s the nastiest way a bluegrass festival crowd shows disapproval). The band has since learned to start with a few slower numbers to avoid this smallscale Dylan-at-Newport moment.

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hear an Appalachian folk band, but also are into the Ramones. The band has earned a Wednesday residency at the Park House, on the North Side, and has now completed its first album. Singer/songwriter Joe Dep, the group’s banjoist, admits he “snuck the whole bluegrass thing into the band” in its formative days. The group started in 2007 as a guitar duo consisting of Dep and Dysart. “Once we recruited Andy [Boehm] on mandolin, we were halfway to being a bluegrass band,” recalls D e p , w h o h a d a lw ay s wanted to try the banjo since hearing Jerry Garcia play it. He began practicing the instrument on his own and took it to rehearsal one day. It worked, and they completed the sound by adding Youhon on violin and Trish Imbrogno on double bass. (Since Dep started attending Berklee College of Music in Boston, they’ve also brought in Mark Naylor to pinch-hit on banjo at some gigs.) The band’s repertoire is wide, and includes twanged-up versions of Talking Heads’ “Road to Nowhere,” Radiohead’s “Creep” and Gorillaz’ “On Melancholy Hill.” Its debut, Another Evening and Other Tales, consists of all originals. It is a concept record detailing one insane night out in which the narrator encounters outlaws, prostitutes and snake-handlers. Each song details a successive hour, from 9 p.m. to 6 p.m., and it has the pace (if not the instrumentation) of city night life. Dysart says that sound — to the right of the Avetts and the left of Earl Scruggs — comes naturally to the group. “I don’t think we should sound like a mountain band,” he says. “We never see a mountain, besides Mount Washington.”

9 p.m. Thu., March 20. Howler’s Coyote Café, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or howlerscoyotecafe.com.

But with its self-described “fast-assed bluegrass,” Shelf Life has managed to win over those in the part of the musical Venn diagram that includes people willing to

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GETTING FAMILIAR {BY IAN THOMAS} New Bums is a duo composed of Skygreen Leopards’ Donovan Quinn and Ben Chasny, probably best known for his work in Six Organs of Admittance. For their full-length debut, Voices in a Rented Room, the two serve up an album’s worth of haunting acoustic numbers. Quinn and Chasny manage to sidestep any of the folk comparisons that seem to arise in relation to arrangements like theirs — mostly because they seem at odds with each other in terms of tone and style.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON QUEVER}

Acoustic dynamism: New Bums

It’s not that the two lack for chemistry, but the songs on the album mostly feel like works in progress, like the two are still sizing each other up, which makes for a dynamism usually lacking when two acoustic guitars are in such close proximity. On the whole, Quinn and Chasny find discord and harmony in equal measure. Somber, acid lyrics generally drive the vehicle, but frequently take a back seat to bright, inspired fretwork. Even the pitch-black numbers manage to charm, offering such a negative perspective as to border on the comical. “She looks at me like a thief / like she knows all my crimes / and can bust me any time,” they harmonize on “Your Girlfriend Might Be a Cop.” With songs that are fleshed out to various degrees, but always poignant, New Bums offers everything from deathly stompers (“Welcome to the Navy”) to fully formed ballads (“Town on the Water”). Steeped in cynicism as it may be, Voices in a Rented Room is about perseverance, not surrender. When their guitars do the talking for them, Quinn and Chasny make that very clear. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NEW BUMS with FENSTER, PAIRDOWN. 9 p.m. Wed., March 26. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-12. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net NEWS

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[JAZZ FUSION] USION] + FRI., MARCH 21 It’s one thing hing to be talented and critically acclaimed, d, but getting the phrase “Grammy-winning” y-winning” before your band name me will take any act to the next level. evel. That’s the case with Snarky rky Puppy, y the jazzsoul fusion n band that won Best R&B Performance ormance along with Lalah Hathaway haway for the song “Something” ng” this past year. The outfitt — led by Michael League, eague, and always including cluding some stellar lar session and touring ng musicians — has become come a Pittsburgh h favorite over the years, and returns ns to the Rex Theater terr for a show tonight. onight. AM 8 p.m. m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. e. $15-17. 412-381-6811 6811 or www.rextheater.com theater.com

NASCAR dynasty; Daniel Zott and Joshua Epstein make up the Detroit-based indie pop duo. Back in February, the group released a mixtape called Produce, which incorporates some hip-hop influences courtesy of Chuck Inglish from the Cool Kids, Asher Roth, King Chip and others. Check them out tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre with special guests Chad Valley and Marcus Meston. Kayla Copes 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[BLUES] + SUN., MARCH 23 Rory Block k has made a lengthy career out of addition to writing her covering blues classics in additio New-Jersey-born Block’s career own songs. The New-Jersey-bo albums, mostly has spanned 50 years and 30 al blues. Her most along the lines of country blues recent album is 2013’s Avalon: A Tribute to Mississippi Missis ssip s pi John Hurt, t the latest installment of what Block calls her “Mentor SSeries.” Check her out tonight playing at Club Ca Café with special guest Dhruva Krishna. KC C 8 p.m. 56 12th St., 412-431-4950 South Side. $16. 412-431-4 4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

Mutual Benefit

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHONNA VALESKA}

BROADWAY’S SMASH-HIT MUSICAL COMEDY

Despite having a name ripped from an insurance company, Mutual Benefit is invested in a quiet and arresting beauty. The band — a loose conglomerate centered around main songwriter Jordan Lee — released its first proper full-length, Love’s Crushing Diamond, last fall, after some smaller cassette releases. It’s a rich and nuanced set of soundscapes that recall the softer side of early Animal Collective along with some of the songcraft skills of Emperor X. Lee and Co. play WPTS’s spring show tonight along with opener Black Brick. Andy Mulkerin ulkerin 7:30 p.m. William Pitt Union Assembly Room, Fifth Avenue at Bigelow Boulevard, d, Oakland. $8-10. All ages. www.wptsradio.org tsradio.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITNEY LEE}

[INDIE POP] + SAT., MARCH ARCH 22 Dale Earnhardt nhardt Jr. Jr. is an eye-catching ing band name, but rest assured ssured neither member iss related to the

Rory Block


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 20 ALTAR BAR. Gary Numan, Big Black Delta. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE BEER MARKET. Jason Kendall. North Side. BENEDUM CENTER. BandFuse: Rock Legends presents Experience Hendrix. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Don Williams. 412-368-5225. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. PALACE THEATRE. Abba Mania. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SMILING MOOSE. I Am the Avalanche, The Swellers,

Turnover, Mace Ballard. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. David Nail, Sam Hunt. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ricky Manning Irish Band, Slim Forsythe Country BigBand, Raised by Wolves and Slim McForsythes Irish Whisky Rebellion. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Jay Wiley. North Side. 412-323-2924. CLUB CAFE. Wicked Chief, Balloon Ride Fantasy, Young Fox. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Oberhofer, Spires, Hawk & Dove. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. The Gotobeds, The Sicks, Deletions. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. THE HANDLE www. per BAR & GRILLE. pa pghcitym Tony Janflone, Jr. .co Duo. Canonsburg. 31ST STREET PUB. 724-746-4227. The Hounds Below, MARTY’S MARKET. The Shapes of Things, Sotiri Tsourekis. Strip District. Will Simmons & The 412-586-7177. Upholsterers. Strip District. RAMADA INN HOTEL & 412-391-8334. CONFERENCE CENTER. BENEDUM CENTER. Abacus Jones. Greensburg. David Garrett. Downtown. 724-552-0603. 412-456-6666. SIDEBAR. Weapons of Choice, BRILLOBOX. Grand Piano, The Crooked Cobras, Murder Red Western, Shade. Bloomfield. for Girls. 724-919-8276. 412-621-4900. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Turnstiles. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Dresses, Talley Cavy, Stage Hands. South Side. 412-431-4668. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Mutual Benefit, Black Brick. Oakland. 412-648-7814.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 21

MP 3 MONDAY WHITNEY ANN JENKINS

AND HER PLATONIC GUY FRIENDS

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Whitney Ann Jenkins and Her Platonic Guy Friends;

“Twist in My Plot”

stream or download for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

SAT 22 1810 TAVERN. Tony Janflone Jr. 724-728-5282. 31ST STREET PUB. Slothrust, Rogue Signals, Brazilian Wax. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. The War On Drugs. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Heather Kropf & Daryl Shawn. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Gone South. Pleasant Hills. CLUB CAFE. Miniature Tigers, Influx, Master Sensei. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Connect, Mad Dukez & Fresh Kills, Kemikal, The Dads, Proseed, Stillborn Identity. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Henry Bachorski Lucky Guy, Mike Berginc. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. KENDREW’S. The GRID. 724-375-5959. LAWRENCEVILLE VFW. Daniels & McClain. Lawrenceville. 412 781-7232. THE LOOSE MOOSE. Zero Fame. 412-655-3553. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

NEWS

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TA S T E

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M A I N F E AT U R E

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MUSIC

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SCREEN

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ARTS

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CLASSIFIEDS

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., Chad Valley, Marcus Meston. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. 3 Car Garage. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Switch. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. theCAUSE, Steve Kimock. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Optimists. 412-487-6259. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Beatlemania Magic. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. High School Rock Challenge. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Good Brother Earl. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Flashback 80s Rock. 724-789-7858.

SUN 23 CLUB CAFE. Rory Block, Dhruva Krishna. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Jeremy Caywood & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Complete Failure, Liquified Guts, Dendritic Arbor, Artillery Breath, Dismemberment. Bloomfield. SHALER NORTH HILLS LIBRARY. Shadows of Eve. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. STAGE AE. Grouplove, Alex Winston. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Blind Owl Band, The Armadillos. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 24 ALTAR BAR. Breathe Carolina. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Unwed Sailor, Enney, Adult Field Trip. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

TUE 25 ALTAR BAR. The Ataris. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Heart. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. The Wheeler Brothers, Desert Noises. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Glenn Matlock & Sylvain Sylvain. Station Square. 412-481-7625. SMILING MOOSE. W.C. Lindsay, Emerson Jay. South Side. 412-431-4668.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh, but they might be worth a road trip!

CLEVELAND {TUE., MAY 27}

Skrillex

WED 26 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Dumplings. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. BRILLOBOX. Dead Rider, Nic Lawless & Young Criminales, Night Vapor. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. Neutral Milk Hotel, Elf Power. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. Jim Avett, The Parker Sisters. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Tanagrams, Stompcat, Sorta Lonely. Bloomfield. 724-366-3469. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. New Bums, Fenster, Pairdown. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 20 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Detour Presents: Rivka w/ Morgantics. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica

COLUMBUS {FRI., JUNE 20}

Beck LC Pavilion

PHILADELPHIA {TUE., JULY 8-WED., JULY 9}

Phish

FRI 21 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Da’ Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582.

Weddings. Events. Portraits.

SUN 23 BRILLOBOX. Hall & McBurney. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 25 SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 21 ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Smack/URL & EMT/CCOE Present: The Steel City Showdown Battle Event ft. Real Deal vs Rosenberg Raw, Lotta Zay vs Nuborn, more. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

SAT 22

SAT 22

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Isa GT, Pandemic Pete, Sara Vicious. Visuals by VIA. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. DJ Twist. North Side. 412-323-2924.

CJ’S. The New Show Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

SUN 23 THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

PRESENT THIS AD FOR

THU 20 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 21 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. MOONDOG’S. Spring Fling w/ the Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Satin Hearts. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

BILL BUDA’S. The Satin Hearts. McKeesport. 412-896-8157. BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Nic C & the Bluetops. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. Shot O’ Soul. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Eldorado Kings. 724-433-1322. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 412-233-9800.

SUN 23 MOONDOG’S. Vince Agwada, Jimmy Adler & Craig King. Guitar Showdown. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ THU 20 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Maura Minteer. Downtown. 412-773-8884.

urgh” SONeeLENZNthEReTR“OLLB EY TOURS

5 OFF $

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Ne t iic N Histor TOUR #1 H Neighborhoods $25 ge rita TOUR #2 He a P ittsBUR GH ER ” “A rriv e a V isito r; De par t

PER PERSON

Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires October 31, 2014

BLUES

SAT 22

WED 26

HIP HOP/R&B

The Mann CLUB ZOO. Barstool Blackout. Strip District. 412-201-1100.

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

$

25

STATION SQUARE NTOWN HOTELS AND PICKUPS FROM 6 DOW 42-2349 L RESERVATIONS CAL 1-800-3

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

Rebecca Photography g p y

5218 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201 • 412.860.8180 www.rebeccaphotography.com

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

FLOORING

Wood and laminate flooring products are designed for the DIYer. But with so many products on the market, it is critical to have a clear understanding of the materials available today. The Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, in a partnership with DIY Pittsburgh, will offer a Home Improvement Workshop Series. In this session of Flooring, students will learn about the materials and installation of solid wood, engineered wood, and laminate flooring. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 6:00-7:30 P.M..

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808


CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Joe Negri Quartet. 724-576-4644. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SEVICHE. Joe Sheehan. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

FRI 21 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ron Wilson, Paul Thompson. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri & Jeff Lashway. Downtown. 412-553-5235. REX THEATER. Snarky Puppy, Alison Wedding. South Side. 412-381-6811.

SAT 22 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Erin Burkett w/ Virgil Walters & Eric Susooeff. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 23 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jessica Lee. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 24 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 25 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Don Aliquo. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Susanne Ortner-Roberts & Mark Strickland. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker 3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 26 ANDYS. David Bennett & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604.

NEWS

WED 26

ACOUSTIC

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. PALACE THEATRE. Ronnie Milsap. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

THU 20 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Zig Daniels. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Shelf Life String Band, Elli Perry. Shelf Life String Band CD Release. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Hey Mavis. Shadyside. 413-361-1915. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Open Stage w/ Gas House Annie. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Dan Bubien. Washington.

CLASSICAL FRI 21 LUZ MANRIQUEZ, PIANO. Music of Chile. James Laughlin Music Center. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Orchestral highlights from Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen w/ Donald Runnicles, Conductor & Stephen Hough, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www. per a 412-392-4900. pghcityp

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 22

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Pete Niederberger & Will Crum w/ Tom Hong. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Paul Luc. Harmony. 570-294-6450. MARS BREW HOUSE. Rick Bruening. Mars. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

WED 26 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage w/ Cherylann Hawk & The Live to Love Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD THU 20 RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION. Noah Bendix-Balgley, Alan Bern, Susanne Ortner-Roberts. NESHOME - New & Old Yiddish Music. Oakland. 412-513-6444.

SAT 22

SUN 23 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Mimi Jong & Dariush Saghafi. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

THU 20 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

SAT 22 HARVEY WILNER’S. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-366-1331. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Hillbilly Way. 724-789-7858.

+

proudly presents

MON 24 ARTEMIS QUARTET. Music by Beethoven, Brahms, & Kurtag. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

WED 26 INCIDENTAL CHAMBER PLAYERS. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-336-8199.

OTHER MUSIC HAMBONE’S. Cabaret: Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing- Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER. Kol Shira A Capella. Squirrel Hill. 412-414-1988.

Be immersed in a live laser ase light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects!

WED 26

COUNTRY

TA S T E

SUN 23 CHATHAM BAROQUE W/ JUSTIN WALLACE, HARPSICHORD. Concert to Celebrate Bach’s 329th Birthday: Music for Organ, Voices & Instruments. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7909. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Orchestral highlights from Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen w/ Donald Runnicles, Conductor & Stephen Hough, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. STEVEN MAYER, PIANIST. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-922-0903.

MON 24

DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran, Katabu Masudi. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

+

.com

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict.org/ event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

M A I N F E AT U R E

+

MUSIC

They’re back! Laser Michael Jackson & Laser Zeppelin

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org +

SCREEN

+

ARTS

+

EVENTS

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CLASSIFIEDS

43


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do March

IN PITTSBURGH

19 - 25

WEDNESDAY 19

Jillian Michaels “Maximize Your Life” Tour BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 20 An Iliad

O’REILLY THEATER Downtown. 412-316-1600. Tickets: ppt.org. Through April 6.

Experience Hendrix

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Poets Tim Seibles & Yah Lioness Borne

NEW HAZLETT THEATER Allegheny Square. All ages event. Tickets: heartjournalonline.com/event or $15 at the door. 7:30p.m.

Mike Birbiglia - Thank God for Jokes Tour

BYHAM THEATER Downtown.

412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Gary Numan

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Big Black Delta & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

MONDAY 24

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Jonny Craig & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Breathe Carolina

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests White Laces. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

FRIDAY 21

HEART

Family Links Just Jazz II Brass & Steel

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SATURDAY 22

The War on Drugs

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

Music: A Gala Night with David Garrett

21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

1964 The Tribute

Don Williams

TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB Oakland. Tickets: familylinks.org or 412-942-0492. 6:30p.m.

Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8pm. Through March 22.

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND

Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Snarky Puppy

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guest Alison Wedding.

Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Comedian Warren Durso Latitude 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Chad Valley & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 23 Tammy Pescatelli

IMPROV Waterfront. Over

TUESDAY 25 The Ataris

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Authority Zero & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Heart

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com, 1-877-4-FLY-TIX or 1-800-745-3000. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Gordon Shoe’s Spring & Summer Preview Event Now – March 23 SHOE & WINE CELEBRATION

Trunk Shows

A TEN DAY FESTIVAL SHOWCASING 11 FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR QUALITY FOOTWEAR AND ACCESSORIES.

$Gift25.00 Certificate 44

Must Present this Certificate at Check-out. Minimum Purchase $125. Cannot be Combined with Other Offers or Discounts. Some Vendor Exclusions Apply. Not applicable on Allen Edmonds, Dansko and New Balance. See Store for Detail. Valid Through 3/31/14. MAILR GS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

TIMBERLAND Paul Ferrone Fri, Mar. 21 MERRELL Jason Bodamer Fri, Mar. 21 & Sat, Mar. 22 AETREX Jayme Golden Sat, Mar. 22 ALL ROUNDER Mike Baumann Sat, Mar. 22 MEPHISTO Mike Baumann Sat, Mar. 22 BIRKENSTOCK Ryan Gorlaski Sat, Mar. 22

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes


FACES OF WORK

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL SHOWS ALL THE SYMPTOMS OF A DIRECTOR IMITATING HIMSELF

{BY AL HOFF} The Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival: Faces of Work runs Thu., March 20, through April 5, with more than a dozen feature films and documentaries. Most films screen at McConomy Auditorium, on the CMU campus, and are $8 ($5 students/seniors). A complete schedule, including guest speakers and special events, is at www.cmu.edu. Three recent films are among those screening this week:

People who work: The Cleaner

WALESA: MAN OF HOPE. Andrzej Wajda’s bio-pic recounts the rise of Lech Walesa, the Polish shipyard worker who became the leader of the Solidarity movement in the 1970s and ’80s. Wajda keeps much of the history rooted in the personal (Walesa’s prickly personality, his family life and his moments of ambivalence) while deftly intercutting archival footage. Walesa’s wife, Danuta, will attend the March 20 screening. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Thu., March 20, at Regent Square. $15/$10 (includes opening-night reception). Also, Sun., March 23, at McConomy. SHIPBREAKERS. When commercial ships “die,” they’re often hauled to places like Alang, in India. Grounded at high tide, they’re dismantled by hand by migrant workers. The work is dangerous, lowpaying and not subject to any environmental regulations. This documentary from Ralph Vituccio and Tom Clancey takes a clear-eyed look at this dark aspect of the global economy, and it’s as grim and depressing as you’d expect. Particularly when contrasted, as it is in the film, with a ship-breaking facility in Brownsville, Texas. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Fri., March 21. McConomy THE CLEANER. In Adrian Saba’s gentle drama, a middle-aged man dutifully cleans up after the dead as a mysterious virus ravages Lima, Peru. His grim work and solitary life is altered when he takes in an 8-year-old boy and begins taking care of the living, rather than simply mopping up after the dead. In Spanish, with subtitles. 4 p.m. Mon., March 24 (Kresge Theater, Carlow University, Oakland), and 7:30 p.m. Tue., March 25 (McConomy)

RESERVATIONS {BY HARRY KLOMAN}

W

M. Gustave (Ralph Fiennes) charms the ladies.

ES ANDERSON has created a

new language in his splendacious cinema, so let’s create a new vocabulary to describe it. The Grand Budapest Hotel hapcurs in Europe, between the two great wars, in the (decidedly mythical) Republic of Zubrowka, and revolutes around M. Gustave (Ralph Fiennes), the concierge at the story’s eponylary hotel, c. 1932. Gustave is a gentleman of old-school manners and elegance, devoted to satisflating the hotel’s (decidedly) wealthy old female clientele, who are all “vain, blonde and needy.” And yes, he satisflates them in that way, too, although he’s also, some suggest, a bit effeminacious. Oh, hell. Enough dicking around. If you’ve never seen a Wes Anderson film, Grand Budapest Hotel isn’t the best place to start. It’s a charmingly told, (decidedly) tall tale — a fable more akin to his animated Fantastic Mr. Fox than his hilariously tender Moonrise Kingdom. It shows all the symptoms of a director

imitating himself, and possibly even putting us on. In public, Gustave is refined and discreet; in private, he’s a keen and tart observer of human behavior (“she was shaking like a shitting dog”). He gets involved in the intrigue surrounding the death of his favorite dowager, and he longs for a time when civilization was more genteel and humane. That would be the 19th century, I suppose, when “class” and “empire” meant something.

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL DIRECTED BY: Wes Anderson STARRING: Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Adrien Brody Starts Fri., March 21

At its best, Grand Budapest Hotel is many things. The color scheme is otherworldly, the music lithe and playful. Apart from its (decided?) nonsense

about the past, it’s a paean to the proles: As frumious soldiers rout and the elite conspire, a network of concierges comes to one another’s rescue. They’re played, in cameos, by members of Anderson’s stock company — Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban and an Owen Wilson so decidedly out of place that he’s named M. Chuck. Edward Norton, Tilda Swinton, Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody, Jeff Goldblum and Harvey Keitel also join the soirée. This yarn is woven from the present by an elderly writer (Tom Wilkinson) looking back on his younger self (Jude Law), who heard the story from an old man (F. Murray Abraham) who, as a younger man, was Gustave’s right-hand man. That’s a lot of (celebrity) cooks, which explains the shaggy-doggedness of it all. (Memory, of course, is one big whopper.) And yet, its flavors are all clearly from the recipe book of a master chef who, this time, just threw in a bit too much saltaciousness.

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FILM CAPSULES CP

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NEW DIVERGENT. Neil Burger directs this sci-fi actioner, adapted from Veronica Roth’s young-adult novel, about a world divided into factions based on virtues. Then there are the “divergents,” who don’t fit in and must escape being wiped out. Shailene Woodley, Theo James and Kate Winslet star. Starts Fri., March 21. IS THE MAN WHO IS TALL HAPPY? A series of interviews with well-known left-leaning writer, historian and philosopher Noam Chomsky are presented by filmmaker Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Silence of Sleep), through face-toface encounters and quirky animations. Fri., March 21-Sun., March 23. Melwood

$7, $5 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/piccadilly

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

MUPPETS MOST WANTED. The action begins right on the heels on 2011’s The Muppets, when the re-united Muppets decide to embark on a world tour. Somebody makes a joke about sequels being inferior, but it’s unheeded by the gang. Thus, it’s no surprise when this outing, directed by James Bobin, turns out to be a disappointment. It’s missing the sweet heart of the earlier film, with its existential “Man or Muppet” query, instead relying on a tiresome comic plot device: A criminal mastermind who looks like Kermit uses the Muppets to facilitate various heists. The jokes and celebrity cameos feel more rote than clever (what doesn’t Sean Diddy show up for?), and the kids at the screening I attended were decidedly restless.

Need for Speed doomed Jesse on Breaking Bad for the lead role in some fast-car porn adapted from a videogame by Scott Waugh. The plot (as if it matters): Fresh from prison (after being framed), a street racer named Tobey Marshall drives from New York to San Francisco, where he’ll run in the Super Duper Street Race, and avenge a wrong to boot. Obstacles along the way are overcome with horsepower and derring-do. Marshall has some wise-cracking sidekicks, a love interest (Imogen Poots) and cosmic guidance from the web-enabled race promoter (Michael Keaton), who also functions as a Greek chorus for all the automotive mayhem. (I hope this role is an homage to Cleavon Little’s omniscient DJ in 1971’s speedingwest classic Vanishing Point.) It’s in fender-busting 3-D, and Waugh does make good use of spectacular Utah desert and California coastline scenery. Also, Paul twice makes like Jesse Pinkman and cries, and these 3-D tears almost make you forgive him. In 3-D, in select theaters. (AH)

REPERTORY 2 AUTUMNS, 3 WINTERS. A jog in the park kicks off the romantic adventures of a few friends in this new French comedy from Sébastien Betbeder. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., March 19. Oaks LABYRINTH. This cultish 1986 film from Muppetmaster Jim Henson spins a fairy-tale-ish yarn about a teenage girl (Jennifer Connelly) who must navigate a strange world in order to rescue her baby brother from a goblin king (David Bowie). Featuring one of the Thin White Duke’s worst hair-dos ever. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 19. AMC Loews. $5

Muppets Most Wanted Who can blame them? This film seems aimed at grown-ups of a certain age who want to indulge in nostalgia for their childhoods. It’s unlikely that any of today’s tots will get extended jokes about Siberian gulags, A Chorus Line and the vagaries of the French work day. Starts Fri., March 21. (Al Hoff) NEED FOR SPEED. Cars, speed, crashes — but first, I want to talk about Catwoman. Remember when Halle Berry won the Oscar for Best Actress, then wiped out in that craptastic film? That’s pretty much how I feel about Aaron Paul, who has traded all the justly deserved accolades for his portrait of sad,

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RAID 2: BERANDAL. In this sequel to the hit 2012 martial-arts actioner The Raid: Redemption, Jakarta cop Rama (Iko Uwais) has to subdue a new batch of criminals, this time by going undercover as a gangster. Gareth Evans directs. In Indonesian, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 19. Hollywood BOB QUALTERS: THE ARTIST IN ACTION. The work of Pittsburgh artist Robert Qualters is currently on exhibit in a Pittsburgh Center for the Arts retrospective. Learn more about the painter in this documentary from Joe and Elizabeth Seamans. Qualters is expected to attend the screening. 6:30 p.m. Thu., March 20. Melwood. Free TWIN PEAKS MARATHON. We take headscratching, off-kilter TV shows for granted these


days, but little prepared America for David Lynch’s moody, maddening and occasionally marvelous mystery series Twin Peaks. The owls were not what they seemed, and neither was much else. Catch the entire series — all 30 episodes — at this Twin Peaks Marathon, part of Hollywood Theater’s ongoing tribute to Lynch. Season 1 Pilot: 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 20; Season 1, Episodes 2-8: 7 p.m. Fri., March 21; Season 2, Pilot and Episodes 1-5: 10 a.m. Sat., March 22; and Season 2, Episode 6-22: 10 a.m. Sun., March 23. Hollywood. $7 per day ($20 Black Lodge marathon pass at www.showclix.com)

“A RAMBUNCTIOUS CAPER

BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH QUICK WIT, FAMOUS FACES, AND WES ANDERSON’S PATENTED AESTHETIC DELIGHTS.” ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

RALPH FIENNES F. MURRAY ABRAHAM MATHIEU AMALRIC ADRIEN BRODY WILLEM DAFOE JEFF GOLDBLUM HARVEY KEITEL JUDE LAW BILL MURRAY EDWARD NORTON SAOIRSE RONAN JASON SCHWARTZMAN LÉA SEYDOUX TILDA SWINTON TOM WILKINSON OWEN WILSON introducing TONY REVOLORI

THE SQUARE. Jehane Noujam’s Academy Awardnominated documentary follows events in Egypt’s Tahrir Square through the eyes of several participants, from the euphoria of Mubarak’s resignation through increasing frustration over the pace of change. In English, and Arabic, with subtitles. 4:30 p.m. Sat., March 22. McConomy, CMU campus, Oakland WEB JUNKIE. This new documentary from Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia looks at “re-training” camps in China, where young people addicted to online activities learn to re-embrace the actual world. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Work. In Mandarin, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Sat., March 22. McConomy, CMU campus, Oakland

Wed., March 26. Melwood. $2

AGE OF PANIC. Modern French life — from the political to the domestic — is examined through the day of one woman, a reporter trying to juggle election coverage with child care. Justine Triet directs this new dramedy. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sun., March 23. Oaks

REALITY. A fishmonger opts to go on a Big Brother-type reality-TV show in this 2011 comedy from Matteo Garrone. The film opens a threeweek Italian Film Festival. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., March 27. Frick Fine Arts, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. In Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 adaptation of Anthony Burgess’ satiric novel, we follow the exploits of young Alex (Malcolm McDowell), a troubled youth of the near future with a penchant for ultra-violence, who is ordered by the authorities to undergo “reconditioning.” The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of popular films that never won an Oscar. 8 p.m. Sun., March 23. Regent Square

SWING LOWE SWEET CHARIOTE. A young African-American woman struggles to maintain her family amid the troubles of her poor urban neighborhood. David C. Snyder’s new drama was filmed in Cleveland. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 27. Hollywood. $5

HIDE YOUR SMILING FACES. Two teenage brothers in a small rural town find their lives and perspectives altered after a neighborhood tragedy in this new indie drama from writer-director Daniel Patrick Carbone. 7:30 p.m. Tue., March 25. Hollywood TIP TOP. This new screwball comedy from Serge Bozon, and starring Isabelle Huppert, uses the tropes of a mismatched-cops police investigation into the death of an Algerian informant to comment on post-colonial France. In French and Arabic, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., March 26. Oaks EAT SLEEP DIE. In this new feature film from Gabriela Pichler, a young Muslim immigrant worker from Eastern Europe working in Sweden struggles to get by after losing her factory job. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Work. In various languages, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Wed., March 26. McConomy, CMU campus, Oakland A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN. Geena Davis, Rosie O’Donnell and Tom Hanks star in this affectionate 1992 comedy about women’s baseball teams of the 1940s. Penny Marshall directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 26. AMC Loews. $5 UN CHIEN ANDALOU and L’AGE D’OR. Don’t miss this double-feature of avant-garde cinematic collaborations between Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali, ground-breaking surrealist films that influence filmmakers to this day. “Un Chien Andalou” (1929, 16 min.) features unsettling images including ants crawling out of a hand, and one infamous eyeball. Their second collaboration, “L’Age d’Or” (1930, 60 min.), intercuts the travails of frustrated lovers with blasphemous images of the Catholic Church, scorpions and dogs. 8 p.m.

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Is The Man Who is Tall Happy?

BEST OF SYNC’D. A music-and-film event in which local short silent films are screened while an original score plays live. This program features films with recorded soundtracks from the last five Sync’d events, plus live music from Gangwish. 8 p.m. Thu., March 27. Melwood. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

The Quiet Man (1952) - 3/20 @ 2pm - $5 Matinee! Twin Peaks Marathon! - 3/20 from 7pm-10pm (Season 1 Pilot), 3/21 from 7pm-12:30am (Season 1, Episodes 2-8), 3/22 from 10:30am3pm (Season 2, Episodes 1-5), 3/23 from 10:30am-Midnight (Season 2, Episodes 6-22)

“ WES ANDERSON MAKES ‘ THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL’

Twin Peaks Party/Silencio Concert! - 3/22 @ 7pm Hide Your Smiling Faces - 3/25 @ 7:30pm

A FOUR-STAR DELIGHT.”

Hide Your Smiling Faces vividly depicts the young lives of two brothers as they abruptly come of age through the experience of a friend’s mysterious death.

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[COMEDY]

THIS SIMPLE PROCESS RESULTS IN SOMETHING MONUMENTAL

VARIETY SHOW

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

If you’re on Twitter, you’re likely one of Rob Delaney’s million-plus followers. He’s known for goofy jokes. (“I bet loggers call the guy who makes lunch the ‘Yumberjack.’”) But having survived addiction, depression and a drunk-driving accident that almost killed him, he doesn’t shy from heavy topics. Delaney, who appears March 27 at the Rex Theater, spoke to City Paper by phone. IS IT HARD TO BE SO OPEN ABOUT YOUR ADDICTION AND DEPRESSION? I’ve been sober for almost 12 years, and I only started doing comedy right after I got out of the hospital. I thought, “Whoa, I’m alive? I’m going to do what I really wanted to do,” which was comedy. I think the fact that I was lucky enough to survive a couple things that could have killed me made me want to be pretty open. YOU TALK ABOUT A LOT OF CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS, LIKE ABORTION RIGHTS, AND PROBABLY GET A LOT OF HATE FROM PEOPLE. Uh huh …

DESPITE YOUR HUGE TWITTER AUDIENCE, YOUR COMEDY IS PRETTY NUANCED. THAT’S NOT WHAT PEOPLE MIGHT EXPECT. You used one of my favorite words, which is “nuanced.” People at large are not the morons that A&E or Bravo or E! or CBS would have you believe; they don’t need to be told the same thing again and again. It’s why it’s fun to go to a buffet: You don’t want to exclusively eat pork chops. You want a salad, you want to have dessert. People like it when you’re funny and also offer insight on something you might happen to know about. Or if you talk about something from way off in left field. So that is why I think I’m popular — I like people and I like to give them different things. And I know that they can handle it. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROB DELANEY 8:30 and 10:30 p.m., Thu., March 27. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $18-20. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

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[ART REVIEW]

Seriously funny: Rob Delaney

ARE YOU ABLE TO DETACH FROM IT? Yeah. I am lucky in a sense that I came of age [before the Internet]. I see people who grew up online, and comedians — that I like and admire — get into it with people online, and it’s just such a giant waste of time. Just don’t get into it with some idiot who’s in his mom’s basement on the other side of the world.

TWIST, TURN, SPEED-SHIFT

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY KENNEDY}

Erwin Redl’s “Speed Shift,” at Wood Street Galleries

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

I

N HIS OWN words, the work of Erwin Redl is a mouthful. As the Austrianborn, New York-based installation artist puts it in the statement for his exhibit at Wood Street Galleries, he investigates “the process of ‘reverse engineering’ by (re-)translating the abstract aesthetic language of virtual reality and 3-D computer modeling back into architectural environments by means of large-scale light installations.” Over the years, his translation of a technical language has translated to his audience through a spectacular series of works that surround and embrace the viewer. From temporary pieces at the Whitney Biennial, and installations in Germany, France, Austria and Korea to “Nocturnal Flow,” a permanent piece of public art created for the Washington State Arts Commission, Redl’s works all possess a sense of existential unity: Their manufactured energy is seemingly at one with the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

organic forms with which they share space. At Wood Street, Redl’s Structures of Time and Space features two pieces, “Twists and Turns” and “Speed Shift.” While joined from a perspective of practicalities, the two works build two unique environments.

STRUCTURES OF TIME AND SPACE continues through April 6. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

The mechanics of “Twists and Turns” are fairly uncomplicated. Four lasers, in blue and red, emit pin-spot beams from their emplacements high on the gallery walls. Strung and suspended from the ceiling are small squares of acrylic plates, positioned in straight and bisecting lines. These catch the light emitted and, as they turn on their

threads in the air current of the gallery, send the light flashing across one gallery wall and then another. This simple process results in something monumental. The room is transformed, improving from a spare, white triangle into a hub of activity, ranging from frenetic to subdued. Some of the trails careen over surfaces and around corners, their trajectories quick and long; others bounce at easy tempos at slight distances. The only illumination in the room is provided by the reflections. At times, the room is cool and dim, but it remains easy to see even the transparent tiles swaying on their lines. At other moments, the laser beams slow down to complete inertia, plunging the room into a sustained moment of total darkness — and with it the viewer, who tensely anticipates the light’s return. For “Speed Shift,” another spare, white rectangular room is bisected at waist height by strips of clear LED strips,


THEIR MANUFACTURED ENERGY IS SEEMINGLY AT ONE WITH THE ORGANIC FORMS WITH WHICH THEY SHARE SPACE. “Twists and Turns” is augmented by an intellectual rather than a sensory accompaniment. One views trails of light as they pitch wildly or meander softly, speeding faster than the eye can follow or gently ping-ponging in the short distance between two points. These evoke traffic, travel, pathways and circuits, and the conveyance by vehicles of humans — much like the ongoing transit below. The cumulative impression made by joining these varied journeys of light smacks of movement, activity, industry, growth and promise, starting points and destinations. Where “Twists and Turns” is capricious and thrilling by its random nature, “Speed Shift” soothes and calms as its elements are controlled. With the same basic tools, Redl has produced two fully divergent worlds, both welcoming and intriguing but each eliciting its own specific response. Both are worth settling into.

[DANCE]

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Texture Ballet Company performs SHADES OF LIGHT 8 p.m. Fri., March 21; 8 p.m. Sat., March 22; and 2 p.m. Sun., March 23. $20-25. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square, North Side. 888-718-4253 or www.textureballet.org

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

NEWS

On the heels of a recent successful performance at New York’s Ailey Citigroup Theater, Texture Contemporary Ballet returns home to the New Hazlett Theater this week for Shades of Light. The program features the premiere of company associate artistic director/resident choreographer Kelsey Bartman’s ballet “This.” Set to the music of Icelandic composer/ musician Valgeir Sigurosson, the 15-minute ballet for five dancers is a response to Sigurosson’s music, says Bartman. “The music is expansive,” she says. “It made me feel like I was on a mountain with sounds echoing around me.” Bartman says she tried to emulate that sense of echoing in her choreography, which she describes as grounded in classical ballet line but altered to make it unrecognizable. As for the ballet’s nondescript title, Bartman says: “I usually have a narrative in my head when I am choreographing. This time I just wanted to make something cool from the sounds I was hearing in the music.” Artistic director and resident choreographer Alan Obuzor’s “Take ... Taken ... Taking ...,” which the company premiered at Ailey Citigroup, is one of two works on the program Obuzor created with the support of artist residencies at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. The ballet began a few years back as a solo work, entitled “Taken.” It was set to one of three movements from composer Philip Glass’ “Violin Concerto No. 1.” Obuzor says from the outset he meant to choreograph to the remaining movements of the concerto, and that the New York tour was the impetus he needed. Also for five dancers, the 25-minute neo-classical ballet is “in tune with the moving quality of Glass’ music,” says Obuzor. A review of the ballet’s New York premiere on danceviewtimes.com described Obuzor as “a very appealing dancer” and his solo in the ballet as “a tour de force of controlled energy.” The final work on the program is Obuzor’s most recent offering, “Looking Back and Moving Forward,” which premiered in February as part of the Kelly-Strayhorn’s Fresh Works series. Another abstract ballet for five dancers, the piece explores themes of reflection, and will be danced to contemporary soul and jazz standards performed live by Anqwenique Wingfield.

ARTISTS: CHRISTINE SCHWANER & ALEXANDRE SILVA // PHOTO: DUANE RIEDER

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

Texture Contemporary Ballet {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

illuminated in set orders and speeds. As they flare, then darken, they additionally generate sound specific to their brightening, the computerized tolling gentle and soft. Their tones are clear and murmuring, docile pulses that vary somewhat in pitch and tempo while steadfastly remaining smooth, never jarring. This effect hearkens to an earlier pursuit of Redl’s: He began his academic career studying electronic composition at Vienna’s University of Music and Performing Arts. The location of these installations greatly enhances what was already intriguing. For “Speed Shift,” located three stories above the pedestrian and vehicular traffic of Wood Street and Liberty Avenue, the atmosphere is heightened by the aural. Through the muted but distinct pulses of sound Redl has contributed, we additionally hear the noise of the world filtering into the gallery. The occasional, unintelligible burst of human voice, the steady rhythm of buses coming to a halt, then accelerating after they’ve discharged one passel of passengers and boarded another, the distant rumble of aircraft miles overhead — all provide the background soundtrack to Redl’s dialogue. These unplanned sonic intrusions are a low, quiet undercurrent rather than an invasion. Counterpointing a work that is already dynamic, they make it ever-changing and unpredictable.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK GARVIN}

."3$)t#&/&%6.$&/5&3 BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 53645"35403(t (30614 5*$,&54 Â&#x203A;8::<JJ@9C<J<IM@:<J8M8@C89C<Â&#x203A;

Tad Cooley and Amanda Kearns in Tribes, at City Theatre

[PLAY REVIEWS]

VOICES HEARD {BY TED HOOVER}

WHATEVER YOU can say about City

â&#x20AC;&#x153;absolutely RIVETINGâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; San Francisco Chronicle

â&#x20AC;&#x153;theatrical MAGICâ&#x20AC;?

One actor unleashes the Trojan War on-stage.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Variety

Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of Nina Raineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tribes, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complain you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get your moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth. There are about four plays going on inside, sometimes consecutively, sometimes concurrently, and if one of them doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold your interest, another will.

TRIBES continues through March 30. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

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Teagle F. Bougere ADAPTED FROM

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LISA PETERSON and DENIS Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;HARE DIRECTED BY

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March 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 6 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Theater

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Raine opens with what turns out to be her least-developed thread â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the life of a royally screwed-up British family. Beth and Christopher are parents to Daniel, Ruth and Billy. Everyone is an emotional nightmare and, with the exception of Billy, extravagant in their misery. John Judd and Laurie Klatscher, as Mom and Pop, with Alex HoefďŹ&#x201A;er and Robin Abramson as Daniel and Ruth, give almost volcanic performances and, under the aggressive direction of Stuart Carden, play full-out. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spend too much time there, because Raineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention centers on Billy, a recent university grad who is also deaf from birth. Billyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey takes him into the deaf community (a group his family has always kept him from). Tad Cooley gives

a quite moving performance as a young man slowly stepping out in the world after having been coddled for so long. And then Raine ďŹ nally gets to her real story, when Billy meets Sylvia, a young woman born to deaf parents and now going deaf herself. Sylvia straddles both the hearing and non-hearing worlds, and Amanda Kearns makes Sylviaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conďŹ&#x201A;icts and struggles immediate and powerful. We go back to the family drama for a bit, then more with Billy and how heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s navigating his way in the deaf community â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which Sylvia is leaving as, paradoxically, her hearing loss becomes more profound. And just because there are a few minutes to spare, out of nowhere Raine introduces another big, messy plot element (thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably a surprise, so I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reveal it). If the play sounds schizophrenic, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably appropriate that this review does as well. Because even though I was fully aware of the clichĂŠs, non sequiturs, extraneous characters and overripe and/or unnecessary plot points, I was intrigued by Raineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writing throughout and fascinated by much of what she was saying. Tribes is a mess, but a very compelling one. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

TROY STORY {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

EVEN AFTER two-and-a-half millennia, a

Homeric voice can still stir an audience â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially as embodied by Teagle F.


Bougere in Pittsburgh Public Theater’s production of An Iliad. Notice the article: Yes, this 2012 play by Lisa Peterson and Denis O’Hare is based on The Iliad, that epic poem you didn’t appreciate but fell asleep with in high school. This is not a rote recitation of Robert Fagles’ 1990 translation, but a lively reimagining by a gifted poet/storyteller who interacts with his audience, provides context and conveys the weight of the tragedies of war. Let’s curb my enthusiasm by admitting that classical mythology in general and the Trojan War (without Brad Pitt) in particular is not everyone’s cup of honeyed wine. But An Iliad harnesses a power greater than any amount of CGI, FX and other techno gimmicks: the human imagination. Bougere, in the role created by and for co-playwright O’Hare, wields some serious tools in storytelling: the original one-man show. Vivid, hyperbolic word pictures of the Greeks’ military might, Troy’s grandeur, the gods’ interference. Credibly, he reifies the range of characters — infant, king, woman and, especially, warriors — in choice scenes and dialogues. And just given the fact that the man is dashing about on stage for more than

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

an hour-and-a-half with no intermission, no break in his role, certainly gives Bougere a lock on Stamina of the Year Award, if such existed. Director Jesse Berger has put the spirit as well as the words of The Iliad front and center (and occasionally up on platforms). Marion Williams’ almost colorless post-industrial (post-apocalyptic?) set and Godot-esque costume design underline the timelessness of the story. Seth Reiser’s lighting design, and Ryan Rumery’s music and sound design, provide punctuation so subtle as to be almost unnoticeable except for how everything works together so well.

PRESENTS...

BOEING BOEING

A comedy written by Marc Camoletti, translated by Beverly Cross and Francis Evans.

MARCH 21, 22, 23, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

For reservations please visit our website at www.mckeesportlittletheater.com or call 412-673-1100.

Celebrate Spring! Celebrate You! 2327 Murray Avenue • PiƩsburgh, Pa 15217 www.ecigpittsburgh.com • 412.421.0602

• Electronic CigareƩes & Related Products • Variety of E-juice Flavors • In-Store or Online Purchasing

AN ILIAD continues through April 6. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Here indeed has the Public fulfilled the promise of its “Masterpiece Season.” An Iliad is not just about a 3,000-year-old mythologized war, but the eternal seduction of the human race with Wrath, Strife, dreams of Glory and all those relevant, very non-ancient Homeric themes.

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One Day Can Change Your Life!

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust presents

TRUST

Cabaret Amazing performers. Intimate Venue.

One night in Pittsburgh.

Cabaret at Theater Square

TrustArts.org/CabaretSeries

Liz Callaway

Groups 10+ Tickets: 412-471-6930 Single Tickets: 412-456-6666

Clint Holmes May 12, 2014

April 7, 2014

ACCESSIBLE

SERVICES AVAILABLE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

03.2003.27.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {STAGE}

MARCH 20

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSON}

By tthe h Way, W Meet Vera Stark

“The Road Ahead-What’s Cookin’?” 4/1

5-8, 9:30-11pm

Mark Strickland

4/1

8pm

Gregory Porter

4/8

5-8, 9:30-11pm

Michele Bensen

4/8

8pm

Sean Jones Quartet CD release

4/15 5-9pm

Tim Stevens

Backstage Cabaret Backstage Cabaret Backstage

4/15 NO LATE SHOW 4/22 5-8PM, 9:30-11pm Tony DePaolis 4/22 8pm

Christian McBride Trio

4/29 5-8pm, 9:30-11pm Roger Humphries

Backstage Cabaret Backstage

4/29 8:30pm

Robert Glasper

Cabaret

5/6

Erik Lawrence

Backstage

5/13 5-9pm

Dan Wasson

Backstage

5/20 5-9pm

Nelson Harrison

Backstage

5/27 5-9pm

Eric DeFade

Backstage

5-9pm

+ THU., MARCH 20 {COMEDY} “More painfully awkward stories in a show about jokes, and how they can get you into trouble” is how they’re describing Mike Birbiglia’s new tour. Birbiglia is a storyteller and late-night talkht talk show favorite known wn for his comedy albums, s, critically acclaimed solo show ow Sleepwalk With Me and segments ments on This American Life. e. Thank God for Jokes hits the Byham Theater tonight. night. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. ntown. $33.25-38.25. 412-456-6666 456-6666 or www.trustarts.org org

and Sunday. Saturday’s daytime screening is followed by a Twin Peaks Party and Concert ($12-15), with renowned, Lynch-themed band Silencio, plus a costume contest, homemade cherry pie and more. BO 7:30 p.m. (with $1 damn good coffee and doughnuts). Continues through Sun., March 23. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $7 daily; discount Black Lodge Passes available. 412-563-0368 or www.the hollywood dormont. org

{SCREEN}

PRESENTED BY

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

Twin Peaks, which ran just two seasons on ABC BC in 1990 and ’91, managed to be both a cult favorite te and (for a while, at least) extraordinarily popular.. David Lynch’s surreal-noir murder mystery remains singular. The Hollywood Theater’s er’s four-day Twin Peaks Marathon hon begins with tonight’s screening eening of the pilot, continues es tomorrow with season one’s remaining seven episodes, and nd splits season two between een Saturday

MARCH 20

Lynn Nottage’s Intimate Apparel was staged at City Theatre in 2007; she later won the Pulitzer Prize, for Ruined. Now, The Rep presents Nottage’s 2011 satire By the Way, Meet Vera Stark. Set in the 1930s, the play follows a black film actress whose roles are limited to housemaids. In real life, Vera is a maid for actress Gloria Mitchell; the two clash when cast in the same Southern epic. Maria Bey-Coates and Kelly Trumbell star. Point Park University graduate and Broadway veteran Tomé Cousin directs. The first performance is tonight. Angela Suico 8 p.m. Continues through April 6. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15-27. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

{STAGE} Not content that The Dark Knight Rising was partly shot here, Grand Buffet rapper Lord Grunge created a satirical Steeltown version of the superhero. Last year’s production of Pittsbugh productio was so popular it’s Batman nw back. The reprise is bigger, with a cast including local luminaries Patrick Jordan, lumin Ultimate Donny, Weird Ultim Paul Petroskey, Dave Mansueto, Davon Man Magwood and more … Mag plus local lo hip-hop legend Sage Sag Francis as “New England Bane.” E Tonight’s the first of three performances at t the t Kelly-Strayhorn Theater. BO 9 p.m. T Also Als 9 p.m. Fri., March Mar 21, and 9 p.m. Sat., March Mar 22. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $25-30. www. pittsburghbatman.com pittsb

+ FFRI., MARCH 21

Mike Birbiglia

{TALK}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KYLE ERICKSEN}

The “new economy” doesn’t mean just a society have to m digital. For Pittsburgh’s gone dig Economy Working Group New Eco (a project of the Thomas Center), it’s an Merton C economic system designed


{IMAGE COURTESY OF CHARLES “TEENIE” HARRIS ARCHIVE, CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

sp otlight

Charles “Teenie” Harris was a peerless documenter of black urban life; he was also amazingly prolific. So when Sean Gibson was asked to guest-curate Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh, for the Carnegie Museum of Art, he had 700 images to choose from. Gibson’s great-grandfather, Pittsburgh-based Negro League great Josh Gibson, famously occupied some of these photos; so, it turned out, did Sean’s grandfather, Josh Gibson Jr., seen in the early ’40s as a teenage Homestead Grays batboy. The exhibit, which opens March 22 (a week before the Pirates do), includes previously unseen 16 mm film footage that Harris — who helped found the Pittsburgh Crawfords, another powerhouse club — shot of Negro League games at Forbes Field. But the focus is on the 25 still images Sean Gibson chose — and not just those immortalizing major-league legends like Jackie Robinson, Roberto Clemente, Willie Stargell and Curtis Roberts (the Pirates’ first black player). Other photos capture the scene in sandlots from Ammon Field, in the Hill District, to racially integrated Little League contests of the 1950s and women’s softball in St. Clair Village. Sean Gibson, who heads the Pittsburgh-based Josh Gibson Foundation, was deeply impressed by the breadth of Harris’ efforts. “He just took photos,” says Gibson. “That’s the great thing about his collection. He just captured everything.” Bill O’Driscoll Exhibit runs Sat., March 22-Sept. 22. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95 (kids under 3 free). 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

to benefit people and communities, not globo-corps, and where nature is healed rather than simply exploited. The NEWG’s Celebration of Pittsburgh’s New Economy begins today, with afternoon and evening sessions featuring nationally known neweconomy scholar, author and activist Gar Alperovitz. Tomorrow, on the Carnegie Mellon campus, there’s a day-long New Economy Market and workshops, and Alperovitz discusses “New Economy Solutions.” BO 2 p.m. (Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland) and 5 p.m. (Baker Hall, CMU campus, pus, Oakland). Also 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., March 22 (Bakerr Hall). Free. www.newpgh. pgh. wordpress.com

Copacetic Comics and Toonseum present this annual showcase for creator-owned, self-published, small-press and handmade comics and artist’s books. Nearly 60 local artists will expo, including names like Artnoose, John Peña, Lizzee Solomon and Wayne Wise. Special guests include at least one comics god — Fantagraphics founder and publisher Gary Groth — and comics goddess Trina Robbins, a pioneer in women’s underground comics (Wimmen’s Comix) turned comics historian. Local guests include Ed Piskor Rugg. there’ss and Jim R ugg. Then there

{WORDS} Leslie “Ezra” Smith is a longtime force on the local arts scene, from spoken-word performances and slam poetry y to stage acting. As co-host of the e Eargasm Open Mic Series, he also so spotlights other talented folks. But at tonight’s Eargasm, m, Smith himself is the featured guest. atured guest Of course, the program, at Homewood’s Lounge 7101, still includes open-mic slots for poets, singers, musicians and comedians. BO 9 p.m.midnight. 7101 Frankstown Ave., Homewood. $10. eargasmopenmic@gmail.com

MARCH 22 Pittsburgh Indy Comics Expo Art by Theo Ellsworth

+ WED., MARCH 26 {STAGE}

MARCH 22 Spring Flower Show both sight and sound at its Spring Flower Show, which shines the spotlight on flowers daffodils, tulips and like daffod hyacinths while celebrating a theme. Sculptures made musical th from refurbished instruments ref complement the flowers; compl recordings of well-loved reco tunes tun score your stroll through certain rooms; th and a plant arrangements even “mimic the rise and fall of musical notes.” The show was designed by Hays Landscape Architecture Studio. AS A 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through C April Ap 20. One Schenley Park, Park Oakland. $11-15. 412-622-6914 or www. 412 12 1 2-62 phipps.conservatory.org phipps p .co

for the artist, who leads the sculpture program at Cleveland University, takes place today. AS 5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 16. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www.boxheartgallery.com

+ SUN., MARCH 23 {OUTDOORS} Like other trees, maples filter the air, lower temperatures, add beauty to our surroundings

and more. But more importantly, they make syrup. Today, the Jennings Environmental Education Center in Slippery Rock celebrates the tree and its famous byproduct with a seasonal maple-sugaring event. After a presentation exploring the many benefits of trees, attendees can see a working evaporator and sample maple syrup during a guided walk through the park. The event is free but popular, so arrive early for a seat. AS 2 p.m. 2951 Prospect Road,

Newly formed Uncumber Theatrics debuts with Her Things: An Interactive Estate Sale, at ModernFormations Gallery. Audience members must learn what happened to the late Willa Ballard, a “turn-of-the-century recluse” who died under mysterious circumstances. Just as in a mystery video game, attendees can examine objects and question characters, but beware: These folks might not be sharing everything they know. The story was created by Uncumber artistic director Ayne Terceira, who worked on Bricolage’s immersive project STRATA, and the cast features local improv vets. AS 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., March 29. 4919 Penn Ave, Garfield. $18-22. 412-362-0274 or www.uncumbertheatrics.com

Art by Irina Koukhanova

{ART}

+ SAT., MARCH 22

PIX guest Theo Ellsworth, a Montana-based artist whose visionary work (Capacity, Sleeper Car) also earned him a solo show at the Toonseum. The opening reception for Theo Ellsworth: Memory and Identity is Fri., March 21. BO PIX: 10 a.m-5 p.m. and 7-11 p.m. 10 S. 19th St., South Side. Free. www.pixcomics.com

{COMICS}

{EXHIBIT}

The Pittsburgh Indy Comics Expo — PIX to you — returns.

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens features

NEWS

Slippery Rock. Free. 724-7946011 or www.dcnr.state.pa.us

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With visual art, perspective is key. Where one person sees an old urinal, another sees a fountain. Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year Irina Koukhanova’s Panoptic Landscape is a collection of painting and sculpture that “captures an all-encompassing system viewed from the perspective of a human or an animal, an adult or a child, and alludes to authority, power play and the dynamics of entrapment.” A reception

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An Evening of Music

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

MARCH 22

Paul Luc APRIL 4

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

The THEATER BOEING. A bachelor Rough & BOEING, is dating 3 stewardesses at the same time, unbeknownst to them. Tumble When the airport shuts down, all APRIL 12 Joe Cheeta’s High Energy personality, Quick Sense of Humor, Combined with his Ability to get Everyone Involved makes Game Show Junkiessm a Fantastic Time to be had by all!

$2.00 16Yuengling Drafts

Arsena Schroeder W/ Angela Mignanellie

oz

pm

am

9:30 -1:30

Presented By

sponsored by

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3 women are in town, thinking they’ll stay w/ him. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. BY THE WAY, MEET VERA STARK. Satire of race in the glamorous days of Old Hollywood, presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 6. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. DEADLY LESSONS. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., March 22, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 724-344-2069. DOROTHY IN OZ. Dark retelling of the Wizard of Oz. Presented by Rage of the Stage Players. Mature audiences. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat, 5 & 8 p.m. Thru March 29. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-292-8427. HAY FEVER. Comedy by Noel Coward. Presented by The Heritage

mystery dinner theater. Sat., Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, March 22, 5 p.m. Tambellini 2 p.m. Thru March 30. Seton Bridgeville Restaurant, Bridgeville. Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. 412-414-1988. HER THINGS: AN INTERACTIVE MURDER AT THE CONVENT.. ESTATE SALE. Interactive theater AND THENTHERE WERE NUN. performance. Presented by Cabaret dinner theater. Fri, Sat. Uncumber Theatrics. March 26-28, Thru March 22. Crowne Plaza 8 p.m. and Sat., March 29, 3 & Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, THE PIRATES OF TREASURE Garfield. 412-362-0274. ISLAND. Based on the AN ILIAD. A new classic tale by Robert adaptation Homer’s Louis Stevenson. epic poem. Presented Presented by by Pittsburgh Public Greensburg Civic Theater. Wed-Fri, www. per pa Theatre. Fri., March 21, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., pghcitym .co 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and March 22, 1 p.m. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru April 1. Greensburg Garden O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. and Civic Center, Greensburg. 412-316-1600. 724-836-8000. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE - A PITTSBURGH BATMAN. The Dark NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The Knight presented as never before, courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice in Pittsburgh-Style. March 20-22, is now in session w/ “real” cases 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, involving zombies, spaceships, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. THE PSYCHIC: A MURDER and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. MYSTERY OF SORTS. Adam Cabaret at Theater Square, Webster, a writer, turns to selling Downtown. 412-456-6666. psychic readings to make the rent. MACDEATH. Interactive murder

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Last Sunday of every month! 8 to 11pm

He soon finds himself involved in a string of hilarious murders. Fri, Sat, 8:15 p.m. and Thru March 20, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 22. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. TRIBES. Billy, a deaf twentysomething who is adept at lipreading the brash discourse of his family, falls for a woman who’s losing her hearing & everyone is forced to learn a lesson about listening. Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 30. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru April 24 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MIKE BIRBIGLIA. 7:30 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. POETRY.COM HAPPY HOUR STYLE. Where poetry meets comedy. Feat. Pittsburgh’s premiere poets & comedians. Third Thu of every month, 6-9 p.m. Thru May 15 The Lounge on Verona, Verona. 412-871-5521.

FRI 21 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru March 21 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. DAVID KAYE, MIKE WYSOCKI, SHARON DALY. 7 p.m. West View Fireman’s Banquet Hall, West View. 412-920-5653. THE DRAFT. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MATT MOLCHEN. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MICHAEL O’KEEFE. Race to the Coffin Comedy Tour. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. RACE TO THE COFFIN COMEDY TOUR PRESENTS: MIKE O’KEEFE & FRIENDS. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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VISUAL

ART

“Spring Painting,” by Rose Duggan, from You Can’t Be Serious: Abstract Minimalist Paintings by Rose Duggan, at Backstage Bar, Downtown

NEW THIS WEEK BE GALLERIES. Flow: Recent Iterations in Clay. Work by Laura Jean McLaughlin & Kevin Snipes. Opening reception March 22, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Teenie Harris Photographs: Baseball in Pittsburgh. Feat. an inside look at some of the greatest moments in Negro League, Major League, & sandlot baseball in Pittsburgh. Opens March 22. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Between Abstraction & Realism. Work by Bettina Clowney. Opening reception March 22, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. City Scenes: Finding Harmony in Pittsburgh’s Changing Colors. Paintings by Claire Hardy. Opening reception: March 20, 7-8:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-716-1390.

ONGOING 3RD STREET GALLERY. Internationally Inspired. A creative response to the 2013 Carnegie International by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Artists talk March 29, 6-8 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. Porous Sediments. Installation by Haylee Ebersole. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Dream Body. Video installation by Blaine Siegel. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s

Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Annual High School Teachers’ Exhibition. Feat. high school art & media educators’ artwork. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ARTICA. David Gonano. Photography. Garfield. 412-661-0641. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. You Can’t Be Serious. Abstract minimalist paintings by Rose Duggan. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Guentner’s Pittsburgh. Work by James Guentner. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Artist reception: March 22, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRYANT STREET LIMITED. Nostalgic Pastel Creations. Work by Linda Barnicott. Highland Park. 412-362-2200. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Tin Can Tramp Folk Art. Mixed media by Steph Neary. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more.

Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Dancing Color. Paintings by Marion Di Quinzio. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG GARDEN AND CIVIC CENTER. Westmoreland Photographer’s Society Exhibition. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 54

FRI 21 - SAT 22

Sunday

WARREN DURSO. March 21-22, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 22 THE HAPPY HOUR COMEDY SHOW. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. KNIGHTS OF THE ARCADE: EPIC D&D COMEDY ADVENTURE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MORPH ILLOGICAL. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

Starts at Noon - 21+ Limited Tables Available For Reservations email: info@roundcornercantina.com

Music by Edgar Um

Family Style Taco Feast

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM

SOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm. 1$ OFF ALL CRAFT BREWS! (Bourbon- Bacon. Rum- honeydew, peach, apples & cinnamon. Tequila- mango & chili pepper. Vodka- espresso, blueberry& lemon, gummy, grape, pineapple, berry, pear.)) 412-918-1215 9 8 5 19088 C Carson S Street l S Southside h id l 4 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

TUE 25 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 26 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

westmorelandphotographers society.ning.com. Greensburg. 724-836-1757. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Surfacing. Work by Nina Marie Barbuto, Ashley Andrykovitch, Alberto Almarza & Samantha McDonough. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Positive Space. Juried art & design student showcase. Wexford. 412-367-9300. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Recent Work by Lindsay Dill & Aldona Bird. Downtown. 412-391-4100. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg.

historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MCKEESPORT REGIONAL HISTORY & HERITAGE CENTER. The Civil War in Pennsylvania. Feat. 4 life size figures that help tell the story of how people from Western

Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Rarefied Vibes. Work by Alysa Sheats & John Shook. Garfield. 412-443-0606. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. March to a Different Drummer. Watercolors by Doug Brown. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Fractured. Paintings by David Berger. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Plume. Installation by Ian Brill. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Fugue States. Work by Cy Gavin. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship

Pennsylvania became involved in the war effort, either as soldiers, factory workers, or eye witnesses. McKeesport. 412-678-1832. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Spring Flower Show. Showcase of musical genres through whimsical sculptures made out of up-cycled instruments alongside thousands of vibrant tulips, daffodils,

14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Closing reception: March 22, 2-4 p.m. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

hyacinths & other seasonal favorites. Opens March 22. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaurthemed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

EVENT: Black Angels Over Tuskegee, presented by New Horizon Theater at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty CRITIC: Kelvin Beachum, 24,

WHEN: Fri.,

March 14

FRI 21 - SUN 23

SAT 22 CANTE JONDO FOR TIKKUN OLAM. Flamenco dance performance. 7 p.m. American Jewish Museum, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010.

B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

SUN 23 PBT AT THE PALACE. Dance selection from the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre & Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra. 3 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FUNDRAISERS THU 20 ARTICULATE ART AUCTION. Benefits the Children’s Sickle Cell Foundation. 6-9 p.m. Sonoma Grille, Downtown. 412-291-6200. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY UNITY BANQUET & SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT. Keynote by Lamman Rucker. 5 p.m. Power Center Ballroom, Duquesne University, Downtown.

FRI 21

& code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 47 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. WOMEN OF TEMPLE SINAI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISER. Feat. live music, the Amish Monkeys, silent auction, more. 7 p.m. Temple Sinai, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-0725.

POLITICS THU 20 DOWNTOWN PUBLIC WORKS TOWN HALL. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100.

LITERARY THU 20

BOOK SIGNING W/ GINA MAZZA. Author of Everything Matters, Nothing Matters: For Women Who Dare to Live with Exquisite Calm, Euphoric Creativity & Divine www. per Clarity. 6-8 p.m. pa pghcitym Amazing Books, .co Downtown. 412-471-1899. BLACK & WHITE PARTY. BOOKS IN THE Benefits Every Child, Inc. AFTERNOON. The Orphan 6-9 p.m. Diesel, South Side. Master’s Son by Adam Johnson. 412-665-0600. 1 & 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, NEW TO YOU INDOOR Oakland. 412-622-3151. FLEATIQUE. 9 a.m. Plum Senior ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK Community Center. 412-795-2330. CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read 6TH ANNUAL INCLUSIVE VOICES LUNCHEON. Benefits the Program to Aid Citizen Enterprise. 11:30 a.m.1 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 412-562-0290.

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SUN 23

STEFANIE WIELKOPOLAN, CAROLYNE WHELAN, MEGHAN TUTOLO, BETH FLEESON, ATHENA PANGIKAS-MILLER. Poetry reading. 2-4 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

RICKY MANNING IRISH BAND, SLIM FORSYTHE COUNTRY BIGBAND, RAISED BY WOLVES AND SLIM MCFORSYTHES IRISH WHISKY REBELLION

Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS.. Feat. Ben Gwin, SJ Guzik, T.C. Jones, Richard L. Gegick. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. PIPER KERMAN. Discussion w/ author of Orange is the New Black. 7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1140. TIM SEIBLES, YAH LIONESS BORNE. Poetry reading presented by HEArt: Human Equity Through Art. 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

FRI 21 KEA MICHAELS, GLENN SURGEST. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. The Potter’s Field by Ellis Peters. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WELCOME SPRING: POETRY READING. Feat. Angele Ellis & Mike Schneider. 7:30-9 p.m. South Side Presbyterian Church, South Side. 412-431-0118.

SAT 22 FREE SNAKE POEMS ABOUT SNAKES. Rachael Deacon, Shawn

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

FRI, MARCH 21, 9PM BLUES

THU/MARCH 20/10PM

THE PAWNBROKERS

CHARM CHAIN + THE FIVE 10’S

SAT, MARCH 22, 9PM ALT COUNTRY/ROCK

THU/MARCH 27/10PM

TUE 25

I’m here with a couple of mentees. We’re here with Pentecostal Temple. We’ve got a mentorship program and brought them out to get some exposure to something other than just playing games and watching TV. [It was] a very intellectual type of play [about the first black pilots in the U.S. Air Force]. It really changes your mindset and perspective on life and what our forefathers went through. The guys played their parts well. You could really feel the emotion throughout the [play]. You could really see the transformation that happened in the individuals’ lives. I’d be happy to see it again. I’m used to seeing stuff at the Benedum and Byham and to see something here, at a theater right here in East Liberty, was really good. I’ve never heard of this theater, and I come by this street all the time.

PETER PAN. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. March 21-22, 8 p.m. and Sun., March 23, 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-279-8887. SHADES OF LIGHT. Performance by Texture Contemporary Ballet. March 21-22, 8 p.m. and Sun., March 23, 2 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

THURS, MARCH 20, 9PM IRISH ROCK/CLASSIC COUNTRY

SUN 23

a businessman and professional football player from Fox Chapel

DANCE

Maddey, Margaret Bashaar, Tommy Venet, more. 7-10:30 p.m. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. RUN GUTSY: A READING. Donations accepted to benefit the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 813-205-7058.

GOOD BROTHER EARL

BOOTY-LESQUE BURLESQUE SHOW

SUN, MARCH 23, 9PM AMERICANA/BLUEGRASS

WED 26 CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing Mary Szyist, Incarnadine 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-621-6880.

THE BLIND OWL BAND PLUS THE ARMADILLOS

THU/APRIL 3/10PM SQUIDLING BROTHERS & PAIN SOLUTION SIDESHOW

MON, MARCH 24, 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH SGD

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

TUES, MARCH 25, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH CHRIS PARKER 3

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

KIDSTUFF THU 20 MISTER ROGERS DAY. Celebrating Mister Rogers’ birthday w/ a visit from Mr. McFeely, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. QUILTING BEE. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 20 - FRI 21 LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FAVORITE FLOWERS. Interactive lessons, healthy snacks, more. Ages 2-3. March 20-21, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. TWIST RESIST. Make a one-of-akind painting. Thru March 21, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Available at better beer retailers, including:

Banksville Beer Bellevue Beer McBroom Distribution Save On Beer

THU 20 - WED 26 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s

- Cranberry

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CTRS

CLINICAL TRIALS RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

ENDOMETRIOSIS

Do you have a medical condition which is not listed?

CONSTIPATION

Give us a call.

UTERINE FIBROIDS

Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call

Currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

BIRTH CONTROL HIGH CHOLESTEROL WEIGHT LOSS/OBESITY

412-363-1900 for more information.

INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

www.CTRSLLC.com

The countdown is on!

Enroll in a health care plan to get coverage under the Affordable Care Act before March 31st and avoid fees associated with not being covered.

Have questions? Want help through the enrollment process? Contatct our Patient Health care Coordinator at 412.258.9539 or healthcareinfo@ppwp.org 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org 7 centers in western Pennsylvania

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 57

[WORKSHOP] Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 21 RAISE THE JOLLY ROGER! Piratethemed party. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Fiber fashion. Ages 10+. 5-7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 724-462-4170.

SAT 22 HAND BUILD W/ CLAY: COIL POTS. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. ORIENTATION FOR 5TH ANNUAL MISS EBONY TEENAGE & MISS PRINCESS PAGEANT. Ages 9-17. www.missebonyteenage.com 10 a.m. Crossroads United Methodist Church-East Liberty Campus, East Liberty. 412-727-1092. PAJAMA NIGHTS: DINOSAUR EXPLORERS & FRIENDS. Experiment together as junior paleontologists & see how scientists gather insight into the lives of extinct animals. Ages 2-8. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SAT 22 - SUN 23 QUACKTACULAR. Use a map to discover ducks in exhibits, make a duck craft, & meet a feathered friend at story time. March 22-23, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235.

SUN 23

’Tis the season to get serious about gardening plans, and the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture wants to help. On Wed., March 26, farmer Chris Brittenburg leads

Building Healthy Organic Soil for Your Vegetable Garden, part of the PASA Master Class series. The workshop, at the East End Food Co-op, will teach you everything you need to know to make the best soil for your crops. Educator Nicole Kubiczki will also be on hand to discuss backyard composting. 6:30 p.m. Wed., March 26. 7516 Meade St., Point Breeze. Free, but a $10 donation to the PASA is suggested. 412-242-3598 or www.eastendfood.coop

TUE 25 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 26 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

ART & STORIES. Drawing workshop. Ages 4+. 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GUEST ARTISTS: SAPLING PRESS. Explore letters & words 4TH ANNUAL MATHEMATICS with a letterpress machine. CHALLENGE & CONFERENCE. 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum High school students only. 9 a.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. University of Pittsburgh 412-322-5058. at Greensburg. PLAY W/ CLAY ON 724-837-7040. THE POTTERS WHEEL. ART NIGHTS AT Sun, 12-2 p.m. Thru THE SPACE March 30 Children’s www. per UPSTAIRS. Bring your pa Museum of Pittsburgh, pghcitym own medium for a .co North Side. 412-322-5058. communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FIRST 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, GARDEN. Unravel a seed to Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. explore its insides, learn what BOB QUALTERS: THE ARTIST a plant needs to survive, more. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.- IN ACTION. Film screening w/ reception to follow at be galleries, 12 p.m. Thru March 31 Phipps 3583 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Conservatory & Botanical Garden, 6:30 p.m. Melwood Screening Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. Room, Oakland. 412-361-0873. FILM SCREENING OF SAVING! ROMARE BEARDEN’S PITTSBURGH RECOLLECTIONS. 6-7 p.m. Greater Pittsburgh MAPLE SUGARING EVENT. Arts Council, Downtown. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental 412-391-2060 x 237. Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

OTHER STUFF THU 20

Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

For more information, call 412-246-5367.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MON 24

OUTSIDE SUN 23

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. NATIONAL AVIARY AT NIGHT. Tropical-themed exhibits, music, food, more. Third Thu of every month, 5-9 p.m. Thru May 15 National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME LECTURES: MUSIC 101. Rebecca Cherian, Trombone: “From the Back Row.” 12:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TRACING YOUR IRISH & SCOTS-IRISH ANCESTORS. 1-4 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. TRINA ROBBINS. Discussion w/ the Women’s Comics “Herstorian.” Part of Will Eisner Week. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WINTER VERMICOMPOSTING WORKSHOP. 6:30-8 p.m. CCI Center, South Side. 412-488-7490 x 226. CONTINUES ON PG. 60

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014


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REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. 9 a.m.12 p.m. Bethel Park Community Center, Bethel Park. 412-854-9120.

THU 20 - FRI 21 ASK THE EXPERT. Community education program to provide answers to medical questions. Mon-Fri. Thru March 31 UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. 412-784-4121.

FRI 21

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. GAME CHANGERS PROJECT FILM FORUM – INDIVISIBLE MAN. Discussion & reception with GCP filmmakers follows. 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. SECOND STEP PROGRAM: DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN. Mervis Hall. 7:30-10 a.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-648-1542. SEMINAR ON NEW ECONOMY SOLUTIONS W/ GAR ALPEROVITZ. 2-4:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. STORYTELLING & HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM: FREE

SPEECH. Keynote speaker: Henry Reese, City of Asylum Pittsburgh. 12-3 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-3982. WIGLE’S 92 NEIGHBORHOODS SERIES: EAST LIBERTY. Celebrating East Liberty w/ speaker Kevin Sousa, food & drink from Station Street Hot Dogs, the Livermore, more. 7-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

FRI 21 - SAT 22 8TH ANNUAL FARM TO TABLE CONFERENCE. Conference on local food production & consumption w/ cooking demos, local food tasting, more. farmtotablepa.com March 21-22 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000. DISCUSSION W/ GAR ALPEROVITZ. Discussion on economy solutions, presented by the New Economy Working Group. 5-8 p.m. and Sat., March 22, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. THE ROSIE ROGERS COWGIRL SHOW. Tongue-in-cheek story by Rosie Trump feat. contemporary dance, video collage, & narrative. Part of the Trespass Residency Series. March 21-22 Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-325-7037.

SAT 22 BOOK TALK EVENT W/ DR. RICHARD KURIN. Author of The Smithsonian’s History of America in 101 Objects. 11 a.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. THE GAME CHANGERS PROJECT. Meet filmmakers & advocates behind the push for Black male achievement in Pittsburgh & beyond. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MEZCAL CLASS. 4 p.m. Verde, Garfield. 412-404-8487. PIX: THE PITTSBURGH INDY COMICS EXPO. Creator-owned, self-published, small-press, & handmade comics. Presented by ToonSeum. 10 a.m.-11 p.m. 10 South 19th St., South Side. 412-232-0199. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. WOODCUT OPEN STUDIO. 1-4 p.m. Tugboat Print Shop, Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663.

SAT 22 - SUN 23 SPRING WORKSHOPS: GLASS FLOWERS. Sat, Sun, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat., May 3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and May 10-11, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Thru April 6 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-721-7812.

SUN 23 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5 p.m. Thru April 6 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480.

Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru April 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. WOMEN’S JOB SEEKER SUPPORT GROUP. 2-3:30 p.m. The Center for Women, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4400.

TUE 25 BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, 6:458:15 p.m. Thru March 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

GREENFIELD CLEANUP Even if you’re not a Greenfield resident, you can still help make the neighborhood a better place. On Sun., March 30, from 2-5 p.m., Allegheny CleanWays will host a cleanup of Bigelow Overlook, near the Bud Hammer Playground. Volunteers should dress for the weather and expect to get dirty; gloves, trash bags and other materials will be provided, as will pizza. Email Leah.Thill@ AlleghenyCleanWays.org for information.

CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOSHER WINE TASTING. Feat. Kosher wines from South America & Spain, Tango music by Aqui Tango, tapas, more. 4-6 p.m. Parkway Jewish Center, Penn Hills. 412-823-4338. OPEN MIC & CRAFT BEER SWAP. 6:30 p.m. Bridgeville Public Library, Bridgeville. 412-812-2262. PERSONAL RENEWAL. w/ Phil Jannetta. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. PUBLIC WRITING OF THE NAMES & CONVERSATION ABOUT THE FEMINIST ART MOVEMENT. w/ Jennifer Myers. 1-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

MON 24 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. CAREGIVING SERIES. Learn how to care for yourself while caring for a relative or friend. Mon, 1 p.m. Thru March 31 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Fourth

BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. Every other Tue, 7 p.m. Thru March 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION. Tue, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thru April 1 Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8821. NINA PALEY. Carnegie Mellon School of Art’s Lecture Series. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970.

WED 26 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. BIBLICAL PROPHECY: THINKING PROPHETICALLY IN THE 21ST CENTURY. Schaff Lecture Series. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1345. BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru March 26 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE CIVIL WAR: WESTERN THEATER - A GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon


Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DAN RATHER. Pittsburgh Speakers Series. 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 414-392-4900. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. IN REASON WE TRUST. Documentary screening presented by the Center for Inquiry. Non-perishable items will be collected for the food bank. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PASA MASTER CLASS BUILDING HEALTHY ORGANIC SOIL FOR YOUR VEGETABLE GARDEN. Workshop presented by Chris Brittenburg & Nicole Kubiczki, Who Cooks For You Farm & Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

AUDITIONS DAY ROOM WINDOW. Day Room Window at The New Hazlett Theater. 6 Allegheny Square, North Side. March 31 & April 3 from 4:30-8pm. Multiracial cast of women ages 15-25. Prepare 2 minute dramatic contemporary monologue. Bring head shot & resume. Actors will be paid. Schedule audition w/ Kathryn Kelly at kskelly412@gmail.com. Information: www.dayroom window.com New Hazlett Theater, North Side. DISCOVER ME! Seeking 2 caucasian actresses age 18-30 for the movie production Discover Me! Call Robert at 412-209-9868. FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. Auditions for Parade. April 1-2. AEA & Non-AEA actors for male/ female roles of all ethnicities. Females who can play age 13-16 also needed. Prepare 32 bars of standard up-tempo musical theater piece, 32 bars of a ballad if second song is requested. Please do not sing any songs from Parade. www.frontporchpgh.com CLO Academy, Downtown. 412-281-3973. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for The Crucible. March 29-30. Actors ages 11+, 1-min. dramatic dialogue. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-254-4633.

NEWS

LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING COMPANY. Auditions for ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL Orlando by Sarah Ruhl. COMPANY. Auditions for Jesus March 28. Equity & Non-Union Christ Superstar in Concert. actors (2 female, 3 male), all roles March 22-23. Seeking Principal are open. Prepare a period Singing Roles, Male & Female or contemporary comedic Dancer/Singers Ensemble, & the monologue, & be prepared to Superstar Choir. www.center retell you favorite funny story. auditions.org/index.php/ unseamdshakes@gmail.com Thru professional-company/jesus-christMarch 28. Third Presbyterian superstar Auditions for The Sound Church, Oakland. 412-621-0244. of Music. May 17-18. Seeking principal roles, von Trapp children, & male/female ensemble. ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF www.centerauditions.org . PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBER Lincoln Park Performing Arts SCREENING. Open to artists 18 or Center. 724-259-6443. over working & living within a 150LITTLE LAKE THEATRE mile radius of Pgh. Applications for COMPANY. Auditions for 2014 video, installation, & other largeseason. March 16 & 30. scale works must be submitted by Males/females ages 14+. More 4pm, April 3 to Unit 102, 100 43rd information & scheduling info at Street, Lawrenceville. Applications www.littlelake.org/auditions & full detail available at www. Little Lake Theatre, aapgh.org. Ice House Studios, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0348. MCKEESPORT THE GALLERY 4. Seeking LITTLE THEATER. submissions for Salon Interviewing directors Show 2014. Send image for 2014-2015 season. files of up to 5 finished . w ww per Send resume by pieces to thegallery4@ a p ty ci h pg March 31 to: gmail.com. Include title, .com McKeesport Little dimensions, & medium(s) Theater P.O. Box 431 & write SALON APPLICANT McKeesport, PA 15134 or email 2014 in the subject line. Deadline: dfallows@7seasandtours.com. March 22. Call or email for info. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for THE NEW YINZER. Seeking 9 to 5: The Musical. March 19 & original essays about literature, 22. Cold readings, dance & 32 bars music, TV or film, & also essays of music, accompanist provided. generally about Pittsburgh. To www.monriverarts.org/audition see some examples, visit www. Grand Theatre. 412-628-1032. newyinzer.com & view the OPEN CALL COMPETITION. From current issue. Email all pitches, the producers of The PULSE On submissions & inquiries to Tour, Open Call Competition gives newyinzer@gmail.com. dancers the opportunity to PITTSBURGH ARTISTS AGAINST be critiqued by professional FRACKING. Seeking artists for choreographers/dancers & talent group exhibition. 1/3 of proceeds agents & compete for scholarships, benefit Protect Our Parks, a awards, prizes, & trophies. grassroots organization committed March 28-30. Email Heather to keeping fracking out of County Adzima at heather@ Parks. Bring 1 - 2 pieces to Garfield ptcproductionsnyc.com Hillman Artworks on Tuesday, April 1st. Center for Performing Arts, 6-8pm. Bob Ziller for more info. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3045. www.protectparks.org POOR YORICKS PLAYERS. 412-606-1220. Auditions for 2014 season. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR March 29-30. 2-min. classical SOCIETY NEW MEMBER monologue. www.pooryoricks SCREENING. Screening March 23. players.org Tall Trees Amphitheater, New members must register to be Monroeville. 412-537-1705. considered for membership. Drop SHADOWS & FLAMES off works at 1 p.m. & return for PRODUCTIONS. Seeking men & pickup at 3 p.m. www.pittsburgh women for the original musical, watercolorsociety.com East Liberty A Pirate’s Tale. March 25-26, Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 7-9:30 p.m. Prepare 32 bars of a 412-731-0636. song & a 2-minute monologue. THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY Dress for a movement audition. FOUNDATION’S TEENS 4 Email your preferred time & date CHANGE GRANT PROGRAM. to: srolly@hotmail.com. Pittsburgh Accepting proposals for youth-led Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. projects or projects designed THE UNREHEARSED specifically for youth that promote SHAKESPEARE PROJECT. social change including disability Auditions for The Comedy of rights, LGBTQ rights, peace/human Errors. March 31 & April 1. rights, racial justice, more. Grants Non-union male/female actors will range from $250-$2,000. experienced w/ heightened trcfwpa.org/grants/grantlanguage & ability to play multiple applications. 412-243-9250. www.unrehearsedshakespeare WASHINGTON PA FILM project.com. Email auditions@ FESTIVAL. Seeking films unrehearsedshakespeareproject. com Third Presbyterian Church, 90 min. or less. Complete rules Oakland. & entry form at www.highland UNSEAM’D SHAKESPEARE ridgecdc.org. 724-678-4225.

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61


BOTTOMS UP!! A guide for hot and safe anal sex. If you’ve got a bottom...bring it!! Tuesday, March 25 @ 7:00pm

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I am a liberal parent. I always thought that I could accept anything that parenthood might throw at me. I knew that I could embrace my son if he were straight, gay, bi, trans, etc. If there is a controlling consciousness of the universe, it has a nasty sense of humor. My son is sexually attracted to Pokémon. He dropped hints that I didn’t really pick up on. But I have stumbled across evidence of his browsing habits that left me pretty clear about his proclivities. He is now 17, so thoughts that he would “grow out of it” are fading. My biggest fear is that he won’t find someone to pair with. I want my children to be happy. Should I address this with him? Try to discourage an orientation that, to me, seems kind of pathetic? DAD OF POKÉMON ENTHUSIAST

“It’s possible that DOPE’s son is just a curious kid who finds unusual sex fascinating, with his browsing habits no more revealing than discarded tickets to a carnival act,” says Jesse Bering, Ph.D., the author of Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us. “But if Pokémon lights this boy’s fire in the ways DOPE imagines, there’s not much DOPE can do. By age 17, his son’s singular erotic profile is pretty much fixed.” What might cause a young man to take a sexual interest in Pokémon? “Nobody knows why some people are more prone to developing unusual patterns of attraction than others,” says Bering. “But the best available evidence suggests that some people — mostly males — have a genetic predisposition for being ‘sexually imprinted’ during development.” It’s like this: Some kids are going to sexually imprint on random shit; kids are exposed to random shit all the time; there’s no way of predicting which kids will imprint on what shit; so there’s no way to prevent Pokémon fetishists or foot fetishists or clown fetishists from happening. A small number of our fellow human beings will have kinks that strike others as pathetic, twisted, sick or silly. And since being shamed by his dad or mom (see below) won’t save a kid from his “pathetic” orientation, shaming your son is a waste of time that will serve only to damage your relationship with him. As for your fears that your son will wind up alone … “Although DOPE might prefer a regular old queer child instead of a rare plushophile — someone with an attraction to cartoonlike stuffed animals, such as Pokémon — the good news is that his son grew up in a world where, somewhere out there, other people were being erotically molded by animated Japanese chimeras in the same way,” says Bering. “Reaching out to that community online can only empower him and help him to accept a now unalterable — and completely harmless — part of his nature. In many ways, life can be easier for DOPE’s son: He’s got a readymade sexual niche, complete with hookup opportunities at annual conventions.” Follow Jesse Bering on Twitter @JesseBering.

I am a het husband. Before we married, I let my wife know that I loved spanking women and I was not a faithful man. Fastforward 20 years: She does not like to be spanked and does not want me cheating, despite my earlier proclamation. So I watch spanking porn and remain faithful. Am I cheating on my wife with porn? WANNABE INTENSELY SPANKING HUSBAND

You are not cheating on your wife when you watch porn — spanking or otherwise. And I don’t think getting together with other women for spanking-only playdates would constitute cheating. Sadly for you, I’m not your wife. When I was 14, my mother found some dirty stories I wrote on my computer. They were hardcore (bondage, slavery, whippings), and some featured neighborhood MILFs that I had crushes on. My mom went ballistic and terrorized me about my kinks until I left for college. I hated my mother so much during this time. It took me a decade to get over it. I’m now 30 and married. My wife and I appear to be “normal.” But we are both into bondage and S&M, we go to fetish parties, and we’ve explored cuckolding and forced bi. Cutting to the chase: My wife is pregnant. We announced the news to my mom and dad, and they were delighted. Then my mother sent me an email saying that if she hadn’t “nipped those dark sexual impulses in the bud,” I would “not now have a lovely wife and a morally acceptable lifestyle,” and she wouldn’t be expecting her first grandchild. I’m so angry. I want to tell my mother that she has my “dark sexual impulses” to thank for her first grandchild! I met my kinky wife on Fetlife! My wife would rather not be outed as kinky to her mother-in-law and says to let it go. What do you say?

THERE’S NO WAY TO PREVENT POKÉMON FETISHISTS OR FOOT FETISHISTS OR CLOWN FETISHISTS FROM HAPPENING.

MAD OVER TERRIBLY HURTFUL E-MAIL RECEIVED

I agree with your wife: Let it go. Focus on your wife and the child you two are having together. The last thing you need is your mother getting in your wife’s face about her kinks or running to fetus-protective services because she believes kinky parents are a danger to their children. But just in case your mother brings it up again, write an email to her, one that your wife sees in advance and approves. Something along the lines of: “My adolescent sexual fantasies were none of your business, and your inability to respect my privacy and sexual autonomy caused me great personal distress at the time. Your actions did not help me. They damaged our relationship. My adult sex life is none of your business. All you need to know is this: My wife and I very happy together — both emotionally and sexually compatible — and if you want to be fully involved in your grandchild’s life, you will never bring this subject up again.” On the Lovecast: Dan matches wits with 74time Jeopardy! winner Ken Jennings at savage lovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.19-03.26

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Before she died, Piscean actress Elizabeth Taylor enjoyed more than 79 years of life on this gorgeous, maddening planet. But one aptitude she never acquired in all that time was the ability to cook a hard-boiled egg. Is there a pocket of ignorance in your own repertoire that rivals this lapse, Pisces? Are there any fundamental life skills that you probably should have learned by now? If so, now would be a good time to get to work on mastering them.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “When you plant seeds in the garden, you don’t dig them up every day to see if they have sprouted yet,” says Buddhist nun Thubten Chodron. “You simply water them and clear away the weeds; you know that the seeds will grow in time.” That’s sound advice for you, Aries. You are almost ready to plant the metaphorical seeds that you will be cultivating in the coming months. Having faith should be a key element in your plans for them. You’ve got to find a way to shut down any tendencies you might have to be an impatient control freak. Your job is simply to give your seeds a good start and provide them with the persistent follow-up care they will need.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Thank you, disillusionment,” says Alanis Morissette in her song “Thank U.” “Thank you, frailty,” she continues. “Thank you, nothingness. Thank you, silence.” I’d love to hear you express that kind of gratitude in the coming days, Taurus. Please understand that I don’t think you will be experiencing a lot of disillusionment, frailty,

nothingness and silence. Not at all. What I do suspect is that you will be able to see, more clearly than ever before, how you have been helped and blessed by those states in the past. You will understand how creatively they motivated you to build strength, resourcefulness, willpower and inner beauty.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I bet your support system will soon be abuzz with fizzy mojo and good mischief. Your web of contacts is about to get deeper and feistier and prettier. Pounce, Gemini, pounce! Summon extra clarity and zest as you communicate your vision of what you want. Drum up alluring tricks to attract new allies and inspire your existing allies to assist you better. If all goes as I expect it to, business and pleasure will synergize better than they have in a long time. You will boost your ambitions by socializing, and you will sweeten your social life by plying your ambitions.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): During her 98 years on the planet, Barbara Cartland wrote 723 romance novels that together

get your yoga on!

sold a billion copies. What was the secret of her success? Born under the sign of Cancer the Crab, she knew how productive she could be if she was comfortable. Many of her work sessions took place while she reclined on her favorite couch covered with a white fur rug, her feet warmed with a hotwater bottle. As her two dogs kept her company, she dictated her stories to her secretary. I hope her formula for success inspires you to expand and refine your own personal formula — and then apply it with zeal during the next eight weeks. What is the exact nature of the comforts that will best nourish your creativity?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Google Ngram Viewer is a tool that scans millions of books to map how frequently a particular word is used over the course of time. For instance, it reveals that “impossible” appears only half as often in books published in the 21st century as it did in books from the year 1900. What does this mean? That fantastic and hard-to-achieve prospects are less impossible than they used to be? I don’t know, but I can say this with confidence: If you begin fantastic and hard-to-achieve prospects sometime soon, they will be far less impossible than they used to be.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The Tibetan mastiff is a large canine species with long golden hair. If you had never seen a lion and were told that this dog was a lion, you might be fooled. And that’s exactly what a zoo in Luohe, China did. It tried to pass off a hearty specimen of a Tibetan mastiff as an African lion. Alas, a few clever zoo-goers saw through the charade when the beast started barking. Now I’ll ask you, Virgo: Is there anything comparable going on in your environment? Are you being asked to believe that a big dog is actually a lion, or the metaphorical equivalent?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” the narrator seems tormented about the power of his longing. “Do I dare to eat a peach?” he asks. I wonder what he’s thinking. Is the peach too sweet, too juicy, too pleasurable for him to handle? Is he in danger of losing his self-control and dignity if he succumbs to the temptation? What’s behind his hesitation? In any case, Libra, don’t be like Prufrock in the coming weeks. Get your finicky doubts out of the way as you indulge your lust for life with extra vigor and vivacity. Hear what I’m saying? Refrain from agonizing about whether or not you should eat the peach. Just go ahead and eat it.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Born under the sign of Scorpio, Neil Young has been making music professionally for more than 45 years. He has recorded 35 albums and is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In early 1969, three of

his most famous songs popped out of his fertile imagination on the same day. He was sick with the flu and running a 103-degree fever when he wrote “Cowgirl in the Sand,” “Cinnamon Girl” and “Down by the River.” I suspect you may soon experience a milder version of this mythic event, Scorpio. At a time when you’re not feeling your best, you could create a thing of beauty that will last a long time, or initiate a breakthrough that will send ripples far into the future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There should be nothing generic or normal or routine about this week, Sagittarius. If you drink beer, for example, you shouldn’t stick to your usual brew. You should track down and drink the hell out of exotic beers with brand names like Tactical Nuclear Penguin and Ninja Vs. Unicorn and Doctor Morton’s Clown Poison. And if you’re a lipstick user, you shouldn’t be content to use your old standard, but should instead opt for kinky types like Sapphire Glitter Bomb, Alien Moon Goddess and Cackling Black Witch. As for love, it wouldn’t make sense to seek out romantic adventures you’ve had a thousand times before. You need and deserve something like wild sacred eternal ecstasy or screaming sweaty flagrant bliss or blasphemously reverent waggling rapture.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Actor Gary Oldman was born and raised in London. In the course of his long career, he has portrayed a wide range of characters who speak English with American, German and Russian accents. He has also lived in Los Angeles for years. When he signed on to play a British intelligence agent in the 2011 film Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, he realized that over the years he had lost some of his native British accent. He had to take voice lessons to restore his original pronunciations. I suspect you have a metaphorically comparable project ahead of you, Capricorn. It may be time to get back to where you once belonged.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Every now and then, you’re blessed with a small miracle that inspires you to see everyday things with new vision. Common objects and prosaic experiences get stripped of their habitual expectations, allowing them to become almost as enchanting to you as they were before numb familiarity set in. The beloved people you take for granted suddenly remind you of why you came to love them in the first place. Boring acquaintances might reveal sides of themselves that are quite entertaining. So are you ready and eager for just such an outbreak of curiosity and a surge of fun surprises? If you are, they will come. If you’re not, they won’t. What was the pain that healed you most? Testify at http://FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 65 + STUDIES 65 + SERVICES 67 + LIVE 67 + WELLNESS 68

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

JOB OPPORTUNITIES Longwall Coal Miners: New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois. Submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Need a job? Looking for a new employee? Call 31-MEDIA to place a Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper. Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Africa, Brazil Work/ Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

CLINICAL STUDIES

ECM Transport is NOW HIRING (10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour

Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

Paper.

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

GOT HOSPITALITY?

CONSTIPATION?

Come to the Hospitality Job Fair seeking entry level and management positions

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $1,000 a week to start. • The Miles Group is the only Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family.

412.316.3342

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

Call For Artists Craftsmen’s Guild Of Pittsburgh. A Fair In The Park 45th Annual Fine Art And Craft Show. Applications Available Online At afairinthepark.org Application Deadline 4/10/14 New Members Screening April 5th, Pittsburgh Center For The Arts. Visit craftsmensguild.org For Information.

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign satisfied with both the des w I have kno I n Whe ke. evo they the response subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City thin tely edia age group, I imm

Regional Road & Local Drivers

Lincoln Heritage

Your ad could be here

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

(20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

STUDIES

ARTISTS

Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com

Monday, March 24 PIttsburgh Technical Institute 1111 McKee Rd Oakdale, PA 15071

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Wednesday, April 2 Omni William Penn 530 William Penn Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Stop By Between 10AM-3PM Bring plenty of resumes & we’ll see you at the fair!

www.tmilesgroup.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! NEWS

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On the Spot Interviews will be held on Thursday March 27, 2014 from 10a-4p 200 Roessler Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Various opportunities Available: Residential Direct Care Staff FT Afternoon- $10.10/ hr + benefits FT Overnight- $9.60/hr + benefits Substitute- $9.35/hr- Flexible hours Assist adults w/ DD in community homes with daily living throughout the South Hills area.

Lincoln Heritage LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

mainstaylifeservices.org

resumes@vikingmining. com

tmilesgroup.com

If unable to attend forward resume: 200 Roessler Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Ph: 412-344-3640 Email: careers@mainstaylifeservices.org Or apply on-line at: mainstaylifeservices.org EOE

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Lincoln Heritage

Longwall Coal Miners New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

APPLY TODAY: Qualified Applicants please submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com 66

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014

In-Home Direct Care Staff: PT Substitute- $11.60/hr- Flexible hours Assist individuals w/ DD one on one with a variety of integrated community activities and/or with personal care in their homes throughout North, South and East Allegheny County.

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

THE MILES GROUP Now Hiring Agents & Managers!! Make $500 A WEEK to start. Come work for the #1 agency within the #1 Final Expense Co. in the Nation! The Miles Group is a Million Dollar A Month Agency. We will help you get your insurance license, will train. You can write your own paycheck. First Year Agents make over $100k!

Here are just a few reasons why you should join the Lincoln Heritage sales team: • • • • • • •

Get paid Daily $$ Proven lead system 98% of clients approved 1 Page application Exotic Incentive trips Extraordinary home office support Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family

6 & 7 Figure Income Earners

Our $25K Cash Give-A-Way

Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance has an A.M. Best Rating of A (excellent) and a BBB Rating of A+, specializing in Final Expense Insurance. Call Now: Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com www.tmilesgroup.com

1yr Agent with his new Jaguar


SERVICES

UPBEAT MIXES

Ink Well

AUTO SERVICES

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

HEALTH SERVICES Get Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for Addiction Treatment. Alcohol Abuse. Drug Addiction. Prescription Abuse. Call Now 855-577-0234 Rehab Placement Service.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Robert A. Lowenstein MD. Board Certified Adult, Adolescent & Child Psychiatrist Office Counseling and medication management of Mental Health issues. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS. NO WAIT LIST CCBHO/GATEWAY/ UPMC for You/UHC Insurance accepted. East Liberty location. 211 N. Whitfield Street, Suite 275, Pgh, PA 15206. 412-661-5437

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016

CLASSES

ACROSS

51. Vantage 1. Mon wid crucial 52. Outrageous, briefly dreads cum outa 53. Be on pins and he head, perhaps needles for 6. Military acronym 56. Channel with since WWI highlights 11. Collar accessory 59. Soon, a long 15. Freeze, as time ago a windshield 63. Tender hugs and 16. Styx venue? kisses, e.g.? (No hitting!) 17. “I’m still hungry!” 67. One published 18. Blitzen’s seating in a literary instruction to his magazine, perhaps sleigh driver? (No dark 68. Vehicle for many forces at work here!) a long, strange trip 21. “Clueless” phrase 69. Online clip-sharing 22. Lukas who played site whose name is an Ryan White anagram of MOVIE 23. Like Conan O’Brien, 70. Back talk ethnically 71. Obeys a neatnik 24. Org. for Ann Miller, pirate’s command who said “You try regarding the deck to help them, try to 72. Squirrel’s staple sing and dance ... it’s heartbreaking.” 26. Important 1. Capital of Latvia substance in immune 2. Whizzes development 3. Agcy. often “quoted” 28. What a goofy, by Weekly World News witty waitstaff 4. Quantity of beers provides? (Everyone at a hotel party is alive and well) 5. Bonobo, e.g. 35. ParaGard, e.g. 6. LaBeouf of acting 36. Locks something in petulant and then before it comes out? being excused by 37. Blows away James Franco in the 40. Certain New York Times musical chord 7. Caretaker’s nickname 42. Piece of eight, e.g. 8. Drops in the 43. Lay’s partner in bucket, perhaps snack food 9. Not masc. 44. ___ suit (baggy 10. Manipulate ‘40s outfit) 11. Modern fuel45. It includes Piccadilly efficient vehicle and Victoria lines 12. R&B singer Braxton 47. A Marine Corps 13. The A in B.A. lance corporal no 14. “America longer qualifies (Fuck ___)” as one: Abbr. (“Team America: 48. The holiest of poker World Police” song) hands? (You screaming 19. Time to attack, convicts can relax) in the military

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20. “___, find me a crossword clue for yourself” 25. Gp. that was an antagonist in “Milk” 26. Become dispirited? 27. Some catheters, briefly 28. Name in crackers or accommodations 29. Currency for many Member States 30. “Peace, muchacho” 31. Jason Sudeikis, to George Wendt 32. Keanu Reeves classic about a bus 33. Divisions in both the AL and NL 34. J.R. who was shot 38. Set in stone? 39. Coke product? 41. Biological throwbacks 43. Unit of derring-do 45. Green Day drummer Cool 46. Feral horse, casually 49. Mets stadium

namesake 50. Biased type type 53. Silicon Alley exports 54. Joey’s rather uninspired catchphrase on “Blossom” 55. Yes votes 56. Isle of exile to which many modern Romans escape 57. Refuse to acknowledge 58. One of Carlin’s seven dirty words that’s since become commonplace 60. Hideo with two career no-hitters 61. Kaput 62. Arcade Fire’s “___ Bible” 64. Walgreens alternative 65. “OMG! that Pomeranian is wearing a life vest!” 66. Actress Longoria who divorced Tony Parker

LIVE

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

COMMUNITY

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Advtertise Here Today!

NORTH FOR RENT ROSS TWP 3br HOUSE for rent with bonus room or 4th br. smooth top range n double door fridge included, nice yard ,plenty of storage covered front n rear porch new a/c unit $950 plus utilities security deposit and ref required call Bill 412-925-5497 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

SOUTH FOR RENT

Newly renovated Apartment in Mount Washington overlooking city. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, w/d hookups. Stove and refrigerator. $1,800 per Month gas and water included. No pets. Call John 412-580-6550

North Shore ~ 529 Lockhart St

ADOPTION Single Out dinner group for LGBT singles is meeting Friday March 21st, 2014 at 6:30pm at restaurant in South Side. Great way to meet local singles & make some new friends. Email singlesoutpgh@yahoo. com or call 412-3370701 to make a reservation.

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Lg. 2BR twnhse. Architect Designed, Int Decorator Finished. New carpet/paint, 2,800 sf!! Upper level is a converted warehouse w/open floor plan, vaulted 14ft beamed ceiling & skylights, f/p, modern eq. kitchen w/granite island. The lower level has laundry, heated garage comfortably prkg 6 vehicles, auto gar dr, sec sys.

MUST SEE! Avail. Immed.

$1,500 John 724-699-5554

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MIND & BODY

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy

724-519-7896

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Superior Chinese Massage

Xie LiHong’s

412-319-7530

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

STAR

412-401-4110

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor) Open 24 hours/7 days a week

(across from Eat n’ Park)

Chinese Bodyworks

412-595-8077

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Your ad could be here

412-441-1185

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount 7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

412.316.3342

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Shadyside Location

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

Grand Opening

Chinese Bodywork

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

massage Therapy

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

MIND & BODY

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Recovery Without Judgement™

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.19/03.26.2014


Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

JADE Wellness Center

Squirrel Hill Office

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Now Open!

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Let Us Help You Today!

MONROEVILLE, PA

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

Call Erin at:

412-434-4798

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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LOCATIONS IN:

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh

Beaver County

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com +

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www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others

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PITTSBURGH STILLERS

Wigle Whiskey seeks to re-establish Pittsburgh’s historic role in the liquor trade {BY ABBY MENDELSON} THE LINE SNAKES out the door into the Smallman Street parking

lot. People wear parkas and mukluks against the late-winter chill. It’s been a year since Wigle, the first distillery to open inside Pittsburgh city limits since Prohibition, first offered its aged, deepcut rye whiskey. One of Wigle’s more adventuresome bottlings, it comes at a knee-bending 121 proof. “A friend served me some,” one hollow-cheeked gent avers. “It was love at first slurp.” Fueled by a pioneering spirit and supported by a sophisticated clientele, the Meyer family — husband, wife, three children, one spouse, various hangers-on — has enlisted in a growing double revolution. First is the rise of small American craft distilleries, once a fixture of the landscape, but for decades virtually moribund. Second is a return to rye whiskey, at one time the nation’s spirit of choice: Long eclipsed by cheaper barley beer and lighter bourbon, rye’s depth and power is finding a whole new market.

Wigle “makes every product in careful, thoughtful ways,” Grelli says. As such, family members mill their own grain, then brew, distill, age and bottle everything themselves. “Craft is integral to what we’re doing,” Grelli says. “In every case we preserve the flavor of the grain as much as possible.” To that end, Wigle also makes other spirits, including clear wheat and rye whiskeys as well as Ginever, a 19th-century Dutchstyle gin. Then there’s a rum-like spirit distilled from buckwheat honey. “It’s called Spiced Landlocked, and has a mossy, earthy, pungent quality,” Grelli says. “It’s not middle of the road.” None of Wigle’s products is. Unlike larger distillers, who strive to ensure that every bottle of Jim Beam, say, is exactly like every other, “we don’t devote a lot of resources to consistency,” Grelli says. “We believe that every batch is unique and should be celebrated.” Grelli pledges the family will “continue to experiment —

“WE WANT TO SHOWCASE THE WHISKEY THAT — BEFORE STEEL — MADE THIS REGION FAMOUS.” For the family of Alan and Mary Beth Meyer, says their daughter Meredith Grelli, it all began four years ago. A couple centuries back, white rye made Pittsburgh both famous and wealthy. With some 4,000 documented local stills in operation, by 1850 the Pittsburgh region was producing a half-barrel for every man, woman and child in America. “The odds were that if you were drinking a spirit, it came from Pittsburgh,” Grelli says. “We said, ‘Let’s bring that back.’” “Our goal was to re-institute rye whiskey in Pittsburgh,” she adds. “We want to showcase the whiskey that — before steel — made this region famous.” That desire prompted a two-year trek to open the doors of the new distillery. Dad, the lawyer, crafted legislation that allowed Pennsylvania distilleries to sell their own product. Second, family members went to alcohol school. Third, they traveled to Munich, Germany, to buy the right pot still. Fourth, they fitted out a Smallman Street warehouse. Fifth, they developed their own unique line of products — all organic, all local. The Meyers quit their jobs, pouring their family savings into the new venture. And they named it for another whiskey-maker who risked it all: Phillip Wigle, a Pittsburgh distiller-turnedWhiskey Rebel sentenced to hang for treason before President Washington pardoned him. One of an estimated 300 active American craft distilleries,

because we know people will go new places with us. They will gladly celebrate that we’re doing all these things they’re not accustomed to. There’s a community of people here united by their taste and curiosity.” And by such regular Wigle events as Labeling Parties, to which two dozen people come on a Tuesday night to snack and drink and help apply labels. Or Taste Panels, during which participants sample products in development, write notes, take votes. The honey spirit, for example, had four such panels, four different development batches and five tastings over five months, until Wigle arrived at a final beta (a word they’ve freely adapted from the high-tech world). “We keep trying stuff until it works,” Grelli says. “We really do work at a fever pitch for innovation. We’re obsessed with new products, new methods, new flavors.” So, apparently, is Wigle’s growing customer base. While some Wigle products are available online through the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, Wigle sells most of its spirits at the distillery. And it’s there that a satisfied customer heads for his car, a grey “I Work for Whiskey” T-shirt wrapped snugly around twin bottles of Wigle’s latest product. “It’s the first time a rye ever said hello to me,” he says with a smile. “It won’t be the last.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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March 19, 2014