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GETTING YOUR SHARE: LOCAL FARM-SHARE SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE NOW! 24


EVENTS 3.14 – 5-10pm FREE GOOD FRIDAYS PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN Every Good Friday in March with cash bar and DJ Shawn Watson, specializing in an all vinyl set of Funk, Punk, Reggae and Rock. FREE admission

4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

5.17 – 6pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY GALA The Warhol & The Warhol Parking Lot Tickets $500; visit www.flywarhol.com

ONGOING PROGRAMS

Tinariwen

DAILY GALLERY TALKS Experience a range of topics including Warhol’s work practices and more. Subjects vary depending on current exhibitions and guest speaker. Guest speakers include curators, artist educators, and more. FREE with museum admission

4.1 – 8pm Warhol entrance space | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot

We welcome Tinariwen, a Tuareg group from the Sahara Desert in northern Mali. With a name meaning “empty places,” reflecting their land of origin, the group formed in 1979 in rebel camps of Colonel Gaddafi, having been forced from their nomadic lifestyle into involuntary military service. Swapping traditional lutes and shepherd’s flutes for electric guitars and drums, the group has developed their own unique style that blends elements of western blues/rock, African tribal chants and Middle Eastern traditional music. The band signed to the U.S. label Anti Records in 2010, and has toured extensively, performing at major festivals such as WOMAD and Bonnaroo. The evening will begin with a DJ set by Pete Spynda (Pandemic) when doors open at 7:30. N E W S

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THE FACTORY (UNDERGROUND STUDIO) WEEKDAYS, 1:30 - 5 PM; WEEKENDS, 12 - 4 PM The Factory is a lively studio program where visitors can create art alongside Artist/Educators while exploring Warhol’s artistic practice. Free with museum admission

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CELEBRATING:

Pittsburgh’S Finest 2014

We present 11 Pittsburgh professionals who demonstrate excellence in the fields of law, healthcare, education, technology, social services & business for 2014.

CENTER FOR DIGESTIVE DISEASES SOUTHWEST GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES (SGA) consists of 5 Board Certified Gastroenterologists: Drs. Richard J. Panicco, Mohan S. Phanse, Philip Joson, Richard Kenney and Jennifer Totten. Each is specialty trained to care for all diseases and conditions in adults related to the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas & liver. These would include cirrhosis of the liver, hepatitis (A, B & C), (Crohn’s disease), colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, digestive disorders, 3515 Washington Rd ileitis intestinal obstructions, diagnosis of gallstones, pancreatic disorders, cancer McMurray (stomach/colo-rectal), diverticular diseases and removal of common bile duct (724)941-3020 stones (ERCP & papillotomy). The group is a leader in open access colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer. They perform approximately 15,000-20,000 procedures a year. Colon cancer is highly screenable, treatable and beatable. SGA’s goal is to provide their patients with the most comprehensive care in a pleasant & friendly atmosphere. Satellite offices in Washington, PA and St. Clair Hospital. Visit: www.swgastro.com

SECURED MEMORY IMPAIRED CARE UNIT Opened in 1989, RIVERSIDE CARE CENTER has established the standard for skilled nursing in McKeesport. Private and semi-private rooms along with a secured memory unit, highlight the 120 bed recently renovated one story facility. Featured clinical programs include Orthopedic and Neurological Rehabilitation, Short term hospital to home, Respite, Hospice, Alzheimer’s / Dementia and Dialysis. Added in 2013, The Center for the Memory Impaired incorporates Pittsburgh’s finest psychiatrists and psychologists along with professional staff and service support that are uniquely trained to care for those suffering with the diagnosis 100 8th Ave of Alzheimer’s or dementia. Additionally Riverside has teamed up with one of the Mckeesport country largest hemodialysis companies to offer onsite service to current residents (412)664-8860 as well as community. The range of services and along with the quality survey rankings continue to score Riverside as one of the top skilled nursing facilities in the community. Please contact them for free lunch, tour or more info: www.myriversidecarecenter.com

HEARTLAND HOSPICE - ENRICHING LIFE HEARTLAND HOME HEALTH CARE & HOSPICE seeks to comfort people who have been diagnosed with a life-threatening illness and also to help their families. Their team of professionals and trained volunteers consist of a hospice medical director, a host of doctors, nurses, social workers, therapists, home health aides, counselors, clergy and the patient’s physicians. Serving the community since 1983, it’s focus is on living and maintaining the quality of life of their patients. They help patients to be more comfortable, at peace and in control of their lives. With hospice care, patients are helped to remain either at their home, 750 Holiday Dr an assisted living facility or skilled nursing center, where they may be cared for #110, Pittsburgh by family, friends and a team of health care professionals and trained volunteers. (412)928-2126 Laura Wright, RN – Administrator emphasizes that her hospice program is designed to meet the needs of patients with life-threatening illness and to help their families cope with the problems and feelings related to this difficult time. Medicare, Medicaid & CHAP (Community Health Accreditation Program) Certified. Offices also in Irwin and Cranberry. Visit: www.heartlandhospice.com

LEADERSHIP & BUSINESS COACH ANNE PAPINCHAK, BS, M.ED, Executive MBA is an experienced performance improvement consultant and ICF-credentialed coach who brings a unique perspective due to her more than 20 years in business, leading cross-functional strategic teams to improve organizational effectiveness globally within multiple industries. Her approach combines vision, heart & strategic execution. As President Elect of the Pittsburgh Coaches Association (http://icf-pittsburgh.org), Anne partners with her clients to realize their power to name their purpose, create what matters most to them and their business and Cell: (412)445-5423 bring forth the courage to grow and experience new results. Business Owners Roundtable: Business Owners learning from other Business Owners. Anne is also a Certified Facilitator and Coach for The Alternative Board® (“TAB”). The Alternative Board is a membership organization of business owners and CEOs who meet monthly in confidential board meetings to assist each other in transforming their businesses. Anne’s one-on-one coaching has enabled business executives to reach their professional goals, and contribute with greater clarity, at a higher level, professionally and personally. Contact Anne for a consultation and take the next step to achieve your goals. Email: Anne.Papinchak@gmail.com, or visit: www.TAB-PghSouth.com

ENHANCE YOUR NATURAL BEAUTY Board Certified Dermatologist Kimberly Rau, MD and Caitlyn Smith, PA-C at SKIN LOGIC DERMATOLOGY AND LASER CENTER and their dedicated team have created a professional environment where your general, surgical and cosmetic dermatology needs are met in one convenient location. Dr. Rau has extensive training in medical & cosmetic dermatology. She uses various lasers to treat wrinkles, photo aging, acne scarring, leg veins & facial blood vessels, port wine stains, rosacea, brown lesions & unwanted hair. She also has experience with a variety of cosmetic fillers and non-invasive rejuvenation treatments. The office now has an Omnilux system of light therapy for stubborn acne and novel 4290 Route 8 laser based technology to treat moderate-to-severe acne as an alternative to drug Hampton therapy. Her success is accredited to taking time with her patients - listening, (412)492-7546 educating & ultimately recommending a plan to achieve and maintain healthy, glowing skin. Visit Skin Logic Thurs., March 27 at their Gala Open House to learn more about special offers and carefully selected cosmeceuticals and procedures. Visit: www.skinlogicdermatology.com

WE CARE FOR YOUR CHILDREN

The special medical needs of children require the experience and family centered care that the Board Certified Pediatricians at PEDIATRIC ALLIANCE NORTH HILLS can provide. Drs. Brian W. Donnelly (also Board Certified as a Lactation Consultant), Bruce Hyde and Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Leann Ross & Andrea Cooper make your children’s health care and well-being high priorities . Pediatric Alliance North Hills enjoys working with first-time parents and their concerns. With patience and wisdom that comes from more than 55 years of combined experience, their providers can advise you on your child’s behavior, 9104 Babcock Blvd nutrition and development and the current trends in pediatric medicine. They #2111, Pittsburgh endorse the immunization guidelines established by the American Academy of (412)364-5834 Pediatrics and will outline a plan of care that will monitor your child’s growth and development. They see newborns, children, adolescents and young adults up to 21 years of age. New patients are always welcome. Visit: www.pediatricalliance.com

EMPLOYMENT & DISCRIMINATION LAW

650 Smithfield St #1110, Centre City Twrs Pittsburgh (412)567-1125

Attorney Margaret (Peggy) Fried at FRIED LAW OFFICES has a strong belief that all employees have a right to work in a safe & healthy environment free from such unlawful practices as discrimination, wrongful termination and sexual/ disability/age/race harassment. Peggy handles a wide variety of employment & civil rights issues for her clients, including the issues relating to severance contracts, Family & Medical Leave, retaliation, reasonable accommodations, noncompete agreements, minimum wage & overtime pay, class actions, the Fair Labor Standards Act, unemployment compensation, hostile work environment, employment benefits & civil rights violations in employment & housing. Peggy works closely with clients to endeavor to provide sound & accurate advice in employment law and in other areas of her practice including, housing construction problems, land use & zoning disputes, home renovation problems & foreclosures, consumer & credit card debt and general civil litigation. Visit: www.friedlawoffices.com

IMPROVING LIVES FOR 45 YEARS Since 1969, MILESTONE CENTERS, INC. has enhanced the quality of life for people with behavioral health or intellectual/developmental challenges. Their caring staff of 473 serves approximately 3,300 clients annually through 26 programs, including residences that provide 24-hour supervision, vocational training, gardening and outdoor adventure. Formerly known as “Allegheny East Mental Health and Mental Retardation Center,” Milestone has always been regarded as a leader in the mental health field in PA. Milestone was among the first mental health agencies to provide a 712 South Ave consumer drop-in center, the first to provide residential services to clients who are Pittsburgh deaf, and the first to engage in Electronic Clinical Records. Milestone also was the (412)243-3400 first in Allegheny Co. to offer a licensed program for seniors who have intellectual/ developmental disabilities, and the first to offer Host Homes, havens for youth who need a dependable environment with adults who can support them. A non-profit, community-based organization, Milestone provides services in 20 counties in Western PA. Visit: www.milestonecentersinc.org

REHABILITATION & RECOVERY MON YOUGH COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC of McKeesport, PA believes

500 Walnut St 3rd Fl, McKeesport (412)675-MYCS (6927)

in making a difference in the life of each individual they serve. Fostering hope, renewal, healing and wellness for those who face the challenges of mental health, substance use and intellectual disabilities has been the mission of Mon Yough Community Services (MYCS) since 1969. With a focus on recovery, MYCS offers child and adult outpatient services, residential homes, vocational and employment support, drug and alcohol services, and case management services. MYCS makes the health and well-being of their consumers and community their first priority. MYCS is an important foundation in the McKeesport community, striving each day to ensure that the unique and individualized needs of each individual they serve are met. Visit: www.mycs.org

THE POWER OF YOGA

PUBLIC CYBER CHARTER SCHOOL

Yoga, from the Sanskit word “yuj”, means the yoking together; the joining into union of the mind, body and spirit. This art has been part of the human experience for thousands of years. Given the pressures of the modern day world, yoga and meditation have proven to be invaluable tools for dealing effectively with stress, personal health and weight management. The certified teachers at YOGA INNOVATIONS offer a wide variety of yoga classes: Hot Yoga, PowerFlow, Warm Flow, Basic, Pilates, Sculpt, Prenatal Yoga, Mommy & Me Yoga, Kids Yoga, Family Yoga, Pay-What-You-Can and $5 Cash Classes. 102 Broughton Rd Yoga Innovations has a class for everyone. Help your body build strength, increase Bethel Park and find peace of mind. In addition to adult classes, Yoga Innovations (412)851-YOGA (9642) flexibility offers summer yoga camps for kids (register by May 1) designed to explore fun and imaginative yoga poses and games that allow exercise in a non-competitive environment.  Creative, child led art projects build on the foundations of yoga.  Through play, kids increase strength, focus, flexibility, balance, and ability to relax. Visit: www.yogainnovations.com

It’s all about knowledge and quality education. PA LEADERSHIP CHARTER SCHOOL (PALCS) is a tuition-free, state-approved public cyber charter school for students grades K-12 who reside in Pennsylvania. Students are individually scheduled for classes with the ability to select from more than 200 courses. Courses are taught by certified teachers who work from one of their sites. The dynamic, teacher-driven curriculum at PA Leadership meets or exceeds all PA State Academic Standards. Textbooks and all learning materials are provided 55 Alpha Drive West as well as various online resources. PALCS students receive a computer, including Pittsburgh a printer/scanner/copier, webcam & microphone headset. PALCS is also proud (412)828-3331 to announce their School of Professional Studies Program (SPS). This program provides onsite educational opportunities for students through certificate-based tracks, much like college majors. Students will be able to gain a better understanding of their area of interest through hands-on activities, career talks with professionals in their field, collaborative projects with other SPS students and many more educational experiences. Visit: www.palcs.org

Shop Local and Support Small Businesses in Pittsburgh!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

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View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/031214


{EDITORIAL}

03.12/03.19.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 11

On the cover: Details from Robert Qualters’ “Persephone,� “The Blue Rider� and “Birdland�

[NEWS] don’t know if all of the tenants will 06 “Iwant to come back.� — Bill Gatti, of Trek Development, on the fate of the South Side’s storied Brew House artist collective

[VIEWS]

on the state’s largest employer 16 “Taking would be a gamble for any politician, and Peduto has more to lose than most.� — Chris Potter on the city’s latest confrontation with UPMC

[TASTE]

enjoyed glasses of the aquafresca 20 “We of the day, a deliciously tangy, floral, ruby-red hibiscus juice.� — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review La Palapa

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, JEANNE MUMFORD, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

(17(57$,10(17

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC]

thought, rather than having people 26 “Iretread Ceann songs for a tribute, take one of the songs he never got to finish or record himself.� — Brian Halloran on putting together a tribute to his brother, the late Patrick Halloran

[SCREEN]

THIS WEEKEND!

{ADMINISTRATION}

surprised Penn and Teller didn’t 35 “I’m invite some snooty art experts to argue

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

the ‘magical creative’ side of art.� — Al Hoff on the pair’s art-mystery doc Tim’s Vermeer

7+856'$<0$5&+ 'HYRQ-RKQVRQRI5XII&UHHN

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

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{ART}

STEEL CITY MEDIA

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The paintings are as busy as an errand-filled Saturday, cozily cluttered not just with text but with everything: people, houses, birds, billboards, weather, leaves, squiggles.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Driscoll on the retrospective Robert Qualters: A Life

[LAST PAGE]

like looking down into Mordor.â&#x20AC;? 63 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ben Avon resident Joel Polacci on

the view of Neville Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coke works from his back deck

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 59 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“THE BUILDING HAS BEEN FALLING APART, AND IT HAS BECOME A LIABILITY.”

INCOMING “Taxing Alternative: Peduto administration rethinking nonprofit contribution system” (March 5) The use of our own taxes for common public purposes is decided by democratic processes, by leaders democratically elected, accountable to the voters. Why should UPMC be able to direct voluntary contributions as their own wishes and profit motivate them? UPMC does not meet the legal definitions of a nonprofit. Why should they not pay their share for our shared roads, sewers, public transit, schools, and the rest of the public support networks that they profit from? UPMC already wields vastly disproportionate power and influence in this city and county, as they … use their vast holdings of tax-free land as powerful tools to shape even basic infrastructure decisions as would best serve their own interests. [We should] continue to demand that UPMC act as a good corporate citizen by obeying the law and paying taxes. — Web comment posted by “Helen Gerhardt”

“The Boss Man” (March 5) Porkified. What does it mean? It goes beyond being a “cool one,” and spending decades listening to and following the Pied Piper of Pittsburgh. It’s about knowing, understanding and admiring the man. The man, who decade after decade, genuinely and consistently displayed his kind and caring way, whether it was to help struggling artists who were turned away by the “mainstream” or having a life-long positive impact on tens of thousands of teenagers. Porkified is forever. We love you, Porky Chedwick. — Web comment posted by “PittsburghOldie”

“10 clergy arrested protesting UPMC” (Feb. 27, web only) They need to get a Steeler or two into the crowd, then maybe they’d get some attention. — Web comment posted by “East of Eden”

@DVERandy I’m one of those people with a Philosophy degree. And now I professionally tweet about potholes. — March 6 tweet from @TimMcNultyPgh, the account of Mayor Bill Peduto spokesman Tim McNulty

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The former Duquesne Brewery and current Brew House art collective is poised for more changes.

CHANGE IS BREWING T

H E S O U T H S I D E ’S l an dmar k

Duquesne Brewery has been part of the neighborhood’s fabric for more than a century. And the Brew House Association — the collective whose members make, exhibit and promote varieties of art — has occupied the structure for more than two decades. But the South Side itself has been in constant flux … and now change is penetrating even the brewery’s 3-foot-thick walls. The Association recently selected Downtown-based Trek Development to lead a renovation of the sprawling structure. That redevelopment will make use of essentially all the facility’s 104,000 square feet — much of which has been idle for years. The project will expand the building’s residential

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

component dramatically, while helping the Brew House Association pursue its artistic mission in other spaces in the building.

Brew House artists are renovating their home, but not changing their mission {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM} Though the brewery now houses only about a dozen full-time residents, with several additional studios and businesses, plans are to reconfigure the structure to include 75 residential units, from studios to two-bedroom apartments. Meanwhile, the Brew House’s program

of providing space for exhibitions, nonresidential studios and administrative offices will continue, and may be expanded. Architect Jody Schurman, whose firm Lab 8 Architects is working on the project with Clearscapes Architecture of Raleigh, N.C., says the Association will retain “tens of thousands of square feet” for those purposes. Significant action was necessary. “The building has been falling apart, and it has become a liability for them,” says Schurman, whose firm once had offices in the building. Once Pennsylvania’s largest brewery and home to the “Prince of Pilsner,” Duquesne Brewery closed in 1972. But with ceilings ranging from 10 to 16 feet high, it offered a classic opportunity for CONTINUES ON PG. 10


For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

CIGARETTES Š SFNTC 1 2014

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Photo courtesy of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

This year marks Port

Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary of

connecting Pittsburghers to destinations throughout the region. As we celebrate the past, we also look forward to a new era of transportation in Allegheny County.

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CHANGE IS BREWING, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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artists to utilize an abandoned industrial Affordability is one issue. Last month, in these units.” Matt Gatto, a multi-media sculptor structure at a low cost. A group of artists the Brew House Association announced began working, and sometimes living, in that it had secured a $1.16 million who currently lives and works in the the structure, and eventually organized grant from the Pennsylvania Housing space, laments, “It’s going to change as a formal cooperative in 1991. Finance Agency. That “gets us about 75 — not just the conditions, but the Over the years, the Association ex- percent of the way” to funding the atmosphere will be different.” But he panded a series of ad hoc studio and project, says Gatti. It also stipulates that acknowledges the tenuous condition living spaces in the building’s upper some units remain affordable, while of the facility. “If we tried to avoid it or floors, while making exhibition, admin- terms of the project ensure the building’s push against it, that would be the end of istration and group workcurrent tenants will have the building.” And Brew House Association Board spaces available at street right of first refusal on Chair Tim Kaulen emphasizes the uplevel. In 1995, the Associathe new units. tion opened Space 101 as Still, rents are expect- grade will allow the group to refocus on a regional exhibition and ed to rise from their cur- creating and promoting works of art. The performance space, and rent $375-to-$1,000 range Association “has never been able to fully welcomed visiting artists to a bracket varying from take on the building because of its size through a residency proroughly $600 to $1,600 a and needs,” he says. But with a developer gram. In 2001, the Associamonth. And the planned on board, Kaulen adds, the Association tion finally secured ownerconstruction, which Gatti will be able to “spend much less time ship of the building. hopes to complete by the on the building and more pursuing the Maintenance was a end of 2015, means that art-oriented goals of our mission.” The latest move toward development perpetual challenge. At all current residents and first, the tenants thought tenants will have to move involves some trade-offs, but it under— BREW HOUSE they could keep up out, at least temporarily. scores the longer-term successes of the RESIDENT AND ARTIST W h i l e T r e k a n d t h e Brew House. the structure themselves. MATT GATTO After all, when the Brew House Indeed, recalls Chris SiefBrew House Association ert, a resident in the earare working to find a suit- Association first formed, South Side was ly 1990s, group members “had to put able spot for temporary relocation, Gatti a rough-edged area shaking off postin so many hours a month toward the allows that “I don’t know if all of the ten- industrial decline: Today, it’s one of the city’s more desirable neighborhoods. cooperative end of things.” ants will want to come back.” As Kathryn Sitter, a former AssoBy some estimates, tenants made or The new units will be smaller (though subcontracted over $700,000 worth of the largest, at roughly 1,000 square feet, ciation board member and previous improvements to the structure through a will still be large). And while Trek’s executive director, puts it, “That’s what combination of sweat equity and grants. Gatti says tenants will still be able to happens in communities where you bring Still, only part of the Brew House was create paintings and other artwork, “You in artists to live and work: Over time, occupiable, and even that was more won’t be able to blow glass or fire pots things improve.” than the organization could handle. In I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM 2009, the occupants were temporarily evicted by city inspectors for a variety of code violations. “It’s still kind of like the Wild West {BY MATT BORS} in there,” says Trek President and CEO Bill Gatti. In 2009, with funds from the Design Center, the Brew House Association funded a master plan to hire Lab 8 Architects to help determine the building’s condition and future. The group also engaged Rick Belloli, of Civic Square consultants, to organize a selection process that culminated this year with the choice of a developer. Trek proved to be the best fit. In projects such as the Overlook in Braddock and Dinwiddie Street Housing in the Hill, the firm has worked with nonprofits, produced multi-use projects and engaged with community constituencies. Even with that track record, Gatti underscores the uniqueness of the Brew House project. “What attracts us to the building is the rawness, history and grit. Yet you have to bring it up to code, and it has to be safe. How do you capture the essence of that?”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

“IF WE TRIED TO AVOID IT OR PUSH AGAINST THE NEED FOR RENOVATIONS, THAT WOULD BE THE END OF THE BUILDING.”

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FURTHER REVIEW More than 15 years after its creation, police review board may finally get some respect {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} FOR MUCH of its 17-year history, the

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Citizen Police Review Board has been the red-headed stepchild of city government. And despite new leadership in the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce and on Pittsburgh City Council, that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed quite yet. Mayor Bill Peduto and City Council President Bruce Kraus have not taken action on the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three vacancies. As a result, when one current member was absent for the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scheduled Feb. 25 meeting, the agency was unable to meet a quorum or conduct business. But Elizabeth Pittinger, the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime executive director, is unfazed. For one thing, she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been through this kind of neglect before and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still here.â&#x20AC;? Elected ofďŹ cials have, in fact, routinely ignored the responsibility to appoint members to the CPRB. Since its inception, attendance records show, the seven-member review board has had at least one vacancy for roughly 40 percent of its meetings. The board has operated with as few as two members. But with Peduto and Kraus in power, supporters of the board say it may ďŹ nally be able to address criticisms from activists who say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toothless â&#x20AC;Ś and from union ofďŹ cials who say its public hearings are purely for show. University of Pittsburgh law professor and law-enforcement expert David Harris, for one, says a sea change may be about to take place. Former Mayor Luke Ravenstahlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach to the board was â&#x20AC;&#x153;hostileâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;sometimes ferocious,â&#x20AC;? Harris says. Relations became especially strained following allegations of police misconduct during the G-20 economic summit, which Pittsburgh hosted in 2009. But now, Harris says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got people leading [city] agencies who understand what the CPRB is really about â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and [who] understand what good it can do for the city.â&#x20AC;?

Former City Councilor Sala Udin, who authored the law that established the CPRB, says public support for the agency stemmed from poor community-police relations, stoked by the 1995 death of Jonny Gammage, a black motorist who died at the hands of suburban police inside city limits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those were the things that were the impetus behind a civilian-controlled alternative,â&#x20AC;? Udin says. But since then, the review board has done little to assuage the concerns of activists like Brandi Fisher, the president of the Alliance for Police Accountability. In an interview before a March 8 rally for Leon Ford Jr., who was paralyzed from the waist down after being shot by police during a 2012 trafďŹ c stop gone awry, Fisher rattled off a list of alleged cases of police abuse. A m o ng t h e m we re former Pittsburgh CAPA high school student Jordan Miles, who was beaten in 2010 after police say they saw a bulge in his jacket they thought might be a gun, and Dennis Henderson, a teacher who was arrested outside a community meeting after commenting loudly on a police ofďŹ cer Jonathan Gromekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driving. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of these situations escalate to a point they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to,â&#x20AC;? Fisher says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No doubt it happens more [to] AfricanAmerican males. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way we can say these are isolated incidents.â&#x20AC;? Attorney Bryan Campbell, who frequently represents the Fraternal Order of Police in disciplinary matters, says Gromek was simply responding to a quickly escalating situation. (As for the Miles case, a federal civil lawsuit involving the incident is going to trial this week.) And the review board, Campbell argues, would be better served reviewing larger policy issues, rather than investigating speciďŹ c allegations. The review boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations are non-binding. When taking disciplinary action, city ofďŹ cials take their cues from the OfďŹ ce of Municipal Investigations, which conducts internal reviews

â&#x20AC;&#x153;YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE GOT PEOPLE LEADING THOSE AGENCIES WHO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE REVIEW BOARD IS REALLY ABOUT.â&#x20AC;?

THE REVIEW boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creation was mandated by a public referendum in 1997.

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014


Performance Series

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Thurs., March. 20, 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater Blackness & whiteness were constructed to serve a sinister function; racism is a minefield we’re forced to dance on. Tim is a 2012 National Book Award Poetry Finalist. I am a gay artist who hasn’t openly addressed lgbtq issues. Mostly I talk about race, gender & privilege. But I will tackle these issues now. I am ready. — Yah Lioness Borne Funded by the Heinz Endowments

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FURTHER REVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

Weddings. Events. Portraits.

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5218 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201 • 412.860.8180 www.rebeccaphotography.com LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN SATURDAY, MARCH 15 10-11:30 A.M. Landscape architect Bill Paxton will present a workshop on residential landscape design. During the lecture, you will learn about various aspects of garden design including site, soil, trees, landscape plants, ornaments, hardscape, accommodate, seasons, historical restoration and special gardens.

HOW TO FRAME A WALL

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TUESDAY, MARCH 18 6-7:30 P.M. Wood framing is the structural skeleton of your home. The Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, in a partnership with DIY Pittsburgh, will offer a Home Improvement Workshop Series. If you are planning a remodeling project that includes opening walls or adding on this course will help you tackle the job in a safe and structurally sound manner. Students will learn safe use of hand and power tools, layout, measuring, cutting, and ultimately how to frame a wall with a window and a door. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

of police conduct, and often completes its investigations before the CPRB has a chance to weigh in. “The Bureau of Police is only acting on what OMI does, not what the CPRB does” Campbell says. At a Jan. 16 CPRB hearing on the Henderson incident, Campbell advised Gromek not to offer any testimony about the encounter. Although the CPRB has subpoena power, it can compel officers only to appear, not to testify. Still, Campbell says, police view the proceeding as “a public humiliation.” Campbell was visibly frustrated at the hearing, and complained that witnesses who testified “have no idea how officers are trained.” Despite the persistence of such tensions, supporters of the review board say a new mayoral administration is cause for hope. Peduto’s pick to be the city’s top lawyer, Lourdes Sanchez-Ridge, represented the CPRB as its solicitor (her husband now holds that post). And his director of the Office of Municipal Investigations is headed by Deborah Walker, a former member of the review board itself. Requests for comment from Walker

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and Sanchez-Ridge through mayoral spokesman Tim McNulty were not returned. But Pittinger is optimistic about the future: While she has a staff of five (including three investigators), she says the review board may be able to pool resources with OMI. “We need access to many different types of documents that might be applicable to a case — and some of those might be gathered by OMI,” agrees current review-board member Thomas Waters. “In the past, OMI has sometimes seen us as not a partner,” says Waters. “That perception will clearly be gone with the new appointment.” BUT THE CHANGE won’t come overnight. Review-board Chair Emma LucasDarby notified Peduto and Kraus of the three board vacancies in a Jan. 10 letter. (By law, the board is a mix of civilians and non-active lawenforcement professionals. Some are appointed by the mayor directly, and others are chosen from a list approved by council. Of the current vacancies, two must be council picks, while Peduto must choose a third with a law-enforcement background.) The letter states that the vacancies must be filled by Feb. 9 to comply with deadlines spelled out in the city code. But at press time, neither council nor the mayor had put forward any names. Mayoral spokesman McNulty said “there should be a name forwarded very soon,” and among the board appointments the mayor is making, the “review board is one of the most important ones in the mix.” Kraus did not return multiple requests for comment. Brian Buchner, president of the National Association for Civilian Control of Law Enforcement Agencies, said to some extent, vacancies are a consequence of a system that relies on political appointees. “You can’t completely remove politics from the system because there has to be some kind of political participation in the process,” Buchner says. For her part, Pittinger hopes a new board will help change the tone of public hearings — and that police may even participate, to explain police procedure. She imagines a “less accusatory” process that “gives people an opportunity to tell their story.” Still, she acknowledges, “We’re feeling a little bit weird, because for the first time in 17 years, we have people in government who understand what we do.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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[POTTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIELD]

UPMC controversy is a defining issue for Peduto, and Pittsburgh {BY CHRIS POTTER} THIS MIGHT come as little consolation if you were stuck on the Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridge during last Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s morning rush hour, or if you were stranded Downtown waiting for a bus. But when a March 3 protest at UPMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters effectively shut down Grant Street, demonstrators werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just obstructing trafďŹ c. They were also giving Mayor Bill Peduto some room to move. The two-day demonstration outside the US Steel Building was spearheaded by the Service Employees International Union, which is seeking to organize hospital service workers. But after allowing the protest to spill into the street on Monday, Peduto effectively halted it on Tuesday. All it took to disperse the crowd was a brief statement read outside the building by Pedutoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief of staff, Kevin Acklin. Even the UPMC brass on the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uppermost ďŹ&#x201A;oors had to hear the message: Peduto has enough leverage with SEIU to send them home â&#x20AC;Ś at least for now. And in a March 5 press conference, Peduto made clear that his agenda was larger than UPMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s labor dispute â&#x20AC;&#x201D; larger even than UPMC itself. Peduto, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d met with CEO Jeffrey Romoff earlier that day, told reporters that while he hoped to mediate the labor ďŹ ght, he was also urging UPMC to settle its long-standing feud with Highmark, the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest insurer. And as City Paper ďŹ rst reported last week, Peduto also hopes to signiďŹ cantly increase the amount large nonproďŹ ts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; UPMC foremost among them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; contribute to city coffers. All three issues â&#x20AC;&#x153;are sort of tied together,â&#x20AC;? Peduto said. Taking on the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest employer would be a gamble for any politician, and Peduto has more to lose than most. No elected ofďŹ cial has been a bigger champion of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;eds and medsâ&#x20AC;? economy: Many of those institutions are sited in Pedutoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old East End city council district. Yet few ofďŹ cials have been as closely aligned with SEIU: While in council, Peduto championed a â&#x20AC;&#x153;prevailing wageâ&#x20AC;? bill with provisions tailor-made for SEIU members. They, in turn, served as foot soldiers in his mayoral campaign. Given all that, it would be easy for Peduto to sidestep the ďŹ ght entirely. The safer move

would be to burnish Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s credentials as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the next Portlandâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;the next Seattle.â&#x20AC;? Laying claim to such a title, after all, is often less about how we make a living than about how we pad our lifestyle: the availability of things like bike lanes, locally sourced produce and paradigm-altering cocktails. Pedutoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst tough political stance as mayor, in fact, was in support of ridesharing services Lyft and Uber, against the objections of entrenched taxi companies. And even as Acklin was addressing the UPMC protesters, Peduto was in Washington, D.C., speaking to the National Bike Summit. But even Seattle doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live on lattes alone. Union members make up a whopping 18.5 percent of the Seattle-area workforce; 15.5 percent of workers in the Portland metro area carry union cards. After decades of deindustrialization, by contrast, Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own unionization rate stands at just 13 percent. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to UPMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workers to decide whether they want to help boost that percentage. For many older Pittsburghers, unions are a source of ambivalence; for many younger Pittsburghers, of indifference. But sooner or later, Peduto â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the rest of us â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will have to reckon with basic questions of economic fairness posed by the rise of meganonproďŹ ts. And those questions are bigger than UPMC, which is why weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing the stirrings of a labor movement among university adjuncts, and among culture workers at area museums. Depending on how we resolve those struggles, Pittsburgh can be for the postindustrial age what it was in the era of Big Steel: a turning point in workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ďŹ ght for a bigger role in a changing economy. Otherwise, we might just be another place to stop in for a $14 cocktail. Eventually, even The New York Times will get tired of writing upbeat stories about us. And even Pittsburghers will get tired of reading them. By then, hopefully, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have shored up the fairness of our tax base, the justice of our health-care system and the prosperity of our workers. If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter whether thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever another protest on Grant Street. Because we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be getting anywhere at all.

UPMC DEMONSTRATORS WERENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T JUST OBSTRUCTING TRAFFIC. THEY WERE ALSO GIVING MAYOR BILL PEDUTO SOME ROOM TO MOVE.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.


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LA PALAPA’S AQUAFRESCA WAS A DELICIOUSLY TANGY, FLORAL, RUBY-RED HIBISCUS JUICE

CONE OF PIZZA {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} “Pizza Not Flat Anymore,” boasts the motto at Pizza Cono. If you didn’t have any problems with pizza being flat, say hello to Mike Rifai. The brand-new shop’s part-owner and spokesman worked in pizza joints while attending Pitt. He graduated in 1997, and became an electrical engineer. But when he heard about cone pizza in Italy, he says, “I thought it would be a great idea for here.” Rifai imported the special ovens for shaping the thin-crust dough into a cone and baking in the toppings … er, fillings. Varieties range from the Classic (basil, tomato sauce and cheese) and the Supreme (with everything) to specialties like Chicken Fajita and Mediterranean (pesto, artichoke, black olives, feta and mushrooms). However, says Rifai, Pizza Cono’s most popular item is the Nutella cone with whipped cream. He also plans to add an egg-and-cheese breakfast cone. The shop (open 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily) offers a selection of barista coffee drinks and loose teas. Rifai hopes it will become a hangout, not just a pizza place. While each cone pizza has the weight and volume of one large slice of traditional pizza, at $3.73-4.66, it costs twice as much. But Rifai says the cones are proportioned more generously, with “smaller dough, but a huge amount of ingredients.” So far, he says, customers agree. “They just want to come and see what is pizza in a cone,” says Rifai. “We hope this will become a franchise.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

5819 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2666

FriedFish

Report

ST. MARY OF THE MOUNT CHURCH 115 Bigham St., Mount Washington 412-381-0212 4-7 p.m. Fridays during Lent $10 gets you a main dish, choice of side (try the homemade haluski) and a dessert. Entrees include the traditional fish sandwich, shrimp and crab cakes. Finding a place to park can be difficult, but it’s worth the effort.

20

HOMETOWN

MEXICAN {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

NE THING WE frequently hear from

people who come to Pittsburgh from the West or the Southwest is that “There’s no good Mexican here!” We beg to differ. Sure, our distance from the Mexican border affects the inventory of our local produce, and the character of our immigrant population; Western Pennsylvania is not Texas or Southern California. But why should that be a hindrance? Especially in this era of widespread food-distribution networks and multicultural culinary interest, there’s nothing about Pittsburgh that makes it inherently incapable of producing a good Mexican restaurant. In fact, we see Mexican cuisine following a trajectory similar to that of Italian cooking 30 years ago. From the four or five stereotypical, highly Americanized dishes once served in every restaurant with a sombrero on its wall, the Mexican dining scene has burgeoned to include explorations of authentic ingredients and preparations of regional as well as

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Tilapia Veracruz

national specialties. This has raised levels of quality … and expectations. La Palapa, the latest addition to our Mexican dining scene, recently made the leap from a stall at the Pittsburgh Public Market to a sit-down restaurant on bustling East Carson Street. Its new space is small but cheerful, full of the saturated colors of

LA PALAPA

1925 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7015 or 412-586-4943 HOURS: Sun. and Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $5-10; entrees $11-25 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED the Southwest, as was the menu. The fact that the names of the dishes were printed in Spanish seemed to show how far we’ve come from the days when the only Mexican food to be had was from suburban chains. While the basic offerings — tamales,

nachos, tacos, enchiladas — tarried largely in the domain of the familiar, we did find some items and variations that were new. The best of these was a salad of tiny shrimp and squid — whole bodies, not rings — with fresh onion, cilantro, tomatoes, roasted peppers and boiled egg. A light, citrusy dressing united these marvelously compatible ingredients, and if the balance was a little heavy on the onions, it was easy enough to correct for that with some selective forking. Sweet apple-cinnamon tamales were less successful, though maybe it was the context of dinner that made us think we preferred the more traditional, savory version. These might have been great for breakfast. Charola para dos, a sampler platter, allowed us to share many of La Palapa’s specialties. Chiles rellenos were mild, tenderfirm and filled with chopped, wilted spinach and a little cheese, a nice variation on the usual floes of molten dairy. An empanada had a thick, hearty crust and was sized closer to a knife-and-fork dish than an on-


the-go hand pie. But a flauta was less like a small deep-fried burrito and more like the diminutive taquito, or rolled, fried taco. It was well-browned and crispy, filled with moist shredded chicken and topped with pico de gallo and crumbled cheese. The pork rib was ultra-tender, juicy, and lightly spiced with salsa verde. In fact, the cooking of meat came off as an unsung specialty at La Palapa. Mole poblano con pollo was a succulent poached chicken breast, and a barbacoa taco was overstuffed with outstandingly flavorful marinated, steam-cooked beef. Sauces, though competent, sometimes paled next to the excellence of these meats. The mole was mild, the salsa verde flat. A platter of three enchiladas — we chose chicken, beef and cheese — achieved a critical balance between tender yet chewy tortillas and just enough filling. We like refried beans and rice well enough, but opted for the vegetable accompaniment here. A lightly cooked, colorful blend of baby carrots, zucchini, cauliflower florets and sugar snap peas reminded us that true Mexican cooking is often fresh and vivid, belying its heavy, greasy reputation.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SHOT OF CONFIDENCE Bartender conference gives city a chance to show off

Our meal began and ended with La Palapa’s crispy, puffy housemade tortilla chips. When we sat down, they were delivered to us with a cup of good, rustic yet creamy guacamole. After dinner, we indulged in sopapillas, scooping up ice cream with more of those addictive chips, this time coated in sugar and cinnamon. We also enjoyed glasses of La Palapa’s aquafresca of the day, a deliciously tangy, floral, ruby-red hibiscus juice. Most Mexican popular dishes were canonized in the menus of national chains that drew inspiration from small, local Hispanic restaurants previously established in other parts of the country. Those chains may have been where many Pittsburghers got their first taste of Mexican cooking, but now, places like La Palapa exemplify the trend in reverse: Local restaurants will free us from the tiresome claim that there is no good Mexican food in Pittsburgh.

Last week, more than 60 bartenders and liquor-brand representatives visited Pittsburgh for the United States Bartenders’ Guild (USBG) northeastern regional conference. The USBG is a national organization dedicated to empowering bartenders through workshops, mentorship and camaraderie. This year, the guild decided to host four regional conferences to help build bonds between nearby cities … and Pittsburgh chapter president Rob Hirst lobbied to host the first one. “If we in Pittsburgh can host so many people who work in hospitality for a living and do a good job of it,” he says, “that is a really big deal.” Over the marathon three-day event, bartenders from six USBG chapters (Boston, New York City, Washington, D.C., Rhode Island, Philadelphia, and Connecticut) were immersed in Pittsburgh cocktail culture. Volunteers shuttled attendees around town on two yellow school buses, conducting tours of the Boyd & Blair and Wigle distilleries and tastings at Acacia, Tender and Kaya. Other events included: dinner at Rivertowne and Olive or Twist; lunch at Legume and Soba; a cocktail competition at Bar Marco; and late-night parties at Grit & Grace and Butcher and the Rye. In addition to the fun and games, the bartenders hit the books: Conference sponsors Stoli, Diageo World Class, Rhum Clement, Jim Beam and Bacardi supported a day of advanced bartending seminars at the University of Pittsburgh. “It’s been an amazing experience. Any time that you can have the opportunity to network with some of the best bartenders and beverage professionals is fantastic,” says Frank Martucci, USBG national vice president and head of the Rhode Island chapter. “It was a terrific showcase for the city of Pittsburgh.” That’s something that Hirst — who organized both the conference and his team of USBG Pittsburgh volunteers over the course of six frantic weeks — is proud of. “We showed them the best time we could show them,” he says. “We wanted to be the best hosts that we could be. Pittsburgh is a huge, emerging market, and we’re doing great things here.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

From left, front-of-house staff Lester Luiggie, with co-owners Luis Navarrete and Jesus Martinez

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Grandma Rose’s CATERING & PASTRY

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

2311 Babcock Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-415-0017

grandmarosespastryshop.com

! WARNING

LET OUR GOODIES PLEASURE PL P LEA EASU ASURE RE YOU Y OU U! YOU!

Adult Adu ulltt Ca Cakes Cak akes by Jessica ADULTCAKERY.COM

Sushi Bar and Thai Cuisine

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

ALI BABA. 404 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-2829. Service is quick at this Middle Eastern restaurant, designed to feed students and nearby museumstaff lunchers. It can get loud and close during busy times, but the atmosphere is always convivial. A wide-raging menu ensures that carnivores and herbivores alike leave satisfied. JE APSARA CAFÉ. 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664. This storefront restaurant offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection, with a menu balanced between unfamiliar and familiar dishes. For less common fare, try Cambodian puffed rice squares, or saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick, warmly spiced coconutmilk sauce. KF

BIRYANI. 4063 William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-8561105. Here, an Indo-American THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 menu offers fresh takes on Fifth Ave., Downtown. burgers, fries and 412-338-9100. This chicken, in addition to dark, clubby restaurant a few traditional Indian excels at VIP service, dishes. There are www. per and offers a menu intriguing variations of a p ty pghci m highlighted by steaks, sandwich wraps (made .co chops and seafood, with naan bread), and with sophisticated but there’s a burger made with straightforward preparations ground lamb, served with such as crab cakes with added mint-garlic yogurt sauce and lobster, or steak encrusted in “Asian” cabbage slaw. KF Kona coffee beans. Also, the BOHÈM BISTRO. 530 Northpointe Grille employs its own butcher (for cutting and dry-aging), and Circle, Seven Fields. 724-741-6015. desserts are made on site. LE This charming North Hills venue offers sophisticated comfort food and peasant fare, designed to be shared in a casual atmosphere. Deviled eggs, pulled pork, roast chicken, mac-and-cheese and a selection of items available as tartines, crepes or flatbreads. Yes, a croque madame can be a superbly presented as a flatbread. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

Takeout • Call for FREE Delivery! Lunch and Dinner Monday-Saturday 3608 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 • (412) 621-1100

www.thaihana99.com th ih h 99 22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Bohèm Bistro {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} pasta, ratatouille and eggplant parmesan; and classic breakfast fare, such as omelets and French toast. Italian notes pervade some of the breakfast options, too: You’ll find French toast made with focaccia, and omelets served with Tuscan toast. JF

CAFÉ VITA. 424 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. 412-828-5506. Embracing the inherent dichotomies of brunch, this restaurant offers both traditional Italian, complete with panini,

Biryani {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412-828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the

rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195. DeLuca’s doesn’t have the White House cachet of Pamela’s, but the portions are large and the quarters are close. On weekends, it’s one of Pittsburgh’s great gathering places. Try the “Super Bowl” omelet. J DINETTE. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-362-0202. This refined California-inspired pizzeria and wine bar offers a small menu mostly featuring gourmet thincrust pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, local and sustainable. Inventive pizzas include toppings such as wilted greens, littleneck clams, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Guests at the wine-bar counter get a front-row seat for the pizza-making. KE DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-3901111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and wood-grilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666. This established venue is known for its revered pub fries and the classic wiener with kraut (plus plenty of beer to wash it down). But don’t miss the pizza, with a top-notch crust. D’s continues to raise the preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty comfort food to an art. JE EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. 412-2622920. This stylish and cheery diner CONTINUES ON PG. 24


Kegs & Eggs On the High Road Shiloh GreeN 123 Shiloh St

Parade Day Specials Saturday, 3.15 -- open at 8:00am Yeah, Eight O’Freakin’ Clock

Pre-Parade Provisions:

Delicious Breakfast Buffet $10 All Ya Can Eat

Plus Free Shellelagh Waxing for the first 56 Guests

Shirt-Staining Green Beers!

On the Low Road Harris GreeN

: s y a s addy

Don’t go out a-boozin’ P 5747 Ellsworth Ave without a ‘tater in your tummy

$5 Foreign Car Bombs limited time only 412.362.5273 412.431.4000

! h a r r Bego

HarrisGrill.com theShilohGrill.com

harrisgrill follow us shilohgrill

We’d like to thank the Irish for chemistry, literature, Guinness, and U2. No Leprechauns were harmed for this event. N E W S

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

GGrand RReopening p g Celebration! • New menu selections • Expanded catering menu • Community engagement

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

7am - 3pm

HALF OFF DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS

all orders!

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ------------------------------------------

336 F Fourth hA Avenue

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH www.CityOven.com 412.281.6836

BenjaminsPgh.com

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

Happy Hour

M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

ibizatapaspgh.com

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine MONDAY: FREE TAPAS MONDAY

$10 value with purchase of a bottle of wine TUESDAY: Buy 1 flight of wine get 2nd 50% OFF of equal or lesser value

412-488-1818

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com 2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge) 24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

THANKS FOR SHARING Area growers offer farm shares

HARRIS GRILL. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-5273. A neighborhood bar and grill (with two outdoor patios) where fun is as important as the fresh food and the cold beer. What else to make of a place that serves “Britney Spears” (chicken tenders on a stick), Cheeses of Nazareth and The Wrongest Dessert Ever, and offers free bacon at the bar on Tuesdays? JE IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-3444123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE LULA. 515 Broad St., Sewickley. 412-749-1200. Seating at this informal tapas bar is lounge-style indoors, and in warm weather, along the sidewalk at café tables. The menu, which also offers a few entrees, is eclectic, and suggestive of Mediterranean cafés, with plenty of seafood, cured meats, cheeses and seasonal produce. Portions are adequate for sharing, if you can bear to part with, say, asparagus spears wrapped in ham. KE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for seating denote a place for moderately priced Japanese food, including sushi. Oishii also adds a few Korean dishes for variety and spice; those seeking a little heat might consider bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF STATION STREET. 6290 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-365-2121. A neighborhood hot-dog joint with exotically dressed dogs, including: chili cheese (with curds), Hawaii (pineapple and bacon), kimchi, sweetbreads and “devil” (egg salad, Tabasco and potato chips). Also offers tacos. JF

Dana Waelde carrying garlic scapes at Blackberry Meadows {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEN MONTGOMERY}

• New wood-fired brick oven

Y THURSDAY 3 MARCH 13

offMenu

offers a variety of pancakes, as well as sandwiches and combo platters of breakfast foods. The “Mama Evans” pancakes are filled with blueberries and bacon, a combination that is smoky, sweet and savory all at once. Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and pressed sandwich. J

FORGET CHRISTMAS: For Pittsburgh foodies, the most wonderful time of the year is now — CSA sign-ups are upon us. In Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), consumers buy produce directly from area farmers, and pick-up either at the farm or area drop-off locations. CSAs help people eat better, while conserving farmland (and farmers’ livelihoods) by keeping farms profitable. While each CSA is different, most offer weekly/ bi-weekly shares for roughly the same cost: $20-30/ week. Many local programs are open for sign-ups now — and registering early is a good idea. Small, organic Blackberry Meadows Farm (www.blackberrymeadows.com) encourages members to “meet the farmers” by picking up shares of produce — mostly heritage/heirloom varieties — from the farm, though limited distribution is available. Those on tighter budgets may opt for seeds and seedlings to “grow your own” share. Blackberry Meadows is increasing its CSA membership to 150 this year, but early sign-ups are still suggested. Many, but not all, of the 200 members of Brenckle’s Farm and Greenhouse (www.brencklesfarm.com) pick up their shares at the farm in Zelienople. Regular shares may be modified into low sugar/starch options, and Brenckle’s prides itself on offering a variety of specialty sweet peppers. Sign-ups remain open into June. Meanwhile, produce from Clarion River Organics (www.clarionriverorganics.com) is grown using horsedrawn plow instead of fossil fuels. CSA coordinator Katie Schwarz anticipates sharing “the first of anything that’s just come into season” with members — and shares can be picked up at numerous locations. Penn’s Corner Farm Alliance (www.pennscorner. com) supports more than 30 area farms with pickups at three dozen Pittsburgh locations. Specialty items include cheese, maple syrup, dilly beans and more; egg and flower shares are also available. While registration for the summer growing season extends through May, spring shares close by the end of March, or until they’re gone. Kretschmann Family Organic Farm (www. kretschmannfarm.com), in Rochester, accepts over 1,000 CSA members, and has many area drop-offs; shares include organic fruit, and are tailored to personal preferences. Kretschmann’s “Agriculture Supported Community” program (archive.kretschmannfarm.com/ASCProgram.html) offers aid to struggling families — and helps ensure that a chance to share in locally grown, nutritious food isn’t just for the affluent. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

Thai Tapas and Wine Bar

Upscale Casual Authentic Thai

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday

11:30am to 3:00pm

2031 Penn Ave (at 21st) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

1712 Murray Avenue Squirrel Hill 412.421.8801

now open 7 days a week!

OPEN DAILY Sun-Thurs 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat 11:30am-11pm

www..silkelephant.net www

Attention Hockey Fans! FREE EVENT PARKING

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*WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum purchase! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like eating or parking for FREE!

Happy Hour Specials 5-7pm Live Music Every Friday 5pm 600 Grant Street

Downtown Pittsburgh N E W S

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412-434-0800

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LOCAL

“HE HAD A LOT MORE FACETS AS A SONGWRITER.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

BUSKING IN THE SUN As the weather warms, two new groups, Busker Street Union and BuskPGH, hope to enrich Pittsburghers’ daily lives by facilitating a lively, high-quality street-performance scene. BuskPGH, a project of the Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corporation, plans to partner with the Port Authority to place performers in Downtown and North Side T stations. “We want to put performers there during peak travel times,” says PDCDC communications director Hadley Pratt, who says an estimated 20,000 commuters use those stations daily. Performers, from musicians to magicians and balloon artists, will be screened for quality, given background checks and required to possess performer insurance. PDCDC hopes to launch the program by the end of March, pending final Port Authority approval. Busker Street Union takes a broader approach, working to provide support and advocacy for buskers throughout the area. BSU’s Eric Sloss sees misunderstanding over laws as one of the biggest challenges facing buskers. “I think there’s still confusion on what’s public and private,” he notes. While busking is legal in the city’s public spaces, it can be difficult to differentiate a privately owned “public” space (like PPG Place) and a city-owned public space (like Market Square). As a result, buskers sometimes find themselves being harassed by police and business owners, even when acting within the law. Sloss also hopes to encourage arts groups, theater companies and musicians to see public spaces as viable performance arenas. Both groups have roots in Busk-Pittsburgh, a program that started in the early 2000s with support from the Sprout Fund and GroundZero Action Network. Sloss was involved in the original formation, and the Busk-Pittsburgh was later taken on by Sean Miller, who describes it as a regional “clearinghouse for busking events.” (Miller has been in touch with BuskPGH to help facilitate that project.) Both of the newer groups hope to educate the public about the importance of public performance. “Part of our goal … is to have buskers seen as part of the Downtown tapestry and culture,” Pratt says. “It’s a centuries-old tradition,” says Sloss. “There are very sophisticated performance artists out there that are doing really creative and entertaining programming in city streets all over the world.”

CEANN RETURNS

“IT’S A CENTURIESOLD TRADITION.”

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Visit www.buskerstreet.org and www.buskpgh.com for information.

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Paying tribute: Ceann’s Brian Halloran (right) with Marc Wisnosky (left)

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

F

OR MORE than a decade, Ceann

had a reputation as the biggest Irish party band to come out of Pittsburgh. Started for fun by a couple of Pitt students in the late ’90s, the band grew to be a touring act, playing with bands like The Town Pants and Scythian. A mix of irreverent humor and old-fashioned rollicking fun colored the band’s album and live shows. Then, in 2011, tragedy struck: Singer and guitarist Patrick Halloran died in a car accident on a snowy February night in Vermont. As one would expect, it dealt a serious blow to the band, which was already in turmoil. “It was pretty surprising,” says Ceann co-founder Marc Wisnosky. “And it was at a time when there was a lot of flux in the band. The previous New Year’s, some of the guys had a falling-out with

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Pat and left the band, so there was this rebuilding happening. When Pat died, all of the people who had been part of the incorporation of the band were no longer in the band; the estate was signed over

CEANN

3:30 p.m. Sat., March 15. Claddagh Irish Pub, Cinema Drive, South Side. $5. All ages. 412-381-4800 Also: 8 p.m. Mon., March 17. Excuses Bar and Grill, 2526 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4090

to his sister, so no one knew what was our intellectual property. It was a weird time for it all to happen in terms of the dynamics of the band.” After Halloran was memorialized, the band called it quits for a while. But that

wasn’t the final note for Ceann, and a tribute album, put together last year by Halloran’s brother Brian, played a part in the band’s revival — which continues this St. Patrick’s Day weekend with two shows on the South Side. “Pat and I lived together here, so I had all of his stuff in storage,” explains Brian, who is a solo musician himself and had played with Ceann for a time. “All the notebooks and files. And he was notorious about keeping his computer backed up constantly. So I started finding all these demos of songs that I never even knew he had written. I thought, rather than having people retread Ceann songs for a tribute, take one of the songs he never got to finish or record himself.” The Legend of Handsome Pat is the album that resulted — a 15-song collection with contributions from Brian


Halloran and Ceann, Pittsburgh names like Paul Tabachneck and The Hang Lows, and bands like Scythian and The Fighting Jamesons, who had played with Ceann. A couple of tracks are unreleased tunes from Patrick Halloran himself. The compilation largely maintains the irreverent humor Patrick was known for. (Ceann’s tunes had names like “Where’s Your Kilt” and “Moron With the Bodhran,” which, if you happen to speak Gaelic, is a rhyme.) The title track, performed by Brian, is a tall tale about Patrick’s life. The Hang Lows do a song called “Beer Pong”; one of Patrick’s songs that made it to the album is called “Hot Dogs.” But there’s a softer side, too: Patrick’s band with his sister, Peanut Butter and Julie, is represented with a tender tune called “Running.” Ceann itself shows up with “The Sun Is Still My Least Favorite Star,” a tale of heartbreak. “For the most part, we tried to stick to the funnier stuff,” says Brian. “But he had a lot more facets as a songwriter. He told me before he passed that he wanted to do an album of his more serious stuff.” By the time the tribute came out last spring, Ceann had already started to play some one-off shows together again, with Brian taking on guitar and lead vocals. “I think it seemed OK to people because he’s Pat’s brother,” says Wisnosky. “It wasn’t like just bringing in someone to take over.” Even though Patrick spent the last several years of his life living in New York City, playing St. Patrick’s Day shows in Pittsburgh is a given for Ceann. St. Patrick’s Day in Pittsburgh is why the band began in the first place. “We put together the band St. Patrick’s Day of ’98,” explains Wisnosky. “Because we used to go out, and it was expensive. We played in the kitchen for our friends; we had a party. But then I went to Ireland that summer and brought home all these books of songs, and Pat and I learned them. Then the next year, we played the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern for St. Patrick’s Day.” The state of Ceann today somewhat mirrors where the band was then — playing a few times a year, not touring exhaustively or playing huge festivals. It’s a good excuse to get together, and a good way to keep Patrick Halloran’s name alive. “We all have personal pursuits, too,” says Brian. “Getting together a couple times a year is great; we don’t want to get to where it feels like a chore for any of us. We all love each other and love getting together and playing the songs, because they’re great.”

PA ID A D VERTISEMEN T

March Featured Mixologist:

HARRIS GRILL

Paul Guarino is originally from Rochester, NY but has been in Pittsburgh ever since attending Duquesne University. He has been bartending for five years and has worked at Harris Grill for seven years. He started as a busser, then server and now as a bartender and part-time manager. His favorite kind of customers are the “regulars”

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who come to Harris because they are courteous, “tips are nice, but when people are friendly it goes a long way.” When Paul isn’t behind the bar, you can find him working on opening Ascend Pittsburgh, a new rock climbing facility coming to Pittsburgh. Visit Paul at Harris Grill and ask for The ABSOLUT Mandrin Tango Foxtrot!

PAUL’S FEATURED RECIPE:

The ABSOLUT Mandrin Tango Foxtrot 2 oz. ABSOLUT Mandrin 1 oz. Orange liqueur

1 tsp. Agave Nectar Orange slices

Lightly muddle the orange slices, add Agave Nectar, fill with ice and add ABSOLUT Mandrin and orange liqueur. Shake and top with ginger beer.

HARRIS GRILL 5747 ELLSWORTH AVENUE, PITTSBURGH 15232 www.harrisgrill.com [ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.]

AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

PAUL GUARINO

March Featured Mixologist

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To learn more about Harris Grill and Paul’s ABSOLUT Mandrin Tango Foxtrot, click on the CPTV Video Player on pghcitypaper.com or scan the QR Code.

ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY. +

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NEW RELEASES

e l l ns u M Bar & Grill NORTH

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

SHOR E

( A C R O S S F R O M P N C PA R K )

THE BIGGEST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY IS AT MULLENS NORTH SHORE! Saturday March 15th

$

3

BBUD LLIGHT DDRAFTS

ALL DAY AND NIGHT.

THE BEST IRISH BAND IN PITTSBURGH….

RED HAND PADDY DOORS BLOW OPEN AT 8AM 200 FEDERAL ST. NORTH SHORE 412-231-1112 28

JOHN MCDONALD RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME (SELF-RELEASED)

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VAN TAYLOR}

One last shot: Timmy Bankz, left, with DJ ChaChee

BANKING ON SUCCESS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} TIMMY BANKZ used to rap under the name Profit — but money was at the root of many of the troubles that faced the MC throughout his 20s. Now in his early 30s, Bankz is working to make a go of it with the help of Monroeville-based producer Van Taylor and a seasoned local DJ, ChaChee. And the payoff has begun, in the form of radio airplay — not so much in Pittsburgh, but in places like Baltimore and Houston. The single that’s getting the attention is “Love You for the Night.” It’s been surfacing in the top 30 of Digital Radio Tracker’s Independent Top 50 chart for weeks now, though it was first released last year. Taylor put together the beat, and Bankz came into the studio to rap over it; the hook came about almost by accident. “It was called ‘Go,’” originally, explains Taylor. “He did the whole song, and right at the end, he said, ‘I love you for the night,’” and I said, ‘That’s the chorus!’ We had to start back at the beginning and that was the chorus.” If not exactly tender, it’s definitely a love song. “I went out of my element,” says Bankz. “That’s not the style I normally make, but I know it’s what I have to do to be successful.” His usual is more hardcore — less love, more harsh reality. That seems more fitting for a guy who spent several years of his 20s in prison on bank-robbery charges. Bankz was an accomplice in several robberies in Monroeville and Westmoreland County

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

in the early 2000s, leading to a federal indictment in 2003 that sent him to prison. “If someone says, ‘Go pick this up for me and I’ll give you $50,000,’ a 19-year-old kid is going to do that,” he says. The money, he says, in part helped to fund his music. He was out for a time in the late ’00s, but was caught driving a getaway car in 2009 and went back to prison in 2010. “I was opening for all the big acts that came to town; I did shows with Wiz,” says Bankz, who was also an amateur boxer. “All that was happening, then I get locked up, and it’s just frustrating.”

TIMMY BANKZ

www.reverbnation.com/timmybankz

“I remember, at Battle of the Groups at Mr. Small’s, I placed higher than Wiz,” he says. “I remember Mac Miller; in my opinion, I’m better than Mac Miller. That’s what frustrates me — I feel like I’d eat that kid up. But he was at the right place at the right time. I’ve gotta give that kid credit: He’s doing what everybody dreams of.” Bankz hopes that, with the help of Taylor and ChaChee, he can ride “Love You for the Night” and the follow-up, “Unconditional Love,” far enough to start living that dream himself. “I don’t go out and hang out; I’m not the one who goes out to the bar or the club no more,” Bankz says. “That’s over.” “This is my family right here,” he adds, referring to Taylor and ChaChee. “This music is my last shot. I’m giving it my all. I’ve gotta make this happen.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

This is the album you might expect from a guy who’s going solo after years leading the city’s premier party/cover band. There are steel-drum sounds and reggae-style upstroke guitar parts, but McDonald is consciously trying to declare independence from his life as the Jimmy Buffet cover guy. These are happy pop songs with a degree of self-reflection and observation — McDonald won’t be an indie darling, but that’s not what he’s shooting for. The journey of the cover artist coming into his own is an interesting one, and Right Place, Right Time documents it well. JOHN MCDONALD CD RELEASE. 6:30 p.m. Sun., March 16. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $1012. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com CHARM & CHAIN I KNOW WHAT YOU ARE (SELF-RELEASED)

Three-song EP from the local band fronted by singer and keyboardist Laurie Kudis. The sprawling grooves range from mid-paced funk-influenced stuff to Southern-rock-style jams. Things could stand to be tightened up here and there, but Kudis’ vocals are reminiscent of Kate Bush at times, Ann Wilson at others — a nice range to have. CHARM & CHAIN EP RELEASE. 10 p.m. Sat., March 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com MATT KING SONGS FOR THE OFFERING (COSMIC AMERICA)

Full-length of psych-rock from the local songwriter. Brings to mind T. Rex and Lou Reed; nothing here stands out as amazing, but it’s all pretty decent. A little more confidence in King’s vocals would go a long way, but a lot of the instrumental arrangements are nice. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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Bend Sinister

[SOUL] + FRI., MARCH 14

Last year’s On My Mind/In My Heart, the full-length that put Boston-based soul singer Jesse Dee on the map, was a pleasant surprise. The vintage sound is natural, not forced; Dee’s swinging numbers recall Van Morrison at his jazziest. He’s a charmer live, and brings his band to Thunderbird Café tonight. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Punch Brothers is based — though its country and bluegrass sound is straight out of Nashville. The group is gearing up for a summer full of festival dates, but you can check out the band tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre along with special guest — and the most Irish name that you’ll see in town on St. Patrick’s Day — Aoife O’Donovan. Kayla Copes 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave. Millvale. $27. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[HIP HOP] + SAT., MARCH 15

[INDIE ROCK] + WED., MARCH 19

Aaron “A-Man” Wellons was an aspiring local rapper when his life was cut short in 2012, the result of medications he’d taken for a brain tumor he’d had since he was a child. Tonight, friends and artists gather at Mr. Small’s Theatre to pay tribute to the young man, and raise funds and awareness to combat prescriptionmedicine addiction and abuse. Musicians taking part include The Get Down Gang, SOS, Jacquae Mae and many more; there’ll also be comedians and a fashion show. AM 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10-15. 18 and over. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[FILM SCREENING] + SUN., MARCH 16

DOWNLOAD NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

Brought to you by: 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Last year, Girls Rock! Pittsburgh held its first music camps for girls, helping tween and teen girls learn to make music together. As the camp organizers gear up for year two, tonight they release a compilation of tracks from the first class of participants, with a listening party at Pittsburgh Filmmakers in Oakland. Along with the listening party, they’ll be screening the film Girls Rock!, a 2008 documentary about the first such camp. Proceeds go toward next year’s camp. AM 3 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland. $6. All ages. www.facebook. com/girlsrockpittsburgh

[ALT-COUNTRY] + MON., MARCH 17

You might not expect to find a country quintet coming out of Brooklyn, but that’s exactly where

Bend Sinister has a lot of things coming up this year. Not only did it just release a new album, Animals, on March 11, but the band is also playing South by Southwest before its tour heads back north. The band’s look and sound somewhat recall the rock of the ’70s mixed with a more contemporary indie-rock vibe; check it out tonight at The Smiling Moose. KC 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. All ages. 412-4314668 or www. smilingmoose. com

Jesse Dee

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PAUL JANOVITZ}


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Walk of 31ST STREET PUB. Against The Shame. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. Grain, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD Six Speed Kill. Strip District. ALTAR BAR. Assassins. Strip GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. 412-391-8334. District. 412-263-2877. Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean SILKS LOUNGE AT THE Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. MEADOWS. Radio Tokyo. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TJ Isenberg. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD Washington. North Side. 412-323-2924. CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance SMILING MOOSE. The HAMBONE’S. Mickey Vaughn Trio. Strip District. Contenders. South Side. & The SnakeOil Boys, 412-281-6593. 412-431-4668. Several Conclusions, HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. THUNDERBIRD Broke, Stranded & Ugly Charlie & The Foxtrots. Bloomfield. CAFE. Jesse Dee. & Bryan McQuaid. 412-682-0320. Lawrenceville. w. w w Lawrenceville. er LAVA LOUNGE. The Carny 412-682-0177. hcitypap g p 412-681-4318. Stomp, Apache Fog, Death Valley .com HOWLERS COYOTE Rally, Stellarscope. South Side. CAFE. Vinyl Jupiter, 412-431-5282. 31ST STREET PUB. Bethesda. Bloomfield. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Never Thought, Motorpsychos, 412-682-0320. Conflict Cycle. Strip District. Iglar Duo. KENDREW’S. Gone South. 412-391-8334. PALACE THEATRE. Abba Mania. 724-375-5959. BEAVER AREA HIGH Greensburg. 724-836-8000. MR. SMALLS THEATER. ShalerSCHOOL. Mark Wood w/ SMILING MOOSE. The Fighting Beaver Area Orchestras. Beaver. palooza VI - CLass Funds Concert Jamesons, The Bloody Seamen. 724-624-4236. feat. Renegades, Tobacco Road, South Side. 412-431-4668. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Restricted Highways, Prominence, THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Styles, Olga Watkins Band. Losing Juliet, Mono. Millvale. Lampshades, General Fantasy. North Side. 412-323-2924. 866-468-3401. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CHRISTINA’S. Shotgun Jack. 412-673-0199. THE CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Ceann. South Side. 412-381-4800. CLUB CAFE. Demos Papadimas & His Band, Boulevard Of The Allies, Jason Kendall (Early) Charm & Chain, Alex Kaufman Trio (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. FISHER’S BAR & RESTAURANT. Brian Lisik. Zelienople. 724-452-1350. HACKETT SLOVENIAN CLUB. Tyler, the Creator Gone South. HAMBONE’S. Ye Olde Royal Shithouse Players. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HEY ANDY’S. Fungus. 724-258-4755. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Karaoke. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Onword Progress, Trophies. Bloomfield. {FRI., JUNE 04} THE R BAR. King’s Ransom. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RAMADA INN HOTEL & Stage AE, North Side CONFERENCE CENTER. Dancing Queen. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Bastard Bearded {SUN., JUNE 06} Irishmen, Chrome Moses, Johnny & The Applestompers. South Side. 412-381-6811. featuring Round Black Ghosts, The Big THE SHOP. A Moment Of Clarity, Bend, Costello & the Cool Minors, No Reason To Live, Liquified Guts, Wreck Loose, Shelf Life String Band Victims Of Contagion. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. Gateway Clipper, Station Square

FRI 14

ROCK/POP THU 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 15

EARLY WARNINGS

Tyler, the Creator

Indie Rock Cruise

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

KEEP CALM

PARTY ON!

AND

Saturday, March 15th

$1 GREEN COORS LIGHT DRAFTS WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.

Purchase of an official BZ St. Paddy’s T-Shirt includes a FREE breakfast buffet! Shirts are $15. __________________________________________________ SEAN SPIFFY STYLEZ MC & DJ 8am-11am

__________________________________________________

OLGA WATKINS BAND 1PM-5PM

__________________________________________________

LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC 8pm-Midnight

__________________________________________________

Special guest appearance by PUNXSUTAWNEY PHIL that morning!

SUN 16

Live Music Scene! Calendar Venue Tour

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu Fri Sat Sun 32

3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16

GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS // Motley Crue Tribute // 8 pm // $17/$22 DANCING QUEEN // 70’s and 80’s dance // 9 pm // $8 St. Patty’s Day Party VELVEETA // 80's covers // 9 pm // $8 DJ JUAN DIEGO, INC // salsa; dance // 6:30 pm // no cover

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

FRI 14 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. DJ Twan, DJ J.R. Bethel Park. 414-595-7953. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Ceann. South Side. 412-431-4090. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Punch Brothers, Aoife O’Donovan. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Town Pants, Dan Macel & Ryan Macel. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 18

UPCOMING SHOWS

CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. HAMBONE’S. Greg Rekus. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOT METAL DINER. The Tony DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Janflone Jr. Duo. West Mifflin. 412-431-8800. 412-462-4900. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. HOWLERS COYOTE Tracksploitation. CAFE. Bryan McQuaid, Lawrenceville. Ryan Taylor & Chuck 412-904-2915. Olsten. Bloomfield. 412REMEDY. Push It! 682-0320. DJ Huck Finn, PITTSBURGH www. per DJ Kelly Fasterchild. pa FILMMAKERS. The pghcitym Lawrenceville. .co Evil Howlers, Electrocats, 412-781-6771. Fabulous Falcons, Fearless ROWDY BUCK. Top 5, Rebel Girls, The Firecrack40 Dance. South Side. ers. Girls Rock! Pittsburgh Camper 412-431-2825. Band CD Release. Oakland. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-440-8241. 412-481-7227. STAGE AE. John McDonald. UNION PIG & CHICKEN. North Side. 412-229-5483. Brightside. East Liberty.

MON 17

140 FEDERAL ST. • PITTSBURGH • BZBARANDGRILL.COM

Pittsburgh’s

SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. The Lava Game. Washington. ST. HENRY LYCEUM. Moose Tracks. South Side. 412-431-9545. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. Tony Janflone Jr. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. TEDDY’S. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. TUGBOAT’S. The Five 6 Band. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

ALTAR BAR. Anna Nalick. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Steve Earle & Shawn Colvin. 412-368-5225. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Chelsea Kills, Vivre Sa Vie, Calyx, Trappers Harp. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Exmortus, Lich King, Vermitrhex. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

WED 19

BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. CLUB CAFE. JD Eicher, Charlie Oxford & Russell Howard, Caleb Lovely. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sleep Experiments, Landlady, Will Graefe. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE SHOP. D. Charles Speer & the Helix, Beagle Brothers, Matt McDowell. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Bend Sinister. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 13

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

412-363-7675. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Factory Soundsystem. Yxu, Antenna, Slinky. Downtown. 412-456-2962.

SUN 16

SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 18

SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 19

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ SMI. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES THU 13

SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 14 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. MOONDOG’S. Anthony Gomes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH. Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. Part of the Steel City Blues Festival. Oakland. 412-999-9479. WALKER’S BAR. The Satin Hearts. Ambridge. 724-457-0662.

SAT 15

ALPINE INN. The Satin Hearts. Beaver Falls. 724-846-9820.

BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. The Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Ironing Board Sam, The Blues Orphans. Rangos Hall. Part of the Steel City Blues Festival. Oakland. 412-999-9479. MOONDOG’S. Miss Melanie & the Valley Rats. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. OBEY HOUSE. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Crafton. 412-922-3883. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Ron & The RumpShakers. 724-433-1322. WESTMORELAND CITY VFD. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues.

JAZZ THU 13

ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Paul Cosentino. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

FRI 14

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 15

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BALTIMORE HOUSE. RML Jazz. Pleasant Hills. 412-370-9621. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Joseph Badaczewski, Howie Alexander, Beni Rossman. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Horn Guys, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NINE ON NINE. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

SUN 16

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Joe Sheehan. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 17 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 18 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsamba. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.


WED 19

SOUTH BY

STEEL CITY

CLASSICAL

Follow our freelance writer Julia Cook as she takes in South By Southwest -with her mom. Pittsburgh acts playing the festival this year include:

The Winter Brave

Cello Fury

FRI 14 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bolero & The Sorcerer’s Apprentice feat. Leonard Slatkin, conductor & Michel Camilo, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

White Like Fire

SAT 15

JUILLIARD BAROQUE. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-621-6204. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bolero & The Sorcerer’s Apprentice feat. Leonard Slatkin, conductor & Michel Camilo, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Devin Miles

The Gotobeds

SUN 16 DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY ORGAN RECITAL. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. 40th Anniversary Concert: ”Time in All its Tuneful Turnings” Carlow University, Oakland. 412-578-8749. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bolero & The Sorcerer’s Apprentice feat. Leonard Slatkin, conductor & Michel Camilo, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Drowning Clowns

Read accounts of the festival via our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

MON 17 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Guy Russo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ben Opie & VE Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 19

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs & Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Paul Thompson, Alton Merrell, James Johnson III. Downtown. 412-818-5604.

ACOUSTIC THU 13

SEVICHE. Jason Kendall. Downtown. 412-697-3120. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Devon Johnson. Washington. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Acoustic Open Mic w/ Sammy Brant. 724-433-1322.

FRI 14

SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Jay Wiley. Sewickley. 412-741-5804. WOLFIE’S PIZZA HEARTH. Barbary Wine.

SAT 15

THE BEER MARKET. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. North Side. HAMBONE’S. Tim & John. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. ST. HENRY LYCEUM. Bill Couch. South Side. 412-431-9545.

N E W S

TRADE-IN EXPO

LATITUDE 40. Country Night. Live bands and/or DJs. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

WED 19 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage w/ Cherylann Hawk & The Live to Love Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD FRI 14 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ploughshare Poets. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CLUB CAFE. Mark Dignam & Friends. The Calm Before The Storm - A Night of Irish Traditional Music & Song. South Side. 412-431-4950.

SAT 15

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike Flaherty. Jack Puskar. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

WILLIAM & MARY COLLEGE CHOIR. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

OTHER MUSIC

THURSDAY, MAR. 13, 2014 – THRU –

SUNDAY, MAR. 16, 2014

BUY, SELL OR TRADE USED AND VINTAGE GEAR GUITAR CENTER WILL EVALUATE YOUR GEAR AND MAKE OFFERS ON QUALIFYING ITEMS

SELL YOUR GEAR AND GET PAID CASH ON THE SPOT OR TRADE YOUR GEAR TOWARDS THAT NEW ITEM YOU’VE BEEN LOOKING FOR

WED 19 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. PUB I.G. Open-Mic Night. Hosted by Vril. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

HOLIDAY MUSIC

EXCLUSIONS AND LIMITATIONS APPLY. SEE DETAILS BELOW. Payouts are given in cash up to $500. Payout transactions over $500 will be paid out by check.

THU 13

COCO COFFEEHOUSE. Barbary Wine. 724-842-0255.

FRI 14 COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. Kevin Burke & Cal Scott. 724-744-3413.

SAT 15

Guitar Center Monroeville

COUNTRY

DUKE’S UPPER DECK. Paddys Drunken Uncles. Homestead. 412-461-8124. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. Mercedez. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe’s Irish Show. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SAT 15

SUN 16

1020 Park Manor Blvd., Pittsburgh (412) 788-1071

SUN 16 CHRISTIAN W. KLAY WINERY. Mike Gallagher. 724-439-3424.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. 724-265-1181. HARVEY WILNER’S. Dallas Marks. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Beagle Brothers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

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ELWOOD’S PUB. Barbary Wine. 724-265-1181.

MON 17

384 Mall Blvd., Monroeville (412) 372-8800

Guitar Center Pittsburgh

For more locations, visit guitarcenter.com.

THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Barbary Wine. New Kensington. 724-337-7008.

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What to do March

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

12 - 18

WEDNESDAY 12

FRIDAY 14

SATURDAY 15

SUNDAY 16

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. With special guests Dan Deacons & Kid Koala. Tickets: livenation.com, ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7:30p.m.

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER East Liberty. Tickets: 412-4310773 or newhorizontheater@ yahoo.com. Through March 16.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: eventbrite.com/aman-rock-the-miccelebration, Dorsey’s Record Shop or Stedefords Record Shop. Over 18 show. 7p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. 1p.m. & 6:30p.m.

Q BALL: HÔT QTURE AN ASSEMBLAGE OF THEATER, FASHION AND CULTURE

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Aoife O’Donovan. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

Puppet Up! - Stuffed and Unstrung CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. Over 18 show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 13

The Fighting Jamesons SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Rock The Mic

Black Angels Over Tuskegee

Daily Grind ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Jesse Dee

Ten (Pearl Jam Tribute)

Frank Caliendo IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through March 15.

Comedian Bob Jay

Canifex ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m. Through March 15.

Once

933 PENN AVENUE Downtown. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412-362-1713. 7p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Q BALL

SATURDAY, MARCH 15 933 PENN AVENUE

PHOTO CREDIT: IVETTE SPRADLIN

Arcade Fire

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Bastard Bearded Irishmen REX THEATER South Side. 412381-6811. With special guests Chrome Moses and Johnny & the Applestompers. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod. com. 7p.m.

MONDAY 17 Punch Brothers

TUESDAY 18 Anna Nalick

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Dan Godlin, Shannon and the Merger & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Shawn Colvin / Steve Earle CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Gordon Shoe’s Spring & Summer Preview Event March 14 – March 23 SHOE & WINE CELEBRATION

Trunk Shows

A TEN DAY FESTIVAL SHOWCASING 11 FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR QUALITY FOOTWEAR AND ACCESSORIES.

$Gift25.00 Certificatee 34

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ALEGRIA Mike Arce Fri, Mar. 14 ECCO Jared Harbottle Sat, Mar. 15 SACHA LONDON Joel Hoffman Sat, Mar. 15 DANSKO Steve Milone Sat, Mar. 15 & Sun Mar. 16 ALLEN EDMONDS Rusty Ortiz Sat, Mar. 15 & Sun Mar. 16

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END OF THE DANCE

COULD VERMEER HAVE USED OPTICAL DEVICES LIKE A CAMERA OBSCURA OR LENS?

{BY AL HOFF} Nancy Buirski’s bio-doc Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil le Clercq opens with grainy, black-and-white footage of 1950s ballet star “Tanny” le Clercq dancing with Jerome Robbins in “Afternoon of a Faun,” the piece that he choreographed for her. With a spare set and simple costumes, the exquisite movements of the long-limbed, angular Tanny draws the eye.

George Balachine and Tanaquil le Clercq, at the barre

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Tanny was muse to both established choreographer George Balachine (whom she married) and young Robbins, and height and athletic slimness became the idealized dancer’s body. But at the height of her career, at age 27, she contracted polio and never walked again. Using archival footage, contemporary interviews with Tanny’s colleagues and first-person accounts read from Tanny’s correspondence, Buirski recounts the ballerina’s abbreviated career, but also her struggle to recover from a devastating illness. The costs were physical and psychological: What is left for a woman who was the embodiment of physical grace, particularly in a time and milieu not as enlightened or understanding of disability as today? Late in the film, Buirski stitches together a clip reel from famous ballets, in which a beautiful ethereal ballerina is stilled, often collapsing with inert legs. This is a high form of romantic entertainment, and the irony is not lost on any of this film’s participants: There’s nothing enthralling about this actually happening. Starts Fri., March 14. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VERONICA MARS.

The former teenage detective is back on the job investigating a murder, all while attending her high school reunion. Kristen Bell reprises her role from the TV series; Rob Thomas directs. Starts Fri., March 14.

ART AND SCIENCE Tim Jenison, at work in his “Music Lesson” room

{BY AL HOFF}

A

T THE OUTSET of the film, Tim Jenison announces: “I’m going to try to paint a Vermeer. … It will be pretty remarkable if I can, because I’m not a painter.” Tim’s Vermeer is a Penn & Teller documentary — Penn Jillette produced and narrates, Teller directs — and you might wonder why a pair of magicians is interested in a middle-aged computer-graphics guy in Texas trying to mimic the distinctive painting style of the 17th-century Dutch painter. But the film is also an enquiry, a scientific investigation into how Vermeer might have produced the exquisite detail and extraordinary depictions of light in his works. Vermeer left behind no documentation on his process; there aren’t even sketches beneath his paint. But could Vermeer have used “trickery,” optical devices like lenses or a camera obscura, to achieve his photo-realistic effects? A tinkerer at heart, Jenison stumbles onto a painting-via-mirror technique he thinks Vermeer might have used. He thus

sets out to prove it, by meticulously recreating Vermeer’s “The Music Lesson.” Jenison does research, enlisting the opinions of both Martin Mull (yes, the comic actor) and artist David Hockney. He visits Delft, where Vermeer painted, and Buckingham Palace. (The Queen owns the original.) Back in San Antonio, Jenison constructs a facsimile of Vermeer’s studio in a warehouse, and hand-crafts all the objects depicted in the painting. Using only materials and techniques available to Vermeer, he fashions lenses and grinds paint.

TIM’S VERMEER

DIRECTED BY: Teller Starts Fri., March 14. Regent Square

Then, he begins painting. For months. (Jenison: “If Vermeer [used this method], it wasn’t a time-saver.”) And understandably, here’s where the intrigue of the film begins to flag. Watching someone paint is just a brush stroke up from watching paint dry.

Penn and Teller are noted skeptics and enthusiastic supporters of science used in the creation of art and illusion. I get why they’d be fascinated with Jenison’s experiment, which seeks to explain with provable facts the unexplainable quality of Vermeer’s paintings. But I’m surprised the pair didn’t round out their doc by inviting some snooty art experts to argue the “magical creative” side of art. Or an art historian claiming that any use of optics nullifies what we consider masterful painting. How could they miss the fun of debunking such highbrows! Jillette and Jenison briefly offer their shared opinion: If Vermeer did use optics, then he’s an even bigger genius! But the film misses an opportunity to create a better context for how controversial this project might be, or simply to argue the never-resolved: What is great art, and who decides? Jenison’s Vermeer project is pretty amazing — especially if you dig a window into people’s obsessions — and, I reckon, you can take the art argument to the bar afterward. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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GMO OMG. Jeremy Seifert’s new documentary looks at the rise of genetically modified foods, and the ways such lab-tweaked organisms might be affecting our health, our larger eco-system and even the ability to control what we eat. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., March 14. Hollywood

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THE GREAT DICTATOR. Charlie Chaplin’s 1940 satire aims its jackboots squarely at the Third Reich. Chaplin portrays two characters — a Jewish barber and the fascist, mustachioed Hitler stand-in, Adenoid Hynkel. The film marks Chaplin’s first real talkie, though its most noted scene — Hynkel’s coquettish dance with a globe — is pure silent-screen poetry. 2 p.m. Sat., March 15, and 2 p.m. Sun., March 16. Oaks

FACES OF WORK: CARNEGIE MELLON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. The eighth annual film festival runs March 20 through April 5, with more than a dozen films (features and documentaries) from around the globe offering commentary of the state of work and workers. Lech Walesa: Man of Hope, a new feature about the Polish electrician turned Solidarity leader, opens the festival. www.cmu.edu/face MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN. It seems no bit of pop culture can be left un-updated, so here’s a big-budget, big-screen, 3-D computer-animated version of the 1960s Jay Ward cartoon from the Rocky and Bullwinkle TV show. And while Rob Minkoff’s film is well produced and fun, it does beg the question: Who is the intended audience? Aging baby boomers who fondly recall the timetraveling, smarty-pants dog Mr. Peabody and his adopted human son, Sherman? The ones who presumably get the jokes about Oedipus, Midnight Cowboy and even a throwaway about Bill Clinton’s infamous troubles in office? Or is it for today’s kids, who will sit still for anything cute, colorful and juiced up with a few fart jokes and madcap chases? Perhaps it’s just another question mark along the fractured space-time continuum that causes Mr. Peabody and Sherman so much comic trouble. Go for the easy laughs, and leave the big mysteries to the dogs. In 3-D, in select theaters (Al Hoff)

TIGER AND BUNNY: THE RISING. For you Japanese anime fans, here’s another brand-new story, featuring characters from the superhero action TV show. 7 p.m. Sat., March 15, and 3 p.m. Sun., March 16. Hollywood

Mr. Peabody & Sherman NEED FOR SPEED. Fresh from prison (after being framed, natch), a street racer takes off on a crosscountry car race, even as his ex-partner puts a bounty on him. Scott Waugh directs this actioner, which stars Aaron Paul, last seen speeding away from a prison of sorts at the end of Breaking Bad. Starts Fri., March 14. THE SINGLE MOMS CLUB. A group of single moms meets at their kids’ school and decide to pool their resources to have fun and overcome obstacles. N ia Long heads up this new ensemble comedy from Tyler Perry. Starts Fri., March 14.

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE. I gave up trying to sort out the plot of this hyped-up swords-and-sandals actioner from N oam Murro, which covers events that happened before, during and after whatever happened in 2006’s 300. (This movie is like those bogus music and video re-releases that get you to pay more for a bunch of outtakes.) It doesn’t matter: It’s just a bunch of muscle men in Spartan bathing suits from ancient Greece fighting a bigger crew of Persian sailors. With swords. In slow-motion. The endless garroting and subsequent blood spurting quickly grows tiresome. There’s a huge naval battle in giant rowboats that looks like a very expensive version of a kid splashing toy boats in the bath. While they don’t make a lick of sense historically or practically, the scary-drag-queen-extravaganza costumes the Persian bad guy and bad girl wear are faaaabulous. Nothing says “I come to squelch burgeoning democracy” like a mesh gold codpiece or a bustier with spikes down the spine. In 3-D, in select theaters. (AH)

REPERTORY BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE. Stephen Herek directs this 1989 comedy that finds a couple of doofuses, Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves), traveling through time to collect historical personages for a class presentation. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 12. AMC Loews. $5 TIGER TALE IN BLUE. In this new film from Frank V. Ross, a young couple in Chicago struggle to keep their marriage intact as they work separate schedules to stay afloat financially. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 13. Hollywood

DJANGO DOUBLE FEATURE. First, enjoy Django, the 1966 spaghetti Western from Sergio Corbucci that established the violent revenge-seeker of the Old West (here portrayed by Franco N eri). The film spawned many imitators and re-interpretations including Sukiyaki Western Django, a 2007 film from Takashi Miike, that re-sets the action among feuding Japanese clans. Django: 6:30 p.m.; Sukiyaki: 8:15 p.m. Sat., March 15. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $3 single film; $5 for both

Raid 2: Berandal THE QUIET MAN. John Ford directed this 1952 film, starring John Wayne as a Pittsburgher who travels to Ireland to reclaim a family farm. Things go bumpy, including a romance with a local lass (Maureen O’Hara) and a boxing match. 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sun., March 16, and 2 p.m. Thu., March 20. Hollywood HELLO DOLLY. Catch a free screening of the 1969 musical comedy directed by Pittsburgh’s own Gene Kelly, and starring Barbara Streisand and Walter

Presented by the Junior Chamber of Commerce Players!

Midnight Sat. 3/15 • $7

$7, $5 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/piccadilly

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Tickets: www.showclix.com/event/RockyHorrorMarch2014

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org


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The Rocky Horror Picture Show - 3/15 @ Midnight! The Quiet Man (1952) - 3/16 @ 11:30am & 7pm 300: Rise of an Empire Matthau. Before the film, hear from another Pittsburgher, actress Judy Knaiz, who portrays Gussie Granger in the film; she’ll discuss her career (including her early days at the Pittsburgh Playhouse) and do a Q&A. 4 p.m. Sun., March 16. George R. White Theatre, Point Park University, 414 Wood St., Downtown. Free (reservations encouraged at its@burghvivant.com) GIRLS ROCK! Arne Johnson and Shane King’s loose, on-the-fly 2008 doc follows four girls through their five-day stay at Portland, Ore.’s chicks-only Rock Camp. The camp, founded by female rockers, seeks to teach young women ages 8-18, many of them hampered by self-esteem issues, that it’s OK to rock out, to express anger, frustration, joy and their newfound sense of empowerment through shrieks at the mic or gnarly guitar shreds. N aturally, personal problems can’t be solved in a week, and our larger culture still can’t quite accept women as equal players in the male-oriented rock biz, but the filmmakers still capture a handful of triumphs. These victories may be small, but with luck, they could be life-changing. The film screens as benefit for Girls Rock! Pittsburgh. Listening party and band meet-and-greet at 3 p.m.; film screens at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sun., March 16. Melwood. $6 (AH)

RAID 2: BERANDAL. In this sequel to the hit 2012 martial-arts actioner, The Raid: Redemption, Jakarta cop Rama (Iko Uwais) has to subdue a new batch of criminals, this time by going undercover as a gangster. Gareth Evans directs. In Indonesian, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 19. Hollywood

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THE GRADUATE. Today, bittersweet comedies about disenchanted young men hit the theaters with regularity. But in 1967, Mike N ichols’ film was a breath of fresh air to a generation deciding that becoming like Dad maybe wasn’t what they wanted. The film made a star of Dustin Hoffman, and gave us the handy catch-word “Mrs. Robinson” to categorize women who seduce younger guys. The classic film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of popular films that never won an Oscar. 8 p.m. Sun., March 16. Regent Square (AH)

LABYRINTH. This cultish 1986 film from Muppetmaster Jim Henson spins a fairy-tale-ish yarn about a teen-age girl (Jennifer Connelly) who must navigate a strange world in order to rescue her baby brother from a goblin king (David Bowie). Featuring one of the Thin White Duke’s worst hair-dos ever. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 19. AMC Loews. $5

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LECH WALESA: MAN OF HOPE. Andrzej Wajda’s 2013 bio-pic recounts the rise of Lech Walesa, the Polish shipyard worker who, emboldened by labor unrest and economic hardships, becomes the leader of the Solidarity movement in the 1970s and ’80s. Walesa’s wife and former First Lady of Poland, Danuta Walesa, will attend the March 20 screening. In Polish, with subtitles. 7:15 p.m. Thu., March 20. Regent Square. $15/$10 students/seniors (includes openingnight reception). Also, Sun., March 23, at McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland ($8/$5).

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The Single Moms Club TWIN PEAKS MARATHON. We take headscratching, off-kilter TV shows for granted these days, but little prepared America for David Lynch’s moody, maddening and occasional marvelous mystery series Twin Peaks. The owls were not what they seemed, and neither was much else. Catch the entire series — all 30 episodes — at this Twin Peaks Marathon, part of Hollywood Theater’s ongoing tribute to Lynch. It begins March 20 with 1990’s Season 1 pilot, and continues March 21-23. Also: $1 donuts and damn fine coffee. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 20. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[DANCE REVIEW]

EVEN WHEN RENDERED IN VISIONARY COLOR, QUALTERS’ IS THE DRAMA OF THE MUNDANE

TRIPLE PLAY {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE performs 3 X 3 through Sun., March 16. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25.75-74.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

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[ART REVIEW] Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performs Dwight Rhoden’s “Smoke ’n Roses.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF RICH SOFRANKO}

A world premiere, a company premiere and an old favorite combined to make Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s 3 X 3 program at the August Wilson Center this past Sunday a triumph. The program, which runs through March 16, opened with the company premiere of Julia Adam’s “Ketubah” (2004). Set to Jewish folk music recorded by The Best Little Klezmer Band in Texas, “Ketubah” was a quaint, metaphoric look at Jewish wedding traditions, from a cleverly crafted game of musical chairs representing the matchmaking process, to the wedding-night consummation and celebration. Inspired by the artwork of Marc Chagall depicting Jewish wedding rituals, the ballet, in seven nicely danced vignettes about the pre-wedding rituals of the bride (Caitlin Peabody) and groom (Cooper Verona), had a Fiddler on the Roof vibe and ease about it. Infused with folk-dance steps, the ballet shone in several standout sections. These included “The Parent’s Agreement,” where Elysa Hotchkiss, as “mother,” danced a tender pas de deux with Verona that ended with her cradling his head. An equally soft and delicate pas de deux between Peabody and Verona found the betrothed pair mimicking Chagall’s “Floating Lovers” paintings, with Verona spinning in circles as Peabody was clasped to him like a backpack. And the ballet’s concluding celebration dance was intoxicating. The ease of Adams’ ballet gave way to the world premiere of Viktor Plotnikov’s “In Your Eyes,” which seemed to flaunt its technical difficulty a la a Paganini violin concerto. Danced to music by Dvorak, played live by members of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Orchestra, Plotnikov’s contemporary ballet choreography for six couples wonderfully challenged PBT’s dancers with elegant, interlacing and weight-sharing partnering that proved a marvel of choreographic skill and inventiveness. Masterful transitions between the couples’ dances, along with quirky dancer head-bobbles and gestures, plus a comedic middle section in which female dancers were “pantsed” of their tutus, all added character to this unique gem of a ballet. The program closed with Dwight Rhoden’s 2007 jazz-cabaret ballet for PBT, “Smoke ’n Roses.” Set to songs sung by Etta Cox, the ballet was smart, smooth and stylistically beautiful. Highlights included the consistent and sharp performances by PBT’s dancers, especially in the sleek, melancholy vignette danced to the song “Everything Must Change.”

QUALTERED

STATES

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

R

OBERT QUALTERS was born in 1934 and grew up in Clairton. Drawn to painting, he studied at Carnegie Tech, then spent time in the Army, in Europe, before attending art school in California during the Beat era. In 1968, he returned to Pittsburgh and kept painting; in the 1980s, he became a local icon with his vibrant images of neighborhoods and landmarks, often annotated with his own quirky texts. Today, Qualters is venerable, an institution. On March 13, the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts (which named him its Artist of the Year in 1985) marks his 80th birthday with a launch party for Vicky Clark’s book Robert Qualters: Autobiographical Mythologies. The event coincides with Robert Qualters: A Life, the PCA’s big, Clark-curated retrospective. The exhibit, which includes 68 works, shows why Qualters’ painting is easy to like. His work, heavily influenced by the Bay Area Figurative School, employs abstraction but is basically representational, and it is marvelously, sometimes even flagrantly, colored. Never intimidatingly austere like so much contemporary art, yet without the archness of Pop, the paintings are as busy as an errandfilled Saturday, cozily cluttered not just with text but with everything: people, houses, birds, billboards, weather, leaves,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

In dreams: Robert Qualters’ “The Blue Rider” (2006-08)

squiggles. Despite his formal training, Qualters displays some of the accessible effervescence of an outsider artist like Howard Finster. On one self-portrait in the exhibit, Qualters self-effacingly writes that his mission is to “Jam every inch of the surface with gross and vulgar images.”

ROBERT QUALTERS: A LIFE

continues through April 20. Book-launch party: 6 p.m. Thu., March 13. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

Qualters is especially easy for Pittsburghers to like: His paintings almost invariably depict this region, past or present. His fame in the 1980s arrived as he was most prolifically memorializing dead steel mills and beloved sites like the City-County Building and Kennywood; the latter alone is the subject of three large-scale paintings in this show. His paintings exploring his memories of vanished landmarks like Jenkins Arcade and Forbes Field second the local fetish for things-that-aren’t-thereanymore. And those companionable, oncanvas texts were a memorable calling card: “So long, Mosse Electrolysis Hair Removal Clinic,” he painted on 1982’s


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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jenkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arcade.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farewell, Mr. Tooth.â&#x20AC;? But while paintings like these might feed our nostalgia, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all they do. For one thing, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re beautiful: Qualtersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; use of color is striking, typically joyful, reminiscent of acknowledged inďŹ&#x201A;uences like Bonnard and Matisse. Few painters have captured the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s light so well, the moods of its rain and snow. A signature piece like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hazelwood â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Second Avenueâ&#x20AC;? (1984), suffused with orange and blue, is a somberly lovely hymn to a rainy evening beneath the glow of a (now-vanished) coke works. Meanwhile, in portraying the times heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen, Qualters renders moments in history as concisely, and intimately, as a graphic novelist might: In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Homesteadâ&#x20AC;? (1980), he populates a neighborhood scene with porch awnings, aimless kids and friendly-looking â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ken the Railroad Man,â&#x20AC;? while falling leaves and an anecdote about Khrushchev visiting here in the 1950s comment on the silenced mill in the background. At the same time, Qualters can be deceptively sly: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kennywood Memories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Turningâ&#x20AC;? looks carefree â&#x20AC;&#x201D; until you notice, in the background, the bizarre counterpoint of the crazily rendered ďŹ&#x201A;ames of Braddockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Edgar Thomson

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birdland,â&#x20AC;? Qualtersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; self-portrait, made with Mark Perrott

steel works. The cheerful, seemingly family-friendly â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kennywood Memories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kiddielandâ&#x20AC;? bears the legend â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eros in Kiddieland,â&#x20AC;? and foregrounds a young boy holding a phallic red balloon, while the images bordering the central scene include a naked woman. But if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to such paintings than mere nostalgia, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also more to Qualters than such paintings. The majority of the exhibitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works are from the past 20 years, when Qualters has, arguably, done much of his best stuff, much of it lacking any explicit Pittsburgh

."3$)t#&/&%6.$&/5&3 BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 53645"35403(t (30614 5*$,&54 Â&#x203A;8::<JJ@9C<J<IM@:<J8M8@C89C<Â&#x203A;

CONTINUES ON PG. 40

Final weekend! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss your final opportunity to see the 2013 Carnegie International, praised by The New York Times as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a welcome shock to the systemâ&#x20AC;? and by The New Yorker as â&#x20AC;&#x153;strikingly thoughtful.â&#x20AC;? On view through Sunday, March 16 Photo: Greenhouse Media

Thursday night admission in March is FREE from 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 p.m.

The 2013 Carnegie International is sponsored by

Free Thursday nights are made possible by a generous grant from The Jack Buncher Foundation. Normal parking fees apply. HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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QUALTERED STATES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

“absolutely RIVETING” — San Francisco Chronicle

“theatrical MAGIC”

One actor unleashes the Trojan War on-stage.

— Variety

STARRING

Teagle F. Bougere ADAPTED FROM

HOMER BY

LISA PETERSON and DENIS O’HARE

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March 6– April 6

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O’Reilly Theater

identifiers (even if the imagery is rooted here). In 2011’s gorgeous “Persephone,” for instance, he depicts the goddess asleep underground, on the verge of awakening, with color pulsing through the snowbound, white-and-gray winter landscape above. “The Blue Rider” (2006-08) finds a young boy awakening in his bedroom to a surreal, Ferris-wheel-shaped vision of belching mills, monumental buildings, a painter at work and the mysterious titular cyclist. “The Night Watchers” (2008) exemplifies Clark’s Autobiographical Mythologies characterization of Qualters as “a historian of the momentary,” with its chromium-red valleytown sunset echoed in the window of a naked woman two adolescent voyeurs are calmly ogling. These later paintings are often full of weirdness, surprise and fun. The wonderfully bizarre “The Old Men’s Dream” (1994) puts some guys on a rooftop with an antic little red devil, overlooking a snowy streetscape filled with both recognizable signage (like the state lottery) and mysterious, ghostly, box-shaped faces apparently on the march. “The Dance” (2013) finds four naked women, and another in her underwear, posing anomalously amidst elderly couples dancing in what might be an old union hall. And who are those pedestrians in 1999’s “Orangutan Dreams” who fail to notice not only the naked, red-haired woman in their midst, but the amiable orang standing next to her? Interestingly, only one work in this show predates 1978, which Clark cites as

QUALTERS’ PAINTINGS ARE AMAZINGLY BIG-HEARTED; POIGNANT; AND, AT TIMES, WEIRDER THAN MOST THINGS OUT THERE.

For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records or Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

the year Qualters began adding text to his paintings. In recent years, however, he’s seldom included text, leaving viewers more leeway to interpret his images, and the pleasure of participating in the creation of their meaning. In Autobiographical Mythologies, veteran curator Clark notes that in art circles, Qualters is often marginalized as a “regionalist.” And in fact, it’s been four decades since he’s had a solo exhibition outside Western Pennsylvania. Clark questions the validity of “regionalism” as a category, but also defends Qualters against the label, in part because of the universality of his themes. Indeed, while Qualters’ paintings are deeply evocative of place, they’re also amazingly big-hearted; poignant; and, at times, weirder than most things out there. But it’s also true that while his concerns are universal, they’re not as allencompassing as those of, say, Brueghel, who’s enough a hero of Qualters’ that he is depicted in several of these paintings. That Dutch master, for instance, routinely depicted base human folly, something it’s impossible to find in Qualters’ work. Qualters’ imagery can be dark and gloomy, as in “Labor Day 1985,” his ironically titled image of the bombed-out J&L plant; it can be heartbreaking on matters like the death of his wife, as in “Key for a Life”; but it’s never really grim, let alone excoriating. (That suited old man clutching money in 1995’s “Allegheny County Jail,” presumably profiting from human misery, is the exception that proves the rule.) Rather, even when rendered in visionary color, Qualters’ is the drama of the mundane: Though a few of the people in his paintings cavort, or pose for the viewer (like the funny fat kid in “Kennywood Memories — Who”), most simply stand, loiter, stroll. In most of his city scenes, the pedestrians are distracted, lost in their own thoughts. A plurality of his work depicts life as most people live it most of the time. When you visit Robert Qualters: A Life, leave 30 minutes to watch “Bob Qualters: The Artist in Action,” Joe and Elizabeth Seamans’ terrific portrait of the artist as an old man at work in his Homestead studio. The film, which screens from noon-3 p.m. daily, illuminates Clark’s summation of Qualters as “a contemporary flaneur and raconteur interested in the human condition as filtered through his own experiences in the city he chose to call home.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[ART]

BARELY THERE {BY ANGELA SUICO} TO WILL ZAVALA, the old advertisements

painted on Pittsburgh’s brick buildings were a novelty when he moved here from San Francisco, in 2003. But when he tried to discuss them with a friend, his friend didn’t know what he was talking about. Zavala drove to a spot on North Negley, where he could have sworn he’d seen one of the signs. It wasn’t there. “I drove around and around, again and again,” says Zavala, an associate professor at Pittsburgh Filmmakers. “Finally I found a brick wall where I was pretty sure … it had been located, and it had been chemical-washed or something. I thought, ‘Well, if anyone’s gonna do this, it should be done sooner rather than later.’” Z ava l a ’s p r oj ec t i s Palimps es ts : Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh, a new exhibit at Filmmakers Galleries showcasing 30 color photographs. Zavala dates most of the ads to the 1930s, with the newest stemming from the 1960s. While certain signs are vibrant and easily legible — “Gold Medal Flour” in Brighton Heights; “Katsafanas Coffee Co.” in the North Side — others are too faded to read. Some were painted over older signs, and traces of both are now visible, forming a palimpsest. “Ryan’s Ice Cream,” in Wilkinsburg, was

The Dirty Ball If you’ve been, you know. If you haven’t, you should.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY BOGEL}

One of Pittsburgh’s “ghost signs”

4-by-5-inch view camera, a large-format device not widely used for a century. The exhibit illustrates the past in several ways. “The language is different,” says Zavala. “The businesses are mostly gone. The products are gone. The method of promoting or selling is completely foreign to us now. It just makes me think: If that’s the case for something only 60 or 70 years ago, then imagine that [one day] all the advertising today will seem just as foreign. Apple products in the not-that-distant future will seem quaint.” Last November, Bogel went to the North Side to shoot a sign on North Charles and Brighton. Having taken pictures of the spot in April, she was seeking better lighting. But “the building [containing the sign] had been torn down. It was a huge surprise to me. That was one of the reasons why we did the project — to preserve these signs before they do fall apart.”

“THE METHOD OF PROMOTING OR SELLING IS COMPLETELY FOREIGN TO US NOW.”

PALIMPSESTS

opening reception: 6 p.m. Fri., March 14. Exhibit continues through May 16. Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. 412-682-4111 or www.pittsburgharts.org

painted over a Coca-Cola sign. To capture the scale of the signs, project photographer Kelly Bogel used a Calumet monorail

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 Jane Street Warehouse, 2120 Jane Street, Southside TICKETS: www.attacktheatre.com/TDB14 or call 1.888.71.TICKETS

Tickets on sale now! Ages 21 and over only Made possible in part by:

Berger Investment Group

Image Design: Rob Henning, Photo: Jonathan Greene

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

BOEING BOEING

A comedy written by Marc Camoletti, translated by Beverly Cross and Francis Evans.

MARCH 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS GROUP RATES AVAILABLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

For reservations please visit our website at www.mckeesportlittletheater.com or call 412-673-1100.

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF GREG KORNIDES}

In the foreground, Kaitlin Very (red dress) with Leon Zionts in Pittsburgh Savoyards’ Utopia Limited

[PLAY REVIEWS]

WILDE STYLE {BY TED HOOVER} ON THE COMEDY landscape, Oscar Wilde’s

The Importance of Being Earnest looms likes Mount Everest. No matter what’s in the foreground, there it is rising up, tantalizingly unassailable. Eventually every serious theater person is going to attempt an ascent and, because perfection is unobtainable, they’re all doomed to failure. (On a couple occasions I’ve met the same ignoble fate myself.) So why do people even try? Well, as George Mallory might have said: “Because it’s there.”

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST continues through Sun., March 16. New Hazlett Theatre, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-20. www.primestage.com

This time, Prime Stage Theater and director Richard Keitel lead an expedition to the summit of this comedy of manners about Victorian gentlemen Jack and Algernon, who, in the pursuit of romance, invent a fictional brother, Ernest, to do their wooing. It all goes delightfully wrong when the fiction collides with fact, and love, reputation and muffins are put in jeopardy. Seeing that it’s Wilde and not, say, Apatow, the language of the piece is as important as the story being told. Wilde famously said he spent an entire morning

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debating putting a comma into the work and an entire afternoon debating taking it out. We don’t really have that sort of discipline in contemporary theater, and the presentational style of acting for which the show was written has long since vanished. So it’s going to take enormous effort to bend a company to Wilde’s style, rather than the other way around. Keitel and a strongly talented cast have clearly given their all. A perfect Earnest is impossible, but the essential job of any production is not to get in the way of the text. In that, Keitel and company succeed admirably. What I especially enjoyed was the sense of childish playfulness brought to the evening by Tom Driscoll and Andrew Swackhammer, as Jack and Algy: Their relationship is that of younger and older brother, even if they didn’t realize it at the time. Driscoll also does a great job of working within the play’s style to great comedic effect. A special mention to Johnmichael Bohach and Lindsay Tejan, set and costumes, for creating, out of what I am sure are limited resources, a lushly outfitted production. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

GOOD BRITAIN {BY F.J. HARTLAND} THE PITTSBURGH Savoyards brings its

season to a close with a colorful — and long-delayed — Pittsburgh premiere.


As the villains Scahio, Phantis and Tarara, Jack Mostow, Michael Greenstein and Gregory Patrick wear ghastly wigs and bring much of the comic relief to Utopia Limited. Unfortunately, Mostrow and Patrick are often hard to hear. As the English governess Lady Sophy, Robyn Peterson shows great range both musically and emotionally, particularly in â&#x20AC;&#x153;When But a Maid of Fifteen.â&#x20AC;? Director Robert B. Hockenberry has staged a spectacular Act I ďŹ nale in which Justin Morrison shines as Mr. Goldbury. Morrison is also a part of a stand-out Act II number â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then I May Sing and Play?â&#x20AC;? along with Jillian Martini and Mia Bonnewell (as Zaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger sisters) and Christopher Neff (as Lord Dramaleigh). As always, the Pittsburgh Savoyards Orchestra under the baton of Guy Russo is a delight. Some important information: Many of the roles are double-cast, with different performers depending on the date. Also, Utopia Limited is not for the faint of heart: This production runs nearly three hours. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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ALTERED STATES {BY LISSA BRENNAN} You hear Plume, Ian Brillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solo exhibit at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, long before you see it. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a frequency as you enter the building; almost from the moment you step into the gallery you feel a vibration, and you wonder, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What the hell is that,â&#x20AC;? and you follow. From far away, it beckons, drawing you up the stairs and down the hall to the furthermost corner, where it murmurs and hums. You brush aside the blackout curtain that obscures it and step into the room it dominates. And you see it. Plume is a triumph of sound and light, a revelatory immersion that captures viewers and entices them beyond observation into participation. Constructed of tile blocks of white plastic, the rounded structureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roof arcs toward the ceiling, while a curved portal reveals a cozy interior where pillows scattered on the floor invite you in. While the pale, sloping dome at first suggests a frigid igloo, what it more accurately evokes is a sweat lodge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not because it physically resembles a smoky, incense-laden shack, but because it possesses the capacity to transform. Inside the dome, the dome is the whole world. Lights flicker and dance in synchronized patterns of color, electricity buzzes and seethes, and the result is visceral and profound. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an installation that the viewer merely interacts with; this is an installation that becomes a part of the viewer. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not sensory deprivation, or sensory overload, but sensory absorption. The rhythm and pulse pull the viewer in, while the viewer in turn is filled with the energy engendered. The viewer and the work become connected in a mutual experience. This is a sweat lodge for a technological age, its manufactured ambience generating a heightened state of being. This works on multiple levels, and what each individual gets out of it will depend on what she allows herself to receive. From a practical and intellectual standpoint, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an electronically enhanced edifice with pleasing intermittent plays of noise and image, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one perfectly valid approach. But if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to go a step further and open yourself fully, you might undergo something heightened, the work producing something dreamlike, bordering on trance: hallucinogenic, evocative and inspiring. Either way, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a staggeringly effective work and not to be missed.

PHOTO BY FRANK OCKENFELS | ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST

UTOPIA LIMITED

continues through Sun., March 16. Pittsburgh Savoyards at the Carnegie Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $12-25. 412-734-8476 or tickets@pittsburghsavoyards.org

[ART REVIEW]

Ian Brillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Plume

The rarely seen Utopia Limited or The Flowers of Progress was the 13th collaboration between Gilbert and Sullivan. The 1893 musical comedy is set on a small island nation in the South PaciďŹ c that in every way is trying to make itself like Great Britain. Not only do the Utopians want to emulate British customs and fashion, but they also want to follow the â&#x20AC;&#x153;newâ&#x20AC;? practice of limited-holdings companies. Immediately, the backdrop by set artist Alyssa Ruggiero creates a tropical atmosphere. Its saturated colors are lush and reminiscent of Gauguinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings of Tahiti. Leon Zionts gives a memorable performance as King Paramount the First, a role tailor-made for his outstanding singing and comedic talents. As Princess Zara, Samantha DeStefano looks and sounds every inch a royal. Her rich voice ďŹ lls the Carnegie Music Hall. And during Act II, she is most eye-catching in a stunning red gown from costumer Robin Kornides. Daniel Arnaldos plays Zaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love interest, Captain Fitzbattleaxe. Arnaldos plays the dashing British ofďŹ cer to perfection, and begins Act II with the very funny â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Tenor All Singers Above.â&#x20AC;?

NOW PLAYING! 5ISPVHI.BSDIt#FOFEVN$FOUFS ISPVH HI.BSDI #FOFEVN$FOUFS

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PLUME continues through April 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

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PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

The Event of the year!

Rock The Mic

Celebrating the Life & Music of Aaron “A-Man” Wellons

03.1303.20.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. the American Olympics team. Angela Suico Noon-6 p.m. Continues through Sun., March 16. 910 Sheraton Drive, Mars. $10-25. 412-963-7030 or www.pghknitandcrochet.com

DON’T MISS IT!

March

15, 2014 7p.m. - 11p.m.

{COMEDY}

“I wrote a rape joke, but rape jokes are tacky and I wouldn’t want to force it on you,” said Davon Magwood recently. The local standup comic, also known for his “God Hates Jags” T-shirt and Twitter war with the Westboro Baptist Church, is taping his first hour-long comedy special tonight at the Rex Theater. The featured comedians are Pittsburgh-based MTV star Susie Meister, Chris Edison, Lana Aurora Roskin and Mitch Beardczykowski. BO 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-15. www.rextheatre.com

$10 in advance $15 at the door

Hear phenomenal local and surrounding area artists Fashion show by CAPRICORN Entertainment Emcee’d by Leslie “Ezra” Smith

Mr. Smalls Theater

400 Lincoln Ave. • Millvale, PA • 15209 Tickets can be purchased at: Eventbrite.com/aman-rock-the-mic-celebration Dorsey’s Record Shop 7614 Frankstown Ave. (Homewood) 412-731-6607 Stedeford’s Record Shop 417 E. Ohio Street, 412-321-8333

MARCH 14

Vanessa Gonzalez G l

Proceeds to BENEFIT up and coming musical artists and prescription drug addiction awareness groups

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SEASONAL CRAFT AND MICROBREW ON TAP

We know it is spelled St. Paddy’s Day, but at Cain’s Saloon on Saturday, y, March 15th we celebrate

St. Pa”T”ty’s Day! Taking the “T” to the parade? Stop by Cain’s Saloon to enjoy...

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All Day! For directions, hours & more visit us online.

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3239 West Liberty Ave. • Pittsburgh, PA 15216 • 412.561.7444 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

Tonight, hear a talk by one of the founders of the green building movement. In the 1990s, Bob Berkebile helped create the U.S. Green Building Council and its LEED rating system. Now, with the Living Building Challenge and the idea of regenerative design, he’s pushed green architecture further — toward buildings that meet their own energy needs and reuse their waste. This founding principal of Kansas City, Mo.-based firm BNIM gives a talk on “urban acupuncture” at the Green Building Alliance’s Inspire Speakers Series, at Phipps Conservatory. Bill O’Driscoll 5-8 p.m. (talk at 6 p.m.). Schenley Drive, Oakland. $15-45. www.go-gba.org

this weekend, at Four Points by Sheraton, in Mars. On the roster are: a talk and booksigning by New York Times best-selling romance novelist Debbie Macomber; knitting lessons from designer Lily Chin; and the display of the special sweater knitted by festival teacher Eleanor Swogger for

At the Pittsburgh Knit & Crochet Festival, yarn masters can take classes, buy supplies and lament over those blasted dropped stitches. The threeday festival, which begins today, celebrates its 10th year

Austin, Texas-based sketchcomedy writer and improviser Vanessa Gonzalez is a regular at venues like Austin’s The Movement, and a repeat guest at comedy festivals like the Hell Yes Fest (in Austin and New Orleans), the Chicago Sketch Fest and the New Orleans Fringe Festival. She makes her Pittsburgh premiere tonight with two performances at Arcade Comedy Theater of I Don’t Know Words. Gonzalez’s one-woman sketch comedy show blends absurd characters, stories and songs. BO 8 and 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

{COMEDY}

+ FRI., MARCH 14 {CRAFTING}

{COMEDY}

MARCH 14 Frank k Caliendo C li d

Sports commentators, actors and former presidents aren’t safe from comedian Frank Caliendo’s impressions. (His imitations of former President Bush and Robin Williams are particularly killer). After honing his chops on MadTV for seven years, Caliendo raised his profile with his own sketchcomedy show on TBS and numerous appearances on late-night talk shows. A sports aficionado, he recently created a four-minute spoof documentary for ESPN. The focus?


sp otlight When approached by the police, many people comply with whatever is asked of them — not knowing that, depending on the request, they have the right to refuse. It’s this “acquiescence” that Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former New York Times reporter David K. Shipler hopes to combat with his latest work, Rights at Risk: The Limits of Liberty in Modern America. The book highlights how civil liberties get pushed to the side in our society, describing students who are punished for expressing their political opinions at school and murder suspects who undergo torture by Chicago police. Shipler says schools aren’t adequately teaching young people about their rights, which reduces Americans’ ability to practice them. “The Constitution is a piece of paper,” he tells CP, “and it lives only with as much health as the citizenry will impart to it. It does not exist except in the hearts and minds of ordinary Americans. Courts reinforce it, but unless it’s deeply internalized by Americans, it will be eroded.” Shipler shares his insight as the keynote speaker for the ACLU Pittsburgh Chapter’s Annual Meeting on March 16, at the Mellon Auditorium in Posner Hall, on the Carnegie Mellon University campus. An original copy of the Bill of Rights will be on display next door, at the Posner Center. Angela Suico 7 p.m. CMU campus, Oakland. Free. 412-681-7736 or www.aclupa.org

Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman’s rise to the presidency. Caliendo performs at Pittsburgh Improv, with four shows tonight and tomorrow. AS 8 and 10:15 p.m. Also 7 and 9:15 p.m. Sat., March 15. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, Homestead. $35, 412-462-5233 or www.pittsburgh.improv.com

+ SAT., MARCH 15 {FOOTWEAR}

DJ Clark Kent is known for two things: producing for rap’s

buy, trade and admire one another’s footwear. Or, as Macklemore puts it, “The sneakerheads would be like, ‘Ah, he got the velcros.’” AS 1-7 p.m. 5 Hot Metal St., South Side. $20-25. 412-212-3263 or www.pittsburghsneaker convention.com

{ART}

Art plus cocktails? Don’t mind if we do. Tonight, the Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails presents its third annual all-women art show. The local talents

{MUSIC}

Members of Juilliard Baroque, the ensemble of Juilliard Historical Performance faculty, present Virtuoso Conversations at Synod Hall tonight. The program includes pieces by Handel, C.P.E. and J.S. Bach and the 17th-century Czech composer Jan Dismas Zelenka. Performing are: Robert Mealy on violin; Gonzalez X. Ruiz on oboe; Dominic Teresi on bassoon; and Jeffrey Grossman on harpsichord. Presented by Renaissance & Baroque, the concert marks Julliard Baroque’s first performance in Pittsburgh in three years. Youth orchestra Fifth Avenue Strings gives a pre-concert performance at 7:15 p.m. AS 8 p.m. 125 N. Craig St., Oakland. $10-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org

{DANCE}

MARCH 15 Pittsburgh b h Sneaker S k Convention & Pop-Up Shop biggest stars, including Jay-Z and Notorious B.I.G., and embracing the sneaker as a fashion statement. Kent brings the latter to Pittsburgh when he hosts the first-ever Pittsburgh Sneaker Convention & Pop-Up Shop, produced by Slaam Basketball LLC, an organization offering basketball clinics for student athletes. Gathering at the South Side’s Circuit Center, sneaker connoisseurs can

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featured include Yelena Lamm, Christiane Leach, Suz Pisano, Sam Thorp and CP’s own Heather Mull. Plus, there’ll be a tasty classic cocktail. Admission to Steel City Sisters in Art, at Monk’s, in Lawrenceville, is free, and proceeds from all sales go directly to the artists. BO 6-10 p.m. 3634 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville. See LUPEC Pittsburgh’s Facebook page for info.

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The PearlArts Studios Salon Series offers art-lab presentations in an intimate setting. Tonight, adventuresome choreographer Maree ReMalia offers an in-process showing of The Ubiquitous Mass of Us. Come early (starting at 7 p.m.) to meet the cast and collaborators, tour artist Blaine Siegel’s nearby studio, win prizes in a scavenger hunt and more. Bolder viewers can even join the cast for a 6:30 p.m. warm-up (no experience necessary). The show will premiere in June. BO 8 p.m. 201 N. Braddock Ave. (sixth floor), Point Breeze. $10-15. www.pearlartsstudios.com

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The popular Dork Diaries series for young readers — all about 14-year-old Nikki Maxwell — is a family affair.

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MARCH 20

Human n Eq E Equity qui uit ity ty tthrough hrou hrou hr Art Performance Series The primary writer is Rachel Renée Russell, and her collaborators — contributing writer Erin Russell and illustrator Nikki Russell — are her daughters. In advance of the next installment, Tales From a Not-So-Glam TV Star,

{MUSIC}

Please Turn Your Cell Phones ON! is what IonSound is calling today’s concert. The contemporary-music ensemble upends standard concert etiquette by inviting audience members to comment instantly

Torke — and it’s asking patrons to pre-load their phones with photos that evoke Arvo Pärt’s “Spiegel Im Spiegel” so they can be projected during the performance. BO 7 p.m. Bellefield Hall Auditorium, 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $10-15. www.ionsound.org

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MARCH 15 The Th h Ubi Ubiquitous bi it Mass of Us

the women visit the Authors. Stories. You. series, at Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. The Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures event includes an audience Q&A, a book-signing and a popcorn bar. BO 2:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-10 (free for kids under 3). 412-622-8866

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on the performance via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Selected comments and photos will be projected for all to see. Oh, incidentally, the sixmember group (piano, violin, cello, flute, clarinet) performs a program including works by John Mackey and Michael

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A distinguished guest and a hometown talent feature at the latest installment of the Human Equity through Art Performance Series. Tim Seibles is an acclaimed, Virginia-based poet whose latest collection, Fast Animal, was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award. Yah Lioness Borne (pictured), founder of Big Juicy Records, is a recording artist and a longtime presence on the local music and performance-poetry scenes. Both performers were invited to the New Hazlett Theater because they second HEArt’s mission to use art to further social justice and reform. BO 7:30 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-15. www.newhazletttheater.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BLACK ANGELS OVER TUSKEGEE. Off-Broadway play by Layon Gray. Presented by New Horizon Theater. Fri., March 14, 7:30 p.m., Sat., March 15, 3 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., March 16, 3 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. BOEING, BOEING. A bachelor is dating 3 stewardesses at the same time, unbeknownst to them. When the airport shuts down, all 3 women are in town, thinking they’ll stay w/ him. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. A FEMININE ENDING. Amanda has the talent to become a great composer, but her life gets sidetracked by the demands of an almost-famous fiancé, divorcing parents & a rent-paying job writing commercial jingles. Thu-Sat. Thru March 15. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

is now in session w/ “real” cases THE GREAT ONE. A sports involving zombies, spaceships, commentator returns to her furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. hometown to mourn a childhood and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. friend, & reminisces about the Cabaret at Theater Square, period of her life between the Downtown. 412-456-6666. Pirates’ 1971 World Series MURDER AT THE CONVENT.. win & the death of Roberto AND THENTHERE WERE NUN. Clemente. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Cabaret dinner theater. Fri, Sat. Thru March 15. Pittsburgh Thru March 22. Crowne Playwrights Theatre, Plaza Hotel, Bethel Downtown. Park. 724-746-1178. AN ILIAD. A new ONCE. The story of adaptation Homer’s an Irish musician & epic poem. Presented . w ww per a Czech immigrant by Pittsburgh Public a p ty ci pgh m drawn together by their Theater. Wed-Fri, .co shared love of music. 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Based on the Academy Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, Award-winning film. Thru 7 p.m. Thru April 1. O’Reilly March 13, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Theater, Downtown. March 14, 8 p.m., Sat., March 15, 412-316-1600. 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., March 16, THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING 1 & 6:30 p.m. Benedum Center, EARNEST. Presented by Prime Downtown. 412-456-6666. Stage Theatre. Fri, 8 p.m. and THE PSYCHIC: A MURDER Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru March 16. MYSTERY OF SORTS. Adam New Hazlett Theater, North Side. Webster, a writer, turns to 724-773-0700. selling psychic readings to make JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE - A the rent. He soon finds himself NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The involved in a string of hilarious courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice

FULL LIST ONLINE

murders. Fri, Sat, 8:15 p.m., Sun., March 16, 2:30 p.m. and March 18-20, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 22. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. TRIBES. Billy, a deaf twentysomething who is adept at lipreading the brash discourse of his family, falls for a woman who’s losing her hearing & everyone is forced to learn a lesson about listening. Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 30. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. UTOPIA LIMITED. Gilbert & Sullivan’s story of a princess returning to Utopia from Britain, bringing British Flowers of Progress, who convince the Utopians to embrace capitalism. Presented by the Pittsburgh Savoyards. www.showclix.com/ event/UtopiaLimited Fri, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Thu., March 13, 8 p.m. Thru March 16. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

COMEDY

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PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

THU 13 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru April 24 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. STEVE HOFSTETTER. 8:30 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-481-7625.

FRI 14 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru March 14 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. DAHRI FERKS. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DAVON MAGWOOD’S LIVE COMEDY RECORDING. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-627-7097. I DON’T KNOW WORDS: VANESSA GONZALEZ. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru CONTINUES ON PG. 48

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014


An Evening of Music

VISUAL

SAVE-MOR

MARCH 22

ART

Paul Luc

Beer & Pop Warehouse

APRIL 4

The Rough & Tumble

S pecial

APRIL 18

Dylan Jane

“Oh The Places I’ve Been,” by Holly Pultz, from Pittsburgh Society of Artists’ Internationally Inspired at 3rd Street Gallery, in Carnegie

NEW THIS WEEK BOXHEART GALLERY. Panoptic Landscape. Work by Box Heart Gallery’s 2014 Artist of the Year, Irina Koukhanova. Artist reception: March 22, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Tin Can Tramp Folk Art. Mixed media by Steph Neary. Opens March 14. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. In Anticipation of Spring. Work by Kevin O’ Toole, Constance Merriman, Karl Mullen, more. Opening reception: March 15, 2-5 p.m. & by appointment. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Palimpsests: Ghost Signs of Pittsburgh. Photographs by Kelly Bogel. Opening reception: March 14, 6-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. LAROCHE COLLEGE. Positive Space. Juried art & design student showcase. Opens March 13. Wexford. 412-367-9300. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. March to a Different Drummer. Watercolors by Doug Brown. Opening reception: March 15, 7-9 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

ONGOING 3RD STREET GALLERY. Internationally Inspired. A creative response to the 2013 Carnegie International by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. Porous Sediments. Installation by Haylee Ebersole. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Dream Body. Video installation by Blaine Siegel. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television.

Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTICA. David Gonano. Photography. Garfield. 412-661-0641. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. You Can’t Be Serious. Abstract minimalist paintings by Rose Duggan. Downtown. 412-325-6768. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Guentner’s Pittsburgh. Work by James Guentner. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRYANT STREET LIMITED. Nostalgic Pastel Creations. Work by Linda Barnicott. Highland Park. 412-362-2200. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition.

Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Dancing Color. Paintings by Marion Di Quinzio. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Surfacing. Work by Nina Marie Barbuto, Ashley Andrykovitch, Alberto Almarza & Samantha McDonough. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Recent Work by Lindsay Dill & Aldona Bird. Downtown. 412-391-4100. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MARKET SQUARE. Congregation. Interactive CONTINUES ON PG. 49

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St. Patrick’s Parade Day Keg & Eggs

March 15, 2014 7AM

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FRI 14 - SAT 15

INDUSTRY NIGHT $2

16oz Drafts

$3 Fireball Shots

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM

SOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm. 1$ OFF ALL CRAFT BREWS!

ALL DAY EVERY DAY $3.50 24oz Bottles

KARAOKE Y THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the “Best Party in Town! wn!”

(Pineapple-Berry & Espresso Vodkas. Mango-Chili Pepper & Strawberry-Jalapeno Tequilas. Peach & Apple-Cinnamon Rums. Bacon Bourbon.) 8 1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

9:30pm-1:30am OVER 21 ONLY LY

1314 EAST CARSON ST. S OU TH SID E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland

CRITIC: Joseph Fleischman,

SAT 15

THE LUPONES. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RACE TO THE COFFIN COMEDY TOUR PRESENTS. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. UNDERWEAR COMEDY PARTY. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

TUE 18 DAVON MAGWOOD, STOPH EDISON, MITCH BEARDCYZKOWSKI, OLIVIA GRACE TRAINI. 9 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 19

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

20, a student from Oakland

WHEN: Sat.,

March 08 I had a free day and thought I’d take my friends to check [the museum] out since they’ve never seen it before. I’ve been here before, but seeing [the International] again in detail is nice. I really enjoy the [photographs] across the wall down below, near the gun sculpture. There’s a little story behind each of the pictures; [in] just a snippet of time, you could see what was happening. There’s really not much I don’t like. Some things I may not get right away because they might be a little abstract, but I appreciate it at the very least. There’s nothing like, “Oh, this is disgusting.” [I was surprised by] some of the more graphic scenes that were depicted with some of the art. They’re just a bit shocking to see, because you might be looking at one, and then the next painting’s a distortion or [there’s] something unsettling about [it].

North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY of pre World War II ironHERITAGE MUSEUM. making technology. Rankin. Military artifacts and exhibits 412-464-4020 x.21. on the Allegheny Valley’s COMPASS INN. Demos and industrial heritage. Tarentum. tours with costumed guides 724-224-7666. featuring this restored ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. An eclectic showroom of fine CONNEY M. KIMBO art sculpture & paintings GALLERY. University of from emerging artists. Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: North Side. 724-797-3302. Memorabilia & Awards AUGUST WILSON from the International CENTER FOR Hall of Fame. Oakland. AFRICAN 412-648-7446. AMERICAN DEPRECIATION CULTURE. Pittsburgh: LANDS MUSEUM. www. per pa Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Small living history pghcitym o .c Feat. imagery, film & museum celebrating oral history narratives the settlement to explore communities, and history of the cultures, & innovations. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. Downtown. 412-258-2700. 412-486-0563. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. FALLINGWATER. Tour the Large collection of automatic famed Frank Lloyd Wright roll-played musical instruments house. 724-329-8501. and music boxes in a mansion FIRST PRESBYTERIAN setting. Call for appointment. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany O’Hara. 412-782-4231. stained-glass windows. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Downtown. 412-471-3436. Preserved materials reflecting FORT PITT MUSEUM. the industrial heritage of Unconquered: History Meets Southwestern PA. Homestead. Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original 412-464-4020. movie props, photographs, & CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. costumes alongside 18th century Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome artifacts & documents, comparing (planetarium), Miniature & contrasting historical events Railroad and Village, USS w/ Hollywood depictions. Requin submarine, and more. Reconstructed fort houses

EXHIBITS

MONDAYS 9-11PM

EVENT: 2013 Carnegie International,

BOB JAY. March 14-15, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. FRANK CALIENDO. 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., March 15, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FULL LIST ONLINE

B Y A N G E L A S UI C O

museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000.


OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. 412-622-6914. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHIPPS GARDEN CENTER. Annual Orchid Show. Presented by The Orchid Society of Western Pennsylvania. Shadyside. 412-441-4442. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

kinetic video & sound installation by KMA - Kit Monkman & Tom Wexler. Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Almagamations. Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Rarefied Vibes. Work by Alysa Sheats & John Shook. Garfield. 412-443-0606. PANZA GALLERY. Fractured. Paintings by David Berger. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Book launch of Robert Qualters: Autobiographical Mythologies: March 13, 7 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0455.

WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

HOLIDAY

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Fugue States. Work by Cy Gavin. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY! THU/MARCH 13/10PM

The Carny Stomp, Apache Fog, Death Valley Rally, Stellarscope

THU/MARCH 20/10PM CHARM CHAIN + THE FIVE 10’S

THU/MARCH 27/10PM BOOTY-LESQUE BURLESQUE SHOW $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

ST. PATRICK’S DAY FAMILY FUN. Live music, face painting, arts & crafts, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fifth Avenue Place, Downtown. 412-456-7800.

DANCE

SAT 15 PITTSBURGH ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE. Feat. over 23,000 participants from Pittsburgh-area marching bands, politicians, & Irish-heritage groups. Liberty Ave. & 11th St., Downtown. 10 a.m.

THU 13 - SUN 16

3X3. Three distinctive works by three different choreographers. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu., March 13, 7:30 p.m. Thru CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

March 16. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS THU 13

SATURDAY MARCH 15TH FROM 9AM-2PM

THE PEACE IT TOGETHER AWARDS CELEBRATION. Honoring individuals & organizations who are actively working to end violence & promote peace in Pittsburgh & throughout Allegheny County. Guest speaker: Dr. Jackson Katz. Benefits the Center for Victims. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 412-482-3240. PEACE IT TOGETHER CELEBRATION. Guest Speaker: Dr. Jackson Katz. Benefits the Center for Victims. 5:30-8 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 412-482-3240 x 214.

FRI 14 - SAT 15

Purchase tickets online at JBMASONMEMORIAL.EVENTBRITE.COM for $45 or buy tickets at the door for $60 INCLUDED IN TICKET PRICE! DONUT AND IRISH COFFEE BREAKFAST BUFFET PIZZA AND WINGS LUNCH BUFFET • 8 DRAFT BEERS 1014 FIFTH AVENUE • 412.281.2583 (BLUE)

WWW.BLUELINEGRILLE.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/BLUELINEGRILLE

TRIVIA BY ZOO WEDNESDAY’S COMING SOON

MOUNT ALVERNIA DAY CARE & LEARNING CENTER ANNUAL FLEA MARKET. March 14-15, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sisters of St. Francis, Millvale. 412-821-4302.

SAT 15

Q BALL. Quantum Theatre’s gala fundraiser. 933 Penn Ave., Downtown. 7 p.m. 412-362-1713. THE SECOND TRI-ANNUAL GREAT PITTSBURGH SPELLING BEE OF 2014. Adult spelling bee benefiting the Literary Arts Boom. 7-10 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 484-888-2021.

SUN 16

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. BOY SCOUT TROOP 905’S 50TH ANNUAL SPAGHETTI DINNER. 1-6 p.m. St. Margaret Mary Church Hall, Coraopolis. 724-457-7423. GIRLS ROCK! THE MOVIE. Documentary screening benefiting the 2014 Girls Rock! Pittsburgh Scholarship Fund. 4 & 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. 412-440-8241.

MON 17 SHAMROCK SHAKE UP. Silent auction, Irish-themed activities, more. Benefits Operation Walk Pittsburgh. 6:30-9 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-641-1924.

POLITICS THU 13 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

MON 17

LITERARY THU 13 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 14

BOOK SIGNING W/ PETE STROBL. Release of Backspin. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Oakland. 412-621-2400. THE BUZZ MONDAYS LIT NIGHT: VOICECATCH. Writing community for graduates of the Words Without Walls program upon their release from the Allegheny County Jail, & other members of the community. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. COMICS DECODED BOOK CLUB. Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 18

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri JAPANESE www. per CONVERSATION of every month, pa pghcitym CLUB. First and Third .co 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed Tue of every month, of every month, 1 p.m. 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Northland Public Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! LA ROCHE COLLEGE LITERARY Practice conversational English. SOCIETY: PITTSBURGH’S Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, MANSIONS. w/ Melanie Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. Linn Gutowski. 7 p.m. PITTSBURGH LaRoche College, Wexford. CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY 412-536-1216. READING GROUP. Tue, LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book 6 p.m. East End Book club for non-native English Exchange, Bloomfield. speakers. Second Fri of every 412-224-2847. month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 19

SAT 15 ELIZABETH HOOVER, DON WENTWORTH, TAMEKA CAGE CONLEY. Versify Reading Series. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: THE ARAB SPRING. Discussion w/ Dalel Khalil, author of From Veils to Thongs: An Arab Chick’s Survival Guide to Balancing One’s Ethnic Identity in America. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. POETRY WORKSHOP FOR TEENS. 2-4 p.m. Carnegie Library, East Liberty. 412-906-9522.

SUN 16

BILLIE HARLAN. Discussion w/ author of Through the Eyes of the Soul. 2 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WRITTEN/SPOKEN. Feat. poets Lorraine Doran, Nicole Callihan, James Tolan, & fiction writer Jeffrey Condran. loj@pitt.edu 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.

KIDSTUFF THU 13 - FRI 14 ROLLED STAMP MAKING. Thru March 14, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 13 - SAT 15

PRINTMAKING. Thru March 15, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 13 - WED 19

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s


Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

[MUSIC]

FRI 14 EVENING ED-VENTURES: DESERTS & HEALTHY DESSERTS. Get up close to prickly cacti & discover what goes on inside of one, then make desserts that are healthy & tasty in all climates. Ages 6-9. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. JOSH & GAB’S ANTI-BULLY SHOW. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211 x 116. LEBO NERDFIGHTERS. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Ages 10-15. 5-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 14 - SAT 15

JUNIE B. JONES. Based on the book series by Barbara Park. 10:15 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. and Sat., March 15, 11 a.m., 2 & 5 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SAT 15

3D FOR KIDS. Make 3D comics & learn how to create 3D art at home. 11 a.m. Adams Memorial Library, Latrobe. 724-537-4383. FAMILY FUN DAY: AMERICAN ADVENTURE. Explore paintings of founding fathers, abundant still lifes, majestic landscapes & make your own work of art. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FLEECE HAT WORKSHOP. Ages 10+. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY: DECORATIVE WALL HANGINGS. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 15 - SUN 16

ALADDIN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru March 16 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SUN 16 DORK DIARIES W/ RACHEL RENEE RUSSELL. Meet

Kevin Burke was born in London, to Irish parents, and he now lives in Portland, Ore. But never mind the address: The New York Times has called Burke “one of the great living Celtic fiddlers.” Now on a U.S. tour, the former member of Ireland’s Bothy Band — who once formed a duo with the legendary Christy Moore — joins American singer-songwriter Cal Scott on March 14 for an evening of Irish music at Aspinwall’s Community United Methodist Church. 8 p.m. Fri., March 14. 400 Center Ave., Aspinwall. $20. dpossumato@earthlink.net

MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MYBUSINESS STARTUP PROGRAM. Thu, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thru April 10 Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. STARTUP SUPPORT: ALPHALAB. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 13 - FRI 14 the author of the tween book series. Book signing & popcorn bar to follow. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

MON 17 LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FIRST GARDEN. Unravel a seed to explore its insides, learn what a plant needs to survive, more. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru March 31 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

OUTSIDE TUE 18

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 19 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 13 CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CITY OVEN GRAND REOPENING CELEBRATION. Half-off all orders. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. City Oven, Downtown. 412-281-6836.

THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FRENCH CONVERSATION. 7:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GAL BECKERMAN: PITTSBURGH DISCUSSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS & SOVIET JEWRY. Lecture & panel discussion. 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN. Thu, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 27 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LIVE YOUR DREAM: THE TAYLOR ANDERSON STORY. Documentary screening presented by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania. 7:30 p.m. Melwood Screening Room, Oakland. 412-682-4111.

ASK THE EXPERT. Community education program to provide answers to medical questions. Mon-Fri. Thru March 31 UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. 412-784-4121.

FRI 14 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. THE BUSINESS OF FRANCHISING: ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS. Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series. 7:30 a.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. JOHANNES BRAHMS: HIS LIFE & MUSIC. Fri, 10 a.m. and Fri., April 25, 10 a.m. Thru April 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKE-IT-A-DATE. Couples glass blowing workshop. 6-10 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. WORKABLE VOLUNTEER CAREER MENTOR ORIENTATION. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. South Hills Interfaith Ministries, Bethel Park. 412-487-6316.

St. Patty’s Day Weekend Friday 3/14 LAFFY Hour Comedy Show 5-7pm

Saturday 3/15 Classic Rockers - SILENT PARTNER Light bottles .50 Coors ALL DAY SATURDAY!

$2

Sunday KARAOKE Tuesday TRIVIA CHALLENGE Wednesday KARAOKE Thursday OPEN MIC/ JAM NIGHT Friday Night DJ

FRI 14 - SAT 15

SHOCKHEADED. Theatrical piece by Felicia Cooper combining storytelling, post-modern movement, & paper sculpture to explore why

608 Washington Ave Bridgeville 412-221-9785 • www.theblackhorsetrail.com

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we gravitate towards logic & patterns. Part of the Trespass Residency Series. 7 p.m. and Sat., March 15, 2 & 7 p.m. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-567-8812.

FRI 14 - SUN 16 PITTSBURGH KNIT & CROCHET FESTIVAL. 1-7 p.m., Sat., March 15, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Sun., March 16, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Four Points Sheraton North, Mars. 412-963-7030. STEEL CITY BLUES FESTIVAL. Live blues music, dance instruction, more. Various locations. www.steelcityblues festival.com March 14-16 412-999-9479.

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BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Folk dance lessons, live music, more. Third Sat of every month, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21 Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188. BECOME A BRILLIANT LEADER. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-281-7141. THE CIVIL WAR IN PENNSYLVANIA. Feat. 4 life size figures that help tell the story of how people from Western Pennsylvania became involved in the war effort, either as soldiers, factory workers, or eye witnesses. Opens March 15. Tue-Thu, Sat. Thru April 5 McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832. DIVORCE 101 WORKSHOPS. 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Legend Financial Advisors, Ross. 412-837-1773. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. 412-271-7660. GEEKSDANZ. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. GRAFTING & PRUNING FRUIT TREES WORKSHOP. Register at www.growpittsburgh. org/2013cge/ 2-3:30 p.m. Rosalina Sauro Sirianni Garden, Bellevue. HOW MARGARET FROM DENNIS THE MENACE CARTOONS ENRICHED MY LIFE. w/ Ann Ruben. Part of the Wonder Woman: On Page and Off exhibit. 2 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

[LITERARY] Need to brush up on your vocab before the Second Tri-Annual

Great Pittsburgh Spelling Bee, happening Saturday at Assemble? Start with some of the words that have won young spellers the Scripps National Spelling Bee over the years:

month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. PUBLIC PAGE-CUTTING WORKSHOP & CONVERSATION ABOUT WOMEN’S RIGHTS. Cut pages out of slate for the Never-Ending Book of Women’s Rights. 1-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

MON 17 CAREGIVING SERIES. Learn how to care for yourself while caring for a relative or friend. Mon, 1 p.m. Thru March 31 Mount Lebanon a lightweight plain-woven or twilled silk Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. usually decorated with a printed pattern 412-531-1912. KEEPING YOUR FINGER ON THE PULSE OF YOUR BUSINESS: FINANCIAL producing happiness METRICS & DASHBOARDS THAT WORK. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 412-648-1544. the act or practice of burying alive MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. POWER OF POSITIVE This grown-up spelling bee benefits THINKING. 10:30 a.m.Literary Arts Boom; register at 12:30 p.m. The Center pghspellingbee.tumblr.com anytime for Women, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4400. before the day of the event. 7 p.m. RESEARCHING YOUR Sat., March 15. 5125 Penn Ave., Garfield. ANCESTORS IN EUROPE. $5. Email pghspellingbee@gmail.com w/ Marilyn Cocchiola Holt. Mt. Lebanon Genealogy for information. Society. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First and Third Mon of every month, SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, CRAZE. Free lessons, AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Oakland. 412-622-3151. followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. SCOTTISH COUNTRY La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 412-708-8844. 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. social dancing follows. No SCOTTISH COUNTRY 412-683-3727. partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal social dancing follows. No Second and Third Sun of every Church, Mt. Washington. partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-683-5670. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Oakland. 412-622-3151. SPELLING BEE WITH Church, Mt. Washington. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon 412-683-5670. Sun, 5 p.m. Thru April 6 Lava Lounge, South Side. SEED SWAP: 2014 GARDEN Wilkins School Community 412-431-5282. SEASON OPENER. Swap Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS: leftover organic or heirloom CHINESE II. First and HOW TO HELP A FRIEND. seeds from last year, or saved Third Sun of every 6-7 p.m. The Center for seeds from vegetables & flowers. month, 2-3 p.m. Women, Squirrel Hill. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carnegie Library, 412-421-4400. Oakland. 412-622-3114. Oakland. WINNERS SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE 412-622-3151. WORKSHOP: 7 www. per a p CLUB. Free Scrabble games, DEVELOPING A SECRETS TO pghcitym o .c all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. CONSCIOUSNESS OF SUCCESS. w/ David Mount Lebanon Public Library, HEALTH. w/ Judy Burke. Loshelder, M.S.Ed. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Theosophical Society of 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon SPANISH CONVERSATION Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. GROUP. Friendly, informal. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-531-1912. At the Starbucks inside Target. 412-462-4200. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, AN EVENING W/ JUDY East Liberty. 412-362-6108. KNAIZ. Live, on-stage interview ASK THE EXPERT. Community SWING CITY. Learn & practice w/ actress best known for education program to provide swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. her role in Hello Dolly. 4 p.m. answers to medical questions. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. Point Park University, George Mon-Fri. Thru March 31 412-759-1569. R. White Theatre, Downtown. UPMC St. Margaret, Sharpsburg. THE UBIQUITOUS MASS 412-600-5292. 412-784-4121. OF US. In process showing PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, of movement performance education & advocacy for by Maree ReMalia. 8 p.m. the LGBTQ community, family AUTOMOBILES, TRUCKS, & & friends. Third Sun of every PearlArts Studios, Point Breeze. INFERNAL VEHICLES. A visual

fou·lard (noun):

eu·dae·mon·ic (adjective): vivisepulture (noun):

SUN 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 17 - WED 19

TUE 18


history of early motorized vehicles. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. AN EVALUATION OF THE FIRST YEAR OF FRANCIS I’S MINISTRY AS THE BISHOP OF ROME. Catholic Common Ground Conversation. Call to register. 7 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-536-1085. KEEPING YOUR FINGER ON THE PULSE OF YOUR BUSINESS. w/ Bob Hogan. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Duquesne Club, Downtown. 412-648-1389. MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION. Tue, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thru April 1 Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8821. PITTSBURGH SOUNDCLOUD MEETUP. 7 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. PITTSBURGH STRESS MANAGEMENT GROUP. 5:30 p.m. Grace Wellness Center, Greenfield. 412-835-3189.

6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. JILLIAN MICHAELS “MAXIMIZE YOUR LIFE” TOUR. 8 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-2600. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LOVE BEYOND MEASURE: MEMOIRS OF A KOREAN WAR BRIDE. w/ Ock Soon Lee & Katie Schell. Presented by the Historical Society of Mount Lebanon. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NEAT! WHISKEY BY THE GLASS PART 2. Learn how the shape of the glass affects the way you enjoy your whiskey. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

WORKABLE

Job-hunting can be discouraging, but WorkAble aims to help under-employed and unemployed individuals through mentoring. Volunteer mentors help with practice interviews, cover letters and basic job skills, but most importantly, they offer support and encouragement to job-seekers. The next mentor orientation is March 14 from 11 a.m. to noon at South Hills Interfaith Ministries, in Bethel Park. Call 412-487-6316 or visit www.workableac.com.

THE WILDE WOMAN’S GUIDE TO ORGANIZING IN FIVE SIMPLE STEPS: USING MINDFULNESS TO CHANGE YOUR HABITS. Workshop w/ Joyce Wilde. 6:30-8 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

TUE 18 - WED 19 THE CIVIL WAR IN PENNSYLVANIA. Feat. 4 life size figures that help tell the story of how people from Western Pennsylvania became involved in the war effort, either as soldiers, factory workers, or eye witnesses. Opens March 15. Tue-Thu, Sat. Thru April 5 McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

WED 19 DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. DON’T EAT ON A WHIM! Workshop exploring the importance of planning & developing healthier eating habits. Call to reserve a spot.

Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide it’s future. 7 p.m. and Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS DAY ROOM WINDOW. Multiracial cast of women ages 15-25. Prepare 2 minute dramatic contemporary monologue. Bring head shot & resume. Actors will be paid. Schedule audition w/ Kathryn Kelly at kskelly412@gmail.com www.dayroomwindow.com

New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for The Crucible. March 29-30. Actors ages 11+, 1-min. dramatic dialogue. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-254-4633. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for Jesus Christ Superstar in Concert. March 22-23. Seeking Principal Singing Roles, Male & Female Dancer/Singers Ensemble, & the Superstar Choir. www.centerauditions.org/index. php/professional-company/ jesus-christ-superstar Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. LITTLE LAKE THEATRE COMPANY. Auditions for 2014 season. March 16 & 30. Males/females ages 14+. More information & scheduling info at www.littlelake.org/auditions Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. MODEL SEARCH & LIVE CASTING. Seeking diverse female models to represent Culture Cloz in a national promotional campaign. March 15. Must be residents of the U.S. & ages 21+. cultureclozmodelsearch@gmail. com Culture Cloz, East Liberty. 412-361-2569. MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for 9 to 5: The Musical. March 19 & 22. Cold readings, dance & 32 bars of music, accompanist provided. www.monriverarts.org/ audition Grand Theatre. 412-628-1032. MONYOUGH COMMUNITY SINGERS. Seeking singers of all ages, especially baritones & basses. www.mycsingers.com 814-460-1731. POOR YORICKS PLAYERS. Auditions for 2014 season. March 29-30. 2-min. classical monologue. www.pooryoricksplayers.org Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville. 412-537-1705. SHADOWS & FLAMES PRODUCTIONS. Seeking men & women for the original musical, A Pirate’s Tale. March 25-26, 7-9:30 p.m. Prepare 32 bars of a song & a 2-minute monologue. Dress for a movement audition. Email your preferred time & date to: srolly@hotmail.com. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. SOUTH PARK THEATRE. Auditions for the 2014 season. March 15. Prepare & bring music for 24 bars of song, cold readings from the script or monologue. Call for more information. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. STAGE & STEEL PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for The King’s Other Men. March 13. Prepare a modern CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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piece (no Shakespeare), cold readings, agility test for combat roles. Call or email for appointment. sam@stageandsteel.com 412-337-8812. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for Polyester the Musical. March 16. Equity & non-Equity, 3 men & 2 women ages 20-60. Prepare 32 bars of music & 2 min. comedic monologue, be prepared to dance. tfauditions@gmail.com. 724-454-7193. THE UNREHEARSED SHAKESPEARE PROJECT. Auditions for The Comedy of Errors. March 31 & April 1. Non-union male/female actors experienced w/ heightened language & ability to play multiple www.unrehearsedshakespeare project.com. Email auditions@ unrehearsedshakespeareproject. com Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland.

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Andy Warhol, Brillo Box, 1964

Whether you’re looking to impress a date or treat the family to a fun night out, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh has you covered this month. Thursdays through the March 27, the Carnegie Museums of art and natural history are open after hours, with free admission from 4 to 8 p.m. (and don’t forget, this is the final week to check out the Carnegie International, which closes March 16). The Andy Warhol Museum’s Good Fridays series is also free this month: Stop by Fridays through March 28 from 5 to 10 p.m. for free admission, plus a cash bar and music by DJ Shawn Watson. Carnegie: 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemuseums. org. Warhol: 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF PITTSBURGH NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Open to artists 18 or over working & living within a curated by members of the 150-mile radius of Pgh. Hour After Happy Hour Applications for video, Writing Workshop. installation, & other large-scale afterhappyhourreview.com. works must be submitted THE NEW YINZER. Seeking by 4pm, April 3 to Unit 102, original essays about literature, 100 43rd Street, Lawrenceville. music, or film, & also essays Applications & full detail generally about Pittsburgh. To available at www.aapgh.org see some examples, visit www. Ice House Studios, newyinzer.com & view the Lawrenceville. 412-682-0348. current issue. Email all pitches, BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions & inquiries to poems with the theme of newyinzer@gmail.com. the mysterious and the OLD ECONOMY magical in the everyday VILLAGE. Seeking for Blast Furnace vendors to sell plants Volume 4, issue 1. & products at the Submit no more annual Garden than 3 of your Mart. For more info www. per best poems. Visit pa & registration, call pghcitym blastfurnace. .co or email c-mdemars@ submittable.com/ pa.gov. Ambridge. Submit for submission 724-266-4500 x 114. guidelines. Deadline: PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF March 15. ARTISTS NEW MEMBERS THE GALLERY 4. SCREENING. Screening Seeking submissions for Salon March 16. Bring three works Show 2014. Send image files of art in the same medium, of up to 5 finished pieces 2D or 3D. Drop off to thegallery4@gmail.com. 12:30-1 p.m., pick up 3-4 p.m. Include title, dimensions, & pittsburghsocietyofartists.org medium(s) & write SALON Thru Pittsburgh Center APPLICANT 2014 in the subject for the Arts, Shadyside. line. Deadline: March 22. Call 412-361-0873. or email for info. Shadyside. PITTSBURGH 412-363-5050. WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY Seeking entries for 68th HOUR REVIEW. Seeking Annual International submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine Aqueous Open exhibition.

FULL LIST ONLINE

412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

www.pittsburghwatercolor society.com PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Screening March 23. New members must register to be considered for membership. Drop off works at 1 p.m. & return for pickup at 3 p.m. www.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-731-0636. THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION’S TEENS 4 CHANGE GRANT PROGRAM. Accepting proposals for youth-led projects or projects designed specifically for youth that promote social change including disability rights, LGBTQ rights, peace/human rights, racial justice, more. Grants will range from $250$2,000. trcfwpa.org/grants/ grant-applications 412-243-9250. WASHINGTON PA FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. or less. Complete rules & entry form at www.highlandridgecdc.org. 724-678-4225. WESTMORELAND ART NATIONALS. Submit up to 4 pieces for upcoming juried art exhibition, 2-D & 3-D art eligible. See website for entry form. www.artsandheritage.com 724-834-7474.


BOTTOMS UP!! A guide for hot and safe anal sex.

Savage Love

If you’ve got a bottom...bring it!! Tuesday, March 25 @ 7:00pm

{BY DAN SAVAGE}

(McKnight Road Store Only)

I have a terminal disease and don’t have more than five or six years left. I haven’t told my wife, which brings me to my problem. We’d lived together for seven years when she cheated on me the first time. We worked things out, but continued to live separately. Then I cheated on her. We got back together again but continued living apart. After a year of therapy, we got married, but kept our households separate. Fast-forward one eviction and three years of living in a studio driving each other crazy, and she cheated on me again — this time in our house. I moved out instantly. A few months and a terminal diagnosis later, I don’t have the will to file the divorce paperwork. We’ve talked about trying to fix us, but I don’t know if I can ride this messed-up roller coaster anymore. On the other hand, I don’t want to waste the rest of my life being a divorced fortysomething. She reads your column, so if you publish this, I’ll have to talk to her about my illness, so at least that won’t be an issue. What should I do about us? DOUBTING THE MARITAL FUTURE AGAIN

find people to play with who would be OK with no sex? I think I could be happy staying monogamous if I could get some of my needs met elsewhere. Is there any hope? SINCERELY LONGING IN MIDWEST

Our Featured Speakers

I’m an early-40s gal in a decent-to-great marriage. But my husband is not kinky at all. I feel like I’ve done all I can to get him comfortable with rough sex, power play, etc., but aside from some very reluctant spanking, hair pulling, and a few humiliating (not in a good way) attempts at bondage, our sex life is almost totally vanilla. I enjoy the sex we have, but not being all of who I am sexually is making me miserable. At this point, I’m not even interested in trying to get my husband on board, and I think he’s just been hoping my desires would go away. They have not, of course. But I can’t see breaking up my marriage over this! Is it worth trying to

Seminar Topics

Jonathan Baker, MPAS, PA-C

There are lots of people involved in the organized kink scene who do BDSM without the sex. For some, the BDSM is the sex. You’ll also find plenty of folks like you in the organized kink scene — men and women who wanna do BDSM while remaining vanilla/technically faithful to their non-kinky partners. Here’s the hard part, SLIM: Getting involved in the kink scene without your husband’s knowledge is going to be impossible. You don’t mention having your husband’s OK to outsource your kinks, and I can only assume that you haven’t talked about it with him. You need to. Because the more involved you get in the organized kink scene, the more potential play partners you’ll have to choose from. The more play partners you have to choose from, the safer you’re going to be — and the less likely you are to be manipulated into going further than you want to. A guy who knows that (1) he’s your only outlet for BDSM play, (2) you had a hard time finding him and (3) you’re hiding him from your husband is a guy with too much power over you. That’s a guy who could make upgrading to full sex a condition of your continuing to see him.

Physicians Assistant at UPMC Anal Dysplasia Clinic which manages/treats anal HPV related disease and is integrated in a multi-disciplinary HIV Clinic.

Rita Labbett, MPH Research Coordinator and Behavioral Counselor at UPMC for their NIH-funded HIV Prevention research. She has over ten years experience in sexual health research, with emphasis on HIV/STI reduction. Jonathan Baker and Rita Labbett are part of the University of Pittsburgh’s HIV Prevention Program which is dedicated to community outreach and education of HIV prevention.

A GUY WHO KNOWS THAT YOU’RE HIDING HIM FROM YOUR HUSBAND IS A GUY WITH TOO MUCH POWER OVER YOU.

You and the wife have a resilient connection, DTMFA. Some intangible something or other has pulled you toward each other despite infidelities on both sides. And reading between the lines — and ignoring the acronym your sign-off creates — it doesn’t sound like being alone or your terminal illness are the only reasons you’re hesitating to file divorce papers. It sounds to me like you love your wife, and she loves you. Imperfectly. And maybe your semiimminent death is putting those infidelities in their semi-proper perspective. I’m thinking the real reason you haven’t filed those papers yet is this: On some level, you now recognize that your actual loving-but-flawed marital relationship should be given more weight than the marital ideal that you’ve both fallen short of, i.e., a flawlessly executed monogamous commitment. I’m sorry about your diagnosis. I hope your remaining years are rich and rewarding, and it would be a shame if you had to face them alone. Maybe if you changed your expectations of each other — if perfect sexual exclusivity wasn’t one of them — you would be less disappointed in each other. Good luck.

Society says it’s taboo. Shameful. But in reality, anal sex is a very normal and pleasurable sexual behavior and many of us are doing it! So let’s break away from the taboo, the stigma, and get down and dirty about booty love!

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Presenters will dicuss, but are not limited to the following: Pittsburgh, PA 15237 • Anal Sex 2904 West Liberty Avenue, • Condom Use (sexy ways to use condoms) Dormont, PA 15216 • Rectal douching / enemas www.adamevepittsburgh.com • Sexually Transmitted Infections • Ways of reducing HIV risk by picking partners, acts, and positions

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Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

I have a fantastic relationship with my girlfriend. We’ve recently been talking about fantasies we’d like to try in real life. One in particular is posing a bit of difficulty. She really enjoys receiving facials, and she’s even more turned on by the idea of multiple men coming on her face. The idea also turns me on. But finding a man (or men) to aid in this kink is tricky. Assuming there was no intercourse or oral sex — the only contact with other men would be their come on her face — what are the risks of contracting something? No matter how good the aim, there’s the possibility of her eyes and mouth inadvertently becoming part of the show. IMPERFECT COME IS NO GOOD

Gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia — you can get all three in your eyes. A person can contract all three orally as well, but the mucous membranes in the eyes are more delicate, and the risk is both greater and grosser. As your girlfriend probably doesn’t want to wear swimming goggles and keep her mouth tightly closed during her big fantasy — it’s hard to get swept up in the moment wearing goggles — you’re gonna want to do this with strangers who are willing to test or with guys you know and trust. Neither option is 100 percent risk-free, ICING, but nothing worth doing is. On the Lovecast, Dan speaks with Irish drag queen Panti Bliss. Don’t miss this one: savage lovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.12-03.19

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do you remember being in your mother’s womb? Probably not. But here’s what I know about that time: In the first few weeks after you were conceived, your body grew at a very rapid rate. Once you were born, if you had continued to expand and develop with that much vigor, you would literally have grown to be as big as a mountain by now. So let’s be thankful you slowed down. But I do want to sound an alert and let you know that you are currently in a growth spurt with some metaphorical resemblances to that original eruption. It’s basically a good thing. Just be aware that you may experience growing pains.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“There was another life that I might have had, but I am having this one.” So says a character in Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel The Unconsoled. At this juncture in your life story, Aries, it might be healing for you to make a similar declaration. Now is an excellent moment to say a final goodbye to plot twists that you wished would have happened but never did. To do so will free up stuck energy that will then become available for future projects. You may even awaken to exciting possibilities you haven’t imagined yet.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

In May 2011, two N epali men reached the top of Mount Everest after a six-week climb. Lakpa Tsheri Sherpa and Sano Babu Sunuwar had prepared an unprecedented way to get back down off the mountain. Strapping themselves to a single parachute, they leaped off and paraglided for 45 minutes, landing near a Sherpa village thousands of feet below the summit. I suggest you look around for a metaphorical version of a shortcut like that, Taurus. Don’t do the next part of the journey the same way you did the previous phase. Take a more direct route. Enjoy an alternate adventure. Give yourself a fresh challenge.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Seeking wisdom and chasing after pleasure are polar opposites, right? You must devote yourself to either one or the other, correct? You can be an enlightened servant of the greater good or else an exuberant hedonist in quest of joy, but not both. True? No. No. No. False. Wrong. Here’s the bigger truth: Now and then, grace periods come along when you can become smarter and kinder by exploring the mysteries of feeling really good. Can you guess when the next of these grace periods will arrive for you, Gemini? Here’s the answer: It’s here now!

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Humans walked on the moon before anyone ever had the simple idea to put wheels on suitcases. Unbelievable, right? Until 1972, three years after astronauts first walked on the lunar surface, travelers in airports and train stations had to carry and drag wheelless containers full of their belongings. I suspect that a comparable out-ofsequence thing may be going on in your own life, Cancerian. In some ways you are totally up-todate, and in other ways you are lagging behind. N ow would be a good time to identify any discrepancies and start correcting them. Metaphorically speaking, I’d love you to have rolling luggage by the next time you take a journey.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

Have you ever heard of the sasquatch, also known as bigfoot? You know, one of those big,

hairy, humanoid beasts that walks upright and lives in dense forests? Scientists assure us that there is no such thing. But then they used to say the same thing about the platypus. It was a myth, they declared; a figment of explorers’ vivid imaginations. A duck-billed, egg-laying mammal simply could not exist. When the respected British zoologist George Shaw claimed there was indeed such a creature, he was mocked by his contemporaries. Eventually, though, the truth emerged and Shaw was vindicated. I suspect that you Leos will soon experience an event akin to the discovery and confirmation that the platypus is real.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Kyoka is a Japanese word that means a flower reflected in a mirror. I suggest you use it as a metaphor to help you understand what’s happening in your life right now. Here are some clues to jumpstart your ruminations. Are you more focused on the image of what you love than on what you love? If so, is there anything wrong with that, or is it perfectly fine? Are you more interested in ephemeral beauty that you can admire from afar than in tangible beauty you can actually touch? If so, is there anything wrong with that, or is it perfectly fine? Should you turn away from a dreamy surrogate and turn toward the real thing? If so, why?

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

In the old fairy tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” the poor woodcutter Ali Baba is collecting firewood in the forest when he spies a gang of thieves bragging about their exploits. Observing them from a hiding place, he hears them chant a phrase, “open sesame.” This magically unseals the opening to a cave that happens to be full of their stolen treasure. Later, when the thieves have departed, Ali Baba goes to the cave and says “open sesame” himself. The hocuspocus works. He slips into the cave and steals a bag of gold from the robbers’ plunder. This story has resemblances to an adventure you could enjoy sometime soon, Sagittarius. I suspect you may discover your own version of “open sesame.” It will give you access to a less literal and more legitimate bounty.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Your ability to heal rifts and bridge gaps is unusually high. You could connect seemingly irreconcilable elements and forge apparently impossible links. Former allies who have become estranged

might be moved to bond again through your compassionate intervention. I’m not promising amazingly miraculous feats of unification, but I’m not ruling them out, either. You have a sixth sense about how to create interesting mixtures by applying just the right amount of pressure and offering just the right kind of tenderness.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

My friend Harry said he wanted to teach me to play golf. “Are you kidding?” I asked him incredulously. “The dullest game on the planet?” He tried to convince me that it would provide lots of interesting metaphors I could use in writing horoscopes. “Name one,” I challenged him. He told me that “Volkswagen” is a slang term that describes what happens when a golfer makes an awkward shot that nevertheless turns out to be quite good. “Hmmm,” I replied. “That is exactly the theme I have decided on for the Aquarius horoscope.” Name your greatest unnecessary taboo and how you would violate it if it didn’t hurt anyone. Freewillastrology.com

get your yoga on!

A British researcher poured 300 million facts into a computer program designed to determine the most boring day in history. The winner was April 11, 1954. It was selected because almost nothing important happened except an election in Belgium. I’m wondering if you Libras might reach that level of blah sometime soon. The astrological omens suggest it’s a possibility. And frankly, I hope that’s exactly what happens. You need a break from high adventure and agitated activity. You would benefit from indulging in some downtime that allowed you to luxuriate in silence and stasis. The time has come to recharge your psychic batteries.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

You won’t be the recipient of good luck in the coming days. N or will you experience bad luck or dumb luck or weird luck. No, Scorpio. The serendipitous slew of synchronicities that will slip and slide into your sphere requires a new word, which I have coined for this occasion. That word is “shluck.” Shluck is a cracked yet plucky sort of backward luck that provides you with an abundance of curious slack. Shluck slings your way a series of happy accidents and curious coincidences that give you experiences you didn’t even realize you needed. To take maximum advantage of shluck’s benefits, you have to dispense with your agendas and drop your expectations.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 58 + STUDIES 59 + WELLNESS 60 + LIVE 62 + SERVICES 62

WORK HELP WANTED JOB OPPORTUNITIES Longwall Coal Miners: New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois. Submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com Advertise Here Today! $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

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Sr. Account Manager Dealer Sales If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/ careers.

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HELP WANTED University of Pittsburgh MechanicMaintain proper vehicle maintenance to ensure safety. HS Diploma or GED; state inspection license; valid Driver’s License; and 3 to 5 years automotive mechanical repair required. To Apply: www.pittsource.com job/position #0004705. AA/EOE Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

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New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois ECM Transport is NOW HIRING Regional Road & Local Drivers

ARTISTS

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Call For Artists Craftsmen’s Guild Of Pittsburgh. A Fair In The Park 45th Annual Fine Art And Craft Show. Applications Available Online At afairinthepark.org Application Deadline 4/10/14 New Members Screening April 5th, Pittsburgh Center For The Arts. Visit craftsmensguild.org For Information.

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EOE

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We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014


Ink Well

STUDIES

LENDING JOKES

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

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ACROSS

tiny conductors? 50. Option for soap 1. Bit of ironic or ice cream facial hair, slangily 51. It might give you 7. ___ de vivre exactly the right card 11. “I could 52. ___ rage (certain keep going” bodybuilder’s feeling) 14. “You expect me 53. Where “Ice Ice to swallow that?” Baby” appeared on 15. Lack of hurdles the “Play That Funky 16. Sliding-intoMusic” single the-bath sound 55. It gets played 17. Gangsters 59. Signs off on with a Red Delicious 60. Diamond cut in a monopoly? significantly new way? 19. Residency 62. Formerly, option for the matrimonially homeless: Abbr. 20. Sticks in a tree, say 63. Sculpting and singing, e.g. 21. Lush 64. Weather 22. Ado 23. Villain once played phenomenon played by Chris Farley by Kenneth Branagh 65. Will Shortz 25. Exalt 27. House of ill repute and others: Abbr. 66. “Hey, kid, catering to roosters? check this out ...” 31. ___-com 67. Smother, perhaps 32. Tool for shaping wood 33. Fan’s sounds? 1. Digitize, as 35. Mischievous a document toddlers 2. Drink up 37. Dealer’s 3. Basses go measures: Abbr. through them 39. Potpourri 4. Bird, notably 40. Chill 5. Weed control need 43. Cut metal, 6. Trapped, in a way in a way 7. Jack-off 46. Amin who was 8. More appealing called, quite fairly, to horses, perhaps “a murderer, a liar, 9. “Got it, got it” and a savage” 10. Stunner 47. Model train company that REFUSES underwater 11. One side of to face accusations a bygone wall that their faulty 12. Its most exciting tracks endanger feature may be a hill millions of imaginary

13. Sweeping, e.g. 18. Mourning who won an NBA championship after receiving a kidney transplant 22. Former gas company with headquarters in Cleveland 24. Otherwise called 26. Mathematically high degree 27. Sportscaster Collinsworth 28. Like some soul-quenching meals 29. Riffs 30. Ring setting 34. Sovereign territory, synecdochically 36. Worked on a pillow case, say 38. Electric Vidal Sassoon product 41. Catch

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

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42. No. 2 features 44. International resort brand 45. Kool-Aid rival 48. Goes from town to town 49. Author and former New York Times public editor Daniel 50. Unmanned, unsettling military flier 54. Verb with thou 56. “I’ve got a boo-boo ...” 57. TV host who retired in 2014 58. PayPal founder Musk (whose name is an anagram of 57-Down) 60. One of hip-hop’s “four elements” 61. Handle of the twelfth most followed person on Twitter

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY

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The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014


SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

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SERVICES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

AUTO SERVICES

CLASSES

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2014. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES Get Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for Addiction Treatment. Alcohol Abuse. Drug Addiction. Prescription Abuse. Call Now 855-577-0234 Rehab Placement Service.

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 18, 2014 for Greenfield K-8; April 8, 2014 for King K-8, Fulton Pre K-5 and Milliones 6-12; and April 29, 2014 for Arsenal Pre K-5. All proposals are due by 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time. • Pittsburgh Greenfield Pre K-8 Replace Cafeteria Lighting and Acoustical treatment General Prime (Rebid) • Pittsburgh King Pre K-8 Replacement of Condensate Drains General, Asbestos and Plumbing Primes • Pittsburgh Fulton Pre K-5 Playground Drainage Improvements General and Plumbing Primes

• Pittsburgh Milliones 6-12 Rebalancing Hot Water Heating System Mechanical Prime • Pittsburgh Arsenal Pre K-5 Restroom Renovations, ADA Ramp and Flooring General, Asbestos, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on March 3, 2014 for Greenfield K-8; March 7, 2014 for King K-8, Fulton Pre K-5 and Milliones 6-12; and April 14, 2014 for Arsenal Pre K-5 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.12/03.19.2014

GENERAL FOR SALE NO CREDIT CHECK for NEW TVs, Tablets, Appliances, Xbox, Jewelry and more. Guaranteed Approval. go to: www.tronixcountry. com/print Enter Code 56C for FREE GIFT w/ paid purchase (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Advertise Here Today!

SOUTH FOR RENT

Your ad could be here

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

412.316.3342

North Shore ~ 529 Lockhart St Newly renovated Apartment in Mount Washington overlooking city. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, w/d hookups. Stove and refrigerator. $1,800 per Month gas and water included. No pets. Call John 412-580-6550

Lg. 2BR twnhse. Architect Designed, Int Decorator Finished. New carpet/paint, 2,800 sf!! Upper level is a converted warehouse w/open floor plan, vaulted 14ft beamed ceiling & skylights, f/p, modern eq. kitchen w/granite island. The lower level has laundry, heated garage comfortably prkg 6 vehicles, auto gar dr, sec sys.

MUST SEE! Avail. Immed.

$1,500 John 724-699-5554

NOW HIRING FOR

Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson. If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE


CLOUDY FUTURE Living in the shadow of a longtime polluter {BY CHRIS POTTER}

JOEL AND CHRISTINE POLACCI live in a handsome Tudor home, on

a quiet street that straddles Ben Avon’s border with Avalon. It’s got three bedrooms, a renovated kitchen complete with granite countertops and a back deck that’s perfect for entertaining. Provided, that is, your guests like watching the emissions from Neville Island’s Shenango coke works below. “It’s like looking down into Mordor,” says Joel Polacci, as he broods over the plant’s mysterious vapors, inscrutable structures and the ever-visible flame used to flare off gasses. The Shenango facility converts coal into hotter-burning coke for use in steelmaking. Usually, the facility is swathed in a white cloud — the steam produced when a load of coke is “quenched” after cooking. Other times, though, a sickly brown plume is visible … and on at least one occasion last year, Christine Polacci recalls, there was a smell so overpowering that “I thought the furnace was going to explode.”

“Most people just say, ‘It’s not as bad as it used to be,’” agrees Frank Meacci, who has lived a few doors from Popovich in a house he built more than 40 years ago. That might be true, he says, if only because the smoke is less visible. Still, “I can’t be sure. You can’t see it, but you smell it.” Coke-plant emissions can include all kinds of pollutants, including those the government says can cause cancer and lesions in the lungs and digestive system. And when you stroll Ben Avon’s broad streets with Meacci, you start to think you can smell the pollution too: a sort of metallic smoky tang, like the first time your heat comes on in the autumn. Popovich, for one, doesn’t intend to get used to that. One of the plant’s most vocal critics, he’s a member of GASP and the Neville Island Good Neighbor Committee, which was formed to keep an eye on the plant. “Corporations are people, right?” he says. “But if you were a person with this many violations,

“HARDLY A DAY GOES BY WHERE THERE ISN’T SOME VIOLATION AT THE PLANT.” Such incidents are at the heart of a legal action filed last month by the Group Against Smog and Pollution (GASP), which has documented hundreds of violations over more than a year. The local group filed a “60-day notice of intent to sue” — a warning that the plant’s owners, Detroit-based DTE Energy, must immediately begin addressing those violations or be sued in federal court. “Hardly a day goes by where there isn’t some violation at the plant,” GASP legal director Joe Osbourne told reporters. That’s despite a history of sanctions that extends across decades and ownership groups. The plant was first sued by federal regulators in 1980, then cited again in 1993 and 1999. In 2008, it was purchased by DTE, which promised to improve its performance. But while the company held regular meetings with concerned residents, it ended up paying its own $1.75 million fine in 2012. Given all that, it might seem surprising that the Polaccis didn’t notice the plant until after they moved in last spring. (“When you’re looking at houses, you’re mostly looking at houses,” explains Joel Polacci, a bit sheepishly.) But Ted Popovich, who lives across the street, says that not noticing the coke works is practically a local ritual. “If you walked up and down the street and asked people whether the plant bothers them,” Popovich says, “I bet a lot of them would say they don’t think about it.’”

you’d be in jail.” DTE spokesperson Randi Barris says that while the company acknowledges problems at the facility, critics are “looking to grab headlines.” DTE inherited many of the problems when it bought the plant, she says. “Since then, we’ve worked hard to improve the environmental performance by making improvements and installing new technologies. … The county data will show we have made significant improvements.” Jim Thompson, the county Health Department’s deputy director of environmental health, is more circumspect. “To DTE’s credit, they have implemented a significant number of improvements,” he says. “But in some areas, things have gotten worse.” And in fact, “our plan was to execute an enforcement agreement well before [GASP’s 60-day limit elapses] anyway.” Popovich isn’t holding his breath — much as he might like to. Government officials, he says, “have to listen to a lot of different constituencies. I hope this lawsuit gives them the ‘oomph’ to fix the problems.” There was a time, of course, when Pittsburghers almost took pride in being able to ignore the local air quality. But in most communities, we no longer have to bother. Instead, we espouse “green” principles, and boast of putting our industrial past behind us. But even as Pittsburgh basks in the sun, some of its neighbors are still living beneath a cloud. Or worse: next door to one. C POT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

March 12, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 11

March 12, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 11