Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 03.05/03.12.2014

TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES: WHY IS ATTENDANCE AT CITY VO-TECH PROGRAMS LAGGING? 06


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


EVENTS 3.5 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CYRO BAPTISTA’S BANQUET OF THE SPIRITS Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

4.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TINARIWEN Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Cash Bar

4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

Free

5.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER: FEATURING VIDEO ARTIST NATE BOYCE Warhol entrance space Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Admission

DJ Shawn Watson

FREE GOOD FRIDAYS

5.17 – 6pm 20TH ANNIVERSARY GALA The Warhol & The Warhol Parking Lot Tickets $500; visit www.flywarhol.com

PRESENTED BY UPMC HEALTH PLAN EVERY FRIDAY IN MARCH, 5PM - 10PM FREE admission, cash bar and DJ Shawn Watson, specializing in an all-vinyl set of

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Funk, Punk, Reggae and Rock

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


{EDITORIAL}

03.05/03.12.2014 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 10

[NEWS] workforce-ready.� — Carrick High School carpentry instructor Carl Uccellini on the importance of Career and Technical Education programs

[NEWS] a disconnect between how 12 “There’s our economy is being run and how our government is being financed.� — Mayoral chief of staff Kevin Acklin on rethinking nonprofit payments in lieu of taxes

[TASTE] soup, with the character of 20 “Yellow-lentil a purĂŠed dal, was supremely satisfying.â€? — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Dijlah

[MUSIC]

don’t have to dress up for 25 “You Halloween, but let’s see if anyone gives you candy.� — Richard Reed Parry of Arcade Fire, on the band’s suggested dress code on its current tour

[SCREEN] is a hoot — ordering the 35 “Stritch cameraman around and faking an injury to get out of a traffic citation.� — Al Hoff on the doc Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me

[ARTS] “Reyes has produced an extensive series of works that does everything I want art to do, plus things I didn’t realize I want art to do.� — Robert Raczka offering some last thoughts on the Carnegie International

[LAST PAGE]

a steelworker pokes the ceiling, 63 “When naturally, a mummified body falls out.�

— Al Hoff looks at Those Who Kill, a new cop show set in Pittsburgh

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 15 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 59 N E W S

+

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

a really good opportunity for 06 “It’s students. My goal is to make them

39

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, JEANNE MUMFORD, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

(17(57$,10(17

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

THIS WEEKEND!

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

7+856'$<0$5&+ 6FRWW%ODVH\RIWKH&ODUNV

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

)5,'$<0$5&+

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

+

M U S I C

6$785'$<0$5&+

7RWDOO\¡V

0$5&+ 0$5&+

'-$-)UHVK

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

7RQ\-DQIORQH-U%DQG

*$0%/,1*352%/(0"&$//   Â&#x2039;&DQQHU\&DVLQR5HVRUWV//&0DQDJHPHQWUHVHUYHVDOOULJKWV$OO5LJKWV5HVHUYHG

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


INCOMING

“IF THE NUMBERS DON’T GO UP, IT WON’T BE POSSIBLE TO RUN PROGRAMS FOR ONLY A FEW”

Jack’s Back: Wagner becomes only Western Pa. candidate in gov’s race (Feb. 26) “Judging from his performances against Onorato and Peduto, Wagner seems to think being dull is the way to be moderate.” — Web comment from “JimM”

Surprise court order complicates Thunderbird expansion plans (Feb. 28, online only) “That’s outrageous! How can this happen in the Lawrenceville we all know and love! (Which side am I supposed to be on again?)” — Post on City Paper’s Facebook page from “Darius Yaghmai”

@billpeduto protesters shut down Grant St and there is NO traffic control?!? WTH? #fail #honeymoonover {PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

— March 3 tweet from “AGWilson” (@AGWilson) regarding UPMC protest blocking Downtown streets

@AGWilson There are 43 police officers throughout downtown including 2 cars from each zone right to assemble is a guaranteed right. — March 3 tweet from Mayor Bill Peduto (@billpeduto) in response

“In my bunker today.” — March 3 tweet from “Fake Jeffrey Romoff” (@JeffRomoffUPMC) during protests against UPMC that drew more than 1,000 people Downtown

Anna Chough, a counselor at Pittsburgh Classical Academy, inspects the health-careers technology facilities at Carrick High School.

TECHNICAL

DIFFICULTIES W

HEN THE students in Carrick

High School’s health-careers technology program get their diplomas, they won’t have to worry about what they’ll be doing after high school. “We have students that are graduating in June,” Mary Kozicky, a registered nurse who runs the program, said during a tour of the school’s facilities last month. “And I’m thinking they’re going to enter the workforce with UPMC directly after graduating.” Post-high school opportunities like this are the main selling point of Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Career and Technology Education program. But while the program gives students the chance to enter the workforce after graduation, several of the classes are under-enrolled. Some may face elimination as the district faces a projected $36 million deficit.

“I’m definitely concerned,” says Angela Mike, executive director of the district’s CTE programs. “I’m concerned if the numbers don’t go up that it won’t be possible to run programs for only a few students. We are monitoring that closely.”

Although on the rise nationally, career and tech programs at city schools face sagging enrollment, uncertain future {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} Enrollment in CTE programs — once widely referred to as “vo-tech” programs — is on the rise nationally. But Pittsburgh Public Schools has struggled to fill classrooms.

According to district data, the CTE program’s capacity is 700 students, but only 528 students are currently enrolled. Of the 35 sessions run district-wide, 29 are below maximum capacity, and eight of those are less than half full. PPS Superintendent Linda Lane says the district is working to increase enrollment while also making the best use of its resources. “If we have a CTE program that is severely undersubscribed and we can’t fill a classroom, we’re going to have to shift our resources to the programs kids want to take,” Lane says. THE DISTRICT is actively working to in-

crease student interest in these programs. Throughout the month of February, it launched a series of CTE events, including a CONTINUES ON PG. 08

6

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


We Welcome

NEW PATIENTS and Accept

EMERGENCY CASES

Before

Dr. Joey

Troupe

Find us on Facebook! Polished Dental PGH

Call

After

412.281.3546

We accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express and CareCredit

WWW.POLISHEDDENTALPGH.COM | 355 FIFTH AVE. | SUITE 1500 | DOWNTOWN Receive up to a

$250 MasterCard® Prepaid Card by mail with purchase of a select Maytag® Laundry PAIR NTW4650YQ & NED4600YQ

& MED7000AW

$1,199/each

Maxima XL™ 4.3 cu. ft. Stackable with Steam Cycle Front Load Washer (Energy Star) & 7.4 cu. ft. Stackable with Steam Cycle Electric Front Load Dryer.

$539/pair p

27” 3.4 cu. ft. Top Load Washer 6.5 cu. ft. capacity Electric Dryer (White)

Pittsburgh’s

2335 2 335 33 W Washington ashing as ngton to R Rd. d. Canonsburg, PA 15317 (724) 916-0100

11759 75 759 N N.. High Highland hlan land R Rd. d d. Pittsburgh, PA 15241 (412) 835-2300

5958 5 958 8 Baum B B Bl Blvd. vd. d. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 661-7550

www.donsappliances.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

S! LAUNDRY EXPCeEnRteTr Don’s Experience

n!

binso Opening Soon in Ro

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

780 Co Commerce Park k Dri D Drive ve Cranberry Twp, PA 16066 (724) 779-9393

+

E V E N T S

www.hillmonappliance.com +

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

MARCH 27 2 SHOWS! M 7PM & 9:30PL HEINZ HAL GET TICKETS AT HEINZ HALL BOX OFFICE WWW.PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG • CHARGE-BY-PHONE: 800-743-8560

ON SALE NOW

career fair and backstage-pass tour to give school counselors a look at CTE programs at Allderdice and Carrick. Carrick has more CTE offerings than any other district school. Its six offerings include finance technology, culinary arts, health careers, information technology, carpentry, and business of sports administration. Other programs at Allderdice, Perry, Brashear and Westinghouse include engineering technology, HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), auto body, machine operations, automotive technology and cosmetology. A job in some of those fields can be a ticket to the middle class. A 2012 report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics listed engineering technicians, makeup artists and registered nurses among the 50 highestpaying jobs that don’t require a college degree. The average salary for an HVAC technician is $42,000 per year, while the average salary for sports business management is $60,000. But these two programs are among the most under-enrolled in the district. During the Carrick tour, counselors heard from CTE instructors about how their programs prepare students for future careers. For example, the newly launched carpentry program has a partnership with the Greater Pennsylvania Regional Council of Carpenters Local 142. Students have been able to visit its facilities. “It’s a really good opportunity” for students, said carpentry instructor Carl Uccellini. “My goal is to make them workforce-ready.” Other programs give students a leg up when they enter college or another post-secondary institution. Students in the accounting program, for example, will already have completed courses that will be required in their first year of a college accounting program. And students in the health program who choose to pursue medical school will have already learned many of the basic skills they need. “They come out of here, they go on to college and their first year of accounting, they’re guaranteed to get A’s,” says accounting instructor Brian Hoelzle. “Business is the number-one major in college right now.” “There are some people that don’t recognize [the CTE program] has changed,” Lane says. “It encompasses all of the tech fields that weren’t around before. There’s been a huge shift, and we’re trying to make sure our parents and our community understands both the opportunities in the fields and the salaries people can get.”

Creating partnerships with local employers is a strong component of the CTE programs. Several employers serve on the district’s Occupational Advisory Committee and are tasked with keeping CTE instructors up to date on changes in their field. “The partnerships have really bloomed since I’ve been here,” says the school district’s Mike. “It’s something I’ve worked really hard on, to cultivate relationships. I think it’s part of connecting students to a career outside of here when they leave.” These partnerships, like the one between UPMC and the health careers program, will give students an advantage in the job market. “It’s a great pipeline for us,” says Dawndra Jones, senior director of strategic initiatives for UPMC nursing. “We encourage them when they do apply to let us know they’ve been through this program, because that means they have a skill-set that someone else might not have. If I have two individuals right out of high school and I know one of them has been through this program, I’m more likely to hire them.”

“A GOAL OF HIGH-QUALITY CTE IS PROVIDING A PATHWAY TO A CAREER.”

STILL, THE CTE program isn’t cheap: The district spends $6.3 million on it annually. “CTE programs are very expensive,” Lane says. “You’re talking about equipment and facility needs that are well beyond what you need in the classroom.” And CTE students face logistical challenges of their own. In 2010, the district organized the CTE program into three regions: North, South and East. Students can take CTE classes within their region while still attending their “home schools” the rest of the day. But if they want to enroll in a program outside their region, they must switch their home schools as well. But transportation may be one factor behind under-enrollment. Students taking CTE classes at a school that is not their home school but in their region can take morning or afternoon classes. If they take morning classes, they are given a bus pass and take public transportation to another school in their region. If they take afternoon classes, they are transported via CTE shuttle. “We lost one or two kids this year from Brashear because travelling [to Carrick] really got to them,” says Kozicky, who runs the program. Mike doesn’t agree. “Those who are really passionate about a program don’t mind traveling,” she says. “The ones I have talked to don’t mind getting up earlier.” She says school closings and repeated district reorganizations have played a CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


Make life easier with Port Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ConnectCard. Get a card and load Stored Cash Value at most Giant Eagle stores or the Downtown Service Center. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to reload at any one of our dozens of ConnectCard machines. Forget the cash, get a ConnectCard.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

WE KNOW

GUI T ARS PET presents

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED!

of the

GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

WEEK 1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

greater role in under-enrollment. When Langley was closed last year, its CTE programs were redistributed to Allderdice and Brashear. Only 13 students are enrolled in machine operations at Brashear High School; the previously popular program has room for 40. The HVAC program relocated to Allderdice, which has just 15 students enrolled, but room for 40. The North Side merger of Oliver and Perry high schools may have also played a role. While the student body was consolidated at Perry, both schools’ CTE programs are housed at Oliver, requiring CTE students to be transported there. “When we merged Perry and Oliver, there was a lot of push to use the Oliver building over the Perry building,” Lane says. “We’re trying to work it out as best we can. I’m not saying it’s a permanent solution.” Under-enrollment and cost aren’t the only challenges. In a string of bad luck, the students in Carrick’s culinary-arts programs have seen two teachers depart in the past two school years. Their first teacher retired in the fall of 2012, after 20 years with the district. On Feb. 14, another teacher resigned to take a new position. Without a certified culinary teacher, the students are unable to cook in the school’s kitchen facilities, losing the hands-on experience the program was designed to provide. It’s difficult for the district to have a contingency plan when CTE teachers retire or resign, says Lane. Unlike in subjects like English or math, there aren’t many substitute

teachers who can fill in for CTE teachers. “It is hard to find people who have the professional expertise and have the ability to work with students and get properly certified,” says Lane. “There aren’t a lot of options out there, so when you get a good person you want to hold on to them. People can make more money out in the private sector. And not everyone is good with working with kids.” Despite these issues, the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium says under-enrollment in CTE programs is not a national trend. “We’ve seen a lot of increased enrollment around the country,” says Evan Williamson, a communications associate with the organization. “So it’s not really a universal symptom.” Williamson says CTE enrollment is growing in part because the programs have adapted to meet the demands of jobs in technology and other growing fields. “CTE is growing in a lot of ways. The old vo-tech days are dead and gone,” Williamson says. “A goal of high-quality CTE is providing a pathway to a career.” District officials say they’re looking into expanding CTE offerings. But they admit the looming budget deficit could be a hindrance. “We’re looking at programs that are far-reaching,” says Mike. “But we’re looking at trying to do that at low cost. It’s extremely costly to set up these programs.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Star Meet sweet Star, a loving and mellow 6 year-old Pit Bull mix. If you think you could open your home and your heart to our precious Star, come and meet her at Animal Friends!

{BY MATT BORS}

HEALTH. BEAUTY. ENVIRONMENT.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 10

Join New Voices Pittsburgh for an inspirational, informative and fun weekend as local and national leaders explore a wide range of issues from urban farming, beauty, health and wellness, fracking and more!

THURSDAY, MARCH 6 - SUNDAY, MARCH 9 Carnegie Mellon University kinkslockstwists.org 412.450.0290

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

IDIOTBOX


W NOPEN O

SKY ZONE INDOOR TRAMPOLINE PARK

ALL AGES “ACTIVE FUN” FAMILY CENTER LEETSDALE/SEWICKLEY 740 BRICKWORKS DRIVE, LEETSDALE, PA Follow us!

PITTSBURGH’S TRAMPOLINE PARK!

ULTIMATE 3D PLAY EXPERIENCE

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE! SKYZONE.COM/LEETSDALE

CALL 724-251-6100 AND BOOK YOUR SPECIAL EVENT TODAY! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Monday- Closed Tuesday- Thursday: 4:00pm - 8:00pm Friday: Toddler Time (Ages walking to 5)- 2:00pm - 3:00pm, Open Jump 3:00 pm - 9:00pm SkyMania $18* (ages 10-15) every Friday night from 9:00pm - 11:00 pm Saturday: 10:00 am - 10:00 pm SkyJam $18 every Saturday night from 10:00 pm - 12:00 am for ages 16+ Sunday: 12:00pm - 7:00 pm

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


Performance Series

TAXING ALTERNATIVE Peduto administration rethinking nonprofit contribution system {BY CHRIS POTTER}

Poets Tim Seibles & Yah Lioness Borne

Thurs., March. 20, 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater Blackness & whiteness were constructed to serve a sinister function; racism is a minefield we’re forced to dance on. Tim is a 2012 National Book Award Poetry Finalist. I am a gay artist who hasn’t openly addressed lgbtq issues. Mostly I talk about race, gender & privilege. But I will tackle these issues now. I am ready. — Yah Lioness Borne Funded by the Heinz Endowments

Tickets $10 at heartjournalonline.com/event $15 at door. Doors open @ 6:30 p.m.

TURN ON THE TV or open a newspaper,

and you can barely escape the dispute between Highmark and UPMC, or the struggle of low-paid service workers clamoring for a union or better benefits. But for the fledging administration of Mayor Bill Peduto, there’s a whole other issue involving local nonprofits to resolve. With the city’s growth being driven by tax-exempt hospitals, universities and other large nonprofits, says Peduto’s chief of staff, Kevin Acklin, “There’s a disconnect between how our economy is being run and how our government is being financed.” Since 2005, some local nonprofits have been contributing to the city through the Pittsburgh Public Service Fund, which deposited up to $5 million a year in city coffers. But the fund expired in 2013, and Acklin is seeking a larger sum … and a different approach. Acklin says he wants nonprofits to contribute closer to $23 million a year — just under 5 percent of the city’s 2013 budget. That sum equates to what large nonprofits — those with annual revenue of more than $1 million — would pay under the city’s

0.55-percent payroll-preparation tax. But Acklin adds the administration wants to “get away from the short-term tin-cup discussion” of seeking annual contributions to its general fund. Instead, Peduto may offer nonprofits a chance to earmark money for specific causes. Those could include anything from shoring up the pension fund to subsidizing affordable housing. To make sure the money was spent according to their wishes, Acklin says, nonprofits might have seats on an advisory committee or other body. The idea is to “give the nonprofit community an opportunity to help transform the city,” says Acklin. In early talks with nonprofits, he says, “The response has been positive, but the devil’s in the details.” Reynolds Clark, a University of Pittsburgh administrator who chaired the Public Service Fund, says the administration’s proposals “are a good basis for moving forward.” Earmarking funds for specific projects or investments, he says, addresses “a concern that the money was going down a big black hole.” Notably, Acklin says that each nonprofit’s contributions should be disclosed publicly. Under the Public Service Fund approach, contributions from nonprofits were bundled together in a lump sum, leaving residents guessing about who paid what. Clark says disclosure might be viable, “as long as it’s approached as a glass halffull rather than half-empty.” He notes that in the Fund’s first year, each nonprofit’s contribution was leaked to the media, and “some folks got bashed: ‘They’re only paying this much?’” Still, Acklin’s $23 million annual goal “is a bit unrealistic,” says Clark. In fact, it’s nearly as much as the Public Service Fund’s $24.7 million total contributions since 2005. “Mr. Acklin is saying, ‘If they were paying the payroll-preparation tax …,’” Clark says. “But a lot of the nonprofit community feels very strongly that’s not a good starting point” because it emphasizes the “quantitative” over “qualitative” benefits that nonprofits offer. “The city has to acknowledge the value of these organizations,” Clark says. At Pitt, that could include everything from the security offered by campus police to the value college-student tutors could provide to kids in city schools.

Individual nonprofits are reacting cautiously. In a statement, Carnegie Mellon University noted that university presidents “had a very positive meeting” with Peduto last December: “We look forward to … continuing our constructive dialogue.” “We look forward to a productive relationship with the Mayor,” echoed UPMC. Highmark, meanwhile, says Peduto’s ideas “have merit,” especially “given the services [nonprofits] receive” from the city. Acklin says he’s looking to Boston as one model for Pittsburgh’s efforts. Boston’s Payment in Lieu of Taxes program applies to educational, medical and cultural nonprofits with property worth more than $15 million. The city calculates a bill for each nonprofit, though it allows them to deduct up to 50 percent of the bill by documenting “community benefits” like scholarships or free admission. While the payments are strictly voluntary — and numerous nonprofits pay less than the city requests — they are also disclosed publicly. Acklin hopes Pittsburgh could have its own framework in place by year’s end, but it may not be easy. During the Ravenstahl administration, the city sued to revoke UPMC’s tax-exempt status — a suit that Clark says “is still hanging out there” in terms of how nonprofits respond. During his 2013 campaign, Peduto supported the UPMC suit and pledged to review other nonprofits’ finances to see if the city should challenge their exemptions as well. (Acklin says that while that remains an option, the new administration is not currently reviewing other nonprofits’ finances.) UPMC has also been the target of a spirited unionization drive by the Service Employees International Union — a key part of Peduto’s political coalition. Acklin confirms that labor leaders have expressed concern that UPMC might use a big contribution to try buying the city’s silence in the labor fight, but says, “I don’t think either side should be worried about the mayor selling them out.” Ultimately, says Clark, how nonprofits respond “depends on whether we’re sitting at a roundtable or across the table” in an adversarial discussion. “And I truly believe Mr. Acklin and the mayor are round-table guys.”

“THERE’S A DISCONNECT BETWEEN HOW OUR ECONOMY IS BEING RUN AND HOW OUR GOVERNMENT IS BEING FINANCED.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


UNITING IN PROTEST Criticism of UPMC has stretched beyond its own workers {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

OVER

260

WINNERS!

TALK TO UPMC workers at one of their many protests over the past few months, and they’ve likely told you they’ve been standing outside chanting because their wages are too low, their medical debt is too high and their employer won’t let them unionize. But they’re not out there chanting alone. And as large as UPMC is — it is the state’s largest employer — it has become a magnet for criticisms that are even broader. As this issue was going to press on March 3, one of the largest UPMC protests to date continued in front of its headquarters at the US Steel Tower. At the demonstration’s peak, around 9 a.m., more than 1,000 protesters spilled onto Grant Street, according to Sonya Toler, the city’s publicsafety spokesperson. Participants included members of the United Steelworkers, SEIU, the Amalgamated Transit Union, local politicians, students, adjuncts, clergy and mine workers, among others. Unions across the region have spoken out in support of UPMC employees not just because they support better wages for healthcare workers, but because they believe the future of organized labor is at stake. “Where this goes — it goes for the whole city,” says Shawn Foyle, standing in front of a yellow banner supporting the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. “Nobody’s moving forward.” Steve Palonis, president of ATU Local 85 (which represents Port Authority workers), stood watching the protest unfold with a group of his members as chants of “Get up, get down: Pittsburgh is a union town,” filled the street. “They’re firing people for trying to organize [and] they’ve got a goddamn food bank for Christ’s sake,” Palonis says of a controversial UPMC effort to provide food assistance to struggling employees. (UPMC has defended the initiative as an employee-led effort to support coworkers in dire straits.) “Pennsylvania could become the next right-to-work state,” added Palonis, referring to laws, common in the South, that make unionizing difficult. “We’re not going away.” UPMC spokesperson Gloria Kreps declined to comment.

{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Several unions from across the city showed support for UPMC workers.

At times, the demonstration encompassed causes that might seem remote from a Pittsburgh hospital room. Politicians, for example, criticized a Republicanbacked bill in the state House that would limit the ability of public-sector unions to deduct dues from employee paychecks. UPMC’s treatment of workers “is a microcosm of what’s going on statewide,” says state Rep. Erin Molchany (D-South Hills). “It’s incumbent upon [UPMC] to help grow Pittsburgh’s middle class.” That economic argument was echoed by John Hanger, a Democratic candidate for governor who waded into the crowd of protesters and talked about the “destruction of unions over the past 30 years.” “U PMC now is a symbol of the greed and unfair treatment of workers across this state,” he told City Paper, adding, “our economy needs more money in regular people’s pockets.” The protest also drew students, some of whom were advocating for unionization of adjunct professors at Duquesne University and the University of Pittsburgh. “We’re all fighting for the same thing,” says 19-year-old Pitt student Sandra Saba. “I know my professor made a wage equivalent to working at Trader Joe’s. […] It’s absurd that [Pitt] treats people who provide our education like shit.” The March 3 protests come on the heels of a Feb. 27 demonstration in which several clergy members were cited for trespassing in an act of civil disobedience on the plaza outside the Steel Building. “I have no regrets at all. We’re going to continue to push forward with what’s right,” said Rev. Rodney Lyde, as he was escorted by police away from the US Steel Building during the February action. “God is on our side.”

IMPRESSIVE PROGRESSIVE SUNDAY, MARCH 30 | 11AM - 8PM Kiosk check-in 9:00AM - 7:59PM

26 Cash & Free Slot Play Winners Every hour!

FINALE DRAWING | 8PM

“WHERE THIS GOES, IT GOES FOR THE WHOLE CITY.”

27 TOTAL WINNERS!

One $10,000 Cash Winner One Rollover Money Winner PLUS 25 $200 Free Slot Play Winners Earn 25 base points and get: Signature 3X entries, Preferred 2X entries, Rush 1 entry

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM Earning period begins at 6am on 3/1/14 through 7:59pm on 3/30/14. If winner is not present,prize will roll over to 8:00pm drawing. Please visit RIVERSCASINO.COM or Rush Rewards Players Club for complete details.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

AZI MMERMAN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


LAW SCHOOL Federal complaint filed against for-profit ITT Tech

Laugh with the Pittsburgh Improv this March! nt al Eve Speci

MARCH 7-9

BERT KREISCHER

MARCH 14-15

FRANK CALIENDO

MARCH 28-30

MARCH 21-23

DAN TAMMY PESCATELLI SST ST. T. G GERMAINE ER TICKETS $17 TICKE

TICKETS $20

TICKETS $35

TICKETS TS $20

Order Tickets online at improv.com or by calling the box office at 412-462-5233 Text PITTSBURGH to 82257 for promotions and giveaways! The h Waterfront f

Homestead, d PA 15120 | ((412)) 462-5233

50% OFF

any one “Opener” Item. Limit One Coupon per Party Expires March 31, 2014

HOME PROTECTION NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

Learn to shoot ONE ON ONE CLASSES AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

– as little as 1 day notice

THOUSANDS OF GUNS IN STOCK HUGE SELECTION B U Y- S E L L - T R A D E

FREE RANGE PASS 1 hour range time. Expires 8/31/14.

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} ALTHOUGH A complaint filed last week

by the Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was aimed specifically at for-profit educator ITT Technical Institute, it may also serve as a warning shot to other for-profit education companies. The CFPB filed a complaint against ITT — which has two campuses in the Pittsburgh area — accusing the school of predatory lending practices. In a Feb. 26 conference call with reporters, CFPB director Richard Cordray said, “Our action today is just the first step the Consumer Bureau is taking to address consumer issues in the for-profit college market.” The complaint against ITT, which will be heard by a federal court in the company’s home state of Indiana, shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. In late January, a consortium of 13 state attorte atto torrneys general announced they ey were investigating four of the largest for-profit educators, including ding both ITT and Pittsburghhbased Education Management Corporation. Richard Cordray and the atCordray torneys general involved in the press call declined to discuss any potential future filings. A spokesperson for Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who is leading the EDMC investigation, said that because the probe is an “ongoing matter, we have no comment.” “Certainly if I were one of those [forprofit education] companies, I would be worried” another shoe might drop, says Henry Levin, a Columbia University professor of economics and education who has studied for-profit education. “What’s interesting to me is that the feds have come in and found a different route of investigation,” he adds. While earlier investigations have focused solely on whether educators lured students with inflated salary and job prospects, “[I]n this lawsuit, they seem to be going after how schools comply with the 90/10 rule.” Under that rule, for-profit educators can use federal loans to pay for no more than 90 percent of a student’s education. The other 10 percent must come from other sources. The CFPB alleges that at ITT, the source was often ITT itself. Cordray said that to cover costs

in a student’s first year, the educator offered no-interest loans, which it called “temporary credit,” that came due at the end of the year. “We believe ITT knew … many students would not be able to repay their temporary credit balances” — or the money needed for the second year of tuition, Cordray alleged. Instead, ITT “pushed them into highcost private loans.” In its lawsuit, the CFPB alleges that while the loan programs were “ostensibly run by third parties,” they were “in reality controlled by ITT and backed by an ITT guarantee that protected those third parties from loss.” Some of the loans, Cordray charged, came with interest rates as high as 16 percent — which he likened to “financing your ccollege education on your credit card.” But ITT financialstaff would “rush students aid st through an automated applicathro tion process without affordtio ing them a fair opportunity to understand the loan obligations involved.” In response, ITT issued a statement saying “ITT Tech did not make any money, in interest or fees, from those thirdparty [financing] programs, which were designed to help students during the recent economic downturn. … ITT Tech believes the complaint is without merit.” ITT also challenged the jurisdiction of Cordray’s agency, a fledgling federal agency created to protect consumers from predatory financial practices. ITT’s statement asserted that the suit addresses “issues that are unrelated to consumer finance, and attempts to cast a negative light on … activities that are extensively regulated by other government agencies.” Kevin Kinser, chair of the Institute for Global Education Policy Studies at the State University of New York at Albany, says he’s not surprised that the CFPB targeted ITT Tech. It is, he says, “one of the first to develop this internal loan model for students to finance their education.” “The business model of ITT, and other for-profit educators, is to maintain enrollment levels,” he says. “If that didn’t happen then stock prices declined. … Unfortunately, students were the ones caught in the middle.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


Weddings. Events. Portraits.

Rebecca Photography g p y

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

5218 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201 • 412.860.8180 www.rebeccaphotography.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

ALIVE &WELL

A series of health information presentations by UPMC

FREE MENOPAUSE LECTURE SERIES The Women’s Midlife Health Center at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC offers care for women in perimenopause and menopause. Please join us for one of our upcoming presentations: Tuesday, March 11

“It’s Not Your Mother’s Menopause” – An overview of menopause. Wednesday, April 23

“Mind Over Menopause” – Managing stress and insomnia. Thursday, May 15

“Wellness, Weight, and Eating Lessons” – How to eat chocolate and still lose weight. All sessions begin at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. To register, go to upmc.com/classes and use “Magee” as a keyword or call 412-802-8299. Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC 300 Halket St., Auditorium, Zero Level Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


A D VERTIS IN G S U PPL EM EN T

Camp Deer Creek Camp Deer Creek is a family owned and operated traditional summer day camp for boys and girls ages 4 - 15. Our 18 acre layout allows plenty of room for our activities that include swimming in our heated pool, horseback riding, nature, archery, crafts, music, drama and field games. We also provide transportation from many areas and lunch.

Carnegie Science Center Design a video game. Create a musical instrument. Discover distant galaxies and beyond! Carnegie Science Center has your summer covered with awe-inspiring camps that will keep inquisitive kids ages 4-14 entertained. Filled with action-packed

programs, camps offer hundreds of handson exhibits, an Omnimax film, Highmark SportsWorksÂŽ, and a cool T-shirt.

Carnegie Museums Museum summer camps deliver the world! The entire museum campus is a field for discovery and creativity, where kids investigate Earth, art, dance, science and more through behind-the-scenes experiences, handson encounters and exciting activities. Weeklong half-day and full-day camps accommodate children from Pre-K through high school. 412.622.3288 or www. artandnaturalhistory.org/camps.

Chatham Music and Arts The Chatham Music and Arts Day Camp

THERAPEUTIC SUMMER PROGRAM for kids ages 7 to 18!

FORT-BUILDING EXTRAVAGANZA

SCREEN-PRINTING

EXPERIENCE INSTALLATIONS

AND MORE!

make awesome art!

www.mattress.org

From Quest Therapeutic Camps & Squirrel Hill Psychological Services

is located on Chatham Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shadyside Campus. The camp offers programs in visual arts, music, drama, dance, nature exploration and sports. Six, three, and one week sessions are available for campers entering kindergarten through ninth grade. Visit www.chatham.edu/daycamp for more information.

CLO Academy CLO Academy's summer performance camps are designed to give kids the opportunity to experience preparing for and performing on the stage. Working with a Director, Music Director and Choreographer, students will create their own exciting musical theater experience! All camps culminate with a life performance at the CLO Academy.

CMU Pre-College Summer Programs Is your child going to be a junior or senior in high school? If so, consider spending six-weeks in one of our distinct PreCollege programs. They can either explore Architecture, Art & Design, Drama, Music, the Ntl. High School Game Academy or Advanced Placement Early Admission to prepare them for study at the college level. For more information visit: www.cmu.edu/ enrollment/pre-college

Gemini Children's Theater Creative Fun! Our 5-day camps provide hands-on experience in a real theater. Under the guidance of theater professionals, each group creates, writes,

TEEN BOOT CAMP JULY 14 - 18, 2014

Innovative treatment for children with social and emotional challenges, through a unique combination of recreational activities, behavioral therapy and group psychotherapy. FOR MORE INFORMATION: contact April Artz, Quest Camp Director, at 412877-7528 or aartz@squirrelhillpsych.org or visit www.questcamps.com p

CONTACT FELICE@MATTRESS.ORG TO REGISTER AND FOR MORE INFO

www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

Camp Deer Creek . . . since 1933

Jumpstart your FUTURE Carnegie Mellon University Summer Pre-College Programs June 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 9, 2014 Advanced Placement Early Admission Fine Arts: Architecture / Art & Design / Drama / Music National High School Game Academy www.cmu.edu/enrollment/pre-college OfďŹ ce of Admission Pre-College Programs

  #"!! "  %   

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oldest & â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funnestâ&#x20AC;? Family Owned & Operated Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Camp

June 16-August 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 4-15 â&#x20AC;˘ Transportation provided in many Pittsburgh areas 412-767-5351 â&#x20AC;˘ www.campdeercreekonline.com


ADVERTISIN G S U PPL EM EN T

W

POIINT PARK UNIVERS

CARNEGIE MUSEUM

Summer Schedule 2014 For more information, please visit:

www.wpwp.pitt.edu/ youth/ywi/ or call

412-624-6557 Mt. Lebanon School District Campus (M-W) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Noon (Grades 4-8) June 16-26 (Thursdays) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm (Grades 4-8) June 19-26 (if snow days used) (M-Th) 9am-3pm

Pine-Richland, Eden Hall Elementary (M-W) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Noon (Grades 4-8)

July 7-17 (Thursdays) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm (Grades 4-8) Franklin Regional School District Campus July 7-18 (M-F) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Noon (Grades 4-8) University of Pittsburgh, Cathedral of Learning (M-F) 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Noon (Grades 4-8) July 14-25 (M-F) 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm (Grades 9-12)

SUMMER CAMPS GRADES 1 - 3

GRADES 4 - 9

June 16 - 27 or Aug 4 - 15

Gr. 4 - 6: July 21 - Aug 8 Gr. 7 - 9: June 30 - July 18

This summer become a TV producer! PCTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TV Production Summer Camp

Aug. 4th-8th and Aug. 11th-15th 9am-Noon â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 13-17 Pittsburgh Community Television 412-322-7570 â&#x20AC;˘ www.pctv21.org

ITY

GRIER SUMMER

join the circus, take trips. Programs include traditional day camps and performing arts and specialty camps at our 100-acre Family Park in Monroeville and in Squirrel Hill and the South Hills.

produces, and performs their show on the last day of camp. Camp sessions available in split groups ages 4 - 17. www.geminitheater.org

Grier Summer Grier Summer is an overnight camp, founded in 1975, located in Central PA, operated on the grounds of the historic Grier School. We offer girls their choice

of one or three week programs in English/Western horseback riding, musical theater, art, or dance. All skill levels welcome.

JCC Day Camps Every child is unique. The JCC has a camp for that! Campers ages 2 to 16 get active at JCC Camps: swim, climb, shoot hoops, explore nature and science, stage musical,

La Escuelita Arcoiris One-week Spanish Language and Culture camps for children ages 6-10 run from June 16 - July 25. Students engage in outdoor games, arts & crafts, and cultural immersion activities, all while learning Spanish! Our bilingual instructors have many years of teaching experience. Located in Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4787 or www.spanishleap.com.

Mattress Factory Community Art Lab + Factory 14s at the Mattress Factory. Dive in to awesome

Best Day Camps in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Burgh

JUN 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUG 22, 2014

GRADES 2 - 12

June 9 - 13 or July 21 - 25

Gr. 4 - 6: June 30 - July 18 Gr. 7 - 9: July 21 - Aug 8

AGES 3-5 Pre-School Camp: June 2 - 6 or July 28 - Aug 1

Original art and architecture, dinosaurs, ecology, biodiversity, ancient civilizations, and scientific mysteries inspire fun-filled and creative self-expression and learning.

GRADES 6 - 12 This camp culminates in a public performance at the New Hazlett Theater on 6/29

Open to Everyone  JCCPGHdaycamps.com

June 16 - 29

Private Voice & Piano

Squirrel Hill 412-521-8010 South Hills 412-278-1975

Ages 12 - 18: June 16 - August 8 ½ Hour and Full Hour spaces available

412-281-2234 pittsburghCLO.org N E W S

p(ALF ANDFULL DAYSESSIONS p0RE ANDPOST CAMPCAREAVAILABLEFORAGESq p&REEPARKINGFORSIGN INANDSIGN OUT UNDERMINUTES

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

412.622.3288 | artandnaturalhistory.org/camps 44&ORBES AVEp0ITTSBURG(, 0Ap52

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


PITTSBURGH ZO

CARNEGIE SCIEN

O

A D VERTIS IN G S U PPL EM EN T

CE CENTER

GGEMINI CHILDRE installations with world-class artists to have a one-of-a-kind art experience at the Mattress Factory Art Museum this summer. Classes are available for students 7-18 and workshops include: Fort-Building Extravaganza, ScreenPrinting and Circus + Activism! Contact 412-231-3169 or felice@mattress.org for more information or to reserve your space!

Point Park University The Performing Arts Community Classes at Point Park University offers a variety of NON-CREDIT Summer camps for High School students. This year camps include Screenwriting, Animation, Filmmaking, Sound Camp, a Movement Intensive and a Dance Workshop (Ages 10+). Adult and youth classes also available throughout

the year. Call 412-392-3456 or visit www.pointpark.edu/community

PCTV-21 Production Camp

for high school students taught in one of the top glass studios in the U.S. Learn the science and art of glass including glassblowing, flameworking, kilnforming, and coldworking.

Ever wonder what goes into the making of a television program? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your chance to find out. Learn all aspects of TV production and produce your own show for air on PCTV 21. August 4th thru 8th and August 11th thru 15th. Youth age 13-17. Call 412-322-7570 or visit www.pctv21.org.

N'S THEATER

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Music & Arts Day Camp* June 16-July 25 *Pre-K Half day option available

Kiddie Cougar Camp Cougar Soccer Camp July 28-August 1

Pittsburgh Glass Center

Cougar Basketball Camp August 4-8

SiO2 Teen Boot Camp at Pittsburgh Glass Center. A formula shattering the notion of glass, SiO2 Boot Camp is a one-week hands-on glass program

Alicia Danenberg, director: 412-365-1174

Ages 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;13 s pittsburghzoo.org s 412-365-2528 Programs start the week of June 2. 18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


ADVERTIS IN G S U PPL EM EN T

Scholarships available. Register today at www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

Pittsburgh Zoo Camp Spend a week exploring the most amazing creatures on the planet through fun-filled, educational Zoo Camp programs. Campers will be introduced to the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium's most fascinating residents through animal encounters, behind-the-scenes tours, and exciting classroom lessons and activities. Program themes are fun and engaging for each age group.

Quest Summer Camp From Squirrel Hill Psychological Services and Quest Therapeutic Camps, the Quest Summer Camp program provides

innovative treatment programs for children with mild to moderate social and emotional challenges through a unique combination of recreational activities, behavioral therapy and group psychotherapy. For more information, contact 412-877-7528 or visit www.questcamps.com

Discover the binary brilliance of robots, explore the science of video o games, and crack secret cases! Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org or call 412.237.1637 for more details.

The Young Writers Institute

For kids ages 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14.

The Young Writers Institute is for young people who like to write, and who want to develop their craft in a community of writers. Program highlights include visiting writers, field trips, readings of student writing and publication in electronic anthologies. Visit www.wpwp.pitt.edu/youth/ywi

Presented in cooperation with

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER NTER

Non-credit - Performing Arts Community Classes

. . . on the campus of the Grier School, an historic girls boarding school in the Allegheny Mountains of Central Pennsylvania.

Summer High School Workshops Students Entering Grades 9 through 12

Summer Film, Animation & Sound

UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;}Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;` Ă&#x160; 7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}

Screenwriting Camp - July 7 to July 11, 2014 Camp Hollywood - July 14 to July 24, 2014 Animation Camp Traditional - July 21 to July 25, 2014 Animation Camp Digital - July 28 to Aug. 1, 2014 Sound Camp (music & film) - Aug. 4 to Aug. 8, 2014

UĂ&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;}iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2021; UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;*iĂ&#x20AC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;ÂŤ

Summer Theater & Dance

UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;

Summer Movement Intensive - July 7 to July 26, 2014 Dance Workshop (2 wks) - July 21 to Aug. 1, 2014 (ages 10+)

UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;

412-392-3456 - www.pointpark.edu/community

www.griersummer.org N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


DE

SI

the

ON

MARKET DAY {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} As a lifelong Lawrenceville resident, Deirdre Kane knows how important the former Bloomfield Market was to the local community. So when the local landmark on 52nd Street closed, it was sorely missed. “I used to frequent that market during my entire childhood,” Kane says. “I’ve had family members work there over the years. It’s important.” So important that Kane and her friend, Dora Walmsley, decided to raise the funds and go into business together. Their new venture, the 52nd Street Market, opened March 1. Walmsley has lived in Lawrenceville for about eight years. The pair met while working in the neighborhood’s community gardens, and they were considering a small urban farm when the market became available. When the women surveyed residents to find out what kind of products they wanted, they discovered folks wanted a mix of affordable basics as well as organic and sustainable products. The market, Walmsley says, tries to offer both. All of the soap is organic, for example, and paper products like towels are made sustainably, and from recycled material. “Our plan is to carry a variety of products from chipped ham to quinoa,” she explains. Kane adds that neighborhood residents indicated they weren’t happy with the offerings at nearby grocery stores, so the market will offer a variety of fresh and local produce. “We’re definitely here for everybody,” Kane says. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

601 52 St., Lawrenceville. www.52ndstreetmarket.com nd

the

FEED

Get your garden going at this year’s

Seed Swap, a free event held by Grow Pittsburgh and Phipps Conservatory, at the Carnegie Library Main Branch, in Oakland, on Sat., March 15. Bring leftover (or saved) organic and heirloom seeds from last year to the International Poetry Room (second floor), and trade them for others. Plus, workshops for seed-starting and seed-saving. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. More information at www.grow pittsburgh.org

20

YELLOW-LENTIL SOUP, WITH THE CHARACTER OF A PURÉED DAL, WAS SUPREMELY SATISFYING

MID-EASTERN FAVORITES

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HERE TEND TO be tight relationships among the cuisines of the Mediterranean basin. Due to trade and climate, menus from Morocco to Lebanon vary but slightly. In the eastern Mediterranean, items like falafel, hummus, kebab and baklava are claimed by practically every country, even those landlocked countries farther east. Evidence for this proposition comes to us via Dijlah, a new Iraqi restaurant. On a menu that focuses on starters, kebabs and sandwiches, we identified a scant few dishes that weren’t familiar to us from other Middle Eastern restaurants. But novelty isn’t everything, and we were eager to see how Dijlah’s kitchen would handle the classics. The decor immediately transported us far from the slushy streets outside, evoking the rich colors and textures of the Islamic world with draped fabrics, Oriental rugs, tin-and-glass lanterns and benches cushioned in elaborately embroidered upholstery. It was a chilly night, so we mostly

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Starter selection including: hummus, baba ghanoush, stuffed grape leaves, tabuleh and red tabuleh

passed over cold starters for hot, with a single exception: Kisir, or red tabuleh, promised something new, and it was a pleasing variation on the classic crackedwheat salad. The main difference was the addition of tomato paste, which thickened the texture, added a sort of earthy acidity to the flavor and contributed the dish’s distinctive rusty color. The bulgur predomi-

DIJLAH RESTAURANT

4130 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-224-2111 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. noon-8 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $3-6; entrees $10-15 LIQUOR: Not permitted

CP APPROVED nated over the parsley, which increased the heartiness, creating a substantial vegetarian dish that mediated between the simple shredded lettuce and cabbage salads that accompanied the entrees, and the heavier meats and rice which comprised them. In fact, our dining companion remarked

that next time, she’ll make a meal of appetizers alone. Her lentil soup, with the character of a puréed yellow-lentil dal, was supremely satisfying. Falafel were crisp on the outside, nicely crumbly on the inside and subtly seasoned. With their crispy fried wrappers, sigara borek resemble little tubes of spanakopita, and come filled with either feta or potatoes and parsley. We chose feta, and its bold brininess held up well against the crisp shell. Dijlah’s obligatory spinach and spinachfeta pies were also well proportioned, their relatively thin dough surrounding bright, moist spinach filling and, in the case of the latter dish, a generous scattering of crumbled, creamy feta cheese. A nice touch was that the pies were reheated on a grill, not in an oven, so that they came with grill marks and even a faint waft of smoke. The grill left a more substantial char on the chicken wings, which created its own flavor, but — alas — obscured the garlic spice sauce and paprika that were applied beforehand. A final brush with the garlic would have been welcome.


technique: A slow simmer infuses chopped meat with sauce even as the liquid itself evaporates, leaving the meat tender and soaked with flavor. Dijlah uses tenderloin in its beef version (there’s also chicken), but the texture was less tender than we expected from that cut; perhaps its leanness didn’t hold up to the long cooking. Nonetheless, the flavor was excellent. A subtle level of spice built with each bite, while bits of onion, cooked near to melting, offered sweetness among the savory morsels. A kofte sandwich, wrapped in pita, offered that wonderful beef patty that should never be confused with a burger, as the spicing is the primary focus in preparing kofta, and loose packing of the ground meat makes for a lighter texture. Dijlah describes its spice blend as “delicate,” and while it was not as assertive as some, we found it by no means bland.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BAR EXAMINATION Two lawyers open Squirrel Hill tavern to explore local beer There are hundreds of jokes (and even a movie) about a lawyer walking into a bar, but in Squirrel Hill, a lawyer — two, actually — decided to walk into the bar and buy it. In the process, brothers Peter and Matt Kurzweg rebranded the recently shuttered Fanattics bar as the Independent Brewing Company. But don’t let the name fool you; while the brothers are avid homebrewers, this is a bar, not a brewery. The original Independent Brewing Company was a pre-Prohibition consortium of small Pittsburgh breweries that were struggling to keep up with Pittsburgh Brewing Company, the once-mighty regional brewer of Iron City, and large national brands. “That concept of supporting the little guys is exactly what we want to do,” says Peter. Although it’s nothing new for a Pittsburgh bar to have a few locally brewed beers on tap, at the Independent, all the beer is small-batch and local. “There’s something you get from being able to visit the breweries, and from knowing the brewers,” says Peter. “There’s a sense of pride in serving good local beer.” There are some advantages in knowing the brewers, too. When the bar ran out of IPA on opening weekend, Peter called Matt Gowanus of Hop Farm Brewing for an emergency delivery. He says he “basically dragged Gowanus out of bed,” but once the brewer arrived, he stayed and chatted about his brewery with customers. Local spirits are highlighted on Saturday nights, when cocktail guru Adam Henry, a Princeton classmate of Peter, steps behind the bar with an ambitious drinks program featuring Pittsburgh distilleries. Still, beer is the focus at the Independent Brewing Company. And, though the bar might appeal primarily to beer geeks, Matt says his highly educated staff is ready to make suggestions for the uninitiated. “If a beer is lingering, it’s not because it’s a bad beer,” he says. “It’s because people might not know that style. If you can turn people around, you can change their lives.”

“THERE’S SOMETHING YOU GET FROM BEING ABLE TO VISIT THE BREWERIES, AND KNOWING THE BREWERS.”

Baklava and Turkish coffee

Iraq kebab was a mix of coarsely chopped — not ground — lamb and beef, formed into two oblong patties and served simply alongside rice and green salad. The two meats were coarsely blended as well, so that the distinctive flavor of the lamb stood up to the robust one of the beef. Smoky notes from the grill deepened the flavor profile still further, and a bit of ground spice sprinkled on top stood out more for not having been blended with the meat. This was a dish elemental enough for the burger-loving kids in our party, but complex enough for adults craving foods we don’t ordinarily make ourselves. Otherwise, Dijlah’s broad Middle Eastern menu did not tell us much about how, or even if, Iraqi cuisine is distinct from what we Americans have come to call, simply, “Middle Eastern.” But in representing this broad genre, it excels. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1704 Shady Ave, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5040 or www.independentpgh.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Authentic Thai Cuisine

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

We Support

L o c al !

Monday 9am-3pm Tuesday-Thursday 9am-6pm Friday 9am-8pm Don’t forget Saturday Brunch 9am-2pm CLOSED SUNDAYS

VOTED BESTGHTMAGHAAZIINE

PITTSBUR r several 2011, fo ing years runn

Dine-In or Take-Out

We also cater office parties! Let us do the work... Call us 24 hours in advance@

THAI CLASSICAL DANCE EVERY SUN AND THUR EVENING

LUNCH SPECIALS

412-415-0338

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30AM-3:00PM

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

5846 Forbes Ave., 2nd Floor • SQUIRREL HILL • 412.521.0728

www.BANGKOKBALCONYPGH .com Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10pm

Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11pm

Attention Hockey Fans! FREE EVENT PARKING

*

*WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

event nights and have your parking validated by making a minimum purchase! It’s like eating or parking for FREE!

Happy Hour Specials 5-7pm Live Music Every Friday 5pm

22

Downtown Pittsburgh

412-434-0800

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

THE CAMBOD-ICAN KITCHEN. 1701 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6199. Having made the jump from street truck to modest sit-down venue, the owners retained their menu, so popular with the late-night crowd, of fresh-cooked Cambodian cuisine. Kabobs, fried wontons, chicken, shrimp cakes, curried vegetable bowls and fried noodles are among the restaurant’s staples, as is its distinctive in-house “moon sauce” and fresh limeade. JF

The Blind Pig Tavern {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

LEGENDS OF THE NORTH SHORE. 500 E. North Ave., North Side. 412-321-8000. Despite its name, Legends is no sports bar: It’s a family-friendly restaurant with a local flavor. The menu is almost exclusively Italian: Offerings include classics such as gnocchi Bolognese and penne in vodka sauce, and more distinctive . w w w specialties such as filet paper pghcitym saltimbocca. KF .co

FULL LIST E N O LIN

ECHO. 1740 Route 228, Cranberry. 724-7793246. The menu at this sophisticated restaurant offers a tour de force of modern American cuisine. It focuses on central ingredients and adds layers of flavor, sometimes in unexpected forms, such as a purée of tuna alongside grilled steak, or golden trout served on a bed of orzo with a fennelcream sauce. But even a simpler dish, such as fettuccini Alfredo, is perfectly executed. LE

MALLORCA. 2228 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-4881818. The ambience here is full of Old World charm, with just a touch of hipness bolstered by attentive service. The fare is Spanish cuisine, and there’s no mistaking the restaurant’s signature dish: paella, featuring a bright red lobster tail. In warm weather, enjoy the outdoor patio along lively Carson Street. KE

EDEN. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070. The food here is inspired by the raw-food movement, but it’s hardly dreary health food. The menu is simple, with a few options in each category: starter, main (raw), main (hot) and sweet. Some dishes were frankly salads, while others were raw, vegan adaptations of cooked comfort foods. (Chicken can be added to some dishes.) There is also an extensive menu of freshly squeezed and blended juices and smoothies. JF

Park in the U.S. Steel Tower on

600 Grant Street

THE BLIND PIG TAVERN. 2210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-5936. This South Side bar, whose name derives from Prohibition slang, offers a satisfying, pig-centric menu of pub grub. Look for the pig in pulled-pork sliders and pepperoni rolls. Or branch out with pizza, grilled cheese sandwich (add bacon!) and other popular bar fare. Wash it all down with legal beverages. JE

www.pghgrille.com

KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. 6012 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at this longtime neighborhood hangout; it’s the real thing. And the original 1940s fare has been updated with taste and style: Burgers and fries share space with Asian potstickers and satay. The mini mac-andcheese is a classic. JE

Eden {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. This Forest Hills venue offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d

expect, such as greens (cooked in pork broth), mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current fine-dining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) and Southern comfort (chicken with black-eyed peas and greens, watermelon salad). LE SEWICKLEY HOTEL. 509 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-741-9457. At this revamped hotel, the offerings reflect a balance between time-honored dishes such as turtle soup and more modern fare, like a crabmeat-stuffed quesadilla. Steak-lovers will be pleased, but adventurous burger fans should check out the Light Up Night burger, topped with blue crabmeat, bacon, avocado and pepper-jack cheese. LE SOBA/UMI. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-3625656/412-362-6198. Here, the local Big Burrito group offers two different menus in the same building. Soba offers pan-Asian fusion (from Korean barbeque to Thai corn chowder and Vietnamese hot-and-sour shrimp) in a minimalist yet elegant restaurant/lounge. Umi’s Japanese menu, meanwhile, focuses on sushi and teriyaki; it’s a perennial finalist in City Paper’s “Best of Pittsburgh” issue. LE SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and CONTINUES ON PG. 24


• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

one of the Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

Happy Hour

M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

China Palace Shadyside

ibizatapaspgh.com

Featuring cuisine in the style of

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

MONDAY: FREE TAPAS MONDAY

$10 value with purchase of a bottle of wine TUESDAY: Buy 1 flight of wine get 2nd 50% OFF of equal or lesser value

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

412-488-1818

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com 2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge)

GGrand RReopening p g Celebration! • New wood-fired brick oven • New menu selections • Expanded catering menu

Sushi Bar and Thai Cuisine

• Community engagement

Y THURSDAY 3 MARCH 13 7am - 3pm

all orders! 336 F Fourth hA Avenue

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

Takeout • Call for FREE Delivery!

www.CityOven.com 412.281.6836

3608 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 • (412) 621-1100

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

Lunch and Dinner Monday-Saturday

www.thaihana99.com th ih h 99 +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS

1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

www.elcampesinospgh.com MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM

CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

Grandma Rose’s CATERING & PASTRY ----- HAPPY HOUR -----

2311 Babcock Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-415-0017

grandmarosespastryshop.com

warning!

LET OUR GOODIES PLEA PLEASURE PL P LEA EASU A URE ASURE RE YOU Y OU U! YOU!

Adult Adu ulltt Ca Cakes Cak akes by Jessica ADULTCAKERY.COM

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

HALF OFF DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm -----------------------------------------900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

STOCK TIPS

SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE

Millvale initiative teaches the art of soup THOUGH STEPHANIE DAVIS — a cook at Eleven —

STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF TAMARIND FLAVOR OF INDIA. 257 N. Craig St., Oakland (412-605-0500); 2101 Green Tree Road, Green Tree (412-2784848); and 10 St. Francis Way, Cranberry (724-772-9191). This menu combines southern Indian cuisine with northern Indian favorites, including meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable curries with rice. Chief among its specialties are dosas, the enormous, papery-thin pancakes that are perhaps the definitive southern Indian dish. JE THAI GOURMET. 4505 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-4373. Located in a narrow former lunchroom, Thai Gourmet is the casual, no-nonsense and no-frills member of Pittsburgh’s Thai restaurant club. The prices are on the low end, but the food quality is high and the portions are huge. The decor mixes Asian themes with diner kitsch in a delightful way. JF YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ

Stephanie Davis prepares a soup stock. {PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

Best Mex Restauraican nt Gift s Certificate Available!

offMenu

“muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The restaurant’s offerings include tapas, hearty meat dishes with an array of international seasonings, and a mix-n-match, create-your-own section for mixed grill. KE

“grew up in the kitchen,” many have not. For them, the Gardens of Millvale (GOM) has a few culinary classics boiled down into affordable, straightforward cooking classes. The goal? “To teach people how to grow their own food and what to do with it,” explains Denise Rudar, GOM co-chair. GOM offers six cooking classes yearly in the borough’s community center. A collaboration between the Borough of Millvale and the Millvale Borough Development Corporation, GOM “helps improve accessibility to vegetables for people living in Millvale,” says Rudar. With no grocery store, residents have limited access to fresh produce outside their seasonal farmer’s market. On Feb. 23, Davis, gathered a group of 10 eager participants around an industrial stove for “Soup’s On,” the GOM winter class on how to make vegetable stock from scratch and use it in a soup. Participants learned about mirepoix (a standard vegetable base of chopped celery, onion and carrot), fond (a pot’s “brown bits” that can add flavor), and the difference between sweating and caramelizing an onion. “It’s all about what you know and what you like,” instructed Davis. “These cooking classes have been about very homey, straightforward food that … could have a lot of variation of ingredients,” says Kyra Straussman, a Lawrenceville resident who has taken both the sauerkraut and soup classes. “Cooking … is about the immediacy and the sensual pleasure of making something that nourishes you and others,” she says. “Once you’ve got the basics down, there’s satisfaction in taking a familiar dish and adding your twist to it.” Costing $20 per person — and offering helpful takeaways like a spice/herb sachet — the classes generate funds for future GOM projects, such as a sustainable hoop house. The next class, on making California rolls, is April 27. See www.millvalepa.com for more information. The final act of Davis’ class involved gathering to welcome a warm bowl of hearty kale, lentil and sweet potato soup with freshly-baked croutons. Thus, these classes serve up yet another desirable component for students: As Straussman says, “It was a little like having a party with a bunch of strangers.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


LOCAL

BEAT

“ANY REAL BAND CAN’T BANK ON SUCH A THING; YOU CAN’T BE READY WHEN IT HAPPENS.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

THE BOSS MAN When I was young, Porky Chedwick belonged to a league of what were, to me, weird old guys that my parents listened to on the radio every weekend. As a kid, the music wasn’t up my alley: When I came into my own tastes, I wanted Nirvana and Pearl Jam. Porky was a relic from my parents’ youth, when my dad would go to his dances. He was a holdover from the 1950s, a time I couldn’t even begin to understand. It was only as I got older that I began to realize what he meant, and how lucky I was to have, even reluctantly, his music and personality as part of my formative years. I had experienced firsthand the kind of radio DJ that was dying off, the kind that other kids might only know from reruns of WKRP in Cincinnati. Thanks to Chediwck, I heard tunes that didn’t get airplay in a lot of places by the ’80s and ’90s. I knew songs like “Stranded in the Jungle,” by The Cadets, long before I ever heard the New York Dolls’ version. Even now, there are songs you can hear in certain pockets of the local radio dial (mostly WLSW-FM in Connellsville, and on specialty shows on WWSW-FM and WJAS-AM) that were only ever popular in Pittsburgh, and only because of Porky. (I was stunned to learn a few years back that Donnie Elbert’s ballad “Have I Sinned?” wasn’t a national hit: It was just a Porky favorite, but still gets airplay here.) Pittsburgh’s musical vocabulary is different from the rest of the country because of him. Of course, a guy who was 96 wasn’t going to last forever, but when word got out that Porky Chedwick had passed away last weekend, it was hard to imagine Pittsburgh without him. The fact that he had an entire generation of people like my dad — who’s never been much of a music aficionado otherwise — turned on to such starkly different music, from doo-wop to raunchy R&B, was a feat. And it was one that only an oversized personality, and an expert on both music and people, could pull off. Porky Chedwick’s contributions to popular music everywhere are huge … and his contributions to Pittsburgh can’t be overstated.

OUR MUSICAL VOCABULARY IS DIFFERENT FROM THE REST OF THE COUNTRY BECAUSE OF HIM.

BIG IN AME RI C A {PHOTO COURTESY OF J.F. LAFONDE}

{BY STOSH JONJAK}

Arena rockers: Arcade Fire

M

USICALLY, Arcade Fire has long

been a big band. Its signature is to build songs into momentous crescendos, until the sound waves themselves practically have physical mass. As the six-member group swaps instruments in and out and with each other like kids rummaging around an unsupervised band room, a theme will emerge, growing more and more massive until it inevitably explodes and fades away. Now, though, the band is big in a more conventional sense, too. The band’s latest album, Reflektor, released Oct. 28, opened at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and moved 140,000 copies in its first week. The supporting tour finds the band hitting giant arenas (like Pittsburgh’s Consol Energy Center) and headlining festivals (like Coachella). The previous album, 2010’s The Suburbs, also debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 on its way to winning the 2011 Grammy for Album of the Year. Even the score the band co-created (along with Owen Pallett) for Spike Jonze’s Her was

nominated for an Oscar this year. This is the algorithm of making it: one day you’re nobodies from Montreal; the next, you have David Bowie doing a guest vocal on the lead single for your new album.

ARCADE FIRE

WITH DAN DEACON, KID KOALA 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 12. Consol Energy Center, 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $39-73. All ages. 412-642-1800 or www.consolenergycenter.com

“Bigness wasn’t the goal; it was an accident,” explains multi-instrumentalist and composer Richard Reed Parry. “Any real band can’t bank on such a thing, you can’t be ready for when it happens, there’s no real book on how it happens, no identical scenario, there’s no roadmap to show us how to adjust to it. … I think we are constantly trying to find ways to be comfortable; this is a thing we have to adapt to.” While the band is adjusting to a career

trajectory that is mirroring its song structures — building momentum, growing larger — its new album endeavors to change elements of the formula. Reflektor features the well-publicized addition of LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy as co-producer to get you to dance, and it was heavily inspired by the Haitian festival music Win Butler was exposed to during a trip to wifeand-bandmate Régine Chassagne’s home country. (To prove that we are living in the 21st century, a 75-minute-long album by a band of Montrealers influenced by Haitian festival music went No. 1.) On the practical side, this means the rhythm is emphasized: There are congas, four-on-the-floor disco beats, kick drums that thump instead of attack, bass and synth bass that are always on the verge of distorting, a mix that makes you constantly aware of percussion, and songs that are allowed to stretch out, to keep you sweating out on the dance floor. On this fourth album, Arcade Fire wants you to dance ... and they want you to dress up.

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

N E W S

+

CONTINUES ON PG. 26

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


BIG IN AMERICA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

Those interested in purchasing a ticket for the upcoming Consol Energy Center show through Ticketmaster’s website are met with the message, “NIGHT OF SHOW: please wear formal attire or costume” — it’s even stamped on the ticket. The dress code is voluntary (a lack of a cummerbund will not be grounds for removal), but this situation illustrates a band adjusting to its newfound size: The intimacy of club shows is history, but having the audience dress up is an attempt to get people to invest in the show. “You don’t have to dress up for Halloween,” Parry says, “but let’s see if anyone gives you candy.” There comes a point when a band gets too big to relate to; there’s a shift that permanently separates the band from the people who follow it. The reference points the band sings about are too unfamiliar for a normal person to understand and the members’ life experiences become too extraordinary. Reflektor is a study in relatability; it suggests the members of Arcade Fire are, consciously or not, aware their band’s burgeoning size is separating them from normalcy. “Flashbulb Eyes” and “We Exist” concern the soul-stealing and objectifying qualities of fame — something none of us can relate to. “Normal Person” questions if it’s possible for the song’s topic to even exist. Its single, “Reflektor,” studies the most terrifying fate of all: a gradual separation of loved ones who eventually become strangers to each other, a lost relationship (with the fans? with each other?), the post-explosion fade-out. There’s a theory in physics wherein “The Big Bang” is followed by “The Big Freeze” — as the universe expands, objects become farther away from one another. The explosive transference of electrons that fuels all physical creation begins to cease; the universe gradually cools until, ultimately, all life ends. Creativity is fueled by collisions, conflicts, and, most importantly, closeness. This is why adjusting to largeness is the theme of Reflektor, this supporting tour and this stage of the Arcade Fire’s career. Success begets largeness, yet success requires conflict. Arcade Fire “is a six-way marriage; opinions clash, feelings get in the way, and a lot of wills are competing,” says Parry. “The process is still taxing and challenging 10 years in … but conflict is good. We have six creative, brilliant musicians working and fighting with each other, but when we come to an agreement and we make something that works and is great, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

ON THE RECORD with Charles Rocha {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROB DUYOS}

That Summer: Charles Rocha, left, with Brad Evanovich

Charles Rocha has played with a slew of bands, starting with Pittsburgh’s The Berlin Project about 15 years ago, and including Bear Cub. He now lives in Florida, where he and another former Berlin Project player, Brad Evanovich, play in a new band, That Summer. They release a debut, The Hearth EP, with a show that will include a bunch of Pittsburgh musicians. YOU SPENT SO MUCH TIME PLAYING IN OTHER PEOPLE’S BANDS — WHEN DID YOU START WRITING YOUR OWN STUFF? I was always writing and collaborating with people, but I never had the confidence to consider myself a songwriter. When I lived in Nashville with Jesse Hall [of Bear Cub], I would show him parts, and he’d say, “Finish a damn song!” Playing with him and working with [Buddy Hall, Jesse’s father] helped me feel more comfortable with my voice. YOU CAME UP IN PUNK BANDS. WHAT STEERED YOU TOWARD THE AMERICANA SOUND? I would love to be in a punk-rock band. I have my Fat Wreck Chords hoodie on right now. But I don’t really have the guys to do it with. It came [from] just being alone, and just having my guitar. A LOT OF THESE SONGS ARE ABOUT TRAVELING. IS THAT A LOT OF YOUR LIFE? Absolutely. I’ve always been a bit of a gypsy myself. I was born in Brazil and moved to America when I was 2; I’ve moved around a lot since I was 12. But I’ve always considered Pittsburgh my home, because it was where my formative years were, and my best friends were there. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THAT SUMMER EP RELEASE. 10 p.m. Sat., March 8. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

INTRODUCTION TO HOME IMPROVEMENT

OFF OF THE CLOUD

TUESDAY, MARCH 11 • 6P.M. - 7:30 P.M.

{BY ALEX GORDON}

The ability to complete even the smallest home improvement begins with a basic foundation of skills with hand tools and power tools. The Landmarks Preservation Resource Center, in a partnership with DIY Pittsburgh, will offer a Home Improvement Workshop Series. In this session, you will learn how to use the most common hand tools and power tools of the trade in home improvement such as a hand saw, circular saw, hammer, nail gun, screw gun, drill, square, and miter saw. You will also learn the most basic of skills; how to read a tape measure to 1/16 of an inch.

IT’S A TUESDAY night and there are 10

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN SATURDAY, MARCH 15 • 10A.M. - 11:30 A.M. Landscape architect Bill Paxton will present a workshop on residential landscape design. During the lecture, you will learn about various aspects of garden design including site, soil, trees, landscape plants, ornaments, hardscape, accommodate, seasons, historical restoration and special gardens. All workshops/seminars are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

Star

Electronic Cigarettes E-Liquids Full Tasting Bar Accessories LIKE US ON

FOLLOW US ON

412-471-5808

ter K 10% O it wi FF th th is

ad

2420 E.Carson St Pittsburgh Pa, 15203 412.381.VAPE Hours of Operations Mon to Sat 11am-9pm Sun 12 noon-7pm

www.vapeinnoncarson.com • www.facebook.com/Vape-Inn-On-Carson

CTRS

CLINICAL TRIALS

ENDOMETRIOSIS

Do you have a medical condition which is not listed?

CONSTIPATION

Give us a call.

UTERINE FIBROIDS

Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call

BIRTH CONTROL HIGH CHOLESTEROL WEIGHT LOSS/OBESITY

412-363-1900 for more information.

INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

www.CTRSLLC.com

Sounding board: DJ Spaed and Mr. Owl facilitate Pittsburgh’s SoundCloud Meetup.

film-score composer Colton Provias. But SoundCloud is especially useful for musicians like Mr. Owl, or anybody who works in electronic music and relies heavily on sampling. SoundCloud is basically a limitless catalog of potential samples and as a result, Mr. Owl explains, Meetups tend to appeal to musicians in those worlds. DJing is often chided as nothing more than “pressing play,” and because so much of the creative process relies on technological ingenuity, DJs are not always eager to show their cards. But the producers at this meeting seem committed to the opensource format. “That’s a great question” is the goto response for presenters throughout the night. The Meetup operates like a casual lecture, an offline message-board mixed with a peer review. At February’s meeting, producer Thumpty Jumpty (the guy with the fog machine) gives a rundown of his gear, then offers a mini-demonstration of the set he’ll perform at an upcoming gig. The performance is intense, loud and very bright. The MIDI-controlled light show moves in perfect sync with the music, which Thumpty describes as “mainstream-radio EDM.” It’s tremendous fun and, honestly, a little surreal to witness sitting down (like watching a rave in a library). After the performance, Thumpty opens the floor to questions. “What are some of your favorite synths, and which ones do you use for what sounds?” “That’s a great question,” says Thumpty.

THE PRODUCERS AT THIS MEETING SEEM COMMITTED TO THE OPEN-SOURCE FORMAT.

RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

Currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

28

people sitting upstairs at Brillobox, facing the stage in rows of foldable chairs. Elaborate lights and lasers are shooting patterns all over the room. Animated visuals play on a video screen and there’s a little machine filling the space with dank, vaguely sweet-smelling fog. The man behind the large synthesizers on stage explains that this is “just a taste” of his full show. Then the music starts. This is Pittsburgh SoundCloud Meetup, a free community of local musicians, producers and DJs (radio or otherwise) who get together to talk production techniques and bounce songs off each other. Meetups like these are, as the name suggests, networking events loosely facilitated by the massively popular soundsharing network SoundCloud. With 1,179 active Meetups worldwide, they offer a way to mobilize an offline community using an online network. “I have a high level goal of where I want the Pittsburgh community to go and this is a vehicle for serving that goal,” says DJ and producer Mr. Owl, founder of the Pittsburgh SoundCloud Meetup. Mr. Owl started this chapter in 2012 with help from his production partner, DJ Spaed, after noticing a lack of real-world collaborating opportunities for musicians in Pittsburgh. After a slow start, they’ve been meeting monthly since November.

PITTSBURGH SOUNDCLOUD MEETUP 7 p.m. Tue., March 18. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. More info: www.soundcloud.com/groups/pgh-sc-meetup

The first meeting, in March, 2012, had little more than a few couches and a case of beer. Aside from a new home at Brillobox and the sound system that comes with it, not much has changed. The group has since hosted notable guests like radio producer Scott Bliss, RAW Pittsburgh showcase director Leigh Yock and

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


We buy all day-every day LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

BAND INSTRUMENTS 4341 Old William Penn Hwy, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

Used Restaurant

Equipment Used cooking, bar, refrigeration, furniture etc...

Contact Darrin Bell at 412-401-5370 South Hills location. Delivery available! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENE HUEMER}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Mike Gordon

MH the Verb

[HIP HOP] + THU., MARCH 06 When Marcus Harris lived in Pittsburgh a few years ago, he played a few crucial roles — he was in charge of hip hop at WPTS (Pitt’s college station) and was part of the group The BnVz. He’s in New York City now and is best known as MH the Verb, but he still thinks of Pittsburgh — and Oakland’s Peter’s Pub — as a home base. Tonight, he has a release party there for his new album, The Balloon Guide, which features exPittsburgher Jack Wilson, among others. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 116 Oakland Ave., Oakland. $5. 412-681-7465 or www.mypeterspub.com

[HIP HOP] + THU., MARCH 06 Though rumors of a Clipse se reunion turned out to be greatly exaggerated, d, the news isn’t all bad. Thursday, Pusha T — one half of that on-hiatus hip-hop duo — will stop by Altar Bar, fresh on the heels eels of his excellent, almost-minimalist alist 2013 release, My Name Is My Name. On that record, Pusha delivers sneering, eering, sharptongued philosophy on the things he knows best — ladies, luxury xury goods and movin’ bricks (not that hat he needs to do that anymore), re), and — except for his tradedemark “Yugh!” — always keeps his cool. With Fly Union. Margaret Welsh h 7:30 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., ., Strip District. $28-30. All Pusha T ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[INDIE ROCK] + THU., MARCH 06

Empires has a sound that makes you feel like you’re back in the ’90s. — but not in a bad way. The band’s new single, “How Good Does It Feel,” for example, sounds unds like it could’ve been on the he soundtrack for 10 Thingss I Hate

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

About You. The Chicago-based band has plans to release its third studio album, Orphan, later this year. Until then, check the group out at The Smiling Moose along with locals Instead of Sleeping. Kayla Copes 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St. South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[JAM ROCK] + FRI., MARCH 07 You can’t really put a label on jam-scene elder statesman Mike Gordon’s sound: There’s some rock, pop, country and a little bit of reggae heard in his music. “Sometimes I just need to be alone,” he sings in his new single, “Ether” — and it’s fitting, because it sees the guy who’s best known for playing bass with Phish heading up a solo project of his own. Check him out tonight at Stage AE. AE KC 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Nort Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[HIP HOP] + FRI., MARCH 07 While there’s a good precedent for blind musicians, musician it’s rare to come upon a deaf rapper. rapper Sean Forbes is breaking mold: The hip-hop artist and the mold motivational performer lost his motiva hearing heari at an early age but still chose to pursue music. c In addition to founding an a organization that translates org pop po music into ASL and produces videos of the pr songs, he himself raps so about life with a disability a with w a sense of humor and a a positive message. This T week he’s in town to t do several matinee programs for school students, plus tonight’s s public performance at the t Trust Arts Education Center. C AM 7 p.m. 805 LLiberty Ave., Downtown. $20. All ages. 412-456-6666 www.trustarts.org or ww


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 06 31ST STREET PUB. Dougie & the Dewtons, Thundervest, Latecomer, Lady & The Monsters. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Emily Forst, Broken Fences, The Wreckids. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Vattnet Viskar, Vaporized, Wrought Iron. Garfield. 412-361-2262. LAVA LOUNGE. Brazilian Wax, Bloated Sluts, Murder for Girls. South Side. 412-431-5282. SMILING MOOSE. Empires, Instead Of Sleeping. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FRI 07 31ST STREET PUB. Har Mar Superstar, Weird Paul, The Lopez, Fry Jones. Strip District. 412-391-8334.

RAMADA INN HOTEL & ALTAR BAR. Emmure Metal Church. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CONFERENCE CENTER. Brothers Kelly. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. BENEDUM CENTER. Brit Floyd ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD (Pink Floyd Tribute). Downtown. GRILLE. Dancing Queen. Ross. 412-456-6666. 412-364-8166. CLUB CAFE. Cibo Matto, SILKS LOUNGE AT THE Buffalo Daughter. South Side. MEADOWS. The Tony Janflone Jr. 412-431-4950. Band. Washington. GOOSKI’S. The Gotobeds, SMILING MOOSE. Crush The Beagle Brothers. Distance, Michigan, Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. 8Cylinder.(early). THE HANDLE BAR & Fantasy Crime, GRILLE. Bill Ali & Matt Highdeaf, Nobody’s www. per Barranti. Canonsburg. a p ty Heroes.(late) South pghci m 724-746-4227. .co Side. 412-431-4668. HOWLERS COYOTE STAGE AE. Mike Gordon. CAFE. Adam Marsland, North Side. 412-229-5483. Kevin Finn, Robin Vote. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Karmic Juggernaut, Nico’s Gun. MOONDOG’S. The Rusty Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Haywackers, One Gig At A Time. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Blawnox. 412-828-2040. Dave Iglar Band. New Brighton. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 724-494-1578. Motionless In White, Like Moths To Flames, The Plot In You, The Defiled. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ALTAR BAR. Tonic, PALACE THEATRE. Vertical Horizon. Strip District. Jefferson Starship. Greensburg. 412-263-2877. 724-836-8000. THE BRONZE HOOD. The Tony PETER’S PUB. Dustie Richards, Janflone Jr. Duo. Robinson. Gasoline Genes, City Love Story. BULLDOGS SPORTS BAR AND Oakland. 412-628-6404. GRILL. The Dave Iglar Band.

FULL LIST ONLINE

“The Road Ahead-What’s Cookin’?”

SAT 08

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER SPROWLS}

SON OF BITCH

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Son of Bitch; stream or download

“Magic Theatre” for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

5-8, 9:30-11pm

Mark Strickland

4/1

8pm

Gregory Porter

4/8

5-8, 9:30-11pm

Michele Bensen

4/8

8pm

Sean Jones Quartet CD release Tim Stevens

4/15 5-9pm

Backstage Cabaret Backstage Cabaret Backstage

4/15 NO LATE SHOW

Latrobe. 724-537-4444. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. TJ Isenberg. North Side. 412-323-2924. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CLUB CAFE. The Deceptions, DuoGrove (Early) That Summer w/ Tigers Eyes, Chris Hannigan, Brian Allision (late). The Hearth EP Release Show. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARD ROCK CAFE. Shonuff, Vibro Kings. Shonuff reunion/ fairwell, Vibro Kings reunion. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Derek Deprator, Lone Wolf Club, Jeremy Caywood & The Way of Life, Jude Benedict. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MOONDOG’S. theCAUSE. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Brett Dennen, Foy Vance. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Cornmeal, Well Strung. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Waiting For Ray. Ross. 412-364-8166.

MP 3 MONDAY

4/1

4/22 5-8PM, 9:30-11pm Tony DePaolis

Christian McBride Trio

4/22 8pm

4/29 5-8pm, 9:30-11pm Roger Humphries

Backstage Cabaret Backstage

4/29 8:30pm

Robert Glasper

Cabaret

5/6

Erik Lawrence

Backstage

5/13 5-9pm

Dan Wasson

Backstage

5/20 5-9pm

Nelson Harrison

Backstage

5/27 5-9pm

Eric DeFade

Backstage

5-9pm

PRESENTED BY

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

An Evening of Music MARCH 7

Bronsen Euard

THURS, MARCH 6, 9PM BLUEGRASS/AMERICANA

CABINET

w/Heidi Jacobs

FRI, MARCH 7, 9PM ROCK/FUNK/JAZZ

KARMIC JUGGERNAUT WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

NICO'S GUN SAT, MARCH 8, 9PM PROGRESSIVE ELECTRONIC /ROCK FUSION

UNIVERSAL BEAT UNION WITH STANDING WAVE

MON, MARCH 10, 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH S G D TUES, MARCH 11, 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

MATT BOOTH QUARTET 4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

MARCH 22

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THU/MARCH 6/10PM BRAZILIAN WAX THU/MARCH 13/10PM The Carny Stomp, Apache Fog, Death Valley Rally, Stellarscope

THU/MARCH 20/10PM CHARM CHAIN + THE FIVE 10’S $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

Paul Luc APRIL 4

The Rough & Tumble Presented By abkmusic.com/coh-events thecenterofharmony.com/ events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

724-400-6044

Rock The Mic

Celebrating the Life & Music of Aaron “A-Man” Wellons

March

15, 2014 7p.m. - 11p.m.

DON’T MISS IT! $10 in advance $15 at the door

Hear phenomenal local and surrounding area artists Fashion show by CAPRICORN Entertainment Emcee’d by Leslie “Ezra” Smith

Mr. Smalls Theater

400 Lincoln Ave. • Millvale, PA • 15209 Tickets can be purchased at: Eventbrite.com/aman-rock-the-mic-celebration Dorsey’s Record Shop 7614 Frankstown Ave. (Homewood) 412-731-6607 Stedeford’s Record Shop 417 E. Ohio Street, 412-321-8333

Proceeds to BENEFIT up and coming musical artists and prescription drug addiction awareness groups

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

ROCK ROOM. Duffy’s Cut, Dead on the Streets, The War is On, DJ Soulful Fella. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. No Bad JuJu. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. THE SHOP. Crooked Cobras, Thunder Vest, No Movement. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Totally 80’s. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Jordan York, Jowel Kellem, Middle Name Danger, Wright Brotherz. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Dropkick Murphys, Lucero, Skinny Lister. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Universal Beat Union, Standing Wave. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. The Jentz. 724-789-7858.

SUN 09 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Sirsy, Thin Sketch, Middle Children. Garfield. 412-361-2262. SMILING MOOSE. Machete Kisumontao, Karikatura. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 10 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. J.B. Beverly, Rory Kelly’s Triple Threat, Danny Kaye. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

WED 12

R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Billy Pilgrim. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy Price & the Lost Minds. 412-487-6259. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Randall Troy Band. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. WINGHART’S. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-5500.

SUN 09

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Tom Roberts. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 11 SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 12 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 06

ALTAR BAR. Pusha T. Strip District. 412-263-2877. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Sean Forbes. Downtown. 412- 456-6666.

FRI 07 FULL ARTS LIST E TRUST EDUCATION CENTER. ONLwIN w. Sean Forbes. Down-

ALTAR BAR. The Tossers La Dispute. Strip w paper town. 412- 456-6666. District. 412-263-2877. pghcitym .co CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Arcade Fire. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Uptown. 412-642-1800. Holly Hood, Billy Pilgrim, Vaig. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Hardon Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Collider, Mulatto Thunders, Satyr/ Elfheim, Blod Maud, 8 Cylinder. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Blue Matches, Brazilian Wax, The SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Fuckies. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

SUN 09

BLUES THU 06

DJS

THU 06

FRI 07

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. SHEREE’S TAVERN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Blues Open Mic w/ Tim Woods. 724-433-1322.

FRI 07 BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Meltdown. Tropical/global bass party. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Good Vibes Coalition. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 08 BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild

SAT 08 BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Jimmy Adler, The Charlie Barath Duo. Monaca. 724-728-7200. THE HOP HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. INDEPENDENT CITIZENS SLOVAK CLUB. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 724-628-9881. NIED’S HOTEL. Still Not Sober. Lawrenceville. 412-345-1767. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ THU 06

FRI 07 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Dwayne Dolphin & The Piccolo Bass Band, Rick Matt & The RMP Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Just Ahead Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Stranger Convention. Garfield. 412-328-4737.

SAT 08

ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Joseph Badaczewski, Howie Alexander, Beni Rossman Roger Barbour Jazz Trio. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CJ’S. Cedric Napolian The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. “Nonstandard” Feat. Nathan Frink & the Nu Artet with John Bagnato, John Petrucelli, J.D. Chaisson, Manny Guevara. Garfield. 412-361-2262. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Poogie Bell Fiasco. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Jenny Wilson Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-338-6463. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 09 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Stranger Convention. Oakland. 412-622-3114. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-697-1336.


HAPPS

COUNTRY FRI 07 PARK HOUSE. Slim Forsythe’s Irish Show. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 08 WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Steeltown. North Side. 412-231-7777.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

TUE 11 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Lone Pine Bluegrass Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

PHILADELPHIA

CLASSICAL

{SAT., MAY 31}

SAT 08

Roots Picnic

FREYA STRING QUARTET. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. RIVER CITY BRASS. The Power of Energy. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

feat. The Roots, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monae, more Festival Piers at Penn’s Landing

PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4872. THE VIRGINIA GLEE CLUB. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

{THU., AUG. 07}

Tori Amos

OTHER MUSIC

Cain Park

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 11 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Dwayne Dolphin. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Matt Booth Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 12 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

ACOUSTIC THU 06 ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Scott Blasey. Washington. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cabinet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 07 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Jon Banuelos. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. HAMBONE’S. Robbers Roost, The Armadillos, Elliott Sussman. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622.

SAT 08 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH.

N E W S

THU 06 HEINZ HALL. All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander & Ebb. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Molasses Creek. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. ROMAN BISTRO. James Hovan. Forest Hills. 412-871-3704. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter King. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh vs.

FRI 07 EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. HEINZ HALL. All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander & Ebb. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

St. Louis

SAT 08

TUE 11 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Lone Pine Bluegrass Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

WED 12 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Open Stage w/ Cherylann Hawk & The Live to Love Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD THU 06 BYHAM THEATER. Celtic Nights: The Emigrants Bridge. Downtown. 412-456-6666. PALACE THEATRE. Gaelic Storm. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SEVICHE. Geña y Peña. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

565 LIVE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. HEINZ HALL. All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander & Ebb. Downtown. 412-392-4900. LEMONT. Sal Ventura. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

WED 12 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

+

OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

MON 10

SAT 08

TA S T E

DOWNLOAD NOW

EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-345-1722 HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Jam Session. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HEINZ CHAPEL. Kevin Solecki, Accordionist. Oakland. 412-624-4157. HEINZ HALL. All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander & Ebb. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

REGGAE PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400 x120.

PNC Park | April 4, 2014

SUN 09

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing Along w/ Ian Kane. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

+

Download the App for a chance to win tickets to:

SUN 09

CLEVELAND

MON 10

The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

Brought to you by: +

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

33


What to do March

IN PITTSBURGH

5 - 11

WEDNESDAY 5 Disney on Ice

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000. Through March 9.

SOUND SERIES: Cyro Baptista’s Banquet of the Spirits ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

Gaelic Storm

Tribes

THE PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 7:30p.m.

CITY THEATER MAINSTAGE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through March 30.

Celtic Nights

Brett Kreischer

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

Pusha T

BRIT FLOYD: WORLD’S GREATEST PINK FLOYD SHOW

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

THURSDAY 6

All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration Sean Forbes TRUST ARTS EDUCATION of Kander & Ebb CENTER Downtown. 412HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through March 9.

456-6666. Tickets: trustarts. org. Through March 7.

FRIDAY 7

Cabinet

Comedian Ron Feingold

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m.

SUNDAY 93

FRIDAY, MARCH 7 BENEDUM CENTER

Through March 8.

Brit Floyd: World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through March 8.

Mike Gordon STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com

The Music and the Mirror or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 89

Ballet du Grand Théâtre de Genève

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Tonic / Vertical Horizon ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-

263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

MAIN STAGE THEATER Midland. Tickets: 724-576-4644 or lppacenter.org. 2p.m.

Brett Dennen

TUESDAY 11

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Foy Vance. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Inside Amy Schumer’s Back Door Tour CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

GEM

FRIDA

OPAL SUGAR

VERA

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


NON-STOP OFFERS A COMPENDIUM OF MID-AIR HORRORS AS SEEN IN 1970S AIRPORT FILMS

IN THE SPOTLIGHT {BY AL HOFF} “Everybody’s got a sack of rocks,” explains Broadway legend Elaine Stritch. But while the 87-year-old performer has her share of troubles, Chiemi Karasawa’s documentary portrait, Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me, makes clear that little is holding Stritch back from singing, touring, being Elaine.

WORST FLIGHT EVER

CP APPROVED

Ready for her close-up: Elaine Stritch

The film mostly follows Stritch as she prepares for a new revue show, singing Stephen Sondheim songs. It takes a spin through her 30 Rock appearance (she and Tracy Morgan check their blood sugar together), and Karasawa uses the occasion of Stritch sorting through old photographs to relate anecdotes about her past, such as her chaste date with a young JFK. The doc is standard fare, but Stritch makes it compelling. She’s a hoot — gamboling around Manhattan, performing in only a dress shirt and black tights, ordering the cameraman around and faking an injury to get out of a traffic citation. Karasawa interviews Stritch’s colleagues and staffers, and they provide some insight into a woman who, like many long-time, mildly eccentric performers, clearly straddles the line between fun and frustrating. For Karasawa’s cameras, Stritch is nearly always on, but occasionally the mask slips: A health scare finds her questioning mortality, and even a living legend gets undone by stage nerves. But Stritch perseveres: “The fear is all part of the excitement.” Starts Fri., March 7. Harris

{BY AL HOFF}

“N

recent ent documentary profiles five individuals als with physical disabilities who, through skiing, discover new ways of moving. ving. Robert Redford narrates. The $25 screening eening is a fundraiser for Three Rivers Adaptive daptive Sports, and includes cludes hors d’oeuvres vres and wine. 6 p.m. Fri., March 7. Hollywood. d. www. w. TRASPA.org g

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARY NATE} NAT

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

The Movementt Kurt Miller’s

Raise your hand if you’re the terrorist: Liam Neeson plays detective.

OT AN EASIER job in the whole federal government than riding first-class in airplanes.” So says a voice on a radio program as this film opens, presumably carping about federal air marshals. Bill Marks (Liam Neeson) might beg to differ. He’s an air marshal, and his job sucks enough that he has to down booze in the parking lot before reporting to work. Even so fortified, he’s still in a foul mood, snapping at fellow travelers and, later, grabbing an illicit cigarette in the plane’s lavatory. Since you asked, he seals off the smoke detector with duct tape — and like almost everything else in NonStop, this makes sense until you actually think about it. Once the flight is over the Atlantic, Marks gets a text message saying that unless $150 million is deposited into an account, a passenger will be killed every 20 minutes. And this gets real, in … uh … exactly 20 minutes. Now it’s up to Marks

to locate and neutralize the killer who is both on board and in his head. Unfortunately, everybody is acting suspicious: the helpful flight attendant (Downton Abbey’s Michelle Dockery) giving sideeye; Marks’ evasive seat-mate (Julianne Moore); and even the little girl who makes a scene about her stuffed animal.

NON-STOP DIRECTED BY: Jaume Collet-Serra STARRING: Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore

Neeson pairs up again with director Jaume Collet-Serra, who helped launch the Irishman’s late-in-life action-film career with 2011’s Unknown. (The solid, stolid Neeson is the kind of canny action guy who brings an oxygen mask to a knife fight — and prevails!) ColletSerra keeps this locked-room/tickingtime-bomb mystery moving at a good

clip, finding a fair amount of space for brawls, panics and assorted kinetic activities, despite being confined to a narrow aluminum tube. (In fairness, Aqualantic Airlines appears to offer a roomier jet than those I’ve been squashed in.) Non-Stop morphs from a bad day at the office to a compendium of midair horrors previously seen in various Airport films of the 1970s. (It’s missing only the food poisoning from Airplane.) It’s all fun until the last reel when, alas, the solution turns out to be not as good as the mystery. But Non-Stop continues the drama in a cheese-tastic way, and the preview-screening audience burst out clapping when the beleaguered airplane finally set down. And like those lucky passengers disembarking, when the film ends, just walk briskly back into your own life. Do not look back — do not think about this story! It won’t even hold together as far as the parking lot. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW IN BLOOM. This coming-of-age story from Nana Ekvtimshvili and Simon Gross also doubles as a look at post-Soviet Georgia, itself a country struggling to find its footing. The two teenage girls suffer the usual troubles (family, boys), but the lawlessness and violence of their homeland’s growing pains also indelibly mark their lives. A quiet but compelling drama held up by two strong performances from the young actresses. In Georgian, with subtitles. Starts March 7. Regent Square (Al Hoff)

CP

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN. Everybody knows who Charles Dickens is, but most of us know little about the writer’s life other than the popular works he left behind. Ralph Fiennes’ bio-pic, adapted from Claire Tomalin’s book, draws back the velvet curtain on one lesserknown aspect of Dickens’ life — his late-in-life affair with a young woman. The film, as befits its title, focuses on the girl, whom we meet as a troubled thirtysomething many years after Dickens’ death. As she takes long frantic walks at the beach, her story is told in flashback. Nelly Ternan (Felicity Jones), a struggling young actress nearing her 18th birthday, meets Dickens (Fiennes), who is charmed with her beauty and intellect. Nelly is easily smitten — Dickens is, after all, a celebrity — and her mother (Kristen Scott Thomas) tacitly approves the affair, seeing it as a fair economic bargain. The semi-secret affair is both a source of joy and growing consternation for Nelly, as she confronts the limitations of being a mistress. (“My name is whispered with yours and yet I have nothing,” she tells Dickens.) The drama is well acted, and rich with gaslit Victorian period detail. But other than the novelty of Dickens’ involvement, the material is all too familiar. We don’t especially need another look through today’s modern prism of how life was unfair to Victorian women, especially lively ones with a keen sense of self and purpose. And the film has trouble balancing its contemporary desire to reclaim Nelly’s tragedy with the inherent sympathy Dickens engenders — as the celebrity, the man

The Invisible Woman with power, the person played by the engaging Fiennes. But as these sorts of period dramas go, this one isn’t bad — and you might learn some naughty secrets about Mr. Charles Dickens. Starts Fri., March 7. Manor (AH)

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN. It seems no bit of pop culture can be left un-updated, so here comes a big-budget, big-screen, 3-D computer-animated version of the 1960s Jay Ward cartoon from the Rocky and Bullwinkle TV show. Rob Minkoff directs this comedy about the time-traveling, smarty-pants dog and his adopted human son. Starts Fri., March 7.

Jerusalem JERUSALEM. National Geographic’s IMAX film Jerusalem, directed by Daniel Ferguson, gives a close-up of the city and the three major religious groups occupying its rocky terrain. We’re treated to spectacular shots of Jewish boys celebrating b’nai mitzvah; Christians tracing the steps of Jesus’ path to his crucifixion on the Via Dolorosa; and Muslims dancing and drumming, while colorful lights decorate the streets during Ramadan. We also meet three teenage girls from each faith tradition. They’re intelligent and articulate, but most of what

On My Way (2013) - 3/5 @ 7:30pm

(1997) - 3/6 @ 7:30pm, 3/7 @ 10:15pm, 3/8 @ 10pm, & 3/9 @ 7pm

The Movement - 3/7 @ 7pm

Inspiring film narrated by Robert Redford. Presented by Three Rivers Adaptive Sports.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Breakup At a Wedding (2013) - 3/10 @ 7:30pm $7, $5 for 65 & over or 12 & under with valid school ID. For tickets: showclix.com/event/piccadilly

H O L LY W O O D T H E AT E R 1 4 4 9 P o t o m a c Av e n u e , D o r m o n t 412.563.0368

36

Q&A with producer/writer, and participant in the reality TV series, “The Chair,” Anna Martemucci and writer/actor Philip Quinaz. $5

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE. Noam Murro directs this hyped-up swords-and-sandals actioner that continues to cover the mythic battles of ancient Greece, first presented in similar 3-D splendor in 2006’s 300. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., March 7. THE WIND RISES. “Airplanes are beautiful dreams,” says a character in Hayao Miyazaki’s anime, a loose biography of Japanese airplanedesigner Jiro Horikoshi. It’s probably no coincidence that in this paean to aeronautics, everybody constantly travels by all means of earthbound transportation. Lives, after all, are spent on foot and in streetcars, and not soaring magically through the air. But without dreams, there is no future, and

CP

Presented by the Junior Chamber of Commerce Players!

Now in her early sixties, former beauty queen Bettie finds herself jilted by her lover and left alone to deal with the financial problems facing her family’s restaurant.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lost Highway ------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Secret of Nimh (1982) - 3/8 @ 1pm, 4pm, & 7pm, 3/9 @ 4:30pm -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

we learn about them is limited to their feelings about the city’s religious significance. It would have been nice to learn what daily life in Jerusalem is like outside of all its spiritual activity. But clocking in at 45 minutes, the film is too short for us to go beyond short interviews and some quick history lessons on the city’s holy sites, smoothly narrated by the ubiquitous Benedict Cumberbatch. Starts Fri., March 7. Rangos Omnimax, Carnegie Science Center, North Side. (Angela Suico)

Midnight Sat. 3/15 • $7

Tickets: www.showclix.com/event/RockyHorrorMarch2014

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org


this beautifully realized film is about transforming dreams into reality. The film, adapted from Miyazaki’s manga, takes us from Jiro’s rural childhood and college education through his work as an aeronautical engineer and his bittersweet romance. He also lives through a devastating earthquake, economic hard times and rising geo-political tensions in the late 1930s. The future of light aircraft is in war, and the sensitive Jiro must reconcile his desire to design a perfect plane with the knowledge of its eventual use. Unlike other of Miyazaki’s films, this isn’t a children’s film, but a slower-paced, historical work with adult themes. (It’s certainly suitable for younger viewers, but they might miss much of its meaning.) Miyazaki has said this might be his last film, and it is a fine capper to an ouevre that includes Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke. As much as Wind is about Jiro and airplanes, so too is it about creating a legacy. One suspects Miyazaki shares Jiro’s passion to make his mark, as well as the lifedefining drive to capture the impossible: For Jiro, it is to conquer the sky; for Miyazaki, to capture the ethereal beauty of a three-dimensional world in a two-dimensional but still transformative format. Both men owe their success to careful observation of the natural world: Jiro sees a potential plane wing in the curve of a mackerel bone, while Miyazaki’s on-screen tableaux transmit such elusive pleasures as a gentle breeze, the gleam of metal in the sun, and even ash fluttering from the sky. Screening in both dubbed and subtitled versions. SouthSide Works (AH)

REPERTORY ON MY WAY. Leaving behind a failed relationship and a struggling business, a woman (Catherine Deneuve) takes a road trip with her grandson.

In Bloom Emmaneulle Bercot directs this new French dramedy. In French, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 5. Hollywood THE NEVERENDING STORY. A book leads a bullied boy into a fantasy land where he has a chance to be the hero. Wolfgang Petersen directs this 1984 family adventure film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 5. AMC Loews. $5 LOST HIGHWAY. Bill Pullman and Patricia Arquette star in David Lynch’s thriller about a jazz musician who, after being framed for his wife’s murder, gradually morphs into a different man altogether. The 1997 film continues a monthly spotlight series on the films of Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 6;

10:15 p.m. Fri., March 7; 10 p.m. Sat., March 8; and 7 p.m. Sun., March 9. Hollywood THE SECRET OF NIMH. Don Bluth directs this 1982 animated adaptation of the popular children’s novel, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIHM. The story relates the adventures of field animals, including a group of escaped lab rats who, through previous experiments, have become hyper-intelligent. 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Sat., March 8; and 4:30 p.m. Sun., March 9. Hollywood CHARLIE CHAPLIN SHORTS. Three short silent films, newly remastered, directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin, including: “Pay Day” (22 min.), about a worker who tries to have fun after

work; “Sunnyside” (30 min.), in which a farm worker is prone to daydreaming; and “The Idle Class” (32 min), wherein a man is mistaken for a rich woman’s drunken husband. With musical accompaniment. 3 p.m. Sat., March 8, and 3 p.m. Sun., March 9. Oaks SUNSET BOULEVARD. There’s much to recommend Billy Wilder’s noir-ish 1950 drama about faded silent-screen star Norma Desmond and the much younger screenwriter, Joe Gillis (William Holden), who moves into her creepy Hollywood mansion as a kept man. The opening scene is a cracker, as we realize the dead guy floating in the pool is narrating the story; the tale, a searing look at the brutal studio machine, the vagaries of fame

CP

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

Sponsored locally by

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

and assorted pathetic souls who live in half-light of reflected glory, just grows darker. Real-life faded silent-screen star Gloria Swanson unforgettably portrays Desmond, and former silent-film director Erich von Stroheim plays her loyal butler. The classic film opens a month-long, Sunday-night series of popular films that never won an Oscar. 8 p.m. Sun., March 9. Regent Square (AH) BREAKUP AT A WEDDING. After a couple calls off their wedding, they decide to do a sham ceremony to appease relatives. Victor Quinaz directs this new comedy. To be followed by a Q&A with producer/writer Anna Martemucci and writer/ actor Philip Quinaz. 7:30 p.m. Mon., March 10. Hollywood FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent filmmakers includes work by three artists. Ivette Spradlin screens five of her inventive shorts, including “A Lesson in Movement” — a delightful kinesthetic montage made from vintage gymnastics, X-ray and animated anatomical footage — and “Silience,” which combines puppetry and stop-action animation with live circus-style performers like a juggler and a contortionist. The program also features two installments of Chris Lee and Tom Williams’ new Pittsburgh-set web sitcom Internet Famous. The episodes (of 11 and 14 minutes, respectively) revolve around angsty Andrew (played by Trent Wolfred), his sex-pig roomie Dave (Matthew Robison) and their pals. (Think a dirtier Friends and you’re in the ballpark.) Also screening is Jonathan Gribbin’s “Exposures,” an eerie, dialogueless 12-minute psychodrama about a troubled photographer that takes place almost entirely inside a single dimly lit flat, at night. “Exposures” recently won the award for best editing at the 2014 Macon Film Festival, in Macon, Ga. 8 p.m. Tue., March 11 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room. $5. 412-681-9500 (Bill O’Driscoll)

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

The Wind Rises BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE. Stephen Herek directs this 1989 comedy that finds a couple of doofuses, Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves), traveling through time to collect historical personages for a class presentation. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 12. AMC Loews. $5 TIGER TALE IN BLUE. In this new film from Frank V. Ross, a young couple in Chicago struggle to keep their marriage intact as they work separate schedules to stay afloat financially. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 13. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[DANCE]

“THE BAD NEWS IS THAT IT’S US HE’S ACCUSING.”

SECOND SKIN

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SIDRA BELL DANCE NEW YORK performs garment 8 p.m. Fri., March 7, and 8 p.m. Sat., March 8. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org N E W S

+

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

{IMAGE COURTESY OF LONG MARCH SPACE}

The late Guo Fengyi’s “Di^pam!kara”

campaign, along with the American freefor-all in arms dealing, has destabilized an entire nation where the corpse count is now estimated at around 100,000. (Not that it’s done America any good, either — look at our own death toll and bloated prison population.) The marvel of Reyes’ achievement is that while delighting in his life-affirming work, you’d have to be in deep denial not to think about the evil we’ve promulgated.

[ART REVIEW]

Sidra Bell Dance New York rehearses garment.

When choreographer Sidra Bell began work on garment during a residency at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater last July, she thought it would take one of two directions: romantic or violent. It took neither. Instead, she focused on the idea of “being in one’s own skin” and how we wear that like clothing. Bell and her company, Sidra Bell Dance New York, will world-premiere garment March 7 and 8 at the Kelly-Strayhorn. Bell has a growing international reputation, but she’s also a regular on the Pittsburgh scene. She has created works for Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company and the nowdefunct August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble, and has an upcoming piece for Reed Dance. Her globe-spanning résumé notwithstanding, the 34-year-old choreographer says she had no thoughts of premiering garment anywhere but Pittsburgh. “I feel privileged and lucky to create and perform works in Pittsburgh,” says Bell, by telephone from New York. “I think Pittsburgh is really special in the way they embrace new ideas in a trusting way.” The hour-long multimedia dancetheater work for five dancers is set to a collection of avant-garde music curated by Bell, including pieces by French “sound poet” Anne-James Chaton, Alva Noto and Canadian electronic-music composer Tim Hecker. Bell says she explores a host of themes in garment’s 15 “episodes,” including an improvised episode titled “Unfettered” in which, Bell says, “the dancers express pure joy and desire, shedding all constraints and wearing the skin they are in well.” Another episode, about appropriation and recurrence, finds Bell referencing the dance works of the late German choreographer Pina Bausch, especially in the company’s use of gender-shifting costuming. “I like the idea that things keep re-occurring of which we can be or not be aware,” says Bell. “Clothing can be one of the big signals of [memories].” Bell’s past works have revolved around fantasy, distorting her dancers’ physical features via makeup, wigs and garish costumes. With garment, she says, she wanted to take a more neutral approach to the overall look. Still, like her other works, garment will no doubt push the boundaries of the movement qualities of dance — as well as societal comfort. “I like creating an event with my works, not just a dance piece,” says Bell.

LAST THOUGHTS ON THE INTERNATIONAL

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

A

S THE 2013 Carnegie International approaches the fate that .awaits us all, here are a few thoughts that I didn’t get the chance to express — in print, that is.

My favorite work that didn’t win a prize: There’s nothing wrong with awardees Nicole Eisenman and Zanele Muholi, but I’m as impressed by Pedro Reyes’ disarming series, aptly titled “Disarm,” as I was on the day the International opened. Reyes has produced an extensive series of works that does everything I want art to do, plus things I didn’t realize I want art to do. It’s a remarkable synthesis of reinvigorated found objects, unlikely sculptural grace, farfetched music, mechanical-kinetic performativity, and initially subtle yet in-your-face politics. Ingratiating but ultimately accusatory, it might be political art at its most effective, though the bad news is that it’s us he’s accusing. And he’s got a point. The detritus Reyes works with is a miniscule percentage of the weaponry exported to Mexico as a result of the colossal and expensive failure that goes by the name of the “war on drugs.” That TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

Why this?

In any survey exhibition, there will be some art that anyone, I imagine, won’t much respond to. But while there’s an element of subjectivity in appreciating art — and I can see some point to everything in the exhibition — in some cases, I’ve got to wonder. Why choose Sadie Benning’s blame-it-on-the-cellphone paintings, or Wade “Don’t-Lend-Him-YourPrinter” Guyton’s non-Minimalism, when there’s so much else out there?

2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Inclusion is not, as some viewers might assume, a simple matter of the curators’ perception of those somewhat strained ineffables “quality” or “artistic excellence.” Rather, I’m hoping, curatorial choices factor in such intangibles as: the work’s influence on other artists; critical reception; novel process of production; geographical representation; thematic diversity; and art-world consensus.

Longest hike for a limited reward. Tie, both located in the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Mark Leckey’s “Made in ’Eaven” is an homage to or parody of a Jeff Koons balloon-bunny sculpture … or maybe both, now that the art world is enthralled by inflated prices CONTINUES ON PG. 40

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


LAST THOUGHTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

DRAMA DESK AWARD WINNER FOR OUTSTANDING PLAY

MArCh 8–30, 2014 A PROVOCATIVE NEW YORK HIT ABOUT WHAT IT MEANS TO HEAR AND LISTEN

and immune to satire. And with Pierre Leguillon’s installation “Jean Dubuffet Typographer,” you’d have to care a lot more than I do about Koons or Dubuffet to justify so many steps to reach this artabout-art (though if they were keeping company with the main crowd upstairs, I wouldn’t be mentioning them). The trip did remind me that it’s been too long since I explored the depths of the Natural History Museum, however.

[EXHIBIT]

FREEDOM TRAIL {BY ANGELA SUICO}

Holding up better than expected.

INCLUSION IS NOT A SIMPLE MATTER OF THE CURATORS’ PERCEPTION OF “QUALITY” OR “ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE.”

“THE BEST-WRITTEN, BEST-PLOTTED, DEEPEST, MOST DARING — AND FUNNIEST — NEW PLAY IN RECENT YEARS” — THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

Best dead artist(s). Another tie (and why not?). I respond to the Joseph Yoakum “story,” including the fact that he waited until he was in his 70s to start drawing. Moreover, he didn’t overproduce but rather made one or two pieces a day (which doesn’t look as if it took very long) and — typical of self-taught artists — he doesn’t appear to have “improved” with practice, or tried to. The landscapes enchant with their imaginative vision of a world in harmony. Apparently, Chicago Imagist/Hairy Who painters (and spouses) Jim Nutt and Gladys Nilsson think so too, since they own a whopping 21 of the Yoakum drawings on view. Then there’s Guo Fengyi, who took up art at age 45. In addition to the viewing pleasures of a near-psychedelic experience, I’m fascinated by the gap between this art and my understanding; I can’t gauge the presence or absence of art training, of which she had none. Without being told, I’d be willing to bet the farm that Joseph Yoakum was untrained, and I’d never be fooled into thinking that Nicole Eisenman wasn’t art-educated, but I wouldn’t know where to position Guo Fengyi’s art. As Donald Rumsfeld has observed, not knowing — the famous “known unknowns” — is a form of knowledge. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

These touch-screens are a new part of the History Center exhibition From Slavery to Freedom.

Another tie. Phyllida Barlow’s “TIP,” outdoors at the Museum of Art’s Forbes Avenue entryway, still looks pretty festive after a rough enough winter that I was glad my car wasn’t outside. Lara Favaretto’s confetti cubes, held together only by the original compression, were disintegrating rapidly at the outset, when not everyone was resisting the urge to touch. But more preemptive policing kicked in and slowed the disintegration.

New additions to the Heinz History Center exhibit From Slavery to Freedom deepen our insight into what it took for an enslaved person to get free. A food display and digital safehouses are some of the latest features in the award-winning exhibit. The first half of the expanded display explores food and plants that fleeing slaves would have used in their everyday lives. Sweet potatoes, chili peppers, peanuts and okra form colorful colonies against one wall, while a display of illustrated wild plants teaches that runaways had to be careful about their dietary choices — they could eat pokeweed, for example, only if it were cooked. Curator Samuel Black hopes the information will help people appreciate the knowledge and skill required for a successful getaway in those pre-Civil War years. “America was largely still a wilderness” at the time, says Black. “It’s hard to think about that today, because everything’s been taken over with concrete. If you were traveling from southern Virginia at that time, you were not on Interstate 79 or Interstate 77. You didn’t have the aid of streetlights. It was pitch dark. Those are the things that I wanted people to fully realize: If you ran out of food that you brought with you, how do you survive?” The display also visits the Underground Railroad’s safehouses, recreated digitally on touch-screen monitors. Visitors can scroll 360 degrees around the houses, examining places like the Monongahela House, a former Downtown hotel, and items like a printing press and the first black newspaper it produced. They can also watch animated scenes of slave-catchers banging on the door of Dr. Francis LeMoyne, a Washington, Pa.-based abolitionist, and Abraham Lincoln stepping onto the Monongahela House’s balcony to address the crowds below. Black says presenting the information this way killed two birds with one stone. “My challenge was, how do I tell this story to a [contemporary] audience when we don’t have any artifacts related to it? We don’t have some Underground Railroad operative’s lantern or anything like that. What I came up with, especially [for] students, is [using] their technology to tell this story, instead of knocking our heads against the wall, trying to find artifacts or reproductions that they may not relate to. But they should definitely relate to a touch-screen.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM is ongoing. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org


[PLAY REVIEW]

WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORK {BY TED HOOVER}

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Ingrid Sonnichen (left) and Erika Cuenca in Off the Wallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Feminine Ending

and a man. Yet 40 years later, here we are again. And I wonder whether Treem understands that the simple act of writing about that same struggle suggests that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never change. Will we, in a few decades, see a play about Amandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter trying to ďŹ nd her authentic self? But all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rather gloomy compared to the big fun to be had from this production, directed by Matt M. Morrow. Morrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insistence on unadorned playing styles from this company, and his refusal to hit the jokes, is part of what makes this play land so entertainingly. Judging from their very strong performances, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say that the castâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two relative newcomers to Pittsburgh theater, Andrew Wind as Jack and Weston Blakesley as David, are going to be around for a very long time. Shaun Cameron Hall does really terriďŹ c work with the not-entirely-credible character of Billy. Ingrid Sonnichsen as Kim is as powerful as she is because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s managed to make it look effortless. But the play is really a showcase for Erika Cuenca as Amanda, who, in a mammoth performance of intense focus and rock-r ibbe d c onvic t ion , keep s reminding us of the humanity deep inside Treemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compelling script.

PHOTO BY FRANK OCKENFELS | ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DIFFICULT to know whether the melancholy lurking underneath Sarah Treemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Feminine Ending is by the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design, or the result of the baggage we bring to this local premiere at Off the Wall Productions. Treemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story is that of whip-smart composer/musician Amanda Blue, a young woman in New York managing her creativity, her man and her selfdramatizing parents. Amanda has found herself putting her own work on hold to look after the suddenly exploding career of her ďŹ ancĂŠ, Jack, a singer just signed by a major label. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge talent but a hot mess whose emotional neediness sucks up all her energy. Things get worse when Amandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, Kim, calls with the news sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving her husband, David. And while visiting them in their crisis, Amanda meets Billy, her long-lost love from high school. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sounds a little soapy, but for the most part doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play out that way. Treem isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going for melodrama; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking at the primacy of men in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives and wondering whether women can â&#x20AC;&#x153;have it all.â&#x20AC;? Kimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving David because she sees her daughter doing what she did years ago â&#x20AC;&#x201D; abandoning her artistic dream to be a wife and mother â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and hopes she can shock her out of it. The melancholy to which I referred isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the sadness of Amandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quandary; while Treem doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t skate over the storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s angst, she has written a very smart, very funny play with well-spoken, entertaining characters. The melancholy stems from the fact that plays like this still need to be written.

SARAH TREEMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VERY SMART, VERY FUNNY PLAY HAS WELL-SPOKEN, ENTERTAINING CHARACTERS.

A FEMININE ENDING continues through March 15. Off the Wall Productions. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 888-718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.com

In my teens, the ďŹ rst sustained political work I did was in the feminist movement of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s. I recall lots of movies and TV shows â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and reams of print â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about women choosing between a career

OPENS TUESDAY! .BSDIt#FOFEVN$FOUFS TRUST"35403(t#090''*$&"55)&"5&3426"3& t(30614 5*$,&54 

PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


as KMA, were among 130 artists who submitted work to the Market Square Public Art program, a new initiative of the City of Pittsburgh’s Public Art Division, managed by the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. Congregation plays in “one of the city’s most important public spaces,” says Renee Piechocki, director of the Office of Public Art for the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. This also marks the North American premiere of Congregation, which world-premiered in 2010, in Shanghai, and has also been exhibited in numerous U.K. cities as well as Macau.

[ART REVIEW]

TOGETHERNESS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN} AS TECHNOLOGY develops, our everyday

experiences are increasingly mediated, and many activities that used to be solitary are now interactive. While interactivity is often overplayed — giving critics good reason to lament the loss of quiet contemplation — the truth is that technology connects us in astonishing ways. And while it can distract us, making us seem at times antisocial, it can also enhance our social behaviors. Not long ago, experiencing visual art was basically limited to looking. But these days, with pieces like rAndom International’s “Rain Room” and Carsten Höller’s slides, many works presented in museums encourage audience participation. Public art, by inhabiting shared space, inherently involves and engages citizens in their everyday environment. Even static sculpture, placed in a public location, inspires varying degrees of welcome (or unwelcome) attention. But public art too is becoming increasingly interactive.

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL

CONGREGATION

Sound and lights: At left and above, visitors interact with the art installation Congregation, in Market Square.

continues through March 16. Dusk-10 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays, and dusk-midnight Fridays and Saturdays. www.marketsquarepublicart.com

The key to most interactive art is that the experience not be entirely orchestrated or predetermined; it truly requires audience participation. Congregation is an interactive video-and-sound installation on display evenings in Market Square through March 16. It’s conceived by the British artists Kit Monkman and Tom Wexler, who, working

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

BOEING BOEING A comedy written by Marc Camoletti, translated by Beverly Cross and Francis Evans.

MARCH 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 2014 Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

For tickets call (412) 431-0773, visit Dorsey’s Records or Stedeford’s or newhorizontheater@yahoo.com March14th- 7:30PM March 15th- 3PM (Matinee), 7:30PM March 16th- 3PM (Matinee)

Kelly –Strayhorn 5941 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa 15206

KMA creates pieces that explore the potential of new technologies, such as thermal imaging. The artists are inspired in part by the way Fluxus artists created instructions or scores, which could be used by anybody to create a work of art. KMA expands that concept by creating a basic narrative that changes with each presentation based on how the audience responds. KMA has found that participants interact with their work best when there are “provocations” that elicit understanding. With Congregation, KMA provides a 25minute cycle of light projections that plays within a circular space on the ground and is accompanied by Peter Broderick’s musical score. While the video includes discrete sections, the piece exists only when participants, captured by a heat-sensor camera, interact within the circle. By observing a 50foot screen suspended above, people on the ground can watch as the thermal camera spotlights, silhouettes and connects them by lines to others. While the artists perhaps do a bit too much emotional manipulation, their use of twinkling lights, spotlights, converging lines, human silhouettes and sentimental score nonetheless lead both participants and observers to feel a deep sense of community and connection, even among strangers. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


“absolutely RIVETING”

One actor unleashes the Trojan War on-stage.

— San Francisco Chronicle

“theatrical MAGIC” — Variety

STARRING

Teagle F. Bougere ADAPTED FROM

HOMER BY

LISA PETERSON and DENIS O’HARE

CALL

412.316.1600

DIRECTED BY

JESSE BERGER

BUY ONLINE

March 6– April 6

PPT.ORG

O’Reilly Theater

Artist Discussion Dinh Q. Lê Wednesday, March 5, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Join curator Dan Byers as he moderates a discussion between Dinh Q. Lê, Dr. Daniel Lieberfeld (Duquesne University), and Dr. Philip Nash (Penn State University), about the power of images during and after the Vietnam conflict. Free. Cosponsored by Carnegie Mellon University School of Art and Jeff Pan.

Courtesy of the artist & Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

Thursday night admission in March is FREE from 4–8 p.m.

2013 Carnegie International artist talks are sponsored by

Free Thursday nights are made possible by a generous grant from The Jack Buncher Foundation. Normal parking fees apply.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


FOR THE WEEK OF

03.0603.13.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., MARCH 06 {PARTY}

St. Patrick’s Day Beer Tasting Thursday, March 13; 6:30 PM $35 online/$40 at the door Kick-off your St. Patty’s weekend with great local beers and Irish fare!

The act of shushing gets shelved tonight when After Hours @ the Library, a series of Carnegie Library fundraising parties, presents In Pursuit of Music: From Mozart to Gangnam Style at the main branch, in Oakland. Activities explore everything from hip hop and classical to country. Guests can offer Teagle F. Bougere their best rock-star pout in the photo booth, then participate in live-action Trivial Pursuit while sipping drinks from local MARCH 06 watering holes. The event, An Iliad co-presented with Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, is for ages 21 and up. Angela Suico 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., wall shows a man’s face Oakland. $55. 412-622-3114 evolving from sorrow to or www.carnegielibrary.org wonder. Another video, cast by a projector seated on top {STAGE} of a boulder sculpture, shows “Every time I sing this song, two still-life scenes with similar I hope it’s the last time,” subject matter, but with the says The Poet in An Iliad. In objects in each looking slightly Lisa Peterson and Dennis different. The show opens O’Hare’s award-winning 2012 with tonight’s reception. AS adaptation, one performer embodies Achilles, Hector and other Trojan War personages, blending majestic Homeric verse with contemporary language to explore the passions behind warfare ancient and present. Pittsburgh Public Theater’s new production stars Teagle F. Bougere, who’s done Shakespeare and A Raisin in the Sun on Broadway. Director Jesse Berger is a Public favorite (Circle Mirror Transformation); the first performance is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through April 6. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-55. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

+ FRI., MARCH 07 {ART}

Tickets at www.Soergels.com 2573 Brandt School Road - Wexford

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

724-935-1743

for meaning through the experiences of the physical body.” Inspired by the Hanging Man tarot card, a video projected upside down against the

Dream Body, a sculpture and video installation from local artist Blaine Siegel, features works evoking “man’s search

5:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 13. 709 Penn Gallery, 709 Penn Ave. Downtown. Free. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

{DANCE} A world premiere, a Pittsburgh premiere and an old favorite comprise 3x3, from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The world premiere is “In Your Eyes,” renowned Ukrainian-born choreographer Victor Plotnikov’s work for six couples set to Dvorák’s joyous “American” String Quartet No. 12 (performed live). The Pittsburgh premiere is “Ketubah,” Julia Adam’s work for 16 dancers evoking Jewish marriage customs as it follows a couple from first meeting to wedding night. The program closes with “Smoke ’n’ Roses,” Dwight Rhoden’s oft-reprised contemporary-ballet work set to a medley of jazz songs sung by Etta Cox. Tonight’s performance is the first of seven over two weekends at the August Wilson Center.

MARCH 12 Puppet Up: Uncensored


{PHOTO COURTESY OF GREGORY BATARDON}

sp otlight

Swiss contemporary ballet company Ballet du Grand Théâtre de Genève opens its five-city North American tour with its Pittsburgh debut Sat., March 8 at the Byham Theater. Presented by the Pittsburgh Dance Council, the acclaimed 52-year-old company is known for its inventiveness, world-class repertory and virtuosic dancers. Moreover, artistic director Philippe Cohen tells CP via email, “the ballet artists from Genève Ballet are men and women whose sole ambition is to convey emotions to the public.” For its Pittsburgh program, the company will perform two ballets by rising choreographic stars Andonis Foniadakis and Ken Ossola. In Foniadakis’ 2012 ballet “Glory,” set to a rousing score by Handel including his “Dixit Dominus, Coro:Gloria Patri,” the choreographer takes full advantage of Genève Ballet’s dancers’ skills, says Cohen: “The ballet is a whirlwind for the eyes and ears which results in the dancers in a form of trance, magnified by the power of the baroque composer.” Danced to Fauré’s “Requiem,” which the composer described as “a lullaby of death,” Ossola’s 2010 ballet “lamp from a religious temple. The 35-minute ballet’s lush choreography combined with Fauré’s music, says Cohen, “maintains an optimistic notion” of our journey to an unavoidable end. Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Sat., March 8. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ SAT., MARCH 08

set amidst the social tumult of the early 1960s, gets its release party tonight, at East End Book Exchange. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. www. eastendbookexchange.com

{STAGE}

{SCREEN}

In Nina Raine’s lauded play Tribes, Billy, a deaf twentysomething with an outspoken family, falls for a woman who’s losing her hearing. Their relationship casts the act of listening in a new light for everyone. This 2012 offBroadway show won the Drama Desk Award rd for Outstanding play.. Robin Abramson and Tad d Cooley star in City Theatre’s production, which is directed by Stuart Carden and co-produced oduced by Philadelphia Theatre heatre Company. Tonightt is the first performance.. AS 5:30 p.m. Continues ues through March 30. 0. 1300 Bingham St.,, South Side. $15-55. 412-4314312489 or www.city y theatrecompany.org org

Bangledesh, Liberia and Kyrgyzstan are among the nations that elected female heads of state before our own Land of Opportunity. Madame Presidenta: Why Not U.S.? is the new documentary by Heather Arnet. Drawing on her family’ss history of women women’sfamily s

Transatla Transatlantic, Colum McCann’s best-seller mixing fact and best-sell begins with Frederick fiction, b Douglass, British aviators Douglas and Brown and former Alcock a Sen. George Mitchell, all U.S. Sen traveling travelin to Ireland in 1845, 1919 and a 1998 respectively. focus then shifts to the The focu 1860s, when Lily Duggan, w an Irish Iris servant inspired by Douglass, seeks a better Doug life in America, and what wh unfolds ties all of the th characters lives’ together. McCann t appears at Carnegie a Music Hall tonight. M His H talk is part of the Monday Night Lecture Mo Series, Serie presented by Pittsburgh Pittsbur Arts & Lectures. AS p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., 7:30 p.m Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 Oakland www.pittsburghlectures.org or www

N E W S

MARCH 11 Amy Schumer

TUE., MARCH 11 + TU {STAGE} {STAG

The mus musical Once swept the Ton Tonys nyss in 2012. Now its first national nat tional touring production stops at the Benedum Center. Starring Stuart Ward as “Guy”

{PHOTO COURTESY OF PETER YANG}

+

TA S T E

+

MARCH 07

Art by Blaine Siegel

Dream Body

MON., MARCH 10 + MO {WORDS} {WORD

{WORDS} His stories, poemss and essays have been recognized nationally. But Gary Fincke’s new book, How Blasphemy Sounds ds to God, is a first for him: a novel-in-stories that, according to locally ly based publisher Braddock ck Avenue Books, explores “our our capacity for loyalty ty and love as it delves into the he lives of people on the brink of faith.” Fincke, whose ose long list of prizes includes des a Flannery O’Connor or Award, is a professor of creative reati re ative v ve writing at central Pennsylvania’s Susquehanna hanna University. Blasphemy, emy, y

rights activism, Arnet, head of the Pittsburgh-based Women and Girls Foundation, heads to Brazil, where Presidenta Dilma Rousseff leads a rising world power. The hour-long film explores the connections between female economic security, political participation and democracy. Tonight’s special premiere screening, at the Carnegie Museum of Art Theater, is followed by a discussion and dessert reception. BO 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $50. RSVP by March 5 at www.wgfpa.org.

M U S I C

+

Ave., Downtown. $25-80. 412456-4800 or www.trustarts.org

and Dani de Waal as “Girl,” the show centers on an Irish musician, a Czech immigrant and the music they make together as they navigate their relationship. With a book by Enda Walsh and music and lyrics by Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová, the show

{COMEDY}

Comedy Central star Amy Schumer has a cut-to-the-core delivery that contrasts with her blonde appearance. “When I was a little kid, they’d be like,

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK GARVIN}

BO 8 p.m. Continues through March 16. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25.75-65.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

+ WED., MARCH 12 {COMEDY}

MARCH 08 Tribes

features favorites like “Falling Slowly.” A six-date, eightperformance engagement here continues the PNC Broadway Across America Series. AS 7:30 p.m. Continues through March 16. 719 Liberty

S C R E E N

Schumer brings the bluntness when the Inside Amy Schumer’s Back Door Tour stops tonight at Carnegie Music Hall. AS 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $35.5043. 412-622-3131 or www. druskyentertainment.com

+

A R T S

‘Your shoes are ugly.’ And I’d be like, ‘You’re adopted, and your parents haven’t told you yet.’ I’d go from zero to horrible immediately,” she explained in an interview with New York magazine last year.

+

E V E N T S

+

“What would you do if you had a hand up your ass for 40 years?” asks the website for Henson’s Alternative’s Puppet Up: Uncensored. This is an improv-comedy show, for adults only, performed by six puppeteers from The Jim Henson Company. (Yes, that Jim Henson.) Songs, sketches and other ribaldry flow from audience suggestions in a touring production that’s played Scotland’s Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and that the Toronto Globe & Mail called “absurd and highly energetic.” It’s at the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead tonight only. BO 8 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $30-50 (18 and older). 412-368-5225 or www.carnegieconcerts.com

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BOEING, BOEING. A bachelor is

33

SEASONAL CRAFT AND MICROBREW ON TAP

HAPPY HOUR H M MON-FRI 5-7PM HALF OFF APPETIZERS H $$1 off drinks and all 33 drafts THURSDAYS: T

THANKSGIVING FEAST T HAND CARVED TURKEY, SALAD, H F FRESH VEGETABLES, STUFFING A AND MASHED POTATOES

S SATURDAYS: Breakfast and Famous Bloody Mary Bar 8am-noon B

STEAK DINNER NY STRIP, S TBONE and FILET MIGNON T Served w/ salad, vegetable S & choice of potato.

dating 3 stewardesses at the same time, unbeknownst to them. When the airport shuts down, all 3 women are in town, thinking they’ll stay w/ him. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 23. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. A FEMININE ENDING. Amanda has the talent to become a great composer, but her life gets sidetracked by the demands of an almost-famous fiancé, divorcing parents & a rent-paying job writing commercial jingles. Thu-Sat and Sun. Thru March 9. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. THE GREAT ONE. A sports commentator returns to her hometown to mourn a childhood friend, & reminisces about the period of her life between the Pirates’ 1971 World Series win & the death of Roberto Clemente. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru March 9. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown.

ONCE. The story of an Irish AN ILIAD. A new adaptation musician & a Czech immigrant Homer’s epic poem. Presented drawn together by their shared by Pittsburgh Public Theater. love of music. Based on the Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Academy Award-winning film. Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. March 11-13, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Thru April 1. O’Reilly Theater, March 14, 8 p.m., Sat., March 15, Downtown. 412-316-1600. 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., March 16, THE IMPORTANCE 1 & 6:30 p.m. Benedum OF BEING EARNEST. Center, Downtown. Presented by Prime 412-456-6666. Stage Theatre. Fri, TRIBES. Billy, a deaf 8 p.m. and Sun, twenty-something who 2:30 p.m. Thru . www per is adept at lipreading March 16. New Hazlett a p ty pghci m the brash discourse Theater, North Side. .co of his family, falls for a 724-773-0700. woman who’s losing her JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE hearing & everyone is forced A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. to learn a lesson about listening. The courtroom of Judge Sat., March 8, 5:30 p.m., Sun., Jackie Justice is now in session March 9, 7 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., w/ “real” cases involving zombies, Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. spaceships, furries, more. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 30. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, City Theatre, South Side. 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret 412-431-2489. at Theater Square, Downtown. UNEXPECTED BROADWAY: 412-456-6666. A CABARET. Presented by MACDEATH. Interactive murder the Renaissance City Choir. mystery dinner theater. Sat., March 7-8, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., March 8, 6:30 p.m. Cafe Notte, March 9, 3 p.m. East Liberty Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 06 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru April 24 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 07

$$4 local pints

Breakfast Specials Mon-Fri 7-11 am B

FRI 07 - SAT 08

IIn house smoke meats and BBQ Noon-1am N

MONDAYS: M The Ultimate Surf and Turf T

ALL YOU CAN EAT A C CRAB LEGS A AND PRIME RIB 4-11PM 4 T Thick cut dinner served w/salad with hush puppies, french fries & cole slaw p

TUESDAYS: T

1 PRICED GOURMET 1/2 B BURGERS 7 7PM-1AM

LLunch Specials Mon-Fri 11 am- 3 pm Dinner Specials 3pm- 1am D 1 10% OFF ENTIRE MENU Sun-Thu 10PM-1AM S Like us on facebook

CainsSaloon.com

3239 West Liberty Ave. • Pittsburgh, PA 15216 • 412.561.7444

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

SMOKE HOUSE SUNDAYS S

46

COMEDY

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru March 14. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE BRIDGE: STORYTELLING & MUSIC. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DUO SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

S SUNDAYS: Breakfast 8am-noon B

For directions, hours & more visit us online.

Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-345-1722. UTOPIA LIMITED. Gilbert & Sullivan’s story of a princess returning to Utopia from Britain, bringing British Flowers of Progress, who convince the Utopians to embrace capitalism. Presented by the Pittsburgh Savoyards. www.showclix.com/ event/UtopiaLimited Fri, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2:30 p.m. and Thu., March 13, 8 p.m. Thru March 16. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

MISSY MORENO & FRIENDS. March 7-8, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 08

AMISH MONKEYS. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. DEATH SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. KEY PARTY IMPROV. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. CONTINUES ON PG. 48


SAVE-MOR VISUALART

Beer & Pop Warehouse

KARAOKE THURSDAY

S pecial

Come sing your head off at the “Best Party in Town”! 9:30PM to 1:30AM “Fifteen Soldiers,” (detail) by Baron Batch, from Rejuvenate at Gallerie Chiz, in Shadyside

NEW THIS WEEK 3RD STREET GALLERY. Internationally Inspired. A creative response to the 2013 Carnegie International by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Opening reception: March 8, 6-8:30 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. Porous Sediments. Installation by Haylee Ebersole. Opening reception: March 7, 6-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. 709 PENN GALLERY. Dream Body. Video installation by Blaine Siegel. Opening reception: March 7, 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ARTICA. David Gonano. Photography. Opening reception: March 7, 6-9 p.m. Garfield. 412-661-0641. GALLERIE CHIZ. Rejuvenate. Work by Baron Batch & Terry Wise. Opening reception: March 8, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-600f5. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Rarefied Vibes. Work by Alysa Sheats & John Shook. Opening reception: March 7, 6-11 p.m. Garfield. 412-443-0606. PANZA GALLERY. Fractured. Paintings by David Berger. Millvale. 412-821-0959.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Guentner’s Pittsburgh. Work

by James Guentner. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRYANT STREET LIMITED. Nostalgic Pastel Creations. Work by Linda Barnicott. Highland Park. 412-362-2200. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600.

THE GALLERY 4. Dancing Color. Paintings by Marion Di Quinzio. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. JAMES GALLERY. Aspect & Perception. Paintings by Micheal Madigan. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MARKET SQUARE. Congregation. Interactive kinetic video & sound installation by KMA - Kit Monkman & Tom Wexler. Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MINE FACTORY. Drawing/ Paper. Group show exploring CONTINUES ON PG. 48

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

Labatt Blue & Blue Light

25 $2.25

Yuengling ing Bottles

9:30pm-1:30am :30aam OVER 21 ONL ONLY LY

ess 28 pack tle 12 oz. Bottl

1314 EAST CARSON ST.

20.99

SOU TH SID E WWW.D EESCA F E.COM

$

POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

PLUS TAX

Passion

Church Brew Works All Styles

Party March 12, 2014

12 oz. Bottles 24 pack

8PM

28.99

$

Under the Rainbow

Test Drive Your S.E.X. Drive!

PLUS TAX

EFSBTEER! RG LCATIO NO

SELE

$3 S.E.X. On The Beach $2 Domestic Drafts & 50 Cent Wings

4516 BROWNS HILL ROAD

Rusty R t D Dory P Pub b

SQUIRREL HILL NEAR THE WATERFRONT

850 Ohio River Blvd., Avalon Pa. 15202 412-761-1258

412.421.8550 SAVEMORBEER.COM

www.rustydorypub.com +

A R T S

Offer Ends 3/31/14

PITTSBURGH’S

Specials:

S C R E E N

Offer Ends 3/31/14

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SHAUN BLACKHAM, JAY BOC, DAVID KAYE. 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. 724-379-7100. STAND UP COMEDY SHOWCASE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE. 8 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-363-7675.

SUN 09 JOHN EVANS, JEFF KONKLE & RYAN WALKER. Race To the Coffin Comedy Tour Service Industry Sundays Hosted by John Dick Winters. 8 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

Available on tap at:

Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grill

VISUAL ART

Strip District

Winghart’s Burger & Whiskey Bar South Side

$ $

1 Bud Light 1 Well Drinks

Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight Drink Specials!

(Southside Only)

Great Music!

Visit All Of Our Locations

Monroeville Mall • 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620

LIVE DJ @Southside

every Wednesday

winghartburgers.com

Like us on www.facebook/wingharts 48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. PUPPET UP: UNCENSORED. A live comedy, variety show for adults only. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666.

AMY SCHUMER. 8 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3360.

Rural Ridge

WED 12

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

TUE 11

Elwood’s Pub

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

the intersection & boundaries drawing & paper. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Almagamations. Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Book launch of Robert Qualters: Autobiographical Mythologies: March 13, 7 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0455. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. REVISION SPACE. Fugue States. Work by Cy Gavin. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship

14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. South Side. 412-431-1810. SLAUGHTERHOUSE GALLERY. Cemeon Larivonovoff: The Russian Icon Painter. Lawrenceville. 412-782-6474. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. EVENT: Screening 724-797-3302. of Kirsi Jansa’s AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, at First Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, Unitarian Church of film & oral history narratives to Pittsburgh, Oakland explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. CRITIC: 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. , 78, a Large collection of automatic retired teacher roll-played musical instruments from Squirrel Hill and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. WHEN: O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting I’m a member of the First Unitarian Church. One of the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. our principles is the recognition of the interdependent 412-464-4020. web of all existence, so we’re very concerned with the CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. environment. We are attempting to do the best we can Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome for the environment, even when we don’t necessarily (planetarium), Miniature know what [the best course of action] is. I think that Kirsi Railroad and Village, USS Jansa has done an incredible job. One of the things that Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. I really admire about her series, Gas Rush Stories, is that CARRIE FURNACE. Built in she attempts to be very objective and to show both sides 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 of the story. And she does. This isn’t a raging attempt to are extremely rare examples sway everybody to one point of view. She’s showing what of pre World War II ironthe scientists think; she’s showing what the farmers think. making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. She’s showing all facets of the story. To have that kind of CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL creativity and objectivity at the same time is a wonderful HISTORY. Explore the gift. Her work is truly tremendous. complex interplay between B Y ANGE L A SU IC O culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. classes, car & carriage museum. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Garfield. 412-223-7698. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion COMPASS INN. Demos and HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour site features log house, blacksmith tours with costumed guides shop & gardens. South Park. featuring this restored stagecoach this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes 412-835-1554. stop. 724-238-4983. and outdoor activities in the PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. surrounding park. Allison Park. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and University of Pittsburgh Jazz 412-767-9200. exhibits. Includes displays, walking Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the tours, gift shop, picnic area and from the International Hall of other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Trolley Theatre. Washington. Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. 724-329-8501. 724-228-9256. DEPRECIATION LANDS KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY MUSEUM. Small living Tours of a restored 19th& BOTANICAL GARDEN. history museum celebrating century, middle-class Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. the settlement home. Oakmont. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor and history of 412-826-9295. gardens feature exotic plants the Depreciation MARIDON MUSEUM. and floral displays from around Lands. Allison Park. Collection includes the world. Garden Railroad. 412-486-0563. . w w w jade and ivory Dinosaur-themed train display. FALLINGWATER. r citypape h g p statues from China Oakland. 412-622-6914. Tour the famed Frank .com and Japan, as well PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball Lloyd Wright house. as Meissen porcelain. museum & players club. West 724-329-8501. Butler. 724-282-0123. View. 412-931-4425. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN MCGINLEY HOUSE & PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 stained-glass windows. Historic homes open for tours, animals, including many Downtown. 412-471-3436. lectures and more. Monroeville. endangered species. Highland FORT PITT MUSEUM. 412-373-7794. Park. 412-665-3639. Unconquered: History Meets NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original more than 600 birds from over A Reverence for Life. Photos movie props, photographs, 200 species. With classes, lectures, and artifacts of her life & work. & costumes alongside 18th demos and more. North Side. Springdale. 724-274-5459. century artifacts & documents, 412-323-7235. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL comparing & contrasting NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits historical events w/ Hollywood rooms helping to tell the story on the Homestead Mill. Steel depictions. Reconstructed fort of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. industry and community artifacts houses museum of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. from 1881-1986. Homestead. history circa French & Indian 412-624-6000. 412-464-4020. War and American Revolution. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church Downtown. 412-281-9285. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ features 1823 pipe organ, FRICK ART & HISTORICAL HISTORY CENTER. From CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Revolutionary War graves. Scott. Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Clayton, the Frick estate, with 412-851-9212. Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery

Gas Rush Stories

Mary Schinhofen

Fri., Feb. 28

FULL LIST E N O LIN

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

49


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

DANCE FRI 07 - SUN 08

GARMENT. Presented by Sidra Bell Dance New York. March 7-8, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

FRI 07 - SUN 09

3X3. Three distinctive works by three different choreographers. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu., March 13, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 16 August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SAT 08 BALLET DU GRAND THÉÂTRE DE GENÈVE. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS THU 06 6TH ANNUAL PANCAKES IN THE P.M. Benefits the East End Cooperative Ministry. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Pamela’s, Strip District. 412-361-5549.

FRI 07 AFTER HOURS AT THE LIBRARY: IN PURSUIT OF MUSIC: FROM WOLFGANG TO GANGNAM STYLE. Unique activities celebrating various genres of music, live-action Trivial Pursuit, photo booth, silent auction, live music, more. 7-10 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-578-2586. COCKTAILS & CONSERVATION: AN EVENING TO CELEBRATE AND SUPPORT THE PRESERVATION

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

[LITERARY]

FRI 07

Iss itt for the sake of their motheer thhat the girlls yearrn for the speedy arriival of theeir father’s motorbboat?? Or peerhhaps it is because they longg foor the giftss he will brring them m: crescent shaped combs, goldd colored slippers or wondeerful smelling shampooos in diffeerent colors. And faabriic, of couursee, that theirr motherr would sew w into dressess that fluutteer in the winnd.

— EXCERPT FROM THE SMELL OF FLOWERS AND SALT BY MONIRU RAVANIPUR (C) THE AUTHOR; TRANSLATED BY ASSURBANIPAL BABILLA / EDITED BY DESIREE COOPER. COURTESY OF SAMPSONIAWAY.ORG

The Iranian author will read at The Ellis School

Women of Courage Speaker Series, 6:30 p.m. Thu., March 6

as part of its

(6425 Fifth Ave., Shadyside), and at City of Asylum, 7 p.m. Fri., March 7 (330 Sampsonia Way, North Side). Visit www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org/events for information and to register.

OF MAXO VANKA’S MILLVALE MASTERPIECE. Showcasing the progress of the restoration & cleaning of 22 murals & preview of the next phase of conservation. 5:30 p.m. St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church, Millvale. 412-407-2570.

SAT 08 JCC’S BIG NIGHT: GAME ON. Music, dancing, auction, more. 7:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. RACE TO ANY PLACE. Stationary bike race benefiting the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 8 a.m.2 p.m. Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock. 412-395-2876.

SUN 09 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 06 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students.

Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. IN THIS VALLEY. Paintings & poetry reading by Bernadette Kazmarski. 7 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. MONIRU RAVANIPUR. The Iranian writer will speak about her life & read excerpts from her work. Part of City of Asylum’s 2014 Woman of Courage Residency. 6:30-7:30 p.m. The Ellis School, Shadyside. 412-323-0278. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

MONIRU RAVANIPUR. The Iranian writer will read from a work-in-progress. Part of City of Asylum’s 2014 Woman of Courage Residency. 7 p.m. City of Asylum, North Side. 412-323-0278.

SAT 08 GARY FINCKE BOOK LAUNCH. Reading, discussion & book signing w/ the author of How Blasphemy Sounds to God. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 09 BOOK SIGNING & TALK W/ MARY FRAILEY CALLAND. Author of Consecrated Dust, A Novel of the Civil War North. 2-4 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

MON 10

COLUM MCCANN. Part of the Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

TUE 11 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

KIDSTUFF THU 06

OTAKU LEBO. For middle & high school students who are ardent fans of anime, manga & J-pop culture. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

THU 06 - FRI 07 STUDIO PROGRAM: SAND. Thru March 7, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 06 - SUN 09 DISNEY ON ICE: 100 YEARS OF MAGIC. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m., Fri., March 7, 7 p.m., Sat., March 8, 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m. and Sun., March 9, 1 & 5 p.m. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000.

THU 06 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s


Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PRINTMAKING. Thru March 15, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 08 CELEBRATE! NATURAL BEAUTY. Make natural lip balm, snacks from Phipps’ gardens, more. Ages 6-9. 1-3 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. THE DUMBEST IDEA EVER! BOOK RELEASE EVENT. Presentation w/ children’s author/ cartoonist Jimmy Gownley. 1 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY: PINCH POT CRITTERS. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

& Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PENNY ARCADE: IMPROV COMEDY FOR KIDS. 1 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 08 SUN 09

ALADDIN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru March 16 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

OUTSIDE SAT 08 WAGMAN OBSERVATORY WINTERFEST STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of www. per Pittsburgh. 4 p.m. pa pghcitym Wagman Observatory, .co Tarentum. 724-224-2510.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

TUE 11

MON 10 LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FIRST GARDEN. Unravel a seed to explore its insides, learn what a plant needs to survive, more. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru March 31 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

MON 10 - WED 12 ROLLED STAMP MAKING. March 10-14, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 11

MOVE W/ ME. Ages 3-4. Second Tue of every month, 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. & 1-2:30 p.m. Thru May 13 Phipps Conservatory

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 12 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 06 ALL ABOUT THE SCHEDULE D. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. ANTIQUES APPRAISAL DAY. 4-8 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. ARTHRITIS & AGRICULTURE FORUM. 3-5 p.m. Arthritis

Foundation, Green Tree. 412-250-3343. CHRISTINE MARIE: A ONE-WOMAN SHOW. 11 p.m. There Ultra Lounge, Downtown. 412-508-3393. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5:30-8 p.m. Steel Cactus, Shadyside. 412-392-4513. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN. Thu, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 27 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. OLD FASHIONEDS CLASS. 6-8 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM

SOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm. 1$ OFF ALL CRAFT BREWS! (Pineapple-Berry & Espresso Vodkas. Mango-Chili Pepper & Strawberry-Jalapeno Tequilas. Peach & Apple-Cinnamon Rums. Bacon Bourbon.) 8 1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F OR BR A IN I M AG I N G S T U D IES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks. Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WINE SCIENCE: THE SOIL EFFECT. 6 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. 412-391-1709.

THU 06 - SUN 09 6TH ANNUAL KINKS, LOCKS & TWISTS CONFERENCE. Environmental & reproductive justice conference. Presented by New Voices Pittsburgh. March 6-9. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-450-0290.

FRI 07 1-ON-1 CONVERSATION W/ JEAN GRAE. Conversation with Jasiri X w/ a performance by Yah Lioness & a selection from The Paradise Gray Collection, Ladies First: Women in Hip Hop. 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. FIRST STEP PROGRAM: MECHANICS OF STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS. Mervis Hall. 7:30-10 a.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-648-1542. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. MAKING BITTERS. 6-8 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. First Fri of every month, 7-11 p.m. Thru Nov. 7 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

FRI 07 - SAT 08 RUMMAGE/BAKE SALE. March 7-8, 8-11 a.m. East Union Presbyterian Church. 724-265-1381.

SAT 08 GETTING CONNECTED: BASIC EMAIL. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. KICKOFF CEILI. Live music, set & ceili dancing, raffles, more. 7 p.m. Teamster Temple, Lawrenceville. 412-487-7941. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean &

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

[ART]

Art by Maxo Vanka {PHOTO COURTESY OF SAM IUSI}

The effort to save and restore one of Pittsburgh’s artistic treasures has a ways to go, but it’s making progress. This Friday, help The Society to Preserve

the Millvale Murals of Maxo Vanka mark the cleaning of six of Vanka’s landmark 22 murals in St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church, and look forward to the next phase of conservation and lighting. Vanko’s stunning murals excoriate war and greed, but relax: Cocktails & Conservation is a party, including drinks, hors d’oeuvres and dessert. 5:30 p.m. Fri., March 7. 24 Maryland Ave., Millvale. $50-100. event@vankamurals.org

are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MADAME PRESIDENTA: WHY NOT U.S.? — VAMOS MENINAS! Documentary screening exploring women being elected to presidency & discusses the lessons Brazil & similar nations offer to countries that have yet to elect a female president, including the United States. Q&A w/ director to follow. 8 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-434-4883. MAPLE SUGARING WORKSHOP. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SMALL BUSINESS BASICS WORKSHOP. 8 a.m. PNC YMCA, Downtown. 412-395-6560 x 130. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117.


SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TEQUILA & MARGARITA CLASS. 4 p.m. Verde, Garfield. 412-404-8487. WOMEN DURING THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR. Speaker: Dr. Clarissa Confer. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

Center for Women, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4400. THE FIFTH DOMAIN: FREEDOM & POWER IN THE DIGITAL AGE. The World Affairs Council & one of Google’s leading executives discuss how we define freedom & power in a new era & what it means to be connected in today’s world. 6:30 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SAT 08 - SUN 09 HARMONY MUSEUM QUILT & COVERLET SHOW. Heritage quilts & coverlets from museum & private collections. March 8-9 Harmony Museum, Harmony. 888-821-4822. PARENTING EXPO PITTSBURGH. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., March 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-373-7300.

SUN 09

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

GLCC

The Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh works to provide local LGBT residents and their families with support and resources. As a volunteer-run organization, the GLCC is always in need of help. Current needs include OUTreach team members and front-desk volunteers; folks are also invited to help sort blankets, coats and other items as part of the Winter Gear Drive. Visit www.glccpgh.org for information or to sign up.

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE Weekly letter writing event. AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, South Side. 412-431-5282. Oakland. 412-683-3727. SPIRITED SESSIONS: ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. GRAPE SPIRITS. 6 p.m. Second and Third Sun Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. of every month, 2-3 p.m. 412-391-1709. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CONGREGATION TALKS. CLASSES. Sun, 5 p.m. Thru The Office of Public Art April 6 Wilkins School will explain the Congregation Community Center, Swissvale. installation. Mon-Wed, 412-661-2480. 7:30 p.m. Thru March 12 CHINESE FOR Market Square, Downtown. BEGINNERS. Second and 412-391-2060 x 237. Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. AFFORDABLE CARE ACT 412-622-3151. INFORMATION SESSION. ESSENTIAL OILS 5:30-7:30 p.m. The AKA NATURE’S Center for Women, MEDICINE. Squirrel Hill. Presented by the 412-421-4400. Theosophical Society w. w w ARTISTS MEETUP. in Pittsburgh. er hcitypap g p Share project ideas Room 103 of .com & support each Woodland Hall. other’s efforts. Fine 1:30 p.m. Chatham artists, photographers, bloggers, University, Shadyside. poets, comic book artists, 412-365-1100. illustrators & musicians welcome. 7 p.m. TechShop, East Liberty. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. BEGINNER ITALIAN. A support group for women Tue, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru 30+. Second and Fourth March 25 Wilkins School Mon of every month Community Center, Swissvale. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-478-2681. CAREGIVING SERIES. BOARD GAME NIGHT. Learn how to care for For high school students & yourself while caring for adults. Every other Tue, 7 p.m. a relative or friend. Mon, Thru March 25 Mount Lebanon 1 p.m. Thru March 31. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Mount Lebanon Public Library, 412-531-1912. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. GERMAN CONVERSATION Fourth and Second Tue of CLUB. Second Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. and every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Fourth Mon of every month, Anchorpoint Counseling 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru April 28 Ministry. 412-366-1300. Carnegie Library, Oakland. DO WHAT YOU ARE: 412-622-3151. DISCOVER YOUR IDEAL GERMAN CONVERSATION CAREER BY UNDERSTANDING GROUP. Every other Mon, YOUR PERSONALITY TYPE. 7:30 p.m. Thru March 24 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The

MON 10 - WED12

TUE 11

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MON 10

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

THE HISTORY OF TREE OF LIFE* OR L’SIMCHA CONGREGATION. w/ David Dinkin. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: ONCE. Pre-performance information session w/ theater critic, Chris Rawson. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

REAL PEOPLE REAL DESIRE REAL FUN

Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for The Crucible. March 29-30. Actors ages 11+, 1-min. dramatic dialogue. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-254-4633. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. Auditions for Jesus Christ Superstar in Concert. March 22-23. Seeking Principal Singing Roles, Male & Female Dancer/Singers Ensemble, & the Superstar Choir. www.centerauditions.org/ index.php/professional-company/ jesus-christ-superstar Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. 724-259-6443. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MONYOUGH COMMUNITY SINGERS. Seeking singers of all ages, especially baritones & basses. www.mycsingers.com 814-460-1731.

CHATLINE TM

412.566.1861 Try for FREE

Ahora en Español

For More Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000

www.livelinks.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 54

Teligence/18+

WED 12 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Every other Wed, 7 p.m. Thru March 26 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LIVING & LEARNING: INTERFAITH COUPLES/ FAMILIES. 7 p.m. Temple David, Monroeville. 412-372-1200. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. TAMING TEMPERS: ANGER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR CHILDREN & PARENTS. 6:30 p.m. Mount

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

[COMEDY]

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

RHYTHM HOUSE MUSIC GROUP. Auditions for the Summer Music Fest at Monogahela Aquatorium. March 8. Open to singers & performers of all genres. www.eventbrite.com/e/openauditions-calling-all-genrestickets-10350461509?aff=efbevent Paradise Bar. 724-305-0669. SOUTH PARK THEATRE. Auditions for the 2014 season. March 15. Prepare & bring music for 24 bars of song, cold readings from the script or monologue. Call for more information. Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE THEATRE FACTORY. Auditions for Polyester the Musical. March 16. Equity & non-Equity, 3 men & 2 women ages 20-60. Prepare 32 bars of music & 2 min. comedic monologue, be prepared to dance. tfauditions@gmail.com. 724-454-7193.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH

PITTSBURGH’S MOST

EXCLUSIVE GENTLEMAN’S CLUB 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking At least one Arizona politican “actually poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical compared homosexuality to cannibalism … in the everyday for Blast Furnace human sacrifice … and bestiality,” recalls Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. . “You know, Visit blastfurnace.submittable. I’ll give her cannibalism. That other stuff is com/Submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. just mean.” Westenhoefer began her two-plus THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking decades in standup as one of America’s first performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. out lesbian comics. Her new tour hits Cruze this For more information, email Friday. 8 p.m. Fri., March 7. 1600 Smallman St., thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. Strip District. $20-25. www.showclix.com/event/ 412-403-7357. THE GALLERY 4. Seeking SuzanneWestenhoefer submissions for Salon Show 2014. Send image files of up to 5 finished pieces to thegallery4@gmail.com. Include Presbyterian Church, March 16. Bring three works title, dimensions, & medium(s) East Liberty. 412-731-0636. of art in the same medium, & write SALON APPLICANT THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY 2D or 3D. Drop off 12:302014 in the subject line. FOUNDATION’S TEENS 4 1 p.m., pick up 3-4 p.m. Deadline: March 22. Call CHANGE GRANT PROGRAM. pittsburghsocietyofartists.org or email for info. Shadyside. Accepting proposals for Thru Pittsburgh Center 412-363-5050. youth-led projects or projects for the Arts, Shadyside. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY designed specifically for 412-361-0873. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking youth that promote social PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR submissions in all genres change including disability rights, SOCIETY. Seeking for fledgling literary LGBTQ rights, peace/human entries for 68th magazine curated rights, racial justice, more. Grants Annual International by members of the will range from $250-$2,000. Aqueous Open Hour After Happy trcfwpa.org/grants/grantexhibition. www. Hour Writing www. per applications 412-243-9250. pittsburghwater Workshop. a p pghcitym WASHINGTON PA FILM colorsociety.com afterhappyhour .co FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. PITTSBURGH review.com or less. Complete rules & entry WATERCOLOR OLD ECONOMY form at www.highlandridgecdc. SOCIETY NEW MEMBER VILLAGE. Seeking vendors to org. 724-678-4225. SCREENING. Screening sell plants & products at the WESTMORELAND ART March 23. New members annual Garden Mart. For more NATIONALS. Submit up to must register to be considered info & registration, call or email 4 pieces for upcoming juried for membership. Drop off c-mdemars@pa.gov. Ambridge. art exhibition, 2-D & 3-D art works at 1 p.m. & return 724-266-4500 x 114. eligible. See website for entry for pickup at 3 p.m. www. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF form. www.artsandheritage.com pittsburghwatercolor ARTISTS NEW MEMBERS 724-834-7474. society.com East Liberty SCREENING. Screening

Suzanne Westenhoefer

FULL LIST ONLINE


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Straight female with a question about something I’ve never really told anyone about, because it’s so weird and gross. After I have a bowel movement, I pull up my jeans. When I do that, the crotch seam presses on my clit as I begin to close the zipper, and I get what I can only describe as an intense mini-orgasm. This is directly related to the recent BM because it happens only after one. It’s not really a full-on climax, rather just a dozen or so fast and strong fluttering contractions of pleasure right in my clit/pussy area. I find myself enjoying these post-poop-gasms, although it’s something I’ve kept to myself. I want to know if you’ve ever heard of this, and why and how it happens. POSSIBLY ODD OR PERHAPS CURIOUS ORGASM MOSTLY ENJOYED REGULARLY

I shared your letter with Dr. Debby Herbenick, a research scientist at Indiana University, a sexualhealth educator at the Kinsey Institute, and the author of Great in Bed and numerous books about sexuality. Dr. Herbenick’s short answer: “Genitals are magical, mysterious places of wonder.” Her more satisfying long answer: “There are other documented cases of people having orgasms while pooping. ‘Defecation-induced orgasms’ seem to be more common than orgasms from peeing, but both kinds happen.” But why and how do they happen? “It’s not entirely clear, but here are some possibilities,” said Dr. Herbenick. “The pelvic nerve — which is one orgasmic pathway — links up to not only the vagina and cervix, but also the rectum and bladder. Another possibility is something called nerve ‘crosstalk.’ In essence, the genital and excretory parts are smooshed closely together, and some nerves (like the pelvic nerve) service more than one part. Thus, feelings and messages carried in the nerves can get muddled. Some people can have vaginal pain from bladder problems. Similarly, people describe genital orgasms from stimulation of nearby parts, and nerve crosstalk is thought to be part of that.” (Want to shut up an “intelligent design” creationist? Ask them to defend the smooshing together of our excretory and reproductive systems — after making them Google “obstetric fistula.”) “POOPCOMER doesn’t have to like the fact that she orgasms from pooping,” said Dr. Herbenick, “but it’s better than unintentionally pooping during orgasm. That also happens.” Follow Dr. Herbenick on Twitter @DebbyHerbenick. You always take questions from BDSMers and cuckolds and other hardcore sexers, but won’t you offer some advice for me, a simple heterosexual girl? My boyfriend always locks the door behind him when he pees. It hurts my feelings! Being a part of his pissing experience would turn me on! He claims he is pee-shy. But he pees in public restrooms in front of other men! So if he knows I like it, and the issue isn’t about being pee-shy, why is he “NO GIRLS ALLOWED” about this?!? PERSONALLY INSULTED SINCE SEXY ENTRANCE DENIED

You’re just a simple heterosexual girl who wants to be part of her boyfriend’s “pissing experi-

ence” — nothing kinky about that, no sir. You’re just after some old-fashioned, all-American voyeuristic piss play. I’m not sure there’s anything I could say that would persuade your boyfriend. If knowing that it would make his girlfriend insanely horny doesn’t motivate a guy to unlock the door, he’s unlikely to be convinced by some gay dude with an advice column. (Just in case: Hey, PISSED’s BF! Open the damn door!) If watching your boyfriend piss is that important, you’ll have to get a new boyfriend or start following this one into public restrooms.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

My 13-year-old stepson leaves his spooch on the goddamn toilet seat. How do I tell him to clean up after himself? I don’t know how he gets it on the toilet seat! Logistically, it baffles me! Step-Parent Ain’t Not Kleaning Spooch That word you keep using — spooch — I don’t think it means what you think it means. Spooch is not slang for ejaculate. The word you want is spooge. And I don’t think your sign-off means what you think it means, either. Putting a “not” after that “ain’t” means you’re anxious to clean your stepson’s spooge off that toilet seat. On to your questions … Your stepson faces the toilet seat as he would when he pees and has himself a wank. He thinks he’s destroying the evidence when he flushes, but he’s obviously missing the drop or two that land on the toilet seat. Teenage boys are not famous for their attention to detail, or for cleaning up after themselves. Replacing your white toilet seat with a black one might help your stepson notice that flushing isn’t enough. Your stepson’s father should have a talk with him. “You’re making a mess of the toilet seat,” his dad should say. “Put the seat up and wipe it off when you’re through.” If your stepson protests that he’s careful when he pees, his dad should tell him that he’s not talking about piss. That poor kid will be so mortified that he’ll blow loads out the window before he masturbates in the bathroom again. I’m a straight girl and I’ve been dating this great guy for a few months. Our sex life is really satisfying, due in no small part to the fact that he has a lot of kinks. He has a thing for scat, though, and that has thrown me for a loop. He doesn’t expect me to engage in poop play, but I know he watches this kind of porn and it freaks me out. Would you break up with someone due to one extremely squicky kink?

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

SO NOT INTO POOP

I would and I have. NOTE: A copy editor has gleefully informed me that Urban Dictionary defines “spooch” as “semen” or “a man’s climax.” But while I have the utmost respect for the modern-day Samuel Johnsons at Urban Dictionary, I refuse to acknowledge “spooch” as a synonym for semen or the male climax. On the Lovecast, Dan speaks with the Perverted Negress about meeting polite kinksters online: savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.05-03.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 1997 film Austin Powers, International Man of Mystery, the lead character announces that “‘Danger’ is my middle name.” Ever since, real people in the U.K. have been legally making “Danger” their middle name with surprising regularity. I think it would be smart fun for you Pisceans to add an innovative element to your identity in the coming days, maybe even a new middle name. But I recommend that you go in a different direction than “Danger.” A more suitable name might be “Changer,” to indicate you’re ready to eagerly embrace change. Or how about “Ranger,” to express a heightened desire to rove and gallivant?

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you between jobs? Between romantic partners? Between secure foundations and clear mandates and reasons to get up each morning? Probably at least one of the above. Foggy whirlwinds may be your intimate companions. Being up-in-the-air could be your customary vantage point. During your stay in this weird vacationland, please abstain from making conclusions about its implications for your value as a human being. Remember these words from author Terry Braverman: “It is important to detach our sense of self-worth from transitional circumstances, and maintain perspective on who we are by enhancing our sense of ‘self-mirth.’“ Whimsy and levity can be your salvation, Aries. Lucky flux should be your mantra.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma once came to the home of computer pioneer Steve Jobs and performed a private concert. Jobs was deeply touched, and told Ma, “Your playing is the best argument I’ve ever heard for the existence of God, because I don’t really believe a human alone can do this.” Judging from the current astrological omens, Taurus, I’m guessing you will soon experience an equivalent phenomenon: a transcendent expression of love or beauty that moves you to suspect that magic is afoot. Even if you are an atheist, you are likely to feel the primal shiver that comes from having a close brush with enchantment.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In my dream, I was leading a pep rally for a stadium full of Geminis. “Your intensity brings you great pleasure,” I told them over the publicaddress system. “You seek the company of people who love you to be inspired. You must be appreciated for your enthusiasm, never shamed. Your drive for excellence doesn’t stress you out, it relaxes you. I hereby give you license to laugh even louder and sing even stronger and think even smarter.” By now the crowd was cheering and I was bellowing. “It’s not cool to be cool,” I exulted. “It’s cool to be burning with a white-hot lust for life. You are rising to the next octave. You are playing harder than you have ever played.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “My old paintings no longer interest me,” said the prolific artist Pablo Picasso when he was 79 years old. “I’m much more curious about those I haven’t done yet.” I realize it might be controversial for me to suggest that you adopt a similar perspective, Cancerian. After all, you are renowned for being a connoisseur of old stories and past glories. One of your specialties is to keep memories alive and vibrant by feeding them with your generous love. To be clear, I don’t mean

that you should apologize for or repress those aptitudes. But for now — say, the next three weeks — I invite you to turn your attention toward the exciting things you haven’t done yet.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I recommend that you sleep with a special someone whose dreams you’d like to blend with yours. And when I say “sleep with,” I mean it literally; it’s not a euphemism for “having sex with.” To be clear: Making love with this person is fine if that’s what you both want. But my main point is that you will draw unexpected benefits from lying next to this companion as you both wander through the dreamtime. Being in your altered states together will give you inspiration you can’t get any other way. You won’t be sharing information on a conscious level, but that’s exactly the purpose: to be transformed together by what’s flowing back and forth between your deeper minds. For extra credit, collaborate on incubating a dream. Read this: http://tinyurl.com/dreamincubation.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

“One chord is fine,” said rock musician Lou Reed about his no-frills approach to writing songs. “Two chords are pushing it. Three chords and you’re into jazz.” I recommend his perspective to you in the coming weeks, Virgo. Your detailoriented appreciation of life’s complexity is one of your finest qualities, but every once in a while — like now — you can thrive by stripping down to the basics. This will be especially true about your approach to intimate relationships. For the time being, just assume that cultivating simplicity will generate the blessings you need most.

I’m guessing that in the coming weeks your default mode should be more akin to dancing than wrestling. The cosmos has decided to grant you a grace period — on one condition, that is: You must agree to experiment more freely and have more fun that you normally allow yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the itch you are experiencing, neither chamomile nor aloe vera will bring you relief. Nor would over-the-counter medications like calamine lotion. No, Sagittarius. Your itch isn’t caused by something as tangible as a rash or hives, and can’t be soothed by any obvious healing agent. It is, shall we say, more in the realm of a soul itch — a prickly tickle that is hard to diagnose, let alone treat. I’m guessing that there may be just one effective cure: Become as still and quiet and empty as you possibly can, and then invite your Future Self to scratch it for you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The world is awash in bright, shiny nonsense. Every day we wade through a glare of misinfor-

mation and lazy delusions and irrelevant data. It can be hard to locate the few specific insights and ideas that are actually useful and stimulating. That’s the bad news, Capricorn. Here’s the good news: You now have an enhanced ability to ferret out nuggets of data that can actually empower you. You are a magnet for the invigorating truths you really need most.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you come up with an original invention, apply for a patent immediately. If you think of a bright idea, put it to work as soon as possible. If you figure out crucial clues that everyone else seems blind to, dispel the general ignorance as quickly as you can. This is a perfect moment for radical pragmatism carried out with expeditious savvy. It’s not a time when you should naively hope for the best with dreamy nonchalance. For the sake of your mental health and for the good of your extended family, be crisp, direct and forceful. What were the circumstances in which you were most dangerously alive? FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You Librans haven’t received enough gifts, goodies and compliments lately. For reasons I can’t discern, you have been deprived of your rightful share. It’s not fair! What can you do to rectify this imbalance in the cosmic ledger? How can you enhance your ability to attract the treats you deserve? It’s important that we solve this riddle, since you are entering a phase when your wants and needs will expand and deepen. Here’s what I can offer: I hereby authorize you to do whatever it takes to entice everyone into showering you with bounties, boons and bonuses. To jumpstart this process, shower yourself with bounties, boons and bonuses.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The art of living is more like wrestling than dancing,” wrote the Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius more than 1,800 years ago. Is that true for you, Scorpio? Do you experience more strenuous struggle and grunting exertion than frisky exuberance? Even if that’s usually the case,

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

57


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 58 + STUDIES 59 + WELLNESS 60 + LIVE 62 + SERVICES 62

WORK HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

JOB OPPORTUNITIES Longwall Coal Miners: New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois. Submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results!

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Lincoln Heritage

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

The Miles Group Now Hiring Agents & Manager!! • Make $1,000 a week to start. • The Miles Group is the only Million Dollar a Month Agency. • We will help you get your insurance license, will train. • You can write your own paycheck. • First Year Agents making over 100K! • Get paid Daily $$ • Proven Lead System. • Competitive group benefits: life, health, and dental for you and your family. Call or email resumes NOW! Darrell Warden Hiring Manager 412-583-8763 wardeninsurance@aol.com

ECM Transport is NOW HIRING Regional Road & Local Drivers (10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour (20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

www.tmilesgroup.com

Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Longwall Coal Miners New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois.

OPEN HOUSE/JOB FAIR March 12, 2014 9am – 11am or 5pm – 7pm 1640 Golden Mile Highway Monroeville, PA. 15146

Call to confirm by Monday, March 10, 2014 Marketing Positions – (412) 539-5792 Sales Positions – (412) 888-6448 Installer Positions – (724) 519-4320

A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

APPLY TODAY: Qualified Applicants please submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


Ink Well

STUDIES

HOUSE ADDITIONS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

ACROSS

46. One at the wheel of a gherkinmobile? 1. Fuel for 51. “The Da Vinci some prop planes 6. Fuel for some trips? Code” group 54. Top-shelf 9. King’s orders, e.g. 55. Oversaw 14. Actress Jovovich 56. Org. in which in a whole lot of “Resident Evil” movies “everybody played with a gay teammate,” 15. Prince per Charles Barkley William’s head 58. Uncaged 16. Behind 61. “All right, y’all, 17. Commerce on the World Wide Web let’s get in the 18. Treat for a solstice old-fashioned horseparty with an image of drawn carriage!” 65. Snarky Gaia drawn in icing? 66. “The L Word” 20. Sports org. creator Chaiken headquartered in 67. “Hey-oh, Daytona Beach keep the urologic 22. Chest muscle, details to yourself” casually 68. Saturn’s 23. GOP electoral largest moon map color 69. Rain delay sheets 24. ___ Valley 70. Superman (Reagan Library city) villain General ___ 25. Trig function 71. Derives (from) 28. Live video of the 2008 presidential runner-up going 1. “Preach on” about his daily life? 2. CV part 32. Rhythm 3. Collectible holder guitarist James on 4. Keys of Jay Z’s “Siamese Dream” “Empire State of Mind” 33. Tragic 5. Chorizo relative supermodel Carangi 34. “Taps” instrument 6. Letters for some 38. The pairs of letters accounting firms 7. Bar in the shower inserted into each of 8. Folded corner, this puzzle’s theme answers, for example as it were 9. Last word of a 43. Random, as French film an occurrence 44. Continental state 10. Forbes alternative 11. Company that where Sarah Palin created Paperboy was born: Abbr. 45. “What ___ gonna 12. Like some black guys on TV wear to this thing?

13. King Carl XVI Gustaf, e.g. 19. Yard size, say 21. One of two living Fab Four members 26. Baja spring break destination, for short 27. Pleased with oneself 28. Peeve 29. Blacken 30. Go against one’s god 31. Language from which “mongoose” and “patchouli” come 35. Elvis’s is at Graceland 36. Wack 37. Islamic prince 39. “They was watchin ‘Yo! MTV Raps’ / What’s the ___ on the craps?”: Ice Cube 40. “Just playin’”

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

41. Gushing poem 42. Rival of Federer and Djokovic 47. Copper coin value 48. Chew the fat 49. Coop units? 50. Part of the plot 51. Path in space 52. Deen of winceinducing language 53. Felix of “The Odd Couple” 57. Clip contents 59. Coated cheese, or the town from which it comes 60. Man caves, perhaps 62. Fast-rising fig. in China 63. Genesis contemporary 64. The end of Ramadan (Oct. 4, this year)

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

59


WELLNESS MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Downtown Massage

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

412-401-4110

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor) Open 24 hours/7 days a week

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

Chinese Bodyworks

412-595-8077

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Forever Relaxation Chinese Bodywork

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Your ad could be here

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Wellness Center

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

JADE Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

412.316.3342

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Xin Sui Bodyworks

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Grand Opening

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

Grand Opening

massage Therapy

MIND & BODY

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014


SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

WE SPECIALIZE IN

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

Let Us Help You Today!

Recovery Without Judgement™

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

M U S I C

+

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

+

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

C L A S S I F I E D S

61


SERVICES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

62

AUTO SERVICES

CLASSES

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.05/03.12.2014

GENERAL FOR SALE NO CREDIT CHECK for NEW TVs, Tablets, Appliances, Xbox, Jewelry and more. Guaranteed Approval. go to: www.tronixcountry. com/print Enter Code 56C for FREE GIFT w/ paid purchase (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

HEALTH SERVICES Get Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for Addiction Treatment. Alcohol Abuse. Drug Addiction. Prescription Abuse. Call Now 855-577-0234 Rehab Placement Service. Advertise Here Today!

Your ad could be here

ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

SOUTH FOR RENT

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

A DO P T I O N

1-866-429-0222

STORAGE

Advertise Here Today!

ADOPTION

for your NEWBORN: A baby is a gift to treasure. I can provide your baby a secure life and uncoditional love. Expenses Paid Call anytime Maria

LIVE

412.316.3342

Newly renovated Apartment in Mount Washington overlooking city. 5 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, w/d hookups. Stove and refrigerator. $1,800 per Month gas and water included. No pets. Call John 412-580-6550

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper


PITTSBURGH POLICE {BY AL HOFF}

THE SET- AND shot-in-Pittsburgh crime series Those Who Kill premiered this week on

A&E (Mondays, at 10 p.m.). The 10-part serial was adapted from a Danish TV show, and stars Chloe Sevigny as newish police detective Catherine Jensen, and James D’Arcy as a forensic psychologist. Episode 1 was very pilot-like, with a self-contained serial-killer story (that guy was easier to catch than a cold!), and some clunky set-up establishing the characters, their relationships to one another, and the likelihood that everybody is brooding over their own secrets. In many ways, this first episode was a checklist of Cop-Show Tropes (COP) intercut with Filmed in Pittsburgh markers (PGH), as noted below. So, is the show worth watching? Sure. It’s fun seeing our town on TV, and the main story hasn’t even unfolded yet. Seek out the first episode online or on demand, or just jump right in after absorbing these predictable aspects, listed as they played out. AH O F F @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

COP: Jensen drives a kicky vintage car. COP: Jensen has stash of cop files/ photos at home.

COP: Jensen breaks into a house and watches a couple sleep, a.k.a. she’s got issues.

COP: On her own time, Jensen investigates a crime scene. At night!

PGH: There go some trains.

PGH: Eagle eyes will spot some “KIDS” graffiti.

PGH: Nice view from Mount Washington of Downtown.

COP: Forensic psychologist also flagged for “issues” and long-suffering wife.

PGH: Heinz Field, natch. PGH: Hey, it’s a functioning steel mill — “Allegheny Works” — with burly blue-collar workers.

COP: Killer tortures naked woman in abandoned building. PGH: It’s the “Mayview Plant,” a.k.a. the former Mayview Hospital.

COP: When a steelworker pokes the ceiling, naturally, a mummified body falls out.

COP: Killer does that now-I’m-nicenow-I’m-raging thing. COP: It’s raining.

COP: Jensen has a cranky supervisor, but is buddies with the coroner (useful!).

COP: Psychologist can “feel” clues at victim’s apartment.

COP: Dead body turns out to be missing prostitute.

COP: Killer collects trophies of victims.

COP: Jensen lives in a fab apartment with million-dollar view.

COP: Jensen collects paintings of serial killers’ homes.

PGH: Said apartment is on Mount Washington, directly above Station Square.

COP: One painting is of her family’s home!

N E W S

+

TA S T E

PGH: Ohmigod, I know where that house is!

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

63


SATURDAYS IN MARCH! Drawings 3PM & 9PM Kiosk check-in 1:00PM - 8:59PM

20 Winners every Saturday win $500 Free Slot Play and an entry into the

CHEVY CAMARO速 GRAND FINALE! Drawing March 29

Earning period March 1, 6:00am through March 29, 8:59pm. 25 base points = 1 entry | 3X Signature, 2X Preferred, 1X Rush Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM or Rush Rewards Players Club for complete details. Chevy Camaro速 is a registered trademark of General Motors Corporation.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

March 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issuu

March 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issuu