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EVENTS 3.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JACK QUARTET Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Tickets door $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

3.5 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CYRO BAPTISTA’S BANQUET OF THE SPIRITS Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

ONGOING PROGRAMS

Tinariwen

GOOD FRIDAYS EVERY FRIDAY 5 – 10 pm Half-price admission and cash bar THE FACTORY (UNDERGROUND STUDIO) WEEKDAYS, 1:30 - 5 PM, WEEKENDS, 12 - 4 PM The Factory is a lively studio program where visitors can create art alongside Artist/Educators while exploring Warhol’s artistic practice. Free with museum admission

4.1 – 8pm Warhol entrance space | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Warhol welcomes Tinariwen, a Tuareg group from the Sahara Desert in northern Mali. With a name meaning “empty places,” reflecting their land of origin, the group formed in 1979 in rebel camps of Colonel Gaddafi, having been forced from their nomadic lifestyle into involuntary military service. Swapping traditional lutes and shepherd’s flutes for electric guitars and drums, the group has developed their own unique style that blends elements of western blues/rock, African tribal chants and Middle Eastern traditional music. From this hybrid style, they craft songs dealing with issues such as political awakening, problems of exile, and repression of their people.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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CELEBRATING:

Pittsburgh’S Finest 2014

We present 11 Pittsburgh professionals who demonstrate excellence in the fields of law, healthcare, education, technology, social services & business for 2014.

AFFORDABLE & AGGRESSIVE DUI DEFENSE Attorneys Giuseppe G. C. Rosselli, Joseph Horowitz & Kevin Abramovitz at ROSSELLI, HOROWITZ & ABRAMOVITZ state that tougher laws & penalties surrounding DUI arrests & convictions necessitate that you hire a specialist who routinely defends DUI cases in court and at the DMV license suspension hearings. Joseph is a former Prosecutor with the Allegheny County District Attorney’s office. He has handled thousands of DUI cases on both sides on the bench. Giuseppe was honored by Super Lawyer’s Magazine as a Rising Star for Criminal Defense. Prior to joining the firm, Kevin worked as an Assistant Public Defender 50 South 7th Street where he gained significant courtroom and trial experience. Pittsburgh All three attorneys represent motorists who have been charged with offenses (412)281-8008 ranging from speeding to driving under the influence, including cases where someone is seriously injured or killed as a result. They explain that each DUI case is unique and requires an indepth analysis under PA’s laws & regulations. Visit: www.rhfalaw.com

CERTIFIED ELDER LAW ATTORNEY

428 Forbes Ave #1400, Lawyers Bldg Pittsburgh (412)261-4202

Attorney Carol Sikov Gross, CELA at SIKOV AND LOVE, PA is one of a few Elder Law Attorneys in Allegheny County who has been certified by the National Elder Law Foundation. With more than 25 years of legal experience, she counsels her clients on the advantages of developing cohesive estate and long-term care plans that preserve assets, facilitate estate administration and ensure that a lifetime of savings is not exhausted in paying for nursing home care. The estate and long-term care planning goals of each client, no matter what age, are evaluated taking into account his or her financial and family circumstances. Carol provides assistance on preparation of estate planning documents, Medicaid and asset protection planning, estate administration, nursing home issues, planning and creation of special needs trusts for disabled individuals, appointment of guardians, Orphans’ Court litigation, will contests, and actions involving removal of fiduciaries. Visit: www.sikovandlove.com

IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MORE THAN 30 YEARS A doctor and staff caring enough to listen to you is a concern that many consider most important in their oral healthcare provider. Of the many dentists to choose from in this area, people want to find a caring, gentle dentist with expert skills to treat them and their families. With Dr. Richard W. Emmert of EMMERT DENTAL you can receive quality dental care. You will find he takes great effort to keep you comfortable during and after your treatment, while utilizing the latest techniques available. With Dr. Emmert and his group of specialists Locations in (periodontists & oral surgeons), you will receive the best in all phases of dental Bethel Park & care from one of the area’s most respected dental professionals. Pittsburgh The team at Emmert Dental specializes in cosmetic dentistry, including digital X-rays, bonding, Zoom! whitening procedures, fillings, porcelain inlay/onlays, crowns & fixed bridges, orthodontics (children & adults), sealants, sedation, extractions and implants, tooth colored fillings, cleanings and root canals. Most dental insurance plans are accepted. Choose one of their three convenient locations: 2404 Oxford Dr, Bethel Park, (412)851-5060; and Market Square, 433 Market St, 3rd Floor Corner, Pittsburgh, (412)434-6060; and 1730 Settlers Ridge Center Drive, Pittsburgh, (412)787-5050. Visit: www.emmertdental.com

SOLUTION SPECIALISTS The team at LIFETIME DEVELOPMENT GROUP, INC is dedicated to assisting you with developing the correct process for you to achieve your goals. They specialize as real estate consultants, credit managers & website development. They help organizations identify and effectively utilize their talents & strengths while developing ways to rise to the next level of success. The Lifetime Development Group has developed a referral system that works directly with organizations & private owners. As credit managers, they have established proven methods that work to assist you with establishing and PO Box 23282 improving your credit score. The Lifetime Development Group also offers you a Pittsburgh free, no-obligation web design consultation. While developing your website, you (412)223-7809 will learn why most websites fail, how to create trust-building relationships, and how to avoid losing business due to ad mis-matching and relaxed target marketing. Complementary consultations. Visit: www.lifetimedevelopmentgroup.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

FLAHERTY & O’HARA, PC consists of attorneys Mark Flaherty, R.J. O’Hara, Stan Wolowski, Chris O’Hara, Tom Henry, Mark Kozar, Greg Szallar and Kaitlynd Kruger and numerous paralegals. Flaherty & O’Hara provides liquor licensing, citation defense, transactional, litigation, alcohol marketing and promotional counseling and related services and training to a wide variety of local, regional and national clients in the restaurant, hospitality, entertainment, airline and alcohol manufacturing industries. With over 100 years of combined experience in the beverage alcohol industry, 610 Smithfield St they know the technical and practical implications of state and federal liquor #300, Pittsburgh laws. Flaherty & O’Hara has offices in Pittsburgh, Harrisburg and Philadelphia. (412)456-2001 It is a founding member of the Alliance of Alcohol Industry Attorneys and Consultants, a national alcohol industry network, and is a member of the James Beard Foundation, the National Restaurant Association and PFMA. Flaherty & O’Hara provides comprehensive services to all levels of the alcohol industry – retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers. Visit: www.flaherty-ohara. com or follow them on Twitter: @reggiearch to learn more.

DIVORCE LITIGATION Attorney Joseph M. Wymard at SHERRARD, GERMAN & KELLY, PC understands that divorce presents many changes, concerns and options. Handling high-profile cases, Joe & his associates recognize that each family has special needs. During a divorce, their attention centers around the needs of the client & their children during and after the divorce. Custody, child support, division of property, medical, educational and emotional support of each family member, and other family issues are considered. When needed, Joe & his associates work with medical, social and accounting professionals to help their clients determine the most equitable division of financial and home assets and custody issues. They place a high-emphasis on 620 Liberty Ave the valuation of closely held corporations in divorce, and are always prepared to Two PNC Plza, Pittsburgh litigate on behalf of their clients. Joe operates in multiple Pennsylvania counties (412)355-0200 as well as several states. Visit: www.sgkpc.com

FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY KRISTAL A. IZYDORCZYK, DMD has the tools and the technology to improve your smile… easily & comfortably. You’ll be amazed at what she can do. You can trust Dr. Izydorczyk’s team of friendly, caring professionals is specialtytrained in the latest techniques in virtually “pain-free” care for cosmetic dentistry. Their results are natural and complete with porcelain veneers, tooth whitening, mercury-free tooth-colored fillings, natural looking crowns & bridges, implant restorations and youthful looking dentures. Dr. Izydorczyk focuses on the care of sensitive teeth and oral health during pregnancy. Dr. Izydorczyk earned her DMD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Locations in Dental Medicine and has been elected to Pittsburgh Magazine’s list of “Top South Park & Dentists in Pittsburgh” in each of the past five years. She created a website that Pittsburgh teaches patients about oral health. At the end of the day, patient education is the first weapon in the fight against dental disease. Come in for a consultation. Two locations: 6435 Library Rd, South Park, (412)835-0666; and 1632 Broadway Ave, Pittsburgh, (412)531-2329.

GENTLE CARING DENTISTRY

1408 East Carson St Pittsburgh (412)431-6631

If you have never had a comfortable, anxiety-free visit to the dentist, Ronald DiCarlo, DMD of SOUTHSIDE DENTAL PAVILION invites you to a new dental experience. Established in 1980 in the heart of the southside, Dr. DiCarlo possesses many years of dental experience. His services include x-rays, check ups, cleanings, white fillings, cosmetic dentistry (bonding, whitening, porcelain veneers), crowns & bridges, extractions, dentures & partials, night guards & implant restorations. Dr. DiCarlo specializes in the use of ClearCorrect aligners. They are so clear they’ll barely be noticeable, and you’ll be able to see the difference as your teeth slowly adjust and align to your target smile. Dr. DiCarlo is currently offering the ClearCorrect for $3,500 -- a 50% savings off the regular price for a complete case. The practice is currently accepting new patients and participates with most insurance plans. Visit: www.southsidedental.weebly.com

HELP FOR LOU GEHRIG’S DISEASE

416 Lincoln Ave Pittsburgh (412)821-3254

ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease, has no known treatment or cure. THE ALS ASSOCIATION is the only non-profit dedicated solely to the fight against Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. They fund research, provide direct patient and family services, conduct public education & advocacy, while offering help and hope to those facing the disease. They raise funds for patient care, increased public awareness and research for a treatment and a cure. The ALS Association assists patients & families through equipment loan, respite care, support group, transportation and home modification programs. The ALS Association Western PA Chapter is a vital link for patients & families to information, counseling & direct medical services. Visit: www.cure4als.org

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SUSAN J. LIEBER, MS, CPO, COC, ACC at LEAVE IT TO LIEBER is highly specialized to respond to the complex needs of adults living with ADHD. She demystifies how cognitive differences such as ADHD can result in school and work difficulties. Susan can help you achieve personal & professional goals, identify strategies and develop the language to advocate for yourself. Coaching services are individualized and are delivered on a one-to-one basis. Whether you want to be more productive personally or professionally, create organized spaces & routines or achieve a sense of balance in your life, working with a coach can help. “I find that people with ADD/ADHD beat themselves up PO Box 38231 because they have difficulty accomplishing things that seem so simple for their Pittsburgh peers. One solution can be found by partnering with a coach who understands (412)967-9567 ADHD challenges and can help the client recognize its unique impact on their performance, achieve greater self-awareness and work together to create systems for success.” Visit: www.leaveittolieber.com

View the online version of this page @ TheProfileSeries.com/022614


{EDITORIAL}

02.26/03.05.2014 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 09

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, JEANNE MUMFORD, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[NEWS] not in the business to put 06 “I’m anyone out of business, but the Yellow Cab system is broken.� — Uber driver Marc Stern on the need for ride-sharing in Pittsburgh

[VIEWS] know you can raise animals 14 “We without this process.� — Patty Lovera of Food & Water Watch on not using antibiotics on food animals

[TASTE]

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

kitchen doesn’t dally with classic 23 “The sauces. Instead, ingredients are chosen

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

to complement the pasta shapes.� — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Cenacolo

[MUSIC]

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“It was strange because we were in a corralled area with this bull named Unkus.â€? — AndrĂŠ Costello on filming a music-video series on a buffalo farm

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

antecedents are decidedly low40 “Its brow — a mash-up of swords-andsandals, doomed romance and disaster pic.� — Al Hoff on Pompeii

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think their outrage is fake.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Comedian Jim Norton on people who take offense at things celebrities say

[LAST PAGE] work beats talent. If you want 63 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hard to master music, you have to work at it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rev. Tim Smith on the lessons instilled by his hip-hop performance program

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 48 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 59 +

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“WE ARE PITTSBURGHERS AND PITTSBURGH NEEDS RIDE-SHARING.”

INCOMING Re: Museum and library workers are looking for better treatment at work (Feb. 19) After having worked for 10 years at Pittsburgh’s original Buhl Planetarium in Allegheny Center, I do understand and sympathize with the museum and library workers mentioned in the article. Low wages, few benefits and part-time work are typical in most nonprofits. As a Library Trustee for the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall in Carnegie during the late 1990s, I can tell you that many nonprofits scrape by from year to year, often raising just enough money to keep the doors open. Even nonprofits with endowments took a big hit during this last recession, with the value of their endowments declining, as well a decline in the wealth of their major donors. Just last week, the [Pittsburgh] Post-Gazette reported that the Carnegie Science Center’s latest $55 million expansion plan may be “extremely ambitious and unachievable” according to a private fundraising analysis. A decade ago, an even more ambitious, $90 million expansion plan, designed by a noted French architect, fell through due to a lack of funds. Most nonprofits rely on some governmental funding but, particularly for non-library regional assets, private, foundation and corporate funding is critical. Such funding has been declining over several decades due to Pittsburgh’s population decline and corporate consolidations, and earned revenue is limited by the audience’s ability to pay. Although high staff turnover costs money, regrettably, most nonprofits have determined it is less expensive than higher staff wages and benefits. — Glenn A. Walsh Mount Lebanon

These are the folks that help the museums function. … Without these workers, the collections at these museums and libraries are just that: collections. These workers bring those collections to life and bring them to the public, and they don’t deserve to be denied health care or treated like their work doesn’t matter. — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

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STREET LEGAL? {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Lyft driver Brandon Stirpe

A

S A NEWLY hired part-time driver

for Lyft, Brandon Stirpe isn’t just carrying passengers in his silver 2012 Kia Forte. He’s also helping to drive a conversation in Pittsburgh about the city’s cab service — and the legality of ride-sharing services. Public officials are weighing how to proceed — on Grant Street, in Harrisburg, and even out at the Pittsburgh International Airport. “We are Pittsburghers and Pittsburgh needs ride-sharing,” says the 26-year-old Stirpe, who earned a master’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh in December.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

His sentiment is shared by 42-yearold Uber driver Marc Stern: “I’m not in the business to put anyone out of business, but the Yellow Cab system is broken.”

Ride-share drivers settling in to a changing market {BY DAN SLEVA} Lyft and Uber are alternative cab services, in which drivers transport passengers using their own vehicles. Drivers

are linked to passengers through smartphone apps, and the fare is charged to the passenger’s credit card. Since arriving in early February, the services have drawn raves from riders — but also the ire of traditional Pittsburgh taxi companies, and legal threats from the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission. They’ve also won a ringing endorsement from Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto. Pittsburgh’s established companies have urged Peduto to authorize city police to cite Lyft and Uber drivers. But at a Feb. 18 press conference, Peduto told reporters, “I’m not going to be bullied. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


STREET LEGAL?, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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I’m not going to send Pittsburgh police operate, backing away from earlier opofficers [to] chase cars with pink mus- position. “It would be unfortunate if [Pennsylvania regulators] cited us. It taches on them.” Enforcement of taxi regulation can would do the city a disservice.” be conducted by the PUC without local police; agency spokesperson Jennifer EVEN WITH THE PUC expressing a willingKocher says it issued 14 complaints for ness to adapt, ride-sharing might still unlicensed cabs in the city last year. But encounter roadblocks out at Pittsburgh although Lyft and Uber have been oper- International Airport. ating in Pittsburgh for two weeks, the Uber’s coverage map includes the airagency has not cited any of their drivers. port; on its Twitter account and website, The agency engaged in some saber- the company has quoted average prices rattling early on, threatening drivers from Downtown to the airport ranging with possible citations, and it seems from $22-28. Stern says he took a couple wary of the way rideof trips to the airport in sharing companies began his first week as a driver. operating without seekAs for Lyft, its covering government approval age area extends only as first. Still, the PUC has also far west as Carnegie, but professed a willingness Stirpe says once a driver to adapt to the way ridepicks up a passenger withsharing companies are in that area, he or she can changing the market. travel as far as 60 miles “Any party at any time beyond it. can petition the commis“We could take you to — CHRISTOPHER sion for a rule change the airport, but we could or a waiver. No one has KEARNS, ALLEGHENY not pick you up there,” done that at this time,” he says. COUNTY POLICE Kocher says. But JoAnn Jenny, a INSPECTOR “We’ve been encourags p oke s p e r s o n f o r t h e ing [the ride-sharing comcounty’s Airport Authorpanies] to come in to meet with us and ity, says neither company has applied we would work with them,” Kocher adds. for a necessary permit. “Non-permitted “They have never presented anything to operators” face citations from county us as far as business models or a reason police, she says. why they should be allowed to run. They “Applicable law and regulations rejust say, ‘We’re operating.’” quire that commercial ground-transporLyft spokesperson Erin Simpson says tation providers, including any person the company looks forward to working who picks up or drops off passengers at with regulators, but hasn’t filed paper- Pittsburgh International Airport for a work with the agency because, “They fee, have sufficient liability insurance regulate taxis and limos. We are a peer- and proper licenses, and that they seto-peer transportation provider.” cure a permit from the Allegheny County Peduto, meanwhile, is urging the Airport Authority,” Jenny says. PUC to rework its regulations … and says Chr istopher Kearns, Allegheny that if it won’t do so, he’ll ask the state County Police Inspector at the airport, legislature to rewrite the rules. In a let- says the department is aware of the ter, Peduto urged the PUC to “create a ride-sharing services. County police will new regulatory category” that would enforce any violation they see, he says — bring ride-sharing drivers “under a including not having the proper permit common-sense regulatory regime.” That to pick up at the airport, or dropping off a would include background checks, li- fare at the non-commercial curb. ability insurance, and vehicle inspection, “If it is an unmarked car, it is difPeduto wrote. ficult to say if they are operating com“We welcome the mayor’s sugges- mercially,” Kearns says. “We haven’t tions,” Kocher says. seen a pink mustache at the airport yet.” Lyft driver Shannon Williams says Kearns says that the insignia on the front that while she was not aware of the bumper would give the police the right PUC threats until after she started driv- to stop a vehicle picking up or dropping ing, she’s optimistic that things will off a passenger. work out. (A spokesperson for Allegheny County “Lyft told us that they had a similar Executive Rich Fitzgerald, a Peduto ally, issue in California,” Williams says: That declined to address the issue. “As it is the state’s Public Utility Commission agreed Airport Authority, rather than the Exlast year to permit the companies to ecutive, that will need to respond to any

“WE HAVEN’T SEEN A PINK MUSTACHE AT THE AIRPORT YET.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


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STREET LEGAL?, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

issues, we’ll defer to them,” wrote Amie Downs in an email.) Lyft or Uber drivers wouldn’t be the first to receive a citation for serving the airport. J.B. Taxi Service, out of Beaver, has been cited a few times by county police when drivers dropped off at the airport without a permit to do so. “We’ve been cited by the county police. We thought we could drop off, but they told us we could not be there without a permit,” says owner Roxanne Szczepanski. Elsewhere, at least one airport has taken action against ride-sharing services independently, despite moves made by other regulators. Although California’s PUC now permits ride-sharing, Uber terminated its pick-up service at Los Angeles’ LAX airport last month, complaining that “authorities have taken an aggressive stance [by] issuing citations to some drivers.” (Drivers in L.A. are allowed to drop off passengers, however.)

presents

PofE T the

WEEK

AS IN OTHER markets where the compa-

nies began operating first and then dealt with regulatory questions, the services seem to be thriving. Neither Lyft or Uber will release figures on the number of drivers they have signed up in Pittsburgh. But Lyft’s app showed that the service was operating with its version of surge pricing — charging more during its busiest times — most

days last week. Stern says Uber is guaranteeing him a $15 base hourly rate now. Stirpe, however, says Lyft is not paying drivers a set rate to begin, and “the actual dollar amount is something Lyft doesn’t like us to disclose.” Drivers describe a similar application process at both companies. Stirpe, for example, says he applied online, and was asked to come to a group interview. Lyft officials checked his insurance status and took his Social Security number for a background check, though he was not fingerprinted — a frequent step in a background check. He says his car was given a brief safety check: seatbelts, turn signals, lights, tires and even an external check for scratches and dings. “When I heard back,” Stirpe says, “I was told that I was a driver and was invited to the staff launch party.” He and the other drivers say their customers — most of whom are either Pitt or CMU students, they say — have been enthusiastic. “People are excited,” says Stern. “Most have used Uber in other cities, and are happy it’s now in Pittsburgh.” Lyft driver Shannon Williams says she loves having fun while making extra money. On Valentine’s Day, she says, “I gave out hearts and candy and little pink mustaches to my passengers. It was completely different than a taxi or other car service. It was great.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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JACK’S BACK Wagner becomes only western Pa. candidate in gov’s race {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} But Wagner told City Paper recently main involvement in the governor’s race that geography had “nothing to do” with was deciding which eastern Pennsylvania his decision. He says Gov. Tom Corbett “doesn’t have a vision as it relates to our Democrat to support in the May primary. But on that day, the race came a bit economy and education” and that “those closer to home: After months of specula- issues and others are just sitting out there tion, South Hills Democrat Jack Wagner unaddressed in limbo. I have a passion to decided to jump into the race. Wagner improve Pennsylvania.” Wagner is also positioning himself will be the seventh candidate in the race; minister and businessman Max Myers as more “moderate” than the race’s other marquee Democrats: U.S. Rep. Allyson dropped out Feb. 24. Wagner’s candidacy has surprised Schwartz, state Treasurer Rob McCord, some. In the 2010 gubernatorial race, he former DEP secretaries Katie McGinty and lost the Democratic primary to fellow John Hanger, and millionaire businessAllegheny County son Dan Onorato, who man Tom Wolfe. Wagner says his moderate won by more than 20 percentage points views best represent Pennsylvanians, “the and 200,000 votes. This time around, majority of whom I consider moderate and [who] share those same moderate views.” Wagner has little cash on hand — about Wagner’s own views have un$ 30,000 — and is well behind dergone considerable moderain terms of raising money, tion over the years. As a Pittsbuilding a campaign team More on s gner’ c burgh City Councilor, he once and garnering endorsements. Ja k Wa n campaig e opposed an ordinance barSo why get involved at n li n o v for Go ring discrimination against this late date? . w at ww gays and lesbians … though as “You can sum it up in one per a p ty ci h pg a state senator in later years, word: geography,” says G. .com he supported such protection. Terry Madonna, director of As recently as his 2013 Pittsburgh the Center for Politics and Public mayoral run, he opposed same-sex Affairs at Franklin and Marshall College. Madonna notes that the race has marriage rights; today he says that “when already passed some key milestones, in- you look at that entire issue of equal rights cluding an early-February endorsement and justice for all, same-sex couples must meeting of the Democratic Party’s state be allowed the right to marriage under committee. (No candidate came away the law.” Wagner says he has changed his with the two-thirds majority needed for position after learning more about the an endorsement.) At this point, says Ma- issue in recent months. He said he has come donna, Wagner “has no money and a lot of to support same-sex marriage through his the unions and other groups have already “general understanding of the law” and picked their horses, so what else could the the realization that same-sex couples were rationale be? I think he sees there are a deprived of basic equal rights in their daily bunch of candidates from the east, and he lives and when it came to important finan[thinks] he can draw well enough in the cial, health-care and even end-of-life issues. Wagner says that he is pro-life, though Pittsburgh media market to make a run.”

PRIOR TO FEB. 20, western Pennsylvania’s

Caption???????????????????????

[PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Jack Wagner during his 2013 run for Pittsburgh mayor

in his 2010 gubernatorial run, he said he would not wish to change current state law, which allows abortion. He says his stance in the middle makes him the best candidate to face off against Corbett. And a December Quinnipiac poll had Wagner as the party frontrunner and a 12-point favorite in a face-off with Corbett. But Don Friedman, a local political consultant who frequently works with western Pennsylvania Democrats, says he’s not sure a moderate candidate is the answer against an extremely vulnerable Corbett. “Jack has no money, so beyond being the only candidate from the west, his main credential is he’s not a liberal. And in this election, that’s not the credential you need,” Friedman says. “Even in good times, Jack has a difficult time raising money. And even when he has

money, he doesn’t spend it particularly well. “Is there math that shows that Jack can win the primary? I don’t see it. I think the main effect he will have on this race is further splitting up the white-guy vote.” That, says Friedman, could be bad news for McCord, who has invested time and resources in western Pennsylvania. Both men have run and won in statewide elections — Wagner served two terms as state auditor general — and both are, as Friedman points out, white males. For his part, McCord says Wagner’s appearance in the race “doesn’t change my strategy and core approach at all.” “There is a long line of people who think they can do a better job of governing this state than Tom Corbett,” McCord says. “I have spent a lot of time in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania as treasurer and campaigning. I think a lot of people think of me as an Allegheny County candidate already. “But Pittsburgh isn’t just a campaign stop. It’s vital to our state’s future because of the region’s ability to reinvent itself.” Madonna predicts Wagner will be helped by the sheer number of candidates in the race and the fact that voter turnout will likely be low. “I think you can win this election with 300,000, 320,000 votes,” Madonna says. “But if you’re Jack Wagner, how do you get there? Even if he can manage to raise the money and saturate the Pittsburgh media market and get the lion’s share of those votes, you can’t get there purely out of the west. “But I do think that Wagner entering this race is going to have an effect on those eastern candidates. Without Jack, I think it would have been a free-for-all out [in western Pennsylvania] for votes. With Jack in the race, I think it’s hard to say what the final outcome will be.”

“YOU CAN SUM IT UP IN ONE WORD: GEOGRAPHY.”

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[GREEN LIGHT]

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THE ANIMALS WE EAT were not made for close quarters. But for efďŹ ciencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sake, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly how we raise our cows, pigs and chickens. One result is a heightened risk of disease and, for decades, the commonplace use of antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to prevent and treat diseases, and also to speed the animalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; growth. But, as in humans, antibiotic use also fosters the growth of bacteria resistant to one or more of these drugs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including the â&#x20AC;&#x153;superbugsâ&#x20AC;? that are a big public-health concern worldwide. The European Union was worried enough to ban all nontherapeutic uses of antibiotics on food animals. In the U.S., federal ofďŹ cials are working to limit such veterinary uses. But some observers want Euro-style restrictions here. On Feb. 5, environmental group Food & Water Watch held a press conference in Pittsburgh touting its campaign meant to protect antibiotics for human use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Save antibiotics for Pittsburgh families NOT factory farms,â&#x20AC;? read a sign at the event. Because of antibiotic resistance, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re continuing to run out of things we can treat those infections with,â&#x20AC;? said guest speaker Dr. Betsy Blazek-Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, of Allegheny General Hospital. Food & Water Watch backs bills in the U.S. House and Senate that would phase out nontherapeutic uses of â&#x20AC;&#x153;medically important antimicrobialsâ&#x20AC;? in animals. Field organizer Margaret Kran-Annexstein says the group is seeking a Pittsburgh City Council resolution on the issue, and will approach U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, who sits on the Senate Agriculture Committee. How big a problem is antibiotic resistance? The federal Centers for Disease Control say antibiotic-resistant bacteria are responsible for 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths annually. But much resistance, perhaps most of it, results from antibiotic use in people: Many such infections are hospital-transmitted, and the CDC estimates that up to half of human prescriptions for antibiotics are unnecessary or inappropriate. Even infections linked to animals are hard to pin down epidemiologically. True, resistant bacteria are widely found on raw meat in supermarkets. (So observe proper cooking and handling.) And the CDC estimates that resistant campylobacter, for instance, infects 310,000 people a year, and kills 28. But antibiotic use is ubiquitous, and fecal cross-contamination possibilities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on farms and processing plants, in groundwater and soil â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are many.

Tracing a particular infection to a particular dosage is almost impossible. Supporters of tighter laws note that an estimated 80 percent of antibiotics sold in the U.S. are used on animals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know you can raise animals without this process,â&#x20AC;? says Food & Water Watch assistant director Patty Lovera. A decade ago, McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s began prohibiting its suppliers from using as growth-promoters antibiotics important in human medicine; Chick-ďŹ l-A recently announced a similar policy. Meanwhile, opponents of stricter federal regulation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most vocally, pharmaceutical companies and big agriculture â&#x20AC;&#x201D; contend that only a small percentage of antibiotic use is used to speed growth. They say antibiotics are mostly used for â&#x20AC;&#x153;disease preventionâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Studies indicate that the presence of foodborne bacteria increases when the use of antibiotics that help suppress animal diseases decreases,â&#x20AC;? reads the website of the Animal Health Institute, a trade group for pharmaceutical manufacturers. David Wolfgang, a Penn State agricultural-extension veterinarian, agrees. Wolfgang says the U.S. Food and Drug Administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new voluntary guidelines limiting antibiotic use (and requiring more veterinary oversight) sufďŹ ciently protect public health without hindering farmers. He says the bigger problem is human misuse of antibiotics. Opponents and supporters of stricter laws draw divergent lessons from European bans like Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Opponents note that while Danish pigsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; overall antibiotic consumption plummeted after the late-1990s ban, more antibiotics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including some drugs important to humans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were used on sick animals. Supporters like the World Health Organization counter that the Danish ban reduced antimicrobial resistance among animals with no serious impact on animal health or meat production. Danish farmers with industrial-scale operations did have to provide a little more room per animal, plus better air circulation and different feed. None of that would be news to Mike Kovach. His Mercer County operation, Walnut Hill Farm, raises pastured cows, pigs, chickens and turkeys in ways that reject industrial agriculture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never used [antibiotics], period,â&#x20AC;? Kovach says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We never have a need for them, because [the animals] are out eating what they evolved to eat.â&#x20AC;? D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

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ArtCity REED DANCE INTENSIVE: A twoweek course of study to provide a bridge to the arts and celebrate the diversity of dance. July 7-18; Time: 9-4:45pm; Ages: 8-12yrs, $250 (sibling discount $225.00) GREEN ARTISTS AND WRITERS: Students create poetry and fiction and sculpt, weave, paint, and print using recyclables and traditional art materials. July 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 1, Age: 8-12yrs, Time: 9-4:45pm; Fee:

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July 14-25 (M-F) 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm (Grades 9-12)

$150 (sibling discount $125.00) TrustArts.org/education, 412471-6079, Trust Arts Education Center, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

kayaking, team sports, hiking, camp fires and so much more! Go to www.cyacampr.com for more information.

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Looking to plan the best week of your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer? At Camp â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;?, your child will enjoy good, old fashioned, outdoor fun. Unplug for the week; no computers, video games, or television, and look forward to a week of swimming,

W This summer become a TV producer! PCTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TV Production Summer Camp

Aug. 4th-8th and Aug. 11th-15th 9am-Noon â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 13-17 Pittsburgh Community Television 412-322-7570 â&#x20AC;˘ www.pctv21.org

Design a video game. Create a musical instrument. Discover distant galaxies and beyond! Carnegie Science Center has your summer covered with awe-inspiring

camps that will keep inquisitive kids ages 4-14 entertained. Filled with action-packed programs, camps offer hundreds of handson exhibits, an Omnimax film, Highmark SportsWorksÂŽ, and a cool T-shirt.

Chatham Music and Arts The Chatham Music and Arts Day Camp is located on Chatham

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Music & Arts Day Camp* June 16-July 25 *Pre-K Half day option available

Kiddie Cougar Camp Cougar Soccer Camp July 28-August 1

Cougar Basketball Camp August 4-8 Alicia Danenberg, director: 412-365-1174

Jumpstart your FUTURE Carnegie Mellon University Summer Pre-College Programs June 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 9, 2014 Advanced Placement Early Admission Fine Arts: Architecture / Art & Design / Drama / Music National High School Game Academy www.cmu.edu/enrollment/pre-college OfďŹ ce of Admission Pre-College Programs

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Winchester Thurston School offers unique, challenging, fun, and smart summer programs for campers ages 3-18 at WTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Hills and City Campuses.


PIT TSBURGH CULTURA

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Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shadyside Campus. The camp offers programs in visual arts, music, drama, dance, nature exploration and sports. Six, three, and one week sessions are available for campers entering kindergarten through ninth grade. Visit www.chatham.edu/daycamp for more information.

CLO Academy CLO Academy's summer performance camps are designed to give kids the opportunity to experience preparing for and performing on the stage. Working with a Director, Music Director and Choreographer, students will

create their own exciting musical theater experience! All camps culminate with a life performance at the CLO Academy.

CMU Pre-College Summer Programs Is your child going to be a junior or senior in high school? If so, consider spending six-weeks in one of our distinct Pre-College programs. They can either explore Architecture, Art & Design, Drama, Music, the Ntl. High School Game Academy or Advanced Placement Early Admission to prepare them for study at the college level. For

more information visit: www.cmu. edu/enrollment/pre-college

Gemini Children's Theater Creative Fun! Our 5-day camps provide hands-on experience in a real theater. Under the guidance of theater professionals, each group creates, writes, produces, and performs their show on the last day of camp. Camp sessions available in split groups ages 4 - 17. www.geminitheater.org

Grier Summer Grier Summer is an overnight

camp, founded in 1975, located in Central PA, operated on the grounds of the historic Grier School. We offer girls their choice of one or three week programs in English/Western horseback riding, musical theater, art, or dance. All skill levels welcome.

JCC Day Camps Every child is unique. The JCC has a camp for that! Campers ages 2 to 16 get active at JCC Camps: swim, climb, shoot hoops, explore nature and science, stage musical, join the circus, take trips. Programs include traditional day

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GEMINI CHILDREN'S

THEATER

SUMMER ZOO CAMP

camps and performing arts and specialty camps at our 100-acre Family Park in Monroeville and in Squirrel Hill and the South Hills.

Orchard Hill KidsFest â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14 For over 25 years, this unique summer day camp has provided one incredible week-long funfest packed with sports, water fun, climbing wall, live music and more. Open to kids entering first through sixth grade. Choose a week: July 6-13, July 13-20, or July 20-27. More information is available at kidsfestrocks.com.

SUMMER CAMPS GRADES 1 - 3

GRADES 4 - 9

June 16 - 27 or Aug 4 - 15

Gr. 4 - 6: July 21 - Aug 8 Gr. 7 - 9: June 30 - July 18

La Escuelita Arcoiris One-week Spanish Language and Culture camps for children ages 6-10 run from June 16 - July 25. Students engage in outdoor games, arts & crafts, and cultural immersion activities, all while learning Spanish! Our bilingual instructors have many years of teaching experience. Located in Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4787 or www.spanishleap.com.

Mattress Factory Community Art Lab + Factory 14s

at the Mattress Factory. Dive in to awesome installations with worldclass artists to have a one-of-akind art experience at the Mattress Factory Art Museum this summer. Classes are available for students 7-18 and workshops include: FortBuilding Extravaganza, ScreenPrinting and Circus + Activism! Contact 412-231-3169 or felice@ mattress.org for more information or to reserve your space!

PCTV-21 Production Camp Ever wonder what goes into the making of a television program? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your chance to find out.

Learn all aspects of TV production and produce your own show for air on PCTV 21. August 4th thru 8th and August 11th thru 15th. Youth age 13-17. Call 412-322-7570 or visit www.pctv21.org.

Pittsburgh Glass Center SiO2 Teen Boot Camp at Pittsburgh Glass Center. A formula shattering the notion of glass, SiO2 Boot Camp is a one-week hands-on glass program for high school students taught in one of the top glass studios in the U.S. Learn the science and art

Best Day Camps in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Burgh

GRADES 2 - 12

Discover the binary brilliance of o robots, explore the science of video

June 9 - 13 or July 21 - 25

games, and crack secret cases!

Gr. 4 - 6: June 30 - July 18 Gr. 7 - 9: July 21 - Aug 8

Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org or call 412.237.1637 for more details.

AGES 3-5 Pre-School Camp: June 2 - 6 or July 28 - Aug 1 GRADES 6 - 12

For kids ages 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14.

This camp culminates in a public performance at the New Hazlett Theater on 6/29

June 16 - 29

Open to Everyone  JCCPGHdaycamps.com

Private Voice & Piano Ages 12 - 18: June 16 - August 8 ½ Hour and Full Hour spaces available

412-281-2234 pittsburghCLO.org 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Squirrel Hill 412-521-8010 South Hills 412-278-1975

Presented in cooperation with

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER NTER


CARNEGIE SCIENCE CEN

TER

introduced to the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium's most fascinating residents through animal encounters, behind-the-scenes tours, and exciting classroom lessons and activities. Program themes are fun and engaging for each age group.

of glass including glassblowing, flameworking, kilnforming, and coldworking. Scholarships available. Register today at www.pittsburghglasscenter.org

Pittsburgh Zoo Camp Spend a week exploring the most amazing creatures on the planet through fun-filled, educational Zoo Camp programs. Campers will be

Winchester Thurston Winchester Thurston School

offers unique, challenging, fun, and smart summer programs for campers ages 3-18 at WTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Hills and City Campuses. Choose from themes in adventure and play, sports and physical fitness, performing/visual arts, and academics. Programs are designed/taught by WTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faculty and education partners For more information visit www.winchesterthurston.org/ summercamp

The Young Writers Institute The Young Writers Institute is for young people who like to write, and who want to develop their craft in a community of writers. Program highlights include visiting writers, field trips, readings of student writing and publication in electronic anthologies. Visit www.wpwp.pitt.edu/youth/ywi

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Ages 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;13 s pittsburghzoo.org s 412-365-2528 . . . on the campus of the Grier School, an historic girlsboarding school in the Allegheny Mountains of Central Pennsylvania.

Programs start the week of June 2.

UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;}Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;v>VÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2021; UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;*iĂ&#x20AC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;ÂŤ UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C; UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;

MISSED THIS ISSUE TO ADVERTISE YOUR SUMMER CAMP?

www.griersummer.org N E W S

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SUMMER DAY CAMPS IN DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

REED DANCE INTENSIVE

GREEN ARTISTS & WRITERS

JULY 7-18 | Monday-Friday Ages 8-12

JULY 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUGUST 1 Ages 8-12

Performance: Saturday, July 19 at 2pm

$150 per student, sibling discount $125

$250 per student, sibling discount $225

In the mornings, students will try their hand at poetry and fiction and find new stories and inspirations. In the afternoons, we will sculpt, weave, paint and print using recyclables from everyday life in combination with traditional art materials.

A two-week course of study to provide a bridge to the arts and celebrate the diversity of dance.

Register Online: TrustArts.org/ArtCity | 412-471-6079 Presented By:

All Camps Take Place at:

Trust Arts Education Center 805/807 Liberty Avenue in the Cultural District, Downtown Pittsburgh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


DE

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the

ON

INGREDIENTS ARE CHOSEN TO COMPLEMENT THE PASTA SHAPES

SWEET STOP {BY AL HOFF} It’s good news for cake-lovers who are loathe to cross a river: Aspinwall’s Bella Christie and Lil Z’s Sweet Boutique has opened a second location in Lawrenceville. Says co-owner Kadee Lewis, who runs the bakery with her sister, Kristin Smith, “We jumped at the opportunity to take over the old Dozen location. We love the neighborhood.” The Butler street location has a funky, reclaimed-wood interior and features a dazzling selection of sweet treats — from colorful cupcakes and cookies to breakfast pastries and glittercovered bonbons. There are fresh-made donuts, some topped with crumbled cookies or maple bacon. (I enjoyed the “Monkey ’n da’ Middle,” which was topped with buttercream, chocolate sauce and fresh banana.) Not surprisingly, chocolate-dipped everything — cookies, pretzels, bacon — are among the shop’s best-sellers, according to Lewis. Catering and custom cakes are a big part of BellaChristie’s business, and Lewis says they love the challenge when customers dream up fanciful cake ideas. The new location has the same menu as the Aspinwall location, but Lewis says they plan to offer more vegan and glutenfree options in Lawrenceville. Seating is on the way, and the upstairs space will soon be available for parties. And like everybody else, Lewis is looking forward to spring, when the sidewalk seating can be put out: “It’s definitely a walking community and we want to be part of that.” And what’s a good walk without a donut break? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3511 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-6871265 or www.asweetboutique.com

the

FEED

19th Annual Empty Bowls Dinner For $20, you get soup, a hand-made bowl, entertainment and the satisfaction of helping the community. Proceeds for this event go to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank and Just Harvest. 2-6 p.m. Sun., March 2. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. www.pittsburghfoodbank.org N E W S

PRIMO PASTA {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

I

N OUR supposedly “paperless” digital

age, we are buried in papers. On a recent excavation of papers, we came across the business card of Fede Pasta, bestowed by a server in a lovely restaurant we dined at several years ago. The pasta there was so exceptional, we inquired and received Fede’s card, along with the explanation that it’s a small producer in the east suburbs. Since then, we’ve enjoyed Fede’s noodles in a number of other fine restaurants; we’ve almost come to expect them in those following the freshlocal-seasonal credo. When we learned that Fede had opened its own restaurant, we could hardly wait. Cenacolo is not a place you’d ever stumble across. Although the address is Main Street in North Huntingdon, this is no central business district. Rather, it’s an off-the-beaten-path business park. On the ground floor, around the back, Fede’s retail store and restaurant share a small, windowless space. It may sound dismal, but the shop is bright and filled with fascinating things, from meats and cheeses

Linguine with Taylor Bay scallops and clams

for antipasto to gleaming machines for rolling, cutting and slicing various shapes of pasta. Two tiny dining rooms are romantically lit — although not dim — and their heavy, majestic woodwork suggests the artisanship of centuries of Italian history.

CENACOLO

Banco Business Park, 1061 N. Main St., North Huntingdon. 724-515-5983 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. PRICES: Meats and cheeses $9-15, starters $9-12, entrees $18-24 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED As for the menu, Cenacolo wisely sticks with its natural strengths. Aside from platters featuring the meats and cheeses sold out front, there are half-a-dozen starters and a dozen pastas, and that’s it. While the menu categories are stripped down, the pasta dishes are not. The kitchen doesn’t dally with any of the classic sauces (although our friendly server did offer some

simpler dishes to our children). Instead, ingredients are chosen to complement the pasta shapes (each dish is identified by its shape, with no repeats). There’s a clever method to maintaining so many options without resort to standard sauces. Recipes rhyme without actually repeating ingredients: There are three seafood options utilizing different shellfish, while cured pork appears variously as pancetta, prosciutto and speck. Each dish is distinctive, and it was hard to choose among them. While we awaited our entrees, we started with polpette — meatballs in marinara — and fried artichokes with lemon and basil. The latter featured a shaggy coating on artichoke hearts, by turns crunchy and tender, mild enough to allow the vegetal artichoke to shine, absorbent enough to hold plenty of lemon juice. The meatballs, made with prosciutto and mortadella, were richly flavored with a flavor profile that differed from the standard Italian-American (Jason thought he detected allspice), while the accompanying tomato sauce was a vibrant reminder of the CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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PRIMO PASTA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

way canned tomatoes can keep us tasting summer all through the winter. Cenacolo takes “fresh mozzarella” to a towering new level with cheese that is stretched from curd to round while you wait, then arrives still warm in a shallow pan of water, delightfully stretchy and mildly creamy. It’s served with pesto and roasted red peppers on hearty, lightly toasted bread for a wildly satisfying stack of flavors and textures. Linguine with seafood was reminiscent of classic white clam sauce, but here chunks of pancetta added earthy savor, while halved grape tomatoes countered with sweet brightness. In addition to clams — some served in their shells — the dish was adorned with a pair of bay scallops, also in their shells, prettily offering up their morsels. Although white wine was present in the sauce, the overall effect was a bit muted, with less of the brightness of vongole. It was a satisfying plate, though the elements didn’t quite seem to balance.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

A CUT ABOVE Butcher and the Rye garners national recognition Last week the James Beard Foundation, one of the world’s pre-eminent food and drink organizations, announced the list of semifinalists for its 2014 James Beard Awards. Downtown’s Butcher and the Rye was one of 25 bars in the United States nominated for Outstanding Bar Program. It is the first Pittsburgh bar to receive a nomination since the category was created in 2012. “It’s a huge honor for us, especially as a brand-new restaurant,” says co-owner Tolga Sevdik, whose bourbonfocused establishment opened just a few months ago. “I’m ecstatic,” says Butcher bartender Maggie Meskey. “I woke up to my phone buzzing like crazy. I’m extremely humbled and extremely proud of everyone I work with.” Meskey credits the strong vision of Sevdik and chef/owner Rick DeShantz with creating the framework for Butcher’s quick success. And for executing that vision, she credits the bar’s dedicated, cohesive bar team, which in addition to Meskey includes: Mike Mills, Wes Shonk, Erika Joyner, Ryan Holtz, Jay DeNat, Bill Taylor and Troy Sanford. “I know we have a great bar program and the best whiskey wall this side of the Mississippi,” Meskey says. “And that’s exciting. But the bigger picture is what we’re doing together. I’ve never learned so much from and about people in such a short amount of time.” Butcher and the Rye faces stiff competition for the top prize, which will be awarded in early May. The Varnish (Los Angeles), Columbia Room (Washington, D.C.) and Arnaud’s French 75 Bar (New Orleans) are just some of the well-established and world-famous bar programs also nominated for the award. “We’re competing with some of the best bars in the country, and our goal is to be on the same level or better than they are,” said Sevdik. But win or lose, this nomination “means a lot for Pittsburgh,” Meskey says. “This will put a lot more focus on Pittsburgh. Next year, you’re going to see other Pittsburgh bars on that list.”

“THIS WILL PUT A LOT MORE FOCUS ON PITTSBURGH.”

Making gnocchi

Lamb tortelloni featured plump pockets of tender lamb served in a sauce that combined the bright sweetness of marsala with the tender richness of a braised lamb shank. And with Fede pasta, there’s no question of hoping for more filling and less noodle: Each bite was perfect. Ricciolina, a thick, tubular pasta, was served with chicken, cauliflower and leeks, brought together in a rich cheddar cream. Here, pistachios were a surprisingly successful component, with a distinct texture that was firm but not crunchy. Pasta alla chitarra — long noodles cut with guitar strings — featured a meat sauce heavy with rich ground beef and tasting, delectably, like a cross between homestyle Italian-American and a classic Bolognese. Our meal concluded with excellent, fluffy, mousse-like tiramisu. Fede’s growth from wholesaler to retailer to restaurant is cause for pastaphiles to celebrate. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752 or www.butcherandtherye.com


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

We Support

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We also cater office parties! Let us do the work... Call us 24 hours in advance@

412-415-0338

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

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M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

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Award Winning Cuisine MONDAY: FREE TAPAS MONDAY

$10 value with purchase of a bottle of wine TUESDAY: Buy 1 flight of wine get 2nd 50% OFF of equal or lesser value

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mallorcarestaurantpgh.com

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE BURGATORY. 932 Freeport Road, The Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412-781-1456. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extraordinary salad. JE

Social {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, CORNERSTONE. and truffled 301 Freeport www. per pa pumpkin seeds. KF Road, Aspinwall. pghcitym o .c 412-408-3258. The ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman contemporary American St., Strip District. 412-201fare at this warm and 5656. This multi-leveled venue welcoming venue offers a (with balcony) perched on the creative take on a traditional edge of The Strip is noted for menu. Every dish is served with its innovative, contemporary a twist, but none — such as American cuisine. Dishes are fancified mac-n-cheese, slowprepared with fresh, local roasted brisket sliders, grilled ingredients and served in a lamb burger or pulled-pork classy modern space, to be nachos — is too twisted. KE complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE

hand-crafted cocktails. The focus is on local and sustainable, with meats, veg and grains from nearby sources. JE

DAPHNE. 5811 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-1130. Outside seating is a plus here, but the well-prepared Turkish food is a year-round asset. The menu is familiar — hummus, falafel, gyros, shish kebab — but the execution is notable and the flavors rich. Lamb features as sausages, chops and a burger, and grilled chicken breast doesn’t get much better than Daphne’s shish kebab. KF

LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional,

Daphne {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7224. The longtime Downtown hot-doggery expands its menu here in an attractive sit-down space, with creatively dressed hot dogs, a variety of poutines (loaded French fries) and

HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE. 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. A motorcyclethemed venue offers mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — prepared from scratch. The menu also offers a modest South of the Border section, and the kitchen’s creativity shows in unique items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday, a roast-turkey sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. KE LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-481-4414) and 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to endless preparations and dressings,


offMenu

the menu here is copious (and that’s not including the daily specials). The Mount Washington location, with its spectacular view of the city, is a popular venue for special occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

BUILDING UP KARMA

PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J

South Side yoga studio adds new café SEAN AND Karen Conley opened Amazing Yoga in

POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. This Duquesne University venue is a decided cut above student dining. The dining room is spacious, with a handsome fieldstone bar. The fare is contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of internationally inflected classics like chipotle barbecue pork tenderloin and blackened chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches like a side dish of “chef’s grains” complete the picture. KE SOCIAL. 6425 Penn Ave., Larimer. 412-362-1234. This casual eatery at Bakery Square offers upscale pub grub: Pizzas, sandwiches and salads have ingredients that wouldn’t be out of place at the trendiest restaurants, but preparations are un-fussy. Or be your own chef, with the checklist-style, build-your-ownsalad option. For dessert, try a custom ice-cream sandwiches. KE VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE

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Amazing Café chef Mark Staley {PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in old-fashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE

2001 “to celebrate life, community and wellness.” Thirteen years later, they opened the doors to a new community-building space: Amazing Café. The “clean eating” café attached to their South Side studio revved up its juicer in early February. A café was in the Conleys’ plans from the start, but they had to wait for the right space — and most importantly, the right people to help run it. As luck would have it, Mark Staley, an Amazing Yoga teacher, proved to be “super passionate about the food revolution, and one heck of a cook,” Sean says. When the lower level of the studio’s East Carson Street building became vacant, everything aligned for the eatery to come to fruition. Amazing Café may become an oasis for Pittsburghers seeking what’s commonly known as “California cuisine.” The menu boasts fresh juices, smoothies, salads, entrees and desserts, all made with the freshest ingredients, such as the (super-tasty) “Spontaneity”— a “burrito” wrapped in greens with a roasted-walnut burrito filling, cauliflower Spanish rice, and red pepper-cashew sauce. A San Francisco native, Staley used his extensive food experience — he’s worked in restaurants and as a healthy-eating specialist for Whole Foods Market — to craft the café’s menu. “This is what I do at home,” he says, adding that the food remains purposefully simple so customers can taste it, read the listed ingredients and make it in their own kitchens. “For me, this is an educational facility,” asserts Staley. Critics who believe that “health food” is inherently bland should try the flavorful winter squash curry served over heirloom black rice. Amazing Café blends its curry powder from scratch, mixing turmeric, galangal and fenugreek, and even toasting the cumin seeds in-house. For all those involved, that attention to detail illustrates why Amazing Café is simply an extension of yoga practice. “Yoga is not about physical poses,” Staley explains. “It’s about building awareness and living a life of conscious choices.” The bright café’s doors are open now, but look for the grand opening later in spring.

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

New Menu Items! Add to a meal or take a bag home.

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS

POTATO CHIPPERS

CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

Sweet Potato “Build your own” HASH

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

BREAKFAST

BURRITOS

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd, Glenshaw, PA 15116 • (412) 486-5513

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

S MAKE U YOUR P O ONE STP! SHO

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

Kitchen Hours: Monday-Saturday 6am - 3pm Sunday 6:30am - 2:30pm

LE CATERT US UPCOMYOUR G EVENTIN !

www.colecafe.com m

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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LOCAL

“ONCE I OWNED A PIANO, I HAD TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

The Pressure is, bar none, the best ’60s-style ska-and-rocksteady band in Pittsburgh. Of course, The Pressure is basically the only ’60s-style ska-androcksteady band in Pittsburgh. “It’s often like, ‘What shows can we play where we just play by ourselves?’” says guitarist and founding member David Riel. “We play a lot of shows where we do two sets, or play with [DJs] we know who spin this kind of music. There are a couple of more third-wave ska bands we’ve played with, but I think when we play, their fans feel like they’re watching the oldies channel or something.” The Pressure has been holding down the subgenre since forming in 2008; Riel founded the band, singer Mz. Annie M. came soon after, and the rest of the band has come on board since, after a few lineup changes. The roster took form when Eric Mazurak moved to Pittsburgh from Detroit and joined; he writes most of the band’s material now, and recorded The Pressure’s new LP and 7-inch single, both of which are being released on March 1. Riel and Mazurak had already known each other through the vintagescooter scene — which plays a big role in the band, as folks who care about vintage scooters tend also to know a thing or two about vintage music. “The guys and girls in the scooter scene are into the ’60s vibe,” says Riel. “They know the ska and reggae of that era. We always try to play shows at scooter rallies.” While it can be lonely out there in Pittsburgh for an old-school ska band, though, there are some advantages. When an old-school ska or reggae name comes through town on tour, The Pressure is an obvious choice to open the show — the band has been booked with the likes of The English Beat and Toots and the Maytals. “I like to think it’s not just because we’re the only ones around here doing this, though,” Riel says with a laugh. “I like to think it’s because we’re good.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE PRESSURE LP RELEASE with THE SHIFTERS, PANDMIC DJS. 9 p.m. Sat., March 1. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

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Steadily rising: The Pressure

SCOOTERLOVERS ROCK

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

On fire: André Costello (left) and the Cool Minors (Matthew Fiorillo, center, and Nicholas Charters)

UP IN FLAMES {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

O

N SAT., MARCH 1, André Costello

will debut his “visual EP,” a 15minute video spanning the entire length of his 2012 three-track EP, Summer’s Best. The video will be released by Wild Kindness Records — part of a relationship that goes back four years to Costello’s debut solo album, Tumbleweed, which is now being distributed by Get Hip Recordings. He also saw the transition

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

from owner and founder of Wild Kindness, David Pokrivňák, to current owner Jeff Betten, and its move to Pittsburgh. “Jeff was always hanging around, so he seemed the most likely guy to take over,” says Costello. “He’s done a great job. He has an amazing amount of energy.” The video, being premiered at Blackbird Studios in Lawrenceville, is a poignant reflection of a piano’s final moments — the

last basking under stage lights, a funeral procession and an eventual pyre, backdropped by the setting sun. It’s not easy to direct an audience’s emotions toward an inanimate object, but that’s exactly what director Samuel Price accomplishes. We are introduced to the piano as Costello sits at it silhouetted by stage lights. The fact that the opening track of Summer’s Best highlights a gui-


tar but Costello is singing the track while playing the piano, hints at an ambiguous connection between the artist and instrument. But as the piano is wheeled out of the performance space and down city streets, complete with graffiti on stone walls referencing the lyrics, one begins to the understand that the piano is more than a prop. And when it’s pushed out of frame, followed by a procession of mourners clutching flowers, it becomes clear that the piano is being rolled toward its grave. When the flowers are placed in between its exposed strings and on its keys, it evokes real sadness. “I got a little teary-eyed when my friends were putting the flowers on it,” says Costello. “I spent a lot of time with that piano.” As meaningful as the piano may be in the video, it played an even deeper role in Costello’s life as a musician and songwriter. When he first got it, he was a guitarist, but hardly a pianist. “Once I owned a piano,” though, he says, “I had to learn how to play it.”

ANDRÉ COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS VISUAL EP RELEASE 7 p.m. Sat., March 1. Blackbird Studios, 3583 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15. www.wildkindness.com

In the months following, Costello painstakingly mapped out some chord progressions, until whole songs were taking form. “I saw enough people play the piano that I knew you didn’t usually hit two keys that were directly next to each other,” he notes, “so I found middle C and would sit at it with my guitar in hand and find all the notes and chords that way.” “New instruments are great for songwriting,” he adds. “Even if you’re a guitar player, simply playing a different guitar will inspire new songs.” Such an intimate relationship with an instrument usually doesn’t call forth a desire to destroy it. But “I needed the space,” Costello admits, “and pianos are really hard to move.” That may seem a bit unemotional, but the final straw came when Costello had an infuriating experience with another instrument. “I found this tenor guitar in a pawn shop in Wellsville, New York,” he recalls. “It was amazing. I was going to make it my signature. Then someone stole it right out of the venue we were playing!” Looking for a way to vent his frustration, Costello came to a decision on the piano’s fate. “After that I was like, ‘fuck it, we’re burning the piano.’”

André Costello burns a piano in a still from his Summer’s Best visual EP.

So, Costello and the film crew headed for a farm in upstate Pennsylvania. “We burned it on a buffalo farm,” he says. “It was strange because we were in a corralled area with this bull named Unkus. He couldn’t get around the other bulls or else there would be a fight to the death. “One time we left the piano alone and one of the farmhands told us, ‘If he sees something new, well, he’s going to want to rub on it.’ We ended up getting a really great shot of Unkus.” Despite the finality of the act, Costello remains firmly attached to the songs that pay tribute to the instrument — and so in a sense, the piano remains. And, Costello says, “Had I sold it, someone would have just stripped it of its metal and left the wood to rot. That’s what they do with these old pianos. By burning it and making more art out of it, I feel we honored its memory.” If there seems to be a spirituality buried somewhere in this tale of a piano’s demise, there’s reason for that. Costello admits that his worldview and, by extension, his songwriting, hovers somewhere between science and theology. The opening track of Summer’s Best, “Roll On (Spaceship)” has Costello, in his beautifully throaty warble, advising, “Don’t trade your faith for science or else you’ll have to think,” then dismantling the apparent sarcasm and genuinely confirming the advice: “’Cause using your head all the time will make your knees get weak.” “I always felt that we shouldn’t understand everything,” he says by way of explanation. “It’s important not to be too concrete about our ideas.” While the Summer’s Best visual EP celebrates a time that Costello is proud of, he also is looking forward to his newest album, slotted for November 2014, also to be released by Wild Kindness. Whether any instruments will get consumed by flames is yet to be determined. “I really do find instruments to be sacred. I think the video captures that.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Shadyside

NO Cover * Giveaways * Beads * T Shirts* Drink Specials And More! 9PM-? Featuring the Mardis Gras House Band playing their original tunes. Pittsburgh’s oldest cocktail lounge. Often imitated never duplicated. 731 Copeland St. Shadyside 412-683-0912

Used Restaurant

Equipment Used cooking, bar, refrigeration, furniture etc...

ROAD RUNNER GREETINGS FROM THE WILDERNESS (SELF-RELEASED)

Mandolins and the like offer some folky overtones to arty indie rock on this EP, but the real draw is the thoughtful, dry lyricism. The writing is either genius or disappointing in its simplicity, with a tone reminiscent of Morrissey or Xiu Xiu (in terms of words only). Who starts a song with a line like “I am not such an asshole / Yet, I am human when I am drunk / not a wolf”? Confident songwriting is matched with impeccable recording and mournful, powerful vocals. ROAD RUNNER. 9 p.m. Thu., Feb. 27. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net PLUTOCRAT NOOSE PLUTOCRAT NOOSE (SELF-RELEASED)

A new full-length from the trio of Amuck, Sikes and Kiltervision, this one mixes rap with rock, dance music and even screamo, sometimes all in one song. A lot of the MC work is impressive — fast, smart, varied in cadence. Often the hooks are these songs’ weaknesses, but there’s a lot of other good stuff going on, from the rhymes to the production, and these guys aren’t copying anyone. PLUTOCRAT NOOSE. 9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 28. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $6-8. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com THE NEVERWERES SONGS OF PILLAGE AND MERRYMAKING (SELF-RELEASED)

Contact Darrin Bell at 412-401-5370 South Hills location. Delivery available! 30

Punk and straight-up rock tunes from some vets of the local scene (Greg Loop, Dave Whaley, David Zappala and Bob Spieler). Catchy, riffy stuff ranging from countryinspired (like “Red Skies Over Omaha”) to Hüsker Dü-style (“Black Moshannon”), done well in all cases — and topped with honest, easy-on-the-ears vocals. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE NEVERWERES. 10 p.m. Sat., March 1. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

MAGIC MAN {BY MIKE SHANLEY} IN TERMS of musical diversity, few musicians can top percussionist Cyro Baptista. Since he left his native Brazil for New York more than three decades ago, he has worked with acts ranging from legends like Yo-Yo Ma, Paul Simon and Herbie Hancock to musical iconoclast John Zorn. Today, he is speaking by phone from a place even more remote — a rainforest in Bahia, Brazil. “My life here is very hard,” he deadpans. “We don’t know if we’re going to drink coconut water or if we’re gonna have juice of some tropical fruits.” He punctuates the comment with a hearty laugh that will recur throughout the conversation. The location of the call is significant because Baptista keeps referring to the rainforest as a metaphor for stints with his musical friends. “They are part of my rainforest, part of my environment, no? I love these guys so much before I played with them,” he says. “And then they came to me! These people are so charged with nature inside them, an incredible force. That’s something that I feel when walking around here [in] the rainforest.” Baptista came to New York in 1980, first visiting the Creative Music Studio on a farm in Woodstock. There, musicians from around the world traded ideas with open-minded jazz men like trumpeter Don Cherry, blending music of different countries long before “world beat” came into the vernacular. “It was the first place, maybe, that [musicians] said, ‘Maybe if I take one note from my music and you put one note there, we can play together, no?’” he recalls. “This moment was so full of mystic energy. It opened the door for me, a really big door. … I’m still high from that.”

“Some kind of voodoo”: Cyro Baptista

the music with a term that originated with the 1930s Brazilian art movement: anthropofagia. “‘Anthropo’ is people and ‘fagia’ is eating,” he explains. “We are in the business of eating people, no? Playing with Yo-Yo, playing with Zorn, I feel that I’m eating them. They start to live inside me. “That’s the way we explain how Brazil is the way it is. We ate all this culture — the American Constitution, the French Revolution, Miles Davis, Celine Dion, John Kennedy.” Musically, the fourpiece group bears this out. In addition to Brazilian music, the members draw on Middle Eastern melodies. When Zorn’s squalling alto saxophone guests on a track, the sound touches on the heavy free jazz of Zorn’s band from the ’90s, Naked City. More recently, the group released Caym, a set of Zorn’s compositions from his second “Masada book,” which also draws on diverse styles. In Brazil, Baptista has been recently been playing candomblé, a style of AfroBrazilian voodoo music which will inspire his March 5 show at The Andy Warhol Museum. “It’s like a ceremonial thing. I’m gonna bring this energy to Pittsburgh. I hope we do some kind of voodoo there that makes everybody in Pittsburgh very … happy,” he drawls, adding that trademark laugh.

“WE ARE IN THE BUSINESS OF EATING PEOPLE, NO?”

CYRO BAPTISTA’S BANQUET OF THE SPIRITS

8 p.m. Wed., March 5. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $25. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

That eclecticism fuels his own projects, including Banquet of the Spirits, which he brings to Pittsburgh next week. On the band’s 2008 album, released by Zorn’s Tzadik imprint, Baptista describes

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CRITICS’ PICKS

Second Empire

[ASIAN JAZZ] + FRI., FEB. 28

common denominator is women. The secondever Female Voices of Metal Fest, hosted by With all of Pittsburgh’s storied jazz history, one project the city hasn’t tackled is Asian jazz-fusion Jayson Shell of the Internet-radio Women of Metal Show, runs the gamut from symphonic — until now, with the founding of the group metal (Second Empire) to New Wave of British Silk Sound. The ensemble was founded by Silk Heavy Metal (Lady Beast) and heavy prog (Lies, Screen Asian Arts and Cultural Organization Inc.). Bros of metal, you’ll get your chance again founder (and WESA Sunday-night DJ) Harish soon; tonight, it’s strictly for the ladies. AM Saluja, and is made up mostly of local jazz 6:30 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. All musicians. Tabla player Samir Chatterjee, who ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com teaches at Pitt and has toured worldwide, feels that having an Asian jazz-fusion group is impor[DEATH METAL] + SAT., MARCH 01 tant: “Jazz has a history of borrowing elements from Asian musical traditions. It is time to take it Death-metal band Dark Tranquility was formed one step further — adopting Asian modes [and] 25 years ago and shows no signs of slowing down. In 2013, the rhythmic ideas into jazz. Swedish five-piece Modern jazz does that a released a new studio lot from Latin American {PHOTO COURTESY album, Construct; it’s the and African music.” The OF MAGGIE HUBER} 10th from the pioneers, group makes its stage who hail from the melodicdebut tonight at Pitt’s death-metal capital of Bellefield Hall. Kayla Gothenburg. Lead singer Copes 7 p.m. 315 S. Mikael Stanne and Bellefield Ave., Oakland. guitarist Niklas Sundin $15-25. All ages. www. have been at it since the silkscreenfestival.org band began, and they bring Dark Tranquility [WORLD] + to Altar Bar tonight. KC FRI., FEB. 28 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave. For 10 years now, Carla Strip District. $18-50. All Leininger’s Global Beats ages. 412-263-2877 or has been providing www.thealtarbar.com world-music events, from regular DJ parties to live [ALT-FOLK] + shows by international SUN., MARCH 02 recording artists. Tonight, Water Liars Water Liars started out the group celebrates 2014 with a bang by with a Brazilian Carnival releasing its self-titled celebration called Arrastão da Alegria. New York-based American- second studio album. The folk band is mainly made up of primary songwriters and players and-Brazilian band Nation Beat plays (on its Justin Kinkel-Schuster and Andrew Bryant. short pre-Carnival tour), and locals Timbeleza Their music can be dark, and deals primarily and DJ Carla Canarinho round out the night. It all happens at Roland’s Seafood Grill in the Strip with themes of childhood and lost love — and District. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 1904 Penn Ave., it exudes a Southern twang that reflects their hometowns in Arkansas and Mississippi, Strip District. $15-20. www.loveglobalbeats.com respectively. Check them out tonight at Club Café along with special guests, Paul Luc and [METAL] + SAT., MARCH 01 Look Left. KC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. Several subgenres of metal are represented $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre, but the

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ROCK/POP THU 27

ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. MoJoJoJo. North Side. 412-322-1850. BZ’S BAR & GRILL. Spiffy Sean Styles. North Side. 412-323-2924. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Stranger Convention, Kinetic. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Darryl & Pete. 724-265-1181. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Unlikely Candidates, The Vegabonds. Station Square. 412-481-7625. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Scott, Rob & Greg of the Clarks. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. Derek Woodz Band, Jay McCall Band. South Side. 412-431-5282. THE NEW BOHEMIAN. Open Mic w/ Jasmine Tate. North Side. 412-223-7827. OAKDALE INN. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. SEVICHE. Alex Talbot. Downtown. 412-697-3120. SMILING MOOSE. Farraday, The Promise Hero Egality, Dendritic Arbor, Ravn. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Black Lillies, The Grifters. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Big Something. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. Crystal Bowersox. Every Voice Counts benefit concert for Life’s Work of Western PA. North Side. 412-471-2600 x 239. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Mad Dog Rodeo. Ross. 412-364-8166. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. No Bad Ju Ju. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Mike Mains & the Branches, Plutocrat Noose, Barz Blackman, Overdost, Fortified PhonetX. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cello Fury. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 01

31ST STREET PUB. Solar Burn, Byzantine, Single Bullet Theory Strip District. 412-735-4755. BEAVER FALLS TURNERS CLUB. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver Falls. 724-843-7576. BRILLOBOX. Kid Durango,

Chris Kintucky, Imperial Railway, Bassette. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. BYHAM THEATER. Richard Thompson & Teddy Thompson. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CATTIVO. The Cynics, Neighbours, Vertigo-go, DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-231-4766 x 11. CLUB CAFE. Charlie Parr, Doug Blevins, Henry Skerritt (Early) The Neverwers, Hepcat Dilemma (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Blake & Dean. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Photo Joe & The Negatives, SixSpeed Kill, Crooked Cobras. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Tre Lads. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Howlin’ Brothers, Dan Tedesco, Isaac Merz. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MP 3 MONDAY TIM KORENICH

FRI 28

CLUB CAFE. Jill Sobule (Early) Michael Dawson, Jasmine Tate, Frnak Vieira (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Hemlock Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Gary Prisby. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jude Benedict & the Last Drop, Willful Souls, City Love Story. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. In Transit. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LATITUDE 40. DaPhunk Band. North Fayette. 412-693-5555. MOONDOG’S. Lou Lombardi’s Strangelove. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Grand Piano. North Side. 412-224-2273. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Hugo Down. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. REX THEATER. Zach Deputy,

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Tim Korenich of The Beauregards; stream or download his solo single,

“We Can Start Again,” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. 412-655-3553. MOONDOG’S. Commander Cody. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Second Empire, Leeja STARK, Lies, Inc., Lady Beast. Female Voices Of Metal Fest II. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. The Avett Brothers, Old Crow Medicine Show. Oakland. 412-648-3054. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. 13 Stories. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Blue Sky Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Bob Morelli’s Tribute to Dean Martin. 412-487-6259. SALATINO’S RIVERHOUSE CAFE. King’s Ransom. 724-565-5700. SMILING MOOSE. Wrought Iron, Liquified Guts, Post Mortal Possession, Fisthammer. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Doppler Affect. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pressure, PANDEMIC, The Shifters. The Pressure LP Release Party. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. Moose Tracks, Bill Couch. West End. 412-458-0417.

hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

FRI 28

SAT 01

CLUB CAFE. Water Liars, Paul Luc, Look Left. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Yeesh, Roulette Waves, CALYX. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Gary Clark Jr. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Sleepy Sun. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 03

SUN 02

MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Sword, Big Business, O’Brother. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. July Talk. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 04

31ST STREET PUB. Windhand, Molasses Barge, Lost Realms. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. That 1 Guy. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang, Reformed Whores. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 05

31ST STREET PUB. The Fleshtones, Nic Lawless & the Young Criminales, East End Gassers. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. Caroline Smith, Lyndsey Smith, Scott & Rosanna. South Side. 412-431-4950. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SMILING MOOSE. Get Scared, Hearts & Hands, Farewell My Love & More. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 27

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ

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SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 28

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Vince Agwada. Strip District. 412-281-6593. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Bill Toms. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE R BAR. Angel Blue & The Prophets. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Emsworth. 412-761-6700. WINGHART’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Monroeville. 412-372-5500.

FULL LIST ONLINE

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Vinyly. w/ Tom Cox, Jwan Allen, & Preslav Lefterov. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 02

THU 27

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ www. per Connor. South Side. pa pghcitym 412-381-1330. .co

SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 04

SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 05

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Mike, DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 28

CLUB V. TGrizz, TreeO, Gmunny, Quizzle. Blawnox. 724-393-5343. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Insane Eric, Skippy Ickum, Legally Insane, See Dee Snutz, Demented, Ghozt Tha Dmented. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

TUE 04

SMILING MOOSE. Reef the Lost Cause, Adlib, Matt Maddox, J.O., The Last Man, Ghetto MC, Overdost. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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THE HOP HOUSE. Sweaty Betty. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross.

TUE 04

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

JAZZ

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

MARCH 7

Bronsen Euard

TUE 04

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Erik Lawrence, Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

w/Heidi Jacobs MARCH 22

Paul Luc

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Cyro Baptista’s Banquet of the Spirits. North Side. 412-237-8300.

The Rough & Tumble

ACOUSTIC THU 27

THE BEER MARKET. Jim Graff. North Side. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JAVA HOUSE. Jack McLaughin, Scott Abert. Brighton Heights. 412-415-0734. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Tony Janflone Jr. Washington.

FRI 28

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. BELLEFIELD HALL. Silk Sound. Oakland. 412-624-4266. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Allan Harris, Ernie Andrews & Milton Suggs. The Gentlemen Sing. North Side. 412-322-1773. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dr. Zoot. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 01

CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. The Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SUN 02

SONOMA GRILLE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

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Fri, Feb 28 • 9pm ROCK

Cello Fury

The Pressure (LP RELEASE)

PLUS The Shifters AND

Pandemic

Mon, March 3 • 9pm Open Stage WITH

abkmusic.com/coh-events

Tues, March 4 • 9pm JAZZ

thecenterofharmony.com/

Space Exchange Series

events/upcoming/

Buy presale and save $$$ 253 Mercer St., Harmony, PA 16037

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

The Grifters

SGD

Presented By

724-400-6044

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

Thurs, Feb, 27 • 9pm AMERICANA/FOLK The Black Lillies PLUS

Sat, March 1 • 9pm 60'S STYLE REGGAE/SKA

APRIL 4

WED 05

THU 27

M U S I C

An Evening of Music

MON 03

BLUES

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Rock The Mic

Celebrating the Life & Music of Aaron “A-Man” Wellons

DON’T MISS IT!

March

15, 2014 7p.m. - 11p.m.

$10 in advance $15 at the door

Hear phenomenal local and surrounding area artists Fashion show by CAPRICORN Entertainment Emcee’d by Leslie “Ezra” Smith

Mr. Smalls Theater

400 Lincoln Ave. • Millvale, PA • 15209 Tickets can be purchased at: Eventbrite.com/aman-rock-the-mic-celebration Dorsey’s Record Shop 7614 Frankstown Ave. (Homewood) 412-731-6607 Stedeford’s Record Shop 417 E. Ohio Street, 412-321-8333

Proceeds to BENEFIT up and coming musical artists and prescription drug addiction awareness groups S C R E E N

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

EARLY WARNINGS

FRI 28

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Raised by Wolves. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Skero & Jingles. Greensburg. 724-836-7687.

SAT 01

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. THE R BAR. Leigh-Anne Yost. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

SUN 02

THU/FEB 27/10PM DEREK WOODZ BAND THU/MARCH 6/10PM BRAZILIAN WAX

WED 05

THU/MARCH 13/10PM The Carny Stomp, Apache Fog, Death Valley Rally, Stellarscope $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. David Bronson. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG. Michelle Lewis. Greensburg.

SOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm. 1$ off all craft brews! Cheers! C heeers!! Ca Carm arm an and nd M Mike! ikke!

1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

$2.00 16Yuengling Drafts oz

9:30pm-1:30am sponsored by

OVER 21 ONLY

1314 EAST CARSON ST. ST S OU TH SID E WWW.D EESCA F E.COM POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

{WED., MAY 14}

Neon Trees

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

{WED., JUNE 04}

Old 97’s

BYHAM THEATER. Soweto Gospel Choir. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

SAT S SA A 01

BU BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN U NA A NATIONAL EDUCATION AN AND CULTURAL CENTER. Gra Grand Bon Rien. We West Homestead. 412 412-461-6188.

SUN 02 SU

Joe Cheeta’s High Energy personality, Quick Sense of Humor, Combined with his Ability to get Everyone Involved makes Game Show Junkiessm a Fantastic Time to be had by all!

Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District

THU 27

ROLAND’S IRON LANDING. Nation Beat, Timbeleza, DJ Carla Canarinho. Part of Arrastao Da Alegria Brazilian Carnaval. Strip District. 412-261-3401.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM

{WED., MAY 07}

Peelander-Z

WORLD

FRI 28

Last Sunday of every month! 8 to 11pm

Peelander-Z

CE CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIG HIGH SCHOOL. Che Cherish the Ladies. Trib Tribute to Brenden Fol Foley & benefits Central Cat Catholic Crew & Oakland Cat Catholic Rowing. Oakland. 1-8 1-888-718-4253.

FRI 28

LIVING ROOM CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT. Eastminster Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-527-0567. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Symphonie Espagnole feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Joshua Bell, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FULL SAT 01 LIST E JACK QUARTET. Andy Warhol ONLwIN w. w paper pghcitym .co

COUNTRY C FRI 28 FR

NIE NIED’S HOTEL. The Slim For Forsythe Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412 412-781-9853. REX THEATER. Reverend Pey Peyton’s Big Damn Roots Rev Revolution Tour w/ Dex Rom m Romweber Duo. South Side. 412 12 412-381-6811.

SAT 01 SA

CLASSICAL

MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PITTSBURGH CONCERT CHORALE. Ingomar United Methodist Church. 412-635-7654. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Symphonie Espagnole feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Joshua Bell, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 02

THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Downton/Dahntahn Abbey Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH CONCERT CHORALE. Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Fox Chapel. 412-635-7654. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Symphonie

Espagnole feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Joshua Bell, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SOPRANO MARLISSA HUDSON & ORGANIST MARVIN MILLS. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

WED 05

CARNEGIE MELLON PHILHARMONIC. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383.

OTHER MUSIC FRI 28

KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Soundwaves Steelband. East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SUN 02

EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Marlissa Hudson & Marvin Mills. East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11.

MON 03

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Carol Woods. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

EASY LISTENING/ OLDIES SUN 02

THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

February 26 - March 4 WEDNESDAY 26 Histoire du Soldat

GEORGE R. WHITE STUDIO, PITTSBURGH OPERA. Tickets: attacktheatre.com or 1-888-71-TICKETS. 7:30p.m. Through March 1.

We are the In Crowd

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests William Beckett, Set It Off & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

THURSDAY 27 The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through March 2.

Soweto Gospel Choir

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Taylor Williamson

thechinesenutcracker. 4:30p.m. & 7p.m.

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through March 1.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Limited all ages. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Featuring Lady Beast, Second Empire & more. All ages show. Tickets: sardonyxproductions. com. 7p.m.

PITTSBURGH WINTER BEERFEST

A Steady Rain

Jim Norton

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. Over 18 show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

Comedian Marques Bunn

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Downtown. Over 21 event. Tickets: pittsburghbeerfest. com. Through March 1.

LATITUDE 40 Robinson Twp. 412-693-5555. Over 18 show. Tickets: latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa. 8p.m.

PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER Oakland. With special guests Old Crow Medicine Show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com. 7:30p.m.

SATURDAY 19 SOUND SERIES: JACK Quartet

The 10th Annual Green 17 Tour with Flogging Molly

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org or music. pitt.edu/tickets. 8p.m. AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. Tickets: showclix.com/event/

MONDAY 34 MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Big Business & O Brother. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 45

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. With special guests The Drowning Men & Pasadena. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Chinese Nutcracker

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests KDH, Talley Cavy & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

The Sword

The Avett Brothers

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28 DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER

FRIDAY 28

Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest

Sleepy Sun

Female Voices of Metal Fest 2

The Unlikely Candidates / The Vegabonds

NEW HAZLETT THEATER Allegheny Square. Tickets: barebonesproductions.com or 1-888-71-TICKETS. Through March 2.

SUNDAY 23

Les Claypool’s Duo De Twang

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Reformed Whores. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

THE KITE

at the Waterfront

2014

THE INVIDIA

108 WEST BRIDGE ST.

SPRING

THE JEWEL

412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes

THE TSUNAMI N E W S

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KILL AND BE CURED

DESPITE THE IMPRIMATUR OF PLINY, POMPEII ’S ANTECEDENTS ARE DECIDEDLY LOW-BROW

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL} The Paris-based actioner 3 Days to Kill, directed by McG, has something for everyone, even if all the pieces don’t hang together well. Kevin Costner plays Ethan Renner, a newly retired CIA agent trying to reconnect with his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld). But there’s a catch: He’s dying from brain cancer. (And as if the man wasn’t suffering enough, he returns home to find his apartment has been taken over by a family of squatters who can’t be forced to leave.)

THE WRATH OF VULCAN

Have gun, will get better: Kevin Costner

But then, Renner meets a mysterious woman (Amber Heard) who promises to cure his cancer if he kills a dangerous CIA target. The stage is set: Renner must juggle rekindling a relationship with his daughter and ex-wife (Connie Nielsen), while killing and torturing his way to running down one of the CIA’s most wanted. Amidst the violence, there are tender moments, like when Renner teaches his daughter to ride a bike, and comical scenes, including Renner asking the man he’s torturing for advice on being a better father. Individually, these disparate elements are entertaining, but rolled together, they leave the story feeling slightly disjointed. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A&E’s new crime thriller,

Those Who Kill, shot in Pittsburgh last fall, begins Mon., March 3. The 10-part series is adapted from a Danish television series, and stars Chloe Sevigny, as a police detective, and James D’Arcy, as a forensic psychologist, hunting a serial killer. 10 p.m. A&E cable channel

{BY AL HOFF}

I

T’S A CLASSY move, opening a movie with thoughts from Pliny the Younger. Especially from Paul W.S. Anderson, a director who has previously put Alien vs. Predator and the Resident Evil franchise into cultural history. But both classicists and cheesy-movie fans will be disappointed with Pompeii, a rather — ahem — overheated account of the very bad day in the year 79, when Mount Vesuvius erupted and buried the titular Italian town. The quickie plot is hard to invest in when you know, at best, the characters end up as plaster-preserved tourist attractions. It centers on a slave-turned-gladiator named Milo (Game of Thrones’ Kit Harrington) who comes to Pompeii just in time to: bond with Atticus (Adewale AkinnuoyeAgbaje), another slave-gladiator; fall in love with a local rich girl, Cassia (Emily Browning); meet the evil Roman senator (Kiefer Sutherland) who slaughtered his family; wage a few sword fights; and watch a volcano destroy everything. (Bonus subplot: He’s also a horse-whisperer!) Despite the imprimatur of Pliny, Pompeii’s antecedents are decidedly low-brow

Love in the time of Vesuvius: Cassia (Emily Browning) and Milo (Kit Harrington)

— a mash-up of swords-and-sandals, doomed romance and disaster pic. Even more disappointing, it fails to embrace the sublime Majesty of the Dreadful and the knowing Wink of Schlock that could have elevated this love-and-lava spectacle to something entertaining. It has its moments, including the afore-

POMPEII

DIRECTED BY: Paul W.S. Anderson STARRING: Kit Harrington, Emily Browning, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje In 3-D, in select theaters

mentioned horse-whispering; a delirious scene where the townsfolk are mowed down by a boat (!); and a lot of men in short skirts, mashing their well-honed physiques into one another. (In an era before readily available erotica, I could see Pompeii providing a few thrills.) If you spring for the 3-D glasses, you get some flaming rocks in your face (and those oiled-up man-muscles really pop), but the glasses also make everything on screen — already covered in a hazy light from ash clouds — a lot darker. Only Sutherland seems to get that everything about Pompeii needs to be more ridiculous: He delivers his lines with a clenched-teeth unctuousness that denotes “dastardly villain who will later die screaming.” It made me pine for the classic Irwin Allen disaster films of the 1970s, and I wiled away Pompeii’s duller parts reimagining the film as a sprawling feature packed with a dozen mini-melodramas, acted out by a variety of hack and has-been actors. More evil Romans, some slinky slave girls, at least two more love stories, a dog, a Kardashian, a haunting love theme and a flowing-lava cam. Now, that’s a movie! A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

NON-STOP. Liam Neeson stars as an air marshal who must take action when passengers aboard a trans-Atlantic flight become pawns in a blackmail scheme. Jaume Collet-Serra (Unknown) directs. Starts Fri., Feb. 28 OSCAR-N OMIN ATED AN IMATED SHORTS. Here’s your last chance to catch this programs of short animated films up for a 2014 Academy Award. The nominees: a lyrical feral child, a kind-hearted witch, a befuddled samurai, a lonely steampunk man, and Mickey Mouse. Fri., Feb. 28, through Sun., March 2. Melwood

CP

OSCAR-N OMIN ATED DOCUMEN TARY SHORTS. One more chance to catch these short documentaries before the Academy Awards are handed out Sun., March 3. Subjects include: a man digging elaborate caves out of sandstone hills in New Mexico; two men making a reconciliation after a decades-old hate crime; a prison hospice in Iowa; and a footage from a public demonstration turned deadly in Yemen. Also of note: “The Lady in Number 6,” which tells the story of the life-loving Alice HerzSommer, the world’s oldest Holocaust survivor; Herz-Sommer died last week, at 110. Starts Fri, Feb. 28. Regent Square

CP

OSCAR-N OMIN ATED LIVE-ACTION . One of these short films will win an Academy Award Sunday night — see them first. The live-action program offers a comedy from Finland, a chat with “God,” a fantastical afterlife called Helium, child soldiers in Africa, and a domestic-abuse drama. Sat., March 1, and Sun., March 2. Melwood

CP

Son of God earthquake, we land in the thick of it: Stalingrad, November 1942, during one of World War II’s worst battles. A small, ragtag group of Russian soldiers and sailors captures a building near the strategically vital Volga River and, from it, fend off a slightly larger group of Nazis (approaching ragtag status themselves). Around them in the bombed-out, persistently burning city are a handful of citizens simply trying to survive. Fedor Bondarchuk’s film is fairly typical of the genre — a microcosm-of-war battle for a tiny bit of ground, while also allowing for various heroic and sentimental stories to unfold among the troops. The CONTINUES ON PG. 42

SON OF GOD. This stand-alone feature is a spin-off of the History Channel TV series The Bible, and covers the birth, life, death and comeback of Jesus (Diogo Morgado). Christopher Spencer directs. Starts Fri., Feb. 28 STALINGRAD. After an unnecessary and clunky framing device that finds a Russian man rescuing trapped Germans after the 2011 Japanese

Forgotten Kingdom (2013) - 2/27 @ 7:30pm Atang leaves the hustle of Johannesburg to return to his ancestral land of Lesotho, where he must bury his estranged father in the remote, mountainous village where he was born.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pulp Fiction (1994) - 2/28 @ 7&10pm, 3/1@7&10pm ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Hollywood Awards Party - 3/2 @ 6:30pm Join the Hollywood Theater in celebrating the biggest night of the year in film! We’ll have games, contests, and prize giveaways all night!

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org N E W S

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Stalingrad Russians, whose group includes an opera singer, are humanized by the building’s lone occupant, a timid teen-age girl whom they protect. Across the square, a relatively sympathetic Nazi officer falls in love with a Russian woman. Stalingrad is Russia’s first 3-D IMAX movie, and that showy technology is just one of the tools in Bondarchuk’s kit to make a highly romanticized visual orgy of war atrocities — from symphonic music and slow motion to constantly falling ash and tanks running over statues of children. (It’s rated PG-13, so it’s the comic-book version of war horrors.) The 3-D helps the elaborately reconstructed sets of ruined Stalingrad feel more realistic. On the other hand, when our heroes amid the murk are spotlit with golden light, Bondarchuk’s romanticism is laughably old-fashioned. The film was a big hit in Russia, and when you scope the slow-motion majesty of Russian soldiers running headlong, guns blazing, into the German trenches, while on fire, it’s easy to see why. In 3-D IMAX, at select theaters. In Russian and German, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 28 (Al Hoff)

McKEESPORT PITTSBURGH

201 Smithfield St. 412-288-9947 BROOKLINE

732 Brookline Blvd. 412-571-0700 MT. OLIVER

226 Brownsville Road 412-904-3120 SHARPSBURG

920 Main Street 412-784-1043

222 5th Avenue 412-637-2920

EAST LIBERTY

MILLVALE

5903 Penn Ave. 412-361-0666

210 Grant Avenue 412-821-4246

NATRONA HEIGHTS

BLOOMFIELD

2620 Freeport Road 724-895-3185

4622 Liberty Avenue 412-821-6171

SQUIRREL HILL

DOWNTOWN

2301 Murray Avenue 412-422-6661

951 Liberty Avenue 412-434-6262

LAWRENCEVILLE

WASHINGTON, PA

4213 Butler Street 412-682-0217

1025 Jefferson Ave. 724-222-9525 Limited time offer. See store for details. $25 down and $25/Month,with no interest if you qualify. Samsung and the Samsung Galaxy are both registered trademarks of Samsung Electronic Co., Ltd. All products and brand names are trademarks or registered of their respective companies. Screen image simulated. Appearance of the phone may vary. For 4GLTE coverage, please see mycricket.com. Terms,conditions and other restrictions apply. Sales tax excluded. ©2013 Cricket Communications, Inc.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

DAMAGE CON TROL: THE FILMS OF ADAM PARADIS AND JB MABE. A selection of short films from Paradis and Mabe, in a variety of formats (Super 8, 16 mm, 35 mm, video) and styles. 8 p.m. Thu., Feb. 27. Melwood PULP FICTION. Quentin Tarantino’s nonlinear, darkly comic 1994 celebration of crime, coincidence and fastfood hamburgers has many noted players, quotable lines and memorable scenes. (If you’ve never seen the film, you can’t go wrong with Christopher Walken’s soliloquy about the Vietnam War … or with Travolta’s bumbling.) Often imitated, Pulp Fiction still holds its own against the scores of pale pretenders that followed. 7 and 10 p.m. Fri., Feb. 28; and 7 and 10 p.m. Sat., March 1. Hollywood

THE WIN D RISES. This Japanese anime from Hayao Miyazaki recounts the story of an airplaneobsessed boy who channels his passion for flying into aeronautical design. The film is nominated for Best Animated Film Academy Award. Starts Fri., Feb. 28.

REPERTORY

GHOST. Her true love dies, but he returns as a potterywheel-friendly ghost. Demi Moore and Patrick Swayze star in Jerry Zucker’s 1990 romance. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 26. AMC Loews. $5 KILLER OF SHEEP. Charles Burnett’s 1977 masterwork — a quiet gut-punch depicting life in Watts — is one of the best American films ever about children, city life, the working class and the black experience, all at once. The central story concerns a melancholy slaughterhouse worker named Stan and his troubled relationship with his wife. As poignant as it is bracingly unsentimental, it’s also a pretty fair piece of visual art. Shot for nickels, Killer of Sheep portrays a community in a gritty, deep-focus black and white that coats your hands with the dust of vacant lots and puts your feet on the asphalt of summer streets. Still, while Killer of Sheep is as stylistically assured as it is unique, it remains inescapably sorrowful — but it’s beautifully, angrily, incisively so. 8 p.m. Wed., Feb. 26. Melwood. $2 (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

THE FORGOTTEN KINGDOM. This new drama from Andrew Mudge is the first feature to be shot in Lesotho. In it, a man travels from Johannesburg to the southern African country to bury his father, and finds himself drawn to his ancestral homeland. In Basotho, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 27. Hollywood

Feral at Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts ON MY WAY. Leaving behind a failed relationship and a struggling business, a woman (Catherine Deneuve) takes a road trip with her grandson. Emmaneulle Bercot directs this new French dramedy. In French, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 5. Hollywood THE NEVERENDING STORY. A book leads a bullied boy into a fantasy land where he has a chance to be the hero. Wolfgang Petersen directs this 1984 family adventure film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 5. AMC Loews. $5 LOST HIGHWAY. Bill Pullman and Patricia Arquette star in David Lynch’s thriller about a jazz musician who, after being framed for his wife’s murder, gradually morphs into a different man altogether. The 1997 film continues a monthly spotlight series on the films of Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Thu., March 6; 10:15 p.m. Fri., March 7; 10 p.m. Sat., March 8; and 7 p.m. Sun., March 9. Hollywood AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[ART REVIEW]

HABITATS

“I CAN MAKE FUN OF THINGS EVEN IF I FIND THEM REPULSIVE.”

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL 2013 continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org N E W S

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JIM NORTON LOVES YOU [COMEDY]

Joel Sternfeld’s “New Elm Springs Colony,” depicting Hutterites in South Dakota

Joel Sternfeld’s Carnegie International photo series is called Sweet Earth: Experimental Utopias in America. Still, perhaps only half of these 29 large-scale C-prints document someone’s attempt to create a thoroughly new and ideal way of life for a large group of people. True, the Kaweah Cooperative thought itself a model society; the 1880s socialist logging community, undone by the creation of Sequoia National Park, is ironically symbolized by Sternfeld’s image of the General Sherman Tree (their “Karl Marx Tree”). But other images include Chicago’s city-hall garden roof — a fine idea, but hardly society-shaking. And if Leonard Knight’s epic outsider-art Jesus shrine Salvation Mountain is a utopia, it’s his alone. Sternfeld is an acclaimed photographer based in New York City. In a recent Carnegie Museum of Art talk, he traced his thematic concerns to youthful readings of Thoreau. Many of his subjects have deep-green ideals, including a pensive Paolo Soleri, who founded the iconic, half-built eco-city Arcosanti. Most photos in Sweet Earth come with several hundred words of explanatory text. But curiously, only a handful of the photos depict people who have anything to do with the experiment in question. Understandably unpeopled are the geodesic-dome ruins of celebrated 1960s Colorado artists’ collective Drop City. And Ambridge, Pa.’s long-defunct Harmonist community, Old Economy, is occupied only by a bride who’s hired the place for her big day. But why is Tennessee’s The Farm — a long-running, still-thriving collectiveliving experiment with many spinoffs and charitable projects — represented by an ancient school bus on blocks? Populated, Sternfeld’s photos spring to life. The 1982 portrait of famed pacifist Scott Nearing — whose 1930s back-to-the-land ethos presaged many of these experiments — is deeply poignant. A self-governing recreational community based on an abandoned California military facility is charmingly represented by a young woman in a tiara and secondhand prom gown. Perhaps inevitably, idealism denied haunts Sweet Earth. A stylized gazebo is all that’s left of “America’s first secular utopian experiment,” in New Harmony, Ind.; the disaster-prone, self-contained environment of Biosphere 2 is pathetically survived by an innocuous whiteboard listing one day’s menu. By contrast, there’s “North Street CoHousing, Davis, Calif.,” whose 17 suburban home-owners removed their backyard fences and now happily share laundry facilities, some meals and a woodshop — a sort of limited-liability utopia.

{BY JOSHUA M. PATTON}

“I HUMILIATE MYSELF, BECAUSE THEN I THINK PEOPLE FEEL MORE COMFORTABLE BEING MADE FUN OF.”

W

HILE WATCHING a viral video of a

family with a pet deer, Jim Norton, the third mic on Sirus/XM’s Opie & Anthony Show, confesses sweetly, “I want to pet a deer.” Host Anthony Cumia gears up to lob insults his way, but Norton continues, “I want to pet a deer, with brass knuckles ... and gently stroke his chin with a roundhouse.” The studio erupts in laughter. It’s easy to see how that joke could bother some people, despite the inherent ridiculousness of the premise. And while Norton understands why some people simply don’t find such jokes funny, the nationally known comedian absolutely doesn’t care if they are offended. In fact, Norton is often outspoken about why he dislikes circuses, Sea World, and the practice of raising conservation funds by selling permits to kill endangered animals like the black rhino. “I loathe cruelty to animals,” said Norton from New York City in a recent phone interview with City Paper. But, he explains, “I can make fun of things even if I find them repulsive.” Norton, who’s 45, has also been very outspoken about recent controversies faced by comedians, celebrities and even everyday people who lose their jobs simply because of something they said. Norton doesn’t believe the sort of outrage such controversies generate is genuine. “I think their outrage is fake,” he says, calling it “arbitrary” and “convenient” because it’s

Jim Norton wants to pet a deer.

a way for people to force their views on society at large. Take Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty. When A&E suspended the reality-TV star for homophobic comments he made to GQ,

JIM NORTON

8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 28. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead, 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $25-45. 412-368-5225 or www.librarymusichall.com

Norton criticized the channel even though he thinks that religious arguments against homosexuality are nonsense. “I don’t have to agree with somebody to not want to see them penalized for saying something,” Norton says, adding, “You can’t just always defend things you like.” Like all great comedians, Norton worships at the altar of unbridled honesty. “I never go onstage and lie,” he says. Whether discussing sexuality, his problems with CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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JIM NORTON LOVES YOU, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

[DANCE REVIEW]

IN MOTION {BY STEVE SUCATO}

Oscar Carrillo and Vanessa Guinto in Garfield Lemonius’ “Flight” {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

addiction (he has been sober since he was 18), or his own insecurities, Norton exposes everything through his art. He feels compelled to speak out whenever anyone’s right to expression is being suppressed. “I think all comedians should do that,” he says. What Norton values about working on the Opie & Anthony Show is its free-range format — so free-range that in 2000, he and Lewis Black spent a night in jail because of a stunt for the show that involved driving around New York City with a busload of naked women. One of the reasons he likes Pittsburgh — which he likens in temperament to New Jersey and blue-collar New York — is because it is also a great city for radio, which translates to good audiences for comedy. “They don’t want you to try to be better than they are,” he says. “If you’re funny they respond to it.” Norton loves radio almost as much as he loves standup. Last year, he hosted a weekly one-hour call-in show on Sirius/ XM. Although its original billing as an “advice show” was meant as a goof, from the start listeners were calling in for help with real problems. Despite all of his trashing of public figures, and punchlines that are just as likely to make one cringe as laugh, Norton revealed himself to be a remarkably sensitive and caring advocate for his listeners, and never judgmental. Unlike such call-in advice hosts as Dr. Drew, Norton never set himself above the callers. He also never claimed to be able to solve their problems. Instead, he listened. And often, guided by deliberate questions from Norton, even callers in denial about their problems realized those problems were self-evident. Most often, the calls focused on addiction, and Norton served as a rational voice, encouraging callers to seek programs in their neighborhoods or professional help. One exchange, conducted via email, involved a veteran who felt suicidal, another issue Norton has dealt with personally. Along with teenage alcoholism and drug addiction, Norton used to cut himself — “Norton’s forearms look like a roadmap,” Gregg “Opie” Hughes once said on the show — and even attempted suicide. All of his struggles have been discussed in a funny and cathartic way on radio, in his act, and in his two bestselling memoirs, Happy Endings and I Hate Your Guts. “I humiliate myself, because then I think people feel more comfortable being made fun of,” says Norton. But Norton’s comedy is not really about making fun of other people or intentionally embarrassing anyone. Instead, he hilariously shows audiences that, deep down, we have all got a little scumbag inside of us.

Variety marks the Point Park University Conservatory Dance Company’s annual faculty choreography production. The program, whose six works ranged in style and subject matter from the crucifixion of Christ to a tribute to the late Bob Fosse, led with Keisha Lalama’s “All Together Now.” Frantic percussive music by Ian Green hailed a flood of dancers as they ran wildly onto the stage. The dozen dancers then settled into a storyline in which Meg Meyer dominated her fellow performers, aggressively posturing and firing off intimidating stares as she bullied groups of them to compete against one another in dance-offs. Lalama’s choreography was creative at times, but the work’s outcome — in which Meyer was supplanted by another performer — felt clichéd. Following Ronald Hutson’s soothing AfroCaribbean-infused “Sand Painting,” choreographer Doug Benz lent movement to two passages from the Gospel of Mark in his “Arc of Descent/Gethsemane (2014).” Part one of this work, set to evening-forest sounds of chirping insects, was a moving, athletic duet performed marvelously by John O’Neill and Alex Hathaway. It referenced the biblical duality of Jesus as both a mortal son in pained struggle and as God, the father, comforting him in the face of the coming crucifixion. Part two featured a trio of female dancers — depicting the Virgin Mary, Salome and Mary Magdalene — watching from a distance the events surrounding that crucifixion. Benz’s choreography for both sections, and the dancers’ performances, were strong, but the two sections lacked stylistic cohesion. The program’s second half opened with Peter LeBreton Merz’s “I Gaze Upon the World in Wonder.” Set to a piano score by Debussy, played live by Sergey Marchukov, the ballet interpreted several images of familiar artworks, including Gustave Caillebotte’s “Paris Street; Rainy Day.” The technically challenging ballet included several fine dancer performances, including that of an elegant Kathryn Van Yahres. The diversely entertaining program concluded with two energetic works. Garfield Lemonius’ beautifully crafted “Flight” took off immediately with powerfully driven dancing full of twists and turns, and was highlighted by an intertwining and daring duet superbly performed by Oscar Carrillo and Vanessa Guinto. The toe-tapping “A Fosse Retrospective” ended things with a high-kicking, “jazz hands”-waving bang. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CONSERVATORY DANCE COMPANY AT POINT PARK UNIVERSITY continues Fri., Feb. 28, through Sun., March 2. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com


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[PLAY REVIEWS]

BLOODY RIGHT {BY TED HOOVER} THE IDEA BEHIND Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson is that Jackson was the first “American” president. According to book-writer Alex Timbers and composer/ lyricist Michael Friedman, Jackson forced his way into American politics by lambasting our first six presidents as oldguard politicos who were keeping alive the notion of British aristocracy. As seen by Timbers and Friedman, Jackson was America’s first political rock star. And to tell his story, they’ve created a rock musical, now receiving its first major Pittsburgh production, from Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company. The word “musical” might be misleading. Bloody Bloody is more like a hip/cool history pageant written by Bertolt Brecht: brief rock numbers commenting on the action; the virtual absence of a fourth wall; self-knowing, self-mocking irony and satire; and a mountain of extremely funny and excessively intelligent jokes. It’s all to tell Jackson’s story. Much of what we consider the American character was put there by Jackson; he forged our “land of the people” ethos, doubled the size of the country, founded the Democratic Party, and campaigned for direct democracy. And, oh yeah, he committed genocide. In order for America to be what it’s become, we had to kill the people already here. As both a public and a private citizen, Jackson murdered as many Native Americans as he could. The show specifically asks: “American hero or American Hitler?”

BLOODY, BLOODY ANDREW JACKSON

NEXT N E X T WEEK! WE E K!

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Young Hickory: Reed Worth in Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson at Point Park Conservatory

THURSDAY, MARCH 6 š 7:30PM T

can’t have been an easy piece to put up — Timbers and Friedman really have created a barnburner — so it’s perhaps not entirely McKelvey’s fault that it seems to get away from him now and again. But that’s a minor complaint compared to his major accomplishments. The work of this design team and the huge student cast, crew and fleet of music ians are nothing short of astounding in their energy, focus and drive. And it gives me great pleasure to single out Reed Worth’s electrifying, mammoth turn as Jackson; it’s a starmaking part, and Worth gives a starmaking performance.

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BALKY {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} CONFESSION TIME: I began my journal-

continues through Sun., March 2. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Sorting out that question makes for a dynamite evening of theater that enthralled me from beginning to end. Timbers and Friedman have created a show as noisy, freewheeling and dangerous as Jackson’s legendary inauguration. Michael McKelvey directs with the exact fast-paced gusto required. This

ism “career” as a sportswriter. Really. High school, college — my first professional assignment was part of a package covering the epoch-marking death of Roberto Clemente. So when Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. trumpeted a new one-woman show about “a sports commentator [who] returns to her hometown … and reminisces about … her life between the Pirates’ 1971 World Series win and the New Year’s Eve 1972 death of … Clemente,” my little ears perked up. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

CORRECTION: OUR FEB. 19 PLAY REVIEW OF AGAMEMNON MISTAKENLY REFERRED TO HENRY HEYMANN, THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH’S FORMER LONGTIME SCENIC DESIGNER, AS “THE LATE.” MR. HEYMANN, WHO RETIRED IN 1993, IS STILL ALIVE.

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PLAY REVIEWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Russ Babines’ The Great One sounded like something I might recognize. In a very alternate universe. The good news is that the company’s multimedia production is dazzling. Director Don DiGiulio and his design team deftly move the action through time and space with projections, lighting and sound. Respectively, Carolina Loyola-Garcia, Bob Steineck and Mark Whitehead deserve applause, along with Diane Melchitsky’s multi-part set (though the Roberto “painting” should have been discarded).

THE GREAT ONE

continues through March 15. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $21. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com

Great also defines this solo performance of Tressa Glover, who portrays the central character, Molly, as well as Molly’s childhood friends, mostly boys. Those who admired Glover’s energy in City Theatre’s Charles Ives Take Me Home can savor that spark again, served with even more versatility. For most of this 80-minute comingof-age one-act, she portrays hyperactive 13-year-olds just getting a look at puberty and life.

Unfortunately, the script has more credibility gaps than the Johnson and Nixon administrations combined. How does the second daughter of a four-child family have her own room with everyone scrunched inside a Levittown-style ranch? The playmates more resemble The Little Rascals than Pittsburgh (Etna?) kids. But the biggest hole is at the climax, when the adult Molly claims that her best friend “made me a better person.” Huh. The play opens with Molly as a “successful” adult who blows off her kids, her husband and the awards she somehow garners — i.e., she’s the very portrait of the self-spoiled solipsistic jerk that we later see her Cleaver-clone parents strove to avoid. Sports in general and baseball in particular are likewise tangential to The Great One. And if you’re curious, the legendary Pirate right fielder is little more than an occasionally false, and often forced, plot device. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

HUNG OVER {BY COLETTE NEWBY} CARNEGIE MELLON University School of Drama’s production of Andrew Lippa’s The

Wild Party, a 2000 musical based on the 1928 poem of the same name, is a jazzy 1920s-nightclub-inspired show about people getting drunk and yelling at each other. This makes it an excellent substitute for people who can’t make it all the way out to Lawrenceville.

THE WILD PARTY

continues through Sat., March 1. Philip Chosky Theater, CMU campus, Oakland. $10-29. 412-268-2407 or www.drama.cmu.edu

Queenie (played here by Claire Saunders) and Burrs (Brian Muller) are two performers in love, whose emotions run high and lead to conflict almost constantly. As the show opens, they have yet another fight. Queenie’s planned revenge is to throw a party and make Burrs jealous of an as-yetundecided partygoer. An interesting note about director Matthew Gardiner and choreographer Tome Cousin: In a show about performers, the most vaudevillian numbers end up among the least memorable. Where the show excels is the party scenes, when the set, employing a pair of rotating platforms, becomes a syncopated whirlwind

of activity. With only 12 performers, the cast manages to crowd the entire stage, creating a real party atmosphere. That said, you ought to be aware that this is a production whose choreographer somehow decided a fight scene needs actors moving in slow motion. It’s a throwback — but not to 1928. As The Wild Party is told almost entirely through song, you can see the gap between the songs Lippa enjoyed writing, where the fun is infectious, and ones written out of duty to the plot, which are just dire. The four or five that hit really hit, but it’s not until halfway through the first act that you hear a single one worth humming. I was also surprised by how uninspired the show’s depiction of sex was; characters just sort of stripped and humped in their underwear. Then there’s the second number, which features what I can only describe as a doo-wop rape scene. Musicals are weird. Pay special attention to the thankless role of Kegs, played by one Jimmy Nicholas — stuck in leather pants with the same haircut as Neil from The Young Ones — who gets precious little material to work with, but made me laugh twice just through wordless reactions to things. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Artist Discussion Dinh Q. Lê Wednesday, March 5, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Join curator Dan Byers as he moderates a discussion between Dinh Q. Lê, Dr. Daniel Lieberfeld (Duquesne University), and Dr. Philip Nash (Penn State University), about the power of images during and after the Vietnam conflict. Free. Courtesy of the artist & Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

Lecture series sponsored by

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Cosponsored by Carnegie Mellon University School of Art and Jeff Pan.

Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.


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FOR THE WEEK OF

02.2703.06.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Art by Dinh Q. Lê

+ THU., FEB. 27 {ART} It’s day one of DRAW2014, a three-day Carnegie Mellon University symposium. Yes, even in the digital age, people still draw. But this program of exhibits, workshops, talks and performances highlights how the practice is changing. Registration for the workshops is closed, though you might try the waiting list. The keynote lectures and exhibitions are free and open to the public, as is Saturday’s day-long expostyle Drawing Arcade at CMU’s Miller Gallery. Speakers include visiting artists Amy Sillman and Stephen Farthing. And on Saturday night, there’s a drawing exhibition, with reception, at Artists Image Resource, on the North Side. Bill O’Driscoll Symposium continues through Sun., March 2. Various locations; prices vary. www.cmu.edu/art/ specialevents/draw2014

MARCH 04

Dinh Q. Lê

Arrested Development, is hosted by Stacy Keene. Instead of being BYOB, tonight’s party is BYOC — “bring your own cookies.” Angela Suico 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847 or www.eastendexchange.com

{SHOWCASE} RAW: Pittsburgh is the local incarnation of an international

MARCH 02 Traveling Souls

{WORDS} We all love a good story, whether we hear it seated near a campfire or while standing in a circle, sipping White Russians. Knowing this, the brains behind True Story Podcast invite people across the nation to hold storytelling parties, record the stories and send in the best ones to be featured on the podcast. Eight local story-tellers will share their experiences tonight at East End Book Exchange. The event, titled True Story:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Art by BobZiller

showcase series for emerging artists in many mediums. Last year, monthly RAW events here drew hundreds. Launching its second season tonight, RAW now takes place every other month, but promises each event will be bigger, with some 40 participating artists in a festival-like atmosphere. Tonight, at its new home, Club Zoo, RAW welcomes 27 visual artists and photographers; hair and make-up artists; a fashion show for local designers; musical acts Shad Ali and Web Three featuring Kaaren Styles; and performances by Yes Brain Dance Theater and burlesque artist Nikki Telladictorian. The evening’s over-21 with a cash bar, and fashionable attire is requested. BO 7 p.m. 1630 Smallman St., Strip District. $15-20. www.rawartists.org/pittsburgh

{MUSIC} On the heels of its fifth album, two-time Grammy-winner Soweto Gospel Choir is touring


Free!Event The Big Read, a national program promoting literacy, begins in Allegheny County on March 3 with a kick-off event at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum. The venue is fitting: This year’s selection is Tim O’ Brien’s The Things They Carried, a collection of short stories about the Vietnam War. The event, organized by the Community College of Allegheny County’s One College … One Community initiative, features keynote speaker Jan Scruggs, founder of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund in Washington, D.C.; a dance and drama piece presented by CCAC students; and the Pittsburgh Gospel Choir. But today is just the tip of the iceberg. As students from Allegheny County high schools and CCAC participate in writing and art contests throughout the month, the public can attend book discussions, film screenings and talks given by military-veteran speakers. (To find events near you, go to www.ccac.edu and search for “Big Read 2014.”) In keeping with the Big Read’s mission to engage the whole community, CCAC faculty will also hold book discussions at local correctional facilities. The school offers all these activities thanks to a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts — it was among the only three Pennsylvania organizations to receive one. Angela Suico Kick-off: 6 p.m. Mon., March 3. Events continue through April. 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-469-6301 or www.ccac.edu

+ FRI.,

FEB. 28

Frick Art & Historical Center, traces the history of our nation’s art. Works date from the country’s formative years to the early 20th century. Genres highlighted include the Hudson River School, the first formal artistic school in America, and the works of American impressionists. Artists

FEB. 27

Soweto Gospel Choir

{COMEDY} At first glance, you’d swear that comedian Mike Bocchetti’s face was one only a mother could love. Not so. “My girlfriend works at a strip club — she’s the bouncer” is one from the New York-based comedian’s trove of one-liners. The veteran comic and actor is the announcer for syndicated The Artie Lange Radio Show. His everyman presence enlivens the jokes he delivers with an entertaining and sometimes wild rapid-fire style: “I was once a victim of identity theft. I hope they have better luck with it than I have.” He’s got two shows tonight, at Arcade Comedy Theater. Charlie Deitch 8 and 10 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15. www.arcadecomedytheater.com

+ SAT., MARCH 01 {ART} An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting, at the

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Wilkinsburg. Free. www. facebook.com/PercolateArt

75-minute show, choreographed by academy director Yanlai Wu (a former principal dancer with the Beijing Youth Dance Troupe), has a cast of 80, ranging from age 3 to adults. BO 4:30 and 7 p.m. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. www. yanlaidanceacademy.com

+ MON., MARCH 03 {EXHIBIT}

MARCH 01

{MUSIC}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SOWETO GOSPEL CHOIR}

the U.S., with a stop tonight at the Byham Theater. Despite its name, the choir performs tunes from many different genres, with covers including Sarah McLachlan’s “Angel” and The Jackson 5’s “I’ll Be There.” While showcasing its versatility, the choir’s tour also honors “the life and legacy of their late President and friend, Nelson Mandela.” The Pittsburgh concert is part of the Cohen & Grigsby Trust Presents series. AS 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-45. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

include Gilbert Stuart, Childe Hassam and Winslow Homer (whose “Picking Flowers” is pictured). The exhibit opens to the public today. AS 10 a.m.5 p.m. Exhibit continues through May 25. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. Free. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

The string quartet is a venerable format, but JACK Quartet keeps it fresh by performing the music of the 20th century along with challenging new work. Violinists Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violist John Pickford Richards and cellist Kevin McFarland have been called “mind-blowingly good” and hailed by critics for their “explosive virtuosity.” The New Yorkbased outfit returns to Pittsburgh to close out this season’s Music on the Edge series. Tonight at The Andy Warhol Museum, JACK plays works by contemporary masters John Zorn, Morton Feldman, Witold Lutoslawski

JACK Quartet

and Hans Abrahamsen. BO 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. 412-624-7529 or www.music.pitt.edu/tickets

his work is in the Alexandria Museum as well as in Washington, D.C.’s Children’s Museum. Bob Ziller is a Pittsburgh fixture who’s exhibited nationally. Their two-man show, Traveling Souls, features work including Elsabee’s gorgeous “Owl” and Ziller’s whimsical “Thad Mosley Owl,” which imagines the iconic local sculptor in wise avian form. BO Opening reception: 3-6 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 27. 317 Trenton Ave.,

+ SUN., MARCH 02 {ART} Wilkinsburg has a new art gallery, called Percolate, and its next show features two seasoned, locally based painters, doing work that sometimes rhymes. Samir Elsabee was born in Egypt, and

{DANCE} The Yanlai Dance Academy celebrates its 10th anniversary in Pittsburgh with an original — yet also familiar — production. The Chinese Nutcracker borrows elements from the classic ballet, but substitutes Chinese New Year for Christmas, and incorporates traditional Chinese music, dance and costuming from some of that country’s many ethnicities. Yanlai teaches everything from ballet to contemporary, as well as classical Chinese styles. This

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An American Ame m rican i Odyssey: Odys Od yss The Warner Collection of American Painting Art by Winslow Homer

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The Battle of Iwo Jima, one of the final and bloodiest fights in World War II’s Pacific theater, took place from Feb. 19March 26, 1945. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum’s new exhibit, War in the Pacific 1941-1945, includes artifacts from this and other battles, including a local marine’s Purple Heart; a captured Japanese Arisaka rifle and bayonet; a hand-painted pin-up girl from the USS Sangay; and photos, uniforms and more. BO 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4141 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5-8. 412-621-4253 or www. soldiersandsailorshall.org

+ TUE., MARCH 04 {ART} Dinh Q. Lê grew up partly in Vietnam, during the “American War.” When he was 10, his family emigrated to the U.S., where Dinh studied art; he later returned to his native land, and his installation Light and Belief — featuring drawings and paintings made by Vietnamese soldiers during the war — is part of the Carnegie International. Tonight, Dinh visits Carnegie Mellon for an artist talk about his work. Tomorrow night, he joins a Carnegie Museum of Art panel talk on art, war and image with Duquesne University professor Daniel Lieberfeld and Vietnam historian Philip Nash. Both events are free. BO 5-6 p.m. (Kresge Theater, CMU campus, Oakland). Also 6:307:30 p.m. Wed., March 5 (4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland). 412622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

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JACKSON. A raucous and unique rock musical that reinvents America’s 7th president as a contemporary rock star. Presented by Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB. The story of five Southern women who have been friends since their college swim team days. Presented by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and First Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. Grand Theatre. 412-628-1032. DO LORD REMEMBER ME. A collage of song, movement & storytelling, presented by New Horizon Theater. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru March 2. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-431-0773. A FEMININE ENDING. Amanda has the talent to become a great composer, but her life gets

MACDEATH. Interactive murder sidetracked by the demands mystery dinner theater. Sat., of an almost-famous fiancé, March 1, 6:30 p.m. Chef Dato’s divorcing parents & a rent-paying Table, Latrobe. 412-271-2295. job writing commercial jingles. THE MARVELOUS Thu-Sat and Sun. Thru March 9. WONDERETTES. Follow four Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. wise-cracking high school girls 724-873-3576. from prom night to their 10 year THE GREAT ONE. A sports reunion, singing 50s & 60s pop commentator returns to favorites along the way. her hometown to mourn Presented by the Legacy a childhood friend, Lineup. Sat, 7:30 p.m. & reminisces about and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru the period of her life March 2. The Legacy between the Pirates’ www. per pa Theatre, Allison Park. 1971 World Series win pghcitym .co 412-635-8080. & the death of Roberto THE MYSTERY OF Clemente. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. IRMA VEP. Satire of several and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru March theatrical, literary & film genres 9. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, by Charles Ludlam. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Downtown. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. The JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE Theatre Factory. 412-374-9200. A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. PORGY AND BESS. Opera The courtroom of Judge Jackie dealing w/ African-American Justice is now in session w/ life in 1920s Charleston, South “real” cases involving zombies, Carolina. Thru Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., spaceships, furries, more. Fri., Feb. 28, 8 p.m., Sat., March Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 1, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., March 2, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret 1 & 6:30 p.m. Benedum Center, at Theater Square, Downtown. Downtown. 412-456-4800. 412-456-6666.

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

Available now at better beer retailers including: Babcock Beer-North Hills Black & Gold Beer Warehouse-South Side Giant Eagle-Robinson and Shadyside Hampton Beer Outlet-Allison Park Save On Beer-North Hills

SECOND STAGE PROJECT: PAUL’S CASE. Story of a high school “dandy” whose artistic & social aspirations drive him to escape from sooty 1906 Pittsburgh. Fri., Feb. 28, 8 p.m. and Sun., March 2, 2 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-456-6666. THE SECRET GARDEN. Based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Presented by the Stage Right Professional Company. Feb. 28-March 1, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., March 2, 2 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. A STEADY RAIN. When a domestic disturbance call takes a turn for the worse, the friendship of two Chicago cops is put on the line. Presented by barebones productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-718-4253.

COMEDY THU 27

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. REDBEARD’S DOWNTOWN COMEDY EXTRAVAGANZA. 9 p.m. Redbeards, Mt. Washington. 412-261-2324.

THU 27 - SAT 01

TAYLOR WILLIAMSON. 8 p.m., Fri., Feb. 28, 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., March 1, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 28

ARTIE LANGE SHOW’S MIKE BOCCHETTI. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. JIM NORTON. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. JOHN KNIGHT, JAY BOC, DAVID KAYE. 6:30 p.m. St. Gregory Byzantine Catholic Church, Upper St. Clair. 412-835-7800. LEVEL 1 CLASS SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LEVEL 2 CLASS SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole CONTINUES ON PG. 51

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639.

family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MARQUES BUNN. 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Fri, 10:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 01

VISUALART “Bird Dog,” by Robert Villamagna, from Don’t Shoot the Bunny, at Gallery on 43rd Street, in Lawrenceville

NEW THIS WEEK

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Guentner’s Pittsburgh. Work by James Guentner. Opening reception: March 1, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CLUB ZOO. Awakening. Local artist showcase feat. Ziggy Sawdust, Tessa Shackelford, Chris Angelo, Mandi McGlynn, Hanna Grace Clark, Rachel Ryan, Zack Emmy, Modesto Studios, more. Opens Feb. 27, 7 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Strip District. 412-339-0917. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting. Feat. American artists from the nation’s early years of independence through the dawn of the 20th century. Opening reception: Feb. 28, 6-8 p.m. Exhibition lecture: March 1, 1 p.m. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. THE GALLERY 4. Dancing Color. Paintings by Marion Di Quinzio. Opening reception: March 1, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Don’t Shoot the Bunny. Metal collages by Robert Villamagna. Opening reception: Feb. 28, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. THE NIGHT GALLERY. From Under The Bed. Pop-up exhibit feat. work by Elena D’ Agostino, Breah Lumm & Jess Paul. Opens March 2, noon-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-780-5777. PERCOLATE. Traveling Souls. Paintings by Samir Elsabee & Bob Ziller. Opening reception: March 2, 3-6 p.m. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. SCAIFE HALL, UNIV. OF PITTSBURGH. Seeing the Seemingly Mundane. Work

by Chris Hatch. Opens March 2, 1:15 p.m. Oakland. 412-414-5344.

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Downtown. 412-325-7017. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Art. Right. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014. Feat. 130 art & literary works from grade 6-12 students around the country. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRYANT STREET LIMITED. Nostalgic Pastel Creations. Work by Linda Barnicott. Highland Park. 412-362-2200. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC. Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Oakland. 412-393-7600. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann,

Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Beyond the Funny Pages: The works of art & life captured in comics. Black History Month exhibit of work by Orrin C. Evans, Jackie Ormes & Clarence Matthew Baker. Downtown. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Blithering Landscapes & Other Ideas. Pen, ink & colored pencil by Eric Hauser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Fabrications. Group show, highlighting work by Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts students. Curated by Bonnie Gloris. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, CONTINUES ON PG. 53

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BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN KNIGHT, JOE EBERLE, LISA DAPPRICH. 6 p.m. Salvatore’s Banquet Hall. 412-334-5646. KEITH STOVER NBIA CHARITY COMEDY ROAST. 9:30 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-481-7625. MIKE WYSOCKI, CHRIS COEN. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar, McKeesport. 412-751-6960.

TUE 04

TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

WED 05

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

Foundation. 11 a.m. South Hills Country Club. 412-885-2374. DENIS THEATRE RED CARPET PARTY. Academy Awards party benefiting the Denis Theatre Foundation. 7-11 p.m. Walnut Grill, Mt. Lebanon. 412-668-0737. IRISH NIGHT: ROW ON FOR BRENDEN. Concert feat. Cherish the Ladies in tribute of Brenden Foley. Benefits Central Catholic Crew & Oakland Catholic Rowing. 7:30 p.m. Central Catholic High School, Oakland. 1-888-718-4253.

DANCE

LITERARY

THU 27 - SAT 01

THU 27

HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT. Performance by Attack Theatre, feat. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, & Chatham Baroque. Sat, Sun, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 1 Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-281-3305.

SAT 01

THE CHINESE NUTCRACKER. The story & music from the Nutcracker ballet infused w/ original elements of the Chinese people. Presented by the Yanlai Dance Academy. 4:30 & 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-400-9022.

FUNDRAISERS FRI 28

EVERY VOICE COUNTS. Concert feat. American Idol’s Crystal Bowersox. Benefits Life’s Work of Western PA. 7 p.m. Rivers Casino, North Side. 412-471-2600 x 239.

SAT 01

SAT 01

MARDI GRAS PANCAKE DINNER. 6-7:30 p.m. Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, Coraopolis. 412-264-6420.

POLITICS FRI 28

GAS RUSH STORIES. Screening & discussion of the film series by Kirsi Jansa. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-621-8008.

THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.wordpress. com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. TRUE STORY: ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT. Reading of true tales by local story-tellers. Hosted by Michael Buzzelli. 7-9 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

FRI 28

BOOK CHAT. Book group for seniors. Last Fri of every month, 10 a.m. Thru March 28 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. KIM HARRISON. Reading & book signing w/ author of The Undead Pool. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743.

SAT 01

CAUSE-PLAY PARTY. Cosplay party feat. costume contest, silent auction, more. Benefits the ToonSeum. 21+. 8:30 p.m. The Tilden, Downtown. 412-232-0199. SPECIAL AUCTION FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE. Benefits the McGuire Memorial. 6 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 724-843-0365.

SUN 02

SUN 02

52

students in grades 5-6 only. 7-9 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920.

TUE 04

LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. Empire Falls by Richard Russo. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: THE HISTORY OF MYSTERY. The owners of Mystery Lovers Bookshop will give a brief history of the mystery genre. 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. COOKIES4CHRIS. Luncheon & vendor show. Benefits Chris4Life Colon Cancer

[KIDSTUFF]

BOOK SIGNING W/ CHARLES MCCOLLESTER. Author of Point of Pittsburgh. 2-4 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

MON 03

THE BIG READ IN PITTSBURGH. Kickoff for a month-long series of outreach events designed to

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LARRY RIPPEL}

During this cold winter, the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum wants to bring to mind a Japanese proverb: “One kind word can warm three winter months.” The museum’s newest exhibit, XOXO, opened around Valentine’s Day, but the themes are perennial. Abstract ideas of love and forgiveness are grounded in activities — visitors can, among other things, hold hands to illuminate hidden messages about love, or write down a sad thought and crank it through a paper shredder. Through Aug. 31. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

promote literacy, reading & open dialogue. Guest Speaker: Jan Scruggs. Presented by CCAC. 6 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-469-6301. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness through interactive experiences. Thru Aug. 31 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FIDDLESTICKS: CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS. Presented by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. 11:15 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. GIANT EAGLE KIDS OF STEEL DAY. Use maps to find your way through the gardens while stopping at fitness & nutrition-oriented activity stations. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-586-7785. HAND BUILD W/ CLAY: PERSONALIZED MUGS. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 01 - SUN 02

ALADDIN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru March 16 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. THE ZANY UMBRELLA CIRCUS: THE GIFT. Theatrical performance based loosely on O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3 p.m. Thru March 2 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 02

PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTERS WHEEL. 12-2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. QUILTING. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 03 - WED 05 STUDIO PROGRAM: SAND. March 3-7, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

TUE 04

KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

WED 05

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. First and Third Wed of every month, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

KIDSTUFF THU 27 - WED 05

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PRINTMAKING. Thru March 15, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP

The West End-based Education Partnership — which provides classroom supplies to disadvantaged schools — is currently tidying up in its Resource Center after January’s distribution and preparing for the April distribution. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of tasks, including sorting inventory, stocking shelves and cleaning. Call 412-922-6500 or www.theeducationpartnership.org.

FRI 28

OVERNIGHT ADVENTURES: MYSTERY AT THE MUSEUM. A mysterious event has occurred at the museum—fossils & artifacts have gone missing! Use sleuthing skills to explore the exhibits of the museum attempting to crack the case. Ages 6+. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. TWEEN FINAL FRIDAY. Obstacle course, games, crafts, more. For

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

TUE 04

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 05

BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center,

Brookline. 412-571-3222. DISNEY ON ICE: 100 YEARS OF MAGIC. 7 p.m., Thu., March 6, 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m., Fri., March 7, 7 p.m., Sat., March 8, 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m. and Sun., March 9, 1 & 5 p.m. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. 1-800-745-3000. WII WEDNESDAYS. Ages 10+. Wed, 3:30 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE TUE 04

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 05

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 27

AMY SILLMAN. Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art Spring 2014 Lecture Series. 6 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970. DRAWING EXPERIENCE W/ NICOLE EISENMAN. Drawing workshop. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. FIBROMYALGIA: CAUSE & SOLUTIONS. 10:30 a.m. McGinnis Sisters, Adams Twp., Mars. 724-779-1212. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. HOW TO E-FILE YOUR FEDERAL RETURN. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MEPPI JAPAN LECTURE SERIES: JAPANESE ARCHITECTS AT PLAY. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 5:30-7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-433-5021. PLUM FARMER’S MARKET. Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Plum Senior Community Center. 412-795-2339. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TRUTH BE TOLD. Documentary screening about growing up in the Jehovah’s Witnesses religion. Q&A w/ director Gregorio Smith to follow. 7:30 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-381-1681.

FRI 28

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every


month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. DRUM WRITE DRAW WORKSHOP: INROADS TO YOUR CREATIVITY. Ages 18+. 6-8:30 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-9450554. OPTICOM CONSULTING PRESENTATION. 8:30-10:30 a.m. UCP/CLASS, Swissvale. 412-394-4271. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: DOWNTOWN. 7-8 p.m. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237.

FRI 28 - SUN 02

ALL ABOUT THE BURGH, THE CULTURE TO KETCHUP TOUR! Fully guided 2-hour tour presented by Molly’s Trolleys. Fri-Sun, 12:45-2:45 p.m. Thru March 31 Station Square.

SAT 01

EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First and Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. 412-271-7660. PEEKABOO REVUE. NeoBurlesque performance. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SHAHZIA SIKANDER. Part of the CMU School of Art Spring 2014 Lecture Series. 1:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

VISUAL ART

Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Aspect & Perception. Paintings by Micheal Madigan. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MARKET SQUARE. Congregation. Interactive kinetic video & sound installation by KMA - Kit Monkman & Tom Wexler. Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MINE FACTORY. Drawing/ Paper. Group show exploring the intersection & boundaries drawing & paper. Homewood.

4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ANGEL & PSYCHIC READINGS. 4 p.m. Steel City Steakhouse, Monroeville. IGNITING YOUR SPIRITUAL INTUITION. w/ Carol Obley. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. 6TH ANNUAL Chatham University, SPRING MODEL Shadyside. CAR SHOW & 412-462-4200. CONTEST. Presented PITTSBURGH www. per by the South Hills TEEN OSCAR pa pghcitym Modelers Association. PARTY. Movie .co www.southhillsmodelers trivia, lessons from asscoiation.weebly.com local filmmakers, more. Teens 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Castle Shannon only. 2-4 p.m. Andy Volunteer Fire Dept., Warhol Museum, North Side. Castle Shannon. 412-884-7913. 412-251-0890. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. YOU REALLY WANT. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, Support group for life goals.

SUN 02

CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

FULL LIST ONLINE

MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Almagamations. Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Pixel Punks DIY Pop-Up Arcade. A showcase of deranged independent games. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Shadyside. 412-361-0455. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. REVISION SPACE. Fugue States. Work by Cy Gavin. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. In Conversation with Aaron MacLachlan & Jen Saffron, March 1, 2 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810.

Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

MON 03

CAREGIVING SERIES. Learn how to care for yourself while caring for a relative or friend. Mon, 1 p.m. Thru March 31 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HIGH POWER SCREENING. A documentary from filmmaker & whistleblower Pradeep Indulkar. Followed by lecture & discussion. Porter Hall 100. Presented by Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace. 7 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. LANDSCAPE DESIGN COURSE. Mon, 6:30 p.m. Thru March 10 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

Real hook ups, real fast.

SLAUGHTERHOUSE GALLERY. Cemeon Larivonovoff: The Russian Icon Painter. Lawrenceville. 412-782-6474. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Nina Sowiski. Photographs. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Pop-Up Exhibition: Sam Thorp & Brian Gonnella. Double Feature. New artwork by Brian Gonnella & Sam Thorp. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

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SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLOVAK HERITAGE: HISTORY OF SLOVAK MUSIC. w/ Jerry Jumba. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

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MON 03 - WED 05

CONGREGATION TALKS. The Office of Public Art will explain the Congregation installation. Mon-Wed, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 12 Market Square, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237.

ADMISSION WITH THIS COUPON EXPIRES MARCH 1, 2014

CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

TUE 04

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ENROLLMENT. 5-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-456-1877 x 202. ARTIST TALK: DINH Q. LE. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 5-6 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-622-3131. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. HOUSING OPTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS W/ DISABILITIES. 6-8 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-422-7200. MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION. Tue, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thru April 1 Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8821. SISTERS OF DIVINE PROVIDENCE FAT TUESDAY LENTEN BREAKFAST. Feat. presentation by Anne Kertz Kernion. 7-9 a.m. Kearns Spirituality Center, Allison Park. 412-635-5437.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures presents author Shane W. Evans, Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District CRITIC: Emma Papariella, 12, a student from Swissvale WHEN: Sun.,

Feb. 23

I wanted to come to learn more about Shane Evans. I read his book Underground, and I thought it was really cool how he wrote it for little kids so they could understand about the Underground Railroad. We got to learn how he gets inspiration and how he writes his books. I liked everything. [I was surprised] because I didn’t know he was a musician. [If my friends asked about the event,] I would tell them that we got to learn [more about Evans] and we got to learn how he wrote stuff, and we could maybe compare it to different authors and see what’s the difference.

WED 05

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

ARTIST DISCUSSION: LIGHT & BELIEF: SKETCHES OF LIFE FROM THE VIETNAM WAR. w/ Dinh Q. Lê. Part of the 1-min. dramatic dialogue. 2013 Carnegie International. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum Park. 412-254-4633. of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING DETROIT STYLE URBAN ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. COMPANY. Auditions for Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Jesus Christ Superstar in Concert. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. March 22-23. Seeking Principal EXPLORING BLUE CHEESES. Singing Roles, Male & Female Workshop lead by Caldwell Linker, Dancer/Singers Ensemble, EEFC Cheese Buyer. Call to reserve & the Superstar Choir. www. a spot. 7 p.m. East End Food centerauditions.org/index.php/ Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. professional-company/jesusHEALTHY BODY christ-superstar Lincoln Park WORKSHOP. Performing Arts Center, 6-7:30 p.m. Carnegie 724-259-6443. Library, Hill District. RHYTHM HOUSE 412-488-7490 x 236. MUSIC GROUP. THE PITTSBURGH www. per Auditions for the SHOW OFFS. A pa pghcitym Summer Music Fest .co meeting of jugglers at Monogahela & spinners. All levels Aquatorium. March 8. welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Open to singers & performers Union Project, Highland Park. of all genres. www.eventbrite.com/ 412-363-4550. e/open-auditions-calling-all-genresTAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, tickets-10350461509?aff=efbevent 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. Paradise Bar, 724-305-0669. 412-449-9833. SOUTH PARK THEATRE. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History Auditions for the 2014 season. of tea, steeping techniques, March 15. Prepare & bring music Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. for 24 bars of song, cold readings Tea samples & European cookies from the script or monologue. Call will be served. First Wed of every for more information. Bethel Park. month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. 412-831-8552.

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS

CREATE-S-TEAM ACADEMY OF MUSIC & THEATRE. Auditions for The Musical Tribute to the Queen of Soul: Ms. Aretha Franklin. Feb. 27. Prepare 2 songs & bring sheet music or sing a capella. Call for more information. Afro-American Music Institute, Homewood. 412-932-3792. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for The Crucible. March 29-30. Actors ages 11+,

SUBMISSIONS

ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical in the everyday

BY ANGELA SUICO

for Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. Visit blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. THE GALLERY 4. Seeking submissions for Salon Show 2014. Send image files of up to 5 finished pieces to thegallery4@ gmail.com. Include title, dimensions, & medium(s) & write SALON APPLICANT 2014 in the subject line. Deadline: March 22. Call or email for info. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBERS SCREENING. Screening March 16. Bring three works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 12:301 p.m., pick up 3-4 p.m. pittsburghsocietyofartists.org Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 68th Annual International Aqueous Open exhibition. www.pittsburgh watercolorsociety.com PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Screening March 23. New members must register to be considered for membership. Drop off works at 1 p.m. & return for pickup at 3 p.m. www.pittsburghwatercolor society.com East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-731-0636. WASHINGTON PA FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. or less. Complete rules & entry form at www.highlandridgecdc. org. 724-678-4225.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m 21 and still a virgin. I also have depression. I’m not bad-looking. I work out and generally keep people laughing. I got a lot of female attention in school, but I was hopeless and still am. I feel myself becoming increasingly violent, to the extent that I have tried to provoke a fight and to intimidate other guys. I’ve been unemployed for three years since dropping out of college, and I haven’t met a girl I was interested in since school. I’ve never made the first move with girls. I get a lot of eye contact from girls, and I’ve been approached by girls, but we barely ever get past exchanging names before they wander off or their friends pull them away. Writing this has made me realize I should start approaching girls, but Idon’t think it’s just that. HOPELESS OVER PAINFUL EXPERIENCE

Women typically expect the guy to do the asking out, HOPE, so that’s something to work on. And if a woman is making eye contact with you in a space where people are generally open to meeting new people and potentially fucking them (house parties, bars, clubs, CPAC), eye contact is an invitation to introduce yourself. But if women are approaching you and then “wandering off” after a moment or two — or being rescued by their friends — you’re doing something wrong. I’m guessing you came across as angry and potentially violent because you are angry and potentially violent, and you’ve cultivated an intimidating vibe. You’re never going to get anywhere with women — or employers — if you give yourself over to anger and violence. Fifteen percent of 21-year-old men are virgins, while only 5 percent of 25-year-old men are. So you have a good chance of losing your virginity in the next few years if you can stop: (1) wallowing in self-pity, and (2) giving yourself over to anger. Get your ass to a doctor and a therapist. Medication can help with the depression, and a good therapist can help you overcome your anger, self-pity and violent fantasies. Getting help is the best way to increase your odds of getting laid and/or getting a girlfriend.

Here’s what you should say: “You’ve got some growing up to do, and I’ve got some eating pussy to do. I don’t want to end our relationship, but I’m moving out when our lease is up.” If your boyfriend breaks up with you, it’s probably for the best — and it may not be forever. If he does dump you for defensive reasons, then he didn’t really want to dump you at all, right? Once his anger subsides, your boyfriend may decide that having you in his life is more important than having you all to himself. I am a heterosexual male. I was dating this girl for six months. We weren’t living together, but there were two toothbrushes at my place, tampons and birth-control pills in my medicine cabinet, and yogurt in my fridge. Things were going well until she told me about a friend-of-a-friend who was building a website for a “swingers club.” I didn’t get outraged, and this outraged her. A four-hour discussion followed, during which I held my “good for them” ground. At the end of it, I no longer had a girlfriend. All I did was not get outraged, and it cost me a girlfriend. Does this seem extreme? Am I crazy?

SEXUAL COMPATIBILITY IS HUGELY IMPORTANT: PRIORITIZING IT DOESN’T MAKE YOU A BAD PERSON.

I’m a bi girl, and I’ve been with a hetero guy for almost three years. I miss being with women. He still parties like he’s in college and is a bit dependent on me socially, whereas I crave independence and, quite frankly, pussy. I’ve started to resent him, not just for the lack of sexual freedom but also because he drinks too much and acts like a slob. I want to move out when our lease ends. I’m willing to work on our issues, but I fear that after this conversation he will break up with me as a defensive approach, rather than seeing the breathing room as a way to work on our relationship. How can I express my need for other sexual partners and more space without sounding like I’m calling off the relationship? INSERT QUIRKY ACRONYM HERE

HER EX LOOKS PERPLEXED

You’re not crazy. You’re lucky. Send that friend-ofa-friend a thank-you note. Because if he weren’t building a website for a swingers club, you might still have tampons, yogurt and scented soaps in your apartment — along with the controlling, insecure nutjob who came with ’em.

During my last relationship, I got to explore the kinkier side of my libido. While the relationship was ill-fated, sex was not the problem. One year and some heartache later, I’m ready to date. But I don’t want a vanilla sexual relationship again. People ask to set me up, and I keep turning them down ’cause I don’t want to get involved with someone unless I know we’re sexually compatible. Yet I feel some angst about using Fetlife or similar sites for dating, as if I’m making sex paramount. NERVOUSLY AVOIDING INTRIGUING VANILLA ENTANGLEMENTS

Sexual compatibility is hugely important, NAIVE: Prioritizing it doesn’t make you a bad person. But the choice you’ve laid out — dating only kinksters you meet on Fetlife or girls your friends set you up with — is a false one. Date both. You’ll have to establish emotional compatibility with a woman you meet via Fetlife, or sexual compatibility with a woman you meet via real life. There’s work to do at the start of any relationship. And don’t assume a woman you meet through friends is gonna be vanilla. She met you through friends, and you’re not vanilla, right? It’s a bad idea to give someone a laundry list of your kinks on the first date. Just say this when the conversation turns to sex: “I’m pretty sexually adventurous.” There’s a good chance you’ll get a “me, too” in response.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

On the Lovecast, Dan finally enlists advice from an actual ethicist at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

02.26-03.05

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Avery, a character in Anne Michaels’ novel The Winter Vault, has a unique way of seeing. When he arrives in a place for the first time, he “makes room for it in his heart.” He “lets himself be altered” by it. At one point in the story he visits an old Nubian city in Egypt and is overwhelmed by its exotic beauty. Its brightly colored houses are like “shouts of joy,” like “gardens springing up in the sand after a rainfall.” After drinking in the sights, he marvels, “It will take all my life to learn what I have seen today.” Everything I just described is akin to experiences you could have in the coming weeks, Pisces. Can you make room in your heart for the dazzle?

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

The battles you’ve been waging these last 10 months have been worthy of you. They’ve tested your mettle and grown your courage. But I suspect that your relationship with these battles is due for a shift. In the future they may not serve you as well as they have up until now. At the very least, you will need to alter your strategy and tactics. It’s also possible that now is the time to leave them behind entirely — to graduate from them and search for a new cause that will activate the next phase of your evolution as an enlightened warrior. What do you think?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

“Life is like Sanskrit read to a pony,” said Lou Reed. That might be an accurate assessment for most people much of the time, but I don’t think it will be true for you in the coming days. On the contrary: You will have a special capacity to make contact and establish connection. You’ve heard of dog whisperers and ghost whisperers? You will be like an all-purpose, jack-of-all-trades whisperer — able to commune and communicate with nervous creatures and alien life forms and pretty much everything else. If anyone can get a pony to understand Sanskrit, it will be you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Does Kim Kardashian tweak and groom her baby daughter’s eyebrows? They look pretty amazing, after all — elegant, neat, perfectly shaped. What do you think, Gemini? HA! I was just messing with you. I was checking to see if you’re susceptible to getting distracted by meaningless fluff like celebrity kids’ grooming habits. The cosmic truth of the matter is that you should be laser-focused on the epic possibilities that your destiny is bringing to your attention. It’s time to reframe your life story. How? Here’s my suggestion: See yourself as being on a mythic quest to discover and fully express your soul’s code.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

The 19th-century American folk hero known as Wild Bill Hickok was born James Butler Hickok. At various times in his life he was a scout for the army, a lawman for violent frontier towns, a professional gambler and a performer in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Women found him charismatic, and he once killed an attacking bear with a knife. He had a brother Lorenzo who came to be known as Tame Bill Hickok. In contrast to Wild Bill, Tame Bill was quiet, gentle and cautious. He lived an uneventful life as a wagon master, and children loved him. Right now, Cancerian, I’m meditating on how I’d like to see your inner Wild Bill come out to play for a while, even as your inner Tame Bill takes some time off.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

“If I was a love poet,” writes Rudy Francisco, addressing a lover, “I’d write about how you have the audacity to be beautiful even on days when everything around you is ugly.” I suspect you have that kind of audacity right now, Leo. In fact, I bet the ugliness you encounter will actually incite you to amplify the gorgeous charisma you’re radiating. The sheer volume of lyrical soulfulness that pours out of you will have so much healing power that you may even make the ugly stuff less ugly. I’m betting that you will lift up everything you touch, nudging it in the direction of grace and elegance and charm.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

“You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take,” says hockey great Wayne Gretzky. In other words, you shouldn’t be timid about shooting the puck toward the goal. Don’t worry about whether you have enough skill or confidence or luck. Just take the damn shot. You’ll never score if you don’t shoot. Or so the theory goes. But an event in a recent pro hockey game showed there’s an exception to the rule. A New York player named Chris Kreider was guiding the puck with his stick as he skated toward the Minnesota team’s goalie. But when Kreider cocked and swung his stick, he missed the puck entirely. He whiffed. And yet the puck kept sliding slowly along all by itself. It somehow flummoxed the goalie, sneaking past him right into the net. Goal! New rule: You miss only 99.9 percent of the shots you don’t take. I believe you will soon benefit from this loophole, Virgo.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Some people say home is where you come from,” says a character in Katie Kacvinsky’s novel Awaken. “But I think it’s a place you need to find, like it’s scattered and you pick pieces of it up along the way.” That’s an idea I invite you to act on in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It will be an excellent time to discover more about where you belong and who you belong with. And the best way to do that is to be aggressive as you search far and wide for clues, even in seemingly unlikely places that maybe you would never guess contain scraps of home.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

What words bring the most points in the game of Scrabble? Expert Christopher Swenson says that among the top scorers are “piezoelectrical” and “ubiquitarianism” — assuming favorable placements on the board that bring double letter and triple word scores. The first word can potentially net 1,107 points, and the second 1,053. There are metaphorical clues here, Capricorn, for how you might achieve maximum success in the next phase

of the game of life. You should be well informed about the rules, including their unusual corollaries and loopholes. Be ready to call on expert help and specialized knowledge. Assume that your luck will be greatest if you are willing to plan nonstandard gambits and try bold tricks.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Sorry to report that you won’t win the lottery this week. It’s also unlikely that you will score an unrecognized Rembrandt painting for a few dollars at a thrift store or discover that you have inherited a chinchilla farm in Peru or stumble upon a stash of gold coins half-buried in the woods. On the other hand, you may get provocative clues about how you could increase your cash flow. To ensure you will notice those clues when they arrive, drop your expectations about where they might come from. What is the best gift you could give your best ally right now? Testify at http://FreeWill Astrology.com.

get your yoga on!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

If you are the type of person who wears gloves when you throw snowballs, Germans would call you Handschuhschneeballwerfer. They use the same word as slang to mean “coward.” I’m hoping that in the coming days you won’t display any behavior that would justify you being called Handschuhschneeballwerfer. You need to bring a raw, direct, straightforward attitude to everything you do. You shouldn’t rely on any buffers, surrogates or intermediaries. Metaphorically speaking, make sure that nothing comes between your bare hands and the pure snow.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

In his song “4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy),” Bruce Springsteen mentions a disappointing development. “That waitress I was seeing lost her desire for me,” he sings. “She said she won’t set herself on fire for me anymore.” I’m assuming nothing like that has happened to you recently, Scorpio. Just the opposite: I bet there are attractive creatures out there who would set themselves on fire for you. If for some reason this isn’t true, fix the problem! You have a cosmic mandate to be incomparably irresistible.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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Training Center 1200 Gulf Lab Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-1304 Applications for testing are accepted year-round and can be made in person at our Training Center, Monday-Friday from 8:00am to 4:00pm or online at www.smlocal12. org. The Apprentice test will be given on Saturday March 15th 2014 at 10:00am at the University of Pittsburgh. Payment is to be made no later than March 10th 2014.

QUALIFICATIONS:

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

High School Diploma (by July 1, 2014) or GED, valid PA drivers license and reliable transportation. There is a non-refundable testing fee of $25.00 that must be paid at the time the application is made. Cash, money order, or certified check are the only acceptable terms of payment, no personal checks will be accepted.

ECM Transport is NOW HIRING Regional Road & Local Drivers (10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour (20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM

For directions or additional information, please call (412) 828-1386 or visit our website at www.smlocal12.org

Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

Sheet Metal Workers Local Union #12 is an equal opportunity employer

Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Longwall Coal Miners New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

APPLY TODAY: Qualified Applicants please submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


Ink Well

STUDIES

PAIRING DOWN

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

ACROSS

1. “We’re good to go” gestures 8. Intimate detail? 15. “You’re lying!” 16. Soft marker point 17. One way to turn on a snowboard 18. People who go along with anything, as it were 19. Words repeated in Buster Poindexter’s “Hot Hot Hot” 20. Sidewalks, e.g. 21. “___ Fiction” 22. Hard-living singer James 23. Screening agcy. 26. Massiveness 28. Wrath 30. Fathers who don’t get married 32. Mendes in “The Place Beyond the Pines” 33. Some examples of 8-Acrosses 35. Best Upset and Best Play, for two 36. “I wanna!” 38. Opposer of background checks: Abbr. 39. “Screw off” 40. Cold and waiting to get drunk 41. French toast 43. German article 44. University whose mascot is Riptide the Pelican 46. Sartorius muscle locale 47. Plantarflexion muscle locales

412-650-6155 48. Search for intelligence 49. Pitcher-turnedsportscaster Hershiser 51. B-boy connection? 53. “Suppose that ...” 54. British character Bertram on “The Office” 57. Orange juice cocktails 60. Self-cutting, e.g.? 61. Morning show specialty 62. Gets by 63. Improvised section for a soloist 64. Show disdain for

DOWN

1. Savvy about 2. Word before Moe Dee or G Rap, in hip-hop names 3. Uncle Cliff, Aunt Crag, Cousin Bluff, etc.? 4. Innocent response to “Are you smoking that cigarette inside?” 5. Question intensely 6. Shot barely taken? 7. Go out with 8. Key of Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 9. Buick coupe until 1991 10. King of the borscht? 11. Reasons for an exam after a hookup: Abbr. 12. Judge Lance in the Simpson and Keating trials 13. Sharp turn

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14. They’re longer than singles 20. Protest against squished conditions inside Easter candy packaging? 23. Monthly ranking in Tiger Beat? 24. Place an obstacle in front of 25. Green light 26. Slaves of Sparta 27. Square 29. Executes, as a computer program 31. Org. that recently voted to accept openly gay troops 33. TV chef, to her critics? 34. Word after garage or porch 37. Record label that was absorbed by Geffen

TA S T E

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

42. One living under anti-gay laws even harsher than in Kansas 45. Mock 47. Protection against lurid search content 50. Intro to French class for a fluent French speaker, e.g. 52. Japanese watch company 53. John’s costar in “Say Anything” 55. 50 Cent’s “___ Club” 56. Showbiz award “grand slam”: Abbr. 57. Karaoke need, casually 58. ___ Garten (the “Barefoot Contessa”) 59. Nuts 60. Rescue squad letters {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper.

MIND & BODY

Downtown Massage 412-401-4110

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor) Open 24 hours/7 days a week

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

Chinese Bodyworks

412-595-8077

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Your ad could be here Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

412.316.3342

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation

massage BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY

Grand Opening

Chinese Bodywork

Therapy

MIND & BODY

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

www.newleafsuboxone.com

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014


JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking.

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Positive Recovery Solutions

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

NO WAIT LIST

WE SPECIALIZE IN

412.246.8965, ext. 9

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL • Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Immediate openings including pregnant opiatedependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients. A PA-licensed facility. www.alliedaddictionrecovery.com

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

MONROEVILLE, PA

Let Us Help You Today!

Recovery Without Judgement™

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

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Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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SERVICES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

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AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES Get Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for Addiction Treatment. Alcohol Abuse. Drug Addiction. Prescription Abuse. Call Now 855-577-0234 Rehab Placement Service.

FINANCIAL

CLASSES

PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.26/03.05.2014

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

CLASSES

ADOPTION

Fiction Workshops Looking for feedback on your writing? Want to write short stories or a novel? Announcing new fiction workshops. Weekly meetings. Supportive environment, all fiction writers welcome. Visit www.BeckyTuch. com or email Becky. Tuch@gmail.com for information.

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Screenwriting Lessons Learn the art & science of outlining, writing and rewriting motion picture screenplays.

. GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE writeyourscript@ live.com

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

A DO P T I O N for your NEWBORN: A baby is a gift to treasure. I can provide your baby a secure life and uncoditional love. Expenses Paid Call anytime Maria

1-866-429-0222

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!


GROWTH STAGE

A local performance program helps teens — and communities {BY ABBY MENDELSON} IT’S A COLD, dark school night in Hazelwood, on the second floor of the made-over Oliver mansion. The building dates from 1865, an age when industrialists lived across the street from their mills, and it’s served by a furnace so ancient that heat is in noticeably short supply. Bundled up in sweaters and scarves, the KRUNK teens are preparing for a show. Jourdan Martin, tall and slim and twentysomething, reminds his troupe about performance and rehearsal schedules — and about proper attire. “Black slacks,” he says, “white shirts, collars and sleeves. Real professional.” “Invite people,” he adds. “Tell them to come.” And they will. KRUNK — Kreating Realistic Urban New-School Knowledge — is a popular hip-hop performance program that operates throughout the region. Founded a decade ago by the Rev. Tim Smith at his Hazelwood Avenue Keystone Church, KRUNK is just one of Smith’s initiatives to transform the neighborhood. When he first came to Hazelwood in 1980, Smith found a community awash in shootings, drugs and mayhem.

‘The Wish List’ to be in everybody’s flow pattern.” “We can definitely do that,” Martin agrees. “At one point, we’ll need a bass player,” Banks adds. “We got tons of bass players,” Martin says with a shrug. Across the room, two girls practice Banks’ lyrics, reading from a sheet torn from a spiral notebook. Tapping out a hip-hop rhythm, Banks says, “I’m writing about hard times.” Martin nods, adds a computerized track that sounds like wooden blocks, then stops. “Ladies,” he calls across the room, “you like the first half?” In the basement of the church next door, seven dancers are working out a complicated routine with choreographer Mike Lee and sound engineer Wesley Smith. “Five-six-and-seven-eight,” Lee calls out “Bring it — not up,” he raises his arms, “but out.” He hunches over, arms thrust forward. They try the movement. It fits. The dancers try it, and again. “Teaching hip hop is tough,” Lee says. “There’s hardly any

“IF YOU PUT KIDS IN THE RIGHT SITUATION, THEY CAN LEARN. AND IT WILL AFFECT HOW THEY LIVE THE REST OF THEIR LIVES.” “I can’t tell you how many people I buried,” Smith recalls. “I saw a lot of people hit the ground.” He pauses. “It breaks my heart to talk about it.” Smith cobbled together programs to help at-risk children, with a focus on homework, sports, music and financial literacy. To participate in his programs, which he dubbed “Center of Life,” he demanded that teens have their participation approved by their parents, maintain their grades, and be prepared to work. More than 400 children are now enrolled in the program; more than 200 have already come through the music initiative alone. “If you put kids in the right situation, they can learn,” Smith says. “And it will affect how they live the rest of their lives.” For its part, KRUNK seeks to impart positive messages about mental and physical health. It also teaches discipline. “If you don’t practice,” Smith is wont to say, “no one will pay to hear you play.” “Hard work beats talent,” he adds. “If you want to master music, you have to work at it.” Doing the work on the second floor tonight is Shyheim Banks, who is splayed in front of a computer, looking for a beat. “I call it ‘The Wish List,’” he says of his new piece. “I want the same beat for the start of the show. I want the same beat for the end of the show.” He drums on the table. “Just a drum set and a piano. I want

documentation standards.” The teens line up. “Make sure you’re where you need to be when you need to be there,” Lee instructs. Smith hits a few keys on a laptop, and the sound from two enormous speakers roars like an airplane taking off, accompanied by wooden block beats. The dancers try the maneuver again until one young man stops. “I spun wrong,” he apologizes. “Do it again,” Lee says. They take it from the top, and execute a series of rapid-fire, complicated moves, marches, pirouettes, snapping-to attention. The seven dancers are in sync but imprecise. Lee tells them to go it again. “The main thing we preach is discipline,” he says. “Work ethic. A lot of kids that we deal with are problem kids. We don’t reject these kids. Instead, we recruit them. We ask for these kids. We want to make a difference in their lives. “They come in. We expect them to work.” He turns to his teens. “Do it again.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

February 26, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 9

February 26, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 9