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EVENTS 2.22 – 2pm TEEN MEMBERS ONLY TOUR: SCHOLASTIC ART AND WRITING AWARDS Tickets Members FREE; to register call 412.622.3314

2.22 – 2pm FILM SCREENING: MADELYN ROEHRIG PRESENTS LOOKING UP FROM ANDY’S GRAVE (2013) AND FIGMENTS: CONVERSATIONS WITH ANDY, YEAR III (2011) Warhol theater Tickets FREE

3.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JACK QUARTET Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Tickets door $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

4.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TINARIWEN Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Cyro Baptista’s Banquet of the Spirits

4.11 – 8pm SISTER SPIT Warhol theater Co-presented with Trans-Q Television Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

3.5 – 8pm Warhol entrance space | Tickets $25/$20 Members & students | FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Warhol welcomes acclaimed Brazilian percussionist and composer, Cyro Baptista, and his genre-defying quartet, Banquet of Spirits. Their records are reviewed within the broad categories of contemporary jazz and world music, and are released on the Tzadik label. This promises to be a unique performance that fans of hybrid jazz/Afro-Cuban music won’t want to miss!

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


{EDITORIAL}

02.19/02.26.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 08

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[NEWS] think it’s a little exploitive. I think 06 “Iit distracts people from finding projects

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

that might be worth those $10.� — Artist Maggie Negrete on large companies and celebrities using crowdfunding to find investors

[NEWS]

haven’t changed their model 14 “Banks enough to really do what needs to be done to serve the needs of lower-income people.� — Professor Lisa Servon on why low-income customers shy away from traditional banks

[TASTE] treatment is the next big push.� 23 “Worker — Jordan Romanus, a local activist with the Restaurant Opportunities Center

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, RICK MINETTI, JEANNE MUMFORD, VALERIE PFERDEHIRT Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

(17(57$,10(17

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[MUSIC] had to say to PNC, ‘Look, if you 28 “Iwant the keys, here they are. I can’t do anything to stop you.’� — Mr. Small’s Theatre owner Mike Speranzo, on facing and avoiding foreclosure

[SCREEN]

THIS WEEKEND!

{ADMINISTRATION}

the jailing-est nation on earth, 55 “We’re not because we’re the worst people,

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

but because it’s a lucrative business.� — Al Hoff on the new documentary Kids for Cash

7+856'$<)(%58$5<

6SXW]\$FRXVWLF1LJKW

{PUBLISHER}

[ARTS]

STEEL CITY MEDIA

an institution with such a high 58 â&#x20AC;&#x153;At profile in Pittsburgh, it would be nice if employees could expect good things.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A cultural-industry worker discusses pay and benefits at the Carnegie Museums

[LAST PAGE] daily annoyances, like the 87 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even interminable UPMC/Highmark ad campaign, can mask a pleasant reality â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like insurance costs well below those being paid elsewhere.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chris Potter on Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relatively benign economic climate

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 22 EVENTS LISTINGS 66 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 77 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 79 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 81 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

SMALLER STARTUPS ARE STARTING TO FEEL AGGRIEVED BY ESTABLISHED NAMES USING CROWDFUNDING

Letter to the Editor I’ll tell you who has already made the case for rational drug policy more than a [Pittsburgh] Steeler [“Safety Blitz,” City Paper, Feb. 12]: John Hanger, who is the only candidate running for governor that supports full legalization of marijuana. Pennsylvania elites continue to enforce our cruel, expensive marijuana laws, but the people no longer do, as they will prove, when they vote for John Hanger for Pennsylvania governor. Our marijuana laws are detrimental for patients who need marijuana as medicine and detrimental for taxpayers because they cost $500 million in law-enforcement costs and lost tax revenues. One half of all drug arrests are for marijuana offenses, and African Americans are arrested at five times the rate of whites, even though usage is the same. We need jobs not jails, schools not jails, and it is time to regulate, tax and legalize marijuana. Only a governor like John Hanger will make the change we need a reality. — Adrienne Buka Swissvale

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Cellhelmet CEO Mike Kane at his company’s Oakland store

PUC planning crackdown on ride-share services Lyft, Uber (Feb. 12, online only)

CROWDED OUT

“Is a car having a pink mustache and picking up a random stranger enough for a citation? I am 100% sure that driving with a pink mustache on a car is legal and also sure that the PUC will be unable to prove the rider being picked up is soliciting.” — Web comment from “Joseph” “The term ‘rideshare’ should stop being used to describe the services provided by Sidecar and Lyft. The service they provide is clearly more similar to a taxi service and has no relation to traditional ridesharing like carpools or vanpools.” — Web comment from “Jim Appleby”

“Reading a history book and a whole page is about how powerful the Phipps were in Pittsburgh. Where’s my money?” — Feb. 10 tweet from “Wesley Phipps” (@wes_phippspsu)

F

OR THE FOUNDERS of Cellhelmet,

launching a crowdfunding campaign two years ago was as much about creating brand awareness as it was about getting startup capital. And Cellhelmet, a Pittsburgh-area cell-phone repair company, ended up getting some of each. The company received $19,000 on Kickstarter — almost double its $10,000 goal — and an offer to appeal to a group of big-name, high-dollar investors on ABC’s television show Shark Tank. Although the company didn’t get an investor on that show, the appearance provided its product, a protective cell-phone case, even more exposure. “[Crowdfunding] helped us tremendously,” says Cellhelmet CEO Mike Kane. “It’s a way for someone with an idea and an invention to do something they

Will the competition for crowd-sourcing dollars shut out small projects the platform was originally designed to help? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


DIVORCE & FAMILY LAW

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KNOW YOUR OIL & GAS RIGHTS For more than 40 years, ATTORNEY DONALD D. SAXTON, JR. has advised clients in Western & Central PA, WV & MD on natural resource issues. Don is the author of a 40-page handbook entitled “Pennsylvania Property Owner Handbook for Leasing Oil & Gas.” Don’s work involves coal, oil & gas, coalmine subsidence, real estate, land use & related litigation and administrative proceedings. He represents oil & gas operators and landowners (large & small property owners and groups of property owners & individual property owners of a few acres). He is experienced in drafting oil, gas & coal agreements, leases, operating agreements, private 1200 Washington Rd placement memorandums and the creation of business entities for oil & gas drilling programs. Don provides certified title options for oil, gas, coal & coal bed Washington methane development. He and Ryan J. Rupert, CPA, Certified Minerals Manager, (724)222-7205 have entered into a collaborative arrangement to work as a team for the benefit of their respective clients desiring this approach for long term management of mineral assets, examination of royalty statements, counseling on tax consequences and estate planning and business succession. Visit: www.donaldsaxtonlaw.com

ETHICAL INVESTIGATORS The hallmark of a quality investigation agency is a reputation for service that gets results, yet is also professional, ethical, and confidential. That is the reputation of EMPIRE INVESTIGATION LLC. With more than 34 years of experience, they offer comprehensive investigative services using state-of-the art technology including electronic eavesdropping detection (debugging), custom-made hidden cameras, computer & cell phone forensics and security threat assessment together with competent investigators and behavioral specialists. Empire Investigation works nationally & internationally using state-of-the-art equipment and experienced investigators to tailor-design each investigation. The most unique aspect of Empire is after clients receive the proof they are looking (800)860-6068 for, we can assist them on how to move forward. Expert behavioral and legal consultants are available. For infidelity, we help couples decide how to work things out or to split. For companies, we coach executives on how to maximize their leadership while keeping their business’s secure and productive. Peace of mind is priceless. Get the proof you need! Visit: www.empireinv.com

Attorneys Frederick N. Frank, Christine Gale, Thomas C. Murcko, Gregory M. Pocrass, Ellis W. Kunka, Dennis D. Hayes, John Schaffranek & Bart Wischnowski at FRANK, GALE, BAILS, MURCKO & POCRASS state that they often must meet with a future client a number of times before a decision is made to undertake a major life change. From their experience, these major transitions involve not only divorce or separation, but custody & parenting time, support & maintenance, separation agreements, prenuptials & postnuptials, adoptions, post trial 707 Grant St, #3300 modifications, enforcements & appeals, complex equitable distribution, complex Gulf Twr, Pittsburgh discovery issues, business valuations & pension analyses, as well as juvenile court, (412)471-3000 wills and estate planning & administration. The firm’s attorneys maintain a commitment toward the amicable resolution of disputes, and emphasize that their obligation to their clients is to counsel, advise, make recommendations and, if necessary, to litigate for their best interest. Visit: www.fbmgg.com

NOBODY IS IMMUNE FROM FINANCIAL TROUBLE People from all walks of life and from all income levels experience financial trouble. You are not the first, nor will you be the last. Still, your particular circumstances are unique.  At the law firm of Bryan P. Keenan & Associates, they care enough to get to know you. They care enough to find the solution that is right for you. Contact BRYAN P. KEENAN & ASSOCIATES, PC to schedule a free initial consultation to see if bankruptcy or a non-bankruptcy alternative can help you. As a skilled bankruptcy attorney, Bryan can help you find out whether Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 can provide you with personal debt relief. As a personal bankruptcy lawyer, Bryan uses imaginative solutions in connec993 Greentree Rd tion with your unique circumstances. He provides comprehensive bankruptcy #101, Pittsburgh advice to his clients, as the impact of bankruptcy continues long after the initial (412)922-5116 filing. Bryan P. Keenan & Associates, PC is a debt relief agency helping people file for bankruptcy relief under the bankruptcy code. For your initial consultation there is no charge. Easy payment plans are available. Visit: www.attorneykeenan.com

CRIMINAL & DUI • BANKRUPTCY • DIVORCE

ATTORNEY MARVIN LEIBOWITZ takes the extra step, working with his

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Money’s tight, budgets are being cut, and some people can’t or won’t pay their bills on time. If these or other debt recovery problems are facing your business or company, CLAIMS RECOVERY SYSTEMS has proven itself a valuable resource in this day and age when credit is so prevalent. They assure you of prompt results and will handle all of your debt recovery problems anywhere in PA and beyond. They specialize in consumer collections, Judgment recovery and bad checks. They are licensed & bonded, fully compliant and unlike other debt recovery agencies will purchase your hard to collect debt accounts for cash. Cash flow is an integral part of every business. Regardless of the size of your accounts, these professionals treat each one with the same respect and confidentiality. All info on their procedures and rates is given without obligation.

HELP FOR LOU GEHRIG’S DISEASE ALS, or Lou Gherig’s Disease has no known treatment or cure. Following diagnosis the average life expectancy is two to five years. Military are twice as likely to get ALS. THE ALS ASSOCIATION is the only non-profit dedicated solely to the fight against Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. They fund research, provide direct patient and family services, conduct public education and advocacy, while offering help and hope to those facing the disease. They raise funds for patient care, increased public awareness and research for a treatment and a cure. 416 Lincoln Ave The ALS Association provides services through multidisciplinary clinics at AGH Pittsburgh and in Johnstown, PA. Additionally their Care Services staff assists patients and (412)821-3254 families through an equipment loan program, respite care program, support groups, transportation program, and home modification program. The local Chapter administers the loan of communication devices, publishes numerous e-bulletins and a newsletter, and they hold the Annual Walk to Defeat ALS. The ALS Association Western PA Chapter is a vital link for patients & families to information, counseling and direct medical services. Visit: www.cure4als.org

RECOVERY BEGINS HERE Specializing in alcohol and drug dependency recovery services, THE CENTER FOR SPIRITUALITY IN 12 STEP RECOVERY wants to assure you that chemical dependency is a treatable disease. People can & do recover. The Center treats male & female adults 18 or older. Executive Director Gina R. Hickman wants you to know the Center’s goal has been to not only give hope to those suffering from drug dependency, but to educate family members and the community to the special needs of those suffering from addiction. The Center’s care management specialists are not therapists but 7119 Hamilton Ave rather people who have a minimum of five years of recovery and can assist you Pittsburgh in finding the treatment resources as well as supportive opportunities best suited (412)247-2750 for your recovery. The Center encourages supportive nurturing & development of a spiritual dimension that aids the 12 step program for ongoing healing & growth. They want people to recognize that chemical dependency is a disease rather than a moral issue, that it is necessary to seek support & 12 step mentoring, and most important, recovery is possible. Visit: www.cfs12step.org

Shop Local and Support Small Businesses in Pittsburgh! N E W S

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clients to resolve the matters entrusted to him. He combines sensitivity with experience, knowledgeable legal advice and advocacy on behalf of his clients. Marvin concentrates his legal practice in the areas of criminal law, DUI, bankruptcy, civil litigation, social security, personal injury and Workers’ Compensation but takes on other types of cases on a case-by-case basis. He has 36 years of experience in providing effective and knowledgeable legal advice. Marvin is a very well respected lawyer and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law and Who’s Who in the World. He uses his skill and experience to solve problems and fight for the needs of each client. Marvin has chosen to practice in a small firm setting because he is committed to delivering quality legal services in a responsive, personalized and cost-effective manner. He will work closely with you to develop a path forward to the effective resolution of your legal issue.

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Since 1925, the dental team and dentists of  DENTONICS, INC. has provided the discriminating, high quality conscious patient with the latest technology in comprehensive esthetic dental care. Dr. Joseph Quartuccio & Dr. Charles Frye are graduates of the University of Pittsburgh and attend over 200 hours of continuing education per year. They have trained extensively at the Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies to incorporate the latest technology of aesthetic 4290 Route 8 dentistry into their practice. They have both been chosen as Top Dentists for the Allison Park past several years as featured in Pittsburgh Magazine. (412)487-6910 Drs. Quartuccio & Frye are trained in Neuromuscular Dentistry for treating TMJ disorders, facial pain and sleep apnea.  They are certified to provide Invisalign (invisible braces). Dentonics also offers state-of-the-art general and reconstructive dentistry, including implants when indicated. Zoom whitening is also offered to brighten smiles. Visit: www.pittsburgh-cosmetic-dentist.com

GUIDANCE & SUPPORT FOR HEALING In the heart of every problem lies its solution. People spend enormous amounts of time and energy searching for answers outside themselves when the true answers lie within. Reverend Debbie Pakler, PhD at BLOOMING SPIRIT ENTERPRISES has been a psychic, spiritual counselor & medium for 20 years. As a psychotherapist, teacher and public speaker, she has assisted people from all walks of life through her counseling, workshops, classes and presentations. People who are seeking practical guidance and tools for their daily lives, answers to spiritual questions, communication with their loved ones who have died, and comfort from their grief and peace of mind receive readings. (412)271-4474     Dr. Pakler has found often people discover they have intuitive abilities but are not sure how to develop them. She offers coaching and mentoring for those who would like guidance in developing their spiritual gifts. Her coaching/mentoring style is insight-oriented, empathic & nonjudgmental. Email: dpspiritmessages@yahoo.com; and visit her websites: www.debbiepakler.com and www.spiritsblooming.com

PART C EARLY INTERVENTION The ALLIANCE FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS is the single point of contact for entry into the Early Intervention system in Allegheny County. Service coordination is provided for children, ages birth to three years, at no cost to families. The Alliance helps children with developmental delays and their families learn what supports are best for their child, easily locate and coordinate those supports, and focus on positive, practical ways of supporting their child. All services are provided in the home or community setting chosen by the family. Services are confidential. 2801 Custer Ave Developmental assessment areas include cognition, communication, physical, Hough Bldg, Pittsburgh social-emotional and adaptive development. The Alliance also helps coordinate and monitor specialized services including speech/language pathology, physi(412)885-6000 cal therapy, occupational therapy, vision and hearing services, developmental therapy and social work. The Alliance partners with community organizations to provide consultation and direct services to families as well as Parent Support Groups who can help you understand your situation and relate to what you’re going through. Visit: www.afit.org

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CROWDED OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

wouldn’t have been able to do otherwise.” Cellhelmet is just one of the success stories coming out of the more than 450 crowdfunding platforms available, including Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Fundrazr. Such websites helped companies and individuals worldwide raise $89 million in 2010, $1.47 billion in 2011 and $2.66 billion in 2012, according to Massolution, a research and advisory firm. But the competition for those dollars is building too, with already-established celebrities and corporations going hatin-hand. For example, last May, Hollywood actor and director Zach Braff used Kickstarter to raise more than $3 million for an upcoming movie; the next month, Warner Bros. raised more than $3.7 million to fund a movie based on t h e Ve ronica M ars television series. Kane says the participation of established players is not a bad thing. “I think the larger companies are actually making it easier for the startups, as they’re putting more eyes on crowdfunding as a whole,” he says. Still, he admits, “They are overshadowing the smaller companies in the media, what the average consumer sees.” And some critics believe allowing major movie studios, celebrities and corporations to use crowdfunding sites sets a bad precedent. Crowdfunding, they say, was designed to benefit smaller, independent entrepreneurs who can’t get capital through traditional means. Rodrigo Davies, a civic technologist and researcher at the MIT Center for Civic Media, says smaller startups are starting to feel “slightly aggrieved” by established names using crowdfunding. “Kickstarter came from this place of struggling artists that mainstream funding sources aren’t supporting,” Davies says. “So for those people, it doesn’t really feel like a level playing field.” “I think this is a really big issue,” Davies adds. “There are lots of large organizations looking into crowdfunding, and people are rightly asking the question, ‘Why do they need it?’”

York’s Carnegie Hall. The symphony has received donations from a number of foundations, corporations and individuals over the years. Among them are several corporate sponsors who each give more than $75,000, and one-time gifts of as much as $1 million. Despite that support, “there’s still more need,” says Al Jacobsen, PSO senior manager of corporate and tour sponsorship. “The truth is with any orchestra in this country, ticket revenue only covers a portion of our expenses, and every year we have a need to fundraise. The perception that just the foundations and corporations provide all the funding we need is incorrect. We rely on individuals, and that need doesn’t go away.” Giving isn’t a one-way street in Kickstarter campaigns; those who contribute usually receive something in return. For PSO’s campaign, backers who give $50 or more will be invited to attend the orchestra’s final rehearsal before the Carnegie Hall show. But the premium isn’t the only reason to donate, Jacobsen says: The symphony’s Carnegie Hall appearance will also focus a spotlight on Pittsburgh. “This will provide a vehicle for us to showcase the Pittsburgh community and what we have here.” “Whether you’re an established or a younger organization, it’s all about … is your project captivating to enough people,” Jacobsen adds. As of Feb. 14, the PSO’s Kickstarter campaign had raised $21,293 of its $30,000 goal, with two weeks to go before the Feb. 28 deadline. (On Kickstarter, projects receive funding only if the entire goal is reached.) Meanwhile, on Kickstarter alone, about 20 other Pittsburgh campaigns are clamoring for funds. Among them is Mojo Game Studios, a local independent video-game studio founded by former Carnegie Mellon students. Mojo is seeking funding to develop an open-world fantasy role-playing game called Cradle. “As an independent game studio, we’d like to maintain as much creative control and freedom as we can,” says Mojo President Hank Zwally. “That means finding other means of funding. [Crowd

“WHETHER YOU’RE AN ESTABLISHED OR A YOUNGER ORGANIZATION, IT’S ALL ABOUT … IS YOUR PROJECT CAPTIVATING TO ENOUGH PEOPLE.”

ESTABLISHED LOCAL entities are get-

ting in on the action, too. Last month, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund its upcoming concert at New


funding] gives people like us an opportunity to do what we want to do. It also gives us a medium for testing community input: Do people really want to see this game?” So far Mojo has raised slightly more than $118,000 of its $350,000 goal, with just a few days remaining before its Feb. 20 deadline. That fundraising target is meager compared to others: Established game-developer inXile Entertainment, for example, raised more than $4 million last year for its newest project. Zwally, who expressed doubts about whether Mojo’s campaign will reach its goal, isn’t happy with the appearance of established firms on the crowdfunding scene. Some of those companies already have investors, he contends: That makes them better equipped to show more game content upfront, which makes them more attractive to other potential backers. “I think it’s pretty clear part of the reason we’ve suffered is because other campaigns have more content to show,” Zwally says. “We don’t have that because we don’t have the funding. And you can see how they can take away from the available funds on Kickstarter.” Maggie Negrete is another Pittsbur-

gher who was hard up against a fundraising deadline as this issue went to press. She’s been seeking $3,000 to publish the first in a series of feminist fairytale comic and coloring books. She too doubts her campaign will be fully funded — she had about $2,300 with just a few days to go — and was critical of bigger names who use crowdfunding. “It really upsets me because there are corporations or celebrities who have funding or have people they can ask,” Negrete says. “I think it’s a little exploitive. I think it distracts people from finding projects that might be worth those $10.” Kickstarter spokesperson Julie Wood doesn’t see the website’s growing popularity as a bad thing. In 2013, three million people donated $480 million to Kickstarter projects. “We see lots of different projects on Kickstarter,” Wood says. “We see projects from people who don’t have the means and people who do. But the great thing is, backers get to decide which projects they want to support.” In any case, Wood adds, “It’s a misconception that it’s some sort of competition or that others are getting overshadowed. When a well-known person

The Undead Pool

Reading / Book Signing Friday, February 28th, 7PM 100 West Bridge Street Homestead (412) 462-5743 In the thrilling 12th installment of the Hollows series, Rachel Morgan must invoke the powers of the ancient elves—and finally come to terms with her complicated feelings for Trent Kalamack—in order to save Cincinnati from bloodthirsty vampires.

Get more info and get to know your favorite writers at BN.COM/events All events subject to change, so please contact the store to confirm.

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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CROWDED OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

uses [a crowdfunding site], it actually brings more attention to the site and to other causes.” LOCAL CHEF and restaurateur Kevin Sousa tends to agree. His campaign to open a restaurant in Braddock was the bestfunded restaurant in Kickstarter’s history, raising more than $300,000. The restaurant, Superior Motors, will offer discounts to local residents, feature a workforce-development component and be the only restaurant in the economically depressed Mon Valley town. “Every Kickstarter campaign creates their own business plan and in turn kind of creates their own market,” Sousa says. “Nobody is taking anything away from anyone else. “There are plenty of folks out there who want to support these things, and the genius of crowdsourcing is that now those ideas have a platform and vehicle to reach their target audience.” Sousa says that crowdfunding can also help encourage risk-taking even

among better-known sponsors. “Established brands and organizations — myself included in this category — aren’t necessarily flush with capital,” Sousa says. “Some projects simply cannot get the funding needed through traditional avenues. When the risk is high and there is no precedent, banks and investors are not generally willing to get behind an idea.” Superior Motors itself, he says, was not attractive to bank lenders. But even on a site like Kickstarter, it sometimes takes money to make money. Companies have begun hiring consultants who specialize in crowdfunding to help capitalize on this growing market. “Unfortunately I don’t think there [is] a whole lot platforms can do about that,” Davies, of MIT, says. “You might hear some people say, ‘It doesn’t matter; if your campaign is deserving people will find it.’ But we all know the competition is fierce, and if you have a slick campaign team behind you, your chance will be better.”

“I THINK IT’S A LITTLE EXPLOITIVE. I THINK IT DISTRACTS PEOPLE FROM FINDING PROJECTS THAT MIGHT BE WORTH THOSE $10.”

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INSUFFICIENT FUNDS Banks offer few options for low-income customers {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

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ON A RECENT frigid Friday afternoon outside the ACE Cash Express off Market Square, there is a steady stream of customers. There’s a 34-year-old mother of two who pays nearly $20 to cash her paycheck of $591.57. She’s not happy to be here, she says, but doesn’t have a choice. After she lost her last job, the bills started piling up, and her PNC checking account got hit with overdraft fees she still isn’t able to pay off. Malick, who declines to give his last name, stops by to load money on his prepaid debit card, an increasingly popular financial option that he says costs him $3 to load, plus a $5 monthly maintenance fee. He’s unable to open a checking account because “I owe so many banks money from gambling.” And there’s William McGann, a 40-year-old Mount Washington concrete worker who’s just cashed his paycheck at a cost of about 3 percent. “I hate banks,” he says. They’re not alone: 10.1 percent of Pittsburghers don’t have bank accounts (about 2.4 percentage points higher than the national average) and 19.9 percent are “under-banked”— meaning they have accounts, but also rely on financial services like check-cashers, payday lenders, pawn shops or rentto-own agreements. That’s according to the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, which is launching a new program in an effort to bring those numbers down. As this issue was going to press on Feb. 18, banks, local officials and community groups were scheduled to announce an initiative called “Bank On Greater Pittsburgh” — an attempt to connect low- and moderate-income people with low-cost banking and financial education. The United Way provided the Urban League with $150,000 in annual grant support for three years for the program, according to Debra Squires, director of family growth and child development at the Urban League. “People who are poor have the least money to put into other services,” Squires says. “The less money you have, the more you need a bank account.” That’s the logic of the Bank On initiative, which is based on a National League of Cities model: People who rely on services like check-cashers would

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

be better off if banks could offer them “second chance” accounts with low transaction costs, low- or no-minimum balance requirements and overdraftfee controls. “That’s why these [initiatives are] a good idea,” says Mark Price, a labor economist at the left-leaning Keystone Research Center. “They mix in education — they try to change the fee structure in a way that’s less harmful to low-income individuals. Because of their income, they are going to bounce checks. Getting banks to partner and recognize that […] is a good thing.” The program has the support of Mayor Bill Peduto, who included the Bank On program among the 100 policies he proposed leading up to his election. “It’s critical that the Urban League is really leading this because they are a trusted voice,” says Betty Cruz, Peduto’s non-profit and faith-based manager. “They will have the interest of the community in mind.” But even if financial institutions are willing to do some banking education in low-income communities, it’s not yet clear whether they plan to change the financial products they already offer — a reality the Urban League’s Squires acknowledges, but hopes to work on as the program develops. PNC Bank, which participates in Bank On initiatives in 17 cities, typically “[offers] the type of products we would offer off the shelf, and in most cases those services require a fee,” says spokesman Fred Solomon. The bank declined to discuss, prior to the official announcement, how it plans to participate in the Pittsburgh version of the program. A Fifth Third Bank spokesman echoed that sentiment, saying it would participate, but essentially offer the same services it offers to all its customers. “Serving people of meager means is very costly,” says Richard Witherspoon, CEO of the Hill District Federal Credit Union. He says he offers a $500 emergency-loan program at a slight loss and plans to participate in the Bank

On program with financial outreach and counseling. But some point out that poor people rely on alternative financial outlets because they offer a service they can’t get at traditional banks. “Banks haven’t changed their model enough to really do what needs to be done to serve the needs of lower-income people,” says Lisa Servon, a professor of management and urban policy at The New School in New York. S e r vo n , wh o wo r ke d f o r s ev eral months last year as a checkcasher and teller in the South Bronx to understand why people use nonmainstream financial services, says many poor people “actually are not ignorant — they’re making pretty consc ious choices about what they’re doing” when they choose checkcashing or payday loans over traditional bank accounts. The people she saw often lived paycheck to paycheck and couldn’t wait several days for a check to clear. They would rather pay for a checkcasher or payday loan in order to make ends meet than pay overdraft fees, which can actually be more costly, she said. Plus, check-cashers are often open later and are more visible in poorer communities. “If we look at the business model of banks, their role is to make as much profit as they can — and they don’t make a ton of profit by doing lots of transactions,” she says. “They’d rather have one customer with a million dollars than have a million customers with one dollar.” Servon says that programs like Bank On can be useful if they offer products that poor people actually need, but it’s important not to lose sight of poverty as the underlying reason people choose alternatives. “Anybody who’s working full time at a job should be able to make ends meet — and that’s just not the case,” she says. “The emphasis is always on the customers changing — and I think the services need to change.”

“THE EMPHASIS IS ALWAYS ON THE CUSTOMERS CHANGING – AND I THINK THE SERVICES NEED TO CHANGE.”

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Two-Night Film Event with Kamran Shirdel Don’t miss Iranian filmmaker Kamran Shirdel in his first US appearance! Screenings include discussion with Shirdel and co-curator Tina Kukielski. Thursday, February 20 Culture Club at Carnegie Museum of Art 5:30 p.m. Happy Hour; 7 p.m. Film Screening $10 includes admission and one drink ticket Friday, February 21 Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Melwood Screening Room 7 p.m. Film Screening $10 admission Co sponsored by Pittsburgh Filmmakers

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UNSAFE AT HOME Legal fight reflects uncertainty for same-sex couples who get married out of state {BY CHRIS POTTER} DOWN ON THE first floor of the City-

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County Building, a handful of same-sex couples celebrated Valentine’s Day by trying to obtain a county marriage license — a public protest of Pennsylvania’s refusal to recognize gay marriage. But a somewhat different drama was playing out six floors above, far from reporters’ microphones. There, in the courtroom of Common Pleas Judge Robert J. Colville, Brad Ankney was suddenly presented with a surprising possibility: His employer might — might —provide health benefits to Ankney’s same-sex partner … if they obtained a marriage license somewhere else. That scenario arose in a lawsuit Ankney filed last August against his employer, the Allegheny Intermediate U n i t . L i k e m a ny e m p l o ye r s , t h e educational-support agency offers health benefits to employees’ spouses. But as his lawsuit argues, “Because Ankney [is] not eligible to be married in Pennsylvania, Ankney cannot avail himself of many of the benefits of his employment.” But in oral arguments before Colville, AIU attorney Anthony Sanchez observed that “Marriage is not an impossibility in this country anymore.” For a couple to obtain benefits, he observed, AIU’s policy only “specifies [they must be] married” — not married in Pennsylvania. Both Maryland and New York recognize same-sex marriage, and are within driving distance. After the hearing, Ankney said he’d consider getting an outof-state license if AIU would recognize it. Still, the Somerset County native said, “I’m a resident of Pennsylvania, and I’d prefer to get a Pennsylvania marriage license.” It’s also unclear whether Sanchez was offering a solution to the impasse, or merely prolonging it. Sanchez contended that since Ankney didn’t have an outof-state marriage license, the issue was “not a live controversy,” and thus not a question Colville could rule on. When approached after the hearing, Sanchez declined comment. Ankney and his partner are not the only Pennsylvania couple facing such uncertainty. Even when such couples cross state lines to get married, once back on Pennsylvania soil, they find themselves on uncertain legal ground. State law does not recognize same-sex marriage for residents, even if their employers do. As Levana Layendecker, a spokesperson for LGBT advocacy group Equality

PA puts it, “There are so many couples in limbo.” ANKNEY’S ATTORNEYS, the ACLU’s Sara Rose and the Women’s Law Project’s Sue Frietsche, say the Feb. 14 hearing was the first time the AIU suggested it might recognize an out-of-state license. That made it a notable development in a hearing which, for the most part, rehashed arguments previously spelled out in written briefs. Ankney contends the AIU’s policy violates both Allegheny County’s 2009 anti-discrimination ordinance, and the state’s anti-discrimination law. Although the state law doesn’t address LGBT discrimination, Frietsche told Colville the policy amounts to sex discrimination too: “If Mr. Ankney were a woman instead of a man, he could qualify for benefits by marrying his partner.” Colville seemed dubious. AIU’s policy “is not based on gender alone,” he said: If it were discriminatory, “The discriminatory act would not occur but for the fact that there was sexual-orientation discrimination.” As for the county ordinance, Sanchez noted that the county’s Human Relations Commission itself had rejected Ankney’s claim in a brief letter. (The letter’s author, Assistant County Solicitor Robert Bogoyn, told City Paper last year that Ankney was “in kind of a catch-22,” since the state is denying the marriage license the AIU requires.) “This court should give great deference to that” decision, Sanchez said. Rose countered that the commission hadn’t even held a hearing, and that its memo offered little in the way of legal reasoning. “The commission’s decision should not be [given] any deference by this court,” she said. Rose was also wary of the suggestion that Ankney cross state lines: “We’d still have an argument that this would be a burden that falls only on LGBT employees,” she said after the hearing. Had Ankney been in an opposite-sex relationship, after all, he could have obtained a marriage license just by hopping on an elevator.

Even with a license, Ankney’s rights off the job would still be in doubt. Under Pennsylvania’s Defense of Marriage law, same-sex marriages consecrated elsewhere are rendered “void.” One month after Ankney filed his suit, in fact, that provision became the target of another lawsuit. Cara Palladino and Isabella Barker were married in Massachusetts in 2005, only to have that marriage effectively annulled when they moved to the Philadelphia area. The two have sued in federal court, arguing that Pennsylvania is violating the U.S. Constitution’s “full faith and credit” clause, which requires each state to grant legitimacy to official acts carried out by every other. “While the state can’t divorce a same-sex couple in a technical sense, they are divorcing them in actuality — and without even a court hearing,” says Malcolm Lazin, executive director of Equality Forum. The Philadelphiabased LGBT-rights group is coordinating the Palladino lawsuit because, Lazin says, state law determines everything from hospitalvisitation rights to “who can pick up a child from school.” And with an outof-state marriage license, securing those rights requires “separate legal documents that you wouldn’t need if you were an opposite-sex couple.” Lazin says his advice to Ankney would be “get married now” — in hopes of securing his rights as soon as possible. For the next several years, at least, “The U.S. Supreme Court will be reluctant to tell Alabama and Pennsylvania who to marry,” Lazin surmises. By contrast, it will act more quickly on a case like Palladino’s, because “if states don’t recognize each other’s judgment, the whole federal system falls apart.” Even then, an initial ruling in Palladino’s case won’t come until late spring or early summer. There is no timetable for Colville to issue a ruling in Ankney’s case. So for now, says Lazin, if you want to understand the limbo same-sex couples find themselves in, “This case and Palladino fit perfectly together.”

“WHILE THE STATE CAN’T DIVORCE A SAME-SEX COUPLE IN A TECHNICAL SENSE, THEY ARE DIVORCING THEM IN ACTUALITY — AND WITHOUT EVEN A COURT HEARING.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


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IT WAS LIKE DINING INSIDE A WES ANDERSON MOVIE

FARE LABOR It’s a bitter irony of higher-end dining: Customers will pay a premium for humanely raised meat … without sparing a thought about the treatment of the kitchen staff who prepares it. Jordan Romanus, a local activist with the Restaurant Opportunities Center, hopes to change that. “Twenty years ago,” he says, “if you were talking about organics or locally sourced food, people would say ‘what?’ Worker treatment is the next big push.” Though Romanus’ efforts are still in the early stages, he’s found a success story: Shadyside farm-to-table specialist Eden. Eden is the first Pittsburgh eatery to enlist in ROC’s RAISE campaign: Restaurants Advancing Industry Standards in Employment. It’s a kind of “seal of approval” for Eden’s labor policies, says Romanus. “We just do what we feel is right,” says Hilary Zozula, Eden’s co-owner and chef. From the restaurant’s 2011 launch, she says, “I wanted to create an environment where no one makes that much more than anyone else. And when we make more money, we give people a raise” — which happened for the first time last year. Eden employs eight people, including Zozula: Kitchen staff start at $11 an hour, rising to $12 after six months. Servers make $3.50 an hour — 67 cents more than the legal minimum for tipped employees — and tips are distributed equally. Servers can make $15-20 an hour even on less-than-busy nights, Zozula says. Eden doesn’t provide health coverage: Co-owner Al Polnac sat down with employees to figure out their options, Zozula says, and “with Obamacare, they were all able to get a better deal on their own” rather than through an employerrun plan. But Zozula says she hopes to offer retirement benefits soon. ROC’s national organization issues a Diners’ Guide, which surveys labor standards at chains and local restaurants. While no Pittsburgh restaurants are listed — yet — Romanus expects that to change, and for local awareness of the issue to increase. Zozula says treating workers fairly is its own reward: “If the servers are unhappy, customers will know. And if the kitchen staff is underpaid and overtired, you’ll be able to taste it.”

Eden chef/co-owner Hilary Zozula {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY CHRIS POTTER}

WRY AMERICAN CUISINE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

A

T ITS MOST basic, food is an essential

requirement for physical survival. Beyond that, everyone knows there are strong sensual and social aspects to food. Food can be political, too. But can it be … literary? Intellectual? Witty? Can food embrace the retro, ironic longings of hipster culture, and still be good to eat? There is more than one restaurant daring to pose these questions, but Butcher and the Rye may have the most satisfying answers. Let’s start with the name. In case its punniness leaves any doubt, Butcher and the Rye features a wall-size mural of Salinger characters Holden Caulfield and his little sister Phoebe with the totemic carousel and titular field of rye superimposed on the Pittsburgh skyline. The rest of the interior is chockablock with taxidermy, bell jars, old typewriters and books, flocked wallpaper (much of it featuring the very animals available on the menu), mirrors, and, yes, an antler chandelier. It was like dining inside a Wes Anderson movie, down to the check that arrived in a little leather-bound notebook with an invitation to leave our comments.

Pork terrine

And, while it has become de rigueur for restaurants to tout their local sourcing of ingredients, Butcher and the Rye is the first to dare to apply this credo to pre-sliced Schwebel’s white bread (used, in this case, as a crouton beneath a fried quail). It would all be easy to mock — except that it worked. The twee decor made for fun dinner-table conversation, the service was welcoming and knowledgeable, and, most importantly, the food (not to mention the house-recipe cocktails) was outstanding.

BUTCHER AND THE RYE

212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 5-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5 p.m.-midnight PRICES: Small plates $7-14; large plates $16-26 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED Caesar salad is a classic because its counterintuitive blend of ingredients creates such an unexpectedly perfect balance of flavors. Butcher dares to upset this balance by substituting kale (tender, baby kale, not

the tough stuff) for canonical romaine and, instead of topping the salad with croutons, heaping it on a whole slice of anchovy toast. The lemony dressing was distinctly fruitforward, while the egg represented separately in dollops of aioli. Many a Caesar has tried to reinvent the wheel, but this might be the first that actually achieved something both new and worthwhile. On the other hand, dry-aged tartare went to great lengths to distinguish itself, but ultimately offered a fairly classic preparation. The beef, to be sure, was exceptional, minced (not ground) and flavorful on just-right toasts. But the array of sauces smeared, squirted and dripped around it, while certainly tasty, didn’t open our palates the way the salad had. Roasted Brussels sprouts, roasted deep and dark, mostly avoided the charred flavor that can overwhelm sprouts cooked under high heat, and their tenderness didn’t translate to mush. A smear of preserved lemon aioli on the edge of the bowl was bright and creamy. Even in this enlightened era of sprouts (unlike those you hated as a kid),

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these were maybe the best we’ve ever had. Macaroni-and-cheese is enjoying its second decade of revival as a fancier food, and Butcher reminds us why: A lengthy list of cheeses added up to richness that transcended mere caloric heft to achieve an impressive depth of flavor. The crispy breadcrumb topping was light, buttery and crunchy in a way that conveyed care and attention. True to the subtext of the decor’s taxidermy, Butcher’s menu features game. A quail special was semi-deboned, floured with black and cayenne pepper and fried whole. The coating was crisp and the meat juicy, but it could have been more tender. Asked how we’d like it done, we’d said we’d trust the chef, but the result was at times chewy; while this may happen with game birds, it seemed avoidable with such a tiny one.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT Garage brewery makes bid for local stardom

Braised, shredded rabbit was served with winter vegetables and pappardelle in a preparation reminiscent of beef bourguignon. Sweet and lush, it was great winter comfort food, but the beyond-al-dente noodles appeared to have been thrown into the sauce raw, where they didn’t completely cook. Their toughness was a distraction. The burger was composed of two cuts of meat, as is the current fashion, and for once the distinction was apparent, with the patty having a meaty, pleasingly nonuniform texture. The fries were so deeply browned as to evoke sweet-potato fries. A sour pickle was the third distinct pickle we were served, along with a bread-and-butter pickle with onion, and a simple ricevinegar pickle. All were tasty and crisp. Its sensibility may be amusingly offkilter, its ambience over-the-top, but one thing Butcher and the Rye surely takes seriously is food.

It’s not uncommon for a garage band to dream of fame and fortune, but what about a garage brewery? It’s not out of the realm of possibility for CoStar Brewing, which for the past year has been producing small batches of increasingly popular beer. After four years of homebrewing, Dominic Cincotta and Jeff Hanna were getting a lot of praise from friends. “Of course, most homebrewers get praise from their friends,” Cincotta says. However, after asking several bartenders to sample their brew and getting an equally positive reaction, they decided to go pro (a decision made, fittingly, over beers at the William Penn Tavern). Instead of opting for a traditional brewhouse, they converted a two-car garage in Highland Park into a licensed brewery. It took about two years to get the building up to code. All four members of the CoStar team — Cincotta and Hanna, along with Hanna’s wife, Caitlyn, and brother Thomas — work full-time jobs. So brewing happens in Saturday sessions that can last up to 12 hours, and produce only a single barrel of beer. The company’s flagship beer is Hopland Park, an American pale ale spiced with Cascade and Northern Brewers hops. There is also a rotation of styles; currently a Black IPA and a Belgian ale are featured. Because output is limited, the brewers limit sales to just a few bars. There’s a permanent CoStar tap at Harvard & Highland, while UP Modern Kitchen has a steady supply. The beer can also often be found at Gus’s, William Penn Tavern, Mad Mex Shadyside and a few other locations. Cincotta says to check the company’s website (www. costarbrewing.com) for updated tap lists. As with every successful garage band, there comes a time to move out of the house. Cincotta says he’s been scouting locations, and plans are underway to move into a larger space, likely in about a year. “More places are interested than we can supply,” he says. “Our challenge is not having enough supply due to our size.”

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“MORE PLACES ARE INTERESTED THAN WE CAN SUPPLY.”

Robert Burns Manhattan

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

Best Mex Restauraican nt

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

L o c al !

BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

Monday 9am-3pm Tuesday-Thursday 9am-6pm Friday 9am-8pm Don’t forget Saturday Brunch 9am-2pm CLOSED SUNDAYS

CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200. The Brew Works setting — the meticulously rehabbed interior of St. John the Baptist Church with its altar of beer — remains incomparable, and there are always several hand-crafted brews on tap to enjoy. For dining, the venue offers a flexible menu, suitable for all ages, ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE

James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

FULL LIST ONLINE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This

1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

Dine-In or Take-Out

venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe DITKA’S RESTAURANT. bombs,” live music 1 Robinson Plaza, on one floor and Robinson. 412menus housed in old 722-1555. With its LP covers. KE www. per wood paneling, white a p pghcitym tablecloths and $30 .co LA CUCINA FLEGREA. entrees, Ditka’s aims for 100 Fifth Ave., No. 204, the serious steakhouse Downtown. 412-521-2082. market — but never forgets The specialties of Italy’s its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Campi Flegrei are featured at Mike Ditka is the former Chicago this Downtown restaurant. The Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a cuisine of this coastal region Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining naturally offers seafood, but also staple such as filet Oscar. LE vegetables and cured meats. Thus, a pasta dish might be laden EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 with shellfish, or enlivened with Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421radicchio and prosciutto. LE 6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF GATTO CYCLE DINER. Wood Street and Seventh Avenue, Tarentum. 724-224-0500. This lovingly restored 1949 vintage diner, now appended to a motorcycle shop, serves breakfast, sandwiches and burgers, all re-named in honor of motorbikes. Nitro chili gets its kick from onions, hot sauce and sliced jalapenos; the Bar-B-Q Glide sandwich is topped with bacon, barbecue sauce and cheddar; and the Sportster is a delicious tuna melt. J

Gift s Certificate Available!

We Support

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mendoza Express LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full

bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE MAURAMORI CAFÉ. 5202 Butler Street, Lawrenceville. 412-408-3160. This café-style breakfast-lunch spot serves, as expected, bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, sandwiches, burgers and fries. This is still down-home cooking, but better-quality ingredients (applewood-smoked bacon) are emphasized, and care that goes into their assemblage (hand-formed burger patties). J

We also cater office parties! Let us do the work... Call us 24 hours in advance@

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MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF MENDOZA EXPRESS. 812 Mansfield Road, Green Tree. 412-429-8780. The décor is pure kitsch — sombreros on the walls, etc. — and the location is a bit obscure. But the menu is ample, and the food is as authentic as you’ll find in Pittsburgh. (Try the rebozo, a scramble of chorizo, peppers and cheese.) JF NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4221888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant, but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The lesstypical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

Authentic Thai Cuisine

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS

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CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

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412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

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PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-6613334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional creamwine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is high-end, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates. KE

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533 Allegheny Avenue Oakmont, PA 15139 (412) 828-8555 www.hoffstots.com

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

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TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular Bloomfield institution, set in an old neighborhood corner bar, has built its reputation on enormous wood-fired hamburgers: choice meat, ground in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, and, on busy weekends, diners line up to get in. KE WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Downtown (412-4345600) and 1505 E. Carson St., South Side (412-904-4620). Big beefy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this an above-average bar stop, whether Downtown or on Carson Street. Burger toppings range from standard cheese and fried onions to arugula and truffle oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its excellent crust. JE


LOCAL

BEAT

“AT A CERTAIN POINT, I HAD TO SAY TO PNC, ‘IF YOU WANT THE KEYS, HERE THEY ARE.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

WAITING FOR KROEGER “There’s only three certains in life,” says Chris Kintucky, in the trademark drawl he tends to pass in and out of. “A risin’ divorce rate, whiskey, and Chad Kroeger one day goin’ country.” At least that’s what Kintucky (real last name: Misutka) is counting on; the onetime employee of Roadrunner Records, the label that broke Nickelback, has put a lot of time into writing country songs … in hopes that when the Nickelback frontman inevitably crosses over, he can send some tunes along for Kroeger to cover. In the meantime, he plays with Pittsburgh’s Kid Durango, a grungepunk band whose lineup (and sound) is colored by a Craigslist ad that frontman Pete Finnigan placed a few years back. “I jokingly placed this ad that said I wanted to start a ‘grunge-folk’ band,” Finnigan says with a laugh. He figured it wouldn’t net anyone serious, but along came Johnstown native Josh Crusan, who came up playing in bands in small bars in small towns like Mundys Corner and Nanty Glo. “I had put these songs together in the studio,” says Finnigan. “And he played them better than me, on an acoustic guitar, in front of me on the street.” With Crusan and bassist Ryan Cunningham from the honky tonks of Cambria County, and Kintucky bringing his country interests to the fold, Kid Durango only needed a little push to go country themselves — that came in the form of a show offer in Lawrenceville on the night of Art All Night last year. Since drummer Jed Blazanin couldn’t make it, the band played its set acoustic. The result: Kid Durango still plays rock music, but also dabbles in folk and country; the band’s country alter-ego is called Chris Kintucky and the Durango Kids. The bands release a new EP (two rock songs, two country songs) Sat., March 1, at Brillobox. And while Kintucky is putting out tunes with Kid Durango, he’s still counting on a certain Canadian crossover. “We’ll see how the next Nickelback album does,” he says. “As soon as he does [go country], I’ll have stacks of songs to send his way.”

“I JOKINGLY PLACED THIS AD THAT SAID I WANTED TO START A ‘GRUNGEFOLK’ BAND.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

KID DURANGO/CHRIS KINTUCKY EP RELEASE with IMPERIAL RAILWAY, BASSETTE. 9 p.m. Sat., March 1. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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MR. SMALL’S

BIG DEAL {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

O

N A FEBRUARY morning, Mike Speranzo is coughing — he’s had a protracted head cold. “It’s just because I’ve been out there hanging drywall in 18-degree weather,” confesses the 45-year-old co-owner of Mr. Small’s Theatre, the live-music venue in Millvale. “Otherwise I’d have gotten over it by now.” He and his nephew, Evan Wood, have been working along with other Small’s employees to build what’s going to be a restaurant on one side of the former church on Lincoln Avenue. They recently completed a few other renovations to the place: a downstairs bar where patrons can buy drafts and hang out if the opener isn’t doing it for them; a screening room for movies and music videos; and an intimate show space where the old backdrop from the Club Cafe stage has found a new home. In fact, Speranzo has been putting sweat equity into the busi-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Keeping Mr. Small’s alive: Mike Speranzo and Liz Berlin

ness he owns with his wife, Liz Berlin, for its entire existence — but this January was the first time in years that they’ve felt they were on sure footing with the venue. For five years, the space, a main-

stay of the live-music resurgence that Pittsburgh has gone through, was on the brink of foreclosure —and it was an old bandmate of Speranzo’s who helped save Small’s.


MR. SMALL’S was founded in 2002 by Speranzo, a musician and former competitive skateboarder, and Berlin, best known as a member of Rusted Root. They bought the property from the borough of Millvale in 2000 and at the outset, it was meant to be a number of things: a livemusic venue, a recording studio, a skate park. While the recording studio was the first part of the plan, it didn’t pan out as well as they’d hoped. “The recording-studio market dried up with the advent of Pro Tools,” the easily accessible recording software that helped to revolutionize home recording, explains Speranzo. “There was a huge dynamic shift.” Over the years, while the live venue grew in popularity, the other aspects of Small’s changed: The studio, run by engineer Larry Luther, moved to the North Side, to the old site of Audiomation Studios. More recently, the skate park was closed. The live calendar at Small’s picked up into the mid- and late-2000s, with promoter Opus One Productions serving as the venue’s primary booker. With the help of an additional investor, the venue secured a liquor license, which helped with revenue, but soon another bump in the road came along: The 2007 implementation of the Allegheny County drink tax. The tax — initially at a rate of 10 percent, though it was dropped to 7 percent in 2009 — put a burden on Small’s in particular because the venue didn’t have a point-of-sale system and was dealing in cash. “All of our prices were on the dollar: It made it easier for my bartenders. All of a sudden, the Allegheny County drink

tax comes in: They put a 10-percent custodial tax on it. Now we’re dealing with non-round numbers. Either we take it up to the next dollar or we eat the cost.” In addition to the tax, Speranzo’s deal with an outside investor caused trouble. “Some of the deals I had inked with the investor for the liquor license went sour, so that created a fiscal drain,” he says. “We started struggling immensely.” The first year’s drink tax ended up being $45,000 that wasn’t accounted for. By fall of 2008, the Pittsburgh Business Times was reporting that the venue had defaulted on a more than $400,000 loan from PNC. “There was a point where I realized if we were going to succeed, I had to stop paying everyone and I had to let the cards land where they may,��� says Speranzo. T h e r e we r e t i m e s when Speranzo and Berlin came close to throwing in the towel. At one point, Speranzo was offered a job in California, working at the West Coast version of Camp Woodward, the centralPennsylvania camp where Speranzo once headed up skateboard instruction. But, for five years, the couple persevered, working with PNC, whose representatives they say were more than helpful. “At a certain point, I had to say to PNC, ‘Look, if you want the keys, here they are,’” Speranzo says. “‘I can’t do anything to stop you.’ They decided that wasn’t in their best interest.”

“They were very nice — they were not the hatchet crew you’d expect your banks to be,” he adds. They couldn’t get out of the bind alone: That’s when David Welsh stepped in. Welsh, a Penn State grad, played with Speranzo in the band Out of the Blue, which was based out of State College and won the 1993 Graffiti Rock Challenge, Pittsburgh’s high-water mark for local bands at the time. Welsh went on to work in real estate, working at Morgan Stanley then helping to found Normandy Real Estate in 2002. The New York-based Normandy’s specialty is buying up the debt on properties that are in trouble, turning around risky acquisitions and selling them at a profit — the firm’s most notable deal involved acquiring Boston’s John Hancock Tower in 2008 and selling it for over $900 million in 2010. “I remember being in the driveway and calling David and saying, ‘Look, I’m gonna lose my liquor license.’ And he said ‘I’ll get you a check.’ I get emotional thinking about it; it was a turning point, because I didn’t want to lose what we’d accomplished.” Welsh then worked with Speranzo to deal with the bankers and read the fine print. For a time, he was only helping; last year, he offered to take on a controlling interest in the mortgage. “He was reluctant to do it for the longest time, because we’re friends,” says Speranza. “But as every good business-

“IT WAS A TURNING POINT, BECAUSE I DIDN’T WANT TO LOSE WHAT WE’D ACCOMPLISHED.”

man does, he never made a move before he was ready. So, as he started negotiating with the bank, he realized what he could do; it was closed out, and the investor we were having trouble with was bought out on New Year’s Day.” It’s not a simple, sweet bailout, though: As part of the restructuring, Speranzo and Berlin — who have never taken a paycheck from Small’s, and live off Berlin’s Rusted Root royalties and touring income — are selling their house in Friendship and moving into the apartment at the venue, along with their 17-year-old son and their niece and nephew. “One of the conditions for David was that he wouldn’t carry all of [the debt] — and Liz and I thought we should take that equity [in our house] and do what’s right instead of profit off of it,” says Speranzo. “So we’re in the process of moving out of our house and moving in here.” MR. SMALL’S recently opened the downstairs bar, and has begun to use the additional rooms for smaller recorded shows and screenings. An expansion to the balcony level of the venue is planned, and the team is making headway on building a restaurant that Speranzo hopes to eventually open seven days a week, which will help with overhead costs in a big venue that, in the winter, might only see five or six shows per month. And as Speranzo and Berlin emerge from five years of doubt and uncertainty, beyond the big plans, the couple has the curious sensation of feeling at ease. “It’s a different feeling,” says Berlin. “After five years with all that hanging over us — we’re free.” A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

February 22, 2014 at 4pm

HPV causes 99% of all cervical cancer.

Grand Opening of the new studio at 5218 Butler St. in Lawrenceville.

Rebecca R b Ph Photography h

Give ‘em the

knockout

Get tested. Get vaccinated.

Food, Photos, Live acoustic music from ʻThe Rents”, Big Ed from Royal Grandeur Productions and much more! Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

#CervicalHealthAwarenessMonth N E W S

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Samples of custom jewelry that combines my photography will be available for viewing and custom orders. Jewelry by Charmed by Jenn, beautiful hand crafted wooden utensils by CKing Wood Works will be available as well. limited edition prints from Rebecca Photography - only one night for a special price.

5218 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201 +

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Have patience: Falling Andes (from left: Dan Peluso, Mike Boyer, Jordan Wood)

GETTING BACK UP {BY ANDY MULKERIN} IF THERE’S one thing Dan Peluso has learned over the years with his band Falling Andes, it’s patience. In 2011, the band was off to a quick start; Peluso had moved back to Pittsburgh after some time working in the music industry in New York City, and he and Jordan Wood started recording together, releasing the single “San Francisco.” It got some buzz on indie blogs (Indie Rock Café, Tympanogram), and they built a band around their recording project, deciding to strike while the iron was hot. (If you think having a band without a hit is hard, trying having a hit without a band.) “We decided we were going to try to be successful, try to get signed, like bands do,” says Peluso. The result was 2011’s Frantic, a fivesong EP of sweet-sounding synth-based indie rock. “I like the songs, but I feel like we kind of rushed it, because we felt like we had some kind of success and we wanted to capitalize on that.” Such is the risk involved in trying to ride the wave. But if the first album was rushed, Falling Andes would have little of the same problem with their

second: Castlevania, another five-song effort, officially drops on Tue., Feb. 25 — about two-and-a-half years after the first record. It’s not just calculated patience that slowed this one up, though … there was also the revolving-door cast of bandmates. At one point, Falling Andes was a five-piece; right now, it’s a three-piece, with drumming duties being filled by synth player Wood and his technology, and guitar held down by Mike Boyer. (Former drummer Peter Natishan will return to town and play with the band for its release show at Club Café, though.) Some of Castlevania was recorded at Audible Images in the North Hills in 2012, and by the time overdubs were done in late 2013, half of the band had turned over. Add to that the fact that Peluso is back in school at Pitt, and it’s a wonder the band was able to get the album done in the time they have. Castlevania, produced by Alex Smolinski (Lola Ray, Butch Vig) is a collection of tight, smart synth-pop tunes with a rock ’n’ roll edge. (“That rock ’n’ roll kind of grittiness is kind of missing” in the pop landscape, asserts Peluso. “That’s one thing we try to do in our shows.”) The lead tune, “Follow Me,” starts off sounding like it could be in a cola commercial — think a slightly

“WE HAD SOME KIND OF SUCCESS AND WE WANTED TO CAPITALIZE ON THAT.”

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simpler Passion Pit — but by the chorus it’s undoubtedly a rock anthem. There are as many crunchy guitar riffs in these songs as there are bloopy synths, and as many analog drums as programmed beats — the collection is a genuine hybrid. The title track, of course, has a bit of a video-game-music feel to it. “Jordan sent the instrumental track to me,” recalls Peluso, “and I put the lyrics and melody to it — the lyrics were about a character running away from monsters and zombies. The track he’d sent had a sort of Transylvania, dark organ sound to it, which inspired that lyrical route. We had referred to the synth tone as ‘the Castlevania sound,’ so then we thought, ‘Why don’t we call the song that?’ Maybe someone will like it because they’re nostalgic about the video game; maybe someone will find it because of the video game!” With the band’s second EP out and — hopefully — a long-term lineup solidified, Falling Andes is, as a band, finally past the dodging of monsters and zombies. The job now is to grow into its potential. What that is, though, is still undetermined: Signing with a label would be great, says Peluso, the onetime label employee. But so would some brand of independent success, whether that’s a solid hometown fan base or more breakout success on the Internet like the band experienced early on.

FALLING ANDES EP RELEASE WITH MIKE CALI

10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

“If there was a label that wanted to invest money in us, give us any of their resources, send us on tour, I think we’d all be on board,” says Peluso. “That’s almost every musician’s dream. But at the same time, if we just send the stuff to music blogs and someone posts it, it gets on Brooklyn Vegan or one of those other big music blogs, then maybe it gets put on satellite radio — you could just build a team and do it yourself. I think it could go either way. “Maybe something will happen, maybe not. But if not, at the end of the day, we made a professional product that we’re happy with, and we’ll always have that. That’s something great, too. Even if you don’t get signed, that’s an awesome thing to have.” AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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ON THE RECORD with Nicole Atkins {BY JULIA COOK}

Amazing: Nicole Atkins

New Jersey native Nicole Atkins now has three full-length albums under her belt, and nothing to prove. Her new album, Slow Phaser, charts new territory for her, as bass beats and understated sonic effects hammer her message home. At times jarring, and at all junctures unexpected, it’s a stripped-down performance from an artist who knows exactly what she wants to say. MTV CALLED YOUR SINGLE “GIRL YOU LOOK AMAZING” A “SAD-SELFIE ANTHEM.” They totally nailed it. That’s exactly what the song is about, you know? That whole psychology, with the Instagram thing. “Oh God, my life is in shambles, but look how great I look right now, everybody!” SLOW PHASER HAS SOME STRONG VIBES OF LOSS AND REGRET, WHILE AT THE SAME TIME YOUR NARRATORS SEEM REALLY EMPOWERED. I wrote a few songs before [Hurricane Sandy] that were based on relationships: relationships that didn’t work out, friendships that didn’t work out, and kind of feeling like an outcast. Then the storm happened, and I was writing a lot about the devastation and the loss of a lot of things that I always thought would permanently be there. Realizing that some of the things that I was focusing on before that were so small in the grand scope of everything — it did feel empowering. It did feel like, I should be doing the sound that I want to, because it’s the only thing that can really last. People go away, people die, buildings come and go, but the sound is always gonna be there. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NICOLE ATKINS. 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

fun on the weekends or impress chicks. “I want to make music that will make people cry, make them smash hotel rooms or stop them from committing suicide,” says lead singer Johnny Saint-Lethal (not his birth name, FYI). The quartet spends 35 hours per week writing, rewriting, rehearsing and recording its music, which has a tight post-grunge sound reminiscent of Built to Spill or Foo Fighters. (But don’t ask them about influences: “We don’t want to sound like anyone but The Show,” insists Saint-Lethal.) For their new EP, they churned out 40 tracks and whittled down to the six best. “The whole goal is to make a product everyone is still listening to after we’re all gone,” says drummer Matthew Vaughan. And like Lennon running into McCartney at a church picnic, or Jagger riding the same commuter train as Richards, this group of aspiring immortals began with a chance meeting. Future Show guitarist Brandon Mitchell was hitchhiking through Death Valley in 2005 when Saint-Lethal gave him a lift. The two immediately hit it off. “I wrote poetry and he knew [the poems] could be songs and gave me my first guitar,” says Mitchell. He moved to Saint-Lethal’s hometown of Pittsburgh, and the two began performing together — though initially, they played back-to-back sets on tour and were not a band. “We were too good of friends to be in a band,” says Saint-Lethal. “You always lose your friends when you try to make them bandmates. But we were always helping each other with our songs, so I was like, ‘This is fucking stupid — let’s be in a band!’” The Show uploaded its debut album, Here’s to Your Jigsaw, to websites that connect bands to radio stations across the globe,

and discovered the album was getting play in Western Europe. So with nothing but DIY promotion and management, band members planned a tour through the U.K. “It took a lot of calls, but we got put in one legit club and then the others started taking us seriously,” says Mitchell. They connected with Chris Potter, the go-to producer for The Verve and its frontman, Richard Ashcroft, and he expressed interest in working with the band. But just as their hard work started paying off, Saint-Lethal’s voice began tapering off minutes into a set. He borrowed money from his father and saw a doctor. The diagnosis: leukoplakia, pre-cancerous tumors on the tongue. “After a while, I couldn’t even sing along with songs in the car,” he says. Then, he could barely speak.

THE SHOW EP RELEASE WITH SYLVANIA, COURT IV, A FRIENDLY GESTURE

7:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $12-15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

The band spent a year out of commission, but Saint-Lethal says he made a full recovery, in large part due to “holistic, hoodoo-voodoo stuff.” He says it softened his vocal approach. “I don’t scream anymore, because I can’t.” The band reformed in late 2012, recruiting drummer Vaughan and bassist Michael Ward. (When you are as serious as The Show, you burn through a lot of rhythm sections: The band has had four drummers and nine bassists.) They are back to being full-time musicians and sacrificing to do so; Saint-Lethal and Mitchell share a onebedroom apartment, and Vaughan is living at 20 Cedar Studios, the Dormont recording facility he runs. “We’re out playing again, which has a lot of people excited,” says Saint-Lethal, “and I am speaking again, which has a lot of people pissed off.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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Greg Hoy has worn numerous musical hats over the years — the ex-Pittsburgher is a sound engineer, has written about music, and has his own repertoire of tunes, backed by various bands. His Pittsburgh rhythm section (which includes local rock stalwarts Paul Labrise, Tom Emmerling and Ray Vasko) recorded a highenergy, high-guitar-riff album, Hair of the Mouth, which the San Francisco resident is in town to celebrate tonight. Greg Hoy & The Enablers play a release show at Garfield Artworks; Boiled Denim, Ruby Buff and Janelle play as well. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

[HOUSE] + FRI., FEB. 21

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

As DJ events ents have migrated to the East End, the South h Side has been left with something of a dearth rth of well-curated dance-music usic nights. The new weekly, Get Your House in Order, is hosted by Brotha Mike and Solid d State Soul, and will feature regular egular guest-DJ appearances nces by house DJs from around the he city. It all happens at Truth Lounge, unge, which is a little off the beaten en path of Carson Street, if you’re looking for some respite pite from the usual Friday-night day-night South Side de stuff. AM 10 p.m. .m. 51 S. 12th St., South Side. de. Free. 4122381-9600 0 or www.truthlounge.com uthlounge.com

[JAZZ] + SAT., FEB. 22 Pittsburgh gh is a city of jazz legends, and Roger Humphries is one of our treasures: The drummerr developed his chops playing at clubs in the Hill District and nd toured with the likes of Stanley tanley Turrentine,

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

Horace Silver and Ray Charles. Tonight, at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, Humphries is honored at the premiere of a new documentary on his life, Roger Humphries: Pass It On. Directed by Billy Jackson (who also made Enough Is Enough: The Death of Jonny Gammage), the film examines Humphries’ rise from the North Side to touring nationwide. The event is a fundraiser for several local artsand music-education groups. AM 7:30 p.m. 1815 Metropolitan St., Manchester. $30-125. All ages. 412-322-0800 or www.mcgjazz.org

[HIP HOP] + SUN., FEB. 23

SonReal started off 2014 by releasing a new mixtape, called One Long Day. The Canadian rapper has a pop appeal, and it’s surprising he hasn’t been heard on Top 40 radio yet — maybe this is his year. He H appears tonight at The Smiling Moose e with special guest Sheezy Bung, a local who’s who releasing a new album, Late Night Missions, Missi next month. Kayla Copes s8p p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. Side $12. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

SonReal

[POP] + TUE., FEB. 25

On Andrew Ripp’s latest album, Simple, Simple there’s a cover of Justin J Timberlake’s Timberla “Mirrors” “Mirro — and it’s pretty good, if pr pretty pret different. Ripp Rip puts his acoustic singersin songwriter so spin sp on the dance-pop dan tune. If that type of thing is up your alley, you y can check him out tonight at ton the Hard Rock Café. Ca KC Station Square 8 p.m. 230 W. Stat Square. $10-12. Drive, Station Squ 412-481-7625 All ages. 412-481www.hardrock.com or www.hardrock


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Tony Janflone, Jr. Canonsburg. 31ST STREET PUB. Lycosta, Fully 724-746-4227. Consumed, Parking Lot Whiskey. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Zach Strip District. 412-391-8334. Schmidt, James Maple, Adrian ALTAR BAR. Evil Empire Krygowski, Kayla Shureman. (Rage Against the Machine Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. Tribute.) Strip District. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 412-263-2877. Fathertime & guests. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF Warrendale. 724-799-8333. HOMESTEAD MUSIC PITTSBURGH ART HALL. Rick Springfield. HOUSE. Jeremy 412-368-5225. Caywood & The Way Of CLAIRTON . Life, Boon, Cherylann www per a p ty AMERICAN LEGION. Hawk & The Live To pghci m .co Daniels & McClain. Love Band, Brooke Clairton. 412-400-1141. Surgener. War On Winter CLUB CAFE. Nicole Atkins, (WOW). Highland Park. Arc Iris, Davey Horne. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD South Side. 412-431-4950. GRILLE. Rhubarb. Ross. 412-364-8166. CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named ROCK ROOM. Ouais, Robin Vote, Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. Robot Cowboy, Blod Maud. FAWN TAVERN. PIPEWRENCH, Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. Manuel Labor, Common ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Capsized. Nightmare. Tarentum. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Lionize 724-224-9511. Brazilian Wax, Dead River, Murder HAMBONE’S. Broke Stranded for Girls. South Side. 412-431-4668. & Ugly, The Lucky Ones. STAGE AE. Air Dubai, iTCH. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. North Side. 412-229-5483. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Mutual Benefit, Black Brick. Oakland. 412-648-7814.

FRI 21

ROCK/POP THU 20 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Kin, Finish Ticket, Oh Honey. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. John Wiatrak. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Greg Hoy & The Enablers, Ruby Buff, Janelle, Boiled Denim. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Rue Snider & No Strand, Morgan Erina, Jeremy Caywood & The Way of Life. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Frank Vieira. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe, Junk Fingers, Bodhi Watts. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

MP 3 MONDAY

SAT 22 31ST STREET PUB. Dead Batteries, Iron City Hooligans, Westerburgh. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Iration. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BENEDUM CENTER. Jimmy Beaumont & The Skyliners, Shirley Alston Reeves, The Marcels, The Chantels, Eugene Pit, Bobby Hendricks, Cleveland Still’s Dubs, Kid Kyle, Pure Gold. Farewell Roots of Rock & Roll Volume XL. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE BLUE HAVEN LOUNGE. All My Monsters. 724-274-9963. THE BRONZE HOOD. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Charlie & The Foxtrots, Wolf Critton. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CHRISTINA’S. Shotgun Jack. 412-673-0199. CLUB CAFE. Dicey & Paprika (early) Falling Andes, Mike Cali (Late). Falling Andes CD Release Party. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Albion Cross. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. ATS-Acoustic, Tom Kurlander & Pale Blue Sound, Junk Fingers. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HAMBONE’S. Hard Money, The Working Poor, Triggers. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

STAGE HANDS

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Stage Hands, featuring The Meets’ Brandon Locher. Download

“Adaptive Lines” for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

Rock The Mic

Celebrating the Life & Music of Aaron “A-Man” Wellons

DON’T MISS IT!

March

15, 2014 7p.m. - 11p.m.

Hear phenomenal local and surrounding area artists Fashion show by CAPRICORN Entertainment Emcee’d by Leslie “Ezra” Smith

Mr. Smalls Theater

400 Lincoln Ave. • Millvale, PA • 15209 Tickets can be purchased at: Eventbrite.com/aman-rock-the-mic-celebration Dorsey’s Record Shop 7614 Frankstown Ave. (Homewood) 412-731-6607 Stedeford’s Record Shop 417 E. Ohio Street, 412-321-8333

Proceeds to BENEFIT up and coming musical artists and prescription drug addiction awareness groups

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

An Evening of Music FEBRUARY 22

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HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. Joy Ike. Hill District. 412-332-4400. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Lopez, Moldies & Monsters, The Fuckies, Sick Panda, Thee Glitterbombs. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Totally 80s. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Show, Sylvania, Court IV, A Friendly Gesture. THE SHOW vinyl EP release party. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Gone South. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PETER B’S. Nied’s Hotel Band, Mia Z. 724-353-2677. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Mercedez. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. The Wax Cylinders. Ross. 412-364-8166. SMILING MOOSE. Lily Kershaw, Scott & Rosanna COLDfront, Chessie & the Kittens. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Sharks. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The 9th Ward, Naked Arcade Heart, The Neverweres. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Rok Bot. 724-789-7858.

SUN 23 CLUB CAFE. The Whiskey Gentry, Broke Stranded & Ugly, Aaron ‘The Uke Slinger’ Jones. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Casket, Mower, Egality. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 24 THE SHOP. Bardus, Slaves BC, Cyrus Gold. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622.

TUE 25 CLUB CAFE. Lost In The Trees, All Tiny Creatures. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Andrew Ripp. Station Square. 412-481-7625. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Big Head Todd & the Monsters feat. Ronnie Baker Brooks & Hazel Miller. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. the Soil & the Sun, Flint Eastwood. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 26 ALTAR BAR. We Are The In Crowd. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Christopher Mark Jones & the Roots Ensemble, Mark Weakland (Early). South Side. 412-431-4950.

DJS THU 20 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. missmungo. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ

HIP HOP/R&B THU 20 ALTAR BAR. Hopsin. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

SAT 22 THE NEW BOHEMIAN. Rhyme Calisthenics: Team Mista Scrap vs. Team Jon Quest. North Side. 412-223-7827. THE R BAR. Soul Village. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 23

WASHINGTON, D.C.

THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SMILING MOOSE. SonReal, Sheezy Bung, The H&T, 1091. South Side. 412-431-4668.

{FRI., APRIL 04}

Dean Wareham U Street Music Hall

BLUES PHILADELPHIA

THU 20 THE BULLPEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 724-356-3000. REX THEATER. Black Joe Lewis, Pickwick. South Side. 412-381-6811. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

{FRI., APRIL 18}

Boy George

Theatre of the Living Arts

CLEVELAND {FRI., MAY 09}

Cloud Nothings

Mahall’s (Lakewood)

hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

FRI 21 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. DJ Twan, DJ J.R. Bethel Park. 414-595-7953. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Da’ Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 22 CARSALA’S BAR AND GRILLE. DJ Dave, DJ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-466-3337. CJ’S. DJ Tee Jay. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. DJ Twan, DJ J.R. Bethel Park. 414-595-7953. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915.

PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227. THE TILDEN. Ember. Mark Walczak & Chico, Tenova. Downtown. 412-913-5360.

SUN 23 PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Electric Sundays. w/ ServersDown & Electric Type. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 25 CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. DJ Phinesse. Reggae, dancehall, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. EDMOOSE, 5x5. Electronic dance music. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 26 CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FRI 21 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THE R BAR. Ron & The Rump Shakers. Dormont. 412-561-9634.

SAT 22 MOONDOG’S. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins. Downtown. 412-471-9100. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & the Blues Attack. 412-487-6259. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. House of Soul. Washington. SUB ALPINE CLUB. The Witchdoctors. 412-823-6661. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SUN 23 BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. The Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill.

JAZZ THU 20 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. POWER CENTER BALLROOM, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Jazz Ensemble. The Music of the Beatles. Downtown.

FRI 21 ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Jeremy Fisher Trio. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CONTINUES ON PG. 53

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


Decisions for the future

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 36

BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Anthony Coleman, Jason Ajemian. Presented with Music on the Edge. Shadyside. 412-361-2262. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Max Leake. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 22 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. The Hot Club of Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Guy Matone. Scott. 412-668-0903. LITTLE E’S. The Ken Karsh Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SUN 23 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. Downtown. 412-697-1336. ST. MARY OF THE MOUNT. Green Light Saxophone Quartet. Mt. Washington. 412-381-0212.

String Band. 724-265-1181.

SAT 22 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Niederberger & Crum. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. MARS BREW HOUSE. Rick Bruening. Mars. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Fiddlin’ Slim. Greensburg. 724-836-7687.

SUN 23

WED 26 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 21

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 22

REGGAE FRI 21

MON 24

COUNTRY ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

ANDYS. David Bennett & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC THU 20 SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Sputzy. Washington.

FRI 21 BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Heather Kropf, Brad Yoder, Jason Rafalak. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown

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WORLD

THU 20

WED 26

CHATHAM BAROQUE. Bach & Beyond. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. FREYA STRING QUARTET. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-223-7873.

ANDREW SORDS, VIOLINIST. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. CHATHAM BAROQUE. Bach & Beyond. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. DANIEL TEADT, FITNESS WITH A BARITONE. Shadyside TWIST. Tom Moran, Presbyterian Michael Griska. South Church, Shadyside. w. w w Side. 412-225-3302. paper 412-682-4300. pghcitym .co PITTSBURGH CIVIC ORCHESTRA. St. Bernard PITTSBURGH WINERY. Pine Catholic Church, Mt. Lebanon. Leaf Boys Trio, Grand Bon Rien. 412-279-4030. Strip District. 412-566-1000. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Pieces by Casella, Prokofiev & Schumann feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Jean Efflam Bavouzet, piano. Heinz THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Tom Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. Batchelor Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ANDYS. John Marcinizyn. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Anquenique Wingfield. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

SAT 22

HAMBONE’S. Bluegrass Jam w/ City Mouse/Country Mouse. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 24

TUE 25

Beyond. Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, Sewickley. 412-741-4550. FREYA STRING QUARTET. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-223-7873. MATT KORBANIC. Music for Guitar. Chatham University, Shadyside. 800-837-1290. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Pieces by Casella, Prokofiev & Schumann feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Jean Efflam Bavouzet, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FRI 21 OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Gashouse Annie. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Loyal Hanna. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Christian Beck Band. Washington.

SAT 22 ANCIENT ORDER OF HIBERNIANS. The Agway Shoplifters. 412-829-2399. CLUB 46 CLAIRTON FIRE DEPARTMENT. Steeltown. Clairton. 412-233-7302.

THE FREYA STRING QUARTET. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. OPERA SINGER ANDREY NEMZER. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 412-268-2383. OPUS ONE. Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 22 BELLEFIELD HALL. The Musich of Burr Van Nostrand. Presented by Music on the Edge. Oakland. 412-624-7529. HARVEY WILNER’S. Dueling Pianos w/ Hermie & Harry. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

SUN 23

WED 26

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: U.S.C.T. Drum Corps. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Brett Eldridge. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

MON 24

CLASSICAL

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Showtunes & Jazz Standards Sing Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 20

WED 26

CARNEGIE MELLON PHILHARMONIC & CHOIRS. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts. culturaldistrict.org/event/3941/ hello-donny-a-showtunes-singalong. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 21 CHATHAM BAROQUE. Bach &

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

February 19 - 25 Shen Yun Performing Arts

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org or shenyun.com. Through Feb. 20.

THURSDAY 20 Hopsin

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests From Funk Volume & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7:30p.m.

Keith Robinson

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 18 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through Feb. 23.

FRIDAY 21

Conservatory Dance Company at Point Park University GEORGE R. WHITE DANCE COMPLEX, PITTSBURGH

PLAYHOUSE Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through March 2.

Iration

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests The Movement and Natural Vibrations. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Billy Joel CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000. 8p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: DAVID ALLEN

WEDNESDAY 19

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson ROCKWELL THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse. com. Through March 2.

Rick Springfield CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

Bodiography presents Left Leg, Right Brain

BYHAM THEATER Downtown.

SUNDAY 23

Alton Brown Live!

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23 BENEDUM CENTER

412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Feb. 22.

Lionize

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Nox Boys & Katie Hate. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-

TIX. 6:30p.m.

SATURDAY 22 Winter Wine Festival TRAX FARMS South Hills. Over 21 event. Tickets: traxfarms.com or 412835-3246. 12p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests The H&T & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

3rd Annual B*tches Ball CRUZE BAR Strip District. Tickets: animalrescue.org/ b-ball-tickets or $40 at the door. For more info visit animalrescue.org/events. 6p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Judah and the Lion & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Big Head Todd

MONDAY 24 Kat Dahlia

TUESDAY 25

Andrew Ripp

SonReal

ALTON BROWN LIVE!

ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Kes, CRON412 & more. All

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone or 866-4683401. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com CARINA ALOHA TURQUOISE

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LARA OLIVE

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

KARMEN FUN BLACK METALLIC

VERONA ANTIQUE PEWTER

Facebook.com/GordonShoes


“WE GONNA PUT A MAN INSIDE THE MACHINE.”

THE BIG LOCK-UP {BY AL HOFF} Robert May’s documentary Kids for Cash take a comprehensive look at the judicial scandal in Luzerne County that made national headlines. The media shorthand was: Juvenile-court judge Mark Ciavarella sentenced thousands of teens, often for minor infractions, while receiving kickbacks from the private jail where they were incarcerated — a.k.a. “kids for cash.”

Center of the scandal: Judge Mark Ciavarella

CP APPROVED

May interviews kids who were sentenced, their parents, school administrators, local media (in particular Terrie Morgan-Besecker, who did extensive reporting at the Times Leader), legal experts and both judges convicted in the scheme. Most notably, he reveals that there never was a kids-for-cash set-up; the judges took a one-time payout related to the jail’s construction deal. But perhaps even more disturbing is the portrait that does emerge, one that isn’t necessarily unique to Luzerne County: the devastating consequences of a post-Columbine “no tolerance” era fueled by panicked schools, and aided by a judge who believed in the power of hard time, expeditiously dispensed. (Many kids waived the right to an attorney.) Less discussed is the privatizing of prisons, and how simply filling them becomes a money-generator, but it’s another grim piece of this puzzle. We’re the jailing-est nation on earth — onefifth of the world’s locked-up kids are in U.S. jails — not because we’re the worst people, but because it’s a lucrative business. Starts Fri., Feb. 21. AMC Loews and Pittsburgh Mills AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LINSANITY. Catch a sneak preview of this new documentary about NBA sensation Jeremy Lin. The film is directed by Evan Jackson Leong, and produced by CMU grad Allen Lu. 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. McConomy Auditorium, Carnegie Mellon campus, Oakland. $8 ($5 students). www.cmu.edu/faces

AGE {BY AL HOFF}

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Cop and Robocop: Marianne Jean-Baptiste and Joel Kinnaman

AUL VERHOEVEN’S 1987 Robocop

was a pulpy mix of satire, commentary and ultra-violence in a morally ambiguous storyline that made perfect sense for the darker side of the Reagan era. Didn’t need a remake. But I had some hopes for a re-built Robocop, directed by José Padilha, since 27 years later, we are more invested in privatizing policing and relying on robots and man-robot combos. And in the name of “security,” we seem happy to accept huge shifts in civil and judicial proceedings, without thinking hard about the long-term consequences. While Robocop v. 1.0 had dystopic leanings — things aren’t like this yet — v. 2.0 would have plenty of actual onthe-ground issues to explore. Although OmniCorp’s “peace-keeping” robots are used worldwide, we learn that Americans don’t want robot cops. The film plods through the necessary set-up: decent Motor City cop Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman); head of OmniCorp (Michael Keaton); brilliant robot scientist (Gary

Oldman); a crime lord and some dirty cops; and some tepid establishment of crime-plagued “Detroit” (portrayed by several nice-looking Canadian cities). Murphy is gravely injured (reduced to head, lungs and one hand), and OmniCorp sees the opportunity to debut a more acceptable robot cop, one “that knows what it feels like to be human.” “We gonna put a man inside the machine,”

ROBOCOP DIRECTED BY: José Padilha STARRING: Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton

explains its CEO. (In real life, we’re already employing a rudimentary version of this, as military personnel in the U.S. control drones operating on the other side of the globe: The drone sees, the man thinks, the drone acts.) But the robocop is an awkward mix: Too much human, and the robot cop’s response

time is slowed by emotions; too much machine, and well, the thing is dreadful at press conferences. Despite Americans being “robophobic,” the broader Murphy-robot ethical issues are barely depicted. The robocop is accepted without question at the police station (no cop-union freak-out?), and the public cheers when it busts a child molester. Murphy’s biggest struggles are personal, as he adapts to being something other than strictly human. If the generic action sequences were cut out, this might have been a small-scale sci-fi-ish tale about the personal costs and larger moralities of combining humans with high-tech machine parts. In the end, this film raises a few provocative questions about private policing, robots acting as humans and what aspects of humanity can be sacrificed for the public “security” (and corporate profits). But it drops the ball on exploring them. Still a lot of work to be done on man-robots — and Robocop. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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One Judge. 3,000 imprisoned children. A scandal that rocked the nation. “Riveting! A real-life thriller that rivals most dramatic fiction.” – The Hollywood Reporter

“Engrossing! A gut-punch of a documentary. May is a gifted storyteller. The movie equivalent of a page-turner!” – Carrie Rickey, Philadelphia Magazine

#kidsforcash

/kidsforcashthemovie

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21

KidsForCashTheMovie.com

TARENTUM Cinemark Galleria at Pittsburgh Mills & IMAX (800) FANDANGO #2112

WEST HOMESTEAD AMC Loews Waterfront 22 (888) AMC-4FUN

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW ABOUT LAST NIGHT. It’s unfair to call Steve Pink’s film a remake of the eponymous 1986 film starring Rob Lowe and Demi Moore. Both films are derived from the same source material — David Mamet’s 1974 play Sexual Perversity in Chicago — but the similarities end there. And that’s a good thing: Pink’s film, starring Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant, has a charm and heart that the original sorely lacked. This is a story about sex, love and screwing up both, but it’s not a romantic comedy in the more maligned sense of the term. It transcends the staleness of the genre, delivering a funny, deep and engrossing story about the art of becoming and staying a couple. Ealy and Bryant are sweet, and at times heartbreaking, together, but it’s Hart and Hall who steal the show through great chemistry and razor-sharp comedic timing. (Charlie Deitch)

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ENDLESS LOVE. Swallow the film’s opening scene, and I guess the rest of this romantic piffle will also make sense. The drop-dead-gorgeous, smart and well-to-do Jade (Gabriella Wilde) graduates from high school having made no friends, but on graduation day meets David (Alex Pettyfer), the dreamy son of a mechanic. They fall in love big Endless time (on only their Love second encounter, they’re performing a coordinated dance!), but guess who isn’t happy about it? Jade’s control-freak of a dad (Bruce Greenwood).But the kids don’t care — they just keep on lovin’ and running out the summer like the world’s greatest Abercrombie & Fitch commercial. Some old heads may recognize Shana Feste’s film as a remake of the 1981 melodrama, but really it’s just another version of the Teens + Love + Parents = Conflict tale that crawled out of the primordial mud with the very first teenagers. For David and Jade, there are the expected complications, including an ill-advised trip to the zoo. But, spoiler alert: This love is endless. (Al Hoff)

In Secret IN SECRET. Even though this tale takes place in 1860s Paris, I feel I have seen this exact-same plot play out in a 1940s film noir. But really, a morality tale about the perils of obsessive love befits any time. Charlie Stratton’s drama is adapted from Emile Zola’s novel Therese

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

About Last Night Raquin, and recounts the troubled life of a young French woman. Therese (Elizabeth Olsen) is trapped in both a loveless marriage to a sickly, simpering fool (Tom Felton) and the gloomy yardage shop of her bossy mother-in-law (Jessica Lange). Then she meets her husband’s co-worker, the sultry Laurent (Oscar Davis), and the pair quickly falls into a dangerous affair. It’s a familiar cautionary tale, bolstered by rising actors Olsen and Davis, who manage to make this rather languidly paced tale crackle when they’re together on screen. On the downside, there is so much whispering and (historically accurate) murk that it can be difficult to discern some of the story details. Starts Fri., Feb. 21. AMC Loews, Manor (AH) LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON. Fatherhood — in its practical, emotional, cultural and biological aspects — is the focus of this gentle drama from Japanese writer-director Hirokazu Koreeda (Nobody Knows, I Wish). Ryota (Masaharu Fukuyama) is a successful architect who applies his commitment to hard work to both his consuming job and to the development of his 6-year-old son; we meet the family when the bright, happy child is applying for a prestigious elementary school. Like father, like son, indeed. Then Ryota discovers the hospital mixed up two babies, and the boy he’s raised is not his own. His biological son has been raised by another family, one less prosperous but more warm and lively. Now both sets of parents must decide which son is truly theirs, as well as balance out the differences between the two families in a series of co-parenting schemes. It’s a potentially wrenching topic that is beautifully handled here, with quiet performances and small moments that are as heartwarming as heartbreaking. In Japanese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 21. Harris (AH)

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POMPEII. A slave-turned-gladiator tries to save his true love from a forced marriage. But wait, a volcano is about to blow! Paul W.S. Anderson directs this actioner, set in the year 79. Kit Harrington (Game of Throne’s Jon Snow) stars. Starts Fri., Feb. 21. 3 DAYS TO KILL. A dying Secret Service agent takes a hitman job in exchange for a miracle cure. He also picks this time to reconnect with his estranged teenage daughter. Kevin Costner stars in this actioner directed by McG. Starts Fri., Feb. 21.


WINTER’S TALE. Akiva Goldsman’s directorial debut could be charitably called a “romantic fantasy adventure,” but it’s also a dreadful, laughably bad mess. Adapted from Mark Helprin’s popular novel, it’s a time-spanning tale of love, miracles, revenge, big-hearted burglars, financially minded demons, flying horses and consumptive women in diaphanous gowns. It mostly takes place in old New York under such a vigorous dusting of fake snow that it might as well have been staged in a snowglobe. In 1916, scrappy Peter Lake (Colin Farrell) breaks into a fancy Central Park house. (For once, Farrell uses his native Irish accent, even though Lake is born of Eastern Europeans and raised in Brooklyn by a Native American.) There he meets the dying Beverly (Jessica Brown Findlay, from Downton Abbey). They fall in love and obsess about starlight. Also, Lake is being pursued by a bad guy (Russell Crowe), who quite astonishingly can disappear people simply by opening up his forehead and sucking them in. About halfway through, I’d sorted out the “magical” from the maudlin, and could at least discern what the film had hoped to be — a wispy, weepy, sprawling inter-generational love story designed to sweep viewers up in its glittery greeting-card affirmations. Alas, the audience’s chief reaction was inappropriate laughter, and I can’t blame them. (AH)

REPERTORY THE GOLD RUSH. One of the few featurelength comedies partly inspired by the Donner Party expedition, and also one of Charlie Chaplin’s best, is this 1925 silent classic featuring the Tramp in the unlikely guise of a 1890s Alaskan gold prospector. Though typically remembered for its signature bits — eating the boot, making dinner rolls dance — The Gold Rush is also elegantly structured and beautifully paced. Though you might not notice, since you’ll be too busy laughing. 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 19. Oaks (Bill O’Driscoll)

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subtitles. 5:30 p.m. Tue., Feb. 25. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh — Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. www.sembenefilmfestival.org GHOST. Her true love dies, but he returns as a pottery-wheel-friendly ghost. Demi Moore and Patrick Swayze star in Jerry Zucker’s 1990 romance. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 26. AMC Loews. $5

Like Father, Like Son FILMS OF KAMRAN SHIRDEL. Iranian filmmaker Kamran Shirdel makes his first visit to the U.S., and presents two evenings of his short documentary films. Originally hired as a filmmaker for the Ministry of Culture and Art in the 1960s, Shirdel, who favors a neo-realist style, has over the years had his work censored, confiscated and banned by subsequent regimes. Different films screen each night. 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 20 (5:30 p.m. happy-hour reception with Shirdel), Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland; $10 (includes one drink). 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21, Melwood Screening Room, Oakland; $10. Both screenings: $15. www.cmoa.org LEGEND. Tom Cruise stars in Ridley Scott’s 1985 fantasy adventure about a young man who must stop a demon from destroying unicorns, sunlight and the woman he loves. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 20; 4 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22; and 1 p.m. Sun., Feb. 23. Hollywood DIRTY DANCING. The much-loved 1987 romance from Emile Ardolino opens a series of Patrick Swayze films. Swoon as Baby (Jennifer Grey) learns about dance, love and heartbreak from local dirtyboogier Johnny Castle (Swayze) while vacationing in the Catskills. You just might have … the time of your life. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21; 10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22; and 4 p.m. Sun., Feb. 23. Hollywood

Winter’s Tale THE NEXT GOAL WINS. This new documentary from Mike Brett and Steve Jamison charts the inspirational rise of an American Samoan soccer team, which once suffered a 31-0 defeat. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 19. Hollywood WHEN HARRY MET SALLY. Rob Reiner’s 1989 film starring Meg Ryan and Billy Crystal as soulmates who don’t quite connect (yet) is the rare romantic comedy that (1) works; and (2) was arguably elevated to neo-classic status by one deadpan line uttered by the director’s mother. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 19. AMC Loews. $5 SENSE AND SENSIBILITY. Ang Lee directs this 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel about the trials of two sisters in their search for love and security in 19th-century England. Emma Thompson, Kate Winslet, Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman star. 7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 20. Melwood

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KILLER OF SHEEP. Charles Burnett’s 1977 masterwork — a quiet gut-punch depicting life in Watts — is one of the best American films ever about children, city life, the working class and the black experience, all at once. The central story concerns a melancholy slaughterhouse worker named Stan and his troubled relationship with his wife. As poignant as it is bracingly unsentimental, it’s also a pretty fair piece of visual art. Shot for nickels, Killer of Sheep portrays a community in a gritty, deep-focus black and white that coats your hands with the dust of vacant lots and puts your feet on the asphalt of summer streets. Still, while Killer of Sheep is as stylistically assured as it is unique, it remains inescapably sorrowful — but it’s beautifully, angrily, incisively so. 8 p.m. Wed., Feb. 26. Melwood. $2 (BO)

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Tom Roberts and AppalAsia. 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 23. Hollywood. $10 (Harry Kloman) M*A*S*H. If you know M*A*S*H only from the feel-good late-’70s TV series, why not check out its mordant, bitterly funny progenitor — Robert Altman’s irreverent 1970 comedy that was more about the then-current Vietnam War than any Korean conflict. In this balls-out celebration of anti-authority, Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould are the wisecracking doctors who never waste an opportunity to show up military “believers” Robert Duvall and Sally Kellerman. M*A*S*H also helped boost the career of Altman into the pantheon of Great 1970s Directors, and was the first of his films to employ his now well-known style of overlapping dialogue and deploying large ensembles of improvisational actors. The 1970 film concludes a month-long, Sunday-night series of classic comedies. 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 23. Regent Square (AH)

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THE FORGOTTEN KINGDOM. This new drama from Andrew Mudge is the first feature to be shot in Lesotho. In it, a man travels from Johannesburg to the southern African country to bury his father, and finds himself drawn to his ancestral homeland. In Basotho, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 27. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

SARABAH. This 2011 documentary from Maria Luisa Gambale and Gloria Bremer profiles Senegalese hip-hop artist Sister Fa, who uses her music to fight female genital mutilation in her homeland. The film is presented by Sembene African Film Festival. In various languages, with

BLACK OUT. A groom who used to be a gangster; a dead man; 20 kilos of coke — if it doesn’t get sorted out, there won’t be a wedding. Arne Toonen directs this recent crime comedy from Holland. In Dutch, with subtitles. 11:30 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21. Hollywood MADELYN ROEHRIG FILMS. The filmmaker presents two short films — “Looking Up from Andy’s Grave” (2013) and “Figments: Conversations with Andy, Year III” (2011) — that document the responses various visitors have to visiting Andy Warhol’s grave in the Pittsburgh suburbs. 2 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. Warhol. Free. www.warhol.org PICCADILLY. Ewald André Dupont’s silent 1929 classic about an ultra-snazzy London club was restored in 2004. Yet Piccadilly would not have returned but for the presence of Anna May Wong, the Chinese-American ingénue of the ’20s. Wong plays Shosho, a Chinese girl who works her way from the club’s kitchen to dancing on stage in authentic Asian attire. With its banal melodramatic story and modest technique, Piccadilly is certainly more the sort of silent film that gave audiences a good spectacle than one which advanced the medium. To be accompanied by live music from

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Next Goal Wins (2013) - 2/19 @ 7:30pm - Documentary follows

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the adventures of the American Samoan football team.

My Fair Lady (1964) - 2/20 @ 2pm ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Legend (1985) - 2/20 @ 7:30pm, 2/22 @ 4pm, 2/23 @ 1pm ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Dirty Dancing (1987) - 2/21 @ 7&9:15pm, 2/22 @ 10pm, 2/23 @ 4pm ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Black Out (2012) - 2/21 @ 11:30pm

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------dealers, psychotic game show hosts, and manic fears! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Action/comedy/crime thriller from the Netherlands!

Finding Beans (2014) - 2/22 @ 6:30pm - Murderous drug SILENTS, PLEASE! Picadilly (1929) - 2/23 @ 7pm

Starring: Anna May Live Music by: Tom Roberts

Wong & AppalAsia

Music by Tom Roberts and AppalAsia!

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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[DANCE]

“IT STARTS TO FEEL REALLY DEMORALIZING WHEN A SITUATION LIKE THIS COMES UP.”

LIFE AND LIMB {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Bodiography performs LEFT LEG, RIGHT BRAIN (THE FRANK FERRARO STORY) 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21, and 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20.75-50.75. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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Some local museum and library workers saw their hours cut last year by employers who didn’t want to provide health care. {ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN HINDERLITER}

Bodiography Contemporary Ballet {PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC ROSÉ}

Bodiography Contemporary Ballet Company’s ongoing dedication to medicalthemed dances may yet earn it a new moniker: “Bodiography, M.D.” Artistic director Maria Caruso’s penchant for evening-length ballets exploring health issues has carved out a niche for the company on the regional dance scene. It’s also helped raise awareness on subjects such as heart health, regenerative medicine and coping with loss. In works like 2010’s Heart (Function vs. Emotion) and 2011’s 108 Minutes, Caruso has taken a broad, community approach to individual maladies. But for her latest, Left Leg, Right g Brain ((The Frank Ferraro Story), Caruso uso builds a ballet around und the story of one individual: Pittsburgh multimedia a artist Frank Ferraro, who ho is coping with ith Parkinson’s disease. di Caruso says she was inspired to create the ballet by Ferraro’s humor, energy and spirit in the face of his disease. It’s a spirit she likens to that of another notable Parkinson’s sufferer: actor Michael J. Fox, to whose children Caruso taught dance while living in New York years ago. The 75-minute, intermission-less contemporary ballet, to be performed Feb. 21 and 22 at the Byham Theater, focuses on how Ferraro uses creative expression to help get past his physical debilities. It’s set to an original jazz score by Craig Davis, to be performed live by the Craig Davis Jazz Ensemble, the Pittsburgh Festival Orchestra and vocalist Anna Singer. “The ballet is really about me interviewing Frank, and the dancers represent different parts of Frank’s physical self,” says Caruso. The work is tied together by video clips of Ferraro’s life before and after Parkinson’s. And as in past ballets, Caruso’s choreography incorporates elements of the physical manifestations of Ferraro’s disease, such as changes in his gait, balance and motor function. The dancers take on those characteristics slowly, illustrating how Ferraro’s body has been gradually affected by the disease. “I really wanted people to see that because someone is stricken with Parkinson’s disease, it doesn’t have to completely change their life for the worse,” says Caruso. “The disease rips away at your physical self. It doesn’t change the essence and beauty of you.”

[ART + LABOR]

PAINTED INTO A CORNER {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

P

ITTSBURGH’S museums and libraries are where we go to admire great works of art and literature. But some museum and library workers say their employers don’t give all employees the respect they deserve.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

Some have joined to form Info Desk, a new campaign by local cultural-industry workers who say they’re underpaid and lack adequate say in the workplace. The effort receives help from members of Fight Back Pittsburgh, a social-justice group

affiliated with the United Steelworkers. A top issue is health care: The group launched last year, after some part-time employees at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh and elsewhere saw their hours limited to less than 30 hours a week. The


cutbacks anticipated the federal Affordable Care Act, which requires employers of a certain size to provide health insurance for employees who work more than 30 hours weekly or else face fines. Interviews CP conducted with several current and former employees of the Carnegie and other institutions suggest that the change was most noticeable at The Andy Warhol Museum. Starting in July, gallery attendants there were limited to 25 hours per week. Of the Warhol’s roughly 40 attendants, some who had been working as much as 40 hours a week saw their hours cut — even as the museum hired 20 or more additional part-time attendants to pick up the slack. Other attendants reportedly quit because they could no longer make ends meet. At other Carnegie museums — which include the museums of Art and Natural History and the Carnegie Science Center — even some employees who were not regularly working 30 hours weekly say they experienced cutbacks. And at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, a part-time employee confirms that parttimers there have also been limited to 25 hours a week since early 2013. The Carnegie Museums acknowledges that cutbacks were prompted by the Affordable Care Act. However, writes Carnegie spokesperson Betsy Momich in an email, as of early last year, only 48 of the Carnegie’s more than 600 part-time employees were then averaging 30 hours or more a week. Of those, 17 have since been made full-timers, writes Momich. “The great majority of our part-time employees did not see their hours reduced,” she writes. C a r n e g i e Li brar y spokes pe rs on Suzanne Thinnes acknowledges that the library is “cognizant of” the ACA, and says that part-time workers are now kept under 30 hours a week. But she also notes that budgets for both full- and part-time pay rose this year. Workers CP interviewed don’t blame the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, for the cuts. Rather, “This whole avoidance of paying affordable health care is despicable,” says one Info Desk organizer, who like most workers interviewed for this article requested anonymity for fear of workplace retaliation. “We’re talking about multimillion-dollar institutions here.”

The cultural workers CP interviewed professed a strong emotional connection to their institutions: The workers “love museums and love being in them, and love working with artists and working with these collections,” says one art-handler. “I feel good going there,” says one Warhol attendant whose hours were cut. “We’re a progressive, forward-thinking museum.” Still, the attendant added, “I feel like this is a very progressive, forward-looking thing, paying people what they should be paid. And they’re not doing that.” “It starts to feel really demoralizing when a situation like this comes up, a federal law, and the opposite of what you hope for comes true,” says another museum worker. The health-care issue has led to other grievances. The workers whom Info Desk addresses include both staffers at reception and information desks and behindthe-scenes folks, like art-handlers and art-maintenance workers; some have specialized skills such as carpentry. According to CP’s interview subjects, many are college students, or graduates in their 20s; not a few are artists themselves. Most earn minimum wage, or a little above, to work seasonal, irregular hours; many have two or even three jobs. One Info Desk organizer estimates that in Pittsburgh, such workers number up to 1,000. (That figure doesn’t include security guards, though an interview CP conducted last summer with a Carnegie Museum of Art security guard indicated that several guards there had also seen their hours reduced.) “Ultimately, $7.25 [an hour] isn’t a suitable wage for any position, and especially not in the Carnegie system, where there’s such a huge gap [in pay levels],” says one Warhol gallery attendant. (According to tax information filed by the Carnegie Museums in 2011, the most recent year available, 17 employees earned in excess of $100,000.) “At an institution with such a high profile in Pittsburgh, it would be nice if employees could expect good things.” Info Desk held its first meeting in October, and its website (www.info deskpgh.org) is currently circulating an online petition titled the “Cultural Industry Workers’ Declaration of Rights.” Its

“ULTIMATELY, $7.25 AN HOUR ISN’T A SUITABLE WAGE FOR ANY POSITION, AND ESPECIALLY NOT IN THE CARNEGIE SYSTEM.”

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demands include “a living wage,” “access to quality, affordable healthcare,” “reliable and predictable scheduling” and “a voice in how our institutions operate and plan for the future.” Info Desk plans to present the petition to leaders of cultural institutions after garnering 5,000 signatures. Asked to respond to the petition, Momich wrote, “We aren’t going to get into a debate about the issues being raised by this group on the petition site.” At press time, the petition had 212 signatures. Signers include local arts advocate Carolyn Speranza. Limiting hours to avoid providing health care is “outrageous,” says Speranza. “It’s disrespectful of the law. But even more so, culture workers have every right to have a living wage and have health insurance.” In fact, one Info Desk member says she has health coverage through her employer, a medium-sized arts nonprofit, but “I don’t get to use it that often”: She can’t afford the $40 co-pays. Nationally, discussion of whether the ACA would cause part-time jobs to spike has been widespread. But while Congressional Budget Office numbers indicate no big rise in part-time jobs, anecdotes abound about retail and fast-food out-

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lets cutting hours to avoid providing coverage. Employers like Papa John’s and Darden Restaurants threatened to do so, but backtracked after public backlash. One Warhol gallery attendant whose hours were cut last year says he understands why. “I can’t blame an organization of that [size] for trying to retain what they have going on,” says Andrew Daub, 26. The Point Park University grad now works about a day a week at the museum, plus two other part-time jobs (including a Starbucks gig that provides health care). To filmmaker Julie Sokolow, a locally based advocate for health care for artists, Info Desk’s campaign highlights “the necessity of a single-payer system” in which health care is completely separated from employment. The current system “[is] not true universal health care … and we need to work toward that.” In the meantime, Info Desk organizers say cultural institutions should try harder. “Wendy’s and Dunkin Donuts don’t make any pretense of being progressive institutions,” says one organizer. “We work for [museums] because we respect the job they perform. We just want them to set an enlightened or progressive standard for society. When they don’t, it’s disappointing.” D RI S C OL L @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

BALLET DU GRAND THÉÂTRE DE GENÈVE

SEE VIDEO O

TrustArts.org/geneve

This world-renowned, sensational Swiss company brings 22 exquisite dancers to perform stunning new work never before seen in Pittsburgh.

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Histoire du Soldat A Soldier’s Tale & A Tiny Droplet of a Portrait

February 23, 26, 27 & March 1 7:30 p.m. The George R. White Studio at Pittsburgh Opera 2425 Liberty Avenue Reservations Required $35 Suggested Donation www.attacktheatre.com/hds 1.888.71.TICKETS (1.888.718.4253)

[ARCHITECTURE]

RE-PRODUCE TERMINAL {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

An Attack Theatre Community Performance Featuring

Members

www.attacktheatre.com Made possible in part by:

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{PHOTO BY KEVIN SHEPHERD}

How much can be saved? The Strip District’s iconic Produce Terminal

Image: Rob Henning Design

THE CHANGE in mayoral administrations from Ravenstahl to Peduto has brought a reprieve for the Strip District’s Pennsylvania Fruit Auction and Sales Building, otherwise known as the Produce Terminal. The noteworthy turnabout has been preceded by a sequence of variously unlikely and paradoxical events. The iconic 1,533-foot-long warehouse, originally built in the late 1920s, was in danger of having 529 feet of its length removed by the Buncher Company. That demolition was part of Buncher’s $450 million proposal to redevelop 55 acres of riverfront property, now mostly parking, into offices, retail

and housing components. But Buncher might have overplayed its hand in late April, when it applied for a demolition permit for the building. The company did not actually own the structure, though it had an option to buy it from the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, and a go-ahead from the URA’s lawyer, George Specter, indicating broader approval from the Ravenstahl administration. At the time, Bill Peduto, then the presumptive mayorelect, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that Buncher’s move was “wrongheaded.” Advocacy group Preservation Pittsburgh, meanwhile, took the demolition-permit application as instigation to apply for historic designation for the building. That’s a months-long process, and “an important part of moving the discussion into the next administration,” says architect and Preservation Pittsburgh


C O H E N

member Rob Pfaffman. Buncher president and CEO Tom Balestrieri cautioned in repeated public hearings and published accounts that he feared that no other developer would be interested in the Produce Terminal building if it had an historic designation. To support the case for removing onethird of the building, Buncher enlisted Al Filoni, principal of McLachlan Cornelius and Filoni Architects, a firm with a substantial portfolio of historic-preservation projects, and Arthur Ziegler, president of Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation. Said Ziegler, “We have supported the Buncher plan because no other developer has appeared who would save the entire building and provide the funding for it.” All the while, possibilities were brewing for other developers, without reaching full proposal stage. Pfaffman stated before the Historic Review Commission that he was working with a developer, but has not yet revealed a proposal publically. Peter Margittai, president of Preservation Pittsburgh, “has been contacted by a group that thought it would be great to use the entire building.” Meanwhile, both the Planning Commission and the Historic Review Commission voted to recommend that the building be given city historic status. Yet on Jan. 21, Pittsburgh City Council rejected such designation. “Legally,” says Margittai, “council is required to vote on the basis of historic-designation criteria. But they [didn’t],” he lamented. In fact, council’s vote, which once might have been crucial, hardly mattered. After barely two weeks in office, Mayor Peduto announced that he had other developers potentially interested in reusing the Produce Terminal while preserving it in its entirety. He stated that Pittsburgh should be looking to examples such as Boston’s Faneuil Hall and Seattle’s Pike Place Fish Market for what might be done to redevelop the Produce Terminal. Peduto’s chief of staff, Kevin Acklin, is spearheading the project, through which the mayor’s office has hired North Side-based Fourth Economy as financial consultants, and the Downtown-based Design Center for planning and architecture, to come up with a more objective proposal of what might be possible

for the building. He asked Buncher for a six-month waiting period to study the feasibility of the project, and Buncher has agreed, even in the absence of a historic designation. A much-improved outcome is suggested but not guaranteed. Some architectural proposals circulated thus far in the name of preservation are nearly as disruptive as Buncher’s initial amputation scheme. Pfaffmann’s proposal imagines vehicular pass-throughs, which disrupt the fabric of the building. A speculative proposal last year by Rothschild Doyno Architects carved a plaza and an avenue from the center of the building. To exercise a light touch on the building might yet be a challenge, even under a preservationoriented mayor. Similarly, a comprehensive community-participation process could take up to a year, not simply the six months secured from Buncher thus far. While a number of participants in the Produce Terminal saga were anticipating a request for proposals from developers or similarly significant event at the time of writing, Acklin indicated that he anticipated no major announcement in the near future. Nonetheless, the new administration has made a palpable shift from a rushed process for a single, demolition-oriented option to a longer one that aims to consider more possibilities for preservation.

TO EXERCISE A LIGHT TOUCH ON THE BUILDING MIGHT YET BE A CHALLENGE, EVEN UNDER A PRESERVATIONORIENTED MAYOR.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE #1 BROADWAY MUSICAL OF THE YEAR!

David Whalen (left) and Patrick Jordan in Barebonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A Steady Rain

A DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MISS THEATRE EVENT!â&#x20AC;?

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ARRESTING

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Left: 2013 National Touring Cast. Photo by Michael J. Lutch. Right: Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

BAREBONES PRODUCTIONS gives A Steady Rain the spare, tight exposition that it needs. Directed by Melissa Martin, Keith Huffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2007 police melodrama features two excellent actors hurtling through the past and the present in an often breathtaking ride.

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A STEADY RAIN continues through March 2 at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $30-35. www.barebonesproductions.com

To be honest, the bare bones of the story are a bit hackneyed: Two kids from the wrong side of the tracks grow up together and stay close as adults, with somewhat differing interpretations of the law, but the love of the same woman. (How many times did we see Cagney or Gable do this?) A tussle with â&#x20AC;&#x153;political correctnessâ&#x20AC;? updates the tale from its black-and-white cinema days. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the quality of Huffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dialogue, and its interpretation by Patrick Jordan and David Whalen, that makes Rain a must-see. Jordan, barebonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; founder and artistic director, portrays Denny, the dominant partner and unrepentant bigot. (Really, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a compliment to say that Jordan does great asshole.) As Joey, the overshadowed â&#x20AC;&#x153;good cop,â&#x20AC;? Whalen tries to put his missteps behind him and to face the future more sensibly and optimistically. But the bud-

diesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rapidly fraying friendship was built on a lie that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold anymore. Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationships with his family, his job and reality in general are falling apart, while Joeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loyalties go into self-contradiction mode. Potential spoilers follow: The setting is Chicago in a year that could well be 1991, before everyone had cellphones and when Milwaukeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cannibal/killer Jeffrey Dahmer was not yet a legend. For audiences invested in the police characterizations of Law and Order, etc., Rain is a richly credible tale of how two ofďŹ cers could get so messed up in their personal problems that they make an irreversibly horrible mistake on the job. Disaster ensues. Catharsis follows climax. (In reality, the beat cops who handed a screaming, terriďŹ ed Asian-American kid back to the blond, blue-eyed serial killer laughed about what they saw as a homosexual â&#x20AC;&#x153;domestic incident.â&#x20AC;? And, yes, they were ďŹ red â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but later both were reinstated.) Cops and actors make a classic combination. A Steady Rain presents one of the best. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

VERDICTS {BY TED HOOVER} THE ELEVATOR pitch for Judge Jackie Justice IS appealing: a musical spoof of Judge Judy with lots of Jerry Springer thrown in. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written by a couple of local boys: book and lyrics by Christopher Dimond and a score from Michael Kooman. Plus, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting a world premiere by


Pittsburgh CLO — and let me take a second to applaud the CLO for devoting energy and encouragement to the development of new musicals. Additionally, the company has spared no expense in outfitting a lavish production with a gorgeous set by Tony Ferrieri, eye-popping lights from Scott Nelson, and Susan O’Neill’s funny and defining costumes. And there’s loads of performing talent. Kara Mikula plays the title role with unabashed glee and sings with powerhouse pipes. Jason Coll is the narrator/love interest, and because he’s been gone so long from area stages, I’d forgotten what a beautiful voice he has.

JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE continues through April 27. The Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $34.75-44.75. 412-456-6666 or www.clocabaret.com

Add in the rubber-limbed Jonathan Visser playing the show’s villainous, conniving studio exec to hilarious effect. Maggie Carr and Connor McCanlus play all the loopy characters brought to Judge Jackie’s TV court with an enormous range and exceptional comedic timing. (A big nod, too, to whoever’s executing all those lightning-quick costume changes backstage.) And music director Michael Moricz and fellow musicians Al Wrublesky and Bert Lerini provide excellent musical support. But it’s curious: Even with all that, on the whole, the show (which admittedly is brand-new) still has some distance to go before it can be called a successful piece of musical comedy. The trouble, ironically, is that, if anything, Judge Jackie Justice feels like it’s already been overworked: It’s all too much. There’s too much plot, too many digressions, too many characters, with a focus too broad and jokes too easy. The show’s creators have, apparently, incorporated every suggestion that anyone along the workshop/development journey have thrown at them into what is, in truth, a sweet-natured but slender idea. Allow me to offer my own unasked-for advice. Coco Chanel used to say: “Before you go out, always take something off.” Judge Jackie Justice needs to get out much, much more. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

SLAVERY DAYS {BY F.J. HARTLAND} LIKE A COLLAGE of music, dance and drama, Do Lord Remember Me, at New

Horizon Theater, recounts true stories of the grim history of slavery in the United States. Playwright James de Jongh has drawn from recorded interviews of ex-slaves conducted as part of the 1930s’ Federal Writers Project. Do Lord Remember Me is divided into six “scenes,” each with a different focus. There’s “Children,” “Hush Harbors” (secret meetings of slaves in the forest), “Getting Enough to Eat,” “Superstitions,” “Rebellion” (recounting the story of Nat Turner) and “The War.” De Jongh has framed the script beginning and ending with the story of a disfigured slave (eventually played by all three of the actresses) and how her face came to be so deformed. Director Eileen J. Morris has assembled a powerful cast of six triple-threat performers, all of whom can act, sing and dance. Kevin Brown, Delana Flowers, Mils James, Camille Washington, Karla Payne and Gary Perkins III form a strong ensemble, playing a variety of characters — both black and white. While audience members might have a personal favorite, this cast is a true ensemble, with no one performer outshining the others. They are all just that good. To the credit of musical director Henry Biggs, the singing (which is a cappella) soars. Stand-out musical numbers include: “Balm in Gilead,” “Motherless Child,” “Roll, Jordan, Roll” and the haunting “Do Lord Remember Me,” which brings the performance to a close.

LIVE FROM THE HILL... 6:00PM - SATURDAY, Feb. 22 Joy Ike and Company with Special Guest CUE Saturday, February 22 Tickets: $8 in advance $10 at the door Tickets at Showclix.comcom

2:30PM - SunDAY, Feb. 23

DO LORD REMEMBER ME

Children’s Book Author Shane Evans

continues through March 2. New Horizon Theater at the Union Project, 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. $15. 412-431-0773

On the downside, the performance space at the Union Project is doing this production no favors. The acoustics are poor. The actors are projecting and enunciating well, but the echo in the hall makes hearing them difficult. And while it does add ambiance, director Morris should consider eliminating the underscoring of some of the scenes with recorded music and effects, as it only muddies the sound further. Despite that (and the barely adequate production values), these stories and the remarkable actors who tell them shine through and still make for a memorable theater-going experience. Do Lord Remember Me is the ideal way to mark Black History Month. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

... author, illustrator, musician, graphic & web designer, entrepreneur and inspiration to kids.

Adults - $10, Kids - $5, Children 3 and Under - Free For information call 412-622-8866 Tickets at pittsburghlectures.org

7:00PM-FriDAY,Feb. 28 Anqwenique & Company

an intimate performance by Anqwenique Wingfield and friends as they bring us an evening visual art, spoken word and music in a special performance of works created, written, composed and choreographed by Black artists.

Tickets: $10advance/ $15 door

Tickets at Showclix.comcom

For more info visit www.kaufmanncenter.org

Kaufmann Center

ELSIE H. HILLMAN AUDITORIUM, 1825 CENTRE AVENUE, PITTSBURGH

CONTINUES ON PG. 64

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[OPERA]

CASE HISTORY {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} WILLA CATHER’S 1905 short story “Paul’s

Case” is an indelible portrait of unhappiness in Pittsburgh. The protagonist, a misfit adolescent, flees the dreary workaday worlds of school and home by immersing himself in art and opera. But his ill-planned escape to glamorous New York finds a literal dead end. To composer Gregory Spears, who first read the story in college, Paul’s powerful emotions — not to mention the young dandy’s own opera obsession — seemed tailor-made for operatic reinvention. Spears’ Paul’s Case world-premiered this past April at UrbanArias, in Arlington, Va. The 85-minute chamber opera — which The Washington Post called “an arresting little piece that communicates its haunting story with clarity and a

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sense of inevitability” — gets its second full production starting this week, at Pittsburgh Opera. Cather, who’d yet to write famed novels including O, Pioneers!, published “Paul’s Case” while working here as a journalist and schoolteacher. For Spears, the story captured the essence of adolescence, with its outsized drama. “If Paul were telling his story, he’d be the main character in an operatic adaption of his story,” says the Brooklyn-based Spears, interviewed by phone. Spears and co-librettist Kathryn Walat simply made the narrative more linear. “I wanted it to feel like a train, like there’s no other conclusion [possible] than the conclusion that happens,” Spears says. His score has been described as minimalist with Baroque touches.

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Paul’s Case composer Gregory Spears

The new production stars Pittsburgh Opera resident artists, a seven-member cast led by tenor Daniel Curran, as Paul. An interesting casting touch has the singers who portray Paul’s hated teachers and principal also playing opera singers at a concert at Oakland’s Carnegie Music Hall … as well as the maids and bellboy at the Waldorf Astoria, where a runaway Paul has purchased a night of luxury with money stolen from his father’s employer. Spears says this casting technique fosters empathy for the educators — most of them women — as working people. But it also cleverly seconds Paul’s fantasy of turning his oppressors into servants. And fantasy-place is indeed the role of New York in Paul’s Case, says Spears. Paul’s personality (and fate) are forged by his hometown: “It’s really all about Pittsburgh at the end.” DR ISC O L L @ PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

02.2002.27.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Oakland. $8-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ FRI., FEB. 21 {CARNIVAL}

FEB. 23

Attack Theatre

+ THU., FEB. 20 {SCREEN}

Since the 1960s, Kamran Shirdel’s short documentaries about Iran have been controversial enough to be banned by the Iranian government. “Tehran is the Capital of Iran” (1966-79) used a slum to contrast “reality and cynical government spin.” This week, Shirdel makes his first American appearance, at the Carnegie Museum of Art. See him speak with Carnegie International co-curator Tina Kukielski after tonight’s screening of his work. Another screening, at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room, follows at 7 p.m. tomorrow. Angela Suico 7 p.m. (with 5:30 p.m. happy hour). (4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland). Also 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21 (477 Melwood Ave., Oakland). $10 ($15 for both screenings). 412-622-3131 or www.c13.cmoa.org

{STAGE} Lately, standouts in any profession get labeled “rock stars.” So Michael Friedman and Alex Timbers went ahead and just gave the treatment to a pre-Civil War U.S. president.

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Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson imagines our seventh commander-in-chief as a contemporary rocker. The founder of the Democratic Party sings numbers like “Populism, Yea, Yea,” forces Indians off the land and consolidates presidential power. Called “invigorating” and “ornery,” this critically acclaimed, irony-laced rock musical gets its first major local production at Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company. The opening performance is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through March 2. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave.,

FEB. 20

Kamran Shirdel

Sensory overload is part and parcel of Mardis Gras. Experience all the sights and sounds when Cavo Restaurant Lounge Nightclub rings in the holiday with the Brazilian Carnival Masquerade Ball 2014. Local samba group Timbeleza provides Brazilian beats, DJ Juan Diego spins Brazilian, carnival and world music, and the Pittsburgh Samba Group entertains with its dancing. Be sure to check out the aerial silk samba performance, too. The festivities are presented by DJ Juan Diego Inc., Luciana Brussi Constantino and Marcela Anita. AS 7 p.m. 1920 Smallman St., Strip District. $15. 412-980-7653 or www.cavopgh.com

+ SAT. FEB. 22 {COMEDY} In spite of the serioussounding name, Arguments and Grievances, a live comedy series and podcast based in Chicago, is no town-hall debate. Instead of discussing how to improve public transit, comedians go toe-to-toe on topics like “Hugs vs. Drugs” and “Dr. Dre vs. Dr. Seuss.” When the show stops by Corner Café, Chicago’s Sam Norton and Kevin White will


Free!Event

Five months after becoming North America’s first host of a giant rubber duck, Pittsburgh gets the same privilege for a very different sort of public art. “Congregation,” a large-scale, interactive video and sound installation, will animate nights in Market Square for three weeks starting Fri., Feb. 21. “Congregation,” created by British media artists Kit Monkman and Tom Wexler (collectively known as KMA), involves a raised projector that casts on the pavement spots and strips of light whose movements are, through a motionsensor, influenced by human interaction. A thermal-imaging camera positioned overhead conveys participants’ movements onto a big screen, so audiences can see the abstract patterns they’re making. The show’s 25-minute cycles, each one unique, are set to music by contemporary composer Peter Broderick. “We have played with the idea that this is the world’s first pedestrian ballet,” says Monkman from the U.K. via Skype. “Congregation” premiered in Shanghai, in 2010, and toured the U.K. It hits Pittsburgh courtesy of the Market Square Public Art Program, a new initiative of the city’s Public Art department and the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. And yes, Monkman knows all about the rubber duck. “I think it’s kind of brave programming for Pittsburgh to chose us next,” he says. By contrast, he adds, “Congregation” is “not a spectacle, it’s an experience.” Bill O’Driscoll Dusk, Fri., Feb. 21. Continues dusk-10 p.m. Sun.-Thu., and dusk-midnight Fri. and Sat., through March 16. Market Square, Downtown. www.marketsquarepublicart.com

debate Pittsburgh’s John Dick Winters and Shannon Norman on The Moon vs. The Sun, and Carmen Sandiego vs. Waldo, respectively. Tonight’s show is presented by Race to the Coffin Comedy. AS 8 p.m. 2500 S. 18th St., South Side Slopes. $5. 412-610-2052 or racetothecoffin@gmail.com.

1300 Bingham St., South Side. Free; registration required at 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org.

{DANCE}

Attack Theatre’s new program is an evening of new and reimagined work. “A Tiny Droplet of a Portrait”

FEB. 25

Porgy and Bess

{TALK}

Alton Brown is an author, TV personality and chef extraordinaire. But he also seems to be a humble charmer. Reflecting on Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour, he says, “I feel we’ve come up with some pretty amazing food demos, and the multi-media segments are solid ... but I do have to say I’m a bit nervous about the singing parts.” A few lucky audience members will assist Brown onstage when his show stops by the Benedum Center, courtesy of the Cohen & Grigsby Trust Presents Series. AS 8 p.m. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $32.25-127.25. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ TUE., FEB. 25 {STAGE}

+ SUN., FEB. 23 {WORDS}

You might know Daniel Beaty from his one-man show Through the Night, performed at City Theatre in 2012, or his YouTube-hit spoken-word piece “Knock, Knock.” In either case, you know about his difficult childhood in Dayton, Ohio, in a home damaged by drug addiction and incarceration. The poet, writer and performer is in town to discuss personal empowerment, his own rise to success and his new book, Transforming Pain to Power: Unlock Your Unlimited Potential (Berkley). Tonight’s the book-release (including a short performance by Beaty) at City Theatre, which last year staged Beaty’s Breath & Imagination. BO 6 p.m.

N E W S

is the premiere of a duet choreographed by Attack’s Peter Kope and Michele de la Reza to music composed by Dave Eggars and performed by Chatham Baroque. Live music also keys “The Soldier’s Tale,” the classic about a soldier’s deal with the devil. Attack presents its new version of this old company favorite (often performed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra) with all five of the troupe’s dancers, and Stravinsky’s score performed live by PSO members (or, on March 1, musicians from Carnegie Mellon’s School of Music). BO 7:30 p.m. Also Wed., Feb. 26; Thu., Feb. 27; and March 1. George R. White Studio (Pittsburgh Opera), 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. Reservation required; $35 suggested donation. 888-7184253 or www.attacktheatre.com

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Porgy and Bess, 2012’s Tonywinner for best musical revival, tells the story of a man with a crippled leg and a woman with a bad reputation. Tonight, the touring production of the Gershwins’ classic hits the Benedum Center for eight performances in six days.

FEB. 23

Alton Brown

sp otlight M U S I C

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+ WED., FEB. 26

Nathaniel Stampley and Alicia Mall Horton star, belting hits like “Summertime,” and accompanied by a 23-piece orchestra. The show is part of the PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh series, presented by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and the Pittsburgh Symphony. AS 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun. March 2. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-68. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

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{SCREEN} It gets more attention than it used to, but Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep (1977) remains an underappreciated masterpiece of American cinema. This quiet, episodic portrait of a Watts slaughterhouse worker and his family and neighborhood, shot in grainy black-and-white,

pulses with life and understated emotion. Long undistributed because of the expense of obtaining music rights, the film’s lately resurfaced in a restored print, which screens tonight as part of the discountpriced Essential Cinema series at the Melwood Screening Room. BO 8 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $2. 412-682-4111 or www.pittsburgharts.org

T last time Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project visited the Kelly-Strayhorn The Theater, a dancer’s injury forced the company to alter its program and T present a work-in-progress showing of Beautiful Struggle. This weekend, p tthe contemporary dance company based in Columbus, Ohio, and Burkina Faso returns with the completed version of this thought-provoking danceF theater work. Beautiful Struggle “reflects on questions of belonging … t visibility and invisibility, which are themes often revisited when delving into v the t slippery territories of race, gender and privilege,” says choreographer/ director Esther Baker-Tarpaga. Set to an eclectic soundscape including d West W African rhythms played live, the 45-minute production combines highly physical postmodern, hip-hop and traditional West African dance h styles with bold costuming and props such as a wooden table that stands st in for a slave ship and a slave-auction block. Woven throughout are spokenword recordings of anti-racism activist Tim Wise. Says Baker-Tarpaga: w “I “ would like audiences to think about the struggle of living in a country that was founded upon slavery and how this resonates in contemporary t times.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21, and 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 22. 5941 t Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-25. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org P

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

THEATER BLOODY BLOODY ANDREW JACKSON. A raucous and unique rock musical that reinvents America’s 7th president as a contemporary rock star. Presented by Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre Company. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. COMPANY. As yet unable to make a commitment of his own, Robert supports his married friends & hears about the ups & downs of their relationships. Presented by the Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 23. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB. The story of five Southern women who have been friends since their college swim team days. Presented by Mon River Arts. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and First Sun of every month, 2 p.m.

Thru March 2. Grand Theatre. 412-628-1032. DO LORD REMEMBER ME. A collage of song, movement & storytelling, presented by New Horizon Theater. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru March 2. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-431-0773. THE GREAT ONE. A sports commentator returns to her hometown to mourn a childhood friend, & reminisces about the period of her life between the Pirates’ 1971 World Series win & the death of Roberto Clemente. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru March 9. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST PREVIEW. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Sat., Feb. 22, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE - A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice is now in session w/ “real” cases involving zombies, spaceships,

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. literary & film genres by Charles Ludlam. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. 2 p.m. Thru March 2. The Theatre Cabaret at Theater Square, Factory. 412-374-9200. Downtown. 412-456-6666. PORGY AND BESS. Opera MADAGASCAR. A haunting dealing w/ African-American story about three Americans life in 1920s Charleston, South who find themselves alone Carolina. Feb. 25-27, 7:30 p.m., in the same hotel room Fri., Feb. 28, 8 p.m., Sat., overlooking Rome’s March 1, 2 & 8 p.m. and Spanish Steps at Sun., March 2, 1 & three different 6:30 p.m. Benedum periods in time. Center, Downtown. Presented by 412-456-4800. www. per Quantum Theatre. a p ty SECOND STAGE pghci m Thru Feb. 22, 8 p.m. .co PROJECT: PAUL’S The Carlyle, Downtown. CASE. Story of a high 412-362-1713. school “dandy” whose THE MARVELOUS artistic & social aspirations drive WONDERETTES. Follow four him to escape from sooty 1906 wise-cracking high school girls Pittsburgh. Sat., Feb. 22, 8 p.m., from prom night to their 10 Tue., Feb. 25, 7 p.m., Fri., Feb. 28, year reunion, singing 50s & 8 p.m. and Sun., March 2, 2 p.m. 60s pop favorites along the Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. way. Presented by the Legacy 412-456-6666. Lineup. Sat, 7:30 p.m. and SIX MONSTERS: A SEVEN Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. MONSTER PLAY. A mysterious The Legacy Theatre, Allison figure in a skeleton costume has Park. 412-635-8080. invited friends, family & vague THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP. acquaintances to come together Satire of several theatrical, and meet her personal monsters. Sun., Feb. 23, 8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. A STEADY RAIN. When a domestic disturbance call takes a turn for the worse, the friendship of two Chicago cops is put on the line. Presented by barebones productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru March 2. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-718-4253. UNDERNEATH THE LINTEL. Glen Berger’s “existential detective story.” Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Thru Feb. 26, 8 p.m. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. A WOMAN CALLED TRUTH. A dramatic reading about the life of Sojourner Truth in honor of Black History Month. Presented by the Indiana Players. Feb. 21-22, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 23, 2:30 p.m. Philadelphia Street Playhouse. 724-464-0725. THE WOMEN. A commentary on the pampered lives & power struggles of various wealthy Manhattan socialites and the gossip that propels & damages their relationships. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 22. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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COMEDY THU 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONTINUES ON PG. 70


VISUALART

“America,” by Nicole Anderson, from Fabrications at Future Tenant, Downtown

NEW THIS WEEK MARKET SQUARE. Congregation. Interactive kinetic video & sound installation by KMA - Kit Monkman & Tom Wexler. Opening reception: Feb. 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Oyster House, Market Square. Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. MINE FACTORY. Drawing/ Paper. Group show exploring the intersection & boundaries drawing & paper. Homewood. REVISION SPACE. Fugue States. Work by Cy Gavin. Opening reception: Feb. 21, 7-10 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. SPACE. The Secret Life of Robots. Installation by Toby Atticus Fraley. Opening reception: Feb. 21, 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Neverlands. Mixed media drawings by Terry Boyd. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Art. Right. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014. Feat. 130 art & literary works from grade 6-12 students around the country. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Pittsburgh at Night. Photographs by John Craig. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/ National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. BRYANT STREET LIMITED. Nostalgic Pastel Creations. Work by Linda Barnicott. Highland Park. 412-362-2200. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC. Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Oakland. 412-393-7600. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Beyond the Funny Pages: The works of art & life captured in comics. Black History Month exhibit of work by Orrin C. Evans, Jackie Ormes & Clarence Matthew Baker. Downtown.

CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Blithering Landscapes & Other Ideas. Pen, ink & colored pencil by Eric Hauser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Fabrications. Group show, highlighting work by Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts students. Curated by Bonnie Gloris. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 70

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 68

PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 21 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 28 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE DRAFT. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. FIRESIDE CHAT W/ MARK & JONATHAN. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MAGICIAN-COMEDIAN EXTREME MICHAEL GIGLIOTTI. Amazing strolling magic & comedy. Fun for the whole family feat. Caesars Palace award winning Master Magician MICHAELANGELO. Fri, 5-7 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & Grill, North Side. 412-231-1112. MISSY’S HI-FI MUSIC IMPROV MIX. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Fri, 10:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 28 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 21 - SUN 23 KEITH ROBINSON. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Feb. 22, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 23, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

ARCADE HOOTENANNY. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. ARGUMENTS & GRIEVANCES PODCAST W/ZACH PETERSON & KEVIN WHITE. Part of the Race to the Coffin Comedy Tour. 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. CHUCK KREIGER, MIKE WYSOCKI, DAVID KAYE. 7:30 p.m. Port Vue Fire Hall, McKeesport. 412-672-4303. JIM JEFFERIES. 8 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall. 412-368-5225. LAWPROV. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. WHEN I’M NOT A PERSON. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 25 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 26 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

VISUAL ART

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THE GALLERY 4. Dwellings. Work by Ryder Henry. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Aspect & Perception. Paintings by Micheal Madigan. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. City by the Bay. Photography by PTI students. Robinson. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Almagamations. Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic

artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Pixel Punks DIY Pop-Up Arcade. A showcase of deranged independent games. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. Figures In February. An Exhibit showcasing local Pittsburgh Artists who attend drawing sessions at the gallery. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Shadyside. 412-361-0455. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. South Side. 412-431-1810. SLAUGHTERHOUSE GALLERY. Cemeon Larivonovoff: The Russian

roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the

Icon Painter. Lawrenceville. 412-782-6474. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Nina Sowiski. Photographs. Closing reception: Feb. 26, 1-3 p.m. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Pop-Up Exhibition: Sam Thorp & Brian Gonnella. Double Feature. New artwork by Brian Gonnella & Sam Thorp. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour EVENT: this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes Pittsburgh rally, and outdoor activities in the Downtown surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. CRITIC: KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright , 24, a house. 724-329-8501. social worker from MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection Wilkinsburg includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as WHEN: well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. I came because I believe in the mission. It’s a cool way Historic homes open for tours, to get people together — this whole idea of dancing lectures and more. Monroeville. and being together. A lot of people are here to have 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to a sense of community with other people that are more than 600 birds from over against gender-based violence, [and] to see in the city 200 species. With classes, lectures, that [they’re] living in who is actively going against demos and more. North Side. patriarchy and other things this event stands for. I 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 think it’s nice to be around other people with that rooms helping to tell the same vibe. I like the energy, and the music is pretty story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant great. It seems like a welcoming environment, which I past. University of Pittsburgh. think is hard to pull together with so many strangers Oakland. 412-624-6000. all at once. I knew they were trying to get a lot of OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe people, but I just thought, knowing how rallies go, organ, Revolutionary War that there would be less people. I think they reached graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. their goal of having a lot of people around. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. B Y ANGE L A SU IC O This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. Western PA Sports Museum, PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY Clash of Empires, and exhibits BEAUTIFUL STRUGGLE. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and on local history, more. Strip Performance by the Baker exhibits. Includes displays, District. 412-454-6000. & Tarpaga Dance Project. walking tours, gift shop, SOLDIERS & SAILORS Feb. 21-22, 8 p.m. Kellypicnic area and Trolley Theatre. MEMORIAL HALL. War in Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. Washington. 724-228-9256. the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a 412-363-3000. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY collection of military artifacts LEFT LEG, RIGHT BRAIN. & BOTANICAL GARDEN. showcasing photographs, Performance presented by Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. uniforms, shells & other related Bodiography Contemporary 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor items. Military museum Ballet. Feb. 21-22, 8 p.m. gardens feature exotic plants dedicated to honoring military Byham Theater, Downtown. and floral displays from around service members since the 412-456-6666. the world. Garden Railroad. Civil War through artifacts & Dinosaur-themed train display. personal mementos. Oakland. Oakland. 412-622-6914. 412-621-4253. HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT. PINBALL PERFECTION. ST. ANTHONY’S Performance by Attack Theatre, Pinball museum & CHAPEL. Features feat. Pittsburgh Symphony players club. West 5,000 relics of Catholic Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony View. 412-931-4425. saints. North Side. Orchestra, & Chatham Baroque. PITTSBURGH ZOO 412-323-9504. www. per Wed, Thu, Sat, Sun, 7:30 p.m. & PPG AQUARIUM. ST. NICHOLAS pa pghcitym Thru March 1 Pittsburgh Opera, .co Home to 4,000 CROATIAN Strip District. 412-281-3305. animals, including many CATHOLIC CHURCH. endangered species. Maxo Vanka Murals. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. Mid-20th century murals HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT. RACHEL CARSON depicting war, social justice and Performance by Attack Theatre, HOMESTEAD. A Reverence the immigrant experience in feat. Pittsburgh Symphony for Life. Photos and artifacts America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony of her life & work. Springdale. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Orchestra, & Chatham Baroque. 724-274-5459. Learn about distilling and Wed, Thu, Sat, Sun, 7:30 p.m. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL coke-making in this pre-Civil War Thru March 1 Pittsburgh Opera, HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits industrial village. 724-887-7910. Strip District. 412-281-3305. on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ SHEN YUN PERFORMING MARS AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY HISTORY CENTER. From ARTS. Classical Chinese dance USED BOOK SALE. 10 a.m.Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s & music performance. Thru 6 p.m., Fri., Feb. 21, 10 a.m.Pittsburgh’s role in the antiFeb. 20, 7:30 p.m. Benedum slavery movement. Ongoing: Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. 3 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 22, 9 a.m.-

One Billion Rising Teonna

Ross

Fri., Feb. 14

FRI 21 - SAT 22

SUN 23

FULL LIST ONLINE

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DANCE

FUNDRAISERS

THU 20

THU 20 - SAT 22

3 p.m. Mars Area Public Library, Mars. 724-625-9048.

SAT 22 IN GOOD SPIRITS. Beer & fine spirits tasting benefiting The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 7-10 p.m. S Bar, South Side. 412-926-3455. ROGER HUMPHRIES: PASS IT ON. Documentary screening, live music, hors d’oeuvres benefiting non-profits w/ programs devoted to developing musical talents of youth. 7:30 p.m. Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, North Side. 412-294-9892. SOUTH SIDE SOUP CONTEST. Benefits the Brashear Association & the South Side Chamber of Commerce. www.southsidesoup. com 12-3 p.m. SouthSide Works Cinema, South Side. 412-381-7335.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT TAP SYSTEM

SAT 22 - SUN 23

SOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm.

MINI GOLF FORE THE LIBRARY. Feb. 22-23 Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

SUN 23

1$ off all craft brews!

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

Cheers! C heeers!! Ca Carm arm an and nd M Mike! ikke!

1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

WED 26 DRINK FOR PINK. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, & celebrity servers. 5-7 p.m. Andys, Downtown. 412-773-8884. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, & celebrity servers. 5-7 p.m. The Porch, Oakland. 412-687-6724. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, & celebrity servers. Benefits the Susan G. Komen Foundation. 5-7 p.m. Local Bar + Kitchen, South Side. 412-431-1125.

POLITICS THU 20 GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: SPORTS & POLITICS. Panel discussion presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852.

A limited-release seasonal beer that is an early spring celebration of our German-American brewing Heritage. This golden colored, all-malt pale bock was made with imported German pilsner & Vienna malts and domestic Munich malt. We balanced the malty sweetness with Liberty and Mt. Hood hops, grown in the Pacific northwest and bred from German Hallertau stock.

FRI 21 THE TRANSPORTATION BILL IS MORE THAN THE GAS TAX. Discussion w/ Senator Matt Smith & Representative Mark Mustio. 7:30-9:30 a.m. Doubletree Pittsburgh Airport, Moon. 412-264-6270.

WED 26 OLYMPIA SNOWE. Part of the Pittsburgh Speakers Series. 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Arriving this week at better beer retailers in Allegheny and Beaver Counties!

Prost!

LITERARY THU 20 BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by CONTINUES ON PG. 72

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North/South Indian • Indo Chinese & Tandoori

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 71

If you liked “Fraley’s Robot Repair” — Toby Atticus Fraley’s whimsical 2011 installation in a Downtown storefront — don’t miss

FRI 21

The Secret Life of Robots.

BILL MOUSHEY. 7 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 800-838-4572. RED HERRING BOOK CLUB. The Magician’s Death by P.C. Doherty. 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 22 DANIEL BEATY. The author will discuss his new memoir, Transforming Pain to Power: Unlock Your Unlimited Potential. Westinghouse High School, Homewood. 412-665-3940.

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allindiapgh.com 72

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

Art by Toby Atticus Fraley {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

The locally based Fraley again combines found objects like old shoe lasts and vintage Thermoses with custom-built electronics in this new batch of “everyday scenes from the lives of robots” at SPACE. (Pictured is “First Steps.”) The show’s free opening reception is 5:30-8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 21. Exhibition continues through April 27. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org

DANIEL BEATY. The author will discuss his new memoir, Transforming Pain to Power: Unlock Your Unlimited Potential. 6 p.m. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. #STEELCITYSLAM. Poetry slam presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective. www.pghpoetry.org/events 8 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

on the books Teacher from the Black Lagoon, Dogzilla, I Want My Hat Back, Love, & Splat. Ages 3-10. Presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. Marshall Middle School, Wexford. 412-456-6666.

MON 24

WED 26

LITTLE SPROUTS SINGLE SERVINGS: OUR TROPICAL ADVENTURE. Ages 2-3. Feb. 20-21, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

SUN 23

Catering Call 412.877.7731 Grand Lunch Buffet Royal Dinner Buffet 50% Off Dinners Tues 5-9pm m

[ART]

Ayana Mathis. 1-2 & 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. “THE WRITE SPOT” WRITERS’ WORKSHOP. Prompt-driven poetry & prose. Third Thu of every month, 7-9 p.m. Thru Feb. 20 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

BAD JOBS IN A WORSE ECONOMY. Authors Adam Matcho & Matthew Newton spotlight life in the Great Recession. Part of the Pitt-Greensburg www. per Written/Spoken pa pghcitym o .c Series. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland BOOK SIGNING W/ Public Library, McCandless. OLATOKUNBOH OBASI, 412-366-8100. M.S. More Than a Smoke: A PITTSBURGH POETRY Global Medical, Economical EXCHANGE. Discussing & Spiritual History of Skating With Heather Grace Hemp & Cannabis. 7-9 p.m. by Thomas Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-471-1899. 412-621-6880. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. TEACHER FROM THE BLACK PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL LAGOON. Musical revue based PHILOSOPHY READING BRING YOUR OWN BARD: AN EVENING OF MURDER & MAYHEM. An informal scene night in which professional actors & non-actors alike take a crack at their favorite Shakespeare pieces. 7:15 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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KIDSTUFF THU 20

THU 20

THU 20 - WED 26 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. XOXO: AN EXHIBIT ABOUT LOVE & FORGIVENESS. Explore love & forgiveness CONTINUES ON PG. 74


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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 72

HAPPS The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

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FRI 21 OVERNIGHT ADVENTURES: ALL-IN-ONE ADVENTURE. Hands-on look at exhibitions & collections. Ages 6+. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. TEACHER FROM THE BLACK LAGOON. Musical revue based on the books Teacher from the Black Lagoon, Dogzilla, I Want My Hat Back, Love, & Splat. Ages 3-10. Presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 7 p.m. Moon High School, Moon. 412-456-6666.

SAT 22

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MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. TEACHER FROM THE BLACK LAGOON. Musical revue based on the books Teacher from the Black Lagoon, Dogzilla, I Want My Hat Back, Love, & Splat. Ages 3-10. Presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Mellon Middle School, Castle Shannon. 412-456-6666.

SAT 22 - SUN 23 ALADDIN. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru March 16 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. THE ZANY UMBRELLA CIRCUS: THE GIFT. Theatrical performance based loosely on O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3 p.m. Thru March 2 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 23 - MON 24 TEACHER FROM THE BLACK LAGOON. Musical revue based on the books Teacher from the Black Lagoon, Dogzilla, I Want My Hat Back, Love, & Splat. Ages 3-10. Presented by the Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. 2 p.m. and Mon., Feb. 24, 10:15 a.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

TUE 25 TUESDAY CRAFTERNOON. For students in grades 1-3. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 26

Brought to you by: 74

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. EZ MATH WORKSHOP. For students in grades 3-6. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru Feb. 26

Even for those with a passable knowledge of botany, differentiating trees during the winter can be difficult. Stripped of one of their most distinctive features — leaves — their true identities seem hidden. But don’t let those trees get one over on you: Join Jennings Environmental Education Center for its

Winter Tree Identification Hike, where you’ll learn how to look for identifying clues in branches, bark and buds. 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 23. 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock. Call 724- 794-6011 or email jenningssp@pa.gov for information.

Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WII WEDNESDAYS. Ages 10+. Wed, 3:30 p.m. Thru April 30 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE SUN 23 FRIENDS OF RACCOON CREEK ART CLUB: WINTER LANDSCAPES. 2-5 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park. 724-899-3611. WINTER TREE IDENTIFICATION. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 25 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 26 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 20 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN. Thu, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 27 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681.


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. KAMRAN SHIRDEL FILM SCREENING. Conversation w/ the filmmaker to follow. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVING AGAINST RACISM IN THE ARTS. Workshop for artists, arts administrators, & patrons of the arts who are interested in working together to create a positive change. 12-2 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. WHAT’S NEW IN FEDERAL TAX CREDITS. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

FRI 21 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park Community Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. INSTITUTE FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL EXCELLENCE SECOND STEP PROGRAM: DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN. Mervis Hall. 7:30-10 a.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-648-1542. KAMRAN SHIRDEL FILM SCREENING. Conversation to follow screening. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 7-9 p.m. Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SAT 22 ARTIST LECTURE: KMA. Feat. Kit Monkman & Tom Wexler of KMA. 3:30-5 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237. BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM. Feat. Harold Hayes from KDKA TV. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

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EACH ONE TEACH ONE. TEQUILA & MARGARITA Black History Month history CLASS. 4 p.m. Verde, Garfield. program, poetry slam, fish fry, 412-404-8487. more. 12-4 p.m. St. James VEGETABLE GARDENING A.M.E. Church, East Liberty. & SEED SHARING EVENT. 412-537-4388. Call to register. 10 a.m. FILM SCREENING: Mount Lebanon Public Library, MADELYN ROEHRIG Mt. Lebanon. 412-736-8216. PRESENTS LOOKING UP FROM ANDY’S GRAVE & FIGMENTS: CONVERSATIONS ALTON BROWN LIVE. 8 p.m. W/ ANDY, YEAR III. 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. Andy Warhol Museum, 412-456-6666. North Side. 412-237-8300. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL FLEA/UPCYCLE MARKET. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Schwartz Weekly letter writing Living Market, South event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Side. 412-443-9585. Panera Bread, HOLLYWOOD Oakland. PARTY AT THE 412-683-3727. . w PALACE. Fancy ww per CAMBODIA a p ty ci event hosted by pgh m UNREELED: A o .c Rick Sebak. 7 p.m. RIVER CHANGES Palace Theatre, COURSE. Film Greensburg. 724-836-8000. screening, Cambodian KOREAN FOR food tasting, more. Part BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. of Asia Unreeled. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Winchester Thurston, 412-622-3151. Upper School, Shadyside. KOREAN II. For those 724-969-2565. who already have a basic CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. understanding of Korean & Second and Fourth Sun are interested in increasing of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.Carnegie Library, Oakland. 12:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-622-3151. Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE DIFFERENCE MEET THE FILMMAKERS: BETWEEN MATTER & THE GAME CHANGERS SPIRIT. w/ Shree Galeme. PROJECT. Documentary Theosophical Society screenings followed by a of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. panel discussion w/ the Chatham University, Shadyside. filmmakers. 2:30 p.m. 412-462-4200. Carnegie Library, Downtown. MYSTICAL PSYCHIC 412-281-7141. FAIR. 12-5 p.m. Library NUTS & BOLTS TO PICKING Fire Hall, South Park. A PAINT CONTRACTOR. 724-348-8063. Workshop presented by Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation. 10 a.m. Landmarks BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Housing Resource Center, A support group for women Wilkinsburg. 412-242-2700. 30+. Second and Fourth Mon PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of of every month Anchorpoint every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Counseling Ministry. Chapel of Oneness, West GERMAN CONVERSATION Mifflin. 412-770-4961. CLUB. Second Mon of SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. CRAZE. Free lessons, and Fourth Mon of every followed by dancing. Sat, month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, April 28 Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-708-8844. Oakland. 412-622-3151. SCOTTISH COUNTRY LANDSCAPE DESIGN DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., COURSE. Mon, 6:30 p.m. social dancing follows. Thru March 10 Mount No partner needed. Mon, Lebanon Public Library, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Grace Episcopal Church, MORNING SPANISH Mt. Washington. LITERATURE & 412-683-5670. CONVERSATION. Mon, SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon CLUB. Free Scrabble games, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. 412-531-1912. Mount Lebanon Public SCOTTISH COUNTRY Library, Mt. Lebanon. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 412-531-1912. social dancing follows. SPANISH CONVERSATION No partner needed. Mon, GROUP. Friendly, informal. 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. At the Starbucks inside Grace Episcopal Church, Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Mt. Washington. Target, East Liberty. 412-683-5670. 412-362-6108. SPELLING BEE WITH SWING CITY. Learn & practice DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon swing dancing skills. Sat, Lava Lounge, South Side. 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. 412-431-5282.

SUN 23

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MON 24 - WED 26 CONGREGATION TALKS. The Office of Public Art will explain the Congregation installation. Mon-Wed, 7:30 p.m. Thru March 12 Market Square, Downtown. 412-391-2060 x 237.

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

TUE 25 BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. EDDO STERN. Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art Lecture Series. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970. MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION. Tue, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thru April 1 Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Mt. Lebanon. 412-572-8821. YOUR BIG DAY BRIDAL SHOW. www.yourbigdaypgh.

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412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 75

com 5:30-9 p.m. La Casa Narcisi, Gibsonia. 724-444-4744.

AUDITIONS ABC’S EXTREME WEIGHT

WED 26

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

com/events/519459561475242/ . 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical in the everyday for Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. Visit blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. CAMERA ARTS CREATIVE. Seeking entries for Black| White: a look into the world of black & white photography, a curated group show, juried by 2 guest judges from

LOSS. Weight-loss show casting call. Feb. 22, BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Visit www. GROUP. For Widows/ extremeweighlosscasting.com Widowers over 50. Second for information. Rock Bottom, and Fourth Wed of every Waterfront. 412-462-2739. month, 1-2:30 p.m. GEMINI THEATER St. Sebastian Church, Ross. COMPANY. Auditions for 412-366-1300. Alice in Wonderland. BIENVENIDO: HAVE Feb. 24-25. Ages 10+, 1-2 min. FUN WHILE YOU SPEAK of an a cappella song & SPANISH. Every other cold readings from the Wed, 7 p.m. Thru March 26 script. www.geminitheater.org/ Mount Lebanon Public auditions Gemini Theater, Library, Mt. Lebanon. Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. 412-531-1912. THE CIVIL WAR: WESTERN THEATER - A GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DARWIN DAY EVOLUTION LECTURE. w/ Charles Jones, PhD. Presented by the Open Your Heart to a Senior, a program sponsored by Pittsburgh Coalition of Reason. 7 p.m. First Unitarian the United Way, pairs volunteers with local seniors who Church, Shadyside. want to continue living independently. A wide variety 412-735-9236. of opportunities are available for individuals, families DETROIT STYLE URBAN and groups, and include providing rides to medical BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd appointments or the grocery store, helping around floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. the house or just visiting. For more information, visit Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. www.OpenYourHeartToASenior.org. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public the Pittsburgh Photo / Arts LINCOLN PARK Library, Mt. Lebanon. community. Deadline: PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 412-531-1912. Feb. 23. cameraartscreative. PROFESSIONAL COMPANY. GREENHORNS FILM Auditions for Jesus Christ wordpress.com SCREENING. Documentary Superstar in Concert. FRESH HEIRLOOMS screening followed by March 22-23. Seeking MARKETPLACE. Seeking discussion w/ Greg Boulos Principal Singing Roles, Male of Blackberry Meadows local & regional artisans & & Female Dancer/Singers Farm. 6:30 p.m. East End crafters for spring indoor Ensemble, & the Superstar Choir. Food Co-op, Point Breeze. marketplace. freshheirlooms. www.centerauditions.org/index. 412-242-3598. com/2014/01/call-for-artistsphp/professional-company/ GUN SAFETY IN A in-our-new-marketplace/ jesus-christ-superstar Lincoln FREE SOCIETY: AN Thru Feb. 21. Park Performing Arts Center. ALLEGHENY COUNTY THE GALLERY 4. Seeking 724-259-6443. CONVERSATION. submissions for Salon Show RHYTHM HOUSE MUSIC 5:30 p.m. Kingsley 2014. Send image files GROUP. Auditions for Center, East Liberty. of up to 5 finished pieces to the Summer Music Fest 412-362-7609 x 161. at Monogahela thegallery4@gmail.com. IDENTITY, Aquatorium. March 8. Include title, dimensions, & AUTHENTICITY Open to singers & EXPERTISE: medium(s) & write SALON & performers of QUECHUA APPLICANT 2014 in the subject all genres. www. LITERACY REGIMES www. per line. Deadline: March 22. a p eventbrite.com/e/ IN THE PERUVIAN pghcitym Call or email for info. Shadyside. .co open-auditionsANDES. Lecture 412-363-5050. calling-all-genres-ticketsw/ Virginia Zavala. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 10350461509?aff=efbevent 4:30 p.m. Carnegie HOUR REVIEW. Seeking Paradise Bar. 724-305-0669. Mellon University, Oakland. submissions in all genres for SWEET ADELINES 412-268-2000. fledgling literary magazine INTERNATIONAL. Seeking LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! curated by members of women of all ages who enjoy Practice conversational the Hour After Happy singing for the Sounds of English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Pittsburgh Chorus Global Open Hour Writing Workshop. Carnegie Library, Oakland. House. Any woman of average 412-622-3151. afterhappyhourreview.com singing ability, with or without PFLAG WASHINGTON. INDEPENDENT FILM vocal training is welcome. Support, education & advocacy NIGHT. Submit your film, www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, for the LGBTQ community, 10 minutes or less. Screenings 7 p.m. 412-279-6062. family & friends. Fourth held on the second Thursday Wed of every month First of every month. Ongoing. Presbyterian Church, DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH Downtown. 412-471-3436. Greensburg. 724-219-0804. PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW WASHINGTON PA FILM Accepting submissions for OFFS. A meeting of jugglers FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. showcase of locally written & spinners. All levels or less. Complete rules & entry lesbian, gay, bisexual, or welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. form at www.highlandridgecdc. transgender-theme 1-act plays. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Manuscript details at facebook. org. 724-678-4225.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a straight male, married to a woman for 25 years. Our marriage started to go sour about 14 years ago. Sex was infrequent and stultifying. Finally, I made plans to separate. When my wife got wind of these plans, she agreed to work on our relationship. Things got better. Sex got more frequent, if not more exciting. Then I saw a letter referencing cuckolding in your column. I mentioned it to my wife. This led to a conversation about introducing cuckolding into our relationship. She has a guy in mind. My first choice would be all three of us having sex. My second choice would be he and I having sex with her. The third would be me watching. The last would be them having sex and me hearing about it afterward. She has opted for the last option and is reluctant to share all the details. She has asked why her having sex with another man is exciting. She speculated it is because I have a big ego — if other men want her, her value is higher. For me, it is all about sex. The idea of her letting another guy in, going down on him, etc. is exciting. We will be breaking the rules for what couples are supposed to do. I have been on cuckolding websites. It seems a lot of guys go in for humiliation. Some claim they have small dicks and want a larger man to satisfy their wives. None of those things apply to me. Has there been research into cuckolding? Why do husbands find it hot? CLEARLY UNDERSTANDING CUCKOLD KINK

that men get physically aroused when they know their sperm might have to compete with those of another man, in order to possibly (even theoretically) impregnate a woman. In such circumstances, men thrust harder and deeper during sex, they ejaculate harder, and their ejaculate contains more sperm.” As for your wife’s restrictions — you can’t be there, she’ll share some details but not all — Ley thinks she’s testing you. “She wants to see how serious CUCK is, how he’s going to react. And she’s establishing some level of independence. It’s her body and her sexuality, too, after all.” Ley thinks you guys are coming at this from a good place. Your marriage is on the upswing, you’re talking about your desires honestly, and you’re willing to compromise. “The key component is communication, grounded by mutual trust and respect. If you pursue this, do it with honest communication.” Follow Dr. Ley on Twitter @DrDavidLey. I am a straight 19-year-old girl in college. I broke up with my boyfriend of several months, and during that relationship, I met one of his friends. This friend has been in a relationship, but his girlfriend cheated, and now he has a free card to go fuck someone else. He wants that person to be me! We have fooled around, but though I am not looking for a relationship, I have reservations about fucking someone who is, even if it’s on a Go Fuck Someone Else card. Advice?

MANY MEN GET AN EGO BOOST OUT OF SHARING THEIR “HOT WIFE.” BUT THERE ARE OTHER MOTIVATIONS AS WELL.

“There hasn’t been a lot of research into the cuckolding phenomenon,” said David J. Ley, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and the author of Insatiable Wives: Women Who Stray and the Men Who Love Them. “Historically, men whose wives cuckolded them were publicly humiliated, and their wives were often severely punished. It is only in the past decade or so that this fantasy has catapulted into the public consciousness, largely due to female sexual liberation and the ability of the Internet to allow men with these fantasies to learn they are not alone.” Because of this history, there hasn’t been much nonjudgmental research into men with your desires. Ley’s book represents the first comprehensive effort to explore your kink. “CUCK’s wife is right,” said Ley, “in that many men do get an ego boost out of sharing their ‘hot wife.’ But there are many other motivations as well. Some men are into the idea of cuckolding and humiliation, in a masochistic way. Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, who masochism was named after, explored this fantasy specifically for the humiliation of it.” Men who enjoy the humiliation aspect of their wives sleeping with other men tend to identify with the term “cuckold,” while men who are into the exciting-sex aspect tend to identity as “hotwifers.” “There are lots of men who explore this fantasy just because they think it’s very sexy,” said Ley. “One theory for this is related to the concept of sperm competition. The theory goes

UNEASY AND UNSURE

Unless there are just two guys at your college — your ex and this dude with the Go Fuck Someone Else card — I would urge you to fuck someone else. Your ex will be pissed at you for fucking his friend, he’ll be pissed at his friend for fucking you, the friend’s girlfriend will be pissed at you for fucking her boyfriend — GFSE card or no GFSE card. Who needs that kind of grief? Find someone who isn’t in your circle, and fuck him instead. I’m a 25-year-old guy with a gender-neutral partner. One of our favorite things to do is for me to deep-throat their cock. It’s long and thick, and they sometimes fuck my throat, quite roughly at times. Is there a medical danger to deep-throating? Sometimes it makes my throat a little sore for a few days after. Could we be harming my throat? TWO WONDERING IF NAUGHTY KINK’S SAFE

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

I could find an expert for you, TWINKS, or search the medical literature. But if cocks were doing permanent damage to throats, I would’ve heard by now. An intense deep-throating session is physically taxing, and you feel it for a few days after. Snowboarding has the same effect on my legs. My advice: Take it easy for a while after trashing your throat, just as I take it easy after trashing my legs. Hear the Lovecast recorded live at Seattle’s Neptune Theatre on Valentine’s Day at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

02.19-02.26

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): From 2010 to 2012, Eric Garcetti worked as an actor on the TV cop shows The Closer and its spin-off series Major Crimes. He played the mayor of Los Angeles. Then in 2013, he ran for the office of L.A.’s mayor in real life, and won. It was a spectacular example of Kurt Vonnegut’s suggestion that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Your assignment, Pisces, is to make good use of this principle. I invite you to experiment with pretending to be the person you would like to turn into.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): A woman from New Mexico wrote to tell me that after reading my horoscopes for three years in the Santa Fe Reporter, she had decided to stop. “I changed my beliefs,” she said. “I no longer resonate with your philosophy.” On the one hand, I was sad that I had lost a reader. On the other hand, I admired her for being able to transform her beliefs, and also for taking practical action to enforce her shift in perspective. That’s the kind of purposeful metamorphosis I recommend for you, Aries. What ideas are you ready to shed? What theories no longer explain the nature of life to your satisfaction? Be ruthless in cutting away the thoughts that no longer work for you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In Arthurian legend, Camelot was the castle where King Arthur held court and ruled his kingdom. It housed the Round Table, where Arthur’s knights congregated for important events. Until recently, I had always imagined that the table was relatively small and the number of knights few. But then I discovered that several old stories say there was enough room for 150 knights. It wasn’t an exclusive, elitist group. I suspect you will experience a similar evolution, Taurus. You may be wishing you could become part of a certain circle, but assume it’s too exclusive or selective to welcome you as a member. I suspect it’s more receptive and inclusive than you think.

1955. No one knew its age or origins. In May 1955, workers were struggling to move the heavy 10foot icon to a new building on the temple grounds when it accidentally broke free of the ropes that secured it. As it hit the ground, a chunk of plaster fell off, revealing a sheen of gold beneath. Religious leaders authorized the removal of the remaining plaster surface. Hidden inside was a solid-gold Buddha that is today worth $250 million dollars. Research later revealed that the plaster had been applied by 18th-century monks to prevent the statue from being looted. I foresee a comparable sequence unfolding in the coming weeks for you, Leo. What will it take to free a valuable resource that’s concealed within a cheap veneer?

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Holistic-health teacher Deepak Chopra suggests that we all periodically make this statement: “Every decision I make is a choice between a grievance and a miracle. I relinquish all regrets, grievances and resentments, and choose the miracle.” Is that too New Age for you, Virgo? I hope you can drop any prejudices you might have about it and simply make it your own. It’s the precise formula you need to spin this week’s events in the right direction — working for you rather than against you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

The renowned Lakota medicine man Sitting Bull (1831-1890) wasn’t born with that name. For the first years of his life he was known as Jumping Badger. His father renamed him when he was a teenager after he demonstrated exceptional courage in battle. I’d like to see you consider a similar transition in the coming months, Gemini. You’re due to add some gravitas to your approach. The tides of destiny are calling you to move more deliberately and take greater care with the details. Are you willing to experiment with being solid and stable? The more willing you are to assume added responsibility, the more interesting that responsibility is likely to be.

In the savannas of Africa, waterholes are crucial for life. During the rainy season, there are enough to go around for every animal species to drink and bathe in comfortably. But the dry season shrinks the size and number of the waterholes. The impala may have to share with the hippopotamus, the giraffe with the warthog. Let’s use this as a metaphor to speculate about your future. I’m guessing that the dry season will soon be arriving in your part of the world. The waterholes may dwindle. But that could ultimately prove to be a lucky development, because it will bring you into contact with interesting life forms you might not have otherwise met. Unexpected new alliances could emerge.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

The English noun “offing” refers to the farthest reach of the ocean that is still visible as you stand on the beach. It’s a good symbol for something that is at a distance from you and yet still within view. I suggest that you take a long thoughtful look at the metaphorical offing that’s visible from where you stand. You’ll be wise to identify what’s looming for you in the future so you can start working to ensure you will get the best possible version of it.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A large plaster Buddha statue was housed at a modest temple in Bangkok, Thailand, from 1935 to

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his Eighth Symphony in a mere two months during the summer of 1943. He worked on it in an old henhouse on a former chicken farm. The location helped relax him, allowing him to work with extra intensity. I wish you could find a retreat like that for yourself sometime soon, Sagittarius. I think you would benefit from going off by yourself to a sanctuary and having some nice long talks with your ancestors, the spirits of nature and your deepest self. If that’s not practical right now, what would be the next best thing you could do?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Is there one simple thing you could do to bring a bit more freedom into your life? An elegant rebellion against an oppressive circumstance? A compassionate breakaway from a poignant encumbrance? A flash of unpredictable behavior that would help you escape a puzzling compromise? I’m not talking about a huge, dramatic move that would completely sever you from all of your burdens and limitations. I’m imagining a small step you could take

to get a taste of spaciousness and a hint of greater fluidity. That’s your assignment in the coming week.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There are 15,074 lakes in Wisconsin, but more than 9,000 of them have never been officially named. That’s strange to me. In my view, everything is worthy of the love that is bestowed by giving it a name. I have named every tree and bush in my yard, as well as each egret that frequents the creek flowing by my house. I understand that at the Findhorn community in northern Scotland, people even give names to their cars and toasters and washing machines. According to researchers in the U.K., cows that have names are happier: They produce more milk. Your assignment, Aquarius, is to name at least some of the unnamed things in your world. It’s an excellent time to cultivate a closer, warmer personal relationship with absolutely everything. You can read free excerpts of my most recent book at http://bit.ly/PronoiaFree2. Tell me what you think at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

get your yoga on!

In his book The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human, literary scholar Jonathan Gottschall muses on the crucial role that imagination plays in our lives. “[The] average daydream is about 14 seconds long and [we] have about two thousand of them per day,” he says. “In other words, we spend about half of our waking hours — onethird of our lives on earth — spinning fantasies.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when your daydreams can serve you well. They’re more likely than usual to be creative, productive and useful. Monitor them closely.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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www.InfluenceStudy.com Participants will be compensated for time and travel.

Please Call 412.650.6155

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 80

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


Ink Well

LOGICAL CONNECTIONS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS

1. Marks of experience, as it were 6. “Your play” 11. Where Putin got his professional start 14. Site of a Vietnam War atrocity 15. Multilayered cake 16. Dope 17. Hockey delay tactic 18. Jefferson Memorial column type 19. Earn after expenses 20. Crisis following the breakup of Guns N’ Roses, the Eagles, and Mötley Crüe? 23. NPR’s “Weekend ___” 24. Human tail? 25. Horror movie set at the dry cleaner? 31. Like pork rinds 35. Dealbreakers: Abbr.? 36. Jazz singer Anderson 37. Bend in a tutu 38. Choice words swapped in this puzzle’s theme answers 40. Jazz singer Simone 41. Spengler who is the first to spot the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man 42. Source of hair on one’s furniture 43. “Liquor is quicker” poet Nash 44. Tour manager for gummy bears and M&M’s? 48. On top of

everything else 49. Superglues, say 54. What the host of “Deal or No Deal” eats to make the gold suitcases look, like, *extra* gold? 58. Band whose “Man on the Moon” is a tribute to Andy Kaufman 59. Bureau that provides sports stats 60. Southern Caribbean island known for scuba diving 61. With 62-Across, what an R specifies 62. See 61-Across 63. Sites of some cosmetic surgeries 64. “Low Rider” band 65. Not on the up-and-up 66. Surge of water

12. Show featuring the New Directions 13. Sandwich that can be made vegetarian with fakon 21. 1950 film noir classic 22. Putting on 26. Beef up 27. Summer sign 28. Body part that may have a spacer 29. Number before Lives or West, in brand names 30. One with a list on campus 31. What freelancers usually submit on 32. Bit of plankton 33. One working with a chair and a whip 34. There’s one named for Achilles 38. Urgent NYPD call

39. “The Matrix” hero 43. Harry Potter and Tom Riddle, for two 45. Sings with frequent breaks? 46. Animated clown some claim is based on David Letterman 47. Some MIT grads 50. It has a point 51. “Wordplay” director Patrick Creadon’s documentary about debt 52. Orgy outfits, stereotypically 53. Blockbuster 54. The M in MHz 55. 1986 Nobelist Wiesel 56. Mojito citrus 57. “What am I, your ___?” 58. Real, as talk {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

DOWN

1. “I’m shooting you now” 2. Ancient tropical tree 3. Suspect’s excuse 4. Prepared to tackle 5. Play the dozens 6. “Say ___ So” (Hall & Oates) 7. Bear associated with Disney 8. River in view in “Room With a View” 9. Begin to leave one’s dreams behind? 10. 7-G, for Homer Simpson 11. Michelangelo sculpture subject

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JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Longwall Coal Miners New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to ďŹ ll the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to resumes@vikingmining. com

www.sunrise-careers.com www.sunriseseniorliving. com

working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

APPLY TODAY: QualiďŹ ed Applicants please submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

latitude360.com/ pittsburgh-pa

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PHEAA.org/jobs


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WELLNESS MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

Chinese Bodyworks

412-401-4110

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Open 24 hours/7 days a week

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

$40/hr

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

724-519-7896

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Your ad could be here Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

412.316.3342

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation

massage

Chinese Bodywork

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Bring this ad in and get a discount

Therapy

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700

Cranberry Office Now Open!

2624 Rochester Rd. Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

Please Call: 412-465-1050

Low Self Pay Rate

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

New Leaf Recovery Services Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

newleafsuboxone.com

Judy’s Oriental Massage

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014


JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. Now open in Monroeville! • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Positive Recovery Solutions

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

NO WAIT LIST

WE SPECIALIZE IN

412.246.8965, ext. 9

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL • Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept most major insurances, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients.

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

MONROEVILLE, PA

Let Us Help You Today!

Recovery Without Judgement™

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

TA S T E

412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

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Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

N E W S

Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

C L A S S I F I E D S

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SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD Public Hearing Notice Continuance of Pre-Hearing Conference CPRB Case #212-13 Tuesday, 2/25/14 @ 5:30 p.m. City Council Chambers 510 City County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

CPRB PITTSBURGH

HEALTH SERVICES Get Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for Addiction Treatment. Alcohol Abuse. Drug Addiction. Prescription Abuse. Call Now 855-577-0234 Rehab Placement Service.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CLASSES

ADOPTION

Fiction Workshops Looking for feedback on your writing? Want to write short stories or a novel? Announcing new fiction workshops. Weekly meetings. Supportive environment, all fiction writers welcome. Visit www.BeckyTuch. com or email Becky. Tuch@gmail.com for information.

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

AUTO SERVICES

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Screenwriting Lessons Learn the art & science of outlining, writing and rewriting motion picture screenplays.

. GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE writeyourscript@ live.com

Your ad could be here

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

STORAGE

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available

3 Locations Shadyside • Oakland • Strip District

412-208-4625 GuardianStorage.com

ADOPTION Adoring Couple, Financially Secure, Sports, Travel, Art, Music Awaits 1st Baby.

advertise your

Expenses Paid

1-800-562-8287

business in

Nicole

pittsburgh

A DO P T I O N for your NEWBORN: A baby is a gift to treasure. I can provide your baby a secure life and uncoditional love. Expenses Paid Call anytime Maria

1-866-429-0222

city paper 412.316.3342

412.316.3342

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on March 11, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • PITTSBURGH BEECHWOOD PRE K-5 Elevator Addition General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes And the following on March 18, 2014, until 2:00 P. M., local prevailing time for: • PITTSBURGH BRASHEAR H. S. Upgrade existing heat recovery unit Mechanical Prime

• VARIOUS SCHOOLS PPS Phase 4 Security Projects – Groups 1, 2 and 3 Electrical Primes

• PITTSBURGH PERRY H. S. New AC unit in principal’s office General, Mechanical and Electrical Primes A pre-bid conference for Various Schools is scheduled for February 19, 2014 at 10:00 a. m. at the Facilities Division located at 1305 Muriel Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. This conference is NOT mandatory but recommended. Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on February 10, 2014 for Beechwood and February 17, 2014 for all other projects listed at Modern Reproductions (412-4887700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. l Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 l www.pps.k12.pa.us

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.19/02.26.2014

PGHCityPaper


Median amount a Pittsburgh renter is paying in monthly housing cost:

Median amount a Pittsburgh homeowner is paying in monthly housing cost:

$

755

$

781

National average: $

Percentage of the Pittsburgh labor force that was female in 1980:

884

National average: $

1,066

CA$HING IN

40 Percentage that is female today:

Median income of a black Pittsburgh resident: $

25,117

Median income of a white Pittsburgh resident: $

48,306

For some Pittsburghers, at least, the economy doesn’t get much better than this.

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{BY CHRIS POTTER} THE NEWLY RESURGENT Pittsburgh economy has given us a few things to complain about: $13 cocktails, tech workers acting like they own the place, and rents in certain East End neighborhoods that have gone from silly to stratospheric. And there are communities where, amidst all this plenty, people are really struggling. But economically speaking, the numbers add up here about as well as they do anywhere in the United States. Even daily annoyances, like the interminable UPMC/ Highmark ad campaign, can mask a pleasant reality — like insurance costs well below those being paid elsewhere. So sit back and enjoy that overpriced mojito; you’ve earned it.

Monthly premium for the lowest-cost “silver-rated” health-insurance plan available in the Pittsburgh metro area: $

119

Nationwide average monthly premium for such a plan:

Chance that a child in Pittsburgh under the age of 5 is living in poverty:

1 in 3

C POT T E R @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

$

310 SO U R C E S: 2 0 0 8 -2 0 1 2 AME R IC AN C O MMU NIT Y SU R V E Y 5 -YE AR E ST IMAT E S; U. S. C E NSU S B U R E AU ; H E ALT H AND H U MAN SE R V IC E S; U NIV E R SIT Y O F PIT T SB U R GH R E SE AR C H E R C H R IS B R IE M

Chance that a senior citizen over age 65 is:

1 in 8

Chance that a Pittsburgh resident over age 24 has a graduate or professional degree: Median earnings for a graduate or professional degree holder in Pittsburgh:

1 in 5 Chance that a U.S. resident does:

Median earnings for a degree holder nationwide:

$

49,618

1 in 10

$

65,164

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SATURDAYS IN FEBRUARY DRAWINGS EVERY HOUR 2PM - 8PM VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB OR RIVERSCASINO.COM FOR FULL DETAILS.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


February 19, 2014