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YUNA-VERSAL: MALAYSIAN POP ARTIST YUNA MAKES IT BIG ON BOTH SIDES OF THE PACIFIC 28


EVENTS 2.7 – 6pm ART.WRITE.NOW.TOUR OPENING RECEPTION Warhol entrance space Tickets FREE

2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JULIANNA BARWICK, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, VASILLUS Warhol theater Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

San Fermin, with special guest, Son Lux

2.18 – 8pm Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.22 – 2pm TEEN MEMBERS ONLY TOUR: SCHOLASTIC ART AND WRITING AWARDS Tickets Members FREE; to register call 412.622.3314

We welcome San Fermin, the chamber-pop project of Brooklyn musician/composer Ellis LudwigLeone, for the first time to the museum. Ludwig-Leone has worked with celebrated composer Nico Muhly on arrangements for the likes of Sufjan Stevens, The National, and Lee Renaldo. Son Lux (aka Ryan Lott), whose debut recording, At War With Walls and Mazes (2008), earned him the title of “Best New Artist” by NPR’s All Songs Considered, opens the show.

2.22 – 2pm FILM SCREENING: MADELYN ROEHRIG PRESENTS LOOKING UP FROM ANDY’S GRAVE (2013) AND FIGMENTS: CONVERSATIONS WITH ANDY, YEAR III (2011) Warhol theater Tickets FREE

3.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JACK QUARTET Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Tickets door $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Cyro Baptista’s Banquet of the Spirits 3.5 – 8pm

4.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: TINARIWEN Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Warhol welcomes acclaimed Brazilian percussionist and composer, Cyro Baptista, and his genre-defying quartet, Banquet of Spirits. Their records are reviewed within the broad categories of contemporary jazz and world music, and are released on the Tzadik label. This promises to be a unique performance that fans of hybrid jazz/Afro-Cuban music won’t want to miss!

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


{EDITORIAL}

02.05/02.12.2014 VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 06

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING} Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

[NEWS] could bury them if we just could 08 “We do whatever we wanted, but we follow the law.� — Jamie Campolongo of Yellow Cab on potential competition from rideshare services Uber and Lyft

[VIEWS]

do you let Jimmy Ponder die, and 18 “How he never played there? That’s shameful.� — Jazz musician Hill Jordan on the mixed record of the August Wilson Center for African American Culture

[TASTE] be doing some things that 23 “We’ll people haven’t seen in Pittsburgh.� — Spencer Warren on his pop-up Embury cocktail bar

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

(17(57$,10(17 THIS WEEKEND!

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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think he taught me to be 28 “Iadventurous musically.� — Malaysian singer-songwriter Yuna on working with Pharrell Williams

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[ARTS] it would be interesting 41 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itothought choreograph movement to completely different music and then transfer it onto the songs we would ultimately use.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alan Obuzor on his new work

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 20 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 58 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 61 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Karama Has No Wallsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a potent

that little in the public arena 38 reminder these days occurs undocumented.â&#x20AC;?

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“CITIES WANT US, AND ONCE WE ARE THERE, WE GROW QUICKLY.”

INCOMING Is $200 million for DowntownOakland BRT the best public-transit investment? (Jan. 29) One crucial thing to understand about this proposal is that many different bus routes end up sharing this corridor, and all of those routes could benefit from the improved travel time. … In that sense, this proposal isn’t just for the benefit of riders between Oakland and Downtown, but also riders into Oakland or Downtown from many farther-out points in the system. — Web comment from “Brian Tucker-Hill” I’m sure that BRT works. I’m not sure which area BRT is right for. I’m not sure that doing real-estate development under the figleaf of better Pgh-Oakland commute times is virtuous, when there are so many other underserved areas (in terms of transit) and so many other blighted zones. — Web comment from “Vannevar Bush” “BRT is such a low bar. Bring back the Spine Line!” — Web comment from “Alex”

Some call Astria Suparak’s Miller Gallery departure a ‘mistake’ (Jan. 29) Well, Astria, it’s pretty clear that being fucking awesome and impactful at CMU is not appreciated. This news is a terrible loss for our local community, the arts community and the CMU community. I can only say that I am so thankful that we got to have you. I think about the shows that you have curated, and I actually get a little choked up because I can’t think of any art exhibits that have been more relevant, powerful and meaningful. Anywhere. — Web comment from “Courtney Ehrlichman”

“I really liked Leslie [Nielsen], I hate that seeing Tom Corbett reminds me of him.” — Feb. 3 tweet from “Kombiz Lavasany” (@kombiz)

Ride-share company Lyft, and its pink-mustachioed vehicles, will launch in Pittsburgh Friday.

BUMPY ROAD AHEAD? I

T S S E RV I C E M AY n o t

ye t b e approved by state regulators, but ride-share company Lyft, with its pink-mustachioed fleet of cars, is apparently launching in the Steel City on Friday anyway. It is, in some ways, a jackrabbit start for the company. Lyft and a competitor, Uber, have launched massive social-media campaigns and placed ads seeking drivers in recent weeks, stirring up local interest in the companies. When contacted by City Paper last week, however, neither company said it was sure when, or even if, they would launch. Then, as this issue was going to press late Monday, Lyft spokesperson Paige Thelan told CP via email that “we just confirmed the launch in Pittsburgh for this Friday, February 7.” Prior to that announcement, officials of the Pennsylvania Public Utilities

Commission told CP that if the company begins offering rides, both the firm and its drivers could face sanctions. At the time, PUC spokeswoman Jennifer Kocher said the agency would classify the companies as “unlicensed providers.”

At least one ride-share company plans to launch here this week. How long it will be allowed to operate is another story. {BY DAN SLEVA} “Anytime someone is transporting someone for any compensation, they would need a Certificate of Public Convenience,” Kocher said. “This is whether it is for a set fare or [what] they

call … a donation.” As of late last week, Kocher said that the PUC knew Lyft was advertising for drivers in Pittsburgh, but that the company had not filed the appropriate paperwork to do business in the state. Obtaining the proper certificate is a hearing-based process, in which existing transportation companies have the right to raise objections. And local firms seem almost certain to voice them. Jamie Campolongo, CEO of Pittsburgh Transportation Group, which includes Yellow Cab, says he has heard rumblings of Lyft and Uber coming to Pittsburgh and is gearing up for a fight. “We will file a complaint with the PUC,” Campolongo says. “We just want them to follow the rules. We could bury them if we just could do whatever we wanted, but we follow the law.” CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


BUMPY ROAD AHEAD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

LYFT BILLS ITSELF as a lower-cost alter-

native to taxis, linking drivers in their personal vehicles with passengers who pay a suggested donation for the ride, through a smartphone app, while the company takes a cut. Lyft’s ads say drivers can make up to $ 20 per hour; some ads claim drivers can make $800 in a weekend. Uber operates a similar service, called UberX, alongside a limo/black-car sedan service known as UberBlack. While Lyft appears set to launch this week, Uber spokesperson Nairi Hourdajian says her company is in an “exploratory stage” here. Uber has listed openings for a Pittsburgh market community-manager position, which would be based in Washington, D.C., and an associate manager for Pittsburgh, to be based in Philadelphia. “We think there is a tremendous opportunity in Pittsburgh,” Hourdajian says. “It is an ideal market because there are lots of young people with all of the universities. Cities like Pittsburgh respond well because they have limited taxi service and limited public transit, especially away from the Downtown area.” Hourdajian tells City Paper that “tens of thousands” of people in the area have downloaded the company’s app, and that

A Lyft ad on Facebook looking for drivers

many have even tried to use it. But while customers have been responsive, ride-sharing has drawn the ire of regulators and taxi operators. Part of UberBlack’s business model, for example, is levying a surcharge for

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service during periods of peak demand. But Campolongo says state regulations bar taxis from charging different rates at certain times of day. “If these companies want to apply for a taxi license, and follow the same regulations, I will compete with them,” Campolongo adds. “But we need a level playing field.” The PUC’s Kocher says the agency’s position is clear: “Once we receive a report of [them] being operational, we would first send them a letter. The vast majority of time, companies bring themselves into compliance. “If they do not, the next step would be fines, and there could be charges filed through the criminal-justice system,” Kocher adds. Punishment could be directed at both the company and drivers. Lyft declined to discuss legal questions, but their entrance into the Pittsburgh market seems similar to their arrival in other cities. “We look forward to working with [local officials] as we’ve worked with other city and state regulators like the California Public Utilities Commission to protect public safety while allowing for innovation and consumer choice,” Lyft’s Thelen says. The companies began operating in California in October 2012, and were

immediately hit with cease-and-desist letters. But according to a Forbes magazine account, the CPUC voted unanimously to regulate the companies and allow them to operate as “transportation network companies,” over the objections of taxi companies. Lyft, Uber and another ride-sharing firm called Sidecar began operating in Seattle last year, though according to The Seattle Times, officials there have deemed the services to be operating illegally. New regulations for such services have been debated, but to date no legislation has been passed in Seattle, and the companies operating there are flourishing — again, over the objections of local cab companies. Some of the debate has already played out in Philadelphia. Uber legally operates an UberBlack service that uses an app to dispatch cars-for-hire there. (The company is also authorized to partner with other limo/black-car services across the state.) But when Sidecar launched its own ride-sharing service there last year, it was promptly shut down. “When we became aware of them operating, we conducted a sting operation,” says James Ney, director of the Taxicab and Limousine Division of the Philadelphia Parking Authority. “We issued stiff citations and impounded the vehicles.” Ney says Sidecar was fined for dispatching without a license; Sidecar drivers were charged with operating unauthorized taxis.

“WHEN YOU PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION FOR HIRE, THERE ARE STANDARDS THAT HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED OVER THE PAST COUPLE OF DECADES TO MINIMIZE HARM.”

KOCHER SAYS unauthor-

ized taxis pose publicsafety concerns. She says the PUC’s regulations ensure the cars are safe and clean and that the proper insurance is in place. Campolongo, of the Pittsburgh Transportation Group, says taxi companies must conduct criminal background checks on drivers, offer safety training and English-language training for drivers, and carry full commercial insurance. Uber and Lyft say they also conduct checks on driving history and criminal backgrounds. Alfred LaGasse, CEO of the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association, also says his group has concerns about these new companies. “When you provide transportation for hire, there are standards that have been CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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BUMPY ROAD AHEAD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

developed over the past couple of decades to minimize harm,” LaGasse says. He adds that the companies might seem like hip start-ups, but their business model is nothing new. “You call, get a ride and pay a fare,” he says. “Clicking on an app is the same as dialing a number to have a taxi dispatched. “I don’t see how that is not a taxi company.” LaGasse and others have also raised issues with the ride-sharing companies’ insurance practices. Lyft and UberX have drivers rely on their primary car insurance first, and then excess liability insurance kicks in. But the companies offer insurance only when there is a confirmed passenger from their network in the car. According to the New York Daily News, an UberX driver looking for fares struck and killed a 6-year-old in San Francisco on New Year’s Eve. The family filed a lawsuit against Uber last week; the company denies liability because the car had no passengers at the time. Last week, Consumer Reports issued a warning that drivers for ridesharing companies might not be covered, and open themselves up to liability. Steve Long, a State Farm insurance agent in Pittsburgh, says that before signing up with ride-sharing companies, drivers should check their insurance policies.

Typically, he says, insurers “have the same language” and “exclude a covered vehicle when it is used to carry a person for a charge. I’d eat my hat if you found one without this exception.” Long says he would not insure a Lyft or UberX driver, and believes insurance companies here would aggressively fight claims arising from an incident involving a ride-share. Uber and Lyft spokespersons would not respond to the insurance issue, except to say they believe they offer the coverage necessary under the law. And Lyft’s Thelan says that the demand for such services speaks for itself. When the company looks for new markets, she says, “We take into account the reliability of transportation in the city. Cities want us … and once we are there we grow quickly.” Campolongo concedes that there might be times when it is hard to catch a taxi here, especially on Friday and Saturday nights. He says the city expands on the weekends and contracts on weekdays, making scheduling tricky. He says Yellow Cab has heard the complaints and has taken action, adding 60 cabs last year, and planning to add another 60 to its 325-car fleet in 2014. But Campolongo says cab shortages are not unique to Pittsburgh. “There are 18,000 cabs in New York City,” he says, “and you cannot get one when it is raining.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Despite liquidation order, community still hopeful arts center can survive {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} WHILE A JUDGE has ruled that the liqui-

dation of the August Wilson Center for African American Culture can move forward, many in the city’s black community and arts community say they’re working to save the ailing arts institution. The $42 million August Wilson Center opened in 2009 with the help of funding from tax dollars, foundations, private donors and an $11 million mortgage from Dollar Bank. But the center has struggled financially, and this past September, Dollar Bank began foreclosure proceedings after the center repeatedly failed to make mortgage payments. The news since has mostly been grim. A court-appointed conservator, Judith Fitzgerald, petitioned Allegheny Common Pleas Court Judge Lawrence O’Toole for the power to liquidate the center’s assets. Such a move was necessary, she wrote in a legal filing, because local foundations and other potential funders “are unwilling to provide any additional funding whatsoever” to keep the center operational. That’s not to say the center has been abandoned. “When [Fitzgerald] said not a single person has come forward, a lot of people scoffed,” says Kimberly Ellis, niece of the late August Wilson, and who attended the Jan. 24 hearing. I n f a ct, a n ano nymous group of Pittsburgh foundations has sought to purchase the center, transferring operations to the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, according to Ellis and attorney E.J. Strassburger. But its price, $ 4 million, was well short of the center’s estimated $ 10 million debt. Roughly $ 7 million of that is Dollar Bank’s mortgage; the bank could take hold of the property if no one submits a bid large enough to pay off the loan. Still, supporters see the offer as a good sign, and say it would be a mistake to rush into liquidation. “One of the things [the offer] indicates is there is some interest in the foundation community to do something for the center,” says Strassburger, an attorney who offered to take over as conservator of the center, in an effort to keep it intact.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Although its future is uncertain, many hope the August Wilson Center can be saved

“I think that sends a positive sign.” “Anything can be turned around. You have to want to turn it around, and that’s the biggest thing I’m not hearing,” says Christiane Leach, artist coordinator with the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council and a local artist who received a fellowship from the AWC. “The money that needs to be raised is not a lot.” Many institutions face struggles early on, contend supporters of the Wilson Center. When the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati was experiencing financial difficulty in 2010, the community came together to retire $ 27 million in debt — thanks in part to debt forgiveness by a group of lenders. (The center’s financial difficulties continued, however. It ultimately merged with the Cincinnati Museum Center.) “I was hoping something like that would happen here with the August Wilson Center [and] the bank would work out a plan” says Samuel Black, president of the Association of Black Museums, of which AWC is a member. “I am disappointed with the work [Fitzgerald] did because the way it looked is basically a hatchet job.” The August Wilson Center’s difficulty “is absolutely in line with what other arts organizations experience all of the time and what other museums experience,” says Ellis. The center’s supporters say they understand the concern about its finances. The facility’s monthly mortgage is $53,639, and it hasn’t made a payment since last February. It’s also facing potential lawsuits from other creditors. Due to annual withdrawal

“ANYTHING CAN BE TURNED AROUND. YOU HAVE TO WANT TO TURN IT AROUND.”

restrictions, meanwhile, the AWC is unable to access a $ 450,000 fund with the Heinz Endowments. (Dollar Bank will cover the cost of utilities at the center through June.) Still, even if the center is sold, many hope it will be purchased by an arts group that can continue the center’s mission. “Our hope is that in whatever solutions are found for the future of the center, that they take in the important mission of the center,” says Mitch Swain, CEO of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, which partnered with the AWC several times. Fitzgerald echoed that sentiment at a Jan. 31 meeting, convened by Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Mark Brentley, to discuss alternative uses for the center. “I’m not looking at any kind of piecemeal sale of assets,” Fitzgerald said at the meeting via telephone. “We’re trying to concentrate first on … trying to keep the mission of the center alive.” Fitzgerald said she’d been contacted by groups interested in potentially acquiring the site — and “all expressed interest in keeping that mission.” Fitzgerald will present bids for the center to Judge O’Toole, who will ultimately decide how to dispose of the facility. If the winning offer exceeds debts owed to creditors, O’Toole will decide how to allocate the remaining funds. “The receiver has a difficult job,” says Eric Shaffer, attorney for Dollar Bank. “And we appreciate her diligence in carrying out the court’s instruction.” There will be a town-hall meeting at 11 a.m. Sat., Feb. 8, at the Carnegie Library Downtown. The focus of the meeting will be on finding a solution to save the August Wilson Center. RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Chris Potter contributed reporting to this article.


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PROPERTY CONTROL Neighborhood groups wary of land-bank bill {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} A LAND-BANK bill that would change the

way tens of thousands of parcels across the city could be redeveloped is drawing criticism from community groups, who argue the legislation doesn’t do enough to include them. “The community approval process is not clear at all,” says Carl Redwood, chairman of the Hill District Consensus Group. “And without full community participation, the land-bank legislation can be a way to fast-track what developers want to do in spite of the community’s wishes.” The bill’s supporters say the legislation is a work in progress, and say they hope community groups will help craft a mechanism to give themselves influence over the disposition of land in their neighborhoods. Consternation among some community groups came after Pittsburgh City Councilor Deb Gross introduced legislation Jan. 14 that would create a Pittsburgh land bank — an entity separate from city council that would act as a central clearinghouse for blighted,

vacant or tax-delinquent properties. Under state law, the land bank would be authorized to expedite the titleclearing process and deal with existing tax liabilities, allowing for more efficient reuse of distressed land. Gross’ legislation gives a sevenmember board the authority to decide what happens to property in the land bank. Three of the board’s members would be appointed by council; four would be appointed by the mayor. The legislation currently specifies that the use of land “shall be consistent with the provisions of the City’s Comprehensive Plan and any adopted neighborhood plans.” Where such plans don’t exist, “the Land Bank shall determine that proposed uses are consistent with the goals of the community by consulting with any community groups in the area [as well as] the Department of City Planning, and the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh.” Marimba Milliones, president and CEO of the Hill Community Development Corporation, says she’s supportive of land banks in theory, but worries about how the land bank will operate in communities that don’t have formalized community plans. “The Hill District has a community plan, but formal codification of that is different,” Milliones says, adding that the city has not systematically provided resources for community planning. “[The legislation] has to take into consideration neighborhoods with very large amounts of vacant land like the Hill District and Homewood and parts of the North Side.” Although the bill is at the top of Mayor Bill Peduto’s legislative agenda, the community-inclusion process “was one of the things that was intentionally left a little bit vague so we could solicit feedback,” says Matthew Barron, Peduto’s policy manager. Letting the legislation develop after it is introduced is “not unique to this legislation,” he says. Nate Hanson, Gross’ chief of staff, says Gross is open to amendments and will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. Thu., Feb. 20, at Pittsburgh City Council chambers, so that “[as] many people

who want to speak [will] be able to speak.” Ernie Hogan acknowledges the bill needs work. He’s the executive director of the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group, an organization which has been leading discussions about blighted and vacant land, and which lobbied the state legislature to pass the law that enables land banks. “There’s been a lot of process around this,” Hogan says, noting that a version of Pittsburgh’s bill has been around “for at least a year.” But, he adds, “I do think there needs to be an engagement process or an internal review board that can seek those community inputs.” City Councilor Corey O’Connor, a potential swing vote, says he’s working on amendments that address some of his own concerns about how community groups will be able to influence the disposition of parcels in the land bank. One amendment would expand the composition of the landbank board, adding representatives from neighborhoods with the most blighted and vacant property. Another would mimic the zoning board’s process, O’Connor says, by offering the public and council a chance to weigh in. Those amendments are still in draft form, O’Connor says, and will likely be presented in a few weeks — though he’s generally happy with the bill. “Overall, it’s a good program because we can gather a lot of properties at one time and distribute them quickly,” he says. “But we want to have all the community leaders involved, and that’s where these amendments are coming from.” City Councilor Daniel Lavelle, who represents parts of the Hill District and the North Side, is less impressed with the bill. He says community groups in his district are worried about everything from what role CDCs will play to what happens if the land bank takes over properties that are occupied, but tax-delinquent. “The ability to control land is key in any community — we’d essentially be giving it over to a board without any accountability provisions,” says Lavelle, noting the bill implies that there won’t be lots of debate. “The bill actually called for the board to be created and seated by March of this year. […] That doesn’t leave much room for conversation.”

“THE ABILITY TO CONTROL LAND IS KEY IN ANY COMMUNITY.”

A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


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CULTURE SHOCK Pittsburgh’s commitment to black culture in the spotlight {BY CHRIS POTTER} SAY THIS FOR the August Wilson Center for African American Culture: Its plight proves why Pittsburgh is the perfect setting for so much of Wilson’s work. Unfortunately. This is, after all, the city that spent millions to keep the Civic Arena running for half a century — despite years of resentment from Hill District neighbors, and not one but two bankruptcies of its principal tenant, the Pittsburgh Penguins. But here we are, on the point of losing a cultural center named in Wilson’s honor … after just half a decade. Opened in 2009, the center is $ 10 million in debt: Late last month, courtappointed overseer Judith Fitzgerald was authorized to prepare the building for sale. While the center’s financial problems have been no secret, many are stunned by how quickly the curtain is coming down. “I’m surprised at the speed” of the bankruptcy process, says Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Mark Brentley, who convened a Jan. 31 meeting on the center’s future. “We thought there would be a few more months to work on this.” Fitzgerald has written that she hopes to find a buyer who “will agree to sustain and help implement the mission of [the Center].” But Pittsburgh being Pittsburgh, it’s not hard to find people who are willing to abandon that mission — if only because they never liked it. On line or on the talk-radio airwaves, someone is bound to fault the center for being a “black venue” that can’t hope to attract whites. That will no doubt come as news to the white audiences who’ve attended events there, and to white performers like jazz guitarist Joe Negri, who have played on its stage. In fact, as far as local jazz trombonist Hill Jordan is concerned, the center’s leadership often lacked the very thing that made Wilson great: a profound, poetic connection to Pittsburgh’s black community. When Jordan spoke at Brentley’s gathering, he had high praise for the center’s in-house roster of talent — including theater director Mark Clayton Southers and the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra. But otherwise, he said, “African-American artists never really set foot in that place.” Talking with reporters later, Jordan noted that

one of Pittsburgh’s black jazz legends — guitarist Jimmy Ponder — died last September without ever appearing on the Center’s stage. “How do you let Jimmy Ponder die, and he never played there? That’s shameful.” That may not prove the worst mistake made by the center’s board of directors: State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has demanded financial records. But as City Paper’s Rebecca Nuttall reports elsewhere in this issue, arts groups have been drafting their own proposals for the center. Brentley, meanwhile, favors using it to expand the school district’s hugely successful Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA) program. Jordan favors running the center as a kind of artists’ collective, with more handson involvement from black arts groups. What’s at stake here isn’t Wilson’s artistic legacy, which has been elevated beyond our ability to screw up. (And consider that when Downtown’s O’Reilly Theater opened in 1999, its inaugural performance was the world premiere of King Hedley II.) What’s at stake is whether we’re more receptive to today’s black artists than we were back in 1978, when Wilson left Pittsburgh for good. Back when the center was being planned, some argued it would be better off in the Hill … or in Homewood, where Brentley and others championed a proposal to build a black museum during the late 1990s. And now that we have Penn Avenue arts crawls and performance spaces thriving in East Liberty, a Downtown zip code seems less essential. Maybe the Center’s desire to stand alongside elite cultural institutions helped to keep some audiences away. As Southers told The New York Times last November, the center seemed isolated from the working-class communities that inspired Wilson’s plays. “You can’t build it and they will come,” Southers said. “Not when you’re trying to work with a community that is not traditional … cultural consumers.” But the stage has been set Downtown. And Wilson’s best work spoke truth to every audience, without ever forgetting the community whose voice spoke in his plays. With the final act about to begin, we’ll see if Pittsburgh can duplicate that performance.

ARE WE MORE RECEPTIVE TO BLACK ARTISTS THAN WE WERE WHEN AUGUST WILSON LEFT PITTSBURGH FOR GOOD?

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


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‘BIRD’ WATCH {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN In 2006, Liz Moore was living in New York and not particularly enjoying her corporate job. A Penn State grad with a degree in psychology — and no formal culinary training — she began laying the groundwork for what would become Bluebird Kitchen, a popular lunch spot just off Market Square. And earlier this month, more than 18 months after the original “fine dining on the go” concept launched, Moore opened a second Bluebird location Downtown, on Stanwix Street. Though the menu has been tweaked — only the new location offers a grilled-cheese sandwich, for instance — diners can find many of the same scratch-made pastries, fresh sandwiches and inventive sides as at the original location. (Both locations serve breakfast as well.) The new spot has plenty of seating, and because it’s located on the ground floor of the First Niagara building, Moore says it has a captive audience of about 2,000 workers who can help smooth out the off-season at the original location. “Because we don’t have a lot of seating [at the Market Square location],” Moore says, “our sales are really dependent on the weather.” Still, Moore is adapting to a clientele that is often as hungry for “a monstrous 12-inch sub” as it is for a grilled cheese ($7.75) with 5 Spoke Welsh cheddar and truffled mornay on brioche. “People perceive us as being a more expensive place to eat,” she says, “but we’re a really good value.” AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

11 Stanwix St. (Lower Level), Downtown. 412-281-4422

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A cheery annual event is the South Side Soup Contest, in which participants take to East Carson Street to sample a variety of homemade soups from local eateries. The soup crawl, held Sat., Feb. 22, sells out every year, so get your tickets early. The $25 tickets go on sale at noon, Fri., Feb. 7, with the proceeds benefiting the Brashear Association’s food pantry and the South Side Chamber of Commerce. See www.southsidesoup.com for tickets and more information.

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

P

EOPLE LIKE chain restaurants

because they always know what to expect. Interestingly, though most diners are family-owned establishments, they offer a similarly comforting predictability — each an independent variation on a culturally consistent theme. At a diner, you can be reasonably sure of sating any cravings for meatloaf, a burger, or pancakes for dinner — not to mention an inexpensive, bottomless, nofrills cup of coffee. The other kind of diner familiarity is more literal: Diners tend to attract a cast of regular customers who know the servers and vice versa. West of the city, the three locations of Bob’s Diner (with a fourth on the way) share menus and a sunny yellow-andorange color scheme. Since the Carnegie location is the only one open for dinner, we stopped in one frigid evening for the warmth of some mutual familiarity. Sure enough, a server was chatting up some customers with the ease of a neighbor, and a second server quickly made us at home at our window-side booth.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

French toast

Bob’s Carnegie building is low-slung, set back from the main drag of Mansfield Boulevard behind a parking lot, and easily identifiable by the large-script “Diner” sign mounted on its front wall. In many ways, it’s quintessential roadside architecture, perfectly synched to the heyday of diners themselves, but blessedly free of James-Dean-on-a-motorcycle posters

BOB’S DINER 211 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. 412-429-7400 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat. 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. PRICES: $5-15 LIQUOR: None

CP APPROVED and other ’50s kitsch. Instead, a more idiosyncratic eye has seen fit to accessorize a sunburst mural, centered on a steaming cup of coffee, with the salvaged sign from a longtime Carnegie restaurant (since demolished for a drug store) and cartoon faces cut from swatches of printed fabric. It’s just eclectic enough to be

colorful, not so much as to feel cluttered. Bob’s serves the classic diner array of all-day breakfast fare, hot and cold sandwiches and stick-to-your-ribs dinner platters. While the menu makes some effort to identify local and homemade items — Mancini’s bread, fresh burgers and the occasional recipe attributed to Bob Marshall, the diner’s founder, in particular — there’s no foodie pretension here. Our server cheerfully owned up that the excellent and homemadeseeming dumplings in the turkey soup were, in fact, frozen. Batter-dipped for an order of French toast, the aforementioned Mancini’s bread was well-griddled, leading to plenty of savory browning on the outside. Cinnamon-raisin and fruit-filled versions round out the French-toast offerings on the extensive breakfast menu. We also liked that the Belgian waffle wasn’t merely an oversized version of the American style, but featured a rich, almost whole-wheaty chewiness inside a crisp, brown exterior.


The fruit cup — with cantaloupe, banana and strawberries — served alongside was actually fresh and bright, not bruised and sad. A savory side of corned-beef hash included green pepper and onion, welcome additions that made up for less crust than Jason would prefer. Bob’s burger hit the diner highlights of griddle-toasted bun atop a well-browned patty. What took it to the next level was that the patty was generously sized (without being extreme) and the bun was more like a chewy roll than a fluffy round of American bread. The meat could have been a bit juicier, but hey, diners aren’t in the business of asking how you want your burger done.

Bob Marshall, president and owner of Bob’s diners

We ordered country-fried steak and fried chicken as dinner platters, although to our minds, they would work as well at breakfast and lunch respectively. Jason was initially taken aback that the steak gravy was brown, not white, but as diner gravy goes it was pretty good — especially on the accompanying fries, which were golden-crisp and fluffy. The steak itself was thick enough to withstand the coating, thin enough to be tender, and suitably crisp in the crust. It paled, however, beside the crust of the fried chicken, which was a deep goldenbrown and shatteringly crisp. The menu said it was “honey golden dipped,” but we detected no sweetness; the menu also said we’d get three pieces, but it was actually a full, four-piece half-chicken. We were wowed. Only Bob’s own spaghetti sauce and meatballs was a disappointment. The sauce tasted more of ketchup than it did of canned tomatoes, and the meatballs alongside were no better than serviceable. At least Mancini garlic toast, flecked with bits of real, toasted garlic, was a winner. But with our rate of success ordering from a menu as big as Bob’s, we feel pretty good about getting familiar with this local diner. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

STOKING THE EMBERS Embury returns in pop-up form In 2008, finding a fancy cocktail in Pittsburgh was a challenge. Then Spencer Warren opened Embury, the precursor to the current wave of upscale cocktail bars, downstairs in the Strip’s Firehouse Lounge. Warren was a bit ahead of his time. “Most people didn’t realize we were there until 2010,” he says. By then it was too late: The bar closed in August 2011. Warren went on to work in Louisville, San Francisco and Miami, while back home his team of bartenders developed cocktail programs at Salt of the Earth, Spoon, Acacia and other cutting-edge local bars. Now, for a limited time, Embury is back. For the next five Monday nights, Warren will transform the upstairs bar at Butcher and the Rye into a celebration of Embury’s glory days. Warren says he’s launching the pop-up as a mix of nostalgia — he even saved some original Embury wallpaper to help re-create the atmosphere — and a desire to nudge the city’s cocktail culture forward again. “I’m always trying to stay ahead of the game,” he says. “We’re going to have a lineup of classic Embury cocktails, but we’ll also be doing some things that people haven’t seen in Pittsburgh.” Take the Embursphere, a cocktail housed in an ice ball. Customers poke a straw through the sphere to enjoy a classic stirred cocktail like a Manhattan or Old Fashioned. Warren will also welcome guests with complimentary drinks in the form of Gummi squares. But put aside your memories of frat-house Jell-O shots — these are carefully created cocktail gels. Look for the drink menu to change each Monday, and expect to see some former Embury bartenders behind the bar. DJ Strobe (Eric Cohen), who used to spin tunes at the old place, provides the music. But don’t try the front door of Butcher and the Rye: The Downtown eatery is closed Mondays. Instead, head down Sixth Street to the emergency-exit staircase. Or as Warren says, “You should look for the red light bulb.”

“WE’LL BE DOING SOME THINGS THAT PEOPLE HAVEN’T SEEN IN PITTSBURGH.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

212 Sixth St., Downtown.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724266-6362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern California-style Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BOCKTOWN BEER AND GRILL. 690 Chauvet Drive, The Pointe, North Fayette (412-788-2333) and 500 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca (724-728-7200). Beer is the essence of Bocktown. Many of the dishes are less than $10, and designed to complement beer. The friendly staff creates a neighborhood atmosphere. JE

Osteria 2350 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} No matter how many tables they add, you may end up waiting for one. JE

FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. CAFÉ DU JOUR. 1107 E. The ambience conjures the Carson St., South Side. nostalgia of Route 66 412-488-9695. This Euro-style road trips. Much of the bistro is “open-kitchen reasonably priced fare cozy” with a quaint is in the “goes well courtyard for intimate with beer” category, outdoor dining. A and the beer list modestly sized yet www. per pa includes a couple thoughtful menu pghcitym .co of house brews. But offers small-tothere’s plenty that’s large plates, highlighting new: Pizza, baked in a Mediterranean- and Europewood-fired brick oven, comes an-influenced California cooking with everything from Jamaican with an emphasis on fresh, jerk chicken to hummus; entrees seasonal produce and excellently include glazed salmon and prepared meats. KF “truck-stop sirloin.” KE CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, wood-fired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-of-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J

FULL LIST ONLINE

DAVIO. 2100 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-531-7422. Davio is a cozy restaurant (down to the family photos) with friendly service. The menu is classic Italian — no wacky ingredients or preparations — but only a few entrées seem lifted from the Standard Italian Restaurant Repertoire. Specialties are crab and veal. L FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrial-sized sandwiches. There’s outdoor eating on the “fatio,” but timing is everything:

Bocktown {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. This little jewel-box of a diner offers authentic, home-style Korean cuisine, including inhouse chili sauce and various kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like rolls), as well as entrées ranging from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to

spicy marinated chicken and Korean pancakes. KF HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis Heights Road, Moon Township. 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE ISABELA ON GRANDVIEW. 1318 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-431-5882. This fine-dining restaurant atop Mount Washington places as much focus on the food as on the skyline. There are a la carte dishes, but the selections are all from the seven-course, prix fixe dinner that is the heart of the Isabela experience. The cuisine is contemporary and varies widely among European, American and Asian influences. LE MISS SAIGON 88. 256 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-802-6388. This restaurant offers a full sushi bar and some Thai curries, but its Vietnamese specialties are the real reason to go. For appetizers, try shrimp mini-crepes or banh uot, a chicken and noodle dish. The salted lemongrass tofu entrée is a standout, as is the Spicy Miss Saigon soup, a wonderfully flavored pho. KF OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District (412-281-6595) and 100 Wood St., Downtown (412586-7743). You won’t get better casual Italian cooking for your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

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{BY JESSICA SERVER}

OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. This two-wheel-themed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE

WINTER CLASSIC Chef Richard DeShantz shares a seasonal favorite IN BOTH OF his Downtown hotspots — Meat &

PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724-581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF SAVORY HILL. 988 Brodhead Road, Moon. 724-457-7109. This “eclectic bistro” offers a fortifying menu of locally sourced, creatively prepared fine dining. The starters span rarefied (scallops) to comforting (nachos), and include truly memorable salads. Entrees include a Southwest surf-n-turf with chipotle peppers, and slowbraised short ribs with risotto and multi-colored carrots. LE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated store-front venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF

Chef Richard DeShantz {PHOTO COURTESY OF ADAM MILLIRON}

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

515 Allegheny Avenue • Oakmont, PA 15139 (412)-828-0570 • www.chelseagriloak.com

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of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, panini and pasta — and their preparations represent a unique marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE

Make Your Valentine’s Reservations Today

Potatoes and the “cocktail-driven” Butcher and the Rye — seasonality plays a huge role in chef Richard DeShantz’s comfort-style cooking. “There are so many culinary opportunities in what the seasons bring us,” DeShantz says. So DeShantz, a self-described “supporter of going back to the classics,” is the perfect person to offer up a post-vortex winter recipe: pot roast. He suggests starting with the best cut of meat and searing it before braising, to seal in flavor. After that, this dish can cook all day on the stove while you relax by the fire. That’s part of the point, explains DeShantz, who says that winter means staying in, being with friends and enjoying home-cooked meals. “The best foods are the ones we remember as children and that bring back nostalgia,” he says. “I’d love to see the classics pop up all winter long.”

Chef DeShantz’s Pot Roast (Serves 8-10) 5 lbs. chuck blade roast 4 carrots 4 stalks celery 2 onions 4 cups diced tomatoes 5 sprigs rosemary 5 sprigs thyme 1 bulb garlic, peeled Chicken stock, to cover roast 2 cups red wine Salt and pepper 1. Rub roast with olive oil, season with salt and pepper. Then place roast on a roasting rack in oven at 550° (or as high as you can) for 20 minutes, until it has a deep brown color. Remove roast from oven, and let rest. 2. Place layer of carrots, onions and celery on the bottom of a pot large enough to hold roast. Place the roast on top, then add remaining vegetables. Add garlic bulb, rosemary, thyme, red wine and chicken stock. 3. Cover and cook in oven at 350° for about 3 hours, until roast is tender. Remove roast from liquid, discard rosemary and thyme. 4. Put pot on med-high flame and reduce liquid by half. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 5. Return roast to liquid and keep warm until ready to serve. Serve with mashed potatoes. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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LOCAL

“PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, YOU’VE GOT A LAW DEGREE TO FALL BACK ON!’”

BEAT

{BY KATE MAGOC}

CLUB TO CLUB New York has the subway; Chicago has the El; D.C. has the Metro; and all three have Uber, the quick, private car service. This makes partying into the wee hours a breeze. Pittsburgh, however, has always struggled when it comes to transportation past 2 a.m., or even midnight. But one new event may help alleviate party-hoppers’ late-night travel limitations. A-OK will be a Saturday-night party held at Cruze Bar, in the Strip District, on a yet-to-be-determined basis; the first event is Sat., Feb. 8. In Pittsburgh’s underground dance scene, Saturday nights are also the home of the successful after-hours party Hot Mass. Connecting to that event has always been a bit of a chore, as it’s located on Penn Avenue, on the edge of Downtown and the Strip District. A-OK, though, is just a short walk away. Spearheading A-OK is Humanaut cofounder Aaron Clark, who was also instrumental in the creation of Hot Mass, as well as the bygone Out of Order party, a monthly Saturday-night event held at Belvedere’s in Lawrenceville, which linked up to Hot Mass. “Even when you had Out of Order at Belvedere’s, you had that gap to get from one party to another,” Clark says. “People have to figure out transportation to get there, and that’s difficult. “Now, someone can take a bus from anywhere in the city down to Cruze and they can take a bus home in the morning if they’re out partying all night,” Clark explains. According to Clark, the transportation solution was almost a happy accident. Pittsburgh party-people are pretty accustomed to the strain and have always figured out ways to get wherever their favorite DJs are. More than anything, Cruze just felt right. “It’s a gay space. And we’re going to blast it with insanely good dance music,” Clark states. “That combo should weed out both the gay and straight assholes by default.” The launch of A-OK will feature the Detroit stylings of Rick Wilhite with opening support from hometown outfit Pittsburgh Track Authority. Hot Mass, slated for this particular night as an official Movement Electronic Music Festival pre-party, will feature Detroit-based techno DJ Daniel Bell.

ONE NEW EVENT MAY HELP ALLEVIATE PARTYHOPPERS’ LATE-NIGHT TRAVEL LIMITATIONS.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A-OK feat. RICK WILHITE, PITTSBURGH TRACK AUTHORITY. 9 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8. Cruze Bar, 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-471-1400 or www.cruzebar.com

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NEW SCHOOL {BY {B BY ANDY ANDY M MULKERIN} ULKE UL KERI RIN} N}

Y

UNA IS A Malaysian pop singer-songwriter who released her first full album in the United States, Nocturnal, last year on Verve. She took time out of her current American tour to talk with CP about moving to the States, working with Pharrell and running her own business in Malaysia.

IS THIS YOUR FIRST FULL U.S. TOUR? This is probably my first headlining tour — the past tours have been supporting Allen Stone and Michael Kiwanuka. HOW DOES THAT FEEL — IS THERE A NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE? Yeah! It’s so much fun; prior to this tour, I was playing a couple of headlining shows in New York, and you can tell when everyone in the crowd is there for your headlining artist. It’s exciting to see your fans and look into the crowd and see faces and say, “This guy is singing along to my song!” WHEN YOU WERE COMING UP IN MALAYSIA, WAS IT ALWAYS A GOAL TO COME TO THE UNITED STATES AND ESTABLISH YOUR CAREER? Oh, yeah. When I started writing music, it was all in English. I kind of had limited opportunities to promote my music outside of Malaysia. And I always thought it could go really far if I took it overseas. When I got the offer to come out to Los Angeles and record, work with different producers, it was scary in the beginning, but I wanted to try. And now I feel comfortable with it.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

Down to business: Yuna


IN MALAYSIA, PRESUMABLY IT’S NOT COMMON FOR A POP ARTIST TO SING IN ENGLISH? Yeah. That was one of the biggest problems, why I wouldn’t sign any recording deals: because the deal would probably be 70 percent of the album should be in the Malay language, or no English songs at all. That wasn’t my forte — I knew my strength was in writing in English. I ended up doing everything by myself — I had an independent label that I registered, put out my own albums. But the main market there is Malay music. I had to come out here and see how far I could go with my English stuff. YOU WENT TO LAW SCHOOL WHILE YOU WERE ESTABLISHING YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST; WAS THAT A FALLBACK IDEA, OR JUST A MATTER OF HAVING DISPARATE INTERESTS? To begin with, I really thought I was going to be working in the legal field, when I went to school. But I think when I was in law school, I got into music, and I saw an opportunity to have a career in music. Before that, I didn’t know how to work within the industry, but I learned on my own, and with a lot of people being helpful and supportive. So I decided this is what I’m going to do, because it would be a waste not to do what I love and make it a career. If anything happens, people say, “Oh, you’ve got a law degree to fall back on!” But I don’t think that’s going to be an option.

the same time [making] it your style. THERE’S A SINGLE ON THE NEW ALBUM, “RESCUE” — IT ALMOST STRIKES ME AS A FEMINIST ANTHEM. IS THAT A CORRECT ASSUMPTION? It’s funny — when I put that song out, I never expected people to call it [feminist]. People ask, “Do you consider yourself a feminist?” It’s mainly a song I wrote to promote self-confidence. I think it’s men

YUNA

WITH JOEY VEGA, CAIT CUNEO 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 12. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $18-20. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

and women. When I wrote that song, I just really wanted to make something really like an anthem, but for yourself. I remember talking with my producer, Chris Braide, who worked on that music; I said, “This is a really uplifting song, and it has to be!” I guess I got my inspiration from, I worked with U.N. Women for a little bit; I went to Geneva — I was kind of involved with the United Nations, and I’d never done anything like that before. So I guess [that was] one of the inspirations for making that song and singing about self-empowerment.

“WHEN I PUT THAT SONG OUT, I NEVER EXPECTED PEOPLE TO CALL IT FEMINIST.”

ON ONE OF YOUR FIRST SINGLES YOU RELEASED IN AMERICA, “LIVE YOUR LIFE,” YOU WORKED WITH PHARRELL WILLIAMS, WHO’S GOLDEN THESE DAYS. WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM HIM? Working with Pharrell, I gained so much knowledge and experience. I think if I did not work with him, I wouldn’t be able to find a style, and hip-hop beats and electronica beats. I think he taught me to be adventurous musically. I think that was how I became a braver singer-songwriter. After that, I worked with Chad Hugo [of N.E.R.D.], who’s more hip hop; Mike Einzinger [of Incubus], who’s more of a rock influence. Working with all these different producers wouldn’t be easy for me if it wasn’t for me working with Pharrell, learning to come up with all these different things you aren’t used to, but at

WHAT’S ON THE DOCKET FOR 2014? I was looking forward to this tour for the past few months and it’s finally happening now; I think, in April, I’m going to go back to the studio and try to write again, start recording again. IN BETWEEN TOURS, DO YOU LIVE IN AMERICA NOW, OR DO YOU GO BACK TO MALAYSIA? I live in Los Angeles, but at the same time, I go back to Malaysia quite often, because I run a clothing store, IAMJETFUEL.com — I run several companies in Malaysia. That was already there before I left for America. I like to go back and see my family and friends and work on my personal projects. DO YOU EVER HAVE TIME TO ACTUALLY STOP AND RELAX? Oh, not yet! Hopefully soon. I was thinking about that: I never took some time off, a holiday. My holidays are still working holidays. Maybe one day. AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS FULL COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS (ENAMEL RECORDS)

Back in the mid-2000s, Full Color — T.J. Fennell’s project — was a regular contributor to the local rock scene. Fennell is in Massachusetts now, but Full Color Illustrations is his duo with the still-local Mike Layton. This full-length is the first in some time from Enamel Records; it’s 11 tracks of heavy guitar rock with programmed drums. Fans of Fugazi-style indie rock and grunge will find a lot to like here: good stuff!

EDDIE BARNZ BACK TO BIZNESS: THE RETURN OF THE MAYOR (SINISTER ENTERTAINMENT)

Twelve hip-hop tracks from the local rapper — well, 11 hip-hop tracks and one spoken-word piece about what he’d do if elected mayor. (I don’t think I’m spoiling anything if I tell you he’s in favor of legalization.) Between the goofy jokes (and there are a few), there are some frank, compelling and sometimes graphic tales of life in the projects. Sometimes it’s a funny juxtaposition, but Barnz is a real storyteller, with plenty of rhymes and pop-culture references in his bag.

YOUNG FOX PREDECESSORS (SELF-RELEASED)

Loud, moody stuff from the local four-piece. Impeccable-sounding rock in the vein of Smashing Pumpkins, Radiohead and early emo over a fourtrack EP. Don’t expect anything updated — every track could have stepped out of 1999 — but it’s well done, and it’s fair to assume that’s what they’re going for. (This isn’t a band of kids; it includes onetime Zao bassist Martin Lunn.) The majestic closer, “Define the End,” is a great note to close on. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


COMEBACK TOUR {BY ANDY MULKERIN} THALIA ZEDEK solo albums have been

an irregular occurrence of late: Liars and Prayers, released in 2008, wasn’t followed up until 2013’s Via — but, right on the heels of that release, the one-time guitarist for bands like Live Skull and Come is releasing a new EP this month. To what do we owe the sudden rush of new material? “We didn’t really get a chance to tour properly with Via,” she explains. “I’d had bad luck with drummers — the drummer I’d played with for like 12 years, Daniel Coughlin, had left the band, and there was a series of other drummers that came and went, then the guy who recorded Via, Dave Bryson, ended up moving to Buenos Aires right after. Between that and stuff I’d been doing with Come, I kind of felt like we hadn’t had a chance to properly promote Via.” At the behest of her label, Chicago’s Thrill Jockey, Zedek went back into the studio to cut the new EP, SIX, which, of course, is six songs (including a Freakwater cover). That way, she has something brand-new to tour behind in addition to last year’s record. The tunes on SIX are signature Zedek — the dreamy take on blues, the gravely, honest and serious vocals — but a bit strippeddown compared to some of the more complicated arrangements of her past work. “It’s nice to put something out quickly and stay on a roll,” she adds. The tour that brings Zedek to Pittsburgh this week is her first in a few years, besides some West Coast dates last year and a few on the eastern seaboard to promote Via. Touring still holds interest for the longtime musician, even though she’s been playing for 30 years.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LANA CAPLAN}

On a roll: Thalia Zedek

in that sort of phase of my touring life, unfortunately — there’s ups and downs. You kind of need a thick skin.” Last year’s excitement for Zedek included some Come reunion shows on the heels of an anniversary re-release of the band’s classic album 11:11. “I think that was a really big deal for us — 11:11 had actually been out of print and unavailable for a long time, and none of us were happy with that,” she says. “We felt like there was enough interest in the record that it should be available.” The German label Glitterhouse worked with Matador Records to rerelease the album, and the band — still on good terms — played some shows to support it. Zedek says it was basically a one-time thing. “Does that mean we would never ever do anything in the future? Not necessarily,” she says. But it also doesn’t mean they’re hiding out in the basement writing an album’s worth of songs together. “No, absolutely not!” she says with a laugh. “We’re spread all over the country, doing absolutely different things with our lives.”

“I’M STILL IN THAT SORT OF PHASE OF MY TOURING LIFE — THERE’S UPS AND DOWNS.”

THALIA ZEDEK

WITH EMILY RODGERS, KEVIN FINN 9 p.m. Thu., Feb. 6. Garfield Artworks, 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $8-10. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

“It definitely has its ups and downs,” she says. “That’s the thing about touring: You can have a great show one night, a packed club and a great audience, you’re just on a total high, then the next show, you’re playing to the sound man, and the bartender wants to close early. I’m still

AMULKERI N@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[POP] + FRI., FEB. 07 Last week, the talk was all about Pharrell’s hat; if Cris Cab gets lucky, some of that hat’s luck will rub off on him. Or, more likely, some of Pharrell Williams’ knack for success will filter through to Cab, who worked with Williams on a new single, “Liar Liar.” Cab, a Miami-born popreggae singer, is poised for a breakthrough, with electronic-infused pop music and the support of the man with the Midas touch. Tonight at Stage AE, Cab opens for Rebelution; next time, he’ll probably be the headliner. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $17.50-20. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[ROCK] + FRI., FEB. 07 You might be surprised prised to hear a bit of hip hop in the title track ack of Paradise Fears’ 2013 EP Battle Scars — the e six-piece is, after all, from South Dakota, ta, and on the whole has more of a pop-and-rock p-and-rock sound. Tonight at Altar Bar, ar, r the band plays tunes from that record and more, acousticc and in the round. Sunderland d opens. Kayla Copes 7 p.m. .m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $25. All ages. 412-206-9719 9719 or www.thealtarbar.com com

Barwick’s latest, Nepenthe). But one thing that makes her unique is that her soundscapes — wintry, gorgeous — are made largely with loops of her voice, rather than a full complement of instruments. Tonight, Barwick crosses the tundra of the North Side to play The Andy Warhol Museum; Vasillus opens. AM 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Cris Cab

G. Love & Special Sauce is back! The longtime Philadelphia alternative hip-hop band is going on tour to celebrate the 20year anniversary of its first album. Recently, the outfit released a new single called “Nothing Quite Like Home,” and a new album, Sugar, g is due out April p 22. Whether you’re a G. Love fan from way ba back or just interested in catching up, you can find the band tonight. at Stage AE E to onig n ht. KC C 8 p. p.m. 400 North Side. $20. All ages. Shore Drive, North Side www.stageae.com 412-229-5483 or www

[AMBIENT] + SAT., FEB. 08 On the surface, Julianna Barwick is in a league with the biggest of the ambientbeautiful outfits, like Sigur Rós (whose Alex Somers recorded {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN BRACKBILL}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

[ALT-HIP HOP] + SAT., FEB. 08

[JAZZ] + THU., FE FEB. 13 The realest jazz in to town tonight will no doubt be at Thunderbird Café, Thu where Chicago’s Ethnic Eth Heritage Ensemble progressive-jazz e — the pro outfit around for 40 out u fit that’s been aro down. The years now — lays it d up of Kahil Elgroup, made u Zabar, Ernest Ernes Dawkins and Corey Wilkes, Wilk has been at it off and an on since the ’70s, and each member has compiled his own comp résumé of session and Julianna touring work. AM Barwick 6 p.m. 4023 Butler St., 4 Lawrenceville. $16-20. Lawren 412-682-0177 or www. 412-682 thunderbirdcafe.net thunde


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 06 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Farewell Drifters. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Satisfaction (Rolling Stones tribute). Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Amon Amarth, Enslaved, Skeletonwitch. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. EOTO. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Woodsman. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Thalia Zedek Band, Emily Rodgers, Kevin Finn. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 07 31ST STREET PUB. Stone Cold Killer, Kill Orion, Drenalin. Strip District. 412-391-8334. THE BEER MARKET. Ray Lanich Band. North Side. 412-322-2337. CLUB CAFE. The NewLanders (Early) Silencio (late). Performing the Soundtrack Works of David Lynch. South Side. 412-431-4950.

CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Silent Partner. Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. DV8 ESPRESSO BAR & GALLERY. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Major League, Egality, Xavier in the Doghouse, Have Mercy, Seaway, Better Off, w/ comedian Philbot the Destroyer. Our Family Portrait Michael Graves, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. Children of October. South Side. THE GREY BOX THEATRE. 412-431-4668. Moreland & Arbuckle. STAGE AE. Rebelution, Cris Bad. Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. North Side. 412-229-5483. HAMBONE’S. Filthy Low THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jazzam. Down, The Torn Part Hearts, Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. the Dovewires. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. 31ST STREET PUB. Lonely Josh Hill Band, Big Gypsy, Teardrops, Crooked Cobras, Nic Lawless. Bloomfield. Weapons of Choice. Strip 412-682-0320. District. 412-391-8334. JERGEL’S RHYTHM ALTAR BAR. Fungus, GRILLE. The The Elliotts. Strip Clintones. Warrendale. www. per District. 412-263-2877. pa 724-799-8333. pghcitym ANDY WARHOL .co KENDREW’S. KardaZ. MUSEUM. Julianna 724-375-5959. Barwick. North Side. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 412-237-8300. The Nox Boys, A Lovely Crisis, BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Face Box, Chase The Monkey, Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. Pachyderm. Millvale. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound 866-468-3401. Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. 412-362-1250. East End Dukes. Greensburg. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. 724-836-7687. Joy Ike. Harmony. 724-400-6044. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CLUB CAFE. JD Eicher & the CONFERENCE CENTER. Skero & Goodnights, The Speedbumps Jingles. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. (Early) Driftwood, The Wreckids

SAT 08

FULL LIST ONLINE

(Late). Pittsburgh CD Release. South Side. 412-431-4950. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Ray Lanich Band. South Side. 412-431-4090. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Tatsuya Nakatani, Mike Tamburo. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Southside American, Fedora the Explorer. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Big Eyed Phish: The Dave Matthews Tribute. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. Platinum. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Don’t Trust Larry, The Dovewires, Roulette Waves, The Neffs, Ex Planets. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Phase IV. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Ross. MARS BREW HOUSE. Ray Lanich. Mars. 724-625-2555. MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Liz Berlin, Willful Souls, Jude Benedict, Ben Shannon, Kelly Zullo. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PIZON’S. Shotgun Jack. 724-677-2737. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603.

MP 3 MONDAY INFLUX

Each week, we bring you a new track from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Influx; stream or download “Scumnegie” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Gone South. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Softwinds. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Dave Hause, Northcote The Lower Eastside Connection, Christiane Leach, Billy Pilgrim, Velvet Heat, Nina Demeter, Reggie Watkins, more. Pop Hop Pittsburgh Showcase. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. G. Love & Special Sauce, Kristy Lee. North Side. 412-229-5483. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Zion Cross. 724-789-7858. TOMASINO’S. Speakeasy Alley. 724-265-1166. THE WAC CLUB. Daniels & McClain. Clairton.

SUN 09

instruments!) and one of the world’s most exciting trumpeters are throwing a New Orleans style party in Pittsburgh! Bring your handkerchief or something to wave for the “second line” party in the Cabaret. Stop what you are doing and make sure you get a ticket.

FRI 07

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Tropical/ global bass party. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LEVEL 20 SPORTS LOUNGE. DJ Twan, DJ J.R. Bethel Park. 414-595-7953. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Good Vibes Coalition. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. REX THEATER. MartyParty, Joker. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

CLUB CAFE. Peter Mulvey, The Damaged Pies. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Chris Hannigan, Morgan Erina, Jeremy Caywood. Lawrenceville. BRILLOBOX. Title 412-681-4318. Town Soul & Funk w. w w ROCK ROOM. er Party. Rare Soul, hcitypap g p Anthophobic, Liquified .com Funk & wild R&B Guts, Torn Off, DJ Mike 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. Bolamite. Polish Hill. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-683-4418. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Korby THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Lenker, Scott & Rosanna, Fry Jones. DJ Billy Pilgrim. Lawrenceville. Garfield. 412-361-2262. 412-904-2915. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. ALTAR BAR. Caroline Glaser, 707-480-8208. Kris Allen Kris Allen. Strip District. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. 412-263-2877. South Side. 412-431-2825. HARD ROCK CAFE. Richie S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Ramone. Station Square. 412-481-7227. 412-481-7625.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 08

MON 10 PRESENTED BY

TUE 11

proudly presents

WED 12

ALTAR BAR. Yuna. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Love Letters. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992. CLUB CAFE. Savannah Smith, Todd Edwards, Ian Tepper. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Teddy Geiger. Station Square. 412-481-7625. STAGE AE. moe. North Side. 412-229-5483.

Be immersed in a live laser ase light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! They’re back! Laser Michael Jackson & Laser Zeppelin

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

DJS THU 06 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. J. Malls. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. LAVA LOUNGE. Emo Night 4teen. South Side. 412-431-5282. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

SUN 09

PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

TUE 11 CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. DJ Phinesse. Reggae, dancehall, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

WED 12 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 08

CJ’S. Top Flight Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377. SMILING MOOSE. Kid A, Howard Alexander III, Reverrb, J Steez, more. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SUN 09 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jonathan Jon Quest Brown, Noetik Five Thousand. Service Industry

Night Open Mic. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

BLUES THU 06 MOONDOG’S. Tinsley Ellis. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 07 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400. THE R BAR.32-20 Blues Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 08 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Gary Prisby & Matt Barranti. 724-433-1322. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Pawnbrokers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SUN 09 MOONDOG’S. Tommy Castro. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ THU 06 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 07

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8 p.m. dance lesson 9pm dancing. Dwayne Dolphin & The Piccolo Bass Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Arturo Sandoval. North Side. 412-322-1773. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Kevin M. McManus & the Pittsburgh Trombone Project. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 08

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884.


SUMMER SPECIALS AT HEINZ HALL

OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Hamilton Ave. Greensburg. 724-836-7687.

WED 12 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but they might just be worth a road trip!

COUNTRY THU 06

MORGANTOWN, W.VA.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

{SUN., FEB. 09}

FRI 07

On sale February 10 at 9 A.M.

s d l o f n e b

MOONDOG’S. The Mavens. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

Valerie June

with Angelique Kidjo

SAT 08

WVU Creative Arts Center

MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL. Steeltown. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. NIED’S HOTEL. Iron City Slickers. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Marshall Lowry Band. Washington.

PHILADELPHIA {SUN., MARCH 23}

Dum Dum Girls Johnny Brenda’s

CLASSICAL

CLEVELAND

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: THE PLANETS W/ NASA FILM. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Ringo Starr th

and his 12 All Starr Band Jacobs Pavilion Nautica

SUN 09 EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

WED 12 ANDYS. Daniel May & Nathan May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Mystic Knights. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

THU 06 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Sputzy. Washington.

FRI 07

TUE 11

SAT 08

ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Womack Family Band. Harmony. 724-452-0539. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

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OPUS II STRING ORCHESTRA. Disney Classics. Beulah Presbyterian Church. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: THE PLANETS W/ NASA FILM. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

W DV E PR ESENTS THE

SUN 09 CARNEGIE MELLON WIND ENSEMBLE. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 412-268-2383. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: THE PLANETS W/ NASA FILM. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

per for ming windbor ne’s

MON 10 ADAM LIU, CELLO & DAVID ALLEN WEHR, PIANO. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080.

ACOUSTIC

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

MON 10

MEDIA SPONSORS

SAT 08

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Ortner-Marcinzyn Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Jim Relja & Texas Tex. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. 724-265-1181. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Jay Wiley. Sewickley. 412-741-5804.

.M. P 0 3 : 7 e 17, n u J , y Tuesda

FRI 07

{SUN., JUNE 29}

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Vince Agwada. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RESTAURANT ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Stranger Convention, Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

WITH THE

OTHER MUSIC THU 06 DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

FRI 07 NIED’S HOTEL. Mr. “S”: A Frank Sinatra Tribute. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

SUN 09

MEDIA SPONSORS

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Pittsburgh Gospel Choir. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

June 24, 7:30 P.M.

MON 10 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Club: Jazz Standards & Showtunes. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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DOWNLOAD THE FUN AND FREE CP HAPPS APP FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES! The event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location. With the FREE CP HAPPS APP, you can bookmark your favorite events, invite friends and make plans, all in a private, personalized environment. Follow the five easy steps below to start using the FREE CP HAPPS APP today.

DOWNLOAD NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

LOCATE VENUES, EVENTS & BUY TICKETS WITHIN THE APP

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

February 5 - 11 WEDNESDAY 52

pittsburghmusicals.com/ tix-shrek. Through Feb. 16.

North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests IWRESTLEDABEARONCE, Oceano & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Greg Warren

G. Love & Special Sauce

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 18 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through Feb. 9.

PHOTO CREDIT: ZACK SMITH

Chimaira

Amon Amarth

Galactic MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Ryan Montbleau. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Emancipator Ensemble REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 17 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 63 Shrek The Musical

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets:

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Enslaved & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 7:30p.m.

Artist Talk: Zoe Strauss CMA THEATER, CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. Free event. For more info visit cmoa.org. 6:30p.m.

Joe Nichols & Uncle Kracker

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 MR. SMALLS THEATRE

412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

FRIDAY 74

Rebelution

Paradise Fears

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Sunderland. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Resurrection Anti Valentines Day 3

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest The Stickers & The Joseph Sisters. All ages

Fungus Grateful Dead Tribute Band ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Cris Cab. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 8p.m.

SUNDAY 96

SATURDAY 85

WOOD STREET GALLERIES Downtown. 412-456-6666. Free and open to the public. Through April 6.

SOUND SERIES: Julianna Barwick

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. No cover. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 11

Wycliffe Gordon & Sean Jones New Orleans Party CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Mamma Mia! HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Feb. 16.

Kris Allen

Structures of Time and Space

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM

ALTAR BAR Strip District.

AcoustiCafe Open Stage

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Kristy Lee. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 8p.m.

GALACTIC

show. Tickets: ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

MONDAY 10

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Caroline Glaser & Nick Barilla. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To ďŹ nd the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

SPIN

at the Waterfront SIERRA

108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

JADE TIDAL

www.gordonshoes.com

BLOOM

Facebook.com/GordonShoes N E W S

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FOUND ART {BY AL HOFF}

A POTENT REMINDER THAT LITTLE IN THE PUBLIC ARENA THESE DAYS OCCURS UNDOCUMENTED

Art is often among the casualties of war, whether the destruction is willful or collateral. And so it was during World War II, when much of Europe — with its vast repositories of public and private art — was a battlefield. Then there were the Nazis, who valued classical art enough to loot it on a massive scale.

TRUE STORIES

Whose art? Matt Damon and Cate Blanchett

How some of this endangered art was saved and located is the focus of George Clooney’s dramedy, The Monuments Men. Set in 1944, it takes a fairly leisurely spin in which a specially tasked group of U.S. soldiers try to locate lost artwork before it is lost to the chaos of the war’s wind-down. (The story is based on real events, also covered in the 2007 documentary The Rape of Europa.) Despite a death or two, Monuments feels more like a low-key caper, with the horrors of war a distant background; it’s enjoyable enough, but there are few surprises — either because you know your history, or because the story hits every expected beat. It’s buoyed almost entirely by its crowd-pleasing cast, in which each actor furnishes a signature performance: dapper Clooney, capable Matt Damon, sharp Cate Blanchett, and deadpan comic-reliefers John Goodman, Bill Murray and Bob Balaban. Even our Allies are familiar souls: Frenchman Jean Dujardin (The Artist) and for the British, Hugh Bonneville, of Downton Abbey. Starts Fri., Feb. 9 AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Build it and they will come! Action Lego guys and gals fight a tyrant (also Lego-based) in this animated action comedy, sort of made from Legos.

The Lego Movie,

directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, features the voices of Chris Pratt, Will Arnett and Elizabeth Banks, plus zillions of digitally animated Legos. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Feb. 7.

{BY AL HOFF}

A

Oscar docs (from top, clockwise): “The Lady in Number 6,” “Prison Terminal,” “Karama Has No Walls” and “Facing Fear”

COMMON thread does run through the five short films nominated for .Best Short Documentary at the 2014 Academy Awards. Each tells of individuals who have persevered, driven by an internal compass that assures them their pursuit is righteous. A remarkable example of carrying on cheerfully is that of concert pianist Alice Herz Sommer, whose life is recounted in Malcolm Clarke’s “The Lady in Number 6” (Canada, 38 min.). Born in Vienna in 1903, Sommer played her way through the Holocaust, when assigned to a concentration camp where the prisoners provided entertainment for the Nazis. She survived, convinced that life would always be filled with joy. Indeed, the lively 109-year-old Sommer revels in the uplifting power of music, and still plays piano effortlessly. Jack Hall is another World War II survivor, but his life devolved into alcoholism and violence. Now 82, he’s serving a life sentence for murder at an Iowa prison. He’s also dying: “I’ll get out of here one of these days — in a box.” Edgar Barens’

“Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall” (USA, 40 min.) uses Hall as the focal point to examine the utility and humanity of the prison’s hospice ward. It provides Hall with comfort, though perhaps not as much as the lifers who voluntarily staff it — murderers redeemed through caring for their own.

OSCAR-NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS Feb. 7-9 and Feb. 14-16 Melwood Screening Room

CP APPROVED A life after violence is also the focus of Jason Cohen’s “Facing Fear” (USA, 23 min.). As a homeless gay 13-year-old in Los Angeles, Tim was severely beaten by some skinhead punks. By chance, years later, he encounters his assailant, Matthew, and the film shows the two embarking on a mutual healing process. In “Karama Has No Walls” (Yemen, U.K. and UAE; 26 min.), director Sara Ishaq

interviews participants (including citizen cameramen) in a 2011 political rally in Sana’a, Yemen, that turned deadly. She stitches together raw (and disturbing) footage, with first-person accounts of the demonstration and its bloody aftermath. A less-covered corner of the Arab Spring, but another potent reminder that little in the public arena these days occurs undocumented. On a lighter note is Ra Paulette’s quixotic pursuit to hand-dig elaborate caves out of New Mexican sandstone. They are more like gorgeous underground houses, replete with sun roofs, wall art and built-ins. But as Jeffrey Karoff’s “Cavedigger” (USA, 39 min.) explains, little about Ra’s work has been easy, taking a toll on his relationships and taxing his spirit. The caves, however, are simply amazing. All the shorts are straightforward presentations, good stories immeasurably enhanced by visuals, whether it be Sommer’s knotted fingers, blood spilling from a protester’s head, the sunlight in Ra’s cave or the look of fear on a tough guy’s face as his life ebbs away. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

MAIDENTRIP. At 14 years old, Laura Dekker set out on a two-year journey, hoping to be the youngest person to sail around the world alone. Her feat is the focus of Jillian Schlesinger’s new documentary. 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7; 4 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8; and 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Hollywood

The Pretty One (2014

2/5 @ 7:30pm - When a woman’s identical, prettier twin sister dies, the woman assumes her sister’s identity.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Labor Day is tough, and the countryside still harbors damage from the war, both physical (unexploded bombs) and psychic (traumatized survivors, and perhaps even ghosts). Things go increasingly wrong for 10-year-old Ahlo (Sitthiphon Disamoe) and his kin; small wonder, since the boy is believed to be cursed. Against the odds, Ahlo — with the help of a drunken former soldier known as Uncle Purple — decides to enter a local rocket contest, in which the winner gets a The Rocket cash prize. The stakes are actually broader: It is hoped the rockets will anger the sky gods and force necessary rain upon the farming town. And for a country still struggling after war, the conversion of residual armaments into agricultural tools is both a literal and figurative swords-intoplowshares gambit. Kim Mordaunt’s sweet dramedy frequently recalls the recent stateside arthouse hit Beasts of the Southern Wild. Both feature a winsome and wise child star; emphasize communities rooted in superstition and the natural order imperiled by man-made catastrophe; and offer a lyrical mash-up of allegorical text and crowd-pleasing inspirational narrative. In Lao, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Feb. 7. Harris (AH) THAT AWKWARD MOMENT. While I’m happy Hollywood is making rom-coms featuring ditzy adorable guys instead of ditzy adorable girls, Tom Gormican’s attempt falls short of success. In the plus column, we get three good-looking and engaging actors in Michael B. Jordan, Miles Teller and Zac Efron, and some drool-worthy Manhattan real estate. But the plot is choppy — the men secretly start relationships while pretending to be players — and the jokes are stale (Viagra boners? Really?). The whole affair is a step back for these actors, all of whom notched up good performances last year: Jordan in Fruitvale Station, Teller in the off-beat rom-com The Spectacular Now and Efron in At Any Price. Dare to travel beyond easy and expected, lads. (AH)

That Awkward Moment ROBOCOP. In the year 2028, a private corporation decides to test its part-man-partrobot law-enforcement officer on the streets of Detroit. José Padilha directs this remake of Paul Verhoeven’s 1987 dystopian classic; Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman and Michael Keaton star. Starts Wed., Feb. 12 THE ROCKET. To make way for a new hydro-electric dam, a family in Laos is forced to seek a new home in a gorgeous but harsh mountain region. Finding arable land

CP

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me 2/6 @ 7:30pm, 2/7 @ 9:15pm, 2/8 @ 7pm, 2/9 @ 2pm ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Maidentrip (2013) 2/7 @ 7pm, 2/8 @ 4pm, 2/9 @ 7pm ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Rocky Horror Picture Show 2/8 @ Midnight

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

COURT TV MEETS SPRINGER! World Premiere!

Kara Mikula | Photo: Archie Carpenter

LABOR DAY. A depressed, lonely divorcee (Kate Winslet) allows an escaped convict (Josh Brolin) to spend a long weekend with her and her 13-year-old son (Gattlin Griffith) in Jason Reitman’s drama, adapted from Joyce Maynard’s novel. Well, that sure sounds like a bad idea, but the “bad guy” turns out to be a dream date — bonding with the lad, fixing up the house and car, and making the world’s most soulful peach pie. What is a bad idea is this film: some good actors mired in a treacly mess of loopy melodrama, executed rather poorly. (The flashbacks were quite confusing.) The maligned prisoner who just needs the love of a good woman is as hoary a romantic notion as the hooker with the heart of gold who just needs to meet that good man. This might have been an edgy story, fraught with the possibilities of terrible things happening when vulnerable people face a crisis. But, gee whiz, everybody in this outing is so noble, so wholesome, so peachpie wonderful, that none of it makes any sense beyond being a silly love story. (Al Hoff)

NOW - April 27 -USICBY-ICHAEL+OOMANs"OOK,YRICSBY#HRISTOPHER$IMOND #ONCEIVEDAND$IRECTEDBY6AN+APLAN

412-456-6666

CLOCabaret.com

Groups 412-325-1582

THE CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE IS A PROJECT OF THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

FRIDAY FEB 14 · 8PM SATURDAY FEB 15 ·2&8PM

Orchestra $49, $39; Loge $49 Balcony $39, $33

VAMPIRE ACADEMY. If you still have any interest in hot young vampires, Mark Waters’ pulper about a girls’ school for vampires and dhampirs (halfvamp, half-human) might be diverting. Starts Fri., Feb. 7.

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org

REPERTORY

PalacePA

FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

THE PRETTY ONE. Jenée LaMarque directs this comedy in which a woman assumes the identity of her twin sister after her death. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 5. Hollywood MOULIN ROUGE. Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman star in this razzmatazz 2001 musical, CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

set in the fabled Parisian nightclub and scored with modern pop songs. Baz Luhrmann directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 5. AMC Loews. $5

short, marked by strong black-and-white visuals, climaxes in a dance battle. 8 p.m. Tue., Feb. 11 (reception at 7 p.m.). Melwood. $5. 412-681-9500 (Bill O’Driscoll)

TWIN PEAKS: FIRE WALK WITH ME. David Lynch directs this 1992 film, a prequel to the events of the Twin Peaks TV show. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 6; 9:15 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7; 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8; and 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Hollywood KULTUR SHOCK! In this locally produced film directed by Todd Osleger, three strangers are mysteriously imprisoned in a single room filled with random knick-knacks, unable to recall who they are or how they got there. Even more baffling, the three — known only by their armband colors “Red,” “White” and “Blue” — appear at the mercy of an Uncle Sam doll, from which a German-accented voice leads them in bizarre instructions. That is, until Blue decides he’s had enough. At the Friday screening, the film will be stopped near the end and audience members can write down their guess for the final twist, with prizes awarded. After the film, guesses will be discussed with the director and producer Eric Paul Chapman during a Q&A. Friday ticketholders are also invited back to Saturday night’s screening for free to see if the clues add up. 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7, and 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. $5 A NIGHT AT THE OPERA. In Sam Woods’ 1935 comedy, the Marx Brothers get mixed up in the opera business. Barrooms still echo with arguments over whether Night or the earlier Duck Soup is the best Marx Brothers movie, but suffice it to say, this gleeful, anarchic romp through the stuffy, high-culture world of opera is deliriously funny. Argument No. 2: Just how many folks can fit in a ship stateroom the size of a closet? The film

CP

CASABLANCA. For Valentine’s Day week, settle into this classic 1942 romance from Michael Curtiz, in which two lovers — Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman — are torn apart by World War II, only to reunite in Morocco under complicated circumstances. Shot in luminous blackand-white, each tiny detail of this precisely crafted, ensemble-acted film is a joy to behold. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 12. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

CP

Kultur Shock! opens a Sunday-night series of classic comedies. 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Regent Square (AH) FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent film showcases diverse short work by three artists. Author and filmmaker Hannah Dobbz’s “Squat or Rot: A Squatter’s Highlight Reel” combines sequences from three documentaries about New York City squatters, dating from the 1980s and ’90s. The videos (one narrated by Ed Asner) are sympathetic to squatters, and ask such pointed questions as whether “gentrification” should be renamed “displacement,” and why talk of homelessness

never interrogates the workings of the real-estate market, like competition between poor people and speculators. Three shorts by Justin Crimone include: “The Brazen Kitchen,” a local cooking show; the barroom comedy “Annie’s Birthday”; and “Spirit House,” Crimone’s taut entry in the 48 Hour Horror Film Project, about a house-sitting gig gone supernaturally awry. Also screening is J. Shanks Kindlon’s dreamlike “Vocabulary of the Mysteries,” which remixes Greek mythology to give Hephaestus, rebel outcast son of Zeus, a robot girlfriend and a platter full of wicked beats. The 20-minute

PITTSBURGH EXTREME RADICAL VIDEO (P.E.R.V.). This screening event commemorates the two-year anniversary of the city’s own microcinema group, Pittsburgh Extreme Radical Video (a.k.a. P.E.R.V.). The program includes works by contemporary local and international videomakers, such as: Gena Salorino, Matt Greenwood, Elijah Paul Crampton & Felix Lee, Kyle Van Noy, Michael J. Maraden, Rem Lezar, Justin Taylor, Christine Hertzel, Joshua Rievel, Joseph L. Flatley, Hayley Notter, and Commodore Gilgamesh & SICH MANG. Complimentary food and beer, while supplies last. 8 p.m. (7 p.m. reception). Wed., Feb. 12. Melwood. $5. More info at the Facebook event page ADULT WORLD. A Stanford graduate feels she is destined to be a great poet, but winds up working in an adult bookstore. Emma Roberts, Evan Peters and John Cusack star in Scott Coffey’s new comedy. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 13. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, N orth Side. www.warhol.org

Artist Talk Zoe Strauss Thursday, February 6 6:30–7:30 p.m. Strauss discusses her project in Homestead and her multifaceted artistic practice that focuses on the unseen or forgotten people and places of urban America. Free; reception with cash bar follows.

Sponsored by

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.


[ART REVIEW]

“IT MADE ME WANT TO CUT APART THE DANCE STEPS AND PHRASES MORE THAN I NORMALLY WOULD.”

WALKABOUT {BY MICHELLE FRIED}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PITTSBURGH JE T’AIME continues through Feb. 21. (Closing reception: 5:30 p.m. Mon., Feb. 17.) Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. 412-681-5449 or www.pittsburgharts.org N E W S

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OBUZOR

LEAPS IN

[DANCE]

Photo by Hilary Robinson

Pittsburgh je t’aime, at Pittsburgh Filmmakers Gallery, is a collection of more than 100 small photographic prints by Londonbased art theorist and former Carnegie Mellon College of Fine Arts Dean Hilary Robinson. In her artist statement, Robinson writes that she used “different generations of iPhone” to capture scenes mainly in Lawrenceville on her “regular walks ... between 36th Street and 48th Street.” This collection of urban still-lifes encounter Lawrenceville’s photogenic strangeness where cement, plant life and humans clash. But as the title suggests, Pittsburgh je t’aime also reads like a pictorial love letter, as Robinson uses warm-blooded point-of-view angles and a devotion to detail. Humans are mostly absent, except in the stuff they leave behind — the heliumspent balloon, the deserted couch, the snuffed fire pit on a riverside cement slab, the mawkish graffiti. Robinson herself makes an occasional appearance, mostly in a series where she cradles small found objects in her hand: bizarre pieces of metal like tokens of industrial fallout; a cat whisker. Given Robinson’s palpable fondness for the city and knack for composition, the photos are charming, especially when spontaneous: birds lifting in a goldenhour sky bordered by our prized rustic landscape, or brilliant natural mishaps like snow caught in sapling branches, replicating the shapes of leaves long fallen. To its utter disadvantage, however, the smartphone as an artistic tool necessarily competes with “feed overload,” a product of both the device’s own ubiquity and the tendency to overshare online. This “eye of the smartphone” aesthetic has been hijacked as visual currency in social media, and its prevalance menaces this artwork, making it beg for an imaginative upper hand, even more so within a brick-andmortar gallery. Pittsburgh je t’aime traps me between social-media-induced anxiety that “everything is boring” and art that emanates good ol’ comforting sincerity. Because unlike the attention-deficit woes of Instagram, a must-read is Robinson’s printed and mounted artist statement (the largest piece in the show) recalling a childhood memory of her great-uncle Jesse, a gamekeeper who daily walked a 10-mile perimeter of the estate he tended. Robinson remembers these walks and Jesse’s oral/visual mapping of the territory — an interaction that inspires this work. With this, Robinson has me longing for what’s missing, and it’s not the image. It’s the story told, the human.

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

Fast-rising local dance talent Alan Obuzor is preparing to premiere his new work “Looking Back and Moving Forward.”

E

VER SINCE Alan

Obuzor was young, his mother, Marjorie Liese, encouraged her children to try different things. Having enrolled Alan and his three sisters in gymnastics at Gymkhana, in Point Breeze, Liese had them also try dance classes at a studio in the same building. The move would change Obuzor’s life. “After my first ballet class, I told my mother I wanted to be a dancer when I grew up,” says Obuzor. He was 9. Unlike most childhood dreams that fade over time, Obuzor’s became only more vivid. By age 11, he was studying at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. At 17, he joined Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, and he danced professionally with the troupe for seven years until recurring knee injuries

forced him to depart in 2007. While Obuzor’s knees might have hindered the progress of his dance career, they didn’t halt it. THE KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER PRESENTS

FRESH WORKS: ALAN OBUZOR WITH ANQWENIQUE WINGFIELD 8 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

That lesson about trying different things led him to take up teaching dance.

He has taught at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School, is currently on faculty at Pittsburgh Youth Ballet, and teaches at Studio 19 Dance Complex in North Hills. The penchant for new experiences also led him become a choreographer when, in 2002, he created a work with fellow PBT company member Julia Erickson for the company’s annual Dancer’s Trust benefit concert. “After I had stopped dancing at PBT, I realized I still wanted to dance,” says Obuzor. “I needed to have a different environment where I could dance healthily.” It was then, Obuzor explains, that he began thinking of starting his own dance company. “I thought if I had my own company I could pursue my own CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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choreography and dance as much or as little as my body would allow, plus I could also teach other dancers and learn from them,â&#x20AC;? he says. So in 2011, Obuzor founded Texture Contemporary Ballet, for which he is now best known. In 2013, the group was named as one Dance Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top 25 to Watch nationally. A proliďŹ c choreographer, Obuzor has created more than 25 new ballets for Texture, including Takeâ&#x20AC;Ś Takenâ&#x20AC;Ś Taking, which will world-premiere at New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alvin Ailey Citigroup Theater on Feb. 27. The company has appeared at the prestigious Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pillow Dance Festival and New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s White Wave DUMBO Dance Festival. Textureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than 30 productions in the Pittsburgh area have included Septemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nearly Wild, which featured Obuzor and Kelsey Bartmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wistful â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken Flow,â&#x20AC;? set to music by Cleveland rapper Kid Cudi. When Obuzor was chosen recently to be a part of the Kelly-Strayhorn Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fresh Works series, it seemed a natural ďŹ t. The program is an incubator and creative laboratory for Pittsburgh-based artists focused on new approaches to dance, and on making connections between dance and other disciplines. Obuzor was given 80 hours in The Alloy Studios, in Friendship, to create a new dance work in collaboration with local vocalist Anqwenique WingďŹ eld. The fruits of their labor, the 25-minute â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking Back and Moving Forward,â&#x20AC;? will be performed this Friday at The Alloy Studios.

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Obuzor says he chose to work with WingďŹ eld after becoming familiar with her talents at a few shows where both she and Texture performed. WingďŹ eld, accompanied by a keyboardist and possibly a percussionist, will provide the music for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking Back and Moving Forward,â&#x20AC;? singing a mix of contemporary soul and jazz standards including Billy Strayhornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lush Lifeâ&#x20AC;? and Sadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cherish the Day.â&#x20AC;? The pairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residency, which began in January, also presented Obuzor with another new challenge, in that the songs WingďŹ eld would sing had yet to be chosen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought it would be interesting to begin choreographing movement to completely different music and then transfer it onto the songs we would ultimately be using,â&#x20AC;? says Obuzor. Obuzor says he found the process of piecing together the movement he created onto different songs intriguing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It made me want to cut apart the dance steps and phrases more than I normally would and presented me with another tool to use in my choreographic process,â&#x20AC;? says Obuzor. The abstract ballet will feature ďŹ ve of Textureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dancers, including Obuzor and associate artistic director Bartman. And while the ballet has no narrative, Obuzor says, he had in mind as its driving force that of getting to a point in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life â&#x20AC;&#x153;when you just stop and reďŹ&#x201A;ect on the really memorable moments in your life.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a theme that Obuzor, 31, can himself now appreciate, recalling that ďŹ rst ballet class and his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lesson about trying new things.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I NEEDED TO HAVE A DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENT WHERE I COULD DANCE HEALTHILY.â&#x20AC;?

FEBRUARY 15 ď&#x161;ş MARCH 2 Thursday, Friday, Saturday at 7:30pm Saturday and Sunday at 3pm Tickets $20 (group rates for 10 and more)

EMAIL: davidkelly@edenbridgephotography.com PHONE: 412.860.8279

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I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

10-=@,=D!x3049E3,77 ?=@>?,=?>:=2x-:C:114.0,??30,?0=><@,=0 $$x2=:@;>?4.60?>"!$

PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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“A MASH-UP OF ALL THINGS SULTRY!” — NEW YORK POST

ONE WEEKEND…FOUR SHOWS ONLY! Bill Shannon’s Fragmentation Series: Live

[ART REVIEW]

FRAGMENTS {BY LEO HSU} A HUNDRED YEARS after Picasso and

Braque introduced cubism, challenging the idea that painters should describe their subjects from a single point of perception, Bill Shannon has extended cubist principles by using 21st-century technologies. Pittsburgh-based Shannon is internationally known for his skateboarding and hip-hop movement-based work, which he performs on crutches due to a degenerative hip disease. Some of that work is referenced in Make Moves, at the Irma Freeman Center. But this solo exhibition focuses on recent work in which Shannon grapples with materials — the remains of infrastructure, the human body, substances that cannot be recycled, but that can be reused — and reshapes them in ways both surprising and appropriate.

MAKE MOVES

continues through the Fri., Feb. 7, closing reception. Irma Freeman Center, 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org

In Shannon’s Fragmentation Series: Live installation, an unclothed model stands a few feet from a “tree” of video cameras and projectors. Video images of different parts of her body are projected onto an assembly of transparent holoscreens, canted at angles to create a video

representation of the human figure. The holoscreens have a futuristic feel, suggesting how our screen-oriented identities are neither solidified nor fluid. The screens float in the darkened room, offering a mediated experience contrasting with the physical presence of the nearby model. Our cultural teaches us to understand individuals as whole, complete and constant. But like the cubists, Shannon emphasizes our complexity and our multiple facets; we know one another by our parts. Scale is mismatched; limbs meet in impossible ways. Shannon adds the dimension of time: Our identities are both complex and elusive. The model’s movements break down across screens, moving in different directions, at different speeds. Moments of beauty emerge as different parts converge harmoniously and unexpectedly. Other works eulogize a broken, threatened world. Using found objects, the familiar textures and terrains of Western Pennsylvania are reconfigured into monuments of rusting metal and broken wood. Shannon has a strong instinct for shaping our associations with these materials into language. “Abstract Landscape” could be a tableau of a post-apocalyptic city that feels too familiar to be about the future; “Here Lies Water” mourns the loss of the purity of our water, contaminated by radiation and methane. The works’ solemnity is offset by pixie-like sculptural figures that appear throughout the gallery. Whimsy, rather than detracting from gravitas, invites reflection.

FEBRUARY 13–15, 2014

UNDIE-ROCK AND COMEDY-POP DUO

THE SKIVVIES Award-winning NYC singer-actors Lauren Molina and Nick Cearley perform “stripped down” arrangements of distinctive mash-ups and originals.

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Theater that moves you.

Through February

B Y J .T R O G E R S

DIRECTED BY SHEILA MCKENNA

S TA R R I N G H E L E N A R U O T I , L A R R Y J O H N M E Y E R S , A N D M E L I N DA H E L F R I C H

16 A mystery, a ghost story, a memory play...

THE CARLYLE, DOWNTOWN 306 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 For directions, dining options, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com or call 412.362.1713

SwanLake WITH THE ORCHESTRA

[PLAY REVIEWS]

TRAPPINGS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} SEX. DEATH. Classical mythology. What’s

not to love about Quantum Theatre’s production of J.T. Rogers’ Madagascar? It’s a deliciously malicious romp through the layers of tragedy and mystery in a family both Sophocles and Tennessee Williams would recognize. (No spoilers coming.) Vast swaths of white fabric envelop the pathway to the stage in what remains of the one-time Union National Bank (now being redeveloped into the Carlyle Condominiums). The sense of faded grandeur, the obsolete opulence, is intensified by the set: a hotel room in Rome overlooking the Spanish Steps. A garishly carved wooden bed. More white drapings. The three remaining marble columns of the 1906-built bank. While the space is roomy, Madagascar is intimate. Sheila McKenna directs a perfect cast whose players occupy the same hotel room but at different times, successfully weaving threads of character and plot into a cohesive, compelling tale. It’s all the more remarkable in that these characters occupy the far end of the sympathetic-repulsive spectrum. The result is rather like being fascinated by a beautiful, poisonous snake. That’s an apt description of the matriarch. Lilian wavers between comparing herself to Persephone, goddess of the Underworld, and her mother, Demeter, goddess of the Harvest. Helena Ruoti blends well-bred charm with un-self-conscious evil, ably portraying the dark appetites behind Lilian’s cultured mask. She occupies the still-posh hotel room five years ago — i.e., at the end of the 20th century according to the 2004 play.

MADAGASCAR

TICKETS: 412.456.6666 ONLINE: PBT.ORG

,"1*-Ê"Ê£äʳÊ-6 Ê1*Ê/"Êxä¯ÊÊUÊÊ \Ê{£Ó°{x{°™£ä£Ê",Ê \,"1*- -J*//- 1,  /°",

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are the father-husband and, especially, the brother-son — offstage but quite central to the drama. Larry John Meyers dynamically portrays the outsider, the catalyst who both causes and unveils many of the family’s cataclysms. Yes, he is part of one romantic triangle, but there are plenty of polygons and other geometries in Madagascar’s various relationships.

IT’S A DELICIOUSLY MALICIOUS ROMP THROUGH LAYERS OF FAMILIAR TRAGEDY AND MYSTERY.

continues through Feb. 22. Quantum Theatre at the Carlyle, Fourth Avenue and Wood Street, Downtown. $36-46. 888-718-4253 or www.quantumtheatre.com

FEB. 13-16, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Melinda Helfrich (left) and Helena Ruoti in Quantum’s Madagascar

Her daughter June has spent her life longing for, well, a life. Melinda Helfrich takes us through a charged childhood, tangled with memories of her mother, into a stunted, almost Glass Menagerielevel, adulthood. The tableaux of mother and daughter are stunning in their similarities and differences. And then there

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CAPTIVES {BY COLETTE NEWBY}

E.M. LEWIS’ Heads, now at The REP, seeks

to capture the experience of being held prisoner in a basement by strangers you can’t even look at, set in the first year of the U.S. occupation of Iraq. The actors know what they’re doing, and respect the situation’s gravitas. In particular, James FitzGerald’s performance, as a prisoner held captive much longer than any of the others, is a treat to watch — assuming it can be called a “treat” to observe a starving man without hope of seeing his family again. FitzGerald spends most of the show playing off of his British cellmate, portrayed by Diana Ifft. Tony Bingham and Patrick Cannon, meanwhile, appear as a second duo that rarely interacts with the other pair.


This play is written well and the actors are great. If you want to see character studies of civilian wartime prisoners, there are no equals. However, Heads continues what seems to be a trend with REP productions this season (as with Soldier’s Heart): the overuse of projected video.

HEADS

continues through Feb. 16. Pittsburgh Playhouse Studio Theater, 222 Craft Ave, Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

subtitles and presumably didn’t provide much more to chew on for Arab speakers. Most of the clips are even less effective; some feature footage of deserts and children — images which seem deadset on eliminating the claustrophobia the play was written to evoke. At some point in the theater world, Aristotle’s unities were tossed in favor of aping montage techniques better suited to cinema. For a company run by a university’s drama program, employing such talented people, it seems a shame to see so little faith in the actors. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Director John Shepard falls into a common trap by not trusting the great performances he drew out. Instead, he shoehorns in a projector screen — American theater’s heavy-handed equivalent of old superhero-comic narration. In an early scene, for instance, a character mentions their captors filming a hostage video listing their demands. We’re then treated to one such video, presumably because this show’s target audience is sheltered middle-schoolers who haven’t seen such productions ad infinitum through the tackiness of cable news. The live actors already have described the video using the ancient technique of dialogue, while the video itself had no

LAX COMPANY {BY TED HOOVER} SEVERAL DECADES ago, an actor named

George Furth wrote 11 one-acts for actress Kim Stanley. Anthony Perkins, who was thinking about directing them, asked Stephen Sondheim for his opinion. Sondheim asked director Hal Prince what he thought … and Prince surprised everyone by saying it should be a musical. It was Prince’s idea to boil down the scripts to the story of five married couples as seen through the eyes of their friend, the persistently single Bobby. And that’s how

the Sondheim/Furth musical Company came into being in 1970. From the start, it was a problematic show. (Variety said “it’s for ladies’ matinees, homos and misogynists.”) Bobby, originally conceived as a cipher, became the show’s focus … but how do you create a musical with an unknowable central character? If the show didn’t feature such an amazing, powerhouse Sondheim score, I doubt anyone would have tried very hard to answer that question. But it is Sondheim, so people will keep trying. Ted Pappas is the latest to scale the mountain, with his production at the Pittsburgh Public Theater.

problems who, every now and again, sing a gorgeous song. The problem is that Company is, in fact, a deeply cynical work about stunted, compartmentalized and/ or dysfunctional emotion. Famous for being Broadway’s first plotless musical, the show is a nonlinear commentary on existential loneliness. But Pappas and company are looking to create a fun world onstage and invite the audience in. It’s an interesting effort which, unfortunately, doesn’t pan out. As mentioned above, I don’t think there’s ever been a completely successful production, but this Public outing feels toothless and more than a little forced. And perplexing, too … with choreography from the ’60s, lingo from the ’70s, and everyone carrying a cellphone. But I do want to mention Hannah Shankman’s pitch-perfect performance as Martha, and her powerful rendition of “Another Hundred People.” And then there’s Courtney Balan, playing Amy; she takes the already show-stopping “Getting Married Today” and launches it into the stratosphere: a thrilling theatrical coup.

THIS PUBLIC OUTING FEELS TOOTHLESS AND MORE THAN A LITTLE FORCED.

COMPANY

continues through Feb. 23. Pittsburgh Public Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $29-60. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Pappas’ goal, I’d say, has been to direct and choreograph as accessible a version as possible. The characters are chummy and charming people with quirky

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DEAF HIP HOP ARTIST LIVE AND IN CONCERT

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FOR THE WEEK OF

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

FEB. 08

mama, ma ama am i clean yet?

."3$)t#&/&%6.$&/5&3 BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 53645"35403(t (30614 5*$,&54 Â&#x203A;8::<JJ@9C<J<IM@:<J8M8@C89C<Â&#x203A;

+ THU., FEB. 06 {WORDS} Slam poet Vanessa Hidary, a.k.a. â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Hebrew Mamita,â&#x20AC;? asks audiences: â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does Jewish look like to you?â&#x20AC;? For Hidary, the answer is far from simple. Her stage name mixes her Jewish heritage with her love for Puerto Rican culture. She drops verses about declining dinner dates because of Yom Kippur and asking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should I fiddle on a fucking roof for you?â&#x20AC;? She performs at the Union Project tonight, presented by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holocaust Center. Angela Suico 6:15 p.m. (VIP reception: 5:30 p.m.). 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. $15-75. 21-and-over show. 412-421-1500 or www.holocaustcenter.org

like that former mill town. Tonight, she gives a free talk about her work in the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theater space. Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Driscoll 6:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free (reception with cash bar follows). 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

{COMEDY} â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women tell me I look married,â&#x20AC;? said Greg Warren, with a shrug, on The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;II donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a compliment. I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You

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FEB. 07 + FRI., FE {ART}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LESLIE CASHEN}

{TALK} In the hallway off the Carnegie Museum of Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobby, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find Zoe Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contribution to the Carnegie International: a series of portraits of folks in Homestead, where the Philadelphia-based photographer took up residence for a couple of months. Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work focuses on unseen or forgotten people and places,

look defeated.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Warren, a quintessential regular-guy comic, has done everything from Comedy Central to BET and Country Music Television. Tonight he begins a four-night, six-performance stand at the Pittsburgh Improv. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Jan. 9. 166 E. Bridge St., W. Homestead (The Waterfront). $20. 412-462-5233 or www. pittsburgh.improv.com

Funny how the same material you use to check your teeth ch for spinach spinac can also form delicate, delicate beautiful artwork. artwo Pittsburgh Glass Center highlights its hig namesake na mediumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s m versatility in ve Halfway to Ha Somewhere, an Som exhibition featuring exhib artists-in-residence artists Granite Calimpong, of C Seattle, and Brent Rogers, Roger of Chicago. Calimpongâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Calim approach is more appro traditional, Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tradit a little littl more funky FEB. 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; think th WilliamsHelene H l Sonoma vs. Ikea. Sono Cooper The show opens s


sp otlight Art by Robert Qualters

To many locals, Bob Qualters is the quintessential Pittsburgh painter: Though the Clairton High grad traveled in his younger days, he’s been ensconced here since 1968, and his widely seen paintings, murals and installations often depict regional icons, from steel mills to Kennywood. But Vicky A. Clark says that the new Qualters retrospective she’s curated paints a bigger picture. At the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Robert Qualters: A Life includes more than 60 paintings, prints and drawings, plus photos of the venerable artist’s many public works; the collection reveals a storyteller playful enough to insert a rhinoceros into a Squirrel Hill street scene. Such dreamlike imagery is increasingly evident in Qualters’ later work, even as his once-signature use of hand-painted text wanes. True, Qualters still hews to a colorful, representional style that doesn’t always thrill critics or collectors. But Clark says people recognize their own lives in the scenes he depicts. “My hope for both the show and the book,” she says, “is that we begin to see Bob as an artist who is relating to the human condition, [rather] than Bob Qualters the Pittsburgh painter, because he is so much more than that.” Related events include the launch (on Qualters’ 80th birthday) of Clark’s book Robert Qualters: Autobiographical Mythologies, and the premiere of a new short film on Qualters. Bill O’Driscoll Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7. Exhibit continues through April 20. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $5. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

with a free reception tonight as part of Penn Avenue’s Unblurred gallery crawl. AS 6 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 20. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. 412-365-2145 or www. pittsburghglasscenter.org

of the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30.75124.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{ART}

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{CRAFTS} Don’t say we didn’t warn you: Valentine’s is just days away. Like every year, I Made It! Market responds with pop-up festival of handmade goods. On offer today inside the former Hollister store at The Waterfront is a wide range of stuff, from ceramics, jewelry and homemade jam to baby items and artistic photography books. And it’s easy to find the four dozen-some artists themselves: They’re usually

FEB. 06

Greg Warren

{MUSIC} Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra gets a little bit alchemical, then a little bit astronomical. First on this week’s program is the world premiere of The Elements. The commissioned work features a movement each by three local composers or composer teams—– Patrick Burke; Bomi Jang, Mathew Rosenblum and Amy Williams; and Reza Vali — representing earth, fire, air and water. The PSO, conducted by Manfred Honeck, also tackles Gustav Holst’s The Planets, with help from the Women

FEB. 08 Pittsburgh Pudding Wrestling Massacre

top problems right now. But shame (including the unhealthy kind) still molds individual lives. Tonight, choreographer and dancer Jasmine Hearn is joined by dancer Taylor Knight for mama, am i clean yet?, a duet with live vocal accompaniment by Anqwenique Wingfield. The show, at the intimate PearlArts Studios as part of the PearlArts Movement Residency Series, explores “the themes of shame, cleanliness, perception and wearing white.” BO 7:30 p.m. 201 N. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. $15. www.pearlartsstudios.com

{WORDS}

the folks behind the display tables. BO Noon-5 p.m. 148 W. Bridge St., W. Homestead. www.imadeitmarket.com

{DANCE} A surfeit of shame probably doesn’t rank among society’s

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McNaugher, Kristofer Collins and Lilliput’s own Don Wentworth (Pittsburgh). BO 8 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5 or covered dish. lilliputreview@gmail.com

Pissglitter Amazonian Warrior do the latter while covered in the former? If so, the Pittsburgh Pudding Wrestling Massacre is just the thing for you. This event from YinzerParty.com is in its sixth year, with past celebrity judges including Bill Peduto and Sharon Needles. Crowds at the Rex Theater will cheer and

{PUDDING WRESTLING} Do you like pudding? Wrestling? Watching women with names like Imoana

{PHOTO COURTESY OF T’RAH HOLIDAY VEAL}

Today’s kitschy web clip-art recalls yesterday’s coloring books — not least when those coloring books were the 1950s creations of artists like Florence Sarah Winship, who depicted celebs like Dinah Shore and Doris Day, and scenes of oh-socheerful domestic life. Color Me Happy is the ToonSeum’s twist: The museum has invited local comic minds including Terry Jones, Aaron Kleiber, Rob Rogers and the Arcade Comedy Theater group to write their own captions for the illos. Guests at tonight’s opening reception can caption away, too. BO 7 p.m. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-20. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

PBR will flow as 10 Pittsburgh ladies compete to win cash by pinning one another down for a count of three. AS 10 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10. www.yinzerparty.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BAKER POULSHOCK}

FEB. 06

Vanessa V Va ness nes ne ssa ssa Hidary

Tonight, Pittsburgh’s singular Lilliput Review puts poetry on the map — or maybe makes a map out of poetry — with A Confluence of Poets. The reading at ModernFormations Gallery spotlights poets from six cities, with a Rust Belt focus. Readers include: Sara Ries, of Buffalo; Chuck Joy (Erie); Diane Borsenik and John Burroughs (Cleveland); Ally Malinenko and John Grochalski (New York City); Maggie Glover (San Francisco); and Heather

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Today, Helene Cooper is a New York Times reporter covering the White House. But her story had some bumps in the road. Once a Liberian citizen sharing a lush life with her adopted sister Eunice, Cooper’s family was disrupted when they fled the 1980 coup — without Eunice. Cooper’s lauded memoir, The House at Sugar Beach, depicts her struggle to face the past and her search for her sister. She discusses her tale tonight as a speaker at the Monday Night Lectures. AS 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes. Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

+ WED., FEB. 12 {FOOD} You might have already bought a bottle of wine to mark Feb. 14 with your significant other (or maybe by yourself, in honor of Singles Awareness Day). But whether you plan to break out two wine glasses or just one, a rich cheese can make your celebration even more special. Learn the hows and whys of cheese-pairing when East End Food Co-op’s Caldwell Linker presents Romantic Cheeses, a free primer on the Co-op’s “creamy, sensuous” cheeses and the best ways to complement them. AS 7 p.m. 7516 Meade St., North Point Breeze. Free; reservations required at 412-242-3598

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

Belvederes Ultra-Dive .50

$2 16 oz. Bottles Every Friday 9-11 PM

ONE-ACTS. Presented by Stage Right. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 15. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-228-0566. COMPANY. As yet unable to make a commitment of his own, Robert supports his married friends & hears about the ups & downs of their relationships. Presented by the Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 18. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. GREASE. Presented by Shady Side Academy. Feb. 7-8, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 9, 2 p.m. Hillman Center for Performing Arts, Fox Chapel. 412-968-3040. HEADS. Story of four hostages in a war zone & how they each respond to their ordeal by making difficult choices to survive. Presented by The REP. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m.

and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 16. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE — A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. The courtroom of Judge Jackie Justice is now in session w/ “real” cases involving zombies, spaceships, furries, more. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 2 p.m. Thru April 27. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. MADAGASCAR. A haunting story about three Americans who find themselves alone in the same hotel room overlooking Rome’s Spanish Steps at three different periods in time. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 16. The Carlyle, Downtown. 412-362-1713. MAMMA MIA! Feb. 11-13, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Feb. 14, 8 p.m., Sat., Feb. 15, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 16, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

INTRODUCING OUR NEW “27“ CRAFT DRAFT SYSTEMSOCIAL HOUR MON- FRI 6pm- 8 pm. 1$ off all craft brews! Cheers! C heeerss! Ca Carm arm an and nd M Mike! ikee! 1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

THE MOUNTAINTOP. A 12 Peers Theater. Thru Feb. 8, 8 p.m., Thru Feb. 15, fictionalized portrayal of 8 p.m., Thru Feb. 18, 8 p.m. the night before Dr. Martin and Thru Feb. 26, 8 p.m. Luther King, Jr.’s assassination. Pittsburgh Playwrights Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & Theatre, Downtown. 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru WICKED. Tue-Thu, Feb. 9. City Theatre, South Side. 7:30 p.m., Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. 412-431-2489. and Sun, 1 & 6 p.m. Thru THE PREDATOR. Staged reading Feb. 9. Benedum Center, of a play by Jack Gilroy Downtown. exploring issues related 412-456-6666. to drone warfare & THE WOMEN. A the militarization commentary on of the civilian realm. the pampered Panel discussion lives & power www. per to follow. Part of a p struggles of pghcitym the Fifth Wall Series. .co various wealthy Mon., Feb. 10, 7 p.m. Manhattan socialites Bricolage, Downtown. and the gossip that 412-471-0999. propels & damages their SHREK THE MUSICAL. relationships. Fri, Sat, Presented by Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 22. Musical Theater. Thu., Feb. 6, Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 7:30 p.m., Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. 724-591-8727. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 16. YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH Byham Theater, Downtown. YOU. Madcap comedy 412-456-6666. about a family of eccentrics. UNDERNEATH THE LINTEL. Presented by the Indiana Glen Berger’s “existential Players. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and detective story.” Presented by Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 16. Philadelphia Street Playhouse. 724-464-0725.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES COMEDY THU 06

P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER (ANOTHER) EVENING OF

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 07 DAVID MICHAEL, MIKE WYSOCKI & BRAD RYAN. 9 p.m. Xlerator Bar & Grille, Beaver Falls. THE PICK-UPS IMPROV SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 08 THE AMISH MONKEYS’ VALENTINE SHOW. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. BUBBS HARRIS & J.C. RATLIFF: THE DEADBEATS OF COMEDY TOUR. Rock Room, Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. CONTINUES ON PG. 50


An Evening of Music FEBRUARY 8

Joy Ike FEBRUARY 22

VISUAL

Charlie & The Fox Trots

ART

$ $

1 Bud Light 1 Well Drinks

w/Wolf Critton MARCH 7

Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight

Bronsen Euard

MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Amalgamations. Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire. Opening reception Feb. 7, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Pixel Punks DIY Pop-Up Arcade. A showcase of deranged independent games. Opening reception: Feb. 7, 6-10 p.m. Bloomfield. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Robert Qualters: A Life. A retrospective curated by Vicky A. Clark. Opening reception: Feb. 7, 5:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-0455. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Halfway to Somewhere. Work by Granite Calimpong & Brent Rogers. Opening reception: Feb. 7, 6-9 p.m. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Feb. 7, 6-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. SLAUGHTERHOUSE GALLERY. Cemeon Larivonovoff: The Russian Icon Painter. Opening reception: Feb. 8, 6-9 p.m. Artist demo at 7:30 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-782-6474. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Double Feature. New artwork by Brian Gonnella & Sam Thorp. Opening Feb. 7, 5-7 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by

David Aschkenas. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Neverlands. Mixed media drawings by Terry Boyd. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Art. Right. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014. Feat. 130 art & literary works from grade 6-12 students around the country. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BE GALLERIES. Arcadia. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Pittsburgh at Night. Photographs by John Craig. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC. Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Oakland. 412-393-7600.

CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Beyond the Funny Pages: The works of art & life captured in comics. Black History Month exhibit of work by Orrin C. Evans, Jackie Ormes & Clarence Matthew Baker. Downtown. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Blithering Landscapes & Other Ideas. Pen, ink & colored pencil by Eric Hauser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je

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CONTINUES ON PG. 50

N E W S

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Visit All Of Our Locations

Work by Brad Heiple, from Amalgamations: Paintings by Brad Heiple & Sophia McGuire, at ModernFormations, in Garfield

NEW THIS WEEK

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

DAVID KAYE, JAY BOC, TOM MUSIAL. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Christ Lutheran Church, Forest Hills. 412-920-5653. DOC DIXON, CHRIS DUBAIL, DAN BROWN. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. East Butler Fire Hall, Butler. 412-920-5653. FATBOY: SKETCH COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE JOHN MCINTIRE DANGEROUSLY LIVE COMEDY TALK SHOW. From Watergate to Bridgegate to Ravengate: a comedic look at political scandals. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE RIDICULOUS & SUBLIME LIFE OF A SUDDENLY ELDERLY MAN. Jeff Schneider’s one-man show about comedy & life. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. WINTER COMEDY BASH W/ MATT STANTON. 7:30 p.m. Tambellini Bridgeville Restaurant, Bridgeville. 859-803-5974.

SUN 09 BONUS STAGE: IMPROV NIGHT. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

TUE 11

TJ MILLER. 8 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

WED 12 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-

VISUAL ART t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Fabrications. Group show, highlighting work by Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts students. Curated by Bonnie Gloris. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Aspect & Perception. Paintings by Micheal Madigan. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus

making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

& Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 14: Projects by

settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French

Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Nina Sowiski. Photographs. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Pop-Up Exhibition: Sam Thorp & Brian Gonnella. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

& Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as


Meissen porcelain. Butler. experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. 724-282-0123. WEST OVERTON NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to MUSEUMS. Learn about more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial demos and more. North Side. village. 724-887-7910. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. FRESH WORKS. Feat. Oakland. 412-624-6000. choreographer/dancer OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer Alan Obuzor. 8 p.m. The church features 1823 pipe Alloy Studios, Friendship. organ, Revolutionary War 412-363-3000. graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop BEDTIME STORIES: A & gardens. South Park. SEX-POSITIVE STORYSLAM, 412-835-1554. PART DEUX. Audience PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY members share up to 5 MUSEUM. Trolley rides and minutes of real-life sexy exhibits. Includes displays, adventures. Benefits walking tours, gift Planned Parenthood shop, picnic area of Western PA. and Trolley Theatre. 7-10 p.m. Brillobox, Washington. Bloomfield. 724-228-9256. 412-478-1243. PHIPPS www. per a p BIKERS SINGLES CONSERVATORY & pghcitym o .c NIGHT. Ages 35+. BOTANICAL GARDEN. Benefits Bikes4Books Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Hazelwood. 7-10 p.m. Show. 412-622-6914. 14 Over the Bar Bicycle Cafe, indoor rooms & 3 outdoor South Side. 412-381-3698. gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden 21ST ANNUAL HEARTS & Railroad. Dinosaur-themed HOPES FUNDRAISER. Auction, train display. Oakland. music, photo booth, more. 412-622-6914. Benefits Girls Hope of Pittsburgh. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball 5:30 p.m. WHIM, Station Square. museum & players club. West 412-329-7172. View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 ABSOLUTE SOCK HOP. Hors animals, including many d’oeuvres, dancing, auctions, endangered species. Highland live music, more. Benefits Park. 412-665-3639. Dreams of Hope. RACHEL CARSON www.dreamsofhope.org/swing HOMESTEAD. A Reverence 7-10 p.m. Rodef Shalom for Life. Photos and artifacts Congregation, Oakland. of her life & work. Springdale. 412-621-6566. 724-274-5459. LOCAL PEOPLE FOR RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL GLOBAL CAUSES. Hors HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits d’oeurves, live performances, on the Homestead Mill. Steel silent art auction, more. industry and community artifacts Benefits Clash International’s from 1881-1986. Homestead. programs in Ghana. 412-464-4020. www.clashinternational.org/ SENATOR JOHN HEINZ events 7-10 p.m. The Grey HISTORY CENTER. From Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. Slavery to Freedom. 412-586-7744. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role OCA LUNAR NEW YEAR in the anti-slavery movement. BANQUET. 12-course Ongoing: Western PA Sports Mandarin-style dinner, Museum, Clash of Empires, and performances by Tzu Chi exhibits on local history, more. Academy, the OCA Youth Strip District. 412-454-6000. Performance Ensemble, Tim SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS Urban from American Idol, HISTORY CENTER. Museum more. Benefits the Organization commemorates Pittsburgh of Chinese Americans. industrialists, local history. ocapghpa.org 5 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. Syria Shriners Pavilion. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. 724-274-7000. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN PRISONERS WORK PARTY. CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Read & code letters, pick Vanka Murals. Mid-20th books, pack ‘em or database century murals depicting war, ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or social justice and the immigrant

SAVE-MOR Beer & Pop Warehouse

DANCE FRI 07

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FUNDRAISERS THU 06

Tier Southde2Xrn Milk Stout

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by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. FRUIT OF THE VINE FESTIVAL. Hors d’oeuvres, live auction, & award-winning kosher wines from California, France, Spain, & Israel. Benefits the Agency for Jewish Learning. 5-8 p.m. Clear Story Studio, South Side. 412-521-1101.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Tesla Club meeting at HackPittsburgh, Uptown CRITIC: Alex Huber, 27, an

TUE 11 HEAR ME ROAR: AN EVENING OF SELF-CONFIDENCE & SELF DEFENSE. Natural health & wellness vendor fair, mini-lecture by Lindsey Smith, & workshop lead by self-defense instructor Jennifer Cassetta. Part of the proceeds will benefit Pittsburgh Action Against Rape. 6-9 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

POLITICS WED 12 CONVERSATION SALON. Large Print room. Second Wed of every month, 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

LITERARY THU 06

Events

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DOWNLOAD THE FREE CP HAPPS APP NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948 Brought to you by:

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. MEET THE ARTIST: THE HEBREW MAMITA. feat. slam poet Vanessa Hidary. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. WALTER MOSLEY. Pittsburgh Contemporary Writer’s Series. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125. “THE WRITE SPOT” WRITERS’ WORKSHOP. Prompt-driven poetry & prose. Third Thu of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Thu of every month. Thru Feb. 6 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

SAT 08 A CONFLUENCE OF POETS. Feat. poets from Buffalo, Cleveland, Erie, San Francisco, & Pittsburgh. 8 p.m.

electrical engineer from New Kensington WHEN: Thu.,

Jan. 30

There was a brief PowerPoint slide on how the fundamentals of electricity work. [The presenter] described the Tesla coil itself and how it creates bolts of lightning, and then gave a demonstration and used MIDI from his keyboard to make the bolts. It’s my sortof niche. I like nerdy stuff. I was surprised that a place like this exists with so many little hobbies and trinkets, [and] that people like this are willing to come together and make little robots and cool 3-D printers. I’m a big fan of Tesla. I hear a lot about him at work and it’s in my background — I’m an electrical engineer, so I like the whole battle between him and Edison and how AC prevailed. I want to learn more about how to build one of these things [Tesla coils]. I’ve watched some YouTube videos and it looks very difficult. BY ANGELA SUICO

ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. HELENE COOPER. Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PRINTMAKING. Thru Feb. 27, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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FRI 07

ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. Communication, leadership & public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MT. LEBANON WRITER’S GROUP. Second Tue of every month, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Make silkscreens, learn sewing machine skills, more. Ages 10-15. 5:30-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 10

KIDSTUFF THU 06 - WED 12

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-

SAT 08 CELEBRATE! VALENTINE’S DAY. Use a variety of flowers & plants to make gifts & prepare holiday snacks out of dark chocolate to give to someone you love. Ages 4-9. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-3 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CHESS TOURNAMENT. For students in grades K-8. Players


must pre-register. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CONTRA DANCE. 1 & 3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. GERTIE THE DINOSAUR’S 100TH BIRTHDAY BASH. Film screening, lessons on flip book making, dino foot print stamping, more. 1-3:30 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. A WALK FOR EDUCATION STEM FAIR. Feat. students & professionals in science, technology, engineering, & math fields. For middle & high school students. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Benedum Hall, University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 979-324-6911.

celebrating the Homestead residents who sat for portraits & welcomed the artist to the community. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. BAD MOVIE NIGHT IN LOVE. Film screening, titles TBA. 7 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE BASICS OF ESTATE PLANNING: LEAVING A LEGACY. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. A CONVERSATION W/ 9TH WONDER. Hosted by Jasiri X, performance by Palermo Stone. Presented by Pittsburgh Hip Hop Arts Collaborative. 7 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-4321. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount TUESDAY CRAFTERNOON. Lebanon Public Library, For students in grades 1-3. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented Mount Lebanon Public Library, by Rhinestone Steel Queer Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 724-699-2613. 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April INDOOR GARDENING: 30 Brookline Community Center, FOLIAGE PLANTS, HERBS, Brookline. 412-571-3222. ORCHIDS & TROPICAL EZ MATH WORKSHOP. BONSAI. Thu. For students in grades Thru Feb. 6 Phipps Garden 3-6. Wed, 6 p.m. Center, Shadyside. Thru Feb. 26 Mount 412-441-4442 x 3925. Lebanon Public www. per a p ty INTERMEDIATE Library, Mt. Lebanon. pghci m o .c ITALIAN. Thu, 412-531-1912. 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 27 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. INTERNATIONAL NATURE DETECTIVES: WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION WONDERS OF WINTER. OF PITTSBURGH. Social, Families are invited to cultural club of American/ explore the forest for clues international women. Thu & discover how plants & First Baptist Church, Oakland. animals survive the cold iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. winter months.Registration MAKENIGHT. Create your deadline: Jan. 31. 2 p.m. own Pogs, scrunchies, more. Jennings Environmental Ages 21+. 6-9 p.m. Children’s Center, Slippery Rock. Museum of Pittsburgh, 724-794-6011. North Side. 412-322-5058. RE-COGNIZING LIFE: USING SIDEWALK SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, PHOTOGRAPHY TO HEIGHTEN 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, SENSITIVITY TO EVERYDAY Oakland. 412-477-4677. NATURE. Speaker: Molly Steinwald. Part of Biophilia: Pittsburgh. 5:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY MORNING Phipps Conservatory & WALK. Naturalist-led, Botanical Garden, Oakland. rain or shine. Wed 412-622-6914. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. 412-963-6100. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. ADVANCED ITALIAN USING MINDFULNESS TO CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. CHANGE YOUR ORGANIZING Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon HABITS. 6 p.m. Nuin Center, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Highland Park. 412-661-6108. 412-531-1912. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. ARTIST TALK: ZOE STRAUSS. Group acupuncture & guided Reception to follow talk

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OTHER STUFF THU 06

meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

FRI 07 DOES THIS HOLD UP: ROADHOUSE. Live podcast recording feat. KISS FM’s Mikey. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JUST BE BEAUTIFUL & WEAR RED DAY. Networking, wig & make-up interactive session, giveaways, more. 7-9 p.m. A Hair Boutique, Shadyside. 412-688-9447. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. First Fri of every month, 7-11 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056. RESURRECTION - ANTI VALENTINES DAY 3. Feat. Silk Contortionist Serotonin, fire performances by Anira Pixel, more. 10 p.m. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-263-2877.

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THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the “Best Party in Town”! 9:30PM to 1:30AM

25 $2.25

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9:30pm-1:30am :30aam OVER 21 ONL ONLY LY

1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOU TH SID E WWW.D EESCA F E.COM POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

FRI 07 - SAT 08

KULTUR SHOCK! Science fiction film screening w/ writer/director Q&A to follow. Feb. 7-8, 7 p.m. The Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668.

THURS, FEB 6 • 8PM INDIE ROCK

THALIA ZEDEK WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FRI 07 - SUN 09 2014 PITTSBURGH INDOOR/ OUTDOOR HOME SHOW. 12-9 p.m., Sat., Feb. 8, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-310-7781.

EMILY RODGERS & KEVIN FINN SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE)

FRI, FEB 7 • 9PM FUNK/JAZZ

JAZZAM SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE)

SAT, FEB 8 • 9PM BLUES

SAT 08

THE PAWNBROKERS

COLORED PENCIL I: TECHNIQUES. Sat, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CORE TO THE FLOOR BELLYDANCE WORKSHOP. 12-1:30 p.m. Fitness with a Twist, Greensburg. 412-538-7490. FRIENDS & FAMILY CPR/ AED CLASSES. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. STAR Center, Bloomfield. 412-578-5476. GARFIELD SKILL SHARE PARTY. Learn more information on how to be a vendor at the Garfield Night Market. 1-3:30 p.m. Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. Activity Center, Garfield. 412-389-5521. CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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MON, FEB 10 • 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH S G D TUES, FEB 11 • 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

JIM RELJA & TEXAS TEX FEATURING PETE FREEMAN (PEDAL STEEL)

NEW KITCHEN HOURS

Mon - Thurs - 4pm to 12am Fri, Sat, Sun 12pm to 1am Happy Hour 5PM-7pm $2 off all Bar Bites $1 off all drafts

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I MADE IT! MINE. Get your valentine gifts at this nomadic indie craft marketplace feat. over 45 regional artists. info@ imadeitmarket.com 12-5 p.m. Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. INSIDE TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE: A CONVERSATION W/ CLAYTON ADAMS. Discussion w/ a direct descendent of Solomon Northup. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OCA YEAR OF THE HORSE LUNAR NEW YEAR BANQUET EVENT. 12-Course Mandarin-Style dinner, cultural entertainment. ocapghpa.org/ lunarnewyear2014/index.html 5 p.m. Syria Shriners Pavilion. 724-274-7000. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m.,

social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. TUGBOAT PRINTSHOP OPEN STUDIO. 1-4 p.m. Tugboat Print Shop, Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663.

SUN 09 3RD ANNUAL PITTSBURGH YOGA EXPO. Yoga workshops, demos, local vendors, more. www.pittsburghyogaexpo.com 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-281-0912. 5TH ANNUAL YOUTH & FAMILY WELLNESS FAIR. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 380. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Thru April 20 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Feb. 16 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 10 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

[YOGA]

Since its introduction in 2012, the Pittsburgh Yoga Expo has provided an opportunity to experience Pittsburgh’s diverse yoga community, all in one place. Founder Rebecca Rankin shared her top five ways to get the most out of the expo: + Stretch it out in at least one of nine workshops + Get inspired by yoga demonstrations + Chow down on some amazing vegan baked goods by the Vegan Goddess + Wash down those treats with fresh, organic juice from four local vendors + Enter to win one of the many raffle prizes ranging from yoga mats to class passes + Give me a high-five or a hug and let me know how much fun you had! 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Pittsburgh Opera, 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. $15-25. www.pittsburghyogaexpo.com

GERMAN CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Fourth Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru April 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP. Every other Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOW TO APPEAL YOUR PROPERTY ASSESSMENT. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY

DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 11

BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high school students & adults. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue,


Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center singing for the Sounds of Highland Park. 412-363-4550. for Imagination, Garfield. Pittsburgh Chorus Global Open 412-924-0634. ROMANTIC CHEESES. House. Any woman of average FOREIGN ACCENT & Workshop w/ Caldwell Linker, singing ability, with or without FOREIGN GESTURE. Lecture EEFC Cheese Buyer. 7 p.m. vocal training is welcome. w/ Kees de Bot. 3:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, Carnegie Mellon University, Breeze. 412-242-3598. 7 p.m. 412-279-6062. Oakland. 412-268-2000. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, THROUGHLINE THEATRE THE HISTORY & IMPACT 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. COMPANY. Auditions for 2014 OF FINANCIAL POWER: 412-449-9833. season. Feb. 15-16. Men/women, THE VAMPIRIC RISE, WEST COAST SWING 1-2 min. monologue & cold FALL & RISE AGAIN OF WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance readings. www.throughline FINANCIAL CAPITALISM. lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, theatre.org The Grey Box Theatre, Interactive program South Side. 916-287-1373. Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. comparing the Great Depression to the Great Financial Crisis of ABC’S EXTREME ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH 2008. Second Tue of WEIGHT LOSS. PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. every month, 7 p.m. Weight-loss show Accepting submissions for and Last Sat of every casting call. showcase of locally written . w w w month, 1:30 p.m. Feb. 22, 10 a.m. lesbian, gay, bisexual, or aper p ty ci h g p Thru Feb. 22 4 p.m. Visit www. transgender-theme 1-act plays. .com Mount Lebanon Public extremeweighloss Manuscript details at facebook. Library, Mt. Lebanon. casting.com for com/events/519459561475242/ 412-531-1912. information. Rock Bottom, 412-256-8109. HISTORY OF COFFEE Waterfront. 412-462-2739. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking TREE ROASTERS & LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING poems with the theme of COMMENTARY ON COFFEE. ARTS CENTER PROFESSIONAL the mysterious and the Speaker: Bill Swoope, Jr., COMPANY. Auditions for magical in the everyday for co-owner of Coffee Tree Jesus Christ Superstar in Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Roasters. Presented by the Concert. March 22-23. Seeking Submit no more than 3 of your Squirrel Hill Historical Society. Principal Singing Roles, Male & best poems. Visit blastfurnace. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Female Dancer/Singers Ensemble, submittable.com/Submit for Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. & the Superstar Choir. www. submission guidelines. Deadline: 412-521-9132. centerauditions.org/index.php/ March 15. professional-company/ THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking jesus-christ-superstar Lincoln performers & artists to ALLEGHENY SPORTS, Park Performing Arts Center. participate in First Fridays TRAVEL, & OUTDOOR SHOW. 724-259-6443. Art in a Box. For more Feb. 12-16 Monroeville MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. information, email Convention Center, Monroeville. Ongoing auditions for actors thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 216-529-1300. ages 18+ for murder mystery 412-403-7357. BEHIND THE SCENES shows performed in the FRESH HEIRLOOMS TOUR AT OLD ECONOMY Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MARKETPLACE. Seeking VILLAGE. Visit the Rapp Houses, two early 19th century Federal-style homes. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] 6-9 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 101. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers ACH Clear Pathways, based in the Hill District, aims to over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. enrich the lives of at-risk youth by providing, among other St. Sebastian Church, Ross. things, a variety of visual- and performing-arts programs. 412-366-1300. Volunteers are currently needed to work with ACH Clear BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN Pathways as mentors to grade-school-age Pittsburgh WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. Public School students. Call 412-620-8862 or visit Every other Wed, 7 p.m. www.achclearpathways.org for information. Thru Feb. 26 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RHYTHM HOUSE MUSIC local & regional artisans & DETROIT STYLE URBAN GROUP. Auditions for crafters for spring indoor BALLROOM DANCE. the Summer Music Fest at marketplace. freshheirlooms. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Monogahela Aquatorium. com/2014/01/call-for-artists-inHosanna House, Wilkinsburg. March 8. Open to singers & our-new-marketplace/ 412-242-4345. performers of all genres. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY ENGLISH CONVERSATION www.eventbrite.com/e/openHOUR REVIEW. Seeking (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount auditions-calling-all-genressubmissions in all genres for Lebanon Public Library, tickets-10350461509?aff= fledgling literary magazine Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. efbevent Paradise Bar. curated by members of the KNITTING CIRCLE AT THE 724-305-0669. Hour After Happy Hour LIBRARY. All ages are welcome. STAGE RIGHT. Auditions for Writing Workshop. afterhappy Second Wed of every month, The Musical of Musicals (The hourreview.com Ongoing. 1:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 12 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Musical!). Feb 9 & 10. Seeking THE POET BAND COMPANY. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 2 men & 2 women. Email Seeking various types of LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! sarah.k.ivins@gmail.com or poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ Practice conversational English. call for appointment. Boyd hotmail.com Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Community Center, O’Hara. WASHINGTON PA FILM Oakland. 412-622-3151. 412-228-0566. FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW SWEET ADELINES or less. Complete rules & entry OFFS. A meeting of jugglers INTERNATIONAL. Seeking form at www.highlandridgecdc. & spinners. All levels welcome. women of all ages who enjoy org. 724-678-4225.

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EXCLUSIVE GENTLEMAN’S CLUB 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

What is the best way to sanitize a latex dildo? At least I think it’s a latex dildo. I actually don’t know. I had a yeast infection a few months ago, and before I knew what was up, I used my toy. Now I’m afraid to touch it until I know it won’t reinfect me! INSERTING THIS CHANCES HARM

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others. NOW HIRING FOR

Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson. If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE 56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

“It sounds like ITCH isn’t 100 percent sure what their dildo is made of,” said Hannah Jorden, senior staff sex educator at Smitten Kitten (smittenkittenonline.com), a progressive sex-toy and gear shop based in Minneapolis. Don’t feel bad: Most people don’t know what their sex toys are made of. “Sex toys aren’t regulated like food,” Jorden said: “There’s no list of ingredients on the back. It could be latex, some other porous rubbery substance, or even a nasty, rash-inducing, endocrinedisrupting, cancer-causing mixture of PVC and phthalates.” Phthalates, a chemical compound found in everything from cosmetics and shower curtains to sex toys and food packaging, are pretty fucking scary. Phthalates block male hormones, harm fetal genital development, interfere with adult brain function, and may put people at greater risk of breast cancer and testicular cancer. But you don’t have to settle for shitty, potentially toxic sex toys. “The trick,” said Jorden, “is to buy only nonporous, nontoxic toys from trustworthy manufacturers and retailers.” So maybe your best course of action would be to toss that old dildo and buy a new one. “The best option is medical-grade, platinumcured silicone,” said Jorden. “Silicone dildos come in lots of different textures and firmnesses, and you can quickly sterilize them by putting them in boiling water for a few minutes or running them through a hot dishwasher cycle. As long as they’re sterilized between uses, silicone dildos can be safely shared with different partners, and they can be used in different orifices without risk of bacterial contamination.” Those platinum-cured silicone toys are going to be pricier, of course, but aren’t our orifices worth it? And our breasts and balls? And our children and their genitals? But if you can’t afford silicone, or if you have a sentimental attachment to older sex toys, you can put condoms over them and continue to use them. “It’s not a foolproof approach,” Jorden warned, “and it supports companies that make low-quality toys. A silicone toy will last a lifetime, and when you buy one, you’re investing in a company that cares about quality and your sexual and reproductive health. Progressive sex shops, like those that are members of the Progressive Pleasure Club (progressivepleasureclub.com), can help ITCH figure out which toys are safe.” Jorden recommended a few trustworthy brands: Toys from Fun Factory, Tantus and Vixen Creations are safe, nontoxic and phthalate-free. And here’s a nonporous, nontoxic, non-silicone option for you: the stainless-steel toys made by NJoy (njoytoys.com). They’re pricey, but they are as indestructible as they are beautiful.

along wonderfully. (Have you ever tried to see who can out-rim whom? Fun stuff.) The snag is that she has a certain dedication to Catholicism and wants us to marry. I’m agnostic on God, but I don’t care at all for his earthly representatives; the idea of a priest giving me permission to kiss her is repellent. A secular courthouse wedding isn’t much more appealing: It seems utterly unnecessary. I suggested flipping a coin as a sort of compromise. She wasn’t interested. Breaking up seems like a dumb thing to do, but that’s the outcome we’re inexorably moving toward. RUNNING INTO NO GO

If you were my boyfriend and you told me — right after I had defeated you in a rimming contest — that you would marry me if you lost a coin toss, but not because marriage mattered to me, I would never rim your ass again. Because if my feelings, however contaminated they were by Catholicism, mattered less to you than a coin toss, your ass would have to learn to eat itself. Maybe it will help if you look at it this way: You’ve already lost the coin toss. The woman you want to spend the rest of your life rimming wants to marry the man she spends her life rimming. Since you would be willing to marry her if you lost a coin toss, then clearly marriage isn’t something you couldn’t bring yourself to do. That means you’re the one who should compromise.

PLATINUM-CURED SILICONE SEX TOYS ARE GOING TO BE PRICIER, BUT AREN’T OUR ORIFICES WORTH IT?

I’m a straight guy 18 months into a relationship with a bisexual woman. We get

I’m perceived as pretty levelheaded, so employees feel comfortable confiding in me. A 21-year-old employee came to me and blurted out, “I had sex with a woman. Then two months later, I met her husband at a bar. I did NOT know that she was married! She didn’t tell me! As it turns out, her husband is a good guy. Now I feel bad and I don’t know what I should do.” I asked him how many times he “dated” this woman. He said maybe five and that the sex happened only once. What should I tell him? EMPLOYEE RELATIONS RESOURCE

You should tell him that some married people cheat on their spouses, and that some cheaters fuck people who wouldn’t fuck ’em if they knew they were married. It’s unfortunate — and unnecessary, as there’s no shortage of people who will happily fuck married people. Then you should tell him that some married couples have open relationships, some have “don’t ask/don’t tell” understandings about outside sex, some married men are into cuckolding, and some people “cheat” because their partners have sexually neglected or rejected them. Your employee has no way of knowing whether this woman’s husband was wronged. But if your employee was party to an infidelity, he didn’t knowingly do anything wrong, so the wrong isn’t his. Nor is it his to right. He should avoid further contact with this woman — unless he gets an explanation that eases his conscience — and he should avoid becoming buds with the husband, however good a guy he might be.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

02.05-02.12

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Back in 2002, three young men launched YouTube, in part motivated by a banal desire. They were frustrated because they couldn’t find online videos of the notorious incident that occurred during the Super Bowl halftime show, when Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction exposed her breast. In response, they created the now-famous website that allows people to share videos. I foresee the possibility of a comparable sequence for you, Aquarius. A seemingly superficial wish or trivial interest could inspire you to come up with a fine new addition to your world. Pay attention to your whimsical notions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I believe more in the scissors than I do in the pencil.” That’s what 20th-century author Truman Capote said about his own writing process. Back in that primitive pre-computer era, he scrawled his words on paper with a pencil and later edited out the extraneous stuff by applying scissors to the manuscript. Judging from your current astrological omens, Pisces, I surmise you’re in a phase that needs the power of the scissors more than the power of the pencil. What you cut away will markedly enhance the long-term beauty and value of the creation you’re working on.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You know it’s Saturday when you are wiping off vodka stains from your face with a marshmallow,” testifies the woman who writes the Tumblr blog “French Fries Absinthe Milkshakes.” I really hope you don’t even come close to having an experience like that this week, Aries. But I’m worried that you will. I sense that you’re becoming allergic to caution. You may be sub-

consciously wishing to shed all decorum and renounce self-control. To be clear, there’s nothing inherently wrong with relaxing your guard. I hope you will indeed give up some of your highstress vigilance and surrender a bit to life’s sweet chaos. Just please try to find a playful and safe and not-too-insane way to do so.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What is the single best thing you could do to fulfill your No. 1 desire? Is there a skill you should attain? A subject you should study? A special kind of experience you should seek or a shift in perspective you should initiate? This is a big opportunity, Taurus. You have an excellent chance to identify the specific action you could take that will lead you to the next stage of your evolution. And if you do manage to figure out exactly what needs to be done, start doing it!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When songwriters make a “slant rhyme,” the words they use don’t really rhyme, but they

get your yoga on!

sound close enough alike to mimic a rhyme. An example occurs in “The Bad Touch,” a tune by the Bloodhound Gang: “You and me baby ain’t nothing but mammals / So let’s do it like they do on the Discovery Channel.” Technically, “mammals” doesn’t rhyme with “channel.” I suspect that in the coming week you will have experiences with metaphorical resemblances to slant rhymes. But as long you don’t fuss and fret about the inexactness you encounter, as long as you don’t demand that everything be precise and cleaned-up, you will be entertained and educated. Vow to see the so-called imperfections as soulful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Almost,” writes novelist Joan Bauer. “It’s a big word for me. I feel it everywhere. Almost home. Almost happy. Almost changed. Almost, but not quite. Not yet. Soon, maybe.” I’m sure you know about that feeing yourself, Cancerian. Sometimes it has seemed like your entire life is composed of thousands of small almosts that add up to one gigantic almost. But I have good news: There is an excellent chance that in the next 14 to 16 weeks you will graduate from the endless and omnipresent almost; you will rise up and snatch a bold measure of completeness from out of the ever-shifting flow. And it all kicks into high gear now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): One of the chapter titles in my most recent book is this: “Ever since I learned to see three sides to every story, I’m finding much better stories.” I’m recommending that you find a way to use this perspective as your own in the coming weeks, Leo. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s crucial that you not get stuck in an oppositional mode. It would be both wrong and debilitating to believe that you must choose between one of two conflicting options. With that in mind, I will introduce you to a word you may not know: “trilemma.” It transcends a mere dilemma because it contains a third alternative.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1984, Don Henley’s song “The Boys of Summer” reached the top of the Billboard charts. “Out on the road today / I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac,” Henley sings wistfully near the end of the tune. He’s dismayed by the sight of the Grateful Dead’s logo, an ultimate hippie symbol, displayed on a luxury car driven by snooty rich kids. Almost 20 years later, the band The Ataris covered “The Boys of Summer,” but changed the lyric to “Out on the road today / I saw a Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac.” It conveyed the same mournful contempt, but this time invoking the iconic punk band Black Flag. I offer this tale to you, Virgo, as an encouragement to update the way you think about your life’s mythic quest … to modernize your old storylines … to refresh and

refurbish the references you invoke to tell people about who you are.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Food aficionado Michael Pollan says that Americans “worry more about food and derive less pleasure from eating” than people in other countries. If you ask them what their association is with “chocolate cake,” they typically say “guilt.” By contrast, the French are likely to respond to the same question with “celebration.” From an astrological perspective, I think it’s appropriate for you to be more like the French than the Americans in the coming weeks — not just in your attitude toward delicious desserts, but in regards to every opportunity for pleasure. This is one of those times when you have a license to guiltlessly explore the heights and depths of bliss.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the Inuktitut language spoken among the Eastern Canadian Inuit, the word for “simplicity” is katujjiqatigiittiarnirlu. This amusing fact reminds me of a certain situation in your life. Your quest to get back to basics and reconnect with your core sources is turning out to be rather complicated. If you hope to invoke all of the pure, humble clarity you need, you will have to call on some sophisticated and ingenious magic.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “What is the purpose of the giant sequoia tree?” asked environmentalist Edward Abbey. His answer: “The purpose of the giant sequoia tree is to provide shade for the tiny titmouse.” I suggest you meditate on all the ways you can apply that wisdom as a metaphor to your own issues. For example: What monumental part of your own life might be of service to a small, fragile part? What major accomplishment of yours can provide strength and protection to a ripening potential that’s underappreciated by others?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “To burn with desire and keep quiet about it is the greatest punishment we can bring on ourselves,” wrote the poet Federico García Lorca. I urge you to make sure you are not inflicting that abuse on yourself in the coming weeks, Capricorn. It’s always dangerous to be out of touch with or secretive about your holy passions, but it’s especially risky these days. I’m not necessarily saying you should rent a megaphone and shout news of your yearnings in the crowded streets. In fact, it’s better if you are discriminating about whom you tell. The most important thing is to not be hiding anything from yourself about what moves you the most. I’ve gathered together all of your long-range, bigpicture horoscopes in one place. Go here to read your forecasts for 2014: http://bit.ly/BigLife2014

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 59 + STUDIES 59 + SERVICES 61 + LIVE 61 + WELLNESS 62

WORK

HELP WANTED

VOLUNTEERS

SHEET METAL WORKER’S LOCAL UNION #12

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

JOB OPPORTUNITIES Longwall Coal Miners: New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois. Submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE Act 235 Courses Basic Class: March 15, 16, 20, 21, 22 Renewal Classes: March 20 www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

State Police Approval Letter Required 724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

Training Center 1200 Gulf Lab Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-1304 Applications for testing are accepted year-round and can be made in person at our Training Center, Monday-Friday from 8:00am to 4:00pm or online at www.smlocal12. org. The Apprentice test will be given on Saturday March 15th 2014 at 10:00am at the University of Pittsburgh. Payment is to be made no later than March 10th 2014.

QUALIFICATIONS: High School Diploma (by July 1, 2014) or GED, valid PA drivers license and reliable transportation. There is a non-refundable testing fee of $25.00 that must be paid at the time the application is made. Cash, money order, or certified check are the only acceptable terms of payment, no personal checks will be accepted.

ECM Transport is NOW HIRING Regional Road & Local Drivers (10) Local Driver Positions at $19 per hour (20) Regional Road Positions at .50CPM

For directions or additional information, please call (412) 828-1386 or visit our website at www.smlocal12.org

Excellent Home Time, Benefits, 401k

Sheet Metal Workers Local Union #12 is an equal opportunity employer

Apply online at ecmtransport.com or call us at 800-548-7379, ext. 7506

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Longwall Coal Miners

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED!

New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois

Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance.

We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

Longwall Foreman Longwall Electrician Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman

Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates by example a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction.

APPLY TODAY: Qualified Applicants please submit resumes to: resumes@vikingmining.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

OBESITY? CALL TODAY!

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

“When you love what you do, everything is better.” Life advice from Brandi L. - co-worker since 2006

At Country Meadows, our customers make each day better for us, just as we make it better for them. We’ve been ranked as one of the Best Places to Work, and we focus on a culture of respect. At Country Meadows, life gets better…for everyone. Current Openings: Personal Care Associate Home Care Associate Dining Associate Culinary Associate (entry level) LPN

Excellent Benefits! Apply online or call 412-257-7910

CountryMeadows.com/careers CountryMeadowsAtHome.com/careers EOE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper


Ink Well

SERVICES

UNOFFICIAL TITLES

AUTO SERVICES

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

ACROSS 1. Baby 5. Festoons with bath tissue 8. Broadway hit that closed in 2003, casually 14. What one hopes not to get off to, on a date 16. Chemical base 17. Title for a social leader 18. Controversial plaything 19. Mesoamerican builder of colossal heads 21. Knock around 22. Title for one who says what’s already clear 27. Like Columbus, by birth 28. Child star Corey who died in 2010 29. John follower 30. Hatcher on “Desperate Housewives” 31. Unspirited? 34. Title for a touchy person 39. Sneaky 40. Head shop purchase 41. “Word” 42. Opera that ends in the Temple of Vulcan 43. Real estate page item 46. Title for a Romeo 50. Tear 51. Marissa Mayer’s company

52. Undercover officer’s shout, upon revealing him or herself 55. Title for a haughty type 60. Waste fuel 61. Smithwick’s, for one 62. Thom Yorke and J.K. Rowling’s school 63. Karaoke need, briefly 64. Coveted

DOWN 1. What some joints smoke? 2. Perrier, to the French 3. Suffix with Gator 4. Take advantage of 5. Highly resonant Indian drums 6. Weeks-early delivery 7. “Card Players Quarreling” artist Jan 8. Midback muscle, briefly 9. “Xanadu” band 10. Critically acclaimed role-playing game in the “Elder Scrolls” series 11. Nearsighted toon 12. Message on a candy heart 13. Photocopied punk rock publications 15. Govt. debt instrument 20. Sacha Baron of stunt comedy 22. Adams who writes “The Straight Dope”

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23. Itching 24. Tweet, e.g. 25. You might have a shot at them 26. Roman numeral in a Shakespeare title 27. Noir-era slang for legs 30. Stand for driving 31. Finished off 32. Camping in a camper 33. Noir-era slang for a safecracker 35. Bigger than big 36. Straddle, say 37. Apt to, um ... sorry, what was I saying? 38. South American monkey 42. Sceneending words 43. “The Namesake”

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author Jhumpa 44. Like some modern mustaches 45. Urban blights 46. Choice 47. Name on a sign outside a house for sale 48. Empty 49. Arabic honorific 53. Nickel, e.g. 54. For each 56. “Now it’s like ‘Murder, ___ Wrote’ once I get you out them clothes” (R. Kelly lyric) 57. Baled stuff 58. ___ flottante (French dessert) 59. Conference series parodied by “Onion Talks”

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2014. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 Fiction Workshops Looking for feedback on your writing? Want to write short stories or a novel? Announcing new fiction workshops. Weekly meetings. Supportive environment, all fiction writers welcome. Visit www.BeckyTuch.com or email Becky.Tuch@ gmail.com for information.

Screenwriting Lessons Learn the art & science of outlining, writing and rewriting motion picture screenplays.

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REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

FINANCIAL PROBLEMS with the IRS or State Taxes? Settle for a fraction of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888608-3016 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

A DO P T :

A secure life of love awaits your baby through the gift of adoption. Expenses Paid. Please call Daria at

888-788-5624

Entertainment and Marketing Execs long for 1st baby to LOVE. Laughter, Sports, Music await.

writeyourscript@ live.com

1-800-561-9323

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A R T S

REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

WANTED TO BUY > WE BUY HOUSES CASH > Any area, any condition, or price range. > Visit our website! > www.sellmyspace.us Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

EAST FOR RENT Morningside- Newly remod. sm. 4BR house, 2 full baths, off st prkg, no pets. 412-628-6154 NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available

3 Locations Shadyside • Oakland • Strip District

412-208-4625 GuardianStorage.com

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

ADOPTION

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

S C R E E N

LIVE

Expenses Paid Rita & Greg

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WELLNESS MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Downtown Massage

Chinese Bodyworks

412-401-4110

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Open 24 hours/7 days a week

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

724-519-7896

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Grand Opening

Forever Relaxation Chinese Bodywork

$45/hour 7621 Saltsburg Rd Plum Boro, PA 15239

412-798-1700 Bring this ad in and get a discount

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

412.316.3342 62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.05/02.12.2014


Positive Recovery Solutions

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. Now open in Monroeville! • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept most major insurances, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self paying clients.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Recovery Without Judgement™ Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

Squirrel Hill Office Now Open!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Low Self Pay Rate

Cranberry Office Now Open!

Let Us Help You Today!

New Leaf Recovery Services newleafrecoveryservices@gmail.com

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pittsburgh

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412-434-4798

SUBOXONE

Help is Available!

TA S T E

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

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Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Please Call: 412-465-1050

N E W S

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

S C R E E N

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E V E N T S

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

February 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 6

February 5, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 6