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STOP REQUESTED: SHOULD WE THINK TWICE ABOUT DOWNTOWN-TO-OAKLAND TRANSIT SYSTEM? 06


EVENTS 2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JULIANNA BARWICK, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, VASILLUS Warhol theater Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SAN FERMIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SON LUX Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.22 – 2pm TEEN MEMBERS ONLY TOUR: SCHOLASTIC ART AND WRITING AWARDS Tickets Members FREE; to register call 412.622.3314

2.22 – 2pm FILM SCREENING: MADELYN ROEHRIG PRESENTS LOOKING UP FROM ANDY’S GRAVE (2013) AND FIGMENTS: CONVERSATIONS WITH ANDY, YEAR III (2011) Warhol theater Tickets FREE

Image: Patrick Hulse, Valentine Portrait (detail), 2012

Art. Write. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014

3.1 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JACK QUARTET Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Tickets door $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.7 – 6pm Art.Write.Now.Tour Opening Reception Warhol entrance space | Tickets FREE

3.5 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: CYRO BAPTISTA’S BANQUET OF THE SPIRITS Warhol entrance space Tickets $25/$20 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

February 5 – March 2, 2014 The Art. Write. Now. Tour exhibition, now in its 4th year, travels nationwide to expose audiences to an annual selection of original work by winning 6-12 grade students from the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. These emerging artists, writers, and filmmakers are selected as the “best in the country” by top professionals in the visual and literary arts. The exhibition contains 130 art and literary works from students around the country. Andy Warhol was a Scholastic Art & Writing Award winner in 1945 at the age of 17.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL}

01.29/02.05.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns KAYLA COPES, ANGELA SUICO

{COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 05

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS] they’re going to all this trouble to 06 “Ifspend $200 million to save six to nine minutes for three miles — that’s a lot of investment.� — Former grad student Ben Samson on the plan to run Bus Rapid Transit from Downtown to Oakland

[NEWS] is a mistake that will leave a 12 “This gaping hole in Pittsburgh’s cultural sphere.� — Eric Shiner, director of The Andy Warhol Museum, on Astria Suparak’s departure from Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery

[TASTE] face’ roulade was served open face 18 “‘Pig on sourdough bread, with fresh herbs, a sunny-side-up egg, pork rinds and hot sauce.� — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Grit & Grace

[MUSIC] wanted to create something 24 “We where you could see people of color who create art.� — Rapper and activist Jasiri X on planning a festival with help from R.A.R.E. Nation

objects that have become ghosts.� — Al Hoff on Oscar-nominated Short Films

[ARTS]

[LAST PAGE] “Two iPhones were languishing without an owner coming forward. A phone charger, meanwhile, was picked up in a matter of days.� — Alex Zimmerman on the Port Authority’s lost-and-found

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 47 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 54 +

(17(57$,10(17 7+,6:((.(1'

7+856'$<-$18$5<

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{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some works could be categorized as material imposters, while others focus on artifice as impersonation.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nadine Wasserman on the 2013 Carnegie International

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is a witty take on 33 â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Possessionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tsukumogami, or ordinary household

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INCOMING

“$200 MILLION TO SAVE SIX TO NINE MINUTES FOR THREE MILES — THAT’S A LOT OF INVESTMENT.”

Grand Plans? Mount Washington residents wondering if any development is better than none at all (Jan. 22) “Living further away from Mount Washington, north of Pittsburgh, I think a hotel is still the way to go. It provides jobs, the hotel will have one of the best views of Pittsburgh, and you have some easy access to the stadiums via Station Square and the Gateway Clipper Fleet. The one drawback could be the increased traffic at the Duquesne Incline and Mon Incline. Whether that’s covered through the hotel builders or City [of Pittsburgh] will have to be determined.” — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page from “Lawrence Han”

Miller Gallery director Astria Suparak removed as CMU plans “new direction” for gallery (Jan. 21, online only) “It is mind-blowing that CMU would let Suparak go. She made the Miller Gallery one of the most exciting and interesting art spaces in the country. Her shows made visitors think critically about the world around them. Moreover, she tapped into a vast network of artists, collectives, filmmakers and thinkers from the region, country and the world. I don’t buy for a second that her shows were too edgy [or] political, or that she was too controversial. Quite the opposite: She brought huge numbers of people — many of whom do not visit galleries often — into the Miller Gallery. … Suparak has the ultimate respect of her peers across the country in the art community, and we can look forward to her next curatorial position because that space will then set the bar of what is being exhibited today. It is too bad that a handful of people in positions of power at CMU could not see this.” — Web comment from “Nicolas Lampert”

“Luke, do you ever not come off as a total douche?” — Jan. 25 tweet from [C!] (@mynameisaverb) to former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl for a series of tweets and retweets complaining about snow removal

“Never” — Jan. 25 tweet from former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl (@MayorLuke) in response

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{ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

FUTURE TRAVEL F

OR MORE than 100 years, the one

constant in Pittsburgh’s transit history has been the desire to give public transportation the right of way … and the inability to do it comprehensively. A 1906 study proposed “a system of underground railways” including “a downtown loop with a radial line to the east and several intermediate stub lines extending north and across the Allegheny River.” But where rail was once seen as the way to address the competing claims buses and cars have on street traffic, Bus Rapid Transit (or BRT) is gaining momentum. The idea behind BRT takes the philosophy of rail and applies it to the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

bus: fewer stops, off-board fare collection, screens that show how far away the next bus is, and separate traffic lanes with signals that give buses priority.

Is $200 million for Downtown-Oakland BRT the best public-transit investment? {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} And the Port Authority — which was among the first to borrow some of these rail-like characteristics on the East Busway — is looking to create a BRT system in the Oakland-Downtown corri-

dor, at an estimated cost of $200 million. “The goal has always been to link Oakland and downtown Pittsburgh, the two largest job centers in the region,” says Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, an ardent supporter of BRT. The current system, he says, doesn’t make people want to forgo driving. But some worry a BRT system between Oakland and Downtown goes too far, by spending scarce capital on one of the region’s most heavily served transit corridors. “That’s a lot of money to invest in that corridor for the benefits that would result,” says Helen Gerhardt, a transit activist who writes for a blog called Buses Are Bridges. “We have so many CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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FUTURE TRAVEL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

communities that only have one bus per hour.” Others worry planning hasn’t gone far enough, that the focus on BRT is closing off more thorough discussions about whether other corridors deserve upgrades, and whether rail should be in the mix.

See website for weather-based changes and more information on the day’s events.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

last November would require converting an existing lane of either Forbes or Fifth Avenues to be “bus-only,” so both inbound and outbound BRT routes would have their own right of way. (Currently, only outbound routes have their own lane through Oakland on Fifth Avenue.) That would render the several 61 and 71 buses, which currently run through Oakland along Fifth and Forbes avenues, unnecessary in a corridor that serves about 30 percent of the region’s transit ridership, Fitzgerald says. Instead, BRT could replace buses that often stack up behind each other. BRT’s advocates also point out the project could be completed in phases, gradually improving service until completion. (Port Authority is considering whether the BRT could terminate in Shadyside or Squirrel Hill.) The project could shave travel times between Morewood Avenue near Carnegie Mellon and Downtown to just over 14 minutes. That trip currently takes between 23 and 33 minutes, according to the proposal. But the BRT project “[isn’t] just about the time,” Fitzgerald says. It’s about spurring development in places like Uptown, which has plenty of property close to Downtown that could be attractive to developers. “We realized there would be a significant amount of development that will occur; property values will go up,” Fitzgerald says. Ken Zapinski, vice president of energy and infrastructure at the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, agrees. “It’s an economic development/ transformation project that happens to have transit as a component.” He says public-private partnerships will be crucial in funding the project, especially given increasingly competitive federal funding. “We cannot use Washington and their procedures or lack of money as an excuse not to improve our transit system,” Zapinski says. And though the Port Authority is seeking federal grant money, it would

likely get no more than $75 million — a reality, Fitzgerald acknowledges, that will require a “significant amount of local match.” IN LATE 2011, Wanda Wilson joined the stakeholder group tasked with assessing whether a BRT plan should move forward, though she says BRT in the Oakland-Downtown corridor was the only transit project up for discussion. The Allegheny Conference, Hill District Consensus Group, Pitt and CMU are among the nearly 50 organizations that have participated in the stakeholder group. “It’s a good group in terms of its makeup,” says Wilson, executive director of the Oakland Planning and Development Corporation. But “it kind of started from […] the assumption that bus rapid transit would be the best way to improve transit in this corridor.” BRT might be the right idea, Wilson says, or the answer “might be a [rail] line that goes underground.” Members of the Uptown community have also expressed some skepticism over the value of BRT. “Uptown hasn’t had a transit problem,” says Jeanne McNutt, executive director of Uptown Partners of Pittsburgh. “There are lots of buses,” she says, noting the BRT could lead to significant reductions in on-street parking. Others argue there should be a conversation about development in corridors beyond Downtown-Oakland. Ben Samson, who designed a Pittsburgh light-rail system for his master’s thesis, says it might be worth focusing on a rail project along the Allegheny River. The Strip District and Lawrenceville both have development potential, he says, and wouldn’t require tunneling underground to extend rail service. “If they’re going to all this trouble to spend $200 million to save six to nine minutes for three miles — that’s a lot of investment,” Samson explains. Mavis Rainey, a former Port Authority board member and executive director of the Oakland Transportation Management Association, acknowledges that “some folks would like to look at a broader scope of ideas.” But rail, she says, has been studied in the past and just isn’t feasible. “Given the financial resources right now […] I’m still kind of surprised that there’s still a conversation: ‘Let’s look at light rail.’”

“WE HAVE SO MANY COMMUNITIES THAT ONLY HAVE ONE BUS PER HOUR.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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FUTURE TRAVEL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

IT ISN’T JUST costs that diminish the

chances a light-rail project will be part of the conversation. There’s also the political cloud left hanging over the North Shore Connector, according to Chris Sandvig, regional policy director for the Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group. That project cost over half a billion dollars and drew national criticism. “There was definitely [a] feeling among Port Authority leadership that because of just how much they were getting beat up over constant service reductions — and the cost of the North Shore Connector — that the only way they were going to get any project done here was BRT,” Sandvig says. “Why we didn’t build a subway to the East End during the heyday of steel is beyond me.” Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie acknowledges the North Shore project’s fraught political past, and stresses the importance of getting buy-in for the BRT project, saying it wouldn’t go forward without community support. “We know we can’t make everyone happy,” Ritchie says, “but we need to be smart about it — we haven’t been in this position in a long time.” And even if BRT is no panacea, Sandvig says the area between Downtown and Oakland is ripe for transit-oriented development.

“You have a very transit-oriented corridor in terms of its built environment,” Sandvig says, noting its flatness. “You have strong market forces on either end that can leverage investment.” But transit activist Gerhardt worries that communities like Greenfield or Penn Hills, which she says could use better transit options, will be left behind. “I think we need to be looking carefully at equitable transit-oriented development,” she says. “Will the most transitdependent people be served by this location? […] I would prefer to see that kind of investment.” But PCRG’s Sandvig thinks it isn’t necessarily a bad thing to use transit as a way to spur development — and convince people to ditch their cars. Even though buses are rarely filled to capacity between Downtown and Oakland, “Is that because we don’t need transit, or because we haven’t done enough with the land to create demand for it?” And to Gerhardt’s concern about transit projects geared toward people who can afford to have cars in the first place, Sandvig says getting more people to ride public transit can help ensure its longterm viability. “What makes Social Security hard to get killed by the government?” Sandvig asks. “Everybody has it.”

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DIRECTOR DISMISSED Some call Astria Suparak’s Miller Gallery departure a ‘mistake’ {BY CHRIS POTTER} ALIEN SHE, the exhibit of riot-grrrl

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culture at Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery, won’t be the first show curated by Astria Suparak to reach beyond campus. A recent “critic’s pick” by Artforum magazine, the exhibit will soon visit cities like Philadelphia, Portland and San Francisco — as have other exhibits Suparak has assembled. This time, though, it’s not just the artwork that’s leaving campus. Suparak is leaving the Miller as well. As City Paper first reported online last week, a spokesperson for CMU confirmed the gallery is moving in a “new direction.” In a statement, College of Fine Arts Dean Dan Martin asserted the Miller “will begin … exhibiting, presenting and exploring work across arts disciplines at the university.” Martin said the space will become “a combined gallery, teaching and research space,” with programming determined by a “faculty leadership committee” representing dep ar t ment s l ike ar t , design, music, and drama. Suparak declined comment. But in a letter sent to colleagues and obtained by City Paper, she wrote that the gallery was “transform[ing] into an internally focused space for students and faculty that will be programmed by a faculty committee, effectively bringing my tenure to a close.” “I will be taking time to explore possibilities for my next venture … while continuing to oversee the Alien She exhibition and tour,” she added. Local art professionals, who credit the Miller with raising Pittsburgh’s profile in the art world, have expressed shock at the news. “This is a mistake that will leave a gaping hole in Pittsburgh’s cultural sphere,” says Eric Shiner, director of The Andy Warhol Museum. Suparak’s exhibits have addressed a range of issues: the fate of abandoned big-box retail stores; the work of anticorporate pranksters The Yes Men; the phenomenon of Steelers fandom. “To have the Yes Men show in Pittsburgh was such a coup, and the Steelers show was a lot of fun,” Shiner says. “I’d always dreamed of doing it myself.”

Shiner fears that the Miller will be more “inward-looking,” focusing on campus work to the exclusion of exhibits with a broader reach and wider audience. “Having a world-class gallery on campus means students have access to critical thinking,” he says, adding that such shows attract art enthusiasts from outside campus, too. This is not Suparak’s first falling-out with academia. She came to Pittsburgh in 2008 after being fired in a dispute with Syracuse University. But her résumé also included acclaimed exhibits in cities like London and Montreal. “She’s gonna be an interesting force,” CMU assistant professor of art Jon Rubin told CP at the time. “She’s brought in so many perspectives,” Rubin says today. “It’s an interdisciplinary approach that reflects Carnegie Mellon’s own interests.” “There was a job description, and she more than fulfilled it,” agrees Ayanah Moor, a CMU associate professor of art. Moor suspects some within the school believe “the space should be serving different interests” — by featuring, say, costume designs from student productions. While Moor says she respects those disciplines, “to see this rich dialogue go away doesn’t make sense.” Some say there may have been an omen of Suparak’s departure: An advisory committee overseeing the Miller was dissolved more than a year ago. “Looking back, it dawned on me that the advisory committee had not met in a long time,” says Dan Byers, a committee member and co-curator of the current Carnegie International. Byers says he plans on writing a letter of complaint to CMU: While Suparak’s departure is “a fait accompli, I feel like there’s a lot that needs to be said.” The College of Fine Arts largely declined comment on this story, though it pledges to shed more light on the Miller’s future in coming weeks. So far, though, the gallery’s fate has received little attention locally. “It’s going to be a bigger deal outside of Pittsburgh than inside it,” sighs Byers. “And that’s the sign of a bad situation — when a city doesn’t recognize its own resources.”

“THAT’S THE SIGN OF A BAD SITUATION, WHEN A CITY DOESN’T RECOGNIZE ITS OWN RESOURCES.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014


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14

Five things we learned about the eight Dems running for Pa. gov {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

www.CTRSLLC.com

nearly 500 residents packed into McConomy Auditorium at Carnegie Mellon University, on Sun., Jan. 26, to hear from the eight Democrats hoping to unseat Gov. Tom Corbett in November. The candidates are: John Hanger, former Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection; Jo Ellen Litz, Lebanon County commissioner; Pennsylvania Treasurer Rob McCord; Katie McGinty, another former DEP head; Max Myers, a businessman and minister; Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski; U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz; and Thomas Wolf, businessman and former Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. The event, sponsored by various East End Democratic clubs, featured a wide range of topics in a series of oneminute answers from the candidates. City Paper plans to delve more deeply into specific issues in the weeks leading up to the primary, but in the meantime, here are five quick things we learned on Sunday.

THE RACE OFFERS DEGREES OF PROGRESSIVENESS In some past primaries, voters have been left without a good progressive option. This year there are as many as six candidates who have at least progressive leanings. Five of the eight Democrats — Hanger, McCord, McGinty, Schwartz and Wolf — are pro-choice and support same-sex marriage. Pawlowski supports same-sex marriage and says he’s “in the middle” on choice because while he is pro-life, he also supports women’s health issues.

MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION AND DECRIMINALIZATION ARE NOT THE SAME THING, DESPITE WHAT SOME CANDIDATES MAY WANT YOU TO BELIEVE Hanger came out of the gate early in favor of legalizing, regulating and taxing marijuana … even as other candidates were still figuring out what to say. With the exception of Litz, the other candidates said they favor decriminalization of marijuana (removing criminal penalties for possession) and legalization of limited medical marijuana. (Litz wrongly asserted that narcotics are regulated by the FCC — the Federal Com-

munication Commission.) McCord said further study of other states was warranted, and he likely favored eventual legalization. But Hanger told CP afterward that voters shouldn’t be fooled. “I’ll take credit for dragging them into this issue,” Hanger says. “They’ve all gone from not talking about it at all and being opposed, to now favoring medical marijuana and decriminalization. I’m still the only candidate willing to legalize and tax marijuana, and talk about the race issue that is endemic to this whole issue.”

REGARDLESS OF WHO WINS, WE’RE LIKELY TO KEEP GETTING FRACKED There were several fracktivists on hand Sunday and most likely left somewhat disappointed. All of the candidates are against fracking on public lands; and all say Corbett has allowed drilling companies to run amok, and if elected, they would make sure the processes are safer and more highly taxed. But only Myers said he would institute a moratorium on all fracking.

REGARDLESS OF WHO WINS, UPMC IS IN DEEP SHIT The candidates were asked if the UPMC/ Highmark dispute deserved Harrisburg’s attention — and none of the Democrats appeared happy with the state’s largest non-governmental employer. Among the highlights, McCord called it “an ugly fight that requires leadership” and said that UPMC was “generating an army of poor people who are working full time.” Schwartz says it’s “quite remarkable that UPMC has made an insurer [Highmark] look as good as it does.” And McGinty emphatically urged UPMC to “stop … interfering with the constitutional right of workers to organize and collectively bargain.”

PRESQUE ISLE IS IN PITTSBURGH? It was a rough day for Litz, who got groans from the crowd when she “passed” on questions regarding abortion rights and same-sex marriage. But her worst moment came when the candidates were asked about their favorite spot in Pittsburgh: She fondly recalled the beaches of Presque Isle — which is in Erie. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

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THE MENU OFFERED 20-ODD CHOICES, EACH PACKED WITH UNEXPECTED COMBINATIONS

FOOD CHALLENGE {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} When Conflict Kitchen announced its new cuisine would be North Korean, it prompted a common question. Says cook Gabby Toborg: “A lot of the reaction we’ve been getting has been people questioning the food — like, ‘What are you going to serve?’” Conflict Kitchen is an Oakland takeout restaurant that serves cuisine from countries the United States is in conflict with. The latest iteration of its menu reflects North Korea’s pervasive food shortages. “We try not to waste any food, and that includes the water the noodles are boiled in,” Toborg explains. “Sometimes we hand out the water to people in line just as a conversation starter.” The menu features North Korean staples such as bibimbop, vegetables on rice in gochujang, a sweet and spicy pepper sauce, perhaps washed down with sujeonggwa, a persimmon punch flavored with ginger and cinnamon. Among the specials are: soondae tteokbokki, a blood sausage dish; and hotteok, a sweet pancake stuffed with coconut, cinnamon and brown sugar. Such specials would be doubly unusual in North Korea, where meat is hard to find and dessert isn’t a priority. But the fare isn’t as lacking in flavor or appeal as many might think. For instance, the dubu bap, a tofu pocket stuffed with rice, is topped with a sauce made from red-pepper flakes, sesame and sweet syrup. And presentation matters: The dishes contain colorful vegetables to make them visually appealing. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

221 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-8028417 or www.conflictkitchen.org

the

FEED

Learn to cook fancier food: The 2014 schedule of monthly cooking classes held at Downtown’s Habitat is out. Classes include regional cooking (France, Italy), holidays (Mardi Gras, Thanksgiving), alcohol and food pairings (bourbon, sake, beer) and a celebration of pork. Classes are $65 and include materials, apron and lunch.For more info, call 412-773-8848 or see www.habitatrestaurant.com.

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Dim sum dishes (clockwise from top left): shrimp kimchi, pork-belly cubes, scallops and fried head cheese

OPPOSITES ATTRACT {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

OMETIMES IT’S tempting to think of restaurants as movies. After all, some of them do come packaged with plots, sets and characters. Grit & Grace, a new Downtown venture from the people behind Spoon and BRGR, is such a restaurant. It even comes with a pitch, printed on the menu: “Grit & Grace pushes opposites to the extreme to bring you the most unique and balanced dining experience Pittsburgh has to offer.” Whether extreme opposites can combine to create balance is a point we felt was open to debate, and Grit & Grace certainly gave us plenty of food for thought. Our initial impressions were disconcerting. The decor begged the term “eclectic,” veering from industrial chic to bling, with seating that included upholstered banquettes and high, copper-topped communal tables. And the menu was all over the place, with Asian ingredients

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

from various traditions combined and/or fused with those from the Mediterranean and American comfort foods, and seemingly no fewer than five ingredients in every dish. This was all the more impressive since most of the dishes at Grit & Grace are small plates, designed for sharing. While some menu descriptions made sense to us as updates of familiar classics like reuben

GRIT & GRACE

535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-1 a.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.2 a.m.; Sat. 4 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sun. 4-10 p.m. PRICES: $6-20 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED sandwiches or ramen, others seemed to cross from fusion into kitchen-sink combos. And with 20-odd choices, each packed with unexpected combinations (Thousand Island sabayon?), we began to feel overwhelmed.

Thankfully, dim sum came to our rescue. Grit & Grace interpreted traditional Chinese dim sum service — in which diners help themselves to tiny morsels of meat or individual buns from a rolling cart — with a tray of five appetizer-size offerings. At only $5 a plate, this seemed like an excellent, low-stakes way to get to know the kitchen. As it turned out, the rewards were big. Pork-belly bites were meltingly tender with flavorful fat, yet satisfying with moments of crispness and chew, in a zingy orange sauce flavored with chili, garlic and ginger. Sliced beef tataki was also excellent, with a perfect dollop of peanut emulsion that recalled satay. Slices of shrimp were sweet and balanced with bitter-tinged broccolini in a kimchi vinaigrette; scallops, too, were succulent, in a citrusy lobster gel. Only a little bowl of cold soba noodles was underwhelming. The success of the dim sum emboldened us to explore the rest of the menu. As with


the decor, the level of refinement varied. Dayboat scallops were sweetly browned, served with a rich lobster dumpling and tender roasted parsnip in a savory broth. A more rustic, but equally salutary selection was crispy “pig face” roulade served open face on sourdough bread, with fresh herbs, a sunny-side-up egg, pork rinds and hot sauce. The pork roulade fell somewhere between head cheese and pancetta in effect. Supple morsels of short rib were served atop a halved cream-cheese biscuit. The biscuit crust was crisp and rich, its crumb delicate, while the white cheddar atop was sharp relief for the richness of the hollandaise sauce that also graced the meat. A thick slice of housemade mortadella was chunkier than the papery slices we get from the deli, but it captured the original’s balance of ultra-tender pork and frank morsels of fat; accompanying coriander mustard was good enough that we literally ate some with a spoon.

Making crepes

While “extreme opposites” might be a slight overstatement, we found Grit & Grace’s kitchen to be unafraid of strong contrasts, while top-notch execution, on an ingredient-by-ingredient basis, maintained balance down to the drizzle of sauce or pinch of seasoning. But for all that dazzling mastery, there were times when the kitchen flew too close to the sun. Given the choice of two desserts — a chocolate truffle number topped with Fruity Pebbles, and a sort of deconstructed apple pie topped with crumbled CheezIts — we went with the latter. The cooked apple filling was suitably sweet-tart, the baked wedges of crust nicely crispy and flaky, but the double shot of Cheez-It ice cream and crushed Cheez-It topping was a gimmick that didn’t work. The artificial flavors of the snack crackers mocked, rather than mimicked, the intended cheddar aspect. It confirmed our original apprehension that the kitchen, in pursuit of extreme opposites, might sometimes go too far. Nevertheless, Grit & Grace earned our recommendation of its confident approach to a wildly various list of boldly complex dishes.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HAVE BEER, WILL TRAVEL Locals offer portable draft-beer system A few years ago, Albert Ciuksza and Todd Barnett wanted to enjoy cold draft beer on a weekend camping trip with friends. “We built our own jockey box (an insulated, portable draft-beer system),” says Ciuksza. Unfortunately for the campers, “It didn’t work so well.” The trip did provide inspiration. Ciuksza, Barnett and two partners (who are no longer with the company) decided to create a portable draft-beer system significantly more efficient than what was currently on the market. In March 2013, they shipped their first PortaDraft. Robert “Flash” Scozafave, who works as a tap-system manager for Frank B. Fuhrer Wholesale, helped engineer the device. “There is probably nobody on the planet who knows as much about tap systems as Flash,” says Ciuksza. The PortaDraft works with any commercial-sized keg. The CO2 propulsion system uses a 20-ounce paintball cartridge for easy refilling. There’s also a super-efficient cooling system: One bag of ice will keep the beer cold for 36 hours. Setup takes five minutes, and is tool-free. “It’s exceptionally easy to put together. You don’t want to not be able to pour a beer because you forgot your nut wrench,” says Ciuksza. Although camping and tailgating provided the original inspiration, the guys ended up setting their sights on bigger markets. Golf courses/country clubs, hospitality/hotels, catering, event venues and bars/restaurants are the five niches they’ve been concentrating on primarily. Another market is the beer-festival circuit, including a sponsorship in the upcoming Pittsburgh Beer Fest (of which Pittsburgh City Paper is a sponsor). “When you’re doing beer fests, most people use jockey boxes. They’re not very attractive, they use a ton of ice — which can be a challenge — and they’re slow.” Common Plea Catering and Bar Marco use PortaDrafts for offsite events; they can also be found outside PNC Park before Pirates games. Home consumer models start at $650, though Ciuksza says that he’s offering a $50 discount for Pittsburgh residents. Ordering and other information is at www.portabeer.com.

“YOU DON’T WANT TO NOT BE ABLE TO POUR A BEER BECAUSE YOU FORGOT YOUR NUT WRENCH.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Happy Hour

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

ibizatapaspgh.com

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine PRIVATE ROOMS AND GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

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900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge)

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Grandma Rose’s CATERING & PASTRY We Support

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

Monday 9am-3pm Tuesday-Thursday 9am-6pm Friday 9am-8pm Don’t forget Saturday Brunch 9am-2pm CLOSED SUNDAYS Dine-In or Take-Out

We also cater office parties! Let us do the work... Call us 24 hours in advance@

412-415-0338

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallops-threeways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic Up Modern Kitchen {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} and delightful Italian restaurant. JIMMY WAN’S. 1337 Old MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial The menu — both prix fixe Freeport Road, Fox Chapel (412Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. and a la carte — focuses on the 968-0848) and 1686 Route 228, This fine-dining restaurant offers authentic flavors of Sicily, Cranberry (724-778-8978). This the bold flavors and confident such as pasta Norma and upscale eatery delivers what preparations of classic Portuguese veal alla Palermitana, Americans expect from a cuisine — from thick, meaty while occasionally Chinese restaurant, plus Iberian octopus tentacles, broiled invoking the shortfare with a modern, with Portuguese bleu cheese, to order tradition, as pan-Asian approach, sausage flambéed en route to with the hash of . www per complete with the table. Entrees include steak in potatoes, peppers a p ty ci pgh m Japanese and French a red-wine sauce, chicken cooked and onions. KF .co influences. Wan’s offers with Portuguese peppers, pork with inventive appetizers such clams and, of course, fish. LE GAUCHO PARRILLA. as sashimi ceviche, traditional 1607 Penn Ave., Strip District. and creative sushi, dim sum and MONTEREY PUB. 1227 Monterey 412-709-6622. Wood-fired Chinese-American entrees both St., North Side. 412-322-6535. meat and vegetables, paired familiar (Peking duck) and less so A welcoming neighborhood with delectable sauces, make (dan dan noodles). KE bar with a menu of classic pub this tiny Argentine-barbecue grub and Irish standards (such as eatery worth stopping at. The “bangers and mash”) But there is beef, chicken, sausage and also the occasional Asian flourish seafood is all infused with or unexpected ingredient mashflavor from the wood grill. up, such as Thai red curry wings, Add-on sauces include: fried green beans, an Irish-Cuban chimichurri; ajo (garlic and sandwich and a BLT with salmon. JE herbs in olive oil); cebolla, with caramelized onions; and the PINO’S CONTEMPORARY charred-pepper pimenton. KF ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-361-1336. The IBIZA. 2224 E. Carson St., menu at this Italian eatery spans South Side. 412-325-2227. from sandwiches that hearken An urbane wine bar and tapas back to its pizzeria days, through restaurant, Ibiza is the sister pastas of varying sophistication, to restaurant to its next-door inventive, modern entrees. Some favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu dishes pull out the stops, including starts in Spain but includes seafood Newburg lasagna and delicacies from Portugal, veal with artichokes, peppers, Argentina and other countries. olives and wild mushrooms Accompanied by a wide international selection of wines, Red Orchid {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with Ibiza offers a transportive LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe gourmet options. KE dining experience. KE Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. 724-745-6791. This casual RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., JG’S TARENTUM STATION neighborhood taqueria offers West View. 412-837-2527. This GRILLE. 101 Station Drive, classic Mexican-American fare cozy, family-run Thai restaurant Tarentum. 724-226-3301. An oldsprinkled with more authentic offers a selection of mostly school continental menu and a options such as tinga (saucy tried-and-true cuisine (salads, well-restored train station make stewed pork) and sopes, thick rice and noodle dishes, and this restaurant a destination. The cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos curries), as well as chef’s specials, menu leans toward Italian fine excels with Americanized many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dining, plus steaks and chops. Mexican dishes, imbuing them dumplings” and Thai toast make But well-charred chicken with authentic ingredients and for excellent starters, and the Louisiana and dishes featuring preparations that recalls the fresh, kitchen shows skill in balancing habañero and poblano peppers flavorful fast food as it’s prepared the flavors of more complex denote some contemporary in Mexico. JF curries and meat entrees. KF American updating. LE

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 22


Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

Book your Valentine’s Day reservations today!

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

For your Dining & Dancing Pleasure: Open Fri & sat nights at 5PM with Live Music starting at 8PM. Visit our website for our entertainment schedule and Happy Hour specials.

Open Fri & Sat at 5PM To review our menu, please visit our website: TheColonyRestaurant.com

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

Available 7 Days/Week for parties, business meetings, fund raisers. For Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner Contact us at 412.668.0903 for more information on private functions

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1928 Cochran Road • Scott Twp, PA 15220

100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

• 412.668.0903 •

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Harris Grill Presents

groundhoggapalooza

Outdoor Ice Bar with Jack ST Frost featuring take-your -head-to-it ice luge shots, funny groundhog hats, and an exclusive altbier from Straub. Limited Release Viewer discretion is advised, GROUNDHOG as are warm woolen mittens. The furry fun starts around 7:00 -- don’t be late now. 21+ Freeze a little, save a lot!

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Please wipe your mukluks. Very few groundhogs, if any, were harmed in the production of this prediction. Please don’t lick the shot luge. If you can’t stand the heat, get off of the patio. N E W S

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

Made-to-Order Omelet Station Waffle Bar Breakfast & Dinner Ent Entrees En ntrees

SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258. Salt embodies a singular vision for not just eating, but fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact menu reflects chef Kevin Sousa’s hybrid style, combining cutting-edge techniques with traditional ingredients to create unique flavor and texture combinations. Salt erases distinctions — between fine and casual dining, between familiar and exotic ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE

BAR & RISTORANTE ANTE

DINNER SPECIAL

Only $45 for two *Includes a glass of house wine for each person

Two weeks only! From Jan. 31 to Feb. 16 APPETIZER: Edamame OR Chicken Gyoza(6) ENTRÉE: Choose from 7 entrees including: Sushi Platter OR Sashimi Platter, Tangerine Scallop & Shrimp, General Tso’s Chicken & Shrimp Free Fried Rice

2101 Greentree Rd. (next to Applebee’s in Scott Towne Center)

412-279-8811 www.osakapgh.com

$14

4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com

SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412-741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE SUN PENANG. 5829 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-7600. Sun Penang’s aesthetic is Asian — simple but not austere — and to peruse its menu is to explore the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. The Pangan ikan is a house specialty, and the Malaysian kway teow (practically the country’s national dish) may be the best you ever have without a tourist visa. JE UP MODERN KITCHEN. 5500 Walnut St., Shadyside. 412688-8220. This contemporary restaurant offers a sophisticated sensibility and eclectic approach to fresh, local and seasonal cuisine. The globally influenced menu ranges from “bites” to “small plates” to entrees, as well as soups, salads and sandwiches. The variety is such that it’s hard to imagine a diner unable to find something enticing. KE

find out on

VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

BEAN POLL Judges rank local baristas in regional competition

The Big East Barista Competition was projected live at Commonplace Voluto, in Garfield. {PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGAN DREW}

Sunday Brunch is Back!

ROSE TEA CAFÉ. 5874 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4212238. This bubble-tea café has broadened its offerings to include high-quality, authentic Chinese cooking. The menu is dominated by Taiwanese dishes, including a variety of seafood items. In place of the thick, glossy brown sauces which seem all but inevitable at most American Chinese restaurants, Rose Tea keeps things light with delicate sauces that are more like dressings for their fresh-tasting ingredients. KF

IF PITTSBURGH IS indeed “the new Portland,” as a Washington Post blog claimed in 2012, then it’s no surprise the local craft-coffee culture is on the rise. The Commonplace Coffee Company — which boasts two Pittsburgh shops, a roaster in Larimer and a growing presence on restaurant tables — is becoming a big part of it. Recently, three Commonplace baristas took part in the Big Eastern Regional Barista Competition in Durham, N.C. There, Phil Johnson, Commonplace’s head roaster and green buyer, volunteered as a judge, while barista Nick Oddo and Pittsburgh operations manager Drew von Arx competed. The event involves making 12 drinks — a mix of espressos, singleshot cappuccinos and originals — in just 15 minutes, while “displaying knowledge and enthusiasm for specialty coffee,” adds Oddo. Though local shops have sent baristas in the past — von Arx previously competed for 21st Street Coffee — Commonplace was Pittsburgh’s sole representative this year. “Pittsburgh has amazing baristas, and shop owners should reward their hard work by sending them to things like this,” says Oddo. In a field of 22, Von Arx and Oddo finished 16th and 18th, respectively, but say there’s really no way to lose. It’s “good publicity” for the city’s coffee reputation, says von Arx, who jokes, “I got more action on my Twitter feed in the hour surrounding my performance than I have in the entire time I’ve had my account.” What’s more, he adds, “If you dedicate time and have the right mindset, it’s just about impossible to not leave the [competition] as a better barista.” First-time competitor Oddo was pleasantly surprised that “for an industry that is knocked for being pretentious by some, [the event] was warm, positive and welcoming.” Despite such events, Johnson says, many people “don’t necessarily give coffee the same amount of respect or open-mindedness,” as they do food. At least, not yet. But with plans to develop a training curriculum leading up to next year’s competition and future goals for coffee education, Commonplace and its baristas may change that — while cementing their place as innovators in Pittsburgh’s growing coffee culture. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014


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LOCAL

“IT’S NOT GONNA HELP ANYBODY UNLESS WE WORK FROM THE INSIDE OUT.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

PLAYING FOR PHIL

A R.A.R.E. COMMITMENT

The Beagle Brothers flank a furry friend.

None of the members of The Beagle Brothers has personally witnessed the Groundhog Day festivities in Punxsutawney before — but they have been to Gobbler’s Knob. “We were asked to play a show this past summer in Punxsutawney, called ‘Phil Fest,’” explains steel-guitar player Read Connolly. “It’s the event where they give the groundhog the elixir of life that has allowed him to live for 120 years.” It was an official Punxsutawney Phil event, replete with members of the inner circle. (Though as Connolly notes, “They weren’t wearing their top hats; they just had T-shirts on.”) One inner-circle member took a liking to the Pittsburgh band — so much so that he jumped up in the middle of their set to let them know. That led to the band’s invitation this year to play the national anthem at Gobbler’s Knob on the morning of Groundhog Day — an event that’s broadcast live nationwide on The Weather Channel. The band worked with producer Dino Destefano on an arrangement of the national anthem that Connolly says is true to form, but also faithful to the Beagles’ sound. The members have collaborated with Commonwealth Press on merch for the event, and are readying themselves for the elements. “Not only are we getting our wardrobe together; we’ve been practicing outside in the cold,” Connolly says. “We pick the coldest nights and go outside to play. The guitars are detuned immediately.” Besides the Beagles, local stalwart Slim Forsythe will be on hand to play his groundhog-themed tune, “The Ballad of Punxsutawney Phil.” Nied’s Hotel, Forsythe’s home base, will be sending a bus up to Punxsutawney, leaving Nied’s at 2 a.m. Sunday morning. (That costs $32 and includes snacks and drinks; call Nied’s for more information: 412-781-9853.) Attendance numbers for Groundhog Day at Gobbler’s Knob generally run upward of 20,000. Given that Feb. 2 is smack in the middle of the weekend this year, Connolly says organizers are shooting for 30,000 this time. As for whether Phil will see his shadow? “I’m reticent to predict what’s going to happen,” Connolly insists.

R.A.R.E. Nation: From left, Rami Bensasi, Palermo Stone, Jonathan Mehalic

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

P

at a crossroads in 2014. In the early 2010s, everything was on the up-and-up: Local rappers had made inroads nationally, and Wiz Khalifa and Mac Miller became the city’s biggest hip-hop exports ever. For a time, it felt like the rising tide brought about by the Rostrum Records and Taylor Gang success stories was going to lift a lot of local MCs’ boats. Then … not much happened. “If you dropped a CD in 2010, you’d get a lot of views” as a Pittsburgh artist, recalls Palermo Stone, who worked as Mac Miller’s hype man before going solo in 2009. “Then it started to go downhill; it became less about Pittsburgh and more about the individual artists. It took its toll on the Pittsburgh scene as a whole.” To Stone, the takeaway lesson isn’t that Pittsburgh’s moment in the spotlight is over; it’s that a thriving

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GROUNDHOG DAY 2014. Gates open 3 a.m., Beagle Brothers play national anthem at 6:15 a.m. Groundhog activity about 7:25 a.m. Gobbler’s Knob, Sportsmen Park, Punxsutawney. www.groundhog.org

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ITTSBURGH HIP HOP finds itself

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

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A R.A.R.E. COMMITMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

PATCHWORK NO MORE {BY IAN THOMAS} Based on the name alone, it isn’t hard to imagine an album called Held in Splendor by a band called Quilt as yet another exercise in twee Americana: the soundtrack to an Etsy buying binge, or a round of artisanal cocktails that precedes a wolf-suited wild rumpus. Luckily, that’s not the case. The world put forth on Held in Splendor, the Boston trio’s sophomore effort, is mossy and messy, a place to be moved through and lived in, not fetishized or encased in glass. It’s clean and majestic, but it breathes.

music scene takes more than just a few shooting stars. That’s the philosophy behind R.A.R.E. Nation, the management and promotion team and artist collective Stone founded with Rami Bensasi and Jonathan Mehalic. “It’s not gonna help anybody unless we work from the inside out,” Stone says, referring to the national attention brought on by Wiz and Mac. “Like the Harlem Renaissance — it was just about writing and poetry. They just wanted to be heard, and they revolutionized the game. They made a pact to not give up until they were heard. It happened there, Atlanta, L.A., in Chicago now — that’s the model for a city’s success.”

RARE NATION AND MIAMI NIGHTS PRESENT

PITTSBURGH SOUND FEAT. PALERMO STONE, BEEDIE, AF ROME, MARS JACKSON, MORE

7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLISON PHARMAKIS}

Splendid: Quilt

With the benefit of a proper studio and the time to use it, Quilt has delivered a more cohesive album than its 2011 debut, which was recorded piecemeal and intermittently. Held offers delicately picked guitar, washes of organ and throaty harmonies by vocalist Anna Rochinski, with a lockstep backbeat that tracks muddy boot-prints across the album’s 13 songs. Instrumentally, think of Fleet Foxes. Lyrically, think of the new-age wizardry of Ty Segall. Quilt stomps through the album purposefully, but not gravely. It’s a joyful journey, anchored in the purity of pop melody. And as pretty as that may sound, it’s surprisingly utilitarian. The inertia of every note functions to facilitate the movement of the next. These songs are not meant to document an experience; instead they are the experience — a life in the world. “’Cause I am not self-contained / I’ll lay here and fly away / but there goes my answer / the harder I look it goes farther,” Rochinski sings on “Just Dust.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

QUILT with SHAKY SHRINES, BUTTERBIRDS. 9 p.m. Tue., Feb. 4. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8-10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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Part of that model: In addition to promoting artists like Stone himself, JKJ and Ads Antalik, R.A.R.E. participates in outreach programs, the most high-profile of which is the Pittsburgh Hip-Hop Arts Collaborative, a new partnership with rapper and activist Jasiri X and his 1Hood organization. The collective’s first event, Thu., Feb. 6, brings hip-hop producer, artist and educator 9th Wonder to town for a live discussion with Jasiri X. It all started when Jasiri approached Stone about working together. “I was just watching them move from afar,” says Jasiri. “It seems like every year I’m in Pittsburgh less and less, but I was watching them from afar. I saw the video [Stone] did with Dee-1; just reading about how he did his project — it seemed like a level of maturity I hadn’t seen from a lot of other artists.” The collaborative effort between 1Hood and R.A.R.E. Nation received grant money from Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh, a joint project of the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Heinz Endowments. The ultimate plan includes various types of programming, but the 9th Wonder talk is the kickoff. “This is a different event from what Pittsburgh is used to,” says Stone. “Everything is usually so music-based; this is less music-based and more educational. What we’re trying to do is shift the culture; even the Jay Z show


[on Jan. 21 was] not sold out. That’s kind of ridiculous to think about. Every time he comes it’s half-full. We’re on a downward shift, and we want to flip the tables on that.” In the planning stages now is a summer hip-hop festival that the group hopes will be a big draw. “You see these cities that have destination hip-hop festivals, like [Philadelphia’s] Roots Picnic,” explains Jasiri. “We wanted to create something like that that would happen every year in Pittsburgh. It’ll be a diverse audience, it’ll be fun, it’ll be dope, it’ll feature local artists, hopefully national artists. “I live in East Liberty, right off of Penn,” he adds. “I just recently found out it was a first Friday [Unblurred art crawl], so I went down the street to Garfield. I saw people all over, but I saw very few people of color. One thing that Pittsburgh does really well is support artists. We wanted to create something where you could see people of color who create art, whether it’s painting or fashion, the whole nine.” “The plan is to have it over two days,” says R.A.R.E. confounder Bensasi. “The first day will focus on art and hip-hop culture — photography, painting, that kind of stuff. Then the second day will be performances. Basically a block party is the idea.”

Palermo Stone’s R.A.R.E. book cover

change. It’s always been confrontational, controversial, but in a positive way — to speak on things that need to be spoken on. I think in Pittsburgh a lot of people have lost sight of that.” That’s what R.A.R.E. Nation has been about since the beginning. Stone and Bensasi, who went to Woodland Hills schools together and are now in their mid20s, founded the group in 2012 to help create an infrastructure for hip hop and art in Pittsburgh, and to give back to the community. In late 2012, Stone released his R.A.R.E. album, which was issued in conjunction with a book of art, some by Woodland Hills students and alumni. That desire to do more than just make music is one thing that distinguishes R.A.R.E.; another is the group’s communications and business acumen. As a promotional company, R.A.R.E. has forged relationships with several local booking groups, and serves as an intermediary for its up-and-coming artists. That’s something that struck Jasiri early in their working relationship. “When you initially bring someone in — I didn’t know Palermo at all,” Jasiri says. “It’s just been really cool to work with him and R.A.R.E. Nation because they just know the business. I think they’re going to be successful — I don’t even think it’s a question. Not only is the music good, but they know how to handle the business.” That mix might make R.A.R.E. Nation a big part of a formula that helps put Pittsburgh hip hop on stable ground. “If you’re around me, I push,” adds Jasiri. “I would say they push equally hard; they’re equally go-getting. It’s been refreshing.”

“I BELIEVE HIP HOP HAS ALWAYS BEEN ABOUT CHANGE.”

PITTSBURGH HIP-HOP ARTS COLLABORATIVE PRESENTS

A CONVERSATION WITH 9TH WONDER, HOSTED BY JASIRI X, WITH PERFORMANCE BY PALERMO STONE

7 p.m. Thu., Feb. 6. Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $5. All ages. www.rarenation.com

“The idea is to do something different, something special for the people of Pittsburgh, because they need it more than they think they do,” says Stone. “We’re so Pittsburgh-proud here that sometimes we don’t realize we need other influences.” “Everyone’s a rapper,” says Bensasi. “And most of what’s put in front of you is subpar, or the message is bad. Nothing is there to last — it’s all for self-gain and not for a purpose. Call me an idealist, but I believe hip hop has always been about

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF DANNY CLINCH}

HAPPS

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Jacksonville, Fla.-based Yellowcard has been at it for a while — the pop-punk band, which throws in some classical influences via violin, is best known for its 2003 hit “Ocean Avenue.” The latest on the five-piece’s radar? A re-imagining of the 2003 Ocean Avenue album — this time all acoustic. Want to take a walk down pop-punk memory lane, only ever-so-slightly different? Try Yellowcard live tonight at Altar Bar. Kayla Copes 8 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. Sold out at press time. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[ELECTRONIC] + SAT., FEB.01 Indiana electronic instrumental rock band Lotus makes its way to Pittsburgh tonight. Don’t be fooled by the “instrumental” label; the band has some hip-hop and classical sounds in its music as Gabriel well. The band’s most Birnbaum recent studio album, Build, was released in 2013 — a must-listen track is the danceable “Break Build Burn.” Check Lotus out tonight at Stage AE. Pittsburgh-based trap DJ Buku opens. KC 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $2025. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[LOCAL MUSIC] + SAT., FEB. 01

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

In the summer, the folks from the Rock All Night Tour throw a ton of local bands in a Lawrenceville park all day and it’s a good time. In the winter, you can’t very well do that — you could put the bands there, but it probably wouldn’t be enjoyable. So they take it inside for Snow Ball, which takes place tonight at Cattivo. Local acts represented on the two stages include

Chrome Moses, Bastard Bearded Irishmen, The Big Bend, Lungs Face Feet and many more. Andy Mulkerin 6 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz

[INDIE FOLK] + MON., FEB. 03 Wilder Maker’s 2013 release Year of Endless Light was met with high praise from critics; at its heart is songwriter Gabriel Birnbaum, who uses his strong voice to defy the sameness that often characterizes indie folk. A little David Berman, a little Damien Jurado, some ’70s rock — it’s thrown together in a particular manner that doesn’t recall any one more than the other, making it uniquely Birnbaum. Tonight he appears solo at Acoustic Music Works along with Milo Jones. AM 7:30 p.m. 2142 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. $6. All ages. 412-422-0710 or www.acoustic musicworks.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., FEB. 04 Craig Finn is one of our more unlikely rock stars. The forty-something singer of The Hold Steady bears, as the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Tony Norman has noted, more than a passing resemblance to former Pittsburgh City Councilor Doug Shields. And the wordy songsmith didn’t rise to true fame until he was hitting his late 30s (though his early band, Lifter Puller, was something of a cult fave). But Finn has a charm and swagger that comes across best live — as at tonight’s show at Mr. Small’s Theatre. Tim Barry opens the night. AM 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18-20. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


An Evening of Music

Julian Roso

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} OAKDALE INN. Dave Iglar Duo.

ROCK/POP

GOOSKI’S. Drugula, Spooky Sounds of the Zeros, The Shapes of Things. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. 222 ORMSBY. Ma Jolie, Playoff KENDREW’S. Speakeasy Alley Beard, Skull Kid, Sup, Muscles? Band. 724-375-5959. Mt. Oliver. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 31ST STREET PUB. Ravenna Phosphorescent, Caveman. Arsenal, Lycosa, Mockingbird, Millvale. 866-468-3401. Slaves BC. Strip District. PARK HOUSE. The 412-391-8334. Me Toos. North Side. ALTMAN’S TAVERN. 412-224-2273. Tony Janflone Jr. RAMADA INN HOTEL Pleasant Hills. & CONFERENCE BRILLOBOX. The ww. r w CENTER. Elmoz Sicks, Night Vapor, pe ghcitypa p Fire. Greensburg. T-Tops. Bloomfield. .com 724-836-0603. 412-621-4900. ROCHESTER INN CLUB CAFE. The Wild HARDWOOD GRILLE. Geese, Sean McClorey (Early) Influx, Radio Days, Anika Bell & the Uptown Rhythm& Brass. Ross. 412-364-8166. Arsenal Choir (Late). South Side. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE 412-431-4950. MEADOWS. Good Guys Band. CLUB COLONY. Five Guys Named Washington. Moe. Scott. 412-668-0903. SMILING MOOSE. AngeLight, ELWOOD’S PUB. Dave Iglar. Lastwatch Aurora, No 724-265-1181. Movement, The Anti-Psychotics, GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Kinetic, Cerebral Collapse. South Side. Stranger Convention. Garfield. 412-452-6749. 412-361-2262. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Grievous Angels, The Tumblers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Joy Ike

FRI 31

THU 30

ALTAR BAR. Yellowcard, What’s Eating Gilbert. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Silent Lions, General Fantasy, Butterbirds. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Briar Rabbit, Joel Ansett, Tony Cenname. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Aaron from The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Scott, Rob & Greg of the Clarks. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. Billy the Kid & The Regulators, The Red Spades. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Karmin, Bryce Vine. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

Charlie & The Fox Trots

FULL LIST ONLINE

EARLY WARNINGS

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SAT 01

ALTAR BAR. Autograph. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE BLACK HORSE TRAIL PUB & GRILLE. Corned Beef & Curry. Bridgeville. 412-221-9785. BRILLOBOX. Meeting of Important People, Wreck Loose, Costello & the Cool Minors. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Sound Servent Jam Session. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CLUB CAFE. Bumper Jacksons, Slim Forsythe, ATS-Countrivabilly BigBand Luke The Knife, Tenova. Official Lotus After Party. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Big Atlantic. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GOOSKI’S. Flora Fauna, The Bloated Sluts, Rogue Signals. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Max House & them Perkulators. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. MOONDOG’S. The Next Doors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. OBEY HOUSE. The Turbosonics, JJ Bickle & the Liberators. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PETER B’S. Antz Marching. 724-353-2677. THE PITTSBURGH WINERY. Water Seed. Strip District. 412-586-1000.

The Both

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN LANTRY}

{THU., MARCH 06}

Pusha T

Altar Bar, Strip District {FRI., APRIL 18}

Ghost

Stage AE, North Side {MON., MAY 05}

The Both (Aimee Mann and Ted Leo) Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale

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CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Twisted Fate. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Blue Sky Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Wee Jams. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. The Redlines, Southside American, Great Ancient Trees. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Bite the Bullet. 724-433-1322. STAGE AE. Lotus, Buku. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 02

SMITTY’S. Moose Tracks, Bill Couch. Sheraden. 412-331-9184.

MON 03

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Humminbird, Michael Tamburo, Triangle & Rhino, Jackie McDowell. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

WED 05

wyep.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

ALTAR BAR. Chimaira, iwrestledabearonce, Oceano, Fit For An Autopsy, Reflections, more. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Carrie Rodriguez, Luke Jacobs. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Galactic, Ryan Montbleau. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Emancipator Ensemble, Odesza, Real Magic. South Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 30

FRI 31

SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Flashback Fridays w/ DJ AJ Fresh. Washington.

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. The Big Throw Back w/ J. Malls & Omar Abdul. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

SAT 01

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Vinyly. w/ Tom Cox, Jwan Allen, & Preslav Lefterov. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

w paper pghcitym .co

BRILLOBOX. Quilt, Shaky Shrines, Butterbirds. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. The Westies, As Ladders. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Gin Blossoms. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Hold Steady, Tim Barry. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

BLUES

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

TUE 04

   

  

SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

SUN 02

PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 04

CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. Two-step Tuesdays. UK Garage. Oakland. 707-480-8208.

WED 05

ANDYS. Tracksploitation. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Mike, DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 01

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Palermo Stone, Beedie, AF Rome, Mars Jackson, Bill Niels, Cody Mojo, JKJ. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

THU 30 FRI 31

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. The Vince Agwada Blues Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Emsworth. 412-761-6700. WINGHART’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Monroeville. 412-372-5500.

SAT 01

BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. The Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. THE BRONZE HOOD. Sweaty Betty Blues Band. Robinson. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Tim Woods. Downtown. 412-471-9100. TUGBOAT’S. Guitar Zack & the Daves. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1992.

JAZZ THU 30

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 31

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Bumper Jacksons, The DeFades, Dr. Alton Merrell. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SAT 01

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. The Luccarelli Jazz Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593.


LOCAL TWEETS

Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

WORLD

@wizkhalifa (Wiz Khalifa)

SAT 01

Everyone wants to talk about @Pharrell and his hat. At least he has the balls to be memorable. Noone wants to be memorable anymore

BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Gringo Zydeco. West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

COUNTRY TUE 04

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Lone Pine Bluegrass Duo. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

@ChrisDos (Chris Barker)

CLASSICAL

straight up, that ImagineDragons/Kendrik Lamar shit was powerful. Even if they stole the quads idea from @whitewives.

THU 30

OVREARTS. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157.

FRI 31

Live Music

OVREARTS. Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. Activity Center, Garfield. 412-294-8071. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bach, Beethoven, & Brahms feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Hélène Grimaud, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

no grammy for kendrick tho. not 1. not 1 single grammy.

hAPPens here

SAT 01 CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. The Soiree Band. Scott. 412-668-0903. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Warm Winter Coat Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8 p.m. dance lesson, 9 p.m. dancing. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

SUN 02

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Jeff Berman Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. SONOMA GRILLE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 03

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 04

ANDYS. Mike Borowski. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Kevin Howard Kevin Howard. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Fields of Praise. Sixth Presbyterian Church, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5884. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Gershwin Valentine. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Session. North Side. 412-904-3335.

ACOUSTIC THU 30

ELWOOD’S PUB. Marshall Street Rents. 724-265-1181. SEVICHE. Zig Daniels. Downtown. 412-697-3120. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Tony Janflone Jr. Washington.

FRI 31

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Dixie Doc & the Pittsburgh Dixieland All-Stars. North Side. 412-508-8951.

SAT 01

565 LIVE. Brian Belonzi. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Jack McLaughlin. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 02

BYS YOGA. Amy Regan. South Side. 412-481-9642. HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bach, Beethoven, & Brahms feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Hélène Grimaud, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

MON 03

PETER SERKIN, PIANO. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4129.

TUE 04

CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH. Donations will be accepted to support the music department at CAPA High School. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 917-363-6089.

OTHER MUSIC THU 30

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

DOWNLOAD THE FREE CP HAPPS APP NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

FRI 31

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. No Bad Ju Ju. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club.

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

Jan 29 - Feb 4 Ladysmith Black Mambazo

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7:30p.m.

Dom Kennedy ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Skeme, The Come up & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Brian Fitzy and Bob Banerjee CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 30 10 Years

REX THEATER South Side. 412381-6811. With special guest Trapper Schoepp & more. All ages show. Tickets:

newbalancepittsburgh.com

ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7:30p.m.

Intro to American Whiskey - Whiskey Class

Artist Talk: Joel Sternfeld

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. Over 21 event. Tickets: tenderpgh.com. 1p.m.

CMA THEATER, CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART Oakland. Free event. For more info visit cmoa.org. 6:30p.m.

LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO

Yellowcard ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Whats Eating Gilbert. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Karmin: Pulses Tour MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Brycevine. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 31 Heads

THE STUDIO, PITTSBURGH

PHOTO CREDIT: LUIS LEAL

WEDNESDAY 29

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29 BYHAM THEATER

PLAYHOUSE Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through Feb. 16.

Madagascar THE CARLYLE Downtown. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 412-362-1713. Through Feb. 16.

Phosphorescent MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Caveman. All ages show. Tickets:

ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

SATURDAY 18

Compagnie Käfig

Guy Torry

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m. & 9:15p.m.

Lotus STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Buku. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trsutarts.org. 8p.m.

Autograph ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Sumpn Fierce & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

SUNDAY 29

Judge Jackie Justice CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. Through April 27.

TUESDAY 41 The Hold Steady

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Tim Barry. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Gin Blossoms JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

FRESH FOAM IS COMING

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH

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SLICES OF LIFE {BY AL HOFF}

“POSSESSIONS” IS A WITTY TAKE ON ORDINARY HOUSEHOLD OBJECTS THAT HAVE BECOME GHOSTS

In this year’s slate of Oscar-nominated Live Action Shorts, two comedies bring some levity to a program dominated by heavier subject matter. Selma Vilhunen’s “Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?” (Finland, 7 min.) portrays the universal comedy of getting a chaotic family ready for a wedding. Circumstances are decidedly odder in “The Voorman Problem” (U.K., 13 min.): Mark Gill’s film follows a psychiatrist (Martin Freeman) into a prison where he examines a man claiming to be God.

SHORTAND SWEET CP APPROVED

God and Man? “The Voorman Problem”

The sentimental “Helium” (Denmark, 23 min.) is sad but heartwarming. A janitor at a hospital captivates a terminally ill boy with tales of Helium, a fantastical after-life that is superior to “boring” Heaven. The words are evocative, but director Ander Walter does a superb job of bringing Helium to life through CGI visuals. Troubled children of a different sort appear in Esteban Crespo’s “That Wasn’t Me” (Spain, 24 min.), in which Spanish doctors traveling in an unidentified African nation are kidnapped by child soldiers. Things go badly, but out of the horror comes some hard-earned redemption.

Tiny warriors: the child soldiers of “That Wasn’t Me”

In “Just Before Losing Everything” (France, 30 min.), a woman and her children are imperiled by her gun-toting husband, and can’t even find sanctuary at the shopping mall — or can they? In this small-scale thriller, director Xavier Legrand builds plenty of fraught tension out of mundane domestic details such as colorful work shirts and crowded parking lots. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Jan. 31. Regent Square

{BY AL HOFF}

I

Among the Oscar-nominated shorts (clockwise from top left): “Possessions,” “Feral,” Room on the Broom” and “Get a Horse!”

T’S THE RED-CARPET season for films,

and despite the proliferating awards shows, the Academy Awards still carry the most weight. And it’s the forum that bestows the most prestigious prize on those often overlooked gems of the art form, the short films. The golden men are handed out March 2, and the Oscar-nominated short films are making their theatrical rounds now. Pittsburgh Filmmakers will be presenting all the short films, in three programs. From Fri., Jan. 31, through Feb. 13, Regent Square will screen the contenders for Best Live Action and Best Animated, in two programs. (On Feb. 14, both programs will move to the Harris for another week.) On the weekends of Feb. 7-9 and Feb. 14-16, the nominated Documentary shorts will play at Melwood. Below is a review of the animated program. (The live-action films are reviewed on the left.) The lyrical, allegorical “Feral” (USA, 13 min.), from Daniel Sousa, delivers gorgeous, evocative visuals using an almost monochromatic palette, shadows and silhouettes. In it, a feral child is rescued

from the woods, but his wildness cannot exist in ordered society. The digitally animated “Mr. Hublot” (Luxembourg/France, 11 min.), from Laurent Witz, creates a beautifully realized, incredibly detailed steampunk world, in which the titular character adopts a doglike robot (or a robot-like dog). It’s sweet and filled with sly humor, and the eagle-eyed will marvel at many visual gags. (I loved the counter in Hublot’s forehead that flipped over numbers as he thought.)

OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORTS

Animated and Live Action (two programs) Starts Fri., Jan. 31. Regent Square

CP APPROVED Shuhei Morita’s “Possessions” (Japan, 14 min.) is a witty take on tsukumogami, or ordinary household objects that have become ghosts. A warrior holes up in a hut in a storm, but he is soon dealing with

dancing umbrellas, with eyes peering through their torn paper, and diaphanous strips of old kimonos bemoaning their lost beauty. Kids and the young-at-heart should take to “Room on the Broom” (U.K., 25 min.), directed by Max Lang and Jan Lachauer. This brightly colored fairy tale, narrated by Simon Pegg, tells of a big-hearted witch who shares her broom with too many stray animals. The break-out star of this short is the wonderfully expressive grumpy cat. Everybody who saw Frozen saw the latest Disney-Pixar short, “Get a Horse!” (USA, 6 min.), directed by Lauren MacMullan. The story is pure slapstick, but the film is a clever meta-text on the animation that Disney helped popularize, with a vintage-style Mickey Mouse cartoon getting tangled up with eye-popping digital effects. The animation program runs 102 minutes, and is rounded out with three additional shorts that were not nominated but have been otherwise commended: “A la Francaise,” “The Missing Scarf” and “The Blue Umbrella.”

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

BLUE VELVET. The pretty little town of Lumberton; Bobby Vinton crooning; and a severed ear lying on the lawn. David Lynch’s melodramatic 1986 thriller probed beneath the veneer of charming Americana to reveal a dark, sexually violent underbelly that both repulses and attracts. Blue Velvet is gorgeously shot, twisted, hallucinatory and, given Lynch’s occasionally maddening style, highly watchable. Kyle MacLachlan is our wide-eyed guide; the film also stars Isabella Rossellini, Laura Dern, Dean Jones and, indelibly, Dennis Hopper, as the sadistic, drug-fueled Frank Booth. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31; and 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. Hollywood

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

GIMME SHELTER. An angry teen (Vanessa Hudgens) from a troubled home seeks out her long-estranged father, a Wall Street broker (Brendan Fraser). But her pregnancy complicates the reunion, and she winds up on the streets. Luckily, she is taken in by a woman (Ann Dowd) who runs a home for pregnant teens with no family support. Ron Krauss’ melodrama is based on a real sanctuary in New Jersey, and for all this film’s TV-movie trappings, one suspects that the material would have been better served by a documentary. Shelter doubles down on making former teen star Hudgens grungy and “real,” but it’s time that would have been better spent fleshing out some of the other girls’ stories and providing better context about how the group home functions as a way station. Ironically, all we ever learn about the girls at the home is what they read aloud from their pilfered psychological profiles — that is, how some stranger has judged them. If you miss the troubled-teen TV movies of yore, this one’s for you, but, for all its good intentions, it gives short shrift to its subject matter. (Al Hoff) LABOR DAY. A single mom (Kate Winslet) gives a mysterious stranger (Josh Brolin) a ride in this drama from Jason Reitman. Starts Fri., Jan. 31. THAT AWKWARD MOMEN T. Dating proves

GROUN DHOG DAY. In this neo-classic 1993 charmer from Harold Ramis, Bill Murray plays a Pittsburgh weatherman who gets trapped in a time loop while covering the annual festivities in Punxsutawney. See it once, then see it again. And again. 1 and 4 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1; and 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 2. Hollywood. $5 (1 p.m. Feb. 1, $3) NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and DAWN OF THE DEAD. It’s a double-feature of George Romero’s most popular and influential zombie films. First up, the locally produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter Night of the Living Dead that introduced America to the modern zombie. It’s followed by Dawn of the Dead (1978) in which folks try to outlast zombies by hunkering down in a shopping mall. Dawn has more laughs, but everything is still all messed up. Night: 8 p.m.; Dawn: 10 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. Oaks. $8 each or $14 for both (with concession benefits). (AH)

CP

Gimme Shelter tricky for Michael B. Jordan, Miles Teller and Zac Efron in Tom Gormican’s comedy. Starts Fri., Jan. 31.

REPERTORY

SPACEBALLS. In Mel Brooks’ 1987 spoof of Star Wars, Lone Starr (Bill Pullman) and Barf the Mawg (a furry John Candy) set their intergalactic RV to hyperspeed in order to save the Druish Princess Vespa (Daphne Zuniga) and her robot, Dot Matrix (voice of Joan Rivers), from the evil

Karen Durbin

A ROMANCE TO ROOT FOR .”

Lou Lumenick

“ WINSLET AND BROLIN HAVE

clutches of Dark Helmet (Rick Moranis). Brooks is on board as both President Skroob and Yogurt, a wizard wise in the ways of the Schwartz. May the puns be with you. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 29. AMC Loews. $5 IKIRU. Akira Kurusowa’s 1952 masterpiece, whose title means “to live,” puts that proposition to a municipal bureaucrat in modern Tokyo who learns he has terminal cancer. Fleeing a life of emotional limbo, the aging Watanabe (Takashi Shimura) vainly seeks refuge in family, sensual pleasures and a fling with a much younger co-worker before desperation drives him to an act of redemption. Shimura’s heartbreaking performance is bettered only by Kurosawa’s own: Ikiru is a deeply moving film that’s also a cinematic tour de force — a philosophical drama and a cutting social critique … and no less a joy to look at, and listen to, for it. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 29. Melwood. $2 (Bill O’Driscoll)

CP

12 O’CLOCK BOYS. Lotfy Nathan’s new documentary profiles the “12 O’Clock Boys,” a group of urban dirt-bike riders in Baltimore. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 30. Hollywood

WONDERFUL CHEMISTRY. This gem is part coming-of-age drama and part thriller, as well as being

SWOONINGLY ROMANTIC.”

Night of the Living Dead

12 O’CLOCK BOYS (2013) - 1/30 @ 7:30PM SXSW hit documentary about Baltimore dirt bike gangs.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------BLUE VELVET (1986) - 1/31 @ 7 & 9:30, 2/1 @ 7 & 9:30 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GROUNDHOG DAY (1993) - 2/1 @ 1 & 4, 2/2 @ 1, 4, & 7 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THE PRETTY ONE (2013) - 2/5 @ 7:30 When a woman’s identical prettier twin sister dies, the woman assumes her sister’s identity.

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES • SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT - NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT TICKETS ACCEPTED

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

THE PRETTY ON E. Jenée LaMarque directs this comedy in which a woman assumes the identity of her twin sister after her death. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 5. Hollywood MOULIN ROUGE. Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman star in this razzamatazz 2001 musical, set in the fabled Parisian nightclub and scored with modern pop songs. Baz Luhrmann directs. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 5. AMC Loews. $5 TWIN PEAKS: FIRE WALK WITH ME. David Lynch directs this 1992 film, a prequel to the events of the Twin Peaks TV show. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Feb. 6; 9:15 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7; 7 p.m. Sat., Feb. 8; and 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Hollywood AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[DANCE PREVIEW]

PIERRE LEGUILLON PRESENTS ANOTHER FORM OF CHARACTER STUDY: THE ARTIST AS SELF-PROMOTER

DANCING IN THE STREETS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

COMPAGNIE KÄFIG performs 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1, Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

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Upside down and right-side up: Compagnie Käfig incorporates Brazilian street dancers. {PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHEL CAVALCA}

Perhaps there is no better illustration of dance’s ability to cross socioeconomic lines than the two works on Compagnie Käfig’s current 14-city U.S. tour. Based in Lyon, France, the troupe for this tour features an all-male cast of 11 street dancers from the Rio de Janeiro shanty towns known as favelas. They perform as part of Pittsburgh Dance Council’s new season on Feb. 1, at Downtown’s Byham Theater. Mourad Merzouki, an award-winning choreographer and French Knight of the Legion of Honour, founded Compagnie Käfig in 1996. Since then, the company has garnered critical praise worldwide, and has performed to sold-out audiences in 650 cities. In 2006, Merzouki was approached by Guy Darmet, former director of the Maison de la Danse in Lyon, to create a work for a group of Brazilian street dancers Darmet had been following. “These young dancers were dancing to express themselves, to exist, to survive,” says Merzouki via email. “The rhythm and the passion are really present within them.” The work they created was 2008’s athletic and acrobatic “Agwa.” The first of the two works the dancers will perform in Pittsburgh, “Agwa” explores universal themes surrounding the importance of water. Merzouki says he used the dancers’ existing movement vocabulary of hip hop, capoeira and samba dance as a starting point, and then combined it with additional choreographic elements. “For them, it is a very special experience because it totally changed their approach to dance,” Merzouki says. “As they were initially dancing in the streets, they now became real professional dancers.” Fascinated by the results, Merzouki has made the dancers a recurring part of Compagnie Käfig. The success of “Agwa” then spawned the program’s other work, 2010’s “Correria” (running), which symbolizes the frantic speed of modernday life. Says Merzouki: “The work plunges us into a hectic race just like the one that governs our daily lives.” Both 30-minute works are set to a music mix, arranged by French hip-hop artist AS’N, which includes samba and bossa nova rhythms. For the 11 street dancers plucked from relative obscurity, Merzouki says the experience of being a part of his company and touring the world has been “like a fairy tale.” And on Saturday, Pittsburgh gets to witness the story’s ongoing happy ending.

{IMAGE COURTESY OF 303 GALLERY, NEW YORK}

Artifice as impersonation: Rodney Graham’s “Pipe Cleaner Artist, Amalfi, ’61” (2013)

ARTINDISGUISE {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

I

N THEIR statement for the 2013 Carnegie International, curators Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers and Tina Kukielski touch on several themes that dictated their choices. However, one theme that became evident, while not directly stated, is that of artifice and impersonation. At first glance, Gabriel Sierra’s installation in the Hall of Architecture might seem to have “little effect” (to quote New York Times art critic Roberta Smith). But “Untitled (111.111.111 x 111.111.111 = 12345678987654321)” is more than mere intervention and appropriation. In the context of Pittsburgh, it functions both as indictment and praise for Andrew Carnegie, founder of both the Carnegie International and the museum that houses it. As part of a major expansion of his original art-gallery concept, the Hall of Architecture allowed Carnegie to bring “antiquities” to the people of Western Pennsylvania. Made up of plaster-cast

replicas of some of the world’s most famous buildings, the Hall is an artificial grand tour. It is at once kitschy and rarefied, as it is now one of the few remaining intact examples left of this type of display. Sierra highlights the space and underscores its quirkiness, grandiosity and dysynchrony by accenting the walls in a rich, deep purple — a color with its own complex set of religious and historical associations.

THE 2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL

continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Not far from Sierra’s installation is another piece that interacts with aspects of its surroundings. “Untitled,” by Wade Guyton, fills one wall of the Founder’s Room and

interjects its presence into the Gilded Age décor. Leaning against one wall, large-scale panels sport flames that rise from the floor. Guyton has made his reputation on artifice. His pieces seem to be paintings, but are in fact digitally rendered. Guyton has pioneered the use of scanners and inkjet printers to create a dynamic and unique abstract vocabulary. Another of his installations transforms a non-traditional space — it was previously the museum’s coatroom — into a contemplative yet relaxed “gallery,” complete with well-worn couches from his own studio. While displayed in the traditional gallery space upstairs, a number of other artists share Guyton’s innovative approach to abstraction. Sadie Benning, though primarily known for her video work, here offers surprisingly tactile, seemingly twodimensional paintings. Hand-built with board and plaster, they are actually more like sculpture, and are based on drawings CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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ART IN DISGUISE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

Opening Night

January

B Y J .T R O G E R S

DIRECTED BY SHEILA MCKENNA

S TA R R I N G H E L E N A R U O T I , L A R R Y J O H N M E Y E R S , A N D M E L I N DA H E L F R I C H

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(runs through February 16)

A mystery, a ghost story, a memory play...

THE CARLYLE, DOWNTOWN 306 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 For directions, dining options, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com or call 412.362.1713

made on her smartphone. Benning is interested in the exchange between digital and analog processes. Similarly, Vincent Fecteau handcrafts his singularly odd sculptures in papier-mâché. The perplexity of the shapes, colors and materiality of his sculptures add to their allure. That interplay between solidity and ephemerality is also apparent in Lara Favaretto’s nearby confetti cubes, which will gradually disintegrate with time. While the above works could be categorized as material imposters, there are other works in the exhibition that focus on artifice as impersonation. In “The Pipe Cleaner Artist, Amalfi, ’61,” a two-panel light box, Rodney Graham assumes the character of an archetypal mid-century avant-garde European artist. The image itself is based on photographs of artists, one of Jean Cocteau and the other of Asger Jorn. Like Graham, Taryn Simon conflates numerous references in her exhaustive installation “Birds of the West Indies.” Compulsive to a fault, the piece presents the many layers of meaning contained in the James Bond brand. On one level, the work is a pictorial catalog of the women, weapons and vehicles that have appeared in Bond films. On another, it pays tribute to bird-watching and Ian Fleming’s interest in it. (The spy novelist named his main character after an ornithologist.) Ultimately, the piece explores the nature of fantasy, and the surprising role that substitution has played in the Bond enterprise — particularly the role of Nikki van der Zyl, who provided the voice for more than a dozen Bond characters, most notably Ursula Andress in Dr. No. In his two installations, “A Vivarium for George E. Ohr” and “Jean Dubuffet Typographer (diorama),” Pierre Leguillon presents another form of character study: the artist as self-promoter. The Dubuffet installation — consisting of a jumble of printed matter and a video — is actually placed in a case in the Museum of Natural History’s Hall of Botany, where it feels both like a newly discovered specimen as well as a scientific interloper. Another piece placed for effect, as well as affect, is Mark Leckey’s short film “Made in ’Eaven,” found amidst the Carngie’s jewel and mineral collections. Leckey has digitally reproduced a sparkling Jeff Koons stainless steel “Rabbit,” itself a reproduction of an inflatable plastic toy bunny. Like Leguillon, Leckey here explores the real or fictive role of the artist as well as the arbitrary allure and value of objects. While large group shows are rarely coherent, a loose thematic framework often invites welcome discovery amidst the multiplicity of experiences on offer. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

[ART REVIEW]

HOUSE WORK {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Interior landscape: view of Chiharu Shiota’s Trace of Memory {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTRESS FACTORY}

Theater that moves you.

The Mattress Factory has expanded to include a small, 19th-century North Side row house a few doors down from its main facility. Trace of Memory, by Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota, is the space’s premiere exhibition. This spellbinding inauguration embraces the former home’s history, while building upon it with artistic innovation. Shiota’s signature technique — surrounding objects and filling environments with corded lattice work — is employed to stunning effect throughout three stories of a Pittsburgh dwelling typical of its era. The house itself evinces generations of habitation: hardwood floors trod to dullness and furrow; paint flaked off walls in patterns that evoke moss and lichen spreading over rock; staircases and window frames, once straight as young spines, now crooked like elderly ones. The wear and decay only enhance the building’s beauty, like the evidence of passing years can improve a lovely girl into a compelling woman. Shiota has begun by creating evocative tableaux throughout. Minimal and simple, they suggest glimpses into the activities of the unseen occupants. In the entryway, a spindly-legged chair has been pulled away from an austere desk, hinting at a brief respite from studies; this staging is echoed elsewhere, with a cast-iron sewing machine. In one room, books are piled high on the floor, some fluttering and flying into the air; in another, stacks of hard-backed suitcases wait, some hinged open and empty like mouths waiting to be filled. The scenes fabricated — the implications for the lives here suggested — are themselves hypnotically compelling. The further embellishment of Shiota’s hallmark yarn-work delivers these scenes into transcendence. Thick, rough yarn, frayed and black, is anchored to floor, stretched to ceiling, pulled to window sills, creating patterns, cradles and cocoons. The most obvious parallel is to webs, imagined arachnids busily weaving delicate snares from corner to corner — though Shitota’s tendrils suggest not an entrapping web, but an embrace instead. Further exploration calls to mind the growth of a creeper, kudzu or ivy, crawling from room to room, the yarn spreading over surfaces of its own imperative. It’s a glorious and lush new beginning for a structure past its century, elusive and transitory. One anticipates how this building will be utilized next, while wishing it could remain as it is now. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TRACE OF MEMORY continues through May 31. Mattress Factory at 516 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org


[PLAY REVIEW]

KING MAKER {BY TED HOOVER} ON APRIL 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther

King Jr. was assassinated while standing on a Lorraine Motel balcony in Memphis, Tenn. In town to support striking African-American sanitation workers, King had delivered his famed “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” address just one night before. Playwright Katori Hall examines what might have happened to King between the speech and the shot in her Olivier Awardwinning play The Mountaintop, which receives its Pittsburgh premiere at City Theatre. The good news is that Hall’s play is a hugely entertaining example of “magic realism,” a literary style in which extraordinary things happen in an ordinary way. The bad news is that most of those extraordinary things are big plot revelations — and it’s against the Sacred Critic’s Code® to reveal surprises in a review. So I can’t tell you what happens in The Mountaintop, except to say it’s

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

King’s last night: Bianca LaVerne Jones and Albert Jones in The Mountaintop

THE MOUNTAINTOP continues through Feb. 9. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-40. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

nothing you expect. We begin in room 306 of the Lorraine Motel (recreated to absolute perfection by Tony Ferrieri), where King finds himself restless and alone after returning from his speech. He calls the front desk

for room service; Camae, a new maid working at the motel, promptly appears at his door, and an intermissionless twocharacter drama unfolds. But again: It’s not what you think. It’s helpful to know that in advance, because early on, Hall seems headed for stereotype and scandal. But then the play zooms off in another direction entirely and you realize that you’ve been set up because … … well, I can’t tell you. But this is a freewheeling evening filled with imagination, audacity and humor. Only the last few moments disappoint, with a heretofore-absent sentimentality. Director Peter Flynn does a marvelous job finding an emotional spine in Hall’s constantly shifting landscape. He also oversees two remarkably detailed performances. With intensely interior emotion and flashes of oratorical thunderstorms, Albert Jones summons an incredibly human King. Not bound by historical imperatives, Bianca LaVerne Jones deploys her excellent comedic style as the forcefully funny maid. Hall has created two characters who reflect each other perfectly: With Flynn’s assistance, Jones and Jones have done exactly that. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Artist Talks Joel Sternfeld Thursday, January 30, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Hear the artist disuss his photographs chronicling utopian communities in the United States. Zoe Strauss Thursday, February 6, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Strauss discusses her multifaceted artistic practice that focuses on the unseen or forgotten people and places of urban America. Reception with cash bar follows.

Sponsored by

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

+ THU., JAN. 30 {STAGE} Although it concerned children with cancer, Dani Girl, the first stage musical by young Carnegie Mellon alums Michael Kooman and Christopher Dimond, went on to productions in Toronto, Boston and Australia. Kooman (music) and Dimond (book and lyrics) are now working on a commission from the Kennedy Center; they’re that good. Their latest work, made for Pittsburgh CLO’s CLO Cabaret, is the musical comedy Judge Jackie Justice. It’s about a TV judge who rules on cases involving zombies, spaceships and furries … until the tables are turned. The premiere production, directed by the CLO’s Van Kaplan, opens tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. Continues through April 27. $34.75-39.75. 412-4566666 or www.CLOCabaret.com

{STAGE}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

J.T. Rogers’ 2004 Madagascar received the American Theatre Critics Association’s award for best new play and the 2005 Pinter Review Prize for Drama; the U.K.’s Telegraph called it “a subtle and haunting piece [that] quietly captures … how little we may know about those we love, and the shifting nature of personality itself.” Quantum Theatre’s new production is Rogers’ first play to be staged in Pittsburgh. Madagascar depicts three Americans individually telling their stories in a Roman hotel room: the wealthy widow of a famed economist who’s vanished; her daughter; and one of the economist’s former colleagues. Directed by Sheila McKenna, the stellar cast — Helena Ruoti, Larry John Meyers and Melinda Helfrich — performs in the resplendently marbled The Carlyle, in Downtown’s Fourth Avenue Historic District. The first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 16. 306 Fourth Ave., Downtown. $18-49. 412-362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com

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Walter Mosley

{STAGE} Judging by the praise for EM Lewis’ Heads, a play about four people held hostage in Iraq, seeing this show belongs on your to-do

JAN. 30

Madagascar

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARCIA WILSON}

hAPPen here

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Events

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list. The Los Angeles Times hailed Heads as one of its top-10 productions of 2007. The Denver Examiner website described it as “a welcome, intelligent and moving drama.” The show debuts tonight, presented by Point Park University’s The REP, and directed by John Shepard. Angela Suico 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 16. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $15 (Jan. 30 preview performance only; subsequent shows are $24 and $27). 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ SAT., FEB. 01 {OUTDOORS} Don’t let these pesky polar vortexes keep you from enjoying the great outdoors. Beat back the cold by bundling up and fortifying yourself with beans. Today, Venture Outdoors leads a Dutch Oven Chili Hike through Hollow Oak Land Trust, near Moon


sp otlight

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ASASE YAA AFRICAN-AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE}

Song, music, dance and the richness of the African diaspora come together in Asase Yaa African-American Dance Theatre’s ballet of Drum Love, presented by Kente Arts Alliance, at the North Side’s New Hazlett Theater. With Drum Love, the Brooklyn-based troupe will make its Pittsburgh debut, having performed around the world including in Japan, Korea, France, Iceland, Ghana, Guinea and the Netherlands. Asase Yaa has also appeared at VH1’s Hip Hop Honors, Stars of New York Dance and at the premiere of the HBO documentary film, Sing Your Song, with Harry Belafonte. Drum Love brings together nine dancers, seven musicians and singer/ historian Mandingue Djelimuso to tell the uplifting story of a young naïve girl who finds herself in love with two handsome big-city artists. Though she is warned by friends and family to avoid these men, she creates a situation that will bring shame to her family. By ballet’s end, however, she recognizes her mistakes and embraces the support of her family and friends. The 90-minute production features colorful costumes, traditional music, including a balafon player, and dance from Guinea, West Africa. Its energy and excitement, says Asase Yaa co-director Kofi Osei Williams, “will keep you on the edge of your seat.” Steve Sucato 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 1-888-71-TICKETS or www.kentearts.org

Township. Work up an appetite on an easy 3-to-4mile hike around this wooded conservation area, then replenish those calories with chili cooked over the campfire. Al Hoff 1 p.m. Montour Run, Moon Township. $15 (members)/$20 (non-members). 412-255-0564 or www. ventureoutdoors.org

also take questions, both presubmitted and from the audience. Feel free to ask her advice for forging a career in law, but note that she cannot comment on current issues before the Court. A book-

and visual works will be on display at The Andy Warhol Museum — Warhol himself was a Scholastic winner in 1945 — as the show makes its stop in Pittsburgh. Opening reception is Fri., Feb. 7. AS Through March 2. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Artwork by Patrick Hulse

{MUSIC}

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FEB. 02 {MUSIC}

On the cover of Amy Regan’s latest album, Pretty Little Baby, the singerFEB. 04 songwriter appears Sonia to be practicing Sotomayor her child’s pose (on a wall, no less), so it’s little surprise that her show tonight is at BYS Yoga. She’ll perform a bit for the Healing a Broken Heart yoga class at 5:30 p.m., but signing will follow the talk, the full concert starts at presented by the Pittsburgh 7:30, if you’re interested in Arts & Lectures series. AS remaining upright while 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, listening. Either way, the 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. folky pop singer will please $20-50. 412-622-8866 or with her personal tunes and www.pittsburghlectures.org silky vocals. Andy Mulkerin Class: 5:30 p.m.; concert: 7:30 p.m. 1113 E. Carson St., South Side. Class: $10-15; concert: $10. 412-481-9642 or {WORDS AND ART} www.bys-yoga.com The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards change “My kid could paint that” from a low-blow insult into a statement of parental pride. The contest {LECTURE} invites teenage artists and Supreme Court Justice Sonia writers to submit their best Sotomayor speaks at the work to a panel of creative University of Pittsburgh professionals. Winners receive tonight. In a conversation scholarships, and have their with Pitt Chancellor Mark works showcased around the Nordenberg, she’ll address country in the Art. Write. Now. the personal history described Tour 2013-2014. Beginning in her memoir, My Beloved today, more than 130 literary World. Justice Sotomayor will

The night belongs to Britten and Beethoven as the University {PHOTO COURTESY of Pittsburgh OF ELENA SEIBERT} Symphony Orchestra performs a piece from each composer’s repertoire. First up is Benjamin Britten’s “Nocturne,” featuring tenor Rob Frankenberry. Following is Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, featuring cellist Paula Tuttle, pianist Donna Amato and violinist Roger Zahab. What better way to wind down your Wednesday than with a concert of two alliterative greats? AS 8 p.m.

FEB. 05

Art. Write. W i Now. N Tour 2013-2014 Feb. 5. Bellefield Hall Auditorium, 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. Free. www.music.pitt.edu

+ THU., FEB. 06 {LITERARY} It’s unusual for an author to

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Easy Rawlins detective series. Mosley speaks tonight as the fifth author in the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers’ 2013-2014 lineup. AS 8:30 p.m. Feb. 16. Frick Fine Arts Building, 650 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pgh writerseries.wordpress.com

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{STAGE} Playwright Glen Berger might be best known as co-writer of the star-crossed Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. But his earlier work, Underneath the Lintel, couldn’t be more different. The 2000 play has one character: a Dutch librarian obsessed with learning the secret behind a library book mysteriously returned 113 years overdue. The play’s Pittsburgh premiere, at 12 Peers Theater, comes largely courtesy of local actor Randy Kovitz, who saw Berger give a reading of the script in New York, in 2009, and was blown away. “It starts out as a very realistic sort of lecture, but it turns into a beautiful piece of theater,” says Kovitz, a seasoned stage and screen actor. He describes Lintel as “an existential detective story” that ultimately spans the globe and millennia of history. And it’s played out on a stark stage, with just a chalkboard, a slide projector and a suitcase full of props. The play’s title refers to decisions made in doorways, which in a moment can change the course of a life. A four-week run at the Pittsburgh Playwrights space, Downtown, begins tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 26. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-15. www.12peerstheater.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CRAIGTHOMPSONPHOTO.COM}

+ TUE., FEB. 04

win both an O. Henry award and a Grammy, but Walter Mosley has done it. Whether he’s writing novels or liner notes for Richard Pryor, Mosley produces work that’s as diverse as his awards, with work ranging from science fiction to political essays to his most famous creation, the

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} THURS, JAN 30 • 8PM

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THEATER COMPANY. As yet unable to make a commitment of his own, Robert supports his married friends & hears about the ups & downs of their relationships. Presented by the Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 18. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DARK SISTERS. After a raid on her family’s compound, sister-wife Eliza embarks on a quest for self-discovery. Presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Fri., Jan. 31, 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 2, 2 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DATING CAN BE MURDER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., Feb. 1, 7 p.m. and Thru Feb. 15, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. HEADS. Story of four hostages in a war zone & how they each respond to their ordeal by making difficult choices to

Thru Feb. 16. The Carlyle, survive. Presented by The REP. Downtown. 412-362-1713. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. THE MOUNTAINTOP. A and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 16. fictionalized portrayal of Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. the night before Dr. Martin 412-392-8000. Luther King, Jr.’s assassination. JUDGE JACKIE JUSTICE Tue, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, The courtroom of Judge 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 9. City Jackie Justice is now in Theatre, South Side. session w/ “real” cases 412-431-2489. involving zombies, OFF THE WALL spaceships, furries, THEATER. more. Wed-Fri, . w ww per Straightening Combs. 7:30 p.m. and Sat, a p ty ci pgh m One-woman show Sun, 2 p.m. Thru .co written & performed April 27. Cabaret Kim El about comingat Theater Square, of-age in urban America. Downtown. 412-456-6666. Carnegie. 800-838-3006. MACDEATH. Presented by ROSE’S DILEMMA. Musical Mysteries & More. Fri., A romantic comedy about a Jan. 31, 6:30 p.m. Lamplighter writer who imagines her Restaurant. 724-468-4545. deceased lover is helping her MADAGASCAR. A haunting finish his last novel. Fri, Sat, story about three Americans 8:15 p.m. and Thru Jan. 30, who find themselves alone in the 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 1. Butler Little same hotel room overlooking Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. Rome’s Spanish Steps at three WICKED. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, different periods in time. Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6 p.m. Presented by Quantum Theatre. Thru Feb. 9. Benedum Center, Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

Groundhoggapalooza

Sat, Feb 1

bottles Straub Groundhog Altbier

$3 16 oz. Straub Craft Drafts

Shadyside Meet Bob McLaughlin from 8-10 PM

Downtown. 412-456-6666. YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 1. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

COMEDY THU 30

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 31

SALLY BROOKS, SARAH KONISHI. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. WOLFIE’S COMIC WARS. 8 p.m. Remo’s Catering, Ross. 310-909-6446. YEAH THOSE GUYS IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 01

COMEDY SHOWCASE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. DEREK MINTO, ANDY PICCARO, DWYANE DUKE, ABBY DENTON, COLLIN CHAMBERLIN, GIO ATTISANO. Stand-Up Rumble I: A Stand Up Showcase. 10 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

TUE 04

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 05

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014


Drawing by Eric Hauser, from Blithering Landscapes and Other Ideas, at Crazy Mocha, in Bloomfield

ART

NEW THIS WEEK

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Art. Right. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014. Feat. 130 art & literary works from grade 6-12 students around the country. Opening reception: Feb. 7, 6-8 p.m. North Side. 412-237-8300. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Pittsburgh at Night. Photographs by John Craig. Opening reception: Feb. 1, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. FUTURE TENANT. Fabrications. Group show, highlighting work by Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Fine Arts students. Curated by Bonnie Gloris. Opening reception: Jan. 31, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7037. JAMES GALLERY. Aspect & Perception. Paintings by Micheal Madigan. Opens Feb. 1. West End. 412-922-9800. PERCOLATE. Celebrate. Closing event Jan. 31, 6-9 p.m. Wilkinsburg. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan & Aaron MacLachlan. Opening reception: Jan. 31, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Pop-Up Exhibition: Sam Thorp & Brian Gonnella. Opening reception: Feb. 7, 5-7 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Downtown. 412-325-7017.

709 PENN GALLERY. Neverlands. Mixed media drawings by Terry Boyd. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BE GALLERIES. Arcadia. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC. Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Oakland. 412-393-7600. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers,

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Burlesque Show ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBO OK

General Meeting for Point Park University Adjuncts February 5 at 4:30 p.m. 60 Boulevard of the Allies

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USW Main Lobby Conference Room

Adjuncts are uniting to make improvements at Point Park University. We have our sights set on gaining job security, a voice in LQVWLWXWLRQDOJRYHUQDQFHDQGUHFHLYLQJEHWWHUSD\DQGEHQHͤWV Come to ask your questions and discuss a plan to win. Fellow adjuncts and knowledgeable union staff will be present for group discussion. Light refreshments will be served. Bring a friend! If you have questions call Randa at 412-304-9575. AFL-CIO CLC

UNION

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All Draft Beers are HALF OFF until Halftime. Complimentary Finger Foods. Cheers! C Ch eeers rs! Ca C Carm arm rm aand nd M Mike! ike!!

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Photo from U.S. News College Compass

VISUAL

& Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Blithering Landscapes & Other Ideas. Pen, ink & colored pencil by Eric Hauser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLEL JUC. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-621-8875. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922.

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TUESDAY 9:30-11:30 9:30-11:30pm 0pm

RADICALTRIVIA $5 Evil Drinks

$2.50 Leinenkugel’s Leinenkugel’s

Wednesday ACOUSTIC MUSIC W MIKE DELUCA $3 American Honey

$2.50 Yuengling

THURSDAY 10pm-2am

KARAOKE $2.50 Coors Light

$3 Evil Shots

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

$ $

1 Bud Light 1 Well Drinks

Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight Drink Specials!

(Southside Only)

Great Music!

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Monroeville Mall • 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620

LIVE DJ @Southside

every Wednesday

winghartburgers.com

Like us on www.facebook/wingharts 42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Adventuring Princesses in Living Color.

Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MALL AT ROBINSON. CSI Pittsburgh: Fictional Crime Scene. Presented by Pittsburgh Technical Institute. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000.

Work by Maggie Lynn Negrete. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY. Spinning Yarns: Photographic Storytellers. Group show curated by Anne Leighton Massoni & Libby Rowe. Moon. 800-762-0097. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29.

OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. But I Am the Fire. Work by Laurie Trok. Latrobe. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and


coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

DANCE

EVENT:

FRI 31

Presentation on Martin Luther King Jr.

SWANS IN THE GARDEN. Vignettes from Swan Lake, presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. 6 & 7:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-454-9107.

at the University of Pittsburgh’s Intercultural House

SAT 01

CRITIC: Lucas Neffa, 22, student from Oakland

ASASE YAA AFRICANAMERICAN DANCE THEATRE. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. BELLYDANCE HAFLA W/ ELECTROBELLY DANCE TROUPE. 8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. COMPAGNIE KAFIG. Brazilian hip-hop ensemble. Presented by the Pittsburgh Dance Council. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. NEXT STAGE DANCE RESIDENCY PERFORMANCE. Works-in-progress by choreographers Mana Kawamura & Gia T. Cacalano. 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

WHEN: Mon., Jan. 20

Somebody who didn’t attend might think they understand how other people view social behavior or social movements. I think, by having attended, I can get rid of those preconceptions I had and say, “Yeah, some people do care more about — like in the activity we did — delegating money toward the elderly as opposed to rehabilitation for those coming out of prison.” Sometimes people have a general idea of what their surrounding friends might think of [these issues]. I’ve met a lot of new people here, and it pushed that comfort zone a little. I really love the variety of age here. I thought I was just hanging out with other kids who are students. It’s not [like that]. I love hanging out with older people, because there is a lot of knowledge and wisdom there. That age gradient was necessary.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 01

BREWS FOR A CHILI NIGHT IV. Sample a variety of beers & chili, plus live music. 6-8:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RAISE THE ROOF. Live art, music by Dan Fox, Kellee Maize, CeeCee DeVillain, more. Benefits the 4th River Free Skool. 8 p.m. The Gallery, Downtown. 412-560-0230.

SUN 02

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. SOUP N’AT. A community meal to help raise funds for local artists. 6-8:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

FRI 31

MON 03

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

GIRLIE SHOW W/ JOANNA LOWE, LISS VICKERY, SARA MACKO & TORIA SUSAN. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOW THE POTATO CHIP WAS INVENTED BOOK RELEASE PARTY. Release of Daniel M. Shapiro’s full-length book of poems. Feat. guest readers: Nikki Allen, Jason Baldinger, Margaret Bashaar, Lori Jakiela, & Brian Mihok. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

SAT 01

ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First w Sat of every month, paper pghcitym 11 a.m.-12 p.m. .co Carnegie Library, ENGLISH LEARNERS’ Oakland. 412-622-3151. BOOK CLUB. For advanced YOUR PATH TO ESL students. Presented PUBLICATION—AND in cooperation w/ the Greater BEYOND. Writing workshop Pittsburgh Literacy Council. for all levels. Presented by Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Pennwriters. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Pittsburgh Airport Marriott, 412-531-1912. Coraopolis. 412-788-8800. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY

LITERARY

TUE 04

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

THU 30

HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

SUN 02

ABBY MENDELSON. Talk & book signing w/ author of Pittsburgh Prays: Thirty-Six Houses of Worship. 1-2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-224-2827.

KIDSTUFF THU 30 - FRI 31

sweaters into conductive mittens for touch screens. Thru Jan. 31, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 30- WED 05

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 31

CHINESE NEW YEAR: YEAR OF THE HORSE. Enjoy dim sum & celebrate the lunar New Year. For middle & high school students. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 01

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. OPEN ART STUDIO. 9:30 a.m.4:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

We’re all about the BEER!

SAT 01 - SUN 02

PIRATE PRINCESS ADVENTURE. Interactive musical theater production. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 2 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

TUE 04

CHESS CLUB. For students in grades K-7. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TUESDAY CRAFTERNOON. For students in grades 1-3. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

All Day, Every Day: $2 PBR 24oz. cans Happy Hour: 5 pm -7 pm Mon-Fri $ 1 off all drinks

WED 05

BOOT CAMP WORKOUT. Ages 8-18. Wed, 6-7 p.m. Thru April 30 Brookline Community Center, Brookline. 412-571-3222. EZ MATH WORKSHOP. For students in grades 3-6. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru Feb. 26 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WRITING & ART WITH TESS. Story & craft-time for kids ages 5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

Wednesday: $1.75 Bud Light Drafts. 20 ¢ Wings Thursday: $2 Yuengling Drafts $3.00 Import Drafts, Burger Madness our Award Winning Burgers $6 Unlimited Toppings Friday: $2 Coors Light Bottles. $3 Blue Moon Drafts Saturday: $2 Any Draft Beer from 9-11pm. $3 Sam Adams Drafts

OUTSIDE SUN 02

MAKESHOP: UPCYCLE. Upcycle

1002 Perry Highway • Pittsburgh,Pa. 15237 412-367-9610 • perrytownedrafthouse.net

WINTER HIKING & BACKPACKING BASICS. 2 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 04

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 05

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 30

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412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

PITTSBURGH’S PREMIER GENTLEMEN’S CLUB 1635 West Carson Street Open Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7pm-2am 412-471-5764

UNTIL MARCH 1st 1st

TWO FOR ONE

LAP DANCES ALL NIGHT LONG

$4 TOP SHELF DRINKS CLUBCONTROVERSY.COM 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ARTIST TALK: JOEL STERNFELD. The photographer will share his perspective on the Sweet Earth exhibit. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GETTING STARTED IN REAL ESTATE INVESTING. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INDOOR GARDENING: FOLIAGE PLANTS, HERBS, ORCHIDS & TROPICAL BONSAI. Thu. Thru Feb. 6 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN. Thu, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 27 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MAPPING THE MOON W/ ALEXANDER VALENTINE. Talk w/ a retired NASA Lunar Cartographer & display of topographic maps of Apollo 14’s landing site, as well as photographs from the Lunar Orbiter. 6:30 p.m. Shaw Galleries, Downtown. 412-281-4884. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.


[ART] Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. BAR CRAFTS: SUPER NERD SUNDAY W/ THE PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR CREATIVE REUSE. Craft kits will be provided. 6:30 p.m. Allegheny Wine Mixer, Lawrenceville. 412-473-0100. CHINESE II. First Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Thru April 20 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. IMAGINE PENN HILLS OPEN HOUSE. 6-8 p.m. Imagine Penn Hills Charter School of Entrepreneurship, Verona. 412-737-6806.

MON 03

When describing her 2010 show Utopie Noire, at la Maison Rouge in Paris, Iranian artist Elika Hedayat explained, “There is a strong sense of dark irony in my work.” That exhibit featured a mix of grotesquely humorous drawings, text and video, borrowing from ancient texts to explore modern conflict. Tuesday, Hedayat — who borrows from Iranian folk art as much as from present-day issues — discusses her work as part of the CMU School of Art Spring Lecture Series. 5 p.m. Feb. 4. Kresge Theater, 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. www.cmu.edu/art/lectures

FRI 31

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BLOOD BROTHER SCREENING. Documentary screening about a Pittsburgh native’s travels through India & his interactions w/ HIV-positive orphans. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1345.

SAT 01

BLACK HISTORY MONTH KICKOFF PARTY. Crafts, food, tribute to Nelson Mandela, more. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. COLORED PENCIL I: TECHNIQUES. Sat, 10 a.m.4:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. First Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Third Mon of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thru April 21 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLOVAK HERITAGE. See different styles of decorated eggs (pisanki) from various Central European countries. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 25 CLUB. Free Scrabble games, Wilkins School Community all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Center, Swissvale. Mount Lebanon Public 412-478-2681. Library, Mt. Lebanon. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. 412-531-1912. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma SPANISH Freeman Center for CONVERSATION www. per pa Imagination, Garfield. GROUP. Friendly, pghcitym .co 412-924-0634. informal. At the ELIKA HEDAYAT. Part Starbucks inside Target. of the CMU Spring Lecture Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Series. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. CMU, Oakland. 412-279-2970. SWING CITY. Learn & practice MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. SALON. Discuss current Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. events w/ friends & neighbors. 412-759-1569. For seniors. First Tue of every WHISKEY CLASS. 1-2:30 p.m. month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Tender Bar + Kitchen, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. 412-531-1912. U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE SONIA SOTOMAYOR: AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL MY BELOVED WORLD. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Conversation & Q&A w/ Justice Weekly letter writing event. Sun, Sotomayor, moderated by 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. University of Pittsburgh 412-683-3727. Chancellor Mark Nordenberg. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Feb. 16 Wilkins School Community Oakland. 412-622-8866.

TUE 04

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 02

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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WED 05

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. FATHER RYAN ARTS Auditions for Amish Burlesque. CENTER. Seeking artists of COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Feb. 1 & 3. 2-min. comedic every level to submit work Seeking new players, monologue & 32 bars of depicting ideas/experiences of no experience necessary. up-tempo Broadway/pop song. peace & unity in 2D formats. Panera Bread, Downtown. Bring your own sheet music. Email submissions w/ links or 412-563-5476. www.mckeesportlittletheater.com jpeg attachments, along w/ artist DETROIT STYLE URBAN Thru. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. statement to arts@forstorrox.org BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. SWEET ADELINES w/ subject line 100 Signs of Peace. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, INTERNATIONAL. Seeking 412-771-3052. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. women of all ages who enjoy FUTURE TENANT. Seeking ENGLISH CONVERSATION singing for the Sounds of performers, writers, musicians, (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Pittsburgh Chorus Global Open composers, choreographers Lebanon Public Library, House. Any woman of average & general artistic visionaries Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. singing ability, with or without for Trespass residency & FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE vocal training is welcome. performance series. Submit a & CULTURE. 10 a.m. Mount www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, proposal at futuretenant.org/ Lebanon Public Library, Mt. 7 p.m. 412-279-6062. current-opportunities/ Open Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Allegheny CleanWays always needs volunteers to Highland Park. 412-363-4550. help clear illegal dump sites, but that isn’t the only A SILENT FOREST way to pitch in. Currently, the nonprofit is seeking SCREENING. An award-winning documentary exploring the local musicians to lend their talents to summer growing global threat of cleanup events: After a long day of removing refuse genetically engineered trees. from rivers, volunteers will be provided with musical Discussion w/ Sara Heald of entertainment. Email rjvereen@gmail.com or visit GMO Free PA to follow. www.alleghenycleanways.org for information. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. SPANISH II. Geared toward submissions through Jan. 31. THROUGHLINE THEATRE those who already have a THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY COMPANY. Auditions for basic understanding of Spanish HOUR REVIEW. Seeking 2014 season. Feb. 15-16. & are interested in increasing Men/women, 1-2 min. submissions in all genres for proficiency. First and Third monologue & cold readings. fledgling literary magazine Wed of every month, www.throughlinetheatre.org curated by members of 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, The Grey Box Theatre, the Hour After Happy Oakland. 412-622-3151. Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. Hour Writing Workshop. STEELTOWN SPOTLIGHT SERIES: DON ROY KING. afterhappyhourreview.com The Saturday Night Live INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH director will discuss his journey Submit your film, 10 minutes PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. from growing up in Pittsburgh or less. Screenings held on Accepting submissions for to becoming one of the most the second Thursday of showcase of locally versatile & experienced every month. DV8 Espresso written lesbian, directors in television. Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. gay, bisexual, or 7 p.m. Frick Fine Arts 724-219-0804. transgenderAuditorium, Oakland. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking theme 1-act plays. 412-624-4125. original essays about literature, Manuscript details www. per TEA CLASS & pa music, or film, & also essays at facebook.com/ pghcitym TASTING. History of .co generally about Pittsburgh. events/ tea, steeping techniques, To see some examples, visit 519459561475242/ Storing Tea, Health www.newyinzer.com & view 412-256-8109. Benefits, more. Tea samples & BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems the current issue. Email all European cookies will be served. pitches, submissions & inquiries with the theme of First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. the mysterious and the to newyinzer@gmail.com. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel magical in the everyday for NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Hill. 412-422-1606. Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. WEST COAST SWING Seeking artwork for upcoming Submit no more than 3 WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance Mid-Winter Hues Multi-Media of your best poems. Visit lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, Juried Art Exhibit. Submit blastfurnace.submittable.com/ South Side. 916-287-1373. recent work (3 pieces max.) Submit for submission that has not been in a previous guidelines. Deadline: March 15. juried show at NHAC. Each THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking AGAINST THE GRAIN piece must be ready for display/ performers & artists to FESTIVAL. Auditions for Faust. hanging w/ wire. Art may be participate in First Fridays Jan 29-30. Send resume & delivered Jan. 30-Feb. 1, noonArt in a Box. For more headshot (for actors) to info@ 4 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622. information, email atgfestival.org w/ “Pittsburgh” THE POET BAND COMPANY. thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. in the email subject line. Seeking various types of 412-403-7357. Creative positions also available. poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ DOLLAR BANK THREE University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. hotmail.com RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. 412-624-4141. WASHINGTON PA FILM MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Seeking a variety of FESTIVAL. Seeking films 90 min. Ongoing auditions for actors ages visual & performing artists or less. Complete rules & entry 18+ for murder mystery shows of all disciplines. form at www.highlandridgecdc. performed in the Pittsburgh area. www.3riversartsfest.org/ 412-833-5056. org. 724-678-4225. artistapps/ 412-456-6666.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m what was once quaintly called a “woman of a certain age” who started reading your column to broaden my horizons. As a result, I summoned the courage to join an online BDSM dating site. I got a response almost immediately from a man who proceeded to tell me my name would henceforth be Sub, advised me that he was to be addressed as His Majesty King Something, and ordered me to phone him. This was too much, too fast, and too weird. I gave him what I thought was a plausible excuse for my decision not to proceed to avoid hurting his feelings. He wouldn’t take no for an answer. I tried blocking him, but he seemed to have several identities on the same site. I deactivated my account. So now I’m in a quandary as to where to seek out other options — preferably options that are safer and not so ritualistically restrictive. FEAR OF FLYING

“When folks first decide to explore a curiosity in kink or BDSM, one of the things I let them know is that this loose band of variegated kinky types — the kink community — is NOT a utopia of ultimate sexual enlightenment,” said Mollena Williams, a kinky author, activist and blogger. “The kink community is a microcosm of the broader society. The same creeps, jerks and assholes on standard dating sites are on BDSM-centric sites. And some will utilize the trappings of consensual kink to nonconsensually slime people.” What Williams means by “slime” is “manipulate, intimidate and potentially abuse.” Creepy assholes will seek out younger and/or less experienced subs like you, because older and/or more experienced subs are more likely to recognize his behavior for the red flag it is — and tell him to fuck off. So what can you do? “Block the trolls,” said Williams, “and seek out the awesome folks who are also hanging out at sites like FetLife.com, ALT.com, iTaboo.com and BDSMfriendbook. com. A kink-friendly profile on a non-kink site is another option. I met my current dominant partner on OkCupid because my profile reveals that I happen to be a big old pervert. Kinky folks are everywhere!” You also have offline options. “She can find local events by checking out Caryl’s BDSM Page (drkdesyre.com) or by joining FetLife and searching events in her area,” said Williams. “She can attend munches, which are nonsexual social meet-and-greets, and classes are good places to meet people who are experienced.” Getting to know kinksters face-to-face doesn’t offer total protection from creeps, “but it’s a great way to get feedback, recommendations and ever-important warnings. Dating in the kink world is no different than dating in the default world. You don’t have to drop your drawers because you’re told to. You don’t have to spank someone because they’re insisting they NEED it. Always meet on an equal footing first. Get to know potential partners and THEN decide if you’ve got enough in common to proceed.” Two suggestions from me: Get a copy of Playing Well With Others: Your Field Guide to

Discovering, Exploring and Navigating the Kink, Leather and BDSM Communities by Mollena Williams and Lee Harrington, and follow Williams on Twitter @Mollena. I’m a bi girl and have been with my girlfriend for nearly 10 years. We discovered a love of BDSM and we’ve had lots of fun exploring. Until now. I am a natural sub, but my girlfriend asked to switch and for me to dominate her. I have tried half a dozen times, but afterward — or sometimes during a scene — she tells me it isn’t working. She says it’s not about my actions but about my “tone.” I feel guilty and depressed because I can’t seem to return the pleasure she gave me when our roles were reversed. GIVING UP ON BDSM

Either your technique and style are both lousy — maybe every fiber of your being is (subconsciously) screaming “I hate this role” during a scene — or your girlfriend is one of those BDSM switches who has a difficult time submitting to someone she knows, loves, wakes up next to every morning, gets into arguments with about bills, etc. It might be better if she subbed for someone else, while continuing to dominate you. I am married to a man who is into BDSM. I am happy to do lighter stuff, but I am not interested in squeezing into a corset and using a flogger on him. So I gave him permission to visit a pro. The pressure was off me, he was getting what he needed, our relationship and sex life improved. But I had no idea how much pros cost! He has been going to see a pro twice a month and spends $200+ on each visit! I expected that he would go a few times a year and that these “sessions” would cost $100. We are supposed to be saving to buy a home! I asked him to cut back and see someone cheaper, and he became angry and defensive. What’s a reasonable number of times to see a pro? What’s a reasonable rate? What about a couple’s plans for the future?

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

THE KINK COMMUNITY IS NOT A UTOPIA OF ULTIMATE SEXUAL ENLIGHTENMENT.

HE SPENT MORE THAN I THOUGHT

Two hundred dollars a session isn’t unreasonable when you consider that corsets, floggers, bondage gear and dungeon spaces do not come cheap. But unless money is no object, blowing $400+ a month is unreasonable and unfair. That’s $4,800+ a year, which could go a long way toward a down payment on a house. Since there aren’t many pro doms who work for $100 an hour — or many partners as understanding as you — your husband should think about cutting back, getting a second job or winning the lottery. But here’s something for you to think about: You say those sessions have improved your relationship and your sex life. If your husband were spending $100 a week to see a shrink — $5,200 a year — and you were seeing those results, would you object? Sports talk with Dan’s brother Billy at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.29-02.05

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Extravagant wigs became fashionable for a while in 18th-century England. They could soar as high as four feet above a woman’s head. Collections of fruit might be arrayed in the mass of hair, along with small replicas of gardens, taxidermically stuffed birds and model ships. I would love to see you wear something like that in the coming week. But if this seems too extreme, here’s a second-best option: Make your face and head and hair as sexy as possible. Use your alluring gaze and confident bearing to attract more of the attention and resources you need. You have a poetic license to be shinier and more charismatic than usual.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

One of your anti-role models in the coming weeks is the character that Piscean diva Rihanna portrays when she sings in Eminem’s tune “Love the Way You Lie.” Study the following lyrics, mouthed by Rihanna, and make sure that in every way you can imagine, on psychological, spiritual and interpersonal levels, you embody the exact opposite of the attitude they express: “You’re just gonna stand there and watch me burn / But that’s all right because I like the way it hurts / You’re just gonna stand there and hear me cry / But that’s all right, because I love the way you lie.” To reiterate, Pisces, avoid all situations that would tempt you to feel and act like that.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

On my 15th birthday, I finally figured out that eating dairy products was the cause of my chronic respiratory problems. From that day forward, I avoided foods made from cow’s milk. My health improved. I kept up this regimen for years. But a month ago, I decided to see if my long-standing taboo still made sense. Just for the fun of it, I gave myself permission to gorge on a tub of organic vanilla yogurt. To my shock, there was no hell to pay. I was free of snot. In the last few weeks, I have feasted regularly on all the creamy goodies I’ve been missing. I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect an equally momentous shift is possible for you. Some taboo you have honored for a long time, some rule you have obeyed as if it were an axiom, is ripe to be broken.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Psychologist Daniel Kahneman, who won a Nobel Prize in Economics, says that consulting experts may be useless. In his study of Wall Street traders, he found their advice was no better than information obtained by a chimpanzee flipping a coin. Meanwhile, psychologist Philip Tetlock did a 20-year study with similar results. He found that predictions made by political and financial professionals are inferior to wild guesses. So does this mean you should never trust any experts? No. But it’s important to approach them with extra skepticism right now. The time has come for you to upgrade your trust in your own intuition.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

I’m a big fan of logic and reason, and I urge you to be, too. Using your rational mind to understand your experience is a very good thing. The less stock you put in superstitious head trips and fear-based beliefs, the smarter you will be. Having said that, I recommend that you also make playful use of your creative imagination. Relish the comically magical elements of your mysterious fate. Pay attention to your dreams, and indulge in the pleasure of wild fantasies, and see yourself as a mythic hero in life’s

divine drama. Moral of the story: Both the rational and the fantastical approaches are essential to your health. (P.S. But the fantastical needs extra exercise in the coming weeks.)

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Sorry, Cancerian, you won’t be able to transform lead into gold anytime soon. You won’t suddenly acquire the wizardly power to heal the sick minds of racists and homophobes and misogynists. Nor will you be able to cast an effective love spell on a sexy someone who has always resisted your charms. That’s the bad news. The good news is this: If you focus on performing less spectacular magic, you could accomplish minor miracles. For example, you might diminish an adversary’s ability to disturb you. You could welcome into your life a source of love you have ignored or underestimated. And you may be able to discover a secret you hid from yourself a long time ago.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

Cosmopolitan magazine is famous for offering tips on how to spice up one’s sex life. Here’s an example: “Take a few of your favorite erotically appealing flavor combinations, like peanut butter and honey or whipped cream and chocolate sauce, and mix up yummy treats all over your lover’s body.” That sounds crazy to me, and not in a good way. In any case, I recommend that you don’t follow advice like that, especially in the coming days. It’s true that on some occasions, silliness and messiness have a role to play in building intimacy. But they aren’t advisable right now. For best results, be smooth and polished and dashing and deft. Togetherness will thrive on elegant experiments and graceful risks.

is a metaphor to symbolize the new ferocity you will invoke as you implement the next step of your noble purpose or sacred aspiration.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Every autumn, the bird species known as the Clark’s nutcracker prepares for its winter food needs by burying 30,000 pine nuts in 5,000 places over a 15-square-mile area. The amazing thing is that it remembers where almost all of them are. Your memory isn’t as prodigious as that, but it’s far better than you realize. And I hope you will use it to the hilt in the coming days. Your upcoming decisions will be highly effective if you draw on the wisdom gained from past events — especially those events that foreshadowed the transition you will soon be going through.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Can you imagine what it would be like to live without any hiding and pretending? How would you feel if you could relax into total honesty? What if you were free to say exactly what you mean, un-

burdened by the fear that telling the truth might lead to awkward complications? Such a pure and exalted condition is impossible for anyone to accomplish, of course. But you have a shot at accomplishing the next best thing in the coming week. For best results, don’t try to be perfectly candid and utterly uninhibited. Aim for 75 percent.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

It’s a favorable time to gather up resources and amass bounty and solicit help and collect lots of inside information. I won’t call you greedy if you focus on getting exactly what you need in order to feel comfortable and strong. In fact, I think it’s fine if you store up far more than what you can immediately use — because right now is also a favorable time to prepare for future adventures when you will want to call on extraordinary levels of resources, bounty, help and inside information. Do a homemade ritual in which you vow to attract more blessings into your life. Report results at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

You are not as broken as you may think you are. Your wounds aren’t as debilitating as you have imagined. And life will prove it to you this week. Or rather, let me put it this way: Life will attempt to prove it to you — and not just in some mild, half-hearted way, either. The evidence it offers will be robust and unimpeachable. But here’s my question, Virgo: Will you be so attached to your pain that you refuse to even see, let alone explore, the dramatic proof you are offered? I hope not!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Kenneth Rexroth wrote a poem called “A Sword in a Cloud of Light.” I want to borrow that image. According to my astrological analysis and poetic intuition, you will generate the exact power you need in the coming weeks by imprinting your imagination with a vision of a sword in a cloud of light. I don’t want to get too intellectual about the reasons why, but I will say this: The cloud of light represents your noble purpose or your sacred aspiration. The sword

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 50 + STUDIES 51 + WELLNESS 52 + LIVE 54 + SERVICES 54

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VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

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SHEET METAL WORKER’S LOCAL UNION #12 --Training Center 1200 Gulf Lab Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-1304 Applications for testing are accepted year-round and can be made in person at our Training Center, Monday-Friday from 8:00am to 4:00pm or online at www.smlocal12.org. The Apprentice test will be given on Saturday March 15th 2014 at 10:00am at the University of Pittsburgh. Payment is to be made no later than March 10th 2014. QUALIFICATIONS: High School Diploma (by July 1, 2014) or GED, valid PA drivers license and reliable transportation. There is a non-refundable testing fee of $25.00 that must be paid at the time the application is made. Cash, money order, or certified check are the only acceptable terms of payment, no personal checks will be accepted. For directions or additional information, please call (412) 828-1386 or visit our website at www.smlocal12.org Sheet Metal Workers Local Union #12 is an equal opportunity employer

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Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

We are currently looking for outside sales representatives to join our advertising team. Send your resume and cover letter to jbrock@steelcitymedia.com

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

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JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Longwall Coal Miners New Mining Complex in Southern Illinois We are seeking candidates with experience in longwall mining to fill the positions on our Longwall Crew at our new coal mining complex in Illinois. A rapidly growing world-class coal producer with more than 28 million tpy of productive capacity and more than 3 billion tons of reserves in the Illinois Basin. Currently operating four of the most productive underground coal mines in the United States.

• Longwall Foreman • Longwall Electrician • Longwall Shift Maintenance Foreman QUALIFICATIONS: Longwall mining experience is required. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Demonstrates, by example, a commitment to working safely. High level of energy with ability to work independently and with limited direction. APPLY TODAY: Qualified Applicants:please submit resumes to:

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 50

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

OBESITY? CALL TODAY!

HAPPS

CLINICAL STUDIES Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.29/02.05.2014

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

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ACROSS

1. “Just stop right there ...” 5. Jerk-offs 10. Twins share one 14. Lyman gave him to Jon, presumably; it’s never really explained 15. Comic Marc who hosts the podcast “WTF” 16. Certain solo 17. Group of priests dipping fruit in melted chocolate? 20. Extract hydrocarbons and also maybe poison everyone 21. KitchenAid mixer add-on 22. Boehner, e.g., for OH 24. Surfing site 25. Drive-___ 28. Slightly cracked 32. Building girder 36. Cry from Bull on “Night Court” 37. Comparatively bare-bottomed military assault? 39. Scottish hooligan 40. M.C. Escher technique 41. Flee fast 42. East African safari park effort? 44. Campbell who was one of five on “Party of Five” 45. To-dos 46. Auntie of pretzeldom 47. Tram loads 48. See 50-Across 50. With 48-Across,

was pissed 52. Give someone else heads 58. Lefty 62. Press charges against a Snuggie-clad werewolf encountered on an acid trip? 64. Citation abbreviation 65. Count in jazz 66. Creamy tone 67. Obama campaign word 68. Cold periods 69. Geology class periods

DOWN

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19. Believer 23. Focus, as on a cinematic detail 25. Kitchen grabbers 26. A spotted one might be spotted at the zoo 27. Made a fresh hole 29. Revolutionary cabal 30. Festoon 31. Scout’s job 33. Pot user out on a boat? 34. PatrÛn source 35. Pictures of Ryan Gosling or goofy-looking cats, often 38. Is freaking awesome 40. Score less than, usually 43. ___ Group (enormous private

equity firm) 44. “Ah, OK” 49. Lotion application units 51. Businessowning toon Nahasapeemapetilon 52. László who lost repeatedly to Michael Phelps 53. Manual’s opposite 54. Sharp increase 55. Nation in 7-Down 56. Early Apple computer name 57. Bit of intimate apparel 59. Velvet Underground singer, for a time 60. “Life is Peachy” nü-metal band 61. Weight 63. “Au Revoir ___ Enfants” {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


LOST CAUSE

Port Authority’s lost-and-found list catalogs our daily lives {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} EVERYONE WHO TAKES the bus knows the feeling: You step onto the curb, the doors close behind you, and as the bus pulls away, you realize you’ve left something behind. A cell phone. A Medicare card. A wooden sword. Your dentures. We’ve all been there. Or at least one rider — who presumably left the 59-Mon Valley toothless — has. That set of dentures was among the 1,062 items left behind on Port Authority vehicles in the past three months. The full list reads like an archive of everyday existence: 47 black wallets, 66 sets of keys and 160 cellphones. Two Bibles, an electric blanket and guinea-pig food. A copy of The New New Testament. Court documents. An electric shaver. A piece of chicken on a stick, wrapped in aluminum foil. All are entered into a Port Authority database, sometimes with asides composed by dispatchers who log the information. “KEYS AND TOO MANY KEYCHAINS” reads one entry’s description. Another describes a black cellphone as “BASIC AS U CAN GET.”

holds onto most items for 90 days before donating them. (Phones, for instance, go to a women’s shelter.) Items of value are left behind all the time, including laptops and other electronic devices. Among the items on the authority’s list, yet to be collected: two wallets, each with over $500. For a transit employee or a fellow rider to hand over such a windfall is “as close as you get to behavior that is not driven by selfishness,” says Christina Fong, an economist at Carnegie Mellon’s department of Social and Decision Sciences. Fong acknowledges there are social pressures in play: Nobody wants to be seen pocketing someone else’s cash. Still, she says, “We know it’s not because they’re afraid a policeman is going to catch them with the wallet.” What’s most surprising about the lost-and-found, though, isn’t that people do the honest thing by handing over objects of monetary value. It’s the objects that owners value enough to reclaim. When City Paper reviewed the list, for instance, two iPhones were languishing without an owner coming forward. A phone

AS SHREE RAO WILL TELL YOU, IT’S NOT JUST THE LITTLE THINGS THAT ARE EASY TO FORGET. LAST MAY, SHE LEFT HER BIKE ATTACHED TO THE RACK ON THE FRONT OF A 61B-BRADDOCK. Maybe one of those items was yours. Maybe when you got off the 16-Brighton bus, you missed the dull metallic jangling of your keys, now identified as “KEYS ON RING WITH ([…] I LOVE JESUS/ETC.)” Maybe you were the one who left your passport in a non-descript black piece of luggage on the Airport Flyer. But as Shree Rao will tell you, it’s not just the little things that are easy to forget. Last May, she left her bike attached to the rack on the front of a 61B-Braddock. “[I] was feeling stupid and started panicking,” she says. The chances of her bike’s speedy return seemed dim. “The only other thing I could think of was tweeting at Port Authority.” It worked: After seeing her Tweet, she connected with Port Authority which radioed the 61B, still on its route, and coordinated the bike’s recovery. But not everyone is that lucky. Typically, lost items wind up at one of Port Authority’s five lost-and-found sites, one for each garage and the T. And while customer-service agents can locate lost items in the database, you have to show up in person to claim it. Just over half of the items are reclaimed eventually, though not everything gets picked up immediately: The authority

charger, meanwhile, was picked up in a matter of days. And then there are the food items. “CHIPS AND DIP” left on a 71D-Hamilton during the first polar vortex: claimed. “SWEET POTATO PIE AND FOLDER WITH FREE ZOO TRIP”: claimed. Generally, food is among the few exceptions to the standard 90-day window. “I wouldn’t imagine they refrigerate that stuff,” says John Beeler, who oversees Port Authority’s customer-service operation. So why doesn’t the Port Authority just toss the food out immediately? The answer, as with everything else claimed from lost-andfound, is that you can never tell what someone will care about. And the bus doesn’t just take you where you’re going. It takes you as you are. “People are taking Port Authority wherever they need to go,” says Heather Pharo, a Port Authority spokeswoman. “That’s reflected in the variety of items you’re going to see. […] “‘Weird’ is in the eye of the beholder.” AZ IMME R MAN @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

January 29, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 5

January 29, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 5