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CROSS-COUNTRY: KAYLEIGH LEITH BRINGS HER NEW-COUNTRY SOUND HOME … BY WAY OF THE NETHERLANDS 22


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


EVENTS 1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DAMIEN JURADO, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, COURTNEY MARIE ANDREWS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JULIANNA BARWICK Warhol theater Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot Image: Patrick Hulse, Valentine Portrait (detail), 2012

Art. Write. Now: Scholastic Art Awards 2013-2014

2.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SAN FERMIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SON LUX Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.7 – 6pm. Art.Write.Now.Tour 2013 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Opening Reception Warhol entrance space | Tickets FREE

2.22 – 2pm TEEN MEMBERS ONLY TOUR: SCHOLASTIC ART AND WRITING AWARDS Tickets Members FREE

February 5 – March 2, 2014 The Art. Right. Now exhibition tour, now in its 4th year, travels nationwide to expose audiences to an annual selection of original work by winning 6-12 grade students from the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. These emerging artists, writers, and filmmakers are selected as the “best in the country” by top professionals in the visual and literary arts. The exhibition contains 130 art and literary works from students around the country. Andy Warhol was a Scholastic Art & Writing Award winner in 1945 at the age of 17.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


{EDITORIAL}

01.22/01.29.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISSUE 04

T {NEEDLEPOIN BY LISA M/ CUNNINGHA O BY COVER PHOT LL} HEATHER MU

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

[NEWS]]

{ADVERTISING}

when outsiders start messing 06 “IwiththinkPittsburgh speech, it can easily sound patronizing.� — Author and CMU professor Barbara Johnstone on attempts to market Pittsburghese

[VIEWS]

we put the Commonwealth’s 14 “When claims of in-person voter fraud to the test ‌ they couldn’t even get out of the starting blocks.â€? — ACLU attorney Vic Walczak on the latest setback for the state’s Voter ID bill

[TASTE]

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

are family recipes taught to 18 “These me by my mama and grandmamma.�

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

— Lampros Kakitsis on his new eatery, The Greek Kitchen

[MUSIC]

is a proper village, with horses 22 “This and cows.� — Pittsburgh-native singer Kayleigh Leith on her current digs in The Netherlands “The thriller gives us a demonstration of how awesome our government’s massive database of phone records and social media is.� — Al Hoff on Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit

[ARTS] about how history and societies are 34 “It’s formed, and how leaders can manipulate myths.� — Author Heather Terrell on what kids can learn from her new book, Relic

[LAST PAGE]

work so hard for recovery, for 55 “They themselves and their families, so that they can become who they want to be.� — Family support specialist Latina Jenkins on the mothers seeking help at Friendship’s Sojourner House

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 48 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 50 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 54 N E W S

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{ADMINISTRATION}

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

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{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“PEOPLE NOW ARE REPRESENTING A PARTICULAR PERSONA. AND THAT CHARACTER IS ‘THE YINZER.’”

Letter to the Editor Our dedicated and citizen-focused County Executive Rich Fitzgerald is right again as he backs a young dynamo, state Rep. Erin Molchany, in her upcoming fight against veteran House member Harry Readshaw, an intraparty battle that is occurring due to redistricting (“Molchany Versus Readshaw,” City Paper, Jan. 15). Mr. Fitzgerald places his finger on the key issue in the race through citing the difference between the two candidates on a bellwether, litmus-test matter: transportation funding, which Molchany supports and Readshaw opposes. Readshaw seeks to [justify] his opposition to the omnibus legislation which was recently signed into law by saying, “It’s a bad time to be taxing people,” which translates to “It’s a bad time to support public transit; it’s a bad time to maintain our infrastructure; and it’s a bad time to support the maintenance and creation of tens of thousands of jobs,” all of which shall be accomplished through passage of this legislation, which when fully implemented, will provide an additional $2.3 billion per year in critical funding for long-neglected projects. Sadly, Mr. Readshaw was joined in his vote against progress and prosperity by some famous names in local politics: General Assembly members Jay, Paul, and Dom Costa; Adam Ravenstahl; and Democratic “leader” Frank Dermody, all of whom are on the wrong side of history, and all of whom have forfeited the ability to claim that they support the essential facets of life in Allegheny County that they voted against. Rep. Readshaw would have had us play Russian roulette when traveling over any of the Commonwealth’s thousands of structurally deficient bridges. Rep. Molchany stated with her “aye” vote that public safety is not an option nor something that can be pursued only when government coffers are flush with money. It is never easy to vote for higher taxes or fees, but sometimes, it is necessary, as reasonable people of all political persuasions recognize. I will gladly pay a couple of dollars more per week in taxes and fees in order to safeguard my life, that of my wife, and all Pennsylvania citizens and to maintain a vibrant public-transit system without further cuts and fare hikes in the years to come. The region and the Commonwealth will be well served if residents of Mount Washington, the South Side, Brentwood, Baldwin and Mount Oliver cast their ballots for an honorable and worthy elected official, Erin Molchany. — Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair

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h its language

city’s history throug e th ts ar ch or ss ofe pr ics ist gu CMU Lin {BY CHRIS POTTER}

F

OR YEARS, Carnegie Mellon Univer-

sity professor Barbara Johnstone has been the world’s foremost expert on Pittsburgh’s unique speech patterns. But don’t expect to use her book Speaking Pittsburghese: The story of a dialect as a phrasebook for negotiating the Strip District on a Saturday morning. Published by Oxford University Press and currently available on amazon.com, Speaking Pittsburghese is both academic and accessible. It charts the unlikely story of a city whose residents went from barely recognizing they had an accent to celebrating it as a touchstone of their identity. As Johnstone writes, “Due to a particular set of geographical, economic, linguistic and ideological circumstances, people in Pittsburgh grabbed onto language as a way of defining themselves.” In Johnstone’s telling, those circumstances included both the collapse of the steel industry and an event just prior to it: the early-1980s publication of SamMcCool’s New Pittsburghese. McCool’s book — and later, Internet chatrooms that allowed Pittsburghers to share nostalgia

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

over speech patterns — helped departing Pittsburghers carry a bit of home with them as they searched for jobs elsewhere. And once they moved to new cities, they

were even more struck by how singular Pittsburgh’s accent was. (One reason “yinz” has assumed such local prominence, Johnstone surmises, is because so many Pittsburghers moved south, where they couldn’t help but be struck by its contrast with “y’all.”) Meanwhile, Johnstone documents, the Pittsburghers who remained behind created a cottage industry celebrating the local dialect on T-shirts and coffee mugs. But those tchotchkes distorted Pittsburgh speech even as they helped define it: Much of what we think of as “Pittsburghese” — phrases like “j’eet jet?” — actually isn’t unique to Pittsburgh at all. In fact, many of those who most celebrate Pittsburghese are newcomers, who don’t speak it correctly … while some of those with the purest accents don’t realize they have an accent at all. (Many locals, Johnstone writes, literally can’t hear the difference between “hahs” and “house.”) But whether you speak the accent well, or badly, Johnstone argues, you are part of a broader story: the tale of how Pittsburghers have made a “hahs” into a home. CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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I’VE OFTEN FELT THAT ONE OF PITTSBURGH’S MOST NOTABLE QUIRKS IS HOW MUCH PRIDE IT TAKES IN ITS OWN QUIRKINESS. IS THAT TRUE OF OUR SPEECH PATTERNS AS WELL? DO WE HAVE NOT JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF TALKING, BUT OF TALKING ABOUT HOW WE TALK? Not completely different. But there’s a lot more consciousness of it, and it came a lot earlier. Now, you find some rather self-conscious, top-down efforts to market local speech in places like New Orleans, for example, as a way of rebranding the city after Katrina. But it never quite became the thing that it is in Pittsburgh. Philadelphia, there’s a very distinct accent there, but it’s never become part of the local identity in this way. IS THAT BECAUSE, LINGUISTICALLY SPEAKING, PHILADELPHIA SUCKS? Actually, the most famous person in my field has studied Philadelphia. But he’s not interested in the dialect as a cultural artifact in the same way — and it isn’t a cultural artifact there the same way. So many random things had to come together. I think part of it has to do with Pittsburgh’s lack of self-confidence. There wasn’t anything outside of steel — no one had really thought about the city in any other kind of way [until the industry collapsed]. And as part of the lead-up to that exodus, Sam McCool wrote that book, which had a big influence. SOME OF THE FASCINATION WITH THIS STUFF — ALL THE T-SHIRTS, FOR EXAMPLE — STRIKES ME AS BEING A CASE WHERE, ONCE PEOPLE EMIGRATE FROM AN AREA, THEY CLING TO ITS TRADITIONS EVEN MORE THAN THE PEOPLE THEY LEFT BEHIND. That’s a very common feature of diasporas. I think the Steeler Nation is like that — there was a wonderful article in the [Pittsburgh] Post-Gazette about how they were creating a Disney-fied version of the Pittsburgh of long ago. I think that was happening with language, too. But now, I think, things have changed. It’s not the same kind of representation of streetcars and city chicken — the Pittsburgh that was disappearing even in the 1950s. Instead of trying to evoke a vanished way of life when they represent Pittsburghese, people now are representing a particular persona. And that character is “the yinzer.” THE STEREOTYPICAL “YINZER” IS ALWAYS WHITE AND WORKING-CLASS. BUT LATELY THERE’S BEEN A SORT OF HIPSTER CELEBRATION OF IT ALL: YOU CAN SEE PITTSBURGHESE-THEMED

Barbara Johnstone

CRAFTS AT HANDMADE ARCADE, BOUGHT AND SOLD BY PEOPLE WHO MAY NOT HAVE AN ACCENT AT ALL. IN YOUR RESEARCH, HOW DO NATIVE SPEAKERS FEEL ABOUT THAT? That’s a good question, and it’s hard to answer because this wasn’t happening even 10 years ago. They had the T-shirts, but the consumers were mostly Pittsburghers sending them to their relatives. I think when outsiders start messing with Pittsburgh speech, it can easily sound patronizing. One reason people like Pittsburgh Dad is they can tell he’s local. [Actor] Chris Preksta has an accent himself when you talk with him personally. SO CAN NON-NATIVES TRAFFIC IN THIS SORT OF “JAGOFF PARAPHERNALIA” WITHOUT BEING PATRONIZING? This is a question I get all the time. I’ve had rather hostile questions from fellow academics who say, “Why don’t you talk about what’s wrong with this? This is really objectionable.” I just say, “I’m an ethnographer; I’m a describer of the culture.” And people are not offended by this. I think people can do this lovingly, and I think a lot of the hipster stuff is kind of loving. STILL, ISN’T THERE KIND OF PAINFUL PARADOX HERE? THE PITTSBURGH ACCENT SEEMS MORE POPULAR THAN EVER, EVEN AS THE CITY’S LOCAL WORKINGCLASS IDENTITY IS DWINDLING. IT’S LIKE THE SAME THING THAT MAKES US CLING TO THE ACCENT IS ALSO WHAT’S PULLING IT AWAY FROM US. Exactly. And Pittsburgh is staking its future on the same things every other city is staking its future on. One group of people CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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SO IS THE MOMENT THAT PITTSBURGHERS BECAME AWARE OF THEIR ACCENT ALSO THE MOMENT WHERE THEY WERE DESTINED TO LOSE IT? The process of losing it is in place, though it doesn’t mean you yourself will lose it. It’s really hard to just change your accent, especially for adults. But certain forms, certain words, certain sounds, have become

stigmatized — they’re widely thought of as things that educated people don’t do. That means those particular forms, like “dahntahn,” are going to go away. YOU’VE BEEN RESEARCHING PITTSBURGH SPEECH PATTERNS FOR YEARS. ARE YOU TIRED OF IT? There are still a few things I want to do. But I feel like I’ve told the story as it can be told. One of the things I’m interested in now is “stance” — which means how you stand, but also aspects of how you talk. So I’m really interested in how Pittsburgh Dad moves. Because what he’s stylizing is not just the language but the facial expressions, and what he does with his hands. When you see people imitating Pittsburghese, they do that. It’s getting so that this yinzer stuff is about that whole stance: talking with a louder voice, and a higher voice, and talking about certain things, like being frustrated and feeling powerless. WHICH GETS BACK TO THE IDEA THAT PITTSBURGHESE IS DEFINED BY SOME LOCAL AMBIVALENCE ABOUT A GLOBALIZED, POST-INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY. SO WILL YOU AND I SOMEDAY BE TALKING ABOUT HOW OUR BODY LANGUAGE HAS A PITTSBURGH ACCENT TOO? I don’t think a set of gestures is associated with a dialect so much as a persona. If you had someone stylizing a classic workingclass guy from almost anywhere, you’d get that — tough, but frustrated. C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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who are not interested in Pittsburghese are the people trying to plan the economic future of the area. During the G-20, people who were serving as hosts were instructed not to speak Pittsburghese. And they didn’t even know what they were being asked not to do. … This is what happens in globalization in general. Globalization has been going on here forever: The fact that the Scots-Irish came here in the first place was globalization. But there’s that famous quote from sociologist Anthony Giddens: Globalization unites as it divides, and divides as it unites. People get thrown together with people who aren’t like them, and you talk more like the other person, because you want to be understood. But at the same time, you’re drawn to notice what is different. There’s an inevitable process of accommodation. Kids go to college and automatically accommodate their speech to other people — at exactly the same time they are talking about how they talk differently from each other.

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GRAND PLANS? Mount Washington residents wondering if any development is better than none at all {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} AFTER FIVE YEARS of waiting, Mount

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Washington residents recently saw signs of life on a long-anticipated “One Grandview” development project slated for Grandview Avenue. But the news wasn’t what they expected. Instead of a planned five-star hotel, the site’s developers — Sycamore Grandview Development — now plan to build a 300-unit apartment complex. For some residents, the change is less than ideal; the project was not what residents were originally told to expect. And the new development has also seen several delays since it was announced last fall. “The community is very disappointed in this developer,” says Sandra Fundy, a leader of Protect Mount Washington, a group of 90 individuals formed in October to combat changes to the One Grandview plan. “Residents are tired of all these developers who come here making promises and then do nothing.” The original proposal, designed by architects at Desmone & Associates, included a 110-room hotel, spa and fitness center, and a fine-dining restaurant. The project also featured a 55-unit condominium development and expansion of the Grandview promenade, a major attraction for sightseers. The latest proposal, however, calls for three to four buildings of apartments, parking spaces for 500 cars, and a restaurant. Opponents worry the new project will drastically increase traffic. They would rather have a development that creates more jobs and is open to the community. However, Sycamore Grandview says the original plan for a hotel is no longer financially feasible. That $100 million project was approved by the city planning commission in 2010, but architect Luke Desmone says funding quickly fell through. “When [the hotel] was proposed, it was felt that the climate was right for that, but as it turned out, the banks were not interested in loaning money for a five-star hotel in Pittsburgh,” Desmone explains. When One Grandview’s developers met with the community in September, they said they’d be presenting their new proposal to the city planning commission in October. That hearing — along with subsequent hearings scheduled for November and December and most recently, Jan. 7 — was canceled.

Sycamore Grandview says its plan isn’t quite ready to present. Residents unhappy with the new proposal are split on what to do next: Should they fight the new development when it’s finally presented to city planning, or support it? Some feel any development is better than none at all. Others want to hold out for the original hotel proposal. “A small number of residents are tired and they want something, anything there,” Fundy says. “But the residents who are invested in the community would rather have nothing than something that will destroy our sense of community. “All this 300 market-rate rental [units] would bring is over-crowded streets. ... No spa, no promenade, nothing for the community.” Troubles for the vacant site on Mount Washington’s iconic Grandview Avenue date back to 1979, when the Edge Restaurant closed down. For the next three decades, the property was vacant, until the structure was demolished by Sycamore Grandview in 2011 to make room for the new development. “I would like the project to move forward,” says William Reilly, a Mount Washington resident. “I’m tired of all the empty lots and every project getting so much negative publicity and stifling development. I’m for the apartment project. That parcel has been an eyesore for 30 years; it’s time to build.” Desmone agrees. He says he’d be happy to move forward with the hotel if a bank stepped forward to fund the $100 million project, but he doesn’t see it happening any time soon. “An unfunded project is of no value to anyone,” Desmone says. Sycamore Grandview says it will to update the community in March. The revised plan will have to be approved by city planning, but doesn’t have to be approved by Pittsburgh City Council, because the panel already approved the zoning variance for the original project. Still, having support from council can’t hurt. “I share the disappointment of the residents and, frankly, that of the developer, as well,” says City Councilor Theresa KailSmith, who represents Mount Washington. “However, we will continue to work through some of the concerns while securing the best possible development for the area.”

“THE COMMUNITY IS VERY DISAPPOINTED IN THIS DEVELOPER.”

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

SILVER BALLOT A state judge strikes at the heart of GOP’s ‘Voter ID’ law {BY CHRIS POTTER} AT SOME POINT, I’m going to start feeling

Cabaret Theater One of the most eminent pianist today, Glasper reconciles modern jazz with hip hop and R&B. His 2012 recording, BLACK RADIO won the GRAMMY for Best R & B album. In 2013 he released BLACK RADIO 2, with special guests like Lalah Hathaway, Marsha Ambrosious, and more. Interviewed by Downbeat Magazine, Glasper stated, “I’ve gotten bored with jazz to the point where I wouldn’t mind something bad happening. Slapping hurts, but at some point it’ll wake you up. I feel like jazz needs a big-a&% slap.”

PRESENTED BY

sorry for Gov. Tom Corbett. One month after a state Supreme Court ruling blew up key portions of the state’s fracking-friendly gas-drilling law, Corbett’s legal team got another shock. Last week, Commonwealth Court Judge Bernard L. McGinley issued a blistering 103-page opinion dismantling the state’s “Voter ID” law. “Voting laws are designed to assure a free and fair election; the Voter ID law does not further this goal,” McGinley’s opinion flatly declared. Requiring a photo ID, he added, was unconstitutional “on its face.” After hearing expert testimony on both sides, McGinley determined that “hundreds of thousands” of voters lacked photo IDs. And it made no sense, he ruled, to burden them because of “a vague concern about voter fraud.” Evidence in the case showed that the voter-ID requirement would have burdened everyone from transgender voters — whose IDs frequently don’t match their appearance — to rural residents, many of whom would have to obtain an ID from far-flung PennDOT license centers in other counties. By contrast, reports of in-person voter fraud in Pennsylvania — the kind voter ID is supposed to stop — are anecdotal, if not apocryphal. In a telephone conference with reporters, American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania legal director Vic Walczak said, “When we put the Commonwealth’s claims of in-person voter fraud to the test … they couldn’t even get out of the starting blocks.” McGinley had tough words not just about how the legislature wrote the law, but about how the Corbett administration implemented it. Among other things, he accused the state of “creat[ing] a culture of misinformation” with a public-awareness campaign that was “consistently confusing.” Even as the state scrambled to make IDs easier to obtain, he wrote, it did little to notify voters of those changes. Many of those changes were problematic in themselves, McGinley wrote. Early on, the Corbett administration realized that the ID requirements spelled out in the law wouldn’t pass constitutional muster. So it devised a new, supposedly easier-to-get ID to be issued by the Department of State rather than PennDOT. But McGinley found

that the law gave Corbett no authority to do so; Corbett had, he wrote, “overstepped legislative constraints.” You have to ask: If a governor can’t adequately disenfranchise voters and suck up to the fossil-fuel industry without stepping on the toes of a GOP-controlled legislature … what kind of Republican is he? But is this really all Corbett’s fault? After all, the Voter ID bill was passed in March 2012, and it gave Corbett just eight months to have its requirements in place by the 2012 presidential election. (Other states with voter-ID requirements, by contrast, phased them in over years.) And McGinley does opine that provisions of the law demonstrated a “legislative disconnect from reality.” Which can mean only one thing: Paging state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe! It was Metcalfe, of course, who originally sponsored the voter-ID law. Predictably, he denounced McGinley’s opinion as “an activist ruling by a partisan Democrat judge.” Which is partly true: McGinley is a Democrat. His concern that Corbett overstepped the law, though, is shared by none other than Metcalfe himself: “The executive branch has gone farther than what the law allows them to do,” he told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review in 2012. McGinley’s ruling can be appealed. Corbett was mulling his options as of press time, but he’s already under pressure from right-wingers. “The fact that the Governor has yet to announce an appeal … is extremely troubling,” the Philadelphia-based Independence Hall Tea Party asserted exactly one business day after the ruling was handed down. “If the Governor refuses to fight for [voter ID], why should we fight for his re-election?” So there’s the Tea Party mindset, the one Corbett is catering to: “We’ll stay home on Election Day, unless you fight to keep everyone else away from the polls.” It’s a mindset that believes if government ensures rights for the rest of us — whether to marry or to vote — it somehow means fewer rights for them. Maybe next time, Corbett should try disenfranchising a different group of voters. Because he’s not doing all that well with the far-right base he’s got.

IF A GOVERNOR CAN’T ADEQUATELY DISENFRANCHISE VOTERS AND SUCK UP TO THE FOSSIL-FUEL INDUSTRY … WHAT KIND OF REPUBLICAN IS HE?

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Artist Talk Joel Sternfeld Thursday, January 30, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear renowned American photographer Joel Sternfeld share his perspective on Sweet Earth—his series of photographs and accompanying texts that chronicle utopian communities in the United States. Photo by Joel Sternfeld from the series Sweet Earth: Experimental Utopias in America, Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.

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OUR NEWEST DOCTOR UPMC CancerCenter is pleased to welcome our newest physician. John Lech, DO Hematologist/Medical Oncologist Dr. Lech is board-certified in hematology and medical oncology, and received a medical degree from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Erie, Pa. As a native of Pittsburgh, he completed his residency in internal medicine at the Western Pennsylvania Hospital and his fellowship in hematology and oncology at The Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Temple University School of Medicine Clinical Campus in Pittsburgh. To schedule an appointment or for more information, call 412-235-1020, or visit UPMCCancerCenter.com. Hillman Cancer Center 5115 Centre Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15232

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WE RECOMMEND ASKING FOR A SIDE OF UNCLE TROY’S EXCELLENT TURKEY GRAVY

GO GREEK {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Lampros Kakitsis loves the food he’s cooking at his new Shadyside eatery, The Greek Kitchen, near the corner of Negley and Centre avenues. He’s been in the restaurant and food-service industry for about 40 years. He’s owned restaurants, and his Greek rice pudding — which bears his first name — can be found in grocery stores across the region. But the place he opened two months ago is very special to him. “These are family recipes taught to me by my mama and grandmama,” Kakitsis says. “My family was in the restaurant business for years in Greece. It makes sense to do this with our food.” The small shop, open Monday through Friday, offers dine-in and take-out options for the traditional, made-from-scratch food. Gyros, spanakopita, grape leaves and the noodle casserole pastitsio are all made daily using fresh, local ingredients. Every morning, the Kitchen also makes Greek staples like tabouli and hummus, as well as sauces, such as the creamy, yogurtbased tzatziki. For dessert, there’s sweet, flaky baklava. Kakitsis is proud of his “jumbo gyro,” a grilled pita stuffed with meat and veggies and topped with tzatziki. “Some places, they give you four or five ounces of meat,” explains Kakitsis. “But not here. Here, you get eight, nine ounces of meat.” He adds: “That’s why when people hear the name Lampros, they know they are going to get fresh food and lots of it!” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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WELCOME SOUL FOOD {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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ABY, IT WAS cold outside. But after three days of enforced family togetherness, it was also getting a mite cabin-feverish inside. Heading south for warmer weather wasn’t a realistic plan, but, on the tail end of the polar vortex, we did go out for some Southern Hospitality. The restaurant by that name has been doing business for about five years now in almost as many locations. Downtown denizens may remember the storefront on Wood Street; mall shoppers may have encountered Southern Hospitality at food courts in Monroeville and Pittsburgh Mills. The restaurant’s new digs, in Edgewood Towne Centre, are its most spacious and gracious to date, standing out from other local soul-food places that all too often tend toward barebones interiors. Oak flooring, wainscoting, tables and booths give warmth to the surprisingly large dining room, while flowers and lamps on the unused bar add a homey touch. On Sundays, the after-church crowd fills every table, but on a wintry Thursday night, we almost had the place to ourselves,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

Fried chicken wings with greens, sweet potatoes and cornbread

while take-out customers came and went. The pork-free menu focuses on fried chicken and fish, punctuated by the appearance of beef ribs, turkey and burgers, plus an extensive selection of appetizers and sides. Some, such as jalapeño poppers, mozzarella

SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY

Edgewood Towne Center, 1763 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. 412-518-9556 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $3-4.75; meats, a la carte $1-8; entrees $6-12 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED sticks and fried zucchini, seemed more like pub grub than soul food, but we tried a few items that were more down-home. One appetizer that really stood out was hash browns. The potatoes seemed to have been shredded and then deep-fried, creating a miraculously light, crisp mound of potato confetti that occasionally

clumped into larger bites. Its deliciousness made us wonder why the preparation isn’t more common. Wings were fried — not buffalo-style, but offered with a half dozen sauces, including Buffalo Wild. We went with Uncle Troy’s Mumbo, a slightly sweetened hot sauce with fruity undertones. We ended up dipping more or less everything on the table in it, savoring its balanced fire. The whole wings were excellent, with a light, crisp coating and moist, succulent meat. Fried okra, a soul-food favorite of ours, was one of the night’s few disappointments. Although the thick slices of vegetable within retained their bright green color and fresh flavor, their tough, armor-like coating was difficult to get past. Angelique wanted to order Uncle Troy’s Platter (fried chicken or fish, two sides, cornbread and a drink) with catfish, but it was out. Our server — none other than Uncle Troy himself — recommended the whiting, and Angelique was glad she took him up on it. The three beautifully cooked filets were firm, not fishy-tasting (as


whiting sometimes can be) but mild and meaty, and encased in satisfyingly crunchy, lightly seasoned cornmeal batter. In addition to various bone-in parts, fried chicken was available in nuggets or strips. We were impressed that it was all hand-cut: The nuggets were simply small pieces of white meat, fried golden-brown and juicy. Fried turkey cutlets received the same treatment, the more flavorful meat a nice bonus. We recommend asking for a side of Uncle Troy’s excellent turkey gravy. Beef ribs, served by the bone, were good and tender, with robust, beefy flavor and a barbecue sauce that enhanced, rather than swamped, the meat. It was a traditional, sweet, tomato-based sauce, but because it was not at all cloying, it didn’t make Jason wish he’d asked for it on the side.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

NOT STANDING STILL Boyd & Blair distillers branching out with colonial rum, other spirits Prentiss Orr, co-owner of Glenshaw’s Pennsylvania Pure Distilleries, tempered his expectations when the first shipment of Boyd & Blair vodka was sent in August 2008. “We thought if we could do 5,000 cases, that would be pretty cool,” he says. “We hit that a long time ago.” In fact, the brand — which is now on the shelves in 35 states — is projected to sell more than 10,000 cases this year.

“WE’VE REALLY TAKEN OUR TIME DEVELOPING NEW PRODUCTS.”

Of more than 15 sides on the menu, we managed to sample seven. Only a couple fell short of our expectations: mac-and-cheese featured overcooked noodles and, though the sauce was stretchy with real cheese, it didn’t offer much flavor; the mashed potatoes were sticky and slightly sweet. But after that, it was hit after hit. Sweet and smoky baked beans. Buttery grits. Deep brown, almost caramelized fries. Extraordinarily savory black-eyed peas (available with or without rice mixed in; we liked the body provided by the rice). Perhaps best of all was greens with smoked turkey. The flavor of the smoky meat pervaded the tender greens, and their plentiful chunks fell apart and integrated into the leaves. Our only general criticism of Southern Hospitality was that most of our dishes could have used a pinch less salt. In all other respects, this restaurant lived up to its name.

With the vodka label, the company’s signature beverage, on firm footing, the distillery is slowly introducing a line of new products. “Instead of rushing too many things out at once, we got our vodka business where it needed to be,” says distiller Rob Ricci. “We’ve really taken our time developing new products.” The first release is Stonewall Rum, named for the fences that separated properties in the early U.S. colonies. “It’s as classic a colonial rum as we could get: It’s molasses-based and lightly oaked,” says Ricci. The aroma has notes of honey and ginger ale, while butterscotch and soft wood are noticeable when drinking. The rum is distilled in small batches, so availability is limited. You can purchase a bottle ($27) directly from the distillery, or find it behind the bar at Butterjoint, Point Bruges, Park Bruges and Root 174. “We haven’t been advertising it, because we’re moving through so much of it,” Ricci says. Next up for the distillery is a vermouth concentrate, now in the final stages of obtaining government approval. The vermouth is 88 proof, and can be mixed into red or white wine, or used on its own as a base for a cocktail. Famed Chicago barman Adam Segar created the recipe (PA Pure also produces Segar’s “Hum” spirit, which is not distributed in the state). The botanicals are sourced by Rod Markus of Rare Tea Cellar. “The way our company has grown is mind-boggling,” Ricci says. “I never thought when I started here that this is where we’d be in five years.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Southern Hospitality owner Troy Johnson

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE BOSSA NOVA. 123 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-232-3030. This stripped-down, oversized industrial space somehow feels sumptuously swank. The menu is small plates, ranging from traditional tapas to Asian-inspired dishes. With excellent food, exemplary service and a grownup atmosphere, Bossa Nova is a nightclub you don’t have to be out clubbing to appreciate. KE

Fukuda {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-7812546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — are traditional, not made up to satisfy eclectic contemporary tastes. www. per a p The cannelloni alone pghcitym .co merits a visit to one of Gran Canal’s cozy, familyfriendly dining rooms. KE

CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF

FULL LIST E N O LIN

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an openminded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-377-0916. This neo-traditional Japanese restaurant excels at re-invention, with a menu that is inspired as much by modern American cuisine as it is by ancient Japanese tradition. Here, roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets its own entrée. It offers a tapas-like, a la carte approach, ideal for sampling a menu that spans traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled skewers, ramen soup and neatly prepared, sliced proteins. LF

GREEN FOREST. 655 Rodi Road, Penn Hills. 412-371-5560. Tucked into a nondescript office plaza is this churrascaria — a Brazilian all-you-can-eat restaurant. Servers pull barbequed meats right off the rotisserie grill and present them at your table, ready to carve off as much freshly cooked meat as you like. There are hot and cold buffets as well, but savvy diners load up on the juicy meats. KE

Café Delhi {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} HOT METAL DINER. 1025 Lebanon Road, West Mifflin. 412-462-4900. This new-oldfashioned diner with a Harley theme offers a traditional menu

with super-size portions. The thick, fluffy “mancakes” hang off the platter, and the huge breakfast burrito is like a Spanish omelet wrapped in a tortilla. For lunch, there are burgers, sandwiches and fresh pie. J LOLA BISTRO. 1100 Galveston Ave., Allegheny West. 412-322-1106. This is a neighborhood bistro with an atmosphere you’d like to experience every night, and food good enough to do the same. The menu here offers “contemporary comfort cuisine” — it hews toward the familiar (meat and fish, pot pie, pasta Bolognese) while applying up-to-the-minute sensibilities to the details: house-cured meats, infused oils, coconut milk in the Moroccan vegetable stew. LF LUCCA. 317 S. Craig St., Oakland. 412-682-3310. This long-standing Oakland restaurant features an updated, pan-Italian selection focused on pastas and seafood, with very little in the way of red-sauce standards or the Northern Italian clichés of the ’80s. Salads are big enough to share, pasta is made in house, and in season, there is a charming outdoor patio. LE NOODLEHEAD. 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. www.noodleheadpgh.com. In a funky atmosphere, Noodlehead offers an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. A small menu offers soups, noodle dishes and a few “snacks,” among them fried chicken and steamed buns with pork belly. The freshly prepared dishes are garnished with fresh herbs, pork cracklings and pickled mustard greens. JF


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PLUM PAN-ASIAN KITCHEN. 5996 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-3637586. The swanky space incorporates a dining room, sushi bar and cocktail nook. The pan-Asian menu consists mostly of well-known — and elegantly presented — dishes such as lo mein, seafood hot pot, Thai curries and basil stir-fries. Entrées are reasonably priced, so splurge on a signature cocktail or house-made dessert. KE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-and-cheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Wellprepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

Poor Richard’s Wexford Alehouse {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 Washington Pike, Bridgeville. 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers a modern yet comfortable take on seafood, offering distinctive appetizers and a few signature entrées. There is also a build-yourown entrée option, in which a dozen fish and shellfish (plus a few meat options) can be combined with interesting sauces, starches and vegetables to create a custom dinner, whether your tastes run to truffle jus or mac-n-cheese. LE

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776-7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and tender within. Add in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as mac-and-cheese or baked beans. JF

THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668. The Carson Street bar and nightclub offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and a knack for well-selected ingredients to the burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, corn-and-

Twisted Thistle {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-243-4348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. To this, add an adventurous selection of meat products, such as bone-marrow brûlée and smoked salmon sausage. Dishes have lengthy ingredient lists, but it all comes together in satisfying and surprising ways. LE

black-bean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. 412-224-2579. In this intimate restaurant, the emphasis is on local, seasonal ingredients simply yet inventively prepared. Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brownsugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique fourcourse dinner just for you. LE

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TRAM’S KITCHEN. 4050 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-2688. This tiny family-run storefront café packs in the regulars. Most begin their meal with an order of fresh spring rolls, before moving on to authentic preparations of pho, noodle bowls and fried-rice dishes. The menu is small, but the atmosphere is lively and inviting. JF TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers above-average fare, reasonably priced. Alongside the contemporary American flavors are numerous Asian-inspired dishes, such as soup made from kabocha pumpkin. From po’boy oyster appetizers to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, each dish is carefully conceived and prepared. KE VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE

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LOCAL

“WE SAID, ‘LET’S TRY LIVING IN THE NETHERLANDS!’”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

In the 13-plus years that the Wednesdaynight drum-and-bass night at the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern has been going consistently, plenty of other DJ nights have come and gone. Heck, plenty of venues have come and gone. So it’s nothing to be ashamed of that the weekly is finally calling it quits — it’s just one of those things we thought would never happen. Fuzz! — originally called Fuze — has been going since its founding in 2000 by Mike Bricks, Jason Chitty and Nick Teodori. One of the keys to keeping the night alive all those years was occasional bigname bookings — and one of the keys to big-name bookings at a club so small was offering a gig on Wednesday nights. “Being a Wednesday, we’ve been able to afford things — we’re not shooting for the sky in terms of spending money or asking for covers,” says Geoff Maddock (a.k.a. Cutups), who joined in the early days and is the longest-standing member of the crew. Since more popular DJs are playing in bigger venues, often in bigger cities on the weekend, Fuzz! has been a nice midweek respite. Some of drum-and-bass’s biggest names — LTJ Bukem, Bailey — have made Wednesdaynight appearances. It’s unique not only for a promotional group to keep it together for such frequent events over such a long time, but for an event to stay in one place for so many years. It’s been a collaborative effort, the crew says — between the DJs, the owners of the bar and sound tech Bob Teagarden, who brings in a truckful of speakers every week. After next week’s final Fuzz!, the crew plans to regroup with a much less frequent night at Brillobox, the first of which will happen Thu., Feb. 20. Having events less often, they hope to get a bigger crowd. But the DJs don’t mind the slow nights. “Even if there’s only 10 or 20 people on a given night, it’s still great,” says Jeff Schuster (a.k.a. Diabolic Logic). “We’re still playing music.” “Sometimes it’s even better that way,” adds Darby Hoffman (a.k.a. SubQ), with a laugh. “It’s a small dance floor; you have room to spread out when there’s only six people.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FUZZ! FINAL EDITION. 10 p.m. Wed., Jan. 29. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, 4412 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $2. 412-682-8611

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The BBT marquee will never be the same {PHOTO COURTESY OF FUZZ!}

THE FINAL FUZZ

EURO-COUNTRY Out-of-country singer: Kayleigh Leith

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

K

AYLEIGH LEITH IS a local music success story of sorts. At least, as much as someone can be when they’ve been living in Europe for the better part of a decade. Leith, a Swissvale native, never played out much when she was living here in Pittsburgh; she grew up in a musical family and sang in church and at school, but wasn’t looking to make a splash as a musician. She only began writing music after a few moves — the last of which landed her in the Netherlands, where her husband, Rob van Disseldorp, is from. And that’s how a Pittsburgh girl became a Dutch country singer. “I met Rob at CCAC, in choir,” Leith says. “We moved to Las Vegas for a time, and lived in New York. We’d lived in some big cities in the U.S., so we said, ‘Let’s try living in the Netherlands!’” That was in 2005, and “[w]hen I moved over here, I never really thought about playing music on this level,” Leith says.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

“I played in some cover bands and local coffeehouses. But coming over here from New York was such a big move. This is a proper village, with horses and cows — there’s only about 1,500 people living in this area. I was going through kind of a low point; I was so far away from home, and I just grabbed my guitar and started writing like crazy.”

KAYLEIGH LEITH

7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 28. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. SOLD OUT at press time. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

Her husband, an audio engineer, told her, “These songs are actually kind of cool; why don’t we play these at parties or whatever?” And when she did, Leith recalls, “People just went crazy about my songs! I’d never really considered myself a songwriter. I just always wrote my truth — I

wrote what I knew, what I was going through. From there, it went — maybe I should make an album!” That was the genesis of her first fulllength, Miles Away, which she released in 2011. It’s a document of that unsettled time in the songwriter’s life; the title obviously alludes to finding oneself far from one’s home in a very different setting, and some of the other tunes reflect a certain amount of longing. Another hallmark of Miles Away is that, while the songs are overlaid with some country-music flourishes, at its heart is a lot of pop songwriting; it could be a crossover album. Country wasn’t Leith’s first love, necessarily; it grew on her as time went by. (She grew up listening mostly to gospel music.) “The whole country thing came about — I heard Taylor Swift’s first album and thought, ‘Wow, that’s a really cool sound.’ And I started listening to Miranda Lambert, Keith Urban. I was still getting into writing. CONTINUES ON PG. 24


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EURO-COUNTRY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

And I loved the new country thing, because it was something I could see myself doing.” When Leith went back into the studio for her follow-up, 2013’s This Woman, she decided she’d found her voice and was ready to go all-out. “Around the time of the first album, I was listening to everything — Miranda Lambert, but also John Mayer, The Band, a lot of Warren Haynes. For the second album, I decided I wanted to plant my feet in the ground and have a complete new country, Nashville-sound album. And that’s what we got.” On the newer album, there’s a rock ’n’ country vibe; songs like “This Woman” and “Born Ready” recall some of the contemporary women of mainstream country, while Leith’s voice is similar to no one so much as Jewel. Besides finding her own niche on the new album, Leith worked with Nashville songwriters to write it; on her previous album, she’d worked with New Yorkers. “Down in Nashville, they always say that’s where the best songwriters in the world are, and that couldn’t be more true; they were amazing,” she says. “You grow so much, learn so much working with them, and that was inspiring for me.” Working with someone else on her songs wasn’t a tough decision. “I think we have a lifetime to grow and to learn, and two heads are always better than one. I wanted to learn how it really was in Nashville. How do they come up with their songs? I learned so much when I was there. It’s an amazing experience.” While Leith hasn’t done a full U.S. tour yet, she’s played Nashville, and she’ll return to Pittsburgh to play now and then — as with her sold-out show this Tue., Jan. 28, at Club Café. She also plays out and around Europe regularly. “Everything in Europe is so close in distance,” Leith says. “In Pittsburgh, you have to travel eight hours to get to New York. Here, I’m in the Netherlands, and I can drive an hour and I’m in Belgium.” It makes for intensely varied shows, she adds. “We play in Germany, we’ve played in Italy, we’ve played in Switzerland — it feels like I’m not going that far, but Germans are completely different from Dutch people. Italians are so different from Germans and Dutch people.” And how does her uniquely American art form go over? “Country music isn’t that big over here,” she admits. “But I really think it’s growing. And I don’t want just the country scene to like my music; I want everyone to. I often hear, ‘I don’t even like country music, but I really like your music!’” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

ON THE RECORD with David Mayfield {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

David Mayfield

David Mayfield returns to town this weekend with his band, The David Mayfield Parade; he chatted with CP about a cause dear to his heart, and about jamming with his famous sister. THIS IS YOUR SECOND TRIP HERE IN LESS THAN A YEAR. I GUESS YOU LIKE IT HERE? Primanti Brothers. Enough said. I always feel like I’m appreciated as an entertainer in Pittsburgh. Some audiences are jaded or too cool for school, but in Pittsburgh it always feels like we’re on the same side. YOU RECENTLY PLAYED A SHOW IN NASHVILLE TO BENEFIT THE NATIONAL HEALTH CARE FOR THE HOMELESS COUNCIL. HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED WITH THAT? My old band Cadillac Sky filmed a video in Nashville’s “Tent City,” and I met some really interesting folks who had some serious issues keeping them down, both mental and addiction issues. I first heard about the National Health Care for the Homeless Council from a friend who was putting together a compilation CD as a benefit. DID YOU GET TO SPEND SOME TIME WITH YOUR FAMILY OVER THE HOLIDAYS? DID YOU PLAY MUSIC TOGETHER? We played a family band reunion show the day before Thanksgiving. We always play music in the living room whenever we are together. My parents and my little sister Jessica Lea get better every time I hear them! I think they practice a lot more than I do. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE with KALOB GRIFFIN BAND. 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 24. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $20. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


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indication, Moot Davis’ new album is going to be hot. The record, Goin’ in Hot, was recorded last year at a studio in Nashville and is due out in April. Davis, his bandmates and producer Kenny Vaughn decided on the title on the final day of recording. In fact, early album art from Davis’ graphic designer featured a house on fire. But sometimes when you play with fire … “We finish on a Wednesday,” recalls Davis, a New Jersey native who got his break in the early 2000s playing honky tonk. “On Thursday we go in and fix some stuff, and on Saturday we get the mixes … and agree to meet up on Monday, make some changes and go from there. So we left there at 3:30 in the afternoon, and by 7, the place had burned to the ground. “It was an all-analog studio, and all the tape was melted to the floor. And of everything that had been recorded there, our project was the only thing that could be saved off of this water-logged, charred computer. It was the craziest thing, but it also makes you feel like it was kind of meant to be.” Actually, Davis’ career to this point has that sort of vibe to it. A stage actor with touring production companies, Davis worked construction jobs when he wasn’t on the road. He began writing songs in his head because the clunker his grandfather gave him to drive didn’t have a radio. He asked his construction foreman to teach him some guitar so he could start to put his lyrics to music — he was 27 at the time. He moved to Nashville in 2001, and a year later was in Los Angeles making his first record.

“I didn’t necessarily set out to write honky-tonk records,” Davis says. “I grew up listening to classic rock, but the honkytonk influence was there from my parents and from summer trips to see family in West Virginia. “I came to realize that the songs I was writing were honky-tonk songs.” Davis will play a pair of Pittsburgh shows that bookend a three-week tour that stretches from Pittsburgh to Austin, Texas, and back again. The tour begins Fri., Jan. 24, at the Dead Horse Cantina in McKees Rocks. The last show will be Feb. 15, at Moondog’s in Blawnox.

MOOT DAVIS

8:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 24. Dead Horse Cantina and Music Hall, 704 Thompson Ave., McKees Rocks. $6. 412-973-3295

In the 2000s, Davis released two albums on legendary producer Pete Anderson’s label, then returned to acting for a time and moved to New Zealand. In 2012 he released a new recording, Man About Town, and unlike his previous efforts, the honky-tonk flavor of the album was complemented by a couple of songs that showed more of his classic-rock leanings than the country music he says he’d “been digesting steadily” for a few years. On the new record, the rock influence is more prevalent than the honky tonk, but the changes are subtle. Davis’ sound has actually morphed into a hybrid that’s grounded in traditional country, and miles away from what passes as modern country music. “I think the sound is just sort of whatever the music dictates,” Davis says. “But I also don’t see me making music that has no connection to what I’ve done in the past.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


CRITICS’ PICKS

TRADE-IN EXPO

Steel Hollow

THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 2014 – THRU –

SUNDAY, JAN. 26, 2014 Using samples — musical and non-musical — is commonplace in pop music today, but it’s a 1988 work that remains one of the most stark and affecting uses of vocal samples ever put together: Steve Reich’s Different Trains. The three-movement piece interweaves speech samples of Americans Damien and European Jurado Holocaust survivors with recordings of trains, along with parts played by a string quartet. Tonight at Wood Street Galleries, the Pittsburgh-based Freya String Quartet plays the piece, along with Ingram Marshall’s Entrada (At the River), and joins the related Symbiotic Chamber Orchestra for Sean Neukom’s The Ghost and Mister Able. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25, and 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. 601 Wood St., Downtown. $8-15. All ages. www.symbioticcollusion.com

[ROCK] + SAT., JAN. 25

When you hail from Pittsburgh and put “Steel” in your band name, you had best be ready to rep the working class — and so Steel Hollow is. The rock three-piece gets heavy at times, but also holds down a certain country cred with a mandolin featuring prominently. A lot of the band’s tunes bring to mind the Springsteen/Bon Jovi mode of workingman’s rock, but with a Western Pennsylvania air. The band releases its latest, Lightning for a Loner, tonight with a show at Altar Bar; Time Tested and Silent Partner open. AM 9 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15 (benefits Matt Parker’s Education Fund). 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE GULLICK}

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Last time Damien Jurado was in town, touring in support of his 2012 record Maraqopa, he confessed his indifference to the spare [SOUL] + SAT., JAN. 25 Last year’s his and hers garnered some attention singer-songwriter fare he’d been releasing since the mid-’90s. Audiences, he said, were for Brooklyn duo Denitia and Sene; the sexy, so accustomed to his low-key persona that bassy electronic R&B of the full-length features just standing while performing felt akin to aching vocals and backing tracks that soothe Pete Townshend smashing his guitar. That, the nerves. This year, the pair is delivering a however, is a little new EP and a video misleading: Jurado produced by Joel knows how to rock Kefali, who produced Denitia out, and not just Lorde’s “Royals” and Sene in relation to his video. It makes 2014 subdued former self. look promising for His kaleidoscopic new the group — so get in record, Brothers and on the ground level Sisters of the Eternal by checking it out Son, picks up where tonight at 720 Music, Maraqopa left off — Clothing and Café, expect a barnburner part of the store’s when he returns to celebration of its third The Andy Warhol year in Lawrenceville; Museum. Courtney the show also Marie Andrews opens. features Smooth Tutors. AM 9 p.m. Margaret Welsh 4405 Butler St., Law8 p.m. 117 Sandusky renceville. $12-15. All St., North Side. ages. 412-904-4592 or $12-15. 412-237-8300 www.720records.com or www.warhol.org

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 23

1/28 2/4 2/11 2/11

5-9pm 5-9pm 5-8pm 8pm

2/18 2/25 3/4 3/11 3/18 3/25

5-9pm 5-9pm 5-9pm 5-9pm 5-9pm 5-9pm

Alton Merrell Backstage Kevin Howard Backstage Spanky Wilson Backstage JazzLive New Orleans Party Cabaret w/ Wycliffe Gordon & Sean Jones Kenia Cabaret Anquenique Wingfield Cabaret Tania Grubbs Cabaret Dwayne Dolphin Cabaret Salsamba Cabaret Don Aliquo Cabaret April is

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Mark Strickland Backstage Gregory Porter Cabaret Michele Bensen Backstage Sean Jones Quartet CD release Cabaret Tim Stevens Backstage Tony DePaolis Christian McBride Trio Roger Humphries Robert Glasper Erik Lawrence Dan Wasson Nelson Harrison Eric DeFade

PRESENTED BY

Backstage Cabaret Backstage Cabaret Backstage Backstage Backstage Backstage

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound, Sun Hound. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. 724-265-1181. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. KR-3, Blue & Green, The Employers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Who’s Bad - The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. FiveUnder, White Light Spectrum, Paradox Please. South Side. 412-431-5282. REX THEATER. Dopapod, Broccoli Samurai. South Side. 412-381-6811. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Onward, Etc., The Neverweres. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 24

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ray Lanich Band. North Side. 412-237-3434. CLUB CAFE. Kalob Griffin Band, David Mayfield Parade. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Galactic Brethren, Ali Macomber. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Grifters, Broke, Stranded & Ugly. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Brewers Row, The Wreckid, Scott & Rossana. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Fathertime. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. PRIESTS, Wildhoney. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Alt Rock Revival Showcase ft. Peanut Butter Lovesicle, The Winter Brave, Imperial Railway, Trace the Pattern, Talley Cavy, 404Error. Millvale. 866-468-3401. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. No Bad JuJu. Greensburg. 724-836-0603. SMILING MOOSE. Melodime, Darry Miller & The Veil. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Fletcher’s Grove, The Rusty Haywackers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 25

31ST STREET PUB. Legendary

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

Hucklebucks, Mickey & the SOBs, Cotton Jackson. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 720 RECORDS. denita & sene, Smooth Tutors. Lawrenceville. 412-414-6771. BALTIMORE HOUSE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. Pleasant Hills. THE BLACK HORSE TRAIL PUB & GRILLE. Shade Ten. Bridgeville. 412-221-9785. THE BRONZE HOOD. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Robinson. 412-787-7240. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. The Pixies. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. Joe Grushecky & The HouseRockers. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bottom Floor. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Demos Papadimas. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Bon Journey Revival. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. All My Monsters. 724-265-9950. PALACE THEATRE. Get the Led

Out: The American Led Zeppelin. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Fonic. Greensburg. 724-836-0603. REX THEATER. Marco Benevento, MojoFlo. South Side. 412-381-6811. THE SHOP. The Filthy Lowdown, Bottle Rat, The Whatleys, Thunder Vest, The Cheats. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Scott, Rob & Greg of The Clarks. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Far From Sunday, Skratch, Deflowered. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. King Fez, Musuhallpa, The 5 Foot 10s. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 26

BRILLOBOX. Frankie Rose, Verity’s Lie. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. HARD ROCK CAFE. Fifth on the Floor. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Koffin Kats, Torn Apart Hearts,

MP 3 MONDAY MARCUS MESTON

Each week, we offer a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from Marcus Meston; stream or download

“Fading In and Out”

for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


Under a Nightmare. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. ROCK ROOM. Drug Lust, Radium Girls, Los Ramonas Negro, Mud City Manglers, Lady Beast, Torn Off, Mowerhead, pARtY Illegals. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Stepkids, Funk Ark. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 28

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Damien Jurado, Courtney Marie Andrews. North Side. 412-237-8300. CLUB CAFE. Kayleigh Leith. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944.

WED 29

CLUB CAFE. Brian Fitzy, Bob Banerjee, Mike Why. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Matt Muckle. Ross. 412-364-8166. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. DuPont Brothers, Guests of Guests. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS THU 23

BELVEDERE’S. Adam-C, JX4. Lawrenceville. 724-301-6982. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae w/ VYBZ Machine. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 25

DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays.

N E W S

MR. SMALLS THEATER. Phat Man Dee, Terry Griffith & Grannia Griffifth. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

JAZZ

MON 27

THU 23

SUN 26

PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

ANDYS. Joe Negri. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

TUE 28

FRI 24

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Downtown. 412-773-8884. Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks BAR ANTONIO. for new DJs. Strip District. Eric Johnson, Dan 707-480-8208. Wasson. Canonsburg. PUB I.G. DJ Phinesse. 724-743-5900. Reggae, dancehall, . w CHRISTINE more. Oakland. ww per a p ty ci h FRECHARD 707-480-8208. pg om .c GALLERY. Hill Jordan SMILING MOOSE. Bill & Slide Worldwide. Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. Rick Diculous. South Side. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & 412-478-3863. SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band, Reggie Watkins Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. LITTLE E’S. The Ken Karsh Trio. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Downtown. 412-392-2217. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. GUILD. Spanish Harlem Orchestra. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan North Side. 412-322-1773. Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The 412-325-6769. Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day 412-664-7200. chill. House music. aDesusParty. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dr. Zoot. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. Downtown. 412-471-9100. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo/Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. CJ’S. The Wayne Barbour Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CHRISTINE FRECHARD THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. GALLERY. Hill Jordan & Dormont. 412-942-0882. Slide Worldwide. Squirrel Hill. 412-758-7235. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the 412-642-2377. Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-381-4300. 412-668-0903. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. David EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Throckmorton. North Side. The South Side Groove Squad 412-904-3335. feat. Bill Toms. South Side. LITTLE E’S. Fred Pugh. Downtown. 412-431-4090. 412-392-2217. NIED’S HOTEL. Jimmy Adler, The MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Charlie Barath Duo. Lawrenceville. Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-781-9853. 412-664-7200. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dr. Zoot. NINE ON NINE. Charlie G Sanders Downtown. 412-471-9100. & Ron Wilson. Downtown. WINGHART’S. The Witchdoctors. 412-338-6463. Monroeville. 412-372-5500. RESTAURANT ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Downtown. 412-697-1336. Olga Watkins. Downtown. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. 412-471-9100. Frank Cunimondo/Patricia Skala. THE R BAR. Sweaty Betty. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. Dormont. 412-942-0882. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. SPEAKEASY. The New View Trio. 412-650-9090. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark MOONDOG’S. Jammin’ for Flaherty. Shadyside.

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 29

LOWEST PRICES ON REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS & RANGES

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 28

ANDYS. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Max Leake. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Dr. Alton Merrell & Impact: A Gospel Jazz Experience. Tuesday Concert Series. Reservations required. Shadyside. 412-381-5105. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Paul Cosentino. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker 3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

AND WE SELL BEDS AT THE CITY’S LOWEST PRICE! MORE THAN 2,000 APPLIANCES IN STOCK! DELIVERY & FREE HAUL AWAY•RENT TO OWN • SERVICE & REPAIRS ARE ALL AVAILABLE!

WED 29

ANDYS. Living Room Chamber Music Project. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Charles Wallace. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CLUB. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 25

SAT 25

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FREON REMOVAL SERVICE HOURS: MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 9AM-5PM

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CONTINUES ON PG. 30

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene!

SUN 26

BLUES THU 23

Venue Tour

FRI 24

Derrick. Benefit Concert for Derrick Edwards. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

Calendar

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Pittsburgh Track Authority, Mirko, Gusto, Naeem. Detour record release. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

FRI 24

UPCOMING EVENTS WED 2/5 7PM SHAVING

SAT 25

SUN 26

SUN 26 +

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu Fri Sat Sun +

1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26

WHO’S BAD // Michael Jackson Tribute // 8 pm // $19/$24 FATHERTIME W/DONNIE IRIS // classic rock // 9 pm // $7 BON JOURNEY REVIVAL // covers // 9 pm // $7 DJ JUAN DIEGO, VII // salsa; dance // 7 pm // no cover

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

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C L A S S I F I E D S

29


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

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THU 23

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Zig Daniels. Robinson. 412-489-5631. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall, Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-697-3120. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Sputzy. Washington.

FRI 24

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Paul Tabachneck. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BOUTIQUE 208. Jon Dull of the Hoffman Road Band, Brandon Yusko. Downtown. 412-566-3600. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustical Bruce. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Mama Corn. North Side. 412-224-2273.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MCCLISTER}

HAPPS

EARLY WARNINGS

ACOUSTIC

Blackberry Smoke

{FRI., APRIL 11}

The Julie Ruin

SAT 25

TWO ALL DAY LIFT TICKETS & AN OVERNIGHT LODGING PACKAGE FOR TWO AT SEVEN SPRINGS! INCLUDES: • One night of Lodging for two • Breakfast Buffet for two • Complimentary Swimming/Exercise room

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SUN 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

Blackberry Smoke Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, Munhall

CLASSICAL THU 23

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The Music of John Williams feat. conductor, Lawrence Loh. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FRI 24

FREYA STRING QUARTET W/ THE SYMBIOTIC CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 412-223-7873. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The Music of John Williams feat. . w w w conductor, Lawrence paper pghcitym Loh. Heinz Hall, .co Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

COUNTRY FRI 24

ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Lynchburgh Hollow. Ross. 412-364-8166.

SAT 25

30

{WED., MAY 07}

WED 29

BYHAM THEATER. Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Brought to you by:

Turkuaz

Rex Theater, South Side

HAMBONE’S. Bluegrass Jam w/ City Mouse/Country Mouse Paul Tabachnik. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark Flaherty. Brunch. Shadyside.

WED 29

OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

{SAT., APRIL 19}

SUN 26

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Camara Drum & Dance. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

DOWNLOAD NOW

Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Marc Scibilia. Harmony. 570-294-6450. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Locks & Dams, The Hills & The Rivers, Black Bear Mute, Bryan McQuaid. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. 724-265-1181. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Rhubarb. Ross. 412-364-8166.

SAT 25

FREYA STRING QUARTET W/ THE SYMBIOTIC CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 412-223-7873. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The Music of John Williams feat. conductor, Lawrence Loh. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. STRIKE DUO. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300.

SUN 26

CARNEGIE MELLON

PHILHARMONIC CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-268-2383. FREYA STRING QUARTET W/ THE SYMBIOTIC CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 412-223-7873. THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. Fields of Praise. Calvary United Methodist Church, North Side. 412-421-5884. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The Music of John Williams feat. conductor, Lawrence Loh. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. TRIANO WOODWIND QUINTET. St. Mary of the Mount, Mt. Washington. 412-381-0212.

OTHER MUSIC THU 23

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

FRI 24

CLUB COLONY. Guy Matone. Scott. 412-668-0903. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Twice as Nice. Washington.

WED 29

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts. culturaldistrict.org/event/3941/ hello-donny-a-showtunes-singalong. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

January 22 - 28 WEDNESDAY 22 Battlecross

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Crimson Shadows & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 6:30p.m.

Detroit Cobras CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guest The Devilz in the Detailz. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

Greensky Bluegrass REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guest Tumbleweed Wanderers. Over 17 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 23

431-4950. With special guest Sun Hound. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Pixies CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND Oakland. With special guest Fidlar. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Dopapod REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guest Broccoli Samurai. Over 17 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

PIXIES Marco Benevento

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL OF OAKLAND

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. With special guest MojoFlo. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Roy Woods Jr IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through Jan. 26.

Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

FRIDAY 24

Fletcher’s Grove

Bruce in the USA The Music of John Williams (Bruce Springsteen HEINZ HALL Downtown. Tribute Band) 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Jan. 26.

Paul Cebar Tomorrow Sound

Who’s Bad The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Joe Grushecky and the HouseRockers

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guest Rusty Haywackers. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

CLUE CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 9p.m.

SATURDAY 25

SUNDAY 26

Steel Hollow Gallery Crawl CULTURAL DISTRICT. 412456-6666. Free event. For

Fifth on the Floor

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With

special guests Springwater & Memphis Hill. Limited all ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

MONDAY 27 Balcony Big Band

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. No cover. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 28 Dark Sisters

CAPA THEATER, PITTSBURGH OPERA Downtown. 412-4566666. Tickets: pittsburghopera. org. Through Feb. 2.

SOUND SERIES: Damien Jurado ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. With special guest Courtney Marie Andrews. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

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Blue Watercolor N E W S

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TA S T E

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M U S I C

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S C R E E N

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A R T S

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E V E N T S

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C L A S S I F I E D S

31


STUDENT FILM {BY AL HOFF}

DREAMING OF THE DAY HE’D EFFORTLESSLY TURN A BIDET INTO A DEADLY WEAPON

The troubles with America’s education system are defined by millions of individual kids’ stories, and two of them are told in American Promise. In 1999, two New York City parents — Joe Brewster and Michele Stevenson — began documenting the educational paths of their 5-year-old son Idris and his best friend, Seun. Both boys — African American, from stable, supportive homes in Brooklyn — had been accepted into Manhattan’s prestigious Dalton School.

SPY VS SPY

Schooled: Idris (left) and Seun

The documentary portrait is intimate, and not intended to be representative beyond its participants. But throughout, the parents and the boys struggle with larger issues that are perennial topics in education: class, race, gender, parental involvement and public vs. private. Oddly, another huge factor, money, is mentioned only in passing. The film understandably spends more time with the filmmakers’ son, Idris, even though Seun faces more challenges and has the more interesting case study. (After Dalton, Seun attends a much different public high school in Brooklyn.) It may be the result of being filmed, but the boys are remarkably self-aware about their educational journey; both also seem like nice, bright kids, and you feel for them when simply “going to school” is so difficult. American Promise doesn’t necessarily offer any solutions, but it poses plenty of questions for discussion. Starts Sat., Jan. 25. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Besides being haphazardly constructed of dead body parts, Frankenstein’s monster has a new problem — he’s caught in a war between gargoyles and demons. Aaron Eckhart stars in I, Frankenstein, a fantasy actioner from the makers of the Underworld franchise, directed by Stuart Beattie. Starts Fri., Jan. 24

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HE SPY THRILLER Jack Ryan:

Shadow Recruit begins where all great espionage tales kick off — the London School of Economics. Kenneth Branagh’s exploration of the Tom Clancy character is an origin story of sorts, detailing how economics student Jack Ryan traded spreadsheets for skulking. After 9/11, Ryan (Chris Pine) joins the Marines, is injured in Afghanistan and later gets recruited by a CIA dude (Kevin Costner) to work undercover at a Wall Street financial firm. Disregard earlier film incarnations in which Ryan worked during the 1980s and ’90s in other capacities — what we need now is a strapping young man who wrote “Liquidity in Post-Soviet Markets.” Because the Russians hate us again, and want to wipe out the U.S. with a one-two punch of high-tech financial collapse and old-school explosions. (For us old Cold Warriors, this enmity is like slipping into a comfy old shoe.) The Russian plot is spearheaded by Viktor Cherevin (Branagh), a solid mass of

Outwit, outlast, outplay: Jack Ryan (Chris Pine) and Viktor Cherevin (Kenneth Branagh)

oligarch, political fixer and dark-arts master, who we meet in his baroque sitting room, while listening to opera and savagely beating his male nurse. Alas, if only the American heroes were so amusing, but our CIA guys deliver standard super-competent but rather plodding performances. That sums up much of the film, which hits many of

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

DIRECTED BY: Kenneth Branagh STARRING: Chris Pine, Kevin Costner, Keira Knightley, Kenneth Branagh In English, and Russian, with subtitles

the spy-thriller beats — a car chase or two, frantic downloading, an imperiled female, a bit of clever misdirection — but never really ignites into something kicky. The dialogue is perfunctory, and some of the tradecraft is downright laughable. As in all pulpy fantasies, desk jockey Ryan slips smoothly into action man, as if he’d been reading Tom Clancy novels his

whole life and just dreaming of the day he’d effortlessly turn a bidet into a deadly weapon. Pine, who reads as “Nice Guy, Never Late to Dinner,” lacks the edge to make Ryan’s supposedly awkward transformation believable or interesting. There’s lots of location shooting in Moscow, which gets to show off its slick, post-Soviet liquidity. Stateside, Shadow Recruit gives us a demonstration of how awesome our government’s massive database of phone records and social media is — it takes just seconds to locate a Russian sleeper agent and his bombing target. Hoary Russian villains aside, Shadow Recruit is another comforting fantasy about preventing another 9/11. In reality, we can probably count on unicorns as much as the ridiculously efficient technological and human resources marshaled here. And despite our global concerns and high-tech nightmares, the final battle between the American Way and the Bad Guys of the Week is resolved with a fist fight. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


present the film, co-presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Mon., Jan. 27. Melwood. $10

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

SPACEBALLS. In Mel Brooks’ 1987 spoof of Star Wars, Lone Starr (Bill Pullman) and Barf the Mawg (a furry John Candy) set their intergalactic RV to hyperspeed in order to save the Druish Princess Vespa (Daphne Zuniga) and her robot, Dot Matrix (voice of Joan Rivers), from the evil clutches of Dark Helmet (Rick Moranis). Brooks is on board as both President Skroob and Yogurt, a wizard wise in the ways of the Schwartz. May the puns be with you. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 29. AMC Loews. $5

NEW

GIMME SHELTER. A teen (Vanessa Hudgens) seeks out her long-estranged father, a Wall Street broker, but is forced onto the streets after she gets pregnant. Ron Krauss directs this drama. Starts Fri., Jan. 24. RIDE ALON G. To ascertain his potential brother-in-law’s mettle, a grumpy cop takes him out on the job. If you think this is the day that all kinds of gangster hell is gonna break lose in Atlanta, you’d be right. Ditto if you predict that wussy, cop-wannabe Ben (Kevin Hart) will wind up saving the day, and winning James’ (Ice Cube) respect. There’s not much new about Tim Story’s comedy (PG-13, but packed with violence and profanity). But it reminded me less of a hundred other mismatched buddy-cop movies than it did a particularly inane and shrill rom-com. Ben is the hysterical woman, James the dismissive man, and through various trials, they discover that each was blinded by first impressions and, in fact, they could love each other. Hart works hard on feminizing his role — fainting, shrieking, bumbling “man” things like guns and muscle cars. It’s a one-joke concept stretched pretty thin, and Ice Cube brings nothing new to the game, even recycling his “it was a good day” line that was funny the first time, way back in 1997’s Anaconda. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY

LOST TOWN . This new documentary from Jeremy Goldscheider and Richard Goldgewicht follows Avrom Bendavid-Val on his search for the history of an all-Jewish town, Trochenbrod, in Ukraine, that was virtually erased from maps after the N azis killed all but 33 of its 5,000 residents. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-9925203 or www.JFilmPgh.org. $10 ($5 students)

Ride Along Doors at 7 p.m.; screening at 8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. Hollywood. $5 PRIDE AN D PREJUDICE. It’s a timeless story — will the star-crossed lovers unite? — but told with such wit and clever observation that Jane Austen’s novel of social manners easily supports yet another adaptation. Joe Wright’s film is lovely and well made, with location shooting in old English manors, and marvelous fluid camerawork that’ll have you truly immersed in the social swirl. To be followed by an informal discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 23. Melwood (AH)

CP

BLACK OUT. A groom who used to be a gangster, a dead man, 20 kilos of coke — if it doesn’t get sorted out, there won’t be a wedding. Arne Toonen directs this crime comedy from Holland. In Dutch, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 23. Hollywood KN IGHTS OF BADASSDOM. In this new comedy from Joe Lynch, LARPers accidentally conjure a demon from Hell. Game just got real, yo. Steve Zahn and Peter Dinklage star. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 24; 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25; and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. Hollywood

Ikiru EDWARD SCISSORHAN DS. Johnny Depp stars as the decidedly different boy-next-door (he has scissors for hands) in Tim Burton’s funny-sweet 1990 film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. AMC Loews. $5 IN TERN ET FAMOUS. This locally produced work began life as a web series, and the entire first season makes its world premiere on the big screen tonight. The comedy, written and directed by Chris Lee and Tom Williams, follows the travails of Andy, a 30ish Pittsburgher who achieves some notoriety when a video of his drunken ranting goes viral. The film was shot in Pittsburgh, and also features music from a number of local bands. The screening will be followed by a meet-and-greet reception.

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IKIRU. Akira Kurusowa’s 1952 masterpiece, whose title means “to live,” puts that proposition to a municipal bureaucrat in modern Tokyo who learns he has terminal cancer. Fleeing a life of emotional limbo, the aging Watanabe (Takashi Shimura) vainly seeks refuge in family, sensual pleasures and a fling with a much younger co-worker before desperation drives him to an act of redemption. Shimura’s heartbreaking performance is bettered only by Kurosawa’s own: Ikiru is a deeply moving film that’s also a cinematic tour de force — a philosophical drama and a cutting social critique ... and no less a joy to look at, and listen to, for it. In Japanese, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 29. Melwood. $2 (Bill O’Driscoll)

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BATMAN RETURN S. In this 1992 Tim Burton film, the caped crusader (Michael Keaton) matches wits with the Penguin (Danny DeVito), an evil businessman (Christopher Walken) and Catwoman (Michelle Pfieffer). 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 24; 10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25; and 7 p.m. Jan. 26. Oaks CODE 2600. Local filmmaker Jeremy Zerechak’s recent documentary looks at the range and impact of the new “Information Technology Age,” be it data-mining, social-media networks or secretive national security projects. 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25. Hollywood. $10 ($18 with Matrix double-bill) THE MATRIX. Turns out information and “reality” is a lot weirder than we thought it was. Join Keanu Reeves in this 1999 sci-fi classic from the Wachowskis. 9:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25. Hollywood. $10 ($18 with Code 2600 double-bill) SILEN TS PLEASE. Charlie Chaplin is the focus of this month’s Silents Please series, which presents his 1916 comedy, “The Pawnshop,” in which he

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portrays a bumbling pawnshop employee. Local musicians will perform a new score live, and Chaplin expert and author Dan Kamin will be on hand for a Q&A. 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. Hollywood. $7/$5

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THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE. Walter Huston, Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt embark on a grimy venture deep into the Mexican mountains on a mad search for gold in John Huston’s riveting and entertaining morality play about the pursuit of wealth. Shot on location, this may be one of the grimiest, dustiest films that ever came out of Knights of Hollywood’s golden age. Badassdom The 1948 film concludes a month-long series of classic black-and-white movies. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. Regent Square (AH)

12 O’CLOCK BOYS. Lotfy N athan’s new documentary profiles the “12 O’Clock Boys,” a group of urban dirt-bike riders in Baltimore. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 30. Hollywood AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

N OT MY LIFE. Robert Bilheimer’s 2012 documentary examines the exploitation of children throughout the world — as forced labor, soldiers and sex workers, among other abuses. The director will

Silents, Please! Sunday, January 26th, 2:00PM

INTERNET FAMOUS WEB SERIES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THE WIZARD OF OZ (1929) - 1/23 @ 2pm -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------BLACK OUT (2013) - 1/22 @ 7:30pm Tarantino-esque gangster romp. Free popcorn and soda with ticket. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM (2013) - 1/24 @ 7pm & 9pm, 1/25 @ 2pm, 1/26 @ 7pm - Live-action role players conjure up a demon from Hell by mistake and must deal with the consequences. Steve Zahn and Peter Dinklage star. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------CODE 2600 - 1/25 @ 7pm -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THE MATRIX - 1/25 @ 9:30pm -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Silents, Please! - 1/26 @ 2pm

Premiere - 1/22 @ 7pm Locally made, kickstarter funded web series. $5, movie starts at 8.

New live score premiere by Tom Roberts This project supported in part by a Seed Award from The Sprout Fund

Featuring Charlie Chaplin in The Pawn Shop, live score by Tom Roberts.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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[DANCE]

“SO THEY THINK WE WORSHIPPED TECHNOLOGY?”

SPACE CRAFT When Mana Kawamura and Gia T. Cacalano show their works-in-progress at The Alloy Studios Feb. 1, the Friendship studio space itself will play a role. The recipients of a Kelly-Strayhorn Theater Next Stage Dance Residency, both choreographers were given a week in The Alloy Studios at the end of January to create new works. Prior to their residencies, both artists told me that while they were approaching the project with some basic ideas, they intended to let the Friendship studio/performance space speak to them, helping to guide the direction their works would take. Kawamura’s initial plan was to use a trio of dancers (including herself) to explore a non-interpersonal relationship that would be influenced by the studio’s architecture and openness. A third-generation dancer/choreographer from Japan now based in New York, Kawamura and her dance company, “Kawamura the 3rd,” are no strangers to Pittsburgh dance audiences: They’ve performed at both the 2011 and 2013 Kelly-Strayhorn Theater newMoves Contemporary Dance Festivals. Her movement style, which she describes as “fluid” and playing into her “flexibility” as a dancer, earned her first prize at the YOKOHAMA choreography competition in Japan in 2010 for her work “cloudburst”. Kawamura’s plan is to create 20 minutes’ worth of material, backed by an electronic soundscape she will assemble. The other half of the Feb. 1 program will feature Pittsburgh’s improvisation queen, Gia Cacalano. Her newly formed local ensemble, Gia T. Presents “Frameworks,” will make its Pittsburgh debut with a 30-minute work-in-progress that Cacalano says will be slightly more choreographed than her previous work. Set to music by pioneering electronic music composer Laurie Spiegel, the work will also make use of the Alloy’s stark space. A long piece of white fabric will be used for theatrical effect, while a costume color palette of grays, whites and blacks will play into the space’s white background and black floor. “I wanted to connect with the space rather than work against it,” says Cacalano. A finished hour-long version of the work will debut Feb. 7 and 8 at the Wood Street Galleries: Cacalano and company will re-adapt it for the new space, while incorporating into it Austrian artist Erwin Redl’s LED light installation Speed Shift. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Kelly-Strayhorn Theater presents NEXT STAGE DANCE RESIDENCY ARTISTS MANA KAWAMURA AND GIA T. CACALANO. 8 p.m. Sat. Feb. 1. The Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. $10. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org.

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New works: Gia T. Presents “Frameworks,” in rehearsal {PHOTO COURTESY OF GIA T. PRESENTS “FRAMEWORKS”}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Author Heather Terrell visits teacher Sarah Shotland’s junior writing class at the Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts.

MYTH COMMUNICATION [BOOK]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

T

HE IDEA THAT history depends on who tells it is itself pretty old. But local author Heather Terrell bets that her new young-adult novel exploring the theme is a good fit for schoolkids of today. And she’s got the air miles to prove it. Relic, the first in a planned trilogy, takes place a few centuries hence, in a dystopian future in which survivors of a massive flood live on an Arctic island, in a pseudo-medieval society called the New North. The protagonist, 18-year-old Eva, is bucking tradition as the first female in generations to attempt The Testing, a grueling series of physical and intellectual challenges designed to determine who leads the patriarchal New North.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

The New North’s ruling document, The Lex, calls that historic flood “The Healing,” and regards it as their gods’ punishment of a wicked society obsessed with modern technology and other luxuries. It’s a belief system enforced through The Testing: Testors must scour the frozen landscape for “relics” that have washed ashore, and then interpret them — but only in accordance with The Lex. Inevitably, Relic recalls The Hunger Games. But the book’s mystery and romance elements notwithstanding, it’s the theme of interpretation that Terrell emphasizes. And that theme happens to jibe with the Pennsylvania Core Standards, the state’s take on a national educational-

reform movement. The Core Standards seek to foster critical thinking, and Terrell says her book can help. “It’s about how history and societies are formed, and how leaders can manipulate myths,” she says. So since the fall, Terrell has been traveling the country promoting Relic. Along with bookstore visits, she’s taken the somewhat unusual step of speaking in schools in numerous other cities, and in a number of public and private schools in Pittsburgh. The book’s publisher, a new imprint called Soho Teen, has even distributed a glossy, 12-page Educator’s Guide for teachers. In November, Terrell visited junior writing students who’d been assigned


Relic at Pittsburgh’s High School for the Creative and Performing Arts. Terrell told them about her first exposure to a radically shifted point of view: The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley’s 1983 retelling of Arthurian legend from the perspective of typically marginalized female characters like Morgan le Fay and Guinevere. Terrell read it as a teenager. “To me it was just revelatory,” she says. “I could not believe how different the story became when it was told through another character’s eyes.” In Relic, she says, “I wanted to examine our time through a future person’s eyes.” Another influence was Neil MacGregor’s book A History of the World in 100 Objects, which documents turning points in human history by highlighting items from the British Museum. As an exercise, Terrell hands each student a photo of one object in the book and gives them 10 minutes to write a short story inspired by it, with pen and paper. Some of the 14 students read aloud their responses to these typically obscure objects, including a 13th-century astrolabe. Then Terrell asks them to consider how their own points of view affect what they’ve written. Something similar, she says, is true of her New Northerners and

their relics: “They take a story they want to tell [and] fit the object into it.” In Relic, one object found by a Testor is a flash-drive on a cord, of the kind the CAPA students use. Relic’s characters believe the device was “a special amulet.” “So they think we worshipped technology?” says one student, as a couple others chuckle ironically. Although she sometimes voices concern about our society’s digitally enabled “cult of self,” Terrell isn’t particularly anti-technology. She simply values the power of altered perspective. “Are the people in the book wrong,” she asks, “when they say we started to worship at some really crazy altars?” TERRELL, WHO’S in her

thrillers. Her first novel, The Chrysalis, took her eight years to write; it was published in 2007 and marketed in 10 other countries. She got the idea for Relic, her sixth novel, two years ago. The Arctic setting appealed to her — Terrell loves research — but mostly she wanted to explore mythmaking. R e lic exemp l ifies t h e o n go in g boom in young-adult fiction, presaged in the 1990s by the Harry Potter books a n d n ow l e d b y t h e Hunger Games franchise. Contemporary young-adult books are finding their way into classrooms alongside classics: Teachers and librarians love anything that’ll get kids to read. Relic, in fact, is the first in a planned trilogy called “The Books of Eva,” with the second installment due in the fall. So Terrell and Soho Teen agreed on a novel marketing strategy: keying off the Common Core standards. The standards were developed by the National Governors Association to both raise educational standards in the schools and make them uniform nationally. Versions have been adopted

“IT’S ABOUT HOW HISTORY AND SOCIETIES ARE FORMED AND HOW LEADERS CAN MANIPULATE MYTHS.”

40s, grew up in Upper St. Clair. She wanted to be an archaeologist, but instead became a commercial litigator, in New York City. She says she was good at it, but didn’t like it much; she started taking archaeology classes, and tried her hand at fiction. Her earliest novels — including The Chrysalis and Brigid of Kildare — were archaeological

in 45 states, and Pennsylvania schools are now implementing the commonwealth’s iteration. The standards emphasize analytical thinking. One language-arts standard for Pennsylvania eighth-graders is: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.” While the Common Core prefers nonfiction texts, especially for older students, Terrell believes Relic addresses the standard in its own way. With input from her mother-in-law, a former superintendent of schools in Rochester, N.Y., Terrell and Soho Teen developed an educator’s guide to facilitate Relic’s use with Common Core curricula in English, history and social studies. The guide, for instance, suggests building lessons around everything from the nature of dystopia to Relic’s incorporation of elements of Inuit language and culture. (Terrell’s New Northerners treat indigenous Arctic people as a servant class.) Students are even prompted to compare the New North’s founding text, the Praebulum, to the preamble to the U.S. Constitution. “Heather was really the pioneer that made the most of what we’re doing with our school and library strategy,” says Soho senior publicity manager Meredith Barnes. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

STRUCTURES OF TIME AND SPACE ERWIN REDL WOOD STREET GALLERIES 01.24–04.06.14 Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl Friday, January 24th, 5:30–10pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. A project of:

FAD… Lille, 2004

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MYTH COMMUNICATION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

PRESENTED BY

PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

COMPAGNIE KÄFIG

DR ISC O L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Compagnie C o Käfig … a.k.a.: the cure ffor fo o pretty much uch an anyt y hi yt hing ng g tthat hatt ai ha ails ls yo ou u. anything you. – The Boston Globe

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FEB 1, 2014 BYHAM THEATER

8 PM

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

TICKETS START AT $19 TrustArts.org/dance 412.456.6666 Pittsburgh Dance Council is a division of

[ART REVIEW]

SCENE MAKERS {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Art by Barbara Weissberger in Behind Our Scenes

instruments!) and one of the world’s most exciting trumpeters are throwing a New Orleans style party in Pittsburgh! Bring your handkerchief or something to wave for the “second line” party in the Cabaret. Stop what you are doing and make sure you get a ticket.

Soho has sent Terrell to schools in cities including Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago and Boston. Meanwhile, Soho Teen, with distribution by textbook giant Random House, mailed out thousands of teacher guides for Relic, says Barnes. The approach seems to be working. So far, Soho Teen has shipped 10,000 hardcover copies of Relic — modest by multimillion-selling Harry Potter standards, but this year-old imprint’s highest-performing title, says Barnes. And of the copies actually sold, Barnes estimates, about 30 percent have ended up in classrooms — twice the usual proportion for a young-adult title. (Additionally, some 40 percent of youngadult titles go to libraries, she says.) For her part, Terrell prefers discussing Relic in classrooms to the social-mediaheavy marketing she did with her first foray into young-adult fiction, her two supernatural “Fallen Angel” books. The latter approach “didn’t feel authentic and it didn’t feel as meaningful,” she says. Reviews of Relic have been mixed. While The School Library Journal says “[f]ans of The Hunger Games will devour this book,” Kirkus calls Relic “standardissue dystopia” and “yet another also-ran in the hordes of books vying to be the next Hunger Games or Divergent.” But the book seems popular in the classroom, even among those not using it as part of a formal curriculum. Relic “really speaks to the kids,” says Anna Chough, a counselor at Pittsburgh Classical Academy who chose the novel to be read as part of one eighthgrade class’s daily “engagement session” before first period. Terrell also spoke to an assembly of all the school’s eighth-graders. Adds Chough: “She expects more out of the kids, and she respects who the kids are.”

Behind Our Scenes, at the Cultural District’s SPACE Gallery, is a curious exhibition. It collects the works of five photographers, two working in tandem, with a generous representation of images by each. But while each installation is intriguing in its own regard, how they come together is a little puzzling. Dennis Marsico’s troika on the maturation of the 1960s rally cry of “sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll” is the exhibit’s entry point. Through photographs and video, Marsico examines the passion of youth weighed down by the practicality and reason of age, images of generically pristine hotel rooms and life-ravaged faces. These are juxtaposed with a series of his granddaughter and a zoo of toy animals. All these images are bright and glossy, colorful, vibrant — those revealing the wear and tear of time no less than those depicting the promise of youth. Nancy Andrews and Annie O’Neill invite us to lurk in the detritus of the North Side’s Garden Theater, whose decayed grandeur once housed moral decay — at least according to the anti-pornography factions. Walls rot beneath torn paper, while bricks cave beside peeling paint, evidence of prolonged abandonment. Details like a cardigan forgotten on a hanger, or the tickets for admission waiting to be torn, are eerily akin to Pompeii. Splendor may have given way to spoilage, but there’s beauty in the patterns of disintegration. “Free to the People,” by Leo Hsu, combines the construction of a “librarytype space,” with shelves bearing a variety of books and a few chairs, with portraits of people taken within a few branches of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. The photographs are identical in size, and similar in composition: candidly snapped close-ups of patrons of varying age, race and gender — each with eyes downcast as they read. Hsu (an occasional City Paper contributor) has made an interesting start, but more detail on the purpose of these library visits would help build a more concrete narrative. In a project created with the intention of replicating the library experience, it would feed our desire for voyeurism — so, whatcha reading? — and allow the intimacy of shared experience. The final series is Barbara Weissberger’s “Collage Formations,” and it’s a stunner. Abstract assemblages layer image after image, playing with time, space, dimension and perspective. What we’re viewing is a mystery, one that entices us to look deeper. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BEHIND OUR SCENES continues through Jan. 26. SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 or www.spacepittsburgh.org


GALLERY CRAWL

Erwin Redl: Structures of Time and Space An investigation of “reverse engineering” that (re-)translates virtual reality and 3-D computer modeling by means of large scale light installations.

Welcoming the Future, Honoring the Present: New and Established AAP Member Works This exhibit is a salon-style hanging of works by current AAP artists alongside a showcase of 21 New AAP members.

2. SPACE*

3rd floor Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery

Therapy and The Muse | Ernest McCarty

Behind Our Scenes Guest Curator: Jen Saffron Participating Artists: Annie O’Neill, Barbara Weissberger, Dennis Marsico and Leo Hsu. Photographers explore the relationship between two-dimensional form and space. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Button Making Music by Aaron Clark of Humanaut/Honcho

4. Shaw Galleries*

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

12. Tonic

Attack Theatre: Traveling A witty contemporary dance performance that tells the story of a traveling salesman. 7 and 8pm.

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE It Is What It Is: People. Art. Live Music. Drinks. Food.

Third Floor*

947 Penn Avenue

Memory Terrain

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Art Show

6. Arcade Comedy Theater

14. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery

811 Liberty Avenue

914 Penn Avenue

Pittsburgh’s best sketch improv comedy.

7. 820 Liberty Avenue*

15. CAPA Gallery

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

Places to Go and People to See Portraits, Landscapes, and Ceramic Work by Pittsburgh CAPA’s 11th and 12th Grade Visual Artists.

212 Ninth Street

Drawing Portraits and Figures High school students in the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Design Arts Studio explore portraiture and figures.

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Reflective Locations An Art on the Walls exhibit curated by D.S. Kinsel exploring varied reflections of modern black masculinity.

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28. Braddock’s American Brasserie Chef Jason will create deconstructed plates pleasantly familiar to the taste but intriguingly disguised to the eye.

crawl after dark The Freya String Quartet, Electric 10PM $15 / $8 students + Seniors Wood Street Galleries, 2nd floor gallery, 601 Wood Street

With Special Guest: Symbiotic Collusion Orchestra.

Night Market VII

FRENDZ: An evening of Pittsburgh-created music 10PM

Steel Town Fire Performances at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30pm

$5, cash bar

22. Backstage Bar

Performances by Host Skull, The Gotobeds, and Meeting of Important People’s Josh Verbanets.

Trust Arts Education Center Peirce Studio, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

655 Penn Avenue

Waves: Perceptions of Light and Sound Kara Ruth Snyder Live Music by Paul Tabachnek.

Arcade Comedy Theater 811 Liberty Avenue

600 Liberty Avenue

25. Boutique 208*

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Performances by the CLO Academy As the sole benefiting Dreamer for January, the CLO Academy performs. 6, 7, and 8pm.

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After the Crawl Comedy Show 10PM $10 / $5 for students / BYOB

23. PNC Legacy Project

Toonseum 947 Liberty Avenue

Global Beats 9PM $5

Live Music by Jon Dull of the Hoffman Road Band and Brandon Yusko.

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20. 131 Seventh Street*

208 Sixth Street

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107 Sixth Street

539 Liberty Avenue

111 Ninth Street

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The Lonely Robot Returns After being trapped inside Fraley’s Robot Repair for many months – and finally making his escape - the Lonely Robot is swinging through Pittsburgh.

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

24. Dream Cream Ice Cream

TRANSPOSE, a project of the Bruce Gallery, Edinboro University

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The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating a legacy of another kind... Celebrating Black History Month.

Start Anew! Performances by Sounds of Steel steel pan band.

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NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE Free Dance Lessons and Demos: Bachata at 7pm, Rumba at 7:30pm, Salsa at 8pm

7th St. and Penn Avenue

13. Sonoma Grille

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136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

21. Katz Plaza

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery.

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Radium Girls German Dada artist Hannah Höch has creating rebellious collages that point out the stark difference between reality and the media’s projected images of women. Live Music by Producer Jakeisrain and the C Street Brass

David Aschkenas: Life and Death of the Igloo Photography exhibit chronicles the last weeks of the Civic Arena’s operation and its demolition.

Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

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707 Penn Avenue

5. Trust Arts Education Center

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The 3rd Annual Bad Art Sale!

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16. Future Tenant

11. August Wilson Center for African American Culture

Paper Planet Polyglot Theatre (Australia)

805 Liberty Avenue

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Wonder Women One of the largest exhibitions of women in comics ever presented, featuring over 50 pieces of original art.

Interactive installations from the 2014 International Performing Arts for Youth Conference: I Think I Can Terrapin Theatre (Australia)

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Terry Boyd: The Neverlands An idiosyncratic and muted interpretation of life and death, originally depicted by the skies, seas, grounds and characters described in J.M. Barrie’s stories.

980 Liberty Avenue

Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

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709 Penn Avenue

947 Liberty Avenue

Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti

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10. Toonseum

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Text “CRAWL” to SMASH (76274) to receive special exclusive offers and more!

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Sponsors:

A Production of:

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Presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

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Friday, January 24 5:30-9pm

Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

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Enigma Lounge 130 7th St

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PITTSBURGH PREMIERE

JANUARY 31-FEBRUARY 16 aEM LEWIS kJOHN SHEPARD

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING DIRECTOR

PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000 {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN MARCUS}

Which witch: Elphaba (Alison Luff), in Wicked

[PLAY REVIEW] FRIDAY FEB 14 · 8PM ON-STAGE SATURDAY WIZARDRY FEB 15 ·2&8PM {BY TED HOOVER}

Orchestra $49, $39; Loge $49 Balcony $39, $33

The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000 www.thepalacetheatre.org

PalacePA

FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

Art

hAPPens here DOWNLOAD THE FREE CP HAPPS APP NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

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NOT THAT THIS has anything to do with anything, but at the opening-night performance of the national tour of Wicked — now returning to Pittsburgh for its fourth engagement — one of the few remaining items on my theatrical wish list was realized. Late in the first act, a patron sitting near the front row fell ill. People began crowding around and then — even as the cast on stage were plowing on — someone called out: “Is there a doctor in the house?” In 25 years reviewing over 3,500 plays, I’ve never seen that happen. (There is a very well-known local story that several years ago, amid similar circumstances, a certain drama professor rose in response and said: “I’m a doctor” … in reference to his Ph.D. Unfortunately, I wasn’t at that performance.) The curtain came down, people rushed to give aid and the gentleman was carried out of the auditorium (an usher told he later that he had just fainted and been taken to the hospital). The show, as it must, went on. I’ve seen this show three times before, so if nothing else, this made an interesting change. Wicked is a mash-up of the original L. Frank Baum Oz stories, the 1995 Gregory Maguire revisionist version of the same name and, especially, the classic 1939 MGM film. Maguire’s novel re-imagines Oz as a police state ruled by a great and powerful wizard nobody ever sees. Animals, who until now have been full citizens, are being forbidden to speak, removed from positions of authority and put into cages. The

musical veers from Maguire’s political thrust and focuses more on Elphaba and Glinda, two college roommates who eventually become what we now know as the Wicked Witch of the West and the Good Witch of the East. Both the book and the musical present Elphaba as one of the few non-wicked people in Oz … but because of her green skin and animal-liberating activities, she’s regarded as the villain. Winnie Holzman’s book has enough humor and imagination to carry this somewhat bloated show from beginning to end. Stephen Schwartz’s frequently bombastic music and lyrics add to the bloat, but when he gets it right — as in the first act’s curtain number, “Defying Gravity” — Wicked hits some remarkable high points.

WICKED

continues through Feb. 9. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $39-149. 412-456-6666 or trustarts.org

Alison Luff and Gina Beck, as Elphaba and Glinda, have a strong onstage chemistry as best friends/enemies; Luff’s powerhouse voice and Beck’s comedic gifts complement each other beautifully. Alison Fraser’s turn as Madame Morrible is a mannered one, though quite effective. But the “stars” of Wicked are undoubtedly the members of the design team, who have created the eye-popping, jawdropping onstage Wicked world. Susan Hilferty’s incredibly detailed costumes are as every bit as breathtaking as Eugene Lee’s setting and Kenneth Posner’s lights. Now, all I need is for everyone who likes Shakespeare to move to another planet, and my wish list will be complete. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


ALL-NEW 2014 SHOW World’s Top Classical Chinese Dancers Original Live Music By The Shen Yun Orchestra Animated Backdrops & Exquisite Costumes

FEB 19-20 THE BENEDUM CENTER ShenYun.com

Order Your Tickets Today Online: ShenYun.com Tel: 888-974-3698 | 412-456-6666

TAKE AN EXTRAORDINARY JOURNEY —5,000 YEARS OF DIVINE CULTURE

“5,000 years of Chinese music and dance in one night.”

T

HE SHOW MOVES quickly through dynasties and regions. Legends, myths, and heroes of literary classics spring to life. Ethnic and folk dances fill the stage with color and energy. The leaps and flips of Shen Yun’s aerial masters, thunderous battle drums, and singers’ soaring voices are all set to animated backdrops that transport you to another world.

—New York Times

“Dazzling ... brilliant choreography.” —Broadway World

Experience the extraordinary. Experience Shen Yun.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.2301.30.14 THURS, JAN 23 • 9PM AMERICANA

O NWA R D

PLUS

THE NEVERWHERES

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE)

FRI, JAN 24 • 9PM JAM ROCK

TUESDAY 9:30-11:30 9:30-11:30pm 0pm

FLETCHERS GROVE PLUS THE

RUSTY

HAYWACKERS

RADICALTRIVIA

SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE)

Wednesday ACOUSTIC MUSIC W MIKE DELUCA

SUN, JAN 26 • 8PM

$5 Evil Drinks

$2.50 Leinenkugel’s Leinenkugel’s

$3 American Honey

$2.50 Yuengling

SAT, JAN 25 • 9PM ROCK N ROLL

KING FEZ PLUS THE FIVE FOOT 10'S SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE) FUNK/ROCK

THE STEPKIDS WITH FUNK ARK SMOKE FREE (ENTIRE VENUE)

MON, JAN 27 • 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH SGD

TUES, JAN 28 • 9PM

THURSDAY 10pm-2am

KARAOKE $2.50 Coors Light

$3 Evil Shots

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH CHRIS PARKER 3

NEW KITCHEN HOURS

Mon - Thurs - 4pm to 12am Fri, Sat, Sun 12pm to 1am Happy Hour 5PM-7pm $2 off all Bar Bites $1 off all drafts

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

We’re all about the BEER!

{STAGE}

Perhaps no Stephen Sondheim musical turned Broadway on its head quite like Company. Debuting in 1970, with a book by George Furth, it was among the first Broadway musicals to deal with adult themes, and its vignette structure was fairly radical, too. Pittsburgh Public Theater has a new production of this now-classic musical comedy, directed by F. Wade Russo (who directed the Public’s 1776). The lead role of Robert — a Manhattan bachelor who’s friends with five married couples and three single women — is played by Pittsburgh native and Broadway veteran Jim Stanek (pictured). The cast also includes local luminaries like Daina Michelle Griffith and Daniel Krell. The first performance is tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 23. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-60. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.og

{MUSIC}

JAN. 23 Company ensemble, dramatizes such a moment in Before Pride, a new play about how the Stonewall riot changed our culture. The play, which incorporates original text, music and dance, was developed with help from local professional artists based on the ensemble’s interviews

{COMEDY}

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

Wednesday: $1.75 Bud Light Drafts. 20 ¢ Wings

Billy the Kid & The Regulators

THU/JAN 23/10PM

White Light Spectrum THURS/JAN 30/10-11PM

Thursday: $2 Yuengling Drafts $3.00 Import Drafts, Burger Madness our Award Winning Burgers $6 Unlimited Toppings

THURS/FEB 6/10PM

Friday: $2 Coors Light Bottles. $3 Blue Moon Drafts

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

Saturday: $2 Any Draft Beer from 9-11pm. $3 Sam Adams Drafts

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT

1002 Perry Highway • Pittsburgh,Pa. 15237 412-367-9610 • perrytownedrafthouse.net

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

with community leaders in Pittsburgh, historical research and group members’ own experiences. The first of two performances at The Alloy Studios is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 25. 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Tickets are pay-what-you-can. www.dreamsofhope.org

+ FRI., JAN. 24

All Day, Every Day: $2 PBR 24oz. cans Happy Hour: 5 pm -7 pm Mon-Fri $ 1 off all drinks

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+ THU., JAN. 23

EMO NIGHT 14 ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

What’s it like using the opposite gender’s bathroom after you’ve transitioned from female to male? Ian Harvie can tell you, and he’ll make you laugh in the process. He’s one of the three comedians bringing the LGBT-themed Come Out Laughing Tour to the ’Burgh. Also performing is Jason Dudey, who launched the tour after starting a comedy show of the same name in California, and Dana Goldberg, voted one of the “top five funniest lesbians in America” by Curve magazine. Angela Suico 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $20-30. 412-471-1400 or www.cruzebar.com

{STAGE}

Two women holding hands in public might not be a big deal today. But in 1969, it was unheard of. Dreams of Hope, the LGBT youth theater

JAN. 29 Ikiru

The Spanish Harlem Orchestra brings Latin jazz beats to the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. This 13-piece band won a Grammy in 2011 for Best Tropical Latin Album, 2010’s Viva La Tradición. Leading the group is founder Oscar Hernandez, whose time as an arranger and musical producer in the ’70s found him rubbing shoulders with such legends as Tito Puente, Ray Barretto and Celia Cruz. Tonight, vocals, brass and percussion all mix under Hernendez’s direction to produce SHO’s award-winning sound. AS 9:30 p.m. 1815 Metropolitan St., North Side. $45. 412-322-0800 or www.mcgjazz.org


Free!Event

Look who’s got a birthday — the Cultural Trust’s Gallery Crawl is 10 years old. To mark the occasion, the Trust is introducing a new component, CrawlAfterDark, in which select venues program events after 9 p.m. The late-night activities require admission ($5-15), and include: comedy at the Arcade Comedy Theater; various music events (The Freya String Quartet, Host Skull, DJ Dave “7Up” Sanchez); and at the Toonseum, Kartoon Karaoke, where visitors can sing-along with classic animations. Before that, check out the wide range of free activities such as dance lessons at Arthur Murray, flames at Katz Plaza (courtesy of fire-artists Steel Town Fire) and exhibitions related to the upcoming Black History Month. Attack Theatre offers Traveling, a dance performance featuring a salesman and his sample case of curiosities. From Australia comes I Think I Can, Terrapin Theatre’s interactive puppet-based installation, and Polygot Theatre’s Paper Planet, a mysterious “natural” world of trees and animals created from paper; both are at August Wilson Center. Art exhibits include: Erwin Redl’s light-installations Structures of Time and Space, at Wood Street Galleries; works from CAPA students (who will also be demonstrating bowl-making); and David Aschkena’s photo series documenting the demolition of the “Igloo.” You might want to pack a few bills for the Night Market, the pop-up art-and-craft venue, and the Bad Art Sale, at Shaw Galleries. Al Hoff 5:30-9:30 p.m. Various venues, Downtown. Free. CrawlAfterDark (9 p.m.; various venues, Downtown; $5-15). 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Attack Theatre’s Traveling

+ SAT., JAN. 25 {OPERA}

Johannes Brahms. A second performance takes place on Feb. 1, at Sixth Presbyterian Church, in Squirrel Hill. AS 3 p.m. Jan 26. Calvary United Methodist Church, 971 Beech Ave., North Side. $15 ($5 students; $20 at the door). 412-421-5884 or www.pittsburghcamerata.org

The outrageous historical situations that inspired classic operas certainly have modern counterparts. Consider Dark Sisters, the 2011 chamber opera by Nico Muhly (music) and Stephen Karam (libretto). It revolves around the media frenzy that ensues when the children from a polygamous cult in the American Southwest are taken by government authorities, and one of the patriarchal Prophet’s five sister-wives flees the compound. Pittsburgh JAN. 27 Opera offers the Ayelet Waldman area premiere of this unusual work, with four performances at the CAPA Theater. Tonight’s opening night is sold out. BO 8 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 28, Jan. 31 and Feb. 2. 111 Ninth St., {WORDS} Downtown. $50.75. Tonight, author Ayelet 412-456-6666 or www. Waldman takes audiences pittsburghopera.org behind the scenes of her upcoming novel Love and Treasure. The book’s events are based on the historic Hungarian Gold Train, which {MUSIC} was “found abandoned and A cappella choral group the filled with treasure” near Pittsburgh Camerata has Salzburg in the 1940s. been part of the city’s fabric Waldman’s 2009 essay since 1974. It solidified its collection Bad Mother was a popularity in 1995, when it New York Times best-seller, released its album A Christmas and her personal essays have Mosaic, under art director appeared in the Times and Gayle Kirkwood. The Fields The Wall Street Journal. of Praise concert will honor (She’s also married to novelist Kirkwood with performances and one-time Pittsburgher of work from artists such as Michael Chabon.) Come see Sergei Rachmaninov and

+ MON., JAN. 27

her at the latest installment of the Monday Night Lecture Series, presented by Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. AS 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4440 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

{WORDS}

Hilton Als is among our most original and provocative writers on culture. In his new essay collection White Girls (McSweeney’s), his first book in 15 years, the New Yorker’s brilliant theater critic discusses, among other things, the authenticity of Eminem and the inauthenticity of Malcolm X, and posits that, culturally, Truman Capote and Michael Jackson count as women. Other subjects include Flannery O’Connor, Louise Brooks and Richard Pryor. Als makes a rare local appearance tonight at the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. BO 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6506 or www.pgh writersseries.wordpress.com

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JAN. 29 Ladysmith Black Mambazo

+ TUE., JAN. 28 {PLANTS}

There’s not much blooming outside, but inside the Phipps Conservatory is a plant show guaranteed to make visitors ooh and ahh and feel more tropical. The annual Orchid and Tropical Bonsai Show combines two of the mostfussed-over and exquisite “hobby plants.” The exuberance of the colorful, showy orchid will be matched with the formality of bonsai, the

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Akira Kurosawa is best known for classic samurai films like The Seven Samurai and Ran. But some of his finest work told stories of contemporary Japan, and the director perhaps never did that better than with 1952’s Ikiru (To Live). Takashi Shimura, who played the leader in Seven Samurai, here portrays an aging civil servant forced by illness to confront his past and seek meaning in his life. The wrenching, cinematically brilliant film shows at the Melwood Screening Room as part of Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ bargain-priced Essential Cinema series. BO 8 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $2. 412-681-5449 or www.pittsburgharts.org

One part “South Afric African musical tradition,” one o part gospel, Ladysmith Black B Mambazo o will perform perfo tonight at the Byham Byha Theater. The longrunning group gro has performed perfo at Nobel Nobe Peace Prize P ceremonies, ceremo as well as a concerts for Pope John Joh Paul II and Queen Quee Elizabeth. Elizabet Ladysmith Ladysm Black Mambazo Mamba

C Come O Out Laughing Tour +

has collaborated with other musical performers such as Josh Groban, Dolly Parton and, most famously, with Paul Simon on his Graceland LP. AS 7:30 p.m. Jan. 29. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $24-44 ($19 children). 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{MUSIC}

JAN. 24

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Japanese art of training trees to achieve their mature shape in miniature form. If you’re inspired, check the Phipps’ schedule of classes on starting your own orchid or bonsai collection. Al Hoff 9:30 a.m.5 p.m. daily, through March 9. One Schenley Park, Oakland. $11-15. 412- 622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER BEFORE PRIDE. Presented by Dreams of Hope. An original piece that investigates pride, based on the performers’ own experiences, research, & interviews w/ LGBTQ leaders in Pittsburgh. Jan. 24-25, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. COMPANY. As yet unable to make a commitment of his own, Robert supports his married friends & hears about the ups & downs of their relationships. Presented by the Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 18. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DARK SISTERS. After a raid on her family’s compound, sister-wife Eliza embarks on a quest for self-discovery. Presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Sat., Jan. 25, 8 p.m., Tue., Jan. 28, 7 p.m., Fri., Jan. 31, 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 2, 2 p.m. CAPA Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

LITTLE RED THE MUSICAL. Presented by Stage Right. Fri., Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Sat., Jan. 25, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 26, 2 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. THE MOUNTAINTOP. A fictionalized portrayal of the night before Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination. Tue, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Wed., Jan. 29, 1 & 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 9. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. ROSE’S DILEMMA. A romantic comedy about a writer who imagines her deceased lover is helping her finish his last novel. Fri, Sat, 8:15 p.m., Sun., Jan. 26, 2:30 p.m. and Jan. 28-30, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 1. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. SOUTH SIDE STORIES. Onewoman show portraying the dynamism of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 23

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 23 - SUN 26

ROY WOOD JR. 8 p.m., Fri., Jan. 24, 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Jan. 25, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 26, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 24

AFTER THE CRAWL COMEDY SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

WICKED. The hit musical about the Wicked Witch of the West. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6 p.m. Thru Feb. 9. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 1. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

In Pennsylvania, a Groundhog has been predicting the weather for over 125 years and Straub has been brewing for over 140 years. This authentic German-Style AltBier is our 14th Annual Groundhog Brew, and is the perfect warmer against the winter cold.

On tap p now at these locations. BELLA LUNA: Murrysville BRILLOBOX: Bloomfield OLIVE OR TWIST: TWIST: Downtown

Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 24 Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. CHUCK KRIEGER, SEAN COLLIER, BRAD RYAN. Schitz & Gigglz Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Level 20 Sports Lounge, Bethel Park. 412-595-7953. DOC DIXON, TOM MUSIAL, DAVID KAYE. Funny Fundraiser. 5:30 p.m. St. Benedict the Abbey Church, McMurray. 412-920-5653. THE DRAFT IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. ELECTRIC SLIDEZ: POWERPOINT THROWDOWN. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. KRISH MOHAN. Laughing Out Loud for the Library fundraiser. 8 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-605-4807. MATT WOHLFARTH, AUGGIE COOK, ANDY PICCARO, PJ WILLIAMS. Wolfie’s Comedy Night. 7:30 p.m. Fireside Inn, Crafton. 310-909-6446. SCIT IMPROV COMEDY HOUSE TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru April 11 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 25

DAVID KAYE, MIKE WYSOCKI, JOSH WOMACK. Knoch Wrestling Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. Saxonburg Fire Hall, Saxonburg. 412-920-5653. DOC DIXON, TOM MUSIAL, DAN BROWN. CWNC Boys Lacrosse Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. St. Ursula School, Allison Park. 412-920-5653. LAWPROV. 9:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MARK RICCADONNA, VINNIE NARDIELLO, SEAN LYNCH. Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Monessen Elks #773. 412-920-5653. ME ON STAGE IMPROV COMEDY SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RANDY & ERIC IMPROV SHOW. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. THE ROYAL MUMBLE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. TOM KUPIEC, KRISH MOHAN, ANDY PICCARO, MORE. Wolfie’s Comedy Night. 8 p.m. Casey’s Restaurant, Allison Park. 310-909-6446. CONTINUES ON PG. 43

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


UNPLANNED COMEDY LIVE. 8 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 323-401-0465.

“Waiting for Inspiration,” by Heather McElwee, from pgc@mgg at Morgan Glass Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK

937 LIBERTY AVE. Welcoming the Future, Honoring the Present: New & Established AAP Member Works. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. I Think I Can. Interactive installation by Australia’s Terrapin Theatre. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Paper Planet. Interactive installation by Australia’s Polyglot Theatre. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-258-2700. CAPA GALLERY. Places to Go & People to See. Portraits, landscapes, & ceramic works by Pittsburgh CAPA’s 11th & 12th grade visual artists. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Drawing Portraits & Figures. Work by high school students in the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Design Arts Studio. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Blithering Landscapes & Other Ideas. Pen, ink & colored pencil by Eric Hauser. Opening Jan 24, 7 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District:

SUN 26

Work by Mia Tarducci Henry, Don Jones, Matthew Buchholz’s Alternate Histories, & animated film screening presented by the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-10 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. URBAN PATHWAYS 6-12 GALLERY. Start Anew! Student photography & 2D art exhibition. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. But I Am the Fire. Work by Laurie Trok. Opens Jan. 23, 6 p.m. Latrobe. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Structures of Time & Space. Light installation by Erwin Redl. Opening reception: Jan. 24, 5:30-11 p.m., part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

VISUALART

ONGOING

CrawlAfterDark. Art exhibitions, live bands, DJs, dance, etc, plus CrawlAfterDark activities starting at 9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GREATER PITTSBURGH ARTS COUNCIL. Reflective Locations. Feat. work reflecting modern black masculinity. Curated by D.S. Kinsel. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. pgc@mgg. Group show feat. featuring artists who either work or teach at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. Opening reception Jan. 24, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE. Therapy & The Muse. Work by Ernest McCarty. Opens Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. SHAW GALLERIES. 3rd Annual Bad Art Sale. Opens Jan. 24, 5:30-10 p.m., part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SONOMA GRILLE. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Art Show. Gallery Crawl: Jan. 24, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE TOONSEUM. Color Me Happy. Feat. 1950s coloring book illustrations as modern memes. Opens Jan. 24. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Memory Terrain.

& innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of BONUS STAGE. 7 p.m. Arcade Southwestern PA. Homestead. Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-464-4020. 412-339-0608. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY Their Time, more. Oakland. NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & 412-622-3131. John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Smiling Moose, South Ongoing: Buhl Digital Side. 412-612-4030. Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin COMEDY OPEN submarine, and more. www. per pa MIC. Hosted by North Side. 412-237-3400. pghcitym .co Ronald Renwick. Wed, CARRIE FURNACE. 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Built in 1907, Carrie Place, Mt. Washington. Furnaces 6 & 7 are 412-431-9908. extremely rare examples STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN of pre World War II ironMIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, making technology. Rankin. Strip District. 412-904-4502. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. featuring this restored An eclectic showroom of fine stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. art sculpture & paintings from DEPRECIATION LANDS emerging artists. North Side. MUSEUM. Small living history 724-797-3302. museum celebrating the AUGUST WILSON CENTER settlement and history of the FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN Depreciation Lands. Allison CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Park. 412-486-0563. Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, FALLINGWATER. Tour the film & oral history narratives to famed Frank Lloyd Wright explore communities, cultures, house. 724-329-8501.

707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Neverlands. Mixed media drawings by Terry Boyd. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. www.digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BE GALLERIES. Arcadia. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/ National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC.

TUE 28

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 29

EXHIBITS

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

Turn your images into gallery-quality mounted prints of any dimension Art by FotoFriend artist Carolyn Frischling makemyfotofoam.com/carolyn

NO BORDER

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Fotofoam uses museum quality mounting of digital c-prints to flamepolished plexiglass.

Photos can be backed with white sintra, anodized aluminum, or white plexi-glass.

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Upload your photos to the FotoFramer and choose your specifications on makemyfotofoam.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MALL AT ROBINSON. CSI Pittsburgh: Fictional Crime Scene. Presented by Pittsburgh Technical Institute. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well

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Special discount code: artforpittsburgh gives 10% off on any order. Valid through Valentines Day (Feb 14, 2014)

C L A S S I F I E D S

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

WET YOUR $5

WHISTLE

WEDNESDAYS

PBR Pitchers 9-11PM

HOME OF BALLBREAKING FUN!!! PGH’s Only Ping Pong Table

$31/2hr

7 Pool Tables

$6hr

ALL DAY EVERY DAY

$ 1.75PBR Drafts 1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOUTHSI D E

as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many

endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504.

SPECIAL THU 23

PITTSBURGH ROCK N’ ROLL HALL OF FAME LAUNCH. Feat. appearances by Joe Grushecky, Joffo Simmons and Art Nardini of the Houserockers, Donnie Iris, Hermie Granati, B.E. Taylor, more. Benefits the Cancer Caring Center. 5:30 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-481-7625.

FESTIVALS SAT 25

BUTLER COUNTY WINE FESTIVAL. 2-5 & 6-9 p.m. Days Inn, Butler. 724-283-1500.

DANCE THU 23

FIESTA FLAMENCA. Traditional music & dance presented by Flamenco Pittsburgh. 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

FRI 24

AN EVENING OF BELLYDANCE. Feat. professional belly dancers, Sahra, Hakan, Unsuk, Trista, & the music of Tom Moran. 8 p.m. Christine Frechard Gallery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. TRAVELING. Contemporary dance performance by Attack Theatre. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 7 & 8 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 25

GOLF BASH. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. St. Ferdinand Church, Cranberry. 724-816-7299. LA NUIT NOIRE. Ball feat. fashion show, entertainment, more. Benefits the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. www.lanuitnoire.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Oakland. 412-393-7600. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Dwellings. Work by Ryder Henry. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLEL JUC. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith

7-11 p.m. Cefalo’s Banquet Center, Carnegie. 412-276-6600. PANTRY BRUNCH CHALLENGE. 10 local chefs make brunch from ingredients typically distributed by food pantries. Benefits the Northside Community Food Pantry. 11 a.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-323-1163. PROJECT EVOLUTION II. Fashion show, live music, more. Benefits

Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-621-8875. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Group show. Saturdays & by appointment. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Adventuring Princesses in Living Color. Work by Maggie Lynn Negrete. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881.

the Homeless Children’s Education Fund. 7 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-282-8070.

SUN 26

2014 SUPER BINGO. Bring a non-perishable food item donation for the Westinghouse Valley Food Pantry. 12:30 p.m. Wilkins Elks. 412-823-6300.

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. SiO2: Highschool Reunion. Feat. work by 12 former SiO2 high school students. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY. Spinning Yarns: Photographic Storytellers. Group show curated by Anne Leighton Massoni & Libby Rowe. Moon. 800-762-0097. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

MON 27

CREATE FOR THE PHILIPPINES. Benefit for victims of Typhoon


Haiyan, presented by Create for the Cause. Feat. a traditional filipino dinner & dancing. 7-9 p.m. O’Hara Student Center, Oakland. 412-759-317.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Cold Hands, Hot Writers,

POLITICS

featuring Zarina Zabrisky, Simon Rogghe, Laura Warman and Karen Lillis at Brillobox, Bloomfield

FRI 24

RIP MIDDLE CLASS 1946-2013. Edward McClelland, the author of Young Mr. Obama: Chicago & the Making of a Black President will discuss the disappearing middle class & how it’s occurring in Pittsburgh. Presented by the Forum for Economic Development. 5 p.m. Carnegie Library of Homestead. 412-330-8484.

SAT 25

READY TO RUN: CAMPAIGN TRAINING FOR WOMEN. Learn from prominent elected & appointed leaders, campaign consultants, party officials, & policy experts. 8 a.m.-5:45 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878.

LITERARY THU 23

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

CRITIC: Alaina Dopico, 24, a

writer from Bloomfield WHEN: Thu.,

I came out to see Laura Warman read poetry. I like Laura’s poetry because her work is fearless. She avoids falling into any traps, like over-metaphorizing every aspect of life or spending too much time trying to avoid talking about oneself when you’re only talking about yourself anyway. It’s really effective because in speaking about her life, she’s also speaking about the lives of anyone else interacting with the world — [things they can relate to] like your job, your exes or your new city. Those last readings [by Rogghe and Zabrisky] — that work, and the performance in general — were bizarre in a way that was captivating and refreshing. It’s a really cool thing, because anything that you do a lot of can start to feel really repetitive. I couldn’t figure out if I was supposed to be laughing or taking it seriously. That discomfort was really cool. B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6426.

MON 27

BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S FAVORITES. Shakspeare reading series presented by Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks. Participants are encouraged to bring along a piece ready to read, jump into a scene already prepared, or just listen. BYOB@ pittsburghshakespeare.com 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. HILTON ALS. PALS BOOK CLUB. Pittsburgh Seniors only. 10 a.m. Contemporary w. w w Mount Lebanon Public Writer’s Series. er hcitypap g p Library, Mt. Lebanon. 8:30 p.m. Frick Fine .com 412-531-1912. Arts Auditorium, TRANSPOSE. Display of Oakland. 412-624-4125. editions of Chimera: A A LITERARY EVENING Journal of Art & Literature, a W/ AYELET WALDMAN. The student-produced journal from novelist will discuss her work Edinboro University. Part of & preview her new book, the Gallery Crawl. 5:30-10 p.m. Love and Treasure. 7:30 p.m. 820 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-456-6666. 412-622-8866. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION COLOR ME BAD: POETRY GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru & STUFF. 7 p.m. East End Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Book Exchange, Bloomfield. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-224-2847. 412-531-1912. WHERE YOU LIVE: WRITING ABOUT YOURSELF & YOUR FAMILY. Memoir writing LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! workshop feat. Scholar-inPractice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Residence Joseph Bathanti. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. 1-4 p.m. Senator John Heinz

FRI 24

Jan. 16

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SAT 25

TUE 28

#STEELCITYSLAM. Poetry slam presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective. www.pghpoetry.org/events 8 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

KIDSTUFF THU 23 - FRI 24

LITTLE SPROUTS SINGLE SERVINGS CAMP: OUR BUG FRIENDS. Ages 2-3. Jan. 23-24, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

THU 23 - WED 29

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solarpowered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 24

LEGO CLUB. Ages 7-12. 4 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 25

MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 25 - SUN 26

PIRATE PRINCESS ADVENTURE. Interactive musical theater production. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 2 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SUN 26

THAT’S A WRAP! TAPESCAPE TRANSFORMED. Repurpose the TapeScape exhibit into mobiles, wearables, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 26 - WED 29

MAKESHOP: UPCYCLE. Upcycle sweaters into conductive mittens for touch screens. Jan. 26-31, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 27

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

TUE 28

TUESDAY CRAFTERNOON. For students in grades 1-3. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 29

EZ MATH WORKSHOP. For students in grades 3-6. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru Feb. 26 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OUTSIDE TUE 28

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

$ $

1 Bud Light 1 Well Drinks

WED 29

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF

Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight

THU 23

ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BLOOD BROTHER. Film screening about a man from Pittsburgh making a difference in the lives of HIV-inflicted children in India. Post-film discussion to follow. Part of the Human Rights Film Festival. 7 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6415. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month,

Drink Specials!

(Southside Only)

Great Music!

Visit All Of Our Locations

Monroeville Mall • 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620

LIVE DJ @Southside

every Wednesday

winghartburgers.com

Like us on www.facebook/wingharts

CONTINUES ON PG. 46

N E W S

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TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

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A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

Real hook ups, real fast.

Free

TRY FOR

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412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INDOOR GARDENING: FOLIAGE PLANTS, HERBS, ORCHIDS & TROPICAL BONSAI. Thu. Thru Feb. 6 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com.

MEET THE GREATER PITTSBURGH LITERACY COUNCIL. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MEPPI JAPAN LECTURE SERIES: TEN THINGS I LIKE ABOUT OSAKA. Presented by the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania. Email aboots@us-japan.org 5:30-7 p.m. Residence Inn Pittsburgh, North Side. MYBUSINESS STARTUP PROGRAM. Thu, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thru April 10 Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1253. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.

FRI 24

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. HUNGRY FOR CHANGE FILM SCREENING. Feat. Leah Lizarondo, The Brazen Kitchen & Ankit Goyal, Fresh from the Farm Juices. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. MAKE YOUR OWN RADIUM GIRL. Collage workshop. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 5:30-9 p.m. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-456-6666. NIGHT MARKET VII. Pop-up market feat. handcrafted arts & crafts. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 131 Seventh St., Downtown. 5:30-10 p.m. 412-456-6666. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR: OAKLAND. 12-1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-391-2060 x 237.

[VISUAL ART]

3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand, on display at the Hillel

Jewish University Center, aims to reach a fuller awareness of the Holocaust by allowing viewers to examine their own perspectives. Curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, the traveling exhibit — which moves to the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill on Mon., Feb. 3 — blends the work of writer and poet Judith Robinson and visual artist Kara Ruth Snyder with historic records and narratives from survivors. Though Feb 2. 4607 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Call 412-421-1500 or visit holocaustcenterpgh.org.

12:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. 16TH ANNUAL SCOTTISH COUNTRY SUMMIT w. w w DANCING. Lessons AGAINST RACISM. er hcitypap g p 7-8 p.m., social summitagainstracism. .com dancing follows. blogspot.com 8 a.m.No partner needed. 3:30 p.m. East Liberty Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Presbyterian Church, Grace Episcopal Church, East Liberty. 412-501-3355. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. COLORED PENCIL I: SMART DIVORCE TECHNIQUES. Sat, 10 a.m.INSTITUTE WORKSHOP. 4:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 Phipps 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Legend Garden Center, Shadyside. Financial Advisors, Ross. 412-441-4442 x 3925. 412-837-1773. FREE ACT PRACTICE SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE TEST. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. CLUB. Free Scrabble games, Sewickley Public Library, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-6920. Mount Lebanon Public Library, KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 SPANISH CONVERSATION Carnegie Library, Oakland. GROUP. Friendly, informal. 412-622-3151. At the Starbucks inside KOREAN II. For those Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. who already have a basic Target, East Liberty. understanding of Korean & 412-362-6108. are interested in increasing SWING CITY. Learn & practice proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-

SAT 25

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

FULL LIST E N O LIN

swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SUN 26

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Fourth Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. JCC INDOOR TRIATHLON. Ages 6-adult. 11:30 a.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010 x 260. MYSTICAL PSYCHIC FAIR. 12-5 p.m. Library Fire Hall, South Park. 724-348-8063.

MON 27

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LAUGH FOR THE HEALTH OF IT! Laugh workshop w/ Julie Ann Sullivan. Non-perishable food bank donations accepted. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.


MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 28

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CRASH COURSE: GET HEALTHY NOW WORKSHOP. Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AS A BUSINESS TOOL. Presented by the Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence. 5:45-8:45 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 412-648-1544. OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SOIL ECOLOGY. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

WED 29

COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Panera Bread, Downtown. 412-563-5476. DESIGN & THINKING. Film screening & panel discussion on how to incorporate design into new product innovation. Presented by PDMA Pittsburgh. 4-8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-621-9009. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EXPLORING LOCAL CHEDDARS CLASS. Call to reserve a spot. 7 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

N E W S

STEVE WOZNIAK. Part of the RMU Pittsburgh Speakers Series. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. TOUGH GUISE 2. Explore how the media/pop culture shape & distort what it means to be male in American society. Part of the Human Rights Film Festival 2013: Conflict & Community. 7 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6415. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS AGAINST THE GRAIN

FESTIVAL. Auditions for Faust. Jan 29-30. Send resume & headshot (for actors) to info@ atgfestival.org w/ “Pittsburgh” in the email subject line. Creative positions also available. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-624-4141.

women of all ages who enjoy singing for the Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus Global Open House. Any woman of average singing ability, with or without vocal training is welcome. www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, 7 p.m. 412-279-6062.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical in the everyday for Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. Visit blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit for

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

CRISIS CENTER NORTH For more than 30 years, Crisis Center North has provided victims of domestic violence with counseling, medical and legal advocacy, and educational programs. Volunteers are needed to help in a variety of capacities, particularly with counseling callers to the Center’s 24-hour hotline. Volunteers must be 18 or older. Training sessions begin in February. Call 412-364-6728 or email dbarie@crisiscenternorth.org for information.

COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for Fiddler On The Roof. Jan. 25-26. Cold readings & movement auditions, prepare a classic musical theatre song to sing a capella. Advanced dance audition for the role of Chava & the featured Russian Dancer (role may double as Feyedka). www. comtraplayers.com Cranberry. 724-591-8727. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for Amish Burlesque. Feb. 1 & 3. 2-min. comedic monologue & 32 bars of up-tempo Broadway/pop song. Bring your own sheet music. www.mckeesportlittle theater.com McKeesport. 412-673-1100. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for The Importance of Being Earnest. Jan. 25-26. Males/females age 20-65. www.primestage.com/about/ auditions.html The Oakland School, Oakland. THE STRAND THEATER. Auditions for Bible On Broadway. Jan 25. Seeking kids age 8-12 for children’s chorus. Email auditions@ thestrandtheater.org or call for information. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 818-399-6468. SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL. Seeking

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submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Seeking a variety of visual & performing artists of all disciplines. www.3riversartsfest.org/ artistapps. 412-456-6666. FUTURE TENANT. Seeking performers, writers, musicians, composers, choreographers & general artistic visionaries for Trespass residency & performance series. Submit a proposal at futuretenant.org/currentopportunities/ Open submissions through Jan. 31. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking artwork for upcoming Mid-Winter Hues Multi-Media Juried Art Exhibit. Submit recent work (3 pieces max.) that has not been in a previous juried show at NHAC. Each piece must be ready for display/hanging w/ wire. Art may be delivered Jan. 30-Feb. 1, noon-4 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

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EXCLUSIVE GENTLEMAN’S CLUB 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson. If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.22-01.29

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Aquarian author Georges Simenon (1903-1989) wrote more than 200 novels under his own name and 300 more under pseudonyms. On average, he finished a new book every 11 days. Half a billion copies of his books are in print. I’m sorry to report that I don’t think you will ever be as prolific in your own chosen field as he was in his. However, your productivity could soar to a hefty fraction of Simenon-like levels in 2014 — if you’re willing to work your ass off. Your luxuriant fruitfulness won’t come as easily as his seemed to. But you should be overjoyed that you at least have the potential to be luxuriantly fruitful.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

When I’m older and wiser, maybe I’ll understand the meaning of my life. When I’m older and wiser, maybe I’ll gain some insight about why I’m so excited to be alive despite the fact that my destiny is so utterly mysterious. What about you, Pisces? What will be different for you when you’re older and wiser? N ow is an excellent time to ponder this riddle. Why? Because it’s likely you will get a glimpse of the person you will have become when you are older and wiser — which will in turn intensify your motivation to become that person.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Actor Casey Affleck appreciates the nurturing power of his loved ones. “My family would be supportive,” he says, “if I said I wanted to be a Martian, wear only banana skins, make love to ashtrays and eat tree bark.” I’d like to see you cultivate allies like that in the coming months, Aries. Even if you have never had them before, there’s a good chance they will be available. For best results, tinker with your understanding

of who your family might be. Redefine what “community” means to you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Author John Koenig says we often regard emotions as positive or negative. Feeling respect is good, for example, while being wracked with jealousy is bad. But he favors a different standard for evaluating emotions: how intense they are. At one end of the spectrum, everything feels blank and blah, even the big things. “At the other end is wonder,” he says, “in which everything feels alive, even the little things.” Your right and proper goal right now, Taurus, is to strive for the latter kind: full-on intensity and maximum vitality. Luckily, the universe will be conspiring to help you achieve that goal.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

At her blog other-wordly.tumblr.com, Yee-Lum Mak defines the Swedish word resfeber this way: “the restless race of the traveler’s heart before the journey begins, when anxiety and anticipation are

get your yoga on!

tangled together.” You might be experiencing resfeber right now, Gemini. Even if you’re not about to depart on a literal trip, I’m guessing you will soon start wandering out on a quest or adventure that will bring your heart and mind closer together. Paradoxically, your explorations will teach you a lot about being better grounded. Bon voyage!

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

How does a monarch butterfly escape its chrysalis when it has finished gestating? Through tiny holes in the skin of the chrysalis, it takes big gulps of air and sends them directly into its digestive system, which expands forcefully. Voila! Its body gets so big it breaks free. When a chick is ready to emerge from inside its egg, it has to work harder than the butterfly. With its beak, it must peck thousands of times at the shell, stopping to rest along the way because the process is so demanding. According to my analysis, Cancerian, you’re nearing the final stage before your metaphorical emergence from gestation. Are you more like the butterfly or chick?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

“I’m not sure where to go from here. I need help.” I encourage you to say those words out loud, Leo. Even if you’re not sure you believe they’re true, act as if they are. Why? Because I think it would be healthy for you to express uncertainty and ask for assistance. It would relieve you of the oppressive pressure to be a masterful problem-solver. It could free you from the unrealistic notion that you’ve got to figure everything out by yourself. And this would bring you, as if by magic, interesting offers and inquiries. In other words, if you confess your neediness, you will attract help. Some of it will be useless, but most of it will be useful.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Dogs have a superb sense of smell, much better than we humans. But ours isn’t bad. We can detect certain odors that have been diluted to one part in 5 billion. For example, if you were standing next to two Olympic-sized swimming pools, and only one contained a few drops of the chemical ethyl mercaptan, you would know which one it was. I’m now calling on you to exercise that level of sensitivity, Virgo. There’s a situation in the early stages of unfolding that would ultimately emanate a big stink if you allowed it to keep developing. There is a second unripe situation, on the other hand, that would eventually yield fragrant blooms. I advise you to either quash or escape from the first, even as you cultivate and treasure the second.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Whatever adventures may flow your way in the coming weeks, Libra, I hope you will appreciate them for what they are: unruly but basically

benevolent; disruptive in ways that catalyze welcome transformations; a bit more exciting than you might like, but ultimately pretty fun. Can you thrive on the paradoxes? Can you delight in the unpredictability? I think so. When you look back at these plot twists two months from now, I bet you’ll see them as entertaining storylines that enhance the myth of your hero’s journey. You’ll understand them as tricky gifts that have taught you valuable secrets about your soul’s code.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Manufacturing a jelly bean is not a quick, slam-bam process. It’s a five-step procedure that takes a week. Each seemingly uncomplicated piece of candy has to be built up layer by layer, with every layer needing time to fully mature. I’m wondering if maybe there’s a metaphorically similar kind of work ahead for you, Scorpio. May I speculate? You will have to take your time, proceed carefully and maintain a close attention to detail as you prepare a simple pleasure.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

I understand the appeal of the f-word. It’s guttural and expulsive. It’s a perverse form of celebration that frees speakers from their inhibitions. But I’m here today to announce that its rebel cachet and vulgar power are extinct. It has decayed into a barren cliché. Its official death-from-oversaturation occurred with the release of the mainstream Hollywood blockbuster The Wolf of Wall Street. Actors in the film spat out the rhymes-with-cluck word more than 500 times. I hereby nominate you Sagittarians to begin the quest for new ways to invoke rebellious irreverence. What interesting mischief and naughty wordplay might you perpetrate to escape your inhibitions, break taboos that need to be broken and call other people on their BS and hypocrisy?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) has had a major impact on the development of ideas in the Western world. We can reasonably divide the history of philosophy into two eras: preKantian and post-Kantian. And yet for his whole life, which lasted 79 years, this big thinker never traveled more than 10 miles away from Konigsberg, the city where he was born. He followed a precise and methodical routine, attending to his work with meticulous detail. According to my analysis, you Capricorns could have a similar experience in the coming weeks. By sticking close to the tried-and-true rhythms that keep you grounded and healthy, you can generate influential wonders. How could you change yourself in order to get more of the love you want? Go to FreeWill Astrology.com; click on “Email Rob.”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 51 + STUDIES 51 + WELLNESS 52 + LIVE 54 + SERVICES 54

WORK

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

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Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Your ad could be here

East End Floral Shoppe is looking for a FULL or PART time floral designer. Must be proficient in all phases of floral design.

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org

Act 235 Courses Basic Class: March 15, 16, 20, 21, 22 Renewal Classes: March 20

Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

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CLINICAL STUDIES

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CONSTIPATION?

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Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

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BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided. For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

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See what our clients are saying

724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

933 Penn Avenue • Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

DIABETES?

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State Police Approval Letter Required

800.810.5800

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

OBESITY?

Send responses and/or resumes to richardirwin6071 @gmail.com

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VOLUNTEERS

STUDIES

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with ponse res the and ads design of our e to hav I w kno I en Wh they evoke. jects in advertise for research sub ediately the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Zhangs Massage

Xie LiHong’s

412-401-4110

WELLNESS CENTER

$40/hr

Chinese Bodyworks

322 Fourth Ave.

Downtown M-F prkg free after 4pm Sat-Sun prkg free all day

massage

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Shadyside Location

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Therapy

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

724-519-7896

JADE Wellness Center

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

Judy’s Oriental Massage

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • New Partial Hospitalization Program

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014


Positive Recovery Solutions

SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol©

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412.246.8965, ext. 9

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

Recovery Without Judgement™ Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

Squirrel Hill Office NOW OPEN!

1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Please Call: 412-359-9257

Let Us Help You Today!

New Leaf Recovery Services newleafrecoveryservices@gmail.com

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz M U S I C

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TA S T E

Call Erin at:

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

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IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

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N E W S

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com

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LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

C L A S S I F I E D S

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SERVICES AUTO SERVICES

REHEARSAL

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. WeCome To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

GENERAL FOR SALE Clinique, Michael Kors for LESS! Name brands without the name brand price. 25% purchase using code AAN till 02/07. DivineAndSexy.Us (AAN CAN)

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2014. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

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ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

WANTED TO BUY > WE BUY HOUSES CASH > Any area, any condition, or price range. > Visit our website! > www.sellmyspace.us

STORAGE

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

EAST FOR RENT Morningside- Newly remod. sm. 4BR house, 2 full baths, off st prkg, no pets. 412-628-6154

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper! ACROSS

ADOPTION Global Executives, Hiking, Skiing, Playful Pets, Theatre and Music Lovingly awaits 1st Baby

Expenses Paid 1-800-933-1975

A DO P T :

888-788-5624

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ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

A secure life of love awaits your baby through the gift of adoption. Expenses Paid. Please call Daria at

Ink Well

UNFILTERED

412-316-3342

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.22/01.29.2014

1. Hairy sitcom cousin 4. Ammunition for a certain gun 10. Yahoo celebrity gossip page 13. Three-time NHL MVP Bobby 14. Scrap 15. Mario Kart console 16. MRS. HAttyCyphert you will amaze at your w*ste line goes invisible vvith these rev/olutionary ___ 19. Cute Mexican salamander (get on this, Buzzfeed) 20. “Slaves of New York” author Janowitz 21. Dole out 23. Frustrated outburst 26. Ern a ___!! Finally PhD in under 2 weeks at RealHarvard University.edu.ru 32. Source of lake-effect snow in Cleveland 33. Barack’s Education Secretary 34. Comment from Rex 36. Response to a polar vortex 37. Feature of this puzzle, and where the theme clues ought to have ended up 40. Morning ___ 41. “2010: Odyssey Two” computer 42. Powder at the barber 43. Hard-boiled genre

44. Good day sir, I am Joseph Komalo, son of a ___. I wish to transfer 1,594,976 ZAR ($14.9. million USD) direct to you account 49. Place for lions or opium 50. Intel gathering 51. Jan. or Feb. 55. “Word” 59. Bonjour cockzilla, want to ___? Woman scream at this more than luxury present 63. Philosophical interest for John Cage 64. Humiliating way to be put 65. Terse explanation, tersely 66. Big lunk 67. Anesthetic gas 68. Portland’s st.

DOWN

1. Site of Howard Dean’s infamous scream 2. “Bang a Gong (Get It On)” band 3. Yo La Tengo, for one 4. Stop all one’s running around 5. Relate, as a story 6. Letters for enlistees’ letters 7. “This movie’s boring, let’s go” 8. Girl who’s been 8 since 1987 9. Ariel Sharon, e.g., casually 10. Mouse hunter 11. Employer of 12-Down, for short

12. Future vets 14. Indian wild dog 17. Windshield problem 18. Evil “Aladdin” bird 22. Mine transport 24. Seattle’s thirdlargest company 25. Valiant 26. Eugene who helped start the Industrial Workers of the World 27. One may be run during lunch 28. Sexist address 29. Poetic sphere 30. L-P content? 31. Spell 35. Erotic play opening? 37. Chateau ___ Michelle 38. Course average? 39. His last fight was a

loss to Trevor Berbick 43. Closing time at the park? 45. Work, as a bone 46. Either retailing partner of Herbert Marcus 47. Minecraft, e.g. 48. “Monday Night Football” exec Arledge 52. Collection of bits 53. Expel 54. Invite sloppiness, perhaps 56. “Ice Loves ___” 57. Number before : 58. Hatchet cousin 59. Wu-Tang member known as “The Genius” 60. Benching unit 61. Bono’s NGO 62. Letters above 0-00, before a baseball game begins

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


HOUSE WARMING

Sojourner House gives mothers in recovery, and their children, a second chance {BY ABBY MENDELSON} IT’S A SUNNY afternoon at Sojourner House, the former Idaho

apartments on Penn Avenue, Friendship. A relic from the time when such buildings were named, the building is now a residential treatment home for 14 adult women and their children. A dozen women are in the basement now, participating in a parenting-through-the-arts program. Today’s task: to use colored paper to illustrate one thing each woman values. “Chains,” says a woman in green as she holds up her project. “Ties that bind the family.” Nods all around. A second woman, wearing a Steelers shirt, displays something torn, woven, discarded. “I didn’t like the imperfections,” she says diffidently, “so I hid them.” “That’s deep,” a third woman says. “Stop trying to hide the imperfections,” adds a fourth. “Be yourself.” “Let the paper be the paper,” interjects a fifth. “Don’t worry about anything else.” “What is it about weaving that’s important to you?” a sixth asks.

lows. “There was always a reason to celebrate,” she says, “or drown my sorrows.” But then she found alcohol was controlling her, and that liquor had spiraled into heroin. She survived 11 years of addiction, until a final bout began with a single Stoli ’n’ cranberry juice and ended up wiping out two weeks of her life. Diana recalls reacting one day to Margaret’s plaintive cries about Mommy’s sickness by telling herself, “I can’t do this anymore. I have to get better and stay clean.” She adjusts Suzanne on her lap. “That was my waking point,” she says. “Then I had to dig deep to find out what was happening with me. Because I didn’t see myself as an alcoholic.” Diana chose Sojourner House because she could bring her daughters: In traditional rehab approaches, the addict goes away and “the family is left to suffer the consequences of addiction,” says Karen Garland, a counselor and assistant clinical supervisor. “Here, the family heals together.” For Diana, part of that healing required going back to basics,

“MOMS ADOPT A HEALING ROUTINE, AND CHILDREN APPRECIATE IT. FOR SOME, IT’S THE ONLY HEALTHY ROUTINE THEY’VE EVER EXPERIENCED.” “That’s the only way I could get it together,” the weaver answers. Hmmmmm, they all say. “Weaving,” she gestures, “is how dedicated I am to keeping my family together.” That’s the rub for these women: keeping themselves and their families in one piece. Because not so long ago, each woman gathered here made some very bad — indeed, disastrous — choices. This exercise, like everything else they do in Sojourner House, teaches them to think about the consequences of every act. Named for the preacher Sojourner Truth, and established in 1991, Sojourner House is one of the rare residential programs that address the needs of addicted mothers and their children. “We help women explore and understand such issues,” offers Latina Jenkins, a family-support specialist. The point of the art project, for example, is to teach women how they can change, how they can create healthy lives and families. “The torn paper is a visual of what’s going on in their lives,” Jenkins says. “They work so hard for recovery, for themselves and their families, so that they can become who they want to be.” No one works harder than Diana, who came with two of her four kids: 2-year-old Suzanne and 6-year-old Margaret. Diana has worked at a little bit of everything — from pizza-maker to Sunday-school teacher — but used alcohol to control her highs and

the stuff that gets thrown overboard with substance abuse. Personal hygiene. Apartment cleanliness. Doing chores. Bringing up her daughters. There’s more, of course: morning meetings, relapse-prevention sessions, counseling time, life-skills lessons. “Being here has shown me who I really want to be,” Diana says. “Who I really can be. Without chemicals in my life.” Here, Diana is responsible for cooking, shopping, homework, sending Margaret off to nearby Sunnyside School. “It’s important that children see mom as a parent,” Garland says, “as the head of the family. “Moms adopt a healing routine,” Garland adds, “and children appreciate it. Hopefully, when they leave here, they carry it with them. Because for some, it’s the only healthy routine they’ve ever experienced.” So far, Diana thinks it’s working. “I feel that I’ve come far working on my deeper-seated issues,” she says. “Throwing in the towel would be going back into my addiction.” She shakes her head. “I don’t want that.” “They tell you to allow five minutes before the miracle — not to be too quick to give up on yourself,” Diana adds, pausing to comb Suzanne’s tangled hair. “God is giving me another chance to finally complete something.” IN F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Polka Dot Disco Pants.

Meet Romy. She is the daughter of a dancer and a former professional motocross racer who met in Jarabacoa, in the Dominican Republic. She was born in Manhattan but spent the first few years of her life in the Dominican. Coming back to the States at the age of four, Romy liked to pretend that she didn’t speak English to avoid doing the things she was asked, though she spoke the language as perfectly as any toddler. As a kid she dreamed of becoming a dancer like her mother though now she sees herself one day owning a boutique with her own clothing line. She’s picking up some experience for these future endeavors as a sales associate at our Garden State Plaza location, as well as studying part time, looking to go into Marketing and Merchandising. In her spare time Romy blogs, DJs, plays soccer and loves white water rafting – though in Winters like these she just hides out and sews. Romy is pictured here wearing the Polka Dot Disco Pants, Corduroy Sherpa Jacket and Spandex Off-Shoulder Top.

Retail Locations: Pittsburgh—Shadyside Philadelphia—U Penn Philadelphia—Walnut Street King of Prussia—The Plaza Cleveland—Cleveland Hts.

Made in USA—Sweatshop Free Operated by Dov Charney

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

January 22, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 4

January 22, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 4