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ANTI-WARCRAFT: SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT EXHIBIT OFFERS ANTI-VIOLENCE MESSAGE 41


EVENTS 1.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, THE NOX BOYS Warhol entrance space Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DAMIEN JURADO, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, COURTNEY MARIE ANDREWS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

BY THE TIME OF HIS DEATH, WARHOL HAD CRAMMED HIS TOWNHOUSE’S FIRST FLOOR WITH SO MUCH STUFF, IT WAS UNUSABLE.

2.7 – 6pm ART.WRITE.NOW.TOUR 2013 SCHOLASTIC ART & WRITING AWARDS OPENING RECEPTION Warhol entrance space Tickets FREE

Learn this and more at the world’s most comprehensive single-artist museum.

2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JULIANNA BARWICK Warhol theater Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: SAN FERMIN, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, SON LUX Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District image: Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1978, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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The

2014

SPIRIT KING of

Award Ceremony January 16, 2014

This annual award honors lifetime achievement in the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Port Authority, The Kingsley Association The Pittsburgh Pirates and the New Pittsburgh Courier are proud to present Reverend LeRoy Patrick and August Wilson as the 2014 Spirit of King honorees. Thursday, January 16th 10:00 am at The Kingsley Center 6435 Frankstown Avenue.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014


{EDITORIAL}

01.15/01.22.2014

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern ANGELA SUICO

VOLUME 24 + ISS ISSUE SU UEE 03

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY ALTERNATE HISTORIES}

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{ADVERTISING}

[MAIN FEATURE] be afraid to leave the house this 18 Don’t winter! Our Winter Guide lists a variety of entertaining and edifying things to do.

[NEWS] like I’m a victim of cartography.� 12 “I—feel State Rep. Erin Molchany on the redistricting that will send her into a primary battle with fellow Democrat Harry Readshaw

[VIEWS]

mean, gosh, it’s almost like Tom Corbett 14 “Idoesn’t think the environmental good intentions of gas-drillers can be trusted after all.� — Chris Potter on shake-ups in the natural-gas industry

[TASTE] crucial that our plant nutrients are 30 “It’s returned to the earth.� — Nancy Martin, of the Pennsylvania Resources Council, on vermicomposting

wasn’t the most ideal boss to work 31 “She for, but after that I started climbing up the ladder.� — The Stepkids’ Jeff Gitelman on working for Lauryn Hill

[SCREEN]

[ARTS] this is an incredibly important 41 “While show to witness, it’s often very hard to take.� — Lissa Brennan reviews ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out, at the Society for Contemporary Craft

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 59 +

(17(57$,10(17 7+,6:((.(1'

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

7+856'$<-$18$5<

7RQ\-DQIORQH-U

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2014 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bikini Kill had a raw energy, fronted by the charismatic Kathleen Hanna, who shouted lyrics about rape and gender identity.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Al Hoff on the bio-doc The Punk Singer

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{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION}

[MUSIC]

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Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representatives TERRANCE P. MARTIN, TARA PARKINSON Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“THE CHARTER-SCHOOL PROCESS IS A VERY POLITICAL ONE IN PITTSBURGH.”

INCOMING The Mixus Brothers make pretty music, even if they’re not family (Jan. 2) “This is a talented duo. [I’m a] proud owner of the debut and having heard To the Far Blue Mountains can safely say they’ve outdone themselves. Really great stuff worthy of bigger things.” — Web comment from “Brian Balich”

Longtime local music blogger Hugh Twyman presents new concert series at Eide’s (Jan. 8) “This man is an asset to Pittsburgh, he goes to nearly every concert, captures it, is a heck of an illustrator. Great guy ... and this music series is an apt way of celebrating 10 years of service to the local music scene.” — Web comment from “André Kristofer Buccini Costello”

Spike Jonze delivers an engaging and provocative love story about a man and his operating system (Jan. 8) “I know some geeks who I suspect are enamored with anime females, so I guess this isn’t much of a leap.” — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page from “Richard Wood”

PROCESS

QUESTIONS Why are some city charter schools approved over others? {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

“Every time I say I’m from philly/PA people ask about Pittsburgh like you know that’s 300 miles from philly right idk anything about it” — Jan. 13 tweet from “Katie Wagner” (@katiewagnerrr)

“If ScareHouse ran awards shows, long-winded acceptance speeches would be cut off ... by clowns with chainsaws.” — Jan. 12 tweet from “Scott Simmons” (@ScareHouseScott)

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S PITTSBURGH Public Schools considers closing another school to help avert a million-dollar budget deficit in 2016, three new charter schools are clamoring for their own share of students … and of public tax dollars. But getting approval for a charter school — a school run by an outside group that nevertheless gets public money from the district itself — can be difficult. Between 2008 and 2012, the district has approved only two charter schools out of 15 proposed. “The charter-school process is a very political one in Pittsburgh,” says Randall Taylor, a former school-board director who’s been involved in two charter applications. Getting approved can depend on who you know, he contends. The outcome of the latest round of charter applications may test that proposition.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Derrick Lopez, president of the Homewood Children’s Village, stands outside the Afro-American Music Institute, one potential site for the group’s proposed Collegiate Charter School campus.

The district is currently considering three charter proposals: the Homewood Children’s Village Collegiate Charter School [HCV]; Robert L. Vann Charter School, slated for the Strip District; and Provident Charter School for Children with Dyslexia, to be located in the North Side. Taylor is one of the backers for the Strip District school, but the Homewood proposal arguably has the strongest

district ties: HCV President and CEO Derrick Lopez worked for the district from 2007 to 2011. He served as assistant superintendent for secondary schools and chief of high school reform during that time, before taking the HCV post. While employed by the district, Lopez helped broker the relationship with HCV, under which the program provides social services like mentoring, coaching, and behavioral support to CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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PROCESS QUESTIONS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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students in three area schools. The district, in turn, helps HCV secure funding by applying for grants from the U.S. Department of Education and other sources. Of the three proposals, HCV would have the largest projected student body: Its application envisions attracting up to 1,000 students in grades 6 through 12. Modeled after an acclaimed “Harlem Children’s Zone,” in which educators make use of community cultural assets, the HCV plans to utilize existing buildings and institutions in Homewood as its campus. These will include the YMCA, Afro-American Music Institute, Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum and Carnegie Library. “My experience with the Pittsburgh Public Schools, coupled with the two years that I have spent here in Homewood working with individual children and families, has given me a lens into the many challenges that our children face,” Lopez says. “It is my hope that the district will recognize that work and the HCV’s unwavering commitment to children.” If it does so, the district would be breaking from recent tradition. The only two charters approved by the district in the past five years were expansions

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of established charter brands. Urban Pathways K-5 is an expansion of the North Side Urban Pathways 6-12, and Propel North Side, while the first of its brand approved in PPS, is one of nine Propel charter schools in the area. “You’re certainly seeing a lot of support from the district for Propel,” Taylor says. “The pattern of preferential treatment is clear, but no one is really saying why.” District Superintendent Linda Lane agreed to an interview for this story, but later canceled it. The district asked for a list of questions, but declined to say why some charters are approved over others, or provide examples of the rationale behind charters that were approved in the past. The district’s charterr eview t eam makes recommendations on charter applications after conducting site visits, examining financial and student-performance data, and assessing the curriculum. The review team’s recommendations are sent to the school board, which held a public hearing on all three current proposals Dec. 16. The state’s charter law constrains a school board’s review of charter proposals — at least in theory. “Charter-school law dictates reasons that can be used to deny an application,” says Tim Eller, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A charter can be denied, for example, if it isn’t financially viable, or if it doesn’t comply with the state school code. It also can be denied if the application doesn’t provide enough evidence to support its claims. If the charter is denied, the applicant can appeal to a

“WE WANT TO USE THE BEST OF WHAT’S OUT THERE. BUT IT’S HOW YOU DELIVER IT.”

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state appeals board. But, Eller adds, “The school district needs to rule on the merits of that application regardless of whether it feels a charter is warranted or not.” One thing almost everyone agrees on: In a neighborhood like Homewood, the status quo isn’t sustainable. According to achievement results from the most recent Pennsylvania State System of Assessment Tests, only 8 percent of 11th graders at Westinghouse, the high-school located in Homewood, scored at least “proficient” in math; just 14 percent of 6th graders scored proficient or above in reading. “The data speaks for itself,” says Lopez. “Only half of the students who begin schooling in the Homewood community end up graduating.” The district has tried a number of fixes: Lopez himself presided over an effort to segregate classes by gender — a 2011 experiment that was brought to an abrupt end in the face of a threatened ACLU lawsuit. Currently, the academic options for Homewood’s children are limited. While students can apply to a magnet program at any school in the district, spots at these schools are highly coveted. HCV’s charter does propose some innovations, including an extended school day and school year. The school will also feature “looping,” in which teachers stay with the same group of students for three or four years, and hopes to be Pittsburgh’s first STEAM school (science, technology, engineering, arts and math). But it also plans to borrow from the curriculum already being used in other schools — namely,

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application have to demonstrate that it is offering anything new. “There are some who think a charter school needs to open for a specific purpose that the applicants feel the district is not providing,” Eller says. “I know at one time there was that belief, but charter school law does not legislate only a certain number of charter schools in a region.” School board member Mark Brentley, though, worries that HCV may undermine any future effort to shore up Westinghouse. A new principal, Alexander Herring Sr., was brought in at the start of the 2013-2014 school year to help turn things around. But Herring “hasn’t really had a chance,” says Brentley. “We have yet to allow the new administration to get a foothold.” But Taylor, who previously represented Homewood on the school board, says the situation in Homewood is dire enough that any solution is worth trying. “I have some strong reservations about [the HCV] plan,” says Taylor, who expressed concerns about kids walking from building to building on its “community campus” throughout the day. But despite that, and despite his support of a different proposal, Taylor says “things are so bad out there, that [the school board] should approve it.” The district is slated to make a decision this spring.

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MOLCHANY VS. READSHAW Redistricting sets up big primary battle for local progressives {BY CHRIS POTTER}

OUR NEWEST DOCTOR UPMC CancerCenter is pleased to welcome our newest physician. John Lech, DO Hematologist/Medical Oncologist Dr. Lech is board-certified in hematology and medical oncology, and received a medical degree from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Erie, Pa. As a native of Pittsburgh, he completed his residency in internal medicine at the Western Pennsylvania Hospital and his fellowship in hematology and oncology at The Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Temple University School of Medicine Clinical Campus in Pittsburgh. To schedule an appointment or for more information, call 412-235-1020, or visit UPMCCancerCenter.com. Hillman Cancer Center 5115 Centre Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15232

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BILL PEDUTO MAY still be looking for the key to the mayor’s washroom, and Pittsburgh City Council President Bruce Kraus may still be practicing with his gavel … but local progressives already have another political fight ahead. First-term state Rep. Erin Molchany, a Peduto ally, is taking on veteran legislator Harry Readshaw in the 2014 Democratic primary. “We have to be cognizant of the next generation of leadership,” says Molchany, who at age 36 is among the youngest members of Allegheny County’s legislative delegation — and its only woman. In Readshaw, she faces an opponent twice her age and with 10 times the legislative experience; the Carrick resident was first elected in 1994. Some of Molchany’s 22nd district — including the portion of Mount Washington she calls home — was combined into Readshaw’s 36th district during a statewide redistricting. The combined district includes Pittsburgh’s South Side, and South Hills neighborhoods ranging from Mount Washington to Carrick, along with Mount Oliver and suburban neighborhoods in Brentwood and Baldwin Borough. That’s mostly Readshaw’s turf: More than 7 out of 10 voters in the new 36th were already Readshaw’s constituents, prompting Molchany to say, half-jokingly, “I feel like I’m a victim of cartography.” But she’s already reaching out to allies, including fellow first-term House Rep. Brian Sims (D-Philadelphia), the first openly gay legislator to be elected to Harrisburg. “Outside of the governor’s race, Erin’s is the most important of the election cycle,” Sims told City Paper during a 2013 visit to Pittsburgh. He and Molchany are close allies, and recently teamed up to draft a new bill tightening equal-pay standards for female employees. By contrast, says Sims, “When I look at Readshaw’s voting record, I see a me-too Republican.” Readshaw allows that “I’m more conservative” than Molchany, though “we’re obviously both more liberal than Republicans.” For example, while Readshaw opposes same-sex marriage rights because “I’m not spiritually for it,” he’s joined to support House Bill 300, which would bar discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Readshaw, a longtime abortion opponent, also originally co-sponsored a measure to require a woman seeking an

abortion to have an ultrasound first, with a screen facing her so she could see the fetus. Similar measures drew national controversy elsewhere, and Readshaw later withdrew his backing. Readshaw said that when he was asked to co-sponsor the measure, “It sounded appealing.” But, he adds, once he saw the text of the bill itself, he realized he couldn’t support it. In any case, Readshaw says, “So much of this job is about helping people in the district. That’s always been my goal.” Readshaw estimates that he’s brought more than $12 million in state funding for district improvements. “The longer you’ve been there, the more apt you are to get things done,” he says. In fact, Readshaw has never faced an election challenge. “I assume that’s an endorsement by my constituents,” he says. But Molchany could pose a serious threat. She’s hired Matt MerrimanPreston, the political field general behind Peduto’s mayoral bid and Molchany’s ow n s u c c e s s f u l 2 0 1 2 campaign against Marty Schmotzer. And she can count on support from Peduto allies like Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. “I’ve already contributed to her, and I’ll be helping her raise money,” says Fitzgerald. “She’s a progressive, a hard worker and a team player. She was so strong on the transportation bill,” which ensured continued state funding for the Port Authority along with road construction around the state. (Readshaw voted against it, because it included a liquidfuels tax that critics say is passed on to drivers: “It’s a bad time to be taxing people,” he says.) Fitzgerald cautions that his backing of Molchany “isn’t negative about” Readshaw, whom Fitzgerald named to the board of Alcosan. “He’s done a lot good things. But Erin’s the future of this region in many ways.” What’s more, he says, “We only have one woman representative in the Allegheny County delegation. Having zero is not an option.” In any case, the battle is shaping up to be the most spirited House race that South Hills voters have seen in a generation. “By the time we get done campaigning,” Readshaw says, “I’m sure constituents will notice a distinct difference between who and what we are.”

“I FEEL LIKE I’M A VICTIM OF CARTOGRAPHY.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014


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[POTTER’S FIELD] PITTSBURGH DANCE COUNCIL PRESENTS

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As re-election season begins, trouble for Corbett {BY CHRIS POTTER}

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WITH GOV. TOM Corbett’s re-election fight about to begin, it will be no surprise when rivals accuse him of acting as a lackey for the gas industry, and a toady of the far right. The surprise is that he’s not doing a very good job at it. At least so far. Corbett’s latest setback came at the close of last year, when the state Supreme Court tossed out much of Act 13, the state law governing “fracking” for natural gas. In a 4-2 decision, the court found that the law, which Corbett had championed, had gone too far in accommodating the gas industry by weakening zoning and environmental rules. It wasn’t Corbett’s first legal setback. Remember the abortive lawsuit to overturn the NCAA’s sanctions against Penn State University for enabling Jerry Sandusky? Remember voter ID, which the state Supremes voided before the 2012 election, and which has been idling ever since? On issues like his courtroom fight to preserve a ban on same-sex marriage, meanwhile, Corbett’s legal struggles have mirrored his travails in the court of public opinion. Last fall, his attorneys drew fire for arguing that, legally, removing the ban would be little different than allowing children to marry. Corbett called the analogy “inappropriate” — apparently because it wasn’t offensive enough. “I think a better analogy would be brother and sister,” he told a Harrisburg reporter. But even Corbett’s backers have little proof that his heart is in the fight, while doubters question whether he has a heart at all. The Act 13 ruling especially must sting, coming as it did just weeks after Corbett kicked off his re-election bid at Pittsburgh’s Heinz History Center. It’s not just that drilling interests have been huge campaign donors. It’s that in a state where job creation has ranked in the bottom 10, the industry’s growth has been among the few successes Corbett can claim. No surprise, then, that his kickoff event included campaign ads so focused on drilling that it was hard to tell what they were advertising: Corbett’s re-election, or Range Resources. Corbett’s attorneys have asked the Supreme Court for “re-consideration” — essentially a do-over. It’s a legal Hail Mary: Duquesne University law professor Bruce

Ledewitz says it’s “inconceivable” that the court would reverse itself. But it’s no less likely than Corbett’s political strategy: assuming the mantle of environmentalist. The ruling, he and other Republicans fretted, voided “setback” requirements that keep drilling rigs at a safe distance from waterways. And despite the ruling, he proclaimed, “I am calling upon Pennsylvania’s oil and gas operators to honor both the spirit and intent” of setback rules anyway. Given that Corbett has touted the drillers’ environmental stewardship all along, it was an odd request. I mean, gosh, it was almost like Tom Corbett doesn’t think the environmental good intentions of gas-drillers can be trusted after all. Major drilling groups quickly agreed that, yes, they would continue to obey the rules they helped write. (Whew!) But the odd part about all the environmental hand-wringing was … environmentalists weren’t the ones doing it. They’ve hailed the ruling instead. George Jugovic Jr., a former state regulator with environmental group PennFuture, says that’s because even without Act 13, the state has plenty of authority to enforce setbacks. What the Supreme Court took issue with, he said, was the ease with which it allowed those setbacks to be waived. “To use the court’s opinion as a basis for not providing protections for streams and wetlands would be ludicrous,” he says. But although Pennsylvania Democrats have been gleefully retweeting every poll showing Corbett’s dismal approval rating, they shouldn’t get too cocky. Corbett might scrounge up an electionyear win, perhaps by selling off the state stores and freeing up liquor sales (though he just scuttled an effort to sell off the state lottery). And while voters may disdain Corbett, they may not like the eventual Democratic nominee any better. Team Corbett is already attacking one Democratic hopeful, Congresswoman/ Philly liberal Allyson Schwartz, for voting in favor of healthcare reform. Corbett may not be able to give us much to vote for, but he can give us someone to vote against. But whoever the Democratic nominee is, the person Tom Corbett really has to get around is … Tom Corbett.

EVEN CORBETT’S BACKERS HAVE LITTLE PROOF THAT HIS HEART IS IN THE FIGHT, WHILE DOUBTERS QUESTION WHETHER HE HAS A HEART AT ALL.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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WINTERGUIDE

A selection of local happenings that should provide entertainment, edification and exercise this season {BY CP STAFF}

{ILLUSTRATION BY ALTERNATE HISTORIES}

Look out, it’s winter! And it’s been challenging for man and monsters alike. We’ve learned new words like “polar vortex” and how to rock a scarf wrapped around our heads. But there’s plenty more to learn – and do – locally. We’ve compiled a selection of local happenings through March that should provide entertainment, edification and exercise.

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MUSIC It was an interesting year for Pixies: The band went through a couple of bass players, losing Kim Deal and then firing her replacement. Now the band that changed college rock plays with Paz Lenchantin, once of A Perfect Circle; you can judge for yourself when they play live. Jan. 25. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 800-745-3000 or www. druskyentertainment.com One of last year’s biggest breakout records came from Phosphorescent, the project of Matthew Houck; it’s not a new band, but 2013’s dreamy, persistent Muchacho put it on the map for many people. Jan. 31. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com In the depths of winter, there’s nothing like local music to warm your heart — and nothing like a crowded bar to warm the rest of you. Find both at Snow Ball, an annual all-locals show from the folks g you RANT Lawrenceville who bring mer. The Armadillos, each summer. Chrome Moses, The Cheats and many more play. Feb. 1. awrenceville. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 157 412-687-2157 Local hip hop has benefited lately from some growing organizational nd one support, and .A.R.E. factor is R.A.R.E. Nation, a music-andart group that aims to ocal artists promote local ate young and educate he group’s people. The Pittsburgh gh Sound show presents ents an allh hip-hop bill Pittsburgh featuring Palermo Stone, d many more. Beedie and Feb. 1. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412-821-4447 or malls.com www.mrsmalls.com

Julianna Barwick at The Andy Warhol Museum {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN BRACKBILL}

January, and comes to town just after. Feb. 4. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

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Twenty-plus years after their initial success b and the tragedy it brought (the band’s original guitarist killed himself after being fired), Gin Blossoms h have b managed to persist — and bring in plenty of nostalgic Gen-Xers Gen-Xers. Here’s the secret: The songs were, and continue to be, really good. Feb. 4. 724-799 Jergel’s, Warrendale. 724-799-8333 or www.jergels.com a The beautiful and soun haunting soundscapes Julianna Bar Barwick creates often evoke a beautiful ba barren tundra, whic which is about what Pittsburgh w will probably be in February, wh when she stops here. Last year’s Nepenthe e is an a aural tranquilizer; enjo enjoy responsibly. Feb Feb. 8. The Andy War Warhol Museum, Nor North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol. www.warhol.org

re between hi h p Somewhere hip e there’s Quiltt, and hippie piece psych-pop the three-piece m Boston. Two group from years afterr the band’s self-titled record, it releases itss follow-up LP, lendor, r in late Held in Splendor,

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Hopsin at Altar Bar

Malaysian p pop singer Yuna made a splash in the Unite United States in 2012 with her selftitled debut album

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life behind the scenes, at home. Feb. 21April 27. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

and its Pharrell Williams-produced lead track, “Live Your Life.” The music on 2013’s Nocturnal is both personal and danceable. Feb. 12. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-206-9719 Sometimes a double bill really packs a punch: Son Lux, the onetime Clevelander whose skills as a composer and producer keep him in demand both artistically and commercially, would be enough on his own. But adding San Fermin, the chamber-pop project of Ellis LudwigLeone, put this show over the top. Feb. 18. The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Hopsin keeps it pretty positive — except when it comes to other rappers. The MC, whose most recent is last year’s Knock Madness, aims to be a role model, dissing drugs and alcohol, and often other rappers, including Tyler, the Creator and Soulja Boy. Feb. 20. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-206-9719 If you grew to love Nicole Atkins as a crooner, you might be in for a surprise: The first single off the New Jersey native’s new album, “Girl, You Look Amazing,” is a candy-sweet dance-pop track that might have her poised for a mainstream breakthrough. Feb. 21. Club Café, South Side. 412.com 431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com It’s been quite some time since Cibo Matto made an appearance ance in Pittsburgh — the ’90s indie darling didn’t make it here on its 2011 reunion tour. But never fear: The band that made you love an insane song about making a birthday cake is back. March 7. Club Café, South Side. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

“Rockland Lake,” by Maurice Brazil Prendergast, from Odyssey at Frick Art & Historical Center

The works in this exhibition, An American Odyssey: The Warner Collection of American Painting, span much this nation’s history — from the 18th century through the arrival of the 20th. Included are paintings from the American Impressionist movement, as well as the popular Hudson River School. Starts March 1. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-3710600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

{COURTESY OF THE WARNER FOUNDATION ON DISPLAY AT THE WESTERVELT WARNER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART}

throughout the winter. January features the work of Laurie Trok, with Sam Thorp and Brian Gonnella getting the space in February. Greensburg. 724-837-1500 or www.wmuseumaa.org In Dwellings, Pittsburgh-based Ryder Henry makes little worlds from what you throw away. His intricate buildings, neighborhoods and spaceships — all constructed from cardboard and other packaging — are inspired by everything from Victoriana to futuristic fantasies. Through Jan. 25. The Gallery 4, Shadyside. 412-363-5050 or www.thegallery4.us Check out tomorrow’s future visual and literary artists at Art. Write. Now. w , a nationally touring exhi h bition that offers original exhibition work by winning 6th-through12th -grade students from the Scholastic Art & Writing

The Westmoreland Museum off American Art has temporarily moved to new digs while the old space is being expanded. The museum is hosting s month-long Pop-Up Exhibits

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN BRACKBILL}

ART/ EXHIBIT

Quilt at Brillobox

Awards. Andy Warhol was one such winner in 1945, and now this exhibit will be held in the museum named for him. Feb. 5-March 2. The Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org One of Pittsburgh’s favorite artists gets a huge solo show at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Robert Qualters: A Life is a retrospective of his paintings, prints and drawings, plus photos of some of his many public murals and site-specific installations. Feb. 7-April 20. Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org Cont trasting styles define the new twoContrasting person show w Halfway to Somewhere Pitts t bu urgh Glass Center. Cente Granite at Pittsburgh an Brent Rogers, Calimpong, of Seattle, and of Chicago, b both did six-week P PGC residencies this year. But where Calimpo Calimpong’s work is formally simple and R clean, Rogers uses imagery imagery, lamination and mo more. Feb. 7April 20 20. Friendship. 412-365 412-365-2145 or www.p www.pittsburgh g assce gl glasscenter.org Toby A Atticus Fraley ro builds robots up to 5 feet tall out of vintage Thermos picnic coolers Thermoses, othe found objects; and other some of them even l move a little, or light up, and they’re all cha charming. Fraley’s ne exhibit at new S SPACE Gallery, The Secret Life T of o Robots, iimagines robot im

Race is a provocative subject, and that’s not a bad thing if it fosters discussion and illumination. RACE: Are We So Different? is a nationally touring exhibition that explores the experience of living with race in America, using interactive multimedia components, photographs, iconic objects and historical artifacts. Starts March 29. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemnh.org

“Singularity,” by Brian Gonnella, at Westmoreland Museum of American Art

LITERARY If you’ve flirted with the idea of writing a memoir, let Joseph Bathanti help you get started. The Italian American Collection Scholar-in-Residence leads Where You Live: Writing About Yourself and Your Family, a workshop designed to get participants thinking about their identities vis-à-vis their ethnic heritage and memories. Jan. 25. Heinz CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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LANDING IN PITTSBURGH TONIGHT!

NOW THROUGH FEBRUARY 9 BENEDUM CENTER

HURRY FOR THE BEST SEATS Box OfямБce at Theater Square Visit TrustArts.org or call 412-456-4800

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Feb. 6. Frick Fine Arts Center, Oakland. 412-624-6506 or www.pghwritersseries. wordpress.com

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Sonia Sotomayor at Carnegie Music Hall

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Colum McCann has explored everything from New York’s homeless population to Roma culture in Europe. The Irelandborn, New York-based author’s 2013 novel TransAtlantic was inspired by the first trans-Atlantic flight, but ranges widely throughout history. Hear the critically hailed author at Monday Night Lectures. March 10. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ELENA SEIBERT}

History Center, Strip District. www.heinz historycenter.org Though best known as a longtime theater critic at The New Yorker — and a slashingly insightful one at that — Hilton Als is also an accomplished author and culture critic at large. His latest book is the provocative essay collection White Girls. Als gives a free talk courtesy of the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series. Jan. 27. Oakland. 412-624-6506 or p www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com

Pittsburgh Public Theater comes out singing (and laughing) with Stephen Sondheim’s classic Company. “Side by Side by Side” and “The Ladies Who Lunch” are among the tunes in this groundbreaking, Manhattan-set musical comedy about a single guy, his married pals and his girlfriends. There’s an 11-piece orchestra, and the lead is played by Pittsburgh native Jim Stanek. Jan. 23-Feb. 23. Downtown. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org CONTINUES ON PG. 24

Sonia Sotomayor otomayor’s remarkable as taken her from the tough journey has streets of the Bronx to the U.S. Supreme e even presided over the New Court; she e ball-drop in Times Time es Square Squa Sq uare ua re Year’s Eve h. She attends the Pittsburgh last month. cture Series to discuss Arts & Lecture her recentt memoir, My Beloved ith University of Pittsburgh World, with or Mark Nordenberg. Chancellor arnegie Music Hall, Oakland. Feb. 4. Carnegie tsburghlectures.org www.pittsburghlectures.org Walter {ILLUSTRATION BY Mosley’ss ALTERNATE HISTORIES} calling card might be his dozen lins Easy Rawlins mysteries,, like Devil in ess. But a Blue Dress. as another 30 Mosley has is credit, including titles to his ction, and he’s among our more science fiction, y outspoken writers. On the politically he latest Rawlins book, Little heels of the osley speaks at the Pittsburgh Green, Mosley Contemporary porary Writers Series.


Culture Club: These Aren't Your Kids' Puppets! Thursday, January 16, 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 p.m. Cost: $10; Includes admission and one drink ticket. Pittsburgh-based puppeteer Tom Sarver leads a fun-filled evening of puppetry for adults. Plus, chat with other puppeteers and create an original puppet of your own. Puppets by Tom Sarver

Culture Club is sponsored by

we xmonday in 2014 the museum will be open mondays (closed tuesdays) in 2014

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Jason Dudey describes the Come Out Laughing comedy tour as “gay, gay-friendly and who-cares-who-you-areor-who’s-in-your-bed.” At the national tour’s stop at Cruze Bar, Dudey is joined by LOGO favorite Dana Goldberg and Ian Harvie, the transgender comedian featured in the concert film Ian Harvie Superhero. Jan. 24. Strip District. www.comeoutlaughing.com Quantum Theatre takes it Downtown — specifically, to the historic, classically styled former Union National Bank — for Madagascar. It’s the local premiere for work by acclaimed American playwright J.T. Rogers; the award-winning 2004 play is about three storytellers and the nature of memory. The top-shelf cast includes Helena Ruoti, Larry John Meyers and Melinda Helfrich. Jan. 30-Feb. 16. 412362-1713 or www.quantumtheatre.com The New York Times calls Compagnie Käfig “one of the most innovative troupes on the experimental dance scene.” The internationally touring, all-male group from Brazil starts with hip-hop dance and blends in samba and capoeira. Pittsburgh Dance Council presents performances of original works set to

a score of samba and bossa nova. Feb. 1. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

movement and storytelling drawn from interviews with ex-slaves recorded in the 1930s as part of the Federal Writers Project. Feb. 15-March 2. Highland Park. newhorizontheater@yahoo.com

Though a few productions in its 10-year history have had materially rich stagings, barebones If Andrew Jackson had been productions revisits its a misbehaving rock star, namesake roots with U.S. history would A Steady Rain. The be a lot more like Bloody Bloody local premiere Andrew of Keith Huff’s Jackson, the drama about 2008 rock two Chicago musical by Alex cops, lifelong Timbers and friends whose Michael profession Friedman that threatens to critics have tear them apart, called “sublimely stars David raucous” and Whalen and Compagnie Käfig “invigorating.” Patrick Jordan. at Byham Theater Point Park’s Feb. 13- March 2. Conservatory Theatre New Hazlett Theater, Co. has a new production. North Side. barebones Feb. 21-March 2. Pittsburgh productions@gmail.com Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com In time for Black History Month, New Horizon Theater stages Do Lord Remember Me at the Union Project. Willa Cather’s 1905 short story “Paul’s James de Jongh’s play is a collage of song, Case” concerns a Pittsburgh boy who flees the grim Iron City for the glamour of New York; things go poorly. Paul’s Case is now an opera by Gregory Spears and Kathryn Walat. Pittsburgh Opera performs the local premiere in its George R. White Studio. Feb. 22-March 2. Strip District. 412-281-0912 or www.pittsburghopera.org WITH THE ORCHESTRA

SwanLake

The Kelly-Strayhorn Theater’s terrific artist-residency program presents another promising production, as internationally acclaimed choreographer Sidra Bell offers the world premiere of her latest work. Sidra Bell Dance New

Come Out Laughing at Cruze Bar

FEB. 13-16, 2014 BENEDUM CENTER

TICKETS: 412.456.6666 ONLINE: PBT.ORG

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York performs garment at the theater. March 7 and 8. East Liberty. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

KIDS It’s the 30th iteration of Wrestlemania this year, and not just any Lycra-clad bruiser can go. At the WWE Royal Rumble, see more than two dozen pro wrestlers compete for a spot at the Big Dance. This is a pay-per-view event, so you know there will be plenty of action — and likely, controversy. Sat., Jan. 21. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. www.consolenergycenter.com If it’s too cold or wet to play outside, let the gang at the NFL Play 60 Training Camp show the kids how to get an hour’s worth of exercise indoors. The event kicks off at the Heinz History Center with football-themed activities including: 40-yard dash, healthy-food demos and a touchdown-dance contest. Feb. 1. Strip District. www.heinzhistorycenter.org When the days are dark and gloomy, the prescription might be some controlled destruction. No country on Earth rivals America for monster trucks, and at Monster Jam, you can watch these 12-foot-tall, 10,000-pound behemoths drive over and through all kinds of obstacles. Feb. 14-16. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. www.consolenergycenter.com Kids might not totally get the joke in The Teacher From the Black Lagoon’s


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amusing title, but there will be plenty for them to latch on to in this hour-long musical revue. In this Theatreworks USA production, characters learn to be courageous when confronting scary things. Feb. 16-23. Various venues. www.pghkids.org Beat the winter cold, and be the star of future campfires. On this Venture Outdoors hike for kids 8-18, learn how to build a fire — from collecting wood to lighting it and, most importantly, extinguishing it properly. This is just one of many themed hikes Venture Outdoors leads during the season; see website for full list. March 1. Riverview Park. www.ventureoutdoors.org

OTHER Beautiful things can happen when a whirring chainsaw hits a big block of ice. See for yourself at the 23rd Annual Ligonier Ice Festival. These works of art exist only at freezing temperatures, so enjoy this while you can. Jan. 25 and 26. Diamond area, Ligonier. www.ligonier.com Do your part for the economy, and buy a new car! Or at least drop a couple bucks on a ticket to the Pittsburgh International Auto Show, where you can marvel at this year’s models. Cars have never been shinier, safer or more equipped with high-tech gadgets. Feb. 14-17. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pittautoshow.com He’s the funny, smart guy in Food Network’s sea of perky chatterers, and now Alton Brown is taking his act on the road. In a live performance that is equal NEWS

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parts comedy, food experimentation, multimedia lecture and live music, you’ll laugh, learn and maybe even get picked to be Brown’s “culinary assistant.” Feb. 23. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

TWO ALL DAY LIFT TICKETS & AN OVERNIGHT LODGING PACKAGE FOR TWO AT SEVEN SPRINGS!

A reliable sign of impending spring is the Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show. This multi-day event will re-fire your home-improvement spirit as you: peruse aisles stocked with fences, tiles and windows; check out the latest in green tech for the home; and price out your dream BBQ grill and multi-headed shower. March 7-16. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pghhome.com At the Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival, you can check out new foreign films, hear from visiting directors and join discussions at post-screening meet-ups. This year’s fest, Faces of Work, will screen docs about ship dismantling and Poland’s Lech Walesa, as well as Frederick Wiseman’s new film about college education, At Berkeley. March 20 through April 5. Various locations. www.cmu.edu/faces

INCLUDES: • One night of Lodging for two • Breakfast Buffet for two • Complimentary Swimming/Exercise room

Spring must be near! JFilm, formerly known as the Pittsburgh Jewish Israeli Film Festival, returns for its 20th year, with a week’s worth narrative and documentary films from around the world that highlight the Jewish experience. March 27-April 6. www.jfilmpgh.org

DOWNLOAD NOW

The upside of all the snow we’ve been getting? You can use a snowball from now to buy your way into the Carnegie Science Center on June 21. Well, one snowball and whatever you choose to pay. (Snowballs will be deposited in the river.) Put one in your freezer bank, and dream of Days of Sunny Science. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

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SOME ROLLS COME WRAPPED NOT IN SEAWEED BUT IN PASTEL-SHADED “SOYBEAN PAPER”

GREENER PALATE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} In 2012, Amy Tyner’s spouse was diagnosed with cancer. “We’re all clean right now,” says Tyner. But, as a chef, Tyner grew interested in healthy eating, and “what these processed foods and engineered seeds are doing.” Her new job echoes that concern. In November, Tyner became executive chef at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens’ Café Phipps. Given the café’s devotion to health and environmental sustainability, she says, “I could professionally really dive into something I was already committing myself to.” Tyner doesn’t just plan menus at the café, which refuses to serve pop or fries. She also works with vendors to get food that’s minimally processed, as local and seasonal as possible, and often organic. The results include winter dishes like Phipps’ wild mushroom and arugula salad, with roasted butternut squash, farro and white balsamic vinaigrette. Even in January, she says, “You are still eating really good flavorful foods as long as you stay in the season you’re in.” Tyner, formerly executive chef and director of food and beverage for Four Points by Sheraton Pittsburgh North, especially appreciates the hyperlocal food from Phipps’ edible gardens. In the winter garden’s first year, “We were picking kumquats” earlier on the January day she spoke to CP. They’re also still harvesting spinach, endive and tatsoy. “As a chef, it’s been an incredible education,” she says. “It’s going to be really exciting in spring and summer, when things start coming up.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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FEED

You don’t have to be sick to enjoy a hot toddy, but one sure does feel good when you are. In a small saucepan, warm up water with honey, cloves, cinnamon stick, fresh lemon juice (plus rind) and chunks of fresh esh ginger. Strain n and sip. Whiskey skey and rum can also be added for taste aste and/or function. tion. Remember: If you u simmer the booze, ze, the alcohol will burn off, so add itt last.

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SATISFYING SUSHI {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

N A HILLTOP above Frankstown Road in Penn Hills, there sits a former fast-food joint that has been reinvented not once but twice — both times as a restaurant serving the cuisine of a faraway culture. The current iteration, Tsuki, means “moon” in Japanese, and its emphasis is on sushi. And if the restaurant’s faux-adobe interior walls and sun-soaked colors are left over from a previous southwestern-themed occupant, that’s OK. Tsuki offers neither ultra-authentic, Japanese-style dining, nor a big-budget, Americanized Japanese “experience” in a shoji-screened setting. Instead, it’s a simple mom-and-pop shop, offering a large and original variety of sushi alongside a limited hot menu. These teriyaki and hibachi options — prepared in the kitchen, not at griddles in the dining space — were clearly secondary. The one hot dish we ordered, yakisoba (literally, fried noodles), is actually Japanese fast food, sold from carts on the street and at festivals. It appeared on Tsuki’s lunch menu, but the staff cheerfully prepared

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

Avocado tower

it for us at dinnertime. Sadly, it scarcely resembled true Japanese yakisoba, in which pork, vegetables and noodles are fried in a savory-sweet sauce and garnished with a variety of toppings: shredded dried seaweed, salty fish flakes, pungent pickled ginger and,

TSUKI JAPANESE RESTAURANT 11655 Frankstown Road, Penn Hills. 412-242-0188 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. noon-9:30 p.m. PRICES: Hot entrees $10-23; sushi and sashimi, pieces and rolls $4.50-$9, special rolls $8-13; entrees (with miso soup and salad) $13-24 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED often, even a fried egg. All of these were missing from Tsuki’s rendering, which featured a bland, light brown sauce over noodles punctuated with tender whitemeat chicken and a melange of vegetables. Happily, everything else was much more satisfactory. Even the edamame were

especially fresh-tasting. Steamed shumai had slightly gummy wrappers and a tepid temperature. But the savory filling was tasty and the texture, tender but studded with firmer bits of shrimp, was excellent. Seaweed salad featured a big, sweet-tart and tasty mound of jade-green seaweed, flecked with toasty sesame seeds, upon on a bed of matchsticked cucumber, which added subtle visual, textural and flavor contrast. Takosu (octopus salad) was also excellent, with tender yet resilient slices of tentacle well matched to a light, citrusy dressing. And then there was the sushi itself. All too many sushi bars strive to offer a broad selection of fish, but few have the massive flow of customers enabling them to keep all that fish fresh and at its peak. The result: flesh watery from too much time in the freezer. Tsuki’s sushi chef is wiser than that, so that most of the myriad rolls on offer center on just a handful of raw options, rounded out with traditional cooked ingredients such as eel and shrimp. To get a feel for the quality of the fish, we tried nigiri of tuna, yellowtail, salmon


and red snapper. The tuna was serviceable, neither weak nor rich-tasting; the salmon was, typically, good but unremarkable. But the red snapper was very flavorful, and the yellowtail simply outstanding: buttery in texture and luxurious in taste. The menu offers the full gamut of maki, from basic classics like cucumber or tuna through more elaborate, but still familiar, options like California or Philadelphia, to truly original creations, some of them just short of gimmickry. One twist that was new to us: Some rolls come wrapped not in seaweed but in pastel-shaded “soybean paper,” which Angelique likened to the skin on fried tofu. This has a neutral flavor, passive texture and striking appearance. While a major departure from authenticity — the flavor of nori is an important aspect of traditional sushi — we found it an idea worth trying, as appearance is also central to the sushi experience, and many elaborate rolls feature flavors that overwhelm the seaweed, anyway.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

BARREL VAULT Bartender John White a storehouse of single-malt knowledge John White’s pale eyes twinkle when he talks about single-malt scotch. The 59-year-old holds a snifter of Glenfiddich 12-year to his nose, his eyes closed. “You get vanilla and honey, but also … can you smell the apples?” he asks. “Taste and smell are powerful catalysts for memory,” adds White, who is currently bartending at South Side’s Bridge 10 Brasserie. “Often when I taste something, it brings me back to another time.” Those memories include a childhood rambling through the hills and valleys of his native Scotland. “I’ve been exposed to the scenery, the isolation, the culture of all the different regions,” he says. In 1982, he left a post in the British Foreign Service and moved to the United States, where he worked his way up the corporate ladder. When he was laid off about nine years ago, he decided to slow the pace of his life. “I’m always a work in progress,” he says. Bridge 10 might be better known for its wine list — owner Dave DeSimone is a local wine writer — but White can provide an education on single malts, too. He notes there are many components to a fine single malt. The type of barrel, and amount of time the whiskey spends aging in it, is the primary source of flavor. Also adding character are the minerals in the water, the way germination of barley is stopped (with peat or without) and the skill of the master blender. But according to White, one key factor is the company you keep while tipping a glass. “The act of slowly sipping scotch is conducive to good conversation,” he says. White has plenty of stories to tell. For example, when Lord Mountbatten, the Queen’s cousin, was killed in an IRA bombing in 1979, White says it was he who ciphered the communiqué back to London. “It’s not so much what happens to you in life,” he says. “It’s how you react to it.”

“OFTEN WHEN I TASTE SOMETHING, IT BRINGS ME BACK TO ANOTHER TIME.”

Owner/chef Kong “Michael” Chen

On our first such roll, the Sunny Day, the soybean paper wrapper was lemon yellow, and the fillings (tuna, salmon, yellowtail, lobster and avocado) were delectably rich. In the pink-wrapped oyster roll, tempurafried oysters stood in for raw fish, while accompaniments such as jalapeño, tomato and spicy mayonnaise evoked — successfully and against all odds — a Southern po’ boy sandwich. Simpler maki are available rolled, or as handrolls with the fillings nestled in cones of nori. This was how Jason wanted to try spicy scallop, which also included avocado and masago, the tiny orange roe. This very effective combination offered sweet, tender shellfish, rich avocado and the briny pop of the roe, all spiced by a creamy sauce that didn’t overwhelm the other flavors. The sushi at Tsuki offers unexpected originality in an unexpected location. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Bridge Ten Brasserie. 20 S. 10th St., South Side. 412-586-5033 or www.bridgeten.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

BAR & RISTORANTE NTE

Sunday Brunch is Back!

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

HALF OFF

Made-to-Order Omelet Station Waffle Bar Breakfast & Dinner Entrees

DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ------------------------------------------

$14

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com

BenjaminsPgh.com

Authentic Thai Cuisine

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

VOTED BESTGHTMAGHAAZIINE

PITTSBUR r several 2011, fo ing years runn

THAI CLASSICAL DANCE EVERY SUN AND THUR EVENING

LUNCH SPECIALS

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30AM-3:00PM

5846 Forbes Ave., 2nd Floor • SQUIRREL HILL • 412.521.0728

www.BANGKOKBALCONYPGH .com Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10pm

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Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11pm

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

st

2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR. 900 Western Ave., North Side. 412-224-2163. A casual-chic burger-and-sandwich joint is a tasty addition to the North Side. The menu consists of a matrix of burgers (two sizes, nine topping combos, beef or veggie patty), four other sandwiches and eight beer-friendly “snacks” (from nuts to a charcuterie platter). Prices aren’t dinercheap, but then some burgers come with red-wine-braised onion and truffle mustard. KE CAFÉ DES AMIS. 443 Division St., Sewickley. 412-741-2388. A genuine French café — with rustic wooden tables, chalkboard menus and display cases full of sophisticated salads, sandwiches and desserts. A perfect spot for that relaxed, multi-hour meal that is France’s greatest export: Thus, dinner can be anything from croque monsieur to shepherd’s pie or roulades of beef. J

Truth Lounge {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

HOKKAIDO SEAFOOD BUFFET. 4536 Browns Hill Road, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1422. This buffetstyle restaurant rises above the scourge of the steam table to offer some true gems among its panoply of East Asian offerings. There’s standard ChineseAmerican fare, but also sushi, hibachi-style Japanese cooked to order, popular offerings such as crab legs and www. per roast Peking duck, and pa pghcitym .co even frog legs. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

CASA RASTA. 2056 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-9189683. This casual storefront taqueria combines the tropical, sometimes spicy flavors of Caribbean and Mexican cuisines in tacos, burritos and tortas. Thus, jerk chicken might be a wing appetizer, or taco filling. Also broaching both cultures: fruit salsa and citrus-marinated fried pork. JF EASY STREET. 301 Grant St. (One Oxford Centre), Downtown. 412-235-7984. A relaxing Downtown venue succeeds with inventive bar fare such as a pork-belly sandwich and yellow-fin tuna tacos that straddle the LatinAsian flavor divide. Less exotic fare is treated well, too: Pastrami is made in house, and the braised-beef sandwich features arugula, pickled onions and cambozola cheese. KE GREEN PEPPER. 2020 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-422-2277. At this family-run restaurant, diners will find authentic Korean recipes refreshingly not reconstituted for timid Americans — no egg rolls or Chinese-American stir-fries. Dumplings contain kimchi, and the soup is pumpkin. Entrees include the more-familiar bulgogi (barbecued beef), as well as bibimbap, in which meat and veggies are mixed with rice. KE

NAKAMA JAPANESE. 1611 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6000. Pittsburghers are crazy about this sushi bar/ steakhouse, and every weekend pretty people crowd inside to watch the knife-wielding chefs. Presentation is key for customers and restaurant alike: The interior is smart, the chefs entertaining, and the food is good, if pricey. LE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN. 856 Western Ave., North Side (412321-8424) and 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424). This restaurant offers outstanding

Thai cuisine — from familiar options to chef’s specials that are truly special, such as gaprow lad kao (a Thai stir-fry) and salmon mango curry. The flavors here are best described as intense, yet without overwhelming the fresh ingredients. KF PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, Robinson. 412-494-3366. Papaya offers a fairly typical Thai menu — from pad Thai to panang curry — augmented by sushi and a few generic Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the side of reliability than excitement, but the presentations show that the kitchen is making an impression. KE SELMA’S TEXAS BARBECUE. 9155 University Blvd., Moon. 412-329-7003. The decor suggests humble and downhome, but the ingredients and preparation seem tailored to appeal to foodies, with everything from lemonade to tartar sauce and baked beans made in-house. Best of all, each meat has its own custom rub and is dry-smoked for hours, then served unsauced so that diners can choose from the six different styles on offer. KF STEELHEAD BRASSERIE AND WINE BAR. Marriott City Center, 112 Washington Ave., Downtown. 412-3943474. In this upscale hotel restaurant, the straightforward menu promises that the aquatic name holds more than brand value. While entrées include seafood and other meat in almost equal proportion, the soups and starters are dominated by the former, with old favorites like jumbo shrimp cocktail matched with more contemporary offerings. LE CONTINUES ON PG. 30


Skinny Pete’s Kitchen

Serving Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Daily

Pittsburgh RESTAURANT WEEK is Here! Jan 13th-19th Vote for Us @ pittsburghrestaurantweek.com/prabby-vote Feature #1 - Start with a mixed greens salad topped with Bacon from our great friends at “Allegheny City Smokehouse”, cranberries, raisins, almonds and “Gibsondale Farms” white cheddar cheese. Then indulge with a unique Flatbread with balsamic glazed “Pasture Perfect” flank steak, roasted mushrooms, sliced red onion, gorgonzola cheese, topped with fresh greens and a drizzle of our house made gorgonzola vinaigrette all piled atop our dough from “Pennsylvania Macaroni Company” and baked to perfection in the wood burning oven. Served with either one non-alcoholic beverage of your choice or we will waive your corking fee.

Make Us Your One Stop Shop!

Let Us cater Your Upcoming Event!

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

Happy Hour

M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

ibizatapaspgh.com

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine HOLIDAY PARTIES PARTIES, PRIVATE ROOMS AND GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

Feature #2 - Saturday Brunch Bacon Pancakes made with the delicious “Allegheny City Smokehouse” bacon, served with fresh fruit and your choice of this special Saturday’s BYOV (bring your own vodka) Bloody Mary Bar or a “La prima” Coffee! Your Choice!

Kitchen Hours: Kit Monday-Saturday 6am - 3pm Sunday 6:30am - 2:30pm

www.colecafe.com

412-488-1818

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202

1718 Mt. Royal Blvd, Glenshaw, PA 15116 Phone: (412) 486-5513

412-415-0338

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com

Check out www.skinnypetes.com

2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge)

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

Best Mex Restauraican nt

one of the Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

Gift s Certificate Available!

China Palace Shadyside

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

Thai Tapas p and Wine Bar

Upscale Casual Authentic Thai

100 VEGETARIAN

LUNCH SPECIALS

1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

DISHES!

Monday-Friday

11:30am to 3:00pm

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

Delivery Hours

Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh!

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

1712 Murray Avenue Squirrel Hill 412.421.8801

Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

www.elcampesinospgh.com

www..silkelephant.net www

MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM NEWS

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

flu

STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-3695380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ

feeling symptoms? A GLOBAL FLU STUDY

YOU MAY QUALIFY FOR AN INVESTIGATIONAL FLU STUDY NEAR YOU.

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING: Fever? Cough, Sore Throat or Nasal Obstruction? Fatigue, Headache, Muscle Pain

www.InfluenceStudy.com Participants will be compensated for time and travel.

Please Call 412.650.6155

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. 4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-4029522. A repurposed, elegant 19thcentury bank offers craft cocktails and inventive small plates, focused on organic, sustainable, fresh and local cuisine. The bar food is mainly finger foods and/or plates seemingly intended for sharing. Besides fancified bar snacks such as potato chips, deviled eggs and popcorn, there are oysters, burgers and even desserts. KE TRUTH LOUNGE. 51 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-381-9600. A Mediterranean-inspired menu spans cocktail-hour noshes and light meals to full entrees. Pleasing appetizers include saganaki (Greek flaming cheese) and the novelty “lambsicles.” Flatbreads fill the spot for upscale pizza, with hearty meat and pasta dishes, such as short-rib ragu, rounding out the entrees. LE

Ready for a BETTER Workout?

VERDE. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-404-8487. The menu here isn’t straight Mexican, but presents some traditional items, including tableside-prepared guacamole and grilled corn-on-the-cob, with reconceived classics, invented, fusion-y dishes like tacos with roasted sweet potatoes, fried chickpeas and Mexican-style tzatziki. There is also an extensive tequila list and a patio for warm-weather dining. KE

Tired of the gym scene? Done with the videos?

Try A New & Better Workout with Kung Fu or Tai Chi

TABLES ON THE GREEN. 1299 Lane Ave., Natrona Heights. 724-226-0955. A golf course east of town may not be where one would expect to find refined Cajun and Creole cuisine, but that’s exactly what this clubhouse restaurant offers. The menu offers Louisiana bayou classics such as shrimp, grits, gumbo and blackened fish in an authentic and well-prepared manner. In a nod to Pittsburgh, steaks and Italian pasta dishes are also offered. LE

Offer ends: Jan 25th Get all the details at: www.rothrockskungfu.com

t Rothrock’s Kung Fu & Tai Chi Wexford We South Side West Mifflin

WAFFLES, INCAFFEINATED. 1224 Third Ave., New Brighton (724-359-4841) and 2517 E. Carson St., South Side (412-301-1763). The fresh-made waffles here are a marvelous foil for sweet and savory toppings. Sweet options include the Funky Monkey (chocolate chips, bananas, peanut butter and chocolate sauce). The Breakfast Magic has bacon, cheddar and green onions inside, topped with a fried egg and sour cream. Or customize your waffles with a dizzying array of mix-ins. J

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

THE WORM’S TURN Vermicomposting benefits the soil — and our food supply THESE DAYS, what goes onto your plate is an issue

of growing importance. But what about what’s left over? Nancy Martin, an environmental educator at the Pennsylvania Resources Council (PRC), says that “winter is a great time to start vermicomposting” — composting with worms. Vermicomposting is done in indoor bins with the help of worms — usually “red wigglers” — that process food scraps and turn them into a valuable, nutrient-rich fertilizer, suitable for use in the garden. Letting worms digest your food scraps, Martin says, “helps return needed nutrients back to the earth where they belong.” The worms can eat up to half their full body weight daily, and they multiply, so as time goes on, you can compost more and more food.

“IT’S CRUCIAL THAT OUR PLANT NUTRIENTS ARE RETURNED TO THE EARTH.” The PRC is holding two vermicomposting workshops in the months ahead, one at Phipps Garden Center on Feb. 13, and one at the South Side’s CCI Center on March 20 (www.zerowastepgh.com or 412-488-7490, ext. 226 to register). Cities like Portland, San Francisco and Seattle have organized composting programs, but Pittsburghers still act independently in order to prevent their share of the 36 million tons of food waste — the largest component of solid waste material, according to the Environmental Protection Agency — from reaching landfills each year. If vermicomposting is done properly, there should be no odor — a common fear — nor a chance for the worms to escape. Worms “like moist, dark places with a steady food supply and want to stay there,” Martin says. The fee for the PRC workshops ($50/individual, $55/couple), will cover “everything [participants] need to go home and start composting without missing a beat,” says Martin. And if you’re a gardener, you’re going to save money on fertilizer. So what does this all have to do with your food? “It’s crucial that our plant nutrients are returned to the earth,” states Martin. Soil is made up of roughly 45 percent minerals, 25 percent water, 25 percent air and 5 percent organic material. “We need those nutrients in the soil.” “It’s a part of a whole-systems approach” to the food cycle, Martin says. “The healthier our soil, the healthier our food.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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LOCAL

“YOU CAN’T EXPECT TO SUCCEED IF YOU ARE ONLY PUTTING IN PART TIME.”

BEAT

{BY MIKE SHANLEY }

STAYING CONNECTED Last week, the Jazz Connect Conference drew a plethora of jazz artists, journalists and industry leaders to New York City. Presented by JazzTimes magazine and the Jazz Forward Coalition, the two-day event paid homage to those who helped promote the music while pondering its future. (Full disclosure: I contribute to JazzTimes.) The latter subject came in tones that alternately sounded bleak or contentious (with regard to things like album sales) and hopeful (when pianist Jason Moran stressed finding an individual voice over toeing the musical line). The conference ran simultaneously with the 10th Annual WinterJazz Fest, which presented more than 90 artists over five days at a variety of venues in Manhattan, most of them on Friday and Saturday. So if the future for jazz is bleak, don’t tell that to the festival’s 7,500 attendees. Jazz Connect consisted of 17 breakout panel discussions spread over both days, and Pittsburgh was represented in several of them. Marty Ashby, of Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, moderated “New Models and Streams for Presenting Jazz,” which dissected the ways in which technology like webcasting and streaming can promote the music. He also made the important point that institutions like his, which have amassed a massive archive, need to figure out how to care for it. Shaunna Machosky, a former music director at WDUQ-FM who now works on the other side of the business at Jazzdog Promotions, spoke on a panel about radio promotion. Following a rousing keynote address from Ben Cameron of the Doris Duke Foundation, five industry trailblazers presented “Inspirational Solo Spots,” talking about their efforts with the music. They included the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Janis Burley Wilson, who made the valuable point that festivals should share audiences in order to keep them coming. For that reason, she advertises Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival in programs for other festivals, an unusual step which has boosted the event’s visibility. “It made sense to me,” she said after the talk. “It’s the same audience. I went to [festivals in] Detroit and Newport, and I saw some of the same people. So why not?”

PITTSBURGH WAS WELLREPRESENTED AT JAZZ CONNECT 2014

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

More of Mike Shanley’s coverage of Jazz Connect can be found on our music blog, FFW>>, at www.pghcityaper.com/blogs/ffw/ NEWS

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Hold the phone: The Stepkids (Jeff Gitelman, left)

MUSICAL EDUCATION {BY NICK KEPPLER}

C

neo-soul trio The Stepkids has a good bit of Steely Dan and Earth, Wind & Fire in its sonic DNA and Thom Yorke among its fans. The band is now touring behind its second album, Troubadour. Lead singer/ guitarist Jeff Gitelman spoke with City Paper about his long musical path. ONNECTICUT-BASED

YOU LIVED THE FIRST NINE YEARS OF YOUR LIFE IN A SOVIET STATE CALLED MOLDOVA. WHAT WAS YOUR LIFE LIKE BACK THEN? Well, we moved [because of] racism and better opportunities: We were definitely minorities there, being Jewish. My dad plays violin. It’s near Romania and stuff. A lot of the folk music of the Moldovans is similar to Romanian music and a lot of Eastern European folk music. From a very young age, it seeped into me subconsciously.

M A I N F E AT U R E

HOW DID THAT LEAD TO PICKING UP THE GUITAR? When we were still in Russia, I fell in love with The Beatles. The song “Yesterday” was the first song that made me feel divine by listening to music. My dad has this Beatles album that was a Russian-only compilation of love songs. We also had a piano,

THE STEPKIDS 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-12. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net.

and my dad would play Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, and I just fell in love with melody. [When] we came to America, I discovered Jimi Hendrix and, because it was the early ’90s, metal, and picked up the guitar. From there, I heard Wes

Montgomery and wanted to study the jazz language. … I then got into Stevie Wonder, who my dad was always listening to, and Marvin Gaye. I went to [the Berklee College of Music] and started writing songs almost as a rebellion against the academic side of school. YOUR FIRST JOB OUT OF COLLEGE WAS GUITARIST IN LAURYN HILL’S TOURING BAND. HOW DID YOU LAND THAT? I loved hip hop and, in the early 2000s, when I went to school, that’s when people first started translating from machines back to humans. The Roots had been playing for a while, and it became fashionable to have live instruments. I had backed rappers, the new rock stars, and I understood that I was acting as a sample. So when Lauryn Hill was having auditions in Boston and New York, I was able CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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MUSICAL EDUCATION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

to translate that very well.

NEW RELEASES

HOW LONG WERE YOU TOURING WITH HER? Just a few months. She wasn’t the most ideal boss to work for, but after that I started climbing up the ladder. I worked with Bobby Brown and I got the job [touring] with Alicia [Keys].

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

LAURYN HILL WASN’T THE BEST BOSS? I probably shouldn’t go on about that. Let me put it this way: It was the best first step in the music industry to have, because it prepared me for the worst. It broke my heart right away about how tough music can be, and how it can cut you if you are sensitive to it. It showed me where musicians can stand in the music-business hierarchy unless they work to get something of their own going. WHEN YOU FORMED STEPKIDS, DID YOU HAVE ANY FEARS THAT ONCE YOU GOT OFF THE LADDER YOU WOULD NEVER BE ABLE TO CLIMB UP AGAIN? Sometimes, but I just saw from other people that sometimes you have to commit everything to something. You can’t expect to succeed if you are only putting in part time. YOUR SOUND IS CONSIDERED VINTAGE AND A LOT OF IT SOUNDS LIKE IT COULD COME FROM 1972. IS THAT SOMETHING YOU TRIED FOR CONSCIOUSLY? Maybe on the surface, it’s like that, particularly on the first album. But there are signs of modern civilization. On every song, there is a sign this is futuristic album, not vintage music.

proudly presents

Be immersed in a live laser ase light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! They’re back! Laser Michael Jackson & Laser Zeppelin

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO SAY ABOUT THE SHOW? I think the fans should know that, like we have a unique voice on our recordings, we also have a unique style in our performances. We’re doing something that no other rock band is doing at the moment, as far as I know. We are a rock band that does choreography, like Earth, Wind & Fire, The Jackson Five, ZZ Top, The Bee Gees — those kind of bands. It might be something someone else is doing. I haven’t seen it. WHAT INSPIRED THAT? JUST AS A THROWBACK? It was thinking of people like Earth, Wind & Fire, who were the whole package. They were great musicians, but they never forgot to be entertainers as well. I think our generation lost that, and we’re the ones to bring it back. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

PAINT 31 HOT DOGS ON TUESDAY (SELF-RELEASED)

Over an hour of music spread over 20(!) tracks from the local trio. Nicely produced power-pop and ’90s style pop-punk; think Weezer and Superdrag meet The La’s and The Nerves. Superior, catchy songwriting and great vocal harmonies. My only complaint would be that a lot of the tracks feel like they’re a few clicks short of energetic, especially when overlaid with PJ Bianchi’s vocals — which, while very good, have a sort of soporific timbre. Still a gem of a record.

MICHELE BENSEN WITH THE BOB ALBERTI TRIO MOMENTS LIKE THIS (SELF-RELEASED)

While this baker’s dozen was recorded nearly 15 years ago in Hilton Head, S.C., it only recently saw the light of day, and just made its way to my desk late last year. Bensen is a mainstay as a vocalist on the local jazz scene; on this collection of tunes by the likes of Frank Loesser, Billy Strayhorn and Henry Mancini, she delivers clean, emotive vocals across a number of styles. Pretty, toned-down stuff.

LOUIS CON CARNE POST CONSPICUOUSLY (SELF-RELEASED)

Harsh electronic noise from a relatively mysterious source claiming to hail from Waynesburg. Lots of sounds of electronic terror over what seems to be a few separate releases concatenated here; the album didn’t come with much information, but the Internet suggests the tracks have titles that range from Dukes of Hazzard references to the standard frustrated and misogynistic stuff that’s unfortunately stock for the genre (“She Is My Property,” “Ovary Press”). AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


Boys to men: Nox Boys (from left: Zach Stadtlander, Bob Powers, Zack Keim, Sam Berman)

HARD NOX {BY MARGARET WELSH} GARAGE ROCK has long dealt in teenage

concerns; for Nox Boys, those concerns just happen to be in the present tense. Or, as 16-year-old frontman Zack Keim explains with a grin, “I have to get good grades or my dad will kill me.” But even with three-fourths of the band currently enrolled at Fox Chapel High School — drummer Sam Berman and bassist Zach Stadtlander are both seniors, while steel guitarist Bob Powers graduated from the school in 1970 — Nox Boys are set apart by more than the nearness of their teenage angst. Their debut record, which they’ll release Saturday via Get Hip Records, is as skillfully executed as it is raw.

NOX BOYS LP RELEASE WITH MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE

8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $8-10. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Keim got to know Powers, a local music veteran, a couple years ago while playing open stages in the band’s home base of Blawnox. “When I started to play with Bob, I wasn’t aware of the garage genre,” recalls Keim. But before long, he was deep into classic ’60s-era garage-rock bands like The Sonics, as well as newer stuff from Black Lips and Ty Segall. There were some hiccups in solidifying a lineup: “The [first] bassist left because he had to go to military school because he was bad,” Keim says. But things started to take off when the band went to see Get Hip stalwarts — and garage legends in their

own right — The Cynics. After Keim slipped the band a demo, Cynics frontman Michael Kastelic became Nox Boys’ “biggest advocate,” Stadtlander says. Guitarist and Get Hip founder Gregg Kostelich was harder to convince, but only slightly: After checking out a couple live shows, Berman says, Kostelich “figured out that he had something to work with.” Now on board with a label, Nox Boys went to Detroit to record with Jim Diamond, perhaps best known for his work on the first two White Stripes records. Fans of those albums will hear similarities in the tone of Nox Boys’ fuzzy, frenetic and confidently cool self-titled effort. Shades of The Kinks, The Ramones and even The Stooges surface as well, but ultimately Nox Boys do their own thing. Everything was recorded live in the studio, an experience all band members agree was intense. “The actual recording we just kind of banged out in a weekend,” Stadtlander says. As a result, Berman adds, the record is “live-sounding and natural. … [I]t sounds the way the genre is supposed to sound.” Nox Boys have already won the endorsements of local musicians like Chet Vincent and Josh Verbanets; winning over their classmates has been a slightly different story, if only because their peers don’t always know what to make of the music they’re playing. But now that the band has a physical record to show for its efforts, Stadtlander says, “The kids at school are starting to turn an ear.” And though Nox Boys might sometimes sound like visitors from 1965, Keim is quick to note that they’re no nostalgia act: “We don’t want to dress up like Paul Revere and the Raiders. We’re just teenagers having fun.” MWELS H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS Nipsey Hussle Ages 21+

jam/funk/livetronica ... everything but the kitchen sink

Ages 17+

swirling, upbeat instrumental rock from an experimental keyboardist Ages 21+

[ALT-COUNTRY] + THU., JAN. 16

densly-textured, spacious electronic music with full band

Ages 17+

all live, all improvised EDM

Ages 17+

For years now, The Old 97s have represented that spot where alt-country and well-written indie rock meet — and Rhett Miller, the band’s singer and main songwriter, is the reason. He’s also a bit of a Renaissance man, appearing as an actor in movies and on TV, and writing (fiction, in addition to essays on music) for publications including The Atlantic. He’s also released several solo albums, and tonight at Club Café, he appears without the band. Trapper Schoepp plays as well. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $22. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[PSYCHE POP] + FRI., JAN. 17

Feb 14

MARTYPARTY / JOKER EUGENE MIRMAN

of BOB’S BURGERS, FLIGHT OF THE CONCORDS

EKOOSTIK HOOKAH WITH

KR-3

FLETCHER’S GROVE

JAN 26

X

THE STEPKIDS

FEB 19

X

with BIG SOMETHING

FEB 28

X

CORNMEAL

APR 04

X

PAPER DIAMOND

Feb 20

BLACK JOE LEWIS ZACH DEPUTY

with LOUDPVCK, BRANCHEZ

with WELL STRUNG

34

X

X

Feb 18

Mar 08

JAN 18 JAN 24

with DERRICK BROWN

Feb 28

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

WITH

WITH

THE FUNK ARK

TROPIDELIC WITH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

RUSTY HAYWACKERS

STATIONARY PEEBLES

CELLO FURY BIG MEAN SOUND MACHINE

While Foxygen has gotten a lot of attention in the indie-rock world in the past year, drummer Shaun Fleming’s side project, Diane Coffee, might be the more interesting act. Fleming’s classic pop and rock songwriting recalls the ’60s and ’70s — heavy on The Beatles and Todd Rundgren influences. Tempo and dynamic changes, plus weird effects and synths, make it all the more interesting; the group’s debut album My Friend Fish is fantastic. Diane Coffee’s first Pittsburgh appearance The Detroit happens tonight at Cobras the Smiling Moose; The Fledgelings and {PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG COOMBE}

Feb 07

Anello open. AM 7 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $8-10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

[HIP HOP] + TUE., JAN. 21 Everyone’s looking for a way to make money in music, and Nipsey Hussle found one: charging $100 for a mixtape. The Los Angeles rapper sold signed copies of his Crenshaw mixtape for the marked-up price and claimed in a Diane tweet to have made Coffee $100,000 by selling all 1,000 copies he manufactured. (It didn’t hurt that Jay-Z apparently bought 100.) Tonight, the rapper appears at Altar Bar along with Erk tha Jerk, JKJ and Mack Breezy. AM 6 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20-25. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

[GARAGE ROCK] + WED., JAN. 22 Through the band’s 20 years of existence, the main constants for The Detroit Cobras have been vocalist Rachel Nagy, guitarist Mary Ramirez and a raw rock ’n’ roll sound. While the band’s most recent release was back in 2007, expect plenty of excitement and irreverent rock attitude tonight at Club Café. The Devilz in the Detailz opens. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $15. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


CIGARETTES © SFNTC 1 2014

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Bill Deasy. Shadyside. ALTAR BAR. Battery MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini (Metallica Tribute). Strip District. w/ Sam Louderback. Blawnox. 412-263-2877. 412-828-2040. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. The Mustache Required, Whoovez, Dick Clarks, AG3. Benefit concert Black Bear Mute, On the Cinder, for James Pawling. 412-368-5225. HRadio Signal, Stephen Lin. CLUB CAFE. Choro No Vinho, Bloomfield. Cuidado (Early) KR-3, Glostik MR. SMALLS THEATER. Willy (Late). South Side. Ferdinand The Bull, Daily 412-431-4950. Grind, William Forrest, CLUB COLONY. Five The Alcohols, The Guys Named Moe. Balcony Scene, Nervous Scott. 412-668-0903. Aggression. Millvale. . w w w HAMBONE’S. Henry 866-468-3401. typaper ci h g p Bachorski & Friends. THE R BAR. The Bill .com Lawrenceville. Ali Band. Dormont. 412-681-4318. 412-942-0882. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD Chrome Moses, Crooked Cobras, GRILLE. Tres Lads. Ross. Moon Rocks. Bloomfield. 412-364-8166. 412-682-0320. SMILING MOOSE. Diane Coffee, JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Fledgelings. South Side. 412-431-4668. Dancing Queen. Warrendale. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 724-799-8333. Dan Getkin & The Masters Of KENDREW’S. Silkwood Shower. American Music, Slim Forsythe 724-375-5959. & the New Payday Loners, Mark WilliamsWilliams. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 17

ROCK/POP THU 16 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Rhett Miller, Trapper Schoepp. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. GSL (Gone South Light). Robinson. 412-489-5631. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dumplings, Awful Waffles, Ambeyonce, Thin Sketch. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Good Brother Earl. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. OAKDALE INN. Dave Iglar Duo. SMILING MOOSE. Xeukatre, Horde of the Eclipse, Sloth Herder, Wrought Iron, Dendritic Arbor. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Slim Forsythe & PayDay Loners, StandingWave, Scuilli-Childers Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

EARLY WARNINGS

{SAT., APRIL 12}

Fanfarlo

Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale {TUE., APRIL 29}

Lily & Madeleine Club Café, South Side {SAT., MAY 17}

The Mavericks

Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead, Munhall

SAT 18 31ST STREET PUB. Gran Gila, Brimstone Coven, Mother Hawk. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. The Legwarmers. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Meeting of Important People, The Nox Boys. North Side. 412-237-8300. BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. The Dave Iglar Trio. Bridgeville. BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Clark Kent Trio. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CLUB CAFE. Ben Shannon, Clinton Clegg (Early) Walker & the Rebellion, White Lights, The Divisions (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Live Acoustic Punk Rock Karaoke. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Sundog 6. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. Tres Lads. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Hucklebucks, Telltale Signs, 45 Spider & the Fastones. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. New Wave Nation. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. Glitz.

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

We’re all about the BEER! All Day, Every Day: $2 PBR 24oz. cans Happy Hour: 5 pm -7 pm Mon-Fri $ 1 off all drinks

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

Wednesday: $1.75 Bud Light Drafts. 20 ¢ Wings

THU/JAN 23/10PM

THURS/JAN 16/10PM

COMMON NIGHTMARE Dead Signal Chasers

Thursday: $2 Yuengling Drafts $3.00 Import Drafts, Burger Madness our Award Winning Burgers $6 Unlimited Toppings

White Light Spectrum THURS/JAN 30/10-11PM

Billy the Kid & The Regulators

Friday: $2 Coors Light Bottles. $3 Blue Moon Drafts

$2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

Saturday: $2 Any Draft Beer from 9-11pm. $3 Sam Adams Drafts

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

1002 Perry Highway • Pittsburgh,Pa. 15237 412-367-9610 • perrytownedrafthouse.net

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Barons, The Lopez, Dear Diehard. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Harlan Twins, The Red Western, Triggers, Molly Alphabet, Paul Luc. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE R BAR. King’s Ransom. Dormont. 412-942-0882. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. PGH Band. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Neulore. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Ekoostik Hookah, KR3. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. The Earth Quakers. 724-789-7858.

PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

MON 20

SAT 18

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Emcee VinceE, Moonlight Motel, Raised by Wolves, Standing Wave, Chris Serra Band, Bodhi Watts, Evan Knauer & Duane Jones. Martin Luther King Day Concert. Benefits the Duncan & Porter Homeless Shelter. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The World Is A Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid To Die. Bloomfield.

FRI 17 THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Da’ Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic: Chalga Party. Pandemic Pete & Shtangata. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. . w w w Lawrenceville. aper p ty ci h g p 412-781-6771. .com CLUB CAFE. Andy Allo, ROWDY BUCK. Mike Cali, Chelsey Nicole. Top 40 Dance. South Side. South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-431-2825. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 412-481-7227. 724-884-5944. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Sister Hazel. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD Oakland. 707-480-8208. GRILLE. John McCann. Ross. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage 412-364-8166. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. SMILING MOOSE. The Bunny Electro, post punk, industrial, The Bear, Jose Garzon. South Side. new wave, alternative dance. 412-431-4668. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 21

FULL LIST E N O LIN

SUN 19

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36

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

CLUB CAFE. Detroit Cobras, The Devilz In The Detailz. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Southside American. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. REX THEATER. Greensky Bluegrass. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Battlecross, Crimson Shadows, Demonwulf. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 16 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. DJ missmungo. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

TUE 21 CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. Two-step Tuesdays. UK Garage. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

WED 22 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Zombo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 18 720 RECORDS. BOLO. Lawrenceville. 412-728-5937. CJ’S. The Tubby Daniels Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

SUN 19 THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BLUES THU 16 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412381-4300.

FRI 17 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SAT 18 THE BLACK HORSE TRAIL PUB & GRILLE. The Vince Agwada Band. Bridgeville. 412-221-9785. NIED’S HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. PARK HOUSE. Jimmy Adler, The Charlie Barath Duo. North Side. 412-224-2273. THE R BAR. Kings Ranson feat. Craig King. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SUN 19 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Sweaty Betty Blues Jam. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Food Bank. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

JAZZ THU 16 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. North Side. 412-256-8234. ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Jazz Ensemble & Jazz Workshop, feat. Mike Tomaro & Jeff Bush. Uptown. 412-396-6000. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Duquesne Jazz Ensemble & Workshop. Uptown. 412-396-6083.

FRI 17 ANDYS. Kenya. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. MARTY’S MARKET. Anqwenique Wingfield. Strip District. 412-586-7177. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Jeff Lashway. Downtown. 412-553-5235. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Jazz Express. Monroeville. 413-372-9750.

SAT 18 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs


COUNTRY THU 16 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. 724-265-1181.

FRI 17

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

COLUMBUS {MON., FEB. 10}

Wild Cub

The Basement

WASHINGTON, D.C. {FRI., FEB. 28}

Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks Black Cat

PHILADELPHIA {SAT., MARCH 22}

Warpaint Union Transfer

HARD ROCK CAFE. Frank Vieira. Station Square. 412-481-7625. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Rustic Highway. Washington.

SAT 18 ROYAL PLACE. Steeltown. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

CLASSICAL FRI 17 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Haydn & Zarathustra feat. Christoph König, conductor & Hila Plitmann, soprano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

26

JANUARY 23-

SAT 18 CINCOPATION WOODWIND QUINTET & THE CARNEGIE MELLON HONORS STRING QUARTET. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Haydn & Zarathustra feat. Christoph König, conductor & Hila Plitmann, soprano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. STRINGS ATTACHED STRING TRIO. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside.

SUN 19

& Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Dan Bubien. Downtown. 412-471-9100. ROMAN BISTRO. Kelly Burgos, Doug Wilkin, Tom Valentine. Forest Hills. 412-871-3704. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Jessica Lee. Point Breeze. 412-480-6959.

SUN 19 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 20 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 21 ANDYS. Arianna Powell. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Tom Wendt. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Flexure. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 22 ANDYS. Erik Lawrence & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

FRI 17 BEER NUTZ PLAZA. Tim & John. Fox Chapel. 412-963-6882. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. 724-265-1181.

SAT 18 ELWOOD’S PUB. Mike Huston. 724-265-1181. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Mark Dignam, Heather Kropf. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. STARLITE LOUNGE. The Night Tones. Blawnox. 412-828-9842.

SUN 19 HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Old Time Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 22 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273. REX THEATER. Greensky Buegrass, Tumbleweed Wanderers. South Side. 412-381-6811.

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SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Tony Janflone Jr. Washington.

DOBRA TEA. Tom Moran, Katabu Masudi. Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

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PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Haydn & Zarathustra feat. Christoph König, conductor & Hila Plitmann, soprano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 22 ALIA MUSICA PITTSBURGH PRESENTS COMALA. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

OTHER MUSIC THU 16 DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448. SEVICHE. Alex Talbot. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

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ms ia ll wi hn jo of sic mu e Th wit h the pitt sbu rgh sym pho ny orc hes tra

CLUB COLONY. The Soiree Band. Scott. 412-668-0903. EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH. Let Freedom Sing! The Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, spoken-word artist Vanessa German, Jim Donovan, more. Hill District. HOLY CROSS GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH. Macdonald Pipe Band of Pittsburgh. Mt. Lebanon. 412-835-3997.

Take your seat for a dramatic and thrilling ride with your Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the music of legendary Oscar-winning composer John Williams. Adventure into the worlds of Star Wars, E.T., Harry Potter and more!

MON 20 NORWIN HIGH SCHOOL. Let Freedom Sing! The Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, spoken-word artist Vanessa German, Jim Donovan, more. North Huntingdon. 724-861-3005.

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January 15 - 21 BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Feb. 9.

Brass Bed

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. With special guest The Grim Game & Cold Weather. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 16 Rhett Miller

Ferdinand the Bull / Daily Grind / William Forrest / The Alcohols / Balcony Scene / Nervous Aggression MR SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 6:30p.m.

Frank Vieira

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. With special guest Trapper Schoepp. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

FRIDAY 17

Diane Coffee

Battery Tribute to Metallica ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-

PHOTO CREDIT: OAN MARCUS

Wicked

263-2877. With special guests Atlas Forge, Last Will & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests The Fledgelings & Anello. All ages show. Tickets:

ACTOR: ALISON-LUFF

WEDNESDAY 15

WICKED THROUGH FEBRUARY 9 BENEDUM CENTER

ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

SATURDAY 18 The Mountaintop

CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Feb. 9.

SOUND SERIES: Meeting of Important People ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM

North Side. 412-237-8300. With special guests The Nox Boys. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

Sundog 6 HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

The Harlan Twins MR SMALLS THEATRE

Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests The Red Western, Triggers & more. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Ekoostik Hookah THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guest KR-3. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

SUNDAY 19 Arnez J

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh.improv. com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 21 Jay Z

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

Nipsey Hussle

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Erk Tha Jerk, JKJ & Mack Breezy. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Bunny The Bear SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests Jose Garzon & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

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MUSCLE HEAD {BY HARRY KLOMAN} In the new BBC series Atlantis, an affable-cum-portly actor portrays Hercules. In the new Hollywood movie The Legend of Hercules, he’s portrayed by Kellan Lutz, one of a recent crop of young slabs of meat having a go at stardom. This story of the half-mortal son of Zeus pits Herc against his earthly father, a king, and also his brother and heir to the throne, who’s engaged to the woman Herc loves. To win her, of course, he must fight battles. It’s all thoroughly pointless, and just barely diverting.

“WE’RE GONNA TAKE OVER THE PUNK-ROCK SCENE FOR FEMINISTS.”

Photo courtesy of Sophie Howarth

L R GR POWER

Not-so-cool Herc: Kellan Lutz

The director, Renny Harlan, is an old Hollywood hand, so you’d think he’d know how to package this sort of cerebral junk food. But the movie’s 3-D is amateurish, with objects and people often blocking your view for no reason. Harlan sometimes reverts to slow motion, and he seems to care more about individual images than overall effect. As for Lutz, he’s mildly untalented, albeit with pecs bigger than his beloved’s breasts (his nipples, in fact, may even be bigger). Hercules was conceived when his pater-deity comes in on the wind, and when he finally accepts his godly heritage, he literally fights like Olympian lightning. In 3-D in select theaters

by Al Hoff

ord event.

en-w up!” — Kathleen Hanna, at a 1991 spok found the riot-grrl “I’m a girl who you can’t shutform help and Kill i Bikin p grou ed the punk

who new generation of feminists. Prophetic words from the woman confrontational spokesperson for a but t ctan relu the ming beco nt, moveme

Ha

nna’s journey is recounte d in Sini Anderson’s bio The Punk Singer, with -doc, archival footage of Bik ini Kill’s mid-’90s heyday, as well as conte mporary interviews wit h Hanna.

Bikini Kill had a raw energy, fro nted by the charismatic Hanna, who shouted lyrics about rape and gender identi At shows, zines and flyers we ty. re distributed. A fashion sen sibility found power in girlhood. A manifesto for riot grrls was produced.

ncier uped with the da d ro -g re na an H d in 1997, an rforming, an Bikini Kill broke up Then in 2005, Hanna stopped pe . re ig ene. three-piece Le T eared from the sc pp sa di s rl gr t e rio

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE NUT JOB In this tale of biological adaptability, a city squirrel named Surly, having been kicked out of his park home,, decides to rob a nut store. The animated nimated family feature eature is directed d by Peter ter Lepeniotis, is, and nd features the voices es of Will Arnett, Katherine ne Heigl and Brendan Fraser.. Starts Fri., Jan. an. 17. NEWS

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the noisiest of th

The energy peters out in the final third — both for a health crisis, and for the film, which focuses almos Hanna, who suffers personal struggle. This might have been a good placet exclusively on this to update the broader context explored in the earlier segments: Withe r riot grrrls and third third-wave feminism?

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ant story ’s an import d by re e th s, n o si e bsum its omis Yet despite rrl bands were quickly suof the issues g y n ta o here. The ri inated grunge, and m cal viewing for male-domd remain unresolved. Critiboth boys and grrls. they raise ek positive change — itypaper.com ahoff@pghc those who se

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penned by hard-boiled pulpster Jim Thompson. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of classic black-and-white films. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19. Regent Square (AH)

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

LOST TOWN. This new documentary from Jeremy Goldscheider and Richard Goldgewicht follows Avrom Bendavid-Val, on his search for the history of an all-Jewish town, Trochenbrod, in Ukraine, that was virtually erased from maps after the Nazis killed all but 33 of its 5,000 residents. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. Rodef Shalom, 4905 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-992-5203 or www.JFilmPgh.org. $10 ($5 students)

NEW BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN. Take a hanky to this heart-wrenching tale of a Belgian couple, whose carefree relationship and differing life philosophies are tested when their young daughter gets sick. The pair also plays in a bluegrass band — their girl is named Maybelle after the Carter Family singer — and that genre’s sorrowful songs of enduring life underscore the powerful, wellacted drama. Director Felix van Groeningen relates the story in a non-linear fashion, pairing happy and sad scenes that only serve to make the experience sadder. In Flemish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Jan. 17. Regent Square (Al Hoff)

CP

EDWARD SCISSORHANDS. Johnny Depp stars as the decidedly different boy-next-door (he has scissors for hands), in Tim Burton’s funny-sweet 1990 film. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. AMC Loews. $5

DEVIL’S DUE. Literally. In this horror film from Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, a young married couple had grave concerns about their impending baby. Starts Fri., Jan. 17 JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT. It’s up to the CIA to stop a Russian plot to destabilize the U.S. economy. Chris Pine, Keira Knightley and Kevin Costner star in this thriller adapted from the Tom Clancy series; Kenneth Branagh directs. Starts Fri., Jan. 17 RIDE ALONG. To ascertain his potential brother-in-law’s mettle, a cop takes him out on the job. Kevin Hart and Ice Cube star in Tim Story’s comedy. Starts Fri., Jan. 17

Broken Circle Breakdown

REPERTORY KIDS FOR CASH. Robert May’s new documentary examines the 2008 “kids for cash” scandal, in which Luzerne County, Pa., judges received financial kickbacks from a for-profit prison to which they sentenced kids for often minor transgressions. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 16. Hollywood LIVING DARK: THE STORY OF TED THE CAVER. Two brothers, attending a family funeral, stumble upon a creepy cave, and maybe the real cause of their dad’s death. David Hunt directs this horror thriller inspired by the tale which gained popularity on the Internet. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17. Hollywood WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY. Mel Stuart’s 1971 adaptation of Roald Dahl’s story is heartwarming without being gooey, and still deliciously weird. As Wonka, Gene Wilder is a delight, warm yet somehow malevolent. He doesn’t seem to care at all when bratty kids disappear. Sure, he says they’re coming back … 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18; and 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19. Oaks (AH)

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Silents, Please! Sunday, January 26th, 2:00PM

KIDS FOR CASH

- 1/16 @ 7:30pm - A riveting look behind the notorious scandal that rocked the nation. Includes free small drink and popcorn!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ANOHANA THE MOVIE: The Flower We Saw That Day

New live score premiere by Tom Roberts This project supported in part by a Seed Award from The Sprout Fund

HOLLYWOOD THEATER 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368

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1/18 @ 2pm - Japanese Animation www.showclix.com/event/anohanathemovie -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Drusky Entertainment Film Series Presents - 1/18 @ 7pm & 9:30pm A mesmerizing documentary with a killer whale at its heart.

BLACKFISH

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WIZARD OF OZ - 1/19 @ 11:30am, 3pm, & 7pm 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

ANOHANA THE MOVIE: THE FLOWER WE SAW THAT DAY. The new Japanese anime film about a group of friends and a ghost; adapted from the television series and directed by Tatsuyuki Nagai. 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. Hollywood

INTERNET FAMOUS. This locally produced work began life as a web series, and the entire first season makes its world premiere on the big screen tonight. The comedy, written and directed by Chris Lee and Tom Williams, follows the travails of Andy, a 30ish Pittsburgher who achieves some notoriety when a video of his drunken ranting goes viral. The film was shot in Pittsburgh, and also features music from a number of local bands. The screening will be followed by a meet-and-greet reception. Doors at 7 p.m.; screening at 8 p.m. Wed., Jan. 22. Hollywood. $5

AFTER TILLER. This new documentary from Martha Shane and Lana Wilson looks at the current availability of late-term abortions. After the murder of George Tiller in 2009, only four doctors nationwide provide this service, and the film chronicles how they struggle with concerns about personal safety, providing care and being at the forefront of such a contentious issue. Food and drinks before the screening at 6 p.m.; a discussion will follow. 6:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. KellyStrayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10 donation (benefits Women’s Law Project). www.kelly-strayhorn.org/events/ BLACKFISH. Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s recent muckraking documentary looks at orcas, gigantic sea mammals who spend decades confined in small pools at theme parks such as Seaworld. The film seeks to elucidate two intertwined theories, both at odds with the theme park’s cheery marketing: that keeping orcas in captivity is cruel, and working directly with the orcas can be dangerous for humans. As a filmmaker, Cowperthwaite has an agenda and sticks to it, with no opposing opinions presented. But it’s hard to make a case for penning up whales: Just because we can capture and train orcas for our amusement (and profit) doesn’t mean we should. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. Hollywood. $10 (AH)

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THE WIZARD OF OZ. If your viewings of Victor Fleming’s 1939 musical film have been via TV only, you owe it to yourself (and any young ’uns) to see this beloved family classic on the big screen. Join Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her little dog, too, on their unforgettable Technicolor journey to the Land of Oz — a wondrous place that, ultimately, isn’t quite as wonderful as Kansas. 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19; and 2 p.m. Thu., Jan. 23. Hollywood (AH)

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THE KILLING. Stanley Kubrick directed this influential nonlinear 1956 crime thriller about a meticulously planned racetrack heist that goes awry (Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs is one of this film’s direct descendants). Gang leader Sterling Hayden heads a cast that includes Marie Windsor and Elisha Cook Jr. spouting dialogue

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Blackfish PRIDE AND PREJUDICE. It’s a timeless story — will the star-crossed lovers unite? — but told with such wit and clever observation that Jane Austen’s novel of social manners easily supports yet another adaptation. Joe Wright’s film is lovely and well made, with location shooting in old English manors, and marvelous fluid camerawork that’ll have you truly immersed in the social swirl. To be followed by an informal discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 23. Melwood (AH)

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BLACK OUT. A groom who used to be a gangster, a dead man, 20 kilos of coke — if it doesn’t get sorted out, there won’t be a wedding. Arne Toonen directs this crime comedy from Holland. In Dutch, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 23. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[DANCE]

WE’RE COMING FACE TO FACE WITH VIOLENCE AS A FORCE

BIG STEP FORWARD Flamenco dance, the most famous export of Spain’s Andalusia region, will take center stage Thu., Jan. 23, at North Side’s New Hazlett Theater — the latest, and largest, celebration of Flamenco Pittsburgh’s bi-annual Fiesta Flamenca. The all-ages program will have a different vibe this time, says Carolina Loyola-Garcia, Flamenco Pittsburgh’s co-founder and director. What started five years ago as a student showcase held at smaller venues has morphed into a large celebration of the art form. “We wanted to keep that spirit of a big celebration of flamenco, but step it up a bit by doing it at the New Hazlett Theater,” says Loyola-Garcia. “It’s a big experiment, but we hope people will respond to the larger venue.” Flamenco Pittsburgh and its Centro Flamenco de Pittsburgh began in 2003 with a mission of bringing flamenco to Western Pennsylvania. In addition to teaching students flamenco dance and culture, the organization does outreach at area schools and colleges, as well as presenting workshops, demonstrations and performances throughout the region each year. For this latest incarnation of Fiesta Flamenca, the program offers traditional music and dance performances by Flamenco Pittsburgh’s professional performance ensemble, Alba Flamenca, featuring dancers Loyola-Garcia and Flor Isava, as well as singer Barbara York and musicians Jon Bañuelos, James Bond and Lucas Savage. Students from Centro Flamenco de Pittsburgh will also perform. The ensemble will offer a mix of repertory works including “Sevillanas,” a traditional dance from Sevilla danced at spring and summer festivals in Andalusia. The performance includes the latest addition to group’s repertoire: “Guajira,” one of the cantes de ida y vuelta, which has Cuban rhythms and was set on the ensemble by dancer/choreographer Antonio Hidalgo. The program also features local guest artists: wind musician Erik Lawrence, cosmic jazz chanteuse Phat Man Dee and bellydance maven Olivia Kissel (formerly of Zafira Dance Company). “Flamenco is very much a hybrid art form because it mixes a number of cultures,” says Loyola-Garcia. “Keeping in that spirit, we are trying to include performers from other disciplines.” And as with any good fiesta, food and drink will be available. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Flamenco Pittsburgh presents FIESTA FLAMENCA. 7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.); Thu., Jan. 23. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $15 advance, $20 at door. 412-320-4610 or newhazletttheater.org NEWS

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Flamenco is Spain’s most well-known dance. {PHOTO COURTESY OF COLTER HARPER}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

HITTING HARD [ART REVIEW]

{IMAGE COURTESY OF COURTESY OF SCOTT WHITE CONTEMPORARY ART, INC.}

{BY LISSA BRENNAN}

Claudia Alvarez’s “Pero Pendiente”

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NOUGH VIOLENCE: Artists Speak Out, at the Society for Contemporary Craft, is clever, insightful, empathetic, haunting, sharp, compelling and ultimately terrible in its efficacy. Curated by director of exhibitions Kate Lydon, it gathers work from 14 artists, local to international, creating in metal, fiber, video, ceramic, found object, mixedmedia, beads and glass, with results stunning and disturbing. The individual pieces are visually arresting viewed simply from an aesthetic perspective. But as we absorb their symbolic resonance, they become jarring, and force us to react. While this is an incredibly important show to witness, it’s often very hard to take. There’s nothing particularly graphic or gory, and that might be part of why we’re shaken by it; we’re not looking at the software carcasses that litter gaming battlegrounds, or the media images bodies left behind on real ones. We’ve desensitized ourselves enough to be no more moved by the latter than we are by the former. But here, we’re not encountering

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incidents of violence. We’re coming face to face with violence as a force. The centerpiece is probably the work used to advertise the exhibition, a contribution by Claudia Alvarez. She’s a Mexican-born, New York City-based artist whose work focuses on the innocence of children regardless of the corruption that surrounds them. “El Chupon II” is at first nothing more than a life-sized

ENOUGH VIOLENCE: ARTISTS SPEAK OUT continues through March 22. Society for Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

ceramic sculpture of a toddler in pink hoodie pajamas, pacifier stuck in mouth; closer inspection shows she’s toting a gun. As an emblem for the show, it’s a smart choice; it’s cute but deceptive, then you get it and for a second it’s almost funny as your brain scrolls through all the precious

yet vicious baby animals and kiddies overflowing in the lowbrow art world. Then it hits you in the gut. Alvarez is also represented by “Pero Pendiente” — more life-sized sculptures, this time with one toddler and his dog holding three other tykes at gunpoint, on their knees, hands up or on heads, backs to him, execution-style. This time there’s not the hint of a joke. In some pieces, the innovation of material plays a major factor in the success of the work. Using wire, wax and canvas, Doug Beube refashions volumes of the Encyclopedia Britannica into explosives, building bombs of knowledge to burst bags and vests. Beth Barron’s wall pieces beautify the wounded and are intriguing if you can get beyond the fact that they are crafted, somewhat repulsively, out of found Band-Aids. Boris Bally sculpts the ephemera of tradition and protection out of gun parts, including a spiny, skeletal Native American necklace composed of gun triggers, and a menorah out of pistols. Several artists focus on violence against CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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women, ranging from the specific intimacy of domestic assault to the general dehumanization of societal debasement. Maimuna Feroze Nana’s cloth dolls are clumsy, amorphous blobs, their features blurred and bruised, bodies wonky and straining; Joyce Scott’s small beaded sculptures twist and turn in desperation, searching for escape. Julie Sirek’s wardrobe of miniature dresses is identical in pattern and fabric, but individualized through burning, shredding and stitching. There is one dress for each woman who perished as the result of domestic violence in Minnesota in 2009. Thirty total. One of the most uncomplicated and affecting works is “I Speak Not For Myself,” by local Blaine Siegel. In this short video, Siegel accompanies audio of Malala Youssafzai — the young Pakistani education activist whom the Taliban attempted to assassinate as she rode the bus home from school — with images of Wilkinsburg High School; Siegel serves as artist-inresidence at the school, which ranks, statistically, among the most violent in Pennsylvania. We see signs, hallways, trophies. But we see no students. The chairs and cafeteria tables we glimpse

are empty. Viewing a school absent of children while listening to a young girl forgive those who tried to silence her for her commitment to knowledge is absolutely chilling.

[BOOK REVIEW]

OUR TOWN {BY FRED SHAW} Perhaps the New York school of poetry (think O’Hara, Ashbery and Koch) was onto something, with its conversational style infused with irreverence and gossip. Kristofer Collins might agree: His latest work, the chapbook-y, 30-plus pages of Pennsylvania Welcomes You (Coleridge Street Books), relies on an optimistic tone from a lessthan-confessional speaker. Collins, once editor of The New Yinzer, now owner of Desolation Row Records and Low Ghost Press, has published several books in the past decade. This latest is a Valentine to the city, but don’t expect smiley-cookie odes or blue-collar elegies. Pennsylvania Welcomes You feels more like an outsider’s embrace of a region too often more concerned with what it isn’t than with what it is — a place where people have artistic and personal room to grow, cultivate relationships and drink beer. There are few heavy themes dealt with here, in poems celebrating quotidian joys. Collins spells this out in “12 E. Read St.,” saying, “Your note said, ‘Don’t be late

ENOUGH VIOLENCE: ARTISTS SPEAK OUT PUBLIC PROGRAMS All free and open to the public. 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org MON., JAN. 20: Violence in the Media Community Call to Action. Talk by professor Steve Gorelick, of Hunter College (12:30 p.m.) FEB. 1 AND MARCH 1: Saturday information sessions (10 a.m.-3 p.m.) with anti-violence organizations FEB. 8 AND MARCH 8: Three Rivers Thunder Community Peace Drum Circle (2-4 p.m.) MARCH 21: Community Call to Action: A Public Health Response To Violence, Abuse and Neglect. Expert talk (noon) and informal discussion (2-4 p.m.)

With this exhibition, we’re required to confront the psychology of violence, its breeding grounds, conception, nurturing and growth, not as incidents or statistics but as a state of mind, and of life, that has become epidemic.

and bring some beer. Dinner is / Assured!’ and standing there in the hallway’s damp light / I did feel assured — by the delicious curves of your southpaw / Script, the coming chill of another shaggy season …” His speaker’s enthusiasm for life’s simple pleasures bursts off the page as “a rage of living,” reminding a reader to seize small moments easily overlooked in a digital age that often forgets the personal touch. Poems with titles like “The Prayer of St. Pierre’s Ravine,” “The Whiskey Rebellion” and “W. Eugene Smith” invoke aspects of local history, while the writer handles them in impressionistic and unexpected ways. The iconic Bloomfield Bridge Tavern gets this treatment in “BBT,” with Collins’ imagery going a bit surreal: “Out here is the bridge & little / Houses beneath it. A ball field gone barren from lack of play / Do you believe any of it? If I tell you it’s all gone, everything / Beyond the door destroyed forever, then it is. And when we walk / Outside all of what you see is just your brain filling in the blanks …” Such uneven imagery tends to leave a reader rootless rather than grounded, relying more on the speaker’s commentary than straightforward description. But while Collins’ playfulness with images can detract from his subject matter, it adds a life-affirming voice to a region that thoughtfully inspires a range of welcome artistic perspectives.

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2nd floor*

Erwin Redl: Structures of Time and Space An investigation of “reverse engineering” that (re-)translates virtual reality and 3-D computer modeling by means of large scale light installations.

Welcoming the Future, Honoring the Present: New and Established AAP Member Works This exhibit is a salon-style hanging of works by current AAP artists alongside a showcase of 21 New AAP members.

2. SPACE*

3rd floor Pittsburgh Playwrights Gallery

601 Wood Street

812 Liberty Avenue

Behind Our Scenes Guest Curator: Jen Saffron Participating Artists: Annie O’Neill, Barbara Weissberger, Dennis Marsico and Leo Hsu. Photographers explore the relationship between two-dimensional form and space. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Button Making Music by Aaron Clark of Humanaut/Honcho

Therapy and The Muse | Ernest McCarty

10. Toonseum

Wonder Women One of the largest exhibitions of women in comics ever presented, featuring over 50 pieces of original art.

11. August Wilson Center for African American Culture 980 Liberty Avenue

3. Tito Way Memento Mori | Mary Mazziotti Cell Phone Disco | InformationLab

4. Shaw Galleries*

Interactive installations from the 2014 International Performing Arts for Youth Conference: I Think I Can Terrapin Theatre (Australia)

The 3rd Annual Bad Art Sale!

Paper Planet Polyglot Theatre (Australia)

5. Trust Arts Education Center

Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

805 Liberty Avenue

12. Tonic

Attack Theatre: Traveling A witty contemporary dance performance that tells the story of a traveling salesman. 7 and 8pm.

NOT UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE It Is What It Is: People. Art. Live Music. Drinks. Food.

Third Floor*

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd floor Gallery.

13. Sonoma Grille 947 Penn Avenue

Memory Terrain

6. Arcade Comedy Theater 811 Liberty Avenue

The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Art Show

14. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery 914 Penn Avenue

Pittsburgh’s best sketch improv comedy.

Start Anew! Performances by Sounds of Steel steel pan band.

7. 820 Liberty Avenue*

TRANSPOSE, a project of the Bruce Gallery, Edinboro University

15. CAPA Gallery

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

Places to Go and People to See Portraits, Landscapes, and Ceramic Work by Pittsburgh CAPA’s 11th and 12th Grade Visual Artists.

212 Ninth Street

Drawing Portraits and Figures High school students in the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Design Arts Studio explore portraiture and figures.

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The Lonely Robot Returns After being trapped inside Fraley’s Robot Repair for many months – and finally making his escape - the Lonely Robot is swinging through Pittsburgh.

810 Penn Avenue, 7th floor

Reflective Locations An Art on the Walls exhibit curated by D.S. Kinsel exploring varied reflections of modern black masculinity.

18. 709 Penn Gallery* Terry Boyd: The Neverlands An idiosyncratic and muted interpretation of life and death, originally depicted by the skies, seas, grounds and characters described in J.M. Barrie’s stories.

19. 707 Penn Gallery* 707 Penn Avenue

David Aschkenas: Life and Death of the Igloo Photography exhibit chronicles the last weeks of the Civic Arena’s operation and its demolition.

7th St. and Penn Avenue

Steel Town Fire Performances at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30pm

Chef Jason will create deconstructed plates pleasantly familiar to the taste but intriguingly disguised to the eye.

crawl after dark The Freya String Quartet, Electric 10PM $15 / $8 students + Seniors

Wood Street Galleries, 2nd floor gallery, 601 Wood Street

$5, cash bar

Trust Arts Education Center Peirce Studio, 805-807 Liberty Avenue

22. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Waves: Perceptions of Light and Sound Kara Ruth Snyder Live Music by Paul Tabachnek.

23. PNC Legacy Project

Performances by Host Skull, The Gotobeds, and Meeting of Important People’s Josh Verbanets.

After the Crawl Comedy Show 10PM $10 / $5 for students / BYOB Arcade Comedy Theater 811 Liberty Avenue

600 Liberty Avenue

The PNC Legacy Project is celebrating a legacy of another kind... Celebrating Black History Month.

Kartoon Karaoke 9PM

24. Dream Cream Ice Cream

$5, 21+

Toonseum 947 Liberty Avenue

Performances by the CLO Academy As the sole benefiting Dreamer for January, the CLO Academy performs. 6, 7, and 8pm.

Global Beats 9PM

25. Boutique 208*

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28. Braddock’s American Brasserie

FRENDZ: An evening of Pittsburgh-created music 10PM

Night Market VII

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107 Sixth Street

With Special Guest: Symbiotic Collusion Orchestra.

20. 131 Seventh Street*

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27. Renaissance Hotel

107 Sixth Street

$5

Enigma Lounge 130 7th St

Live Music by Jon Dull of the Hoffman Road Band and Brandon Yusko.

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208 Sixth Street

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136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

539 Liberty Avenue

111 Ninth Street

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Radium Girls German Dada artist Hannah Höch has creating rebellious collages that point out the stark difference between reality and the media’s projected images of women. Live Music by Producer Jakeisrain and the C Street Brass

21. Katz Plaza

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio

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26. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

709 Penn Avenue

947 Liberty Avenue

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A Production of:

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Visit TRUSTARTS.ORG/Crawl on your mobile device for a new experience

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Friday, January 24 5:30-9pm

Presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

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A DARING REIMAGINING OF AN AMERICAN ICON

January 18 – February 9, 2014

by

Katori Hall

Directed by Peter Flynn Flash back to 1968.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC A. SMITH}

Nevermore: David Crawford as Edgar Allan Poe in Poe’s Last Night

[PLAY REVIEWS]

TELL-TALE ART {BY TED HOOVER}

Open the door to room 306 of the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spent the last night of his life.

WHAT WITH ONE thing or another, I’ve

spent my life around writers. So I can say with authority that if you’re looking for the most screwed-up, self-destructive people around, your search can begin and end with them. And Edgar Allan Poe sits at the top of that list. Poe was an orphan estranged from his foster family; he was also an out-of-work drunk plagued by gambling debts. At age 28, he married his 13-year-old cousin. By 40 he was dead. Yet in the middle of all that, he churned out some of the most famous poems and short stories ever written.

POE’S LAST NIGHT continues through Jan. 19. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-687-4686 or www.pghplaywrights.com/poe

“SOUL-STIRRING DRAMA” —VARIETY

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

There’s a lot there to theatricalize, and Pittsburgh theater stalwart David Crawford has done just that with Poe’s Last Night, a play he wrote and in which he stars for this Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre production, directed by Monteze Freeland. Crawford keeps the concept simple. We meet Poe in 1849 Baltimore, where we find him deranged and convinced he’s about to be murdered. He rummages through his past, trying to figure out how he ended up there, and who might be trying to kill him. These memories call to mind some of his

written work, and he quotes liberally from “The Pit and the Pendulum,” “The Cask of Amontillado” and “The Raven.” These segments are, in fact, extended readings of his work. In other hands, the material might be deadly. But they turn out to be the show’s highlights, thanks to an incredible soundscape by Mark Whitehead, Freeland’s specific direction and Crawford’s commanding voice and intelligence. We get a very real sense of Poe’s writing, the twisted beauty of his prose and the frightening implications of his subject matter. The narrative sections of the piece are rewarding as well; Poe led an amazingly misshaped life, and learning some of what he went through is quite interesting. The one problem is that Crawford and Freeland approach these passages with a very cool reserve: Crawford’s signature sumptuous voice and energy level is barely ever raised to the frenzied, explosive pitch needed to drive the show. But I’m not sure if that ultimately detracts from this intriguing evening. So go and enjoy it, and thank your lucky stars you never wanted to be a writer. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

SOUTHERN COMFORT {BY COLETTE NEWBY} I WAS EXCITED to see South Side Stories

with my roommate, a recent transplant to Pittsburgh, so I could show her something about her new town’s character and


history. South Side Stories, written by and starring Tami Dixon and directed by Matt M. Morrow, was perfect for my goal. The diverse collection of stories spans the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long history, adapting tales told to Dixon by locals. You end up expecting Rick Sebak to walk on stage. I have nothing but respect for the performer in a one-woman show, especially one in which she has to change characters on the ďŹ&#x201A;y as often as in this production. Dixonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characters run the full spectrum of class and race and gender, and she has to cross more of those boundaries than Pittsburgh has bridges.

The show is sort of an object lesson for wannabe writers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; real-life stories are never structured in a satisfactory way. Most successful documentaries and literary nonďŹ ction pieces have to process the story for a very long time to give the audience anything to take home besides the vague impression that there are a lot of people in the world. An anthology format means committing to that process multiple times, which can be difďŹ cult for even the most accomplished writer. Many of these pieces succeed magnificently, reflecting the development of the neighborhood, or just painting the portrait of a capital-Y Yinzer. A rare few leave you feeling like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re missing an ending. The recurring segment, about a woman dealing with a sudden death on her block, raises and drops plot threads and shifts in tone from ethereal to madcap and back. We are essentially told that there was a conclusion, but not how it happened. If you have ever tried to ďŹ t in by pretending to like French fries on your sandwiches, or if you somehow genuinely do like them, this show is about a world you love intimately.

YOU END UP EXPECTING RICK SEBAK TO WALK ON STAGE.

SOUTH SIDE STORIES continues through Jan. 26. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-$55. 412-362-1713 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

There are pitfalls: Some of the accents sounded about 200 miles too far south, and one segment commits the cardinal sin of being a novelty rap song. But this is top-quality stuff, and by and large, you will be ďŹ&#x201A;oored by the diverse cast the writer/performer evokes.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Murph Dogg â&#x20AC;˘ 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ultraverseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;˘ Image on paper

Š LITTLESTAR

10-=@,=D!x3049E3,77 ?=@>?,=?>:=2x-:C:114.0,??30,?0=><@,=0 $$x2=:@;>?4.60?>"!$ PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.1601.23.14 MONDAYS 9-11PM

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

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ALL DAY EVERY DAY $3.50 24oz Bottles

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{TALK}

S OU TH SID E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

THURS, JAN 16 • CLASSIC COUNTRY/ROCK SLIM FORSYTHE & PAYDAY LONERS + STANDINGWAVE + SCUILLI-CHILDERS BAND (NO SMOKING ENTIRE VENUE)

FRI, JAN 17 • 9PM

$ $

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Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight Drink ! Specials

(Southside Only)

Great Music!

Visit All Of Our Locations

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ALT COUNTRY/AMERICANA DAN GETKIN AND THE MASTERS OF AMERICAN MUSIC PLUS SLIM FORSYTHE & THE NEW PAYDAY LONERS + MARK WILLIAMS WILLIAMS (NO SMOKING ENTIRE VENUE)

SAT, JAN 18 • 9PM JAM ROCK EKOOSTIK HOOKAH PLUS KR3 (NO SMOKING ENTIRE VENUE)

MON, JAN 20 • 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, JAN 21 • 9PM JAZZ FLEXURE (70'S MILES DAVIS INSPIRED) OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen Hours: Sun - Th open til 12am Fri & Sat open til 1am

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

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JAN. 18 The M Mountaintop t i

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

David Sobel says that schools can learn a thing or two from farmers’ markets: They could use the natural and historic resources of the local community to teach ecology, culture and economics. Sobel, of New England’s Antioch University, is known as “the father of place-based education” and is the author of books including Beyond Ecophobia: Reclaiming the Heart in Nature Education. He speaks tonight at the Inspire Speaker Series. The Green Building Alliance event, at Phipps Conservatory, also features Jane Werner, executive director of the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Bill O’Driscoll 5-8 p.m. (talk at 6 p.m.). Schenley Plaza, Oakland. $15-45. Register at www.go-gba.org.

{ART} As of today, just two months remain in the 2013 Carnegie International. The Carnegie Museum of Art is busy supplying more reasons to visit (or revisit) this massive show of contemporary work. At tonight’s Culture Club: These Aren’t Your Kids’ Puppets!, watch Tom Sarver reprise his original puppet show from the exhibit’s opening, and try your own hand at puppetmaking. And Jan. 20 is 2013 Carnegie International Family

Day, with art-making activities, a self-guided gallery search, storyteller Alison Babusci, and more puppetry. BO Culture Club: 5:30-9 p.m. ($10; includes drink ticket). Family Day starts at 11 a.m. Mon., Jan. 20 (free with museum admission). 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-6223131 or www.cmoa.org

viewer’s own interpretation, too. The exhibition, presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, kicks off with tonight’s opening reception. Angela Suico 5:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Feb. 23. 709 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

Art by Laurie Trok

JAN. 23 Butt I Am A the th Fire

+ FRI., JAN. 17 {ART}

Local artist Terry Boyd debuts Neverlands, his collection of Peter Pan-inspired artwork, at 709 Penn Gallery. Mixed media such as ink, Mylar and thread on paper reflect themes found in the novel: life, death and war. Yet the silhouettes of the coffin and ship in works like “and the echoes seemed to cry savagely” are ripe for the

{ART} Veteran Pittsburgh-based photographer David Aschkenas has shot for publications from Time and Men’s Health to Der Spiegel, and his work is held in collections including the Carnegie Museum of Art’s. In 2010, he turned his lens on the Civic Arena, during its yearlong demolition process. A few of Aschkenas’ 10,000 images of the now-vanished landmark comprise Arena: Remembering the Igloo, an exhibit that opens


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF RICHARD TERMINE}

“I grew up in a puppet family,” says Heather Henson. Understatement alert: Henson is the youngest daughter of the late Jim Henson, the guy who created the Muppets. As a kid, she learned about every kind of puppetry there is. After art school, she returned to the family profession, launching IBEX Puppetry in 2000. While the Orlando-based troupe embraces the Muppet legacy — its productions include “Sing Along With The Muppet Movie” — the internationally touring group’s own aesthetic is distinct. IBEX’s Celebration of Flight (pictured), for instance, combined large- and small-scale rod puppets, kitework, dance and music to evoke birds. Now, thanks to Annmarie Dugan — the IBEX lighting designer who also chairs Pitt’s theater department — IBEX is here to premiere Flight: A Crane’s Story, at Pitt’s Charity Randall Theatre. For this hour-long reworking of Celebration of Flight, Henson hired a playwright and director to help tell the story of a young crane named Awaken, who is separated from her family and must learn how to fly — and migrate — on her own. At each of the two performances, the program includes a half-hour pre-show workshop where families can make their own crane puppets to perform with as part of the show. Henson adds that Flight has an environmental message: “Back to nature. Simplify. Listen.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18, and 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $12-25. www.play.pitt.edu

today at 707 Penn Gallery. (There’s also a book of the same title.) The images range from dramatic night-time shots of the Igloo’s half-demolished dome to forlorn views of the Penguins’ abandoned locker room. Tonight is the opening reception. BO 5:30-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through March 2. 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

{MUSIC}

Rust, visits for An Evening With the Authors. Meyer won railcars-full of critical praise for that 2009 debut, set in a small, economically depressed Pennsylvania town, and followed it up with the similarly lauded The Son. Joining Meyer is area native Brian McGreevy, whose 2012 horror novel Hemlock Grove became an Emmy-nominated Netflix series. The event, at Waverly Church in Point Breeze, is moderated by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette book editor Tony Norman. BO 7 p.m. 590 S. Braddock Ave., Point Breeze. $10 ($15 includes postprogram, reservation-only reception). 412-242-0643

through his fictional interplay with a maid at Memphis’ Lorraine Motel. The premiere production, in 2011, in the U.K., won the Olivier Award for best new play. The

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARC ROYCE}

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra presents Haydn and Zarathustra, JAN. 17 featuring guest Haydn and conductor Christoph Zarathustra Köning and Grammywinning soprano Hila Plitmann. The concert begins with Haydn’s “The Philosopher,” followed by a collaboration with Plitmann Broadway staging starred (pictured) on contemporary composer Richard Danielpour’s Samuel L. Jackson and Angela Bassett. Now the play comes “Darkness in the Ancient Valley.” The evening concludes to City Theatre. Peter Flynn, a veteran an of Broadway with Strauss’ famous “Also and off-Broadway, -Broadway, Sprach Zarathustra.” This BNY directs a cast featuring Mellon Grand Classics event ones (from City’s also features a special Saturday Albert Jones excellent nt The Brothers performance explaining the Size) as King, and Bianca mechanics of “Zarathustra.” LaVerne e Jones as (Note that Plitmann will not Camae. The first be performing Saturday.) AS performance mance is 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. tonight.. BO 18, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Jan. 5:30 p.m. m. 19. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Continues ues Downtown. $25.75-109.75. through h Feb. 9. 412-392-4900 or www. 1300 Bingham ngham pittsburghsymphony.org St., South th Side. $15-55. 412431-2489 89 or www.citytheatre tytheatre company.org ny.org {STAGE} As a rising young American {WORDS} DS} playwright, Katori Hall took Widely acclaimed on a daunting task with The novelist Philipp Mountaintop: The show depicts the last night in the life Meyer, author of American rican of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

{MUSIC}

Les Délices, a Cleveland-based group of French Baroque musicians, performs Myths and Allegories tonight at Synod Hall. Inspired by The Odyssey, Odysseyy, the music

JAN. 17 Arena: ena Remembering Remem the Igloo

Photo by David Aschkenas will feature both instrumental and vocal re-tellings of Homer’s epic tale from 18th-century composers. The music of Les Délices has been featured on NPR’s Harmonia and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The group’s performance here

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+ MON., JJAN. 20 Martin Luther K King Jr. was gunned down in hatred 46 years ago. Today his birthday holiday, and his is a national holi peaceful protest for legacy of peacef justice and equality lives e on in events event like East Liberty Celebrates Dr. Cele Martin Luther King Jr. The Lut free, annual annua festival at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater Kelly-Stray highlights highlightts the t work of social-justice-minded social-justice groups including Project Silk, includ Love Front Porch, Por the Union Project and Assemble. There As are also live performances by p talented youth yout ensembles from Hope Academy, A Soundwaves Steelband, CHANCE, Dreams of Hope Dr and 1Hood Media. BO

JAN. 18 Myths th h and d Allegories Al

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Noon (live performances at 2 p.m.). 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

+ THU., JAN. 23 {ART}

{FESTIVAL}

+ SAT., JAN. 18

NEWS

is presented by Renaissance and Baroque of Pittsburgh. AS 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. Synod Hall, 125 N. Craig St., Oakland. $10-35. 412-361-2048 or www.rbsp.org

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The Westmoreland Museum of American Art is undergoing a major expansion, and in the meantime is operating Westmoreland @rt 30, a pop-up space east of Greensburg. The site features both work from the museum’s permanent collection and Pop-Up Exhibitions. The current Pop-Up, But I Am the Fire with Laurie Trok, showcases 16 paintings and three installations by the local artist, including laser-cut, birchpanel works that blur the line between painting and sculpture. Tonight there’s a salon with Trok herself. BO 6 p.m. Exhibition continues through Feb. 2. 4764 State Route 30 (between Greensburg and Latrobe), Westmoreland County. Free. 724-837-1500 or www.wmuseumaa.org

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TUESDAY 9:30-11:30 9:30-11:30pm 0pm

RADICALTRIVIA $5 Evil Drinks

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JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

THEATER 10-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL. 4721 Stanton Ave., Stanton Heights. treebeans@yahoo.com Sat., Jan. 18, 5 p.m. DATING CAN BE MURDER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. FLIGHT: A CRANE’S STORY. Play by Heather Henson exploring nature’s deepest mysteries & the spiritual essence in the cycle of life on Earth through the story of a crane named Awaken. Sat., Jan. 18, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 19, 2 p.m. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-7529. THE MOUNTAINTOP. A fictionalized portrayal of the night before Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination. Sat., Jan. 18, 5:30 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Sun, 2 p.m. and Wed., Jan. 29, 1 & 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 9. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. POE’S LAST NIGHT. Edgar Allan Poe’s greatest mystery is the story

of his own death. Thu, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 19, 5 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. SOUTH SIDE STORIES. One-woman show portraying the dynamism of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. WICKED. The hit musical about the Wicked Witch of the West. Tue-Thu, 7:30 p.m., Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 1 & 6 p.m. Thru Feb. 9. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 1. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

COMEDY THU 16 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WOLFIE’S COMIC WARS. 8 p.m. Moondog’s, Blawnox. 310-909-6446.

Jan. 19, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 18

FRI 17

LEGENDARY WID, JOHN KENSILL, DAN BROWN. BEST OF THE BURGH 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden. COMEDY SHOWCASE. 724-379-7100. Fri, 8:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 24 SHAUN BLACKHAM, Corner Cafe, South Side. TERRY JONES, DAVID 412-488-2995. KAYE. 7 p.m. The SCIT IMPROV Rose Bar, McKeesport. COMEDY HOUSE 412-751-6960. TEAMS. Fri, 8 p.m. . www per Thru April 11 a p ty pghci m Steel City Improv .co OPEN MIC STAND UP Theater, Shadyside. COMEDY NITE. Hosted by 412-404-2695. Derek Minto & John Pridmore. TRAVIS IRVINE, Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE, South Side. 412-612-4030. WOODISH. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by WOLFIE’S COMEDY SHOW Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. W/ MATT WOHLFARTH & Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. FRIENDS. 8:30 p.m. Moonlite 412-431-9908. Cafe, Brookline. 310-909-6446. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. ARNEZ J. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., 412-904-4502. Jan. 18, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun.,

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 21

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FRI 17 - SUN 19

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

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{BY ERIC LIDJI}

In Pennsylvania, a Groundhog has been predicting the weather for over 125 years and Straub has been brewing for over 140 years. This authentic German-Style AltBier is our 14th Annual Groundhog Brew, and is the perfect warmer against gainst the winter cold.

On tap now at all SHARP EDGE Locations

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014


Warm Up Your Keys This Winter!

January’s Featured Mixologist: MELISSA GIORDANO

Congratulates January’s Featured Mixologist

COURTHOUSE TAVERN

The Piano Hawk PIANO TUNING & REPAIR Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266

Melissa Giordano is a senior Nursing major at Robert Morris University. She has been working at the Courthouse Tavern for one year but has been bartending for ten years. Melissa says the best part about working at the Courthouse

New Camera? How about some lessons? Take your photography to the next level. Learn at your own pace with a Private Photography Instructor. LEARN: Camera Operation, Photography 101, Lighting, Composition,Photoshop, Lightroom, Camera Raw, Photoshop Plug-Ins and much more.

Tavern is “the customers, especially the regulars.” The strangest tip she has ever received is from a customer that gave her blonde hair dye in hopes to change her from a brunette. Find her working Monday through Friday from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

Private Instructor: DAVID KELLY

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MELISSA’S FEATURED RECIPE:

EMAIL: davidkelly@edenbridgephotography.com PHONE: 412.860.8279

The ABSOLUT Bloody Felon 1 ¼ oz. ABSOLUT Cilantro Dash of Hot Sauce Bloody Mary Mix Lime Slice Dash of Celery Salt Crushed Cilantro Dash of Pepper Celery Stick Pour all ingredients into a glass and garnish with the celery stick.

COURTHOUSE TAVERN 310 FORBES AVE. PITTSBURGH, PA 15222 (412) 338-8608 www.courthousetavern.com [ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.] To learn more about COURTHOUSE TAVERN and Melissa’s ABSOLUT Bloody Felon, click on the CPTV Video Player on pghcitypaper.com or scan the QR code

ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid & Tropical Bonsai Show. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From

New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 18 AFTER TILLER BENEFIT SCREENING. Benefits the Women & Girls Foundation & Women’s Law Project. www.womenslawproject.org 6 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-281-2892. BURNS SUPPER. Tribute to poet Robert Burns feat. dinner, live music, raffle, more. Benefits the Macdonald Pipe Band of Pittsburgh. 6 p.m. Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-835-3997.

SUN 19 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 16

Comedian Travis Irvine is a little difficult to pin down. In addition to sharing the stage with comics like Demetri Martin and Hannibal Buress, Irvine — a regular contributor to Huffington Post — is an independent filmmaker whose oeuvre includes a horror movie about killer raccoons and a documentary about his own unsuccessful bid to become mayor of his hometown. This weekend, Irvine brings two sets of his spirited standup to the Arcade Comedy Theater. 8 and 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17. $5-10. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-339-0608 or www.arcadecomedytheater.com

Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. 724-887-7910.

SPECIAL MON 20 A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE 2014. Dream center, prayer service, dinner, multimedia presentation, re-creation of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s historic speech, more. 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. St. Vincent College, Latrobe. 724-805-2564. EAST LIBERTY CELEBRATES MLK. Live performances, family friendly activities, more. 12-4 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

DANCE THU 16 - SUN 19 RECIPES OUR MOTHERS GAVE US: THE 2014 GLUE FACTORY PROJECT. Dance theater production created & performed by Maria Cheng, Beth Corning & Francoise Fournier. Presented by Corningworks. Thru Jan. 18, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 19, 2 p.m.

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. “THE WRITE SPOT” WRITERS’ WORKSHOP. Prompt-driven poetry & prose. Third Thu of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Thu of every month. Thru Feb. 6 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. ZARINA ZABRISKY, SIMON ROGGHE, LAURA WARMAN, KAREN LILLIS. Cold Hands, Hot Writers. 7:30 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

SAT 18 ACQUIRED TASTE: READINGS ON FOOD, SEX, & ROCK N’ ROLL. feat. Lisa Panepinto, Pete Williams, & Eric Schwerer. 8-11 p.m. The Shop, Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MEET THE AUTHORS. Conversation w/ Brian McGreevy, author of Hemlock Grove, & Philipp Meyer, author of The Son. 7 p.m. Waverly Presbyterian Church, Regent Square. 412-242-0643. CONTINUES ON PG. 51


“Dancers in Motion – Hot Pink,” by Joyce Werwie Perry, from Dance, at the Lawrence Hall Gallery at Point Park University

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. Arena: Remembering the Igloo. Photographs by David Aschkenas. Opening reception: Jan. 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Neverlands. Mixed media drawings by Terry Boyd. Opening reception: Jan. 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Inside Out: The Art of the Students of GPLC. Feat. artwork of students from around the city & the globe. Opening reception: Jan. 19, 12:30-4:30 p.m. Oakland. 412-393-7600. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. East of Eastside Gallery Grand Opening. Work by Adrienne Heinrich, Jane Ogren, Mark Panza, Sue Pollins, Kurt Shaw, more. Opening reception: Jan. 19, 2-5 p.m. & by appointment. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin O’Toole: Recent Works. Wood sculptures. Opens Jan. 20. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 29. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Pop Explosion: The Artist & Popular Culture. Group show juried by Nicholas Chambers. Opening reception Jan. 18, 7-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the

famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. WAVES: Perceptions of Light & Sound. Acrylic & mixed media paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. www.digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BE GALLERIES. Arcadia. Work by Atticus Adams. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. 13th Annual Art Inter/National. Invitational group show exploring the resilient & ephemeral nature of the human experience. Cocktail reception: Jan. 18, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost

Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Dwellings. Work by Ryder Henry. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLEL JUC. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-621-8875. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Group show. Saturdays & by appointment. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. SHEILA CARTER JONES, BONITA LEE PENN, CJ COLEMAN. Poetry reading, part of the Versify Reading Series. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847.

MON 20

Movement. Part of the Martin Luther King Jr., Celebration Day. Thru Jan. 22, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor landscape made of 22 miles of packing tape. Thru Jan. 19 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OVERNIGHT OUT OF THE GUTTER: www. per ADVENTURES: pa GRAPHIC NOVEL pghcitym .co DINOSAUR DISCUSSION GROUP. ENCOUNTERS. Third Mon of every Explore Earth’s past by month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie investigating the lifestyle & Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. behavior of giants such as Dippy the Diplodocus to the first tiny JAPANESE CONVERSATION mammals. 7 p.m. Carnegie CLUB. First and Third Tue of every Museum of Natural History, month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3288. Oakland. 412-622-3151. STUCK. Floyd gets his kite stuck LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice up a tree. He throws up his shoe conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. to shift it, but that gets stuck, Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. followed by a ladder, the kitchen 412-422-9650. sink, & an orangutan! Presented by the Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company. 7 p.m. Moon High CONVERSATION SALON. School, Moon. 412-456-6666. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing New & Selected Poems by Charles Simic. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-621-6880.

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TUE 21

WED 22

FRI 17 - SUN 19 SHREK: THE MUSICAL. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 19 McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

SAT 18 MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177. PAJAMA NIGHTS: DINOSAUR EXPLORERS & FRIENDS. Experiment together as junior paleontologists & see how scientists gather insight into the lives of extinct animals. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. SATURDAY W/ THE SWAN QUEEN. Creative movement dance class & story time session w/ a dancer from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre in costume. 10:30-11 a.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. STUCK. Floyd gets his kite stuck up a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck, followed by a ladder, the kitchen sink, & an orangutan! Presented by the Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-456-6666. CONTINUES ON PG. 52

KIDSTUFF THU 16 NUTS FOR NUTELLA. DIY Nutella workshop. 7-8 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-6920. STUCK. Floyd gets his kite stuck up a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck, followed by a ladder, the kitchen sink, & an orangutan! Presented by the Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company. 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. Marshall Middle School, Wexford. 412-456-6666.

THU 16 - WED 22 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. STUDIO: ON FREEDOM CORNER. Make art that celebrates Pittsburgh’s Freedom Corner, the historic Hill District intersection & symbol of the home of the Civil Rights

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Real hook ups, real fast.

SAT 18 - SUN 19 PIRATE PRINCESS ADVENTURE. Interactive musical theater production. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 2 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. SHREK: THE MUSICAL. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 19 McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

SAT 18 - WED 22 STUDIO: MANY HANDS. Create clay birds that symbolize your dreams. Birds will be photographed & displayed at the museum. Part of the Martin Luther King Jr., Celebration Day. Jan. 18-22, 12-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

MON 20 ARTVENTURES: 2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL FAMILY DAY. Self-guided gallery tour, story telling, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. FREEDOM CIRCLE & SING-A-LONG. Sing songs from the Civil Rights Movement. Part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. KING FOR A DAY. People of all ages can read aloud portions of

Dr. King’s speeches. Part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE TUE 21 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 22 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 16 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. CONVERSATIONAL CHINESE & CHINESE CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CULTURE CLUB: THESE AREN’T YOUR KIDS’ PUPPETS! Puppetry performances feat. Tom Sarver, Kristen Barca, Joann Kielar, & Mike Cuccaro. Adults only. 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. First and Third Thu of every month, 7 p.m. 412-271-7660. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: HUMAN TRAFFICKING. Community panel & discussion. 6:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. HIDDEN LAWRENCEVILLE: AN EXHILARATING SPHERE OF LIVING HISTORY. Multimedia presentation by the Lawrenceville Historical Society. 7 p.m. McVey Auditorium, Canterbury Place, Lawrenceville. 917-282-8949. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INDOOR GARDENING: FOLIAGE PLANTS, HERBS, ORCHIDS & TROPICAL BONSAI. Thu. Thru Feb. 6 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/

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Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Interconnected World: Art & Science at the Environmental Charter School. Garfield. 412-362-0274. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Adventuring Princesses in Living Color. Work by Maggie Lynn Negrete. Bloomfield. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The New Collective. PCA all-guild exhibition of current work. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. SiO2: Highschool Reunion. Feat. work by 12 former SiO2 high school students. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic!

international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LEADERSHIP CHALLENGE CERTIFICATE INFORMATION SESSION. Thu, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Jan. 16 Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-5600. MENTORING IN PITTSBURGH: A PANEL DISCUSSION. Representatives from local nonprofit organizations will discuss how they can facilitate mentoring opportunities. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PRAYER SERVICE TO END HUMAN TRAFFICKING. Sisters of Divine Providence Auditorium. 7 p.m. LaRoche College, Wexford. 412-635-5426. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL ARTISTS’ INFO/ MIXER. Open to any & all visual & performing artists interested in participating. 6-8 p.m. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, Downtown. 412-456-6666. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu,

The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Artist Talk: Leo Hsu and the Free to the People Project: Jan. 18, 2:30-4 p.m. Poetry and Play reading w/ Joy Katz & Rob Handel Jan. 19, 3-5 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 16 - FRI 17 SAND MANDALA FOR PEACE. Created by Lama Ven. Khenpo Choephel & Lama Konchak Sonam. Presented by The Pittsburgh Tibetan Cultural Center. Thru Jan. 17, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194.

THU 16 - SUN 19 PITTSBURGH RV SHOW. www.pittrvshow.com Sat, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun, 10 a.m.5 p.m. and Thru Jan. 17, 4-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 19 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-325-6074.

FRI 17 AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. BALANCED MIND PITTSBURGH MASSAGE PARTY. Massage, crystal healing, live Indian music, more. 6-9 p.m. Fitness with a Twist, South Side. 412-225-3302. SALSA FUEGO DANCE CONGRESS. Amateur dance


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

contest, social dancing, more. 7-11 p.m. Mexico City, Downtown. 773-919-2019.

SAT 18

Maggie’s Farm Rum

EVENT: BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Folk dance lessons, live music, more. Third Sat of every grand opening, month, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21 Strip District Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, CRITIC: West Homestead. 412-461-6188. , 33, a THE CIVIL WAR ERA: A psychiatrist from GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. Greenfield Discussion w/ Rodger Duffy. Third Mon of every month, WHEN: 10 a.m. and Third Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m. Thru Feb. 15 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. Maggie’s [Farm] Rum is the second craft distillery opening KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. up in Pittsburgh, so it’s basically them kickstarting the Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 fact that they’re here and opening themselves to the Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. community. We’re big fans of Wigle [Whiskey], and they KOREAN II. For those started selling some of [Maggie’s] rum by the bottle a few who already have a basic weeks ago. The stuff they are making is really, really good. understanding of Korean & It’s kind of shocking how good it actually is, [since] it’s the are interested in increasing first thing they’re doing. I’ve dumped enough money into proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wigle that [I figured] it’s time to dump some money into Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. somewhere else, too. Wigle built up a nice community MEET THE ARTIST: LEO HSU of people that are really into spirits, and [Maggie’s] is & THE FREE TO THE expanding a culture of doing fun things with stills. People PEOPLE PROJECT. 2:30 p.m. seem a little dressier here than the standard Pittsburgh Carnegie Library, Downtown. jeans-and-sweatshirt: It’s more highbrow. I would have 412-281-7141. PUBLIC ART 101. Workshop for expected mostly twenty-something Lawrenceville hipsters, artists ready to learn more about and this is a little bit more Squirrel Hill crowd. how to work in the public realm. B Y ANGE L A SU IC O 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, Downtown. 412-391-2060. 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 10 a.m. and Third Sat of every REFRESH PGH WINTER SHOE 412-683-3727. month, 10:30 a.m. Thru Feb. 15 EXPO. 1-7 p.m. Irish Centre, ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-863-8646. Second and Third Sun of every Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SALSA FUEGO DANCE month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, MORNING SPANISH CONGRESS. Dance workshops, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. vendors, more. 9 a.m. St. Nicholas ARGENTINE TANGO Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Greek Orthodox Church, Oakland. CLASSES. 5-6 p.m. and Sun, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 773-919-2019. 5-6 p.m. Thru Feb. 16 Wilkins 412-531-1912. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA School Community Center, MT. LEBANON GENEALOGY CRAZE. Free lessons, followed Swissvale. 412-661-2480. SOCIETY. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. BULLY PROOFING YOUR KIDS. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 12 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran 412-531-1912. 412-708-8844. Church of Perrysville, West View. RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS. SCOTTISH COUNTRY 412-364-6626. First Mon of every month, DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., CHINESE II. First Sun of 6:30-7:30 p.m. and Third Mon social dancing follows. No every month, 2-3 p.m. of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. partner needed. Mon, and Third Sun of every Thru April 21 Carnegie Library, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. month, 2-3 p.m. Thru Oakland. 412-622-3151. Grace Episcopal Church, April 20 Carnegie SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, Mt. Washington. Library, Oakland. 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 17 412-683-5670. www. per a p 412-622-3151. Mount Lebanon Public Library, SMALL BUSINESS pghcitym o .c JAMES A. KELSO Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BASICS WORKSHOP. LECTURE IN HONOR SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Chatham OF MARTIN LUTHER Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing University, Shadyside. KING, JR. Speaker: Iva E. 412-365-1253. follows. No partner needed. Carruthers. 3:30-6 p.m. SWING CITY. Learn & practice Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Eastminster Presbyterian Church, swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, East Liberty. 412-924-1345. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. PFLAG GREENSBURG. 412-759-1569. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE Support, education & advocacy AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, for the LGBTQ community, South Side. 412-431-5282. family & friends. Third Sun of 5TH ANNUAL ANTIQUE every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United & COLLECTIBLE Church of Christ, Greensburg. IDENTIFICATION. Presented BEGINNER ITALIAN. Tue, 412-518-1515. by the Historical Glass Club of 6:45-8:15 p.m. Thru March 25 Pittsburgh. 1:15-4 p.m. Mount Wilkins School Community Lebanon Public Library, Center, Swissvale. 412-478-2681. THE CIVIL WAR ERA: A Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. BOARD GAME NIGHT. For high GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL school students & adults. 7-9 p.m. Discussion w/ Rodger Duffy. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Third Mon of every month, Weekly letter writing event. Sun, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

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CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CRASH COURSE: GET HEALTHY NOW WORKSHOP. Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HEALTH CARE REFORM FOR THE SMALL EMPLOYER: HIGHLIGHTS & RECENT DEVELOPMENTS. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-834-7170 x 30. OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. READER’S THEATER GENERAL MEETING. This group rehearses pieces & then performs for senior living facilities in the South Hills. Third Tue of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 18 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SOIL ECOLOGY. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

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Congregation, Oakland. 412-992-5203. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

ROBOTO CLEAN-UP DAY Whether the Mr. Roboto Project is your regular hangout or you just catch a show there from time to time, you’re welcome to lend a hand in improving the Bloomfield DIY venue. On Sun., Jan. 19, beginning at 1 p.m., folks can help clean, organize and install a new door. Bring mops, brooms and other cleaning supplies, if possible; Roboto will provide the pizza. Call 412-853-0518 or visit www.therobotoproject.org for information.

WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373. WOMEN’S BUSINESS NETWORK – DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH CHAPTER. A networking group whose mission is to provide personal & professional resources to advance the presence of aspiring & successful businesswomen. Call Kathleen Fratangeli for info. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 12-1 p.m. Sonoma Grille, Downtown. 412-803-4502. WORKABLE STAFFING AGENCY FAIR. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Millvale Community Center, Millvale. 412-487-6316 x 3216.

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. BLACK HISTORY UNFOLDED. Seminar hosted by the Israelite Church of God in Jesus Christ. 3-5:45 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-879-0441. CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN DESIGN. Learn techniques for creating floral designs that incorporate the European styles of parallelism, landscape vegetative, multi-plane & hand-tied. Wed, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 29 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. BOBCAT PLAYERS. Auditions 412-441-4442 x 3925. for the 2014 season. Jan. 11, 16, 18. CYRIL H. WECHT. Speaking on Cold readings & 1-min. monologue several high-profile cases he from a play or movie. www. has worked on. Longwood at bobcatplayers.com Beaver Area Oakmont, Verona. 877-214-8410. High School, Beaver. 412-953-0237. DETROIT STYLE URBAN CARNEGIE PERFORMING BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Peter Pan. Jan. 18. Male/female Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. dancers age 5-adult. ENGLISH www.carnegieperforming CONVERSATION (ESL). artscenter.com/ Wed, 10 a.m. Mount auditions.html Lebanon Public Carnegie. 412-279-8887. . Library, Mt. Lebanon. w w w THE HERITAGE paper 412-531-1912. pghcitym PLAYERS. Auditions for .co GETTING READY FOR Noel Coward’s comedy, PRIME TIME: BUILDING “Hay Fever.” Jan 19 & 20. STRATEGIC FOUNDATION Seeking actors ages 19-50. IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS. Cold readings from the script. Presented by the Institute for www.bphp.org Seton Center, Entrepreneurial Excellence. 8 a.m.Brookline. 412-254-4633. 5 p.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. 412-648-1544. Auditions for Amish Burlesque. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Feb. 1 & 3. 2-min. comedic conversational English. Wed, monologue & 32 bars of up-tempo 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Broadway/pop song. Bring Oakland. 412-622-3151. your own sheet music. www. LOST TOWN. Documentary mckeesportlittletheater.com screening about the only Thru McKeesport. 412-673-1100. all-Jewish town to ever exist PRIME STAGE THEATRE. outside of Palestine. Conversation Auditions for The Importance of w/ author Avrom Bendavid-Val Being Earnest. Jan. 25-26. Males/ to follow. 7 p.m. Rodef Shalom

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females age 20-65. www.prime stage.com/about/auditions.html The Oakland School, Oakland. SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL. Seeking women of all ages who enjoy singing for the Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus Global Open House. Any woman of average singing ability, with or without vocal training is welcome. www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, 7 p.m. 412-279-6062.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical in the everyday for Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. Visit blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Seeking a variety of visual & performing artists of all disciplines. www.3riversartsfest.org/ artistapps/. 412-456-6666. FUTURE TENANT. Seeking performers, writers, musicians, composers, choreographers & general artistic visionaries for Trespass residency & performance series. Submit a proposal at futuretenant.org/ current-opportunities/ Open submissions through Jan. 31. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking artwork for upcoming Mid-Winter Hues Multi-Media Juried Art Exhibit. Submit recent work (3 pieces max.) that has not been in a previous juried show at NHAC. Each piece must be ready for display/hanging w/ wire. Art may be delivered Jan. 30-Feb. 1, noon-4 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My friend is married, and she has two little kids. Her husband had a rough childhood and has some issues. Since their most recent child was conceived, they have not had sex. He says there is a difference between a lover and a mother, and he refuses to have sex with his wife now because he thinks of her as a mother and not as a lover. She is struggling with this and doesn’t know what to do. Any advice? MISERABLE UNDERSEXED MOM

My advice? Don’t make babies with crazy people. But if your friend doesn’t have access to a time machine — or if she does but she’s attached to her children — she should inform her husband that she didn’t sign up for a sexless marriage. So he’ll need to get his ass to a therapist and get over this new hang-up. (Why didn’t he have this problem after the birth of his first child?) If counseling doesn’t do the trick, your friend should tell her husband that the mother of his children intends to find a guy who will fuck her, a divorce attorney or a divorce attorney who will fuck her. One of my wife’s nephews recently came out as gay, which is no problem for us, but it created friction in his immediate family. We were at a big extended-family dinner together, and I made a point of smiling warmly in his direction to let him know that my wife and I were allies. He responded with the Hot Steamy EyeFuck. And not just once: Every time I looked at that end of the table, I got the HSEF. Maybe he was bored or trying to cause trouble. Is there a look that says, “I’m not interested,” or better yet, “Knock it the fuck off”? We want to be supportive without encouraging bad behavior.

By sending him to see a pro-domme. You dominate him by ordering him to submit to her, she cracks the literal whip and then orders him to show his gratitude to you — and his submission to you both — by going home and vanilla’ing the shit out of you afterward. I am a woman and just started dating a great guy. My problem is that I am concerned he might be gay. I tend to be more conservative, and although I have slept over, I banned anything below the belt. He “petted” me over the underwear, and I did the same to him. I also went under his underwear and rubbed my hand around his penis without actually touching it. When I have done this to other guys, they tended to go crazy — writhing, panting and begging. But this elicited no reaction from him, though he was already hard. Am I reading too much into this? GUESSING ABOUT YEARNINGS

How do you stick your hand in a guy’s underpants — how do you go under a guy’s underwear — without actually touching his cock? Anyway, your new boyfriend did have a physical reaction when you were fooling around: His dick got hard. He didn’t have the same over-the-top reaction to your bizarre moves that other guys had, but getting an erection when a girl sticks her hand in your underpants is a pretty good indication a guy isn’t gay. It’s also possible that he wanted to pant, writhe and beg, but he restrained himself because you had banned “anything below the belt” and your great new boyfriend didn’t want you to feel pressured to go further than you were comfortable with.

MY ADVICE? DON’T MAKE BABIES WITH CRAZY PEOPLE.

UNNERVING NEPHEW CROSSES LINE

The next time you want to tell a horny 19-yearold gay relative that you’re an ally, use your words, e.g., “If you need someone in your corner, you can count on us.” A warm smile is likely to be misinterpreted as an invitation to fuck your (closeted-and-dying-for-cock) uncle or fuck with your (well-meaning-but-patronizing) uncle. The best way to communicate “knock it off” is by using words, not your eyes. I’m a straight woman, married to an awesome guy. Our sex life wasn’t always super. At first, he didn’t want much sex and had a lot of inhibitions. But I’ve worked hard at bringing him out of his shell, and the last few years have been great. The problem is he told me he’s interested in being dominated. By me. I am so uncomfortable with this idea. He has always been somewhat passive in bed. I assumed that it’s because he was shy and embarrassed about sex, but maybe it’s more than that. The problem with his passivity is that it totally kills my mood. I don’t want to crack a whip (metaphorically or literally) and tell him what to do. How can I give him what he wants? DAME NOT DOMME

NOW HIRING FOR

My wonderful boyfriend and I are both GGG, and we have had a few threesomes involving women, a fantasy both of us shared. My biggest fantasy, however, is to be with two men. But he just doesn’t find men attractive and isn’t into it. Now a former fling of mine (male) told me that he finds my BF attractive and would love to be with both of us. This would be a wet dream come true! I feel like my BF is nervous about being with another man because (a) he has performance anxiety and/or (b) he’s not comfortable exploring his sexuality. If he could get past his insecurities, I feel like he might enjoy himself. Should I just give up this dream?

Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson.

WISHES HE WERE A LITTLE BI

Your boyfriend isn’t bi, he’s not even heteroflexible, and he’s made it clear that he’s turned off by the idea of a threesome with another male. Even if you could talk him into it, arranging a threesome with a dude who has expressed a sexual interest in your boyfriend would be disrespectful and potentially disastrous. Drop it.

If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com

Dan speaks with New York Times columnist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz on the true demographics of gays in the US: savagelovecast.com.

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.15-01.22

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Metaphorically speaking, you have recently come into possession of some new seeds. They are robust. They are hardy. They have the potential to grow into big, strong blooms. So when should you plant them, metaphorically speaking? I’m going to suggest that you wait a while longer. It wouldn’t be bad for them if you sowed them right now, but I think their long-term vitality will be even greater if you postpone the planting for at least a week. Two weeks might be better. Trust your intuition.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Flemish artist Jan van Eyck (1385-1441) was renowned for his innovative mastery of oil painting. He signed many of his works not just with his name but also with his motto: Als ick kan. Its idiomatic translation is “The best I can do.” What he meant was that he had pushed his talent and craft to the limit, and then stopped and relaxed, content that he had given all he could. I invite you to have a similar attitude as you wrap up the projects you’re currently involved in, Aquarius. Summon all your passion and intelligence as you create the most excellent outcome possible, but also know when to quit. Don’t try too hard; just try hard.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s an excellent time to rise up and revolt against conventional wisdom. I urge you to immunize yourself against trendy groupthink as you outwit and outmaneuver the status quo. Have fun and activate your playful spirit to the max as you create workarounds to the way things have always been done. At the same time, Pisces, stay acutely attuned to your compassion and common sense. Don’t be a quarrelsome intransigent. Don’t be rebellious just to please your ego. If you follow these guidelines, you will be able to pull off a graceful insurrection that both soothes and stimulates your soul.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Whose enemy are you? Are you anyone’s adversary or obstructionist or least favorite person? Answer honestly, please. Don’t be in denial. Next question: Do you derive anything useful from playing this oppositional role? If your answer is yes, that’s fine. I won’t try to talk you out of it. Continue to reap the benefits of being someone’s obstacle. But if, on the other hand, you get little value out of this negative relationship, now would be a good time to change it. You have more power than usual to free yourself from being an antagonist.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You Tauruses are customarily more grounded than the rest of us. But this week, I’m wondering if you will be tempted to escape the laws of gravity and rebel against the call of duty. I suspect that your dreams, at least, will feature uninhibited forays into the wild blue yonder. While you’re sleeping, you may float weightlessly in an interplanetary spaceship, become an eagle and soar over forests, wear a futuristic jet pack on your back and zip through the sky, sail across the Serengeti Plains in a hot-air balloon or have a picnic on a cloud with a feast of cotton candy and sponge cake and mint tea. Would you consider bringing this kind of fun into your waking life?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What part of your life is too small, and you want

to make it bigger? Is there a situation that’s overly intense and dramatic, and you wish you could feel more light-hearted about it, less oppressed? Are you on a quest that has become claustrophobic, and you’d love to find a way to make it more spacious and relaxed? If you answered yes to any of those questions, Gemini, there’s good news. Very soon now, you will have a close encounter with the magic you need to open what has been closed and expand what has been narrow. Be alert for it. Be crafty as you gather it in and harness it for your use.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In her poem “Catch a Body,” Ilse Bendorf says she dislikes the advice “Don’t ever tell anybody anything.” On the other hand, “Tell everyone everything” isn’t the right approach, either, she says. Judging from your astrological omens, Cancerian, I surmise that you’re wavering between those two extremes. You’re tempted to think you’ve got to do one or the other. Should you cultivate the power that comes from being silent, and keep people guessing about your true feelings? Or should you seek greater intimacy but risk giving away your power by confessing all your inner thoughts? I suggest you take a middle path. Tell the vivid truth, but carefully and incrementally.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

the people who never get to know what it is that they can really be.” If that description applies to you even a little, Libra — if you’re still not completely sure what you’re good at it and what you want to do — the coming months will be prime time to fix that problem. Start now! How? Open your mind to the possibility that you don’t know yourself as well as you someday will. Take vocational tests. Ask smart people you trust to tell you what they think about your special aptitudes and unique qualities. And one more thing: Be wildly honest with yourself about what excites you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his book Schottenfreude: German Words for the Human Condition, Ben Schott dreams up new compound German words for use in English. Here’s one that would serve you well in the coming week: Fingerspitzentanz, meaning “fingertips-dance.” Schott says it refers to “tiny triumphs of nimblefingered dexterity.” His examples: fastening a bracelet, tightening a miniscule screw, unknotting, removing a recalcitrant sticker in one unbroken

peel, rolling a joint, identifying an object by touch alone, slipping something off a high shelf. Both literally and metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you now have an abundance of this capacity. Everything about you is more agile and deft and limber than usual. You’ll be a master of Fingerspitzentanz.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The four elements that compose cocaine are the same as those that make up TNT, caffeine and nylon: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. The combinations and proportions of elements are different in each substance, of course. But the point, for our purposes, is that the same raw materials lead to different results. I foresee a similar drama unfolding in your own life, Sagittarius. How you assemble the ingredients you currently have at your disposal could produce either a rough and ragged high, a volatile risk, a pleasant stimulation or a useful resource. Which will it be? When they say “Be yourself,” which self do they mean? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

get your yoga on!

If a substance has been burned, it can’t be burned again. There’s no flammable stuff left to feed a fire. That’s simple physics. Now as for the question of whether a person can be burned more than once — we’re speaking metaphorically here — the answer is, unfortunately, yes. Some folks don’t learn from their mistakes and don’t have enough emotional intelligence to avoid the bullies and manipulators who burn them again in the future. But I’m confident that you aren’t one of these types, Leo, or that at least you won’t be in the coming days. You may have been burned before, but you won’t be burned this time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “People who don’t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year,” said author Peter Drucker. “People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.” In general I agree with that assessment. But I think it needs to be altered for your situation in the coming months. Here’s the adjusted version of the formula: Virgos who don’t take risks in 2014 will make an average of 3.1 big mistakes. Virgos who do take risks in 2014 will make, at most, a half a big mistake.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “You know what the greatest tragedy is in the whole world?” asks novelist Terry Pratchett. “It’s all the people who never find out what it is they really want to do or what it is they’re really good at. It’s all

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The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

East End Floral Shoppe is looking for a FULL or PART time floral designer. Must be proficient in all phases of floral design. Send responses and/or resumes to richardirwin6071 @gmail.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014


Ink Well

STUDIES

BLUNT ENDS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

DIABETES?

OBESITY?

CONSTIPATION?

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

SmokING STUDY

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

See what our clients are saying

University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided.

In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with response design of our ads and the I have to they evoke. When I know jects in advertise for research sub ediately the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

ACROSS 1. Gives a red card, e.g. 7. Did 69 in a parking lot, say 11. Owner’s command 14. Melanite or andradite 15. Long, wet, and snakelike 16. “I am so over this ...” 17. Loose-fitting gown with a floral print, perhaps 19. Marriage announcement page word 20. Toy made out of clay, in a song 21. Initials in meaningless sex 22. Separate 26. Business card detail 28. Twelve-step program for friends and relatives 29. Bad kind of butterflies 31. Salaryman, pejoratively 32. Certain petroleum product 34. Church’s offering 39. ‘80s skate flick adjective 40. Station 42. She who shall remain nameless 45. Chinese liquor made from sorghum 47. The ___ Report

48. HVAC system device 50. Hgt. and wgt. calculation 51. Check on trade 54. Indoor gridiron org. 55. With inches to spare? 60. ___-Lo Green 61. Court order 62. “Twilight” guy 63. She who shall remain nameless 64. Some male dolls 65. Sleeping sickness bug

DOWN 1. Monthly release 2. Shake 3. Detergent featuring 3x stainfighting power 4. Sanjay Gupta’s channel 5. Care for 6. “Sophie’s Choice” novelist William 7. Script line 8. Went 9. Metallica’s “Nothing ___ Matters” 10. Like a poor judge of character? 11. Fudgetopped treat 12. “OK, yeah, that’s funny” 13. 1986 David Cronenberg adaptation 18. ___ Jam (label

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— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

412-624-9999 with which Justin Bieber is feuding) 22. Palindromic airline to Stockholm 23. Hype 24. Villain’s quarters 25. One or two 27. Wimp 29. Afflicted with dry skin 30. “___ will NOT be quiet” 32. Circular course 33. Season-ending knee tear site, often 35. “Party Hard” rocker 36. ___ Paulo 37. Caesar’s “And you?” 38. Linguist/leftist Chomsky 41. “Great

M A I N F E AT U R E

Expectations” narrator 42. Composer of “The WellTempered Clavier” 43. Withdrawal toll 44. Art hanger, at times 45. Fridge decoration 46. In disagreement 48. Suspends 49. Afore 52. Piddling 53. Russian street snack 56. Be outstanding? 57. Thai temple 58. Triage areas, briefly 59. President who died two months after RMN was inaugurated

Cervical Cancer Prevention There’s a vaccine for that!

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

HPV vaccine has the power to protect females from a devastating form of cancer. HPV vaccination is recommended for girls at age 11-12 years and can be given up to age 26. Learn more at ImmunizeAllegheny.org +

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on February 4, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: TAYLOR ALLDERDICE HIGH SCHOOL • Building Identification Sign General and Electrical Primes • New Science Laboratories General, Asbestos, Plumbing, HVAC and Electrical Primes PITTSBURGH ARSENAL PRE K-8 • Replacement of Boiler Feed Unit Mechanical Prime Contract PITTSBURGH BEECHWOOD PRE K-5 • Coal Hole Elec. Re-bid Electrical Prime PITTSBURGH LINDEN K-5 • New Elevator and Stair Tower Additions General, Asbestos, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes PITTSBURGH MIFFLIN PRE K-8 • Replacement of Boiler Feed Unit Mechanical Prime Contract BARACK OBAMA • Building Identification Sign General and Electrical Primes PITTSBURGH WHITTIER K-5 • Elevator Addition General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 6, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

SERVICES AUTO SERVICES

REHEARSAL

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

ANNOUNCEMENTS Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Create-S-Team Academy of Music and Theater Creatively Promoting Self-Esteem through Music and Theater

AUDITIONS Seeking male and female vocalists to perform in A musical tribute to Ms. Aretha Franklin Auditions held on 1/23/14 at 6:30p.m.

Call 412.506.7510 for more information

NOTICES

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BO ARD PUBLIC NOTICE Pre-Hearing Conference: CPRB Case #13-212 Tuesday, 01/28/14 @ 5:30 p.m. City County Bldg 414 Grant Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Regular Board Meeting: immediately following @ 6p.m. Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

CPRB PITTSBURGH

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) WE BUY HOUSES CASH Any area, any condition, or price range. Visit our website! www.sellmyspace.us

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ADOPTION Global Executives, Hiking, Skiing, Playful Pets, Theatre and Music Lovingly awaits 1st Baby

Expenses Paid 1-800-933-1975

A DO P T :

A secure life of love awaits your baby through the gift of adoption. Expenses Paid. Please call Daria at

888-788-5624

412-316-3342


WELLNESS MIND & BODY

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716

Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

Therapeutic Massage

FULL BODY MASSAGE

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

$40/hr

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

412-441-1185

724-519-2950

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

Zhangs Massage

with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Shadyside Location

STAR

$10 Coupon

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-401-4110

Aming’s Massage Therapy

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave.

Downtown M-F prkg free after 4pm Sat-Sun prkg free all day

massage Therapy

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Xie LiHong’s

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

WELLNESS CENTER

J&S

Chinese Bodyworks

GLASS

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Water Pipes And Glass W lass las For All Your Smoking Needs

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

China Massage $60/hr FREE Table Shower

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

724-519-7896

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

Squirrel Hill Office NOW OPEN! 1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Please Call: 412-359-9257

Low Self Pay Rate

New Leaf Recovery Services newleafrecoveryservices@gmail.com NEWS

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Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh Start Today! Lose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

JADE SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE Call Erin at:

412-434-4798

Let Us Help You Today!

Health Services

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 62

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Recovery Without Judgement™

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

info@freedomtreatment.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.15/01.22.2014

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz


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Play your cards right. ASK UT THE O B A

Y7 LUCK DED AD ! BONUS

MONDAYS | 6PM

$25 BUY-IN

BLACKJACK TOURNAMENT

• Total Buy-in monies awarded • Receive $25,000 in buy-in chips • $1,000 prize pool GUARANTEED

Are you the next Hot Shooter?

HOT SHOOTERS BOUNTY! Win $1,000 or more every time it hits.

THURSDAYS IN JANUARY|6PM TOTAL BUY-IN MONIES AWARDED 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB FOR COMPLETE PROMOTIONAL DETAILS.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

January 15, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 3

January 15, 2014  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 24 Issue 3