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FRESH APPROACH: LOCAL FOOD BANKS TRY TO MOVE FROM CANNED TO FRESH FOOD 06


EVENTS Damien Jurado, with special guest, Courtney Marie Andrews

1.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.28 – 8pm Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

The Warhol welcomes back Seattle-based songwriter, Damien Jurado, on a tour supporting his January release of Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son on Sec retly Canadian Records. The new record, produced by Richard Swift, marks his 13th release.

1.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, THE NOX BOYS Warhol entrance space Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Julianna Barwick 2.8 – 8pm Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

2.7 – 6pm ART.WRITE.NOW.TOUR OPENING RECEPTION Warhol entrance space Tickets FREE FREE parking in The Warhol lot

Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival. The Warhol partners with the VIA Music & New Media Festival to present the Brooklyn-based recording artist, Julianna Barwick, in The Warhol’s theater. Barwick’s lush compositions and unique ambient aesthetic are built around multiple loops and layers of her ethereal voice. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014


{EDITORIAL}

01.08/01.15.2014 {COVER PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

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[NEWS] you’re the second or third 06 “Ifgeneration of a family who lives in a neighborhood without a grocery store, you might not know what to do with fresh kale.� — Josh Murphy of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank on the challenges of bringing fresh produce to food pantries

[VIEWS] ought to remember our past, 12 “We but never at the expense of

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“A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE REALLY HUNGRY FOR FRESH FOOD.”

INCOMING Open the Wabash Tunnel to cyclists (Jan. 2) “Opening the tunnel to cyclists would create the longest bike lane in a tunnel in the United States, if not the world. It would be a magnet for cyclists and a real sign of Pittsburgh’s forward progress on multi-modal transportation.” –– Web Comment from “Jon A. Webb” “I don’t even live in the South Hills, but I’d love to be a part of this effort. In fact, everyone, motorists included should be. Tunnels are the major bottlenecks in this city and are extremely pricey to build. A new one isn’t in Pittsburgh’s future for the foreseeable future. Anything that brings more people from A to B using what we have is a big deal.” –– Web Comment from “Ben” “If cyclists can manage riding through abandoned Turnpike tunnels and the Paw Paw tunnel, we can surely manage riding an empty, modern, lighted tunnel for which there is no reasonable travel alternative.” –– Web Comment from “Stuart Strickland”

Bring Open311 to Pittsburgh (Jan. 2) “The current 311 [was] created many years ago under the Murphy Administration [and] called the Mayor’s Service Center. While there have no doubt been system migrations and upgrades, the system is still in essence the same as it was in 1999. … The problem is at the core. 311 needs to embrace a new system. It is as simple as that. If they want it to succeed, it will. They just need to embrace change.” –– Web Comment from “The Truth Hurts”

State Supreme Court ruling lights up gas-drilling backers (Jan. 2) “I am glad to see that someone is doing the job they were elected to do and not just working for those who give the biggest campaign donations!” — Web Comment from “John W. Parana” “There was a sense that ‘we the people’ had no say in the matter of where fracking could take place in communities across the state of PA. The ruling by the Supreme Court is the ‘Game Changer’ we are talking about. The game the industry and some of our legislators have been playing is unfair, destructive and we’ve been bullied enough.” — Web comment from “Briget Shields”

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sam Pozutto of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank shuttles boxes of cabbage across the Duquesne warehouse.

PRODUCINGCHANGE A

FEW WEEKS ago, Jeralyn Beach

got an email asking whether she could take 40,000 pounds of stage-two bananas. She knew it would stretch her staff: They had to be picked up in Philadelphia within 24 hours, weighed, cataloged and coordinated with local pantries that could get them into their clie nts ’ s toma chs b efor e r eac h in g stage seven, the last gasp of the fruit’s mushy demise. By the time the bananas arrived in Pittsburgh a day later, they were at stage four. Beach, the produce coordinator for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, knew she’d have to be creative to avoid wasting the food bank’s already stretched budget — or worse, “dumping”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

fresh produce because she couldn’t get it out the door in time. She coordinated the food bank’s workers, who effortlessly glide around their massive Duquesne warehouse on

Food banks face challenges as they move from canned to fresh food {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} electric forklifts, to stack the bananas to maximize the amount of airflow between boxes and slow the ripening process — which had to be done by

hand, one box at a time. “We didn’t end up dumping” the bananas, Beach says, with a casual inflection that suggests these logistical challenges don’t rattle her. That’s a good thing, because her produce-procurement job is only going to get more complicated. The food bank is part of a national trend away from the shelf-stable items that typically line pantry aisles in favor of fresh fruits and vegetables. The food bank has set an ambitious goal: within three to five years, 50 percent of what it distributes will be produce — almost double the six million pounds of produce the organization moved last year. But distributing more produce


doesn’t simply mean replacing cans of beans and boxes of rice with pallets of celery, apples and potatoes. The food bank will have to reorient its supply chain around an unforgiving product. It ripens too quickly in certain humidities, and not quickly enough in others. It creates costs for local pantries that must either invest in refrigeration or be in frequent phone contact with the food bank to determine what produce is on hand — and with local farmers who may have overproduced a crop that needs to be picked up right away. And even if you’ve managed to build the most efficient supply chain possible, there’s no guarantee that food-pantry clients will want more produce, or even have the tools to cook it. “We had doubts about whether there was a lot of client demand for fresh produce; we had doubts about whether we could deliver it properly,” says Josh Murphy, director of distribution programs at the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. And it’s not just about delivery: “If you’re the second or third generation of a family who lives in a neighborhood without a grocery store, you might not know what to do with fresh kale.” Still, food-bank administrators know they can feed more people with fruits and vegetables; non-perishable items have become as much as three times as expensive as produce. And they also know there’s a significant publichealth upside to getting this right: more fresh food on the tables of low-income families, who are often at the whim of a food industry that pushes low-cost fat, salt and sugar. “People may think of us as boxed meals … not always the healthiest products: snacks, cookies, crackers, candy, soda pop,” says food-bank CEO Lisa Scales. “There has been significant change [toward produce] in the past three years.”

miracle … that you could have corn 12 months in the year,” Fraser says. On top of the canning boom, manufacturing practices weren’t particularly precise, which was good news for food banks. Big food companies “just guessed what [they] needed,” Fraser says, and what they couldn’t put on the shelves or fit in a warehouse, “a manufacturer would usually just say, ‘Let’s just donate that to a food pantry.’” By the early 2000s, food manufacturers weren’t guessing anymore. “You have integrated your supply chain, and have a vast computer network ensuring you are getting your supplies just as you need them, so you aren’t blowing needless money on refrigeration/storage,” writes the food bank’s Murphy. Simultaneously, Americans gravitated toward fresher foods, and production of canned goods across the board plummeted to about 10 billion units per year, Fraser says. “It really felt like the bottom dropped out,” Scales says. “We have significantly less donated product from when I started in 1996. … It’s caused us to buy a lot more food.” Scales’ colleagues say she’s made the shift to produce the food bank’s top priority. To pull it off, she has brought in people like Don Ziegler, a consultant with GENCO, a company that helps businesses operate more efficiently. “It’s really just applying the rules we use in a commercial venue to a nonprofit,” Ziegler says. “We’re looking to change the whole inventory system. Produce really hasn’t been a mainstay of that.” One of the changes he’s hoping will take hold early this year is a webbased system that will let the food bank manage its produce inventory in real time. That will improve the current model, where food-bank staffers must constantly check to see what is in stock and update a website accessible to member agencies. Beach, the produce coordinator, says the new system should create a more equitable distribution of produce, since the food bank will be able to track what produce is going to a given agency. But even with a new inventory system, there are significant infrastructural hurdles. “Our building wasn’t built to handle

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produce,” Beach says. She has limited cooler space and can’t always store fruits and vegetables at the optimal temperature. “And that’s just on our end.” Many of the pantries operate in church basements or other buildings that “may or may not have any cooler space,” Beach says. PERFECTING THE supply chain is only half the battle. The food bank is also working to “market” produce to food pantries and offer education to families who might not otherwise use produce regularly. Judy Dodd, a registered dietitian and professor in Pitt’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, explains that low-income families know they should be eating better, but often don’t have the tools or the access. “The people I work with know what they should be eating,” says Dodd, who has consulted for Giant Eagle, the food bank and the WIC program. She adds that risks for health problems from heart disease to stroke are lessened by more healthful diets. “But I think about a mom with two kids … How much time is [she] going to take? She needs the recipes, she needs the ideas, she needs the equipment. … It [isn’t] enough just to put [produce] on their plate.” Jesse Sharrard, the food bank’s food-safety and nutrition manager, understands this challenge — especially

when the food bank gets something “weirder.” Like the time it got 2,000 pounds of chestnuts and he had to come up with visual step-by-step cooking instructions. Sharrard is also banking on initiatives like “Kids Cook,” an interactive after-school and summer program, to get younger family members thinking about produce. “When it comes down to it, we have an easier time getting kids to participate in a long-format class like that — parents typically are busy,” Sharrard says. The idea is that by influencing kids’ eating habits, not only will they have the ability to cook healthier food for themselves, they can influence the diets of their parents and relatives. There are some signs that people are responding well to the food bank’s emphasis on produce. The food bank’s mobile produce pantry, “Produce to People,” which operates in 16 locations each month, distributed food to 9,450 households in November — the highest monthly posting in its roughly eight-year history. And while the shift to produce will likely have a public-health upside, food-bank staffers are careful not to be too sanguine. “There are always educational gaps to look at,” Murphy says. But, he adds, “A lot of people are really hungry for fresh food — they’re excited to have access to it.” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Group takes a stand against verbal harassment {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} A WOMAN IS at the gym running on a treadmill when she notices a man staring at her. “I just love watching you run,” he says. Another woman is crossing the street when two men walking in her direction part to flank her on both sides. “Hey baby,” one whispers into her ear. These are just two local stories of street harassment — a form of sexual harassment that occurs every day between strangers in public spaces — posted among thousands on ihollaback. org, a website where victims of street harassment can share their experiences from around the world. Hollaback has launched in 22 countries and 64 cities around the world, seeking to empower victims by giving them an outlet for talking about street harassment. The organization started a Pittsburgh chapter in December. Founded by four local women, the local chapter is focused on increasing awareness about street harassment and why it is disrespectful. “The goal is not to end communication between strangers, but to have it defined by respect,” says Allison Winters, one of the founders of the Pittsburgh chapter. Street harassment can range from sexual comments and stares to groping or flashing. And while acts such as groping or flashing are widely denounced as unacceptable, attitudes toward catcalling are more ambiguous. “I was always told to ignore it,” says cofounder Heather Dougherty. One of Hollaback’s goals is to educate the public on how any kind of street harassment — even remarks that may be intended as compliments — can have negative consequences on victims, potentially including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. “Everyone deserves to feel safe,” says Maggie Graham, another cofounder of the local Hollaback site. “Physical violence leaves a longer, visible mark. But I’ve still felt threatened.” However, there are few legal tools victims can use to combat street harassment. Whatever the potential negative impact of verbal catcalls, the speech is protected. “One person talking to another person — even if it’s unpleasant — would likely

be protected under the First Amendment,” says Vic Walczak, legal director of the Pennsylvania American Civil Liberties Union. “So, ‘Hey, sexy,’ or ‘I wanna sleep with you’ — one-time catcalls like that are protected.” But that doesn’t mean those who experience street harassment can’t fight back. As part of the testimonial process, Hollaback encourages victims to take pictures or videos of their harassers and post them on Hollaback’s website. That, too, is protected free speech. “This antidote is also constitutional,” Walczak says. “The catcaller cannot cry foul when a video is posted on YouTube of them acting poorly. There is a First Amendment right to record people in public.” In addition to increasing awareness about street harassment, posting pictures or videos of harassers can also serve to shame people into changing their behavior. “If someone does something inappropriate, then yeah, I’m going to take a picture because people don’t believe this exists,” says Akira Robinson, the fourth founder of Hollaback Pittsburgh. That rationale, in fact, is what inspired the creation of the site in the first place. In 2005, a woman in New York City took a picture of a man masturbating on the subway. When she showed the picture to police, they said they couldn’t arrest the man, but the picture went viral after being posted online and ended up on the cover of the New York Daily News. “Our whole organization was sparked by someone taking a picture,” Graham says. “The police said they couldn’t do anything, but the man was publicly shamed.” So far, no one has uploaded a picture or video to the Pittsburgh site. But the local website has received more than a dozen testimonials from people who have witnessed street harassment. And for Hollaback Pittsburgh’s founders, being able to share their stories makes all the difference. “If you’re treated [as] less than human, you feel less than human,” says Dougherty, reflecting on her own emotions after being harassed in the past. “I felt rage followed by shame. But [because of] Hollaback, I feel validated, empowered and strengthened.”

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the momentum is behind newly installed Mayor Bill Peduto, you didn’t need to just witness the crowds at his Jan. 6 Heinz Hall swearing-in ceremony. Nor could you get the full picture from that evening’s celebration at the Heinz History Center, which featured gospel singers on one floor, yinzer-rock on another and alt-bluegrass performances on a third. If you really wanted to see how broad Peduto’s base of support has become, you also needed to look at who helped pay for the party. There on the inaugural program’s list of big-dollar sponsors was the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local #5 … which during the May primary spent five-digit sums backing Peduto’s chief rival, Jack Wagner. Other sponsors included PNC Bank, which has received tax subsidies Peduto denounced during his campaign, and the Pittsburgh Steelers, who also seek subsidies to add seating in Heinz Field — a giveaway Peduto also opposes. In politics, the surest sign of victory is when even your foes anxiously claim your friendship. Ordinarily, in fact, this would be the point where I warn that history is filled with reformers who sought to change the system … but were changed by it instead. But there’s reason to think that history may not repeat itself. It’s not just because Peduto aired campaign ads that specifically rejected future subsidies for sports teams, or because he’s opened up his transitionteam process to just about anyone who expressed an interest. The best reason to hope he’ll rise to the moment, I think, is that he seems to know how easily he could blow it. “My election doesn’t complete the task of setting things right,” he told the audience at Heinz Hall. “It only offers us the chance to begin.” As he takes office, in fact, one of his strengths has been how aware he seems of his own potential weakness. Long derided as an effete East Ender, Peduto has spent much of his postelection victory lap shining the spotlight on the long-suffering neighborhood of

Homewood. His Election Night victory party was held at its Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum; his inaugural was capped off by spoken-word performer Vanessa German, a Homewood resident who nearly brought down the house with a performance that trumpeted Pittsburgh as a “city of citizen champions,” who could “be inspiring right where we are.” I’ll admit that while sitting near the back of Heinz Hall, I found myself wondering whether Pittsburgh has been equal to German’s soaring vision of it. If the “power of Pittsburgh” was that we always have each other’s back, as she claimed, how have we tolerated the hardship going on in our own backyards? How have we for so long permitted the pockets of despair that is the subject of so much of German’s other work? But Peduto has a chance to make good on Pittsburgh’s newfound optimism, and not just in those burgeoning neighborhoods that already have much to be optimistic about. It’s a hopeful sign that when Peduto invited religious leaders to offer invocations on the Heinz Hall stage, he chose leaders who urged that he not be blinded by a glittery vision of Pittsburgh as “the next Portland.” As East Liberty Presbyterian Church Senior Pastor Randy Bush put it, Pittsburgh “can only succeed if everyone has a foundation on which to build a life” within it. Over the past few months, Peduto has perfectly straddled the old Pittsburgh and the new, celebrating the best of its old-school culture while pledging to reform its old-school politics. After not one but two renditions of “It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” on the Heinz Hall stage, he told the audience, “We ought to remember our past, but never at the expense of forgetting our future.” We’re about to find out whether he can lead us from old city to new, whether long-entrenched interests like the Steelers or more conservative unions will co-opt this opportunity, or help to expand it. We can say this much for Peduto’s legacy already: On his first day, he threw a great party, the kind where you could find someone to talk to no matter who you were. Not a bad start.

ONE OF PEDUTO’S STRENGTHS HAS BEEN HOW AWARE HE SEEMS OF HIS OWN POTENTIAL WEAKNESS.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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A WEEK OF SOUP {BY AL HOFF} You can keep your broths, consommés and variously watery soups. I prefer a soup that is thick and rich — a meal in a bowl that fills the belly in a satisfying manner. If you can eat it with a fork, or stand a spoon in it, that’s perfect. The rotating board of hearty soups offered at the Apollo Café, Downtown, more than fits the bill. This family-run breakfast-and-lunch spot is tucked away slightly above sidewalk level on Forbes Avenue, but it’s worth stepping up to try its Mediterranean fare. And a cheap place to start is with some soup — a cup is $2.95 ($3.95 for a bowl). There are several choices daily, plus vegetarian chili each day. Here’s a week’s worth of options: Monday: chicken barley. Barley is an underutilized grain that cooked in soup resembles pasta, but is more nutritious. Tuesday: lentil. Another substantial soup you can feel good about. Harness the power of legumes. Wednesday: bean vegetable. Carrots, mushrooms, green beans, onions, celery, fresh herbs and white beans, in a tomato base. (Tomato-lovers, don’t miss the peppery, pasta-studded tomato-basil soup.) Thursday: lemon chicken and rice. Bright from lemon, rich and yellow with egg, the shredded chicken and rice are porridge-like, but great taste, not looks, matter here. Friday: chicken noodle. You can stand the proverbial spoon in it! Thick noodles, chicken, celery, carrots, onions, herbs — it’s like a homey casserole in liquid form. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

429 Forbes Ave., Downtown. 412-4713033 or www.apollocafepittsburgh.com

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The first Brew ’N Chew w kicks off Sat., k Jan. J 11, at the Monroeville Convention Center. Sample C beers (33 domestic breweries, plus imports) and food from more than two dozen mostly local purveyors. Also: bands and bar games (darts, pool). Two sessions: 1-4 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. See the t GoodTaste! Pittsburgh website for details and tickets. w www.goodtastepittsburgh.com w

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CARNE ASADA FRIES ARE LOADED NACHOS WITH FRIES SWAPPED FOR THE CHIPS

NORTH OF

THE BORDER {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

C

HANGES ARE AFOOT on the Central North Side. Some are big, like the transformation of the Garden Theater into someplace welcoming to all. Others seem smaller, like the disappearance of two-thirds of an idiosyncratic trio of hot-dog joints that for decades were located side by side by side on Federal Street. We were sad to see them go, but now welcome the broadening of handheld meal options: The last survivor is now flanked by a Jamaican takeout place, while another has been replaced by El Burro Comedor, a taco and burrito shop in the tradition of sunny Southern California. Actually, to call it a “taco and burrito shop” is a bit reductive. El Burro has crammed a lot of atmosphere into a tiny space, and a lot of Cal-Mex flavor into a deceptively brief menu. Owners Derek Burnell and Wes De Renouard, both San Diego natives, worked with a Bloomfield artist to create a classic, colorful hand-lettered menu board and a big Dia de los Muertos skull painting. Along with sunny walls and lacquered-wood counter seating, these

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

Tijuana street dog

create a casual, but far from careless, vibe. Meanwhile, tacos in three forms (hard, soft and taquito, or rolled), plus burritos, multiplied by several different fillings, equaled a tantalizing array of choices. A third menu heading, “Other,” added such assimilated Mexican snacks as nachos and quesadillas, plus Cal-Mex specialties carne

EL BURRO COMEDOR 1108 Federal St., North Side. 412-904-3451 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m. -9 p.m. PRICES: $3-8.50 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED asada fries, Tijuana dogs and chilaquiles. In short, El Burro is not so much an expanded taqueria as a stripped-down restaurant, offering as much fork-and-knife fare as quick, handheld meals. But if you go for quick, handheld meals, you’ll probably be happy. These do not include taquitos: These crisp-fried tubes are

served beneath avocado salsa, pico de gallo and cheese, for a plate that is delicious, but not very portable. Soft tacos are available in corn or flour tortillas, the former served authentically doubled up, with the outer tortilla lightly crisped on the griddle. The meat fillings included the classics: shredded beef and chicken, chorizo, carnitas (roasted pork), and carne asada (chopped steak), plus potatoes, mahi mahi and shrimp. Toppings were simple and authentic: onions and cilantro, plus a little salsa (or salsa verde, in the case of our asada). We found price and quality of El Burro’s tacos to be comparable to those of other contenders in Pittsburgh’s newish crop of taquerias, even if the steak was a little chewy. Burrito choice was equally exciting. Alongside classic filling formats such as breakfast (egg, cheese and chorizo) and rice and bean, El Burro offers chile relleno, shrimp diablo verde and a “California Burrito” which — filled as it is with steak, fries and guacamole — seems like it could just as well be named after Pittsburgh. (As it turns out, Californians have been putting


fries in their burritos for decades, making this adaptation well suited to local import.) We had the chile relleno burrito, in which a tortilla was lined with refried beans and filled with a roasted poblano pepper, itself stuffed with rice and cheese. This construction had the advantage of excellent ingredient distribution, as well as a pleasingly layered flavor profile. Carne asada fries were essentially loaded nachos with fries swapped for the chips. In El Burro’s case, they were loaded with good things: not only plenty of steak, but also shredded cheese, pico de gallo, guacamole and sour cream. The thin and crispy fries made for a delightful interplay between rich and creamy toppings and the dish’s crunchy base.

El Burro nachos

Chilaquiles is a sort of homey casserole of tortillas, salsa and cheese which is not often seen on fast Mexican menus, at least not in our region. Having been baked in salsa, the chips were decidedly not crunchy, but served as a mildly corn-flavored, substantially textured base against which El Burro’s excellent, and distinctly spicy, salsa verde stood out. A la carte toppings like tomatoes, beans and meat (queso was already included) allow diners to push this hearty dish in whatever direction they prefer. The Tijuana street dog is another California innovation that seems uniquely suited not only to Pittsburgh food culture, but to the particular past of El Burro’s own storefront. We loved this delicious — and fiery — combination of all-beef wiener, crisp bacon, pico, queso and paper-thin slices of jalapeño. From East Coast to West and back again, the humble hot dog has come a long way: We welcome its transformation, along with that of the neighborhood in which it’s served. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SOCIAL MIXER Grit & Grace strives to keep cocktail culture fun Just because you’re drinking a perfectly made cocktail — complete with house-made mixers — at a hip new Downtown bar, it doesn’t mean you can’t have some fun. That’s the idea at Grit & Grace, the latest concept from chef Brian Pekarcik and Richard Stern, owners of Spoon and BRGR. “Cocktails got really serious for a little bit. That’s great, but it doesn’t always have to be a serious experience,” says restaurant manager Nicole Battle. “It’s a lot more fun here.” Spoon beverage director John Wabeck and G&G bar manager Holly Fridley designed the cocktail menu. The two previously worked together under the mentorship of famed sommelier and cocktail creator Todd Thrasher, at Restaurant Eve in Arlington, Va. The cocktails here cast an eye toward Asia. “Oshaku” (named for a geisha whose sole role is to pour drinks) is a play on a martini, swapping out vermouth for plum wine. “Jambie the Genie,” served in a whimsical, skullringed tiki mug, is a fruity, and potent, mix of Mextaxa, sochu, St. Germain, Benedictine and guava purée. “Since sharing food is part of the experience here, we wanted to do the same with drinks,” says Fridley. So try a Scorpion — a mix of brandy, rum, citrus juice and orgeat that’s served in a bowl with several straws. Then there are the porron, Catalonian drinking vessels that, when tilted at just right angle, waterfall booze through the air and into a drinker’s mouth. Though porron are traditionally used for wine, here they’re filled with a mix of gin, white wine, sochu and tamarind soda. “We had to worry about keeping it light in color because it can get messy,” says Fridley. A hefty wine list (curated by Wabeck) is also available, along with a selection of 15 beers. Whatever you drink, Battle says, “We don’t want anyone to feel like it’s ‘too nice,’ and they can’t come in just because it’s a new Downtown bar.”

“SINCE SHARING FOOD IS PART OF THE EXPERIENCE HERE, WE WANTED TO DO THE SAME WITH DRINKS.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748 or gritandgracepgh.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-9407777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several apple-based dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE

Janice’s Sweet Harmony Café {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

retro chic with its whiskey and beer, Brillobox is (for now) the cool place to be. The menu isn’t lengthy, but it’s broad: Choose from bar staples or more inventive (and veggiefriendly) specialties such as Moroccan roasted-vegetable . www per stew or herbed a p ty ci pgh m polenta wedges. JE .co

FULL LIST ONLINE

BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham St., Mount Washington. 412-431-9313. This Mount Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE

CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF

BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE BRGR. 5997 Penn Circle South, East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. A bar that serves well-designed

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Curry on Murray DOR-STOP. 1430 Potomac Ave., Dormont. 412-561-9320. This bustling, homey family-run venue is everything a breakfast-andlunch diner ought to be. The food is made from scratch: Alongside standards (eggs, pancakes, and hot and cold sandwiches) are also distinctive options, including German potato

pancakes, ham off the bone and a sandwich tantalizingly called a “meatloaf melt.” J GIA VISTO. 4366 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville. 412-374-1800. The menu at this welcoming Italian restaurant ranges from simple classics to elegant inventions. Whether it’s a fried risotto appetizer enlivened with a elemental but sublime red sauce, or a perfectly cooked salmon on a Mediterraneaninspired bed of beans and vegetables, the fare exhibits the kitchen’s attention to detail. KF IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are ever-popular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE JANICE’S SWEET HARMONY CAFÉ. 2820 Duss Ave., Ambridge. 724-266-8099. A musically themed diner offers tried-andtrue breakfast-and-lunch diner standards (with fun, musical names such as “Slide Trombone”). This is your stop for French toast, German apple pancake, fruit-filled pancakes, and savory options such as skillet fry-ups (eggs, home fries, cheese, sausage). J JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. The menu at this convivial whitelinen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the more unusual. There’s a


offMenu

strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE

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Eliza Bowman leaves theater world for the baking scene

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WHILE STAGE managing in New York City, Eliza

Cupcakes from Eliza’s Oven {PHOTO COURTESY OF ELIZA BOWMAN}

VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. 220 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412-394-3400. The venerable Italian restaurant from Greensburg now has a Downtown outpost. In this elegant space, some classic dishes are updated; a few favorites, like turtle soup are retained; and the fresh mozzarella bar deserves to become a classic. Try the distinctive pizza, with a layered, cracker-like crust. LE

YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724-5915688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

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SMILING BANANA LEAF. 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412362-3200. At this absolute jewelbox of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than Thai-inflected Chinese food. Grilled meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF

WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-2211232. At this cozy, contemporary, candle-lit cottage, the Italianand Mediterranean-inspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF

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{BY JESSICA SERVER}

JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 Washington Road, McMurray. 724-260-7999. This sister restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of artfully casual insouciance. The preparations — many with Mexican or Asian influences — are appealingly straightforward, neither plain nor fussy: Pork loin with bourbon glaze; spicy flatbread loaded with shrimp, roasted red and poblano peppers, pineapple and cheese; and skirt steak drizzled in a creamy chipotle sauce. LE

VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-8881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF

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Bowman gained quite a reputation — as a baker. Bowman fed cast members baked goods during long rehearsal hours before taking on baking the theater’s concessions with a friend. Suddenly, the women had a small business, Bowman recalls, adding, “I realized I liked doing that more than I liked writing down blocking.” Bowman grew up cooking with her grandma and fondly remembers holidays spent baking sticky buns in particular. “I loved that time spent in the kitchen with her.” Feeling “burned out” on NYC, Bowman moved to Pittsburgh and earned a business degree from CCAC. There, she also took courses on baking and pastry before “just [diving] in” to open Eliza’s Oven, a stall in the Strip District’s Public Market. She’s been baking there, in what she calls “the world’s tiniest commercial kitchen,” since late October. Everything on the Eliza’s Oven menu is made with a locally produced beverage: soda from the Barmy Soda Company, beers from East End Brewing Company, Wigle Whiskey, Maggie’s Farm Rum, Gryphon’s Tea and Commonplace Coffee. Even her grandma’s original sticky-bun recipe uses local milk from Family Farms Creamery. And she finds that her “boozy” flavor combinations help her stand out. Though the alcohol burns off in baking, the taste remains, creating family-friendly baked goods that highlight what Bowman calls “the wonderful complex flavors” found in local products. Bowman’s says her best-seller is the “Drunken Oatmeal Cupcake”: a whiskey-oatmeal cookie topped with vanilla cake, brown-sugar frosting, and a dusting of cinnamon and sugar. Another hit is the beer cheese — sold alongside barleywine pretzels — which some people buy by the quart. Although Bowman already feels successful, she looks toward a future that holds new lunch items and baking classes. And ultimately, she hopes to play on a larger stage: a brewpub that pairs baked goods with beer and wine, instead of “overly sweet” dessert drinks. It’s a role she may be born to play: As Bowman puts it, “I just want a beer with my dessert.”

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LOCAL

“EVERY TIME I WRITE A PIECE, I FEEL LIKE I’M STARTING FROM SCRATCH.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

Been to a local concert in the last decade? You’ve probably crossed paths with Hugh Twyman. Since 2004, Twyman has been documenting the local music scene on his HughShows website, where he posts artist interviews, reviews and — primarily — photos of the many local and touring acts he sees every year. This year, Twyman — with assitance from J Vega of the Wilderness Recording Studio — is branching out further, celebrating 10 years of HughShows with a monthly series of concerts he’s calling HughShows Live. After considering an all-day festival, he began to think instead about a series at local record stores. “I always loved to go to in-store performances, but there are hardly any around,” he says. A couple of stores showed interest, but it turned out that the folks at Eide’s Entertainment had recently built a stage on the third floor, which they had yet to use. “It was pretty much a perfect match,” Twyman says. The inaugural show features The Red Western, Paul Luc and Household Stories, and Twyman already has musicians booked through June. “It’s mostly indie pop, indie folk, indie rock — that’s what I like to listen to,” he says. And, since HughShows Live takes place in a record store on Saturday afternoon, it’s an opportunity for anyone to see bands that generally only play 21-and-over venues. This first show will also feature representatives from the Homeless Children’s Education Fund and the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, collecting donations of new school supplies and non-perishable food items. Currently, Twyman plans to run the series through the year, if not longer — there are still at least 30 bands and artists he’d like to include. Ultimately, as with Twyman’s website, the goal is to showcase the Pittsburgh music scene. “When I first started, I was more into the national bands and kind of dismissed the local bands,” he says. “But over the years, I’ve found that we have a lot talented people who are making incredible music. That’s what keeps me going.” MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HUGHSHOWS LIVE. 2-5 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. Eide’s Entertainment, 1121 Penn Ave., Strip District. Free. hughshowsredux.blogspot.com

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Here’s looking at Hugh: Hugh Twyman {PHOTO COURTESY OF HUGH TWYMAN}

TWYMAN COMES ALIVE

BETWEEN

THE NOTES {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

M

ATHEW ROSENBLUM is looking at some sheet music, and he’s excited. For one thing, it’s sheet music unlike what you’d expect: Through most of the score, there’s no staff and no time signature, and the directions don’t say stuff like “andante,” but instead make references to emotions, non-musical ideas, animal sounds. They’re “graphic scores” written by American composer Burr Van Nostrand, and beside being innovative and experimental, they’re c l o s e t o R o s e n b l u m b e c a u s e Va n Nostrand served as a mentor to him when he was in school. Van Nostrand, though, went largely unnoticed for a great deal of his life, only finding something of a renaissance in recent years, with New World Records releasing his works on CD, and bigname critics like Alex Ross singing his praises. It’s easy for a composer, not unlike a pop songwriter, to toil in obscurity for a long time. And that’s a challenge Mathew Rosenblum has taken on, as a faculty member at the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

Keeping composed: Mathew Rosenblum

University of Pittsburgh and a well regarded new-music composer who is known for working with microtonality, tones that fall between the notes of the standard scale. In fact, he knew even in high school in Queens, where he grew up, that the kind of work he did might not gain him a ton of fame.

MUSIC ON THE EDGE PRESENTS H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET PLAYING

MATHEW ROSENBLUM’S “MÖBIUS LOOP.” 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. All ages. 412-237-8300 or www.music.pitt.edu/mote

“A bass player who sat in as the director of our jazz band asked us all if we wanted to write for the jazz band,” Rosenblum, who started as a saxophonist, recalls. “I wrote a sort of way outside, free-form thing that was based on music

I was listening to at the time — the Jazz Composers Orchestra was what was going on in New York. And [the high school jazz band] played it, and it was kind of wild, and he took me aside and said, ‘I would get all your music played right now in this semester, because you’re never ever going to hear your stuff again.’” He laughs about it today, but that’s a sentiment often directed toward contemporary composers whose work is challenging; being a composer working off the beaten path, then, often involves not just writing music, but creating spaces where people can find it. That’s why Rosenblum and his Pitt colleague Eric Moe together run Music on the Edge, a series that brings chamber-music ensembles to Pittsburgh, usually The Andy Warhol Museum, to play contemporary works. Moe and Rosenblum first met in San Francisco when Moe lived there in the 1980s. “I had a new-music ensemble there,” Moe recalls. “We were always looking for the coolest stuff we could


find. Mathew’s work was really unlike anything I’d ever heard.” When Moe joined the faculty at Pitt in 1989, he says, “One of the first things I did was hire Mathew.” Rosenblum had credentials as an interesting composer, and as someone who was doing work that was very different from what Moe was doing. (“I just wrote my first microtonal piece last month,” Moe notes, twentyodd years after starting to work with Rosenblum.) Rosenblum started at Pitt in 1991. Moe had already established Music on the Edge himself, but it soon became a joint venture. “We sat down and thought, ‘How could we make this into something more?’” says Moe. At the time, the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble was the main institution working with new music locally. “When I first came to Pittsburgh,” Moe says, “the funding climate was: ‘Well, we already have a new-music ensemble, why would we need another?’ Well, I just came from San Francisco, where we had six, and they were doing just fine.” Rosenblum, Moe says, helped to make Music on the Edge an institution. “He was able to find secure financial backing for it,” Moe notes. “I would have to threaten to quit every time I wanted funding for it,” he adds with a laugh. For someone whose music can be confounding — and admittedly difficult to play — Rosenblum is warm and friendly, and perhaps that’s part of what makes him successful. He talks about his pieces with equal parts enthusiasm and self-deprecating detachedness. “That was sort of the culmination of that interest in multiple narratives,” he says of one complex operatic piece. “I think I’ve finally gotten beyond that. But it took a while to play that thing out.” In the past two years, Rosenblum has had two full albums of his work released: In 2012, New World Records pressed a compendium of his works, from 1989’s “Circadian Rhythms” to 2011’s “Two Harmonies,” and last fall, BMOP/sound released 2001’s “Möbius Loop” in two versions on a CD along with “Sharpshooter” and “Double Concerto.” Since the albums range in terms of composition dates, they serve as something of a disjointed walk through much of Rosenblum’s body of work. The parts of the “Circadian Rhythms” suite range from percussive, improvisationalsounding moments to repetitive, rockband-inspired movements that recall Glenn Branca and Rhys Chatham, and parts that sound like detuned jazz — at once beautiful and uneasy. (That’s CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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BETWEEN THE NOTES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

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one facet of the microtonality that is Rosenblum’s trademark; another is the Eastern-sounding keyboard work in “Two Harmonies.”) “He’s always been interested in repetition,” says his colleague Moe. “Not in a mindless way, but in a really intriguing way. How you deal with the memory of things you’ve heard before, but they’ve changed so slightly — or even a lot. “Was a time when you were either a strict minimalist, the Phil Glass, or you were doing the anti-Phil Glass thing. Mathew was able to sort of steer the course between the two of them.” Composing is “a process that goes on, and it never ends,” says Rosenblum. “Every time I write a piece, I feel like I’m starting from scratch and learning again. I’m not sure exactly why. You don’t want to fall back into things that you know. … I like to try to keep hearing new things and moving in different directions.” Even as he moves in other directions — he’s currently working on a Guggenheim Fellowship, and will return to teaching later this year — Rosenblum’s older work continues to come around. This Saturday night, Jan. 11, at The Andy Warhol Museum, h2 Saxophone Quartet will play “Möbius Loop” as part of a concert produced by Music on the Edge. h2, which has been playing since the mid2000s, chose the piece because Rosenblum helps curate the series (which h2 was recruited for by Amy Williams, who rounds out the composition program at Pitt along with Rosenblum and Moe). “There are so many influences in his music,” says h2’s Geoffrey Deibel. “There’s a strong groove element, there’s an aleatoric element — at times, all four players are doing something different. There are a lot of tempo changes. There are a lot of parts that are hard for each player to play, and to play as an ensemble.” For a saxophone quartet, microtones mean playing in ways that are unconventional. “It’s mainly a combination of strange fingerings,” says Deibel. “Often in microtonal music they’re quarter-tones, but in this piece there are quarter-tones and sixth-tones. It’s a lot of preparation.” “We really like it and enjoy playing it,” says h2’s Jeffrey Loeffert. “I imagine it’s something that’s not played a lot because it requires a lot of intensive rehearsals,

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

h2 Saxophone Quartet

and it helps to have an ensemble that’s been playing together as long as we have.” Rosenblum will also be featured this year as part of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Year of Pittsburgh Composers. Part of the program takes five Pittsburghbased composers, and commissions them to write a five-part piece based on the natural elements. Rosenblum is joined in that venture by Patrick Burke, Boomi Jang, Reza Vali and Amy Williams. In pop music, it’s normal for an artist to conquer his or her own city before becoming known elsewhere; in the world of contemporary composers, it’s quite different. Rosenblum has lived for the past 20-plus years in Squirrel Hill with his wife Maggie and their two daughters, but his notability in new-music circles doesn’t necessarily permeate everyday life here. For the symphony to highlight local composers is a step toward making people like Mathew Rosenblum notable in their own environs, not just in New York. In February, Music on the Edge will present a program of Burr Van Nostrand’s music at Bellefield Hall; Lindsey Goodman, Dave Eggar and Eric Moe, along with the New England Conservatory Chamber Ensemble, will play two pieces by Rosenblum’s onetime mentor. Having his own piece played is great, but this is what Mathew Rosenblum is excited about. “Burr is this sort of undiscovered genius guy who got lost in the shuffle in the ’70s,” Rosenblum explains. “It was very exciting, then people lost track and he hasn’t written anything in 30 years. And he was one of my first mentors. He’s coming down, and it’s a very important event for us.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

FIST FIGHT IN THE PARKING LOT YEAR OF THE OX (SELF-RELEASED)

Two super-sludgy tracks bookend this five-song EP from the well-known locals, with some more upbeat heavy rock songs in between. Things get downright epic on the centerpiece, “Natural Fool,” where singer Abby Krizner’s voice shines, showing that she’s got way more than snarl. Those stoner-metal tracks are where the band really shines, but this entire EP is quality. FIST FIGHT IN THE PARKING LOT EP RELEASE. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $5. 412-206-9719

WILL SIMMONS & THE UPHOLSTERERS INNUENDO: THE ITALIAN WAY (UNREAD/ALMOST HALLOWEEN TIME)

Vinyl and cassette are the two ways to get this new release from the onetime Four Roses frontman, who’s on to more earnest (but upbeat) material on this folkpop release. Simmons is backed by scene vets Bill Fulmer, Bob Junkunz and Greg Lagrosa on 13 tracks of lo-fi sunshine pop and thoughtful, well-written (if at times maybe slightly overdone) lyricism. The trombone is tasteful and integrated nicely — a feat on a pop record. WILL SIMMONS & THE UPHOLSTERERS LP RELEASE. 9 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. Thunderbird Café, 4033 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-682-0177

INFLUX LATENCY (SELF-RELEASED)

Six tracks of cute, though sometimes deceptively complex, indie rock from the new local three-piece with some diverse backgrounds (including jazz performance). There’s a certain youthful naiveté about Karl Jancart’s lead vocals, which provides an interesting counterpoint to the complicated rhythms and the shifts from folk-pop to pop-punk and further. Nice first effort! AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLISON BOHL}

Pittsburgh’s

Live Music Scene! Calendar

Brass Bed

[METALCORE] + FRI., JAN. 10

If your first New Year’s resolution was to see more experimental shows, Garfield Artworks is your place tonight (and probably for a good chunk of 2014). Headliners Hands! — a Boston collective centered around Ian Ayers and Charlie Porter — brings a little bit of who-knows-what to the gallery tonight. (They do noise; they do ambient; they do electronic dance music!) Joining the band will be Knucklewagon — also a noise outfit,, also from Boston and also named after a body part, sort of — along with Enney, Scott Fry Experience and Mangy Bipods. If your second New Year’s resolution was to save money, note that this show is only $1 per band. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 4131 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. All ages. 412-361-2262 or www.garfield artworks.com

There are a lot of heavy bands out there that sound angry, but don’t seem to have much to be angry about — or worse, bands that are really angry … at their ex-girlfriends. Not so with This or the Apocalypse; the Lancaster-based metalcore band lashes out at soulless commercial culture and American militarism on its 2012 record Dead Years. It’s a cathartic listen with a serious moral center — something that hasn’t been typical in recent years. band plays the Smiling Moose Tonight, the ban with Shai Hulud Hulud, Sirens & Sailors and Arcane Heaven. AM 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $13-15. All ages. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

Meklit

Venue Tour

[EXPERIMENTAL] + THU., JAN. 09

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

TUE JAN 21 THU JAN 23 TUE FEB 4

[JAZZ] + SUN SUN., JAN. 12 It’s tough to qui quickly sum up Meklit: The Ethiopian-born singer and songwriter plays a mix of folk, jazz and pop music, but also j co-founded a program to bring African musicians together, and was a 2012 TED to fellow. She’s She’ performed with musicians like Beck, and a has a new record coming out in March Marc on Six Degrees; you can catch her before it hits, tonight at Club be Café. A.G. Levine opens. AM 7 p.m. 56 S. Le 12th St., Sout South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com www.clubcafe

[INDIE ROCK] + WED., JAN. 15

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RUS ANSON}

Brass Bed does doesn’t play around with a frills: What the Louisianalot of fri based bas band does, it does with fuzzy guitars, keyboards, f a rhythm section and thoughtful vocals. The four-piece enjoyed critical success with its most recent full-length, The Secret Will Keep You, which came out in April on Crossbill Records. Previously, the band had released an EP of Harry Nilsson tunes, but aside from the well-honed songcraft, you won’t hear a lot of Nilsson on the new album. Think Galaxie 500 and even T Radiohead instead. Tonight the Ra band plays Club Café with The Grim Ga Game and the seasonally appropriate Cold Weather. AM 7 p.m. appropr 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. 412431-4950 431-49 or www.clubcafelive.com

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BILL ALI // rock covers // 8 pm // no cover WELL STRUNG // bluegrass // 8 pm // no cover TONY JANFLONE // blues // 9 pm // $7 FERRIS BUELLER’S REVENGE // 80’s covers // 9 pm // $7 DJ JUAN DIEGO, VII // salsa; dance // 7 pm // no cover

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 09 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The SemiSupervillains, The Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Hands!, Knucklewagon, Enney, Scott Fry Experience, Mangy Bipeds. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Breckenwood. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KENDREW’S. The GRID. 724-375-5959.

FRI 10

We’re all about the BEER! All Day, Every Day: $2.00 PBR 24oz. cans Happy Hour: 5pm-7pm Mon-Fri $ .00 1 off all drinks Wednesday: .20 cent wings, $ .75

1 Bud Light Drafts, $4.00 Bombs, DJ Outtareach

Thursday: Karaoke DJ T-Money Friday: DJ Sneak Saturday: DJ Magic Mike Sunday: EDM Night with DJ 5X5 Suga 1002 Perry Highway • Pittsburgh,Pa. 15237 412-367-9610 • perrytownedrafthouse.net

ALTAR BAR. The Classic Rock Experience. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BELVEDERE’S. The Big Bend, Grand Piano, Andre Costello & the Cool Minors. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB CAFE. Billy The Kid, Red Hook Winery (Early) Scott & Rosanna, Courier (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Tony Janflone. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MOONDOG’S. Memphis Mike & the Legendary Tremblers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Katie Hate, Cynimatics, Fiveunder, My Thoughts In Color, Pressin On, Exempt. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Silkwood Shower. Ross. 412-364-8166. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Jimbo & the Soupbones. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. This Or The Apocalypse, Sworn In, Shai Hulud, Sirens & Sailors (early) The Weeks (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTH SIDE VFW POST 6675. The Dave Iglar Band. South Side. TERRACE GARDENS. Daniels & McClain. Clairton. 412-233-2626.

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Cello Fury. Harmony. 570-294-6450. CLUB CAFE. The Mixus Brothers, Again The Bandits (Early) Playing Mantis, Novis (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Albion Cross. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Crooked Cobras, Megawolf, Grumpy, Bill Jasper. South Side. 412-431-4090. HAMBONE’S. Adrian Krygorski, Jaimie Kent & The Options. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Lily Wine Affair, Traffic Jam. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HARVEY WILNER’S. Lucky Me. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jar’d Loose, Abysme, The Proslyte, Night Vapor. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Ferris Bueller’s Revenge. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

MARS BREW HOUSE. Ray Lanich. Mars. 724-625-2555. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. OBEY HOUSE. The Shiners. Dan Mariska Band. Bloomfield. Crafton. 412-922-3883. 412-682-0320. RPM’S 31 SPORTS BAR & THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. GRILLE. Tres Lads. Bridgeville. For Everest, Posture & the 412-221-7808. Grizzly, Salvatore Rex, Butterbirds, THUNDERBIRD CAFE. I Am a Sea Creature, Unraveler. Stone Cold Killer, Bloomfield. Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, Will Simmons & The Upholsterers. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Will Simmons & www. per pa Michael Todd. The Upholsterers LP pghcitym .co Canonsburg. release. Lawrenceville. 724-884-5944. 412-682-0177.

MON 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 12 CLUB CAFE. Meklit, A.G. Levine. South Side. 412-431-4950. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. School of Rock: British Invasion. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Cellular Chaos, The Fuckies, Joey Molinaro, Satyr/Elfheim. Bloomfield. 412-853-0518.

MP 3 MONDAY THEM LABS

WED 15 CLUB CAFE. Brass Bed, The Grim Game, Cold Weather. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB ZOO. In This Moment, Butcher Babies, Devour The Day, All Hail The Yeti. Strip District. 412-201-1100. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Ideamen, Dhruva Krishna & Rainbow Reagan, Memphis Hill. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Pat the Bunny, Endless Mike & the Beagle Club, Douglas Fur, The Homeless Gospel Choir, The Otis Wolves. Bloomfield.

DJS THU 09 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Desus, The Social Curator. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

SAT 11 ALTAR BAR. Fist Fight In The Parking Lot. CD release. Strip District. 412-263-2877. AMERICAN LEGION LANGLEY POST 496. Moose Tracks. Sheraden. 412-331-0341. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Gone South. Pleasant Hills. CALIENTE PIZZA & BAR. Ray Lanich. Bloomfield. 412-904-1744.

TUE 14

FRI 10 Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from Them Labs; stream or download

“It Comes From Me,” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. REMEDY. H.Lurker, Maestro, MASTERHEAT, Da Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. CONTINUES ON PG. 24

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

FRI, JAN 10 • 9PM COUNTRY

MAVENS PLUS BOY = GIRL THE

SMOKE FREE SHOW (ENTIRE VENUE)

SAT, JAN 11 • 9PM ROCK

STONE COLD KILLER + BUFFALO BUFFALO BUFFALO + WILL SIMMONS &

UPHOLSTERERS

THE

SMOKE FREE SHOW (ENTIRE VENUE)

MON, JAN 13 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH

SGD

SMOKE FREE SHOW (ENTIRE VENUE)

TUES, JAN 14 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

WITH

THURMAN BURMAN SMOKE FREE SHOW (ENTIRE VENUE) OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen Hours: Sun - Th open til 12am Fri & Sat open til 1am

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7 www.thunderbirdcafe.net

THURS/JAN 9/10PM

BURLESQUE SHOW THURS/JAN 16/10PM

COMMON NIGHTMARE Dead Signal Chasers THU/JAN 23/10PM

White Light Spectrum $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Billy Pilgrim. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

@MacMiller (Mac Miller)

All I want to do is play the new madden as Ricky Williams.

TUE 14 CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. DJ Phinesse. Reggae, dancehall, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ SMI. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 11

CJ’S. House of Soul. Strip District. 412-642-2377. THE R BAR. Smooth Groove / Stevie Wellons. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

TUE 14 THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BLUES THU 09 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412381-4300.

FRI 10 565 LIVE. The Blues Orphans Trio. Bellevue. 412-522-7556.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

COUNTRY

MON 13

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Mavens, Boy = Girl. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 14 @alispagnola (Ali Spagnola)

Lost glove on the ground was flicking me off. Do you think you’re better than me, glove? I’m not the one laying in the street.

SUN 12 PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Thurman Burman. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 11

WED 15

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

LOCAL TWEETS

@wizkhalifa (Wiz Khalifa)

THE HOP HOUSE. The Blue Bombers, Pat Scanga. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. KNUCKLEHEAD’S BAR. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Ross. MOONDOG’S. Billy the Kid & the Regulators. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. TEDDY’S. Sweaty Betty Sweaty Betty Blues Band. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

WED 15 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Shari Richards. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

JAZZ THU 09 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 10 ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BAR ANTONIO. Eric Johnson, Dan Wasson. Canonsburg. 724-743-5900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8pm dance lesson, 9pm dancing. North Side. 412-904-3335.

ANDYS. Ken Karsh & Teddy Pantelas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. RML Jazz. Downtown. 412-370-9621.

THU 09

LITTLE E’S. Just Ahead Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo/Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 11

WED 15

ACOUSTIC

Now you cant talk about my pants cuz I dont have any on. Ha Ha. Suck it

SAT 11

ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Dwayne Dolphin. Downtown. 412-456-6666. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. David Bennett & Daniel May. Reservations required. Shadyside. 412-381-5105.

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Crum & Niederberger. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Well Strung. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Sputzy. Washington.

FRI 10 ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. 724-265-1181. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Kid Detective, noise,nothing, Distractions, Mark Natural. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. CLUB COLONY. 412-642-2377. Guy Matone. Scott. LITTLE E’S. Andrea 412-668-0903. Pearl Trio. Downtown. OLIVE OR TWIST. w. w w 412-392-2217. The Vagrants. er hcitypap g p MARVA JO’S BISTRO. Downtown. .com The Tony Campell 412-255-0525. Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. NINE ON NINE. Etta Cox HAMBONE’S. & Ron Bickel. Downtown. Meloneous Monday Night 412-338-6463. w/ Matt Pickart. Lawrenceville. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second 412-681-4318. Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. 412-225-9269. Wednesdays. North Side. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. 412-321-1834. RML Jazz. Greensburg. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam 412-370-9621. w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 11

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WED 15

SUN 12

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark Strickland. Shadyside.

REGGAE SAT 11 THE VALLEY HOTEL. The Flow Band. 412-233-9800.

FRI 10

SAT 11 NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe, the Turpentiners. Slim Forsythe’s birthday bash. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853.

CLASSICAL THU 09 SATURN STRING QUARTET. Mozart Clarinet Quintet K 581, Brahms Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1679.

FRI 10 PM WOODWIND PROJECT. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. SATURN STRING QUARTET. Mozart Clarinet Quintet K 581, Brahms Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. Strand Theater, Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

SAT 11 H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. SATURN STRING QUARTET. Mozart Clarinet Quintet K 581, Brahms Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. St. Joseph O’Hara, O’Hara. 412-963-8885.

SUN 12 BEETHOVEN ON THE BLUFF III: VIOLIN/CELLO I. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6083. DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY ORGAN RECITAL. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-4157. SATURN STRING QUARTET. Mozart Clarinet Quintet K 581, Brahms Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7153.

WED 15 SATURN STRING QUARTET. Mozart Clarinet Quintet K 581, Brahms Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120.

OTHER MUSIC THU 09 DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

FRI 10

CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903.

SUN 12 HAMBONE’S. Ukulele Group Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 13 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret Jazz Standards & Showtunes Sing-a- long. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.


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What to do IN PITTSBURGH

Janury 8 - 14 WEDNESDAY 86 South Side Stories

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO, CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Jan. 26.

THURSDAY 97

The Semi-Supervillains CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest The Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 10 108 The Classic Rock Experience: Midnight Special

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

SUNDAY 12 John Heffron

The Weeks

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh.improv. com or 412-462-5233. 7p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests William Forrest and Alive in the Underground. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Meklit

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 6:30p.m.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 ALTAR BAR

Larry the Cable Guy

guest Novis. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 10:30p.m.

Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

Fist Fight in the Parking Lot ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

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CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guest A.G. Levine. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

FIST FIGHT IN THE PARKING LOT

Katie Hate / Cynimatics / Fiveunder / My Thoughts in Color / Pressin On / Exempt

SATURDAY

newbalancepittsburgh.com

SOUND SERIES: H2 Saxophone Quartet

Playing Mantis

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special

Lily Wine Affair / Traffic Jam HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

Theresa Caputo Live! The Experience

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: heinzhall.org. 7p.m. & 9:30p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 3p.m.

Winter Wunderground

Country Night with DJ Ally

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 event. Tickets: showclix.com/event/ winterwunderground. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 14 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. No cover. 6p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

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FAMILY AFFAIRS

HER DEPICTS A WORLD WHERE INTIMACY IS MOST EASILY EXPLORED THROUGH THE ARTIFICIAL

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} Director John Wells gets much more right than wrong in his adaptation of Tracy Letts’ darkly comic, Pulitzer-winning August: Osage County. Letts’ screenplay preserves the essential story of a family whose three daughters (shades of King Lear) return to their rural Oklahoma homestead after the sudden disappearance of their father, an alcoholic professor — only to face their raging, pill-addicted, brutally candid mother, Violet (Meryl Streep). And most every punch in this classic family-secrets drama lands, from the raucous comedy to the grim revelations, and the quieter moments in between.

ALONE IN A CROWD

Photoplay: Julianne Nicholson, Meryl Streep and Margo Martindale

CP APPROVED

Adapting for the screen, the filmmakers relocate several scenes to car interiors. That doesn’t hurt much, though it downplays the house’s own role as a character. What hinders more is Wells’ heavy reliance on close-ups: We miss the wider shots that might reveal more about the relationships between characters (something you inevitably get on stage). On stage or screen, August remains a showcase for whoever plays Violet, and Streep delivers a harrowing portrait of a tortured, sharp-tongued woman, tough but vulnerable, who sees too much for her own good. Julia Roberts, Julianne Nicholson, Chris Cooper, Margo Martindale and Ewan MacGregor also stand out in the fine ensemble cast. Starts Fri., Jan. 10 DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2013 Films That Never Played Pittsburgh. Andrea Riseborough and Clive Owen star in James Marsh’s slow-burn thriller, Shadow Dancer, about a young Belfast woman forced to turn informant against her own IRA brothers (Domhall Gleeson, Aiden Gillen). Downbeat and appropriately gloomy, with some good performances in a somewhat muddled tale.

Love boat: Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) and Samantha take a trip to Catalina.

{BY AL HOFF}

W

E CASUALLY profess our love

for Google maps, Minecraft, the unseen miracle that brings us Tumblrs of cats — but what if we really loved these software configurations and they loved us back? Exploring the fungible space between humans and the technology they embrace is Her, a bittersweet love story written and directed by Spike Jonze (Adaptation). Set in a near-future Los Angeles (played by Shanghai), Her’s everyman is Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix), a sensitive, withdrawn soul who works composing hand-written letters. Then he installs a new operating system for his devices which is artificially intelligent, intuitive and “understands” him. It speaks in a lively female voice (supplied by Scarlett Johansson), and the more one interacts with it, the better it adapts to one’s needs. Theodore names it “Samantha,” and the two quickly connect. They talk, flirt, take trips, have a sexual relationship. Theodore explains humanity to Samantha, and her skills help him grow more secure and confident. Theodore falls in love with Samantha,

and he’s not the only one. His neighbor, Amy (Amy Adams), also has a relationship with an operating system, and the streets are filled with folks attuned to the robot voice in their earpieces. Yet despite all this accommodating technology, people long to connect with each other, if even clumsily: Amy finds comfort in filming her sleeping mother, and Theodore misses the irony of his job, where his for-hire letters produce profound emotions between unseen strangers.

HER DIRECTED BY: Spike Jonze STARRING: Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Adams Starts Fri., Jan. 10

CP APPROVED Her depicts a world where intimacy is most easily explored and sustained through the artificial. (Theodore’s exwife tells him: “You always wanted a life without the challenges of anything real.”) But it’s not that simple: Turns out that opening up to one’s OS creates its own

emotional vulnerabilities, and artificially intelligent beings like Samantha aren’t immune to existential debate, either. (“Are these feelings real, or are they just programming?”) Throughout, Her juggles a tricky concept that seems in danger of tumbling into twee pretentiousness. But Phoenix and Johansson sell it — you believe in their improbable love affair. A tip of the hat, too, to the production details which help sell the film’s engaging contradictions: its look the crisp haziness of a dream (or modern Chinese city on a badair day); the slightly off color palette; and a wardrobe best described as frumpy futuristic. And Her sticks the landing, winding up in a place both surprising, logical and wistfully open-ended. Initially, Theodore seems laughable, pitiable — what kind of loser falls in love with a bit of technology? But query your own commitment to various devices and programs. Her’s exploration of these beguiling and problematic relationships will linger with you, not least when you reach for your iPhone. Again. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014


FILM CAPSULES CP

Jonathan Visser) and a clever twist, it’s a concentrated, half-hour dose of dark science-fiction irony. On-screen bonus: local icon Bill Cardille as your Serlingesque host. Also featured at this Film Kitchen are three shorts by politically minded prankster Travis Irvine, including: “Journey to the End of the World,” shot in actual Mayan ruins on Dec. 21, 2012 (“This is the apocalypse high five!”); “Death and Difference in Dallas,” with person-in-the-street interviews about the JFK assassination; and “Pumped About Democracy.” In the latter, an earnestly bespectacled Irvine and crew hit drunken Halloween festivities in small-town Ohio just before the 2004 presidential election in order to ask young revelers, “Are you pumped about democracy?” (The humor resides in how much less or more seriously interview subjects take the question than does Irvine himself.) And filmmaker Alex Abramson screens three locally shot music videos for rapper Eclypse. 8 p.m. Tue., Jan. 14 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood Screening Room. $5. 412-681-9500 (Bill O’Driscoll)

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THE ARMSTRONG LIE. A couple of years ago, seven-time Tour de France champ Lance Armstrong and documentarian Alex Gibney teamed up to film what they hoped would be Armstrong’s victory lap: winning the grueling, multi-day bike race in 2009 while consistently testing clean for performanceenhancers, thereby silencing the growing chorus of critics who suspected him of doping. Two immediate questions: Why would the presumably clear-eyed Gibney get swept up in the Armstrong myth-making machine, and why would Armstrong, who knew he was dirty, throw in with an award-winning muckraker like Gibney (Enron, WikiLeaks)? Both those questions get answered in Gibney’s film, which offers: a précis of Armstrong’s career; plenty of armchair psychology about who the cyclist was and what he meant to fans and detractors; and still more explanations and apologies from Armstrong. It’s fascinating on all accounts, with plenty of blame to go around. Starts Fri., Jan. 10. Harris (Al Hoff)

CP

Film Kitchen’s “Meet Your Maker”

REPERTORY MYSTERIES OF THE UNSEEN WORLD. This new 40-minute IMAX film depicts things that are ordinarily too fast, too slow or too small for humans to see; some things are just invisible. But through technologies such as high-speed and time-lapse photography, electron microscopy and nanotechnology, director Louie Schwartzberg gives us a peek. Highlights include: watching mold grow; popcorn popping; and the teeny-tiny structures on the wing of a butterfly. Forest Whitaker narrates the film. Screens daily. Rangos Omnimax, Carnegie Science Center, North Side

SULLIVAN’S TRAVELS. In Preston Sturges’ biting 1941 comedy, a pampered Hollywood director (Joel McCrea) goes on the road disguised as a hobo to learn the truth about the downtrodden masses. Screens as part of a month-long, Sunday-night series of blackand-white classics. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 12. Regent Square

The Armstrong Lie THE LEGEND OF HERCULES. The full story of Hercules, legendary strongman of Greek myth. Kellan Lutz (Twilight series) plays the he-man; Renny Harlin directs. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., Jan. 10 LONE SURVIVOR. Peter Berg’s actioner, based on “lone survivor” Marcus Luttrell’s memoir, recounts the 2005 mission in which four members of SEAL Team 10 (Mark Wahlberg, Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster, Taylor Kitsch) attempt to capture a Taliban leader in a remote Afghan village. Things quickly go from bad to worse to tragic, as the men are trapped and outgunned. This will be a polarizing film: Some viewers will laud it for showing the “real” story of heroic Navy SEALs; others will enjoy a better-thanaverage war actioner, with lots of gruesome injuries; and still others will see another jingoistic Hollywood/military co-opt. Giving the real soldiers the benefit of the doubt for a harrowing ordeal, and Berg some marks for tension (and one horrifying fallingdown-the-mountain sequence), I mostly found this film depressing — a perversely entertaining reminder of all the blood and treasure that’s been lost. It’s long been human nature to celebrate brotherhood under fire and “heroic” deaths in battle, but what’s depicted here seems like an especially futile exercise. Starts Fri., Jan. 10. (AH)

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EVANGELION: 3.0 YOU CAN (NOT) REDO. Another installment in the Japanese anime Evangelion series from Hideaki Anno. The tale, set in the future after Earth has been attacked, resumes 14 years after the events of the last film. 7 p.m. (subtitled) and 9 p.m. (dubbed) Fri., Jan. 10. Hollywood WEIRD SCIENCE. More high school hi-jinks from John Hughes in this 1985 comedy starring Anthony Michael Hall, Ilan Mitchell-Smith and Kelly LeBrock. In it, a couple of nerds use their computer to bring a dream woman to life. 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 10; 10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11; and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 12. Oaks LENNY COOKE. Ben and Joshua Safdie’s new bio-doc looks at the non-career of Lenny Cooke, who in 2001 was rated the nation’s No. 1 high school basketball player, but who went undrafted in 2002. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. Hollywood RURAL ROUTE FILM FESTIVAL. This touring program offers a slate of short films (narrative, documentary, experimental, animated) that focus on life and places outside of the big cities. This year’s program includes: footage of the Northern Lights; a look at crop circles in Holland; reindeerherding in Finland; work at a Christmas-tree farm; bird-nest cams; 1950s Kodachrome footage from the Country Music Hall of Fame; and two Native American brothers who ride in demo derbies. 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 12. Hollywood

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KIDS FOR CASH. Robert May’s new documentary examines the 2008 “kids for cash” scandal, in which Luzerne County, Pa., judges received financial kickbacks from a for-profit prison to which they sentenced kids for often minor transgressions. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 16. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

CLUE. Jonathan Lynn directs this 1985 mystery comedy adapted from the popular board game. Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry and Madeline Kahn head an ensemble cast. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 8. AMC Loews. $5 SUMMER IN FEBRUARY. Jonathan Smith’s new period melodrama is set amid the Newlyn School of artists in early-20th-century Cornwall. Among them was the bohemian Lamorna Group, and a torrid love triangle. The film stars Dominic Cooper, Emily Browning and Dan Stevens (the ill-fated Matthew on Downton Abbey). 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 9. Hollywood

FIGHT CLUB. David Fincher’s darkly comic 1999 mindbender follows a depressed young man (Edward Norton) as he finds a savior in a new buddy, Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), and a new hobby in the secretive underground world of bare-knuckles fighting. (Remember, if anybody asks — there is no Fight Club screening.) 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 15. AMC Loews. $5

Rural Route Film Festival FILM KITCHEN. The monthly series for local and indie film is highlighted by “Meet Your Maker.” Pat Francart’s lovingly made Twilight Zone riff centers on a physicist trying to replicate the Big Bang. With its careful black-and-white cinematography, a strong cast (including local stage pros like John Amplas and

Silents, Please! Sunday, January 26th, 2:00PM

SUMMER IN FEBRUARY (2013) - 1/9 @ 7:30pm Period romance for all you Downton Abbey lovers. Buy a ticket, get a free small popcorn & soda _________________________________________ EVANGELION 3.0 YOU CAN (NOT) REDO 1/10 @ 7pm (subbed) & 9:30pm (dubbed) _________________________________________ LENNY COOKE (2013) - 1/11 @ 7pm & 9:15pm Documentary about a number one ranked high school basketball player who in 2002 shockingly ended up undrafted for the NBA. _________________________________________ ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW - 1/11 @ Midnight _________________________________________ THE RURAL ROUTE FILM FESTIVAL

New live score premiere by Tom Roberts

“Best Of/Shorts Tour” - 1/12 @ 4pm & 7pm - Includes a piece

on reindeer herding in Finland, a Will Oldham narrated nature short, and beautiful 1950s Kodachrome footage from the Country Music Hall of Fame. More at www.ruralroutefilms.com/tour

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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This project supported in part by a Seed Award from The Sprout Fund

HOLLYWOOD THEATER 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 +

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[ART REVIEW]

“IT UPENDED EVERYTHING I SUSPECTED ABOUT THE KIND OF PERSON WHO WOULD DO THIS.”

PHYSICAL GRAFFITI {BY PHILIP ANSELMO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

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[BOOK]

RECONCILIATIONS {{BY BY NICK KEPPLER}

O

Rokni Haerizadeh’s “Reign of Winter”

Dozens of drawings and a pair of animations by Iranian artist Rokni Haerizadeh join the contemporary art at the 2013 Carnegie International. The exhibit is the first in the U.S. for Haerizadeh, who lives and works in Dubai in exile from his native Tehran. Most basically, Haerizadeh’s artistic practice consists of transforming reprints of media images by drawing over portions of the original. His genius lies in his ability to pick up on latent tendencies in the images and pursue their unseen trajectories. However absurd his interventions may seem, the grotesque additions never violate the logic of the original compositions. Rather than sublimate, Haerizadeh lets the instincts out, and it’s these forces, unchecked, that guide his brush: contorting faces, lopping off heads or morphing people into furniture or animals. Haerizadeh’s drawings are parasitic without preference for genre or medium. Scenes of civil unrest or political patronage get juxtaposed with snapshots from a wedding album. All is ceremony and subject to the same atavisms. His gestural figures colonize their host texts and pervert the original images, even as they expose the fallacy of the authentic. His “sketchbook” — fittingly perched above the museum’s Grand Staircase — is an already-published, illustrated history of 2011’s British royal wedding that Haerizadeh recasts as an orgiastic assembly of animals, costumed phalli and headless bodies. The debauchery and paganism once allied with ritual rise to the surface in a work that supplants the banality of picturebook desire in favor of the artist’s more fertile and animistic visions. Haerizadeh’s talent for liberating the repressed is most explicit in the two videos, each composed of thousands of individual hand-drawn frames. Once animated, his figures invade the conventional space of the filmed scene. In coils of ink and gesso, they consume their hosts or — in the case of a news broadcaster — spew like nightmares from their heads. In silence, the footage proceeds like a reverse exorcism, as if the demons had been persuaded to reinhabit the bodies, to exhibit the convulsions of their bastard forms. Yet Haerizadeh operates at a level that confounds any effort at a consonant affective reading. We can never with any certainty say whether the imagery disgusts or arouses, makes us hungry or sick — and it’s this ability to provoke such weird ambivalences that make these works so worth our attention.

N JULY 31, 2002, a Hamas operative placed a suitcase bomb in a cafeteria in Jerusalem’s Hebrew University, killing nine people. The location was chosen because of the school’s population of American students. David HarrisGershon and his wife, Jamie, were two such students. Jamie suffered burns and shrapnel wounds but survived. David wasn’t in the cafeteria at the time, but afterward experienced anxiety and insomnia that psychotherapy could not relieve. Desperate and inspired by South Africa’s post-apartheid reconciliation process, he took the unusual measure of returning to Jerusalem to meet the family of the bomber. Now a writer, speaker and privateschool teacher who lives in Squirrel Hill, he recounts the process in the new memoir What Do You Buy the Children of the Terrorist Who Tried to Kill Your Wife? (Oneworld Publications). Harris-Gershon — who also won last year’s Moth GrandSLAM storytelling contest — recently spoke with CP.

YOU ADMIT THERE ARE GAPS IN YOUR OWN MEMORIES OF THAT TIME. HOW DID THAT AFFECT YOUR APPROACH TO WRITING? I tried to recall everything as best I could. From the moment I saw my wife in the emergency room, I emotionally shut down. Admittedly, there are things that are hazy from everything being surreal and the traumatic impact. I was trying to deal with the aftereffects, the PTSD symptoms, when I came back to the States. One of the things I was required to do in therapy was reconstruct every memory I had. While, psychologically, those methods didn’t really help, they did reconstruct the chronology.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

{PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

David D Dav id H Harris-Gershon arris i Gersh hon


WHAT ROLE DID YOUR RESEARCH INTO THE ATTACK AND ISRAELI/PALESTINIAN RELATIONS PLAY IN YOUR HEALING? When we came back to the States, I was paralyzed by my PTSD symptoms and the therapy didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do anything to help, so I decided to learn everything I could about the attack, as a way of trying to move on from it. I found that Mohammed Odeh, the man who had placed the bomb in the cafeteria next to my wife, expressed remorse upon his capture. When I learned that he had done that, it upended everything I suspected or would have thought about the kind of person who would do this. I realized the only possible way I could understand him better, and Palestinians better, was to go back to Israel and perhaps try to confront him about why he had done that.

DAVID HARRIS-GERSHON speaks at City of Asylum 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 9. 330 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. 412-3230278 or www.cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

WHAT IMPACT DID YOUR SIT-DOWN WITH ODEHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FAMILY HAVE ON THEM LONG TERM? ARE YOU STILL IN CONTACT? Very sporadically, I will send hellos through the translator. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not in any substantive contact. The children really didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who I was when I visited. They were too young. It was more important to both myself and the rest of the family â&#x20AC;&#x201D; his wife, mother and brothers, who invited me. This was a middle-class family in East Jerusalem who had no idea what Mohammed was doing [or] that he was involved in Hamas, and would have stopped him if they had known. This was a family who was also traumatized because they had lost a son and a brother. I know we both viewed this

as something that was personally important to us, and we understood the small political ramiďŹ cations of us meeting. WOULD YOU RECOMMEND THAT KIND OF MEETING TO VICTIMS OF VIOLENT CRIME AND THEIR FAMILIES? I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell anyone what they should or shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do. I do think it is important for Israelis and Palestinians, Jews and Muslims, to get to know each other. That would help any reconciliation and compromise. There are groups that bring Israelis and Palestinians who lost someone in the conďŹ&#x201A;ict together as a way of making something politically productive out of that, and I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essential if things are going to change. YOU WANTED TO MEET WITH ODEH HIMSELF BUT HE WOULDNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T SEE YOU. DO YOU STILL WANT TO MEET HIM? My original motivation was to relieve the post-traumatic stress I was feeling. My meeting with the family did that. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why, but meeting with the family relieved the symptoms I was feeling. In that sense, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a motivation to meet with him. But if I got word today from the Israeli prison service that I was able to meet Mohammed, I would probably be unable not to go.

TOUR 20 2014

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YOU MENTION IN THE BOOK BEING HANDED A LITTLE PIECE OF METAL PULLED FROM YOUR WIFEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INTESTINES. DO YOU STILL HAVE IT? I do, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in a backpack, in the same pocket I put it in a week after I received it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not something I examine or take out regularly, but I have it.

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JANUARY 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;26, 2014 WRITTEN AND PERFORMED

BY TAMI DIXON

Check out the rest of our season here.

DIRECTED BY MATT M. MORROW

Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic director â&#x20AC;˘ Earl Hughes producing director

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[DANCE]

LIFE’S COOKBOOK {BY STEVE SUCATO} WHILE LIFE doesn’t come with an in-

struction manual, the wisdom of those who have come before us is supposed to offer guidance. But what if some of that wisdom — those recipes for happiness, success and fulfillment — turn out to be nothing more than clichés passed from generation to generation? In CorningWorks’ latest Glue Factory Project, Recipes Our Mothers Gave Us, three veteran dancers with diverse cultural backgrounds question some of the common recipes for a better life they were taught as youths. The hour-long Recipes Our Mothers Gave Us was created by and will be performed by dancer, choreographer and CorningWorks artistic director Beth Corning, actor/dancer Francoise Fournier and playwright, actor and choreographer Maria Cheng. The show has five performances, Jan. 15-19, at the New Hazlett Theater. Recipes is the fifth annual incarnation in Pittsburgh of CorningWorks’ Glue Factory Project, which brings together nationally and internationally recognized

Corning, who directs the show, says she believes that life is indeed like a recipe. “We all start the recipe with excitement and expectation, and depending on what kind of person you are, you either follow it to a T or you improvise some of the steps,” says Corning. “Either the recipe comes out or you fail, and that can change every time you try that recipe.” One recipe the work explores is the one women use to attract a mate. “Men wear socks, underwear, a suit and tie and are girded against the world,” says Corning. “Women are laid bare wearing push-up bras, lowcut dresses, makeup and high heels. Why were we the ones that had to get naked to attract a mate? Why do we keep doing that recipe when we can do everything without men now?” Corning says that in the creation of this work, she carried with her lessons learned from working with Tony Awardwinning theater director Dominque Serrand, and which were employed in her most recent CorningWorks production, last June’s critically acclaimed one{PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK WALSH/CORNINGWORKS} woman show Remains. Deportment and carriage: a scene from Recipes Our Mothers Gave Us “As a choreographer, we are always performing artists over the age of 40 to chooses the subject matter and the artists seduced by beautiful movement,” says create substantive dance-theater works. who will participate, usually from among Corning. “Mining the movement to make As in past Glue Factory shows, Corning the many artists she has worked with in sure I was not getting seduced by it, and stripping away any artifice, was what I the past. Corning, formerly artistic director of was aiming for.” Corning also enlisted the help of Pittsburgh’s Dance Alloy Theater, met Fournier years ago, while teaching in playwright Shelley Berc to look over the Sweden. Fournier has worked with such material. The idea, says Corning, was to noted Scandinavian choreographers as make sure “that the recipes were making Birgitta Egerbladh and Per Jonsson. Cheng a cohesive cookbook.” is co-founder of Denver’s Theatre Esprit Asia; Corning knew her from the University of Minnesota’s dance department, CORNINGWORKS when Corning had a dance company in PRESENTS 2014 GLUE Minneapolis. (Cheng replaced the project’s FACTORY PROJECT: original third collaborator, dancer/choreRECIPES OUR ographer Nora Chipaumire, who left the MOTHERS GAVE US project due to scheduling conflict.) Jan. 15-19. New Hazlett Theater, In previous Glue Factory Projects, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25-30 Corning traveled to work with her (Jan. 19 is pay-what-you-can). 412-320-4610 or www.corningworks.org fellow collaborators in their home cities. This time, both Cheng and Fournier (who lives in Stockholm and had not Audiences will even get to see what previously been to the United States) traveled to Pittsburgh this past year to else the trio has cooked up from different perspectives, as Recipes will be performed work with Corning. Set to an original soundscape by with patrons seated on three sides of composer Mary Ellen Childs, Recipes Our the stage. In keeping with cooking metaphor, Mothers Gave Us explores common societal stories relating to succeeding in each performance will be followed by a life via a series of vignettes played out complimentary tasting event hosted by in solos, duets and trios. To illustrate the local guest chefs including: Jamilka vignettes, says Corning, Recipes uses Borges and Sarah Thomas, of Bar Marco; metaphor, text and an array of props Michael Chen, of Tamari Restaurants; such as rolling cooking trolleys, 36-gallon and David Russo, of the International Culinary School. pots and various kitchen utensils. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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WICKED IS FLYING BACK TO PITTSBURGH.

JANUARY 15 - FEBRUARY 9 BENEDUM CENTER

HURRY FOR THE BEST SEATS Box OfямБce at Theater Square Visit TrustArts.org or call 412-456-4800 Groups 15+ 412-471-6930

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.0901.16.14

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., JAN. 09

{STAGE}

A visiting string quartet drops into town for not one but seven concerts, each at a different venue. The Saturn String Quartet, featuring members of the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, is joined for this mini-tour by Pittsburghbased clarinetist Alex Jones. At stops in Zelienople, Somerset, O’Hara, Fox Chapel, Mount Lebanon and Pittsburgh proper, the group will perform Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet K581 and Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet Op. 115. The performances begin tonight, at Chatham University’s James Laughlin Music Center, and conclude Jan. 15 at Shadyside’s Calvary Episcopal Church. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. (Chatham campus, Shadyside; free). Performances continue through Wed., Jan. 15 (times, venues and admission prices vary). www.facebook.com/ saturnstringquartet

+ FRI., JAN. 10 {ART} Gallerie Chiz launches the new year with a show called

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT FISCHER}

{MUSIC}

JAN. 16 Z Zarina i Zabrisky

media artist. Charlie Green exemplifies the post-graffiti movement. Jeffrey Hovis’ warped, brightly colored, cartoon-like images are influenced by the 1950s’ Cobra Art movement. Teresa Martuccio is inspired by historical biographies and “cute things in nature.” And Cheryl Towers makes or remakes dolls to reflect the variety of their uses in

Edgar Allan Poe was successful in his lifetime, and more than two centuries after his birth, he still ranks among the most influential American writers. But the circumstances of Poe’s death, at age 40, remain a mystery. The latest to speculate on the demise of the man who wrote “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Raven” is Pittsburgh-based actor David Crawford. Crawford, best known as “Dr. Foster” from Night of the Living Dead, wrote and stars in Poe’s Last Night, a new one-man show opening tonight at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Jan. 19. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-30. www.pghplaywrights.com

+ SAT., JAN. 11 {CRAFTS} Nationally known, Pittsburghbased jewelry-maker Olga Mihaylova specializes in beadwork. At today’s Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Second Saturdays Workshop, the Bulgaria-born artist — a previous best-of-show winner at the Three Rivers Arts Festival — shares her skills to help attendees ages 15 and up create an original bracelet. The three-hour workshop is held in the Trust Arts Education Center. BO 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 805807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $50 (includes materials). www.trustarts.org

+ SUN., JAN. 12 {SCREEN}

JAN. 16 H Hidden idd id dd Lawrenceville

RANGOS OMNIMAX THEATER SPONSORED LOCALLY BY:

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Primitive Chic, spotlighting five artists working in the outsider-art tradition. Daniel Belardinelli is an established and widely exhibited mixed-

different cultures. The opening reception is tonight. BO 5:30-8 p.m. 5831 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com

After the hype of holiday blockbusters, slow down at the Hollywood Theater with the Rural Route Film Festival, a touring short-film program whose works highlight the people and places outside of the big city. (Rural Route is based in New York City, but its founders are from Iowa.) Works are documentary, narrative, experimental or archival, and this year’s program of 11 films features:


Free!Event Art by Susan Winicour

Last year, Melissa Hiller, director of Pittsburgh’s American Jewish Museum, was entranced by the work of a local artist she’d never heard of: Susan Winicour, who had died in July, at age 74. Winicour’s work was brought to Hiller’s attention by her predecessor at the museum, artist Leslie Golomb. Winicour specialized in printmaking, and during one period of her life spent up to half of each year in Germany, studying that medium. Winicour was also deeply influenced by German expressionism; what struck Hiller was how Winicour depicted human interaction. Winicour’s work is “very much about the bizarreness of relationships and how hard it is for people to relate to each other,” says Hiller. Starting Jan. 11, the museum (housed in the Jewish Community Center), hosts The Circus of Life: Work by Susan Winicour. The exhibition includes 27 works on paper, both prints and acrylic paintings, mostly from the past two decades. While some of Winicour’s works are literally set at the circus, Hiller titled the exhibit with broader themes in mind: “It’s about the circus of relationships and interaction, and the way we entertain for one another or have masks for different situations.” At the familyfriendly opening reception, Ben Sota, of Pittsburgh’s Zany Umbrella Circus, will perform a new work inspired by Winicour’s images. Bill O’Driscoll 6-8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11 (performance at 7:15 p.m.). 5738 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. 412-521-8011 or www.jccpgh.org

reindeer-herding in Finland; the Northern Lights; birds-nest cams; two Native American brothers who ride in demo derbies; and 1950s Kodachrome footage from the Country Music Hall of Fame. Al Hoff 4 and 7 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $7. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

Wed., Jan. 15); long Chenrezig practice (7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17); and dissolution ceremony (11 a.m. Sat., Jan. 18). 5720 Friendship Ave., Friendship. Free. www.threeriversdharma.org

{WORDS}

A Measure of Blood is Kathleen George’s latest thriller featuring

JAN. 15

+ WED., JAN. 15

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOAN MARCUS}

Wicked Wi i k d

JAN. 10 Primitive Chic

{STAGE}

{RITUAL} Could you use some positive energy? Could the world use “blessings of peace and compassion”? Such is the Pittsburgh Tibetan Cultural Center’s promise regarding construction of its Chenrezig sand mandala at Spinning Plate Gallery. Visitors have a rare opportunity to observe the creation of this traditional artwork, by the Center’s resident lama, Khenpo Choephel, and visiting Lama Konchak Sonam. The opening ceremony is this morning, and you can watch the process daily all week long. On Jan. 18, the sand is ceremonially deposited into a body of moving water. BO 11 a.m. Also 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through Jan. 18. Also: Meditation and talk (7 p.m.

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Pittsburgh Police commander Richard Christie. The book is rife with local settings, from Christie’s Bloomfield home to the Squirrel Hill murder scene and even the University of Pittsburgh theater department, where George is a professor. Measure of Blood is the critically acclaimed George’s seventh mystery novel. She’ll sign copies at today’s book launch, at Mystery Lovers Bookshop. BO 4 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Road, Oakmont. Free; registration requested at 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

Eisenstat, speaking of Lawrenceville, “the neighborhood seems luminous.” The writer and photographer (who notes that his surname means “iron city”) is an enthuasiast for walking Pittsburgh. He describes his presentation Hidden Lawrenceville: An Exhilarating Sphere of Living History as a folk history, “combining strands of autobiography & psychogeography; where industrial anthropology & candid photography meet on the street, down by the waterfront, and wherever the thrall of enigma beckons.” The lecture-with-photos launches the Lawrenceville Historical Society’s 2014 lecture series. BO 7 p.m. McKey Auditorium, Canterbury Place, 310 Fisk St., Lawrenceville. Free. www.lhs15201.org

gets stuck, too. His shoes. His cat. The kitchen sink. An orangutan. Bring the kids to this show by the U.K.’s Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company to learn how he gets out of this sticky situation. Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater presents the local premiere today at the Byham Theater, followed by performances at five area schools. Angela Suico 2 p.m. (101 Sixth St., Downtown). Continues through Sun., Jan. 19 (various locations). $9.50-11 (free for children 2 and under). 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

The touring production of Wicked lands in Pittsburgh. A three-weeks-plus engagement starts tonight at the Benedum Center, courtesy of PNC Broadway Across America. With a book by Winnie Holzman and music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, this Tony-awardwinning hit musical — a Wizard of Oz prequel — focuses on Elphaba, the green-skinned young outcast who grows up to be the

{WORDS}

$39-149. 412-456-2600 or www.trustarts.org

Wicked Witch of the West. She and Glinda the Good Witch become unlikely friends, and the show captures their evolution into two very different women. AS 7:30 p.m. Continues through Feb. 9. 803 Liberty Ave., Downtown.

+ THU., JAN. 16 {TALK} “On a nice day,” says Adam

JAN. 12 Stuck k

{STAGE} In Stuck, Floyd’s kite gets stuck in a tree. And everything he throws to loosen the kite

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According to the San Francisco Chronicle, writer Zarina Zabrisky is “a sensation,” known for her “raucous readings” and loyal followers. Born in the Soviet Union, and with a résumé that includes stints as a street artist, oilfield translator and kickboxing instructor, she’s author of two short-story collections. Her new novel, We, Monsters (Numina Press), is about a soccer mom who becomes a dominatrix in hopes of writing a novel. The acclaimed, San Francisco-based Zabrisky tops the bill at Cold Hands, Hot Writers. Other readers at Brillobox include Berkeley, Calif.-based writer and poet Simon Rogghe, local poet Laura Warman and the event’s organizer, Karen Lillis, who runs pop-up indiepress bookstand Small Press Pittsburgh. BO 7:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. eyescorpion@gmail.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

SOCIAL HOUR 5pmpm-99pm EVERY DAY SIP ON $3 $3 HOUSE- MADE LIQUOR INFUSIONS GULP DOWN $3 $3 CRAFT DRAFT BEERS CHEERS!, CARM & MIKE

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THEATER 2014 STARS OF TOMORROW. Showcase of outstanding high school talent. Sat., Jan. 11, 2 & 7:30 p.m. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. DATING CAN BE MURDER. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. THE DISAPPEARING. Dark comedy presented by The Beat Cabaret. Sat., Jan. 11, 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. PLAID TIDINGS. Forever Plaid Christmas special, presented by Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret. Wed, Thu, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. POE’S LAST NIGHT. Edgar Allan Poe’s greatest mystery is the story of his own death. Thu, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 19, 5 p.m. Thru Jan. 18. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown.

SOUTH SIDE STORIES. Onewoman show portraying the dynamism of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 09 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 10 COMEDY SHOWCASE BY SOLOMON. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. LIANNA CARRERA, ABBY DENTON, MISSY MORENO. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

FRI 10 - SAT 11 IMPROV-O-RAMAGANZA 3. Jan. 10-11, 7:30 p.m. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727.

JOHN HEFFRON. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Jan. 11, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 12, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 11

WED 15

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

THE AMISH MONKEYS. Improv sketch comedy. Second Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. eclectic showroom of fine art 412-243-5201. sculpture & paintings from KNIGHTS OF THE emerging artists. North ARCADE: EPIC Side. 724-797-3302. D&D COMEDY AUGUST WILSON ADVENTURE. Improv CENTER FOR AFRICAN Dungeons & Dragons www. per pa AMERICAN CULTURE. show. 10 p.m. Arcade pghcitym .co Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Comedy Theater, Renew, Remix. Feat. Downtown. 412-339-0608. imagery, film & oral history LARRY THE CABLE GUY. narratives to explore communities, 9:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. cultures, & innovations. 412-392-4900. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY industrial heritage of Southwestern NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Smiling Moose, South Side. Neapolitan Presepio. Nativity scene 412-612-4030. feat. more than 100 human & angelic figures, along w/ animals, accessories, & architectural elements. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MALL AT ROBINSON. CSI Pittsburgh: Fictional Crime Scene. Presented by Pittsburgh Technical

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 14

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FRI 10 -SUN 12

In Pennsylvania, a Groundhog has been predicting the weather for over 125 years and Straub has been brewing for over 140 years. This authentic German-Style AltBier is our 14th Annual Groundhog Brew, and is the perfect warmer against the winter cold.

On tap now at: Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaska Grille-Strip District Redbeard’s-Downtown and Mt. Washington

CONTINUES ON PG. 35

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{COURTESY OF EDWYNN HOUK GALLERY, NEW YORK, AND THE ANONYMOUS COLLECTOR}

“Isabella in the Little Salon, Gardner Museum,” by Abelardo Morell, from Pittsburgh Collects, at Silver Eye Center for Photography

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK

BE GALLERIES. Arcadia. Work by Atticus Adams. Opening reception: Jan. 11, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Anna Brewer. Opening reception: Jan. 11, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. GALLERIE CHIZ. Primitive Chic. Work by Daniel Belardinelli, Charlie Green, Jeffrey Hovis, Teresa Martuccio & Cheryl Towers. Opening reception Jan 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. FUTURE TENANT. Shame of the City: Deconstructing & Reconstructing Comic Narratives. Group exhibition of 23 works of art, each a deconstruction of a single page of the 1984 comic book “The Invincible Iron Man.” Opening reception: Dec. 13, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7037.

ONGOING ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Symphony of Colours. Work by Nadya Lapets, June Kielty, Kim Freithaler & Vickie Schilling. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. www.digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals.

Tarentum. 724-275-7001. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Sandra Benhaim. New work. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Creator of the Future. Work by Matthew Stull. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. THE GALLERY 4. Dwellings. Work by Ryder Henry. Shadyside. 412-363-5050.

GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILLEL JUC. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-621-8875. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/ Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Group show. Saturdays & by appointment. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Interconnected World: Art & Science at the Environmental Charter School. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Adventuring Princesses in Living Color. Work by Maggie Lynn Negrete. Bloomfield. PANZA GALLERY. David A. Ludwig: Structures. Paintings, study sets, & drawings from a 40 year career. Millvale. 412-821-0959. CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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Institute. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Flower Show & Light Garden. Feat. poinsettias, amaryllis, whimsical lights & adornments. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Garden Railroad. Dinosaur-themed train display. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

by the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Autism-Friendly Performance Dec. 27. Sun, 12 & 4:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 15

FUNDRAISERS 15TH ANNUAL TWELFTH NIGHT T ng GALA. Masquerade ball benefiting Chatham Baroque. 7-10 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-687-1788. BREW ‘N CHEW BEER FESTIVAL.. Feat. 10+ breweries, food pairings,, interactive game stations, more. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank & Give Kids the World. www. goodtastepittsburgh.com 1 & 5 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. XTREME BINGO W/ THE PITTSBURGH OPERA. Benefits the Delta Foundation. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-322-2800.

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THU 09 - SUN 12 CARNEGIE TREES 2013: EMBRACING THE ART OF PLAY. 20-foot Colorado spruce trees adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments that celebrate the art of play. Mon, Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 12 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

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SAT 11

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RECIPES OUR MOTHERS GAVE US: THE 2014 GLUE FACTORY PROJECT. Dance theater production created & performed by Maria Cheng, Beth Corning & Francoise Fournier. Presented by Corningworks. 7 p.m., Jan. 16-18, 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 19, 2 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

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SUN 12 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

WED 15 BRADDOCK HILLS HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL PASTA DINNER. 5:30-7 p.m. Braddock Hills High School, Braddock. 412-271-4929.

POLITICS THU 09

wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. MARTHA GRIMES. Author of The Way of All Fish. 7 p.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 888-800-6078. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FULL LIST ONLINE

LITERARY THU 09 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour.

.com

MON 13

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 14

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. MT. LEBANON WRITER’S GROUP. Second Tue of every month, 7 p.m. Thru Feb. 11 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

WED 15 HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF MOUNT LEBANON SPEAKER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

STUCK. Floyd gets his kite stuck up a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck, followed by a ladder, the kitchen sink, & an orangutan! Presented by the Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company. 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

CRITIC: Shaaron Foster, 63,

TUE 14

retired state worker from Harrisburg WHEN: Jan.

TUESDAY CRAFTERNOON. For students in grades 1-3. Tue, 4 p.m. Thru Feb. 25 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

02

WED 15 [It’s] a monologue by Art Rooney about his life in the North Side neighborhood, and the Steelers. [The play was written by Gene Collier and Rob Zellers, and Rooney is played by Tom Atkins.] I went to Pitt from ’68 to ’72 and fell in love with the Steelers. I’m visiting my friends and [the play] seemed like a good, festive thing to do. [My favorite parts] were the anecdotes about Art’s early life on the North Side, things like swimming through Exposition Park and almost drowning in Three Rivers Stadium. [He had] a wry sense of humor, always letting us know what his roots were, and he was not interested in putting on any airs. B Y ANGE L A SU IC O

STUCK. Floyd gets his kite stuck up a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck, followed by a ladder, the kitchen sink, & an orangutan! Presented by the Big Wooden Horse Theatre Company. 7 p.m. Linton Middle School, Penn Hills. 412-456-6666.

OUTSIDE SAT 11

WINTER TRAILS DAY. Snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, more. 10 a.m.3 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 14 SERIES PROGRAM. feat. John Donoghue, author of Fire Under the Ashes: An Atlantic History of the English Revolution. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE SMITHFIELD CRITICS. Rin Tin Tin: The Life And Legend by Susan Orlean. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 19 McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

SAT 11

WED 15

KIDSTUFF

THE ART OF ORIGAMI. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

THU 09 - WED 15

SAT 11 - SUN 12

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor landscape made of 22 miles of packing tape. Thru Jan. 19 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 10

Try it Free!

SUN 12

EVENT: The Chief at Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown

SAT 11

PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green www. per Tree. 412-921-9292. ghcitypa

GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. p Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

OVERNIGHT ADVENTURES: ALL-IN-ONE ADVENTURE. Explore the museum at night by going on a hands-on adventure of exhibitions & get a look at collections that are not normally on display. Ages 6+. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

FRI 10 - SUN 12

SHREK: THE MUSICAL. Fri, Sat,

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 09 ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every

PIRATE PRINCESS ADVENTURE. Interactive musical theater production. Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 2 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DEVELOPING A CORPORATE MENTORING PARTNERSHIP. w/ Dana Gold, Mentoring Partnership of Southwestern PA. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. HEALTHY HAPPY HOUR: NEW YEAR, NEW YOU. Fresh juices & mental/health tips from MyoFitness & Pittsburgh NSBE Professional Chapter. 6-8 p.m. Fresh From The Farm Juices, South Side. 412-773-1436. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. LEADERSHIP CHALLENGE CERTIFICATE INFORMATION SESSION. Thu, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Jan. 16 Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-5600. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. OPEN STUDIO NIGHT. Ages 21+. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.

FRI 10

AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Second CONTINUES ON PG. 38

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The New Collective. PCA all-guild exhibition of current work. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. SiO2: Highschool Reunion. Feat. work by 12 former SiO2 high school students. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce

Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Pittsburgh Collects. 75 selected works contributed by 3 Pittsburgh photography collectors. Conversation w/ collector Evan Mirapaul & closing reception: Jan. 11, 2 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists.

Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


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HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F OR BR A IN I M AG I N G S T U D IES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks. Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

and Third Fri of every month and Fourth and Last Fri of every month Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634.

SAT 11 AFTERNOON TEA DANCE: ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCING. 1-3:30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-535-2078. JEWELRY MAKING. Workshop for those ages 15 & older, led by jewelry artist Olga Mihaylova. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY GRAND OPENING PARTY. 7 p.m. Maggie’s Farm Distillery, Strip District. 724-322-5415. NEW YEAR, NEW YOU HEALTH SCREENINGS. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sam’s Club, Robinson. 412-494-4140. OPEN CERAMICS STUDIO. Produce bowls to donate to Just Harvest’s Empty Bowls fundraiser. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. & 2-4 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. UPCYCLE YOUR STYLE! Workshop for students grade 6, 7 & 8 will be led by Alison K. Babusci. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. WINTER WUNDERGROUND. Live music, body painting, live art, contests, more. Presented by Touchfaster. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811.

SAT 11 - WED 15 PITTSBURGH RV SHOW. www.pittrvshow.com Sat, 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sun, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

[ART]

On Saturday, artist Anna Brewer’s solo show New Works opens at the Christine Frechard Gallery. Brewer discussed her work via email. IS THERE AN OVERARCHING THEME TO THIS SHOW? The themes are embedded in the form and style of the works. There are 10 4-by-4-foot paintings, which have a cultish quality, seemingly encoded with a system of layering that incorporates pop culture, world politics and personal history. WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? My inspiration comes from the process of painting itself. I start by intuitively applying color, pattern and the beginnings of a landscape. From there, I begin to build a world, employing traditional characters such as Red Riding Hood and the Wolf, and my own creations, like the Benevolent Dictator. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. 5871 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888 or www.christinefrechardgallery.com Jan. 13-17, 4-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 19 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-325-6074.

9 a.m.-5 p.m. Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194.

SUN 12

BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GERMAN CONVERSATION. 7:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SAHAJA MEDITATION. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 17 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE FOR BEGINNERS. Second Sun of every month, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Fourth Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THERESA CAPUTO LIVE! Psychic medium & star of the TLC reality series, “Long Island Medium” 3 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SUN 12 - WED 15 SAND MANDALA FOR PEACE. Created by Lama Ven. Khenpo Choephel & Lama Konchak Sonam. Presented by The Pittsburgh Tibetan Cultural Center. Opening ceremony: Jan. 12, noon. Jan. 12-17,

MON 13


TUE 14 BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. Fourth and Second Tue of every month, 6-7:30 p.m. Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry. 412-366-1300. CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:308 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. CRASH COURSE: GET HEALTHY NOW WORKSHOP. Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE HISTORY & IMPACT OF FINANCIAL POWER: THE VAMPIRIC RISE, FALL & RISE AGAIN OF FINANCIAL CAPITALISM. Interactive program comparing the Great Depression to the Great Financial Crisis of 2008. Second Tue of every month, 7 p.m. and Last Sat of every month, 1:30 p.m. Thru Feb. 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. INSTITUTE FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL EXCELLENCE SECOND STEP PROGRAM. Mervis Hall. 7:30-10 a.m. University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-648-1544. OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. REAL-WORLD INSIGHTS: PITT-GREENSBURG 2014 BUSINESS CONFERENCE. Keynote speaker: Daniel J. Wukich, Quest Healthcare Development, Inc. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-837-7040. SOIL ECOLOGY. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SQUIRREL HILL MANSIONS. Speaker: Melanie Linn Gutowski, writer & historian. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. WINES OF SOUTH AFRICA. 6 p.m. Dreadnought Wines, Strip District. 412-391-1709.

SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS BOBCAT PLAYERS. Auditions for the 2014 season. Jan. 11, 16, 18. Cold readings & 1-min. monologue from a play or movie. www. bobcatplayers.com Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 412-953-0237.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook.com/events/ 519459561475242/ 412-256-8109.

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

PITTSBURGH BOTANIC GARDEN

Join the folks at the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden as they transform 460 acres of abandoned mining land in the Oakdale area into a vast botanic garden. The ongoing volunteer event, Grow the Garden Days, features a different project each month: For the Jan. 11 meeting, volunteers will help build a bamboo fence. Call 412-444-4464 or visit www.pittsburghbotanicgarden.org for information.

CARNEGIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Auditions for Peter Pan. Jan. 18. Male/female dancers age 5-adult. www.carnegieperforming artscenter.com/auditions.html Carnegie. 412-279-8887. GEMINI THEATER COMPANY. Auditions for Aladdin. Jan. 13-14. Adults/students age 10+, cold readings & 1-2 min. a capella song. www.geminitheater.org Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for Noel Coward’s comedy, Hay Fever. Jan. 19. DETROIT STYLE URBAN Cold readings from the script. BALLROOM DANCE. www.bphp.org. Seton 3rd floor. Wed, Center, Brookline. 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna 412-254-4633. House, Wilkinsburg. MCKEESPORT 412-242-4345. LITTLE THEATER. ENGLISH www. per pa Auditions for CONVERSATION (ESL). pghcitym .co Amish Burlesque. Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Feb. 1 & 3. 2-min. Lebanon Public Library, comedic monologue & Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 32 bars of up-tempo Broadway/ EXPLORING THE CHEESE pop song. Bring your own AGING PROCESS THROUGH sheet music. www.mckeesport PARMIGIANO REGGIANO. Learn littletheater.com McKeesport. how & where cheese is made, & its 412-673-1100. importance in cooking & history. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Call to reserve a spot. 7 p.m. East Auditions for The Importance End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. of Being Earnest. Jan. 25-26. 412-242-3598. Males/females age 20-65. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice www.primestage.com/about/ conversational English. Wed, auditions.html The Oakland 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. School, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SWEET ADELINES THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. INTERNATIONAL. Seeking women A meeting of jugglers & spinners. of all ages who enjoy singing for All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. the Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Global Open House. Any woman

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of average singing ability, with or without vocal training is welcome. www.soundsofpgh.org Mon, 7 p.m. 412-279-6062. TRIB TOTAL MEDIA. Auditions for the Trib Total Media Young Artists Competition. Register recorded auditions by Jan. 13, live auditions held on Feb. 2. www.westmorelandsymphony.org 724-837-1850.

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BLAST FURNACE. Seeking poems with the theme of the mysterious and the magical in the everyday for Blast Furnace Volume 4, issue 1. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems. Visit blastfurnace.submittable.com/ Submit for submission guidelines. Deadline: March 15. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Seeking artwork for upcoming Mid-Winter Hues Multi-Media Juried Art Exhibit. Submit recent work (3 pieces max.) that has not been in a previous juried show at NHAC. Each piece must be ready for display/hanging w/ wire. Art may be delivered Jan. 30-Feb. 1, noon-4 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

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EXCLUSIVE GENTLEMAN’S CLUB 412.904.3191 1620 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. 5 blocks from Casino - Off of Beaver Ave. “The Penthouse Club” and 3-Key logo are registered trademarks of General Media Communications, Inc., and are used under license.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.08-01.15

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Can you guess what combination of colors makes the most vivid visual impact? Psychologists say it’s black on yellow. Together they arrest the eye. They command attention. They activate a readiness to respond. According to my reading of the astrological omens, this is the effect you can and should have in the coming weeks. It’s time for you to draw the best kind of attention to yourself. You have a right and a duty to galvanize people with the power of your presence. Whether you actually wear yellow clothes with black highlights is optional as long as you cultivate a similar potency.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m guessing that in a metaphorical sense, you’ve been swallowed by a whale. Now you’re biding your time in the beast’s belly. Here’s my prediction: You will be like the Biblical Jonah, who underwent a more literal version of your experience. The whale eventually expelled him, allowing him to return to his life safe and sound — and your story will have the same outcome. What should you do in the meantime? Here’s the advice that Dan Albergotti gives in his poem “Things to Do in the Belly of the Whale.” “Count the ribs,” he says. “Look up for blue sky through the spout. Make small fires with the broken hulls of fishing boats. Practice smoke signals. Call old friends. Organize your calendar. Dream of the beach. Review each of your life’s ten million choices. Find the evidence of those before you. Listen for the sound of your heart. Be thankful that you are here, swallowed with all hope, where you can rest and wait.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): How do you like your tests? Short, intense and

dramatic? Or leisurely, drawn-out and lowpressure? Here’s another question: Do you prefer to pick out the tests you take, making sure they’re good fits for the precise lessons you want to master? Or do you find it more exciting and adventurous to let fate determine what unpredictable tests get sent your way? Ruminate about these matters, Pisces. You’re due for a nice big test sometime soon, and it’s in your interest to help shape and define how everything unfolds.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You can blame it on the coming full moon. You can blame it on the gorgeous storm or the epic dream or the haunting song or the suffering you’re struggling to vanquish. All I ask is that you don’t blame it on the alcohol. OK? If you’re going to do wild and brave and unexpected things, make sure they are rooted in your vigorous response to primal rhythms, not in a drunken surrender to weakness or ignorance. I’m all for you losing your oppressive self-control, but not the healthy kind of self-control.

get your yoga on!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When is the last time you did an experiment? I’m not talking about scientific tests and trials that take place in a laboratory. I’m referring to real-life experiments, like when you try out an unfamiliar experience to see if it appeals to you … or when you instigate a change in your routine to attract unpredictable blessings into your sphere. Now would be an excellent time to expose yourself to a few what-ifs like that. You’re overdue to have your eyes opened, your limits stretched, and your mind blown.

ideas.” I’m sure there was a person like that in your past — someone who disparaged and discouraged you. But I’m happy to report that 2014 will be the best year ever for neutralizing and overcoming that naysayer’s curse. If you have not yet launched your holy crusade, begin now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

To help take the edge off the darkness you have been wrestling with, I offer you these lines from a poem by Kay Ryan: “The day misspent, / the love misplaced, / has inside it / the seed of redemption. / Nothing is exempt / from resurrection.” In other words, Gemini, whatever has disappeared from your life will probably return later in a new form. The wrong turns you made may lead you to a fresh possibility. Is that what you want? Or would you prefer that the lost things stay lost, the dead things stay dead? Make a decision soon.

As a child, French philosopher and writer Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) loved math. But his father, who homeschooled him, forced him to forego math and concentrate on studying the humanities. Blaise rebelled. When he was 12 years old, he locked himself in his room for days and immersed himself in mathematical investigations. When he emerged, he had figured out on his own some of Euclid’s fundamental theorems about geometry. Eventually, he became a noted mathematician. I see the coming weeks as prime time to do something like the young Pascal did: Seal yourself away from other people’s opinions about who you’re supposed to be, and explore the themes that will be crucial for the person you are becoming.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

“Human beings are often unable to receive because we do not know what to ask for,” says the writer Malidoma Somé in his book Water and Spirit. “We are sometimes unable to get what we need because we do not know what we want.” With that in mind, Cancerian, hear my two pleas: first, that in the next six weeks, you will work diligently to identify the goodies you want most; and second, that you will cultivate your capacity to receive the goodies you want most by refining your skill at asking for them.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Julia Morgan (1872-1957) was the first woman licensed as an architect in California. She designed more than 700 buildings in the course of her brilliant career, and thrived both financially and artistically. One key to her success was her humility. “Don’t ever turn down a job because it’s beneath you,” she advised. That’s a helpful message for you to hear, Leo. It applies to the work-related opportunities you may be invited to take on, as well as the tasks that your friends, associates and loved ones ask you to consider. You can’t possibly know ahead of time how important it might ultimately be to apply yourself conscientiously to a seemingly small assignment.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of Beethoven’s music teachers said, “As a composer, he is hopeless.” When Thomas Edison was a kid, a teacher told him he was “too stupid to learn anything.” Walt Disney worked at a newspaper when he was young, but his editor fired him because “he lacked imagination and had no good

In 1609, Dutch sea explorer Henry Hudson sailed to America and came upon what we now call Coney Island. Back then it was a barren spit of sand whose main inhabitants were rabbits. But it was eventually turned into a dazzling resort — an “extravagant playground,” according to the documentary film Coney Island. By the early 20th century, there were three sprawling amusement parks packed into its two square miles of land, plus “a forest of glittering electric towers, historical displays, freak shows, a simulated trip to the moon, the largest herd of elephants in the world and panoramas showing the Creation, the End of the World and Hell.” I mention this, Scorpio, because 2014 could feature your very own Henry Hudson moment: a time when you will discover virgin territory that will ultimately become an extravagant playground.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If men had wings and bore black feathers, few of them would be clever enough to be crows,” said 19th-century social reformer Henry Ward Beecher. That might be an accurate assessment for most people, but I don’t think it will be true for you Sagittarians in the foreseeable future. Your animal intelligence will be working even better than usual. Your instinctual inclinations are likely to serve as reliable guides to wise action. Trust what your body tells you! You will definitely be clever enough to be a crow. Imagine that one of your heroes comes to you and says, “Teach me the most important things you know.” What do you say? FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 43 + STUDIES 43 + LIVE 43 + SERVICES 45 + WELLNESS 46

WORK HELP WANTED $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

HELP WANTED Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

LIVE

CLINICAL STUDIES

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

OBESITY?

CONSTIPATION?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

CLINICAL STUDIES Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

412-650-6155

412.363.1900 CTRS

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

412.363.1900 CTRS

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

VOLUNTEERS

Cervical Cancer Prevention

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read.

There’s a vaccine for that!

Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

SmokING STUDY University of Pittsburgh

Smokers who want to try new cigarettes that may or may not lead to reduced smoking are wanted for a research study. This is NOT a treatment or smoking cessation study. Compensation will be provided.

HPV vaccine has the power to protect females from a devastating form of cancer. HPV vaccination is recommended for girls at age 11-12 years and can be given up to age 26.

For more information please call The Nicotine & Tobacco Research Lab at

412-624-9999

Learn more at ImmunizeAllegheny.org

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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HAPPS

Ink Well

DOUBLE-O

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

Download the App for a chance to win tickets to:

JAY Z Magna Carter World Tour at CONSOL Energy Center Tuesday, January 21

DOWNLOAD NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

Brought to you by: 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

ACROSS

1. Sites of many a college experiment 6. Run the roast 11. Orthodontist’s deg. 14. As perfect as perfect can be 15. Sales goal 16. Period of literary style, e.g. 17. Ocean floor dweller that vomits in self-defense 19. Dairy product often mixed with brandy in December 20. Chili pepper, e.g. 21. Rack spec 22. Walgreens alternative 23. What a fan might bring to the stadium to cheer for a series sweep 26. Suffix with Roman or Arab 30. Enviable position, probably 33. Life or death 34. Safe time to eat shellfish, in an adage 36. “Where ___ they now?” 37. One who completed a major, say 38. Fluffy clouds 39. FX technology used in cinematic virtual worlds 40. Take-home from the mortuary 41. Sharpness 42. Game with trump cards 43. Badminton call 44. Mexican food wrapped in a corn husk 45. Opening of a sewage-filled pool? 46. H1N1, e.g. 48. War on Terror

prison, briefly 49. Island in the East China Sea 50. 2014 Orange Bowl team: Abbr. 52. Men’s 100-meter sprint record holder 54. Jerks 59. Pseudonym for Norma McCorvey, in a landmark 1972 case 60. Pre-configured Windows folder 63. Wu-Tang Clan co-founder 64. Japanese carmaker with the Rodeo 65. Use, as plates 66. Standing on the street? 67. Hardwood tree 68. Suit up

DOWN

1. Laser___ 2. Ancient Greek theaters 3. Bring in from the field 4. Computers that currently come with Mavericks 5. Flow controller 6. Play about a boy and his horse 7. Big name in champagne 8. Inner part of a 10-Down 9. French summer 10. See 8-Down 11. Patch-covered punk apparel 12. Noted TV snake oil salesman 13. Wise 18. 205, to Septimius Severus 21. Source of vegan protein

23. Surrealist director Luis 24. Letters granted automatically on “Wheel of Fortune” 25. “Hey, I didn’t see you there” 26. Swallow, as with flames 27. Light reddish-brown, as some horse coats 28. Scott Bakula time travel show 29. Die Welt connector 30. They’re meant to make you pause 31. Climax that may be simultaneous, as in three places in this grid 32. “Go ahead,” archaically 34. Driverless racers 35. Outfit in the “Simpsons” episode “King-Size Homer” 41. Grinding away 42. Course guide abbr.

47. What Jack Napier fell into, to become the Joker 48. Chewed without teeth 50. Take place 51. Burmese politician/ activist Aung San ___ Kyi 52. “WTF global warming??” 53. Slow flow 54. Keyser ___ (Kevin Spacey role in “The Usual Suspects”) 55. Tough test, as it were 56. Stakes before the deal 57. Pontiac muscle cars 58. Email scam targets, for short 60. Sri LankanBritish rapper 61. Initials of a famed Algerian-born designer 62. Firework that doesn’t fire

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


SERVICES AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Create-S-Team Academy of Music and Theater Creatively Promoting Self-Esteem through Music and Theater

AUDITIONS Seeking male and female vocalists to perform in A musical tribute to Ms. Aretha Franklin Auditions held on 1/23/14 at 6:30p.m.

Call 412.506.7510 for more information

ADOPTION PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Advertise Here Today!

Your ad could be here

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

TAYLOR ALLDERDICE HIGH SCHOOL • Building Identification Sign General and Electrical Primes • New Science Laboratories General, Asbestos, Plumbing, HVAC and Electrical Primes

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

PITTSBURGH ARSENAL PRE K-8 • Replacement of Boiler Feed Unit Mechanical Prime Contract

ADOPTION

Popular College Counselor and School Admin. Travel, Sports, Museums, await 1st Baby. Expenses Paid Annie & David 1-800-513-0931

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on February 4, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

CLASSES

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

412.316.3342

NOW HIRING FOR

PITTSBURGH BEECHWOOD PRE K-5 • Coal Hole Elec. Re-bid Electrical Prime PITTSBURGH LINDEN K-5 • New Elevator and Stair Tower Additions General, Asbestos, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes PITTSBURGH MIFFLIN PRE K-8 • Replacement of Boiler Feed Unit Mechanical Prime Contract

Display Sales Representative

BARACK OBAMA • Building Identification Sign General and Electrical Primes

Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson.

PITTSBURGH WHITTIER K-5 • Elevator Addition General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes

If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on January 6, 2014 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716 www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

Zhangs Massage

MIND & BODY Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

STAR

412-441-1185

Superior Chinese Massage

Free Table Shower w/60min 1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

412-401-4110

$40/hr 322 Fourth Ave.

Downtown M-F prkg free after 4pm Sat-Sun prkg free all day

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s

Aming’s Massage Therapy

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

WELLNESS CENTER

J&S

Chinese Bodyworks

GLASS

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

China Massage

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs

$60/hr FREE Table Shower

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 (Next to PNC Bank) Call for more information

Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

724-519-7896

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1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.08/01.15.2014

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!


SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

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Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat. Most insurances Accepted Including Access Card

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Squirrel Hill Office NOW OPEN! 1900 Murray Ave, Ste. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Please Call: 412-359-9257

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Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

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• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

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412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

N E W S

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TA S T E

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M U S I C

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LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Beaver County

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Addictions

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

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C L A S S I F I E D S

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January 8, 2014