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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 01.01/01.08.2014

BABY BOOM: NEW IDEAS FOR A NEW PITTSBURGH 06


EVENTS 1.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in Warhol lot

1.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, THE NOX BOYS Warhol entrance space Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in Warhol lot

1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in Warhol lot

1.28 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: DAMIEN JURADO, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, COURTNEY MARIE ANDREWS Warhol theater Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in Warhol lot

2.8 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: JULIANNA BARWICK Warhol theater Co-presented with VIA Music & New Media Festival Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in Warhol lot

TH ROUG H JAN UARY 12

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014


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01.01/01.08.2014

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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern BRETT WILSON

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[NEWS] entire planet cannot revolve 06 “The around our momentary convenience.� — State Sen. Daylin Leach on why we should reduce our reliance on plastic bags, just one of our New Ideas for the New Year

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and an off-kilter subplot about a new-agey feminist camp, Jane Campionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top of the Lake turned over a lot of unsettling rocks.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Al Hoff on some great TV in 2013

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[ARTS] energy level never fell below 24 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The frenetic as the ensemble â&#x20AC;&#x201D; mostly cast in multiple roles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; overfilled the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new home at Off the Wall Theater.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michelle Pilecki on No Name Playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Viva Los Bastarditos!, from her list of 2013â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;most surprising productionsâ&#x20AC;?

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“THE ENTIRE PLANET CANNOT REVOLVE AROUND OUR MOMENTARY CONVENIENCE.”

FEEDBACK Notable quotes from 2013 that made you wonder, “What were they thinking?”

NEW IDEAS FOR A NEW YEAR

“I think a much better analogy would have been brother and sister, don’t you?” — Oct. 4 quote from Gov. Tom Corbett, comparing same-sex marriage to incest

Pittsburgh is gearing up for new leadership with new ideas. We offer some of our own suggestions to get the new year off on the right foot.

“[Nelson Mandela] was fighting against some great injustice, and I would make the argument that we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people’s lives — and Obamacare is front and center in that.” — Dec. 6 quote from Rick Santorum to Bill O’Reilly, comparing the Affordable Care Act to apartheid

“Congrats to Tim McNulty and the tremendous work of the entire team from [executive editor] David Shribman on down. You really blew the cover off of this one. Yawn…” — April 30 comment from Mayor Luke Ravenstahl on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s website, about a story revealing that Ravenstahl was funding attack ads against Bill Peduto

NEW IDEA

PLACE A SURCHARGE ON DISPOSABLE BAGS Pittsburghers use more than 100 million bags each year {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

“His talking about that on the House floor would have been an open rebellion against almighty God and God’s word, against God’s law. And as a Christian, if I would have sat there and been silent, it would have violated my conscience because of my beliefs as a Christian.” — June 28 quote from GOP state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, about why he silenced a colleague on the House floor who wanted to speak in favor of marriage equality

“No, we do not have any staff members in there. If you can find us one, please let me know.” — May 17 quote from Gov. Tom Corbett, upon being asked if any members of his cabinet were Hispanic

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SK LOGAN WELDE about the state’s top environmental problems, and you won’t hear him talk about single-use bags. But ask him to name a problem that can be solved with a relatively minor change in incentives, and paper and plastic inch closer to the top of the list. “It’s something that’s such a big part of our lives,” says Welde, a staff attorney at the Clean Air Council. “[Consumers] have literally always accepted that it’s a free thing — people don’t even consider that it’s [bad] for the environment.” Welde has been pushing legislation in Philadelphia that would reduce singleuse bags by levying a fee on them. If Pittsburgh followed suit, he says, it would significantly reduce urban litter, raise home values in poorer neighborhoods and grease the wheels for action at the state level.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

And even though he works for an environmental organization, “I hardly mention the environmental costs because people tend to look at you as a tree-hugger and write you off,” he says. Yes, there’s a mass of plastic debris in the Pacific Ocean twice the size of Texas. And yes, marine creatures often confuse the plastic for food, ingesting small pieces that kill them or make their way into the food supply. The bags’ fossil-fuel-intensive production and delivery pollutes the air … and every single plastic bag that has ever been manufactured — trillions overall — will

last for hundreds, if not thousands, of years before degrading. Still, Welde acknowledges, “Paper or plastic?” just doesn’t produce much handwringing at the checkout counter. So Welde stresses arguments that he thinks should persuade libertarian critics, some of whom argue the government shouldn’t meddle with another “sin tax.” Put simply: Cities are spending millions of dollars on cleaning up litter, Welde says, a cost that taxpayers can’t opt out of. Based on census data and conservative estimates of bag use per person, Welde


estimates that Pittsburghers use more than 100 million bags each year. That amounts to about $3 million in avoidable litter collection costs in Pittsburgh — and nearly $15 million in Philadelphia, he says. And the free market doesn’t appear to be accounting for those costs. AT GIANT EAGLE, for instance, customers

who bring reusable bags face no economic incentive to do so — the costs are simply built in to the business model, and the local grocery chain doesn’t appear to be considering a change in its policy. “A decision has been made: We’re going to offer customers a choice” between paper and plastic, spokesman Dick Roberts says, noting the company offers reusable bags and has a plastic-bag recycling program. State Sen. Daylin Leach introduced a bill earlier this year that would nudge consumers toward reusable bags at larger retailers like Giant Eagle by instituting a 2-cent-per-bag fee on plastic bags. The reve nu e wo u ld be ear marke d f or sustainability efforts at the state level and in the retail stores themselves. “The entire planet cannot revolve around our momentary convenience,” Leach says. “If a bag was given out at the Battle of Hastings, it would still be around.” But unlike the Norman conquest of England, the bill seems unlikely to take the Republican-controlled legislature by storm. The bill hasn’t been brought up for a vote in committee, while critics say

Leach’s bill doesn’t go far enough: A 2-cent fee wouldn’t dramatically change consumer behavior, the complaint goes, especially since his measure doesn’t impose a cost for paper bags. “Given the political climate, I thought we’d be modest,” Leach says. Given partisan gridlock at the state and federal levels, cities like Pittsburgh can be laboratories to experiment with public policy. “Pushing on the state level will take time,” says Erika Staaf, of PennEnvironment. “And what better way to build momentum by passing it city by city, municipality by municipality?” A fee in Pittsburgh would hardly be the first: Washington, D.C.’s bag fee took effect in 2010. But a local fee could help finance other environmental initiatives Bill Peduto hopes to accomplish when he takes the city’s highest office. By Welde’s accounting, a 5-cent fee would generate around $500,000 for the city each year; a 25-cent fee could net between $1.3 and $2.1 million. That’s a lot of LED streetlights. Perhaps more importantly to people like Welde, a successful bag fee can open doors down the road by demonstrating that simple behavioral changes lead to tangible improvements to their cities. Even if no one is asking you to give up your car, maybe you’ll be convinced to ditch regular use of bottled water or largely unread phone books. “It’s kind of an educational step,” he says.

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BRING NEW IDEA OPEN311 TO PITTSBURGH Technology would improve how the city receives, reacts to citizens’ needs {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} THIS WINTER, if you want to find out if your street has been cleared of snow, there’s an app for that. With the ClearStreets online application, users can enter their address to see in real time which streets have been plowed in their area and when other streets will be plowed. Unfortunately, this app isn’t available in Pittsburgh. It’s part of the city of Chicago’s Open311 system, which uses technology to increase openness, innovation, and accountability in city services. In several major cities, like Pittsburgh, 311 is a number residents can call to request non-emergency city services to deal with problems like potholes, graffiti or broken street lights.

The idea of Open311, adopted by Chicago and other cities around the country, is to help increase the efficiency of these services while providing the public with data on the city’s service delivery. Open311 is designed to reduce the number of calls to 311 call centers, the number of duplicate calls and caller wait times, by offering the public different methods for requesting 311 services. “We wanted to spark civic innovation in the city,” says Daniel O’Neil, executive director of Smart Chicago Collaborative, the organization that helped launch Open311 in Chicago. With an Open311 system, developers can create apps that enable the public to submit service requests and check the status of their requests. For instance, with the Chicago Works application, residents can submit photos with their service requests and monitor progress through the city’s Service Tracker system. “There is a great will to do these types of projects,” says O’Neil, who believes governments are often hesitant to implement Open311 because their technology is outdated. “The government workers I know are all really open to this, but it’s difficult to do because there are budgetary constraints.”

2009, the city beat others around the country when it launched iBurgh, the first app of its kind, which allowed residents to report issues such as potholes and graffiti to the 311 Response Center. But the app is no longer operational. “We had a slew of problems getting the data to transfer into a database where we could access it and address the issue,” says Wendy Urbanic, coordinator for the city’s 311 Response Center. “We are excited about the prospect of getting a mobile application that performs as well as our citizens deserve, but I have no indication of how soon that might happen.” Other city officials have already taken notice of what’s happening in Chicago. As incoming District 8 Councilor Dan Gilman prepares to take office, he says advancing technology in city services will be a top priority. “I will be working with Mayor [Bill] Chicago’s Open311 app, Chicago Works Peduto’s new leadership team and organiChicago was aided in its efforts by Code zations like Code for America to implement for America, a nonprofit that pairs munici- programs like this in Pittsburgh,” says pal governments with developers to create Gilman of Open311. “However, we will not new web-based technologies. By utilizing just be looking to copy what other cities this program, Pittsburgh’s government have done, but instead focusing on new technology that Pittsburgh can use to be a could bring Open311 to the city. This idea isn’t new to Pittsburgh. In national leader.” RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014


OPEN THE WABASH TUNNEL TO CYCLISTS

QUICK HITS

NEW IDEA

Five quick ideas to mull over in 2014

NEW IDEAS

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH AND AL HOFF}

Long-underused tunnel could help create urban hub {BY CHRIS POTTER} Could bikes also use the tunnel?

THE STORY OF bike commuting in Pitts-

burgh is arguably a tale of two cities. In some neighborhoods, new bike lanes and riverfront trails have carved out more room for cyclists. But if you’re in the city’s South Hills, those improvements might as well be happening in a different time zone. While East End arteries like Fifth Avenue still might not be exactly bike-friendly, South Hills thoroughfares like Route 19 are practically suicidal. Even if a cyclist negotiates them successfully, Mount Washington awaits: Going over it requires hundreds of feet of vertical climb; going through it requires either driving a car or riding a bus or light-rail vehicle. But what if cyclists could use the Wabash Tunnel instead? Operated by the Port Authority, the tunnel lies about a third of the way from the Fort Pitt Tunnel to the Liberty Tubes. It delves into the mountainside just off Saw Mill Run Boulevard, emerging across the street from Station Square. In recent years, it’s been used as an HOV lane for rush-hour commuters carrying at least one passenger. But while two lanes are painted on the roadway, there’s only enough clearance to allow traffic in one direction at a time. So the tunnel is always half-empty at best … and it’s usually much emptier than that. “We’ve been hearing from many cyclists who would like to see access to the Wabash Tunnel,” says Scott Bricker, executive director of cycling-advocacy group Bike Pittsburgh. “So many people in the South Hills are interested in biking from there into the city. But that means going up and over Mount Washington, which is formidable unless you’re a really strong cyclist.” The tunnel could offer a dramatic cycling experience. At more than 3,300 feet long, the Wabash is roughly the same length as the Great Allegheny Passage’s Big Savage Tunnel, near the Pennsylvania/

Maryland border. And though the Wabash offers a less impressive view of the Golden Triangle than you’ll find emerging from the Fort Pitt Tunnel, cyclists would get to experience a bit of the scenery that car-commuters take for granted. Converting the Wabash would not be easy. For one thing, notes Port Authority spokesman Jim Ritchie, the tunnel was renovated for HOV use with funding from the Federal Transit Authority … and those dollars have strings attached. Even routine changes to tunnel operations — like an initiative to expand access during a construction project on West Carson Street — got snarled in months of red tape. Then there are ongoing maintenance costs, and the challenge of reaching the tunnel in the first place. “You have to look at access,” Bricker says. “Saw Mill Run is hugely busy and dangerous.” Bricker says there may be more cost-effective ways to help South Hills cyclists, like bikeparking facilities at light-rail stations and other amenities to facilitate multi-modal transportation with the Port Authority. On the other hand, “It’s not a crazy idea at all,” says Bricker — and it’s certainly not the worst one in the tunnel’s history. The Wabash was built in the early 1900s for a railroad that later went bankrupt. It was later envisioned as a key link for the Port Authority’s now-notorious “Skybus” project, which was scuttled, and then for the West Busway, which was re-routed. Other proposed uses — like turning the tunnel into an underground cocktail lounge, or a giant bowling alley — have also failed to materialize, even when they were serious. It may be time for cyclists to have their turn. And while converting the tunnel would be an uphill climb, it’s hard to imagine it could be any steeper than Mount Washington itself.

“SO MANY PEOPLE IN THE SOUTH HILLS ARE INTERESTED IN BIKING FROM THERE INTO THE CITY.”

Sometimes the key to coming up with a big, new idea is throwing a bunch of little ideas against the wall to see what sticks. So here are a handful of proposals for making Pittsburgh a better place, some very simple and others that might be a bit more outside the box.

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Last year, a lot was made of Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald’s notion that buses should be rerouted from the heart of Downtown. He had half a good idea: Instead of buses, cars should be removed from the Downtown area. Gridlock would be eliminated, as would the exhaust from thousands of idling cars every day. Certain streets beyond the main thoroughfares could even be turned into green space or permanent food-truck parks, complete with al fresco dining.

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Citizens often feel like they don’t have enough input into decisions made

by government officials. We should follow the lead of several British cities and install Citizens Panels. The panels — which can vary in size from a couple of dozen people up to a couple of thousand — take surveys and attend community discussions about quality-of-life concerns and other issues affecting the city. And legislators actually take their advice to heart when making decisions.

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One of the most frustrating parts of riding a Port Authority bus is being stuck on the back of a crowded bus and being unable to exit through the back door. The agency needs to change that by allowing ConnectCard users to pay their fares and exit through the backdoor. It would save time and encourage more riders to get ConnectCards, which we assume is what Port Authority has wanted all along.

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Pittsburgh is the City of Bridges, so why not connect two of the three sister bridges that span the Allegheny River with a pedestrian bridge? It would be a great marketing tool: “Even our bridges have bridges.”

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The city has spent a lot of time and money on new walkways along the rivers. How about a few picnic tables to allow people to enjoy their lunch or an afternoon picnic without sitting in goose poop? CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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LESS MEAT AND DAIRY {BY CHRIS POTTER} If there was one New Year’s Resolution worth keeping, it might be to consume less meat and dairy. There are the animals to think about, not to mention your own health and the threat of global climate change. (Some studies estimate that more than half of all carbon emissions come from livestock.) But, c’mon … meat! Cheese! Meat! Joe Calabrese, who launched VeganABC with his wife Michele and son Matt this past summer, feels your pain. “I hate to say it, but I love good fried chicken,” says Calabrese, who operates a stall at the Strip District’s Pittsburgh Public Market. That’s one reason VeganABC offers hearty fare like vegan pulled “pork” and “chicken” salad in sandwiches or take-home containers. But Calabrese says recovering carnivores and dairy-lovers can take other transitional steps, too. For example, blend cashews with a double measure of water to replace cream in recipes. (Soak cashews overnight to ease blending). Or order a take-out pizza with no cheese, so you can add vegan toppings like ersatz sausage with a blend of dairy-free “cheeses.” The flavors will “not be what you’re used to,” Calabrese acknowledges. But if you’re going vegan, you should “be open to options.” And remember that paring your consumption of animal-products need not be an all-or-nothing proposition, Calabrese adds: “Every step you can make helps make the world a little better.” CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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WE’VE BEEN TO SUPPOSEDLY BETTER RESTAURANTS WITH FAR LESSER SERVICE

UPSCALE PUB GRUB

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

O

N THE fine-dining spectrum, it

used to be that at one end were the white-tablecloth establishments serving multiple, tiny, exquisite courses, and at the other end were sports bars slinging quarter-pound — or bigger — burgers. There have always been some worthy contenders in the latter category, but often, it seemed that the measure of food quality in taverns lagged far behind the square footage of television screens. Lately, however, we’ve seen the trend toward high-end bar food blurring the distinction between fine dining and pub grub. Even if it stretches your sensibilities to call a burger “fine,” the fact that even sports bars are now connected to farmers’ markets is an indisputable fact. Urban Tap, which recently entered the East Carson Street fraternity at a relatively mature level, has us pondering such matters. Though it’s wallpapered in giant TVs, the restaurant’s brick, steel and wood decor evokes post-industrial chic, smartly accessorized by a staff clad in tight, allblack casualwear. The menu is mostly

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

Braised short-rib burger

devoid of sports-bar clichés (only wings and nachos, both in upgraded forms, reminded us of classic bar menus), but there’s nothing to challenge a sports fan’s palate either. Perhaps this is the end state of America’s foodie moment: We haven’t all achieved enlightenment, but everyone strives for better than jalapeño poppers.

URBAN TAP

1209 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-7499 HOURS: Daily 11 a.m.-2 a.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads and sandwiches $5-13; entrees $12-32 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED The more time we spent at Urban Tap, the more depth we came to appreciate. The entrees were protein-centric, no doubt, but firm, tender grouper topped with roastedtomato-and-red-pepper chutney was a far cry from a fried-fish sandwich with tartar sauce, and duck confit poutine was several steps more refined than canned gravy over fries. Meanwhile, each interaction

with the staff revealed additional levels of knowledge paired with the perfect mix of friendliness, accommodation and professionalism. We’ve been to supposedly better restaurants with far lesser service. This, and the food itself, pushed Urban Tap close to the fine-dining end of the spectrum, even without a white tablecloth in sight. The poutine — with duck gravy, no less — was rich and satisfying, with pliant meat and creamy melted cheese over firm, crispy fries; if it needed a sprinkle of salt, that was preferable to its being overseasoned in the kitchen. Mac-and-cheese with smoked Gouda featured hearty, artisanalstyle pasta in a cheese sauce that wasn’t off-puttingly smoky, although it could have been a touch creamier. A burger topped with pork belly, pancetta, short rib and a finely shredded slaw gave credence to Urban Tap’s slogan, “Saahside’s Finest.” The burger would have stood well on its own, especially with the tender, rich brioche bun, but its toppings elevated it to near-decadence, the belly unctuous, the slaw subtly tart. A mass of shoestring fries


alongside were flavorful and tender, but the ratio between soft and crisp was slightly off: Just a few more golden-crusted fries would have been ideal. A big rib-eye steak is a standard menu item, but a slightly larger, 28-day aged cut was featured during our visit, and Jason dug in. It was hard to tell which was more satisfying: the big flavor of the aged cut, or the extraordinary char on the surface. This encompassed both bits of true crust and areas that were merely browned, providing variety rather than intensity. The only flaw was one inherent to rib-eye: The deckle, that especially tasty rim of meat, was a touch gristly from being seared. We don’t blame the kitchen for that, but merely note that’s why this cut — the same one that yields prime rib — is more famously slow-roasted. A puddle of chipotle-inflected sauce was tasty but superfluous, while the side of rapini was simply, honestly steamed to a firm bright green.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

VINTAGE PERFORMANCE Locals clear hurdles on way to joining elite circle of wine pros

“Marbled” potatoes, small wedges of white and blue potatoes, were somehow browned outside while remaining a bit firm, rather than fluffy, within. When we mentioned this to our server, she eagerly offered to replace them with an alternative. The only real misstep was short-rib nachos. Despite diced, not shredded, beef and a super-creamy candied-jalapeño queso over delicate chips, this was brought down by pico de gallo made with sad, December tomatoes and a slaw that seemed to favor insubstantial romaine over cabbage. At a humbler establishment, this dish could have been a highlight, but here — and at these prices — it was a letdown. With flattering lighting, top-notch service and excellent food, Urban Tap elevates tavern dining about as high as it can go before we have to dress up for dinner.

To advance to the top of the Court of Master Sommeliers, a wine professional needs to pass four levels of challenging examinations. The pinnacle achievement is to become a Master Sommelier, a title held by only 135 people in North America. And some locals are taking steps to join their ranks — someday. Becoming a master “is like getting your BA, your MA, and [then] your Ph.D.,” says Sarah Thomas of Bar Marco, who just passed the Level One “Introductory” examination. And she hopes to advance to the next level as quickly as she can. “When you have this body of knowledge, it means you can make your customers’ experiences that much better,” she says. The same day Thomas took her test in Baltimore, Alyssa McGrath of Dish Osteria was working her way through the Level Two exam in Laguna Beach, Calif. Those who pass Level Two are awarded the distinction “Certified Sommelier,” of which there were only six in Pittsburgh. McGrath had to pass three tests to advance: tasting, theory and service. “The theory part was the most daunting to me,” she says. But she passed — theory and all — and is now looking toward Level Three next year. Both women agree that the role of a wine director is becoming increasingly important at Pittsburgh restaurants. “It’s part of the forward momentum we have with the restaurant world in our city,” says McGrath. The knowledge and skill required to advance grows significantly with each level. In fact, it’s a common practice for budding sommeliers to carry a stack of flashcards around with them. For Thomas, though, it’s all par for the course: She has an academic background and takes a scholarly approach to the process — often studying at a university library. And with this field of study, there’s a little bonus at the end of the day: “The nice thing now is I get to come home and study with a glass of wine … and I don’t feel bad about that.”

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“IT’S PART OF THE FORWARD MOMENTUM WE HAVE WITH THE RESTAURANT WORLD IN OUR CITY.”

Executive chef Marc Barckhoff

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRIDGE TEN BRASSERIE. 20 S. 10th St., South Side. 412586-5033. This brasserie mines the rich core of sophistication in everyday French fare. The menu offers familiar dishes such as steak frites, escargot and cassoulet made distinctive with regional French inflections. Add a well-trained staff and a lovingly curated wine list for a fine-dining experience. LE

Meat and Potatoes {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} to wash it down). But don’t miss the pizza, with a top-notch crust. D’s continues to raise the preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty comfort food to an art. JE

DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 2000. The tavern-like décor 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. provides a comfortable, 412-338-9100. This dark, unpretentious setting clubby restaurant for socializing, and the excels at VIP service, menu bridges retro and offers a menu and au courant in a highlighted by steaks, www. per pa now-familiar way, chops and seafood, pghcitym .co with grownup comfort with sophisticated food and big burgers on but straightforward brioche buns with fancy preparations such as crab toppings. Try the excellent maccakes with added lobster, or and-cheese, accented with bacon steak encrusted in Kona coffee and truffle oil, or the donutbeans. Also, the Grille employs sized onion rings drizzled with its own butcher (for cutting and balsamic vinegar. KE dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE

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CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soulfood restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chickenand-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666. This established venue is known for its revered pub fries and the classic wiener with kraut (plus plenty of beer

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Tin Front Café DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-3901111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and wood-grilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer

and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-3257007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and handcrafted cocktails. LE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. This casual eatery successfully taps the multicultural cuisines of India’s eastern coast, with dishes such as gongura chicken and mutton biryani. Other regions are also represented with dosas, curries and tandoori specialties. For an appetizer, try Chicken 555, dressed with peanuts, curry leaves and a traditional pickle. KF NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thyme-roasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild


mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE SPADAFORA’S. 3932 Route 8, Allison Park. 412-486-1800. Though little more than an unassuming concrete-block box on the outside, inside this is a warm, welcoming family-run trattoria offering Southern Italian specialties as well as ItalianAmerican fare. Quality ingredients, thoughtful preparation and friendly service make this restaurant stand out. KE TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: mac-andcheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

offMenu

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PLEDGING TO EAT less is a common New Year’s resolution, but you can actually eat more this year — at least of certain foods. Local holistic health professionals suggest a range of healthy habits, from breathing more deeply and drinking more water to taking “sun breaks” — short stints outside whenever possible. But increasing your intake of some foods, they add, can also have a huge impact. Jess Pederson, a certified holistic health coach, recommends eating more cauliflower. Like broccoli, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables, it “is nutrientdense and full of vitamins, fiber” and other nutrients. “Just one cup of raw cauliflower contains 80 percent of your daily vitamin C needs” alone, says Pederson — while its anti-oxidant properties may reduce the risk of cancer and other ailments.

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Having a hard time fitting cauliflower into your diet? Pederson suggests pulsing it in a food processor, making a powder that can be used in a grain-free pizzacrust recipe. Tracey Eakin, a plant-based nutrition counselor, recommends ground flax seeds as a daily staple. Adding just one tablespoon per day can prove “incredibly cancer protective,” says Eakin. “[Flax] improves insulin sensitivity, cholesterol, blood pressure and hot flashes. It’s also an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids. Add it to your morning oatmeal or smoothie.” She also advises sipping hibiscus tea throughout the day: Make your own by placing four hibiscus tea bags in 64 ounces of filtered water and refrigerate overnight. Kate Porigow, also a certified holistic health coach, will be adding more sprouts into her diet. “They are full of micro-nutrients and enzymes that help our bodies run more efficiently, and they’re easy to toss on salads or add to sandwiches. “ Also making the holistic short list: fresh herbs and spices such as cinnamon, cayenne pepper, oregano, mint, dill, turmeric and rosemary, as well as chia seeds, berries, mushrooms, kimchi, fermented beverages and raw cacao. “I love our city’s traditional foods,” Pederson admits. “Put a plate of pierogies in front of me and I’m in heaven. … But now it’s even easier to add in a side of locally grown greens to boost the nutrient content of our meals.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014


LOCAL

“WITH CHET’S NEW STUFF, I’M SUPPOSED TO BE LOUD AND LET LOOSE.”

BEAT

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

NOT IN THE FAMILY

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE MIXUS BROTHERS CD RELEASE with AGAIN THE BANDITS. 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 11. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $7. All ages. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com N E W S

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All dressed up: The Mixus Brothers

To answer your first question: No, The Mixus Brothers are not actual brothers. Drummer Johnny Willett and banjoist/ guitarist Jacob Stempky present themselves as Red and Jebbh Mixus, two hardtraveling Americana musicians dressed like old-time farm workers, as a way to “step out of ourselves as husbands and fathers and employees for as long as it takes to put on a show,” says Willett. “I like the old-time bluegrass,” adds Stempky (who wants it to be known he’s been playing the banjo since 1994, long before the rise of Mumford & Sons). “I like the way they presented themselves. It’s all in the name of acting and entertaining.” Stempky and Willett actually have lives that are much more comfortable than those of the Dust Bowl vagabonds seen on their album covers and promotional photos. Both well into their 30s, Stempky is a grants and contracts officer for the University of Pittsburgh and Willett an occupational therapist. They met when they both took their daughters to the same playground in serene Frick Park. “We were both laid-back guys with the same goals for music,” says Willett, “so it made sense for us to form the band and have an outlet.” They have impressively found the time to churn out two full-length albums in about a year. Next week, they release the second, To the Far Blue Mountains. With the two sharing vocal duties, it’s an even mix of romp-and-stomp numbers and slower, dreamier songs. “I have always liked the way Beck has his albums compiled,” says Stempky. “You need a lot of ups and downs and mixes of slow and fast.” The disc features both the usual rural references of folk music (acorns, mountains and foxes) and a few moments that give away its creators’ educated backgrounds; there are nods to the myths of Sisyphus and Ouroboros. The concept of family is never far from the Mixus Brothers, even if the’re not related. “When we started, we made a deal,” says Willett. “We would only make music our daughters would like dancing around to, or would be good for bedtime.”

Getting away from their roots: The Big Bend (from left: Abe Anderson, Chet Vincent, Dan Dickison, Madison Stubblefield, Andy Voltz)

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

I

T’S NO PRINTER’S error that led to the band Pittsburgh has come to know as Chet Vincent and The Big Bend putting out its new LP, Unconventional Dog, under the pared-down moniker of The Big Bend. No, Chet didn’t get booted from the band — but he’s also not the focal point he once was. “Early on, I had a lot of false starts with groups; it was painful in the way that that is, and I was sick of restarting,” he says. “And when we started [this band], there was no reason to believe that that wouldn’t be the case also. I wanted to have something to fall back onto with all the gains we made, or, in my mind, that I would’ve made. But then it ended up working out; we had a great relationship.” Drummer Abe Anderson notes that the band hasn’t completely dropped the Chet Vincent nomenclature: the names

are “interchangeable now,” he says. The band’s new full-length is a similar blend: taking some of the old Big Bend with it, but moving into largely uncharted territory. If your knowledge

THE BIG BEND LP RELEASE

WITH GRAND PIANO, ANDRE COSTELLO AND THE COOL MINORS 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 10. Belvedere’s Ultra Dive, 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412-687-2555 or www.belvederesultradive.com

of The Big Bend comes mostly from the 2011 album For Everyone, prepare for a shock: This one’s got fuzzy guitars, heavy riffs and a classic-rock — sometimes even stoner-rock — vibe.

While “it’s cool to have this rootsy sound,” says Anderson, it wasn’t completely natural to the band as a whole. “I like to play loud, funky drums. With Chet’s new stuff, I’m supposed to be loud and let loose.” Loud rock, Anderson notes, is familiar to all the band’s members: “We are children of the ’90s; that’s what we grew up with.” “We’re gonna change from cowboy shirts to flannel shirts,” says keyboardist Andy Voltz, with a wry smile. Unconventional Dog is a blues-rock slow-burner with a persistent rhythm section, and it lets you know right off the bat that The Big Bend is a different animal these days. The keys are aggressive; Vincent’s vocals, which on the last record were sometimes tentative, are commanding. “Limousine,” the third track, recalls blue-rock revival acts like CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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A WELL-ROUNDED BEND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, and even the more folky tracks that take from the band’s earlier iteration (like “Heart Strings”) project more of a ’70s Californiasound feel than straight country. The band spent the better part of a year recording the album at Anderson’s parents’ house in Point Breeze, where they were freed from the constraints of the studio. (The elder Andersons were out of town for an extended period.) Guitarist Dan Dickison and bassist Madison Stubblefield engineered and mixed the record. “They have a nice-sized foyer area, and that’s where we decided we wanted to track the drums,” explains Vincent. “And they had a baby grand piano, which we were excited about. It was a good live room; they have hardwood floors and all.” “[In the studio], you have to record the drums first, and you set up and mic everything, then you have to tear it all back down,” explains drummer Anderson. “This way, we had time — we took a couple of weeks just to set everything up. “Then it was like — ‘Chet, come on over, let’s drink whiskey and watch Game of Thrones and do takes all night.’ If it works, it works. If you get hot, great — I think we did half the album in one night of base tracking. But it’s nice not to

have the time constraints hanging over your head.” Vincent hasn’t given up on the more country side of his writing, but he has other outlets for the more straightforward country and folk songs that populated much of the last album — for one, he writes and plays guitar with Molly Alphabet. As a result, says Voltz with a chuckle, “Now you just have undiluted rock from Chet.” Vincent is also a regular on the open-mic circuit at places like Hambone’s in Lawrenceville, which he credits for a good bit of his development writing

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and performing. “That’s been an invaluable experience: not just networking, which is great, but it’s a chance to play all the time, every week,” Vincent says. “And you realize how much you suck every week. Then there are endless opportunities to try again.” “There’s the band scene and the openmic stuff, and there’s not much overlap,” he adds. Although the band’s 2011 release was independent, The Big Bend is working now with Wild Kindness Records, the formerly Youngstown-based label purchased last fall by Pittsburgher Jeff Betten. Unconventional Dog is one of a handful of Pittsburgh releases on the label — and the interest came as some surprise to the band, which first encountered Betten during a Gateway Clipper show the band played with Round Black Ghosts, Grand Piano and Josh Verbanets. “I met Jeff through open mics,” says Vincent, “and for whatever reason, he came to this Gateway Clipper show even though he’d never seen the bands. He saw us for the first time, then a few months later, he bought Wild Kindness, and he knew we had the album coming out.” The Big Bend got a boost almost immediately when an advance track from the new record appeared last month alongside Wild Kindness artists Andre Costello and the Cool Minors on a special Pittsburgh-themed edition of NPR’s The World Café, which is nationally syndicated. Wild Kindness is issuing both CD and LP versions of the full-length — one of the luxuries that tend to come with working with a label instead of going it alone. “We were nervous” about signing with a label, says Vincent, “but [Betten] approached us with very realistic goals, and it’s been really great so far.” Realistic goals are something The Big Bend holds dear. While band members hope 2014 brings more out-of-town shows, and they’re working toward some more unconventional local gigs, the members have a refreshing point of view on work and success in music. “‘High hopes, low expectations’ is how I look at it,” says Anderson. “The more things that are in the positive column — even if it’s like, ‘Band plays, people are happy, alcohol is consumed,’ that’s great.” “The Levon Helm documentary has a thing,” says Voltz: “With music, you’re just along for the ride.” “We’re small beans,” adds Vincent. “But it doesn’t mean cool things don’t happen to bands like us, or towns like Pittsburgh. If we have opportunities, we’re going to track them down.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

ECLYPSE THE BELGREEN SESSIONS (SELF-RELEASED)

Full-length from the local alt-hip-hop MC. Understated production from Jay Card and Paco (and a couple tracks by Pav Medicinal) foregrounds Eclypse’s smart, wordy flow. Some of the hallmarks of a freestyle/battle-rap background show themselves — Eclypse plays with sounds, rhymes and consonance, moving a mile a minute and cruising from idea to idea. This isn’t especially hooky stuff, but it’s good food for thought if ideas and language are what you’re looking for in hip hop. THE REFORMATION FATAL EXPECTATION (SELF-RELEASED)

From Rush-style prog to operatic rock to psyche-y soul a la “Ball of Confusion”-era Temps, The Reformation’s second release is all over the map, but the band seems comfortable there. A lot of these tunes are long, but shorter edits come at the end to make them a bit more radio-friendly; sometimes the radio edit is the better choice, because conciseness can be a musician’s friend. Some really good musical moments here, though: “A Grave Path” may be the highlight of the album, and the spacey noir jazz of “Fall and Forgotten” is beautiful. Some of the guitar and drum sounds come off a little cheap here and there, but with a little more focus and production expertise, this band could be onto something. WRECK LOOSE WELL (SELF-RELEASED)

An EP of piano rock from this newer project launched by some local-music veterans. The reference points you might expect from a piano-rock fourpiece are definitely there — Harry Nilsson for sure, and Randy Newman and Ben Folds — but also Jackson Browne and Tom Petty. And here’s the best part: It’s impeccably well done. Good tunes executed well! AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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WN O N PE O

SKY ZONE INDOOR TRAMPOLINE PARK

PITTSBURGH’S TRAMPOLINE PARK! Modern Baseball [DOOM] + FRI., JAN. 03 Brown Angel doesn’t play locally often — it only happens a couple times a year. But even that is something of a feat considering guitarist Adam MacGregor has been living in Beijing for more than a year now. The longtime doom-metal trio has been working on new material even with the main songwriter in absentia; right now, though, MacGregor is back on this side of the world, and the band plays a show at Gooski’s, with some help from locals Zeitgeist and Outlander. Andy Mulkerin 10 p.m. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. $5. 412-681-1658

and Midwest in January, after all, is a bit of a crap shoot. All the better for those interested in checking into the local scene, though — for example, tonight’s headlining show by The Me Toos, a blues-based rock band from the ’Burgh. The no-frills outfit takes its cues from early rock ’n ’ roll, with some Delta-blues-style slide guitar laid over a lot of its tunes; tonight, the threepiece plays on a bill with Locks and Dams and Sephus Lee. AM 10 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 412-431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

[INDIE ROCK] + MON., JAN. 06

There’s something about the [ELECTRONIC] + SAT., delivery of Modern JAN. 04 Baseball’s Tonight’s Brendan show at Lukens that Brillobox is no recalls the run-of-the-mill vocals of dance night; John K. headliner Baseck, Samson — the from Los Angeles, even-handedness, mixes breakcore with the occasional slips melodic electronic dance Baseck into talking. The band music to make something is a bit heavier than what at once aggressive, danceable The Weakerthans delivered, and sometimes whimsical. Imagine but it’s emo-inspired indie rock that violent electronic percussion interspersed could fit right into the canon from more with video-game music and even than a decade ago, if not for the updated synthesized flutes — you’re starting to get references to Internet particulars. Modern the picture. Also playing this one: Detroit duo Baseball garnered critical nods for its album Fluxion A/D and longtime locals Vasculator, Sports, which came out just over a year Disheveled and 8Cylinder. AM 9:30 p.m. ago, and the band hits the Smiling Moose 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-621-4900 tonight. The Color and the Sound, or www.brillobox.net Hundred Acre Wood, Unraveler and Fun Home open. AM 6 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., [ROCK] + SAT., JAN. 04 South Side. $10. All ages. 412-431-4668 or Right about now is when touring acts slow www.smiling-moose.com their roll a bit: Driving around the Northeast

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM / 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 02

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. SMILING MOOSE. Pity Sex, Self Defense Family, LVL UP, Adventures. South Side. 412-431-4668.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Flea Apparitions, Dream Weapon. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS

SUN 05

THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944.

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. J. Malls. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. PUB I.G. Study Break. House, break, techno, more. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

WED 08

FRI 03

HAMBONE’S. Rachel Eddy. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gold & The Rush, Round Black Ghosts, Alexander Sands. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MON 06

FRI 03

CLUB CAFE. The Hoffman Road Band, Porno Tongue, Broke Stranded & Ugly. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Brown Angel, Zeitgeist, Outlander. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HEY ANDY’S. Fungus. 724-258-4755. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Asterplace, Audiopool. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Phase IV. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LINDEN GROVE. Silkwood Shower. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Code Whiskey. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. SMILING MOOSE. Cold Fronts, The Guru, Mount Royal, I Am A Sea Creature Cousin Sleaze, Slaves BC, Wrought Iron, Dendritic Arbor. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Love Ethic, Food, Barbara Perfect. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SMILING MOOSE. Modern Baseball, The Color & Sound, Hundred Acre Woods, Unraveler, Fun Home. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 07

THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

THU 02

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Global/Tropical Bass party. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900.

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SAT 04

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 03

BELVEDERE’S. Hubbs, Shad Ali, Primavera Vills. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

SUN 05

THE R BAR. The Midnight Horns. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

BLUES THU 02

SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. www. per pa 412-687-2157. pghcitym .co DIESEL. DJ CK. NOLA ON THE South Side. 412-431-8800. SQUARE. John Gresh THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Gris Gris. Downtown. Vinyly. w/ Tom Cox, 412-471-9100. Jwan Allen, & Preslav PENN BREWERY. The Lefterov. Lawrenceville. Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-904-2915. 412-237-9400. PUB I.G. Streetwise Saturdays. w/ Ro & Bamboo. Oakland. 707-480-8208. THE R BAR. Vince Agwada. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Dormont. 412-942-0882. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

FRI 03

SAT 04

EARLY WARNINGS Local releases in 2014

JAZZ

SUN 05

PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. 5x5. DJ Tony Smith. McCandless. 412-367-9610. PUB I.G. Uncle Ray’s All Star Game. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 04

ALTAR BAR. One (U2 Tribute). Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Baseck, Fluxion A/D, Vasculator, Disheveled, 8cylinder. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. One Sweet Burgh (Dave Matthews Band Tribute) (Early) The Me Toos, Locks & Dams, Sephus Lee (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HAMBONE’S. Photo Joe & The Negatives. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Vertigo Go, Jakels of Botswanna, DJ Zombo. Radu Rama Benefit. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. NIED’S HOTEL. Austin Drive. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. SMILING MOOSE. Embalmer, Sodomized, Liquified Guts, Anthophobic. South Side. 412-431-4668.

THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Good Vibes Coalition. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PUB I.G. Bass Mint Fridays. w/ Get Nasty. Oakland. 707-480-8208. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

TUE 07

{RELEASE DATE: JAN. 11}

Fist Fight in the Parking Lot Year of the Ox {RELEASE DATE: JAN. 24}

Nox Boys Nox Boys

{RELEASE DATE: FEB. 25}

Falling Andes Castlevania

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

CARHOPS’ SUB SHOP. Train Wreck Tuesdays. Open decks for new DJs. Strip District. 707-480-8208. PUB I.G. Two-step Tuesdays. UK Garage. Oakland. 707-480-8208. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

WED 08

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. The Programmer. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

THU 02

CJ’S. Roger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

FRI 03

MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Greensburg. 412-370-9621.

SAT 04

CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Lucarelli Brothers, Peg Wilson. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621. WIGHTMAN SCHOOL. Swing City w/ Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8pm dance lesson, 9pm dancing. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-5708.

MON 06

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Balcony Big Band. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

TUE 07

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Roger Humphries. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

ACOUSTIC THU 02

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. 724-265-1181.

SAT 04

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 05

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Old Time Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WED 08

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD SAT 04

BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Grand Bon Rien. West Homestead. 412-461-6188.

CLASSICAL SAT 04

VOCES SOLIS. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

SUN 05

CORNELL UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300.

OTHER MUSIC THU 02

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

SAT 04

HEINZ CHAPEL. Cornell Glee Club. Oakland. 412-624-4157.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

Janury 2 - 7 THURSDAY 26 Pity Sex / Self Defense Family

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

guest Broke, Stranded and Ugly & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com /opusone. 9p.m.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $7 cover. 9p.m.

Phase IV

O’REILLY THEATER Downtown. 412-316-1600. Tickets: ppt.org. Through Jan. 5.

Cold Fronts / The Guru

FRIDAY 37

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

The Hoffman Road Band CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special

School of Rock

Lava Game

The Chief

IMPROV Waterfront. Over 21 show. Tickets: pittsburgh. improv.com or 412-462-5233. Through Jan. 5.

SUNDAY 59

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $7 cover. 9p.m.

Lil Duval

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Steel City Crue: Motley Crue Tribute & High N Dry: Def Leppard Tribute

MONDAY 61 Modern Baseball

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 10:30p.m.

SATURDAY 48

An evening with One Sweet Burgh: A Dave Matthews Band Tribute

ATLAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests There You Are. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

One: A celebration of U2

LIL DUVAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 3 PITTSBURGH IMPROV

ATLAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 5p.m.

SMILING MOOSE South Side. 412-431-4668. With special guests The Color and Sound, Hundred Acre Woods & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

TUESDAY 71

Gallery Talk with Donald Warhola ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Free with museum admission. For more info visit warhol.org. 1p.m.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

Warm Wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year! GIVE HUNGER THE BOOT! WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

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Now - January 31

Bring in ANY 3 Non-Perishable food items and receive a $20 Gift Certificate good towards your regular priced footwear purchase of $100 or more at Gordon Shoes or any of our 3 New Balance Pittsburgh locations.

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

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Benefits GREATER PITTSBURGH COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

WINTER CLEARANCE 40-60% OFF! +

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21


ENLIGHTENED WAS FUNNY, SAD, FAMILIAR, UNCOMFORTABLE

2013 FILMS REDUX {BY AL HOFF} Here’s a year-end round-up of films that maybe slipped past you, and are worth a place on your home-entertainment schedule. Twisty-turny Thrillers: Side Effects, Trance, The Place Beyond the Pines, The East and The Counselor. All of these had interesting pedigrees, good actors and some problems. But on the small screen with lower expectations, they should be decent entertainment.

TV I LOVED IN 2013

Michael B. Jordan in Fruitvale Station

Documentaries: The Last Gladiators (hockey enforcers); A Band Called Death and Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me (two bands that never got as big as maybe they should have); and I Am Divine (more than just the star of John Waters’ films). My fave doc of the year, Alex Gibney’s WikiLeaks: We Steal Secrets, was fascinating, provocative and nearly unbelievable. Based on Real Events: No (how PR won a Chilean election), Kon Tiki (ocean adventure), Fruitvale Station (break-out role for Michael B. Jordan) and Behind the Candelabra (HBO’s biopic of Liberace’s final years). Just Fun: The Sapphires (about a 1960s aboriginal girl group), In a World (the cutthroat world of voice-overs) and Rush (Formula 1 thrills and spills). Two Worthy Coming-of-Age Tales: The Spectacular Now and The Way Way Back. Beltway Blow-out: No winter night would be complete without a head-tohead comparison of two White Housetakeover films, Olympus Has Fallen and White House Down. Who saved it better? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AHOFF @PGHCITYPAPER.COM

My pick for biggest film wreck of 2013: Oz the Great and Powerful. Miscast, overstuffed and proof that going big with 3-D doesn’t improve on a beloved book series and 2-D film. Runners-up (also re-boots): The Lone Ranger and Man of Steel.

22

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HIS WAS A pretty good year at the movie theaters, but TV has been giving the big screen a run for its money. The small screen in 2013 had some clear front-runners, like moody late-’60s Mad Men and Breaking Bad’s wrenching final season. But there was other good stuff that was less hyped, tucked away on a far-flung cable channel or otherwise may have escaped one’s notice. Here’s a sampling of what I dug this year: It’s mostly new shows, and nowhere near definitive. The gloomy winter months are a perfect time to catch up with these shows via DVD, online streaming or on-demand cable. I lovelovelove serial dramas, so 2013 was a great year for me and my TV. The British police procedural Broadchurch was a well-done take on the familiar: how a murdered child upsets the social equilibrium of a small seaside town. See this version before the American remake. Over on Sundance Channel: Combining a procedural with gorgeous New Zealand scenery and an off-kilter subplot

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

On the watch: Laura Dern in HBO’s Enlightened

about a new-agey -agey feminist camp, Jane Campion’s ampion’s Top of the Lake turned d over a lot of unsettling rocks. Rectify y was slow, moody and didn’t dn’t have a lot of plot, but for the e patient, it was a fascinating character racter study of a man released — but not exonerated — after two decades on Death Row. FX continues es to turn out quality genre entertainment, inment, including The Americans, ns, a 1980s period drama about Soviet spies working undercover rcover in suburban a Washington, D.C. .C. It’s as much a domestic melodrama drama as it is a thriller, an awkward kward dance of spycraft and marriage. The Bridge, adapted d from a Danish show, started strong and wobbled bbled Tatiana Maslany a bit toward the stars in end when it got Orphan Black caught in the serial-killer rut. But it had real strengths: ths:

a great performance performan by Demain Bichir, a messy mess milieu (the Juarez-El Paso Pa border) and fascinating fascinatin side characters. Fingers Fing crossed for season 2. It was buried on the BBC America channel over the summer, but the thriller-withsci-fi-overtones Orphan -ove Black proved that entertaining TV can entert be low-budget, shot low in generic Canada g and headed up by a kick-ass woman. kic Actually, make that Actua several severa women, as lead a actress Tatiana Maslany delivered Masl an amazing perfora mance man as a variety of clones. c Another show floated across BBC oa


America that, even though it was about zombies, didn’t get much attention. Mini-series In the Flesh was a darkly humorous look at how awkward life was for “rehabbed” zombies returning home. The toughest show to talk folks into watching this year was HBO’s Enlightened. But this awkward dramedy created by Laura Dern and Mike White about an imperfect woman (Dern) who finds purpose (sort of) in corporate whistle-blowing was my favorite show of the year: funny, sad, familiar, uncomfortable. I power-watched seasons 1 and 2 in less than a week. HBO cancelled it, but it wraps up well.

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

THE WAIT. In this new thriller from M. Blash, two sisters decide to keep their dead mother at home after being informed by a psychic that she will return to life. Chloe Sevigny and Jena Malone star. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 3; 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 4; and 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 5. Hollywood

REPERTORY

JUMP. In this new Irish drama from Keiron J. Walsh, the daughter of a Belfast crime boss is saved from a suicide attempt by a stranger on New Year’s Eve. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 2. Hollywood WILD AT HEART. David Lynch’s surreal 1990 sex-and-violence potboiler features Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern as outrageous lovers on the run across America’s seediest landscapes; Diane Ladd, Harry Dean Stanton and Willem Dafoe also star. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 3, and 9:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 4. Hollywood TOUCH OF EVIL. Orson Welles directed this baroque, south-of-the-border noir that plunges newlyweds Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston) and his bride, Susan (Janet Leigh), into a shadowy nightmare of crime and degradation. Policeman Vargas interrupts the honeymoon to investigate a bombing that may have been rigged by the border town’s corrupt and corpulent police chief, Hank Quinlan (Welles), who also frames Susan on a drug charge. From its famed, lengthy opening tracking shot all the way through to its bitter conclusion, Touch of Evil is a tour de force of the seamy and unseemly made visual, complete with Welles’ dense, nearly nightmarish mise-en-scene and striking camera work. Notable actors in unforgettable parts include Dennis Weaver as a jittery motel clerk, Marlene Dietrich as an aging madam and Mercedes McCambridge as a sexually ambiguous junkie. The film kicks off a monthlong, Sunday-night series of classic blackand-white films. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 5. Regent Square (Al Hoff)

CP

Elizabeth Moss in Top of the Lake

In the easier-laughs department: You either get Kenny Effin’ Powers or you don’t, and I’m in the camp that says Danny McBride’s wildly profane and intentionally offensive HBO comedy Eastbound and Down is smarter than it seems. Season 5 was a near-perfect rollercoaster of Kenny’s highs and lows, culminating in — shock! — personal growth. Lovable, shaggy Irishman Chris O’Dowd anchors Family Tree, Christopher Guest’s comedy for HBO about a man finding himself by tracing his oddball ancestors in the U.K. and the U.S. The show features a lot of Guest regulars, plus a woman who speaks through a monkey hand-puppet. New TV Never Really Ends: I don’t have Netflix, though Santa just brought it. So I haven’t caught up on Orange Is the New Black or House of Cards, two shows I like the sound of and look forward to watching soon. I’ve also got the buzzed-about French undead show The Returned piled up on the DVR. Also making my must-see list in 2013 were: Showtime’s Masters of Sex, HBO’s Veep (season 2 saw improvement) and Girls (ditto), and still more Justified. And as a bonus, my pick for kookiest but still-serious reality show ever was Iceberg Hunters. This Canadian six-parter screened on the Weather Channel, and depicted a Newfoundland family shooting bullets at icebergs to break them up, “harvesting” the ice with a boat and selling it for fancy bottled water. TV: It brings you the world. +

useful cynicism and fervent belief. It’s meant to be appalling — excess with a capital XXX — but also amusing and vicariously exhilarating. You’ll root for Belfort’s downfall, not because he deserves it (he does) or because you need the narrative closure, but because this three-hour vicarious ride is simply exhausting. Go big, or stay home. (AH) WADJDA. There’s perhaps nothing so remarkable about a sweet, low-key comingof-age story about a young girl who’s determined to live life on her own terms. But there is when that film is set and filmed in Saudi Arabia, a nation where the public and even private roles of women are strictly curtailed. Add in that this is the first feature film produced in Saudi Arabia and that it’s made by a woman, Haifaa Al Mansour — and Wadjda is notable just for existing. But it’s worth seeing on its own merits. Young Waad Mohammed is wonderful as tomboyish pre-teen Wadjda, who dreams of owning a bicycle. She enters a Koranrecitation contest at her school (there is a cash prize), while also navigating a complicated route into womanhood. Wadjda never vocalizes it, but Mohammed lets us see how dismayed she is to discover that with age, her world is shrinking rather than expanding. In Arabic, with subtitles. Harris (AH)

CP

THE GREAT BEAUTY. When occasional journalist and Rome society fixture Jep Gambardella (Toni Servillo) turns 65, he grows more contemplative of his life: Has it all been a whirl of parties, bullshit and frivolous pursuits? Director Paolo Sorrentino examines this query in his loosely plotted but visually dazzling film. The luxurious homes, the crumbling Roman ruins, the gorgeous ennui of the decadent elite, the bright colors, sly wit and surreal moments will remind viewers of similar Fellini films. You might find the existential troubles of Gambardella not quite universal, but if you have the patience for this sort of arty, stylized Euro dramedy, this is a fine and mostly entertaining example. In Italian, with subtitles. Regent Square (AH)

CP

CLUE. Jonathan Lynn directs this 1985 mystery comedy adapted from the popular board game. Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry and Madeline Kahn head an ensemble cast. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 8. AMC Loews. $5 AN DY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

ONGOING

WOLF OF WALL STREET. Martin CP THE Scorsese’s comedy ostensibly details the rise and fall of real-life stockbroker Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), but it’s a cautionary tale that, like its coked-up protagonist, insists on having a wild time right up until the last scene. Oh, to be young, insanely rich, powered by primo drugs and with no pesky moral compunction about skirting the law. Wolf is the American Dream in satirical hyperdrive, manically elucidated by its bullshit-spewing golden boy, and it treats our prevailing myth with both

A HOFF@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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Register today for the NEW SEMESTER!

SUNDAY FUNDAY! January 5 U 12:00-2:30pm Try FREE classes!! Including Hip Hop, Acting, Musical Theater, and Creative Theater. Visit pittsburghCLO.org for a complete schedule

JUMP

(2013) 1/2 @ 7:30PM: Jump follows the lives of four twenty-something’s whose lives collide one fateful New Year’s Eve in a night of fast talk, wild coincidence and intrigue.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WILD AT HEART (1989) 1/3 @ 7PM & 9:30, 1/4 @ 9:30PM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THE WAIT (2013) 1/4 @ 7PM, 1/5 @ 4PM & 7PM:

Two sisters decide to keep their deceased mother in their home after being informed that she will come back to life. Starring Chloe Sevigny & Jena Malone.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------KID CITY NEW YEAR’S DANCE PARTY

1/4 FROM 2-6PM: Featuring DJ KellyMom, dancing, arts & crafts, and a sparkling cider toast! 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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CLASSES AVAILABLE for ages 3-18 Next semester beginss January 13 ! ENROLL ONLINE or NEW CLAesSS 8-11. ag for P HO P HI call 412-281-2234 TODAY! REGISTER

Did You Know? ? Only Pittsburgh CLO Academy students are eligible to audition for Pittsburgh CLO summer season shows. +

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


WE RECALL SOME OF THE YEAR’S MOST INTERESTING VISUAL ART, THEATER AND DANCE

[BOOK REVIEW]

CRISIS MANAGER “I love you so much I think I’m going to be annihilated; have you tried the brownies?” Joy Katz isn’t kidding when she says this, as a one-sentence summation of her third book of poems, All You Do Is Perceive (Four Way Books/Poetry, $15.95). Well, she’s sort of kidding — about the brownies. But she also isn’t — not about the “I love you.” Her poetry’s like that: a world perceived vividly through the almost constant anxiety of being a mother alone with a small child, day after day. As in “Mother’s Love,” the book’s core poem, she’s negotiating crisis on the edge of bailing out any moment: “Give the child up, says the warm blanket / … you are my favorite, says falling out a window.” That offer of brownies exemplifies how Katz often flashes sly humor — near to black sometimes, but smiling, and meaning it, in the midst of life-and-death seriousness. “Happiness is on me like a scratch in a car door,” she says. Katz lives in Point Breeze, with her husband and 6-year-old son, born in Vietnam, whom she adopted when he was 2 months old and first nurtured while living in Brooklyn. That densely urban environment suffuses the book. She teaches in the graduate writing program at Chatham University, and in Carlow’s Madwomen in the Attic workshops. After first coming to Pittsburgh about 15 years ago to start a career in industrial design, Katz became interested in poetry and, following her instinct to write, headed to Stanford on a Stegner Fellowship. Pittsburghers are graced to have her again among us. In these 84 pages, Katz fashions an attractively strange, layered, distinctive voice, as in “Suicide Cascade”: “The saddest time in my life was also the time the most people said, You look beautiful … also the time I wrote about furniture, the heavier the better … The poet tried to reach her therapist before she killed herself / is a place you can change the ending.” The work is both deeply personal and socio-politically aware. “They’re sending postcards from the hanging” is the unspoken Dylan line that leads to Katz’s poem “A Lynched Man Came with the Mail onto my Desk.” Her “The Very Last Movie about the Nazis” reflects her sensitivity to the difficult ambivalence — “I turned the Holocaust into a pet” — involved in writing about these horrors that are, inescapably, embedded in culture.

[LISTS]

{BY MIKE SCHNEIDER}

THREE LISTS FOR 2013

{BY CP CONTRIBUTORS}

ROBERT RACZKA’S FIVE MOST SURPRISING ART EXHIBITS OF 2013

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HERE’S NOTHING wrong with “business as usual” in art, and Pittsburgh saw more than its share of fine exhibits in established genres and forms, from skillfully rendered paintings and incisive documentary photography to labor-intensive sculptural installations. But the times they are a-changin’, and some truly outside-the-box exhibits have been appearing around town … not to mention podcasts, performances and web projects that fall outside the purview of this article. In no particular order: Within (Janine Antoni at the Mattress Factory, Sept. 12, 2013-March 30, 2014). Antoni arrived as a revolutionary presence in the art world 20-plus years ago, and it’s only fitting that she’s the first artist to take over the townhouse at the Mattress Factory. Particularly notable was her room-

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{PHOTOS COURTESY OF ADAM WELCH (LEFT) AND THE MATTRESS FACTORY (RIGHT)}

Adam Welch’s installation Terminal Moraine and Janine Antoni’s “Graft” (detail: first floor view)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

by-room sequencing, which utilized the fact that there’s only one route through the building, up the stairs to a dead end. By cutting a hole in the ceiling, she signaled that the sequencing was intentional and not something we brought to the table. Alloy Pittsburgh (Carrie Furnaces, Rankin, Sept. 28-Oct. 26). Chris McGinnis and Sean Derry organized a monumental effort inside what’s developing into a monument. Fourteen artists attended workshops, did research and created site-specific installations that variously enlivened and entertained, and in some cases changed the way I think about Carrie Furnaces and the history of the steel industry. Glory Hair (Daniel Allende at 5139 Penn Ave., Oct. 11-12). The term “pop-up” has been tossed around a lot lately, covering just about every product and service imag-

inable, but I think of this as the first true art pop-up in Pittsburgh. Staged by Daniel Allende, who was transplanted to Pittsburgh for Carnegie Mellon’s grad program (where I taught a class he was in), this unique event combined hair-themed murals, expressive, no-charge haircuts by professional barbers, and free beer and pizza served through a partition-wall glory-hole. A one-off by a one-off artist whose next project could be just about anything. Terminal Moraine (Adam Welch at The Mine Factory, July 19-Aug. 10). What’s an artist to do with an accumulation of work? Adam Welch brought a fresh, shall we say, “curatorial” perspective to the dilemma by repurposing a truckload of his paintings and sculptures into a labyrinth of sorts. It worked. Oh Snap! (Carnegie Museum of Art,


Feb. 21-May 12). Museums are plagued by the symphony/ballet/opera problem: Namely, how do you interest the younger generation? Seems that many don’t care to be “interested” — but they might want to be involved. Starting with a handful of photographs from the museum’s collection, the audience was asked to respond by submitting photos of their own, which were printed and hung near the inspiration. Billed as a collaborative photography project and “not an exhibition,” this audience-sourced, um, exhibition got lots of submissions, many surprisingly good. Time will tell whether it’s the beginning of the end — though I hope not — or a new beginning.

physical-theater director Dominique Serrand to create this moving multimedia solo work. The performance transported audiences into a riveting realm of emotional loss, where physical reminders of departed loved ones haunted the living.

STEVE SUCATO’S SEVEN MOST TRANSPORTIVE DANCE PROGRAMS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA RIAL}

Brent Luebbert and Kaitlin Dann in Attack Theatre’s Soap Opera

In a year filled with great dance programs, here are seven that transported audiences from their seats to worlds away. Soap Opera (Attack Theatre, Feb. 2-10). Soap Opera mixed dance, mythology and opera music to tell the fictitious story of a terminally ill concert pianist — and his opera-singer lover’s bedside efforts to keep him alive by reading colorful stories aloud. The work transported audiences into the stories, with the characters’ inner lives culminating in a vision beyond the veil. Pavement (Kyle Abraham/Abraham. In.Motion, Feb. 16). Pittsburgh native Abraham and his New York company re-imagined 1991 film Boyz n the Hood as a dance work set in Homewood and the Hill District. The work took its Byham Theater audience on a moving journey through Abraham’s feelings on violence and genocide within the black community. Moulin Rouge (Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Feb. 14-17). Choreographer Jorden Morris asked what would happen if two innocent people were dropped into the boiling caldron of decadence, art and bohemian life that was Paris in the late 19th century? The answer was a marvelous ballet full of Parisian history, romance and intrigue, with lots of can-can dancing. Frequency of Structure and Flow (Gia T. Presents, March 29-30). Gia Cacalano and her international troupe of improvisational dancers and musicians stepped into artist Miguel Chevalier’s digital-media exhibit Power Pixels 2013. In the process, they took their Wood Street Galley audiences on an otherworldly journey of sound, motion, color and light. Remains (CorningWorks, Jun. 5-9). Veteran Pittsburgh-based dancer Beth Corning teamed with Tony Award-winning N E W S

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Compagnie Marie Chouinard (Sept. 28). As part of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts, choreographer Marie Chouinard and her Montreal-based troupe blended drama, nudity and the bizarre in two U.S. premieres, respectively interpreting Henri Michaux’s visual art and Erik Satie’s music into cutting-edge dance. The Jazz Furnace (The Pillow Project, Oct. 12). Director Pearlann Porter repurposed an icon of Pittsburgh’s steel-industry glory days into a site-specific dance space on a gargantuan scale: Her Pillow Project unleashed its improvisational “Postjazz” movement style and video wizardry as a day-long extravaganza of dance and music, revisiting some of the troupe’s most popular works.

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Learning something new: City Theatre’s production of Daniel Beaty’s Breath & Imagination (March 15-31) was a joy even without the revelation that it was a mostly true story about a real guy very much worth knowing. Roland Hayes rose from tenant farmer to international stardom singing both opera and spirituals, but was caught in the Jim Crow net in his native land. Vocalists Jubilant Sykes and Kecia Lewis were superb. Cross-dressing and multi-casting: Daina Michelle Griffith is a beautiful, sexy woman who totally rocked as various men — whacked-out hipster/Nazis — in Off The Wall Productions’ The Zero Hour (Oct. 25-Nov. 9). Madeleine George’s play is a bit bony, but there’s enough meat for Griffith and co-star Erika Cuenca to create a series of engaging characters. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Jubilant Sykes (with Kecia Lewis in the background) in City Theatre’s Breath & Imagination

Decades of reviewing have confirmed over and over the wisdom of Sturgeon’s Law: “90 percent of everything is crap.” So what keeps crusty critics going back to the theater again and again? It’s the surprises. The bad ones make good party chitchat. The more pleasant reawaken the joy that reminds us why art is essential. In no particular order, here are my favorite surprises: A maturing master: Starting with his long-ago “Strindberg on a Shoestring” in a former upholstery-factory-turnedVFW-dancehall, Martin Giles’ passion and affinity for dour Scandinavians has been no secret. Fast-forward to Quantum Theatre (always a mine for surprises) and

[BOOKS]

Three new paperbacks peek into local history from very different angles. Pittsburgh has only six years on its oldest building. That gives Emily M. Weaver a substantial story to tell in The Fort Pitt Block House (History Press, 157 pp., $19.99), out just in time for the structure’s 250th anniversary, next year. Though built as a defensive redoubt for Fort Pitt, the Block House spent much longer as a private residence — including multi-family housing — and even did time as a candy store before the Daughters of the American Revolution took it over and fought for its preservation. Weaver, the building’s curator, cogently makes the most of this first comprehensive history of Pittsburgh’s first landmark. In Pittsburgh in World War I: Arsenal of the Allies (History Press, 144 pp., $19.99), Elizabeth Williams offers an overview of life here in 1917-18. Perhaps you knew that Allegheny County produced half the steel used by the Allies, and that 60,000 Pittsburgh men went to war. But the scale of mobilization Williams documents is still astounding: Most of the city’s then-vast industrial base was dedicated to the war effort, and “around 500,000 Pittsburghers were already employed in war work” before the U.S. even entered the conflict. Williams, college archivist at LaRoche College, also offers intriguing material about anti-German nativism in a city of immigrants; labor activism; the city’s nurse shortage; and how, in 1918, the local Red Cross chapter collected about 182,000 pounds of peach pits and nut shells as material for the making of gas masks (whose technology was also partly developed here). Pittsburgh Film and Television (Arcadia Publishing, 127 pp., $21.99) is, perhaps fittingly, mostly photographic images, an oddly curated bunch selected and with captions by local film-and-TV historian John Tiech. Charming photos of Fred Rogers’ early days keynote a section on local broadcast history. A chapter on location filmmaking — with lots of unpeopled, contemporary shots of Monroeville Mall (famously used in Dawn of the Dead) — feels largely superfluous. More interesting are behind-the-scenes movie-production shots, dating to the 1990s. The quality of the stills (many by Tiech himself) is variable, but it’s nice to be reminded that films including Hoffa, Dogma and The Mothman Prophecies were shot here. Bonus: trade ads from the early film industry. “Why not hitch up with a live concern and get the best that is going,” cajoled the Wonderland Film Exchange in 1908.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HARTFORD STAGE/T. CHARLES ERICKSON

MICHELLE PILECKI’S BEST SURPRISES IN PITTSBURGH THEATER 2013

TA S T E

Giles’ bold direction of Henrik Ibsen’s John Gabriel Borkman (Jan. 31-Feb. 24) with dry wit and, yes, surprising insight. A few months later, Giles’ mercurial actor persona got its best display ever in Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre’s production of The Kreutzer Sonata (May 30-June 22), a virtual one-man show by playwright Nancy Harris adapting Leo Tolstoy. Polished nonsense: As a musical and as a play, Jake Oliver’s Viva Los Bastarditos! (July 12-27) is a train-wreck of strained credulity, clichéd characters and boilerplate songs. But No Name Players’ production was just so much fun. The energy level never fell below frenetic as the ensemble — mostly cast in multiple roles — overfilled the company’s new home at Off the Wall Theater. Perfect grace in classical drama: I’m always grateful for a chance to see and hear the works of the ancient masters, but was absolutely thrilled by Point Park University Conservatory Theatre’s Hecuba (Nov. 8-24). At the time, I praised the chorus as the best I’d ever seen, but didn’t name them: Erin Ulbert, Viveca Chow, Te’Era Coleman, Lexi Gleichauf, Linda Kanyarusoke, Aine Lafferty, Ariana Livingston, Corinne Scott, Kristin Serafini and Nicole Stouffer. Monica Payne directed them in Euripides’ tale of revenge.

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IBS WITH DIARRHEA ENDOMETRIOSIS CONSTIPATION DIABETES ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE HIGH CHOLESTEROL WEIGHT LOSS/OBESITY

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. hills, long stairways, high bridges, tunnels, trains, panoramic views and more.” The guided night-time hike concludes in Beechview, with a return to the starting point by trolley. BO 6-9:30 p.m. $12. Mount Washington. Register at 412-255-0564 or www. ventureoutdoors.org

Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call

412-363-1900

JAN. 09

Martha h Grimes

for more information.

INVESTIGATORS – DR. S. BERG, DR. KATZ, DR. L. DOBKIN

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Please join us for a sneak peek of the new Emergency Department (ED) at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC. Be one of the first to tour our new, expanded 22-room, 13,000-squarefoot, state-of-the-art ED, which will provide comprehensive clinical care to men and women, and will include internal medicine, diagnostic imaging, cardiology, orthopaedic surgery, gastroenterology, colorectal surgery, pulmonology, and urology. We will be offering guided tours as well as have our staff on hand to answer any questions. Thursday, Jan. 9 12 to 2 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 11 11 to 1 p.m.

Entrance is located on Craft Avenue. Light refreshments will be provided.

UPMC.com/Magee 1-866-MyMagee

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

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You’re invited.

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RESEARCH SERVICES, LLC

Currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

Wednesday, Jan. 8 9 to 11 a.m.

FOR THE WEEK OF

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL VENTURA}

CTRS

CLINICAL TRIALS

OK, says the Pittsburgh Public Theater: This time it’s really your last chance to see Tom Atkins play Art Rooney in The Chief. Tonight’s the first performance in the latest revival of this one-man show about the legendary Steelers founder, the most popular production in the Public’s long history. The play, by Gene Collier and Rob Zellers, depicts a loquacious Rooney hanging out in his office in 1976, just after the Steelers’ second Super Bowl. But The Chief is about more than football: Much of it concerns Rooney’s Irish-American North Side upbringing, city politics, life at the horsetrack and more — a personal history of the 20th century. (Rooney was born in 1901.) The play premiered in 2003; previously, the Public had said that a 2011 revival would be the last. The show returned last year … but one of these days, that “last call” is bound to come true. This run, with the iconic Atkins directed by Ted Pappas, has six performances. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Jan. 5. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-65. 412316-1600 or www.ppt.org

{OUTDOORS} Tonight, the latest installment of Venture Outdoors’ Urban Fitness Hike series takes the scenic route — and not just because Mount Washington & Beyond includes the neighborhood that’s one of Pittsburgh’s biggest tourist draws. This fast-paced sixmile trek includes “steep

+ FRI., JAN. 03 {OUTDOORS} Jennings Environmental Education Center is active all winter, for outdoor recreation as well as edification and volunteer opportunities. Today’s the registration deadline for Jan. 11’s Winter Trails Day, a day of free wintersports instruction, including snowshoeing programs (for ages 8 and up) and crosscountry skiing programs (ages 12 and up); participants must bring their own gear. And through Sun., Jan. 5, you can register to help out with the 14th annual Prairie Improvement Day. The center seeks volunteers ages 12 and up to spend the morning of Sat.,

Art by Maggie Lynn Negrete and Doyle Merlin Daigle II

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Adventuring P Princesses i iin Living Color


{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

sp otlight

Tami Dixon’s South Side Stories premiered at City Theatre in December 2012. The one-woman show — part oral history, part tribute to one city neighborhood’s survivors — is an alternately comic and poignant work that proved so popular it earned an extended run after the holiday. And now, a year later, it’s back again by popular demand, for a new three-week run. Dixon portrays some 20 characters, most drawn from the South Side Slopes resident’s own experiences and extensive interviews she recorded with longtime denizens. The characters are male and female, old and young, Slopes and Flats, from a retired mill-worker to a newcomer who feels shut out by the Slopes’ insularity. Don’t, for the most part, expect a portrait of today’s East Carson Street scene, all bars and boutiques with a big outdoor mall at one end. That mall site, Dixon reminds us, used to be home to a steel mill, and she’s more interested in those who outlasted mill culture than she is in the folks popping in at Urban Outfitters. Matt M. Morrow directs; the first performance in the intimate Hamburg Studio Theatre is Wed., Jan. 8. Bill O’Driscoll Jan. 8-26. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $30-55 ($10 off for South Side residents). 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Jan. 18, helping to manage this state park’s 20-acre prairie ecosystem, Pennsylvania’s only public protected prairie. Volunteers that day get a lunch of hot soup. BO 2951 Prospect Road, Slippery Rock. Register at 724-794-6011 or www.apps.dcnr.state.pa.us

ment of “Riu Riu Chui,” a traditional carol derived from a medieval Spanish chant; and “Shepherd’s Pipe Carol.” Voces Solis is an ensemble of The Summer Singers, a choral group composed of professional musicians, music educators and other

{ART} “Adventuring Princesses,” artist Maggie Lynn Negrete’s series of original fairy-tale zines, is in blackand-white. Now, Negrete has invited eight local artists to color in the exploits of Dara of Robles and Alva of the Dark Crescent, who turn fairy-tale gender stereotypes on their heads. Invited artists include Brian Gonella, DS Kinsel, Lizzee Solomon and 10-year-old superfan Eleanor Musgrave. The results are on display tonight as Adventuring Princesses in Living Color, at The Roboto Project. The exhibit opens with a party where visitors will have the chance to do their own coloring-in. The event is part of Penn Avenue’s Unblurred gallery crawl. BO 7-10 p.m. Exhibit continues through Jan. 31. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. mgglnt@gmail.com

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trained singers. The group’s members include Becki Toth, a Summer Singers co-founder known for her performances and directing with the Carnegie venue’s resident theater company, Stage 62

Production. BO 4 p.m. 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. Free. 412-276-3456 and www.carnegiecarnegie.org

+ WED., JAN. 08 {SCREEN} Tonight, learn about American meat with American Meat. Graham Meriwether and Memo Salazar’s 2013 documentary contends that our meat-production system of factory farms is bad for animals, bad for small farmers and bad for the environment — and that better ways of doing things can still feed everyone affordably. Featured is Joel Salatin, whose Polyface Farms was spotlighted in The Omnivore’s Dilemma and numerous other food docs. The free screening at the East End Food Co-op is followed by a discussion with the store’s meat buyer, Jessica Santacrose. BO 6:30 p.m. 7516 Meade St., North Point Breeze. Free; reservations required at 412-242-3598.

Art by Jill Elgin

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the cutthroat world of publishing, revolves around two hit men, a wronged author and an unscrupulous agent. Grimes, 82, is a Pittsburgh native best known for her 22 Richard Jury mysteries and her biting humor; this year, she also published Double Double:

{WORDS} Acclaimed detective novelist Martha Grimes is back with The Way of All Fish. Her forthcoming follow-up to 2003’s satirical Foul Matter, also set in

A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism, written with her son, the pseudonymous Ken Grimes. Martha Grimes visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop tonight for a talk and signing. BO 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

Wonder Women: On Page and Off, the new Toonseum exhibit, does not involve Wonder Woman, the iconic superhero. Rather, it chronicles women in the comics industry and their art, based on the work and art collection of comics historian Trina Robbins. That history, says Robbins by phone from her home in San Francisco, is notably long: Her own trove of original art by women cartoonists dates to 1903. “Some of them were really superstars,” says Robbins. Pioneers included Grace Drayton (who created the fat-cheeked Campbell’s Soup kids) and Nell Brinkley — whose Brinkley Girls were so popular they featured in Broadway’s Ziegfield Follies. Dale Messick’s long-running strip “Brenda Starr” debuted in 1940 … but her earlier work had been rejected by a male editor who, Robbins says, complained that “he had tried a woman cartoonist once and she did not work out.” Other artists less famous are also represented, including Jill Elgin, whose circa-1945 artwork for Harvey Comics’ crime-fighter The Black Cat is pictured here. After the 1940s, when women replaced male cartoonists off at war, women struggled in the industry for decades. Even Wonder Woman herself was seldom drawn by women (though Robbins herself drew a four-part series for D.C. in 1985). But the rise of graphic novels has opened up opportunities, says Robbins, whose new history of women cartoonists is titled Pretty in Ink (Fantagraphics). Robbins says that change has delighted not just readers, but bookstore-owners and librarians, too: “They have been so happy to find all these books that have girl heroes in them.” Bill O’Driscoll Opening reception: 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 4 ($20). Exhibit runs through March 30. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

Ring out the holidays with a free choral concert at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. The group Voces Solis will perform traditional but little-heard seasonal songs including “In the Bleak Midwinter” (based on a Christina Rossetti poem); an arrange-

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

In Pennsylvania, a Groundhog has been predicting the weather for over 125 years and Straub has been brewing for over 140 years. This authentic German-Style AltBier is our 14th Annual Groundhog Brew, and is the perfect warmer against the winter cold. Available now at:

Demsher’s Beer Distributor Distributor-Presto Robinson Beer & Beverage Beverage-McKees Rocks Save On BeerBeer Cranberry Whole FoodsFoods Wexford

about Art Rooney, Sr. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Jan. 2-3, 8 p.m., Sat., Jan. 4, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 5, 2 & 7 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. GHOST: THE MUSICAL. Based on the Oscar-winning movie. Thru Jan. 2, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Jan. 3, 8 p.m., Sat., Jan. 4, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 5, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. PLAID TIDINGS. Forever Plaid Christmas special, presented by Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret. Wed, Thu, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. SOUTH SIDE STORIES. One-woman show portraying the dynamism of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and

Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 02

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Jan. 30 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 03

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 03 - SUN 05

LIL DUVAL. 8 & 10:15 p.m., Sat., Jan. 4, 7 & 9:15 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 5, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 04

DINNER W/ THE NOLENS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

$ $

1 Bud Light 1 Well Drinks

Wednesday,10 pm-Midnight Drink Specials!

(Southside Only)

Great Music!

Visit All Of Our Locations

Monroeville Mall • 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • 412.904.4620

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TUE 07

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 08

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. PJ WILLIAMS, JEFF KONKLE, SHANNON NORMAN, JESSE IRVIN, TOMMY KUPIEC. Best Of The Burgh Comedy Showcase. 8 p.m. Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny

PUBLICNOTICES P U B L IC N OTI CE S@ P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER THE CHIEF. One-man play

Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Neapolitan Presepio. Nativity scene feat. more than 100 human & angelic figures, along w/ animals, accessories, & architectural elements. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ CONTINUES ON PG. 29

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014


: Structures, at Panza Gallery

Work by David A Ludwig, from David A. Ludwig

VISUALART

NEW THIS WEEK

HILLEL JUC. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-621-8875. THE NIGHT GALLERY. The Night Gallery Grand Opening & Art Show. Group show feat. local artists. Opens Jan. 5, noon-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-915-9254. THE TOONSEUM. Wonder Women: On Page & Off. Feat. 70+ pieces of original art representing over 50 women artists, historical timeline tracing the history of women in comics & landmark events in women’s quest for equality from 1896 to present, more. Opens Jan. 4. Downtown. 412-232-0199.

ONGOING

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National

juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Symphony of Colours. Work by Nadya Lapets, June Kielty, Kim Freithaler & Vickie Schilling. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. www.digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BE GALLERIES. 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Work by ceramic artist Yoko Sekino-Bove & jewelry artist Jim Bove. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Sandra Benhaim. New work. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. CONNECTIONS: The Work of Fabrizio Gerbino. Downtown. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Creator of the Future. Work by Matthew Stull.

Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Clayton Holiday Tours - A Pittsburgh Christmas. Artifacts displayed in Clayton evoke the family’s celebrations, archival & newspaper materials will give an idea of seasonal activity in & around the city. Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Shame of the City: Deconstructing & Reconstructing Comic Narratives. Group exhibition of 23 works of art, each a deconstruction of a single page of the 1984 comic book CONTINUES ON PG. 31

Hollywood depictions. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ Reconstructed fort houses HISTORY CENTER. museum of Pittsburgh history Pennsylvania’s Civil War. circa French & Indian War In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s and American Revolution. significant contributions Downtown. 412-281-9285. during the Civil War feat. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL artifacts, military encampments, CENTER. Ongoing: tours life-like museum figures, more. of Clayton, the Frick estate, From Slavery to Freedom. with classes, car & carriage Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role museum. Point Breeze. in the anti-slavery movement. 412-371-0600. Ongoing: Western PA Sports HARTWOOD ACRES. Museum, Clash of Empires, and Tour this Tudor mansion and exhibits on local history, more. stable complex, and enjoy hikes Strip District. 412-454-6000. and outdoor activities in the SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS surrounding park. Allison Park. HISTORY CENTER. Museum 412-767-9200. commemorates Pittsburgh KENTUCK KNOB. Tour industrialists, local history. the other Frank Lloyd Wright Sewickley. 412-741-4487. house. 724-329-8501. SOLDIERS & SAILORS KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. MEMORIAL HALL. Military Tours of a restored 19th-century, museum dedicated to honoring middle-class home. Oakmont. military service members since 412-826-9295. the Civil War through artifacts MCGINLEY HOUSE & & personal mementos. Oakland. MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. 412-621-4253. Historic homes open for tours, ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. lectures and more. Monroeville. Features 5,000 relics 412-373-7794. of Catholic saints. North Side. NATIONAL AVIARY. 412-323-9504. Home to more than 600 ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN birds from over 200 species. CATHOLIC CHURCH. With classes, lectures, Maxo Vanka Murals. demos and more. North Mid-20th century Side. 412-323-7235. murals depicting NATIONALITY war, social justice ROOMS. 26 rooms and the immigrant www. per helping to tell the pa experience in pghcitym story of Pittsburgh’s .co America. Millvale. immigrant past. 421-681-0905. University of Pittsburgh. WEST OVERTON Oakland. 412-624-6000. MUSEUMS. Learn about OLIVER MILLER distilling and coke-making HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ in this pre-Civil War industrial Whiskey Rebellion site village. 724-887-7910. features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and PTI HOLIDAY LIGHT exhibits. Includes displays, & MUSIC SHOW. walking tours, gift shop, Thru Jan. 3, 5-10 p.m. picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Pittsburgh Technical Institute. Washington. 724-228-9256. 1-800-784-9675. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Garden Railroad. HOLIDAY TRAIN DISPLAY. Dinosaur-themed train Working coal mine, airport, display. Winter Flower steel mill & firework display. Show & Light Garden. Mon-Fri and Sat, Sun. Thru Feat. poinsettias, amaryllis, Jan. 4 Penn Hills VFD #224, whimsical lights & adornments. Verona. 412-828-0860. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF from around the world. PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY Oakland. 412-622-6914. ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, PINBALL PERFECTION. glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, Pinball museum & more. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 players club. West View. 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. 412-931-4425. 412-456-6666. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including CARNEGIE TREES 2013: many endangered species. EMBRACING THE ART Highland Park. 412-665-3639. OF PLAY. 20-foot Colorado RIVERS OF STEEL spruce trees adorned w/ NATIONAL HERITAGE handcrafted ornaments AREA. Exhibits on the that celebrate the art of play. Homestead Mill. Steel Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 12 industry and community Carnegie Museum of Art, artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

FULL LIST ONLINE

HOLIDAY

THU 02 - FRI 03

THU 02 - SAT 04

THU 02 - SUN 05

THU 02 - WED 08

DANCE SAT 04

BELLYDANCE HAFLA W/ ELECTROBELLY DANCE TROUPE. 8 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 8, 8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833.

SUN 05

THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Autism-Friendly Performance Dec. 27. Sun, 12 & 4:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS SUN 05

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS MON 06

FIGHT BACK PITTSBURGH GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING. 6:30 p.m. United Steelworkers Building, Downtown. 412-298-6361.

LITERARY THU 02

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPOKEN JAZZ. Open mic-less night w/ musical accompaniment for poetry, prose, song, more. First Thu of every month, 8-10 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. “THE WRITE SPOT” WRITERS’ WORKSHOP. Prompt-driven poetry & prose. Third Thu of every month, 7-9 p.m. and First Thu of every month. Thru Feb. 6 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

SAT 04

ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: GEORGE OHR: SOPHISTICATE & RUBE. Discussion & book signing w/ Ellen Lippert. 3-5 p.m. CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

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HEAVY DRINKERS NEEDED F OR BR A IN I M AG I N G S T U D IES The University of Pittsburgh Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry are seeking MEN AND WOMEN FROM 18–55 YEARS OF AGE for brain imaging research studies who currently have or have had a problem with ALCOHOL. • The study involves questionnaires, interviews, and brain scanning. The brain scanning includes 1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and 1 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan. • The research study will take place at UPMC Presbyterian hospital. The study will be conducted over a period of two weeks. Payment up to $1,100 for participation upon completion. For details, call 412-586-9633, or contact by email at PMIPstudy@gmail.com, or visit www.addictionstudies.pitt.edu.

MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION GROUP. Mon, 10 a.m. Thru Feb. 24 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

TUE 07

ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. Communication, leadership & public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

KIDSTUFF THU 02 - WED 08

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

OUTSIDE TUE 07

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, Musical swing set, sandbox, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, solar-powered instruments, Oakland. 412-477-4677. more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. WEDNESDAY 412-322-5058. MORNING WALK. BALL. 500 beach Naturalist-led, balls, larger inflatable . w ww per rain or shine. balls, a disco ball a p ty ci h pg Wed Beechwood & music. Ongoing .com Farms, Fox Chapel. Children’s Museum of 412-963-6100. Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor landscape made of 22 miles of packing tape. ADVANCED ITALIAN Thru Jan. 19 Children’s Museum CONVERSATION. Thu, 10 a.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon 412-322-5058. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. TOUGH ART. Interactive 412-531-1912. artworks by Chris Beauregard, CONVERSATIONAL Katie Ford, Scott Garner, CHINESE & CHINESE Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum CULTURE. Thu, 7 p.m. of Pittsburgh, North Side. Thru Feb. 27 Mount Lebanon 412-322-5058. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. EMPATHY FIRST. A ARTKIDS: START THE NEW compassionate communication & YEAR RIGHT. 11-11:45 a.m. Frick conflict transformation

WED 08 FULL LIST ONLINE

OTHER STUFF

THU 02

SAT 04

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Saturday, the Frick Art & Historical Center kicks off the year with StART the New Year Right. In the latest installment of its monthly, family-friendly series ArtKids, young’uns ages 4 to 8 are invited to explore the museum’s galleries, in search of ideas for decorating their own 2014 calendars. The program is also a great excuse to check out the fascinating exhibit Civil War Era Drawings From the Becker Collection before it closes on Jan. 12. 11–11:45 a.m. Sat., Jan. 4. 7117 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. 7424 Washington St., Swissvale. First and Third Thu of every month, 7 p.m. 412-271-7660. HOMO-AEROBICS. Presented by Rhinestone Steel Queer Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-8 p.m. Thru March 6 Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 724-699-2613. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: GHOST THE MUSICAL. Pre-performance information session w/ theater critic, Chris Rawson. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SILENT CITY: ON LISTENING, NOISE, & NATURE IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS. w/ Abby Aresty. Part of Biophilia: Pittsburgh. 5:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory &


Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

FRI 03

AMBER BAMBER, JOANNA LOWE & JEREMY CAYWOOD. The Coming of Age show. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. RAINBOW RISING COFFEE HOUSE. For gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered individuals and friends. Music, games, movies, entertainment and more. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Smithton. First Fri of every month 724-872-5056.

SAT 04

FITNESS @ THE LIBRARY: EXPERIENCE THE MASALA BHANGRA WORKOUT. Indian dance-based fitness program. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru April 26 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SUN 05

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. 5-6 p.m., Sun., Jan. 19, 5-6 p.m. and Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Feb. 16 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CHINESE II. First Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Thru April 20 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

“The Invincible Iron Man.” Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Gadgets to Grandeur. Group show feat. brand new & vintage Chiz artists. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Make Moves. Assemblage work, drawings, video & more by Bill Shannon. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Obscure/Reveal. Hot wax paintings by Christine Aaron, Karen Freedman, Amber George, Lorraine Glessner, Catherine Nash, James Nesbitt, more. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Interconnected World: Art & Science at the Environmental Charter School. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett,

Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. David A. Ludwig: Structures. Paintings, study sets, & drawings from a 40 year career. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The New Collective. PCA all-guild exhibition of current work. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. SiO2: Highschool Reunion. Feat. work by 12 former SiO2 high school students. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Pittsburgh Collects. 75 selected works contributed by 3 Pittsburgh photography collectors. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Downtown. 412-325-7723. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

Where the Magazine Comes to Life!

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CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

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COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, ARRANGING W/ THE no experience necessary. SEASONS. Prepare Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. arrangements using locally EVENT: , 412-422-7878. available flowers. 7-9 p.m. , and CONTEMPORARY Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. EUROPEAN DESIGN. 412-441-4442 x 3925. Learn techniques for creating ASTROLOGY & ANGEL concert at the floral designs that incorporate READINGS. 4 p.m. Oliver’s Rex Theater, South Side the European styles of Pourhouse, Greensburg. parallelism, landscape 724-836-7687. CRITIC: vegetative, multi-plane & LEADING UNDER , 19, hand-tied. Wed, 7-9 p.m. CONDITIONS OF a mechanic from Thru Jan. 29 Phipps UNCERTAINTY. Presented Garden Center, Shadyside. South Park by the Institute for 412-441-4442 x 3925. Entrepreneurial Excellence. DETROIT STYLE URBAN WHEN: 7:30-10:30 a.m. BALLROOM DANCE. Duquesne Club, 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-648-1544. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. MORNING SPANISH 412-242-4345. LITERATURE & Tonight was a dope show at [the] Rex with my favorite ENGLISH CONVERSATION CONVERSATION. Pittsburgh-based artist, Buku. Buku played some awesome (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mon, 10 a.m. stuff tonight. I don’t think I’ve ever felt the bass drop so Mount Lebanon Public Mount Lebanon hard. Of the openers I had only heard of Le Moti, and they Library, Mt. Lebanon. Public Library, absolutely killed it, but Torvvo and Robbie Rockso were 412-531-1912. Mt. Lebanon. seriously sick additions to the show as well. I was surprised LET’S SPEAK 412-531-1912. www. per by the amount of people that turned out — one of the best ENGLISH! Practice RUSSIAN FOR a p pghcitym turnouts I’ve seen [at] a Buku show. Who says Pittsburgh has conversational BEGINNERS. First .co English. Wed, 5-6 p.m. Mon of every month, no music scene? Between these performances and VIA, I am Carnegie Library, Oakland. 6:30-7:30 p.m. and really happy to be living in a city with so much new musical 412-622-3151. Third Mon of every talent that is often rare to find in other cities. That says NEW YEAR, NEW month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. something about artists — when they aren’t just trying to do OPPORTUNITIES. Career Thru April 21 Carnegie Library, what someone else already did, but trying to do something counseling program. Oakland. 412-622-3151. new and fresh that anyone into any music scene can respect. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon SCOTTISH COUNTRY B Y B RE T T W I L S ON Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 412-531-1912. social dancing follows. THE PITTSBURGH No partner needed. Mon, SHOW OFFS. A meeting of 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. the Mirror: A Tribute to R-ACT THEATRE PRODUCTIONS. jugglers & spinners. All levels Grace Episcopal Church, Marvin Hamlisch. Jan. 5. Auditions for Murder at the welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. Open to tri-state area Movies. Jan. 6. Seeking 4 men Union Project, Highland Park. SPELLING BEE WITH students in grades 9-12. & 4 women. Readings from 412-363-4550. DAVE AND KUMAR. centerauditions.org Lincoln PSYCHIC & ASTROLOGY Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. the script. Call for information. Park Performing Arts Center. READINGS. 5 p.m. The Bronze 412-431-5282. Robinson. 724-775-6844. 724-576-4644. Hood, Robinson. TRIB TOTAL MEDIA. Auditions LINCOLN PARK QUEER HISTORY 101. Discussion for the Trib Total Media Young PERFORMING ARTS CENTER CRASH COURSE: GET w/ Harrison Apple. 7 p.m. Artists Competition. Register HEALTHY NOW WORKSHOP. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, STUDENT COMPANY. recorded auditions by Jan. 13, Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. Auditions for Little Shop live auditions held on Feb. 2. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. www.westmorelandsymphony. MT. LEBANON org 724-837-1850. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH For seniors. First Tue of every PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Accepting submissions Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Help our public library system this year by joining 412-531-1912. for showcase of locally the Love Your Library Sorting Project. Volunteers are OPEN (POST) JAZZ written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or needed to sort books and other materials, preparing IMPROVISATIONAL transgender-theme 1-act plays. DANCE CLASS. Tue, them for delivery to over 70 library branches. Sorting Manuscript details at facebook. 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 takes place Monday through Friday at the Library Support com/events/519459561475242/ The Space Upstairs, Point Center in the West End. Call 412-622-1015 or email 412-256-8109. Breeze. 412-225-9269. volunteers@carnegielibrary.org for information, or to set THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking SOIL ECOLOGY. Tue, 7-9 p.m. up an appointment with the Volunteer Services Office. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Garden performers & artists to Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 participate in First Fridays x 3925. Art in a Box. For more of Horrors. Jan. 6-8. Open information, email to tri-state areas students in thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT BOBCAT PLAYERS. Auditions grades 9-12. centerauditions. 412-403-7357. GROUP. For Widows/ for the 2014 season. Jan. 11, org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Widowers over 50. Second and THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 16, 18. Cold readings & 1-min. Center. 724-576-4644. Fourth Wed of every month, monologue from a play or movie. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking PRIME STAGE THEATRE. 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, www.bobcatplayers.com Beaver submissions in all genres Auditions for The Importance Ross. 412-366-1300. Area High School, Beaver. for fledgling literary magazine of Being Earnest. Jan. 25-26. BIENVENIDO: HAVE FUN 412-953-0237. curated by members of Males age 20-65/females WHILE YOU SPEAK SPANISH. LINCOLN PARK age 20-65. www.primestage. the Hour After Happy 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon PERFORMING ARTS CENTER com/about/auditions.html Hour Writing Workshop. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. DANCE COMPANY. The Oakland School, Oakland. 412-531-1912. Auditions for The Music & afterhappyhourreview.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH

WED 08

AUDITIONS

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a 34-year-old straight female. I’ve been morbidly obese for most of my life. I’ve been on a couple of dates, and only when I asked the guy out. I am aware that some men are attracted to fat women. But since I never received real sexual attention as a teen/twentysomething, I don’t know how to deal with men sexually or in a way that would develop into a relationship. I also think my lack of experience has made me bitter. How do I stop being bitter and learn to develop a romantic relationship? FAT AND BITTER

Romantic and/or sexual relationships are something you learn by doing, so you’ll have to start doing them — you’ll have to start doing men — to learn how they’re done. There are men who are into BBW, a.k.a. big beautiful women, but folks on Twitter recommended staying away from BBW-focused websites (which tend to be overrun by fetishists) and go with mainstream sites like OKCupid instead. But maybe dating sites aren’t the place to start. “More important than worrying about finding people who love your size is making sure YOU love your size,” says Jolene Parton, a fat dancer, sex worker and activist. “Self-love can be the hardest thing in the world for a fat woman, but it’s the best way to inspire others to love you and your body. Getting plugged into a fat-positive community might help you find friends and lovers who love the whole you. NAAFA. org and Nolose.org are great places to start.” What to do about the bitterness? Let it go. Yes, men suck. But women can be sucky and judge people on appearances alone, too. (Ask any short guy.) All of us have had our hearts broken or, even worse, ignored, and every one of us has cause to feel bitter. Most people let it go, and you can, too. One other bit of advice: Be open about being inexperienced. That will attract some guys and scare others off. Good riddance to those it scares off, but don’t assume that guys who are interested are necessarily nice guys. Some might be manipulators who want to take advantage of your inexperience or perceived desperation. To help sort the good ones from the bad, convene a small panel of friends to serve as bullshit detectors. Your own bullshit detectors don’t develop until you start dating, so ask your panel to point out any red flags you’ve missed. Good luck!

that only the person and their partner can know how to navigate,” says Dr. Leah Torres, an obstetrician/gynecologist with a focus on family planning, “but I encourage safety first always.” And Dr. Torres sees danger in what you’re doing, BELLY. “Abdominal muscles protect and hold our intestines, liver, spleen, pancreas, etc. in place, and there can be risk involved in blunt trauma such as punches in the abdomen, especially if the muscles are ‘relaxed,’” says Dr. Torres. “For example, if someone has an infection like cytomegalovirus (‘mono’), the spleen can be more susceptible to injury. Blunt trauma could cause splenic rupture and internal bleeding that could be life-threatening. While that is uncommon, it is an example of how something that appears ‘not dangerous’ could become so.” One precaution you could take? Stop relaxing your abdominal muscles, and use your tensed, flexed abdominal muscles to protect your internal organs. “There is no risk to the IUD, as it is inside a very small uterus that is in the lower pelvis,��� says Dr. Torres. “But when someone is pregnant (!), I would recommend no belly punching under any circumstances!” I’m a gay man in a relationship with a great guy. But he seems to be “feminizing” me. I’ve spent the last decade in grad school. I stayed in shape, but there was no time for significant exercise. I’ve started working out, but I weigh about 20 pounds less than my boyfriend and can’t match his aggression in bed. He has even joked about me being “the woman” in our relationship — and I don’t like that. However, it’s not like I can toss him into bed and have my way with him. I want him to see me as another man in bed. It’ll be another year or two before I reach his level of athleticism. Any ideas in the meantime?

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

ALL OF US HAVE HAD OUR HEARTS BROKEN OR, EVEN WORSE, IGNORED.

I’m a 30ish woman in a GGG relationship. I’m submissive and masochistic; he’s dominant and willing to inflict some pain. Neither of us has tons of BDSM experience. My question: My boyfriend is into belly punching. I’m happy to indulge him. He likes it when I relax my abdominal muscles. Is this safe? What precautions should we take? Does the fact that I have an IUD factor in? And if I ever get pregnant, should we stop? BELLY ERECTS LONG LOVELY YOUKNOWWHAT

“There certainly are consensual boundaries

NOT ONE TO FEEL ENTIRELY MASCULINE

Just one: Get over yourself. Watching a man wring his hands about his fragile manliness hardly makes him seem more masculine. (And it doesn’t make him seem more feminine. It just makes him look ridiculous.) And 20 pounds of muscle do not “make the man.” Being comfortable in your own skin makes you a man. No, scratch that: Being comfortable in your own skin makes you a person — a decent, tolerable, secure and attractive person. (And a man who’s passive in bed is still a man! Christ!) If your boyfriend says something that annoys you, tell him to knock it off. But your boyfriend could be “joking” about you being the passive one because he prefers it that way. If he would rather be the tosser, you’ll need to either find a different boyfriend or stop grounding your sense of masculinity in something so arbitrary as a game of who-tossed-who-farther.

Vote for your favorite City Paper cover of 2013 for a chance to WIN a CP prize package! tinyurl.com/CityPaper2013

Jolene Parton burns up Twitter @jolenestarshine. Dr. Leah Torres regularly posts about women’s health issues and smacks down antichoice trolls on Twitter @LeahNTorres and blogs at Leahtorres.com.

(you must be signed into our website to be entered into the drawing) CONTEST ENDS 01/08/14

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

01.01-01.08

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Would you be interested in a motto that will help set the tone for you in 2014? I’ve got a suggestion that’s in alignment with the astrological omens. It’s from a poem by Margaret Atwood. Try saying this and see if it works for you: “Last year I abstained / this year I devour / without guilt / which is also an art.” If you choose to make this affirmation your own, be sure you don’t forget about the fact that devouring without guilt is an art — a skill that requires craft and sensitivity. You can’t afford to get blindly instinctual and greedy in 2014; you shouldn’t compulsively overcompensate for 2013’s deprivations. Be cagey and discerning as you satisfy your voracious hunger.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

The coming months will be a good time to meditate on the concepts of happy accidents and benevolent trouble. Go ahead and throw constructive mischief into the mix, too, and maybe even a dose of graceful chaos. Are you game for playing around with so much paradox? Are you willing to entertain the possibility that fate has generous plans for you that are too unexpected to anticipate? There’s only one requirement that you have to meet in order to receive your odd gifts in the spirit in which they’ll be offered: You’ve got to be open-minded, eager to learn and flexible.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

I think we humans need some new emotions. It’s true that old standards like sadness, anger, jealousy and fear are as popular as ever. But I would personally love to be able to choose from a greater variety, especially if at least 51 percent of the new crop of emotions were positive or inspiring. Now it so happens that in 2014 you Pisceans will be primed to be pioneers. Your emotional intelligence should be operating at peak levels. Your imagination will be even more fertile than usual. So how about it? Are you ready to generate revolutionary innovations in the art of feeling unique and interesting feelings? To get started, consider these: 1. amused reverence; 2. poignant excitement; 3. tricky sincerity; 4. boisterous empathy.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Deep bronzes and smoky cinnamons and dark chocolates will be your lucky colors in 2014. Mellow mahoganies and resonant russets will work well for you, too. They will all be part of life’s conspiracy to get you to slow down, deepen your perspective, and slip into the sweetest groove ever. In this spirit, I urge you to nestle and cuddle and caress more than usual in the coming months. If you aren’t totally clear on where home is, either in the external world or inside your heart, devote yourself to finding it. Hone your emotional intelligence. Explore your roots. On a regular basis, remember your reasons for loving life. Stay in close touch with the sources that feed your wild soul.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

For years, French painter Édouard Manet and French poet Stéphane Mallarmé hung out with each other every day. Mallarmé referred to their relationship as “the most complete friendship.” They influenced each other to become better artists and human beings. I’m guessing that in the coming months, Taurus, you’ll thrive on that kind of stimulating companionship. Having such regular contact with a like-minded ally might even be an important factor in ripening your intelligence.

At the very least, I predict that soulful friendship will be a crucial theme in 2014. You will attract blessings and generate luck for yourself by deepening your ability to cultivate synergistic bonds.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

St. Peter’s Basilica is a very old church in Vatican City. It contains a life-size bronze statue of St. Peter that is at least 700 years old. Over the centuries, countless visitors have paid their respects by kissing and touching the feet of the idol. The metal composing the right foot has been so thoroughly worn down by these gestures that the individual toes have disappeared, leaving a smooth surface. You will have a similar kind of power in 2014, Gemini. Little by little, with your steady affection and relentless devotion, you can transform what’s rigid and hard.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Big rivers don’t travel in straight lines. Their paths are curvy and complicated, with periodic turns and bends. In some places they flow faster and in others they’re slower. Their depth and width may vary along the way, too. Your own destiny is like one of those big rivers, Cancerian. In some years, it meanders for long stretches, slowing down as it wanders along a crooked course. It may even get shallower and narrower for a while. But I expect that in 2014, you will be moving more rapidly than usual. You will be traveling a more direct route, and you will be both wide and deep.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

The citizens of Iceland love literature, but many are not content to simply read. One out of every 10 Icelanders writes and publishes a book at sometime in his or her life. I know it’s unrealistic, but I would love to see at least one in 10 of all my Libra readers do the same in 2014. I think you’re ready to make a big statement — to express yourself in a more complete and dramatic way than ever before. If you’re not ready to write a book, I hope you will attempt an equivalent accomplishment.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

I’m hoping you will find a new teacher or two in 2014, maybe even a mentor. Not a guru who tells you what to do. Not an exploitative “expert” who claims to know what’s right for you or a charismatic narcissist who collects adoration. What I wish for you, Scorpio, is that you will connect with wise and humble sources of inspiration … with life-long learners who listen well and stimulate you to ask good questions … with curious guides

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In 2014, it’s possible you will be given a cabbage farm or a petting zoo or some bequest that’s not exactly in close alignment with your life’s purpose. But it’s more likely that the legacies and dispensations you receive will be quite useful. The general trend is that allies will make available to you a steady flow of useful things. Your ability to attract what you need will be high. In the coming months, I may even have good reason to name you an honorary Scorpio. You might match those Great Manipulators’ proficiency at extracting the essence of what you want from every situation. Homework: To hear Part One of my three-part audio forecasts about your destiny in 2014, go to http://bit.ly/BigPicture2014.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

I predict that you will commit no major acts of self-sabotage in 2014. Congrats! I also foresee that you will be exceptionally careful not to hurt or damage yourself. Hooray! More good news: You won’t be as critical of yourself as you have sometimes been in the past. The judgmental little voice in the back of your head won’t be nearly as active. Yay! Even your negative emotions will diminish in frequency and intensity. Hallelujah! Whoopee! Abracadabra!

OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

“In games there are rules,” writes science-fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, “but in life the rules keep changing.” This is always true, of course, but I think it will be an especially poignant truth for you between now and your next birthday. During the coming months, you may sometimes feel as if every last law and formula and corollary is mutating. In some cases, the new rules coming into play will be so different from the old rules you’ve been used to, they may at first be hard to figure out. But now here’s the happy ending: It may take a while, but you will eventually see that these new rules have an unexpected logic and beauty that will serve your future well.

who open your eyes to resources you don’t realize you need. In the coming months, you are primed to launch a quest that will keep you busy and excited for years; I’d love to see you get excellent help in framing that quest.

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

LIVE 36 + WORK 36 + SERVICES 37 + STUDIES 37 + WELLNESS 38

WORK

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The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

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Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media salesperson. If you have what it takes to sell, send your resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014


Ink Well

SERVICES

BRING IN THE NEW YEAR

ANNOUNCEMENTS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

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ACROSS

1. Sarah McLachlan hit covered by Avril Lavigne 5. Load separate from colors 11. “Gangnam Style” singer 14. Endure 15. Beat on a course 16. “So that’s your game” 17. “Sleepless in Seattle II: We Need to Get to the Hospital Now”? (Happy New Year to baby Hildegard of Bingen!) 20. Like some stockings or boots 21. Moves leaves 22. Letters addressed to an airplane, perhaps 23. Dad’s rackful 25. Thanksgiving? (Happy New Year to President-elect George W. Bush!) 31. President after U.S.G. 32. Crude shelter 33. Duke’s daughter 36. Bases’ opposites 38. Hair slickener 39. Important means of communing with Jah 40. “Anchors Aweigh” readiness gp. 41. Go to a higher court, say 43. Trent Reznor’s band, briefly 44. Sequel to a 2013 3D film in which Manny Pacquiao

spars in space? (Happy New Year to adolescent Jesus!) 47. Coax 48. Personal ad abbr. 49. Verdi baritone aria 52. Start, as a club? 57. Off-the-cuff riffs about old-timey clothes-cleaning devices? (Happy New Year to Emperor Justinian I!) 60. Heavenly sphere 61. 36-Across neutralizer 62. “In the Valley of ___” (2007 Tommy Lee Jones film) 63. Burns of PBS docs 64. Make straight 65. Song word repeated after “Que”

DOWN

1. “Madonna: Truth or Dare” director Keshishian 2. Put through hell? 3. “Crystal clear” 4. Doing nothing 5. Old-style emo expression 6. Like one who has to manage a large staff? 7. Vexing problem when your arms are restrained 8. Have a go at 9. Injured body part in a 2013 “Girls” episode 10. Was loud in bed? 11. Fill a suitcase, say 12. Half of many a Zappos delivery 13. Orange tubers

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18. Grave robbers and such 19. Indian spice mix 23. British tea name 24. One-on-one offense, in basketball slang 25. ___ Farbissina of the “Austin Powers” films 26. Foundational skills 27. Either of two “The Cat in the Hat” characters 28. Crow relative 29. Like Charlie Brown 30. One-named New Age pianist 34. Spirit in a bottle: Var. 35. Up the ying ___ 37. “Sex for Dummies” author 39. Appeared positively postcoital

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41. Hitters attempt to keep it up: Abbr. 42. Keep it in one’s pants 45. Oranjestad dweller 46. Show that influenced “Lost,” with “The” 49. Small, furry Rebel Alliance ally 50. Bloody, perhaps 51. Amazon.com ID 52. Hot dog alternative 53. Doing nothing 54. Its Egyptian name simply means “river” 55. Transport on a slope 56. Worker protection agcy. 58. Cry for Argentina, perhaps 59. Alias preceder {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

REHEARSAL

Your Classified Ad printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $1,150! aTo run your ad in papers with a total circulation exceeding 6.9 million copies per week, call City Paper Classifieds at 412-316-3342. No adult ads. (AAN CAN)

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CLASSES EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

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CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD Public Hearing Notice CPRB Case #180-13 Thursday, 1/16/14 @ 5:30 p.m. City Council Chambers 510 City County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Regular Board Meeting: Tuesday 1/28/14 @6pm Same location as above.

Questions may be directed to 412-765-8023

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.01/01.08.2014

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Addictions

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January 2, 2014