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GAME CHANGERS: ANAMANAGUCHI REWORKS VIDEO-GAME SOUND INTO HIGH-ENERGY DANCE MUSIC 32


EVENTS 12.12 – 8pm NELLIE MCKAY Warhol theater Tickets $20/$18 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

12.30 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 30 from 10am to 5pm

1.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, THE NOX BOYS Warhol Entrance Space Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Warhol theater Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

TH ROUG H JAN UARY 12

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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[MAIN FEATURE] lot of the folks that we’re seeing — 18 “A many of them used to donate to food pantries.� — Jay Poliziani, executive director of Northside Common Ministries, on the changing face of food insecurity

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

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“I am old. But this is the least cynical I have felt for a long time.� — Longtime activist Lisa Frank on the movement to end income inequality.

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architecture that appeals to both aesthetes and kids, then I am all for it.� — Charles Rosenblum on The Playground Project exhibit at the Heinz Architectural Center

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“Half a dozen men in heavy work clothes are warming up around an iron stove and baking potatoes on the ductwork.� — A 1971 newspaper account of life at the Pittsburgh Produce Terminal.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 60 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 71 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 73 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 78 NEWS

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INCOMING

“WHAT REALLY MATTERS ARE THE POLICIES GOING FORWARD.”

Letter to the Editor In response to Chris Potter’s Nov. 27 column, “Capital Offense?,” I would note that the issue of requiring Capital Grille employees to work on Thanksgiving is a thorny one, made so by the fact that in all of the years the restaurant has been in existence prior to 2013, it had not been open on this day. McCormick and Schmick’s, a restaurant with some similarities to The Capital Grille, and situated right next to it in Downtown Pittsburgh, has been open on Thanksgiving for years with no public controversy. I believe parent company Darden Restaurants when its spokesperson states that there is customer demand for it to offer Thanksgiving service; more people dine out on this holiday each year, electing to eschew all of the preparation that goes into presenting the traditional feast at home. Capital Grille servers work hard and are talented individuals. They earn a good, living wage for it, the average check being at least $50 per person. I would conclude that the average gratuity is about $10 per guest. Should Pittsburgh City Council wade into the matter to condemn a business that is open on Thanksgiving? I know that the elected officials of my community would never consider biting the hand that feeds it, devoting its time and effort on the public dime to issue a proclamation against a company which provides good jobs and tax revenue for the township. There are two options in the battle to get stores and restaurants to be closed on Thanksgiving: to appeal to one’s sense of conscience or enact laws. I believe neither will be successful. The genie is out of the bottle. Profit and battling for a greater piece of the retail-sales pie are practiced by most merchants and restaurants, and a sufficient number of patrons respond to it to make it worthwhile for businesses to expand hours into once-sacrosanct days. I would hope that City Paper would not endorse using the police powers of government to force certain establishments to be closed on Thanksgiving, as is the case in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Maine. If we were to do that, why not declare Sunday to be the Sabbath for all and bring back full-scale blue-law repression of the early 20th century? On a related note, Chik-Fil-A provides its employees every Sunday, Thanksgiving and Christmas off, forgoing an untold amount of profit. I wonder if it would ever garner a kind word from the editor of City Paper. Something tells me that the answer is “no.” — Oren Spiegler

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

CLIMATE CHANGE

Big environmental challenges face incoming Peduto administration {BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

T

UCKED AWAY in Schenley

Park, Panther Hollow Lake looks idyllic — at least from a distance. Water inundates it during heavy rainfall, picking up sediment and the runoff from impervious surfaces — roofs, parking lots, and roads — located in neighborhoods upstream. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Erin Copeland, pelland land a senior seni enior ior res restoration storati ation ion ecologist for Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, at Panther Hollow Lake, which is prone to flooding


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According to the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy and the county’s sanitary authority, in 2012, 82.6 million gallons flowed into and out of Panther Hollow Lake. The system can only handle so much before you get a dirty lake and soggy basements in the businesses and houses just downstream, and eventually sewage overflowing into the three rivers. Once a place for families to ride paddleboats, the lake is now cloudy and clogged. “When I was teenager, we used to go ice-skating there. It was a beautiful place,” says Raymond Baum, 69, president of the Squirrel Hill Coalition and an advocate for the watershed restoration. But now, “It’s a big mess, anytime there’s a storm event.” For the lake itself, a solution might be at hand: The city, the county and private foundations all plan to finance a restoration effort that begins next year. “You can’t do anything, especially on a large scale, without working with these partners,” says Erin Copeland, senior restoration ecologist at the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy. “ T h e y ow n t h e l a n d , they own the pipes, they treat the water. … [T]hat partnership piece, this is where the solution is coming from.” But the lake is also a microcosm for broader environmental challenges that mayor-elect Bill Peduto must face. While the city has recovered from the worst excesses of the industrial era, bureaucratic hurdles and political squabbling have hampered some efforts — including those Peduto himself has authored. And despite new “green buildings” and other advances, the city’s recent environmental record is something of a mixed bag. The 2011 “U.S. and Canada Green City Index,” sponsored by Siemens, placed Pittsburgh 24th out of 27 cities. This September, the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy ranked the Steel City 25th out of 34 cities. Local officials and the Green Building Alliance, a major backer of green initiatives in Pittsburgh, have challenged the report’s methodology, but some observers say they suggest there’s work to be done. “The current situation is a classic case of glass half full or half empty,” says Stephen Herzenberg, executive director

of the Keystone Research Center. “What really matters are the policies going forward and what the rankings will be 10 years from now … and a possible partnership between the new mayor and county executive.” OF THE 100 policies Peduto campaigned

on for mayor this year, more than a quarter focused on sustainability. And his track record reflects a longstanding interest i n t h e i s s u e . I n 2 0 0 6 , he co-chaired Pittsburgh’s first Green Government Task Force, and has served on the city’s Sustainability Commission along with eight other mayorappointed city officials. “Bill was the politician that was at all of the climate-action meetings,” says Jim Sloss, the city’s energy-and-utilities manager and one of two employees in its Office of Sustainability and Energy Efficiency. B ut wh e n P e dut o is sworn in on Jan. 6, his first challenge might be to pick up on initiatives that have idled in recent years. Three years ago, Peduto and several other council members sponsored bills tying development subsidies to sustainability practices. One measure was the Clean Air Act of 2010, which aimed to reduce pollution from construction sites by requiring lower emissions from diesel engines. A stormwater management ordinance, meanwhile, was aimed at mitigating runoff from parking lots or other “impervious surfaces” that shed water. Another bill set wage requirements for those who would be employed at some developments. The bills were “put together by [a] coalition of labor unions, environmental groups, and faith-based and community organizations,” says Dan Gilman, who serves as Peduto’s city-council chief of staff and who will replace him as council’s District 8 representative. “The great thing was, it was one of the first times you saw labor unions lined up for clean air and environmental groups lined up for a prevailing wage.” “What I like about him is he’s reaching out to everyone,” says Kimberly Chapman, a resident of East Liberty and member of Action United, an advocacy group for low- and moderateincome residents. But since the bill passed in July 2011,

“WE HAVE SOMEONE WHO REALLY CARES ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY FOR ALL, NOT JUST CERTAIN NEIGHBORHOODS.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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CLIMATE CHANGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

Even He Wasn’t Expecting This.

the clean-air initiative has idled. The bill required that regulations implementing the ordinance would be publicized within six months, but Gilman says Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s administration “opposed all three pieces of legislation and never put force behind them.” The regulations include standards for the retrofit technology for diesel-fueled construction equipment and the procedures for verifying them. Administration officials deny that the bills were being ignored. According to City Solicitor Daniel Regan, the regulations were finalized just this past month. “This is a complicated p i e c e o f l e g i s l at io n , ” Regan says. “There were a number of parties involved internally and externally that worked on drafting those.” But the delay has hindered the process, says City Controller Michael Lamb, who is tasked with implementing the requirements. “We’ve been working on ways we can inform construction sites and contractors and have been identifying ways they can move forward with retrofitting new [pollution-control] equipment,” Lamb says. “But without the regulations in place, it’s tough to do.” “Letting this important legislation languish for over two years does not shout, ‘I support this,’” says Rachel Filippini, executive director of the Group Against Smog and Pollution. Barney Oursler, executive director of Pittsburgh United, which led the fight for the bills, says it’s not clear that the stormwater ordinance is being enforced, either. “[The current administration] tells us it’s being complied with, but we don’t have any comfort that they’re actually doing anything with it,” Oursler says. “So we’re really looking forward to the new administration and transparency.” The city and its water authority are currently being sued by PennFuture for not enforcing the ordinance at a partially publicly funded development by the Buncher Company in the Strip District. Regan says his office is defending the city on the grounds that it is enforcing

the ordinance. The lawsuit, filed in 2012, has yet to go to trial. PennFuture CEO George Jugovic says that with the administration turning over in January, it may not be necessary. “Given that [Peduto] sponsored it, I think we’ll have an opportunity to sit down and settle it. All we’re asking for is that the administration enforce an ordinance that was adopted by council.” Still, the outgoing administration can point to some accomplishments. It has, for example, joined with Allegheny County and other government agencies to form the Western Pennsylvania Energy Consortium, which pools resources to purchase electricity at discount rates — with at least 25 percent of that power coming from renewable sources. That source is mostly wind energy produced in Somerset County, according to Sloss’ sustainability office. The office has also overseen the Green Initiatives Trust Fund, which was created in 2008 with $100,000 in seed money from the operating budget. The fund invests in sustainability initiatives, like an effort to light streets with energyefficient LED bulbs. Any money saved by those investments goes back into the trust for more sustainability efforts. The city has installed more than 40,000 streetlights with LED bulbs so far, says Sloss, saving $120,000 in reduced electricity costs. “I would say during the Ravenstahl administration, this was the one program they [Peduto and Ravenstahl] actually came together on,” Sloss says.

“THEY TELL US IT’S BEING COMPLIED WITH, BUT WE DON’T HAVE ANY COMFORT THAT THEY’RE ACTUALLY DOING ANYTHING WITH IT.”

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THE NEED for cooperation will be far greater when the region confronts the overhaul of its sewer system. The Allegheny County Sanitary Authority (ALCOSAN) is under a federal court order to clean up its act by preventing sewage from being dumped into rivers and other waterways. Such discharges happen when rainstorms overwhelm the sewer infrastructure: Water from storm drains backs into sewer pipes and untreated sewage spills from outlets into area waterways. Advocates want the solution to include investments in sustainable infrastructure, and more green solutions like CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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CLIMATE CHANGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

water gardens. But because ALCOSAN handles discharges from the city and 82 other county municipalities, good relationships between local governments are key. “We’re really going to have to work together,” says Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald was a highly visible supporter of Peduto’s campaign from the outset, and backed the election bids of some Peduto allies on council. “It’s good we have a new mayor and council coming in, and on county council we have a lot of cooperation as well,” he says. “I’m optimistic.” Expectations are high among voters as well. According to a recent survey by regional-indicators organization PittsburghTODAY (an arm of the University of Pittsburgh’s University Center for Social and Urban Research), 78 percent surveyed in the Pittsburgh region think government should be responsible for taking the lead on the environmental agenda. Peduto has already appointed an intriguing figure to the new post of chief innovation and performance officer. Debra Lam is the daughter of Chinese immigrants who settled in the city’s North Hills. Her resume includes a

stint at the State Department and as a sustainability integrator for a Londonbased engineering design consultancy firm. For her senior thesis at the University of California-Berkeley, she compared environmental policies in the U.S. and China. “What I bring to the city and mayor is a very wide breadth of experience and understanding in how cities work around the world,” Lam says. Lam will be Sloss’ new boss in the City’s Office of Sustainability and Energy Efficiency. “There are going to be some changes and maybe a more defined set of goals,” Sloss says, “but it’s a smooth transition.” Lam’s skills as a former sustainability integrator might very well be put to good use as Peduto aims to engage various sectors and cross old city-county divisions for sustainability initiatives. “One of the most important things is that the mayor has to have a vision and drive this,” Lam says. “It needs to come from the top, and the good thing is we have someone who really cares about sustainability for all, not just certain neighborhoods, but something all neighborhoods can actively participate in.”

“WHAT I LIKE ABOUT HIM IS HE’S REACHING OUT TO EVERYONE.”

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

WORKING CLASS Adjuncts, fast-food workers face similar plight {BY CHRIS POTTER} AN EARLY-WINTER rain fell on the North Side street corner — strategically located between a McDonald’s and a Wendy’s — as Elizabeth Massey-Demus stood with nearly 100 other protesters on Dec. 11. “I’m not out here doing this for my own good,” she told me. “We really need a $15 minimum wage.” Not that she’d pass up the extra money. Massey-Demus works as a fast-food cashier for the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. That’s not enough to raise her two children without government help, which is why she’d joined the nationwide day of protest urging the wage be more than doubled. It would be unfair to single out Massey-Demus’ employer — let’s just say its mascot has bright-red hair — because very few fast-food places pay a decent wage. Hell, most barely pay better than a university hiring people with advanced degrees. On the same day that Massey-Demus was out in the rain, in fact, adjunct professors staged a protest of their own at Duquesne University. Their demands were different — the adjuncts want Duquesne to allow them to form a union under the auspices of the Steelworkers — but their plight was much the same. The union estimates that with a full teaching load, an adjunct can hope to earn maybe $15,000 a year. A fast-food cashier, working 40 hours a week at $7.25 an hour, can expect to earn $15,080. Such problems may seem remote in Pittsburgh. A story about our economic resurgence comes out every other week, seemingly. This past July, a study found Pittsburgh’s rate of upward mobility — the chance that someone born in the bottom 20 percent of earners can rise to the top 20 percent — to be among the top 10 for cities nationwide. But a more recent report issued by the Pew Charitable Trusts this month — which got much less attention locally — found that Pittsburgh’s economic mobility was just average among metro areas. And even Richard Florida, who once hailed a rising “Creative Class” of boho artists and computer gurus over at Carnegie Mellon University, has been raising the alarm. Though often derided as a propagandist for effete, elite knowledge workers, Florida has been warning

about the consequences of having the rich get richer while everyone else’s earnings lag. Pittsburgh’s level of income inequality, he says, ranks 17th out of 51 U.S. metro areas with more than 1 million people. That’s “better than many [areas], but not great,” Florida says. Inequality, Florida and his researchers have found, is often tied to areas with low labor representation — which means we may all have a stake in campaigns to organize adjuncts, or service workers at UPMC. If the voices of low-wage workers aren’t addressed, it’s not hard to imagine the dream going sour for everyone else. For starters, how long will college students be willing to take on more than $20,000 in student loans, when they can see their own instructors on campus, pleading for enough money to live on? Folks with college degrees aren’t just making fast-food wages: Many are working in fast-food jobs, or something similar. Earlier this year, the Center for College Affordability and Productivity found that more than onethird of college graduates are working jobs that only require a highschool diploma. In a city as devoted to eds and meds as Pittsburgh has become, that’s a potentially serious problem. Law schools — long a cash cow for universities — are already scaling back. Pitt and Duquesne both shrunk their incoming class sizes this year, a response to a terrible job market for lawyers. The economic stress has, however, created an opportunity for at least one sector of the economy: labor activists. Employers may be accomplishing what years of protests have so far failed to do: provide workers from wildly divergent backgrounds a sense of solidarity. “I am old,” says Lisa Frank, a longtime local activist now working with One Pittsburgh, which organized the Dec. 11 fast-food protest. “But this is the least cynical I have felt for a long time.” At that protest, I asked MasseyDemus what she wanted the rest of us to do: boycott fast-food places? “If you feel the way I do,” she answered, “maybe you should stand up, too.” Maybe someday, you won’t have a choice.

“IF YOU FEEL THE WAY I DO, MAYBE YOU SHOULD STAND UP TOO.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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Is the signature smell of Texas A&M University more “Italian lemon, bergamot and iced pineapple” (that open into “a body of vivid florals, raw nutmeg and cinnamon”) or more “bat feces” and “chilifest stink”? The two commentaries were contrasted in a November Wall Street Journal report on the introduction of Masik Collegiate Fragrances’ Texas A&M cologne (one of 17 Masik college clients) at around $40 for a 1.7-ounce bottle. Louisiana State University’s scent conjures up, insisted one grad, the campus’s oak trees, but so far has pulled in only $5,500 for the school. (To a football rival of LSU, the school’s classic smell is less oak tree than “corn dog.”) The apparent gold standard of fan fragrance is New York Yankees cologne, which earned the team nearly $10 million in 2012.

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The Original Hot Dog Shop Oakland

Double Wide Grill South Side

The Pub at Tonidale Robinson

Gateway Grill Monroeville

Double Wide Grill Mars

The All Star Bar & Grill Robinson

Graziano’s Bloomfield

Bella Notte Strip District

Local South Side

Hard Rock Café Station Square

Red Beard’s Bar & Grill Mt. Washington

Mulligan’s West Mifflin

Among America’s most prolific “fathers” (in this case, perhaps better considered “egg-fertilizers”) are Nathaniel Smith, age 39, who claimed on TV’s Divorce Court in September that he is the father of 27, and the late Samuel Whitney, whose grown stepdaughter Lexie Woods learned that he claimed 54 before he died in July at age 87. Smith (known in Dayton, Ohio, as “Hustle Simmons”) insisted that he is a fine father (doesn’t smoke or drink, keeps in contact with most of the kids, has “only” 21 child-support orders out), and besides, he told WHIO-TV, “I know of people who have even more than me.” (Among Whitney’s belongings, said Woods, were a “pile” of birth certificates and a stash of maximum-strength Viagra. “He was a likable man, a ladies’ man.”)

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In October, a 28-year-old man, reeling from a domestic argument in Port Richey, Fla., put a gun to his head and, against his girlfriend’s pleas, fired. As a neighbor across the street stood on her porch, the suicide bullet left the victim’s head and made three wounds on the neighbor’s leg, sending her to the hospital. About a week later, on the Norwegian island of Vesteroy, a moose hunter missed his target but hit a cottage in the distance, wounding a man in his 70s as he answered nature’s call. He was airlifted to Ullevaal University Hospital in Oslo.

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In November, barely two weeks after a small plane carrying 10 skydivers left no survivors when it crashed on the way to an exhibition near Brussels, Belgium, nine skydivers were able to dive for safety when two planes headed for a tandem jump collided near Superior, Wis. News stories did not address how experienced skydivers escaped one plane but not the other.

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In September, Orthodox Jewish communities once again staged traditional kaparot, in which chickens are killed in a prescribed way for the purpose of “transferring” a believer’s latest sins over to the chicken (whose death banishes the sins). (In many such ceremonies, the chickens are donated for food, but protesters in Los Angeles criticized rogue practitioners who simply tossed carcasses into the trash.) In November, Miami-Dade County animal services found a severely injured chicken with a family’s 4-by-6 photograph protruding from its chest, having been haphazardly

“implanted,” along with a note containing several hand-written names, apparently a casualty of local Santeria services.

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Toilets are always a favorite protest symbol, most recently employed by David Labbe, disputing a zoning decision by officials in Augusta, Maine, that prevented the sale of his house to Dunkin’ Donuts (for, he said, three times what he paid). He has begun lining his property with discarded toilets. Augusta-native Labbe says he has given up on his city and his neighbors (who fear traffic problems if a Dunkin’ Donuts opens).

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In November, Michael Brown, 19, became the most recent person forced to report to a police station (this, in College Station, Texas) in the middle of the night to ask that officers please remove the handcuffs he had been playing around with. Following the officers’ mandatory records check, it was learned that Brown had an arrest warrant for criminal mischief, and following a mandatory search, that he also had 2 ounces of marijuana in his pocket.

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Twice in November, men wrongfully convicted of major, chilling crimes, who were finally freed after serving long sentences, claimed upon release that they were — somehow — not bitter. Ryan Ferguson was released in Missouri after serving almost 10 years for a murder he surely knew nothing about (convicted because a prosecutor withheld exculpatory evidence). Derrick Deacon was freed in New York after nearly 25 years — served because the eyewitness (who finally recanted) had identified Deacon out of fear of retaliation by the Jamaican gang member she actually saw.

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It was Linda Ducharme’s turn in the spotlight in November as one of a seemingly increasing number of people who commit to bethrothing themselves to inanimate objects (“objectophiles,” “mechaphiles”). The Gibsonton, Fla., woman’s spouse is a Ferris wheel called the Sky Diva, and their relationship was chronicled on the Logo TV channel’s show What!? (Most famously, Erika La Tour Eiffel of San Francisco staged her 2008 wedding to the Eiffel Tower.)

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Many men have fallen for underagesex stings (tricked by NBC’s To Catch a Predator or by law enforcement nationwide). But perhaps Cliff Oshman, 64, of Daytona Beach, is the first to have brought his wife and young daughter along to meet the girl he was seducing. Oshman was arrested in October, and as usual, the “victim” did not exist except as the persona of an undercover cop.

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A club in the German coastal town of Cuxhaven might be in trouble following a September incident in which a 42-year-old dwarf accidentally fell off a podium before engaging in the club’s contest, “Lilliputian Action,” in which customers chase an elusive dwarf. Meanwhile, London’s Hippodrome Casino has reportedly run a series of ads seeking dwarfs (maximum height: 4 feet, 9 inches) for a special crew of bouncers and door guards to be unveiled in December.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RT HL I NK . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013


We Put The “T” in Toys For Tots. On Friday, December 13th, don’t just get caught in the morning rush. Catch the holiday spirit. Bring a toy down to the Steel Plaza T station and help lift a child’s spirits for the holidays. Friday morning, December 13th from 5:30 till 9 am, Toys for Tots will be collecting new, unwrapped children’s gifts. Port Authority is proud to join with media sponsors Q92.9 FM and the United States Marine Corps in asking you to help fill a child’s heart with joy and happiness this holiday season.

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STAMPED ON Cuts in federal food benefits mean tightened belts for residents and charities alike {BY REBECCA NUTTALL AND ALEX ZIMMERMAN} {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

J

UST WEEKS before Thanksgiving, a

time when belts loosen all across the country, nearly 1.8 million lowincome Pennsylvanians began tightening their own. On Nov. 1, cuts in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — often referred to as SNAP or food stamps — went into effect. As a result of reduced federal spending, Pennsylvania’s program has lost some $183 million. And a family of four with no income is allotted $1.75 to spend per person per meal. “I’ve seen families who were getting

a couple hundred dollars down to a hundred,” says Brandi Rukovena, food-pantry coordinator for North Hills Community Outreach, adding that families will have to make choices between paying for medications, making mortgage payments and having enough to eat. Among those impacted: an estimated 766,000 children and 494,000 elderly who receive benefits in Pennsylvania. “We already have record numbers of children” in poverty, says David Greeve, SNAP coordinator for the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. “With parents getCONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

ting less benefits from the SNAP program, it really impairs their ability to provide for their children. “I always come back to one man who was brought to tears. He was in a divorce situation and was finding himself unable to provide for his family. It hurts a person’s pride and feelings of independence. It creates a sense of desperation and hopelessness.” Meanwhile, Greve says, “A lot of our seniors are forced to make a choice between getting their medicine and putting food on the table.”


STAMPED ON, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

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amilies or individuals who qualify for SNAP receive an ACCESS Card, which acts like a debit card at a grocery store. The card can be used to buy bread, cereal, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and dairy products. It can’t be used purchase products like alcohol or tobacco, or items like soap, diapers, household supplies or vitamins. SNAP benefits vary in amount and are dependent on a family or individual’s income. For a family of four, a household’s gross monthly income cannot exceed $3,141. For individuals, the threshold is $1,533. Food-stamp benefits were decreased because the federal stimulus plan expired. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare, which administers SNAP benefits, federal funding for food stamps was decreased by 5.4 percent. For a family of four, that amounts to a decrease of $36 monthly. The reduction reflects the last gasp of President Barack Obama’s 2009 stimulus

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

plan. That year, food benefits were increased by 13 percent, based on the assumption that the cost of living would rise by that percentage over the ensuing four years. But federal cost-of-living numbers — whose accuracy is hotly contested by economists — reflected a smaller rise, and benefits were reduced accordingly. “While Republicans will say this is a rollback of an increase, if a person [started receiving food stamps] in July, they’re getting less now than they were before,” says Ken Regal, executive director of Just Harvest, a nonprofit that helps people apply for benefits. “That’s a cut, no matter how you slice it.” The 5.4 percent cut is “a small decrease,” said Kait Gillis, a spokesperson for the state’s Department of Public Welfare. “But unfortunately, it’s going to affect people, and we hope our local organizations can pull together to fill the gap for citizens in need.” That won’t be easy, say area food pantries and food banks.

Food banks overdrawn

D

emand at the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank always spikes during the holiday season. But CEO Lisa Scales predicts that the reduction in SNAP benefits will put even more pressure on the food-distribution network. “It is definitely a huge concern for us,” Scales says. “[W]e’re seeing a bigger increase this November compared with past years.” The food bank’s Produce to People monthly distribution in Duquesne could signal new demand in the region. Last November, 627 families showed up; this November, after the cut to SNAP benefits, the number jumped to 837. Local food pantries, which directly serve individual neighborhoods, are also feeling the strain. “We’re extremely bare-bones as it is,” says Jay Poliziani, executive director of Northside Common Ministries, whose food pantry serves roughly 1,000 people each month, making it one of the largest in the city. “We’re always struggling to have enough to share with them.” Local pantries offer supplemental assis-

tance — usually only about 10 days’ worth of food, Poliziani says. And more people are in need, especially as many find themselves underemployed or with no work at all. “Thirty-some dollars doesn’t sound like a big deal to most people,” Poliziani says, but for those already struggling, “it is a significant amount of money.” It’s not just a problem in the city. Jim Guffey, executive director of South Hills Interfaith Ministries, says the impact is being felt in the suburbs, too. His group’s November numbers are up “significantly” compared with past years — though he’s not sure if that’s entirely due to SNAP cuts. “Pre-recession, we were serving 100 to 120 families a month just in our food pantry. Now, we’re serving 650 to 800 families,” Guffey says. “We’ve just not seen the recovery.” “It’s not the downtrodden underneath the bridge,” he adds. “[T]hese are people who are employed.” Poliziani agrees: “A lot of the folks that we’re seeing — many of them used to donate to food pantries.”


North Side food-pantry volunteers Malta Langston and Dee Tolbert

Further cuts in store

W

hat makes the cuts especially troublesome, say critics, is that SNAP benefits didn’t adequately meet families’ needs even before the reductions took effect. “The amount people get is based on far out-of-date data,” says Regal, of Just Harvest. “It’s also based on a monthly theoretical food package … that is nutritionally inadequate. As a result, people on food stamps struggle constantly to get their money to stretch through the month.” SNAP recipients already do what they can to stretch their benefits. “I usually keep a lot of staples,” says Michael Joynt, a 46-year-old single North Side man who relies on his local pantry and food stamps. “Usually pasta, rice … and a lot of tomatoes.” And further reductions could be on the way, thanks to negotiations in Congress over a new Farm Bill (which has been the vehicle for SNAP funding). The version passed by the Democrat-controlled Senate calls for $4 billion in cuts, or .5 percent. House Republicans, meanwhile, are calling for $39 billion in cuts, or 5 percent. That’s raised protests from Democrats like Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey. “The proposed cuts by the House … that’s a cut that’s totally unacceptable,” says Casey, who is seeking to not only avoid further cuts but to increase SNAP benefits to their pre-November levels. “You’ve got

1.7 million people [nationwide] who rely on this program and it’s vital.” What’s more, Casey says: “Apart from the obvious need, when you have an economy that’s recovering, there’s also a huge economic benefit” to SNAP spending. Since SNAP benefits get spent at local grocery stores, the money is plowed back into local businesses. Citing a 2010 report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Casey says, “When you spend [$1] on SNAP, you get [$1.75] back overall and that has a huge benefit on the economy.” Unlike the November reductions, the next round will likely not be made across the board. Instead, the new law is likely to cut SNAP spending by raising eligibility requirements, or taking other steps to make it harder to apply for and maintain benefits. “To impose new cuts or any restrictions is not only unwise or mean-spirited, but it also doesn’t accomplish what people advocating for those cuts say it will accomplish,” Regal says. “It’s not going to reduce the deficit in any meaningful way.” “There’s a common misconception that all of the people who use these programs are freeloaders, and that’s simply not true,” adds Greeve, of the Urban League. “Some of these people don’t want be on these benefits. And it would be greatly to their benefit if they weren’t just portrayed all the time as lazy, when these people are anything but.”

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CHARLOTTE PAIGE:

“I told my son, ‘You can’t eat it all at one time.’”

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problem growing up in Homewood with her five siblings. Her father worked 35 years as a mechanic for Heinz and her mother was a housekeeper in Squirrel Hill. But as a student at Westinghouse High School, “I got messed up with the wrong crowd doing things I wasn’t supposed to do … drinking and stuff, skipping school.” She eventually dropped out. “My mother taught us better than that — I didn’t want to listen” Paige says, adding that if her life had been less turbulent, “things would have been a lot different.” She later obtained her GED and took classes through the Community College of Allegheny County, but found it difficult to find jobs that brought in enough money. And lots of employers “wouldn’t hire [because] I wasn’t working at a place long enough,” she says, adding that jumping from job to job was a financial necessity: “You get paid minimum wage, that’s not enough.” When Paige’s son was 14, she decided it was time to explain that she needed his help saving as much food as possible, so they didn’t run out by the end of the month. “I told him, ‘We can’t get what we used to — you can’t eat it all at one time,’” she says. “He didn’t want his friends or nobody to know.” But Paige says she can’t afford to worry about whether people see a stigma in depending on government aid for food. “I really don’t care,” Paige says. “I have to feed my family.”

harlotte Paige has spent much of her adult life piecing together jobs to raise her kids and pay the bills. She’s worked at Burger King, cleaned office buildings Downtown, and, most recently, was a certified nursing assistant. But then the woman she was caring for died, and the cartilage in Paige’s knees gave out. That was “the last good job I had,” says Paige, 51. “I just couldn’t do it anymore.” She has been enrolled in the foodstamp program for 20 years, but for the past two, disability, food stamps and child support have been the only sources of income for Paige and her teenage son. (Paige also has an adult daughter.) Last month, her food stamps were reduced from $94 to $74 per month — and that’s only the most recent cut. She says it has been cut two other times in the past year because of changes in her other benefits. Paige owns her own home, with what she says is a modest monthly mortgage payment of $500. She receives $730 in monthly disability payments; her son, who was born with a serious abnormality in his hand, receives a similar amount. And yet, she says, “I got to run to the food banks ’cause I don’t have enough. I do whatever I can to make ends meet.” The food banks make “a lot of difference,” she says. “They gave me three packs of meat, and the church brought me a turkey dinner.” Putting food on the table wasn’t a

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AMY GILL:

“Often it’s that $15 that gets you through.”

A

my Gill’s food-stamps account is empty … and it’s seven days before it will be replenished. “I’m due for my food stamps at the 9th of the month and I don’t have eggs or bread,” she says in the waiting area at the Northside Common Ministries food pantry. Each month, there is a period when her food benefits run out and she leans on the pantry to help feed her 9-yearold daughter. And while Gill does what she can to stretch the benefits — “I tend to buy more starches” — sometimes her card is tapped after a couple weeks. And she’s worried that period will only grow longer, now that her SNAP benefits have been reduced from $200 to $185. “I try to minimize it in my head, but often it’s that $15 that gets you through until next time,” she says. Gill, 41, sits at the pantry in a row of plastic folding chairs, waiting to pick up frozen meat, cereal and produce she hopes will last until the 9th. It has been an hour since she arrived and her number hasn’t been called — typical on a busy Tuesday morning, says the North Side resident. Gill has been on food stamps since she lost her full-time job seven years ago. She’s been going to the food pantry for the past three. She now works part time as a home health aide for a woman living with multiple sclerosis. Previously, Gill has done everything from janitorial work to clinical administration at doctors’

offices. (She has a degree in the subject). But it was “a struggle to maintain” those jobs because of her sometimes crippling depression. “I’m seeking fulltime employment, but I don’t know what my chances are because of the mentalhealth issues,” Gill says. “It’s just been a slow decline in my ability to function,” she says. “I still look for work in the medical field; I just can’t find it.” Being out of the field for 10 years, she says, has made her a less appealing job candidate. Gill says her other daughter, a 24year-old who has a job in sales, also struggles with food insecurity. She’s “not eligible on paper” for food stamps, Gill says, but is just “eking it out.” Sometimes mother and daughter stop together at Produce to People, a fooddistribution program offered by the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. When resources get tight, Gill often goes without food herself — especially since her SNAP benefits were cut several months ago because of confusion over her income, Gill says. “Children don’t understand why they have to ration their cereal,” Gill says. “You can’t just run to the store — otherwise you’ll be out of food stamps immediately. You always wrestle with guilt as a parent.” And even though Gill says she’s “not too proud” of being on stamps or using food banks, she adds “you can’t stereotype people.” Beneficiaries come from “all races,” says Gill. “They’re not who you think.”

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MICHAEL JOYNT:

“I’ve learned to live simply.”

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he has battled bipolar disorder and clinicaldepression diagnoses. “I’ve learned to live simply,” Joynt says. “I don’t have furniture, I don’t have a car, I don’t have kids … those are my values. I lead a full, rich life that a lot of other people don’t.” He learned to crochet when he was 7 and made his first hat at 10. He’s had various jobs in the arts, including painting doll faces in an East Liberty studio during the late ’80s. A Swissvale native and graduate of Woodland Hills High School, Joynt often had a hard time at school. “I was an eccentric child — I got harassed,” he says. “I was always a little different, creative.” His parents have always been supportive, Joynt says, even after he brought home a man he had been dating when he was 19. Employers haven’t always been so accepting. “I’ve gotten indirectly fired for it and I know it,” Joynt says. “[They] come up with some lame bullshit excuse for why they let me go.” Joynt now works the front desk part time at a local museum, does some occasional freelance event work and sells his own hats and jewelry through his company, HatManAtLarge. (The “at large” part “encompassed me living on the street, being kind of nomadic, kind of a gypsy,” Joynt says.) And even though money is tight, and moving can strain financial resources, “I could probably just pick up and go,” Joynt says. “It’s a tough choice, but I’ll probably do it again.”

he first time Michael Joynt set off on a solo adventure, it was 1,600 miles on a Greyhound from Pittsburgh to New Mexico. That was a trip he took for his 16th birthday, visiting his sister, who was stationed at an Air Force base there. Thirty years and dozens of states later, Joynt is back in Pittsburgh, sitting in the middle of one of its busiest food pantries and crocheting a hat. He’s been coming to the pantry, just a few blocks from his North Side apartment, for a year to supplement the $200 per month he receives in food stamps. (Last month, he says, he didn’t receive any money on his EBT card, something he’s hoping will get straightened out soon.) But he doesn’t think losing a few dollars as a result of SNAP cuts will affect him much: “I know how to stretch it.” He loads up on staples at the pantry so he has money left for vegetables and almost never goes out to eat. “I love to cook,” Joynt says. “Chinese is one of my favorites because it’s actually quite simple … and it’s relatively inexpensive.” But if he were to lose the benefits permanently, he says, the impact “would be very dramatic.” Joynt has relied on food stamps off and on over the past 10 years in Michigan, Maryland and Oregon — and he’s been in tough spots before. There was the time he was homeless in Dallas after he left an abusive relationship with his partner; he lived in transitional housing in Portland; and

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VICKIE STEVENSON:

“They give you so many hoops to jump through.”

F

or Vickie Stevenson, a single mother living in Allison Park, getting by on SNAP benefits is all about planning ahead. She’s received food stamps off and on for the past eight months, and says she struggles during months she doesn’t receive them. “You always have to plan your meals out in advance,” says Stevenson, who holds a master’s degree in social work. “It’s actually cheaper to make things from scratch. You can’t afford to eat out, so you learn what you like and you make it. When I don’t have food stamps, I just run [to the store] and get ground beef and have hamburgers and French fries.” Stevenson first began receiving benefits in 2010, when she relocated to Pittsburgh so she and her now-18year-old daughter could be closer to their family. (The Beaver County native had previously lived in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, West Virginia and Arizona.) While she looked for a job, she reached out to Just Harvest in hopes of getting health care; she suffers from anemia. She didn’t get the insurance — and isn’t covered to this day — but learned she did qualify for food stamps. “I qualified [for SNAP] and I thought I’d be stupid not to take it,” says Stevenson. Even so, she says, “They design the system to give you so many hoops to jump through so you won’t take advantage of these services. But I have a teenage daughter who

vs.

likes to eat.” Soon after, she found a job in behavioral health and lost her SNAP benefits. But nearly nine months ago, she took on a new position as a mobile therapist, helping children ages 3 to 18 with behavioral problems. The work requires a lot of time on the road, since she provides therapy sessions for children at home. And because her hours vary, so does her eligibility for food stamps. “My case load currently is really low,” Stevenson says. “But last month I made $86 too much, so next month I won’t get food stamps.” That penalty for working amounts to roughly $150 in lost food aid — what Stevenson estimates she gets per month since the cuts went into effect. She said her benefits have been reduced by at least $50, but it’s hard to determine since the amount she gets fluctuates based on her income. It is, she says, difficult to feed two people on what she receives even when the benefits do come through. On a recent shopping trip to prepare for Thanksgiving dinner, Stevenson brought a bag of coupons. She shopped at Bottom Dollar that day, because they were advertising the lowest prices on turkey. “You have to look at all the flyers and see who’s having a better sale,” Stevenson says. “With these cuts you really have to stay on top of that. The holiday season is especially difficult: Why did they wait until November to cut us right before the holidays?”

Cleveland December 29, 2013

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THERE WERE PLENTY OF VEGETABLES, SOMETHING OF A TREAT AT A DINER

CHOCOLATE BAR {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} The idea of opening a luxury chocolate shop on South Side’s bar-laden East Carson Street might sound odd to some people. But Le Petit Chocolat owner Amanda Sougouna says her shop, which opened in June, is a welcome addition to the community. “I’ve been welcomed by families who say, ‘Thank you for not being a bar,’” says Sougouna, who grew up two hours outside of Pittsburgh and attended the Culinary Institute. Her shop offers artisan chocolates in 15 flavors, but Sougouna especially enjoys making customized flavors for her customers. Varieties include the coffee-flavored café armande, white chocolate-based coconut lime, spicy ginger rose and pistachio-topped toffee. Now that it’s cold, Sougouna is also selling hot chocolate, and for the summer, she’s considering gelato. “There’s nothing really like this in Pittsburgh,” says Sougouna. “Part of the sparkle of what we do is I make everything by hand.” The chocolate’s ingredients are locally sourced: The cream comes from Turner’s Dairy in Penn Hills, the butter from Beaver Meadow, in her hometown of DuBois. The single-bean chocolate is fair trade. Le Petit also offers private dipping parties where guests are invited to dunk fresh fruit, dried fruit, nuts and pretzels into their choice of chocolate. “I like the idea that moms and dads can come in with their kids, couples can come in on a date,” Sougouna says. “It’s something unique they can do.” RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1928 E. Carson St., South Side. 412245-1533 or www.lepetit-chocolat.com

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Just in time for the holidays, the ladies of the EatPGH blog (Sarah Sudar, Laura Zorch, Julia Gongaware and Mandy McFadden) have released their new book, Pittsburgh Chef’s Table: Extraordinary Recipes From the Steel City. The cookbook features nearly 100 recipes from Pittsburgh chefs, plus interviews. See www.eatpgh.com for more info.

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TALL ORDER {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

M

ICRONESIA IS an archipelago of

tiny islands. Microtel is a hotel full of bargain-size rooms. And Micro Diner is a tiny place to get lunch, dinner or breakfast during many hours on Mount Washington. Although it shares altitude with Grandview Avenue’s splendid restaurant row, Micro Diner is located on much more down-to-earth Shiloh Street among the banks, dry cleaners and bars that cater to the neighborhood’s residents. It’s bright and cheerful, with yolk-yellow walls and, true to its proclamation as a diner, a counter facing the grills and griddles at the establishment’s heart. A few tables provide the rest of the seating. But the size of the space is the only diminutive thing about Micro Diner — except, significantly, for the prices: Nothing is over $10. True to diner tradition, portions are ample and the menu covers all the classic diner categories: eggs, pancakes, French toast, breakfast and lunch sandwiches, burgers, soups, salads and entrees from old-school stan-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

Breakfast, with eggs over easy

dards like liver and onions to contemporary standbys like grilled tilapia. Our kids love to eat breakfast for dinner and split an order of French toast. Six triangles of toasted, egg-dipped white bread — which the French themselves call pain perdu, or lost bread — looked promising, pale areas mingling with toasty brown ones. But what was really lost was crispness, even at the edges of the crusts.

MICRO DINER 221 Shiloh St., Mount Washington. 412-381-1391 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-4 p.m.; late night Thu.-Fri. 10 p.m.-4 a.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-4 a.m. PRICES: $4-10 LIQUOR: BYOB

Moving from sweet to savory, we ordered an appetizer of fried zucchini. Thick matchsticks of zucchini — apparently fresh, not frozen, judging by their intact dark green skins — made a more substantial presentation than the more usual slices or wedges. Unfortunately, the coating, which was flecked

with herbs and bread crumbs, was a bit too heavy in both texture and taste for the tender squash. A marinara dipping sauce was oddly pale and chunky, more like a mild salsa than anything you’d find with pasta. The same breading, and consequent issues, recurred on a fried chicken-breast sandwich. Actually, the issue with the sandwich was more fundamental. The full-size breast of a whole chicken — two halves — not only dwarfed its rather large sesameseed bun, but it was also far too thick at one end to cook through before the thin end had become overdone. In the best bites we could taste what could have been: moist white meat seasoned by the crisp coating, herbs stepping forth to add flavor. But forget biting through cleanly with your teeth; the overcooked tips exceeded even the abilities of a fork and knife. Truthfully, everything that came out of the fryer was overdone. The fries were dark brown, and while quite a few of them had that great, caramelized potato flavor with crunchy and fluffy parts, most simply tasted like overcooked potatoes, requiring


plenty of ketchup — or gravy — to tone down the effect. Ah, the gravy. When Jason received mashed potatoes topped with homemade chicken gravy, he was nearly ready to forgive all previous transgressions. Flecked with shreds of chicken, the thick, but not pasty, gravy didn’t just surpass typical diner fare; it would credit a roast chicken at any but the finest of restaurants. It was savory and flavorful, upgrading the slightly lumpy mashed potatoes and salvaging the deep brown fries, all without drawing too much attention to itself or wearying the palate. Which made the chicken pot pie all the more disappointing. Inexplicably, the sauce in the pie wasn’t that same gravy — at least, not recognizably — but blander, with a hard-to-explain, less-than-smooth texture. There were plenty of vegetables, something of a treat at a diner, where nonpotato plant matter is usually scarce. But the blend of carrots, broccoli and lots of corn was peculiar, and the proportions suggested leftovers rather than careful selection. The crust was flaky enough and crisp at the edges, but inadequate to promote this flawed pie to favor.

Strawberries-and-cream French toast

Angelique eats burgers only a few times a year, and Micro Diner’s “Spicy Bleu and Bacon” burger enticed her to make this one of those times. She’s a fool for spicy, tangy buffalo sauce, and the promise of that, mingled with bleu cheese and bacon, was what reeled her in. So it was perplexing when, at first, her burger was delivered with American cheese and a half-hearted offer to take that off, if she wanted. Yes, please. When the burger was returned, the processed cheese had been scraped away, but also missing was any detectable buffalo sauce. Still, the beef patty was better than we’d expect at most restaurants that don’t specialize in burgers, and the bleu cheese dressing was good and chunky. At Micro Diner, we found glimmers of greatness among preparations that, with a little more care, could secure this restaurant’s reputation as tiny, but mighty. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HOLIDAY SPIRIT Every night is light-up night at Blawnox bar It’s a festival of lights all year long at Bob’s Garage on Freeport Road, in Blawnox. Depending on when you show up, the bar will be illuminated in light displays that offer thematic representations of Easter, St. Patrick’s Day, summertime or Halloween. However, it’s during the extended Christmas season (November through February) that the Garage truly shines. The outside of the one-floor, concrete building is dripping with waterfalls of rainbow bulbs, plus glowing Santas, stars and stockings — evoking memories of neighborhood home-decorating contests. Inside you’ll find a world fantastical, where, intertwined with a parade of ornaments, are the thousand points of light (and then some) that the elder President Bush dreamed of in his campaign speeches. “It took over 360 person-hours to put up all these lights,” says Bob’s Garage cook Dave Kimbal. “It’s kind of absurd and over-the-top.” But the lights illuminate a worthy cause: the Spirit of Christmas charity. Owner Bob Paganico established the nonprofit in 1987 to raise money to supply Christmas meals and gifts for underprivileged kids and senior citizens. According to Kimbal, more than 350 families receive assistance each year. The lead-up to Christmas features several events in which Paganico donates his profits and the bartenders their tips to the charity. The drive’s big event, Hot Sausage Day, takes place Dec. 21, starting at noon. (See the bar’s Facebook page, listed below, for details.) As for the bar itself, it’s a solid neighborhood joint. Mixed drinks are poured with a heavy dose of spirits, while the beer selection leans toward big and national over local craft. There is a menu full of deep-fried delights, and karaoke happens on Wednesdays through Saturdays. What shines even more luminously than the lights at Bob’s Garage are the people at the bar. Bartenders and wait staff are down-home friendly, and regulars mix with adventurous East Enders, who’ve taken a drive upriver to sing along to tunes selected by affable karaoke host Tom Wadsworth.

THE LIGHTS ILLUMINATE A WORTHY CAUSE: THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS CHARITY.

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

372 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-963-9552 or www.tinyurl.com/bobsgaragepgh

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

• Over 50 wines by the glass • Seasonal Cocktails

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Happy Hour

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

M-F 4:30 – 6:30p.m.

412-325-2227

ibizatapaspgh.com

TAPAS & WINE BAR

Award Winning Cuisine HOLIDAY PARTIES, PARTIES PRIVATE ROOMS AND GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412-488-1818

mallorcarestaurantpgh.com 2224 E Carson St SOUTHSIDE (at Birmingham Bridge)

& D Lun rink ch, Spe Dinn cial er sD aily !

We’re so much more than pizza! Proudly Supports

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

savor authentic flavors from oaxaca & mexico city AT the mexican underground in the strip

HOLIDAY GIFT CARDS Available at all locations.

Ross Twp. 412-821-0600

Visit our 7 locations! www monttecellos com www.montecellos.com 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

THE BLIND PIG TAVERN. 2210 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-5936. This South Side bar, whose name derives from Prohibition slang, offers a satisfying, pig-centric menu of pub grub. Look for the pig in pulled-pork sliders and pepperoni rolls. Or branch out with pizza, grilled cheese sandwich (add bacon!) and other popular bar fare. Wash it all down with legal beverages. JE

st

2031 Penn Ave (at 21 ) 412.904.1242 @casareynamex

Vivo Kitchen {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE

CHURCH BREW WORKS. 3525 Liberty LA CUCINA FLEGREA. Ave., Lawrenceville. 100 Fifth Ave., 412-688-8200. The www. per No. 204, Downtown. Brew Works setting a p ty pghci m 412-521-2082. The — the meticulously .co specialties of Italy’s rehabbed interior of St. Campi Flegrei are featured John the Baptist Church at this Downtown restaurant. with its altar of beer — remains The cuisine of this coastal region incomparable, and there are naturally offers seafood, but also always several hand-crafted vegetables and cured meats. brews on tap to enjoy. For Thus, a pasta dish might be laden dining, the venue offers a flexible with shellfish, or enlivened with menu, suitable for all ages, radicchio and prosciutto. LE ranging from pub nibblers and wood-fired pizza to nouvelle American entrées. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE DITKA’S RESTAURANT. 1 Robinson Plaza, Robinson. 412-722-1555. With its wood paneling, white tablecloths and $30 entrees, Ditka’s aims for the serious steakhouse market — but never forgets its sports roots: Aliquippa-born Mike Ditka is the former Chicago Bears coach. Try the skirt steak, a Chicago favorite, or a fine-dining staple such as filet Oscar. LE

Eat&In Take Out! Wexford 724-935-4151

BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-to-date selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed

THE LIBRARY. 2304 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-0517. The entrée list at this bookishthemed bistro is short, usually a good sign that the chef is focusing on the strengths of his kitchen and the season’s freshest foods. Dishes revolve around the staples of meat, seafood and pasta, but in fearless and successful preparations that make the menu a worthwhile read. KE LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this fine-dining but casual establishment. There’s a wellcurated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. This Greek estiatorio offers hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, appetizers (many of them less-familiar) and casseroles are on offer as well as heartier fare like kalamarakia (octopus), roasted leg of lamb and stuffed tomatoes. LF

Tamari {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} LAS VELAS. 21 Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegarmarinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant, but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The less-typical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, CONTINUES ON PG. 30


We’re all about the BEER! All Day, Every Day: $2.00 PBR 24oz. cans Happy Hour: 5pm-7pm Mon-Fri $ .00 1 off all drinks Wednesday: .20 cent wings,

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

HALF OFF DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS

$ .75

1 Bud Light Drafts, $4.00 Bombs, DJ Outtareach

Thursday: Karaoke DJ T-Money Friday: DJ Sneak Saturday: DJ Magic Mike Sunday: EDM Night with DJ 5X5 Suga

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm -----------------------------------------900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

1002 Perry Highway • Pittsburgh,Pa. 15237 412-367-9610 • perrytownedrafthouse.net

BenjaminsPgh.com

2012 & 2013 WINNER! 1/2 PRICE BOTTLES OF WINE EVERYDAY 9-11PM LUNCH, DINNER & DRINK SPECIALS DAILY! BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY AT 412.320.1990! 2019 EAST CARSON STREET, SOUTHSIDE WWW.BOBBYHENDRIXPGH.COM NEWS

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

offMenu

in either a traditional creamwine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE

Dine-In or Take-Out Mon 8a-3p•Tues-Fri Tues-Fri 8a-8p Saturday Brunch 9a-3p

412-415-0338

Let Del’s Cater Your Holidays! Open Christmas Eve Pick up your Holiday Dinner 10:30am to 2:30pm

Buffet Lunch with Santa Claus Saturday, Dec. 14 Noon-4pm Call Marianne soon to make reservations 412.298.2906

People & Pet Psychic Readings Available 4428 LIBERTY AVENUE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 Visit us at DelsRest.com

TESSARO’S. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809. This immensely popular Bloomfield institution, set in an old neighborhood corner bar, has built its reputation on enormous wood-fired hamburgers: choice meat, ground in-house; fresh rolls; and a variety of toppings. Regulars sit at the bar, and, on busy weekends, diners line up to get in. KE VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Downtown (412-434-5600) and 1505 E. Carson St., South Side (412-904-4620). Big beefy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this an above-average bar stop, whether Downtown or on Carson Street. Burger toppings range from standard cheese and fried onions to arugula and truffle oil. Don’t miss the pizza with its excellent crust. JE

Ankit Goyal, of Fresh From the Farm Juice {PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

www.skinnypetes.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

DOWN ON your luck? Try standing next to Ankit

TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is high-end, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates. KE

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202

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South Side juice-stand owner attracts good luck

SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J

A Unique Luncheon and Gourmet Food Destination

Happy Hour Daily • 4 to 6 www.yoritasouthside.com

HE’S GOT JUICE

PARIS 66 BISTRO. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166. A charming venue brings Parisian-style café culture to Pittsburgh, offering less fussy, less expensive everyday fare such as crepes, salads and croques, those delectable French grilled sandwiches. With fresh flowers on every table, specials chalked on boards and French conversation bouncing off the open kitchen walls, Paris 66 epitomizes the everyday glamour of the French neighborhood bistro. KF

LET US CATER FOR YOUR HOLIDAY EVENT!T!

1120 East Carson St. South Side Sangria & Cerveza

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

Goyal for a bit. The owner of South Side’s Fresh From the Farm Juices seems a magnet for good fortune — and ideas. A Long Island native, Goyal’s parents served him fresh juice every day. Fresh From the Farm Juices is his attempt to bring his beloved, healthful habit to the public. It began when Goyal was working in New York. “[What] depressed me more than anything was the way that people were eating,” says Goyal, who thought to himself, “The reason people are eating like [this] is the availability of what’s around them.” So Goyal brought juice to his coworkers. “They [began] drinking it like crazy,” he says, even giving up their consumption of energy drinks in favor of what Fresh From the Farm now calls “Restless Red” (apple, beet, carrot, lemon, ginger, parsley) juice. Feeling like he was on to something, Goyal and wife, Danielle, moved to Ligonier for its proximity to organic farms and lower startup costs. “I fell in love with it,” says Goyal, who launched the company in October 2012. Months later, Goyal was delivering bottled juices — which now include Limey Green (apple, spinach, kale, carrot, lime, cilantro) and Black and Yellow (pineapple, orange, blackberry lavender) — to a café when he fortuitously met a satisfied customer who wanted to invest. Goyal acquired a South Side space, and a costly GoodNature X1 Cold-Press, which can juice 40 to 50 gallons per hour. “It’s the best,” he says — which is why there’s ordinarily a five-to-six-month waiting list to purchase one. But not for Goyal: Within hours of his inquiry, the company offered him an available machine due to a cancelation. “My life is not always that amazing,” Goyal insists. So if you want to see what two pounds of organic produce, the crème de la crème of juicers, a healthy dose of luck, and Goyal’s passion can create, stop by the store, check out a monthly themed party, or order a case to be delivered. “This is a relatively new thing in the city of Pittsburgh,” says Goyal. “The response has been great.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

1330 Bingham St., South Side. 412-224-2650 or www.facebook.com/freshfromthefarmjuices


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“THE MOSH PIT’S STILL THERE, BUT IT’S LESS VIOLENT AND MORE EUPHORIC.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

A LIFE IN ROCK

MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

For more information or to order Behind the Stage Door, visit www.richengler.com.

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VIDEO-GAME FUSION Touring is a video game: Anamanaguchi

{BY TYLER CRUMRINE}

The cover of Rich Engler’s new memoir, Behind the Stage Door

Like any successful promoter, Rich Engler knows to give the public what it wants. So, after hearing time and time again, “You should write a book!” he decided to do just that. “There were some great stories and great memories that I had, and I started to put those down about three years ago,” Engler says. Through dozens of stories and hundreds of photos, posters and other memorabilia, Behind the Stage Door tells the story of Engler’s 47-year career in the music business. It’s available for $24.95 online and at most Giant Eagle stores. Engler’s interest in music began in the small, working-class town of Creighton, Pa., where, as a high school junior, he began playing in — and booking shows for — his first band. “I was able to grow into the business, and see the business from both sides,” he says. “In the ’60s, this music was so new. I just felt that I really had to get that out to the world and be part of it.” By the late ’60s, Engler had joined with Pat DiCesare to create DiCesare-Engler Productions, which booked everyone from The Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac to Madonna. In 1977, DiCesare-Engler bought the Stanley Theater (now the Benedum Center), which, Engler says, helped put Pittsburgh on the map. “Everyone wanted to play [there] because it was one of the biggest theaters in the country. We had the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan … you name it, they played the Stanley.” For Engler, who estimates having put together around 5,000 concerts and special events, hanging around with rock stars — Alice Cooper and David Bowie, among many others — was par for the course. He admits dealing with rockstar-sized egos could be a little trying: “In the beginning, it was like, ‘Come on, really?’” he recalls. “And then it became second nature. If they want breakfast for 50 people and dinner for 75 people, and white limos and Dom Perignon and all these things, you just do it. It makes it much easier.” To get the real dirt, you’ll have to read the book. “[It’s] a ride through the years,” Engler says. “I think anyone who likes music and rock ’n’ roll will get a kick out of it.”

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WO GUITARS, a bass, and drums. Lights primed and ready to go. Pedals set, instruments tuned, and monitors balanced and aligned. At this point, most bands’ set-up would be done. For Anamanaguchi, however, there’s still another essential preparation: making sure the dual hardwired Nintendo Entertainment Systems won’t blow out the venue’s speakers. Anamanaguchi is a four-piece band out of New York that uses chiptune — sounds programmed onto hard-wired vintage video-game cartridges — to create its songs. The process isn’t new, but Anamanaguchi has been doing it longer, and with more success, than any band out there, as suggested by the band’s 554-percent-funded, $277,399 Kickstarter campaign for its new tour and album, ENDLESS FANTASY. Composing entirely new songs on old NES cartridges, the band then plays over the tracks with guitar, bass, and drums in real time, creating a combination of lo-fi 8-bit electronica and high-energy punk rock. Anamanaguchi isn’t just trying to make “video-game music,” though. Unlike other chiptune artists who merely emulate their

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

favorite games, the band sees chiptune not as a specific genre, but as a unique style of making music. In ENDLESS FANTASY, it started pulling from jazz and classical influences as much as Mario or Zelda. Pigeonholed as strictly punk or power pop in the past, the band has recently begun to be categorized as dance. The classification solidified when Billboard ranked ENDLESS FANTASY No. 2 on its dance charts the week of its release, beating out even the incumbent will.i.am. The band welcomes the new label.

ANAMANAGUCHI WITH RSK

7 p.m. Wed., Dec. 18. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $12-15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

While Anamanguchi’s music is “definitely a fusion,” says guitarist and founder Peter Berkman, “I really like the genre ‘dance’ because it’s vague, you know? A lot of times people are like, ‘Is this post-hardcore?’ or ‘Is this postmodern dance?’ … When we were asked, we were like, ‘Let’s just call it

dance, because that’s what we want people to do.’” And once Anamanaguchi gets going, it’s hard not to. The songs are joy incarnate, and while the mosh pit from the band’s punk roots is still there, it’s become the most upbeat moshing imaginable. Like the video games it pulls from, Anamanaguchi is all about having fun, and while things may sometimes get intense, everyone’s still there to enjoy themselves. “We played SUNY-Purchase, a college here in New York, and at any given moment there was more than one person crowd-surfing,” says Berkman. “It was awesome. The mosh pit’s still there, but it’s less violent and more euphoric. We’re all about the partying. We’re all about the punk music and the dance music living in the same place. We wouldn’t want that to get too out of balance.” Coming off the overwhelming success of the ENDLESS FANTASY Kickstarter, the party is bigger than ever. James DeVito, Anamanaguchi’s bassist and engineer, has kicked the visual elements of the band’s performances into full-on light shows, including frequency-synced neon poles,


custom animations, and rainbow cubes that double as hologram projectors. The results are impressive. Noticing the success, other artists are deciding to join in on the fun. Bands like Das Racist, Matt & Kim and Ra Ra Riot have all asked the group to do remixes in the past. Anamanaguchi has even been approached by some of the acts that band members grew up with. “We actually just did one for Cyndi Lauper, which is going to come out in a couple months on her actual re-release, which we’re super, super excited about,” says Berkman. “It’s ‘Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.’ We love that song and love Cyndi Lauper. “Pretty much anywhere we go, people react to [our style of music] insanely well, which is cool,” he adds. “It gives us opportunities to be able to do something that people might not have trusted us with before, and it’s all stuff that we’re all really excited about.” A few years ago, the band dreamed of someday playing Japan. Now, with Japan under its belt, it’s touring the world, flying to Europe in early 2014. According to Berkman, touring the world is the closest thing the band has found to playing a real-life video game. The four have gathered their ideal team of freedom fighters from across the nation, and have set out on a mission: creating positive energy here on spaceship earth. “That’s pretty much it: going places and making people feel excited about life,” Berkman says. “Basically the only thing we can ever hope to do is make music we think is beautiful, share it with people who hopefully think it’s beautiful too, and then inspire them to do whatever it is they want to.” And the inspiration doesn’t stop with the songs. Anamanaguchi already earned a YouTube Music Video Award nomination for sending the first-ever piece of pizza into space via weather balloon, and next the band will be funding a game jam encouraging developers to make computer games based around the album. Berkman says he’s hoping for a lot of dating simulations. Each member of the band brings his own influences and background: Some barely even played video games growing up. But each of them realizes the situation he’s found himself in is where he wants to be. “I think it’s kind of like Final Fantasy VII,” says Berkman. “There’s a moment in that game where everyone’s on a plane and they’re like, ‘All right, everyone leave and if you feel like coming back, come back.’ That’s kind of like us. We all have our own reasons for doing it, but we’re united by this idea of, like, ‘Let’s just have some fun.’”

NEW RELEASES

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© SFNTC 4 2013

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

DAVID R. MOONEY INTERIOR LANDSCAPE (SELF-RELEASED)

This hour-long sound sculpture is theoretically divided into five tracks, but it’s really one long, evolving piece derived from field recordings the Squirrel Hill-based artist made around Pittsburgh. It rests somewhere between straight ambient soundscape work and the more structured, samplebased stuff we’ve gotten from Steve Reich or, more recently, Nick Zammuto. Street sounds, people sounds, unrecognizable computery stuff — it’s all put together masterfully. Not a windows-down driving album, but something to really concentrate on. THE BEAUREGARDS EAT AT BEAU’S (SELF-RELEASED)

The Beauregards — Pittsburgh-born, currently doing time at Ohio University — continue their good work on this four-song EP. Clean, poppy indie rock that’s reminiscent of the late ’90s and early ’00s (think Engine Down and the like, even Joan of Arc here and there). Extra points for food-themed song titles like “Boston Creme Pie” and “Chicken Salad.” This one’s worth picking up.

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

THE DAMAGED PIES THE BEST OF THE DAMAGED PIES VOLUME II (SELF-RELEASED)

A collection of 18 tracks from the band spearheaded by Steve Bodner, with help from plenty of others. (Three drummers are represented here, as are two vocalists in addition to Bodner himself.) Mostly lo-fi alt rock; Bodner’s writing is at its best on the louder, less serious tunes like “Y’all in Shock”; sometimes the slower songs plod along a bit. The best of the lot is the final, live track, “Just Like Monkees With Guns” — the live recording captures the band’s fun energy.

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33


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DENEKA PENISTON}

No hollerin’ allowed: Hoots and Hellmouth

HOOTS ON HELLMOUTH {BY ALLISON COSBY} FOLK-ROCK BAND Hoots and Hellmouth toured almost nonstop for years after forming in 2005, and the Philadelphiabased band is back on the road again this fall after a year-long break. Co-founder and lead songwriter Sean Hoots talked with CP about touring in the modern age and finding his voice as an artist.

12/12 12/13 12/17 12/19 12/20 12/20 12/21 12/26 12/27 12/28 12/28 12/29 01/03

TOM McBRIDE CALLAN (CD RELEASE PARTY) (EARLY) ANGEL SNOW FRANK VIEIRA THE PUMP FAKES FT. MEMBERS OF THE CLARKS, GOOD BROTHER EARL & TRES LADS (EARLY) THE RACE TO THE COFFIN COMEDY TOUR FT. JOHN DICK WINTERS, ALEX STYPULA & MORE (LATE) BILL EBERLE (EARLY) BILL DEASY'S ANNUAL BOXING DAY SHOW FT. THE GATHERING FIELD VIBRO KINGS STEEL CITY COMEDY TOUR (EARLY) BLUE OF COLORS (LATE) CABINET w/THE UNKNOWN STRING BAND THE HOFFMAN ROAD BAND

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

YOU SEEM TO HAVE A HISTORY OF PRETTY RELENTLESS TOURING, SO I’M SURE IT FEELS GOOD TO GET BACK INTO IT THIS FALL. HOW’S IT GOING? Spirits are high, all guns are blazing. Taking that time off was really good because it allowed everyone to do something else for a little. We’re coming back into it with the positive, energetic approach that we used to have. Our general love of being on the road developed as a result of bands that we had been in before — we were all in bands prior to the Internet age of being in a band. “DIY” meant something a lot different then: You didn’t have websites you could go to, emails you could send or invites that you could post. It was a much more “roll up your sleeves and get down into it.” CLEARLY YOU’RE “HOOTS,” BUT WHO IS “HELLMOUTH”? My bandmate Andrew [Gray] — I guess “Hellmouth” was what he considered a stage name at some point, but no one ever really called him that. The two of us were performing [at an open-mic night] weekly, and eventually the guy who was running it just coined us Hoots and Hellmouth, because it sounded good and it was our

names. A lot of people read it and they think “Oh, you just mean ‘hoot and holler,’” and we kind of cringed when we realized that. We don’t want to paint ourselves into a corner just because we started out playing some music that was pretty barnburning and revival in nature. If you listen to our progression, things do get further away from that rootsy sound. So, you know, it’s a blessing and a curse, the name. EARLY ON IN THE BAND, YOU ESPOUSED AN ATTITUDE AGAINST BIG ROCK ’N’ ROLL EGOS. IS THAT STILL AN ATTITUDE YOU HOLD AS A BAND? Definitely — that’s kind of who we are as people. When we started in 2005, that was before this whole neo-Americana boom that has occurred in the last few years. We went back to this acoustic thing just because were bored of what rock ’n’ roll had become — it was emo, then it was pop emo, then it was fucking arena-sized emo, with

HOOTS AND HELLMOUTH

WITH HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

all kinds of crazy pop-punk stuff. It had basically ascended to the place of all the corporate rock that had come before it [and] that punk rock was supposed to be against. I decided I needed to get away from writing music as a need to connect with a large audience and get back to writing music for the sake of writing music — digging in and trying to find my own singular voice in there. And that’s what Hoots and Hellmouth has become over the years, and that’s still where we are. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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The Carlyle is the Perfect Downtown Residence! Here you can choose from five unique floor plans including our 1,240 square foot, two-story Alex Townhouse floor plan, all the way up to our expansive 6,000 square foot 22nd Floor Penthouse.

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The classic 1920’s exterior architecture is lavishly complemented by the completely renovated interior. Amenities include a fitness room, doorman, dayman, rooftop terrace, cinema room, on-site storage and so much more. Picture a walkable neighborhood, one in which most errands can be

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Bakery Living The new Bakery Living community will offer studio, one and two bedroom units equipped with top of the line appliances including in unit washer and dryer. A large variety of floor plans are available – to meet your expectations and budget. Many apartments will offer balconies or patios. A swimming pool, fitness center, movie theater/gaming room, and stunning views are just a few features. Onsite there is a bike/walking path that will lead you straight to the heart of Shadyside. The apartments will have a smoke free and pet friendly environment. Bakery Living Amenities: • On-Site Management and Maintenance • Online Service Request • Full-service concierge • Courtesy Package acceptance and storage • Walnut Perks – Resident Discount Program • Common area Wi-Fi • Parking garage with direct access to all floors and two EV car charging stations • Smoke-free building • 24-hour fully equipped fitness center with direct access to bike path • Secure indoor bike storage room and repair station • Three distinct, stylish lounges complete with a fireplace, billiard table and bar • Sun Deck, outdoor bar & grilling stations • Spectacular indoor/outdoor swimming pool for yearround use • Pet-friendly community

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST

• Business Center • Meditative courtyard with water and fire elements • Conference facilities • Movie theater and gaming room with comfortable seating • Convenient access to parks, bike paths, coffee shops & retail technology-related employers • Stunning gourmet kitchens include Quartz countertops, Kohler faucets, Whirlpool ICE line appliances and dark Espresso cabinets • Nine-foot ceilings in most residences • In unit washer and dryer • Fully operational TRACO energy efficient windows • Many residences have spacious private balconies or private walk out patios We can’t wait to help you find the perfect place! To speak with a leasing specialist or to make an appointment please call 412-683-3810.

151 Fort Pitt Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-901-6900 www.151firstside.com This is the first new condominium constructed in Pittsburgh’s Golden Triangle since 1968 and has 82 residences. It offers luxurious urban living combined with spectacular views of the city.

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900 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.trekdevelopment.com This former printing factory is now 25 luxury-loft apartments located in the heart of the Cultural District.

Allegheny Center Ten Allegheny Center Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-231-6688 www.alleghenycenter.com/ apartments Allegheny Center offers residents a fully equipped exercise facility and beautiful rooftop sun-decks with a spectacular view of downtown Pittsburgh.

Chatham Tower Condominiums 112 Washington Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-8040 www.chatham-tower.com Located just across from the Consol Energy Center, Chatham Tower is surrounded by the pulse of the city and defines downtown living.

Coldwell Banker DUPLEX FOR SALE IN UPTOWN 2032 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-352-3417 www.pittsburghmoves.com/ ID/248307 Near the Birmingham Bridge, near RiverCity Java. Excellent investment, or live in one side and rent out the other. Uptown is happening!

201 Stanwix 201 Stanwix Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-584-4072 www.201stanwix.com This former Bell Telephone Building now features 158 luxury one-two-bedroom apartments in downtown Pittsburgh and is part of the National Register of Historic Places.

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306 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-325-1190 www.carlylecondo.com Choose from six unique floor plans at this classic 1920s downtown building. With a completely renovated interior, the charm does not stop when you walk through the door.

2349 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3176 www.thecorkfactory.com This historic Strip District structure is one of Pittsburgh’s most popular urban residences due to unmatched building amenities and services. It is complemented by beautiful landscape, a pool deck and spectacular views of the city.

231 Moye Place Mount Oliver, MLS 964078 Schocker-Weigers Realtors / Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 x278 Spacious 3BR, 2BA Colonial. Living Room w/fireplace, beamed ceiling. Formal Dining Room. Equipped eat-in-kitchen w/French doors to Sun Room. Fenced yard. Call to hear more!

526 Penn Avenue Apartments 526 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-227-0959 pmcpropertygroup.com These newly-renovated apartment homes have kept their historic charm. Located

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Carson Street Commons 2529 East Carson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15203 412-431-1183 www.morgancommunities.com Situated side-by-side with the South Side shops and restaurants, the Carson Street Commons has a 24hour fitness center, walking trails and is pet-friendly.

Century Building 130 Seventh Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-688-7200 www.centuryon7th.com This restored 1907 building located in the Cultural District has 60 residential lofts, commercial, retail and amenity spaces.

Crane Village Apartments 651 Oaklynn Court Pittsburgh, PA 15220 877-292-8321 www.cranevillageapts.com Choose from a studio, one-two-three-bedroom apartment homes, or a twobedroom townhome on this 15-acre property.

Crawford Square Apartments 510 Protectory Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-281-9955 www.crawfordsquareapts.com Crawford Square Apart-

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Homes Available in East Liberty starting at $300,000 Design features include; Open Floor Plan filled with Natural Light Throughout 10 ft. 1st Floor Ceiling with Exposed Floor Joists 2160 sq ft. Finished Living Space Vaulted 3rd Floor Master Suite with 360 sq ft. Roof Top Deck 3 Bedrooms and 2.5 Baths Custom Fabricated Light Filled Open Stair Case Sustainable Finishes Throughout including FSC Hardwood and Cork flooring Low Maintenance Exterior Finishes Including LP Smart Siding

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ments offer a range of floor plans and modern amenities conveniently located to a number of downtown attractions.

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Devon Tower Apartments 4920 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-4030 www.ndcrealestate.com Devon Tower is located in the center of the city and is within walking distance to the campuses of CMU, Carlow College and University of Pittsburgh, as well as with university-related hospitals.

Doughboy Apartments 3400 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-683-3230 www.desmone.com/project/ doughboy-square-apartments Doughboy Apartments is an urban infill project in Lawrenceville. Units will range in size from 850-square-foot one-bedroom units to 1600-square-foot twobedroom units.

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Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-4030 www.forrent.com The Fairfax Apartments are just a short walk from most of Pittsburgh’s colleges and feature newly remodeled spacious floor plans.

Fifth Avenue School Lofts 1800 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15219 412-242-0273 5thlofts.com This renovation of the historic Fifth Avenue School building offers the best of loft living with 65 large sunny units with distinctive layouts, high-quality finishes and great views.

Franklin West 272 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15206 412-661-1151 www.franklinwest.com Franklin West has superior apartments and townhouses in Shadyside, Butler, Oakmont and Gibsonia.

Gateway at Summerset Apartments 1876 Parkview Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15217 855-202-0609 www.gatewayatsummerset.com The high-end touches here provide all the perks of upscale apartment living joined with the charm of a traditional neighborhood. It is just minutes from The Waterfront, Frick Park and Squirrel Hill.

Grandview Pointe Luxury Apartments 1411 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15211 855-825-0717 www.grandviewpointe.com Centrally located atop Mount Washington, enjoy a breathtaking view of the city of Pittsburgh while living in a spectacular apartment.

Heinz Lofts 300 Heinz Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 877-821-7207 www.heinzlofts.com Heinz Lofts offer a majestic view of the Allegheny River and downtown Pittsburgh. Expect apartments that are expansive-feeling, with up to 16-foot ceilings and generous square footage.

Hyland Hills Apartment Homes 275 Oakville Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15220 412-921-4416 www.hylandhills.info Hyland Hill has exciting amenities both inside and outside. The prime location provides city convenience in a country setting.

Kenmawr Apartments 401 Shady Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-361-2774 www.kenmawrapartments.com Located in vibrant Shadyside, the recent multi-million-dollar renovation has left these fine apartments better than ever.

The Locomotive Lofts Gateway Towers Condominiums 320 Fort Duquesne Boulevard Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-471-3400 www.gatewaytowerspittsburgh.com Experience a neighborhood in a high-rise at Gateway Towers, in downtown Pittsburgh. Here you will find all the amenities that include fine living at its best.

4840 Harrison Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-621-1133 www.locomotivelofts.com With a prime location adjacent to vibrant Butler Street in Lawrenceville, these one-two-bedroom apartments are great for anyone looking for an exciting, greener urban lifestyle.

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Managed by Faros Properties

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Schocker-Weigers REALTORs Prudential Preferred Realty 1679 Washington Road Pittsburgh, PA 15228 412-833-7700

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Market Real Estate, Inc. Market Real Estate, Inc. - Your downtown Pittsburgh neighborhood residential real estate agency extends our full-services for your real estate needs. We encourage young professionals, empty-nesters, and families to seek a Downtown living experience. Not limited to Downtown, Market Real Estate Inc. prides itself on being able to effectively list and sell residential and commercial buildings in all of the diverse neighborhoods in the City of Pittsburgh and greater Pittsburgh area. From the South Hills, to the trendy East End and its development boom, to Fox Chapel Waterfront and Wexford Estates, no property is left unsold. You can even find us selling in the Laurel Highlands. Three Rivers Property Management, LLC, Market Real Estate’s Sister company, is also rapidly expanding throughout the Greater Pittsburgh Area. Whether you’re looking for a rental or need a property rented, Three Rivers Property, LLC is paving the way for a higher

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CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST Lot 24 2404 Railroad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-552-3186 www.lot24inthestrip.com This newly renovated 96unit apartment property is located in the Strip District and boasts sustainable living. The amenities do not fall short as they have a terrace, club room, heated pool and much more.

Market Square Place Lofts 222 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-281-7675 www.marketsquareplace.com The 46 loft-style rental apartments define “urban chic” with the open floor plan, huge windows and exposed bricks and beams that date back to the turn of the century.

Morgan at North Shore Apartments 100 Anderson Street Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-321-2300 www.morgancommunities.com This riverfront location offers spectacular views of the city, private balconies and entrances, a 24-hour fitness center and a heated swimming pool.

Morgan Communities The Waterfront 611 E. Waterfront Drive Munhall, PA 15120 412-476-3377 www.morgancommunities.com This pet-friendly community lies along the Monongahela River in the historic Homestead area. The river view and trails create ample green space.

Mountvue Apartments 5 Grandview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15211 412-488-6863 Mountvue Apartments is located in the beautiful Mount Washington with a view of the entire city.

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Otto Milk Condominiums 2434 Smallman Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-288-2566 www.ottomilkcondos.com Otto Milk features one-two-bedroom lofts in the historic Strip District with high ceilings, rooftop decks, terraces, two-story units, gathering areas and a fitness center.

Penn Garrison Lofts

River Vue 300 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412- 434-5700 www.rivervuepgh.com Located at the Point, this sophisticated downtown residence features 218 unique one-two-bedroom apartments, as well as two-story homes.

The Standard Life Building

915 Penn Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-227-0959 www.penngarrison.com Located in the heart of downtown’s Cultural District, these stylish lofts have 117 units ranging from studios to two-floor penthouses.

345 Fourth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-339-0352 www.standardlifepittsburgh.com This exquisitely-designed landmark has been reinvented with 36 spacious, modern one to three bedroom apartments in vibrant downtown.

The Pennsylvanian

Starr Lofts

1100 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-391-6730 www.thepennsylvanian.com The Pennsylvanian guarantees elegant living in this historical building located downtown.

4115 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-450-0053 www.boterodevelopment.com This green renovation of a historic Lawrenceville building features air-conditioning, in-unit laundry, exposed brick and 11-foot ceilings.

Piatt Place 301 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-434-1181 www.piattplace.com Situated downtown, the Piatt Place is a majestic redesign of the former Lazarus department store. Private access to the upper levels reveal luxury rooftop condos with outdoor terraces.

Portal Place Apartments 2633 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-403-5037 www.portalplaceapartments.com Spacious and modern one-two-bedroom apartments in Oakland feature fully equipped kitchens with breakfast bars, walk-in closets and plush neutral carpeting.

University Commons 382 South Bouquet Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com University Commons is located in the heart of Oakland and features one-two-threebedroom apartments.

Walnut Capital 5500 Walnut Street, Suite 300 Pittsburgh PA 15232 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut Capital is one of Pittsburgh’s largest and fastest growing real-estate management companies. When you are ready to buy or sell a home, the professionals here have the expertise and sales tools to help.

Continued >>


900 Penn offers the City’s finest apartment living right in the heart of Downtown’s Cultural District! We offer 1&2 bedroom apartment homes which include; stainless steel appliances, hardwood flooring, exposed wood beams, washer and dryer in your unit, pet friendly, a spacious, open floor plan, an unmatched rooftop view, short walk to PNC Park, Heinz Field, 14 theaters, and the best restaurants in the city.

Call us to schedule a tour TODAY! Call 900 Penn your home TOMORROW!

412-688-7200

(New construction just opened July 2013) 4840 Harrison Street, Pittsburgh, Pa 15201 412-621-1133 (TDD# 1-800-545-1833)

CALL TODAY FOR CURRENT RENTAL INCENTIVE

ONE & TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS

currently available ranging in price from $1450-$2150 per month (plus electric) www.LocomotiveLofts.com Located adjacent to vibrant Butler Street in Lawrenceville Neighborhood of Pittsburgh SPECIAL FEATURES: · Quality bamboo hardwood flooring · Fully equipped designer kitchens & baths · Washer and Dryer in every unit · Balconies available in Select units · Professionally Managed by CMS, Inc. · Pets are permitted (size and number limitations apply) · Green/Energy Efficient Apartment · Keyless entry system · Controlled access off street parking available · Full maintenance service with oncall emergency maintenance provided

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT


Strip District Living At Its Finest

CITY LIVING AT ITS BEST Walnut on Highland 121 S. Highland Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut on Highland is an urban housing and retail complex in heart of revitalized East End featuring gourmet kitchens, breathtaking views, custom-wood cabinets and so much more.

Walnut Towers at Frick Park

Washington Plaza Luxury Apartments

7070 Forward Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-683-3810 www.walnutcapital.com Walnut Towers, in Squirrel Hill, oďŹ&#x20AC;ers an urban location nestled near the beautiful green space of Frick Park.

1420 Centre Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-391-9833 www.washingtonplaza.com This high-rise features tennis and volleyball courts, a swimming pool, 24-hour ďŹ tness center, sauna/tanning beds, ďŹ&#x201A;oor-to-ceiling windows and shuttle services.

Washington Plaza

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long Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Allegheny River, in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eclectic Strip District, sits The Cork Factory.

O

riginally constructed in 1901 as The Armstrong Cork Factory, this historic structure is now Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most in-demand urban residence. Thanks to the unmatched building amenities and services, old-world style and its unique community, The Cork Factory is more than an apartment building â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it holds the promise of a whole new lifestyle.

T�QQTRNCPUKP2KVVUDWTIJ1WT�QQTRNCPUžKPUGXGTCNQPGVYQQTVJTGG he Cork Factory Lofts feature some of the most spacious luxury

DGFTQQOXCTKGVKGUžHGCVWTGYKFGHCEVQT[YKPFQYUDCNEQPKGUWRFCVGF MKVEJGPUEQPETGVG�QQTKPICPFHGGVGZRQUGFEGKNKPIU6JGRGVHTKGPFN[ Cork Factory Lofts boast all the latest comforts in a serene environment, KPENWFKPINWZWT[UYKOOKPIRQQN�TGRKVUUVCVGN[EQOOQPCTGCUFT[ cleaning pick-up and delivery, and accomodating concierge services.

Tthe hip, new residential culture in the Strip District. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

he Cork Factory is widely recognized as a major catalyst in creating

with us, or at our sister property Lot 24, the Strip District is Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most exciting, fastest growing neighborhood for urban-oriented yinzers.

â&#x20AC;˘ thecorkfactory.com â&#x20AC;˘ inthestrip-pgh.com

Apartment Features: â&#x20AC;˘ Tennis and Volleyball Courts â&#x20AC;˘ Heated Olympic Size Swimming Pool â&#x20AC;˘ Landscaped Walking Paths â&#x20AC;˘ 24-Hour Fitness Center â&#x20AC;˘ Sauna â&#x20AC;˘ Tanning Bed â&#x20AC;˘ Pet Friendly â&#x20AC;˘ Utilities Included â&#x20AC;˘ Digital Cable Included (Plus HBO & Showtime) â&#x20AC;˘ City Views

â&#x20AC;˘ 6-Foot Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Hair and Nail Salon â&#x20AC;˘ Dentist â&#x20AC;˘ Bar and Grille â&#x20AC;˘ Food and Wine Delivery Services â&#x20AC;˘ Dry Cleaning Service â&#x20AC;˘ Package Acceptance and Delivery â&#x20AC;˘ 24-Hour Emergency Maintenance

Millcraft Investments Millcraft Investments is a Pittsburgh-based real estate developer and property management company with over a fifty-year history of successfully creating and maintaining prominent large-scale office and mixed-use developments.

and profitability.

Established in 1957, this family owned company has built its reputation on a tradition of vision and excellence.

Today, Millcraft Investments is a multi-million dollar operation which has been involved in a variety of real estate ventures, including industrial properties, commercial and retail office buildings, golf course communities, hotels and restaurants, adaptive reuse and residential developments.

The hallmark of this tradition can be found in Millcraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steadfast commitment to customer service, integrity, hard work, stability

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Through the long-standing cultivation of these ideals and experience, Millcraft Investments has emerged as a recognized leader in real estate development and hospitality.


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT


Strip District Living At Its Finest

• thecorkfactory.com • inthestrip-pgh.com • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF DYLAN JOHNSON}

We buy

all day

Starlight Girls

BUY • SELL • TRADE Ryan Lee Crosby hails from Boston, but plies the trade of old Southern blues. While he might be comparable to second-generation pickers like John Fahey and Leo Kottke, he also covers early-20th-century artists like Charlie Patton. Crosby’s latest release, Institution Blues, is a collection of mostly acoustic — but sometimes amplified — blues originals. He brings it to Acoustic Music Works tonight. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 2142 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. $8. All ages. 412-422-0710 or www. acousticmusicworks.com

[ELECTRONIC] + FRI., DEC. 13 There are parties, and then there are epic parties. Then there are epic Friday the 13th parties. Tonight’s event at the Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum — with a slew of performers headed ded up by the Dutch drum-and-bass trio rio Black Sun Empire — is shaping up to be the biggest unlucky Friday show how we’ve seen in some time. It’s the he first local appearance for that outfit; tfit; also playing are: U.K. hardcore DJJ Gammer, r trap DJ Kid Kamillion, Speaker peaker of the House, Jimni Cricket and d a bunch of others. As is the trend with these parties, there are e promises of laser light shows, s, a bouncy castle and everything thing else that makes a truly epic night. AM 8 p.m. 7310 Frankstown n Ave., Homewood. $25-30. 5-30. 17 and over. www. ww. thatepicparty.org g

Kid

[FOLK ROCK]] + SAT., DEC. 14 4 A singer, songwriter, riter,

NEWS

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poet, designer, painter and artist all in one, Joseph Arthur has a lot going for him. His rich blend of poetry, art and music was discovered by Peter Gabriel in the mid-’90s, when Gabriel signed Arthur to his Real World label. Since then, Arthur has released 10 studio albums, including his most recent project: The Ballad of Boogie Christ, a concept album that follows a fictionalized character loosely based on Arthur himself. Arthur will perform tonight at Altar Bar with a live band featuring multi-instrumentalist and founding member of R.E.M. Mike Mills, and Bill Dobrow on the drums. Allison Cosby 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $15-18. All ages. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

4341 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC

MONDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-8PM

www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com

Ryan Lee Crosby

[ACOUSTIC] + FRI., DEC. 13

GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS • PRO SOUND KEYBOARDS • BAND INSTRUMENTS

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., DEC. 17 Starlight Girls seem to have struck the perfect balance between retro and spooky and fresh and light. The Brooklyn-based band Brooklynfalls somewhere in the indie-rock/pop realm, but seems to be influenced by nearly every decade of o music in the 20th century, which ma makes it hard to describe exactly what’s going on with the music — and they seem to like it that s way. The group recently released a rece new 7-inch collaboration with Xiu collab Xiu front man Jamie Stewart; its Ja sound has a heavier vibe that’s h new to the band’s repertoire. That will hopefully tide us over until unt its forthcoming full-length full-leng LP is released in 2014. 2014 Catch the Girls at Brillobox tonight with Brillo Casino Bulldogs and Kamillion Hard Money. M AC 9 p.m. Penn Ave., Bloom4104 P $7. 412-621-4900 field. $ www.brillobox.net or www

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MUSIC

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

THIS WEEK

BUY TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

103 Slade Lane Warrendale, PA 15086

724.799.8333 JERGELS.com +

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Wed, 12.11: MARSHALL TUCKER BAND // 8pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Thu, 12.12: LIVE AT THE FILLMORE – The Defi efinitive Allman Brothers Tribute Band // 8pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Fri, 12.13: DANCING QUEEN // $7 cover // 9pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Sat, 12.14: NIGHT LIFE BAND // $7 cover // 9pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Sun, 12.15: ROCKIN’ BRUNCH WITH SANTA benefiting Zoe’s New Beginnings // 1-4pm, JOHN McDONALD - HOLIDAY SHOW // 7pm PITTSBURGH VS. CINCINNATI // 8:30pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Mon, 12.16: BALCONY BIG BAND // 8pm ---------------------------------------------------------------Tue, 12.17: Y108 COUNTRY NIGHT with DJ Ally live remote and THE STONEY RIVER BOY (featuring DJ Stoney) // 8pm

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proudly presents

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 12

Be immersed i d in i a live li llaser li light ht show h that th t features f t animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! Don’t miss Laser Holiday Magic! Now through Jan. 6, 2014.

SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

ALTAR BAR. Hawthorne Heights. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Nellie McKay. North Side. 412-237-8300. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Tom McBride, Grey’s Fool, Bobby Johns. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Adult Field Trip, Cameron Stenger, Trapper’s Harp, Enney. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Motometer, Perish, Paradox Please. South Side. 412-431-5282. OAKDALE INN. Dave Iglar. REX THEATER. Off With Their Heads, Morning Glory, Direct Hit, Barons. South Side. 412-381-6811.

FRI 13 31ST STREET PUB. Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers, Chux Beta, South Seas Sneak. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Big D & the Kids Table. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. John Raymond & Strange Cocktail. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLUB CAFE. Callan, Sue Powers & Burr Beard (Early). Callan CD release party. Dax Riggs, Haggard Wulf (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. ATS, Bodhi Watts, Junk Fingers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOLLAR CLUB. The Red Western, Triggers, Satin Gum. South Side. 412-431-2002. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Bill Deasy. Shadyside. MOONDOG’S. Jimbo & the Soupbones. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MOONLITE CAFE. The Dave Iglar Band. Brookline. 412-531-2811. OBEY HOUSE. Marbin, Light. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PARK HOUSE. Soul Crusher. North Side. 412-224-2273. PITTSBURGH ART HOUSE. Chet Vincent & The Big Bend, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, Andre Costello, Ellen Siberian Tiger, Charmaine Evonne feat. Sara Macko, Life(Liss), Morgan Erina. Highland Park. 814-403-2989. SMILING MOOSE. Austin Lucas, Allison Weiss, PJ Bond, United By Hate, Demons Within, Nazgul, Hericide. South Side. 412-431-4668.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bethesda, The Armadillos, Polar Scout. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 14 31ST STREET PUB. Boiled Denim, Iron Lung, SFX, Crying Wolf. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Joseph Arthur. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE BLACK HORSE TRAIL PUB & GRILLE. One Sweet Burgh. Dave Matthews cover band. Bridgeville. 412-221-9785. BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Lava Game. Station Square. 412-232-3101.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Get Back! The Beatles Laser Experience Live. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Hoots & Hellmouth, Holy Ghost Tent Revival. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB COLONY. John Sarkis. Scott. 412-668-0903. CONNOLLY IRISH PUB. Moose Tracks. Sheraden. 412-777-9700. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Gone South. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Mustache Required, Crochetcatpause, The Fleeting Ends, Thin Sketch, Muscle Baby, 2D6. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Carousel, Argus, Corsair. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MP 3 MONDAY TROXUM

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s track comes from solo artist Troxum; stream or download “Age of Man” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


THE KICKSTAND. The Dave Iglar Band. 412-384-3080. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. Lucky Me. 724-265-9950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Liz Berlin, Von Grey, Jasmine Tate, Kiersten Kelly. Women’s Revival Showcase. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Wee Jams. 412-487-6257. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. theCAUSE. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 15 SMILING MOOSE. gates, Worship This. South Side. 412-431-4668.

MON 16 222 ORMSBY. Gnarwhal, Lost Boy, New Lands, Lions, Sup, Muscles?, Total Hack’s Static Death. Mt. Oliver. HAMBONE’S. Melonious Monday w/ Matt Pickart. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SMILING MOOSE. Like Moths To Flames, Sworn In. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 17 BRILLOBOX. Starlight Girls, Casino Bulldogs, Hard Money. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Angel Snow, Brad Yoder, Jim Platt. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944. HARD ROCK CAFE. Devon Allman. Station Square. 412-481-7625.

WED 18 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Caleb Pogor & The Talkers, Bryan Kinney, Stephen Foster & the Awesomes. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Anamanaguchi, RSK. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

DJS THU 12 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Desus, The Social Curator. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

FRI 13 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

GREATER PITTSBURGH COLISEUM. Black Sun Empire, Gammer, Kid Kamillion, Speaker of The House, 2rip, Jimni Cricket. Homewood. 707-480-8208. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s Alternative. DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REMEDY. H.Lurker, Maestro, MASTERHEAT, Da Admiral. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 14

SAT 14 THE HOP HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. MOONDOG’S. Studebaker John & the Hawks, Vince Agwada. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. OBEY HOUSE. Bill Toms & Hard Rain. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PARK HOUSE. Wil E. Tri. North Side. 412-224-2273. THE R BAR. The Jimmy Adler Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. 412-233-9800.

WED 18 THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

JAZZ

BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. ANDYS. Lisa Bleil. & guests. Bloomfield. Downtown. 412-621-4900. 412-773-8884. CAPRI PIZZA AND CJ’S. Roger Humphries www. per a p BAR. Saturday Night & The RH Factor. Strip pghcitym o .c Meltdown. Top 40, Hip District. 412-642-2377. Hop, Club, R&B, Funk LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Soul. East Liberty. & Friends. Entrepreneurial 412-362-1250. Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. South Side. 412-431-2825. Downtown. 412-773-8884. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE 412-481-7227. SQUARE. Ron Wilson w/ Dave Vannatter & Dave Pellow. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. 412-668-0903. Electro, post punk, industrial, new GRANDVIEW GOLF CLUB. wave, alternative dance. South The N-Motion Band. Braddock. Side. 412-431-4668. 412-719-4120. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Jazz Band. North Side. Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. 412-904-3335. South Side. 412-478-3863. LITTLE E’S. Bridgette Perdue Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. 412-664-7200. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day Negri w/ Max Leake. Downtown. chill. House music. aDesusParty. 412-553-5235. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 12

FRI 13

SUN 15

TUE 17

WED 18

HIP HOP/R&B MON 16 ALTAR BAR. Chris Webby. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

WED 18 ALTAR BAR. Hi-Rez. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

BLUES THU 12 THE HOP HOUSE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Green Tree. 412-922-9560.

FRI 13 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Miss Freddye’s Blues Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. The Igniters. Washington.

SAT 14

ANDYS. Kathy Connor. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FATHER RYAN ARTS CENTER. Maggie Johnson. McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. George Heid III Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Erin Burkett, Virgil Walters, Eric Sosoeff. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra w/ Freddy Cole. North Side. 412-322-1773. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-338-6463.

RESTAURANT ECHO. RML Jazz. Cranberry. 412-370-9621. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

SUN 15

FTRIDATHY HE

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kenia. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Mark Lucas. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

13

PARTY

MON 16 HAMBONE’S. Jazz Standards & Showtune Sing Along. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

$2.50 MILLER LITE $3 FIREBALL CINNAMON WHISKY D.J. QWIK

TUE 17 ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Benny Benack III. Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Jazz Jam Session. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Maureen & David Budway. Christmas the “Budway”. Shadyside. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. OPEK “No Holiday Music” Show. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

AND IDAYS AND HOlIDAY THE HOl OUT THE ROCK OUT ROC H HAVE A KILLER TIME WIT US! JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

WED 18 ANDYS. Zero Ted: An Evening of Holiday Carols. Downtown. 412-773-8884. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Maureen & David Budway. Christmas the “Budway”. Shadyside.

ACOUSTIC THU 12 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Marino Erwin. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

FRI 13 HAMBONE’S. Chris Hannigan & Friends. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. KEAN THEATRE. Rob, Scott & Greg of The Clarks. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Mark Cyler Duo. Greensburg. 724-836-7687 VAN NESS GRILLE. Jordan Auth. Sharpsburg. 412-408-3438.

In Pennsylvania, a Groundhog has been predicting the weather for over 125 years and Straub has been brewing for over 140 years.

SAT 14 KEAN THEATRE. Rob, Scott & Greg of The Clarks. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. KELLY’S RIVERSIDE SALOON. Jay Wiley. 724-728-0222. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Gil & Randall. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. TAVERN IN THE WALL. Peter King. Aspinwall. 412-782-6542.

This authentic German-Style AltBier is our 14th Annual Groundhog Brew, and is the perfect warmer against the winter cold.

SUN 15

Available now at better beer retailers.

HAMBONE’S. Calliope Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

NEWS

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TUE 17 HAMBONE’S. Acoustic Open Mic w/ Brad Yoder. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Ages 21+

WED 18 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. The Armadillos. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip! CLEVELAND, OHIO

REGGAE pres. with Obvious / Ages 17+

FRI 13

{SAT., FEB. 08}

The Black Angels with Roky Erickson

WINGHART’S. The Flow Band. Monroeville. 412-825-6510.

SAT 14

Beachland Ballroom

PENN BREWERY. The Flow Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

Ages 21+

PHILADELPHIA

COUNTRY SAT 14

{SAT., MARCH 01}

Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks

HAMBONE’S. Honky Tonk Christmas w/ The Mavens. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THREE RIVERS BAR & GRILL. Jason Dallas Ray Band & Friends. Monroeville. 412-576-4983.

Ages 21+

Theatre of Living Arts

WASHINGTON, D.C.

CLASSICAL

{WED., MARCH 05}

FRI 13

Bob Mould 9:30 Club

THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. It Was All Shining: A Camerata Christmas. Mt. Lebanon United Methodist Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7131.

HOLIDAY MUSIC

SAT 14 Ages 17+

THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. “It Was All Shining: A Camerata Christmas” Sixth Presbyterian Church, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. PITTSBURGH SCHOOL FOR THE CHORAL ARTS. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-267-7707.

BRO SAFARI with TORRO TORRO, CRNKN

Dec 12 Dec 20 Jan 5 Feb 5

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS KEYS N KRATES

DEC 26

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JAN 18

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A METAL XMAS & A HEAVY NEW YEAR

JAN 24

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FLETCHER’S GROVE

feat.

JAN 25

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MOJOFLO

EMANCIPATOR ENSEMBLE

JAN 26

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THE STEPKIDS

FEB 19

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TROPIDELIC

EUGENE MIRMAN

APR 04

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ONE LAST NIGHT

with ODESZA and REAL MAGIC

Feb 14

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

of BOB’S BURGERS, FLIGHT OF THE CONCORDS

BIG MEAN SOUND MACHINE

CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH. Ancient Airs & Dances. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900.

OTHER MUSIC THU 12

HEINZ HALL. Highmark Holiday Pops. feat. the Mendelssohn Choir. Downtown. 412-392-4900. STAGE AE. Holiday Hootenanny & Pajama Jam. North Side. 412-229-5483.

FRI 13

TUE 17 Dec 11

THU 12

HEINZ HALL. Highmark Holiday Pops. feat. the Mendelssohn Choir. Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. South Hills Chorale. Holiday Songfest. Upper St. Clair. 412-835-6630. www.

FULL LIST ONLINE

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DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Crucible Sound #8. Ryan Emmett, Ben Hall, Daniel Malinsky, Tom Moran. Garfield. 412-362-0274.

FRI 13 LEMONT. Vida. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 14 LEMONT. Phil & Roxy. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Da Phunk. Washington.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

SAT 14

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH. University of Chicago Motet Choir. Shadyside. 412-661-0120. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Renaissance City Choir. East Liberty. 412-345-1722. ELWOOD’S PUB. Tim & John Christmas Singalong. 724-265-1181. HEINZ HALL. Highmark Holiday Pops. feat. the Mendelssohn Choir. Downtown. 412-392-4900. ST. THOMAS MORE CHURCH. Upper St. Clair High School Alumni Choir. Bethel Park. 412-977-6193. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. South Hills Chorale.

Holiday Songfest. Upper St. Clair. 412-835-6630.

SUN 15 ASPINWALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. One Voice Christian Vocal Ensemble. Advent Choral Concert. Aspinwall. 412-781-2884. CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL. The Lira Ensemble. Polish Carols, Song & Dance. Oakland. 412-622-3131. HEINZ HALL. Highmark Holiday Pops. feat. the Mendelssohn Choir. Downtown. 412-392-4900. ST. BRENDAN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Messiah Sing Along. Sewickley. 412-364-5974.

MON 16 PALACE THEATRE. Kenny G. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

TUE 17 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. A Jazz Christmas w/ Craig Davis. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

WED 18 FERRANTE’S LAKEVIEW. Cahal Dunne’s Wonderful World of Christmas. Greensburg. 724-853-4050. HEINZ HALL. Michael Bolton w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Downtown. 412-392-4900. NORTHMONT UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. J. Richard Szeremany, organ, Carly Noel Black, soprano. Advent & Christmas Organ Music. Noon. 412-364-0105.


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December 11 - 17 WEDNESDAY 11 !!!

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. With special guest Yip Deceiver. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Marshall Tucker Band JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

Hawthorne Heights ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. With special guests The R4 Project & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

RAUH THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through Dec. 15.

THURSDAY 12.

Highmark Holiday Pops HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Dec. 21.

FRIDAY 13

SUNDAY 15

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. With special guests The Fighting Jamesons. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

TRAX FARMS South Hills. 412-835-3246. Reservations required. 9:30a.m. or 12:30p.m. Through Dec. 22.

SATURDAY 14

MONDAY 16

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-3685225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. With special guests Bizzy Crook & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 7p.m.

Big D and the Kids Table Breakfast or / The Pietasters Lunch with Santa

WYEP Holiday Hootenanny & Pajama Jam STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: wyep.org. Doors open at 6p.m.

Chris Webby

Get Back! The Beatles Laser Experience Live!

Tom McBride The Alchemists’ Lab

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CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guests Grey’s Fool and Bobby Johns. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Joseph Arthur

Live at the Fillmore The Definitive Tribute to The Allman Brothers Band JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12 ALTAR BAR

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. With special guests Mike Mills & Bill Dobrow. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 17 Devon Allman

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

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TEDIOUS AND SIMPLISTIC, IT’S ANOTHER ROAD MOVIE

REEL TRUTHS {BY AL HOFF} The film essay The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology, directed by Sophie Fiennes, opens with a scene from the futuristic actioner They Live. Our narrator and pontificator, Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic Slavoj Zizek, declares this 1988 film as “a forgotten masterpiece of Hollywood,” and particularly notable for its explicit critique of ideology.

BEATEN

PATHS In search of meanings: Slavoj Zizek

From this easily decoded work, Zizek winds his way through a dozen other popular films, unpacking: how drinking CocaCola both creates and destroys desire; how Taxi Driver can help us understand the 2011 killings in Oslo; what the shark from Jaws has in common with Nazis; and how Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” defines groups as disparate as whites in Rhodesia and the Shining Path guerillas. Fiennes employs ample film clips, and Zizek speaks conversationally from recreated sets such as Travis Bickle’s room and Titanic’s lifeboat. You can agree or disagree: Zizek picks movies to prove his points, while perhaps many other films would just as easily disprove them. (Also, huge spoiler alert from Zizek: “There is … no point of reference which guarantees meaning.”) It’s all rambling and fairly dense, though not difficult to follow. If you enjoy this sort of deconstructing, it’s provocative fun. If you’d prefer your Batman without the Platonic digressions, this probably isn’t for you. But just like comic-book movies, there is a bonus sc scene after the credits roll. Fri., Dec. 13-Sun., Sun., Dec. 15. Melwood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AHOFF@PG

“When Santa squeezes his fat, white ass down th that chimney tonight, he’s gonna find the jolliest bunch of assholes this side of the nuthouse.” Brush up on your Griswold for the

Christmas Vacation Quote-Along screening. 9 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. Hollywood, Dormont

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

S

INCE 1996, Alexander Payne has directed one great film (Election), one decent one (The Descendants), and three highly overrated ones. And yet, I never imagined he’d make a movie as hackneyed and unbearable as Nebraska. Tedious and simplistic, it’s another road movie — that’s all he makes any more — about a senile old man, his diffident son and their journey of self discovery. (Why else would you sojourn with someone you don’t want to be in the same room with you, let alone the same car?) Turns out they don’t discover much about themselves, which may be what Payne wants to say. But his movie is so busy being contrived that I can’t be sure. This road trip begins when Woody (Bruce Dern) receives a magazine-sweepstakes letter and believes he’s won a million dollars. He lives in Billings, Mont., and the money is in Lincoln, Neb., 900 miles away, so he keeps setting out,

Woody (Bruce Dern) heads for the heartland.

on foot, to collect his prize. Finally, to shut him up, his younger son, David (Will Forte), agrees to drive him to Lincoln to collect the booty that the whole family (his wife and other son) knows isn’t really there.

NEBRASKA DIRECTED BY: Alexander Payne STARRING: Bruce Dern, Will Forte Starts Fri., Dec. 13

A thoughtful and patient director could build a character study on that foundation. But Payne is a rather smug one, so the men stop in the small town where Woody grew up, and where affable old friends and relatives turn into greedy vultures. David learns good and bad things about his father whilst communing with these folks, but nothing that screenwriter Bob Nelson

concocts is remotely original, insightful or moving. Why are these people so forlorn and empty — or does Payne just want them to be? Does the dialogue capture the banality of conversation between people with monotonous lives, or is it just bad writing? Now and then we get a glimpse of a disheartening malaise — a broken heartland, you might say — but we learn nothing compelling about its immutable causes. The acting is largely uninspired and often feeble: Dern hobbles around and looks bemused, and Forte brings nothing to the role of a man who’s pretty much nothing. I watched Nebraska with an older audience that chuckled at its corny and often sophomoric humor, but I can’t believe they’ll go out and tell their friends that they liked it. As every Nebraskan knows, sometimes you just have to salvage what you can from disaster. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES. The 1970s San Diego anchorman Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) moves on to a 24-hour news channel in New York City. Also, it is now the ‘80s. Steve Carell and Paul Rudd costar; Adam McKay directs. Starts Wed., Dec. 18 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG. Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and crew continue their looonnng journey in Part 2 of Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s adventure novel. In 3-D in select theaters. Starts Fri., Dec. 13

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A MADEA CHRISTMAS. The irrepressible Madea celebrates the holidays in the country and gets up to her usual heartwarming mayhem. Also, Larry the Cable Guy! Tyler Perry stars and directs. Starts Fri., Dec. 13

REPERTORY THE POLAR EXPRESS. With its nearphotorealism, and the imaginations of director Robert Zemeckis and crew taking off from Chris Van Allsburg’s gorgeous kiddie book, this animated film is a visual treat, from a child’s iris reflecting light like polished stone to the sight of timber wolves galloping through snowy nighttime woods. The spare story follows a boy skeptical of Santa Claus who’s among a dozen well-groomed children spirited away on Christmas Eve by a magical steam locomotive; guided by a crusty conductor (voice of Tom Hanks), they’re off to the North Pole to learn valuable lessons. But attaining feature length demands major narrative padding, and the film belies its own parables about faith: Believing is made to seem so much more pleasant than doubting that you’d be a fool to do otherwise. Screening daily, in IMAX, at Carnegie Science Center (Bill O’Driscoll) SCROOGE. Every year seems to bring another bastardized version of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, so why not clear your palate with one of the earliest film adaptations? Henry

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Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

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JINGLE ALL THE WAY. Christmas is for buying things! Brian Levant directs this 1996 holiday comedy about two dads (Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sinbad) who are trying to purchase that year’s must-have toy, Turbo-Man. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 12. AMC Loews. $5

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A French comedy about a couple who decide to name their baby Adolf.

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WHAT’S IN A NAME? A group of friends in Paris finds their dinner discussions getting heated — and revealing — after one fellow says he might name his newborn son “Adolf.” Alexandre de La Patellière and Matthieu Delaporte direct this new comedy, adapted from Delaporte’s play. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Dec. 11. Hollywood

NATIONAL LAMPOON’S CHRISTMAS VACATION. For my money, the funniest entry in the “Vacation” franchise, because it taps a universal truth: Other people’s behavior ruins your holidays, while your behavior contributes to other people’s misery. It’s all about giving and getting! Everyman Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) tries to lay on the perfect Christmas, but is undercut by his low-rent cousin (Randy Quaid), uptight neighbors,

100 51st St. • Lawrenceville Off Butler St/Across from Goodwill

Edwards’ 1935 British film is a faithful recounting of the novella, and features Seymour Hicks as a particularly nasty Ebenezer Scrooge. 7 p.m. Wed., Dec. 11, and 7 p.m. Thu., Dec. 12. Oaks

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1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

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demanding elderly relatives, his boss, a squirrel and a tangle of Christmas lights. Jeremiah S. Chechik directs this 1989 neo-classic holiday comedy, penned by John Hughes. At Hollywood: 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 12; 7 p.m. Fri., Dec. 13; 3 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14 (all seats $5); and 9 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14 (this is the quote-along version). Also, 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 19, at AMC Loews ($5) (Al Hoff)

A CHRISTMAS STORY. Guess what Ralphie wants for Christmas? An official Red Ryder Carbine Action 200-shot Range Model air rifle. Will he get it? Discover this and other small wonders of holidays past in Bob Clark’s 1983 holiday film, presented on the big screen. 2 p.m. Sun., Dec. 15. Hollywood MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET. In George Seaton’s 1947 charmer, a Macy’s store Santa, Kris Kringle, claims to be the real deal. This being modern America, lawyers are called in, but what counts most is winning hearts, not court cases. Look for the redand-white guy to triumph. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 17. AMC Loews. $5

SCROOGED. It’s a snarky modern update of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, starring the droll Bill Murray as the grumpy TV executive missing the true meaning of the holidays. Richard Donner directs this 1988 comedy. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Dec. 13; 1 p.m. (all seats $3) and 6:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14; and 7 p.m. Sun., Dec. 15. Hollywood ELF. Pick which holiday movie features these bits: a grumpy department-store Santa; ice-skating at Rockefeller Center; incredulous local TV news reports about Santa’s arrival; name-brand-toy product placement; a well-known Manhattan department store; a mishap while decorating the tree; stop-animation characters gliding through fake snow; the declaration that “Santa’s sleigh runs on Christmas spirit”; a workaholic dad who works Christmas Eve; a miracle caused by the groupsinging of Christmas carols by former curmudgeons; and a kid who by infecting others with his pure joy causes everybody to see the season’s true meaning. You could have mentioned dozens of films, but if you’d like all these tried-and-true elements of the heart-warming holiday comedy in one 97-minute chunk, then Elf is for you. Directed by Jon Favreau (Made), Will Ferrell plays Buddy, an oversized elf (he’s the super-sized kid who is a prime candidate for Ritalin) who turns up in New York City looking for his long-lost father (James Caan). Mixed into the been-there-done-that holiday moments are seen-’em-before, fish-out-of-water gags: Evidently there are no escalators in Santa’s workshop. Inoffensive and mildly amusing, 2003’s

SANTA CLAUS CONQUERS THE MARTIANS. After watching a bunch of Earth TV shows, kids on Mars start clamoring for Santa. So a couple of Martians head to Earth to kidnap him. Don’t worry, it all works out in this 1964 so-bad-it’sgood film, directed by Nicholas Webster. The Gothees play holiday music before the Dec. 18 screening. 7 p.m. Wed., Dec. 18, and 7 p.m. Thu., Dec. 19. Oaks

A Madea Christmas Elf is still like getting last year’s present re-wrapped. 10 p.m. Fri., Dec. 13; and 5 and 10 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. Oaks (AH)

Berlin classics such as “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep” and “Blue Skies.” 11 a.m. Sat., Dec. 14, and 2 p.m. Sun., Dec. 15. Oaks

WHITE CHRISTMAS. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye are a pair of entertainers who travel to Vermont with two singing sisters (Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen) for the holidays. Once there, the men discover the country inn is run by their old Army general, and he’s in financial straits. Looks like a big musical show might be the ticket! Besides the title song, Michael Curtiz’s 1954 film includes other Irving

ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry) is so busy seducing a couple of naïve stranded guests (Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick) that he fails to notice his colleagues from outer space are planning a coup. With lots of singing and dancing, and everybody wearing underwear! Jim Sharman directs this 1975 cult classic. Midnight, Sat., Dec. 14. Hollywood

PURPLE RAIN. If you’ve never seen this deliriously demented autobiographical vanity production about the Rise of Prince on the big screen, consider making a date. All his purple majesty’s highlights — riding his motorcycle, pitching a hissy fit, bleating out the title song and getting upstaged by Morris Day — deserve to be writ large. Albert Magnoli directs this 1984 cheese-o-classic. Tonight is a celebration of Prince, with music, prizes, art and the film. Doors opens at 6:30 p.m.; film at 8 p.m. Thu., Dec. 19. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

bring your cheer bring your traditions bring your family There's always a lot to see duringthe holidays at Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History!

Be inspired by the Holiday Trees, tour the 2013 Carnegie International, talk with a totem pole carver, and view the life-like figurines of the Neapolitan presepio. And stop in our museum stores for unique and creative gifts! Just coming to shop? Parking in our lot is free for the first 30 minutes.

Holidays at the museums is sponsored by

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the museums will be open mondays (closed tuesdays) in 2014. two of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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[DANCE]

I FEEL THE SAME WAY ABOUT CHILDREN THAT I DO ABOUT ARCHITECTURE

AMERICAN DREAMING {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Continuum Dance Theater performs OBJECTS OF DESIRE 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 412-3204610 or www.newhazletttheater.org NEWS

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CPLAY HILD‘S {BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

A

RCHITECTURE has long had a para-

Continuum dancer in a promo image for Objects of DESIRE {PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLEY GRIFFIN}

A nuclear family with 2.5 kids, a dog and a house with a white picket fence has been the stereotypical vision of the American dream. But is that vision still relevant? That is the question behind Continuum Dance Theater’s Objects of DESIRE, which the company will world-premiere Sat., Dec. 14, as part of the New Hazlett Theater’s Community Supported Art performance series. The 50-minute, intermission-less dance-theater work is choreographed by Continuum artistic director Sarah Parker. But it was derived largely from feedback Parker and company received over the past nine months: During local informal public showings and rehearsals, they surveyed audience members about their perceptions of the American Dream. “We wanted to know what makes people tick, what motivates them, and what they desire most in the world,” says Parker. Parker, a graduate of Point Park University, founded Continuum in 2011 as an off-shoot of her Pittsburgh-based Evolve Productions, which regularly produces dance education and performance events. Objects of DESIRE is only the second full-length work the fledgling all-female troupe has produced, after 2012’s The Movement. Set to a soundscape created by Parker that includes music by American-Chilean musician Nicolas Jaar and Israeli singersongwriter Asaf Avidan, Objects of DESIRE follows a single character, portrayed by dancer Michelle Skeirik. Over the course of the piece, Skeirik’s character encounters four more characters who represent aspects of herself in the form of “desires.” These desires include success and power, materialism, and relationships and sex. Each character also carries with her a physical object that symbolizes that desire. “The show is almost like a movie for the audience to experience,” says Parker. Used to cranking out new (if shorter) works at “a feverish pace,” Parker says the luxury of time afforded her and the company via the New Hazlett’s subscription-style CSA series allowed her for the first time to involve the community in the creation of a work. It’s a process she says really benefitted Objects of DESIRE. CDT will show a video about the making of the work in the New Hazlett lobby before the show.

doxical relationship with childhood .and children. At least since Leon Battista Alberti construed architecture in the Renaissance as an erudite and scholarly enterprise, it has been a sophisticated pursuit, appropriate only for adults. Twentiethcentury modern architecture, in the hands of people such as Mies van der Rohe, only exacerbated that sense, by draining the built environment of any remote scrap of fun or frivolity. So how much of a surprise is it that architecture is newly a playground at the Carnegie Museum of Art — both as an installation in and a theme of the Carnegie International and through the Heinz Architectural Center’s The Playground Project exhibition? Beyond a subject matter or building type, it is part of a larger rumination about opening doors, expanding audiences and making the place more accessible to children and other everyday people. For the versions of architecture and art that aim to be social and non-elitist, these are admirable goals indeed. At least that’s what I keep telling myself. Alas, I feel the same way about children that I do about architecture: I can really trouble myself to interact with only the very best examples. And yet, though “You kids get off my lawn” may be a personal mantra, it is hardly a valid exhibition critique. Both the quality of the exhibition and the revised cultural outlook that it represents need careful consideration.

M A I N F E AT U R E

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

Say “aah”: view of Golem (Mifletzet) (1972), a playground by Niki de Saint Phalle, in Rabinovich Park, Jerusalem

Happily, The Playground Project — a collection of 2-D displays, video documents and actual play spaces, guest-curated by Gabriela Burkhalter — establishes itself in historical and aesthetic rigor. Playgrounds themselves have roots in scientific approaches to child development, as epitomized by psychologists Jean Piaget and

THE PLAYGROUND PROJECT continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

Bruno Bettelheim. Simultaneously, the tendency of some branches of Modern art, whether Surrealism or art brut, to value child-like expressions of naïveté, means that artists such as Isamu Noguchi convinc-

ingly blend real fields of play with the discourse of the art world. Likewise, certain architects have made playgrounds a specialty. Aldo Van Eyck might be the most renowned for his work in Amsterdam, where his hundreds of designed playgrounds reflect the particularly Dutch version of humanization in architecture — practical, hands-on vignettes in the city that still make reference to Dutch modernist art. In this show, Van Eyck’s playgrounds are shown through period photographs. Arguably these tendencies to blend the interests of modern art and childhood play reach a particular culmination in Tezuka Architects’ work, which is both elegant and conducive to play. Their ringshaped Fuji Kindergarden is a one-story pavilion with an open plan and an occupiable roof, complete with perforations to CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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New Media Interactive Works by Erin Ko Opening Reception: Saturday, December 14th

12.07.13…12.28.13

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

LOST TIMES {BY BRETT WILSON}

Likewise, go ahead, bring kids into the Heinz Architectural Center. Turn a large part of it into a concept-based playspace, and let them run, kick and yell. But in an exhibit in which play spaces through the decades by real masters, both familiar and obscure, crowd each other for attention, you can indeed have too many sandboxes and too many drawings by randomly selected third-graders. Perhaps most tellingly, the pervasive use of plywood as background for the exhibit’s drawings and images seems like a heavy-handed misstep. When the aim is to find renewed harmony in the architectural interests of children and adults after too many occasions of divergence, surely the multi-colored plaster walls of the Heinz Architectural Center could be reconceptualized as kid-friendly polychromy, rather than covered over. The forceful masking of these potentially sympathetic walls is no better a treatment for architecture than it would be for children. The best of these works show that balance is to be found in openhearted and conciliatory approaches from all perspectives, not overcompensation for previous errors.

Sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll: That was supposedly the spirit of the late 1960s and the 1970s. But Steve Hallock, author of the new memoir In Cheesman Park (Codefore Publications) wants to add a thing or two. Hallock, 64, directs the School of Communication at Point Park University. Growing up in the Denver area, he spent late nights hanging out with friends, learning to drink and doing other things they weren’t supposed to. Much of the action was in a place called Cheesman Park. When Hallock was in college, a close friend of his raped a woman. Hallock’s book details how he and his friends dealt with that horrific act, as well as exploring how women were seen during that time. “Attitudes toward women at that time were not all good, and the [story] details just what happens when you treat human beings without dignity and respect,” he said in a recent interview. “Which is truly ironic, because when people look back on American history they often see the ’60s and ’70s as a time of acceptance, peace and love.” The book depicts Hallock’s social circle as a metaphor for that era. The characters — real people given different names to preserve their anonymity — each embodied and represented the divergent ideals of the time. Some would open their doors to anyone at any time and cook them meals. Others liked the openness of the time but — as taken to extremes in the case of the rapist — lacked universal respect for others. While the book is full of dialogue, Hallock acknowledges that he did not carry a tape recorder around in those days. But the events and conversations he recounts are true to form, he says. “I really intended to capture an era, to present the thinking and the attitude of the rapist, the time period and everyone else around at the time.” Cheesman Park was Hallock and friends’ getaway from the world, and he depicts that place so that it feels universal. But he tells the story of a group of kids from that era in a way many of us have never heard before. “This is not just a book about rape and drugs,” he says. “It’s about how our language and behavior affects others and how even today we still fail at treating everyone with the same level of respect and humanity.”

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[BOOK]

In Cheesman Park author Steve Hallock

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accommodate pre-existing trees. It is conceptually recreated in the Heinz Architectural Center’s largest exhibition room with hanging fabric screens that both echo the building’s shape and allow video images of the structure’s frolicking kids to be projected, along with a soundtrack of laughter and squeals. Within the fabricenclosed volume are scores of white balloons for kids to kick around to recreate the play of the original building. OK, kids, get on my lawn. If Tezuka Architects can find the alchemy in restrained and seemingly effortless architecture that appeals to both aesthetes and kids, then I am all for it. In fact, the Lozziwurm, the newly installed playground piece originally created by Yvan Pestalozzi in 1972, seems forced and garish by comparison. A new piece by Tezuka would probably have been more elegant and more likely to save the trees that were felled to accommodate the Lozziwurm. Or why not something more zoomorphic by that perennial favorite, the late Niki de St. Phalle? Or Richard Dattner, whose interlocking, three-dimensional building tiles, on display at the HAC, compellingly link grown-up and child-like architecture?


[PLAY REVIEWS]

KEY ROLES {BY TED HOOVER} IT WAS A great “you got peanut butter in

my chocolate” moment in Toronto back in the mid-’90s when actors/musicians/ writers Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenblatt met while working on a theater project and found their childhoods had been remarkably similar. Both were piano prodigies who had sacrificed a “normal” adolescence to intense practicing and competition. Revisiting and reworking these memories, Dykstra and Greenblatt created 2 Pianos 4 Hands, which the two men performed around the world for more than five years. It’s easy to understand why this is the most frequently performed Canadian play ever written. It’s a smooth and swift evening, entertaining when it can be (which is most of the time), with enough of an edge to keep it from curdling. And more than any show I’ve ever seen, 2 Pianos is a testament to the backbreaking work needed just to be “merely good.” These young men discover that it’s years and years of crushing, relentless discipline … with no guarantee on the other end.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Christopher Tocco (left) and Bob Stillman in 2 Pianos 4 Hands, at City Theatre

Tocco simply unfurl their extraordinary musical gifts in brief, or long, recital — including, and especially, the first movement of Bach’s “Concerto in D Minor.” It’s a mesmerizing end to a terrific evening. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Program A starts with a blast of nostalgia, gentle comedy and some serious, um, stuff in “St. Clair Xmas,” nicely directed by Marcus Muzopappa. Wali Jamal has written himself a great role as the friendly neighborhood psycho, sipping hot choco-

late and memories with some old St. Clair Village buddies, both white and black. Especially notable are a sharp-eyed Judy Kaplan, and a sharp-tongued Deborah Starling as his wife. Andrew Ade’s “True Meaning,” gently directed by Rita Gregory, is a lovely little lightweight tale of what “adult relationships” are really about. Tonya Lynn fulfills the wit and pain of the central character, with Adam Rutledge strong as her brother and Tonia Marie sympathetically cute as his wife. A sure cure for holiday sweetness and light, Lissa Brennan’s hilariously abrasive “And to All a Good Night” leaves no offensivenesses behind. Directed by Cheryl ElWalker, the over-the-top comedy upends every Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? stereotype with unabashed performances by LaMar Darnell Fields, Willa Cotton, Sara Fisher and William Blair, with Jamilah Chanie as the granny from hell. Completing the program are Tammy Ryan’s wellmeaning “Cornucopia” and Marlon Erik Youngblood’s lassitudinous “Just Jesus.” While hitting more holidays, Program B also hands out more sermons. At least Kim El’s “An Ubuntu Holiday,” directed by Stephen Santa (for real), is a fairly gentle infomercial for its not-Christmas celebration. A gloriously outfitted Candace CONTINUES ON PG. 58

HOLIDAY PARADE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

2 PIANOS 4 HANDS continues through Dec. 22. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

I suspect that if the show’s talent requirements weren’t so specific, 2 Pianos 4 Hands might be the most performed play in the world. You need two strong actors who don’t play pianists … they actually need to be pianists. So let’s give a big hand to City Theatre and director Tom Frey for bringing together Bob Stillman and Christopher Tocco for this Pittsburgh premiere of 2 Hands. Much of the show is each actor playing a young boy being tormented by an extravagantly crazy piano teacher; Stillman and Tocco have no difficulty slipping in and out of all these roles with a deft comedic touch. When the play turns serious in the second act, each actor plays shattering heartbreak with a haunting stillness. And Frey does incredible work blending all the emotional beats seamlessly, allowing the production to be inflated with joy or bruised with sorrow as needed. And sometimes the 2 Pianos trappings disappear and Stillman and NEWS

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NEVER LET IT be said that Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.’s Theatre Festival in Black & White is timid in its demands for theatrical diversity in the many senses of the term. Already celebrated for mixing the talents of white and black playwrights, directors and other artists, the festival marches into double digits declaring that there are many holidays to celebrate at this time of year.

THEATRE FESTIVAL IN BLACK & WHITE: HOLIDAY EDITION! continues through Dec. 17. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co., 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-25. www.pghplaywrights.com/bwfest

Mark Clayton Southers, company/ festival founder and artistic director, asked 10 playwrights for new one-acts on a holiday theme — a tough genre even without an emphasis on Christmas. That’s still the most represented holiday in the event (what? No Saturnalia or Festivus?), which offers a very large, very mixed bag in two portions.

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Walker explains Kwanzaa with humor, not a hammer, winning over her friend, gamely portrayed by Crystal Beatty. (Irony of the week: A former top BP executive is suing the we’re-not-British petroleum producer after it fired her because her similarly “ethnic” dress “intimidated” her white colleagues.) Tameka Cage-Conley’s “Where I First Saw the Light” provides surprises, insights and the opportunity for stellar performances by Jonas Chaney, Barney McKeena, Dionysus Westbrook and Ben Blazer. T.C. Brown directed this stunner about friendship, privilege and manhood. Ray Werner’s ambitious “Christmas Star” stumbles a bit in its portrayal of an Afghanistan war veteran, but succeeds in sparking some serious thoughts about patriotism, PTSD and the family. Monteze Freeland strongly directs Les Howard, Marcia L. Jones and Trevor Butler. “We Need a Ramadan,” by Aasiyah El-Rice, smooshes two plays together for an unwieldy pair of melodramas, though the latter’s structure has a nice flow. Directed by Vince Ventura (who also plays a villain), Camille Washington, Candace Walker and Mayme Williams interact well in the innerstory. Sam Lothard brings both humor and heroism. “Hanukkah in the Back Country,”

by Judy Meiksin, is also light on credibility, but avoids the heavy hand of preachiness. Kim El directs this slight tale about sisters, sisterhood and Hanukkah. While I might question the “screamer” (copy-editor-ese for exclamation point) in the title, I don’t doubt the sincerity, effort and enjoyment inherent in the 10th Annual Theatre Festival in Black & White: Holiday Edition! There’s plenty of feel-good, chuckles, provocativeness and holiday cheer to go around. And remember, Christmas warriors: Bill O’Reilly would be turning in his grave if it weren’t only his sense of humor that was dead.

niment by Cello Fury. Animated Holidaze, written by Tami Dixon, Gayle Pazerski and Brad Stephenson, takes a shotgun-blast approach to the holidays, trying to cover every common response to this time of excess and marketing. There are parodies of old holiday ads (make your wife’s life worth living with kitchen appliances!) and unadorned presentations of classic stories. It’s the sort of show you’d present to an alien to explain the whole season, why we of the Northern Hemisphere don’t feel too hopeless as the nights become longer and the roads become deadlier. A show like this stands on the strength of its segments, and what’s there is pretty solid — new celebrity impressions dubbed over Rankin-Bass films; an interview with the creepiest Elf on a Shelf imaginable; and a remarkably straightforward performance of the narration and music of The Grinch Who Stole Christmas. I’m not sure I fully “got” the latter, because the original is still readily available and there didn’t seem to be much to add. However, even when segments didn’t strike you too warmly,

IT’S THE SORT OF SHOW YOU’D PRESENT TO AN ALIEN TO EXPLAIN THE WHOLE SEASON.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

YULE ’TOONS {BY COLETTE NEWBY} THE LAST SHOW of the fifth season of Bricolage’s Midnight Radio series, Animated Holidaze, is a dash through the cartoons of Christmas past, re-scored and voiced by Midnight Radio regulars and directed by Jeffrey Carpenter, with musical accompa-

you could enjoy the quality animation projected on the wall. I had forgotten how much talent Chuck Jones brought to the Grinch, and it was nice to remember. In this show, there’s no singling out the sound design for special praise because it was 90 percent of the performance. Cello Fury brought the show to musical extremes, from foreboding to jubilation. The vocal performers were spot-on in their timing (particularly Sheila McKenna). And the foley artist, Skyler Sullivan, would deserve praise even if he’d provided sound effects only for the aforementioned Grinch performance, and every plink of every stolen Christmas tree bauble.

MIDNIGHT RADIO’S

ANIMATED HOLIDAZE continues through Sat., Dec. 14. Bricolage Theater, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. www.bricolagepgh.org

If you’re enchanted by the idea of little claymation snowmen swearing, or if you appreciate every opportunity you get to see live foley work, then Midnight Radio is the best way to get excited for the most stressful time of the year. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

“...one of the moment’s hottest art stars...” —Artforum

Culture Club Goes Late Night: Wade Guyton and Guests Friday, December 13, 8–11 p.m. Cost: $18 in advance/$20 at the door ($15 students); Includes one drink ticket. For more information visit carnegieinternational.org Wade Guyton Installation © Carnegie Museum of Art

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

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THE

NUTCRACKER

+ THU., DEC. 12

{PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVEN SHWARTZER}

{WORDS} â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because we did not have threads / of turquoise, silver, and gold, / we could not sew a sun nor sky. / And our hands became balls of fire. / And our arms spread open like wings,â&#x20AC;? wrote poet Shara McCallum in her 2003 collection Song of Thieves. The Jamaican-born poet, a professor at Bucknell University, has been published internationally. Today, at the request of the Library of Congress, she visits the Carnegie Library of Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main branch to share work from her latest collection, The Face of Water: New and Selected Poems. The free reading continues Pittsburgh Arts & Lecturesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Writers LIVE series. Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Driscoll 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. 412-622-8866 or www. pittsburghlectures.org

{MUSIC} As they say in Elf, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear.â&#x20AC;? This week and next, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra joins the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh and other guests for Highmark Holiday Pops,

DEC. 12 Shara McCallum

{COMEDY} The Second City returns for its annual holiday visit. The legendary troupe is back at Pittsburgh Public Theater with a new production, The Nut-cracking Holiday Revue. Very little actual ballet is likely involved: Second City is known for its sketch comedy and for its improv, taking audience suggestions in unexpected directions. This group of Second City performers includes Adam Peacock, Asher Perlman, Pat Reidym, Marlena Rodriguez, Sarah Shook and Emily Walker. The first of three performances is tonight. BW 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., Dec. 14. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-220. 412316-1600 or www.ppt.org

+ FRI., DEC. 13 {ART}

a program of classic holiday tunes. Led by Todd Ellison, whom the New York Times calls one of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broadwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electric conductors,â&#x20AC;? the PSO will ring in the season for anyone of any age. Brett Wilson 7:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 21. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $21-99. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

DEC. 17 Benny Benack III

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try the local â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Ver-salesâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Du-boysâ&#x20AC;? pronunciation trick with Pittsburgh je tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aime. The title of this show of some 100 prints of iPhone photos of the urban landscape, taken by Hilary Robinson, just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sound right without all those luxurious consonants. Robinson spent several years at Carnegie Mellon as dean of the College of Fine Arts and an art professor, and was a welcome presence on our arts scene. Now a dean at Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Middlesex University, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributed this photographic billet doux. It opens today at Filmmakers Galleries, sans reception; a closing reception is set for Feb. 17. BO Noon-6 p.m. Exhibit continues through Feb. 21. 477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland. Free. 412-681-5449 or www.pfm.pittsburgharts.org

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{EVENT} School violence is chronic, and Wilkinsburg gets more than its share: One 2011 study ranked the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school district as the most dangerous in the state. But during his 2012-13 artist residency at Wilkinsburg High School, Blaine Siegel saw other possibilities. In conjunction with his work in the Society


Art by Wade Guyton

sp otlight Drinkies are de rigueur at art openings, usually verboten in museum galleries. But while the Carnegie Museum of Art’s monthly Culture Club always offers cocktails in the museum’s lobby, on Dec. 13, visitors will be encouraged to imbibe in the makeshift gallery better known as the coatroom. That night, artist Wade Guyton and Carnegie International co-curator Daniel Baumann will serve drinks from behind the coatroom’s counter-turned-bar, which stands alone after the removal of all those metal lockers to accommodate Guyton’s large-scale abstract works made with an Epson printer. There is furniture, though: “The sofas are from my studio,” Guyton tells CP by phone from his home base, in New York City. The informal event consists of chats with Guyton and Baumann and readings by local literary types (like Caliban Books’ John Schulman) from texts by photographer Joel Sternfeld, whose series Sweet Earth: Experimental Utopias in America is also part of the International. (The evening includes a brief toddle to Sternfeld’s work and Guyton’s other work.) Baumann has often exhibited works by the internationally known Guyton at other venues; here, their goal is to reanimate a familiar space. “It’s giving a life to the room it wouldn’t otherwise have,” Guyton says. But are he and Baumann actual mixologists? Not really. “It’ll be tequila night,” says Guyton. Bill O’Driscoll 8-11 p.m. Fri., Dec. 13. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-20 (includes drinks). 412-682-3131 or www.carnegieinternational.org

for Contemporary Craft exhibit ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out, Siegel has organized tonight’s hour-long program of performances and readings by student musicians, writers and poets, including members of the school’s marching band. BO 5:30 p.m. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. Free ($5 suggested donation). 412-261-7003 or www.contemporarycraft.org

cards for family and friends. Upcoming are Dec. 20’s holiday cartooning class and Dec. 27’s create-your-own-comic class. BO 6-9 p.m. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25 per child. 412232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

all the characters. The show has two more performances, tonight and tomorrow at Carnegie’s St. Peter and Paul Hall. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. 220 Mansfield Blvd., Carnegie. $5-12. www.stageandsteel.com

{STAGE} {COMEDY}

If you’ve always thought A Christmas Carol would be better with sword fights, Stage & Steel Productions has

’Tis the season … for holidaythemed spoofs. This weekend, at Arcade Comedy Theater, local stage troupe No Name Players performs Greg Kotis’ new musical The Truth About Santa. Kotis promises to “peel back the tinsel” and reveal who Santa Claus really is. (The answer is recommended for those 18 and over.) No Name’s Don DiGiulio directs tonight’s late-night show and a Saturday performance. Meanwhile, Saturday’s late-night slot at Arcade is a special holiday edition of the sketch/variety show Fireside Chat with Mark & Jonathan. BO Santa: 10 p.m. and also 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $5-10. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

Art by Hilary Robinson

DEC. 13 Pittsburgh je t’aime

+ SAT., DEC. 14

DEC. 12

The e Nu N Nut Nut-cracking ut cr crac ack ac k Holiday Revue

of the museum’s permanent exhibit on Native Americans. BO Unveiling: 10:30 a.m. (museum hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.). 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free with museum admission ($11.95-17.95). 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemnh.org

{WORDS} Kevin Finn is known ’round

here as one of Pittsburgh’s better singer-songwriters. But he’s also a well-regarded poet who’s just followed his chapbook Escape Wounds with the collection Sea of Dust (Six Gallery Press). Finn marks the book’s release tonight with a reading at newish Squirrel Hill hang-out Dobrá Tea. Also reading are visiting poet

{ART}

{KIDS} Craftily, Toonseum is calling it Kids’ Night Out. But really, this month-long weekly series is a chance for parents to steal some shopping time while the wee ’uns ages 5 to 12 enjoy a craft workshop. At tonight’s Holiday Card Creation Station, expert crafters help kids design

NEWS

Since late November, Native American artist Tommy Joseph has been working daily to hand-carve “The Hunt,” a 16-foot Tlingit totem pole commissioned by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. The Alaska-based Joseph (a member of the Eagle Moiety, Kaagwaantaan Clan) is widely known for carving canoes, masks and ceremonial objects. This morning, he’ll unveil “The Hunt” for its installation at its new home at the museum. This Celebration of the Raising features Tlingit song, drum and flute by musician Morgan Redmon Fawcett, plus guided tours

you covered. The local troupe specializing in stage combat presents A Medieval Christmas Carol, its brand-new ye olde version of the tale, this one depicting cold-hearted King Scrooge and various Yuletide ghosts. The script’s by Ruth Comley, and Micheal R. Kiser directs a cast of six who play

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+ TUE., DEC. 17 {MUSIC} Benny Benack III is a rising jazz star, but the Benack name is familiar here: His grandfather was a Dixieland cornet player and local icon, and his father is a musician and educator. (His mother, too, is a singer.) Pittsburgh-born B3 is an acclaimed trumpeter and vocalist in his own right, now relocated to New York, where he plays out and teaches at Lincoln Center. But Benack, 23, comes home for the holidays with his band to hit the Backstage Bar during the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s JazzLive series. And tonight’s the night. BO 5-9 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. www.trustarts.org

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Arthur Seefhart and locals Bernadette Ulsamer and Kris Collins. BO 7 p.m. 1937 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. 412-449-9833 or www.dobrateapgh.com

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THEATER 10TH ANNUAL THEATRE FESTIVAL IN BLACK & WHITE: HOLIDAY EDITION. Ten one-acts; plays by black playwrights directed by white directors & vice versa. Thu, Fri, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. and Thru Dec. 17, 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 15. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 412-377-7803. 2 PIANOS 4 HANDS. The riotous story of Ted & Richard, childhood friends who spent years chasing the same goal: concert pianist stardom. Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 22. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. THE ALCHEMISTS’ LAB. Contemporary satire loosely based on Ben Johnson’s The Alchemist. Presented by Point Park’s Conservatory Theatre Company. Dec. 13, 8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 14, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 15, 2 p.m. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. ANNIE. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 15, 2:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 21.

Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ANOTHER CHRISTMAS STORY. Dec. 12-15, 7:30 p.m. Ingomar United Methodist Church, 412-364-3613. CHARLES IVES TAKE ME HOME. A father’s love of music & a daughter’s passion for basketball are at odds in this play about competition, commitment, & craft. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 15. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. ELF’ED. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Fri., Dec. 13, 7 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 21, 7 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. FEARLESS: A SHEPHERD’S STORY. An original Christmas production presented by Brown Chapel Heir Force. Thu., Dec. 12, 7 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-471-4332. MADELINE’S CHRISTMAS. Celebrate Christmas w/ Madeline, Miss Clavel, & the rest of the 12 little girls in 2 straight lines. Sat, Sun, 1:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 15.

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Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. MRS. BOB CRATCHIT’S WILD CHRISTMAS BINGE. Musical 724-745-6300. parody of Charles Dickens’ A THE MALTESE PENGUIN. Christmas Carol. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Interactive murder mystery dinner Thru Dec. 14. Little Lake Theatre, theater. Wed., Dec. 18, 6:30 p.m. Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. The Improv, Waterfront. A MUSICAL CHRISTMAS CAROL. 412-462-5233. Presented by Pittsburgh CLO. A MEDIEVAL CHRISTMAS Fri, 7:30 p.m., Sat, 12, 4 & 8 p.m. CAROL. A new take on the classic and Sun, 2 & 6 p.m. Thru Dec. 22. Dickens’ tale. Presented by Stage Byham Theater, Downtown. & Steel Productions. Fri, Sat. 412-456-6666. Thru Dec. 14. SS Peter & OVER THERE...THE G.I. Paul Ukrainian Orthodox CHRISTMAS TOUR. Church Hall, Carnegie. Feat. songs from the 412-276-9718. World War II-era. www. per MIDNIGHT RADIO: a p ty Presented by Pohl pghci m ANIMATED HOLIDAZE. .co Productions. Sat, A dubbed–over spin on 6:30 p.m. and Sun, classic animated holiday 3:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 15. favorites. Fri, Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. Dec. 14. Bricolage, Downtown. 724-746-1178. 412-471-0999. PLAID TIDINGS. Forever Plaid MRS. BOB CRATCHIT’S WILD Christmas special, presented by CHRISTMAS BINGE. Musical Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret. Wed, Thu, parody of Charles Dickens’ A 7:30 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Christmas Carol. Presented by the Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 12. Cabaret Indiana Players. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. at Theater Square, Downtown. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22. 412-456-6666. Philadelphia Street Playhouse, A TAFFETA CHRISTMAS. Indiana. 724-464-0725. Fifties style holiday sequel to The Taffetas. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 15. The Theatre Factory, 412-374-9200. A TUNA CHRISTMAS. Musical comedy about Christmas in the 3rd smallest town in Texas. Presented by the Heritage Players. Sat., Dec. 14, 6:30 p.m. Broughton Fire Hall, South Park. 412-833-5585. WELL. Comedy by Lisa Kron acknowledging the heartbreaking challenge of true empathy. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Dec. 22. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. WHITE CHRISTMAS. Irving Berlin’s musical presented by the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center Professional Company. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 14. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, . 724-576-4644.

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COMEDY THU 12 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Derek Minto. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Offer good thru 12/31/13

4516 Browns Hill Road

Sq. Hill near the Waterfront 412.421.8550

savemorbeer.com

THU 12 - SAT 14 CHARLIE MURPHY. 8 p.m., Fri., Dec. 13, 8 & 10 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 14, 7 & 9 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233. THE SECOND CITY: NUTCRACKING HOLIDAY REVUE. Chicago’s famed comedy troupe. Dec. 12-14, 8 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. CONTINUES ON PG. 64

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FRI, DEC. 13 • 9PM ROCK

BETHESDA PLUS THE ARMADILLOS AND

POLAR SCOUT SAT, DEC 14 • 9PM

THE CAUSE THREE-SET SHOW OF 1980 GRATEFUL DEAD!! PLAYING THE MUSIC FROM RECKONING & DEAD SET. ACOUSTIC OPENING SET FOLLOWED BY TWO ELECTRIC SETS

MON, DEC. 16 • 9PM OPEN STAGE WITH

SGD

VISUALART

TUES, DEC 17 • 9PM JAZZ

OPEK "NO HOLIDAY MUSIC" SHOW

SAT, DEC 21 • 9PM FUNK/SOUL THE REUNION OF AND THE OLD E ALLSTARS

CK9

“Ruche 0352.20,” by Karen Freedman, from Obscure/Reveal at James Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Deck the Halls. Local artist showcase. Opening reception: Dec. 14, 7-10 p.m. feat. ugly sweater contest & food drive benefiting the Westmoreland County Food Bank. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Creator of the Future. Work by Matthew Stull. Opens Dec. 13. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Pittsburgh je t’aime. A collection of iPhone photos by Hilary Robinson. Opens Dec. 13. Closing reception Feb 17, 5:308 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FUTURE TENANT. Shame of the City: Deconstructing & Reconstructing Comic Narratives. Group exhibition of 23 works of art, each a deconstruction of a single page of the 1984 comic book “The Invincible Iron Man.” Opening reception: Dec. 13, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7037.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. threaded colors // drawing lines. Work by Nicole Czapinski. Downtown. 412-325-7017. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Longterm exhibition of Warhol’s

film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. SKIN. Faculty/ student collaborative exhibition. Downtown. 412-291-6200. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2013. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Symphony of Colours. Work by Nadya Lapets, June Kielty, Kim Freithaler & Vickie Schilling. Downtown. 412-325-6769. BAR MARCO. 3 Perspectives: An Attempt to Understand. This exhibit aims to explain the events of the Holocaust through art, narrative & history. Feat. work by Judith Robinson & Kara Snyder & curated by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Strip District. 412-421-1500. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. www.digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BE GALLERIES. 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Work by ceramic artist Yoko SekinoBove & jewelry artist Jim Bove. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Tarentum. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Holiday Sale. Pottery, jewelry, woodwork, painted & stained glass, greeting cards, prints, metal works, more. Verona. 412-828-1031.

BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Group exhibition & holiday sale. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Sandra Benhaim. New work. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. CONNECTIONS: The Work of Fabrizio Gerbino. Downtown. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FIELDWORK: CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY. On Paper. Work by Althea Murphy Price, Paul Stephen Benjamin, Krista Franklin, William Downs, Alisha B. Wormsley, & Jordan Martin. onpaper@inbox.com. Garfield. FIREBORN @ THE WORKS. Ceramics & glass pop-up gallery. Feat. Line & Color, works by Donn Hedman. S. 27th St., South CONTINUES ON PG. 64

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MUSIC

OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017 7

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THURS/DEC 12/10PM

MOTOMETER, PERISH, AND PARADOX PLEASE THURS/DEC 19/10PM

WINTER WONDER-LESQUE BURLESQUE SHOW THURS/DEC 26/10PM

SLIM FORSYTHE & HIS NEW PAYDAY LOANERS $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com +

SCREEN

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146 44th St . Pgh, PA 15201 ARTS

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ww.cattivo.biz

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TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY “FA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA” SOCIAL HOUR 5pm-9pm EVERY DAY ”FA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA” SIP ON $3 HOUSE- MADE LIQUOR INFUSIONS

“FA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA” GULP DOWN $3 CRAFT DRAFT BEERS

“FA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA” HAPPY HOLIDAYS, CARM & MIKE

FRI 13 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BRAD RYAN. 9 p.m. Downey’s House, Robinson. 412-489-5631. DAVID KAYE’S FILTHY DIRTY XXXMAS. 7:30 p.m. Village Tavern & Trattoria, West End. 412-920-5653. THE DRAFT IMPROV SHOW. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. LEVEL THREE IMPROV CLASS SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 14 THE AMISH MONKEYS. Improv sketch comedy. Second Sat of every month, 8 p.m. Thru Feb. 8 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 21 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RUCKUS IMPROV. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 16 1908 Carson Street l Southside l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 17 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 18 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. MATT WOHLFARTH, TOM KUPIEC. 8:30 p.m. Peter B’s, 724-353-2677. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the

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Side. South Side. 412-381-3181. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Clayton Holiday Tours A Pittsburgh Christmas. Artifacts displayed in Clayton evoke the family’s celebrations, archival & newspaper materials will give an idea of seasonal activity in & around the city. Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Gadgets to Grandeur. Group show feat. brand new & vintage Chiz artists. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. PRESENT. New media interactive works by Erin Ko. Opening reception: Dec. 14, 7-11 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Pieces Together. Mosaics by Stevo. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. IMAGEBOX. Michelangelo Noir: Drawings Based on the Pre-cleaned Frescoes. Work by Richard Claraval. Garfield. 412-441-0194. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. Venus, Eve, & Madonna. Presented by the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Work by Ruthanne Bauerle, Dorothy de Groat, Tazim Jaffer, Yelena Lamm, Tommy Mason, Daniel Mercer, Nathan Nissim, Rhoda Taylor, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. JAMES GALLERY. Obscure/ Reveal. Hot wax paintings by Christine Aaron, Karen Freedman, Amber George, Lorraine Glessner, Catherine Nash, James Nesbitt, more. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326.

industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Neapolitan Presepio. Nativity scene feat. more than 100 human & angelic figures, along w/ animals, accessories, & architectural

MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. African Dreams, Cubists Visions Redux. Sculptures by David Lewis, paintings by Terry Shutko. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Revisited 2013. New paintings & pastels by Adelaide La Fond. South Side. 412-431-3337. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Interconnected World: Art & Science at the Environmental Charter School. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. David A. Ludwig: Structures. Paintings, study sets, & drawings from a 40 year career. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pictures in Jewelry. Photos embedded in rings, pendants, watch covers & rings, given as gifts between 1880-WWI. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881.

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The New Collective. PCA all-guild exhibition of current work. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. SiO2: Highschool Reunion. Feat. work by 12 former SiO2 high school students. Reception Dec. 20, 6-9 p.m. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Pittsburgh Collects. 75 selected works contributed by 3 Pittsburgh photography collectors. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED. Feat. 40+ American ceramic artists interpreting the way they see the drinking cup. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Ignudi: Drawings Based on the Nude Youths of Michelangelo. Work by Richard Claraval. Closing party: Dec. 13, 7-10 p.m. Friendship. 412-441-0194. THE TOONSEUM. All That and a Bag of Chips: The 90s Animation Renaissance. Feat. original production art, sketches, storyboards, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Hive. 3D-animated audiovisual installation where gallery visitors confront a swirling mass of amorphous figures, appearing as a collective of matter as opposed to individual beings in deep space. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

elements. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Tlingit Totem Pole. Carving & installation by Tommy Joseph. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131.

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Lionel Days. Artifacts from Lionel’s own train collection feat. special activities, a Kids Zone, more. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village,


USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425.

RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. paintings, more. Mon-Sat. Thru A Reverence for Life. Photos Dec. 23 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622. and artifacts of her life & work. SNOWFLAKE SHOWCASE Springdale. 724-274-5459. MARKET. Paintings, prints, textiles, SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY wood creations, jewelry, ceramics, CENTER. Museum commemorates more. Tue, Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Pittsburgh industrialists, local Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. Thru Dec. 18 Greensburg Art SOLDIERS & SAILORS Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791. MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since CARNEGIE TREES 2013: the Civil War through EMBRACING THE ART artifacts & personal OF PLAY. 20-foot mementos. Oakland. Colorado spruce 412-621-4253. trees adorned w/ WEST OVERTON www. per handcrafted ornaments pa MUSEUMS. Learn pghcitym .co that celebrate the art of about distilling and play. Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 12 coke-making in this Carnegie Museum of Art, pre-Civil War industrial village. Oakland. 412-622-3131. 724-887-7910. CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, more. Wed-Sun. COFFEE W/ THE CURATOR: Thru Jan. 5 709 Penn Gallery, THE PRESEPIO. Learn about Downtown. 412-456-6666. the museum’s re-creation of the Nativity within a vibrant panorama of 18th-century Italian village THE PCA ANNUAL HOLIDAY life. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie SHOP. Ceramics, jewelry, fiber Museum of Art, Oakland. art, prints, more by 200+ regional 412-622-3131. artists. Thu-Sat, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun, 12-5 p.m., Tue, Wed, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Mon, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru SEASONAL INSPIRATIONS Dec. 23 Pittsburgh Center for the HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Pottery, Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. paper crafts, stained glass,

THU 12 - SUN 15

FULL LIST ONLINE

HOLIDAY THU 12

THU 12 - WED 18

THU 12 - SAT 14

SANTA’S ARRIVAL. Thru Dec. 24, 4-9:30 p.m. Mall at Robinson, Robinson. 412-788-0816. HOLIDAY TRAIN DISPLAY. Working coal mine, airport, steel mill & firework display. Mon-Fri and Sat, Sun. Thru Jan. 4 Penn Hills VFD #224, Verona. 412-828-0860.

CHRISTMAS LASER SPECTACULAR. 6 & 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 14, 6 p.m. Canonsburg United Presbyterian Church, Canonsburg. 412-965-2737. HOLIDAY JEWELRY SHOW & SALE. Live music & wine reception on Dec. 13. 5-9 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 14, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Washington Community Arts and Cultural Center, Washington. 724-222-1475. OLD ALLEGHENY VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS HOUSE TOUR. Dec. 13-14 Calvary United Methodist Church, North Side. 412-323-8884.

more. Ages 4-12. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-3 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. FIFTH AVENUE PLACE HOLLY TROLLEY. Hosted by Santa’s little helpers, trolleys circle downtown each weekend picking up at stops approximately every 15 minutes. www.downtownpittsburgh.com Sat. Thru Dec. 21 Fifth Avenue Place, Downtown. HOLIDAY SHOP WALK. Promotions & events at participating businesses. Liberty Ave., Bloomfield, Bloomfield. KST HOLIDAY BAZAAR. 10+ vendors. 11 a.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MERRY MERRY ART MARKET & FUNDRAISER. Hand-painted ornaments, antiques, handmade jewelry, more. Sponsored by the South Arts & Heritage Box. www.southartspittsburgh.org 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Schoolhouse Art Center, Bethel Park. 412-835-9898. OLD ECONOMY CHRISTMAS DINNER. Candlelit dinner w/ musical entertainment. 6 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500.

SAT 14

SAT 14 - SUN 15

CELEBRATE! THE HOLIDAYS. Make seasonal cards, garlands,

GLASS ORNAMENT WORKSHOPS. Sat, Sun, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Thru

FRI 13 HOLIDAY BUSINESS NETWORKING MIXER. Vendor marketplace & fashion show. 6 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-723-2414.

FRI 13 - SAT 14

CONTINUES ON PG. 66

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HOLIDAY PARTY! DEC.19 Come sing your head off!

Karaoke 9:30PM to 1:30AM

$2.255

Yuengling ng Bottles

9:30pm-1:300am OVER 21 ONLY

1314 EAST CARSON ST. SO UTHSI DE W W W. DEESCAFE. CO M POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

CLASSIFIEDS

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 65

make a real connection

Dec. 22 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-779-2471. RIVERS OF STEEL HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR. Dec. 14-15, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Homestead Pump House, 412-464-4020.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Handmade Arcade at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown

SUN 15

Free

TRY FOR

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.210.1010 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

CHRISTMAS FILM FESTIVUS. Screening of National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation & Scrooged. 6:30 p.m. The Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. FESTIVUS FOR THE REST OF US HOLIDAY PARTY. Trivia, prizes, more. Donations for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank are welcome. Presented by the Pittsburgh Coalition of Reason. 5 p.m. Rock Bottom, Waterfront. 412-731-1901. I MADE IT! MARKET FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Nomadic indie craft market. 12-6 p.m. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-828-8566 x 19. ORNAMENTS FROM THE OUTDOORS & UPCYCLED CREATIONS. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. SOUTH SIDE ANGLICAN CHURCH GRAND OPENING & CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION. 11 a.m. Schwartz Living Market, South Side. 412-475-9049.

MON 16 - WED 18 SEASONAL INSPIRATIONS HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Pottery, paper crafts, stained glass, paintings, more. Mon-Sat. Thru Dec. 23 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

TUE 17 - WED 18

TUESDAYS $

3.25

Blue Moon Season and Blue Moon Drafts 7 pm to midnight

CARNEGIE TREES 2013: EMBRACING THE ART OF PLAY. 20-foot Colorado spruce trees adorned w/ handcrafted ornaments that celebrate the art of play. Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 12 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. SNOWFLAKE SHOWCASE MARKET. Paintings, prints, textiles, wood creations, jewelry, ceramics, more. Tue, Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, 10 a.m.7 p.m. Thru Dec. 18 Greensburg Art Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

WED 18 CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, more. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DIY GIFT IDEAS W/ LOCAL PRODUCTS. Presented by Jackie Cleary, Auburn Meadow Farm & Pennsylvania Association of Sustainable Agriculture. Call to reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

from Brighton Heights WHEN: Sat.,

Dec. 07

This was a fantastic craft fair, and if I heard correctly Pittsburgh’s first and largest. As a new resident to Pittsburgh, the Handmade Arcade was a really interesting way to see how Pittsburghers define themselves through their crafts and unique and eclectic pieces of work. Each piece that I saw was created with great attention to detail and crafted very well. All of the jewelry here was so different, with pieces ranging from many different styles, to different materials like metal and wood, and each designer had their own inspirational background. This was the essence of what it means to shop local, and I was pleasantly surprised to see so many great people come out for the event today. Who said Pittsburgh doesn’t have style? The designers at the event today are surely creating a name for Pittsburgh in the fashion and jewelry industry through new, fun and innovative pieces. B Y B RE T T W I L S ON

2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 15, 2 & 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

FRI 13 - SAT 14 WHO IS VIE BOHEME? An evening of song, dance & theatrics by Vie Boheme. Part of the Viva:BLACK trilogy. Dec. 13-14, 8 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000.

FRI 13 - SUN 15 THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 15 Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Fri, 7 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7 p.m., Sun, 12 & 4:30 p.m., Thu, 7 p.m., Mon., Dec. 23, 7 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 29, 12 p.m. Thru Dec. 26 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SAT 14 - SUN 15 THE NUTCRACKER. Presented by the Laurel Ballet & the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra. 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 15, 2 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

DANCE

FUNDRAISERS

THU 12 - SUN 15

FRI 13

NICOLAS PETROV’S ROMEO & JULIET. Presented by the Conservatory Dance Company. Thru Dec. 13, 8 p.m., Sat., Dec. 14,

2001 E CARSON STREET • SOUTH SIDE • (412) 431-6757

CRITIC: Julio Rabeen, a chef

ACT 2: A CELEBRATION OF SECOND CHANCES. Live music, guest speaker, more. Benefits the Helping Hand Fund. 6-8 p.m.

LITERARY THU 12 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HIP HOP FAMILY TREE RELEASE. Release & signing of the graphic novel by Ed Piskor. 6-8 p.m. Phantom of the Attic, Oakland. 412-621-1210. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SHARA MCCALLUM. Poetry reading. Part of the Writers LIVE series. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. SPOKEN WORD OPEN MIC NO. 6. Readings by Faith Barret, Karen Dwyer, John Fried, Patrick Miller, & Megan Ward. 7-9 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

FRI 13

J. Verno Studios, South Side. 412-820-2050 x 412. MARTINI MAKING COMPETITION & FUNDRAISER. Benefits Special Spaces Pittsburgh Metro. 85broadspittsburgh.com 6-8:30 p.m. Summa Design Studio, East Liberty.

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 14 - TUE 17

SAT 14

PSYCHIC & PET PSYCHIC READINGS. Benefits Mercy Corps, Philippines Relief Efforts. Dec. 14-15, 12-6 p.m. and Dec. 1617, 4-8 p.m. Del’s Restaurant, Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

SUN 15 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. SUNDAY SCHOOL CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH PARTY. Brunch buffet, lingerie fashion show, burlesque performance, confessional booth, more. Benefits the Philippine Red Cross. 12-3 p.m. Perle Champagne Bar, Downtown. 412-471-2058.

POLITICS THU 12 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504.

ACQUIRED TASTE PRESENTS: FAST FOOD. Food-themed reading series feat. Sheila Squillante, Dave Housley, & Marissa Landrigan. 7-8:30 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. B.E. QUARTERLY ZINE RELEASE PARTY. Readings by Janette Schafer, Deena November, Tessa Barber, Scott Silsbe, more. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. KEITH SNIADACH. Book launch & signing w/ author of The Gatekeeper: The Final Secret Tribulation. 2-4 p.m. Downey’s House, Robinson. 412-489-5631. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292. SEA OF DUST. Release party & poetry reading feat. Kevin Finn, Bernadette Ulsamer, Arthur Seefahrt, Kris Collins. 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-687-1780.

MON 16 OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month,


6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

8-10 a.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. COOL YULE: FREE FAMILY FUN ASPINWALL TOASTMASTERS. DAY. Design your own gift wrap, Communication, leadership & interactive family tours, scavenger public speaking. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. hunts, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Frick UPMC Lighthouse Pointe, Art & Historical Center, Point Aspinwall. 412-760-0690. Breeze. 412-371-0600. JAPANESE CONVERSATION FAMILY FUN AT FIFTH AVE CLUB. First and Third Tue of every PLACE: SILVER SPECTACULAR. month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Make silver foil wreaths & stained Oakland. 412-622-3151. glass ornaments w/ the Children’s LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Museum, plus face painting & conversational English. Tue, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fifth Avenue 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Place, Downtown. Hill. 412-422-9650. FAMILY PUPPET MAKING WORKSHOP. Creations will be showcased in the FedEx Ground THE SMITHFIELD CRITICS. Parade at Highmark First Night Discussing Holidays On Ice by David Pittsburgh. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Trust Sedaris. 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Arts Education Center, Downtown. Downtown. 412-281-7141. 412-471-6079. HOLIDAY CARD MAKING WORKSHOP. 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown, Downtown. 412-281-7141. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical KID’S SHOPPING DAY. swing set, sandbox, solar-powered Discounted sales event for children instruments, more. Ongoing to holiday shop for friends & Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, family. 1-5 p.m. The ToonSeum, North Side. 412-322-5058. Downtown. 412-232-0199. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ inflatable balls, a disco CORNER. Ages 5-11. ball & music. Ongoing Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Children’s Museum of Market, Strip District. Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-586-7177. . w 412-322-5058. ww per POLAR EXPRESS a p ty ci h pg EXPLORING THE WORK SLEEPOVER. Screening .com OF JUDITH SCOTT. Thru of The Polar Express: Dec. 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. An IMAX Experience, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, themed activities, more. 6 p.m. North Side. 412-322-5058. Carnegie Science Center, North TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor Side. 412-237-3400. landscape made of 22 miles of SANTA’S WORKSHOP. Photos packing tape. Thru Jan. 19, 2014 w/ Santa, cookie decorating, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, holiday crafts, performance by Josh North Side. 412-322-5058. & Gab, more. www.waterfrontpgh. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks com/santas-workshop 1-4 p.m. by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Waterfront Town Center, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Homestead. 412-476-8889. Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CALLIGRAPHY. Dec. 14-15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. KID’S NIGHT OUT. Holiday crafts 412-322-5058. & classes. Ages 5-12. Fri, 6-9 p.m. LOCOMOTION WEEKEND. Thru Dec. 20 The ToonSeum, Guest train displays by local Downtown. 412-232-0199. hobbyists, free train checkups at ROCK BAND! Open stage for the “Loco Doctor” table, hands-on teen singers, songwriters & activities, more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. instrumentalists to play w/ Emma and Sun., Dec. 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented Carnegie Science Center, North by Hope Academy. Fri, 5:30Side. 412-237-3400. 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 East Liberty SANTA FAMILY FUN CRUISES. Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. Sat, Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 412-441-3800 x 43. Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-355-7980. SANTA VISITS AT PHIPPS. Sat, BREAKFAST EXPRESS. Breakfast, Sun, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 The Polar Express: An IMAX Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Experience, time in the Miniature Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. Railroad & Village®, and a chance SLEEPING BEAUTY HOLIDAY. to meet Mr. McFeely, more. Sat. An interactive musical production. Thru Dec. 21 Carnegie Science Sat, Sun, 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. Dec. 22 Gemini Theater, Point BREAKFAST W/ SANTA CRUISE. Breeze. 412-243-6464. Sat, 8:30 a.m. Thru Dec. 21 Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Square. 412-355-7980. BRUNCH W/ SANTA. Photos BREAKFAST W/ SANTA-SAURUS. w/ Santa, cookie decorating, Christmas crafts, more. 11:30 a.m.Breakfast & hands-on activities. 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Dinosaur costumes welcome.

Oakland. 412-621-2353. SOUTH HILLS BRASS PRESENTS: HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS. Narrated by a member of Mt. Lebanon Library’s Reader Theater. Ages 4+. 1:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 17

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OUTSIDE TUE 17 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 18 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

WED 18

OTHER STUFF

KIDSTUFF

THU 12

THU 12 - WED 18

CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FOOD FOR CHANGE SCREENING. Documentary which looks at the current resurgence of food cooperatives. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. FRENCH CONVERSATION. 7:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MAKENIGHT. Create LED light holiday cards, wreaths, ornaments, more. 21+. 6-9 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MEET THE LIBRARY FOR THE BLIND & PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. PLUM FARMER’S MARKET. Thu, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Plum Senior Community Center, . 412-795-2339. PUPPET MAKING HAPPY HOUR. Workshop for adults 21+. Creations

FULL LIST ONLINE

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will be showcased in the FedEx Ground Parade at Highmark First Night Pittsburgh. 5:30-8 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SELF DEFENSE FOR WOMEN IN HEELS. w/ Kathryn Kluk. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-391-1348 x 228. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

Pittsburgh ‘s #1 Gentlemen’s Club

Friday

DECEMBER 20TH

Let me see you TWERK contest! Plus Pole Dance Shows! Complimentary Drinks and Buffet! Champagne Rooms and Lapdance giveaways AND your FREE chance to win Black n Gold tickets! MUSIC BY DJ KAOTIC

THU 12 - SUN 15 FUJI, GULLS & BUOYS. Screening of two Robert Breer films. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 22 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

For those seeking refuge from Nutcrackers and Christmas Carols, the Pontani Sisters offer a different brand of holiday entertainment. The New York City-based burlesque troupe returns to the Rex Theater with its Burlesque-A-Pades

THU 12 - MON 16 TORO FEST 2013. It’s a weeklong celebration of fish, fine food, and Japanese cuisine. Various locations. Hosted by Fukuda. Email fukudapgh@gmail.com for information. Dec. 12-16.

F F O 5 $ SION

S ADMthI this ad

Holiday Spectacular. The show offers a

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mix of naughty and nice, including fabulous costumes, comedy, magic, the “fastest tap dancing in the world of burlesque” and more. 9 p.m. Sat., Dec. 14. 1605 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

FRI 13

BACK TO BASICS: A TRIBUTE TO OLD SCHOOL BURLESQUE. Feat. local burlesque, drag, & singing performers. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. BURLESQUE-A-PADES: A HOLIDAY BARBRA STREISAND, HER LIFE SPECTACULAR FEAT. THE PONTANI & MUSIC. w/ Dr. Cleon Cornes. SISTERS. 9 p.m. Rex Theater, Fri, 10 a.m. Thru Dec. 20 Mount South Side. 412-381-6811. Lebanon Public Library, FRACTURE COMIC BOOK LAUCH Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PARTY & SIGNING. 2 p.m. BEST OF THE BATCH: Phantom of the Attic, Oakland. BRIDGING BUSINESS & 412-856-4403. SERVICE W/ A HANDS-ON KOREAN CONVERSATION. APPROACH. w/ Latasha 3-5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Wilson-Batch. Women Oakland. 412-622-3151. Business Leaders KOREAN FOR Breakfast Series. BEGINNERS. Korean 7:30-9 a.m. Chatham grammar & basic University, Shadyside. www. per conversation. Sat, pa 412-365-1253. pghcitym o .c 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 COGNITIVE Carnegie Library, Oakland. ENHANCEMENT. 412-622-3151. Discussion program KOREAN II. For those who already presented by Squirrel Hill have a basic understanding Psychological Services. 2 p.m. of Korean & are interested in Temple David, Monroeville. increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.412-372-1200. 12:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 28 Carnegie CULTURE CLUB GOES LATE Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. NIGHT: WADE GUYTON & KRAMPUS & SOLSTICES BASH. GUESTS. Art talk & a variety of Performance by Po Folks Cabaret, activities designed & performed vendors, costume contest, more. by special guests. Part of the 2013 7 p.m. The Parkway Theater, Carnegie International. 8-11 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-301-1493. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. LIVING HISTORY 412-622-3131. DEMONSTRATIONS. Part of the LEBO NERDFIGHTERS. Open Pennsylvania’s Civil War exhibit. discussion of all things nerdy. Sat, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 For high school & college Senator John Heinz History Center, students. 3:15 p.m. Mount Strip District. 412-454-6000. Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA

CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM • 18 AND OVER

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks 412) 771-8872 cluberoticapittsburgh.com

CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY ART WORKSHOPS. Classes in jewelry making, painting, cartooning, puppet making, quilting, more. Second Sat of every month Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-6079. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month, 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KEEP LOOKING UP! A STAR GAZER’S VIEW. w/ Donna Greco. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. WISHCRAFT: HOW TO GET WHAT YOU REALLY WANT. Support group for life goals. Sun, 1-2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-371-1707.

COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FITNESS CONSULTATIONS. Wed RDL Fitness, McCandless. 412-407-0145.

MON 16

TUE 17 - WED 18 FUJI, GULLS & BUOYS. Screening of two Robert Breer films. Part of the 2013 Carnegie International. Tue-Sun. Thru Dec. 22 Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

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PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Accepting submissions for showcase of locally written lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking submissions for Volume 3,

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES OF PITTSBURGH Ronald McDonald House Charities of Pittsburgh, in Lawrenceville, helps the families of seriously ill children by offering temporary housing to those who have to travel to the area for treatment. Volunteers are needed for both regular positions and one-time projects, including cleaning, administrative work and organizing family-friendly activities. For information, call 412-246-1103 or visit www.rmhcpgh.org.

FULL LIST ONLINE

OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. READER’S THEATER GENERAL MEETING. This group rehearses pieces & then performs for senior living facilities in the South Hills. Third Tue of every month, 2 p.m. Thru Feb. 18 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SUBMISSIONS ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE CIVIL WAR ERA: A GEOGRAPHIC FOCUS. Discussion w/ Rodger Duffy. Third Mon of every month, 10 a.m. and Third Sat of every month, 10:30 a.m. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice Thru Feb. 15 Mount Lebanon conversational English. Wed, Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 5-6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-531-1912. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Union Project, Highland 412-531-1912. Park. 412-363-4550. SAHAJA MEDITATION. SPANISH II. Mon, 7:30 p.m. Geared toward those Thru Feb. 17 Mount who already have a Lebanon Public basic understanding www. per a p Library, Mt. Lebanon. pghcitym of Spanish & are .co 412-531-1912. interested in increasing SCOTTISH COUNTRY proficiency. First and DANCING. Lessons Third Wed of every month, 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3151. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, Church, Mt. Washington. 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-683-5670. 412-449-9833. SPELLING BEE WITH WEST COAST SWING DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance Lava Lounge, South Side. lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, 412-431-5282. South Side. 916-287-1373.

TUE 17

all ages. masember@mac.com. Coraopolis United Methodist Church, Coraopolis. 412-279-6062.

AUDITIONS FIRST NIGHT MARCHING BANDS. Seeking loud & vibrant musicians to play the First Night New Years Eve celebration. Contact Cheryl Capezzuti at cheryl@studiocapezzuti.com for more information. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. Auditions for Boeing Boeing. Dec. 14-15. Prepare a 2-min. monologue. www. mckeesportlittletheater.com. McKeesport. 412-673-1100. SOUNDS OF PITTSBURGH CHORUS. Auditions for annual Christmas concert. Women only,

Issue 4. Submit no more than 3 of your best poems in any theme. http://blastfurnace.submittable. com/Submit THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa. org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a straight woman who loves my boyfriend, but I want more sex. My boyfriend doesn’t see sex as a priority. When we first started dating, we had sex every day — it was incredible — but around the fourmonth mark, something changed. I’ve had to beg for it ever since — and I mean beg. I give him space, I take care of things on my own for as long as I can, and right around the time when I feel myself start to get really anxious, I ask for sex. And I am rejected. Only when I’m so hurt that I’m literally sobbing on the floor is he suddenly interested in having sex with me: right then, right there. It happens about twice a month. I don’t know what to do. Other than the sex, everything is wonderful. He is the best and most thoughtful boyfriend ever, but he says he likes being the one who’s controlling the sex. My problem sounds mundane, I know, but it’s killing me. SEXLESS AND DEPRESSED

Sorry, SAD, but relationship graveyards around the world are crowded with tombstones that read, “Everything was great … other than the sex.” And this isn’t your mundane, run-of-the-mill mismatched libido problem, which is bad enough. (And, as I’ve written until my fingers are bleeding, reason enough to end a relationship.) You’re dating a guy who can get it up only when he sees his girlfriend sobbing on the floor — and this sobbing-on-thefloor shit goes down twice a month. I can only conclude that this is how your boyfriend likes it. He’s turned on only when you’re not just miserable but pushed past the breaking point. DTMFA. Frequency is not a problem that improves with time. A boyfriend who wants sex only twice a month at four months into a relationship — and then only when his girlfriend is sobbing — won’t want sex once a week five or 10 years in. You know what else doesn’t improve with time? Assholery. I promise you that the emotionally abusive games that cause you so much pain will metastasize, spreading from your sex life to other areas of your life. The more difficult extricating yourself from this relationship becomes, the less wonderful and thoughtful he’ll become. End it now.

additional partners. Rather than dish about who and how we love — and how fortunate we feel! — I’d like to get right to my plea for support. I want the freedom in my life that I’ve always wanted for you, Dan: to be able to live and love and talk about your actual life without being afraid that it could cost you your job, your kids, your family. Having to live in the closet is difficult. I cannot say that it is as difficult for us as it is for someone who is LGBT. I did not know I was “poly” as a kid. I never felt like I didn’t fit in for that reason growing up — and I agree with you that this is a relationship structure rather than a sexual orientation. But this isn’t a contest about who suffers more. Instead, I think we should ask ourselves if we can become part of a movement toward freedom and equality for everyone, even if some of the ways we live and love are choices and some are not. The progress we have made together toward a more tolerant world for gay people gives me hope that we could be next. I don’t think you are the emperor of acronyms, Dan, but you should be. So can we be added to the acronym? Perhaps we can honor the differences between our experience and the LGBT experience with an ampersand. What do you think of LGBT&P?

RELATIONSHIP GRAVEYARDS ARE CROWDED WITH TOMBSTONES THAT READ, “EVERYTHING WAS GREAT … OTHER THAN THE SEX.”

PRIVATELY POLYAMOROUS PERSON

“Bye.”

You haven’t been keeping up, PPP. We are no longer the LGBT community. We are the LGBTQLFTSQIA community, a.k.a. the lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, leather/fetish, two-spirit, questioning, intersex and asexual community/ communities. I don’t see why we can’t slap a “P” onto the end of our acronym, so say it with me now: “I’m proud to be a member of the LGBTQLFTSQIAP community/communities!” But I have to draw the line at the ampersand. Because if we give poly folks a punctuation mark, then everybody is gonna want a punctuation mark, and our ever-metastasizing acronym is an unwieldy, sprawling mess already. And why should poly folks be held at arm’s length with an ampersand? Because most poly folks are straight? Lots of leather/fetish folks are straight, and they’re covered in the acronym. Lots of trans men and trans women are straight, and they’re covered. If they aren’t being held with a pair of punctuational tongs, why should poly folks be? You’re a sexual minority, too, and poly people sometimes face discrimination and oppression. So welcome to the club. And putting poly folks in the acronym brings us one step closer to seizing control of the entire alphabet. Pretty soon, angry religious conservatives will have to post their hateful screeds in hieroglyphics because using the alphabet will be just as gay as putting a rainbow bumper-sticker on your car. So … gee … maybe I ought to let you have your ampersand. Why not steal punctuation marks from the haters, too?

My husband and I have been married for 20 years, and we both share our lives with

On the Savage Lovecast, hear the tale of a college slut-shaming intervention: savagelovecast.com.

I recently ended things with a guy I liked because he wanted to stop using condoms, but balked when I said we should both get tested for sexually transmitted infections. He said he felt I didn’t trust him. I tried to explain that trust has nothing to do with it, and that if he didn’t care whether I felt safe, I shouldn’t trust him. I’m not seeing this guy anymore. But what do you say to someone who conflates a request for STI testing with a lack of trust? SEEKING TRUTHFUL INSIGHT

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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Free Will Astrology

12.11-12.18

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There are pregnant truths I could reveal to you right now that I’ve decided not to disclose. I don’t think you’re prepared to hear them yet. If I told you what they are, you wouldn’t be receptive or able to register their full meaning; you might even misinterpret them. It is possible, however, that you could evolve rather quickly in the next two weeks. So let’s see if I can nudge you in the direction of getting the experiences necessary to become ready. Meditate on what parts of you are immature or underdeveloped — aspects that may one day be skilled and gracious, but are not yet. I bet that once you identify what needs ripening, you will expedite the ripening. And then you will become ready to welcome the pregnant truths.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Finifugal” is a rarely used English adjective that I need to invoke in order to provide you with the proper horoscope. It refers to someone who avoids or dislikes endings — like a child who doesn’t want a bedtime story to conclude, or an adult who’s in denial about how it’s finally time to wrap up long-unfinished business. You can’t afford to be finifugal in the coming days, Capricorn. This is the tail end of your cycle. It won’t be healthy for you to shun climaxes and denouements. Neither will it be wise to merely tolerate them. Somehow, you’ve got to find a way to love and embrace them. (P.S. That’s the best strategy for ensuring the slow-motion eruption of vibrant beginnings after your birthday.)

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 2009, actress Sandra Bullock starred in three films, two of which earned her major recognition. For her performance in All About Steve, she was given a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress. Her work in The Blind Side, on the other hand, won her an Oscar for Best Actress. I’m thinking that you might experience a similar paradox in the coming days, Taurus. Some of your efforts might be denigrated, while others are praised. It might even be the case that you’re criticized and applauded for the same damn thing. How to respond? Learn from Bullock’s example. She gave gracious acceptance speeches at the award ceremonies for both the Golden Raspberry and the Oscar.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Almost 2,000 years ago, a Roman doctor named Scribonius Largus developed recipes for three different kinds of toothpaste. One contained the ashes of burned-up deer antler, aromatic resin from an evergreen shrub known as mastic and a rare mineral called sal ammoniac. His second toothpaste was a mix of barley flour, vinegar, honey and rock salt. Then there was the third: sun-dried radish blended with finely ground glass. Let’s get a bit rowdy here and propose that these three toothpastes have metaphorical resemblances to the life choices in front of you right now. I’m going to suggest you go with the second option. At the very least, avoid the third.

According to 20th-century British author John Cowper Powys, “A bookshop is a dynamite-shed, a drugstore of poisons, a bar of intoxicants, a den of opiates, an island of sirens.” He didn’t mean that literally, of course. He was referring to the fact that the words contained in books can inflame and enthrall the imagination. I think you will be wise to seek out that level of arousal in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Your thoughts need to be aired out and rearranged. Your feelings are crying out for strenuous exercise, including some pure, primal catharses. Do whatever it takes to make sure that happens. “I am not fearless,” says Mexican journalist and women’s-rights advocate Lydia Cacho, “but I’m not overtaken by fear. Fear is quite an interesting animal. It’s like a pet. If you mistreat it, it will bite, but if you understand it and accept it in your house, it might protect you.” This is an excellent time to work on transforming your fright reflexes, Pisces. You have just the right kind of power over them: strong and crafty and dynamic, but not grandiose or cocky or delusional. You’re ready to make your fears serve you, not drain you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected President of the United States four times, more often than any other president. We can conclude that he was one of the most popular American leaders ever. And yet he never won a majority of the votes cast by the citizens of his home county in New York. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life. You may be more successful working on the big picture than you are in your immediate situation. It could be easier for you to maneuver when you’re not dealing with familiar, up-close matters. What’s outside your circle might be more attracted to your influence than what’s nearer to home.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythically speaking, this would be a propitious time for you to make an offering to the sea goddess. In dreams or meditations or fantasies, I suggest you dive into the depths, find the supreme feminine power in her natural habitat and give her a special gift. Show her how smart you are in the way you express love, or tell her exactly how you will honor her wisdom in the future. If she is receptive, you may even ask her for a favor. Maybe she’ll be willing to assist you in accessing the deep feelings that haven’t been fully available to you. Or perhaps she will teach you how to make conscious the secrets you have been keeping from yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t linger in a doorway, Libra. Don’t camp out in a threshold or get stuck in the middle of anything. I understand your caution, considering the fact that life is presenting you with such paradoxical clues. But if you remain ambivalent too much longer, you may obstruct the influx

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “It’s a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn’t want to hear,” said TV talk-show host Dick Cavett. I will love it if you make yourself one of those rare types in the coming week, Scorpio. Can you bring yourself to be receptive to truths that might be disruptive? Are you willing to send an invitation to the world, asking to be shown revelations that contradict your fixed theories and foregone conclusions? If you do this hard work, I promise that you will be granted a brainstorm and a breakthrough. You might also be given a new reason to brag. What holiday gifts do you want? Express your outrageous demands and humble requests. www.freewillastrology.com.

NOW HIRING FOR

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you feeling a bit pinched, parched and prickly? Given the limitations you’ve had to wrestle with lately, I wouldn’t be surprised if you were. Even though you have passed some of the sneaky tests and solved some of the itchy riddles you’ve been compelled to deal with, they have no doubt contributed to the pinched, parched prickliness. Now what can be done to help you recover your verve? I’m thinking that all you will have to do is respond smartly to the succulent temptations that life will bring your way in the coming weeks.

Display Sales Representative Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media Sales Person

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you ever situated yourself between two big bonfires on a beach and basked in the primal power? Was there a special moment in your past when you found yourself sitting between two charismatic people you loved and admired, soaking up the life-giving radiance they exuded? Did you ever read a book that filled you with exaltation as you listened to music that thrilled your soul? These are the kinds of experiences I hope you seek out in the coming week. I’d love to see you get nourished stereophonically by rich sources of excitement.

If you have what it takes to sell, send you resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

NEWS

of more definitive information. The best way to generate the clarity and attract the help you need will be to make a decisive move — either in or out, either forward or backward, either up or down.

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 74 + SERVICES 75 + STUDIES 75 + WELLNESS 76 + LIVE 78

WORK

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Paid in Advance!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.process-brochures.com (AAN CAN)

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

VOLUNTEERS

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

FUN PART-TIME JOB Want to work Steeler and Pitt games? Concerts? Landmark Event Staffing, an industry leader in event staffing and security, is looking to hire enthusiastic, customerservice oriented people to work events in and around the city of Pittsburgh. You must be at least 18 yrs. of age and able to pass a criminal background check. Veterans, students, retirees and those looking for an exciting first OR second income ome are ALL welcome to apply. Call our Pittsburgh office to set up an appointment.

412-321-2707

“When you love what you do, everything is better.” Life advice from Brandi L. - co-worker since 2006

At Country Meadows, our customers make each day better for us, just as we make it better for them. We’ve been ranked as one of the Best Places to Work, and we focus on a culture of respect. At Country Meadows, life gets better…for everyone. Current Openings: Personal Care Home Care Housekeeping Dining /Culinary Floor Tech LPN

Excellent Benefits! Apply online or call 412-257-7910

CountryMeadows.com/careers CountryMeadowsAtHome.com/careers EOE

Want to earn some extra money? Immediate Opportunities Available for inventory takers in Pittsburgh, Penn Hills, Washington, and all surrounding areas. • No experience needed • $9.00 per hour • Flexible part-time hours • Paid training • Fast track paid program Three availability’s needed: • Daytime • Evening • Anytime Must have access to reliable transportation RGIS is the industry leader in inventory, merchandising, and workforce solutions. We are assembling an Inventory Team to accurately & efficiently count clients’ merchandise This is a physical job that requires working on sales floors, in warehouses, and in stock rooms The ability to climb up and down ladders is a requirement If you are enthusiastic, highly motivated and looking for a new challenge, Apply at: www.rgis.com District 006, Pittsburgh RGIS is an equal opportunity employer

Design Engineer This position is an exciting addition to the existing Engineering Department at Circadiance. Circadiance develops, manufactures and markets respiratory products for people with sleep disordered breathing or who need non -invasive ventilation. The primary function of the Design Engineer is to support the new product development process including manufacturing, quality and supplier selection. The successful candidate will be able to design new products and product improvements/perform sustaining engineering activities & evaluate the patent landscape. Required: • BS Degree in Mechanical Engineering or equivalent • Preferred Masters in Mechanical or Biomedical Engineering • 3 years exp. in medical device co.

PLEASE APPLY TO: careers@circadiance.com And view Full job description at www.circadiance.com

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 74

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SERVICES CLASSES

CLASSES

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

NOTICES

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on January 7, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: • Replace Swimming Pool Locker Room Lighting Langley, 2940 Sheraden Boulevard, 15204 Electrical Prime

ADOPTION

ANNOUNCEMENTS

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877362-2401 (AAN CAN) The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

CLINICAL STUDIES

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

CARS FOR SALE

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

’02 Jetta GLS $4,500 123k, 2.0 eng, manual, moonroof, heated leather seats, crusie control, fully equip, insp. 11/14, 412-370-5036

FEELING DOWN?

412-650-6155

for healthy adults ages 18-30 with good sleep. Participation involves fMRI scans, sleep monitoring, and includes spending a full weekday in our sleep lab. Compensation provided. Call 412-383-2159 or visit veteranssleep.pitt.edu for more information

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

HIGH CHOLESTEROL CALL TODAY!

ARE THERE TIMES WHEN YOU FEEL OVERLY ENERGETIC? To see if you might qualify for a research study at the University of Pittsburgh text ‘mood’ to 412-999-2758 or call 412-246-5588

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with ponse res the and design of our ads e to hav I w kno I en they evoke. Wh in ts jec sub ch ear advertise for res ly ate edi imm I up, gro the 24-35 age er. Pap City think of using the

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

412.363.1900 CTRS

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions.

412.316.3342

Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100.

January 6-10 Downtown Pittsburgh $72,000/year average salary. Start your year off right by training and gaining a certification as a Six Sigma Green Belt through Advanced Process Optimization, Pittsburgh’s foremost Process Improvement authority. Sign up with our partner ProTech

Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

Call: 855-427-6462 or Register at:

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

http://www.protechtraining.com/six-sigma-green-belt-PT0002?c=Pittsburgh Advanced Process Optimization, Inc. http://www.apoinc.us +

SLEEP RESEARCH STUDY

CLINICAL STUDIES

(UPMC Oakland)

Six Sigma Green Belt Training

NEWS

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Advertise Here Today!

Your ad could be here

CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

REHEARSAL

• Replace Cafeteria Lighting and Acoustical Treatment Greenfield, 1 Alger Street, 15207 Electrical and General Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on December 2, 2013 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. ~ Downtown

M-F prkg free after 4pm Sat-Sun prkg free all day

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Xie LiHong’s

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

China Massage

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

$60 per hour FREE Table Shower UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

THIS SPACE!

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to PNC Bank

Call for more information

724-519-7896

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J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.11/12.18.2013

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

$10 Coupon with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950 MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

412.316.3342


JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Start Today! Loose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

WE SPECIALIZE IN

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Recovery Without Judgement™

Call Erin at:

412-434-4798

Health Services

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE • INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz

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LOCATIONS IN:

CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Pittsburgh

Beaver County

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091

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www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others

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LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

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Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

EAST FOR RENT Morningside- Newly remod. sm. 4BR house, 2 full baths, off st prkg, no pets. 412-628-6154 Squirrel Hill Apt- Updated lg. 2BR, eq. kitc w/disposal and d/w. Washing facilities and storage, off str prkg. $1,050+g&e Avl 1/1 Call Tony 412-849-8856

STORAGE

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{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

get your yoga on! give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

Ink Well

CLOSEOUT SALE

ACROSS 1. Beliefs 5. Enjoy powder 8. He rapped with the Bomb Squad 14. Big mouths 15. Advice-giving sister of 45-Across 16. Capital in the Western U.S. 17. New York City skyscraper name 19. Weapon for boneheads? 20. “Rad!” 21. Folds on a jacket 23. Have a high rank? 24. Acts the flaneur 26. Place in the office for giving away unwanted junk 28. Ready to mate 30. Play about Capote 31. ___ Faire 32. Trotsky’s target 33. Gruber to whom “Yippee-ki-yay, motherfucker!” was addressed 36. Strips for the orchestra 38. Something from the whole gang 41. Single accompanier 44. Stepped heavily 45. Advice-giving sister of 15-Across 49. Elba, e.g., to Napoleon 50. Modern minced oath for “shit” 52. Have a goal

54. Chalk, e.g. 58. Blocks in the playroom 59. Lenovo competitor 60. “Voilà” 62. Reason for points on a license 63. Early electronic composer Edgard 65. Small telescope 67. Whole 68. Network that became Spike 69. Fit to ___ 70. Use aloe on 71. Take action against 72. Goods, and what might follow either word in 17-, 26-, 38-, 54-, and 65-Across

DOWN 1. “Sure, sounds good” 2. Places for shots and shootouts 3. Villain’s laugh 4. Label for Opal and Hüsker Dü 5. The last song on Bob Dylan’s “Desire,” named for his then-wife 6. Random House imprint 7. Word before child or demons 8. Something mild after something hard 9. Lady lobster 10. Very very 11. Cause ___

12. Prepared to be knighted 13. Reacts to sunlight, as transition lenses 18. Woody Guthrie’s “___ Koch” 22. “C’mon, I think I hear the cops” 25. Become one 27. Gang’s area 29. Yet, to a poet or text messager 34. One who pens 35. Terry Gross’s network 37. Tour de France stage 39. French kings 40. Journalist Wells or Tarbell 41. In re: 42. Philippine language

43. Acknowledge the seniority of 46. Trendy term meaning lots and lots of information 47. Chrome, e.g. 48. “That makes very clear sense” 51. Where the Rays play, familiarly 53. One may be long and hard 55. Cover dinner 56. Decorates one’s home, as it were 57. Sports channel that shows college games 61. Emmywinning Daly 64. MIT, e.g. 66. It’s on the books

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


PRODUCTIVE DEBATE

In argument about Produce Terminal’s future, more than a building is at stake {BY CHRIS POTTER} PITTSBURGH CITY COUNCIL is about to decide whether to designate

the Strip District’s 1,500-foot-long Produce Terminal as a historic structure. It’s the kind of debate Pittsburghers love to have: Worrying about preserving the Strip District’s authenticity, after all, is among the Strip District’s most authentic traditions. If you’re a newcomer, it might be hard to see what the fuss is about. The Buncher Company wants to demolish the western third ab of the building, providing access to a $450 million mixeduse development it hopes to create along the Allegheny River. Supporters note that the building is largely vacant. Architecturally speaking, meanwhile, there’s little to distinguish the low-slung structure. Walter Kidney, the late dean of Pittsburgh architectural historians, doesn’t even mention it in his book Pittsburgh’s Landmark Architecture. P But the building is historic in another sense: It connects us to a time when Pittsburgh was central to the national economy, an era when — even if something wasn’t made here — there was a good chance it passed through on the way someplace else.

grape harvest attracted amateur winemakers. But worries about the produce terminal’s future have also defined its past. By 1965, a U.S. Department of Agriculture report ort worried about traffic access to warehouse facilities, while wholeholesalers were threatened with redevelopment proposals. Chief among these, until the Buncher proposal came along, was “Penn Park,” ark,” one of those 1960s-era proposals that look best when they are 30 years in the future. Boulevards raced along park-like plazas as curved ed office towers grouped around traffic circles, like executives standing around a water cooler. That plan collapsed, but by the late 1990s, the Strip had a new fear: being crowded out by new nightclubs. The real threats were more gradual, more inexorable. Trucks replaced trains, suburbs supplanted the cities, prepackaged food crowded out fresh produce. In 1976, the Pittsburgh Press fretted that the terminal, which had housed as many as 200 produce dealers, had only two dozen left: “[W]here once the Strip District terminal al was the only place to unload large quantities of produce, it is fast becoming just one more place to park a truck.”

WORRYING ABOUT PRESERVING THE STRIP DISTRICT’S AUTHENTICITY IS AMONG THE STRIP DISTRICT’S MOST AUTHENTIC TRADITIONS. Opened in 1929 as the Pennsylvania Railroad Fruit Auction & Sales Building, the terminal consolidated produce-handling operations — unloading rail cars, bidding on produce, even repairing boxes and barrels damaged in transit — in a single location. The facility was “as modern as engineering science can devise,” crowed a 1928 account in the business magazine Greater Pittsburgh. Produce arrived from all over the Western Hemisphere, to be distributed locally or shipped elsewhere. Nearly 50 years later, it was still among the country’s largest produce terminals, processing 570 million pounds of fruits and vegetables a year by 1975. And it was not just a place of work but a way of life. Auctions were held regularly, attracting brokers like the one featured in a 1959 newspaper profile: “When his temper boils [over low bids], he puts on his hat and coat to leave. Just an act! But it usually brings higher bids!” Other accounts read like passages from a Steinbeck novel: “Inside the chilly terminal, half a dozen men in heavy work clothes are warming up around an iron stove and baking potatoes on the ductwork for a morning snack,” a February 1971 Pittsburgh Press story began. “It would be just another dismal winter scene if it weren’t for the fact that these men have summer at their feet. Summer in the form of fresh strawberries, beans, asparagus, tangerines, grapefruit, oranges, apples, pears and lemons.” Retail customers too shopped in its often-drafty spaces, especially when the

Government’s attitude changed as well. In the early 1980s, the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority invested $2.5 million to upgrade it. In those days, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette tte reported [it was] “at its busiest” during “the dark, early morning hourss from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m.,” and during fruit auctions three days a week. Three decades later, by contrast, a URA official would tell the paper that “The Strip is about Penn Avenue on Saturday morning.” No doubt lots of Pittsburghers would agree, which shows how much has already changed … for the Terminal building and the city. These days, Pittsburgh’s primary boast is the quality of life it offers to its own citizens; years ago, we defined ourselves largely by the goods and services we provided to everyone else. The Strip District was the rare place where those two aspects of its character coincided. It didn’t just exist for weekend visitors … and that authenticity helped attract visitors in the first place. That might be true for a while longer, even if the Buncher plan goes through, or the condos planned for the Wholey’s warehouse join in the condos already built at the Otto Milk and Armstrong Cork buildings. dings. Anyway, the wholesalers and auctioneers aren’t coming back: Dubbing the building historic won’t reverse its history. But for decades now, the produce terminal helped define the Strip District’s history. You can understand why preservationists don’t want to cut that building, or the story it tells, short. C POT T E R @PG H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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December 11, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 23 Issue 50

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