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GRRRL HOOD: CMU EXHIBIT LOOKS AT RIOT GRRRL CULTURE 40


EVENTS 12.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NELLIE MCKAY Tickets $20/$18 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

12.30 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 30 from 10am to 5pm

1.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

1.18 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, THE NOX BOYS Warhol Entrance Space Tickets $10/$8 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

T 1.25 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: STRIKE DUO Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

New Three times the space. Three times the pop.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Open during museum hours or visit online at warholstore.com

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[VIEWS] aren’t happy with this, 14 “People and regard it as a violation of family values.� — Labor activist Jordan Romanus, on a decision by Darden Restaurants to keep the Capital Grille open for Thanksgiving

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Dench and Steve Coogan are 36 “Judi the oddest of couples in a road movie that’s every bit as tender as it is hilarious.� — Harry Kloman reviews Philomena

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[ARTS] Takahashi uncovers feminism’s 40 “Brooks tendency to vacillate between friendly separatism and determined community-building.� — Michelle Fried on work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi in riot-grrrl-themed exhibit Alien She

[LAST PAGE] come here because there’s 63 “Some nowhere else to go.� — Will Denton on the clientele at the East End Cooperative Ministry drop-in center

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 54 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 +

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44TH & BUTLER ST. i n revitalize revitalizedd Lawrenceville

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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INCOMING

“I’M NOT REALLY SURE OUT HERE IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA WHO’S GOING TO FILL THE VOID.”

High Ideals: Can marijuana legalization have an effect on the race for Pa. governor? (Nov. 20) “This guy gets right to it. Putting liberal activist[s] in jail and taking away their voting rights forever is [the] whole idea of the Drug War. I nominate John Hanger to be [Hillary’s] VP in 2016. Bill, Hillary and John will be a good team. It would be nice to be there for the Inauguration, a cloud of glory in the Rose Garden, peace spreading over the Earth.” — Web comment from “Robert Bender”

Rivers Casino employees march for right to unionize (Nov. 19, online only) “Wonderful to see people coming together to fight for their rights ... to fight for their human dignity. We’re in this together, let us help one another.” — Web comment from “Estelle” “That’s only one … side. [M]ost of us who work there [don’t] want a union. A union would screw us out of what we get now. I do not support this BS. The union would be very bad for the casino.” — Web comment from “Micheal Paul McMillen”

Blackberry Meadows Farm offers a more humane approach to Thanksgiving (Nov. 20) “If these birds cost $4 a pound, then a 20 lb. bird would cost $80. They probably are excellent eating and it’s awesome that they are treated humanely. But I don’t know many people that would — or even could — spend $80 for a turkey. Just sayin’.” — Web comment from “Lisa Imperiale”

“[T]hey ruined my Thanksgiving I have to go to Pittsburgh and visit my in laws where I will get laughed at because my team sucks.” — Nov. 25 tweet from “Catherine Teacher” (@clevelandcatie) after the Browns’ loss to the Steelers Nov. 24

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{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Falk Foundation helped launch the Ask Campaign in Pittsburgh with a $150,000 grant.

STEPPING AWAY F

OR N EARLY 85 years, the Falk Foundation has flown under the radar in Pittsburgh’s philanthropic community. In October, the organization announced it would be shutting down next year — and until that point, some never even knew it existed. But from needle-exchange programs to community-benefits agreements and televised school-board meetings, the Falk Foundation has played a role in bringing plenty to Pittsburgh. “I would say that the Falk Foundation legacy is that we put good ideas into practice well before their time,” says Kerry O’Donnell, president of the foundation for more than a decade. The Falk Foundation is a social- and racial-justice organization born from

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

the Maurice and Laura Falk Foundation, which was created in 1929. The foundation’s work behind the scenes has led to a number of progressive developments that have shaped the local com-

After working behind the scenes for 85 years, the Falk Foundation will close its doors in 2014 {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} munity and increased opportunities for marginalized populations in Pittsburgh and nationally. Back in 2005, for example, when Pittsburgh was poised to see the construction of a casino and new hockey arena in the

North Side and Hill District, respectively, the Falk Foundation thought it would be a good idea for the residents of those neighborhoods to benefit from the development. That idea took the form of community-benefits agreements with the Rivers Casino and Consol Energy Center developments. “Community-benefits agreements very often benefit communities of color, so we wanted the residents living around those developments to benefit because of the public subsidies going into those projects,” O’Donnell says. CBAs first caught O’Donnell’s eye in California. After introducing the idea to the Pittsburgh community, Falk brought together the Pittsburgh Foundation, the Heinz Endowments, the POISE Foundation and the Women and Girls CONTINUES ON PG. 08


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STEPPING AWAY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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O U S LY

: SUPPORT E D B Y

Foundation to bring it to fruition. “That’s something I’ve always loved about this job,” says O’Donnell. “Being able to go out and find successful models throughout the country and bring them here.” As a result, the CBAs negotiated by local organizations Pittsburgh United and the One Hill Coalition, have created economic development, education and youth services, employment opportunities, work-force development and the Hill District’s first grocery store in decades. CBAs represent just one of the innovative ideas the foundation pioneered in Pittsburgh. In 1968, the foundation — originally referred to as the Falk Fund — helped establish the Freedom House Ambulance program, which provided medical assistance to residents in the Hill District at a time before the city had emergency medical services. The black-owned ambulance company also provided jobs for African Americans throughout the city. Later, the city’s emergency medical services were modeled after the Freedom House program. Falk also had a hand in creating opportunities for ex-offenders. The foundation gave a grant to the Urban Affairs Coalition in Philadelphia to establish the Formerly Convicted Citizens Project in Pittsburgh. This organization was responsible for getting “Ban the Box” legislation passed in 2012, which prohibits City of Pittsburgh agencies and departments from asking job applicants questions related to a person’s criminal back-

ground on initial job applications. “[The foundation] brought a lot of life to this issue,” says Dean Williams, who served as executive director of the Formerly Convicted Citizens Project. “It’s the first time this kind of awareness has been brought to the issues facing people with criminal records. They gave me the resources to accomplish the mission I accomplished.” More recently, Falk has been involved in issues related to gun violence, including a billboard campaign launched by the Center to Prevent Youth Violence that asks the question, “Is there a gun in the home where my child plays?” “I looked at the racial disparities in homicide rates and I had to think, ‘We are so small, how can we possibly make an impact?’” O’Donnell says. “I started to ask where are these guns coming from and I was shocked that no one was asking those questions.” Just this month, O’Donnell presented the results of a gun-trace study of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police’s firearms tracking unit. The study found that in 73 percent of gun-related cases in 2008, the perpetrator was carrying a firearm owned by someone else. “It became very clear to me that the majority of those guns used in crimes are from lawful owners who don’t lock up their guns,” O’Donnell says. Falk also provided CeaseFire Pa and the Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network with a grant to launch the “Where did the gun come from?” campaign. “I really appreciate all the hard work the Falk Foundation has put in on this issue. They will very much be missed,” says Rob Conroy, of CeaseFire Pa. “I’m not really sure out here in Western PA who’s going to fill the void. I think they raised awareness on the issues. The foundation is tireless when it comes to this.” While many Falk beneficiaries agreed Pittsburgh has a robust foundation community, they said there are few doing work in the niche area Falk supported. “In recent years they became especially focused on investing in strategies [on] gun control and gun access, and I’m not sure any local funder has done that,” says Heather Arnet, executive director of the Women and Girls Foundation, which received a Falk grant in 2004. “What was so great and unique about Falk is it was very focused on social justice and racial justice,” says

“WE WERE VERY SAD TO LEARN THE FOUNDATION WAS CLOSING ITS DOORS.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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STEPPING AWAY, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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was closing its doors, but we understand it existed well beyond the initial trust.” According to Sigo Falk, who serves as chairman of his family’s foundation, his uncle Maurice Falk intended for the foundation to exist only for 35 years. Instead, the Falk Foundation has served Pittsburgh and organizations throughout the nation for 85 years, working largely behind the scenes. “We weren’t out there for glory,” Falk says. “And some of these things wouldn’t have worked if our name was attached.” So why did the foundation continue on longer than initially intended? “We were doing good,” says Falk, who’s approaching 80 years old. “It gave me a retirement job. It gave me a base to continue doing a lot of nonprofit stuff.” Now Chatham University will be tasked with carrying on the foundation’s legacy. The foundation dispersed the remainder of its endowment by giving $ 15 million to the university. The foundation has supported the university for decades, and Falk has served on the board of trustees since 1981. “It’s an amazing gift,” says Bill Campbell, vice president of marketing and communications for Chatham. “And it’s a testament to the long relationship between Falk and Chatham and what they’ve accomplished over the years together.” The Falk Foundation will officially close down in August.

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Melissa Protzek, executive director of the Allegheny County Court Appointed Special Advocate program, which received a $ 50,000 grant from Falk in 2004. “I hope someone steps up to fill that void.” Despite Falk’s impact, the foundation doled out only $24 million in grants over 52 years. Its power was in forming coalitions with other foundations and organizations. In 2004, when the Women and Girls foundation needed funding to expand its reach, Falk provided it with a $75,000 grant. Since then, the WGF has in turn granted $600,000 to organizations in the Pittsburgh region and has worked as an ally with Falk on other initiatives. “The Falk Foundation was an early investor in the Women and Girls Foundation,” says Arnet. “Their grant in 2004 helped broaden our programming engaging women and girls in civic action. They’ve really been a leader for social justice.” Protzek’s organization, CASA of Allegheny County, received a grant from Falk in 2005 to establish a case-manager position to address the needs of older minority foster children. In later years, the program received two additional grants to further its child-advocacy efforts and to build diversity within its own organization. “Our support from Falk allowed us to serve children better,” Protzek says. “We were very sad to learn the foundation

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

IDIOTBOX


FAIR TRADE Information fair helped Venezuelan woman find small-business success {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} NEYJU RONDON’S family didn’t understand why she wanted to leave Venezuela. Their life was comfortably middle-class. Her mom owned a gas station; her dad owned a restaurant in Barinas, the small town she grew up in. She liked school, had an aptitude for math, and earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting. Not long after graduation, Rondon says, she got “a really good position” at a plastics company in Caracas. Still, she wanted to leave. “My family was so mad,” says Rondon, 36. They’d say: “Come on, you go to the United States just to clean houses, to become a dishwasher? Why would you study if you [want to] do that?” Those were her first jobs in the U.S. — and money was tight. But eight years after moving to Pittsburgh she would be conversant in English, own a company with dozens of employees and organize “La Feria,” an annual information fair that now attracts about 1,000 Latinos and connects them with community resources. Before Rondon came to the U.S., she wasn’t unhappy but she was frustrated. There wasn’t consistent rule of law in Venezuela, she says, and crime was bad enough that you could get killed by someone trying to steal your shoes. She visited Pittsburgh in 2002 to see her boyfriend, Cesar Herrera, a man she’d met in Venezuela but who had moved to Pittsburgh to take English-language classes at Pitt. Before the end of her week-long visit, she extended her visa and planned to marry him. Three months later, she was pregnant. “I didn’t speak any English,” Rondon says, so she started watching as much TV as she could to pick it up. They lived on the North Side and rented a place that cost a few hundred dollars a month. Herrera worked as a dishwasher at Franco’s Trattoria, in Dormont. “Everything for us was expensive,” Rondon says. Herrera helped her get a job at the restaurant, but it didn’t last long. Rondon was pregnant and kept getting sick at work. So she began house-cleaning for a Nicaraguan family. Two goals lingered in the back of her mind: “Step one: Learn English. Step two: Do something better than cleaning houses.”

{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Neyju Rondon

Neyju was already becoming a fixture of the Pittsburgh Latino community. She met Patricia Documét, the Pitt professor who started the La Feria information fair at her church, and quickly got involved in organizing the event. (She ran it from 2009-2010.) She started to get corporate cleaning requests through friends and word-of-mouth, but didn’t have an official company they could contract with. To change that, she took one of Brent Rondon’s (no relation) classes in Spanish on how to start a small business. He was among the first participants in La Feria and is the director of Duquesne’s Pittsburgh Immigrant Entrepreneurs Program. “I noticed that she’s very driven … she wants to try new things,” Brent Rondon says. “She’s not afraid of talking to people or making deals.” It wasn’t long before he was helping her fill out IRS forms and registering her with the state. In 2010, she launched “Neyju Check List,” her own official cleaning company, and secured one of her first contracts with an ice-skating rink. Running the business was a challenge — Neyju struggled at times to break the language barrier. “My English is not perfect,” she says, adding, “I’m not afraid about it.” Now, she has about 40 employees who work on a number of contracts with hotels and other businesses in the area. Six months ago, she moved to Reserve Township, and her 10-year-old son Alejandro is a budding wrestler who has won state-wide competitions and hopes to make it to the Olympics. “You have to follow what you’re feeling,” Neyju says. “[My parents] understand now — and they understand for Alejandro, too.”

“YOU HAVE TO FOLLOW WHAT YOU’RE FEELING.”

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the hunt: a tlingit totem pole carving and installation by Tommy Joseph

NOW ON VIEW November 26–December 14 Witness history in progress as artist Tommy Joseph carves a traditional 16-foot Tlingit totem pole commissioned by Carnegie Museum of Natural History. For a detailed schedule, please visit the website. This project is made possible by the Emil Heuser Family.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013


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[POTTER’S FIELD]

CAPITAL OFFENSE? Critics tell upscale restaurant to get stuffed {BY CHRIS POTTER} WHEN DOWNTOWN’S Capital Grille steak-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

house announced plans to remain open on Thanksgiving, its owners probably didn’t expect to become the turkey. After all, eateries like McCormick & Schmick’s — which shares building space with Capital Grille — have been open on Thanksgiving for years. So have big-name retailers like Wal-Mart. Yet last week, Pittsburgh City Council passed a resolution denouncing the Grille’s owners, Florida-based Darden Restaurants, for joining a “trend to push for corporate profit at the expense of our shared cultural values and the wellbeing of our citizens.” “People regard this as a violation of family values,” says Jordan Romanus, a labor activist with the Restaurant Opportunities Center, part of a national campaign to improve working conditions for food-service employees. Darden’s response may sound a bit plaintive, especially for a Fortune 500 company with $ 8 billion in revenue: “Capital Grille is just one of dozens of other restaurants and retailers that will be open for Thanksgiving this year in the Pittsburgh area,” the company says in a statement. “[W]e don’t understand why we’re being singled out.” “Whatever Darden does has the potential to affect everyone,” counters City Councilor Natalia Rudiak, who drafted the resolution. That’s because Darden is the country’s largest restaurant operator, thanks largely to its ownership of the Red Lobster and Olive Garden chains. (Both those eateries will remain closed on Thanksgiving.) And Darden is also a heavy hitter in national politics, one activists blame for thwarting increases in the minimum wage for restaurant workers. Among restaurant operators, Darden ranks behind only McDonald’s in the amount of money contributed to politicians in the 2012 election cycle. (Most of its money goes to Republicans, whose own commitment to family values will, I’m guessing, not entail returning checks from an employer who calls workers in on Thanksgiving.) According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Darden has also spent more than $ 1 million lobbying federal officials so far in 2013 alone. In its statement, Darden says it’s keeping Capital Grille open due to “overwhelming guest demand.” And the company

might be finding it hard to leave revenue on the table: In September, Darden reported a 37-percent plunge in quarterly earnings. Its “Specialty Restaurant Group,” which includes Capital Grille, was the only bright spot. A Darden spokesman said the company is offering 12-to-14-pound turkeys for employees who work Thanksgiving; the company says it’s sought to “enable[e] as many of our employees as possible to enjoy Thanksgiving at home, if that’s what they prefer.” But one Capital employee, who spoke on condition of anonymity, had a different take: “They asked if we would prefer to work Christmas Eve or Thanksgiving. It wasn’t much of an option.” “This isn’t just about Thanksgiving,” the employee added. “It’s about our wages, that we haven’t gotten a raise in 22 years” — the last time the $ 2.83-per-hour minimum wage for restaurant servers was raised. And while “I can go work somewhere else, all these jobs are the same.” Which is exactly the problem, says Romanus. “We’re setting a precedent that says, ‘If you treat workers badly, you’ll be held accountable.’” We’ll see whether it works. Rudiak says her resolution has drawn fire from talkradio hosts, “who seem disturbed that workers are standing up for themselves.” Other media will simply ignore the story completely. Between breathless dispatches from mall parking lots, you might witness a bit of handwringing about how Thanksgiving-day shopping means customers have less time at home. But as for the workers? Few reporters will spare a breath … while few shoppers will spare a thought. Even my anonymous Capital Grille informant pleads guilty: “I went in to RiteAid on a holiday — I think it was even Thanksgiving — last year. I said, ‘I’m sorry you have to work on a holiday,’ and the clerk said, ‘I’m working because you’re here.’ I felt like such a hypocrite. I said, ‘I’m never doing this again.’” Which is to say that Darden’s defense — no one complains when everyone else does it! — may be as damning as it is convincing. Increasingly, holidays have become the special time of year when we celebrate ourselves by oppressing each other. So God bless us all, every one. Now get your ass back to work.

DARDEN’S DEFENSE — NO ONE COMPLAINS WHEN EVERYONE ELSE DOES IT! — MAY BE AS DAMNING AS IT IS CONVINCING.

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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After its launch was delayed for a month by the Madison, Wis., city attorney, the Snuggle House was cleared and scheduled to open on Nov. 15 to provide in-bed, pajama-clad “intimate, non-sexual touch[ing]” for $60 an hour. “So many people,” said assistant manager Emily Noon, “don’t have a significant other in their lives” and “just need to be held” (including, she said, the elderly and hospice patients, who are part of the target clientele). The city’s delay was, a spokesman said, to assure that Snuggle House had protocols for dealing with “risky” situations in which a customer refuses to take “no sex” for an answer. (Snuggle House has prominent surveillance cameras and panic buttons for the staff.)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

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Among the underreported catastrophes caused by Hurricane Sandy in the New York-New Jersey area in October 2012 was the tragedy that befell the 27,000-case WineCare storage cellar in Manhattan. Though it claimed to have lost only about 5 percent of its inventory when waters from the Hudson River flooded its supposedly secure warehouse, that number apparently did not count the many preserved bottles whose labels washed off, dramatically reducing the value of customers’ toweringly priced grape and forcing WineCare into bankruptcy court, according to a New York Times report in July.

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The California genetic testing company 23andMe was recently awarded a patent for a computer program that lets parents, by running probabilities through the known relevant cell and DNA variables (of over 240 conditions and traits), predict their “perfect” baby. Of course, the program can provide only the percentage likelihoods, and a company spokeswoman, anticipating a backlash against the concept of “designer babies,” rejected the idea that 23andMe would work with fertility clinics.

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Super Protests: (1) Artist David Cerny, fed up with the collapse of the governing parties in the Czech Republic, launched a barge on the River Vitava in Prague in October, holding a gigantic purple hand with middle finger extended, aimed at Prague Castle (the office of President Milos Zeman). (2) In a November protest against Russia’s “police state,” artist Pyotr Pavlensky, in front of horrified tourists at Moscow’s Red Square, nailed the skin of his scrotum into cobblestones near Lenin’s Mausoleum. Pavlensky, who was arrested, earlier called his stunt “a metaphor for the apathy, political indifference and fatalism of contemporary Russian society.”

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The Azerbaijani government’s official vote totals for the Oct. 8 elections (showing President Aliyev winning) was mistakenly released to the public on Oct. 7. (Officials blamed a computer app “bug.”)

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Terry Jenkins, 25, was arrested for domestic battery in Myrtle Beach, S.C., in September after, according to the police report, he had asked his girlfriend and her female cousin for a bedroom ménage à trois. He then allegedly became enraged when the women paid more attention to each other than to him.

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Awkward: (1) A teenage girl somehow managed to get stuck in a child’s swing on a playground in London in September, and soon three trucks carrying 12 firefighters were on the scene and managed to remove the swing from its frame to free her. (2) New York University student Asher Vongtau, 19, managed to fall into a 2-foot-wide shaft between a dorm and a garage in November and remain stuck for 36 hours until campus security spotted him. (He was hospitalized in serious condition.)

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In July, just days after the one-year anniversary of the spree killing of 12 people at the Century 16 Theaters in Aurora, Colo., Cassidy Delavergne was arrested after he entered the NCG Trillium theaters in Grand Blanc Township, Mich., wearing full body armor and carrying a loaded gun and a fake CIA badge (and alarming some but not all bystanders). Delavergne explained that he wore the equipment only because he did not want to leave it in his car while he watched the movie — and thought the badge might alleviate other patrons’ fears.

American Psychiatric Association members have been engaged in well-publicized academic brawls over the past 10 years about the contents of APA’s signature publication, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, whose fifth edition (DSM-V) was released in May. However, despite the thorough airing of contentious viewpoints as to what is and is not a mental illness, its final “consensus” nevertheless labeled “pedophilia” as a sexual “orientation” rather than a “disorder.” Falling under outside criticism almost immediately, APA in October reopened the debate, calling the labeling a “mistake.” (A “sexual orientation” in many state and local jurisdictions affords antidiscrimination rights.)

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Weird SportsCenter: (1) A Brazilian minorleague soccer match in September ended in a 2-2 tie only because, with minutes left, the trainer for one team stepped to the goal and cleared two quick tie-breaking shots that his players could not have reached in time. “It was our only chance,” he said later. (The referee allowed play to continue.) (2) She Got Game: Bringing her basketball skills to an October five-on-five contest in Thimphu, the queen of Bhutan, 23, scored 34 points with 3 rebounds and 4 assists, and talked up basketball’s imminent rise in the Asian kingdom to a New York Times reporter. The queen said she, and the king, play almost every day.

Hells Angels, which in the old days reputedly handled thieves in a different way, filed a lawsuit this time, in October, against Dillard’s department stores — alleging a violation of its Hells Angels Motorcycle Club trademark by a similar design on one of the store’s T-shirts.

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A 43-year-old Canadian man is not guilty, argued his lawyer in court in November, of violating a local Dubai law on public insults, even though he used the “f-word,” because he had merely uttered “[f-word] off” and not “[f-word] you.” Explained the lawyer, “[f-word] off” is simply a demand (in Canada, anyway) that someone leave you alone.

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DE

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THE REUBEN APPEARED TO CONTAIN ABOUT A POUND OF CORNED BEEF

CHATEAU GATEAU {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} The Chateau street looks more like the ideal place to open up a machine shop or a trucking company than to buy delicious cupcakes named after Pittsburgh neighborhoods. But that’s what Laura Hatajik and her partner, Keren DeCarlo, have done in the old Fort Pitt Bedding Company in this sliver of the North Side. Once a manufacturing plant, the building now features office space and a slick, modern storefront where the pair sell cupcakes and sandwiches at the Chateau Café and Cakery. “We did the research, and in this area, we found that there were about 800 employees with nowhere to eat,” Hatajik explains. Their newly converted ground-floor space is not only big enough for breakfast and lunch crowds, but can also host special events. The women, who both came most recently from corporate backgrounds, were introduced through a mutual friend. Hatajik has been baking for years, formerly running a side business out of her home. DeCarlo has formal culinary training and is a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu Pittsburgh. Their savory food menu features paninis, salads, wraps and soups, as well as a daily special; this included pizza and burgers on recent afternoons. On the sweet side are cupcakes: a red velvet cupcake called the Downtown; a maplebacon cupcake known as the Shadyside; and a boozy cupcake made with Blue Moon called the South Side. “This has been a dream for both of us for a very long time,” Hatajik says. CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1501 Preble Ave., Chateau. 412-802-2537 or www.chateaucafeandcakery.com

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Weary of those e foodie dining reviewss of fare you’ve neverr heard of at pricess you can’t afford? The e antidote may be a talk and book-signing g with Marilyn Hagerty, y, whose unapologetic tic 2012 review off a North Dakota Olive ve Garden went viral. 7 p p.m. m Mon., Dec 2. Mount Lebanon Library, 16 Castle Shannon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-531-1912 or www.mtlebanonlibrary.org

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HEARTY FARE {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

E’VE ALL HEARD tales of Pitts-

burgh’s heyday, when the mills cranked out steel all day and local businesses prospered on the paychecks of the workers who made such productivity possible. Some may have their own memories of that time; the rest of us have Emil’s. Emil’s — named after its founder, Emil Luzaich, who ran the restaurant from his seat at the bar from the 1950s till his death in 2009 — is located in the first floor of a two-story building in Rankin. Windowless and nondescript indoors and out, it’s reminiscent of any number of local bars found throughout the Mon Valley: Regulars no doubt anticipate the warm camaraderie waiting within, but to outsiders, its inscrutable facade suggests a private clubhouse. But Emil’s isn’t a smoky bar to while away the hours until closing time — or, if it were, you’d still get home in time for Wheel of Fortune. With operating hours that only stretch past 7 p.m. once a week (that would be 8 p.m. on Fridays), if you want to partake

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

Reuben sandwich

of Emil’s old-school experience, you may have to leave work a little early. Inside Emil’s, two little dining rooms flank a big, asymmetrical bar, and decor consists of some paneling, mirrors and a few seasonal tchotchkes. Plastic picnic tablecloths and paper placemats, too, were in seasonal earth tones. The bright lighting conspired with the limited decor to suggest a family night out, rather than a working man’s local.

EMIL’S LOUNGE 414 Hawkins Ave. (across from Rankin Borough Building), Rankin. 412-271-9911 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. PRICES: Dinners $10-23; sandwiches $3-8 LIQUOR: Full bar

The menu, split between diner-style sandwiches and surf and/or turf entrees, is another relic from a bygone era. Emil’s daughter, Krissy Kochis, who now runs the restaurant with her husband, Bill, calls it “hunky” food, meaning meals that

would satisfy a hungry laborer: steak, calf liver, steamed shrimp. On Fridays, there’s prime rib, and Thursday — Italian night — means spaghetti or rigatoni with meatballs or hot sausage, meatball or sausage hoagies, and chicken “parm.” The chicken parm certainly sounded enticing to us. Our server warned us that the portion was big, and she wasn’t kidding. Instead of a cutlet, or even a couple of cutlets, here were two enormous breasts of chicken, their breading overwhelmed by the meat and a thick blanket of melted cheese, plus enough sauce to hold the flavors together. Jason, our resident parm partisan, missed a good crust, but the chicken was tender and juicy, and it was hard to argue with all that melted cheese. A side bowl of rigatoni in a dark red sauce was forgettable, however. On the sandwich side, Emil’s is especially proud of its fried fish and reuben. No one in our party was up for a pound of fried cod, but Jason ordered the reuben, which appeared to contain about a pound of corned beef. Texas-toast-size slices of


marble rye, nicely browned, were sufficient to the task, but the bottom piece quickly grew soggy beneath the meat, sauerkraut, dressing and gooey floes of molten Swiss. The corned beef was round cut, rather than the more finely grained brisket, but, despite relatively thick slicing, it was tender. We would have liked more kraut to balance things out. Since prime rib was not available on a Thursday, we tried instead to get our beef fix from a New York strip. The slab of meat we were served was easily a few inches thick. It was only a touch less than the medium rare we ordered, but while the top was a lovely brown, the too-brief cooking came at the expense of an adequate crust on the other side. The lack of char led directly to a lack of flavor. We ameliorated this somewhat with salt at the table, but we wished it had been properly seasoned by the kitchen.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

RUM RUNNER Local distillery up and running, despite rum deal from Congress At the height of the recent federal shutdown, U.S. Rep. Shelia Jackson Lee (D-TX) took to the House floor and said, “There’s a rum maker in Pittsburgh who was just getting his business together … ready to produce legally, good rum in Pittsburgh. Maggie’s Farm Rum.” But, she continued, it couldn’t open for business because the shutdown stopped the approval of new labels — a situation she called “egregious and horrific.” Tim Russell, owner and distiller of Maggie’s Farm Rum, says that while Lee was a tad hyperbolic, the shutdown did cause several sleepless nights: “Not having anything for sale was my worstcase scenario.” Happily, the shutdown ended before his capital ran out, and rum is now dripping from a small still in his Strip District warehouse. “I’m taking it slow to make sure I get it right,” Russell says of his 20-gallons-per-week operation. Since production is so limited, Russell is currently focusing his distribution to bars and restaurants: Bocktown, Kelly’s, Piper’s Pub and Industry Public House are among those already selling Maggie’s Farm. Russell expects to start selling retail in January, though he plans some one-off events before then. The first is set for Black Friday, when the distillery will offer bottles at $28 each (plus tax) starting at 11 a.m. Maggie’s Farm Rum is distilled from turbinado sugar, which contains a significantly higher percentage of molasses (the traditional raw material used to make rum) than common table sugar. The white rum is soft and grassy, with a hint of residual sweetness. It’s sipable on its own and also makes for a nice mixer. Russell says he’s also planning on aging some of his product in bourbon barrels. Russell says that until now there have been no outstanding Americanproduced (Puerto Rico aside) rums, something he hopes to change. The spirit also fits nicely into the growing Pittsburghdistilled marketplace. “We have people here making whiskey and vodka,” he says, “so I chose rum.”

“NOT HAVING ANYTHING FOR SALE WAS MY WORST-CASE SCENARIO.”

Tony D’Onofrio, chef at Emil’s for 44 years

Onion rings were well above average, great big slabs of juicy onion coated not in batter, but in a light breading. Breaded rings tend to trade big crunch for satisfying onion, but Emil’s provided both. Jason found the fries unexceptional, but Angelique thought they, too, had good, crispy crusts outside and nicely contrasting, creamy interiors. A similar description applied to the crab patties. These were not the same as crab cakes, but more like croquettes, with a crispy fried coating on the outside and a mashed-potato-like filling inside. Though lacking much crab flavor, they were mildly pleasant to eat. Ultimately, though the flavors at Emil’s weren’t exciting, that wasn’t the most important thing about the place. What impressed us most was the connection to a disappearing part of local culture, when a hearty life demanded a hearty meal. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3212A Smallman St., Strip District. 724-322-5415 or www.facebook.com/ maggiesfarmrum

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

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AZUL BAR Y CANTINA. 122 Broad St., Leetsdale. 724-2666362. Colorful and convivial, Azul dishes up Southern Californiastyle Mexican cooking in a festive atmosphere. The menu offers the familiar fajitas, tacos and burritos — to be washed down with margaritas — as well as quirkier fare such as crunchy sticks of jicama and fried ice cream. JE BAR MARCO. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900. At this former firehouse-turnedrestaurant, a small but wellcurated menu makes a perfect complement to this venue’s wine and cocktail list. The tapas-inspired roster ranges from charcuterie plates and classics, like patatas bravas, to smoked-pork tamales and grilled radicchio and endive salad. KE CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, woodfired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-of-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

Let Us Cook Your Holiday Meal! 4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com

Wai Wai {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} DAVIO. 2100 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-531-7422. Davio is a cozy restaurant (down to the family photos) with friendly service. The menu is classic Italian — no wacky ingredients or preparations — but only a few entrées seem lifted from the Standard Italian Restaurant Repertoire. Specialties are crab and veal. L DORMONT DOGS. 2911 Glenmore Ave., Dormont. 412343-0234. This is an actual hotdog (and veggie-dog) restaurant, with an emphasis on top-quality

Bar Marco {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} frankfurters, local bakery buns and fresh, innovative toppings. Try the Texas Avenue Dog, topped with chili sauce, cheddar, sour cream and Fritos, or the Bruschetta Dog, with marinated tomatoes, pesto and parmesan. J

castle, Hyeholde is housed in a little fantasy building dating to the 1930s. The splendidly landscaped grounds host outdoor pig roasts, clambakes and picnics in the summer. Unusual meats — elk, ostrich — are combined with fresh, local ingredients in preparations that join classic and contemporary … and offer the exquisitely rare experience of eating art. LE

FAT HEADS. 1805 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-7433. This place seems to expand every few years, with reason: terrific beer selection, chicken wings and industrialIBIZA. 2224 E. www. per pa sized sandwiches. Carson St., South pghcitym .co There’s outdoor eating Side. 412-325-2227. on the “fatio,” but timing An urbane wine bar is everything: No matter how and tapas restaurant, Ibiza many tables they add, you may is the sister restaurant to its end up waiting for one. JE next-door favorite, Mallorca. Ibiza’s menu starts in Spain but FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland includes delicacies from Portugal, Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. Argentina and other countries. The ambience conjures the Accompanied by a wide nostalgia of Route 66 road trips. international selection of wines, Much of the reasonably priced Ibiza offers a transportive fare is in the “goes well with dining experience. KE beer” category, and the beer list includes a couple of house LOS CHILUDOS. 325 Southpointe brews. But there’s plenty that’s Blvd., Suite 300, Canonsburg. new: Pizza, baked in a wood724-745-6791. This casual fired brick oven, comes with neighborhood taqueria offers everything from Jamaican jerk classic Mexican-American fare chicken to hummus; entrees sprinkled with more authentic include glazed salmon and options such as tinga (saucy “truck-stop sirloin.” KE stewed pork) and sopes, thick cornmeal cakes. Los Chiludos GOLDEN PIG. 3201 Millers excels with Americanized Run Road, Cecil. 412-220-7170. Mexican dishes, imbuing them This little jewel-box of a diner with authentic ingredients and offers authentic, home-style preparations that recalls the Korean cuisine, including fresh, flavorful fast food as it’s in-house chili sauce and various prepared in Mexico. JF kimchis. The brief menu includes traditional appetizers such as OSTERIA 2350. 2350 Railroad dumplings and gimbop (sushi-like St., Strip District (412-281-6595) rolls), as well as entrées ranging and 100 Wood St., Downtown from bulgogi (beef stir-fry) to (412-586-7743). You won’t get spicy marinated chicken and better casual Italian cooking for Korean pancakes. KF your money than here. The menu has been pared to the essentials HYEHOLDE. 1516 Coraopolis of Italian cuisine: antipasti, pizza, Heights Road, Moon Township. panini and pasta — and their 412-264-3116. Half cottage, half preparations represent a unique

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 22


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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

offMenu

marriage of Old-World recipes and local ingredients. JE

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TABLE TALK Local chef shares Thanksgiving traditions — and a recipe

PIGS-2-PEACHES. 100 Wises Grove Road, New Brighton. 724581-4595. It’s not just barbecued meats and sides at this diner, but also breakfast, sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and homemade desserts aplenty. The barbecued meats are juicy (sauce on the side), and fried okra, fried green tomatoes and biscuits round out the Southern-style comfort-food experience. KF RAMEN BAR. 5860 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-5138. What’s not to love about a big steaming bowl of wheat noodles, flavorful homemade broth and plenty of meat and vegetable add-ins? Besides the traditional offerings, Ramen Bar also has an intriguing penchant for applying the ramen technique to a variety of classic dishes from across Asia, such as Chinese ground-pork dishes. JF SAVORY HILL. 988 Brodhead Road, Moon. 724-457-7109. This “eclectic bistro” offers a fortifying menu of locally sourced, creatively prepared fine dining. The starters span rarefied (scallops) to comforting (nachos), and include truly memorable salads. Entrees include a Southwest surf-n-turf with chipotle peppers, and slowbraised short ribs with risotto and multi-colored carrots. LE THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF

Sonja Finn on her rooftop garden {PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA PETRILLA}

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-3698. This two-wheelthemed café and bar offers a creative pub-grub menu (with many offerings named for bicycle parts). The salads are more impressive than those you’ll find at most bars, and the menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered zucchini planks wrapped around melty cheeses. JE

“THANKSGIVING WAS the one and only big family meal of the year. It is by far my favorite holiday,” says Sonja Finn, chef/owner of East Liberty hotspot Dinette. “Even when my mother worked 12- to 14hour days, my parents still made dinner every night. Many days, that meant we ate dinner at 10 or 11 p.m., but we still ate together. My husband and I try to do the same with our son.” They’ve also established traditions of their own, like starting the Thanksgiving meal with tomato-fennel soup. “Soup is a good way to begin, because it easily gets everyone to the table and eating,” Finn says. What other advice does Finn have for home chefs? “Holiday meals are often filled with high-fat dishes, many of which have sweet accents,” she says. To “break up the richness,” she suggests serving “slightly bitter, hearty lettuces like radicchio, Belgian endive, escarole, treviso, frisée.” One last tip: “It’s good to have a glass of wine with you in the kitchen.”

Sonja Finn’s Thanksgiving Tomato-Fennel Soup (serves 8) INGREDIENTS: Extra-virgin olive oil 1-2 teaspoons chili flakes 2 large yellow onions 3 heads fennel 3 32-oz. cans plum tomatoes Heavy cream and salt to taste

Trim fronds off fennel bulbs; save one for garnish. Cut fennel bulbs and onions into 1-inch pieces. To a soup pot, add olive oil to just cover the bottom. Add chili flakes, fennel and onion. Sweat ingredients until translucent, trying not to brown anything. Add water to just cover the ingredients and let boil to soften fennel — about 30 minutes. Crush tomatoes with your hands and add them to the pot. Cook rawness out of the tomatoes, about 1520 minutes on low heat. (The sugars in the fennel and tomatoes can burn very easily, so stir frequently.) Purée in batches in a blender, then push through a fine-mesh strainer. Return soup to a clean pot. Bring to a boil and add cream and salt to taste. Add water if necessary to reach desired consistency. Garnish with Parmigiano Reggiano and some tiny green fennel fronds. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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LOCAL

BEAT

“THERE’S A UNIVERSAL HUMAN FEELING OF NOT LIVING UP TO OUR FULL POTENTIAL.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

INTO THE FIRE Matthew Firek and Andrew Wilds took the long way around to get to their new project, Fire K Studios, a full-service recording studio in Baldwin. The South Hills natives and lifelong friends spent some time in State College — where they began to experiment with recording — and Wilds took a job as a firefighter (which he still holds). “It’s actually an ideal job,” says Wilds. “A firefighter’s shift — we’re on for 24 hours, then off for 72 hours, so that creates a lot of free time to be at the studio if need be. They actually work really well together.” Wilds and Firek played in bands together during high school and college, then went their separate ways for a bit, only to reunite in State College in 2007, when Wilds moved there. They built a home recording setup, and things began to grow from there. When Wilds got a job offer from the Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire, the pair’s plan began to come together. “In a way it worked out; it was then that we decided we’d open a commercial studio here in Pittsburgh,” Firek says. “We took all the equipment we’d gathered over those years and put it together in one place here.” Fire K doesn’t specialize in one genre, says Wilds — “We were primarily a rock band, and worked with rock and metal, but we’ve grown to handle anything. Matt’s pretty good with hip hop and electronic music. The studio is big enough [that] we can work with anything, even classical; we both have a classical background.” They also offer recording for voiceovers and podcasts, and can accommodate bands that want to rent practice space. On Thu., Dec. 5, Firek and Wilds open Fire K to the public for an open house — an opportunity to check out the facilities and chat with the engineers. In addition to demonstrations and food and drink, Christopher Hannigan will perform.

“A FIREFIGHTER’S SHIFT CREATES A LOT OF FREE TIME TO BE AT THE STUDIO.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FIRE K STUDIOS OPEN HOUSE. 6-9 p.m. Thu., Dec. 5. 5001 Curry Road, Suite 3. Free. 412-655-3030 or www.firekstudios.com

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{BY STOSH JONJAK}

“W

E ARE trying to process the feeling of being confused and overwhelmed,” says MGMT’s Andrew VanWyngarden. “And not overwhelmed by band experiences, but by life experiences. The themes of the [new] songs get into existential problems and bigger issues that affect everyone, and not just us.” As these themes suggest, VanWyngarden just like you and me. In fact, he spent some of his formative years growing up in Wilkinsburg, went to McEwen Elementary (a now-defunct school in Shadyside), and even almost lost his prized Pirates hat when it slipped out of his hand and into centerfield during an early-’90s Pirates game. “I had to convince the usher it was mine instead of Andy Van Slyke’s,” he says. “But I got it back.” Unlike you and me, VanWyngarden is the frontman of a popular, successful band — making the existential musings intriguing, a thematic departure from the humor-and-irony-driven ascent of the band’s initial surge to stardom. On MGMT’s new self-titled full-length,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

G N I D N R R A U T INW {PHOTO COURTESY OF MIGUEL VILLALOBOS}

Ground rule: MGMT

gone are the days of sunnier psychedelic dance pop, that earlier, broadly popular era punctuated by ironic and humorous gold singles “Time to Pretend” and “Electric Feel,” and the platinum, world-breaking ode to the comforting longings of nostalgia, “Kids.” Founding members VanWyngarden and Benjamin Goldwasser have chosen to descend toward creating structure-defying, gauzily-produced and heavily layered songs

MGMT

WITH KUROMA 7 p.m. Mon., Dec. 2. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $32.50-35. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

with existential themes: the end of civilization (“Mystery Disease”), alien invasion (“Alien Days”), self-examination (“Your Life Is a Lie”, “Introspection”). There is an integrity behind this inward turn and continued experimentation: Instead of shamelessly attempting to re-create the past’s ironic success, MGMT chose to get serious. In the early 2000s, Van Wyngarden and

Goldwasser were slumming in the dorms of Wesleyan University, making funny sounds with old synthesizers, hosting “concerts” consisting of friends sitting in a circle and being weird. An EP of jokey pop songs released on the small indie Cantora Records seemed to serve as the peak for another obscure college act only their friends would remember. But in fact — that EP found its way to the ears of Columbia Records, who declared the group worthy of a record deal. Next came collaborating with star producer Dave Fridmann and recording an album, Oracular Spectacular, that, on the strength of its ironic and humorous songs sold 900,000 copies in an era where albums don’t sell 900,000 copies. The band’s first hit single, “Time to Pretend,” comically trumpets: “Let’s make some music, make some money, find some models for wives.” The ultimate irony is how prescient the song turned out to be. But success was overwhelming. MGMT’s second album, 2010’s Congratulations, was a personal reaction to being thrust into stardom. Humor and irony are replaced by an intimate sensitivity. CONTINUES ON PG. 26


TURNING INWARD, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

mark Holid ay pops High with the pittsburg h symphony and the mendelsso hn choir Ring in the season with a festive concert by the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Mendelssohn Choir and an all-star cast of guest artists. Celebrate as we deck the halls with your favorite holiday music and a special visit from Santa. FOR TICKETS: CALL

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412.392.4900 OR VISIT pittsburghsymphony.org

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Abandoning the immediate, hook-heavy pop of the first album for complex and ambitious multi-part suites, these songs welcomed being spun on a turntable in some darkened basement, examined seriously. Debuting strongly at No. 2 on the Billboard top 200, Congratulations ended up selling a little over 200,000 copies — respectable, but a far cry from the Oracular Spectacular rocket ship. Quick success had created the difficult second album; would this be a momentary diversion before the predictable, return-to-their-popularroots third act? Quite the contrary, this third album shows Congratulations was a spot on the map towards MGMT’s ultimate destination. Bridges and codas appear unpredictably out of an ether of swelling instruments; a darker, psychedelic pop supports more mature lyrical themes. This approach is divisive, adulated by some and discomfiting to others, who, VanWyngarden believes, do not wish to examine the issues these songs confront. “The lyricism is about why there is a dissonance of knowing you should be somewhere a little further along, and knowing that you’re not and trying to figure out what’s keeping you from getting there,” VanWyngarden says. “I think there’s a universal human feeling of not living up to our full potential.” We like to think of our celebrities as transcending existential dilemmas — this idea is at the core of the great American desire to be famous. But, when a successful band admits to being tormented by the unanswerable questions that affect us all, the illusion of celebrity is shattered. This is challenging to an audience, and negative reactions are inevitable. This can also be rewarding, and the third album is: Initial inscrutability gives way to illumination. Reacting to success will be the overarching storyline in MGMT’s career. When a debut album explodes, most bands pursue duplication — to try to make that same album again and again. Bands who completely diverge from a successful formula confound their initial supporters, open themselves to fail at their new experiments, and cast a shadow of doubt over the veracity of that initial success. But this approach also liberates and dignifies. Let’s appreciate the poignant idealism behind the struggle with being identified that drives a band towards experimentation; most importantly, let’s appreciate a band for whom success may not be and never was the ultimate goal. This time around, the second single, “Your Life Is a Lie,” is the band’s ironic song — appearing on an album where the band’s primary objective is to tell its fans the honest truth. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

LARRY NATH VISIONS AND REVISIONS (SELF-RELEASED)

Collection of straightforward rock, blues and folk-y songs by the local singersongwriter, recorded with some help from folks like virtuoso guitarist Jimmy Adler. Soft ballad “Mystery” might be the highlight of this one, with a quiet beauty and slightly uneasy vibe that sets it apart from the rest; Nath’s talents (and voice) shine especially when he strays from the blues-rock formula.

BUTTERBIRDS SWEET LITTLE HONEY NOTHIN’ (SEIZURE MAN)

Relaxed, upbeat indie pop from the locals; sophisticated sounds and clean production offset cute, somewhat naïve material. Dueling male-female vocals and group choruses lend a party vibe that’s reminiscent of indie outfits like Kickball. Recommended for a sunny day. BUTTERBIRDS CD/CASSETTE RELEASE. 8 p.m. Fri., Dec. 6. The Shop, 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $5. All ages. 412-951-0622

KONTROL COW TWENTY-TWO (SELF-RELEASED)

Simple, silly songs with an irreverent vibe. A little punk, a little throwback rock, a lot of sex jokes and angry tirades about mainstream culture and the suburbs. Nothing particularly new or nuanced here, but a fun listen if you’re into lighthearted double-entendre and making fun of suburban parents.

MIKE STOUT TIME TO BUILD A NEW WORLD (SELF-RELEASED)

Some new tunes from the lefty songwriter who’s based here and tours worldwide. The music — mostly folk-rock — is fine, but that’s not what people listen to this type of stuff for. Stout brings to the fore problems like privacy (“Big Brother’s Watching”), covert war (“I Was Killed By a Drone”) and the like — plus, on the title track he talks about moving beyond protest. If that’s your jam, you’ll like this one. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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Using ’shrooms for health: Rubblebucket

UPS AND DOWNS {BY ANDY MULKERIN} IT’S BEEN AN exciting year for Rubblebucket:

The Brooklyn band, long toiling as an indie, signed with Communion Records over the summer, but it also put on the brakes a bit as singer Kalmia Traver was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The group was back on the road in the fall, though; we talked with bandleader and trumpet player Alex Toth about Rubblebucket’s whirlwind 2013. YOU RELEASED AN EP LAST MONTH, SAVE CHARLIE, THAT SOUNDS A BIT DIFFERENT FROM YOUR OLDER MATERIAL — MORE RAW, HONEST. IS THAT INDICATIVE OF WHAT YOU’VE BEEN WORKING ON FOR THE NEXT FULL-LENGTH? Yeah, that was harvested from the material we’ve been working on. We still have wild, whimsical tastes and writing approaches, and we experiment with so many different processes as we’re writing, so I don’t think we’ve ever just stayed in one place. LYRICALLY, SOME OF THE SONGS SOUND MORE PERSONAL THAN A LOT OF YOUR OLDER STUFF. I’ve written hordes of poetry for years, but … it kind of ends up sounding like beat poetry or slam poetry — just really rhythmic, visceral poetry with really wild strings of words. I feel like we’re getting better and better and sculpting that into clearer messages. “Save Charlie” was harnessed from some personal things, trying to make it poetic and make it make sense. “Patriotic” came from a dream Kal had — “Patriotic” and “Six Hands” are both from dreams. That’s something I admire about Kal: how vivid her dreams are. I have the most

boring dreams: Things go wrong on stage; I’m in a rehearsal playing the same song for six hours. But she’s, like, a bird, or she’s in a waterfall that turns into a mermaid, or she’s on the Trail of Tears, and being oppressed. HOW IS KALMIA DOING ON TOUR SO SOON AFTER CHEMO? We tried to make this tour a little more relaxed, and we rented a nicer van for the West Coast leg; she had a bed set up in the back and she got to sleep a lot. She’s on what she calls the “Don’t Die-et,” which is all really healthy stuff, and every night in the hotel room she boils these medicinal mushrooms called chaga; there’s tons of documentation on their cancer-fighting properties. There’s an aspect of the road that’s incredibly healing.

RUBBLEBUCKET WITH RICH AUCOIN, AMBEYONCE

7 p.m. Wed., Dec. 4. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-15. All ages. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

IT MUST HAVE HIT YOU HARD WHEN SHE HAD HER DIAGNOSIS, BUT YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO CANCEL TOO MANY TOUR DATES, RIGHT? We’d been off the road most of the year because we were thinking of recording the album this fall. But then the other big news that happened simultaneously, as Kal was being diagnosed, was that we were getting signed to [Communion Music]. We’d been an unsigned, DIY band for our whole bandhood, and to have a resourceful, artistfriendly and well-connected label that totally gets us — it’s a huge opportunity. Opening for Mumford & Sons, getting ready for this record, it’s really a major-league thing. A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF BRICK STOWELL}

proudly presents

Be immersed in a live laser ase light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! MellowHigh

[ROCK] + SAT., NOV. 30

You don’t catch a lot of live music in Monroeville these days (though it does have a rich history, with venues like the long-gone Holiday House). The recently opened Winghart’s bar and restaurant — in the Monroeville Mall — is looking to change that, and tonight it’s hosting a benefit show for the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. Catch locals The Nied’s Hotel Band (far from Nied’s Hotel) and The Businessmen, for a good cause. Christopher AM 4 p.m. 300 Smedley Monroeville Mall, Monroeville. Free, donations accepted. 412-372-5500 or www.winghart burgers.com

[ALT-RAP] + WED. DEC. 04

[ALT-ROCK] + SAT. NOV. 30 You might not know much about local singersongwriter Christopher Smedley yet, but his debut album The SoundColor Sessions speaks for itself: Each song is very different from the last, but they all feature a laid-back charm that makes the album pleasant to listen to from beginning to end. Smedley, who taught himself to play guitar while he was in college, released the album this summer, after collaborating with guitarist and SoundColor Productions owner Jay Weaver. Smedley will celebrate the release of the album with a show tonight at Club Café. Allison Cosby 10 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

+

The members of Los Angeles rap collective Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All are hard to keep up with. The latest subgroup — called MellowHigh — is made up of Hodgy Beats and Left Brain (who commonly work together as MellowHype), plus Domo Genesis. The trio released their debut album this fall, and their music includes everything we’ve come to expect from an Odd Future project: raps about smoking weed, something dark and eerie about the music, and a slew of guest vocals. It’s far from average, though, and the trio’s performance tonight at Mr. Small’s is sure to be memorable. Special guests Tairey, Norman Dean, Palermo Stone and Crystal Seth open the show. AC 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $12. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

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SHOWS & TIMES:

CarnegieScienceCenter.org

BUY TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

THIS WEEK

No time like Thanksgiving weekend to gather the family around — and in this case, Bill Deasy is huddling up with his old band-family, The Gathering Field, for a show at Moondog’s. But it’s not a one-off; Deasy has announced that he and the rest of the original lineup — Dave Brown, Ray DeFade and Eric Riebling — will be recording a new album next year. The band was one of the top draws in town in the mid- and late-’90s, and its single “Lost in America” was a rock-radio staple here and elsewhere. Andy Mulkerin 8:30 p.m. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. $12. 412-828-2040 or www. moondogs.us

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They’re back! Daft Punk & Sublime

[BENEFIT] + SUN., DEC. 01

S C R E E N

Wed 11.27 TRES LADS $7 cover // 9:00 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fri 11.29 TOTALLY 80’S $7 cover // 9:00 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sat 11.30 NEW WAVE NATION $7 cover // 9:00 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sun 12.1 LANDAU MURPHY America’s Got Talent Winner // 7:00 Ticketed event ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mon 12.2 BALCONY BIG BAND // 8:00

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 28 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593.

FRI 29 BRILLOBOX. Grand Buffet. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Vanessa Carlton. South Side. 412-431-4950. CLUB COLONY. Hewlett Anderson. Scott. 412-668-0903. ELWOOD’S PUB. Nicole Belli Trio. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Erica Hughes & The Well Mannered, The Mon River Ramblers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Metro. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Skero & Jingles. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Lucky Me. Greensburg. 1-800-922-5548.

ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. The Tony Janflone Jr. Band. Ross. 412-364-8166. ROY’S BY THE TRACKS. The Bill Ali Band. Finleyville. 724-348-7118. SMILING MOOSE. Kreig, Vomit Orchestra, Wrought Iron, Dendritic Arbor. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Jazzam. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Verdict. Robinson. 412-489-5631. HARMONY RIDGE. Anubis Morrison. Ambridge. 724-266-2414. HARVEY WILNER’S. Silkwood Shower. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HEY ANDY’S. ReCover. Monongahela. 724-258-4755. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Live Band Punk Rock Karaoke. www. per Bloomfield. pa pghcitym .co 412-682-0320. MARS VFW. The Stargazer Band, Southside 31ST STREET PUB. Jerry. Proceeds benefit Philippine Primer 55, Solarburn, Definitive Islands relief. Mars. 724-462-4081. Strike, Stratega. Strip District. MOONDOG’S. The Gathering 412-391-8334. Field. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. BRILLOBOX. Grand NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Buffet. Bloomfield. Billy the Kid & The Regulators. 412-621-4900. Downtown. 412-471-9100. CIP’S. Barbra Ray & OBEY HOUSE. King’s Ransom. the Stingrays. Dormont. Crafton. 412-922-3883. 412-668-2335. THE PRAHA. The Dave Iglar Band. CLUB CAFE. Rust Belt Kings, Tarentum. 724-224-2112. Tom Breiding (Early) Christopher THE R BAR. The Gordon Smedley (late). Album release. James Blues Band. Dormont. South Side. 412-431-4950. 412-942-0882. SIEB’S PUB & RESTAURANT. Montford. Ross. 412-364-8511. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Velveeta. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Thanatotic Desire, Havoc Theory, Klaymore, Horrid Ordeal. South Side. 412-431-4668. SONNY’S TAVERN. Slim Forsythe’s Rockin’ Gospel Orchestra. Bloomfield. 412-683-5844. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. KR-3, Blue & Greeno. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TUGBOAT’S. Guitar Zack & The Daves. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1922.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 30

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HUTTEN PHOTOGRAPHY LLC}

CHARLES WALLACE

SUN 01 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Jack & The Bear. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. STAGE AE. Twenty One Pilots, Smallpools, Sirah. North Side. 412-229-5483.

MON 02 Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s track comes from Charles Wallace; stream or

download “Don’t Ask” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

BELVEDERE’S. Jucifer, Night Vapor, Resin. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. STAGE AE. MGMT, Kuroma. North Side. 412-229-5483.

TUE 03 THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Plum. 724-884-5944.

WED 04 CLUB CAFE. Frontier Ruckus, CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013


We Believe In Delicious Memories

Support these Local Businesses this Holiday Season! Electronic CigareƩe Store

A friendlier alternaƟve to smoking

2327 Murray Ave. Pgh Pa 15217 412.421.0602

B

O AKMO NT A

K

E

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We Create Delicious Memories

www.ecigpiƩsburgh.com

oakmontbakery.com

Dear Pittsburgh, Shop Small Shop Local Love, Jules 4502 Butler St. Lawrenceville julespittsburgh.com N E W S

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We Buy, Sell & Trade!

Men’s & Women’s Accessories, Clothing & Shoes

mmunity locally grown, community owned

Always LLooking Al k ki FFor or & B Buying i g! Vintage, Vint Vi ntag a e, Current, Trending & De Designer Brand Brands ds

Garden Center

7516 Meade Street Pittsburgh, PA 15208 (412) 242-3598 www.eastendfood.coop

At the co-op, fresh delicious food is just the beginning. Nourish your family. Discover local foods. Connect with others and help build a strong community. It all comes together at the Co-op. @ EastEndCoop Open to everyone every day 8 AM - 9 PM

Cavacini

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Sun 12-5pm

Christmas Trees Wreaths Poinsettias Christmas Cactus Garland

clothesmindedpgh.com 4740 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15224 412-685-4017

100 51st St. • Lawrenceville

412-687-2010

Off Butler St/Across from Goodwill

Support these Local Businesses this Holiday Season!

make it memorable Give a gift aglow with meaning— authentic and unforgettable, ancient glass art is accompanied by sand from the Holy Land.

Holy Land Sands Candleholder, $34 HANDCRAFTED IN WEST BANK

5824 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA Holiday hours begin Dec 1: Mon–Thu 10–8, Fri–Sat 10–6, Sun 11–3 412-421-2160 pittsburgh.tenthousandvillages.com

Bring in this ad to receive 25% OFF one item. Offer valid at participating stores until 12/7/13. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs or Traveler’s Finds. One coupon per customer per day. 1000983

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013


visit us at 3818 Butler Street in Lawrenceville or online www.yobroapparel.com

in partnership with

December 7-8 2013

sponsored by

jenna@unionproject.org 412.363.4550 ext. 222

highlandparkpotterytour.com

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All gift cards - buy one getamonepmFREE Black Friday only 11 – 8 Spa Jema • 117 First Avenue, located in downtown Pittsburgh 412-281-3336 • www.spajema.com

Small Business Saturday

Locally-owned purveyor of artisanal olive oils and balsamic vinegars. Our selection includes several monovarietal oils, as well as dozens of flavored oils and vinegars

November 30th Musical entertainment from 11am–1pm by the Ambridge Steel Drum Band

NEW LOCATION: East Liberty – Indigo Square 5975 Broad Street Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (412) 362-1942

˜‘‹†–Š‡ƒŽŽƒ†‡••ǤŒ‘›ƒ†ƒ›•–”‘ŽŽ‹‰–Š‡‹ŽŽƒ‰‡‘ˆ ‡™‹…Ž‡›™Š‹Ž‡•—’’‘”–‹‰Ž‘…ƒŽ•Š‘’•ƒ†”‡•–ƒ—”ƒ–•Ǥ ”‡‡’ƒ”‹‰‡˜‡”›™‡‡‡†Ǥ For details visit www.YuletideInSewickley.com.

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SEASONAL LOCATION in South Hills Village Mall

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

Events

hAPPen here

Radio Days, Chris Hannigan. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Plum. 724-746-4227. REX THEATER. Rubblebucket. South Side. 412-381-6811.

DJS THU 28

LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s Alternative. DJ Electric. South Side. 412-431-5282. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Hypnotyza. Downtown. 412-471-2058. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. CAPRI PIZZA AND Homewood. BAR. Saturday Night 412-969-0260. Meltdown. Top 40, PARK HOUSE. Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Jx4. North Side. Funk & Soul. East Libwww. per 412-224-2273. a erty. 412-362-1250. p pghcitym PERLE CHAMPAGNE o .c DIESEL. DJ CK. South BAR. Bobby D. Side. 412-431-8800. Downtown. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. 412-471-2058. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, South Side. 412-431-2825. Rick Diculous. South Side. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-478-3863. 412-481-7227.

SAT 30

FULL LIST E N O LIN

FRI 29 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DRUM BAR. DJ Zimmie. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 01 PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. 5x5. DJ Tony Smith. McCandless. 412-367-9610. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 03 SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

WED 04 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 29

DOWNLOAD THE FREE CP HAPPS APP NOW

MR. SMALLS THEATER. DJ Goodnight, Beedie, The Come Up, Jung Phil, Joey Fattz, Justice Street Poets, more. Black Friday: A Hip-Hop Fashion Event. Millvale. 412-874-4582.

WED 04 MR. SMALLS THEATER. MellowHigh ft. Hodgy Beats, Domo Genesis, Left Brain, Tairey, Norman Dean, Palermo Stone, Crystal Seth. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

BLUES THU 28

OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

THE HOP HOUSE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 29

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

DOUBLE D’S SALOON. Shot O’ Soul. Lawrenceville. 412-687-1805.

MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini & Felix & the Hurricanes. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

SAT 30 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. PARK HOUSE. Jimmy Adler, Charlie Barath. North Side. 412-224-2273. SKYLARK MOTOR INN. .32-20 Blues Band. Moon. 412-264-5753. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Shot O’ Soul. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

SUN 01 CARSALA’S BAR AND GRILLE. The Witchdoctors. West Mifflin. 412-466-3337.

WED 04 THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

JAZZ THU 28 CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

FRI 29 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Downtown. 412-456-6666. FIFTH AVENUE PLACE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band, Four-of-a-Kind. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack Quintet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SAT 30 ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. The Jimmy Adler Band. Monaca. 724-728-7200. CJ’S. Sweet 16 The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Horn Guys. North Side. 412-904-3335. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Suite Life: A Billy Strayhorn Birthday Bash. Feat. Sean Jones & the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. MARVA JO’S BISTRO. The Tony Campell Band. McKeesport. 412-664-7200. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Jessica Lee. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.


LOCAL TWEETS

HAPPS

Her Country String Band, Stella! Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Joseph Sisters. Washington.

Recent dispatches from the music Twittersphere

SAT 30 31 SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Backwood Playboys. Bridgeville. 412-221-7808. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

@olgawatkinsband (Olga Watkins Band)

I’m going to find out where these people work then show up there and yell “Free Bird” while they’re in the middle of something.

CLASSICAL

The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

FRI 29 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Honeck, Beethoven, & a Waltz Tradition feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Till Fellner, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Download the App for a chance to win tickets to:

SAT 30

@wizkhalifa (Wiz Khalifa)

RENAISSANCE CITY WINDS. Holmes Hall, North Side. 412-681-7111.

Drunk at this Xbox party :)

SUN 01 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Honeck, Beethoven, & a Waltz Tradition feat. Manfred Honeck, conductor & Till Fellner, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

@DJBonics (DJ Bonics)

Apples >>>>>>

TRANS-SIBERIAN TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA ORCHESTRA

MON 02

SUN 01 EDGEWOOD COMMUNITY HOUSE. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Edgewood. 412-731-3443. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Alton Merrill. Shadyside. SONOMA GRILLE. Jessica Lee. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 02 SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

TUE 03 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Kevin Howard. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 04 NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Rick Matt. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC THU 28 LEVELS. Sean Kemmerer. North Side. 412-231-7777. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

CHATHAM BAROQUE & PITTSBURGH CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY. Bach Brandenburg Concertos. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-687-1788.

SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Jay Wiley. Sewickley. 412-741-5804.

OTHER MUSIC

SAT 30 AMBRIDGE SONS OF ITALY. Speakeasy Alley. Ambridge. CLUB COLONY. Judi Figel. Scott. 412-668-0903. LEVELS. Nina Sainato. North Side. 412-231-7777. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

THU 28

SUN 01

SAT 30

HAMBONE’S. Calliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Cityscape. North Side. 412-231-7777.

TUE 03

HOLIDAY MUSIC

PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Brooke Annibale. Harmony. 570-294-6450. RIVERS CASINO. Bobby V. North Side. 412-231-7777.

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WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. In the Mood. North Side. 412-231-7777.

DOWNLOAD DOWNLOAD NOW NOW OR OR TEXT TEXT “EVENTS” “EVENTS” TO TO 77948 77948

SUN 01 STRAND THEATER. The Celtic Tenors. Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

MON 02

REGGAE

STRAND THEATER. The Celtic Tenors. Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

SAT 30

WED 04

COUNTRY FRI 29 HAMBONE’S. Molly Alphabet &

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FRI 29

PALACE THEATRE. Branson on the Road Christmas Style. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

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at CONSOL Energy Center Saturday, December 7

DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

SAT 30

WED 04

HAMBONE’S. The Mahlors. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRI 29

LOST CHRISTMAS EVE 2013

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NORTHMONT UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. J. Richard Szeremany, organ, Carly Noel Black, soprano. Advent & Christmas Organ Music. Noon. North Park. 412-364-0105.

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do Nov 27 - Dec 3 WEDNESDAY 27

FRIDAY 29

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Dec. 1.

Lissie MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Purple Apple & The Artless. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

Ali Spagnola’s Power Hour Concert and Drinking Game CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

Tres lads JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $7 cover charge. 9p.m.

SATURDAY 30

An evening with Vanessa Carlton CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

John ‘Dr. Dirty’ Valby

Landau Murphy

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:15p.m.

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 7p.m.

Rust Belt Kings

MONDAY 25

Christopher Smedley

Panthers Pregame Party STAGE AE North Side. Free event. Live music from Cassadee Pope and food & drink specials. Doors open at 12:30p.m.

TRAX FARMS Finleyville. Free admission. For more info visit traxfarms.com. 5p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. With special guest Tom Breiding. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

Macy Kate

TWENTY ONE PILOTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1 STAGE AE

newbalancepittsburgh.com special guests Smallpools & Sirah. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

A Night with St. Nick

Honeck, Beethoven & a Waltz Tradition

PHOTO CREDIT: LINDSEY BYRNES

The Mahones/Bastard Bearded Irishmen

IN PITTSBURGH

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 10:30p.m.

SUNDAY 14

Twenty one pilots STAGE AE North Side. With

MGMT

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Kuroma. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

TUESDAY 36 2 Pianos 4 Hands

CITY THEATER MAINSTAGE South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through Dec. 22.

Download the fun & free CP HAPPS APP To find the most popular events in Pittsburgh Available on the App Store and Google Play.

DOWNLOAD THE FUN & FREE CP HAPPS APP TO FIND THE MOST POPULAR EVENTS IN PITTSBURGH

BLACK FRIDAY SALE!

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F O R M E N A N D WO M E N 36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

3810 FORBES AVE 3 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


NOTHING SACRED

FOUR ASPIRING WRITERS MEET AND GET MIXED UP IN A KILLING

{BY HARRY KLOMAN} Judi Dench has always been so commanding on film that it’s hard at first to adjust to her in Philomena, where she plays an aging Irish woman searching for the child she was forced to give up for adoption 50 years earlier. But it doesn’t take long for her darting eyes and timorous mien to convince us.

Two for the road: Judi Dench and Steve Coogan

CP APPROVED

Philomena is a wonderful collaboration between a vigilant director (Stephen Frears), a great acting dame and the canny Steve Coogan, who co-wrote the script (based on a true story) and plays Martin, the sardonic journalist who accompanies Philomena on her search for her son. Their journey ends up indicting a perpetually callous and self-serving Catholic Church that’s more interested in covering its ass than in healing souls. Philomena and Martin are as different as two people can be: She’s literal and he’s rhetorical — which means she doesn’t know when he’s joking, let alone what he’s joking about. (“She told four people today that they’re one in a million. What are the odds of that?”) They’re the oddest of couples in a road movie that’s every bit as tender as it is hilarious, and that asks us to consider whether anger or forgiveness is the better way to respond to the unforgivable. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Come celebrate local filmmakers at the

Steeltown Film Factory Short Film Festival. The program will screen a selection of short films made locally by the entrants and finalists of the Steeltown competition. Also, learn how you can submit a short script to be considered for next year’s contest. 6 p.m. Sun., Dec. 1. Hollywood, Dormont. Free

MEET THE BEATS Boys among the books: William S. Burroughs (Ben Foster), Allen Ginsberg (Daniel Radcliffe) and Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan)

{BY AL HOFF}

A

FTER A confusing scene set in a jail, John Krokidas’ Kill Your Darlings begins in “Patterson, New Jersey 1943,” where Allen Ginsberg has just been accepted to Columbia University. I hope you know who Ginsberg turned out to be, because if not, this origin story about the Beats is just a coming-of-age film about some guys who cut school and were into books. This bio-pic unfolds over one significant year during which four aspiring writers meet, formulate a plan for a new literary style, enjoy sex and drugs, and get mixed up in a killing. Ginsberg (Daniel Radcliffe) spots the beautiful Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan) reciting Henry Miller in the school library; later, at a Village party, he encounters William S. Burroughs (Ben Foster), flopped in a bathtub inhaling nitrous oxide. Also in attendance: the older David Kammerer (Michael C. Hall), who is in a messy codependent relationship with the capricious Lucien. The fourth musketeer, Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston), is introduced later, with the twin distinctions of having

been in the Merchant Marine and written 1 million words. Unless viewers bring their own knowledge to provide context, Kill doesn’t make clear how this roundelay of “subversive” experiences translates into later creative output, other than tapping the persistent romanticism that wild times equal fantastic prose.

KILL YOUR DARLINGS DIRECTED BY: John Krokidas STARRING: Daniel Radcliffe, Dane DeHaan, Michael C. Hall Starts Fri., Nov. 29. Regent Square

“I love complicated” is Lucien’s arch refrain, and it’s ironic that this tale revolving around him should feel otherwise. It’s muddled, but the themes are superficial and obvious. (The montage of three penetrations — needle, penis and knife — is particularly amateurish.) And despite being structured around heartbreak and a violent death, it lacks any vivid sense of hurt, confusion or

anger. The final scenes are cast as a moral dilemma for Ginsberg, testing his loyalty and how deep his rejection of authority is, but they barely cast a shadow. Radcliffe is moving into edgier adult roles, though it’s hard not to see Harry Potter in this tale of a bespectacled lad, smart but unschooled-in-the-ways-of-weird, who finds both conflict and a new sense of purpose at an esteemed educational institution. The fine-boned, dewy Radcliffe is also poorly cast as the less attractive young Ginsberg. (It’s a distinction that matters when the work pivots on the hierarchies of male beauty.) The film wraps up with a series of snapshots of the real Ginsberg and company, from Columbia through the Morocco sojourn and into the AARP years. Perhaps the final unintentional irony comes at the very end of the credits: “Photos of Allen Ginsberg courtesy of Allen Ginsberg LLC.” From gleefully smashing the system to being a post-mortem LLC — a full life is indeed complicated, though only a sliver is presented here. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Tan Smart…Live Well! Tanman Says… Learn how important Vitamin-D is!

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www.anytimetantanningclub.com Pittsburgh Filmmakers

Opening Friday Nov. 29

Kill Your Darlings Fri- 8:00 Sat- 5:30, 8:00 Sun- 3:00; 5:30 Mon-Thu- 8:00

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)

- 11/27 @ 2pm & 7pm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------These Birds Walk (2013) - 11/29 @ 7pm & 9pm -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Regent Square Theater

Bastard Bearded Irishmen Concert

1035 S. Braddock Ave.

- 11/30 @ 7:30pm

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Caucus

w/ Sound/Unsound trio - 12/1 @ 2pm

Fri- 8:00 Sat- 5:30, 8:00 Sun- 3:00 Mon-Wed- 7:30 Thu- 5:30; 7:45 Harris Theater

Silents, Please! Film Series

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Steel Town Film Factory Film Fest - 12/1 @ 6pm

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

809 Liberty Ave.

theaters.pittsburgharts.org

BLACK NATIVITY. Kasi Lemmons directs this contemporary adaptation of Langston Hughes’ play about family, forgiveness and reconciliation at Christmas time. A single mom (Jennifer Hudson), facing eviction, sends her teenage son, Langston (Jacob Latimore), to New York City. There, he can spend the holidays with her parents (Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett), from whom she is long estranged. Langston finds temptation in the big city, but also, through a series of lessons (including a dream in which the nativity is recreated in Harlem), learns about the importance of family and heritage. The work is enlivened with R&B songs, and fortified with Hughes’ words. That’s not to say the film isn’t sentimental and full of contrivance, but the cast plays the material straight and soberly, which helps buttress the melodrama and saves it from mawkishness. Plus, this is a straight-up PG film without snarkiness, cursing and other naughtiness that you can take the whole family to. (Al Hoff)

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THE BOOK THIEF. In Brian Percival’s adaptation of Markus Zusak’s novel, young Liesel (Sophie Nélisse) is sent to live with adoptive parents (Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson) in a small German town in 1938. Life quickly gets messy: The family hides a Jewish refugee; war begins; and privation and hardship pile up. Liesel finds an escape in books, and her love of the written word both sustains and endangers her.

Caucus The film doesn’t offer anything new on the much-documented Holocaust experience, and perhaps due to its origins as a youngadult novel, much of it feels perfunctory rather than provocative. It’s meant to be an emotional experience, but when a film is narrated by Death as this one is, it does take some of the shock out of it. Which of these poor souls will be untimely claimed? Even more distracting for me was how the actors inexplicably speak English with a German accent. This had the unfortunate effect of making everything sound like a

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

Black Nativity silly skit. Even more baffling, some characters do speak German, with subtitles, and books are shown in both languages. There was so little nuance in this film — there are good Germans and bad Germans — that I wondered why the filmmaker just couldn���t pick one side for language. (AH) CAUCUS. A.J. Schnack’s vérité-style documentary takes us back to the heady days of 2011, when eight Republican presidential candidates made an assortment of gambits to win the votes of Iowa caucus-goers. From grudgingly eating a corn dog at the state fair (Mitt Romney) and singing (Herman Cain) to arriving perennially late (Michelle Bachman) and visiting every county in the state (Rick Santorum), it’s a full roundup of retail politics at its most micro level. (Some events barely have a dozen attendees.) It’s also a spectacle of a certain brand of politics, as these candidates scramble to win over an electorate — white, older, rural, conservative Christian — that hardly represents 21st century America. And yet for all the hoops jumped through, the victories are pyrrhic: Romney wins, then loses Iowa; Santorum wins Iowa but loses the nomination; Romney outlasts his way to the nomination but loses the big game. Two years from now, it all starts again, as Iowa exercises its outsized role in demanding that primary candidates suffer through a hundred greasy spoons and incoherent rants about taxes. In the credits, Schnack thanks his forbearers in political documentary, but there are enough bizarro-Americana scenes in here to remind one of Altman’s Nashville. Starts Fri., Nov. 29. Harris (AH)

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DELIVERY MAN. Words I never thought I’d write about a Vince Vaughn comedy: “The fun was undermined by the earnestness.” Ken Scott’s film is a remake of a Canadian comedy about an underachieving dude (Vaughn) who discovers his youthful donations at a sperm bank have resulted in 533 children, more than a hundred of whom are suing to learn his identity. Freaked out but intrigued, our hero starts by anonymously inserting himself into the lives of his grown children. It’s an absurd premise that needs a light touch, but Scott’s film veers closer to Lifetime. If you want a thoroughly predictable tale about a dad who reconnects with dozens of his kids, then have at it. But prepare to suspend a lot of disbelief for this redemption tale to make sense. (AH) FROZEN. This film hits many of the things I dislike about animated Disney tales. It is: not remotely close to the source material (Hans Christian


to blend with the African-American skin tones; Thurman’s perverse literalness; and every moment that John Ritter is on the screen. 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 29, and 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 30. Oaks (AH) SILENTS, PLEASE. A program of early silent shorts, including Melies’ “A Trip to the Moon,” Buster Keaton’s “One Week and more. Live musical accompaniment provided by the Sound/Unsound Trio. 2 p.m. Sun., Dec. 1. Hollywood HOME ALONE. Kevin (Macauley Culkin) is accidentally left behind when his family heads out for the holidays, and this proves to be very bad news for a pair of burglars. Chris Columbus directs this 1990 comedy that made a star of the face-palming Culkin. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 3. AMC Loews. $5

Frozen Andersen’s “The Snow Queen”); full of Broadway- broodiness and memorable violence made it type songs; and populated by characters created to compelling, and helped override its baroque plot. move merchandise. And it undermines any “strong But Lee eschews the seriousness that grounds some female” narrative by drawing these women to look Asian crime thrillers in favor of stuff Americans like sexualized freaks (tiny waists, strapless tops like: scenery-chewing Samuel L. Jackson, jokey violence and a lot of and saucer eyes that take backstory filled in with up half the head). TV broadcasts. Other folks either Brolin is good, but like or don’t mind this, in this retelling, his and thus will enjoy this character reacts more wintry tale directed to others’ action than by Christopher Buck from his own urgency. and Jennifer Lee. One There’s a notable lack of Norwegian sister (voice of Delivery Man tension, when Doucett’s Kristen Bell) has to save agency is undercut by the other from the discohis passiveness or by inspired ice palace she’s ridiculous alpha-male entombed herself in; scenes that wouldn’t for helpers, the rescuing be out of place in a lass has a sturdy young martial-arts comedy. woodsman, his trusty Newcomers to the story reindeer and a goofy may find the mystery, snowman (voiced by Josh with its twists and Gad). (Even I chuckled when the snowman blurted out apropos of nothing: feints, a moderately entertaining thriller despite its “I have no skull.”) The animation is top-notch, with ludicrous plot. Fans of the Korean film should just the snow and ice deserving special commendation. treasure their memories. (AH) Disney’s depiction of women, though, still seems to be a work in progress. Arrive on time: The pre-film short, “Get a Horse,” is a clever meta commentary on the URBAN ENCOUNTERS: WHAT TO DO IF YOU evolving nature of Disney animation, from black- GET STOPPED BY THE POLICE. Carl Clay’s 1998 and-white Mickey to eye-popping 3-D. In 3-D, in film is a video release of a play performed by the Black Spectrum Theater Company, dramatizing select theaters (AH) the issues around youth of color being stopped by the police. It’s a provocative topic that certainly has resonance here in Pittsburgh, particularly in the wake of the Jordan Miles incident. The film concludes the Sembéne African Film Festival. 6:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 29. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. www.sembenefilmfestival.org

NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON. Jeremy Irons stars in this new thriller from Bille August about a professor who, late in life, takes off for an adventure after saving a woman from suicide. 7:30 pm. Wed., Dec. 4. Hollywood WHITE CHRISTMAS. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye are a pair of entertainers who travel to Vermont with two singing sisters (Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen) for the holidays. Once there, the men discover the country inn is run by their old Army general, and he’s in financial straits. Looks like a big musical show might be the ticket! Besides the title song, Michael Curtiz’s 1954 film includes other Irving Berlin classics such as “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep” and “Blue Skies.” 7:30 p.m. Thu., Dec. 5. AMC Loews. $5 ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Silents, Please! Sunday, December 1, 2:00PM

Early Film Techniques, including Buster Keaton’s One Week, A Trip to the Moon and more! With live music by the Sound/Unsound Trio. http://www.showclix.com/event/EarlyFilmTechniques This project supported in part by a Seed Award from The Sprout Fund

HOLLYWOOD THEATER 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368

REPERTORY

THESE BIRDS WALK. This new documentary from Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq looks at the chaotic lives of street children in Karachi, Pakistan. In Urdu, with subtitles. 7 and 9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 29. Hollywood

Oldboy OLDBOY. After a boozy night out in 1993, Joe Doucett (Josh Brolin) finds himself imprisoned in a privately run cell, with no explanation. Twenty years later, he is just as mysteriously released — and he sets about learning who locked him and why. Spike Lee directs this American remake of Park Chan-wook’s 2003 Korean crime drama. The original was a dark, pulpy shocker whose

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BAD SANTA. Willie T. Soke (Billy Bob Thornton) is one dissolute and drunken Santa Claus: He and his “elf” partner Marcus (Tony Cox) suffer through their low-budget North Pole mall act in order to gain access to rip off the store. Comic circumstances require that Soke move in with Thurman (Brett Kelly), a lonely, pudgy boy who believes in “Santa.” It’s not that director Terry Zwigoff isn’t entitled to unload a deep, dark film, especially on such an easy target — it’s just that the film should be better. It’s basically a one-joke enterprise: Santa is an asshole. Bad Santa — for better or worse — never does let up in its misanthropy. This earns my grudging admiration. And the film does harbor a few inspired moments: Marcus’ elf-ear tips, which evidently don’t come in shades guaranteed

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[BOOK REVIEW]

AN AFFABLE TROUBLEMAKER HAS OFFICIALLY INFILTRATED THE SYSTEM

PERSONALS {BY FRED SHAW} I tell my freshmen-comp classes that anecdote, when written clearly and concisely, is effective because of the personal element it adds. I suspect Ann Curran feels the same: Her first collection, Me First (Lummox Press), trades in 101 pages of first-person poems detailing a life of encounters with writers, pols and celebs as a freelancer for various Pittsburgh publications. Curran’s work is mostly straightforward free verse whose simple language mimics that of reportage, albeit in ways that often focus on the peripheral details of an interview or experience only now making it into print. The subjects of several poems are royalty in these parts, with Dan Rooney, Mr. Rogers, the Hillmans and Paul Mellon each getting a turn in Curran’s spotlight, where she rejects PR spin in favor of humanizing her subjects, for better or worse. In “Me and Andy Warhol,” a meeting with the pop-art master leaves her speaker less than impressed: “We check out his workout spot with girly weights, / watch him react to the scorn of students, / conduct a brief interview on the way / out the door as he constructs a wall / with monosyllabic yeses and noes / to hide the person he is, was, will be …” Curran’s is a speaker who seems intent on divulging something personal about these subjects, even if it’s only that they’re thin-skinned and egotistical. However, this treatment cuts both ways, showing society’s uneasy and fleeting views on fame, as Curran dishes on out-of-date stars like Barbara Bosson and Jack Klugman. The tone in some of these poems is gossipy, but who among us doesn’t like to tell of brushes with glitterati, especially in the ‘Burgh? Yet while these poems might appeal to some, it’s the poet’s treatment of lesser-known subjects that has more emotional heft. In “Me and the Fish Lady,” Curran writes, “She comes by bus from Carrick / with two carry-ons stuffed with clothes / and makes a Laundromat of the Y.” The subject here seems more worthy of poetic treatment than others with greater name recognition. This same Y is the setting for “Me and Barack Obama,” where the speaker reveals the future President’s willingness to take a joke. It’s moments like these that make reading Me First serve as proof of the human curiosity that demands that we put ourselves and others, both in and out of the headlines, under a microscope.

RIOT GRRRL, UNINTERRRUPTED [ RT [A R REVIEW] REV EVIE IEW] IE W]] [ART

{BY {B Y MI MICH MICHELLE CHEL CH ELLLE FFRIED} RIED} RIED RI D}

A

CRESTING ’90s revival requires proper tribute to riot grrrl — the hybrid underground movement that reimagined punk rock’s DIY modes with feminist purpose. Typically, riot grrrl’s legacy is told through music, but Alien She, at Carnegie Mellon’s Miller Gallery, offers a spirited collection — part art exhibition, part historical project — showcasing the movement’s artifacts while honoring its evolved second life in art in various media and disciplines. (This reviewer, though employed by Carnegie Mellon University, is unaffiliated with the Miller Gallery). The first major exhibition dedicated to riot grrrl, Alien She is both instructive-ly designed and loyal. That’s unsurprising: Curators Astria Suparak and Ceci Moss were involved in the West Coast-bred scene as teens. “The participants of the original movement were in their teens and 20s in the ’90s, and have since solidified their identities, interests and careers,” writes Suparak, director of the Miller Gallery, in an email. Alien She includes works by seven artists who, she writes, “have incorporated, expanded upon, or reacted to riot grrrl’s ideology, tactics and aesthetics.” As a gateway, the gallery’s first floor is dedicated to riot grrrl’s creative output, including hundreds of self-published zines, fliers and more, gathered from personal and institutional collections. Neatly arranged rows of paper trace a retired analog past — the Xerox-and-Sharpie, feminine brute universe of the riot grrrl — now brushed off for the archives. Learn something or get nostalgic, but save energy for the

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

Slumber company: part of Tammy Rae Carland’s photo series “Lesbian Beds”

artworks on the second floor. Breaking the ice are Allyson Mitchell’s three towering hominids in estrus — suitably titled “Ladies Sasquatch” — whose burly-girly displays (what are they to do with no male in sight?) are betrayed by their

ALIEN SHE

continues through Feb. 16. Miller Gallery, Purnell Center for the Arts, Carnegie Mellon campus, Oakland. 412-268-3618 or www.cmu.edu/millergallery

craft-kitsch construction: a repurposing of granny’s fabric scraps and wigs? A discarded teddy-bear collection? Neighboring this joyous barbarism is Mitchell’s sly tribute to academic feminism, with a wall-sized pencil drawing depicting a robust feminist li-

brary framing a diptych of T-shirts reading: “Women’s Studies Professors Have White Privilege” and “I’m with problematic.” The grouping suggests that feminism is caught in a nauseating feedback loop. A counterpoint are Tammy Rae Carland’s large photographs that pause overthinking. These include the romantic, slept-in colorfields of “Lesbian Beds,” while the empty stages in “I’m Dying Up in Here” evoke awkward stillness, as if the performer had just fled the scene. Carland talks love, anxiety, attachment and queer politics without bristles. There’s also a career-spanning collection by filmmaker, performer and author Miranda July. A sure highlight is her video “Nest of 10s.” It’s worth the 10 minutes — rarely will you find such provocative, sometimes


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HOLIDAY UNW

[ART REVIEW]

PLACEMENTS

RAPPED

A dance adven

ture for the kid

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

He An’s “What Makes Me Understand What I Know?” {PHOTO COURTESY OF GREENHOUSE MEDIA}

difficult, push and pull about gender, sex and class in such a deceptively banal narrative. The third floor further reconciles art and post-riot grrrl acolytes, starting with L.J. Roberts’ crowd-pleasing, 15-foot-tall barbed-wire fence encased in fuchsia yarn and titled, “We Couldn’t Get In, We Couldn’t Get Out” — an impressively belabored sculptural trope. Roberts’ other works borrow from the visual language of protest, including a giant flag, originally installed on a church steeple, reading “Mom Knows Now,” which wall text characterizes as “a coming out and a declaration.” Stephanie Syjuco’s brainiac installations mark the intersection of sociocultural provocation and dry humor. “The Counterfeit Crochet Project (Critique of a Political Economy)” is a participatory work, inviting viewers to crochet knockoffs from a catalog of hacked patterns, from Gucci purses to Burberry scarves. Syjuco’s visually tame projects give me a thrill: An affable troublemaker has officially infiltrated the system. Riot grrrl found empowerment through its marginality as a radical movement, a sensibility distinct in works by Ginger Brooks Takahashi. She’s a founding member of feminist genderqueer art collective LTTR (which formerly stood for “Lesbians to the Rescue”). “A Wave of New Rage Thinking,” reads a post-apocalyptic-looking piece of signage tacked to the wall that Twitterizes the first floor’s famous riot-grrrl manifesto. “Feminist Body Pillow” is a fleshy dog-pile of stuffed T-shirts printed with racy though delicate assertions of lesbian lust and queer visibility. Also featured is Brooks Takahashi’s traveling Project Mobilivre-Bookmobile, “an effort to bring artists’ publications to a wider audience while demystifying bookmaking with workshops.” Altogether, Brooks Takahashi uncovers feminism’s tendency to vacillate between friendly separatism and determined community-building. Community-building, a withstanding preoccupation among feminists and artists, is central to Faythe Levine’s photographic series “Time Outside of Time,” which documents off-the-grid communities. Alien She is superbly designed, comprehensive and approachable. But it’s important to remember that riot grrrl was antiauthoritarian, gritty, screechy. It reveled in failure and was intentionally unsuitable for mass consumption. One wonders whether institutional sanctioning of such movements is the compromise required to get them into history books. If so, perhaps it’s OK, because this exhibition’s authors were directly involved with the movement. Nonetheless, Alien She resounds riot grrrl’s, and feminism’s, hold on contemporary life. It says, “This happened, keep going.”

For the 2013 Carnegie International — curated by Dan Byers, Tina Kukielski and Daniel Baumann — Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky emphasized the importance of place. For most of us, a firm sense of place is at the root of our identity. Whether it’s where we grew up or where we live, the particulars and history inspire pride and nostalgia. In his series “What Makes Me Understand What I Know?,” He An uses large neon characters pilfered from the signage ubiquitous in Chinese boomtowns. The characters spell out two names: his father’s and that of a Japanese adult-video actress. Globalization tends to homogenize and transform a place until it is unrecognizable. The series explores intimacy familial and virtual to meditate on the alienation caused by rapid development. Particularly poignant in the halls of the museum built by industrial titan Andrew Carnegie, He An’s series is echoed in Zoe Strauss’ Homestead Project photographs, which chronicle a community transformed by boom and bust. Amar Kanwar’s films similarly record the transformation by industry and urban growth of landscape in India. But where Strauss portrays specific Homestead residents, Kanwar, like He An, prefers a mood of disconnection and isolation. Industry is also captured in the work of Yael Bartana, but instead of faceless globalization, she focuses on workers building by hand. However, far from sanguine, her two films explore the failures of Zionism. In an edited version of 1935’s propagandistic “Awodah,” smiling pioneers conquer the desert. In “Summer Camp,” Bartana documents efforts by the Israeli Committee Against House Demolition to rebuild a Palestinian home destroyed by Israeli authorities. Like Bartana, photographer Joel Sternfeld captures the failures and triumphs of revolutionary ideas. His series “Sweet Earth” documents American experimental utopias. Evoking a similar mixture of melancholy and optimism are the photographic portraits of Zanele Muholi. These images, declarative like Strauss’, show people from South Africa living with adversity (in this case, confronting homophobia). In company with Strauss and Muholi are Henry Taylor’s portrait paintings, which capture the milieu surrounding his Los Angeles studio. Taylor portrays people from the neighborhood as well as iconic figures like Eldridge Cleaver and Huey Newton. By focusing on place as both a global and local concept, the International underscores the importance of locale and community in a rapidly changing landscape.

in all of us.

December 6, 6: 30 p.m. December 7, 11 :00 a.m. and 2: 00 p.m. The George R. White Studio at Pittsburgh O pera TICKETS: 1.88 8.71.TICKETS or attacktheatr e.com/wrap www.attackthe

atre.com

Made possible in part by:

Dec. 4-21

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Family Four-Pack only $100! picttheatre.org 412-561-6000

Paul Giovanni

by based on characters created by

Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle The Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland

2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL continues through March 16. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

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Romeo&Juliet NICOLAS PETROV’S

MU S I C B Y SER G EI PR O K O F I E V

ROCKWELL THEATRE, PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE

December 10 - 15, 2013

Ronald Allan-Lindblom artistic director Earl Hughes producing director

www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

(412) 392-8000

Give the Gift of

oadway! Brroa B

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN}

:LWKD&/2*LIW&HUWLÀFDWHIRU7ZR

412-281-2822 4 412 1 12 28 281 1 28 82 22 2

Patrick Jordan (left) and Leandro Cano in barebones’ The Motherfucker With the Hat

[PLAY REVIEWS]

LOVE STORY December 6 - 22 Byham Theater

Pittsburgh’s own

TOM ATKINS 1/2 price tickets sponsored by

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ties of the characters soften and lots of plot starts bubbling up. None of that’s bad. But {BY TED HOOVER} where we end up is completely different from where we began. LAST YEAR, barebones productions presented As it turns out, Guirgis is a sentimenStephen Adly Guirgis’ Jesus Hopped the ‘A’ talist obsessed with love. And when you Train, and the show knocked my socks off. strip away the dirty words and ratty Guirgis’ explosive writing was so passion- milieu, the play reveals itself to be a meloate, and his vision so singular, I couldn’t drama; all the villain needs is a mustache to wait to see his then-new Broadway show twirl. Again, not a bad thing, but a little The Motherfucker with the Hat. surprising from something titled The Motherfucker With the Hat. On Douglas McDermott’s very clever THE MOTHERFUCKER set, Leandro Cano finds lots of humor and WITH THE HAT honesty in the role of Jackie’s cousin, Julio. continues through Dec. 7. Edwin Lee Gibson’s decision to underplay barebones productions at the New Ralph is perfect for the first half of the Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25-35. 412-320-4610 show, but comes up a little short in the payor www.barebonesproductions.com off. Playing Ralph’s wife, Daina Michelle Griffith is, as usual, a fascinating actress It wasn’t a long wait, as barebones now — here handling a role which is Guirgis’ presents Motherfucker. This time we hop- weakest device. skip around New York City with Jackie, a The irony of the show is that the peorecently paroled drug-dealer now working ple who would most appreciate Guirgis’ on his AA sobriety … 12 steps that his somewhat mawkish story will be the least substance-abusing girlfriend, Veronica, is likely to see it. not inclined to take. A suspicion she may I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM have cheated on him leads Jackie to enlist the help of his AA sponsor, Ralph D. … and a few other assorted characters. As directed by Rich Keitel, and opening {BY F.J. HARTLAND} with a scene of lethal toxicity thanks to Ruth Gamble (as Veronica) and Patrick THE BOYS ARE BACK: Smudge, Jinx, Sparky Jordan (as Jackie), this barebones produc- and Frankie, better known as the 1950stion starts with an H-bomb bang. Corro- style singing group The Plaids, return for sive, profane, darkly funny — this was the their holiday show Plaid Tidings, now at the CLO Cabaret. writing I first heard in Jesus. Plaid Tidings is a sequel to original But then the play begins to change. The intensity drops, the radioactive personali- Forever Plaid, placing Forever Plaid in

PLAID ALL OVER


the ranks of such theatrical franchises as Nunsense and The Taffetas. On the plus side, you do not have to see the original to understand Plaid Tidings. Unfortunately, like most sequels, the script doesn’t measure up to the original. In the original, The Plaids (who were killed in a car accident on their way to their first show) come back from Heaven to do that show. In Plaid Tidings, The Plaids return to do the Christmas special they never got to do. Plaid Tidings even goes so far as to steal from the original when the performers re-do their Ed Sullivan Show routine. Playwright Stuart Ross didn’t create much of a plot for Forever Plaid; he supplies even less for Plaid Tidings.

Brandon Lambert, Eric Longo and Quinn Patrick Shannon) deserve high marks for their energetic performances. The singing is spectacular; the harmonies, lush. Not only do these four actors sing more than 30 musical numbers, they perform the gee-whiz humor without commenting on it. And they move scenery, too! Memorable moments include the beautiful “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “The Carol of the Bells” and Frankie’s (Shannon) tirade on “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer.” There is also a rap number (“Twuz Tha Nite B4 Xmas”), which seems terribly out of place. On the other hand, the modern element of cell phones is handled in a very funny way. This talented director and cast as well as these classic songs deserve a much better book than they got. To their credit, all the participants rise above this script. If you know who Rosemary Clooney is, or if you remember watching Perry Como on your black-and-white television, Plaid Tidings may be just the shot in the arm your Christmas spirit needs.

THE DIRECTOR, CAST AND SONGS DESERVE A MUCH BETTER BOOK THAN THEY GOT.

PLAID TIDINGS

continues through Jan. 12. CLO Cabaret at Theatre Square. $39.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pittsburghclo.org

Plaid Tidings director Guy Stroman keeps this production tight and fast-paced, and the cast members (Billy Hepfinger,

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Carnegie Trees Opening Celebration Wednesday, December 4, 2013 5:30–8 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art Hall of Architecture $75 Enjoy a first look at the six uniquely decorated Carnegie Trees for the 2013 Holiday season at this preview party, hosted by the Women’s Committee of Carnegie Museum of Art. This year’s theme is Embracing the Art of Play. Call 412.622.3325 to register.

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131

shop the museum stores for creative gifts one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.2812.05.13

It’s nothing short of miraculous.

The Alchemists’ Lab SIDE EFFECTS MAY INCLUDE: GIDDINESS, CONFUSION, CHECKING OF YOUR TICKET TO MAKE SURE YOU’RE IN THE RIGHT PLACE, FLYAWAY HAIR, BOGYPHOBIA, AMAZEMENT, AMUSEMENT, BEWILDERMENT, AND AN UNNATURAL INTEREST IN BAKLAVA.

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

December 10-15

NOV. 30

DEVISED & WRITTEN BY GAB CODY IN COLLABORATION WITH THE STUDENTS OF POINT PARK UNIVERSITY’S CONSERVATORY THEATRE COMPANY.

PITTSBURGHPLAYHOUSE.COM OR 412.392.8000

Suite Life: A Billy Strayhorn Birthday Bash

RONALD ALLAN-LINDBLOM, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR EARL HUGHES, PRODUCING DIRECTOR

+ FRI., NOV. 29 {EXHIBIT}

Visiting Phipps pp Conservatory y over the holiday liday season for its festive displays ays is a Pittsburgh rite of passage. age. This year’s Winter Flower wer Show and Winter Lightt Garden will surely illuminate nate the season. The exhibit, opening today, will feature glass sculptures — articulated ed mushrooms, ferns, bromeliads eliads — and a light installation ation evoking the night sky ky that might cheer up even en Scrooge. (The artists are Matthew McCormack and Jenn Figg.) Plus plenty of poinsettias, as, amaryllis and paperwhites. And if your previous visit to Phipps was to see the corpse flower, don’t worry — it will definitely smell better this time. Today also marks

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

the start of Phipps’ special late winter hours. Brett Wilson 9:30 a.m.-11 p.m. (Winter Light Garden: 5-11 p.m.). Displays p p y continue through Jan. 12. One

Schenley Park, Oakland. $1115. 412-622-6914 or www. phipps.conservatory.org

{STAGE} One of the closest things to a 21st-century holiday stage classic we have is Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge. Christopher Durang’s 2002 parody of A Christmas Carol world-premiered right here at City Theatre, and has gone on to light up stages pretty much everywhere. Little Lake Theatre Company’s new production opens this week, featuring: a title character who’s had enough of the numerous urchins living “in a bunch in the root cellar”; a ghost who can’t get her timing down; and four of Durang’s original songs. The show, directed by Jena Oberg, features Leah Hillgrove in the title role and Art DeConciliis as Scrooge. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 14. 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org www.littl

{MUSIC} {MUSIC

NOV. 30

2 Pianos 4 Hands

It’s practic practically a tradition: For the sixth yyear running, music Manfred Honeck and director M Pittsburgh Symphony the Pittsb Orchestra present a special Thanksgiving-week concert Thanksgiv as part of the BNY Mellon Classics series. The Grand Cla tonight and Sunday, shows, to several Strauss waltzes feature se polkas, and Bizet’s and polka “Carmen Fantasie Brilliante for Flute and Orchestra.” (It’s a family show, so expect expe a green-feathered visitor visit during the “Sport Polka.”) Highlights Pol include worldinc renowned Austrian ren pianist Till Fellner pi (pictured) performing ( (p Beethoven’s Piano B Concerto No. 4. C BO B 8 p.m. Also 2:30 p.m. Sun., 2 Dec. D 1. 600 Liberty Ave., Downtown. A $25.75-$109.75 (free $25 for children ages 3-12). ch 412-392-4900 or www. 412-392-4 pittsburghsymphony.org pittsburgh


{PHOTO COURTESY OF GREEN BUILDING ALLIANCE}

sp otlight If you don’t associate Russia with green buildings, you’re not entirely wrong: The push to make high-performing structures that are kinder to the environment and nicer for people to inhabit is just getting started there. Mike Schiller, who heads Pittsburgh’s Green Building Alliance, learned as much on his speaking tour there this past summer. But he also connected with two leaders in that fledgling movement: Russian Green Building Council founder Guy Eames and Svetlana Koshkina, CEO of the Russian Green Development Forum. “It’s so new to Russia, they’re sort of spearheading the entire movement,” says GBA spokesperson Leslie Montgomery. Compare that to the U.S., where the two-decade-plus green-building movement includes things like last week’s GreenBuild Conference, in Philadelphia, with 30,000 attendees from 90 countries. And Moscow has just nine certified-green buildings, compared to about 40 in much-smaller Pittsburgh. Eames (who’s U.K.-born but Russia-based) and Koshkina are now on a GBA-facilitated, State Department-funded cultural-exchange tour of five U.S. cities (which includes the GreenBuild conference). And on Dec. 4, the pair (pictured) visit GBA headquarters to talk about the special challenges of greening Russia’s built environment, from regulatory hurdles to taking on massive projects like the Sochi Olympics. Next year, the exchange continues when Schiller and Nancy Hart, GBA’s vice president of development, return to Russia for more. Bill O’Driscoll 5:30-8 p.m. Wed., Dec. 4. 33 Terminal Way, Suite 311, South Side. $5. 412-431-0709

The 1997 play 2 Pianos 4 Hands might be the most popular crowd-pleaser you’ve never heard of. Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenblatt’s comedy for a pair of piano-playing actors tells the story of two childhood friends who both spent years trying to become famous concert pianists. The two perform tunes by everyone from Bach to Billy Joel while portraying dozens of characters, from pushy parents to eccentric teachers. The play’s had national touring productions and been staged around the world, with translations into Finnish, French and Japanese. City Theatre’s new mainstage production {BOOKS} features Broadway-credited The indie bookstore is Bob Stillman (pictured) and experiencing g something Christopher Tocco, who has international stage ge experience; Tom Frey, who has as performed in the e show hundreds DEC. 01 of times himself, Holiday Book directs his 12th production. The Sale & Soiree first performance is tonight. BO 5:30 p.m. Continues es through Dec. 22. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatre company.org

+ SUN., DEC. 01

There might be folkss out there who think the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater is named after someone called “Kelly Strayhorn.” Butt everyone else can tell you that the “Kelly” iss Gene Gene, and Strayhorn refers to a guy who grew up around the corner and went on to

N E W S

here, and not of a rrenaissance i a minute too soon for holiday gift-buying. Today’s fancily titled Holiday Book Sale &

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NOV. 29

Winter Flower Show and Winter Light Garden

{EVENT}

Soiree includes displays by a half-dozen favorite venues,, with books new and used, everything from used best-sellers to graphic bes novels, work by local no authors, art books and au more. The Small Press mo Pittsburgh-sponsored Pi event, at Belvedere’s ev Ultra-Dive Bar, feaU tures holiday tunes tu by DJ J. Malls and holiday cocktails ho and an mocktails at the bar. ba At press time, confirmed vendors co included Amazing in Books, Copacetic Bo Comics, East End Co Book Bo Exchange, The Th Muse Stand, Mystery Lovers M Bookshop and Bo Spaces Corners. Sp BO Noon-5 p.m. 4016 40 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Lawrencevill Free entry (21 and over). 412-687-2555

{MUSIC}

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Techniques. BO 2 p.m. 1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $5-7. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DENMARSH PHOTOGRAPHY, INC}

{STAGE}

worldwide fame as a pianist and composer. That’s why each year, the venue hosts Suite Life: A Billy Strayhorn Birthday Bash. Tonight’s event commemorates what would have been the 98th birthday of the man who wrote “Lush Life,” “Satin Doll,” “Take the ‘A’ Train” and many more. The Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra, led by trumpeter and composer Sean Jones, and with vocalist Carolyn Perteete, offers a tribute concert. For the preshow VIP reception with Jones, cocktail attire is requested. BO 8 p.m. (6 p.m. VIP reception). 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-25 (VIP: $75). 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

{SCREEN} Once upon a time, for decades after the invention of cinema,

M U S I C

+

Trio performs to a program of mostly classic shorts including: Méliès’ pioneering and iconic 1902 fantasy “A Trip to the Moon”; Buster Keaton’s “One Week”; Viking Eggeling’s hypnotic early abstract animation “Symphonie Diagonale” (1924) and the 1924 British comedy “The Fugitive Futurist.” The program is called Early Film

there were, technically, no “silent films”; nobody had to call ’em that until some movies talked. These days, though, people are rediscovering the pleasures of sound-free movies screened with live musical accompaniment, at events like the Hollywood Theater’s Silents, Please! series. Today, Ben Opie’s Sound/Unsound

How can you not like an Open Mic & Craft Beer Swap? Especially at a public library? The Bridgeville Public Library launched this series in September, and we can’t really see any downside to sampling beer while listening to live acoustic music in such close proximity to all those books. Local musicians of all genres — and, presumably, brews of all genres — are welcome at this family-friendly event (though you must be over 21 for the beer swap). Bring beer, bring a guitar, return that overdue copy of Siddhartha … but do it tonight, because this is the final Open Mic & Craft Beer Swap of the year. BO 6:308:30 p.m. 505 McMillen St., Bridgeville. Free. 412-221-3737 or www.bridgevillelibrary.org

+ THU., DEC. 05 {OUTDOORS}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEAN-BABTISTE MILLOT}

+ SAT., NOV. 30

NOV. 29

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

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Get outside this December and challenge yourself with the Venture Outdoors urban fitness hike Woods Run Top to Bottom. When the weather turns, it’s easy to get caught indoors cozying up next to a fireplace. But an even better feeling is getting in a good workout with winter air rushing into your lungs. The hike starts at Observatory Hill, heads down to the Ohio River and then back up to the Hill for a beautiful nighttime view of the city. The guided 4-to5-mile hike will be challenging, but worth the sweat. BW 6 p.m. Riverview Park, Perry North. $12. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

Sample beers from the Straub 2013 Legacy Sampler this Friday, 11/29 at: Duffy’s Pop & Beer Warehouse Warehouse-Pleasant Hills 2-4pm Brewski’s Dist.-Russellton Dist.-Russellton 3-5pm

riotous story of Ted & Richard, childhood friends who spent years chasing the same goal: concert pianist stardom. Sat., Nov. 30, 5:30 p.m., Tue, Wed, 7 p.m., Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 5:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 22. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. CHARLES IVES TAKE ME HOME. A father’s love of music & a daughter’s passion for basketball are at odds in this play about competition, commitment, & craft. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m. and Wed, 1 & 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 11. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. A CHRISTMAS CAROL: THE MUSICAL. God bless us, every one! Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 8. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. DEATHTRAP. The story of a writer who is struggling to write a murder mystery play, & the real life events that lead

to the perfect deathtrap. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 30. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ELF THE MUSICAL. Based on the 2003 movie. Thru Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 29, 8 p.m., Sat., Nov. 30, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. GODSPELL. Musical telling of the Gospel. Fri, 8 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 7, 2 p.m. Thru Dec. 6. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. LIVE READ: THE GOONIES. Screenplay reading feat. a cast of local actors & comics. Nov. 29-30, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MADELINE’S CHRISTMAS. Celebrate Christmas w/ Madeline, Miss Clavel, & the rest of the 12 little girls in 2 straight lines. Sat, Sun, 1:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 15. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE MOTHERFUCKER WITH THE HAT. Things are starting to look up for recovering alcoholic Jackie

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

MONROEVILLE N I LIVE I MUSIC UI at Monroeville Mall 412.372.5500

December 1st Benefit Concert for the National Ovarian Cancer Society

Live Featuring: The Business Men Music! The Nied’s Hotel Band

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

& his girlfriend Veronica—until Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. Jackie spots another man’s hat in and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru their apartment & embarks on a Dec. 8. O’Reilly Theater, quest for vengeance. Presented by Downtown. 412-316-1600. barebones productions. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 1. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 1-888-718-4253. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ OVER THERE..THE G.I. DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru CHRISTMAS TOUR. Feat. Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. songs from the World War II-era. 412-681-4318. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, 6:30 p.m. and Sun, 3:30 p.m. Thru BEST OF THE Dec. 15. Crowne Plaza BURGH COMEDY Hotel, Bethel Park. SHOWCASE. Fri, 724-746-1178. www. per 8 p.m. Corner PLAID TIDINGS. pa pghcitym .co Cafe, South Side. Forever Plaid Christmas 412-488-2995. special, presented by PLAYER ONE IMPROV Pittsburgh CLO Cabaret. SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Wed, Thu, 7:30 p.m., Sat, Comedy Theater, Downtown. 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 412-339-0608. 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 12. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. VERY SPECIAL TRUE WEST. Play by Sam Shepard THANKSGIVING SPECIAL. about two battling brothers at Hosted by Burt Stewart. the edge of the desert. Presented Nov. 29-30, 8 p.m. Steel City by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

COMEDY THU 28

FRI 29 FULL T LIS ONLINE

FRI 29 - SAT 30

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

THEATER 2 PIANOS 4 HANDS. The

FRI 29 - SUN 01 TOM GREEN. 8 & 10 p.m., Sat., Nov. 30, 7 & 9 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 1, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 30 FALL, IN LOVE: COUPLES IMPROV SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MICHAEL BLACKSTON, SHAWTY SHAWTY, YOUNG STU, SMOKEY, DAVE “THE FROG” BEY. 9 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

MON 02 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 03 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 04 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. CONTINUES ON PG. 48


Friday, Nov. 29 9PM FUNK/JAZZ

VISUAL

Jazzam

New Features on Tap!

Saturday, Nov. 30 9PM

ART

JAM ROCK

KR-3 plus Blue AND Greeno

WED/NOV 27/10PM

Monday, Dec. 2 9PM

EVIL EMPIRE

Open Stage WITH SGD

(RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE TRIBUTE BAND)

$ 5.00 St. Nicholas Bock

Tuesday, Dec. 3 9PM

16oz Pints

THUR/DEC 5/10PM

JAZZ

Space Exchange Series

STONE COLD KILLER

Thursday, Dec. 5

THUR/DEC 12/10PM

AMERICANA/FOLK ROCK

STRAY BIRDS WITH Daniel Marcus

$ 3.75

MOTOMETER, PERISH, & PARADOX PLEASE

Purple Haze

$3.25 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

7 pool tables $6/hour PGH’s ONLY PING PONG TABLE Available Thur-Sun 9pm-2am•$3/half hour

16oz Pints

(EARLY SHOW) 7:30PM

AMERICAN AQUARIUM

Photograph by Dina Kantor, from Dina Kantor: Finnish and Jewish, at the American Jewish Museum

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

(LATE SHOW) 10:30PM

NEW THIS WEEK PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Pictures in Jewelry. Photos embedded in rings, pendants, watch covers & rings, given as gifts between 1880-WWI. North Side. 412-231-7881.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Andrews & Miller: Non-Objective Forms. Photographs & paintings. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 707 PENN GALLERY. threaded colors // drawing lines. Work by Nicole Czapinski. Downtown. 412-325-7017. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. SKIN. Faculty/student collaborative exhibition. Downtown. 412-291-6200. ARTISAN. Bonnie Gloris. An exhibit of Gloris’ newest body of work. Garfield. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Symphony of Colours. Work by Nadya Lapets, June Kielty, Kim Freithaler & Vickie Schilling. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. Oakland. BE GALLERIES. 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Work by ceramic artist Yoko Sekino-Bove & jewelry artist Jim Bove. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Multi-Media Artists’ Sale. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Blooming w/ Holiday Spirit. Group exhibition & holiday sale. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Allison Stewart. Paintings. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. CONNECTIONS: The Work of Fabrizio Gerbino. Downtown. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099.

FATHER RYAN ARTS CENTER. Pittsburgh Society of Artists Annual Exhibit. McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052. FIELDWORK: CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY. On Paper. Work by Althea Murphy Price, Paul Stephen Benjamin, Krista Franklin, William Downs, Alisha B. Wormsley, & Jordan Martin. onpaper@inbox.com. Garfield. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FIREBORN @ THE WORKS. Ceramics & glass pop-up gallery. Feat. Line & Color, works by Donn Hedman. S. 27th St., South Side. South Side. 412-381-3181. FRAMEHOUSE. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Group Show. Work by more than 40 artists. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4559. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Clayton Holiday Tours - A Pittsburgh Christmas. Artifacts displayed in Clayton evoke the family’s celebrations, archival & newspaper materials will give an idea of seasonal activity in & around the city. Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Arbor Aid 2013. Group show of art created from urban wood. Benefits Tree Pittsburgh. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390.

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

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2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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CONTINUES ON PG. 48

N E W S

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT

OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

S C R E E N

12.50 MILLER

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FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @M2THIRD +

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

“HAPPY HOUR” 6-8PM ENJOY 3$ CRAFT DRAFT BREWS $3 HOUSE INFUSED COCKTAILS PARKING LOT AVAILABLE RESTAURANT COMING SOON CHEERS, CARM & MIKE.

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TUESDAY 9:30-11:30pm

RADICALTRIVIA $5 Evil Drinks

$2.50 Leinenkugel’s

Wednesday ACOUSTIC MUSIC W MIKE DELUCA $3 American Honey

$2.50 Yuengling

Do you have the “Voice” of the southside? PROVE IT!!! Enter our Karaoke contest to win a $100 Jekyl’s Gift card

THURSDAY 10pm-2am

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$3 Evil Shots

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Neapolitan Presepio. Nativity scene feat. more than 100 human & angelic figures, along w/ animals, accessories, & architectural elements. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Tlingit Totem Pole. Carving & installation by Tommy Joseph. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Lionel Days. Artifacts from Lionel’s own train collection feat. special activities, a Kids Zone, more. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents,

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

GALLERIE CHIZ. A Magical Mirror of International Cultures Combining Real & Imaginary Worlds. Work by Masha Archer, Salvador DiQuinzio, Mitzi Hall, & Manuela Holban. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. In Medias Res. New work by Marlana Adele Vassar. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Pieces Together. Mosaics by Stevo. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. Venus, Eve, & Madonna. Presented by the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Work by Ruthanne Bauerle, Dorothy de Groat, Tazim Jaffer, Yelena Lamm, Tommy Mason, Daniel Mercer, Nathan Nissim, Rhoda Taylor, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. JAMES GALLERY. Obscure/ Reveal. Hot wax paintings by Christine Aaron, Karen Freedman, Amber George, Lorraine Glessner, Catherine Nash, James Nesbitt, more. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations.

comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of

Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. African Dreams, Cubists Visions Redux. Sculptures by David Lewis, paintings by Terry Shutko. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. Framed: Independent & Experimental Animation. Work by Steven Subotnik, Pahl Hluchan, Lynn Tomlinson, Kristen Lauth Shaeffer, Karl Staven, James Duesing, Dennis Hlynsky, Andrew Halasz. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. The Sad & Sleepy Dreamers. Artwork by Christian Wolfgang Breitkreutz. Signs From the Times. An Exhibition of New Works by Ron Copeland. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. David A. Ludwig: Structures. Paintings, study sets, & drawings from a 40 year career. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The New Collective. PCA all-guild exhibition of current work. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence

Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200.

Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Pittsburgh Collects. 75 selected works contributed by 3 Pittsburgh photography collectors. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED. Feat. 40+ American ceramic artists interpreting the way they see the drinking cup. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. Hagar the Horrible’s 40th Anniversary. Feat. 40 pieces of original art, as well as personal artifacts that give insight into the family that inspired Hagar’s family. All That and a Bag of Chips: The 90s Animation Renaissance. Feat. original production art, sketches, storyboards, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. VOLUTO / COMMONPLACE COFFEE. Colorblind Pittsburgh. Paintings by Ryan Ian McCormick. Garfield. 517-862-1963. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Comfort Women Wanted. Work by Chang-Jin Lee. Hive. 3D-animated audiovisual installation where gallery visitors confront a swirling mass of amorphous figures, appearing as a collective of matter as opposed to individual beings in deep space. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. CONTINUES ON PG. 50


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Flower Show & Light Garden. Feat. poinsettias, amaryllis, whimsical lights & adornments. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the antislavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

6 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-779-2471.

SUN 01 EVENT: Undercroft Opera performs Norma at the Seton Center Auditorium, Brookline CRITIC: Laurena Blackman, 28, a teacher from Shadyside WHEN: Sun.,

Nov. 24 It was a beautiful and tragic opera love story that has themes of love, revenge and, above all, our abilities to move beyond both when others do us wrong. The orchestra was just brilliant in this show and it accompanied the actors’ performances beautifully, as I had chills nearly the entire show. I heard that this was the first time that Norma was going to be seen by a Pittsburgh audience since 1997, therefore I simply had to come see it as a lover of opera. Every single detail was so well paid attention to as well, from the costumes to the lasers. It made the setting of the entire show just feel so easy, and I did not have to think about it and could just enjoy it. I highly recommend this show to anyone who loves opera, and especially those who are looking for something fresh and interesting. B Y BRE T T W I L S ON

HOLIDAY THU 28 - SUN 01 24TH ANNUAL BEAVER COUNTY FESTIVAL OF TREES. Decorated trees, holiday candy, live music, Santa, more. Benefits the Beaver County CYS & U.S. SARR Corps. www. beavercountyfestivaloftrees.org 5-9 p.m., Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 12-9 p.m., Fri., Dec. 6, 5-9 p.m. and Dec. 7-8, 12-9 p.m. Brady’s Run Park Lodge, Beaver Falls. CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, more. Opening Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SEASONAL INSPIRATIONS HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Pottery, paper crafts, stained glass, paintings, more. Mon-Sat. Thru Dec. 23 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622. CHANUKAH AT THE JCC. Candle-lighting & various holiday activities daily throughout Chanukah. www.jccpgh.org Thru Dec. 4 Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010.

FRI 29 THE SHOEMAKER & THE CHRISTMAS ELVES. Theatre IV’s yuletide spin of the Grimm Brothers’ classic. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

THU 28 -SAT 30

SAT 30

SNOWFLAKE SHOWCASE MARKET. Paintings, prints, textiles, wood creations, jewelry, ceramics, more. Tue, Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 18 Greensburg Art Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

BRUSTER’S LIGHT UP NIGHT. Hot cocoa, pictures w/ Santa, more. 6-9 p.m. Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Ross. 412-608-7816. FIFTH AVENUE PLACE HOLLY TROLLEY. Hosted by Santa’s little helpers, trolleys circle downtown each weekend picking up at stops approximately every 15 minutes. www.downtownpittsburgh.com Sat. Thru Dec. 21 Fifth Avenue Place, Downtown.

THU 28 - WED 04 THE PCA ANNUAL HOLIDAY SHOP. Ceramics, jewelry, fiber art, prints, more by 200+ regional artists. Thu-Sat, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun, 12-5 p.m., Tue, Wed, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Mon, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Thru Dec. 23 Pittsburgh

SAT 30 - SUN 01 GLASS ORNAMENT WORKSHOPS. Sat, Sun, 9 a.m.-

FESTIVAL OF LESSONS & CAROLS. 2 p.m. Most Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Troy Hill. 412-231-2994. MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT. Photos w/ Santa, magic show, make-your-own gingerbread house & ornament, more. Benefits Emmaus Community of Pittsburgh. 2-5 p.m. Generoasta Coffee, Warrendale. 412-381-0277.

MON 02 - WED 04 HOLIDAY MART HAPPY HOUR. Enjoy complimentary refreshments & hors d’oeuvres while shopping for handmade gifts. Dec. 2-5, 5-7 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

TUE 03 SNOWFLAKE SHOWCASE MARKET. Paintings, prints, textiles, wood creations, jewelry, ceramics, more. Tue, Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 18 Greensburg Art Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

WED 04 CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, more. Opening Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. 412-456-6666. ILLUMINER EXTRAORDINER. Hanukkah celebration feat. the building of a menorah w/ canned goods to be donated to the Squirrel Hill food pantry. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-521-1120. MERRY MIXER. Holiday shopping event feat. refreshments, photos w/ Santa, more. 3 p.m. Metamorphosis Salon & Day Spa, Lawrenceville. 412-781-1262.

DANCE FRI 29 - SAT 30 EXPRESS BURLESQUE: HOLIDAY ENCORE. Presented by RED Productions. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 30 Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

FUNDRAISERS THU 28 23RD ANNUAL PNC YMCA THANKSGIVING DAY TURKEY TROT. 1-mile fun run/walk, 5K, & 5-mile. www. ymcaofpittsburgh.org/turkey-trot/ 8:30 a.m. PNC Park, North Side. 412-323-5000.

FRI 29 BLACK FRIDAY BUNDLE UP BENEFIT. Dance party & winter blanket/outerwear drive to benefit local homeless families.


Presented by iCandy & the GLCC. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400.

DRONE WARFARE PROTEST. Forbes & Murray Aves., Squirrel Hill. thomasmertoncenter.org/ tmccalendar 2-3:30 p.m.

Blast Furnace Press. 7:30-9 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. OPEN MIC POETRY NIGHT. 7 p.m. Safari, Duquesne.

SUN 01

WED 04

CAPITAL’S END OR OUR END. Discussion on economy & class war. network23.org/ capitalsend 6:30-9:30 p.m. AVA Bar & Lounge, Oakland.

MELANIE LINN GUTOWSKI. Book signing w/ author of Pittsburgh’s Mansions. 12-2 p.m. Amazing Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

LITERARY

KIDSTUFF

THU 28

THU 28 - WED 04

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, SANTA FAMILY FUN CRUISES. solar-powered instruments, Sat, Sun, 1 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 more. Ongoing Children’s Gateway Clipper Fleet, Station Museum of Pittsburgh, Square. 412-355-7980. North Side. 412-322-5058. SLEEPING BEAUTY BALL. 500 beach balls, HOLIDAY. An interactive larger inflatable balls, musical production. Sat, Sun, a disco ball & music. 1 & 3:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 22 Ongoing Children’s Gemini Theater, Museum of Point Breeze. Pittsburgh, North 412-243-6464. Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive www. per pa indoor landscape AWESOME pghcitym .co made of 22 miles of ANIMALS ROCK™ packing tape. Thru THE HOLIDAYS! Jan. 19, 2014 Children’s 11 year-old author Max Museum of Pittsburgh, Tiber & his mom Susan will North Side. 412-322-5058. read their children’s book. TOUGH ART. Interactive 12-5 p.m. Carnegie Museum of artworks by Chris Beauregard, Natural History, Oakland. Katie Ford, Scott Garner, 412-622-3131. Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. SCIENCE FUN DAY. 412-322-5058. Ages 4-5: 9 a.m.-noon; Ages 6-10: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North ROCK BAND! Open stage Side. 412-237-1637. for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play CHESS CLUB. For students in w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by Hope Academy. grades K-7. 6:30 p.m. Mount Fri, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 Lebanon Public Library, East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43. MAKE A GINGERBREAD HOUSE. Ages 3+. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, WEAVING. Thru Nov. 30, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. A YEAR W/ FROG & TOAD. Based on the Books by Arnold Lobel. Fri, 8:15 p.m., Sat, 2:30 & ELECTRONICS TAKE-APART 8:15 p.m., Sun., Dec. 1, 2:30 p.m. & GIANT CARDBOARD and Dec. 3-5, 7:30 p.m. Thru STRUCTURES. Use real tools Dec. 7 Butler Little Theatre, to take apart electronics to Butler. 724-287-6781. discover what’s inside & create giant structures using cardboard, metal, string, more. 9 a.m.WRITING & ART WITH TESS. 4:30 p.m. and Nov. 30-Dec. 1, Story & craft-time for kids ages

SUN 01 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS SAT 30

MON 02 GOING VIRAL AT AGE 85: ADVENTURES OF AN ACCIDENTAL FOOD STAR. Talk & book signing w/ Marilyn Hagerty, author of Grand Forks: A History of American Dining in 128 Reviews. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700.

TUE 03 GRIT! A MULTI-GENRE LITERARY READING. Feat. Caitlyn Christensen, Rebecca Clever, Sarah Shotland, & Bob Walicki. Presented by

10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. GREATEST LITTLE VARIETY SHOW. Puppet theater, magician, performance by Josh & Gab, more. Nov. 29Dec. 1, 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. A YEAR W/ FROG & TOAD. Based on the Books by Arnold Lobel. Fri, 8:15 p.m., Sat, 2:30 & 8:15 p.m., Sun., Dec. 1, 2:30 p.m. and Dec. 3-5, 7:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 7 Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781.

SAT 30 FAMILY FUN AT FIFTH AVE PLACE: COLOR ME RED. Meet Santa, make Poinsettia pins & sun catchers w/ folks from the Children’s Museum, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fifth Avenue Place, Downtown. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip District. 412-586-7177.

SAT 30 - SUN 01

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 01

MON 02

FRI 29

TUE 03

FRI 29 - SAT 30

TUE 03 - WED 04

FRI 29 - SUN 01

WED 04

5 & up. First Wed of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

OUTSIDE SAT 30 - WED 04 WAGMAN COMET ISON VIEWING. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. Nov. 30-Dec. 14, 6:30 a.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510.

presents

TUE 03 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

Mr. Cattivo 2013

WED 04 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 28 BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap.pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

Tickets ON SALE NOW at Cattivo or online http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/520319

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THU 28 - WED 04

Free

CSI PITTSBURGH: FICTIONAL CRIME SCENE. Presented by Pittsburgh Technical Institute. Thru Jan. 30, 2014, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mall at Robinson. 412-788-0816.

TRY FOR

FRI 29 SEMBENE FILM FESTIVAL. Fri. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-204-7291.

Try it Free!

412.566.1861

SAT 30 HARMONY HIKE. Marking the 260th anniversary of

Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

CONTINUES ON PG. 52

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C L A S S I F I E D S

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

[LITERARY]

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Washington’s 1753 mission. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1-2:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Thru Dec. 28 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. andSat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SUN 01 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Dec. 1 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. CHINESE II. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HOT COCKTAIL PARTY. Education,and consumption, of warm craft cocktails, outside on Verde’s patio. Part of Pittsburgh Cocktail Week. 3 p.m. Verde, Garfield. 412-404-8487. LYME DIEASE SUPPORT GROUP. Email pghlyme@gmail. com for information. 6 p.m. Christ Lutheran Church, Millvale. STEELTOWN FILM FACTORY SHORT FILM FESTIVAL. 6 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-251-0890.

MON 02 FROM STRESSED TO CALM: HAVE HAPPY HOLIDAYS. w/ Sanna Carapellotti, MS, Cht. 7 p.m. Northwood Realty, Mars. 412-860-7874. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

You cleaned your nails with a butche butcher but her k he knife, niiffe, nif w aiting for your wife — waiting my mother — late again, to ob be e rre ea e ady. dy. ready. Iw atc at t hed tc he ed yo you o watched a ang n le the lo ng ong ng bla bl blade angle long sso o its sh har arp arp p ti tip could pick away sharp the the e we w wee eek’s oil & engine grime, week’s m mod o el glue & sawdust melded model w hile hi you sang Mathis, while Chances Are. Ch Y ou never broke the skin, You ne er missed a note. note never Pitch-perfect, meticulous technician, I loved you like the sun hates darkness, and in its blazing burns most brutal. — REBECCA CLEVER

Rebecca Clever appears at Brillobox with Caitlyn Christensen, Sarah Shotland and Bob Walicki for Grit!, a multi-genre literary reading. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Dec. 3. 4140 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SLOVAK HERITAGE. Talk about reconstruction of Slovak dolls w/ Sue Stafura. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. WORLD AIDS DAY COMMEMORATION. 7:30 p.m. Heinz Chapel, Oakland. 412-624-2008.

TUE 03 AFFORDABLE CARE ACT INFO SESSION. 6 p.m. BGC Community Activity Center, Garfield. 412-441-6950. MT. LEBANON CONVERSATION SALON. Discuss current events w/ friends & neighbors. For seniors. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. WILKINSBURG CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY. Tue, 6-9 p.m. Thru Dec. 4 Wilkinsburg Borough Building, Wilkinsburg. 412-244-2900.

WED 04 COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. CREATIVE CONNECTIONS: JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY. Ages 50+. 2 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE & CULTURE. w/ Dr. Carol Kaplan. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational


THE THEATRE FACTORY. Tribute to Marvin Hamlisch. Jan. 5. Open to tri-state area Auditions for The Mystery students in grades 9-12. of Irma Vep. Dec 8-9. Seeking centerauditions.org. Lincoln 2 men to play all roles. Prepare Park Performing Arts Center, a 2 min monologue. Call or Midland. 724-576-4644. email tfauditions@gmail.com LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING for an appointment. Trafford. ARTS CENTER STUDENT COMPANY. Auditions 724-454-7193. for Little Shop of Horrors. Jan. 6-8. Open to tri-state areas students in grades 9-12. 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY centerauditions.org Lincoln & STUDIO SPACE. Acccepting Park Performing Arts Center, art work & crafts for Deck Midland. 724-576-4644. The Halls: Annual Holiday MCKEESPORT LITTLE Exhibition. Submission THEATER. Auditions for Boeing Boeing. deadline: Nov. 30, Dec. 14-15. Prepare 2013. Email 5 jpg. a 2-min. monologue. samples of work & www.mckeesport include resume &/ littletheater.com www. per or bio along to McKeesport. a p pghcitym info@28westsecond.com 412-673-1100. .co PRIME STAGE ACTING OUT! THEATRE. Auditions PITTSBURGH PRIDE for The Devil’s Arithmetic. THEATER FESTIVAL. Dec. 10-11. Seeking male Accepting submissions for & female actors age 14 to showcase of locally written adult. Actors should prepare lesbian, gay, bisexual, or a 1 to 2 minute dramatic transgender-theme 1-act plays. monologue, a resume & headshot. Schedule Manuscript details at facebook. an appointment at com/events/519459561475242/ www.primestage.com. The 412-256-8109. Oakland School, Oakland. ASSEMBLE. Call for artists, PROJECT EVOLUTION technologists, & makers. MODEL CALL. Casting CLASH INTERNATIONAL. Seeking artists living within females, males & children. Seeking performance artists Dec. 6. No requirements for Local People for Global ten blocks of Assemble to (height, weight, etc.) Causes fundraising event in submit work for the HyperLocal Email models@projectevo.org February 2014. Particularly Show + Art Bazaar. Email for information. seeking artists w/ relevant louise@assemblepgh.org THE REP. Equity Principal performance pieces (i.e. for information. Garfield. auditions for “By the Way. short plays, comedy sketches, 406-529-2520. Meet Vera Stark.” Dec. 3. songs, spoken poetry etc.). BLAST FURNACE. Call or email ademara@ localforglobal@gmail.com Seeking submissions for Volume 3, Issue 4. Submit no more than 3 of your [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] best poems in any theme. http://blastfurnace. submittable.com/Submit. This holiday season, help get presents to needy kids CLASH INTERNATIONAL. around the state by joining with Pittsburgh Toys for Tots. Seeking art & craft Volunteers are needed in the toy warehouse to unload submissions (i.e. paintings, and sort toys as they are delivered from collection sites. photographs, jewelry, etc.) Help is also needed with distribution to various sites for Local People for Global across Western Pennsylvania. Call 412-852-9994 or visit Causes fundraiser. All www.toysfortots.org for information. submissions are tax deductible. Call for more information. www.clashinternational.org pointpark.edu for an GEMINI THEATER The Grey Box Theatre, appointment. Pittsburgh COMPANY. Auditions for Lawrenceville. 412-352-3338. Playhouse, Oakland. Pirate Princess Adventure. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking 412-392-8141. Dec. 1 & Dec. 3. Ages 10-adult, cold readings & 1-2 min. a cappella SOUNDS OF PITTSBURGH performers & artists to CHORUS. Auditions for song. www.geminitheater.org participate in First Fridays annual Christmas concert. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. Art in a Box. For more Women only, all ages. 412-243-6464. information, email masember@mac.com GEYER PERFORMING thedapcoopzumba@ Coraopolis United Methodist ARTS CENTER. Auditions for hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. Church, Coraopolis. Oliver! Dec. 1-2. Boys age 6-18, THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY 412-279-6062. cold readings & 32 measures of STAGE RIGHT. Auditions classic musical theater piece. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking for “Another Evening of Bring sheet music in correct key. submissions in all genres for One Acts.” Dec. 1-2. Seeking www.geyerpac.com. Scottdale. fledgling literary magazine 5 men & 5 women. Call or email 724-887-0887. curated by members of the stagerightboyd1@gmail.com LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING Hour After Happy Hour for appointments/information. ARTS CENTER DANCE Writing Workshop. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. COMPANY. Auditions for 412-228-0566. The Music & the Mirror: A afterhappyhourreview.com. English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE LOST HISTORY OF THE NEW MADRID EARTHQUAKES. Porter Hall. 4:30-6 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. TEA CLASS & TASTING. History of tea, steeping techniques, Storing Tea, Health Benefits, more. Tea samples & European cookies will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

SUBMISSIONS

FULL LIST ONLINE

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TOYS FOR TOTS

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I recently ended a relationship that lasted a year and five months. While I loved this woman, for much of the relationship she was, to varying degrees, depressed. I tried to be as helpful and patient as possible. I got her into counseling. We went to couples counseling. She got on medication. I encouraged her to eat well (I cooked her many healthy meals) and exercise daily (which she was never able to do). I tried to get her out into nature. I tried to listen and practice strong communication skills. I encouraged her to explore the benefits of a fulfilling and GGG relationship, but our sex life faltered because of the depression and her low libido. I kept helping and waiting, but she was simply unable to make healthy changes. I felt trapped dating someone who couldn’t take control of her life. I eventually ended the relationship, which was the right decision for me, but she was crushed. Do you have any advice for dating someone with depression? Can relationships and depression work? SERIOUS ABOUT DEPRESSION

Love them, Protect them, Immunize them Like seatbelts, car seats, bike helmets, and life jackets

Flu Vaccine has the Power to Protect Annual flu vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months and older. Learn more at: www.cdc.gov/flu

apply if both are staying in hotels? READER IS SEEKING KNOWLEDGE

When you’re having sex with a stranger, RISK, it’s generally considered safer — some would argue only marginally so — to go back to his place. The reason is kinda depressing: A stranger is less likely to murder you at his place because then he has to dispose of your body, which is apparently a pain in the ass. But if he murders you at your place, he can stick your landlord and loved ones with disposal duties. I’m a 21-year-old gay male. Can someone “quit” a fetish? I’m an ABDL, which stands for “adult baby/diaper lover.” I get turned on by putting other guys into diapers or having other, usually older, guys put me in diapers. I can have normal sex and have had a few decent relationships, or at least as decent as most gay guys still in college have. I’ve met a great guy who has helped me mix ABDL with bondage for some REAL fun, and I’m pretty OK with knowing that there’s nothing particularly wrong with a kink like mine. Unfortunately, this particular fetish creeps most people out, and the idea of being into this kink when I’m in my 40s grosses me out. I’ve gone through the bingeand-purge cycle most guys go through when they realize they’re into diapers. But is there any way to retrain your brain to not get off on a particular fetish?

THE CONSENSUS IN THE SEXAND-SCIENCE RESEARCH CROWD IS THAT A BRAIN CANNOT BE RETRAINED WHERE KINKS ARE CONCERNED.

“I think SAD did the right thing,” said Rob Delaney, the comedian, Twitter supernova and author of Rob Delaney: Mother. Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Falcon. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. “And not only ‘the’ right thing, but a series of right things.” Delaney’s book is a collection of essays — most of them hilarious —about his own struggle with depression so crippling, it almost took his life. Delaney is now the official spokesperson for all people everywhere who struggle with depression. “This guy went above and beyond,” Delaney continued. “One might ‘suck it up’ for a bit longer if there are kids involved or if you’ve been together for years and years and this depressive state is an anomaly, but this guy can’t be expected to weld himself to someone he’s been dating for less than a year and a half.” Delaney not only felt that you had done right by this woman, but that your actions could serve as a template for other readers. “SAD was kind, patient and proactive, and when that didn’t work, he ended the relationship,” said Delaney. “He didn’t assume that she would implode without him. He seems to have a manageable enough ego to realize that he’s not the only doorway through which this woman can walk to happiness; he’s merely another human being whose happiness has value, too. And maybe this breakup will provide the jolt she needs to recalibrate her approach to her depression and really get better. He also showed her another person taking care of himself. I sincerely hope she develops this skill herself, but you cannot will that behavior into people. That does not mean you don’t love them.” Not following @RobDelaney on Twitter? You’re the only one. Go to robdelaney.com to buy his book. Is it safer for a woman planning to have a one-night stand to take the guy back to her place or to go to his place? Does this

ANOTHER BOY DIAPER LOVER

The consensus in the sex-and-science research crowd is that a brain cannot be retrained where kinks are concerned — so you might as well enjoy your kinks. (That’s only if your kinks can be enjoyed consensually, which yours happily can be.) And while some people have taken drugs to “treat” disturbing kinks, these drugs suppress libido generally; they do not target one kink in particular. (Are you willing to give up sex to get over diapers? I didn’t think so.) That said, kinks have certain narratives and broad themes, and figuring those out may help you enjoy other kinks with lower creep factors. If what you enjoy about diapers is the helplessness and loss of control they symbolize, mixed with submission to an affectionate authority figure, you might find fetish puppy play similarly arousing, as that also has themes of helplessness, dependence and affection. And while most people don’t find fucking a person who is pretending to be a baby dog any less creepy than fucking a person who’s pretending to be a baby baby, there seem to be a lot more puppy-players out there. But I think you should keep looking for a guy who’s into the same things you are. If you can’t date the great guy who helped mix diaper play with bondage, you should take his existence as proof that there are other guys who will like you and like what you like. This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan chats with an expert about sex after weight-loss surgery: savagelovecast.com

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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1. Floors 5. Sir, in India 10. Small hardware store purchase 14. “That fall wasn’t as bad as it looked” 15. “In ___” (Nirvana album) 16. Lowbrow Vegas alternative 17. Shakespearean drama set in a dojo? (-Kid) 19. Neural transmitter 20. It may get rubber-stamped 21. Send into the hall? 23. App maker’s concern 25. Dead fans tend to like them 28. Shortage in the cellar? (-Iron) 33. Takes down, as a back might 34. Mayonnaise-y sandwich substance 35. It’s fermented warm 36. Engorged 37. ___-de-France 38. Hit hard, as a baseball 41. Perfects 43. Ellington rolling in dough? (-Big) 45. It comes up from behind 46. Brand next to Swanson and Birds Eye, perhaps 47. Mineral used

as a weighting agent 51. Place for some rock 55. Like some thermometers 57. Valentine’s Day gifts that have to go back at the end of the night? (-Guns) 59. Major American export 60. One of a reproductive pair 61. Great Basin tribe 62. Guys, in an early ‘90s slang spelling 63. They hang onto stars 64. Meh

DOWN 1. Collaborative website 2. Muscat’s country 3. Run 4. Genre for Operation Ivy 5. Gave a nappy finish to, as leather 6. Org. for Djokovic 7. Prefix with pad 8. Party in recent nuclear negotiations 9. Woody’s last name on “Cheers” 10. Passage to the lungs 11. “This register’s open” 12. Chicago deep dish chain 13. Weigh station unit 18. Zaps, in spite

of significant medical red flags 22. “Breaking ___ Hard to Do” 24. Enter equivalent 26. Tackle box gizmo 27. Dr. Jekyll’s alter ego and family, were he to settle down with an evil wife and kids 28. Enclose, as with bricks 29. First hip-hop single to reach #1 on the Billboard charts 30. Stayed mad 31. Not driving 32. Rascal 33. Buffalo player in yellow and blue 36. Afternoon cupful, say

39. Sap 40. Mountain lift 41. Horrible cartoon 42. Foul 44. Source of some spring color 48. Chain with stacks 49. DVR giant 50. Fashion periods 52. Regarding 53. The Quilts of ___ Bend 54. ___ Auto Club (Canada’s answer to AAA) 55. Wu-Tang Clan member who died in 2004 56. ___ Speedwagon 58. Places to go for a break, briefly {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

11.27-12.04

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Touted as a prime source of “kick-@ss spirituality,” author Danielle LaPorte has advice that’s good for you to hear. “You will always be too much of something for someone,” she says, “too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy.” But that’s exactly as it should be, she adds. It would be a mistake to “round out your edges,” because then you would “lose your edge.” And I’m here to tell you that you need all of your edge right now, Sagittarius. It’s time to ignore people’s mediocre expectations and push past their limits. To be true to yourself, you will probably have to be too much of something for several someones.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Going into my spiritual mentoring session with the priestess, I had the intention of discovering truths about myself I didn’t know before. That meant stirring up revelations about my ignorance as well as my potentials. I wanted assistance in facing my flaws as well as in tapping into my dormant powers. It worked. Her guidance was a potent catalyst. I was able to shed the debilitating nonsense stories I’d been telling myself about who I am. I awakened strengths that had been asleep. What I wish for you, Capricorn — indeed, what I predict for you — is a comparable experience. To expedite matters, go out in search of a person, adventure or breakthrough that can help provide you with the kind of prod I received.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I bet people will be gossiping about you more than usual. Is there anything you can do to ensure that it’s mostly benevolent gossip? Yes, there is. First, make sure that when you gossip about others, you are unfailingly positive in your comments. If you don’t have anything good to say about someone, don’t say it. Second, be on your best behavior. Communicate clearly and don’t even think about taking unethical shortcuts. Finally, contribute more inspirational energy than usual to every group you’re part of. Be an effervescent team player.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Maybe your ego isn’t big enough. I’m serious. Is it possible that you could benefit from being more proud of yourself? Would it be healthy for you to give yourself more credit for the struggles you have weathered and the skills you have mastered and the beauty you have managed to forge out of the chaotic raw materials that life has given you? I’ve got a good feeling about this, Pisces. I can imagine you summoning the playful courage you will need to express more confidence. I can even picture you beginning to fantasize about embarking on certain stirring adventures you’ve never believed you were strong enough to try before now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Thinking inside the box will be a crime against your nature in the coming weeks. The last place you want to be is in a pigeonhole. I advise you to stay far away from tight squeezes, claustrophobic “sanctuaries,” and “convenient” confinements. If you’re in a one-size-fits-all situation, you simply won’t be able to access your highest intelligence. So then where should you be? I am rooting for you to wander into the wild frontiers where unsanctioned wonders and marvels await you. I’d love for you to find virgin terrain and uncharted territories where the boring old rules don’t apply.

Mike Finnigan is a veteran keyboardist and blues vocalist who has toured with more than 20 major acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Etta James, Leonard Cohen and Los Lonely Boys. There’s a primal quality to his singing. It’s gritty and fluid and tempestuous, almost feral at times. I understand perfectly why Bonnie Raitt has called him a “tall drink of bacon.” The sound he makes with his voice is that lush and tasty. Can you guess his astrological sign? It’s Taurus, of course. I’m naming him your patron saint this week because you yourself are as close as you have ever come to being a tall drink of bacon.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): French painter Henri Matisse thought highly of his own work. He tended to ignore critics because he didn’t think they understood his art well enough to produce intelligent critiques. There was one person whose opinion he was willing to heed, though; a single colleague who he said had earned to right to evaluate and assess his art: Pablo Picasso. I encourage you, Gemini, to come up with your own short list of people whose judgment you totally trust and respect. It’s a good time to seek out their feedback on how you’re doing.

you criticize in others. You don’t practice what you preach. One last piece of good news: Now is your special time to work on being forthright, genuine and consistent.

violins. After years of experience, Lorenzo Pellegrini knows which few trees will produce instruments with the most resonant tones. They grow slowly and have few knots. They need to have had enough water to grow strong, but not so much water that they’re mushy. Your task in the coming weeks, Virgo, has a certain resemblance to the master tree-picker’s work. It’s time for you to start selecting and gathering the raw materials you will use to craft your own lyrical story in 2014.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I am very fond of strawberries and cream,” said author Dale Carnegie, “but I have found that for some strange reason, fish prefer worms. So when I went fishing, I didn’t think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted. I didn’t bait the hook with strawberries and cream. Rather, I dangled a worm or grasshopper in front of the fish.” That’s a good teaching story for you, Scorpio. In order to get your desires fulfilled by the people who have the power to do that, you should give them what they actually long for — not what you long for, nor what you wish they would long for. This is always true, of course, but it’s especially applicable to what’s going on in your life right now.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s the bad news: For all of us, including you, there is a gap between our intentions and our actual effects. Here’s the good news: Now is your special time to narrow that gap. More bad news: All of us, you included, are periodically guilty of sending out mixed messages. We confuse people with our ambivalence; what we say is sometimes different from what we feel. More good news: Now is your special time to reduce your mixed messages to as close to zero as possible. One more taste of bad news: Like all of us, you are a bit hypocritical. You engage in behavior that

What part of you is too tame? How can you inspire it to seek wilder ways of knowing? Write Freewillastrology.com.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): How is it possible that you have come so far and worked so diligently only to be resigned now to hanging out in limbo, waiting around for the lucky break that may or may not ever arrive? I’m here today to escort you out of this infernal place. If you resist, my assignment is to drag you out. Why am I so adamant? Because I am sure it’s a mistake for you to be passive and hope for the best. You need to resume working diligently, focused for now on what’s right in front of you without worrying too much about the big picture. In my opinion, that approach will lead you to unforeseen help — and a clarification of the big picture.

   

  

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your levels of personal magic are high. The radiance beaming out of your eyes is extra sparkly. There’s an artistry to the way you are expressing yourself. Without even trying, you’re exuding natural charisma and animal magnetism. In light of all these advantages, I suspect you will have an elevated capacity for both giving and receiving pleasure. In fact, I predict that your ability to feel really good and make other people feel really good will be at a peak. I hereby designate this the Week of Supreme Bliss.

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

wyep.org

The BBC reported on an expert who combs Switzerland’s Risoud Forest to find the spruce trees whose wood can be made into the highest quality

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

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SURROGATE MOTHERS WANTED Established Program Conducted By A Local Law Firm Seeks Compassionate, Loving Women To Carry Couple’s Biological Babies, Generous Compensation Paid To Those Women Who Qualify. M. Lawrence Shields III Attorney At Law 412-221-0640 X 101

Events

hAPPen here

• Replace Cafeteria Lighting and Acoustical Treatment Greenfield, 1 Alger Street, 15207 Electrical and General Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on December 2, 2013 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 www.pps.k12.pa.us

EOE M U S I C

• Pardons • Expungements • Credit Reports

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

• Replace Swimming Pool Locker Room Lighting Langley, 2940 Sheraden Boulevard, 15204 Electrical Prime

If you have what it takes to sell, send you resume to Jessie Brock: jbrock@steelcitymedia.com

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ADOPTION Art classes to Zoo Trips, and Everything in between, 1st baby will be our King/ Queen. 1-800-966-3065 Expenses Paid

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on January 7, 2014, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Sell ads, web, radio and more. Be a multi-media Sales Person

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Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

Display Sales Representative

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ADOPTION

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

NOW HIRING FOR

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Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

ADOPTION

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DOWNLOAD THE FREE CP HAPPS APP NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948 Available on the iPhone App Store & Google play Brought to you by:

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES

CLINICAL STUDIES Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

DIABETES? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

412-650-6155

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

SLEEP RESEARCH STUDY for healthy adults ages 18-30 with good sleep. Participation involves fMRI scans, sleep monitoring, and includes spending a full weekday in our sleep lab. Compensation provided. Call 412-383-2159 or visit veteranssleep.pitt.edu for more information

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with response design of our ads and the I have to they evoke. When I know jects in advertise for research sub ediately the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

412.363.1900 CTRS

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart.

give the gift of good health JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHVFDQEH SXUFKDVHGRQOLQHDW

VFKRROKRXVH\RJDFRP

Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

EAST FOR RENT Morningside- Newly remod. sm. 4BR house, 2 full baths, off st prkg, no pets. 412-628-6154

Southside- Immediate sublease available through May. 3BR/2.5 BA, garage, and private patio. $2,500/ month plus utilities. Contact: info@littlearth.com or 412-471-0909

ESTATE SALE

Estate Sale November 30th Hundreds of items! For information/pictures go to:

thereclamationnation.com

get your yoga on!

(UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions.

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

SOUTH FOR RENT

VWULSGLVWULFWVTXLUUHOKLOOQRUWKKLOOV


WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr 322 Fourth Ave. ~ Downtown

M-F prkg free after 4pm Sat-Sun prkg free all day

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

Therapeutic Massage

FULL BODY MASSAGE

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

$10 Coupon

$40/hr

with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Shadyside Location

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

412-441-1185

724-519-2950

Xin Sui Bodyworks

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

412.316.3342

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328 Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

J&S GLASS

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

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Weight Loss Center of Pittsburgh Start Today! Loose 25 pounds by Valentine’s Day! Only $99 per month!

JADE SUBOXONE TREATMENT

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

WE SPECIALIZE IN

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Call Erin at:

412-434-4798

Let Us Help You Today!

Health Services

Addictions

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 62

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL - a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Positive Recovery Solutions Dedicated to improving the lives of those with addiction issues by utilizing modern advancements in medical, clinical and pharmacological modalities. ~ Suboxone© ~ Zubsolv© ~ Vivitrol© NOW TAKING PATIENTS Call Today Toll Free 855-344-7501 Located at 730 Brookline Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA. 15226

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Recovery Without Judgement™

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Wellness Center

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Next Day Appointments Available

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.27/12.04.2013

Help is Available! Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz


UPWARD CLIMB

In a church basement, city’s needy find help turning their lives around {BY ABBY MENDELSON} “S’UP, BROTHER WILL?” the man asks. Dressed in green T-shirt and

dark ball cap, he treads lightly down the stairs, where he greets case manager Will Denton. “It’s good,” answers Denton, who coordinates activities in the large, open room. “All good. Here for —” “Afternoon snack,” the man says with a smile. He heads for the food counter, where fruit, crackers, peanuts, pretzels, coffee, Pepsi and Mountain Dew await. Sometimes what brings people into the East End Cooperative Ministry is no more than that: a smile, a greeting, a little afternoon pick-me-up. Sometimes it’s a whole lot more. “Some come here,” Denton says, “because there’s nowhere else to go.” He pauses. “I’ve been on the other side of the table. So I identify with what I encounter every day.”

One morning a week, Wild and Denton meet with counterparts from a dozen agencies. They work on moving clients to shelters and finding the services they need: health care, legal aid, food stamps, clothing. “There’s a lot of partnership,” Wild says. “That’s the only way we can get things done.” The paradigm case is a 50-year-old man they call Vinnie. Vinnie’s a long-timer, been around a dozen years or so. Outside, Vinnie has his spot, Penn and Highland. He’s always well dressed: pressed slacks, leather jacket, frequently checking his watch. But he’s also homeless and easily conned. He has friends who let Vinnie bunk with them — at the end of the month, just in time for Vinnie to receive his disability check. Which magically seems to disappear while he’s on the couch snarfing cookies and watching movies. Wild and Denton got Vinnie into housing. Got him a reliable payee, too: someone who will manage Vinnie’s money and not,

“YOU FEEL GOOD WHEN YOU’RE ABLE TO HELP SOMEONE. IT FEELS GOOD TO BE PART OF THEIR STORY.” More than 40 years ago, 18 East End houses of worship saw the need to take concerted action for a growing witches’ brew of social ills: unemployment, homelessness, mental illness, addiction, poverty. Together, those faith groups established EECM’s drop-in center in the basement of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, at the corner of Roup and Friendship avenues. The center now serves some 170 people a week, offering everything from hot coffee to help to getting off the street. “We help a lot of community people,” says Kellie Wild, ordained United Methodist Minister and EECM’s director of homeless programs. The quiet basement contains a smattering of books and games, an old computer — and today, a man in a gray sweatsuit and red Miller cap, who sleeps sitting up. People move quietly around him, exchange pleasantries, get drinks. Everyone seems distracted; everything seems to move in slow motion. One man strolls in, wearing sunglasses and a backpack, and asks for his mail. Nothing today, Denton informs him with a shake of his head. While the center operates every afternoon, a special draw is Wednesday’s free medical clinic. Officially, it’s open between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.: Usually, though, it’s past 6 by the time they’ve processed the average four dozen people who show up with everything from infections to addictions and psychosis.

ah, liberate it. “Vinnie kept me up a lot of nights worrying about him,” Wild says. Now, Denton says, “He’s as self-sufficient as he can be. At least he’s not standing on the corner freezing.” “Sometimes it’s hard to find solutions,” he adds. “Some people have so many elements that each time you find one, there’s another.” There was, for example, the twentysomething woman who’d been displaced by Hurricane Katrina. The mother of a young child, she was homeless, unemployed, a domestic-violence victim — and at risk for worse. Working tirelessly, Wild and Denton got her into a women’s shelter. Within 30 days, they found her housing, then a job. “This was so overwhelming,” Denton says. “But you have to do what you have to do.” “We keep pushing,” Wild says. “It’s hard. But you feel good when you’re able to help someone. It feels good to be part of their story.” Those successes “encourage me to come back and try again,” Denton adds. “That all hope isn’t lost.” Outside, a ragged man lurches toward the door. “I’m going to see what I can find,” he mumbles. “’Cause there ain’t no such thing as no help. This is America.” INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Black Friday 20% OFF 2013

Everything with $60 purchase!*

30% OFF Sale Items!*

*Customers must provide valid emaill address to receive e discount.


November 27, 2013