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SELF WORTH: YASUMASA MORIMURA INTERROGATES HISTORY, IDENTITY AT THE WARHOL 46


EVENTS 11.15 – 8pm FUTURE ISLANDS WITH SPECIAL GUESTS, LADIES AUXILIARY Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.23 – 4pm IN DISCUSSION: THE WORK OF YASUMASA MORIMURA WITH ERIC SHINER, NICHOLAS CHAMBERS, CINDY LISICA AND CHARLES EXLEY Co-presented with the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Asian Studies Center, University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh FREE with Museum admission/Members FREE

12.30 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS The Warhol will be open on Monday, December 30 from 10am to 5pm

1.11 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: H2 SAXOPHONE QUARTET Co-presented with the Music on the Edge series of the University of Pittsburgh Department of Music Tickets advance $15/$10 students; for tickets call 412.624.7529 or visit www.music.pitt.edu/tickets Door Tickets $20/$15 students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

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The Warhol welcomes back Verve recording artist, Nellie McKay, for a unique solo performance in The Warhol’s theater. In contrast to her first appearance at The Warhol in 2010 with a full band, McKay returns for an intimate performance on piano and ukulele, spanning a range of her material. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


{EDITORIAL}

11.13/11.20.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 46

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[VIEWS] did seem that people were more 18 “Itaware of environmental issues ‌ than I would have expected.â€? — PittsburghTODAY director Douglas Heuck on a recent study of the region’s environmental attitudes

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

[TASTE] know what’s in everything 30 “We we jar, and there’s nothing mysterious.� — Legume’s Trevett Hooper on home canning

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been singing together for so 32 “We’ve long, it’s just a natural thing in my life.� — The Spring Standards’ Heather Robb, who started playing with her bandmates as a teenager

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{PUBLISHER}

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STEEL CITY MEDIA

Hiddleston steals the show 42 “Tom as Loki, while everybody else simply

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

looks handsome and tries to keep their dignity in a comic-book movie.� — Al Hoff reviews the film, Thor: The Dark World

[ARTS] recreation of the infamous 46 “The photo of Lee Harvey Oswald’s shooting by Jack Ruby, with Morimura shooting Morimura, is thrilling.� — Lisa Brennan on Yasumasa Morimura: Theater of the Self, at The Warhol

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 22 EVENTS LISTINGS 52 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 63 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 65 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 69 N E W S

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INCOMING

“WE NEED A LOT MORE RESEARCH BEFORE WE START DRILLING UNDER OUR PUBLIC PARKS.”

Elected officials commit to address gun violence head on (Nov. 8, online only) There is no such thing as “gun violence,” there is only violence in which any number of weapons/ instruments can be used. Gun violence is term used by uneducated, liberal gun-control sheep to propagate their cause. — Web comment from “Anvil78”

Corbett Campaign Kicks Off in Pittsburgh (Nov. 6, online only) So this rag is run by democrats. How dare you quote a democrat on what Republicans want. In the future, please put a permanent headline at the top that the Blogh is a democrat party mouthpiece. — Web comment from “Pittsburgh Powerman” Oh please. I’m rolling my eyes at you. You don’t have a 19% approval rating without losing a few of your own party — hence the fact that only a third of his own party rates his job performance favorably. Tom Corbett is disappointing people across all parties. — Web comment from “Sara Dawida Novelly” Doesn’t matter which party you’re in or how partisan this journalism is, the guy is an ineffective douche and needs to go. — Web comment from “Pablo Me”

Have we ever noted that Josh Wander has nearly 4,500 more followers than Bill Peduto WTF. — Nov. 5 tweet from “Chris Vague” (@quietcurse)

INDUSTRIAL

PARK? Proposal to drill beneath Deer Lakes Park raises questions of safety, government procedure {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

K

ATHRYN STRANG clearly remembers her reaction when her mother told her that Allegheny County officials were contemplating drilling for natural gas beneath her beloved Deer Lakes Park. “I was so mad I started hitting my fists on the table,” the 8-year-old said after she spoke in front of Allegheny County Council Nov. 6. Kathryn, who a year ago started a local environmental group with her younger sister Elizabeth, lives less than a half-mile from Deer Lakes Park. Her family uses the park regularly, for hiking and biking as well as watching wildlife and playing on the playground. Deer Lakes is the latest battleground in the controversy over drilling for gas in the Marcellus Shale, a layer of stone a mile beneath the earth’s surface. Such drilling involves “fracking,” the use of highly pressurized fluids to break up the rock and release gas deposits. Skeptics worry about potential water and air contamination from that practice.

{ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN HINDERLITER}

“There are just too many unknowns” about the drilling process, says Kathryn’s father, George, who accompanied his children to council along with his wife, Joy. “There are a lot of homeowners in the area that use wells for water. And what about air quality? “I just think we need a lot more research into the long-term health risks before we start drilling under our public parks.” Concern about drilling in county parks began bubbling up late this summer, when Allegheny County Executive

Rich Fitzgerald issued a request for proposals to drill under Deer Lakes Park in Frazer Township. Under Fitzgerald’s proposal, no well pads — the equipment on the surface that forces fracking liquid down and brings gas up — would be allowed on county land. Drillers would be permitted only to tunnel under the parks from well pads on private property nearby. But opponents have been denouncing the proposal at county-council meetings, while some county councilors have become concerned about the transparency of CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


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contract negotiations. And Republican County Councilor Heather Heidelbaugh, for one, says she has never heard more opposition to a proposal before her. “There has been no other issue where I have received public [feedback] that is 98 percent against drilling in the parks,” she said at a Nov. 6 county-council meeting. Councilor Barbara Daly Danko, meanwhile, has proposed a three-year-hold on drilling beneath county parks, while the county conducts a “thorough examination of the risks and liabilities” of drilling. “We’re not asking for a moratorium on drilling,” says Daly Danko. “We are going to be drilling at the airport and probably on other industrial sites owned by the county. Why don’t we see how that goes before we begin drilling at our parks?” THE COUNTY was approached this summer by Huntley and Huntley, an engineering firm that consults with the drilling industry, about drilling beneath the park. The county issued its request for proposals in September. Fitzgerald won’t release details about the number of proposals received or the companies involved. However, according to published reports quoting county-council members, the only proposal submitted came from Huntley and Huntley — which already has drilling rights on private land around the park — and its partner, energy company Range Resources. Despite public opposition — which Fitzgerald ascribes to a “vocal minority” — the county executive says allowing drilling beneath Deer Lakes makes sense because drilling is already taking place nearby. Fitzgerald says Range Resources has leases on about 58,000 acres around the park, and that there are currently 19 active wells. Approving fracking under the park won’t bring well pads any closer to its boundaries, he says. “This process is happening anyway, regardless of whether we participate in it or not,” Fitzgerald says. “Council can vote 15-0 against this. I can say no to this, but the fact is, it’s going to happen anyway.” Fitzgerald also says that if the county does sign a lease, it can demand that the terms include provisions to ensure addi-

tional safety and environmental protections. And the revenue from drilling, he says, will benefit residents with “money that we can use to fix up and maintain our county parks.” Some opponents, though, worry that Fitzgerald is already undermining county council’s ability to weigh in on the matter. “My main issue here is the process and procedure that is being used,” says County Councilor William Robinson. “I believe the administration is out of bounds and has gone outside their authority in pursuing this drilling idea on county parks.” Fitzgerald, he says, should “let council play its rightful role.” County council must approve proposed uses for county land. Yet Robinson says he’s been stymied in efforts to obtain proposed agreements with Huntley and Range. An informal request for documents was ignored, he says: He’s awaiting a response to a follow-up Right-toKnow records request. Fitzgerald maintains that council doesn’t have a role in negotiating the deal. Under the terms of the original request for proposals, the executive’s office has until Nov. 30 to work out terms with the driller. The contract would then be submitted for council’s approval; if council doesn’t act by year’s end, the measure would have to be reintroduced in 2014. “I also invited Councilor Robinson to a meeting where I gave some information about this to council and he decided not to come. But we want to get suggestions and feedback from council if they have any,” says Fitzgerald. Daly Danko’s three-year hold on park drilling, meanwhile, has received no public feedback at all: The bill has been languishing in council’s Government Reform Committee since she first proposed it in September, because Council President Charles Martoni, also the committee chair, has not brought it forward for debate. Robinson says he worries that Fitzgerald’s influence has been keeping the bill from coming forward for debate. “This council is made up of grown men and women capable of making their own decisions,” Robinson says. “We must be given the information it needs to make an informed choice, and this process must be allowed to continue

“COUNCIL CAN VOTE 15-0 AGAINST THIS. I CAN SAY NO TO THIS, BUT THE FACT IS, IT’S GOING TO HAPPEN ANYWAY.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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with the group Marcellus Protest, says he doesn’t feel Daly Danko’s legislation

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goes far enough, but says “at least it’s a start.” “It doesn’t ban fracking: It simply says, ‘Let’s hold on for three years when it comes to county parks,’” Packer continues. “I believe in three years we are going to see that fracking is a much more dangerous endeavor than [drilling advocates] want to believe.” Packer says he fears that Fitzgerald is interfering with the bill’s process to make the bill go away. “I think he has the notion that he’s the county executor, not the county executive,” Packer says. “We all saw from his campaign contributions that he owes a lot to these businesses for getting him elected.” (During the 2011 campaign for county executive, a memo surfaced in which Fitzgerald pleaded with drillers for financial support.) Packer says that as long as a drilling proposal is before county councilors, they can expect to hear from concerned citizens. And the citizens signing on to this battle, he says, aren’t just the usual anti-fracking protesters like himself. “When the county decided to drill in county parks, they hit a raw nerve with people,” Packer says. “It’s like drilling in their backyards. … And at the end of the day, people like Kathryn Strang and her family speaking up are the ones who will ultimately make the difference in this fight.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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without interference.” For his part, Fitzgerald acknowledges that “It’s no secret that I don’t support that bill.” But Martoni says Fitzgerald has not “applied any pressure whatsoever” regarding Daly Danko’s legislation. Martoni says he plans to bring the measure forward for discussion after he attends a Nov. 25-26 symposium on shale gas being held at Duquesne University. “I just want to get the facts,” Martoni says. “If we drill under the parks from outside, what harm will it do? I don’t know. Some say it won’t cause any, and some say it will.” If the bill is not given a committee hearing within 60 days, Robinson says procedural maneuvers can pull the bill out of the committee and bring it before the full council for discussion. That deadline has not passed, and Daly Danko says she is still hopeful that her measure will be brought up for discussion through the typical process. “I think there are people who are in favor of drilling generally, but are still against the idea about drilling on or near our parks,” Daly Danko says. If drilling beneath parks were put on a ballot before voters, she predicts, “it would overwhelmingly fail.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

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police officer Garrett Brown was accused of aggressively slamming into Blaine Johnston and Matthew Mazzie’s delivery truck late in 2010, the city fired him. But on Nov. 7, an arbitration panel unanimously decided to give Brown his job back, with some restrictions. “We all agreed on the outcome — that’s rare,” says Robert Swartzwelder, a Zone 2 police officer who represented the Fraternal Order of Police on the arbitration panel. Unanimity in arbitration cases is uncommon because tripartite panels include one representative each from the FOP (which advocates for the officer) and the city (which usually advocates to uphold the city’s disciplinary action). “The sides are convincing the neutral arbitrator to one side or the other,” Swartzwelder says. “This case was very clear.” The city begged to differ. So did Mazzie and Johnston, who were both subpoenaed to testify before the arbitration panel and have filed a federal civil suit against Brown, the city and a handful of other officers. Their lawsuit claims Brown threw coins at their truck, punched its mirror and followed them without clearly identifying himself as a police officer. The police report tells a different story, claiming that Brown was rear-ended and tried to get the drivers to stop to exchange insurance information. Brown was charged criminally with insurance fraud, theft by deception, reckless endangerment and filing a false report. In May, he was acquitted of any criminal wrongdoing connected to the incident. Brown will be reinstated (unless the city appeals within 30 days), but cases like his raise concerns about the arbitration process with Mayor-elect Bill Peduto’s administration. “Over the years, you see a lot of situations occur with alleged illegalities, and it goes to arbitration and people get their jobs back,” says Kevin Acklin, Peduto’s chief of staff, who notes the biggest problem is “a moral issue within the city workforce. … You have to have a way to hold the workforce accountable to standards of ethics and performance.”

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Bryan Campbell, Brown’s FOP attorney, says the process isn’t problematic. After all, a neutral arbitrator typically has the most decision-making power. Asked about efforts the new mayoral administration may make to review the arbitration process, Campbell says: “What’s the alternative? You need a process to protect people.” And even though Acklin didn’t offer a specific alternative, he also didn’t rule out the possibility that the Peduto administration may look at ways to reform the process when the FOP’s collective-bargaining agreement with the city is up for negotiation next year. “We’re approaching it with the respect that police and other uniformed officers deserve,” Acklin says, “but with the goal over time of trying to restore the culture of accountability and ethics.” Still, city officials say the arbitrator’s decision was reasonable. “I can respect the decision of the arbitrator,” says Wendy Kobee, an assistant solicitor who argued that Brown should have been fired. “I might not have reached the same conclusion [but] it was a thoughtfully rendered decision.” “I supported the city’s case,” says Deputy Chief Paul Donaldson, the city’s representative on the arbitration panel, “but when the criminal charges were dismissed, it had a negative impact on our case.” Donaldson acknowledges that being cleared of criminal wrongdoing doesn’t necessarily mean Brown became fit to be a police officer — and he says that’s reflected in the city’s burden of proof in arbitration hearings. The panel operates by considering whether the city had “just cause” to fire Brown, which is a less-stringent standard than finding someone guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Conflicting expert interpretations of whether Brown was rear-ended or slammed into Mazzie and Johnston’s truck made it difficult to discern exactly what happened, Donaldson says. “What do we have left here? We’re not sure who caused the accident and the mirror is broken.” The outcome wasn’t just influenced by factual disputes, according to


Donaldson; arbitrators often shy away from terminating an officer. “The arbitrators are willing to punish,” Donaldson says, “but there is a reluctance to give the death knell — to take their job away from them,” often because a fired officer will likely never be hired in law enforcement again. That tendency may be reflected in Brown’s case: He was given his job back, but with back pay only from May 20 (after he was acquitted of criminal wrongdoing) and without any compensation for lost overtime or secondary employment opportunities. He will face a one-year probationary period with a “last-chance” agreement, under which Brown could be terminated if he faces further discipline. He will also be required to participate in “employee assistance programs,” but Donaldson declined to go into specifics. And even though the decision “was not as flagrant as some of the others I’ve participated in,” Donaldson says of Brown’s arbitration, the process isn’t ideal. “It certainly has a negative impact on our ability to manage. There are people who we believe should have clearly been terminated.”

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Chris Potter contributed to this report.

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Photo of La Roche College Dance Major and Bodiography Apprentice Chelsea Zimmer by Eric Rosé of Mysterion Studios

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BILL IS DUE Peduto’s ascent to the mayor’s office comes with great expectations from the citizenry and himself {BY CHRIS POTTER} IT TOOK Bill Peduto less than two hours to declare victory on Election Night: With the election a foregone conclusion, the mayor-elect gave his victory speech at around 9:40 p.m., to the cheers of an audience gathered at Homewood’s Greater Pittsburgh Coliseum. By another reckoning, though, the announcement was nearly a decade in the making. In that time, Peduto had lost one mayoral run and abandoned another, headed a council majority, and then lost it. This year’s victory came only after he’d painstakingly built a political operation that helped elect allies in races across the city. And that may have been the easy part. Asked by a reporter what it meant to win the November election with 84 percent of the vote, Peduto answered, “I have my work cut out for me.” But he was, he said, glad for the journey: “I think back to 2005” — his first mayoral bid — “and I think I would have been a terrible mayor.” “We weren’t with him back then,” agreed Gabe Morgan, state director of the Service Employees International Union’s local 32BJ, on Election Night. When Peduto joined council as the representative of the affluent East End, in 2002, he boasted of being the knowledge-worker’s representative: An early initiative involved supporting after-hours clubs in the interest of creating a vibrant nightlife. More recently, though, Peduto touted a “prevailing-wage” bill for workers in taxsubsidized buildings, and backed Hill District residents seeking neighborhood benefits from the new Penguins arena. “We saw Bill, who represents the wealthiest in the city, fight the hardest for working people,” Morgan said. And Peduto, who was repudiated in black neighborhoods throughout the city in 2005, won many of them this year, thanks partly to allegiances with black leaders like state Rep. Ed Gainey. Few missed the symbolism of Peduto’s decision to hold his celebration in one of the city’s most neglected communities. As Morgan put it, “We define progressive as where you hold your victory party.” But future challenges were evident

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Mayor-elect Bill Peduto speaks with reporters on Election Night.

even that night. While some of Peduto’s rivals — including City Council President Darlene Harris, and councilors Daniel Lavelle and Ricky Burgess — attended his party, no honeymoon lasts forever. Burgess, who represents Homewood, wryly said, “I’m glad my advocacy has brought so much attention to Homewood. I’m looking forward to disproportionate resources being steered into this community.” Meanwhile, as Barack Obama can attest, the progressive voters who make up Peduto’s base can become disenchanted quickly. Peduto had been brushed back in October, when the Pittsburgh PostGazette reported that he and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald were pondering a shift that would move Port Authority bus routes to the periphery of Downtown. The idea had been proposed before, but never fails to generate a populist backlash — this time, it took fire even from transit-backers whom Peduto has championed. (For his part, Peduto says an overhaul is a long way off — and if it doesn’t make transit more convenient for riders, he’d stick with the status quo.) But Peduto’s biggest challenge, says City Controller Michael Lamb, is “the infrastructure deficit.” After years of aus-

terity budgets under state-appointed financial overseers, he says, “The city is literally crumbling. Our facilities are just deplorable.” And that, Lamb says, can frustrate politicians with broad visions: “It’s a challenge of limited resources – but in a broader sense, how do you stay strategically focused on getting core things done?” “Bill’s a very big-picture guy,” says the SEIU’s Morgan. But the challenge, he says, is “how to carry out the vision he has while also cleaning up the mess” he is inheriting. “It’s a challenge many progressives stumble on.” The city’s legacy problems are “what keeps me up at night,” agrees Kevin Acklin, Peduto’s future chief of staff. “I hear rumors of trucks that have been in the shop for months.” Some of Peduto’s earlier initiatives themselves are in need of attention: The mayoral primary itself revealed gaping holes in a campaign-finance reform ordinance that Peduto had championed on council. And many other reforms that Peduto and his allies shepherded through council, ranging from tow-truck regulations to diesel-

emission limits, have languished during the Ravenstahl years. Even so, it’s hard to imagine a stronger start for a mayor-elect. Last week, Peduto unveiled a leadership team that was diverse in every sense of the word. It included both members of the Democratic old guard — like onetime/longtime Public Works head Guy Costa and former City Councilor Valerie McDonald Roberts — and newcomers like Lourdes Sanchez Ridge, a Republican whom Peduto has tapped for solicitor. As Peduto told reporters Nov. 7, the roster includes both government newcomers and old hands “who have been down the path before.” And as if to prove he could reform government without running roughshod over it, Peduto also told reporters that he supported city council hiring its own attorney, instead of compelling it to rely on legal advice from the city solicitor, who reports to the mayor. Peduto’s willingness to let council seek a second opinion might seem a small change, but it’s a hopeful sign if you’re worried the new boss will be the same as the old. Mayoral administrations, after all, don’t always end the way they began. Back in 1993, another youthful (by Pittsburgh standards) politician won the mayor’s office by promising good government, and making a pledge to listen to neighborhoods. “We’re going to redefine government in Allegheny County,” Tom Murphy told the Post-Gazette, while promising to hold community meetings in every city neighborhood. But when Murphy left office three terms later, much of his tenure was defined by controversial investments in sports facilities and Downtown retail, often pursued in defiance of the public will. Peduto has taken pains to disavow such ambitions. On Election Night, he pledged, “There is not going to be a Renaissance IV,” citing the “top-down” approach of the city’s earlier redevelopment initiatives. There are reasons to wonder if Peduto can govern in the populist style he campaigned on. But if he does, it won’t be the first time he’s defied the cynics … even if doing so took longer than he intended. “You come in feeling like you’re going to conquer the world,” Tom Flaherty, then the head of the county’s Democratic Committee, told me not long after Peduto first took office in 2002. “Usually, you can’t even conquer a ward.” Usually. But not always.

“I HAVE MY WORK CUT OUT FOR ME.”

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


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[GREEN LIGHT]

GREEN INTENTIONS

One of a kind. Like you.

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} A NEW SURVEY of environmental attitudes

in Pittsburgh holds some surprises. And while many residents are doing less to protect the environment than they think, survey results suggest government has a mandate to do more. The Pittsburgh Regional Environmental Survey (posted at www.pittsburghtoday. org) was conducted by nonprofit PittsburghTODAY and the University of Pittsburgh’s University Center for Social and Urban Research, with phone interviews of more than 800 residents of the seven-county area. Respondents gave themselves high green marks: 60 percent of survey respondents believe they are doing an excellent or good job protecting the environment. PittsburghTODAY director Douglas Heuck finds that encouraging. “It did seem that people were more aware of environmental issues generally and practiced conservation more than I would have expected,” says Heuck, whose foundationfunded group benchmarks Pittsburgh against other regions. But how good are we at actually protecting the environment? It’s true that we are using less of some resources. For instance, 74 percent of survey respondents said they conserve water with strategies like taking shorter showers — and indeed, in recent years, average monthly water usage by Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority residential customers has dropped from 5,000 gallons to under 4,500 gallons, says PWSA spokesperson Melissa Rubin. Yet asked how much water they use, respondents came up dry: While nearly 80 percent estimated their household uses 50 or fewer gallons a day, according to PWSA figures, the true average is nearly three times that. The info gap recalls the survey’s results on air quality: Almost two-thirds of respondents said that air quality here is either a minor problem or no problem. Yet according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the region’s air still too frequently harbors dangerous levels of smog, and a big soot problem remains. On energy usage, most respondents said they turn down thermostats and air-conditioners overnight or when they’re away. But actual usage figures are a mixed bag. The average Equitable Gas customer, for instance, uses 90 million cubic feet of natural gas per month. That’s down 30 percent from 1997, says Equitable spokesman Scott Waitlevertch, with some of the decline due to con-

servation measures and some to replacing ancient boilers. But the average Duquesne Light customer’s usage of 600-plus kilowatts a month hasn’t changed in years. Given that combating climate change means giving up fossil fuels completely, clearly there’s much room for improvement beyond individual effort. And people seem to know it: Although 86 percent of respondents “agree that individual citizens should be responsible” for helping solve environmental problems, “nearly 79 percent believe there is little or nothing they can do” in that cause Heuck believes this paradox reflects the difference between things people can control — like their thermostats — and things they consider beyond their reach, like global warming. That’s where government comes in. Nearly 80 percent of respondents agreed “that government should be responsible for solving Pennsylvania’s environmental problems,” and two-thirds agreed that “state government oversight of the environment should increase.” Politicians often say fighting climate change would hurt the economy. But 73 percent of those surveyed favor “mandatory controls to curb carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions.” More surprisingly, only 28 percent said that environmental regulations weaken the economy — and 57 percent said they’d protect the environment even if it did slow growth. “There may be more people interested in responsible government oversight of the environment than we’re sometimes led to believe,” says Heuck. Erika Staaf, of statewide group Penn Environment, was pleasantly surprised by the 57 percent of respondents who said they’d prioritize environmental protection over energy production, even if it limited supplies of oil, gas or coal. Meanwhile, although half of those surveyed supported gas drilling, 95 percent of respondents agreed that gas drillers should be required to disclose all the chemicals they use in hydraulic fracturing. “There’s a proposal in Congress right now that would do that,” Staaf notes, referring to the FRAC Act. “It’s amazing to me that we can’t get that passed.” Change requires political action. If people want less pollution, Staaf says, “They need to be sending a strong message to their leaders at any level that, yeah, it’s OK to clamp down on this.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


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9 #9

REASONS TO DRINK

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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“Fantasy sports” are hugely popular, but when fans “draft” players for their teams, they “own” only the players’ statistics. Recently, Wall Street and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs created Fantex Holdings, which will allow investors to buy actual pieces of real players — namely, rights to 20 percent of the player’s lifetime earnings (including licensing and productendorsement deals). The firm told The New York Times in October that it will soon stage an “IPO” for budding NFL star Arian Foster and hopes to sign many more athletes, plus singers and actors similarly early in their careers. (Fantex’s lawyers also drew up a 37-page list of potential investment risks, such as injuries, slumps and scandals — and the fact that the stock will trade only on Fantex’s private exchange.)

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One surprising legacy of the oppressions of communist East Germany is modern-day Germany’s commonplace “clothing-optional” lifestyle (FKK, or “Freikoerperkultur” — free body culture). A September Global Post dispatch counted “hundreds” of FKK beaches across the country and referenced a turned-up snapshot (not yet authenticated) of a young Angela Merkel frolicking nude in the 1960s or 1970s. Foreigners occasionally undergo culture shock at German hotels’ saunas and pools, at which swimsuits are discouraged (as “unhygienic”).

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In December, China joined only a handful of countries (and 29 U.S. states) by strengthening the rights of elderly parents to demand support from their adult children — not only financially (which has been the law for more than a decade), but now allowing lawsuits by parents who feel emotionally ignored, as well. An October Associated Press feature on one rural family dramatized China’s cultural shift away from its proverbial “first virtue” of family honor. Zhang Zefang, 94, said she did not understand the concept of “lawsuit” when a local official explained it, but that she deserved better from the children she had raised, who now allegedly resent her neediness. (A village court promptly ordered several family members to contribute support for Zhang.)

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Recent separate testings in 21 springs in Austria and 18 fonts in Vienna yielded a conclusion that 86 percent of the holy water in the country’s churches was not safe to drink — most commonly infected with diarrhea-causing E. coli and Campylobacter. University of Vienna researchers found samples with up to 62 million bacteria per milliliter of water, and the busier the church, the higher the count. Various studies show “churchgoers” to be happier, more optimistic and healthier than other people, leading some atheists and agnostics to wonder whether the church experience could be fruitfully replicated but minus belief in God. Hence, the “Sunday Assembly” was created in London, and has spread to New York City and Melbourne, Australia, with 18 other hoped-for openings by year’s end, according to a September report in The Week. Founders seek “a sense of community,” “a thought-provoking [secular] sermon,” “group singing” and an “ethos of self-improvement,” exemplified by the motto “live better, help often, wonder more.” They hope that eventually Sunday Assembly will

organize Sunday school, weddings, funerals and “non-religious baptisms.”

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An alleged drug ring in the Brooklyn, N.Y., neighborhood of Sheepshead Bay was busted in September after police cracked a stream of Internet messages offering heroin (called “DOB”) and cocaine (“white girl”). Among the messages was one sent at 6:45 p.m. one Friday, giving customers “45 minutes” to get their order in for the weekend before the sellers obediently shut down at 7:30 (i.e., sundown) for the Jewish sabbath.

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Los Angeles Animal Services has proposed that the city be established as a Sanctuary City of Feral Cats and that cats should be an exception to property owners’ right to evict animals causing damage. Under the L.A. City Feral Cat Program, reported OpposingViews. com, felines “will gain an inherent right” to be on residential or commercial property. Animal Services believes that an enhanced spaying program will eliminate most feral-cat problems, including somehow their toileting excesses and their killing of neighborhood songbirds.

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People With Worse Sex Lives Than Yours: (1) Optometrist Robert Deck III, 48, was arraigned in Oakland County, Mich., in October on an indecent-exposure charge after an August incident in which he allegedly began to masturbate in his office while fitting a female patient with contact lenses. (2) Edward Falcone, 57, a retired woodshop teacher at Brooklyn High School of the Arts, was arrested for public lewdness in October after students on a school bus reported a motorist masturbating as he followed the bus. (3) Leslie Bailey, 28, was convicted of misdemeanor lewd conduct in San Francisco in October after being spotted by a BART train operator on separate occasions, incompletely clothed, thrusting his hips against an empty seat.

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Ariel Sinclair, 23, an assistant manager at a Rite Aid drugstore in Virginia Beach, Va., was charged in October with stealing $6,000 from the store’s Virginia State Lottery machine. According to police, access to the machine requires an authorized fingerprint, which she supplied, apparently failing to think ahead that this would eventually be difficult to explain. “We work a lot of different cases,” said a police spokesman, and “some are [easier] than others.”

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Among the things responders mentioned in Public Policy Polling’s October release as being viewed more favorably than the U.S. Congress were hemorrhoids, the DMV and toenail fungus. The same firm’s polling earlier in the year showed Congress less likable than root canals, head lice, colonoscopies and Donald Trump, but back then, Congress did beat out telemarketers, Ebola virus and meth labs.

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Among the reported personal-residence expenditures provoking Pope Francis in October to remove Limburg, Germany, Bishop Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst: his bathtub (equivalent of about $20,000), cupboards and carpentry ($550,000) and artwork ($690,000). (Days later, the Vatican announced that the church would open a soup kitchen at the bishop’s mansion.)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

Friday, Nov. 15 | 6 –10 pm Explore the exhibits and enjoy special activities with the Pittsburgh Glass Center! Register for a workshop to make your own fused-glass tile! Cash bar + Live music + Snacks available for purchase

Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org to register. Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event


DE

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ON

PROPER FILLS DOWNTOWN’S NEED FOR DINING SPOTS BETWEEN DELI AND HAUTE CUISINE

OLD IS NU {BY CHRIS POTTER} Updating classic comfort food has been A Thing in contemporary dining for a while. So perhaps it’s no surprise to see Jewish comfort food getting its turn. It’s certainly no surprise that it’s being done in Squirrel Hill by Pam Cohen and Gail Klingensmith, who own Pamela’s Diner next door. Their “modern Jewish bistro” is called “Nu,” which is both a Yiddish expression (meaning “so? well?”) and a reflection of culinary approach. The menu, compiled by chef Kelsey Sukel and Cohen’s sister Risé, “uses Jewish ingredients in a modern way,” says Cohen. Located at 1711 Murray Ave., Nu retains a global perspective (though everything from making pickles to carving meat is done on site). The vegetarian sandwich, for example, includes fried eggplant and mango chutney. Nu had a soft launch about two weeks ago, garnering positive word-ofmouth. But you can’t please everyone, especially when you’re updating Jewish recipes in Pittsburgh’s most traditional Jewish neighborhood. “We’ve had 85-year-olds come in and say, ‘This isn’t how you make it,’” Cohen says. Especially controversial is whether matzoh balls should be “floaters or sinkers” when added to soup: “It’s a cultural thing from family to family,” says Cohen. (Nu is in the sinker camp.) But Klingensmith and Cohen stress the universal appeal of their “Montreal smoked meat” — a new-to-Pittsburgh beef brisket that is salted and dry-cured. “You don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy it,” says Klingensmith. Though of course … it couldn’t hurt. CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

Get the kids cooking this weekend at Slow Food Pittsburgh’s class at Marty’s Market, in the Strip District. Kids will choose produce, learn basic knife skills and cooking techniques, sautée the vegetables, and then sample everything. 12:302 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. For kids 8 and older. $10. Reservations required at www. martysmarket.com.

A BETTER

PIZZA JOINT {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

N

OWADAYS, NOT many adults spend their leisure time painting bucolic scenes of sailing ships and deer in the woodlands, so “paint by numbers” has been relegated to child’s play. But with some decent brush work, perfectly attractive — albeit formulaic — paintings could be made from numbered canvases. So it is with restaurants. True originality is sublime, but rare, with most restaurateurs clearly working within a set vocabulary of tastes and trends. But while cooking by numbers may not yield a truly transcendent dining experience, it certainly doesn’t preclude a satisfying meal. Which brings us to Proper Brick Oven and Tap House in the heart of the Cultural District. In the Pittsburgh tradition, we feel compelled to add that it’s in the space occupied for decades by one of the many Tambellini restaurants, but as we never went there, we walked in without any baggage related to its past. Proper’s interior doesn’t suggest much past at all, aside from the exposed brick walls that have become architectural shorthand for “cool, reused old building.” Beyond that,

Pizza margherita

the decor aims for that middle ground between cozy and classy. Most of the seating is at a long, upholstered banquette facing the bar, above which 30 beers on tap are listed in chalk on individual boards. A fire flickers in the mouth of the brick oven, and a collage of stained wooden panels from wine crates serves both as wall art and wine list. In short, whether it’s before a show or a ballgame, whether you’re meeting friends or colleagues, Proper is a — yes — proper choice.

PROPER BRICK OVEN AND TAP ROOM 139 Seventh St., Downtown. 412-281-5700 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $4-6; sandwiches and salads $8-12; pizza and pasta $14-18 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED The brief menu of snacks, pizzas and pastas breaks no new ground, but strives to be about as refined as that workmanlike trinity can be. Goat cheese and mozzarella

are housemade, pasta is housemade or else sourced from local artisan maker Fede. Even the potato chips (with sea salt and fresh chives) are housemade. Other starters are closer to true tapas or antipasti than to pub grub. And while the offerings are up-to-date, the only really trendy move is “bacon candy,” an item we viewed with some skepticism; the American habit of sweetening things that ought to be savory and/or salty tends to dull, even dumb down, the palate. But we were happily surprised with Proper’s version. Instead of being masked by sweetness, the thick bacon slices’ native smokiness was intensified by their contact with maple syrup, and their chewiness made this snack satisfying without working our jaws too long. Fried chickpeas tossed with sea salt and smoked paprika were a simpler, more classic nibble. Like wasabi peas without the sinus-cleansing potency, they were crispy, light and addictive. As you’d hope, the brick oven turned out suitably tasty pizzas. High-quality ingredients played their part, too. The Bianca CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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A BETTER PIZZA JOINT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 25

featured house-made ricotta, burrata (a fresh Italian cheese made with mozzarella and cream) and Parmigiano-Reggiano. Without sauce to temper the oven’s heat, the thin crust scorched a bit, but the flavors, highlighted by roasted-garlic chili flakes and extra-virgin olive oil, had more depth than a typical white pizza. The Carnivore, with four forms of meat — sweet and hot Italian sausage, bacon and pepperoni — was aptly named. The pie was almost overwhelmed by cured meat. The crumbled sausages formed an a thick layer that obscured the (housemade mozzarella) cheese, but the bacon really shone, its sweet smokiness bringing high and low notes while its chewier texture added variety to the bite. Meanwhile, where the cheese peeked through, it was rich and creamy, and the puffy edges of the crust were lusciously chewy.

Sous chef Ron Castle

Linguine with white clam sauce (vongole) came in a reasonable, rather than gut-busting, portion, and the al dente noodles were thoroughly coated with a slightly thick, flavorful sauce studded with juicy clams, including a suitable handful served in the shell. Jason’s only quibble was that the sauce could have been a touch brighter, but the absence of oiliness avoided a common pitfall of this dish. A special pasta, seasonal butternutsquash ravioli, was dominated by lots of thick cream sauce, whose sweetness tipped the balance between the dish’s other, earthy and salty flavors. We would have preferred just enough of this sauce to cling to the ravioli. But we loved the ravioli’s tenderness, and the fact that the squash inside had not been pureed to the consistency of baby food, but retained some texture of the gourd from whence it came. Comfortable, casual, affordable and thoughtful, Proper is the kind of place that would be right at home on Murray Avenue or Butler Street. Now that Downtown is emerging as a neighborhood, too, Proper is a welcome addition to the broad, but underserved, need for dining spots between deli and haute cuisine. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

FRANKLY LOCAL Franktuary offers Pennsylvania-only drink menu Roger Harvey, bar manager at Franktuary in Lawrenceville, had a revelation when he started updating the restaurant’s cocktail menu: Most of the drinks were made with spirits that had been distilled far away. “There was all this branding on the menu for companies that we had no relationship with,” he says. So he decided to make a big change by introducing a “Local Libations” menu — one devoted to drinks made with Pennsylvania spirits. “We want to reinvest in our own communities,” Harvey says. “I want to give as much money as I can to people that we know.” Curiously, perhaps, the cocktail menu doesn’t include the names of the local brands; it uses generic terms like “rye” or “vodka” instead. “We want people to ask,” says Harvey. “It’s about starting a conversation [about local distilleries],” Harvey says. The restaurant’s 10-tap beer system also got a local makeover. Almost all the beer on tap is brewed in Pennsylvania, as is the nearly alcohol-free Red Star Kombucha. However, Harvey says, “We’ve built really great relationships with a few out-of-town breweries — Seattle’s Elysian Brewing Company, for example — and we don’t want to burn those bridges.” So he’s keeping one tap open for what he’s calling “imports”: Franktuary-friendly domestic beers produced outside the area. There will still be a selection of bottles from around the country and the world. As for wine, Harvey says that while he respects local winemakers, there aren’t enough quality Pennsylvania wines to compile a full list. “We wanted to find the best varieties from as close as we could,” he says. So alongside a red and a white from the Strip District’s Pittsburgh Winery, customers will find a riesling from the Finger Lakes, a chardonnay from Long Island and even a rosé from New Mexico. Harvey says that this is just the start of Franktuary’s focus on local libations: “We’re still just learning more and more every day.”

“I WANT TO GIVE AS MUCH MONEY AS I CAN TO PEOPLE THAT WE KNOW.”

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3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-5867224 or franktuary.com/lawrenceville


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& D Lun rink ch, Spe Dinn cial er sD aily !

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

We’re so much more than pizza!

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE

Proudly Supports

Eat In & Take Out! Wexford 724-935-4151

CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nugget-like, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF

Ross Twp. 412-821-0600

CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412-761-2233. Tapas from around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plate preparations are sophisticated, and the presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors range from Asian-style crispy duck wings and scallopsthree-ways to roasted peppers stuffed with ricotta. KE

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Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11pm

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

CREEN S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Sienna Sulla Piazza

CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana, while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF

Everyday Noodles {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} EVERYDAY NOODLES. 5875 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-6660. At this Chinese restaurant, the menu is organized around pasta dishes, including noodle soups, “dry” noodles served with sauce and toppings, dumplings, wontons and potstickers. A few rice dishes, non-noodle soups and steamed vegetable plates round things out. But noodles — made fresh in full view of customers — rule. JF

inventive, modern entrees. Some dishes pull out the stops, including seafood Newburg lasagna and veal with artichokes, peppers, olives and wild mushrooms over risotto. But don’t forgo the flatbread pizzas, many with gourmet options. KE

ROOT 174. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-2434348. The foundation of the menu is also a basic formula: fresh, local and seasonal ingredients. FUKUDA. 4770 Liberty To this, add an . www per Ave., Bloomfield. adventurous selection a p ty ci pgh m 412-377-0916. This of meat products, .co neo-traditional Japanese such as bone-marrow restaurant excels at brûlée and smoked re-invention, with a menu that salmon sausage. Dishes have is inspired as much by modern lengthy ingredient lists, but it all American cuisine as it is by comes together in satisfying and ancient Japanese tradition. Here, surprising ways. LE roasted beets are powdered, kale is crisped, and pork belly gets RUMFISH GRILLE. 1155 its own entrée. It offers a tapasWashington Pike, Bridgeville. like, a la carte approach, ideal 412-914-8013. The kitchen offers for sampling a menu that spans a modern yet comfortable take traditional sushi, charcoal-grilled on seafood, offering distinctive skewers, ramen soup and neatly appetizers and a few signature prepared, sliced proteins. LF entrées. There is also a buildyour-own entrée option, in MARISQUEIRA. 225 Commercial which a dozen fish and shellfish Ave., Aspinwall. 412-696-1130. (plus a few meat options) can This fine-dining restaurant offers be combined with interesting the bold flavors and confident sauces, starches and vegetables to preparations of classic Portuguese create a custom dinner, whether cuisine — from thick, meaty your tastes run to truffle jus or Iberian octopus tentacles, mac-n-cheese. LE broiled with Portuguese bleu cheese, to sausage flambéed SALT OF THE EARTH. 5523 en route to the table. Entrees Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441include steak in a red-wine sauce, 7258. Salt embodies a singular chicken cooked with Portuguese vision for not just eating, but peppers, pork with clams and, fully experiencing food. The ever-changing but compact of course, fish. LE menu reflects chef Kevin Sousa’s hybrid style, combining cuttingPINO’S CONTEMPORARY edge techniques with traditional ITALIAN. 6738 Reynolds St., Point ingredients to create unique Breeze. 412-361-1336. The menu flavor and texture combinations. at this Italian eatery spans from Salt erases distinctions — sandwiches that hearken back to between fine and casual dining, its pizzeria days, through pastas between familiar and exotic of varying sophistication, to

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

ingredients, between your party and adjacent diners. LE

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SEWICKLEY SPEAKEASY. 17 Ohio River Blvd., Sewickley. 412741-1918. This little restaurant has the charm of a bygone era and old-fashioned food whose pleasures are worth rediscovering. The Continental menu offers chestnuts like duck á l’orange and Virginia spots, as well as more distinctive dishes, such as tournedos dijon bleu and French Acadian porterhouse. LE SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA. 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-281-6888. This fine-dining spot brings an elegantly casual, European vibe to the renovated Market Square, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Starters include grilled octopus, beans and greens, and flatbreads, while the entrees (meat, pasta, fish) offer more sophisticated presentations. KE THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412431-4668. The Carson Street bar and nightclub offers a top-notch sandwich and salad menu, by bringing creativity, quality preparation and a knack for well-selected ingredients to the burgers, sandwiches and appetizers. Options include: shrimp skewers with smoked peppers, corn-and-black-bean fritters and a roster of inventive sliders. JE TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honeybased wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. 412-224-2579. In this intimate restaurant, the emphasis is on local, seasonal ingredients simply yet inventively prepared. Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brown-sugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique four-course dinner just for you. LE TWISTED THISTLE. 127 Market St., Leechburg. 724-236-0450. This cozy restaurant, set in a restored 1902 hotel, offers above-average fare, reasonably priced. Alongside the contemporary American flavors are numerous Asianinspired dishes, such as soup made from kabocha pumpkin. From po’boy oyster appetizers to crab cakes and over-sized short ribs, each dish is carefully conceived and prepared. KE

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

CAN-DO SPIRIT Local foodies extol the virtues of canning AT LEGUME, preserved foods are prominently featured in its seasonal menu. In one evening, dishes may feature a range of pickled vegetables — daikon, peppers, beans and turnips — as well as sour-cherry preserves and kimchi. On Sun., Nov. 3, the Oakland eatery’s chef/owner Trevett Hooper addressed a small crowd gathered at the new Pittsburgh Public Market. His question — “Why preserve food?” — is one that he’d joined with the Pittsburgh Canning Exchange and Slow Food Pittsburgh to answer. The fledgling Pittsburgh Canning Exchange (www.canningexchange.org) connects novice and experienced canners for hands-on education. Only two-and-a-half months after the group’s first homecanning party, this canning swap served as its first public event. “In 2014, we’re going to have a lot of opportunities for people to experience canning,” promises Gabe Tilove, one of the Pittsburgh Canning Exchange’s four young founders. Ten participants swapped goods ranging from the expected (tomatoes and jam) to the exotic: fig mustard, lemon curd, goat’s milk soap and peach chutney. The crowd nearly doubled for Hooper, who aimed to answer his own question simply: “For me [preservation] is about being a participant in our local foodshed.” But there are other advantages, too. It’s healthier, said Hooper: “We know what’s in everything we jar, and there’s nothing mysterious.” Also, canning takes advantage of good deals at harvest time, when perishable crops are at a surplus. Perhaps most importantly, preserving food helps support farms and farmers, especially those growing crops that have short seasons, like cherries. Legume, for example, purchased 500 pounds of cherries this year, turning them into everything from jams to juice, compared to the 80 pounds the restaurant would have bought if the fruit were limited by its three-week season. This inspires a “better relationship with the farm” says Hooper. The Nov. 3 event also included a pickle contest hosted by Slow Food Pittsburgh, charcuterie from the Crested Duck and a beet-canning demo. All in all, it was a well-rounded celebration of a growing food trend that is entrenched in old-school techniques. “It’s a really important thing that you’re all doing,” Hooper told the group. “It’s really empowering.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


Introducing the fun and free CP HAPPS APP! The event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location. With the FREE CP HAPPS APP, you can bookmark your favorite events, invite friends and make plans, all in a private, personalized environment. Follow the five easy steps below to start using the FREE CP HAPPS APP today.

DOWNLOAD NOW OR TEXT “EVENTS” TO 77948

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LOCAL

“IT’S REALLY A CASE OF BUILDING FAN BY FAN.”

BEAT

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

The CD of Alex Stanton’s album Care and Feeding — recorded solo under the name Townsppl — comes packaged in colorful cardstock. Follow the included instruction sheet and cut along the dotted lines, and you’ll end up with an elaborate paper sculpture. “Too often you get a CD and you copy it to your computer and then you put it on a shelf, or maybe you throw it away,” Stanton says. Accordingly, the final step in constructing the sculpture involves cutting the CD in half. “I was trying to make something that was not throw-away-able.” But Stanton’s interest in construction carries far beyond cardstock. After roughly three years of teaching guitar lessons, he’s in the process of opening a 2,000-squarefoot music-lesson space and recording studio in Squirrel Hill, which will be known as Sunburst School of Music. In addition to oneon-one lessons, Stanton plans to start a program, loosely based on the School of Rock franchise, that would give students a chance to practice in a full rock-band setting. “I really started to get into guitar when I started playing with a drummer and a bassist,” Stanton explains. “That became a big part of the mission: to get guitarists to play with other musicians.” Generally, parents have to drive their kids to suburban music stores for lessons; Stanton figures that his spot, “a music school that doesn’t sell guitars,” is an original, at least within city limits. Though Stanton will soon have a recording studio at his disposal, he recorded Care and Feeding — which brings to mind the lush indie rock of Grizzly Bear or a more subdued Animal Collective — alone in his kitchen, later enlisting production help from Donora’s Jake Hanner. To re-create that sound live, he’s recruited a band of nine musicians, meeting with each of them separately to teach them their parts. There is some overlap, at least philosophically, between Stanton’s ambitious projects. “Both are about building things,” he says. “Building a song to me is about trying different things, and if you think about business, it’s kind of the same thing: a lot of trial and error.” More on Sunburst: www.pittsburgh guitarlessons.com. MWELSH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TOWNSPPL. 8 p.m. Thu., Nov. 14. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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Lessons in the city: Alex Stanton

DOING AND TEACHING

THE SLOW BREAK A little at a time: The Spring Standards

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

B

R O O K LY N BA N D T h e S p r i n g Standards would seem to have a lot going for it. The three-piece is made up of especially talented multiinstrumentalists, with multiple lead singers and a knack for moving vocal harmonies. The band was on Conan O’Brien’s show in 2008, after its Rhett Miller-produced debut came out. A filmmaker is working on a documentary about a recent tour. But at the same time, things aren’t blowing up, exactly: Band members used Kickstarter to fund their forthcoming live album. They couldn’t afford to hire a publicist for their current tour, so they resorted to doing their own tour PR, which isn’t easy when you’re hitting a dozen cities. “It’s such a mystery,” says vocalist and keyboardist Heather Robb. “We’ve had conversations with people we trust who say, ‘What’s it going to take to get you to where you need to be?’ And I wish I had an answer.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

The Spring Standards began in earnest in 2008 with the release of that first EP, but Robb and bandmates James Cleare and James Smith have been making music much longer. The three met when they were teenagers, living around

THE SPRING STANDARDS

WITH YOU WON’T, AARON “THE UKE SLINGER” JONES 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

the Pennsylvania-Delaware border. They played together in a band for a time, then set out for college (Cleare for music, Robb and Smith for acting). “We never fell out of touch, but then we all moved to New York — not together, we just all ended up there — and we got back together and started playing, and it

hadn’t gone anywhere,” says Robb. At any given time, Robb might be playing keys or melodica; Cleare might be on guitar or bass; Smith may or may not be playing trumpet. Where most groups have a set approach to working and writing, The Spring Standards’ versatility makes for a wide range of methods. “We’ve been both praised and criticized for really being all over the map in terms of genre,” says Robb. “And I think a lot of that has to do with [the fact that] there’s really no equation. It’s almost like we’re miners and we’re dropping down and we don’t know if we’re going to find gold or diamonds or coal. You never really know what you’re going to find with a song. “We do all wear a lot of hats, and we’re all songwriters.” Having multiple singers is a blessing for a band, and The Spring Standards takes full advantage: Each member takes over lead vocals at some point. But Robb


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insists that it’s not really a matter of being stacked with overwhelming vocal talent. “I love the singing voice of everyone in my band. I would say, though, I think the whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” she says. “I think that any one of us on our own, we’re not exceptional singers. But there’s something that happens when our voices sing together that I can’t explain. We’ve been singing together for so long, it’s just a natural thing in my life.” Being on the cusp of big success, but still coming from a do-it-yourself point of view, the trio isn’t afraid to take on some novel projects. Earlier this year, the band took on a tour that consisted mostly of house shows — that was the tour on which they were followed by a filmmaker. “At this point, we’ve made three fully fan-funded records,” says Robb. “We had a summer that had some shows but not a ton, so we started brainstorming. We’d seen more and more bands doing house tours, ranging from people you’ve never heard of to David Bazan, who’s made a whole career on basically playing house parties.”

1305 E. CARSON ST.

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They went to their Kickstarter donors and offered to play house shows; the smallest, Robb says, came in Birmingham, Ala., where the band played for two people one afternoon en route to another show. In Pittsburgh, in addition to a show at Club Café, they played two house shows, including one at the home of Penguins play-by-play announcer Paul Steigerwald, who found the band via a friend and has since become a supporter. “In the case of Pittsburgh, we’re really lucky to have Paul on our side,” says Robb. “We have a few other connections in other cities, too. I think that’s a reflection of how we’ve built our fan base, and I think it’s also a reflection of the state of the music industry. It’s really a case of building fan by fan.” For now, that’s how the band will continue to do it — because, Robb says, she’s not sure there’s a better way. “It is a puzzling position to be in,” she says. “All we know right now is, we just need to keep going — for the fans, for us, for the time and energy we’ve put into this, for the feedback we’ve gotten and felt encouraged by.”

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ON THE RECORD with Landon Knoblock of CACAW {BY MIKE SHANLEY} CACAW’s music unites distorted rock synthesizers with free-jazz saxophone and drums in a series of compositions inspired by science fiction. Keyboardist Landon Knoblock, who started out in a piano trio, spoke to CP in anticipation of band’s Nov. 17 show at Thunderbird Café.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRYAN ZIMMERMAN}

Back after 14 years: Sebadoh

GIMME GROWN-UP ROCK {BY MIKE SHANLEY} WHILE SONGS on Sebadoh albums through

the ’90s continued to chart lead man Lou Barlow’s love life, a different chapter comes across on this year’s Defend Yourself, the band’s first new album since 1999. Several reviews of the album mentioned that the guitarist had separated from his wife, and an examination of the lyrics reveals his thoughts on the subject. Being the writer he is, Barlow isn’t in mid-life-crisis mode, nor does he play the bitter divorcé. In fact, he presents a pretty articulate perspective on how these things happen, with resolve coming by the end of the album. Jason “Jake” Loewenstein, the band’s bassist and second songwriter, isn’t surprised by Barlow’s candor.

one way or the other, [a skill] he seemed to tap into when he was a very young man.” As a result, the band created an album that matches the power of its mid-’90s heyday. Sebadoh reunited in the mid-2000s, and even came to Pittsburgh in 2011, but things are still part time for them. Barlow lives in California, while Loewenstein and drummer Bob D’Amico (who joined in the reunion) live in New York. (Co-founder Eric Gaffney isn’t with the revamped lineup.) “In some ways, it’s been the M.O. for Sebadoh for a long time,” Loewenstein admits. “It’s been a real long time since Lou and I lived in the same town together. The mechanics of making a record or going on tour was like, we get a few hours to practice, get as close as we can and it’s got to come together onstage or under the red light of the recording device.” A band that was known for its home recordings, the trio returned to its roots by setting up in a Glendale, Calif., practice space, armed with recording equipment. Unlike the band’s early lo-fi, four-track recordings, though, Defend Yourself was captured on better equipment, without sacrificing the sonic roar of the musicians’ youth. Songs like “Love You Here” and “Can’t Depend” prove they’re still capable of combining the heavy side with catchy, sometimes beautiful, arrangements. Loewenstein, unfazed by his partner’s lyrical matter, lightheatedly confesses that he’s happy for the response the band continues to receive. “I have a huge respect for people that have stuck with us for a long time,” he says, with a chuckle. “I’m a grateful indie-rock musician.”

BARLOW ISN’T IN MID-LIFE-CRISIS MODE, NOR DOES HE PLAY THE BITTER DIVORCÉ.

SEBADOH

WITH OCTA#GRAPE 9 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $16-18. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

“That’s kind of what we like about him,” Loewenstein says. “That’s sort of his main thrust: examining different parts of the difficulty of human relationships, especially men to women, romantic ones.” The tone of the lyrics “actually changed to some type of conclusion about what the communication problem was, what was pulling one person

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

IT SOUNDS LIKE YOU’RE TRYING TO CHANGE THE IDENTITY OF YOUR INSTRUMENT. There are things I’ve always loved about synthesizers. But I always felt like there was this bad connotation that synthesizers had because of fusion. So there was that fear. But I thought, “You love that sound; why are you denying it?” I love the sound of synth bass, it’s a beautiful sound.

Landon Knoblock

THE STELLAR POWER ALBUM INCLUDES A SYNOPSIS ALONG WITH TRACK TITLES LIKE “SPACE ROBOT FALLS IN LOVE.” DO THE PLOT LINES INSPIRE YOUR WRITING? They’re totally after the fact. With songs, I write them, record them, sit and listen to them and let my imagination go as if I were the listener without having any attachment to it. I read a lot of science fiction. ARE YOU IMITATING SATELLITE TRANSMISSIONS IN SOME OF THE SONGS? That wasn’t an intention but, man, those are my sounds. I run the keyboards through eight guitar stomp-boxes. [I’ve thought,] “That sounds like Blade Runner. I’m totally seeing the Ridley Scott thing.” You also try to think, “What does it feel like?” The answer will probably be: “How a robot might feel in this situation.” We can imagine that. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CACAW with NAPOLEON IN EXILE. 9 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $7. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.com


CRITICS’ PICKS

Lil Rev

[ELECTRONIC] + FRI., NOV. 15 The Stackin’ Paper party returns to Belvedere’s tonight for a one-time special event with an extremely stacked lineup. Hip-hop DJs and producers Kaytranada and Groundislava will headline the show alongside Jerome LOL — who is known for his niche in reappropriating an early Internet-age aesthetic. The party is presented by LazerCrunk, and local DJs Gusto, Naan Naan and Mr. Dug will open the night. Allison Cosby 9 p.m. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2555 or www.belvederesultradive.com

[ALT-FOLK] + FRI., NOV. 15 You know Slim Cessna best as the front man of the semi-nomadic psycho-country act Slim Cessna’s Auto Club; tonight and tomorrow night, though, he graces his place of employment with another of his bands. Denver Broncos UK, a more subdued but equally weird alt-folk outfit, features Cessna and Auto Club vets Munly Munly and Lord Dwight Pentacost, along with Rebecca Vera. This weekend’s two engagements at The Mattress Factory are rare appearances for the band, and rare music shows at the installationart museum. Andy Mulkerin 8:30 p.m. tonight and Sat., Nov. 16. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $15-20. 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

[UKULELE] + SAT., NOV. 16 No, Lil Rev isn’t a new rapper from Atlanta — he’s a cult ukulele player, known in uke circles worldwide. The virtuoso musician (real name: Mark Revenson) hails from Milwaukee, and he makes an appearance today to lead a workshop and perform a concert in association with Steel City Ukuleles. If you’re a uke player — at any level — you’re welcome to play along at the workshop or the jam session after the

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

concert. AM 1 p.m. (workshop) or 7 p.m. (concert). Wilkins School Community Center, 7604 Charleston Ave., Swissvale. $25 for workshop, $10 for concert, or $30 for both. www.meetup.com/Steel-City-Ukuleles

[FOLK] + TUE., NOV. 19 It’s not every day you get to hear someone play an autoharp — but today is one of those days. Toronto-based folk singer-songwriter Basia Bulat is known for her deeply personal folk songs, which often incorporate unusual instruments like the autoharp, charango and hammered dulcimer. Bulat released her third studio album, Tall Tall Shadow, in September, and on it she steps out of her comfort zone, experimenting with more electronic production. She has said that the album was her way of working through the death of a loved one, and that comes through most strongly in the lyrics, which are at once heartbreaking and hopeful. She plays tonight at Club Café with special guest Josh Verbanets. AC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412431-4950 or www.club cafelive.com

Basia Ba asi sia a Bu Bulat ula latt {PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROLINE DESILETS}


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP

STAGE AE. New Found Glory, Alkaline Trio, H2O. North Side.

THU 14

FRI 15

ALTAR BAR. Cherie Currie. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. townsppl. South Side. 412-431-4950. HEINZ HALL. Ann Hampton Callaway w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: The Streisand Songbook. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Great SCOCIO. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Devil Makes Three, Sturgill Simpson. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Conspirator, Escort. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers. South Side. 412-431-4668.

HARVEY WILNER’S. Gina Rendina. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. HEINZ HALL. Ann Hampton Callaway w/ the Pittsburgh 31ST STREET PUB. Lo-pan, Black Symphony Orchestra: The Black Black, Rebreather. Strip Streisand Songbook. Downtown. District. 412-391-8334. 412-392-4900. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Future Islands. North Side. Andre Costello & The Cool 412-237-8300. Minors, Chet Vincent & BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. John the Big Bend, Grand Raymond & Strange Piano, Coronado, Shelf Cocktail. Regent Life String Band, Nic Square. 412-999-9009. ww. r w Lawless, more. HEART CARNEGIE SCIENCE pape pghcitym OF RUST: A Tribute to CENTER. Balloon .co Neil Young. Bloomfield. Ride Fantasy. North Side. 412-682-0320. 412-237-3400. LEVELS. Backseat Driver. CLUB CAFE. Sebadoh, North Side. 412-231-7777. Octa#grape. South Side. MATTRESS FACTORY. 412-431-4950. Denver Broncos UK. North Side. DOUBLETREE MEADOWLANDS. Sputzy. Washington. 724-222-6200. 412-231-3169. MR. SMALLS THEATER. HAMBONE’S. Southside Lucero, Titus Andronicus. Millvale. American, Boon. Lawrenceville. 866-468-3401. 412-681-4318. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. The Regular Joes. Greensburg. Tony Janflone, Jr. Canonsburg. 724-836-7687. 724-746-4227. PALACE THEATRE. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. N2O2R. Washington. SMILING MOOSE. Nico & the Sound, White Lights. South Side. 412-431-4668. SOUTH SIDE VFW POST 6675. Jason Craig & Mark Anthony. South Side. 412-904-2842. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Big Mean Sound Machine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. VAN NESS GRILLE. The Dave Iglar Band. Sharpsburg. 412-408-3438.

FULL LIST ONLINE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SIGNE PIERCE}

EARLY WARNINGS

SAT 16 31ST STREET PUB. Flithy Lowdown, Bottle Rat. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Here Come the Mummies, Gene the Werewolf. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BILL BUDA’S. E-Z Action. McKeesport. 412-896-8157. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Walk of Shame. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CIP’S. The Good Guys. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLANCY’S PUB. Tony Janflone Jr. Dravosburg. CLUB CAFE. You Won’t, The Spring Standards. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Kevin Garrett, Tony Resch, Different Places, Todd Teacher, Johnny Martin, Justin Giancola. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

Anamanaguchi

{WED., DEC. 18}

Anamanaguchi Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {SAT., JAN. 25}

Pixies Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland {SAT., FEB. 01}

Lotus Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

at Monroeville Mall

Laura B and the Off Labels 9pm p • $5 $ Cover after 10pm th

Nov 16

Skratch Coastal Remember Coas

9pm • $5 Cover after 10pm

winghartburgers.com

300 Monroeville Mall • Monroeville, PA 412.372.5500 5 Market Square • Pittsburgh, PA 412.434.5600 1505 E Carson St. • Pittsburgh, PA 412.904.4620

HAMBONE’S. Nebulous. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HEINZ HALL. Ann Hampton Callaway w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: The Streisand Songbook. Downtown. 412-392-4900. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Iron Crown, Dope Lake, Perish, Goosed, Molasses Barge. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MATTRESS FACTORY. Denver Broncos UK. North Side. 412-231-3169. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. MR. SMALLS THEATER. 5th Annual AcoustiCafe Beatles Tribute. Benefits the Autism Connection of Pittsburgh. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Amy Grant. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE R BAR. Felix & The Hurricanes. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Stephen Kellogg & His Band, The Saint Johns. South Side. 412-381-6811. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. Joe Grushecky & The HouseRockers. Washington. STAGE 1. ReCover. Clairton. 412-233-3636.

SUN 17 ALTAR BAR. Reel Big Fish, Five Iron Frenzy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARSON CITY SALOON. The Tony Janflone Jr. Duo. South Side. 412-481-3203. HEINZ HALL. Ann Hampton Callaway w/ the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra: The Streisand Songbook. Downtown. 412-392-4900. SMILING MOOSE. Insult to Injury, The Contenders, 8 Percent, A Friendly Gesture, Seeing Shadows. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cacaw, Napoleon In Exile. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 19

Meet the Pres./CEO and Head Brewer at two pub crawls featuring beers from the 2013 Legacy g y Sampler p

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Junior Astronomers, William Forrest, Blød Maud. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944.

WED 20

Thurs. 11/14 South Side (starting at 6PM) Dee’s Cafe, Smiling Moose, Jack’s, Urban Tap

Fri. 11/15 The Strip District (starting at 6PM) Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaska Grill, Bella Notte, Roland’s Seafood Grill, The BeerHive

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

BRILLOBOX. Raya Brass Band, Lungs Face Feet, Pandemic. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Sol Cat, There You Are, Puzzle Pieces. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Saintseneca, Advance Base, Vikesh Kapoor. Garfield. 412-361-2262. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. REX THEATER. Kevin Devine. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. A Wilhelm Scream, Barons, August Ruins. South Side. 412-431-4668.

DJS THU 14 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D. Downtown. 412-471-2058. SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

FRI 15

TUE 19

WED 20

SMILING MOOSE. Bill Bara, Mad Mike, TyFun, Rick Diculous. South Side. 412-478-3863.

THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

WED 20 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B TUE 19 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. K. Michelle. Munhall. 412-368-5225.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa ALTAR BAR. Jake Miller. Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, Strip District. 412-263-2877. DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BELVEDERE’S. www. per Kaytranada, pa THE HOP HOUSE. pghcitym JeromeLOL, .co Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Groundislava, Gusto, Green Tree. 412-922-9560. Naan Naan, Mr Dug. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo 412-381-4300. Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s AMERICAN LEGION GOLD STAR Alternative. DJ Electric. South Side. POST 820. The Witchdoctors. 412-431-5282. Monroeville. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. SPEAKEASY. Miss Freddye’s Blues 412-874-4582. Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. PERLE CHAMPAGNE LEGACY LANES. Ron & BAR. DJ Midas. Downtown. The RumpShakers. Baldwin. 412-471-2058. 412-418-3351. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. MOONDOG’S. Smokin’ Joe Rossi & South Side. 412-431-2825. the Southbound Express. Blawnox. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night 412-828-2040. w/ DJ Connor. South Side. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John 412-381-1330. Gresh’s Gris Gris. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

WED 20

FULL LIST ONLINE

BLUES THU 14

FRI 15

SAT 16

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. w/ Stefan the Mad Serb & Sara V. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. E ast Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. ENIGMA ELITE LOUNGE. Global Beats: Timeless. w/ DJ Osi (Kenya) & Carla Leininger (Brazil). Downtown. 412-391-1004. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. DJ Pat. Downtown. 412-471-2058. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 17 PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. DJ Tony Smith. McCandless. 412-367-9610. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SAT 16 BOBBY D’S SWING CITY. The Jimmy Adler Band. Squirrel Hill. BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Jay Weaver & Olga Watkins Duo. Monaca. 724-728-7200. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Blue Bombers w/ Pat Scanga Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty Blues Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. MOONDOG’S. Billy Price Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Jill West & the Blues Attack. Shaler. 412-487-6259. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Muddy Kreek Blues Band. North Side. 412-231-7777. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Booze Brothers Band, Shot O’ Soul feat. The Fabulous Johnny Smoothe. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

JAZZ THU 14 ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Acoustic Alchemy. North Side. 412-322-1773. POWER CENTER BALLROOM, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY. Mike Tomaro & the Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra. Celebrating the Great American Songbook: Then & Now. Downtown.

FRI 15 ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CAFE NOTTE. Jeremy Fisher Trio, Kristan Mancini Fisher. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The John C. Hall Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Venneri. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Bridgette Perdue. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Daniel May. Downtown. 412-553-5235. TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB. Jessica Lee, Rick Purcell. Oakland. 412-621-2353.

SAT 16 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BICYCLE HEAVEN. Charles Wallace, Eric Vermillion. Album release show. North Side. 412-716-4956. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Dwayne Dolphin Band,The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB CAFE. Guy Matone. South Side. 412-431-4950. LEMONT. John Sarkis. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NATILI’S. Lucarelli Brothers, Peg Wilson. Butler. 412-956-6957. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Satin Hearts. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SUN 17 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Eric Johnson. North Side. 412-904-3335. MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Daniel May. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Joe Sheehan. Downtown. 412-697-1336.


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

WORLD FRI 15 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Alash Ensemble, Appalasia. Shadyside. 412-361-2262.

SAT 16

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. King Fez. Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

REGGAE SUN 17

PHILADELPHIA

THE LOUNGE ON VERONA. The Flow Band. Verona. 412-871-5521.

{FRI., NOV. 23}

COUNTRY

Luscious Jackson

FRI 15

Union Transfer

NIED’S HOTEL. The Slim Forsythe Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Aimee Jane, Stefan Kiran. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

CLEVELAND {SUN., NOV. 25}

SAT 16

Metric

LEVELS. Gary Prisby. North Side. 412-231-7777.

House of Blues

SUN 17

COLUMBUS

PALACE THEATRE. Trace Adkins. Greensburg. 517-214-4592.

CLASSICAL

{WED., DEC. 04}

Jessica Hernandez and the Delta

FRI 15 PM WOODWIND PROJECT. Flute & clarinet duo Amanda Morrison, clarinet & Dan Parasky, flute. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

The Basement

MON 18

FRI 15

SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

BEER NUTZ PLAZA. Tim & John. Fox Chapel. 412-963-6882. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Mac Martin &The Dixie Travelers, The Armadillos. North Side. 412-224-2273.

TUE 19 ANDYS. Mark Lucas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Eric DeFade. Downtown. 412-456-6666. TENDER BAR + KITCHEN. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522.

WED 20 ANDYS. James McClellan & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

ACOUSTIC

SAT 16 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Brad Yoder Duo, Zoe Mulford. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

SUN 17 HAMBONE’S. Old Time Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 18

THU 14 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Graham Buckey. Robinson. 412-489-5631. LEVELS. Juan & Erica. North Side. 412-231-7777. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610. SEVICHE. Jason Kendall & Jim Graff. Downtown. 412-697-3120.

N E W S

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 19

SUN 17 ROBERT NICHOLLS. Organ concert. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120. THE WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PHILHARMONIC. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg.

WED 20 CARNEGIE MELLON GUITAR ENSEMBLE. Mellon Institute, Oakland. 412-268-2383.

OTHER MUSIC THU 14 DEL’S RESTAURANT. Marco Fiorante. Bloomfield. 412-683-1448.

FRI 15 WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Platinum. North Side. 412-231-7777.

CLUB CAFE. Basia Bulat, Josh Verbanets. South Side. 412-431-4950. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

SAT 16

WED 20

SUN 17

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. The Armadillos. 412-224-2273. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WEST VIEW VFW. Wee Jams. West View. 412-931-9954.

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11/14 11/15 11/16 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/22 11/23 11/23

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Hillsong United. Uptown. 412-642-1800.

11/26 11/29 11/30 11/30 12/10

MON 18 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

M U S I C

+

twnsppl SEBADOH THE SPRING STANDARDS & YOU WON'T BASIA BULAT SOL CAT ELSINORE BROKEN FENCES (EARLY) WINE & SPIRIT (LATE) SOUTHSIDE AMERICAN (EARLY) THE PRIDE OF OUR FATHERS COMEDY SHOWCASE HOSTED BY ANDREW RODGERS (LATE) SAMANTHA MCDONOUGH VANESSA CARLTON RUST BELT KINGS (EARLY) CHRISTOPHER SMEDLEY (ALBUM RELEASE) (LATE) ZOE KËATING

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD

S C R E E N

FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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A R T S

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C L A S S I F I E D S

39


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WITH special guests from NYC

WITH THE

A brand new orchestra event featuring Danny Elfman’s famous film scores brought to life on stage by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and enhanced by visuals on the big screen from Tim Burton films including Beetlejuice, Batman & Batman Returns, Edward Scissorhands, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Alice in Wonderland!

The PRETTY Babies l the only al

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40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

November 13 - 19 Bret Michaels

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

Trapt ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. With special guests No Resolve & more. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

THE WEDDING SINGER

Point Park's Contemporary Choreographers

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL

THURSDAY 14

Ann Hampton Callaway presents The Streisand Songbook HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Nov. 17.

The Devil Makes Three

The Musical Box performs Genesis BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Fat Tour 2013: Less than Jake & Anti-Flag

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Sturgill Simpson. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8:30p.m.

A Silent Film

STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. With special guest Get Dead & Masked Intruder. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. All ages show. With special guests Hands and the Show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Cherie Currie HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com

Eddie Spaghetti THUNDERBIRD CAFE

or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

New Found Glory & Alkaline Trio STAGE AE North Side. All ages show. With special guest H2O. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

FRIDAY 15

The Wedding Singer ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE

SUNDAY 17

GEORGE R. WHITE PERFORMANCE STUDIO Downtown. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through Nov. 24.

PHOTO CREDIT: FRIEDMAN WAGNER-DOBLER

WEDNESDAY 13

Mia Z / Laura B and the Off Labels WINGHARTS BURGER & WHISKEY BAR Monroeville. 412-372-5500. $6 cover. 9p.m.

Here Come the Mummies ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. Over 21 show. With special guests Gene the Werewolf. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Lucero

HE-HO: Artists’ Health & Housing Fair for the Community

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Titus Andronicus. All ages show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. With special guests Five Iron Frenzy. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

The Magic Flute BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. 2p.m.

MONDAY 18

SATURDAY 16

LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL Carnegie. 412-276-3456. Tickets: stage62.com or 412-429-6262. Through Nov. 23.

Reel Big Fish

KINGSLEY ASSOCIATION East Liberty. Free event. For more info visit pittsburghartscouncil. org. 12p.m.

Charles Ives Take Me Home

LESTER HAMBURG STUDIO South Side. 412-431-2489. Tickets: citytheatrecompany. org. Through Dec. 15.

TUESDAY 19 K. Michelle

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

COLD WEATHER IS COMING! Come see our large selection of shoes and boots for men and women.

Women’s Earthkeepers Chillberg Sport

Men’s Earthkeepers Mt. Maddsen

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

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HAMMER TIME {BY AL HOFF}

BLUEGRASS’ SORROWFUL SONGS OF ENDURING LIFE UNDERSCORE THE DRAMA

Thor: The Dark World opens with a flashback — way back — that lays out a lot of history and place-setting that was a bit confusing to the non-Marvel-ous such as myself. But as with most comicsbased films, things soon shook out to the basics: A bad guy (Christopher Eccelston) is trying to get a super-weapon which is inconveniently stored inside the good guy’s girlfriend, Jane (Natalie Portman). Our hero is Thor (Chris Hemsworth), aided by his giant hammer, and in a welcome turn, his tricky sibling Loki (Tom Hiddleston).

FILM TIME Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and his trusty hammer

Director Alan Taylor lays out the usual warmed-over buffet: pseudoscience, lots of CGI destruction, a splash of romance, a cameo or two, and the occasional laugh. (Thor politely hanging up his hammer on a coat-rack got a huge laugh.) Millennia of conflict is resolved in a giant battle on London’s South Bank, with occasional worm-hole digressions to alternate realms. Hiddleston, once again, steals the show as Loki, while everybody else simply looks handsome and tries to keep their dignity in a comic-book movie. The always-welcome Chris O’Dowd is cast in a small role as Jane’s “loser” date, but he seems more fun to have dinner with than some lunk with a hammer who’s always getting in fights. In 3-D, in select theaters

Broken Circle Breakdown (top); In Bloom

T

annual Three Rivers Film Festival continues through Nov. 23. Films screen at four area theaters: Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ venues — Regent Square, in Edgewood; Harris, Downtown; and Melwood, in North Oakland — as well as the Waterworks Theater, in Aspinwall. Below are reviews for films screening this week:

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Last week’s review of Corpsing p inadvertently listed the wrong theater. The Frankenstein-inspired Frankenstein-inspir local film is screenscreen ing as this month’s month Film Kitchen at the Regent Square Theater, in i Edgewood. 8 p.m. p.m (7 p.m. reception), reception) Thu., Nov. 14

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HE MOVIES keep playing: The 32nd

it’s simple enough for small children to follow, but witty enough for adults. And if the premise bears a significant (and acknowledged) resemblance to E.T., no matter; like The Iron Giant, this is an emotionally potent “kids’ movie.” 4:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 14 (Waterworks) and 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16 (Regent Square) (Bill O’Driscoll)

THREE RIVERS FILM FESTIVAL

IN BLOOM. This coming-of-age story from Nana Ekvtimshvili and Simon Gross doubles as a look at post-Soviet Georgia, itself a country struggling to find its footing. The two teenage girls suffer the usual troubles (family, boys), but lawlessness and the violence of their homeland’s growing pains also indelibly mark their lives. A quiet but compelling drama held up by two strong performances from the young actresses. In Georgian, with subtitles. 9:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15 (Regent Square) and 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 19 (Melwood). (AH)

Through Sat., Nov. 23 www.3rff.com MOON MAN. AN. In SStephan tephan Schesch’s captivating, visually resplendent splendent ania ani mated film,, the man in the moon, bored, hitches BROKEN CIRCLE B a ride to earth (on a BREAKDOWN. Take a BREA comet). But this gentle, hanky to this hearthan Moon Man child-sized soul’s oul’s plan to wrenching tale of a wre return home me puts him Belgian Belgia couple, whose afoul of the e self-aggrancarefree relationship is testdizing President sident of Earth. ed when their young daughter gets y Meanwhile, our planet’s sick. The pair also plays in i a bluegrass band, children pine ne for Moon and that genre’s sorrowful sorrowfu songs of enduring Man’s comforting forting prespowerful, well-acted drama. life underscore the powerfu ence in the e night sky. Director Felix van Groeningen Groening relates the story This adaptation tion of Tomi in a non-linear fashion, pairing happy and Ungerer’s children’s sad scenes that only serve to make the hildren’s book, set in a modern-ish sadder. In Flemish, with odern-ish fableexperience sadde world, pits wonderment against regimensubtitles. 9:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. tation and imagination against control; Waterworks (Al Hoff) 14. W

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

NO HORIZON ANYMORE. Could you spend the winter at the South Pole, cooped up in a building with just 42 other people, and no sunlight? Pittsburgher Keith Reimink did (he worked as a chef), and made a film about his experience. Besides amazing vistas (and the Southern Lights), Reimink introduces us to various polar projects, and, most fascinating, how a modern facility sustains itself in such a harsh, remote environment. 2 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. Melwood (AH) HARRY DEAN STANTON: PARTLY FICTION. In this documentary, David Lynch and Harry Dean Stanton sit together, drinking coffee and smoking. “How would you like to be remembered?” Lynch asks. “Doesn’t matter,” Stanton replies. At 87 — and after many, many movies — Stanton has a lot to be remembered for. But filmmaker Sophie Hurber isn’t so concerned with making


a detailed, linear biography; instead, she allows Stanton’s story to unfold delicately, through movie clips, interviews with Wim Wenders, Sam Shepard and Kris Kristofferson, and through Stanton’s own enigmatic story-telling. The result is moving, moody and visually striking. In other words, exactly the kind of film one would expect to star Harry Dean Stanton. 9:45 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16, and 3:45 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. Regent Square (Margaret Welsh) SAL. James Franco directs this intimate look at the last day of actor Sal Mineo’s life. Its point is apparent — it’s an ordinary day, turned extraordinary by our knowledge that these are Mineo’s final hours before being murdered — but this is still a pretty tedious (and poorly shot) film to sit through. 2 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17, and 4 p.m. Sat., Nov. 23. Harris (AH) KEN LOVE PRESENTS. The local filmmaker screens two recent shorts about key Pittsburgh artists. “We all need magic, we all need fantasy,” says the subject of “Margo Lovelace and the Magic of Puppetry.” The 28-minute film details the painstaking construction of marionettes, and tells how she launched her successful Lovelace Puppet Theatre, in the 1960s, on then-funky Ellsworth Avenue. Love’s portrait draws heavily on some nice vintage performance footage, but this work is short on voices besides Lovelace’s. Much more substantial is “Thaddeus Mosley: Sculptor,” about the 87-year-old creator of monumental, hand-carved abstracts in wood. Though built around images from Mosley’s huge 2009 Mattress Factory show, the 36-minute film beautifully details his process, notes his inspirations (Brancusi, jazz, African tribal art, etc.), sketches his biography and incorporates insights from Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild’s Bill Strickland and Richard Armstrong, director of the Guggenheim Museum. 5: 30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. Regent Square (BO) S#X ACTS. A 16-year-old Israeli girl strives for popularity by hooking up with the cool guys, a plan that soon finds her losing control of her narrative. Jonathan Gurfinkle tells the tale in six acts, each depicting a sex act and consequences that grow increasingly unpleasant. It’s a gutsy, provocative portrayal (don’t expect any heartwarming lessons) that accurately captures the reality of some teens’ messy lives. In Hebrew, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17, and 9 p.m. Thu., Nov. 21. Harris (AH) IDLE THREAT. If nothing else, Idle Threat proves that not every Wall Street banker is a sociopath. George Pakinham, of Deutsche Bank, has spent years trying to get everyone — drivers and city officials alike — to respect a New York City law against idling car engines. Idling, we learn, doesn’t just waste gas; it’s an environmental hazard, too. The film is earnest to the point of hokiness (NPR’s Car Talk guys feature prominently), and sometimes strains to fill its 65 minutes. After all, there’s no villain here except sloth and shortsightedness. But those, it seems, are enemies to match even Pakinham’s zeal. 7 p.m. Wed., Nov. 20 Harris (Chris Potter) A HOFF@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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NEW THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY. The first holiday movie of the season is out, and like that perennial dessert, fruitcake, it’s packed with little bits of everything: motherhood, fatherhood, a baby, a funeral, amateur obstetrics, God, lack of God, cat-fights, sexting, a career-defining NFL game, Chekhov’s iPad, interracial romance, commitment, lack of commitment, Santa, raucous comedy, tears, men without shirts, ample bosoms, prayer, cursing and a lot of Showcase Mega Mansion. Malcolm D. Lee’s dramedy is an update on the characters from his 1999 The Best Man (you’ll get a brief re-cap in the opening credits), and it’s a weird mix of naughtiness and a T.D. Jakes-style tale that doesn’t quite gel. The film also seems to go on forever, an endless stream of melodrama breaking out, resolving and busting out again. There’s a decent cast here (reprising their 1999 roles), and they deserve better than this sillinessby-way-of-seriousness hodge-podge. The film would have been twice as good with half as much in it. (Al Hoff)

LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

Silents, Please!

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am

Sunday, December 1, 2:00PM

Early Film Techniques, including Buster Keaton’s One Week, A Trip to the Moon and more! With live music by the Sound/Unsound Trio.

only on www.pghcitypaper.com WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday and Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Friday

http://www.showclix.com/event/EarlyFilmTechniques This project supported in part by a Seed Award from The Sprout Fund

HOLLYWOOD THEATER 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368

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three rivers film festival The Best Man Holiday BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR. Abdellatif Kechiche’s drama recounts the relationship between two young French women. Adele (Adele Exarchopoulos) is a gawky high school student, still finding herself, when she meets Emma (Lea Seydoux), a blue-haired college student. The attraction is instant and mutual, and the pair quickly becomes a couple. But as such things are wont to go, the course of young love is fraught and too often fleeting. Blue was the big winner at Cannes this year, and subsequently generated a lot of chatter about its lengthy sex scene between the two women. It’s up to each viewer to determine whether this explicit (but oddly prudish — there are no genitals on display) material is exploitative. (I would certainly argue that its length doesn’t add anything to the larger narrative, and Mr. Kechiche clearly exhibits a voyeuristic fascination with backsides.) But patrons should be warned not to see Blue for the sex alone: The film is nearly three hours long, and being French, there is a lot of moody silence, broken up by discussion of art, literature and philosophy. Both actresses are very good, with Exarchopoulos in the trickier role of having to convey several years of change, often with little or no dialogue. Beyond the hype,

Wed Wednesday, dnessday day,, N Nov ov 13 Regent Square Theater 8:00 A Field in England Harris Theater 7:30 Punk Singer Melwood Screening Room 6:30 Closed Circut 9:00 Bluebird Waterworks Cinemas 4:30 Fateful Findings 4:45 Ilo Ilo 6:45 The Deflowering of Eva van End 7:00 Fierce Green Fire 9:00 Oxyana 9:30 Truth About Emanuel

Friday, Nov 15 Regent Square Theater 7:00 The Priest’s Children 9:15 In Bloom Harris Theater 7:00 Bastards 9:15 The Armstrong Lie Melwood Screening Room 7:30 The Italian Connection 10:00 Go Down Death Micro Cinema 7:00 Spectacle Saturday, Nov 16 Regent Square Theater 2:00 Moon Man 4:30 Blood Brother 7:15 The Priest’s Children 9:45 Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction Harris Theater 4:00 Jamel Shabazz 6:30 Nothing but a Man 9:00 Mortal Remains Melwood Screening Room 2:00 No Horizon Anymore 4:30 Little Red 9:00 Micro Cinema: Incite Journal

Thursday, Nov 14 Regent Square Theater 8:00 Film Kitchen: Corpsing - w/ reception at 7:00 Harris Theater 6:00 Animated Films by Jean Michel Kibushi 8:00 Stranger by the Lake Melwood Screening Room 7:30 Closed Circut Waterworks Cinemas 4:30 Moon Man 5:00 Drinking Buddies 7:00 2 Autumns, 3 Winters 7:15 Prince Avalanche 9:15 The Servant 9:30 Broken Circle Breakdown

3RFF.com

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Sunday, Nov 17 Regent Square Theater 1:30 Cousin Jules 3:45 Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction 5:30 Ken Love Presents 8:00 Watchtower Harris Theater 2:00 Sal 4:30 Morning Star 7:00 S#x Acts Melwood Screening Room 3:15 Lasting 5:30 Go Down with Death 8:00 The Search for Emak Bakia Micro Cinema 12:00 Nightingale Monday, Nov 18 Regent Square Theater 7:00 Braddock, America 9:15 The Last Time I Saw Macao Melwood Screening Room 8:00 Lasting Tuesday, Nov 19 Regent Square Theater 7:30 Duane Michals: The Man Who Invented Himself Harris Theater 7:00 Morning Star 9:15 Nothing but a Man Melwood Screening Room 7:00 In Bloom 9:15 Watchtower

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Tan Smart…Live Well!

FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

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Filmmaker Magazine: 25 New Faces of Independent Film (2013) 11/13 @ 7:30pm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Dune (1984) 11/14 @ 7pm, 11/15 @ 7&10pm, 11/17 @ 7pm ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Troma Fest (Mother’s Day, Class of Nuke ‘Em High, Return to Nuke ‘Em High) 11/16 @ 5pm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Rocky Horror Picture Show 11/16 @ Midnight ------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Wasp Woman & Attack of the Giant Leeches 11/17 @ 3pm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Premier of Esquire TV’s White Collar Brawler 11/19 @ 7:30pm

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Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont 412.563.0368 www.thehollywooddormont.org

Events

hAPPen here

NOTHING BUT A MAN. Michael Roemer directs this 1964 independent drama about an AfricanAmerican mill worker who faces challenges at home and at work (where he attempts to unionize), as well as pervasive discrimination in his Southern town. The film stars Ivan Dixon and Abbey Lincoln, and also features a young Yaphet Kotto. Screens in a restored 35 mm print as part of the Three Rivers Film Festival. 6:30 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16, and 9:15 p.m. Tue., Nov. 19. Harris

Blue is a bittersweet coming-of-age tale that is often quietly wise about the deeper issues that can undermine the early ecstasy of young love. (Or really, any love affair beyond its heady start.) But I’m still not convinced we need three hours to relate this. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Nov. 15. Manor (AH)

REPERTORY BIG. Join the carefree Tom Hanks as he discovers the joys of being a kid in an adult’s body. Penny Marshall directs this 1988 family favorite. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 13. AMC Loews. $5 DUNE. David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi novel, set in a desert far, far away. Kyle Maclachlan stars; also, Sting. 7 p.m. Thu., Nov. 14; 7 and 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15; and 7 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. Hollywood

cult classic. Midnight, Sat., Nov. 16. Hollywood ROGER CORMAN DOUBLE-FEATURE. Get your weekend buzz on with 1959’s Wasp Woman, in which a vain lady’s beauty treatments have a disturbing side effect. Also horrifying movie-goers in ’59, Attack of the Giant Leeches, a film that needs no further explanation. 3 p.m. Sun., Nov. 17. $7 for both films (includes small popcorn). Hollywood DREAMWORLD. An aspiring animator (Whit Hertford) is convinced by a lively woman (Mary Kate Wiles) to drop everything and drive to Northern California to seek a job at Pixar. Ryan Darst directs this new indie dramedy. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Nov. 20. Hollywood

ORNETTE: MADE IN AMERICA. Shirley Clarke directs this 1985 documentary about jazz musician Ornette Coleman. The film screens as part of the Sembéne African Film Festival. 6:15 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15. Carnegie Library, 7101 Hamilton Ave., Homewood. Free. www.sembenefilmfestival.org MALLRATS. Join two dudes (Jason Lee and Jeremy London) who, after being dumped by their girlfriends, seek comfort at the mall and among its offbeat denizens. Kevin Smith directs this 1995 comedy. 10 p.m. Fri., Nov. 15, and 10 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. Oaks

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

TROMA FEST. The evening celebrating the low-budget horror house begins at 5 p.m. with the family charmer (not) Mother’s Day (1980), in which a picnic turns to rape and murder. At 7 p.m., it’s learning-gone-very-very-wrong in 1986’s Class of Nuke ’Em High. Which you should pay attention during, because the 9 p.m. film is the brand-new catch-up, Return to Nuke ’Em High: Volume 1. Sat., Nov. 16. Hollywood. $7 each, or $15 for all three. ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry) is so busy seducing a couple of naïve stranded guests (Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick) that he fails to notice his colleagues from outer space are planning a coup. With lots of singing and dancing, and everybody wearing underwear! Jim Sharman directs this 1975

Blue is the Warmest Color COLD TURKEY. It’s nothing but trouble for this family at Thanksgiving, when a long-absent daughter turns up. Peter Bogdanovich and Alicia Witt star; Will Slocombe directs this new film. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Nov. 21. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


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[DANCE]

HIS IMAGES, WHILE SELFIES, ACTUALLY DEPICT SOMEONE ELSE

HEAR-ABOUTS {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Murphy/Smith Dance Collective presents SEE WHAT I HEAR 8 p.m., Fri., Nov. 15, and 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-20. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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[ART REVIEW]

EYE

FOR AN “I“ {BY LISSA BRENNAN}

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Jamie Murphy (left) and Renee Smith {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK SIMPSON}

Whether it is laughter, birds chirping or the rush of a car as it passes by, sound is integral to life. So what happens when sound is removed from our lives? That question inspired the Murphy/Smith Dance Collective’s new work, See What I Hear, which the company will perform Nov. 15 and 16 at the KellyStrayhorn Theater. The 60-minute multimedia work, choreographed by company directors Jamie Murphy and Renee Smith, came about through personal experiences the two had involving family members with hearing loss. For Smith it was her grandfather, whose hearing loss stemmed from his service in World War II. “I think everybody in one way or another has had this be a part their lives,” says Smith. “His feelings of isolation, and our family’s efforts to make him a part of our conversations, were part of the inspiration behind this work.” Murphy and Smith also decided to explore how sound creates environments, and how it affects communication both verbally and nonverbally. See What I Hear represents the maturation of those ideas, first seen in a shorter dance work the pair did for the Kelly-Strayhorn’s 2012 newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival, and further developed during an artist residency and work-in-progress showing at the theater this past July. Murphy and Smith call See What I Hear the most involved production their 2-year-old modern-dance company has mounted to date. “We tried to make the work more theatrical and light-hearted, as opposed to concentrating solely on the challenges of hearing loss,” says Murphy. See What I Hear is set to an original score of music and sound by percussionist/ composer Gordon Nunn, along with sounds created by the work’s seven dancers. The piece will move through sections that are literal — such as one in which sounds like raindrops, chewing and snoring are used to trigger specific memories of danger — and sections that are more abstract. The latter includes a passage involving the concept of soundcolor synesthesia, in which the dancers will try to physically interpret colors that are identified (in some studies) with certain musical pitches or keys.

ONGTIME VISUAL-ARTS patrons in

Pittsburgh might remember Yasumama Morimura’s introduction to the area as part of the 1992 Carnegie International, one of the artist’s first major showings outside of his native Japan. Two decades later, Morimura has gathered international acclaim and is the focus of a large solo exhibition at The Andy Warhol Museum, Yasumama Morimura: The Theater of the Self. Then, as now, Morimura uses the self-portrait to represent himself in the environment of art. Now, unlike then, the self-portrait has become a tool used by many to represent themselves in the environment of social media. However, in Morimura’s portraits, the artist himself is fully obscured, hidden within the work — his images, while selfies, actually depict someone else. Morimura begins with existing images — paintings, drawings, etchings, photographs — and recreates each with himself as all figures represented. He meticulously duplicates every element of the works he replicates through props, costumes and set, and steps into not only the featured role but the full cast list. The results range from disquieting to hilarious. Perhaps the strangest thing is that one can spend an afternoon examining the exhibition piece by piece but — despite the fact that Morimura is the sole face pictured, his visage standing in for that of every human depicted in every work — emerge with no real idea of what the artist looks like. The exhibition is divided, based on

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

{IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND LUHRING AUGUSTINE, NEW YORK }

Yasumasa Morimura’s “A Requiem: Oswald, 1963,” (2006)

Morimura’s own input, into three categories: art history; the “Requiem” series, devoted to interpretation of iconic photography; and actresses. Each of the sections is enthralling, each approaches its subjects with a lovely balance of reverence and humor, and each intrigues and delights the viewer.

YASUMAMA MORIMURA: THE THEATER OF THE SELF continues through Jan. 12. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

The art-history representations span from classical to pop art. Interestingly,

the former spur more feelings of amusement, while the latter seem more imbued with gravity. In “Fugato,” Morimura transforms into both lady and servant, white and black, in a take on Manet’s “Olympia.” Several works place him in the stead of Frida Kahlo, her own work based in self-portraiture. Morimura substitutes hallmarks of Kahlo’s nativity with his own — cranes, koi, temples — and replaces her signature traditional shawl with a Louis Vuitton pashmina wrap. He embodies the Mona Lisa pregnant and clothed, pregnant and naked, and pregnant and cross-sectioned, a fetus curled up inside her body. (The fetus does not appear to have Morimura’s features, but it’s hard to tell.) The botanical truth that sunflowers do not actually have faces did not hinder Morimura from inserting his


FINAL WEEKEND!

own into Van Gogh’s paintings. The “Requiem” series is devoted to photographic works ranging from journalism to portraiture. Mao, Marilyn, Einstein — they are iconic images fairly straightforwardly approached, and out of context you might walk past them without looking twice. The recreation of the infamous photo of Lee Harvey Oswald’s shooting by Jack Ruby, with Morimura shooting Morimura, is thrilling, as are his takes on Hitler via Chaplin. The majority of the paintings and photographs saluted are all fairly well known, and will light the spark of recognition in anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of fine art and historical imagery. In the “Actresses” segment, a few of the movie “stars” he represents are somewhat obscure. We’ll easily identify Dietrich in Blue Angel, Liz in Cleopatra drag, and Marilyn in recklessness. But although Sylvia Kristel was the lead in a film seminal of its genre (Emmanuelle), her image and name are less familiar.

THE RESULTS RANGE FROM DISQUIETING TO HILARIOUS.

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: Michael Cooper.

SUNG IN ENGLISH - GREAT FOR ALL AGES “gorgeously whimsical” - The Globe and Mail

Mozart’s

Yet investing the distant, foreign and olden with familiarity and, by turn, identification is one of the astonishing outcomes of Morimura’s work. “Angels Descending Staircase” is so staggering just based on the magnitude of its population that it might make you a bit giddy to look at. It nods to Edward Burne-Jones’ Pre-Raphaelite standby “The Golden Stairs,” an extravaganza resembling a Busby Berkeley grand finale set in the heavens, and is an accomplishment in costume, makeup, hair, set design, color, texture, pattern and light. “After Marilyn Monroe” is a plain black-and-white photograph with simple clothing, aping an iconic image of the star that inspired one of Andy Warhol’s most identifiable works. What Morimura does by casting himself in all of these roles is to make them accessible to us as well, connecting us to art and to each other by refusing to limit himself to being classified as anything but “subject.” At 4 p.m. Sat., Nov. 23, the museum will host a discussion of Morimura’s work. Participating are museum director Eric Shiner; Nicholas Chambers, the Warhol’s Milton Fine Curator of Art; art professor and Warhol assistant archivist Cindy Lisica; and Charles Exley, a University of Pittsburgh assistant professor of Japanese literature and film. Seating is first-come, first-served, and admission is free with museum admission.

NOV 15 & 17

Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD! English texts projected above the stage.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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[BOOK REVIEW]

ON THE EDGES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} AGAINST THE Hidden Riv-

er, Michael W. Cox’s new collection of short stories, takes its title from a line in Dante’s Purgatorio. And indeed, each of Cox’s main characters inhabits a kind of purgatory. Not all are rank outsiders, but even the ones who aren’t young male whores or escapees from a mental institution are, painfully, neither here nor there. They’d be outside looking in — if only they knew (or could admit) what they really wanted. In “Send Off,” the fine opening story, narrator Sunil is a buttoned-down graduate student in Chicago — an IndianAmerican raised in Somerset, Pa. — on his last night before moving to Orlando. In Sunil’s wry, earnest voice, Cox beautifully calibrates the emotional terrain he traverses between the wild roommate

who likes to bring home hookers, the unstable buddy Sunil meets for breakfast on moving day, and the sweet, compatible young woman upstairs whom he adores but simply can’t see any way to be with. (“I did not hug her and I certainly did not kiss her,” Sunil says, heartbreakingly, of their goodbye.) However, the widely published Cox, an associate professor of English writing at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, sets most of these

AGAINST THE HIDDEN RIVER By Michael W. Cox Mammoth Books, 166 pp., $14.95

stories in considerably darker terrain. Recurring figures include closeted, middle-aged gay men and the young men

who service them. In one of the collection’s best stories, “Oak Park, Illinois” — many of these pieces are set in the Chicago area — the narrator is a rent boy getting it on with a suburban dad when the man’s 7-yearold son walks in. The story starts as tragedy — the dad panics and suffocates the boy — but turns into dark comedy thanks to the narrator’s wised-up voice and disdainful, playfully cruel attitude toward his john (and everything else). While motifs emerge in the narratives, there’s a pleasing range of tones here. The narrator of “Island” (set in Pittsburgh) has an almost hard-boiled edge as he tells of getting his overprivileged son out of trouble with the daughter of his working-class former mistress. “Unfinished Business,” which starts at the funeral of the narrator’s father, reminded me of something by T.C. Boyle: the testimony of a literate, sardonic ne’er-do-well. “Abandon” sketches a credible portrait of a young man emotionally closed off to

himself because of repressed memories of witnessing his father’s infidelities; it ends, lyrically, with a note ironically recalling Joyce’s “Araby.” “Away From Home,” about a young woman’s fraught relationship with an emotionally vacant husband, is simply chilling. Not all the stories work equally well. For instance, “One Dark Sky,” in which the narrator recalls, as a child, accompanying his father on same-sex rendezvous, trades too heavily on such overly general metaphors as vampirism and Invasion of the Body Snatchers. But Against the Hidden River was a finalist for the prestigious Flannery O’Connor Book Award, and deservedly so. It concludes strongly with “Leopold and Loeb,” in which the street-kid narrator accompanies his brilliant but mentally ill teenage pal on a break from the mental hospital. Here as elsewhere, Cox navigates a river of sadness, and finds the occasional, if ambiguous, rivulet of hope.

HIS CHARACTERS WOULD BE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN — IF ONLY THEY KNEW (OR COULD ADMIT) WHAT THEY REALLY WANTED.

D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

“...a welcome shock to the system...” —Roberta Smith, The New York Times

Oct. 5, 2013–Mar. 16, 2014

Sponsored by

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.


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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS...

THE WESTING GAME

A mystery adapted by Darian Lindle, from the Newbery Award-winning novel by Ellen Raskin.

NOVEMBER 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 2013 Saturday & Sunday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • MCKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

www.mckeesportlittletheater.com

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Melessie Clark (center) and the chorus in Point Park Conservatory’s Hecuba

[PLAY REVIEWS]

SONG OF ITSELF {BY TED HOOVER} THE PROGRAM reads, “company of pitts-

burgh presents [title of show],” but there’s a reason for those typographical hijinks. company of pittsburgh is a newer theatrical troupe, and the absence of capitalization signifies its catchphrase, “musical theater: deconstructed.” The troupe couldn’t have picked a better exhibit than [title of show] — a musical deconstructing the deconstruction of musicals.

[TITLE OF SHOW] continues through Sat., Nov. 16. company of pittsburgh at Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St. Lawrenceville. $12-20. www.companyofpgh.org

Book-writer Hunter Bell and composer/ lyricist Jeff Bowen launched a now-legendary Internet campaign to bring this 2006 off-Broadway cult favorite to Broadway in 2008. So what’s it about? Itself. [title of show] opens with two men, Hunter and Jeff (originally played by Bell and Bowen), writing a musical about two men, Hunter and Jeff, writing a musical about two men writing a musical. The show chronicles its own creation, from initial impulse, early workshops and readings to the off-Broadway and Broadway productions. Tagging along are friends Susan and Heidi (originally played by Susan Blackwell and Heidi Blickenstaff). It’s not just meta, it’s meta-meta. The actors know they’re playing actors in a theater; they know you’re watching them; and

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they continually goof on the Aristotelian unities of theatrical space, action and time. Did I just reference Aristotle? Please. The purpose of [title of show] is to make you laugh so hard your contacts pop out. While some of the jokes might be insider-ish, there’s so much cleverness and delight on stage that even my date — who is fortunate enough not to have wasted her life in the musical-comedy gulag — was laughing as much as me. And that’s because of this truly terrific company of pittsburgh production, directed with laser-beam precision by Nick Mitchell and choreographed with humorous flair by Kristann Menotiades. Providing the polished musical direction — as well as his own comic mugging — is Douglas Levine. Chad Elder, Jim Scriven, Christine Laitta and Jodi Gage sing and dance and clown around with unabashed glee. The hook is watching four hopefuls relentlessly strive to create an evening’s entertainment. And because of the show’s schematic and the talent involved, we end up rooting for — and being hugely rewarded by — Hunter, Jeff, Susan, Heidi, Chad, Jim, Christine and Jodi. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

A CHORUS FINE {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} LIKE OUZO, classical Greek drama is an ac-

quired taste that can be difficult to swallow. The Point Park University Conservatory Theatre Company has drunk deep of the gods’ nectar to produce a pleasing and stirring Hecuba, in the 1992 translation of Euripedes by Kenneth McLeish. Directed by Monica Payne, the student cast moves and


chants with unconscious precision, and the intimate black-box staging pushes the passion right into the audience. For those unfamiliar with classical theater, the formalities of long speeches with repetition/emphasis by the chorus can be a bit off-putting. Greek drama is a lot of talk, and all the action — especially the violence — happens off-stage. Characters predict and react. Under Payne’s direction, they also writhe, stride and undulate, capturing Euripedes’ tragedy into a tight one-act. The play is one of many from the Trojan War. The long-time queen of Troy, now a captive slave to the Greek victors, bemoans her fate, suffers unendurable griefs and wreaks revenge on a dishonorable villain. There is a lot of handwringing about war that is, alas, as timely now as when the play debuted circa 424 BCE.

musical adaptations of older films, joining efforts from The Producers to Legally Blonde. Stage 62’s production, directed by Becki Toth, is a valiant effort to polish a lazy script into something entertaining. The show is about wedding singer Robbie Hart, here played by Chris Martin, and his burgeoning romance with a waitress, Julia (Becca Chennette). It takes place in the ’80s, making this a 2013 production of a 2006 adaptation of a 1998 movie set in 1985. This show’s biggest weakness is the desperately humor-starved script, written by Tim Herlihy and Chad Beguelin. Wedding Singer is a comedy only in the classical sense, in that it ends with a wedding. (I apologize for spoiling the end of The Wedding Singer.) For instance, the idea of an old white lady rapping and saying dirty words was obnoxiously played out by the time the original film was released. Yet the adaptation felt the need not only to keep this abysmal “joke,” but to expand it into a climactic number. Most of the other jokes are equally poorly conceived; many seem to assume that gay people’s existence is a punchline rather than a statistical fact. If you laugh at this show, it is thanks to the performers doing a heroic job with what they were given. The songs are a mixed bag. Perhaps half of them are enjoyable, but the other half, including the grandma song, will provide you with the longest cringes of your life. This does make you appreciate the good numbers even more strongly.

THE INTIMATE STAGING PUSHES THE PASSION RIGHT INTO THE AUDIENCE.

HECUBA continues through Nov. 24. Studio Theatre, Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-621-4445 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

OK, most of the actors don’t fit the ages they play, but ignore that: Melessie Clark embodies the regal Hecuba and the sorrowing mother. She moves and speaks as a queen. She gushes pain, and ultimately relishes the triumph allowed her. Perris Drew offers strong counterpoint in the dual role as the ghost of Hecuba’s son and then as Agamemnon, her new and likewise doomed master. The 10-member chorus is the best I’ve ever seen. The production is visually rich (who cares about anachronism) thanks to a superb design/tech team: Cathleen Crocker Perry, costumes; Cat Wilson, lighting; Jeff Fuga, set; Steve Shapiro, sound; and whoever came up with the appropriately ghastly makeup for the chorus. Kudos also to Kim Martin, production manager, and Nik Nemec, stage manager. It should come as no surprise that music-theater-trained students would be so well suited to the demanding rhythms and choreography of Hecuba. Get a taste of what has wowed the Greeks for nearly twoand-a-half millennia. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

FOR WORSE {BY COLETTE NEWBY} THE WEDDING SINGER is another notch on the bedpost from Broadway’s fetish for

“…FRESH AND DELICIOUSLY ENTERTAINING!” —TORONTO STAR

November 30 – December 22, 2013

BY TED DYKSTRA AND RICHARD GREENBLATT Directed by Tom Frey

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! 412.431.CITY (2489) CityTheatreCompany.org

A smash comedy featuring music from Bach to Billy Joel

THE WEDDING SINGER continues through Nov. 23. Stage 62 at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave, Carnegie. $15-18. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.org

The company does manage to wring some moments of fun out of the premise. The visual designers walked an uneasy path — providing the fashions of the 1980s while making characters believable and sympathetic to an audience that isn’t out of its mind on cocaine and Miami Vice. The weaker songs are bolstered by dance pastiches of “Thriller” and Flashdance. Generally, the production’s efforts to ape the age it’s set in mark the highlight of the show. The Wedding Singer is for people who loved the movie, or loved the ’80s, and can’t get enough of either. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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FOR THE WEEK OF

11.1411.21.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF HAND MADE THEATRE, RUSSIA}

+ FRI., NOV. 15 {ART} You might know the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh from its big shows at the Carnegie. But even when the AAP occupies a smaller venue, the show feels pretty big. For instance, the regional organization’s new group exhibit, at Lawrenceville’s Framehouse Gallery, includes work by more than 40 artist members. Contributors include Kathy Boykowycz, William DeBernardi, Tom Estlack, Tim Fabian, Adrienne Heinrich, Cara Livorio, Terry Shutko and Hisham Youssef. The show, juried by Kathleen M. Miclot and Liz Reed, opens tonight with a reception. Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m. 100 43rd St., Unit 107, Lawrenceville. Free. www.aapgh.org

{DANCE}

a constant. The company’s annual showcase at the Byham Theater, tonight and tomorrow, includes premiere works by company members and guests, with select performances by La Roche dance majors. Founding artistic director Maria Caruso performs her most recent work, “Lux Aeterna” (with the Westmoreland Choral Society), and Nancy Goldsmith’s “Ave Maria.” BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35-55. 412-456-6666 or www.bodiography.com

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Bodiography Contemporary Ballet has seen some changes in recent years, from becoming the resident dance company for La Roche College’s performing-arts department to a big expansion of its own Squirrel Hill studio. But Multiplicity remains

NOV. 17

Time for Fun

{DANCE} Kyle Abraham has yet to perform here since winning his MacArthur genius grant earlier this year. But you can see a work by this Pittsburgh native in one of eight performances this week and next of Contemporary Choreographers. Point Park Conservatory Dance Company’s eclectic annual showcase for cutting-edge choreographers features Abraham’s “Continuous Relation,” blending street and classic modern styles. The other choreographers, all Chicagobased, include Randy Duncan, Brian Enos and Hubbard Street 2 director Terence Marling, whose “Fatum Inflictum” was choreographed for the Company. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Nov. 24. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. $7-20. 412-391-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

+ SAT., NOV. 16 {OUTDOORS}

NOV. 15

Contemporary Choreographers

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Pittsburgh’s recent environmental success stories include Nine Mile Run. The urban creek is part of an ongoing restoration effort that includes renewed wetlands and the return of long-vanished fish and insects. While the restoration is a work-inprogress (pollution remains),


Free!Event

Heard any good health-care stories lately? Two free events this week mean to clarify various ongoing attempts to make sure everyone’s got health coverage. On Sat., Nov. 16, there’s HE-HO: Artists’ Health & Housing Fair for the Community, which is open to everyone (not just artists). HE-HO brings local health-care and housing experts to the Kingsley Association for a day of health screenings, workshops and more, including live music. The fair, sponsored by the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council, includes afternoon sessions on how to get the most out of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare). There are also home-buying workshops. And advocacy group Health Care 4 All PA will discuss the sort of health-care reform many activists favor: single-payer, universal coverage, resembling the plans in other developed countries that cost less and get better outcomes than our hodgepodge system. Health Care 4 All is also sponsoring a separate, Nov. 19 talk about the single-payer bill now before Pennsylvania’s state legislature. The Single-Payer Healthcare Talk, by University of Massachusetts–Amherst economics professor Gerald Friedman, takes place at the First Unitarian Church of Pittsburgh and includes his analysis of how the legislation could save the commonwealth $17 billion and create 100,000 jobs. Bill O’Driscoll HE-HO: Noon-6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 16 (6435 Frankstown Ave., Larimer; www.pittsburghartscouncil.org). Single-payer talk: 7 p.m. Tue., Nov. 19 (605 Morewood Ave., Oakland; www.healthyartists.org).

you can take its measure on today’s Nine Mile Run Hike, led by Venture Outdoors. The seven-mile day trek traverses Frick Park to where the creek empties into the Mon. That’s followed by lunch on the riverbank and the hike back. BO 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Frick Park. $12. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

{COMIC} One of Pittsburgh’s resident comics madmen has a new graphic novel. With works like last year’s American Barbarian (Adhouse Books) and Image Comics’ Godland

{STAGE} Aquila Theatre is a New Yorkbased company with London roots and a nationally touring presence. The troupe, praised by the New York Times as “an extraordinarily inventive and disciplined outfit,” is now on the road with Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. The comedy, with its shipwrecks, duels, cross-dressing disguises and character names like Malvolio and Sir Toby Belch, is a favorite among the Bard’s works. Aquila mounts it tonight only at the Hillman Center for Performing Arts, as part of the Hillman Performing Arts

Art by Cara Livorio

trains, boats, ticking clocks, flocks of birds and more. The group has opened Italy’s Carnival of Venice and played Scotland’s Edinburgh NOV. 16 Fringe Festival. Starting Tom Scioli tonight, Hand Made Theatre brings its show Time ous, disabled orphan who lives for Fun (also in a nunnery” … but turns the meant literally, we presume) tables by remaking the place to town for nine Pittsburgh as a brothel. BO 7:30 p.m. International Children’s Theater performances, starting Cathedral of Learning, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. with today’s, at the Byham mtapgh@gmail.com Theater. BO 2 p.m. (101 Sixth St., Downtown). Show continues through Nov. 24 at five area schools. $9-11. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

American worker?” asks Robert Reich in Inequality for All. Answer: “Nobody.” Our distribution of income is the most unequal of any developed nation — and the most unequal here since just before the Great Depression. Jacob Kornbluth’s documentary about Bill Clinton’s old Secretary of Labor making his case for change is in theaters. But tonight, a special screening on the Carnegie Mellon University campus includes a Q&A featuring Reich himself, via Skype. The free event is organized by activist and CMU English professor Kathy M. Newman; sponsors include the Make It Our UPMC campaign. BO 6:15 p.m. McConomy Auditorium,

+ MON., NOV. 18 {SCREEN}

{STAGE}

series, Tom Scioli is known for his riffs on the dynamic style of Old Master Jack Kirby. Now, Scioli has self-published Final Frontier about the rock band who are “The Beatles of Superheroes.” The story plays out in a universe with distinct echoes of Marvel’s pantheon and an off-the-wall parodic sensibility. Scioli holds a release party tonight at Copacetic Comics. BO 7 p.m. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. www.copaceticcomics.com

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Series. BO 7:30 p.m. 423 Fox Chapel Road, Fox Chapel. $10-25. 412-968-3040 or www.thehillman.org

+ SUN., NOV. 17 {STAGE} When they say Hand Made Theatre, they mean it. This 10-member Russian troupe’s puppetry consists of interlocking and weaving together their hands and arms to create

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Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh is a new group fostering collaboration between musical theater artists and promoting new musical theater. Led by Stephanie Riso (a co-founder of Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre and Cabaret Pittsburgh), the group seeks aspiring or established composers, lyricists, librettists, performers and anyone interested in developing new musicals. Meanwhile, there’s tonight’s free reading of a new musical in development, at Pitt’s Studio Theatre. Off With Her Maidenhead, by Amy Claussen and James Rushin, is an irreverent send-up of Disney “princess” movies, whose heroine is a “mute … beautiful, ethnically ambigu-

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NOV. 15 Associated Artists of Pittsburgh

“Who is looking out for the

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CMU campus, Oakland. knewman4@gmail.com

+ TUE., NOV. 19 {ART} Martin Creed: More and Less is an exhibit of works by the award-winning but sometimes controversial British artist, organized by students in a University of Pittsburgh museum-studies class. Works include “Work No. 960” (a row of cacti, in arranged in descending height) and the self-explanatory “A crumpled ball of paper in every room.” Tonight, students in the class (taught by Nicholas Chambers, an Andy Warhol Museum curator) speak about Creed’s work in University Art Gallery. BO 6-8:30 p.m. Exhibit continues through Nov. 26. Frick Fine Arts Building, 650 Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. 412-648-2423

+ WED., NOV. 20 {STAGE} All seven Harry Potter books in under 70 minutes? For any Potter fan who has poured hours into those volumes, that sounds both offensive and amazing. But that’s Potted Potter — The Unauthorized Harry Experience: A Parody by Dan and Jeff. The touring twoman spoof — written and performed by former BBC television hosts Daniel Clarkson and Jefferson Turner — was a New York Times “Critics’ Pick,” and if The Sorting Hat could pick a show, it would place you here. Tonight is first of eight performances at the Byham Theater, presented by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. Brett Wilson 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Nov. 24. 101 Sixth Street, Downtown. $45-75. 412-4566666 or www.TrustArts.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

TUESDAY 9:30-11:30pm

RADICALTRIVIA $5 Evil Drinks

$2.50 Leinenkugel’s

Do you have the “Voice” of the southside?

We wanna find out! We are starting a Karaoke Contest this Thursday Nov. 14 thru g Dec. 12 ( finals)- Winner receives a recording contract w Columbia Records- haha just kidding- 100$ gift card to Jekyl’s!

THURSDAY 10pm-2am

KARAOKE $2.50 Coors Light

$3 Evil Shots

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

THEATER THE 39 STEPS. A comedic take on the classic Hitchcock film. Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 17. The Legacy Theatre, Allison Park. 412-635-8080. BLUE/ORANGE. A tale of race, madness & a Darwinian power struggle at the heart of a dying National Health Service. Presented by The Phoenix Theatre. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. 1-888-718-4253. CHARLES IVES TAKE ME HOME. A father’s love of music & a daughter’s passion for basketball are at odds in this play about competition, commitment, & craft. Sat, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Sun, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue, 7 p.m. and Wed, 1 & 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 11. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. THE CURIOUS SAVAGE. Affection & generosity of spirit triumph in this story of a very wealthy eccentric named Mrs. Savage, who has some surprises in store for her eager,

fortune-hungry adult children. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 23. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. DEATHTRAP. The story of a writer who is struggling to write a murder mystery play, & the real life events that lead to the perfect deathtrap. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 30. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. HAMLET. Presented by Pittsburgh Classic Players. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 17, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 16. The New Bohemian, North Side. HECUBA. A new take on Euripides’ classic Greek tragedy. Presented by the Conservatory Theatre Company. Thu, Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 24. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. THE MAGIC FLUTE. Mozart’s final opera presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 17, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 15. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

NO CLUE. Presented by Musical Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 17, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 16. Mysteries & More. Fri., Nov. 15, CCAC South Campus, West 6:30 p.m. Chef Dato’s Table, Mifflin. 412-469-6219. Latrobe. 724-739-0228. PLAID TIDINGS. Forever NOAH’S ARK. Staged reading Plaid Christmas special, about a White House insider presented by Pittsburgh CLO traveling to his past, through Cabaret. Wed, Thu, 7:30 p.m., world events from the Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun, Kennedy presidency. Presented 2 p.m. Thru Jan. 12. Cabaret by In the Raw. Mon., at Theater Square, Nov. 18, 7 p.m. Downtown. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-456-6666. 412-471-0999. POTTED POTTER, PARLOUR SONG. A THE UNAUTHORIZED suburban housing . w ww per HARRY EXPERIENCE: development is home a p ty ci h pg A PARODY BY to two friendly couples. .com DAN & JEFF. Presented But beneath the bland by Daniel Clarkson routine of affluence, & Jefferson Turner. Nov. 20-21, illicit desires & painful memories 7:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 22, 8 p.m., prompt mysterious occurrences. Sat., Nov. 23, 2, 5 & 8 p.m. and 201 W. Waterfront Dr., Sun., Nov. 24, 1 & 6:30 p.m. Homestead. Presented by Byham Theater, Downtown. Quantum Theatre. Wed-Sat, 412-456-6666. 8 p.m. and Sat, Sun, 7 p.m. TITLE OF SHOW. The trials of Thru Nov. 24. 412-362-1713. two nobodies who decide to PICNIC. Play by William Inge write a completely original about male & female roles in musical starring themselves 1950s America. Presented by the & their two talented actress CCAC South Campus Theatre. friends. Presented by Company of Pittsburgh. Wed-Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 16. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 347-229-2061. TRUE WEST. Play by Sam Shepard about two battling brothers at the edge of the desert. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Sat, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru Dec. 8. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. THE WEDDING SINGER. An adaptation of the movie, presented by Stage 62. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 17. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. THE WESTING GAME. Based on the novel by Ellen Raskin. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 24. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. WIT. Dr. Vivian Bearing, dying of ovarian cancer, reflects on life in her final hours through the wit of John Donne’s poetry. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 17. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200.

COMEDY THU 14 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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“Pittsburgh Bridge,” by Stevo Sadvary, from Pieces Together at Gallery on 43rd Street

VISUAL

ART

NEW THIS WEEK 707 PENN GALLERY. threaded colors // drawing lines. Work by Nicole Czapinski. Opens Nov. 15. Downtown. 412-325-7017. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. The Digital Imagers Group Show. Opening reception Nov. 15, 5-8 p.m. www. digitalimagers.org. Oakland. BICYCLE HEAVEN. Adoor It. Art exhibit benefiting early onset Parkinson’s Disease. Opening Nov. 15, 7-10 p.m. BYOUNG412@AOL.COM. North Side. CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY. Paradisio. Multi-media exhibition presented by the Department of Art & Design. Opening reception: Nov. 14, 6-9 p.m. California. 724-938-4182. FIREBORN @ THE WORKS. Ceramics & glass pop-up gallery. Feat. Line & Color, works by Donn Hedman. S. 27th St., South Side. Thru Dec. 24 412-381-3181. JAMES GALLERY. Obscure/ Reveal. Hot wax paintings by Christine Aaron, Karen Freedman, Amber George, Lorraine Glessner, Catherine Nash, James Nesbitt, more. Opening reception: Nov. 15, 6-9 p.m. West End. 412-922-9800.

SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Pittsburgh Collects. 75 selected works contributed by 3 Pittsburgh photography collectors. Opening reception Nov. 14, 6-8 p.m. South Side. 412-431-1810.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Andrews & Miller: Non-Objective Forms. Photographs & paintings. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISAN. Bonnie Gloris. An exhibit of Gloris’ newest body of work. Garfield. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Eccentric Characters. Paintings & collages by Diane Keane. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

BE GALLERIES. Endangered. Work by Elizabeth Castonguay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Multi-Media Artists’ Sale. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Allison Stewart. Paintings. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. CONNECTIONS: The Work of Fabrizio Gerbino. Downtown. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FATHER RYAN ARTS CENTER. Pittsburgh Society of Artists Annual Exhibit. McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052. FIELDWORK: CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY. On Paper. Work by Althea Murphy Price, Paul Stephen Benjamin, Krista Franklin, William Downs, Alisha B. Wormsley, & Jordan Martin. onpaper@inbox. com. Garfield. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FRICK FINE ARTS AUDITORIUM. Martin Creed: More & Less. Curated by University of Pittsburgh Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar w/ Nicholas Chambers. Floor talk: Nov. 19, 6-8:30 p.m. uag@pitt.edu. Oakland. 412-624-4125. FUTURE TENANT. Arbor Aid 2013. Group show of art created from urban wood. Benefits Tree Pittsburgh. futuretenant.org. Downtown. 412-325-7037.

THURS/NOV 14/10PM STARI MOST, UKE & TUBA, GRAIN THURS/NOV 21/10PM

DOORS OPEN AT 1PM M “HAPPY HOUR” 6PM-8PM $ 3 CRAFT DRAFT BREWS $ 3 HOUSE INFUSED COCKTAILS PARKING LOT AVAILABLE RESTAURANT COMING SOON

BURLESQUE SHOW

WED/NOV 27/10PM EVIL EMPIRE (RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE TRIBUTE BAND) $2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

412-918-1215 1908 Carson S Street LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

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2 MILLER LITE DRAFTS FOR PITTSBURGH FOOTBALL GAMES

& Clyde’s

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ED BLAZE, NEMA WILLIAMS, RACHEL FEINSTEIN. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 15

BLACK & GOLD HEADQUARTERS ALL GA MES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER (mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075 CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

BARPROV. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. LEVEL 1 IMPROV CLASS SHOW. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RUCKUS IMPROV. 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. YO! GLORIA! IMPROV RAP. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 15 - SAT 16 RED GRANT. 8 & 10:15 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 16, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 16 808 IMPROV. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CHAMPAGNE HIERARCHY IMPROV. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DOC DIXON, DAVID MICHAEL, DAVID KAYE. Burgettstown Girls Softball Funny

WED, NOV 13 • 8PM COUNTRY/PUNK BLOODSHOT RECORDS RECORDING ARTIST

EDDIE SPAGHETTI

KARAOKE THURSDAY Come sing your head off at the “Best Party in Town”! 9:30PM to 1:30AM

25 $2.25

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FRI, NOV 14 • 9PM FUNK/JAZZ/AFROBEAT

THE BIG MEAN SOUND MACHINE SAT, NOV 15 • 9PM 10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

THE CAUSE PLAYING THE MUSIC OF THE GRATEFUL DEAD, BEATLES, DYLAN, PHISH AND OTHER PSYCHEDELIA

SUN, NOV 16 • 8PM JAZZ/ROCK ) WITH NAPOLEON IN EXILE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Langeloth Community Center, Burgettstown. 304-670-8718. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SUN 17 BASILE THE COMEDIAN. 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

MON 18 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 19 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 20 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 55

GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. A Magical Mirror of International Cultures Combining Real & Imaginary Worlds. Work by Masha Archer, Salvador DiQuinzio, Mitzi Hall, & Manuela Holban. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. In Medias Res. New work by Marlana Adele Vassar. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Pieces Together. Mosaics by Stevo. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. Reclaiming Landscapes. Photographs by Student Art Show winner Christopher Sprowls. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. The Marriage Project: Faces

COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from

of Equality. Portraits of same-sex couples who would like to marry in PA or have their out-of-state marriages recognized in this state. ACLU fundraiser Nov. 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MINE FACTORY. Framed: Independent & Experimental Animation. Work by Steven Subotnik, Pahl Hluchan, Lynn Tomlinson, Kristen Lauth Shaeffer, Karl Staven, James Duesing, Dennis Hlynsky, Andrew Halasz. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. The Sad & Sleepy Dreamers. Artwork by Christian Wolfgang Breitkreutz. Signs From the Times. An Exhibition of New Works by Ron Copeland. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. DANCE. Work by Joyce Werwie Perry. The Lawrence Hall Gallery. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by

the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563.

Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. CRAFTED. Feat. 40+ American ceramic artists interpreting the way they see the drinking cup. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPACE. Behind Our Scenes. Photographs by Nancy Andrews, Leo Hsu, Dennis Marsico, Annie O’Neill, & Barbara Weissberger. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Ignudi: Drawings Based on the Nude Youths of Michelangelo. Work by Richard Claraval. Friendship. 412-441-0194. THE TOONSEUM. Hagar the Horrible’s 40th Anniversary. Feat. 40 pieces of original art, as well as personal artifacts that give insight into the family that inspired Hagar’s family. All That and a Bag of Chips: The 90s Animation Renaissance. Feat. original production art, sketches, storyboards, more. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. VOLUTO / COMMONPLACE COFFEE. Colorblind Pittsburgh. Paintings by Ryan Ian McCormick. Garfield. 517-862-1963. WASHINGTON COMMUNITY ARTS AND CULTURAL CENTER. Tri-County Ceramics Invitational. Feat. ceramic artists from Washington, Greene & Fayette Counties. Washington. 724-222-1475. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Comfort Women Wanted. Work by Chang-Jin Lee. Hive. 3D-animated audiovisual installation where gallery visitors confront a swirling mass of amorphous figures, appearing as a collective of matter as opposed to individual beings in deep space. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets


Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, & costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural imagery in lampworked glass. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Friendship. 412-365-2145. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Emily Raboteau at the Pittsburgh Contemporary Writer Series, Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland

Laugh with the Pittsburgh Improv this December!

CRITIC: Lauren Russell, 30, a graduate student from Friendship WHEN: Thu., Nov. 07 The writer Emily Raboteau came to discuss her experiences as the child of a biracial couple, her experiences from traveling all over the world and her newest book, Searching for Zion. I read an essay recently about being strip-searched at an airport that she wrote and I really enjoyed it, so I thought it would be interesting to come and listen to her speak. She was a great speaker and had many great stories, so many that I really couldn’t find a part of her speech that I would deem my favorite story. I really appreciated her openness and ability to be honest, as it helped the audience really feel a part of her stories. As the child of a biracial couple, I appreciated her opinions and experiences, as I could relate many of my own experiences to hers. Especially hearing her speak of not quite belonging has been something I’ve gone through in my life as well. B Y B R E T T WIL SO N

DECEMBER 5-8

DECEMBER 12-14

DECEMBER 20-22

DECEMBER 26-28

CHRIS PORTER

CHARLIE MURPHY

BRUCE BRUCE

BILL CRAWFORD

FROM LAST COMIC STANDING

FROM THE DAVE CHAPPELL SHOW

FROM BET’S COMIC VIEW

FROM THE WDVE MORNING SHOW

TICKETS $17-$20

TICKETS $27

TICKETS $25-$35

TICKETS $20

Order Tickets online at improv.com or buy calling the box office at 412-462-5233 Text PITTSBURGH to 82257 for promotions and giveaways! The Waterfront | 166 E Bridge St | Homestead, PA 15120 | (412) 462-5233

ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Vanka Murals. Mid-20th Springdale. 724-274-5459. century murals depicting war, RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL social justice and the immigrant HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on experience in America. Millvale. the Homestead Mill. Steel 421-681-0905. industry and community artifacts WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. from 1881-1986. Homestead. Learn about distilling and 412-464-4020. coke-making in this pre-Civil SENATOR JOHN HEINZ War industrial village. Scottdale. HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s 724-887-7910. Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, SNOWFLAKE military encampments, SHOWCASE MARKET. life-like museum Paintings, prints, figures, more. From textiles, wood Slavery to Freedom. www. per a p ty creations, jewelry, Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s pghci m o .c ceramics, more. Tue, role in the anti-slavery Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., movement. Ongoing: Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, Western PA Sports Museum, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 18 Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. Greensburg Art Center, 412-454-6000. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD commemorates Pittsburgh OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY industrialists, local history. ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, Sewickley. 412-741-4487. clay, glass, wood, sculpture, SOLDIERS & SAILORS textiles, more. Opening Nov. 15, MEMORIAL HALL. Military 6-8 p.m. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 museum dedicated to honoring 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. military service members since the Civil War through artifacts 412-456-6666. & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. SEASONAL INSPIRATIONS ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Features 5,000 relics of Pottery, paper crafts, stained Catholic saints. North Side. glass, paintings, more. Mon412-323-9504.

THURSDAY LADIES NIGHT $2.50 Blue Moon Drafts $5 Specialty Martinis $3.50 Vodka Cocktails 1/2 off Appetizers

HOLIDAY

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 15 - SAT 16

5pm-close for all specials

Spiffy Sean Styles

FRI 15 - SUN 17

from Walk of Shame playing acoustic from 8pm till the party stops!

SAT 16

140 Federal Street NORTH SHORE

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[LITERARY] Sat. Thru Dec. 23 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622.

“Glass Backlog,”

SUN 17 HOLIDAYS AT THE HOUSE. The celebrations of an 18th century Christmas come to life with costumed guides, holiday displays & traditional decorations. 12-8 p.m. Woodville Plantation, Bridgeville. 412-221-0348.

TUE 19 - WED 20

NEXT WEEK: Tattooed XXX Starlet

Bonnie Rotten LIVE , NOV. 21-23 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

SEASONAL INSPIRATIONS HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Pottery, paper crafts, stained glass, paintings, more. Mon-Sat. Thru Dec. 23 North Hills Art Center, Ross. 412-364-3622. SNOWFLAKE SHOWCASE MARKET. Paintings, prints, textiles, wood creations, jewelry, ceramics, more. Opening reception: Nov. 16, 2 p.m. Tue, Thu, Fri, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat, 1-4 p.m. and Wed, 10 a.m.7 p.m. Thru Dec. 18 Greensburg Art Center, Greensburg. 724-837-6791.

McGlynn reads her work as part of the Point Park University Writers Series. 6 p.m. Tue., Nov. 19. Lawrence Hall Ballroom, 212 Wood St., Downtown. Free. 412- 391-4100 or www.pointpark.edu

CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD OF PITTSBURGH HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET. Jewelry, clay, glass, wood, sculpture, textiles, more. Opening Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 5 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

DANCE SEE WHAT I HEAR. Performance by the Murphy/ Smith Dance Collective. Nov. 15-16, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

SAT 16 KASALAN. Wedding-themed folk dances presented by the Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh. 4 p.m. Upper St. Clair High School, Upper St. Clair. 412-303-1986. THE OTETS PAISSII PERFORMING ENSEMBLE. “Na Megdana” (“On the Village Square”). 7 p.m. Carnegie Library of Homestead. 412-461-6188.

FUNDRAISERS THU 14 VOICES & VINES. Wine tasting & live music by Emily Forst. Benefits the Homeless Children’s Education Fund. 6:30 p.m. The Pittsburgh Winery, Strip District. 1-888-718-4253.

FRI 15 THE GREAT PITTSBURGH SPELLING BEE OF 2013. All ages welcome to participate. Benefits the Literary Arts Boom. Register at pghzinefair.com/ spelling-bee 7-9 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 484-888-2021. TEENY TINY MARTINI PARTY. Dance demonstrations & lessons, classy cocktails, music, raffles,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

atalog Miniature figurines hold court in my back catalog nities Broken ears full of college dictionary obscenities Chad White is — oh my god — in my bedroom om With his lesser twin, Stephen, and identically y They’re touching everything: felled animals The lemony crotches of shed tights Quietly, the inhabitants of my Reagan years Reassume their posts; with every purchase I’m trying to be better, to upgrade the child’s ’s Garden of verse: a joyful unicorn lurches when en I curse But when I say ‘I’ve changed’ I’m full of terror And here in the realm of all that is mine There are mean boys touching my things

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performances, more. Benefits the Renaissance City Choir. 7-10 p.m. Absolute Ballroom & Dance, Homewood. 412-441-1461.

SUN 17 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

POLITICS THU 14 GERTRUDE STEIN POLITICAL CLUB OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Meetings of group devoted to LGBT issues in electoral politics. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. United Cerebral Palsy of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-521-2504

MON 18 INEQUALITY FOR ALL. Screening of Robert Reich’s documentary on the widening economic gap. Q&A w/ Reich via Skype to follow the film. McConnomy Auditorium. Mon., Nov. 18, 5:15 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000.

LITERARY THU 14 3 POEMS BY.. Poetry discussion

group feat. work by Rumi. 7:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. BOUND TOGETHER BOOK CLUB. Jealousy by Alain Robbe- Grillet. 6:30-7:45 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. PATRICIA PRATTIS JENNINGS. Reading & book signing w/ former PSO keyboardist & author of In One Era and Out the Other. 7 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WILLIAM ROCK & HYACINTH GIRL PRESS POETRY READING. Feat. Nikki Allen, Jessica Cuello, Sally Rosen Kindred, Deena November, Dan Nowak. 7-9:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

FRI 15

MON 18

AUBREY HIRSCH. Author of Why We Never Talk About Sugar 8 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100.

12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru

SAT 16 COFFEE & CRIME W/ DANA KING. Talk & book signing w/ author of Grind Joint. 10 a.m. Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Oakmont. 1-888-800-6078. DEJA VU BOOK CLUB. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume. For adults & teens. 11 a.m.12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. Third and First Sat of every month, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

SUN 17 SUNDAY POETRY & READING SERIES. Phill Provance. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.


Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976. OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

TUE 19 JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KARYNA MCGLYNN. Poetry reading. Lawrence Hall Ballroom. www.pointpark.edu 6 p.m. Reading w/ the author of I Have to Go Back to 1994. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. LET’S TALK ABOUT IT: MUSLIM JOURNEYS, LITERARY REFLECTIONS. The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

WED 20 TAPROOT WRITERS WORKSHOP. For serious writers of all levels. 5 p.m. Laughlin Memorial Library, Ambridge. 724-255-8476. WEDNESDAY WORDS W/ SOLOMON. 7 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

KIDSTUFF THU 14 - WED 20 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor landscape made of 22 miles of packing tape. Thru Jan. 19, 2014 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 15 EVENING ED-VENTURES: ART PARTY. Sculpt w/ paper pulp & make a mosaic from materials you can find at home. Ages 6-9. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. MAGIC FRIENDS & SILLY MONSTERS. Child/caregiver pairs will collaborate in creating & telling a story. For Pre-K & tots. isa-pgh.com Mon, Fri, 10 & 11:15 a.m. Thru Nov. 15 Assemble, Garfield.

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ROCK BAND! Open stage for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by Hope Academy. Fri, 5:307 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43. YOUTH MAKER NIGHT. Ages 10-15. 5:30-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 15 - SUN 17 SEUSSICAL. Presented by the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center Student Company. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 24 Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-576-4644.

SAT 16 BEGINNING BEEKEEPING CLASS. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-225-0930.

TUE 19 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 20 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 14

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT BRIEFING. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. IBEW Local Union No. 5, South Side. GET CRAFTY W/ 412-394-4271. THE MATTRESS BEAVER VALLY FACTORY. Create your ARTISTS NOV. own installation box. MEETING. Guest www. per 2:30 p.m. Carnegie a p artist Jennie Johnstone. pghcitym Library, Downtown. .co 7 p.m. Merrick Art 412-281-7141. Gallery, New Brighton. MAKE IT!: LASER 724-846-1130. CUTTER + 3D PRINTING. Ages BUDDY VALASTRO: THE 10-14. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. CAKE BOSS. The Family Assemble, Garfield. Celebrations Tour. 7:30 p.m. MARTY’S MARKET KIDS’ Palace Theatre, Greensburg. CORNER. Ages 5-11. Sat, 724-836-8000. 3-5 p.m. Marty’s Market, Strip CANDLELIGHT OPEN HOUSE. District. 412-586-7177. Re-creation of an 18th century SANTA’S ARRIVAL PARTY. evening w/ beer & wassail Lunch, prizes, more. 11 a.m. tastings, games, shopping, more. Century III Mall, West Mifflin. 4-8 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, 412-653-1222. Greensburg. 724-532-1935. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: CHINESE CONVERSATION COMMUNITY NEWSROOM CLUB. Second Thu of every PROJECT W/ ERIC LIDJI & month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu GARFIELD COMMONS. Ages of every month Carnegie Library, 5-10. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. Oakland. 412-622-3116. 412-540-5349. CURATORS’ DISCUSSION: SKETCHBOOK: 2013 COFFEE, CURATORS, & CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL. CONTEMPORARY ART. w/ Teen drawing workshop. Sat, Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thru & Tina Kukielski. Part of the Nov. 23 Carnegie Museum of 2013 Carnegie International. Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie

SAT 16

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 16 - SUN 17 FRECKLEFACE STRAWBERRY. A musical about loving the skin you’re in. Sat, Sun, 1:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 17 Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300.

SUN 17 - MON 18 TIME FOR FUN. Puppetry & story telling presented by Handmade Theatre. 2 p.m. and Mon., Nov. 18, 10:15 a.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

WED 20 TIME FOR FUN. Puppetry & story telling presented by Handmade Theatre. 7 p.m. Penn Hills High School, Penn Hills. 412-456-6666.

OUTSIDE FRI 15 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru Nov. 22 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

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Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DON’T MESS WITH MY REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE! Interactive training on how to approach your legislator. Presented by the ACLU. 6:30-8:30 p.m. First Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-681-7736. FOUR RIVERS VAUDEVILLE. Performance feat. Phat Man Dee. 8 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-904-3335. GAME NITE AT THE ARCADE. Interactive games, hosted by Mike Buzzelli. Second Thu of every month, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

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GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: TECHNOLOGY & FREE SPEECH. Panel discussion & Q&A. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. PFLAG BUTLER. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Second Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Covenant Presbyterian Church, Butler. 412-518-1515. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TECHNOLOGY START-UPS & INNOVATION WORKS. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

S C R E E N

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

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412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

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HAPPS The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

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Pens Limited time only. See store for details. Offer valid at participating dealers in select markets, while supplies last & only for new monthly activations from non-Sprint related carriers with purchase of new device. Free phone limited to certain models. $100 credit applied toward purchase of Boost phone. Excludes taxes. Additional terms & restrictions apply. See participating dealer for details. ©2013 Boost Worldwide, Inc. All rights reserved. Boost, Boost Mobile and the logo are trademarks of Boost. The Android robot is reproduced or modified from work created and shared by Google and used according to the terms described in the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution License. Google Play is a trademark at Google Inc., Samsung and Galaxy S are all trademarks of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. KYOCERA is a registered trademark of Kyocera Corporation. The LG Electronics, Inc., Optimus F7 and Quick Memo are registered trademarks of LG Electronics Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

FRI 15 21+ NIGHT W/ THE PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Learn about the science of melting glass, live music, more. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. HEALTHY HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS VENDOR FAIR. Presented by Women for a Healthy Environment. 5:30-9 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-420-2290. HMH: SPANKSGIVING. Drag show, spanking demos, private photo booth, more. Also accepting toy donations for the Play it Forward Pittsburgh Toy Drive. 9 p.m. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. 412-345-3464. SEMBENE FILM FESTIVAL. Fri. Thru Nov. 29 Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-204-7291.

FRI 15 - SAT 16 JESUS SEMINAR. 7:30-9 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 16, 9:30 a.m.4 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-561-6277.

SAT 16 ASPINWALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FALL BAZAAR. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Aspinwall Presbyterian Church, Aspinwall. 412-781-2884.

beer, more. 270 West Bridge St., SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA Homestead. farmtotablepa.com CRAZE. Free lessons, followed 3-7 p.m. by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. FROZEN IN TIME: TINTYPE 412-708-8844. PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE SCOTTISH COUNTRY CIVIL WAR. View a tintype DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., camera from 1860 & have social dancing follows. No your own tintype image partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. developed. Part of the and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Pennsylvania’s Civil War exhibit. Church, Mt. Washington. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Senator John 412-683-5670. Heinz History Center, Strip SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE District. 412-454-6000. CLUB. Free Scrabble games, HE-HO: ARTISTS’ HEALTH & all levels. Sat, 1-3 p.m. HOUSING FAIR FOR Mount Lebanon Public THE COMMUNITY. Library, Mt. Lebanon. Vendors & workshops 412-531-1912. bringing artists SPANISH face-to-face w/ local www. per CONVERSATION healthcare/housing pa pghcitym GROUP. Friendly, experts & providers. .co informal. At the 12-6 p.m. Kingsley Center, Starbucks inside Target. Sat, East Liberty. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty, 412-391-2060 x 228. East Liberty. 412-362-6108. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. STEEL ON ICE ANNIVERSARY Korean grammar & basic PARTY. Pittsburgh’s premier ski conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. club celebrates 25 years. Dancing, Carnegie Library, Oakland. dining, more. 7 p.m. Mirage, 412-622-3151. Greenfield. 412-563-9864. KOREAN II. For those SWING CITY. Learn & practice who already have a basic swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. understanding of Korean & Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. are interested in increasing 412-759-1569. proficiency. Sat Carnegie WESTMORELAND COUNTY Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEA. LINCOLN AT THE Tea, scones, savories, more. LIBRARY. Meet & greet w/ 11:30 a.m. Historic Hanna’s Ralph Lincoln, an 11th generation Town, Greensburg. descendant of Abraham 724-532-1935 x 210.

Military Mondays

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CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks • (412) 771-8872 • cluberoticapittsburgh.com

SAT 16 - SUN 17

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

“PITTSBURGH FANTASY IN WOOD” WOODCARVING SHOW. Vendors, food, more. Nov. 16-17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Castle Shannon Volunteer Fire Dept., Castle Shannon. 412-469-2903.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RESTORE

Volunteering with Habitat for Humanity doesn’t always mean building houses. The organization also runs ReStore, which sells donated building and home-improvement materials to the public. Individuals are needed to help with organizing, pricing and customer service at the Edgewood Towne Centre location. All proceeds go toward local building projects. Call 412-351-0512 x14 or visit www.pittsburghhabitat.org.

BACKYARD COMPOSTING WORKSHOP. 10-11:30 a.m. Construction Junction, Point Breeze. 412-488-7490 x 226. BALKAN DANCE PARTY. Folk dance lessons, live music, more. Third Sat of every month, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 21 Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-461-6188. DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S PITTSBURGH. Dance classes designed for people w/ Parkinson’s Disease to explore the art of dance & live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. 412-387-2542. FARM TO TABLE PITTSBURGH HARVEST TASTING. Sample fresh foods from local farms & restaurants, sip local wines,

Pittsburgh ‘s #1 Gentlemen’s Club ! LOOK WHAT’S BACK

SUN 17

Lincoln. 11:30 a.m. Millvale Library, Millvale. 412-822-7081. LINCOLN ON LINCOLN. Gettysburg Address delivered by Ralph Lincoln. 3 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theater, Millvale. 412-822-7081. LIVING HISTORY DEMONSTRATIONS. Part of the Pennsylvania’s Civil War exhibit. Sat, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sat, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thru Dec. 14 Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. OPEN (POST) JAZZ SESSION W/ THE PILLOW PROJECT. Open class for exploring & investigating personal movement musicality. 12-2 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. PROHIBITION COCKTAILS MIXOLOGY CLASS. 1-4 p.m. Perle Champagne Bar, Downtown. 412-471-2058.

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ANIMALS OF THE ICE. Learn about the animals who walked the earth in Western Pennsylvania during the Pleistocene Epoch or “Ice Age.” 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES. Sun, 5-6 p.m. Thru Dec. 1 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-661-2480. THE ONE COMMAND. w/ Judy Burke. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. CONTINUES ON PG. 62

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 61

MON 18 GREATER PITTSBURGH NONPROFIT PARTNERSHIP ANNUAL MEETING. Speakers: Bill Peduto & Bruce Bickel. 8:30 a.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-394-4271. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. SURVIVING THE HOLIDAYS. Bereavement seminar. 1:30 p.m. St. Barnabas Health Care System, Gibsonia. 412-364-3613 x 206.

TUE 19 BASIC FLORAL DESIGN: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN GEOMETRIC ARRANGING. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 19 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. MY PEOPLE FILM SERIES. Films, discussions & more highlighting the lives & experiences of LGBTQ people of color. Tue, 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 19 The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. OPEN (POST) JAZZ IMPROVISATIONAL DANCE CLASS. Tue, 7-10 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. TAKING STEPS TO SAVE LIVES: BECAUSE HEARTBURN CAN CAUSE CANCER. Presented by the Esophageal Cancer Action Network. 6:30-8 p.m. Carnegie Library, East Liberty. 412-363-8232.

WED 20 BUSINESS MENTORING ROUNDTABLE STARTUP SHOWCASE. www.pittsburgh. tie.org 5:30-9 p.m. Roland’s Iron Landing, Strip District. 412-261-3401. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. FORMER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ROBERT GATES. Pittsburgh Speakers Series, presented by Robert Morris University. 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. HEALING FOODS. Program presented by Rosemary Traill, Certified Natural Health

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

Women only, all ages. Counselor. 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. masember@mac.com 412-242-3598. Coraopolis United Methodist LEAGUE OF WOMEN Church, Coraopolis. VOTERS/ALLIES FOR CHILDREN 412-279-6062. PUBLIC MEETING. Speaker: Patrick Dowd. 10 a.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 28 WEST SECOND 412-261-4284. GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Acccepting art work & crafts Practice conversational English. for Deck The Halls: Annual Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Holiday Exhibition. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Submission deadline: Nov. 30, OBSCURE GAME NIGHT. 2013. Email 5 jpg.samples Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 27 of work & include resume Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. &/or bio along to 412-681-4318. info@28westsecond.com THE PITTSBURGH SHOW ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH OFFS. A meeting of jugglers PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. & spinners. All levels welcome. Accepting submissions Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, for showcase of locally Highland Park. 412-363-4550. written lesbian, gay, bisexual, SPANISH II. Geared toward or transgender-theme 1-act those who already have a plays. Manuscript details at basic understanding of facebook.com/events/ Spanish & are interested 519459561475242/ in increasing proficiency. 412-256-8109. First and Third Wed of BLAST FURNACE. every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. Seeking submissions 412-622-3151. for Volume 3, Issue 4. WEST COAST Submit no more . w SWING ww per than 3 of your best a p ty ci pgh m WEDNESDAYS. poems in any theme. .co Swing dance lessons. http://blastfurnace. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, submittable.com/Submit South Side. 916-287-1373. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays COMTRA THEATRE. Art in a Box. For more Auditions for Pippin. information, email Nov. 16-17. Actors age 16+, thedapcoopzumba@ bring a Broadway-style song hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. to sing, cold readings & THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY dance audition also. HOUR REVIEW. Seeking www.comtraplayers.com submissions in all genres for Cranberry. 724-591-8727. fledgling literary magazine GEYER PERFORMING ARTS curated by members of CENTER. Auditions for Oliver! the Hour After Happy Hour Dec. 1-2. Boys age 6-18, cold Writing Workshop. readings & 32 measures of afterhappyhourreview.com. classic musical theater piece. INDEPENDENT FILM Bring sheet music in correct key. NIGHT. Submit your film, www.geyerpac.com Scottdale. 10 minutes or less. Screenings 724-887-0887. held on the second Thursday LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER DANCE of every month. DV8 Espresso COMPANY. Auditions for Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. The Music & the Mirror: A 724-219-0804. Tribute to Marvin Hamlisch. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking Jan. 5. Open to tri-state area original essays about students in grades 9-12. literature, music, or film, & centerauditions.org. Lincoln also essays generally about Park Performing Arts Center, Pittsburgh. To see some Midland. 724-576-4644. examples, visit www.newyinzer. LINCOLN PARK com & view the current PERFORMING ARTS issue. Email all pitches, CENTER STUDENT submissions & inquiries to COMPANY. Auditions for newyinzer@gmail.com. Little Shop of Horrors. Jan. 6-8. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM Open to tri-state areas OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking students in grades 9-12. individual artists & artist centerauditions.org Lincoln groups for month-long Park Performing Arts Center, exhibitions in a new transitional Midland. 724-576-4644. gallery measuring. Artists MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. will be responsible for all Ongoing auditions for aspects of their exhibition. Send actors ages 18+ for murder images & a brief introduction mystery shows performed to the work to: bljones@ in the Pittsburgh area. wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to 412-833-5056. jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & SOUNDS OF PITTSBURGH jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. CHORUS. Auditions for annual Christmas concert. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

SUBMISSIONS

FULL LIST ONLINE

AUDITIONS


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Why am I such a slut?

Let me know if you want to see me in it.” GIRL, CORRUPTED

Are you a slut? Or are you a woman who loves sex, has a high libido and has sex with a lot of willing and grateful partners? Those are traits for which culture wouldn’t conspire to leave you feeling compelled to slap a pejorative label on yourself — if you were a dude. Don’t buy into the sexist double standards. So long as your sex life isn’t negatively impacting your relationship(s), your health, your friendships, your family life, your classwork or your career, you aren’t doing anything wrong. Don’t let shitty, sexist people make you feel like you have to slap a shitty, sexist label on yourself. Have fun, be thoughtful, be safe, be considerate of others’ feelings and your own. And remember: What works for you now might not work for you always. Don’t look back on this part of your life with shame or regret if you downsize your sex life. Do what’s right for you, eliminate the risks that can be eliminated, mitigate the risks that can’t be eliminated and don’t worry about what other people think.

I’m a man. Recently I discovered Omegle, the online site that allows you to “talk to strangers,” and I’ve had some fun posing as a lesbian. I would talk to women my own age (mid-20s) about life, love and, of course, sex. Many times, these chats included role play or sexy chat. We would both be masturbating. This was just chatting: I wouldn’t trade pics. I don’t keep in touch after our chat is over, and I am pretty sure everyone is satisfied. Am I an asshole for doing this? I made a post on Reddit to some real lesbians, and they clearly feel like I am an asshole. So I stopped. But was this really that bad? It’s the Internet, and for all I know I am chatting with other straight dudes pretending to be lesbians. If I’m not trying to pursue these women in real life, where’s the harm?

GOOD/FUNNY/ SUBVERSIVE DRAG IS A BURLESQUE ON WHAT IT MEANS TO BE MALE, NOT A DENIGRATION OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE FEMALE.

I am a gay man. One of my friends — I’ll call him Jerry — helped me out of a jam last summer. I received notice that I had to vacate my apartment while I was overseas, and Jerry volunteered to pack up my stuff and put it into storage. I am extremely grateful, as Jerry has saved me a huge amount of money and hassle. Recently, though, I was house-sitting for Jerry, and I found some intimate items of mine — a cock ring and a bottle of lube — that I thought had been lost in the move. Me and Jerry have fooled around before, but I find the fact that he took these items very strange. Do I confront Jerry, or leave the items as “payment” for helping me move? Or should I take them back without saying anything and let him figure it out? UNSURE IN CANADA

Two gay men in the same city and with similar sexual interests (including an interest in each other) could wind up owning identical bottles of lube and cock rings. It’s unlikely, of course, and it’s even less likely that Jerry owns the exact same lube and cock ring as the ones that went missing when he packed your place up. But seeing as Jerry helped you out of a jam, you should either give him the benefit of the doubt or turn a blind eye to what amounts to harmless perving. Lube isn’t that expensive, and that cock ring wasn’t from Tiffany’s — was it? — so replacing them isn’t going to ruin you. P.S. Assuming Jerry didn’t leave your intimate items in plain view, that means you snooped. If you have the kind of friendship where you can confront him about his theft, admit to your snooping, and have a laugh about it — and maybe put the lube and cock ring to good use — leave him a note where you found your intimate items: “I see you like my cock ring.

DON’T YOU KNOW EVERYTHING, SAVAGE?

Loath as I am to contradict the Lesbians of Reddit — which sounds like the title of a ’50s pulp-fiction novel — I don’t think you’re an asshole, DYKES. If you created fake personal ads, if you actively misled lesbians who contacted you, if you sent women pics that weren’t yours to trick them — if you were doing any of that — then you would be an asshole. But spinning out a few masturbatory fantasies on a site designed to facilitate oneon-one conversations between people who are never going to meet? That’s not asshole behavior. You found a way to enjoy your wannabe-lesbian fantasies without doing harm to any flesh-and-vulva lesbians. And yes, most of the “lesbians” you chatted with on Omegle were other straight dudes.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

Is drag done by cisgender straight men problematic? I thought drag was mostly about humor. I am acquainted with a bi trans woman who thinks this is offensive; at risk of further offending her, I haven’t asked why. Maybe you know? Haven’t we come a long way if straight men are comfortable enough with their sexualities to dress as women? NOT FEELING OFFENDED

“Freedom means freedom for everyone,” as a huge asshole once said. That means straight guys are free to do drag, and bi trans women are free to take offense. For the record: Good/funny/subversive drag is a burlesque on what it means to be male, not a denigration of what it means to be female. And there are straight guys who do it right. Instead of arguing with a friend who wants to police the gender expression of others, get your hands on the DVDs of An Audience With Dame Edna, and invite your bi trans friend over to watch. This week on the Savage Lovecast, Dan speaks with Daniel Bergner about foot-fetish shame at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

11.13-11.20

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sweetness is good. Sweetness is desirable. To be healthy, you need to give and receive sweetness on a regular basis. But you can’t flourish on sweetness alone. In fact, too much of it may be oppressive or numbing. I’m speaking both literally and metaphorically: To be balanced you need all of the other tastes, including saltiness, sourness, bitterness and savoriness. From what I understand, you are headed into a phase when you’ll thrive on more bitterness and savoriness than usual. To get an idea of what I mean, meditate on what the emotional equivalents might be for bitter tastes like coffee, beer and olives, and for savory tastes like mushrooms, cheese, spinach and green tea.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When you procrastinate, you avoid doing an important task. Instead, you goof off, doing something fun or simply puttering around wasting time. But what if there were a higher form of procrastination? What if you could avoid an important task by doing other tasks that were somewhat less important but still quite valuable? Here’s what that might look like for you right now: You could postpone your search for the key to everything by throwing yourself into a project that will give you the key to one small part of everything.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

There’s something resembling a big red snake slithering around in your mind these days. I don’t mean that literally, of course. I’m talking about a big red imaginary snake. But it’s still quite potent. While it’s not poisonous, neither is it a pure embodiment of sweetness and light. Whether it ends up having a disorienting or benevolent influence on your life all depends on how you handle your relationship with it. I suggest you treat it with respect but also let it know that you’re the boss. Give it guidelines and a clear mandate so that it serves your noble ambitions and not your chaotic desires. If you do that, your big red snake will heal and uplift you.

In his utopian novel Looking Backward, American author Edward Bellamy wrote a passage that I suspect applies to you right now: “It is under what may be called unnatural, in the sense of extraordinary, circumstances that people behave most naturally, for the reason that such circumstances banish artificiality.” Think of the relief and release that await you, Capricorn: an end to pretending, a dissolution of deception, the fall of fakery. As you weave you way through extraordinary circumstances, you will be moved to act with brave authenticity. Take full advantage.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

“I have your back” is an American expression that could also be rendered as “I’m right behind you, ready to help and defend you” or “I’m ready to support you whenever you’ve got a problem.” Is there anyone in the world who feels that way about you? If not, now would be an excellent time to work on getting such an ally. Cosmic conditions are ripe for bringing greater levels of assistance and collaboration into your life. And if you already do have confederates of that caliber, I suggest you take this opportunity to deepen your symbiotic connection even further.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): More than a hundred countries around the world celebrate a holiday called Independence Day, memorializing a time when they broke away from another nation and formed a separate state. I encourage you to create your own personal version of this festival. It could commemorate a breakthrough moment in the past when you escaped an oppressive situation, a turning point when you achieved a higher level of autonomy, or a taboo-busting transition when you started expressing your own thoughts and making your own decisions with more authority. By the way, a fresh opportunity to take this kind of action is available to you. Any day now might be a good time to declare a new Independence Day.

In my astrological opinion, almost nothing can keep you from getting the love you need in the coming days. Here’s the only potential problem: You might have a mistaken or incomplete understanding about the love you need, and that could interfere with you recognizing and welcoming the real thing. So here’s my prescription: Keep an open mind about the true nature of the love that you actually need most, and stay alert for the perhaps unexpected ways it might make itself available.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

In his poem “A Sort of a Song,” William Carlos Williams celebrates its strength: “Saxifrage is my flower that splits the rocks.” I nominate this darling little dynamo to be your metaphorical power object of the week, Virgo. May it inspire you to crack through blocks and barriers with subtle force.

There’s a new genre of erotic literature: dinosaur porn. E-books like In the Velociraptor’s Nest and Ravished by the Triceratops tell tall tales about encounters between people and prehistoric reptiles. I don’t recommend you read this stuff, though. While I do believe that now is a good time to add new twists to your sexual repertoire and explore the frontiers of pleasure, I think you should remain rooted in the real world, even in your fantasy life. It’s also important to be safe as you experiment. You really don’t want to explore the frontiers of pleasure with cold-blooded beasts. Either travel alone or else round up a warmblooded compassion specialist who has a few skills in the arts of intimacy.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’re not being swept along in a flood of meaningless distractions and irrelevant information and trivial wishes, right? I’m hoping that you have a sixth sense about which few stimuli are useful and meaningful to you, and which thousands of stimuli are not. But if you are experiencing a bit of trouble staying well grounded in the midst of the frenzied babble, now would be a good time to take strenuous action. The universe will conspire to help you become extra stable and secure if you resolve to eliminate as much nonsense from your life as you can.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The saxifrage is a small plant with white flowers. It grows best in subarctic regions and cooler parts of the Northern Hemisphere. The word “saxifrage” is derived from the Latin word saxifraga, whose literal meaning is “stone-breaker.” Indeed, the plant does often appear in the clefts of stones and boulders.

“People fall so in love with their pain, they can’t leave it behind,” asserts novelist Chuck Palahniuk. Your assignment, Gemini, is to work your ass off to fall out of love with your pain. As if you were talking to a child, explain to your subconscious mind that the suffering it has gotten so accustomed to has outlived its usefulness. Tell your deep self that you no longer want the ancient ache to be a cornerstone of your identity. To aid the banishment, I recommend that you conduct a ritual of severing. Tie one side of a ribbon to a symbol of your pain and tie the other side around your waist. Then cut the ribbon in half and bury the symbol in the dirt.

At what moment in your life were you closest to being perfectly content? Recreate the conditions that prevailed then. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

   

  

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again,” said painter Joan Miró. “You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life,” he added. The coming days are likely to bring you none of the former kind of experiences and several of the latter, Cancerian. It’s a numinous time in your longterm cycle: a phase when you’re likely to encounter beauty that enchants you and mysteries that titillate your sense of wonder for a long time. In other words, the eternal is coming to visit you in very concrete ways. How do you like your epiphanies? Hot and wild? Cool and soaring? Comical and lyrical? Hot and soaring and comical and wild and cool and lyrical?

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 66 + STUDIES 68 + SERVICES 68 + LIVE 69 + WELLNESS 70

WORK HELP WANTED Paid in Advance!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.process-brochures.com (AAN CAN) Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY! Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

We are NOW HIRING at a location near you!

• School Bus Drivers • Van Drivers and Monitors

VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

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Macy’s is hiring in Pittsburgh for the Holidays! Go to holiday.macysJOBS.com to search all of our employment opportunities!

To advertise your seasonal and holiday help wanted ads call the City Paper Classified Department at 412.316.3342

Full Time Financial Service Rep (FSR) Sales/Service experience preferred, Excellent communication skills necessary to address member needs via various channels, Ability to crossoffer products, services & solutions to members, Proficient in Microsoft Office products. Must Pass background check & bondability. HS diploma or equivalent. Salary commensurate with exp., benefits package, EOE. Qualified applicants send resume & salary requirements to hr@riverset.com No phone calls please!

We are currently looking for outside sales representatives to join our advertising team. Send your resume and cover letter to jbrock@steelcitymedia.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! EOE

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

CONSTIPATION? ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

SERVICES CLASSES

REHEARSAL

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Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ANNOUNCEMENTS Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION

ADOPTION

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

PSYCHIC CLEMENCY Psychic. The key to success Real gifted. Tel: 1-888-576-6179 www.clemency-psychic.us (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

LAWYER

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ADOPTION A Creative Financially Secure Home, LOVE, Laughter, Travel, Sports, Family await 1st baby. Expenses Paid. Jackie 1-800-362-7842

ADOPTION For Your NEWBORN

• Pardons • Expungements • Credit Reports

A baby is a gift to treasure. I can provide your baby a secure life, and unconditional love.

Law Office of Lorraine Smith Downtown Office (412)427-4130

Expenses Paid Please call anytime. Maria 1-866-429-0222


Ink Well

LIVE

THE BIG CASE

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

1. Cookbook conversion chart abbr. 4. Guy de Maupassant novel published in English as “The History of a Scoundrel” 10. Adam’s family member 14. Court 15. Mick’s first wife 16. Science fiction achievement award name 17. Two-time Super Bowl MVP quarterback 19. One who can do no wrong, perhaps 20. Support for the arts? 21. WHO concern since the early 2000s 23. Site of tension between the Koreas 24. Hiccup 27. “You ___!” (“Natch!”) 29. Respectful Japanese title 30. Highest place where trees grow, on a mountain 33. Cheddar 35. Wet spot of sorts 36. Feature shared by “iPhones” and “ObamaCare,” and what can found in 17-, 30-, 43-, and 59-Across 41. Sam who did not direct the 2013 reboot of “Evil Dead” 42. “The Divine ___” (Bette Midler debut) 43. Modern gaming machines

46. “I Can ___ Cheezburger?” 49. O.J.’s “Naked Gun” co-star 50. One in an open, say 53. Reuters rival, for short 54. Humorist Bombeck 56. Top 57. Celebrate a championship by destroying your city, say 59. Gawk 62. Spiny African plant 63. Releases gas, perhaps, as a volcano 64. The French way? 65. Chastity device 66. Luisiana, e.g. 67. Thing spread in bed: Abbr.

DOWN 1. Twitter friends, casually 2. Toyota mid-sized coupe 3. “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” monster-balladeers 4. Hoops 5. “Ich bin ___ Berliner” 6. Limited group of computer connections, briefly 7. Spanish liqueur 8. QB Donovan dissed by Rush Limbaugh a year before taking his team to the Super Bowl 9. “With you there” 10. What yellowfin tuna may be sold as 11. Nirvana fan? 12. Swelling head issue 13. Interweb amusement, as it were

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HOUSES FOR SALE

$980,000/MLS 967380 Stone House+10 Acres Marilyn Davis/PRU 724838-3600 Ext 640

$199,900/MLS 958374 Maple Smt. Rd/20 Acre Marilyn Davis/PRU 724838-3660 Ext. 640

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18. 2009 NYC Marathon winner Keflezighi 22. Lengths of leather for shaving 25. Fancy-pants British prep school for boys 26. Kunis who is reportedly Ashton’s girlfriend 28. Thing submitted to an insurance company 31. Swedish city across the water from Copenhagen 32. Certification for aliens: Abbr. 33. Rickrolling, “I Like Turtles,” etc. 34. Baseball bird 36. Hip-hop impresario Gotti 37. Grinding tool 38. Where one might see sea stars

TA S T E

39. Put in a footnote 40. Part of AMA, ALA, or ADA 44. “Yes ____, Bob!” 45. Extremely cute tree-hoppers 46. They’re gonna do what they do so just turn your head away and hold your palm out 47. Directorial phrase 48. So psyched 51. Human trunk 52. “The monster is coming this way!” 53. Modern airport profilee (*sigh*) 55. Stand next to 58. Electronic musician Four ___ 60. Compound banned from some plastics, for short 61. Crew’s best guess: Abbr.

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Your ad could be here

$449,900/MLS 971410 159 Stonewall Road Marilyn Davis/PRU 724838-3660 Ext 640

$395,000/MLS 977548 230 W. Main/Ligonier Marilyn Davis/ PRU 724-838-3660 EXT 640

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currently available ranging in price from $1450-$2150 per month (plus electric) www.LocomotiveLofts.com Located adjacent to vibrant Butler Street in Lawrenceville Neighborhood of Pittsburgh

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

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Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

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Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

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Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop 1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

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FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

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Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 11.13/11.20.2013

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

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LOCATIONS IN:

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www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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ROCK THE RIVER PACKAGE $479 PER COUPLE • DINNER FOR TWO • LIVE ENTERTAINMENT BY CITYSCAPE • ONE NIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS • COMPLIMENTARY HOTEL • NEW YEARS DAY BRUNCH Please call 412-231-7777 or visit RIVERSCASINO.COM to purchase your package by December 26, 2013. Refund policy applicable. Ask for details.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE

RIVERSCASINO.COM

777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


November 13, 2013