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BLEAK HOUSE: ABUSE ALLEGATIONS HAVE DIVIDED A FAMILY FOR A DECADE — AND COUNTING 06


EVENTS 11.7 – 5-8pm ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10/FREE parking in The Warhol lot

11.8 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: SPECIAL DELIVERY, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10

11.15 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: FUTURE ISLANDS Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

11.23 – 4pm IN DISCUSSION: THE WORK OF YASUMASA MORIMURA WITH ERIC SHINER, NICHOLAS CHAMBERS, CINDY LISICA AND CHARLES EXLEY Co-presented with the National Consortium for Teaching About Asia and the Asian Studies Center, University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh Free with Museum admission/Members Free

Jenny Hval with special guest The Garment District

12.12 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: NELLIE MCKAY Tickets $20/$18 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot

11.1 – 8pm Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

We welcome Norwegian musician and songwriter, Jenny Hval, for her debut in The Warhol’s theater. On a tour supporting her latest release Innocence Is Kinky, Hval, whose multidisciplinary work as a musician, artist and writer, is often described as “provocative” and “transgressive,” will be featured at the Performa Festival in NYC, before appearing at The Warhol. Pittsburgh’s own, The Garment District, featuring Jennifer Baron, formerly of The Ladybug Transistor (who has a forthcoming release on Night-People Records) opens the show.

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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professor Jill Engle on a legal battle in which four adult children are suing their own father over alleged abuse

[VIEWS]

just gave government 20 “Republicans employees a bonus two-week vacation … all in the name of fiscal restraint.” — Chris Potter on the GOP’s governmentshutdown insanity

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“Amy Weiland is banking on a philosophy that treats coffee like craft beer.” — Alex Zimmerman on Lawrenceville’s new Constellation coffee shop

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10.23/10.30.2013

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

“Julian Assange is also, according to this film, a 24-hour jerk, the sort who drinks your beer and doesn’t chip in for Wi-Fi.” — Al Hoff reviews the film, The Fifth Estate

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] families stalked by wolves, it’s 47 “Depicting a profound riff on a history fading from awareness.” — Robert Raczka on artist Ryan Keene’s “Sketches: Production” series, part of Alloy: Pittsburgh

[LAST PAGE] that we 71 “Itmakehasthebeennextsuggested version waterproof.” — Guerrilla-art group Entropy Syndicate, on the capsizing of a public sculpture responding to Florentijn Hofman’s giant rubber duck

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 23 EVENTS LISTINGS 54 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 63 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 64 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 65 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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“IT’S LIKE THE TWILIGHT ZONE.”

INCOMING Shut Out: PennDOT to spend $240,000 to fence off homeless camps under highways (Oct. 16) Dialogue is crucial, but so is our state government recognizing that poor people are human beings and residents. — Web comment from “Pghlesbian” How insane is it that there need to be “encampments” for the homeless at all? It boggles my mind that PennDOT can spend the money on fences and labor, and also that the social services are focusing their attention on keeping the homeless in convenient clusters. — Comment on City Paper’s Facebook page from “Jenni Dangel” If a campfire poses the risk of structural problems with a bridge, PennDOT has bigger problems than homeless encampments. — Web comment from “Kurt Haverstock”

BLEAK

HOUSE

After more than a decade, a local family is still locked in a battle over alleged abuse. Will a lawsuit bring this case to an end?

James A. Richards’ new book teaches bands how to self-promote (Oct. 16) This article brings up some great points when it comes to musicians looking to get their music heard. … Musicians often need to do much more than just write good music, record and perform live. — Web comment from “Terrance D. Schemansky”

“i did it, i survived Pittsburgh without ever seeing the duck in person.” — Oct. 21 tweet from “Spooky Steve” (@naive_steve)

{BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

O

NE OF THE happiest days in

Michael Clark’s life, he says, came in 2001, when his parents separated: It meant, he realized, that his father wouldn’t be coming home anymore. For years until that point, Michael and his three younger siblings contend, they’d lived in fear of Michael’s father, Dr. Kevin Clark. “It got to the point that it was just a way of life,” says Michael, who was 14 when his parents split. “My brother and my sisters and I would cry whenever my mother would leave the house because it just turned into a war zone. … You would just keep to yourself and pray he didn’t call for you.” Through his attorneys, Kevin Clark denies ever abusing his children. And no one has accused him of doing so after 2001. But in some sense, the Clark family has still never truly left the Moon Township home they once shared. Nor have they escaped the courthouse. At least, never for very long.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Michael Clark, of Moon Township, and his siblings have sued their father in civil court over alleged abuse they say they suffered as children.

Over the past 12 years, Kevin and Valette Clark have fought over support payments, over visitation rights, over claims of child abuse. There have been custody hearings and criminal proceedings. A dispute about child support is pending before the state Supreme Court. And it’s not over. In 2007, Michael, then 20, sued his father in hopes of

“mak[ing] him pay for what he did to me.” Such a lawsuit is unusual. “It’s very rare to see a case like this,” says Jill Engle, a professor of family law at Penn State University. Michael Clark’s lawsuit accuses his father of behavior ranging from verbal mistreatment to sexual abuse. The Clarks’ three younger children later filed CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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wrote an opinion casting doubt on those allegations. Now, it is Mulligan presiding over the Clark children’s lawsuits — suits they filed, they say, partly because of frustration over those earlier court battles. “Here we are, back in front of Judge Mulligan, the one person who could have ended this all years ago,” Michael Clark says. “Nothing involving my father has gone well for us.” WHEN VALETTE Majors first met Kevin

Clark, at the University of Pittsburgh in 1982, the picture looked brighter. Val was a singer and Kevin a pianist, Valette Clark recalls, and they performed together around the city. (Through his attorneys, Kevin Clark declined comment for this story.) They began dating in 1984, and in 1985 moved to St. Louis together, so Kevin could attend medical school. They were married later that year, eventually returning to Pittsburgh so Kevin Clark could serve an internship. He currently works in the area as an ophthalmologist in private practice. By August 1987, the Clarks had their first child, Michael; two girls and a boy would follow in the next seven years. But their Moon Township home “was not a peaceful house,” Michael Clark’s lawsuit contends. Among other allegedly abusive behaviors, three of the lawsuits allege that Kevin Clark held his children in midair from a second-floor banister in the home.

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lawsuits of their own. (Michael Clark agreed to speak on the record for this story, but his siblings — two sisters and a brother — declined. City Paper does not identify the names of victims in cases of alleged sexual assault.) Together, the suits claim that the alleged abuse has caused a range of lasting injuries including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as some chronic physical pain. Some of the allegations were part of a 2005 criminal case. Several criminal charges based on those allegations were dismissed in a preliminary hearing that year; Kevin Clark later pleaded “no contest” to lesser offenses. His lawyers deny the claims made in the current lawsuits. “I feel very badly for the suffering that all of the people involved in this case have gone through,” says Ed Flynn, one of Kevin Clark’s attorneys. “But it is reprehensible to accuse Kevin Clark of these things that I know he could not do. And it is unfair to lay the blame for all of this solely at his feet.” Michael Clark also finds fault with Kathleen Mulligan, a widely respected Allegheny County judge. It was Mulligan, who presides in the county’s family court, who handled the Clarks’ divorce. And it was Mulligan who left in place Kevin Clark’s unsupervised visits with his children — even as he was facing criminal charges related to the allegations of abuse. It is Mulligan who

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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“He would hold me over the banister by my knees and he would let me go and then catch me by my ankles,” Michael Clark recalls. “It scared the shit out of me, and he would be laughing.” Michael Clark’s lawsuit, much like the others, alleges his father “terroriz[ed] his family” in other ways. For example, it alleges that in 1999, Kevin Clark had three of the children lie down on the floor, and “told them that the situation was similar to a recent robbery where the victims were murdered.” Kevin Clark, the complaint alleges, told them “‘you won’t know when it’s comin’,’ implying that he might kill them then and there.” Kevin Clark’s own legal filings deny the accusation, as well as other claims of abuse. The filings acknowledge that he referred to Michael as “psycho son” and “faggot,” but deny “that these references were physically or psychologically abusive.” As for the balcony allegations, in a 2005 preliminary hearing, Kevin Clark’s then-lawyer, Robert Stewart, contended that Kevin Clark was not acting “with an intent to terrorize. This is a father goofing around [who] has control of [his children] and brings them back in.” Stewart likened the situation to “a father toss[ing] his kid in the air” or “[l]etting them ride on their shoulders” because “they could always fall off.” In any event, says attorney Ed Flynn, if any of the alleged incidents did occur, they were only mistakes made by a young father that “don’t rise to the level of child abuse.” According to a 2005 written opinion that is an exhibit in Michael Clark’s civil lawsuit, Judge Mulligan took the allegations seriously. She wrote that after a pair of 2002 custody hearings, she allowed Kevin Clark “only supervised visits with the … two younger children” — a decision “based upon the testimony at the two hearings.” While sex-abuse allegations were not raised at those hearings, a psychologist, Dr. Mark King, had conducted a psychological evaluation of Kevin Clark, and Mulligan wrote that he found the father’s conduct “was extremely inappropriate and was clearly psychological abuse and probably physical abuse as well.” Still, Mulligan wrote, “King testified that father did not have the characteristics of a sexual abuser.” “These kids have suffered,” says Val Clark. “I feel guilt about not leaving him earlier every day.” But “My father was old-school. He told me, ‘You married him, you have to make it work,’ and I tried.” “I know people wonder why we lived like that, but it’s a delicate dance to get out of that bad situation,” she adds. And

“when we did leave, we went to family court and we expected to be protected and we weren’t.” THE CASE was assigned to Mulligan, who came with plenty of positive recommendations. In 2000, when the county bar association ranked Allegheny County judges for impartiality, temperament, diligence and legal ability, Mulligan ranked either among the top 10 or close to it in each category. But as the years wore on, Val Clark began mistrusting Mulligan — and other aspects of the judicial process. When Kevin Clark first sought visitation rights with his children, Mulligan initially ordered that the visits be supervised by the Parental Stress Center, an East Liberty family-support agency. But in 2004, Kevin Clark sought to have the visits be unsupervised — just himself and his children. Mulligan agreed. As she later wrote in an opinion, staffers had upbeat assessments of the supervised visits. “[W]hile the children were legitimately afraid of father because of his past conduct,” Mulligan added, unsupervised visits were warranted “given father’s progress and the fact that the visits had been going well.” But after the unsupervised visits began, accusations began surfacing that had previously received little attention: that Kevin Clark had been sexually abusive as well. The earliest allegation of sex abuse seems to have surfaced during King’s evaluation in 2002, though accounts vary as to how the accusation arose. According to court records, King’s recollection is that while he was evaluating Kevin Clark, Val Clark told him about an incident in which she’d allegedly caught Kevin holding Michael, threatening to insert a broomstick in his anus. But as Mulligan recounted the history in her opinion, King testified that “none of the children told [King] about such an incident themselves” even though they “did talk in great detail” about other alleged abuse. “Because it was a parent who relayed the information and not a child,” Mulligan wrote, King did not report the matter to authorities. Both Val and Michael Clark, however, say that’s not how it happened. Michael Clark says he did tell King of the abuse; Val says Dr. King told her about a second incident. As Mulligan puts it, “Mother testified that Dr. King told her that Michael reported the sexual abuse to him in 2002 and upon learning this, Dr. King confronted her about what happened.” “I couldn’t believe it at first,” Val Clark CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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now says. “It was the most devastating day of my life.” But court records show that Clark’s then-attorney, Daniel Glasser, didn’t raise the allegations in 2002. Nor did Val Clark mention it during her own courtroom testimony prior to 2004. In a 2006 appeal of Mulligan’s custody decision, a new attorney for Val Clark wrote that Glasser “advised her that they did not need to delve into Father’s past sexual assaults because Father had ‘admitted to enough on the record’ to justify an award of supervised visitation. Further, Pennsylvania law imposed no requirement upon Mother to raise those issues at that time.” (Glasser says he is “prohibited” from discussing the issue, citing attorney-client privilege. Kevin Clark’s lawyers are seeking to have the privilege waived, so they can question Glasser about the allegation.) The appeal adds that raising further abuse allegations served “no useful purpose” in 2002, “because supervised visitation was ordered and because the children were protected.” Too, the appeal asserted, alleged sex abuse is “a particularly difficult issue to address with children at younger ages.” In all, the complaint read, Val Clark was acting on advice that was “not unreasonable.” (The appeal was rejected by the state’s Superior Court, on the grounds that it was filed too late.) But the accusation surfaced again in 2004, when Val Clark challenged the unsupervised visits awarded to Kevin Clark. This time, the accusation prompted an investigation by the county’s office for Children, Youth and Families. As Mulligan later wrote, the agency’s investigation “did not reveal substantial evidence of sexual abuse or exploitation” and was “unable to determine that [the abuse allegation] was credible.” Flynn says that finding helps prove the charges were baseless. “There were a lot of people who came in contact with this family during this case,” Flynn says. “If they had heard about allegations of sexual abuse then they would have been mandated to report it.” That didn’t happen here, he says. In legal filings, Kevin Clark’s attorneys contend that Val Clark, out of “bitterness” and “dissatisfaction” with child-support payments, has “continued to fabricate incidents of sexual abuse.” Filings add that

Michael Clark has Asperger’s syndrome and is thus “particularly susceptible to [her] suggestions.” (Michael Clark denies having Asperger’s.) “Those kids’ names are on the lawsuits,” Flynn says, “but she’s the one controlling the direction of the litigation.” “All I’ve ever tried to do is protect my children,” Val Clark says. “They’ve claimed this from the beginning, that I learned this from my mom, that she somehow brainwashed us,” Michael Clark says. “But I was there. My brother and sisters were there.” MOON TOWNSHIP police, at least, believed

it. After an officer attended a November 2004 forensic interview at Children’s Hospital with three of the Clarks’ children and their mother, police compiled an affidavit summarizing the children’s allegations. Among the accusations, according to that affidavit: Michael Clark charged that his father had “attempted to assault him two times in a sexual manner with a foreign object” when Michael was between the ages of 12 and 13. While the affidavit alleges his mother interrupted the broomstick assault, he later testified that another child witnessed the second incident, which he said might have involved a curtain rod. Another child also accused Kevin Clark of an assault with a broomstick. Kevin Clark was charged with offenses including criminal attempt to commit involuntary sexual intercourse with a child, and unlawful restraint. While former deputy prosecutor Daniel Cuddy says he can’t remember specifics of the case, he says in an email that “there was definitely enough [evidence] to support it or I wouldn’t have prosecuted it.” According to the transcript of the May 2005 preliminary hearing, however, Michael Clark testified he couldn’t remember whether he’d actually been penetrated during the second incident. But his father had violated him with his fingers while Michael was fully dressed, in the car, he said. “I think he likes to think of these things as a joke,” he testified. Robert Stewart, Kevin Clark’s attorney at the proceeding, countered by asking how his client could be charged “when he is driving with one hand supposedly trying to reach under and put his fingers in his [son’s] anus?”

“IT IS REPREHENSIBLE TO ACCUSE KEVIN CLARK OF THESE THINGS THAT I KNOW HE COULD NOT DO.”

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

The other child to allege an incident involving a broomstick also struggled to recall details. According to the hearing transcript, when asked if Kevin Clark did anything with the broomstick, the child answered, “I am not positive, but I think he did.â€? Flynn notes that some charges were tossed out at the preliminary hearing, including some of the sex-abuse allegations. District Justice Mary Murray also dismissed the balcony charges, saying there was insufďŹ cient evidence that the behavior constituted child endangerment. “I agree it is probably not the best type of playing,â€? she said, according to the transcript. “At that level, you don’t have to meet the highest burden to get a case moved on,â€? Flynn says. “But the allegations by two of the [children] were tossed out. So what does that tell you?â€? Charges involving two alleged assaults on Michael Clark were allowed to proceed. But Mulligan never rescinded her order allowing Kevin Clark unsupervised visitation. And one of the younger children whose charges were dismissed now says that during the preliminary hearing, “I was scared of testifying against him because I knew I had to see him again.â€? Some child advocates question Mulligan’s decision to leave unsupervised visits intact. “The arrest suggests that there is substantial evidence that this crime occurred. ‌ How could we possibly allow this possible perpetrator to have contact with the child?â€? wonders Frank Cervone, the executive director of Philadelphia’s Support Center for Child Advocates, which represents children in court proceedings. “There is already so much pressure on a child in these situations,â€? he adds. “Why jack that pressure up by forcing interaction with the guy who’s been arrested? “Maybe the kid testiďŹ ed the way he did because [the allegation] was made up,â€? says Cervone. Then again, he says, the child might also have felt threatened. “Because there was no stay-away order from the judge, we’ll never know for sure.â€?

“You have charges ďŹ led by law enforcement, and the judge decides to overrule that,â€? says Lundy Bancroft, a widely published author and domestic-abuse expert who spent 15 years counseling male abusers. “That’s direct interference with the prosecution if the victim is forced into having tons of unsupervised visits with the accused.â€? When contacted, Mulligan said she was unable to comment on the case. But in a later written opinion, she noted that while “there is no doubt that father was abusive during the marriage,â€? prior to 2004, “despite numerous opportunities, mother never before presented ‌ evidence of sexual abuse in court.â€? And in a hearing in her own court, she wrote, “testimony of the children ‌ was vague and inconsistentâ€? In 2005, Mulligan had also ordered Mark King to re-evaluate Kevin Clark — and to assess Val Clark as well. This time, though, King had seen “a positive changeâ€? in the father, who “now admitted that he did some ‘really bad things,’â€? Mulligan’s opinion says. “[F]ather strongly denied the sexual abuse but admitted almost everything else.â€? What’s more, King told her that the younger children’s interaction with their father was “very positiveâ€? and they “were not in any way afraidâ€? of him. By contrast, Mulligan wrote, King found Val Clark to be depressed and anxious, as well as “suspicious and obsessiveâ€? — and opined that her anger “was hurting any chance for father and the two younger children to have a relationship.â€? Val Clark rejects that account. She ďŹ led a complaint — later withdrawn — against King with the state, alleging that he should have reported the abuse allegation to authorities in 2002. “I believe Dr. King’s negative assessment of me was an attempt to cover his tracks for not reporting the abuse,â€? Val Clark says. But in the end, Mulligan concluded that “Either the children have convinced themselves that the incidents took place, or they are saying that these incidents took place in order to prevent unsupervised contact with father or to endear themselves to their mother or their CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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siblings.” At Kevin Clark’s request, she had already imposed a gag order and sealed the family-court case. In an October 2004 order, Mulligan sealed the court record, barred the public from courtroom proceedings, and prohibited Val Clark from “discussing with the media or any third party, any allegation of sexual abuse of the children.” (The criminal case remained open.) Val Clark, whom Mulligan has found in contempt for not doing more to encourage the children to visit with their father, has posted court documents online. She also began speaking to City Paper before the gag order was lifted this summer. “What was happening to my children wasn’t fair,” she says. “And if it was happening to me, maybe it was happening to other people. I didn’t feel like I could stay quiet any longer.” DECIDING WHAT’S in a

younger two children, and the pending criminal case. Rather than face a trial on the sexabuse charges, in December 2006 Kevin Clark pleaded “no contest” to three lesser counts of endangering the welfare of a child. In a “no contest” plea, a defendant accepts a sentence without asserting guilt or innocence. Judge Gerard Bigley sentenced Kevin Clark to one year of probation for each count, running concurrently. State law defines “endangering the welfare of a child” as taking place when a parent or guardian “violat[es] a duty of care, protection or support.” Kevin Clark’s lawyers say the offenses refer to the incidents in which he held his children out from the balcony (the very behavior the district judge had called “not the best type of playing”). Val Clark had another interpretation. Based on her understanding of what prosecutors had told her, she says, “I believed this could be used in any civil case and that he was convicted of sexual abuse.” But the definition of endangerment does not mention sexual abuse. And a no-contest plea can’t be used against a defendant in a related civil trial. “This was supposed to be our closure, but apparently there have been no consequences for him,” says Val Clark. “It’s like the Twilight Zone,” Michael Clark says. “There have been so many times when we have been told that we would be protected, but it’s never happened.” And so they have turned to the civil suits, which allege a range of physical and psychological abuse in 2001 or before, which contributed to long-lasting psychological and physical trauma. But the Clark children’s first order of business was trying to get Mulligan removed from the case — and again they have been frustrated.

“KEEPING BOTH PARENTS INVOLVED IN A CHILD’S LIFE ISN’T ALWAYS THE BEST THING. BUT WE SEE JUDGES TRYING TO FORCE IT EVERY DAY.”

child’s best interest, especially in families with troubled histories, is rarely easy, experts say. Engle, the Penn State professor, says judges have “a ton of discretion” in family disputes. “The best interest of the child” is a broad standard, she says — one that “leaves a judge sometimes to struggle with making value judgments.” Mulligan’s decision to maintain unsupervised visitation, Bancroft says, is “not an unusual thing to happen.” In general, he says, judges put too much emphasis on “trying to maintain two-parent households even when … one of the parents is abusive. “Keeping both parents involved in a child’s life isn’t always the best thing,” he adds. “But we see judges trying to force it every day.” Sal Frasca, executive director of the Children’s Rights Council — a Washington D.C.-based nonprofit that seeks to maintain “meaningful contact” with both parents — disagrees. Even where there are allegations of abuse or dysfunction, he says, “The best parent for a child is both parents,” Frasca says. “Both parents contribute particular things to a child’s growth, so the child should have the opportunity to be exposed to that.” By 2005, though, Michael and his older sister — the siblings who best remembered their parents being together — were not seeing their father at all. Disputes over visitation focused on the

FLYNN, WHO requested Mulligan take the

case, says he did so because she is “very familiar with the parties, the issues and the allegations, so it made absolute sense to have the case assigned to her. Besides, she will not be the ultimate decider of the facts; the jury will be.” Mulligan is up for retention on this November’s ballot, and her return to the bench is recommended by the Allegheny County Bar Association. Her reputation CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013


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has reached all the way to Philadelphia, where Cervone says that even if he finds some of her actions in the Clark case “a little odd,” he’s always heard her spoken of as a “stellar judge who is beyond impropriety.” But while Schuchardt, Michael Clark’s lawyer, says Mulligan is generally fair, he argues that she should not be hearing this case because of her history with it. She has, after all, already issued opinions expressing doubt over whether sex abuse ever took place — which is a key claim likely to be argued in her courtroom. “It is highly unusual to have a case overseen by a judge who has already rendered a written opinion on the ultimate issue,” he says. And while a jury will hand down a final verdict, Schuchardt says, “The judge will decide questions of law, which includes, crucially, what facts the jury gets to hear.” For example, he says, Mulligan has ruled that testimony and prior orders from the custody case will be inadmissible. Schuchardt asked Mulligan to recuse herself. When she refused, he appealed, but Administrative Judge W. Terrence O’Brien, too, denied the request. In a brief order, O’Brien noted that a jury would hand down the actual verdict. Her earlier rulings “show neither bias nor the appearance of bias,” he wrote. But Cervone, for one, says judges should recuse themselves when there is

“either substantive conflict of interest” or if there is “an appearance of impropriety” — an appearance that may exist “inside the minds of the parties involved.” Such an appearance “will be hard for [Mulligan] to avoid” here. The fact that a jury will ultimately decide the matter “helps insulate the case, but not entirely,” Cervone adds. “Continuity should not be the primary concern here, what should be of concern is overall fairness and getting a full hearing of the facts.” Author and abuse-expert Bancroft puts the matter more succinctly: “It’s absolutely preposterous,” he says. “She has already made rulings in the case.” Bancroft adds that family-court proceedings are often prone to suspicions of favoritism. That’s one reason he opposes sealing records in any case. “If a judge is going to rule, for example, that sexual abuse didn’t occur, then those findings should be made public,” Bancroft says. “[Sealing family court cases] is a severe violation of due process and it is protecting the court and its appointees from scrutiny.” Michael Clark’s concerns are more immediate. Currently, all four children’s suits are set to be consolidated for a single trial, to be held next spring. “Even though I feel like the odds are stacked against us,” says Michael Clark, “we have to push forward.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

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[POTTER’S FIELD]

OPERATION SHUTDOWN What the @#$! was that supposed to be about? {BY CHRIS POTTER} IT WAS JUST 10 months ago that Western

Pennsylvania’s own congressman Keith Rothfus took his first high-profile stand: voting against aid for the victims of Hurricane Sandy. Now look at him: voting against funding government services for the rest of us. Congresspeople grow up so fast. Or actually, not at all. On Oct. 17, Rothfus was one of 144 House Republicans who voted against a bill to end a 16-day government shutdown and avoid a default on U.S. debt. Even many Republicans who’d previously supported the shutdown — like Western Pennsylvania congressman Tim Murphy — had thrown in the towel by this point. But Rothfus was joined by fellow Pennsylvania Tea Party fave Pat Toomey, one of only 18 senators who voted against the measure. And what do we have to show for it? For many Republicans, the shutdown/debt default threat was supposed to help exact concessions on Barack Obama’s health-care reforms. Rothfus insisted that “Western Pennsylvanians are looking for relief from President Obama’s health-care law.” That didn’t pan out so well. By Oct. 15, Rothfus was tweeting that “Western Pennsylvanians expect & deserve the President, Senate, & House to work together.” Sure enough, days later the President, Senate, and House agreed to end the shutdown. Yet Rothfus voted against the very consensus he claimed to want. For Toomey, meanwhile, it was all about deficits, not health care. “I cannot support piling hundreds of billions of dollars of debt … without even a sliver of reform to start putting our fiscal house in order,” he said in a statement. But one thing the shutdown didn’t advance was the cause of fiscal prudence. Furloughed federal workers are getting back pay for the time they were locked out. Which means Republicans just gave government employees an extra two weeks of paid vacation … all in the name of fiscal restraint. But maybe the shutdown wasn’t a means to an end, so much as an end in itself — an effort to erode whatever faith we might still have in the public institutions Republicans often disdain. As humorist P.J. O’Rourke once said, Republicans campaign for office by telling you government

is terrible … and once elected, they set about proving it. Anyway, it’s not as if you could call Rothfus and Toomey losers here. For one thing, delaying some other federal worker’s paycheck can be a great way to cash in yourself. During the shutdown, Rothfus announced raising more than $227,000 in the second quarter of 2013 — more than five times as much as potential Democratic challenger Erin McClelland. He may reap a bigger windfall after his shut-down vote: Already Rothfus’ coffers include $5,000 from Koch Industries, whose owners are among the Tea Party’s leading sugar daddies. (Political committees controlled by Toomey, meanwhile, have garnered $40,000 from Koch sources since 2009, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.) Perhaps the most brainmelting thing about this fiasco, though, is how the people who provoked the crisis act as if they had nothing to do with it. As government clanked back into operation, Rothfus primly observed, “The lesson that should be learned is that elected officials … must come together and negotiate before the eleventh hour.” That conveniently fails to mention the reason the chime was striking 11: because the GOP had pushed the clock hands forward. Toomey’s office, meanwhile, used social media to claim a debt default wouldn’t be that bad. We could “prioritize” the government’s debts, making sure bondholders got paid first while everyone else waited in line. When the credit-rating agency Moody’s predicted that prioritization would happen, Toomey’s official Twitter account enthused, “Moody’s agrees with me.” Famous last words, at least for anyone who once owned stock in Enron or Lehman Brothers. Mostly, though, Rothfus and Toomey have simply laid low. Unlike charismatic figures such as Ted Cruz or Michele Bachman, they radiate a disarming dweebishness. And it works: Even when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published a blistering Oct. 18 editorial blasting the “political vandals of the right,” it didn’t call out Toomey or Rothfus by name. But the lesson of this shutdown is: Don’t be fooled. When you elect politicians who have contempt for government, you end up with government that has contempt for you.

MAYBE THE SHUTDOWN WASN’T A MEANS TO AN END, SO MUCH AS AN END IN ITSELF

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+

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

A 61-year-old Texas man admitted to a hospital not long ago appearing to be falling-down-drunk, even though denying having had even a single drink, was discovered to be unintentionally manufacturing beer in his stomach. With “auto-brewery syndrome,” stomach-based yeast automatically ferments all starches (even vegetables or grains) passing through, converting them into ethanol. Normally, natural stomach bacteria control the yeast, but if, for example, antibiotics had inadvertently eliminated the bacteria, the yeast would prevail. The case was reported in a recent International Journal of Clinical Medicine.

+

While Congress struggled recently to pass a budget or an increase to the national debt limit, one program made it through rather easily, according to a September New York Times report: farm subsidies for inactive “farmers.” The subsidies were renewed, based on a 2008 law, virtually assuring that more than 18,000 in-name-only farmers (who received $24 million last year) will not be cut off. Included, according to a 2012 Government Accountability Office report, were recipients at 2,300 “farms” that had not grown a single crop in five years (including 622 without a crop in 10 years).

+

The security contractor USIS, which does $2.45 billion worth of background checks for the National Security Agency and other departments (and had cleared file-leaker Edward Snowden and the Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis), gets paid only for completed files. However, full background checks often

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

require months of work, and at some point, reported The New York Times in September, when USIS needed cash, it would “flush” stillopen files, treating them as completed, and submit them for payment — as happened with the files of Snowden and Alexis. In both cases, reported the Times, subsequent, crucial information failed to make it into the flushed files.

+

Names in the News: (1) In separate incidents of suspected thefts in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in January (all within about a month), police arrested John Lennon Ribeiro Siqueira, John Lennon Fonseca Ferreira and John Lennon Camargos Gomes. (2) Convicted for drug possession in May in Rockland County, N.Y.: Mr. Genghis Khan, 23. (3) Charged with carjacking in July in Hilo, Hawaii: Mr. Alkapone Cruz-Bailes, 19. (4) Mr. Beezow Doo-doo Zoppitybop-bop-bop was arrested in August on drug charges in Washington County, Iowa.

+

The missing element in obtuse doctoral dissertations in science is that they cannot be danced to, according to writer John Bohannon and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which has established an annual “Dance Your Ph.D” video competition, and this year’s finalists were being selected at press time. Sarah Wilk was an entrant, featured in a Wall Street Journal report using glowing green balls and a flaming Hula-Hoop to help illustrate her “Odd-Z Transactinide Compound Nucleus Reactions Including Discovery of 260-Bh.” So was Peter Liddicoat, using a chorus line of a juggler, a ballerina and others for “Evolution of

Nanostructural Architecture in 7000 Series Aluminum Alloys During Strengthening by AgeHardening and Severe Plastic Deformation.”

+

Steven Cohen, eager to make a point that his country of residence, France, is more oppressive to artists than his native South Africa, staged a one-man demonstration at the Eiffel Tower in September. Wearing a bird outfit, tights and a garter, he had for some reason tethered a live chicken to his exposed penis with a long ribbon. After Cohen was arrested for indecent exposure, his lawyer complained that her client had been kept in custody too long for such a minor charge. “France,” she exclaimed, “is throwing artists in prison.”

+

Use What You Have: (1) Abbott Griffin, 57, was arrested in Toledo, Ohio, in August and charged with robbing a Circle K convenience store, during which he had allegedly grabbed the clerk and bashed him repeatedly with a Bible. (2) One resident of a shelter in Seattle was charged in August with assaulting another in a dispute over TV-set volume, using a tub of butter-substitute. (3) Ms. Honesty Keener, 37, was convicted in Gloucester County, N.J., in August of a 2011 break-in during which she demanded money from the female resident under threat of rubbing her open sores over the resident’s skin.

+

New Kinds of Field Sobriety Tests: In October, with her two children waiting in the car at a Holyoke, Mass., Shell gas station, Brenda Diaz, 26, allegedly attacked the store’s Slushie machine, naked (before police arrived to taser, pepper-spray and arrest her).

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Surely, most shoplifting occurs because the thieves wish merely to obtain goods without paying. Occasionally, as with the arrest of Christopher Wiener, 26, in Fargo, N.D., in July, an alternative theory suggests itself and raises the question: Would it be more embarrassing to be seen actually purchasing an artificial vagina (from the Romantix adult bookstore) than to be arrested for shoplifting it?

+

“We Treat Them Like Family”: (1) Deborah Cipriani, 55, of North Ridgefield, Ohio, runs from her home America’s only rescue center for skunks, and naturally, she told London’s Daily Mail in October, some of her companions like to sleep with her in bed (which is reportedly fine with partner Kevin). (2) Diane Westcott and her husband (also named Kevin), of Layton, Utah, have four cats and a dog, but since 2003 also at least one goose, who of course also sleeps with her. “Gladys” wears diapers because, as Diane explained (with understatement), it is “not possible” to potty train a goose.

+

Undignified Deaths: (1) A 68-year-old hiker with a broken ankle was killed in Mansfield, Australia, in August following his “successful” lift from the bush by an Ambulance Victoria helicopter. Moments after he was raised, airborne, about 30 yards off the ground, he fell to his death. (2) A 52-yearold man was killed in an explosion in Rowan County, Ky., in July when he lit a cigarette while hooked up to an oxygen supply. The man had already survived three explosions under the same circumstances.

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ON

A FLOURISH OF GARLICKY OLIVE OIL UNITED THE WHOLE SEAFOOD-PIZZA ENSEMBLE

JAVA OF THE STARS {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} Celestial navigation has existed for thousands of years, but it’s easy to miss Constellation, a new Lawrenceville coffee and espresso shop on Penn Avenue. But owner Amy Weiland is busy making the shop more visible (a new logo on the front window and outdoor seating), and she’s hoping to build an atmosphere that will reflect “a place to navigate the neighborhood by.” Weiland, 26, is taking over the location and much of the equipment from Cats and Dogs Coffeehouse, but she’s banking on a philosophy that treats coffee like craft beer, an experience that can enlighten the palate — and the brain. Weiland explains my espresso: It’s a single-origin seasonal Ethiopian Wazzalla ($2.60) with a fruity initial flavor that transitions into something more complex and earthy. For more info, there are laminated handouts — for instance, “Mexico Santa Teresa” is a bean with “butter croissant + cherry aromatics” and a “delicate mouthfeel.” The aesthetic is part coffeeshop, part mom-and-pop diner. A newly installed bar will soon offer pies by Louis Butler, and the menu board was purchased from a Florida snack bar. And even though the shop will satisfy the caffeinated elite (she’ll soon be serving drinks made from beans aged in cabernet sauvignon barrels), Weiland doesn’t want to alienate. You can still buy a regular latte ($3.50-4) or hot cocoa ($3), though she isn’t interested in “building drinks with lots of sugar additives.” Here, the bean matters. AZIMMERMAN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

4059 Penn Ave., Lawrenceville

the

FEED Register now for the

CANNING SWAP

, sponsored by Slow Food Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Canning ng Exchange. Trade your jam for or beets. Submit your pickles ckles to the pickle contest, test, or be a pickle judge.. To be held Sun., Nov. 3, at the new Pittsburgh Public Market (2401 Penn n Ave., Strip District).. $5 to swap, submit or judge. udge. More info at www. canningexchange.org. e.org.

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ITALIAN

STYLE

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HERE’S SOMETHING about red-sauce Italian. You’d think its fate would have been sealed a generation ago, when Northern Italian restaurants began to creep out of Little Italys and into malls and Main Streets. With their dark, sophisticated sauces and starched white linen, these restaurants raised the bar for Italian cuisine by teaching Americans that the old macaroniand-meat-sauce combos, so simple they could be sold in a can, were but a faint echo of real Italian cooking. And if that wasn’t the end of the redsauce restaurant, then surely the rise of regional Italian cooking in the 1990s, when risotto and crespelle joined the lexicon, would drive a stake in its heart. In the 21st century, restaurateurs have even developed a rebuttal to the pizzeria: the wood- or coal-fired oven serving Neapolitan-grade pies in casually classy BYO bistros. How could the old style of Italian-American dining persevere? And yet here we are. Many Italian restaurants are now in their third generation of serving lasagna and spaghetti and meatballs to ever-appreciative diners, and new

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

Aged Delmonico steak and asparagus

places are always opening to rehearse the old recipes. For all of Italian cooking’s subtlety and sophistication, it turns out there’s something deeply appealing about what Italian-Americans cobbled together in the middle of the last century.

MATTEO’S

3615 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7722 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, sandwiches and salads $9-15; pizzas and pastas $13-26 LIQUOR: Full bar

Matteo’s, on Butler Street, doesn’t play the retro card. There are no raffia-covered chianti bottles in sight, no red-checked tablecloths, no plastic grapevines or oil paintings of Venetian canals. The vibe is thoroughly modern and chic, but the menu is firmly grounded in the old school of ItalianAmerican cooking, even if the preparations are contemporary. Perhaps nothing captured this as well as the bread course. The small braided loaf

— just the right size for a family of four — evoked American Italian bread with its firm crust and airy interior. But while “Italian bread” as we know it is nearly flavorless, Matteo’s had a crust that was browned to a toasty caramel, while the interior uncoiled stretchily and tasted slightly, addictively rich. Seafood pizza was similarly upgraded to a thin and chewy flatbread topped with stringy cheese and a shellfish trio of crabmeat, shrimp and scallops. This is a typical seafood-pizza combo which has frequently disappointed us in the past, but not at Matteo’s, where the shrimp and scallops were plump, the crab tender and just warmed, and a flourish of garlicky olive oil united the whole ensemble. These satisfying beginnings were the highlights of our meal. Mussels with bacon and blue cheese were a welcome departure from the usual white-wine broth, which can be soupy. In this preparation, there was little watery broth hiding the main attractions, but also not enough bacon or blue cheese to bring these interesting flavors to the fore.


Lamb ragu over pasta (we chose campanelli) was underseasoned, except for an over-abundance of rosemary, and too far to the sweet end of the tomato-sauce spectrum. Any one of these flaws would have been acceptable, given the countering virtues of tender ground lamb, wellproportioned tomato and just-right al dente noodles, but the trifecta threw the flavor of the sauce too far off balance. The failure of veal marsala was harder to explain. This is typically served as an entrée with pasta marinara on the side, so we were a bit surprised to see several semimedallions of veal served in a brown broth over noodles. Along with mushrooms, the veal swam in this soupy sauce that was velvety in texture, but utterly lacking marsala’s distinctive tang or the savory pan drippings that are supposed to form the basis of the dish.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SUNDAY BEST Local restaurant pros take Sunday-morning wine-drinking seriously

Pumpkin tortellini promised a seasonal treat in sage browned butter, but the squash’s sweetness predominated, and there was so much melted fat pooled at the bottom of the dish as to be unappetizing. We did note that the tortellini appeared to have been briefly sautéed in a pan before being sauced, faintly crisping their outsides as an armor against the butter bath. Matteo’s basic concept of traditional Italian-American fare, subtly updated, seems a good match for Lawrenceville, a neighborhood poised to broaden its appeal. In addition, Matteo’s atmosphere, service, and, we must say, its cocktail menu are superb. But somewhere the attempt to translate the less-ambitious cooking of a previous generation for the sophisticated palates of this one seems to have gone awry, with neither the homey comforts of the old nor the refined approach of the new triumphing.

A multi-glass drinking session that begins 11 a.m. on a Sunday usually marks the beginning of some kind of debaucheryfilled “Funday.” But for a select group of restaurant professionals, Sunday-morning drinking can be serious business. That business involves tasting, evaluating and identifying at least six wines — all tasted blind. “I’ve been hosting these every Sunday for nearly eight years,” says John Wabeck, Spoon’s beverage director. Wabeck started the tastings while he lived in Washington, D.C.; he brought the concept with him when he moved to Pittsburgh last year. The tastings are designed to enhance the city’s wine knowledge, and to prepare sommeliers to advance further in the rigorous Court of Master Sommeliers examinations. In a town that’s not well known for its wine culture, this is a very good thing. The group averages six to eight participants. On the morning I visited, there were people from Spoon, Legume, Dish, Allegheny Wine Mixer and Rolling Rock Club. After some playful banter, the mood quickly becomes serious. “There are a lot of people that want this to be an art,” but it’s actually more like a science, Wabeck says as he instructs the less-experienced members how to define a wine. He then reminds the more experienced participants what to look for. Each wine can be broken down into its component parts: sight, nose and palate. First, three white wines are analyzed, followed by three reds. Group members look, sniff, taste and (sometimes) spit. There’s an elaborate “tasting grid” to fill in, and Wabeck encourages everyone not to leave any blanks. Despite the catchy beat of a rocksteady soundtrack, the atmosphere is academic, focused, even a little intimidating. At the end of each round, someone volunteers to share his or her analysis of a wine. Accuracy is important, but learning from one’s mistakes — and from Wabeck and the rest of the group — is the real goal. Or as Spoon’s Heather Perkins puts it, “Mornings like this help us provide better service to our customers.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Bartender Deshelle Taylor

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Authentic Thai Cuisine

Thank you to the Readers of City Paper for voting for us!

BYOB TUES.-THURS. 11am - 10pm FRI.-SAT. 11am - 11pm SUN.-MON. - closed

VOTED BESTGHTMAGHAAZIINE

PITTSBUR r several 2011, fo ing years runn

ß

3801 Butler St • Lawenceville

412-622-0111 www.piccolo-forno.com Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

THAI CLASSICAL DANCE EVERY SUN AND THUR EVENING

LUNCH SPECIALS

5846 Forbes Ave., 2nd Floor • SQUIRREL HILL • 412.521.0728

www.BANGKOKBALCONYPGH .com Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10pm

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30AM-3:00PM

Friday-Saturday 11:30am-11pm


STILL MAD AFTER 20 YEARS! madmex.com

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Little

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

DINING LISTINGS KEY

Authentic Thai Cuisine

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

GRAZIE! To Pittsburgh City Paper Readers.

All Lunches

We love you, too!

7 - $9

$

freshest

THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING D

733 Copeland Street, Shadyside

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

412-682-2130 girasolepgh.com

----- HAPPY HOUR -----

HALF OFF DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm -----------------------------------------900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF BELLA FRUTTETO. 2602 Brandt School Road, Wexford. 724-940-7777. Adjacent orchards are one of the attractions at this comfortable, clubby suburban restaurant. The Italian-inspired menu features the fruits of these orchards in several applebased dishes, including apple ravioli and apple bruschetta. Bella Frutteto combines an innovative but unfussy menu with friendly service and congenial seating. KE BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE

A Unique Luncheon & Gourmet Food Destination We Support Local!

Now open for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner!

Yes...That Bob’s Sub!

Monday 8am-3pm Tuesday-Friday 8am-8pm Don’t forget Saturday Brunch 9am-3pm

D COME EAT A LEGEN AT ONE OF OUR 3 NEW LOCATIONS!

Dine-In or Take-Out

PITTSBURGH

INDIANA

NEW KENSINGTON

215 SMITHFIELD ST. (412) 594-3686

550 PHILADELPHIA ST. (724) 471-2127

87 TARENTUM BRIDGE RD. (724) 335-0900

WWW.BOBSSUB.COM 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

We also cater office parties! Let us do the work... Call us 24 hours in advance@

412-415-0338

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

The Porch {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} BRGR. 5997 Penn Circle South, East Liberty (412-362-2333) and 20111 Rt. 19, Cranberry Township (724-742-2333). This casual restaurant celebrates — and in many cases, imaginatively re-creates — America’s signature contribution to global cuisine. BRGR keeps its patties to a reasonable size, which allows for a variety of gourmet toppings — plus room for excellent fried sides (French fries, onion

Casa Rasta {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} rings, pickles), or milkshakes (traditional or spiked). JE CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soulfood restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chickenand-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF

staples — and the more unusual. There’s a strong emphasis on fresh pasta and inventively prepared seafood, such as crusted Chilean sea bass in an orange buerre blanc and berry marmalade. LE

IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated CASA RASTA. classics, like pan-seared 2056 Broadway flounder with fresh Ave., Beechview. tomato and asparagus. 412-918-9683. This Others are everwww. per pa casual storefront popular workhorses pghcitym .co taqueria combines like the BLT and fish the tropical, sometimes tacos, or reinventions spicy flavors of Caribbean such as a Thai empanada and Mexican cuisines in tacos, or Pittsburgh’s own “city burritos and tortas. Thus, chicken”(skewered pork). KE jerk chicken might be a wing appetizer, or taco filling. Also JUNIPER GRILL. 4000 broaching both cultures: fruit Washington Road, McMurray. salsa and citrus-marinated 724-260-7999. This sister fried pork. JF restaurant to Atria’s chain cultivates an ambience of DIAMOND MARKET. 430 artfully casual insouciance. The Market St., Downtown. 412preparations — many with 325-2000. The tavern-like Mexican or Asian influences — décor provides a comfortable, are appealingly straightforward, unpretentious setting for neither plain nor fussy: Pork socializing, and the menu loin with bourbon glaze; spicy bridges retro and au courant in a flatbread loaded with shrimp, now-familiar way, with grownup roasted red and poblano comfort food and big burgers peppers, pineapple and cheese; on brioche buns with fancy and skirt steak drizzled in a toppings. Try the excellent maccreamy chipotle sauce. LE and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donutPALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. sized onion rings drizzled with 1445 Washington Road, North balsamic vinegar. KE Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a JOSEPH TAMBELLINI charming setting for fine dining. RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant The menu is primarily Italian, St., Highland Park. 412-665-9000. with traditional but thoughtfully The menu at this convivial considered dishes. The hearty, white-linen Italian restaurant but refined, farfalle rustica pairs straddles the ultra-familiar — wild-boar sausage with wild the five choices in the chicken mushrooms and a sherry sage and veal section are trattoria cream sauce, while housemade

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 30


25 Years Of Delicious Memories

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

3rd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Delivery Hours 11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

Toast! Tasting Tuesdays 4 course chef’s menu $30 4 course vegetarian $25 optional wine pairing $15

Thank You for Voting

Toast!

Wednesdays all bottles of wine are 1/2 price

Thursday Burger Night! Burger, Beer & Bourbon $12

Kitchen & Wine Bar

Friday Night Happy Hour

one of the Best Wine Selections in Pittsburgh!

9:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. 1/2 off snacks, appetizers & beer $5.00 wine features, special flights, cocktails & more

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Thank You For Voting Us Best Bakery!

Artisan Pizza & Craft Beers on Draft! 60 wines by the glass

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www.toastpgh.com • 412-224-2579

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

offMenu

crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

Italian, Steak and Seafood

Thank You for voting Matteo’s

Best New Restaurant and Chef Matt Cavanaugh one of the Best Chefs in the city

3615 Butler St., Lawrenceville, PA 412-586-7722

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

FALLING INTO PLACE With help from Salt, Garfield Community Farm celebrates the harvest IF AUTUMN hayrides and cider call to you, then there’s

SMILING BANANA LEAF. 5901 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-362-3200. At this absolute jewel-box of a restaurant, the menu emphasizes authentic Thai dishes rather than Thai-inflected Chinese food. Grilled meat appetizers are beautifully seasoned, and the pad Thai offers a lively balance of ingredients. The assertively spicy pumpkin curry features a special variety of Thai gourd. JF SPADAFORA’S. 3932 Route 8, Allison Park. 412-486-1800. Though little more than an unassuming concrete-block box on the outside, inside this is a warm, welcoming family-run trattoria offering Southern Italian specialties as well as Italian-American fare. Quality ingredients, thoughtful preparation and friendly service make this restaurant stand out. KE STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-3695380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ VIETNAM’S PHO. 1627 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-2818881. The menu features a manageable selection of noodle and rice dishes and the eponymous pho soups. There’s also a tempting assortment of simple vegetable dishes and appetizers that go beyond mere spring rolls, such as whole quail with lemon leaves and herbs, and ground-shrimp patties on sugar-cane skewers. JF YAMA SUSHI. 515 Adams Shoppes, Rt. 228, Mars. 724591-5688. This suburban eatery offers honest, straightforward Japanese cooking without hibachi theatrics or other culinary influences. Besides the wide sushi selection and tempura offerings, try squid salad or entrees incorporating udon, Japan’s buckwheat noodles. KF

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GARFIELD COMMUNITY FARM}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE

good news: This Sunday, Oct. 27, Salt of the Earth is turning its parking lot into an all-out harvest festival. A $40 entrance fee admits adults (kids get in free) into the Fall Festival, which runs from 1 to 6 p.m., and features such beloved traditions as bobbing for apples and a pie-eating contest (with rumored celebrity judges). Organizers are forgoing the opulence of last year’s event — which featured an 11-course dinner — in favor of old-fashioned fun. There will be a cider press, now en route from Ohio’s Lamppost Farm, upon which guests can try their hands pressing juice. Proceeds benefit the Garfield Community Farm (GCF), the nearly three-acre urban lot that provides Salt with everything from heirloom tomatoes to jostaberries. Salt’s relationship with GCF is “mutually beneficial,” says Julia Baker, the staff farmer. “Salt’s fully invested in the success of the farm, and in return we always bring them the best of the best.” GCF’s faith-based mission involves organic gardening “in the places that have been neglected and abandoned,” she adds. The farm’s director, John Creasy, serves as the associate pastor for The Open Door. While providing produce and education to Garfield’s residents, GCF hopes to raise money that will help fund a permanent pavilion, enabling food-based youth camps and other more community programming. Sunday should appeal to a cross-section of Pittsburghers, from foodies to families to pork fanatics. That’s right: Salt is building a pit within which chef Kevin Sousa will roast a whole pig. (Don’t worry: There’ll be something for vegetarians, too.) If the pig roast, cider press and East End brews don’t whet your appetite, the chef demos may. In one, Salt’s chefs will prepare dishes with farm-to-table produce gathered by guests touring GCF. Transport will be provided by a bus-turned-hayride, naturally. “The spirit … is to celebrate the fall harvest and the ways that the community has learned to provide for itself,” says Jessa Darwin, Open Door’s administrator. “It’s [about] how far the farm has come … and the direction that it’s going in the neighborhood and the city.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


La Gourmandine

Thank you

BAKERY AND PASTRY SHOP

for voting us the BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT!

4605 BUTLER ST. I PITTSBURGH I 412-682-2210 W W W .L A G O U R M A N D I N E B A K E RY . C O M

THANK YOU FOR VOTING FOR US! BEST DESSERTS: FIRST PLACE

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From the French Dream Team who brought you Paris 66...

Thai Me Up You’re bound to like it

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Thai restaurants in Pittsburgh!

A gift of love SQUIRREL HILL • 5837 FORBES AVENUE • 412-682-1966

Dine In • Take Out Catering • Party Trays

www.gabyetjules.com

Par eets Whereenn Cisirmcle South P

Hours: Monday - Friday 11:00am. – 9:30 pm Saturday Noon – 9:30 pm 412-488-8893 or 412-488-7170 118 S. 23 St. Pittsburgh, PA 15203 www.thaimeuppittsburgh.com

LIVE JAZZ & BLUES MUSIC EVERY WEEKEND

Jazz Jam Every Tuesday Swing Dance Every Friday 8pm-12am 150+ Craft Beers “Jazzed” Up Comfort Food Open Daily at 11am • Happy Hour 5-7pm Private Space Available For Your Next Event www.jamesstreetgastropub.com FOLLOW US ON

LIKE US ON

422 FORELAND STREET, NORTH SIDE 412-904-3335 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

1120 East Carson St. South Side Sangria & Cerveza

Happy Hour Daily • 4 to 6 www.yoritasouthside.com

Best French Restaurant 2011 - 2013

- Pittsburgh Magazine and Pittsburgh City Paper 6018 PENN CIRCLE SOUTH –SHADYSIDE www.paris66bistro.com 412-404-8166

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN RESTAURANT

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us Best Indian Restaurant in Pittsburgh

Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine 7795 McKnight Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com


Award Winning Thai Cuisine

We at Nicky’s Thai Kitchen want to

THANK Y U!

For voting us best Thai Restaurant 2011, 2012 and now 2013 Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisine to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out. Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day.

——— NORTHSIDE ———

——— DOWNTOWN ———

856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B.

903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424)

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LOCAL

“SCHOOLS TODAY ARE FOCUSING MORE ON MENTORSHIP AND I SEE A SHIFT HAPPENING.”

BEAT

{BY RICK MOSLEN}

BEST OF THE FEST

THE KEYS TO

LEARNING Edhochuli is among the Pittsburgh bands headed to The Fest.

The most significant Pittsburgh punk-rock event of the season may actually take place thousands of miles away. On Oct. 31, over 10,000 punk, hardcore, and indie-rock fans will invade Gainesville, Fla., for a four-day music festival named The Fest. In its 12th year, the event differs radically from typical overcrowded, sun-baked outdoor music shindigs. “The Fest takes some of the best punk bands from around the country and crams them into bars, coffee shops and small clubs — the types of venues they are used to playing,” says Dan Rock, of Pittsburgh band World’s Scariest Police Chases, which is anticipating the release of a new LP, NOFX … and out come the wolves dookie, on AF Records next month. A plethora of local talent decorates this year’s Fest lineup, with bands like WSPC, Adventures, Code Orange Kids, Edhochuli, Run Forever and White Wives. (A handful of Pittsburgh comedians also join this year’s Fest-ivities.) Despite high-profile band reunions, cheap beer, documentary screenings and circle pits, not to mention more than 300 billed bands, it’s the sense of camaraderie between Fest-goers that lures fans back each year to the (normally) peaceful town. “It’s great to walk around Gainesville and run into people that you haven’t seen in weeks, or months, or years,” says David Rath, guitarist and vocalist for Edhochuli. “The best part about The Fest is the opportunity to see a bunch of goofy friends from all over the world all in one place.” For the above bands, this event just means one stop on their regular out-oftown ventures. “We are indeed touring to the Fest,” says Rath, whose band’s self-titled album hit local record stores in August. ”Our plan is to get [our new album] onto as many turntables and cassette decks as we possibly can.” With most of these Pittsburghers playing their second or third Fest (and with Code Orange Kids also joining this autumn’s Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin), the local punk scene shows no signs of dwindling outside city limits. “There are a ton of amazing bands coming out of our city right now,” says Rock, “and watching bands like Run Forever and Edhochuli kill it [on stage] thousands of miles from home makes you really proud to be from Pittsburgh.”

G

ERI ALLEN IS pretty busy these days. In the midst of a tour with ACS — a trio with drummer Terri Lynn Carrington and bassist Esperanza Spaulding — the pianist is preparing for a move that brings her back to Pittsburgh, the city where she earned her master’s degree in ethnomusicology in 1982. Come January, she assumes the position of director of jazz studies at the University of Pittsburgh, succeeding her mentor, Dr. Nathan Davis, who retired last summer. But before that happens, Allen will host one of Davis’ most enduring legacies: the 43rd Annual Pitt Jazz Seminar and Concert. The weeklong event features free presentations by participating musicians, culminating in a concert on Sat., Nov. 2, featuring 12 musical guests. Throughout its history, the seminar has drawn legendary musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie, Elvin Jones, Art Blakey and Kenny Clarke (the latter two Pittsburgh natives) to perform and lecture in close quarters with fans and students of the music. With Davis retiring, Allen says it was important for the event to continue

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF DEAN C. JONES}

{BY MIKE SHANLEY}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

Jazz scholar: Dr. Geri Allen

without a gap. She also stresses that this year’s seminar pays tribute to the man who set the standard for it in 1970. Allen was already on a fast track toward a jazz career before she came to Pitt in 1979. Growing up in Detroit, she immersed herself in the city’s fertile jazz scene, playing with people like trumpeter Marcus Belgrave, one of this year’s seminar guests. Upon leaving

43RD ANNUAL PITT JAZZ SEMINAR CONCERT FEATURING

GERI ALLEN

8 p.m. Sat., Nov. 2. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-25. 412-624-4187 or www.music.pitt.edu/jazz-sem

Pittsburgh, she was part of the adventurous M-BASE group in New York, and went on to lead her own groups and play with legends like saxophonist Ornette Coleman, who hadn’t played with a pianist in nearly 40 years. Allen’s latest album, Grand River Crossings: Motown & Motor City Inspirations, puts a modern spin on classic songs

that came out of her hometown. College-level jazz programs were still a relatively new concept in 1979. “I feel I was [coming to Pitt] at the tail end of an era when musicians still learned in the traditional way — from their mentors,” Allen explained in an email. “The schools today are focusing more on mentorship and I see a shift happening in that regard. Nathan Davis is my mentor, and he has supported my academic and performance career as a teaching assistant here at Pitt, and throughout my journey as a professional musician/scholar.” The seminar and concert are highly regarded because of their “marriage of the performance and academic aspects of the art form,” she says. “Dr. Davis created an innovative prototype for jazz in the academy, which connects university and grassroots community together in a spirit of meaningful exchange.” This year’s concert features: trumpeters Belgrave and Randy Brecker; tap percussionist Brinae Ali; tenor saxophonists Ravi Coltrane and Ernie Watts; trombonist


Vincent Chandler; bassist Kenny Davis; vocalist Carmen Lundy; guitarist Russell Malone; and drummers Kassa Overall and Jeff “Tain” Watts. Along with the individual seminars that several musicians will host prior to the concert, some will also lecture at Pittsburgh CAPA High School, Falk Laboratory School and the Hill House Association Senior Service Center. Jana Herzen, of the Motéma Music record label, will also host a free lecture titled “Navigating the Changing Tides of the Business.” Allen, who just completed 10 years on the jazz and contemporary improvisation faculty at University of Michigan’s School of Music Theatre and Dance, feels comfortable stepping in to host the event. “Nathan has been so respected, and he’s created such an important legacy that [with] my coming in, I’ve been very supported [by the seminar committee],” she says. “Everyone wants to see the seminar do well.” While the concert will follow the traditional format of ensemble performances with break-out sections for different subgroups, there are a few additions this year. Most significantly is the addition of dancer Ali (who acts as an additional percussionist) and vocalist Lundy. The use of two drummers is a bold move, especially with a force of nature like

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

Pittsburgh native Watts, and with Overall, whose experience includes time with Allen and in freer settings as well. But having both is another extension of the way her predecessor would program the show. “Nathan, as a horn player, would always share the bandstand with other horn players,” she says. “And I’m a rhythm section player and I thought, ‘OK, let me look at having more than one drummer.’” Allen’s career has been similar to the best jazz, in that it has made new strides while hewing close to its history. Prior to her album saluting Detroit, for example, she recorded the solo album Flying Toward the Sound. On it, she paid homage to pianists Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner and Cecil Taylor, all of whom have vastly different approaches to their instrument. Rather than play their compositions, Allen composed a suite that uses their ideas as a launch pad, thereby taking the idea further. Likewise, the array of musicians coming to Pitt this month will likely create something new by building on the legacy. Yet as she talks about the event, Allen continually returns to the subject of Davis. “His generosity has benefited many artist/scholars and he has made a profound impact on the perception of jazz as it exists today in the academy,” she says. “We owe a great deal to him.” I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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ON THE RECORD with Randy Weston {BY MIKE SHANLEY}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROL FRIEDMAN}

Randy Weston

Randy Weston grew up in Brooklyn, with friends like Thelonious Monk inspiring him to play piano. He has traveled throughout the world, incorporating numerous influences into his playing. He comes to the New Hazlett Theater with his African Rhythms Quartet on Sat., Oct. 26. YOU CALL YOURSELF A STORYTELLER, RATHER THAN A MUSICIAN. WHY? My wonderful travels in the world [are] because of music. Music is the star, not Randy Weston. It’s taken me from Bed-Stuy growing up, to the black church, the blues, and all over Asia and Africa. So I tell stories about my experiences, about AfricanAmerican culture, African culture and the spirituality in music itself. Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington: They were not only great musicians. They told the story of African-American life. CAN YOU CALL YOUR MUSIC JAZZ? Jazz doesn’t really give the full story. What we call jazz is African Americans’ contribution to the United States. So if you look at it that way, it gives you a deeper understanding, also the genius and the spirituality of all these people. In Africa, people make music out of anything. For them, music is the voice of the creator. HOW COME YOU DIDN’T BECOME A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN UNTIL YOUR LATE 20S? Well, you can understand why: people like Art Tatum, Earl Hines, Nat Cole and Duke! All those people [were] around. So to call yourself a pianist, you gotta be careful! That was royalty. All those people who played this music and did it a different way — on the same instrument! INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RANDY WESTON’S AFRICAN RHYTHMS QUINTET. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $30. 888-718-4253 or www.kentearts.org

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FINDING THEIR VOICE

BUY TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

{BY MARGARET WELSH}

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

IF THE SIGHT of dozens of zombies meandering toward Arsenal Park a couple of weekends ago wasn’t enough to draw the attention of neighbors, the sound of Supervoid booming across Lawrenceville was. The event was Zombie Fest, and Supervoid was first in a day-long musical lineup; just a few early arrivers drew close to the band, bobbing their fake-blood-covered faces to the beat. But Supervoid sounded huge and heavy, and frontman Brian Urban’s vocals could have filled a packed arena. “It’s the first time we’ve played outside,” bassist John Braymer says. Perhaps they should make a habit of it. The original vision for Supervoid — which then, in 2012, included Braymer, guitarists Joe Madia and Dave Warren, and drummer Greg Kemper — was something stoner-ish and fuzzy, along the lines of Fu Manchu or Kyuss. The problem was: They couldn’t find a singer. After trying out three or four people, Braymer explains, “We started to think, ‘Maybe vocals just don’t sound good in this practice space.’” Then Urban showed up. Formerly the singer for Dungeons and Dragonsthemed death-metal band Dethlehem (which Warren was also a member of), Urban adds a twist to the Supervoid’s proggy anthems, slick desert rockers and sludgy blues jams. “We thought about doing clean vocals,” Braymer says, “but Brian had just spent five years in a deathmetal band.”

Into the … well, you know: Supervoid

members. “Brian is the only singer I’ve worked with who is actually a musician,” Braymer says. “He helps with songwriting; he’ll sing out a riff suggestion. Everyone else [I’ve worked with] just got drunk.” When it came to recording Supervoid’s first full-length, Filaments — which the band will release Saturday — finding like-minded producers was a challenge. “I’m not saying we’re super-original,” Braymer says, “but no one in Pittsburgh really sounds like us. We looked at different studios, but we didn’t want to be someone’s recording guinea pig. We wanted someone who would know where we were coming from.” They ended up with three local musicians: Chris Ruane, of Fist Fight in the Parking Lot, recorded drums; John Dziuban, of Sistered, did the mixing and the rest of the recording; and Hero Destroyed’s Zach Moore did the mastering. The clean, radio-friendly production — which brings to mind recent records by bands like Baroness and Kylesa — manages to (mostly) capture Supervoid’s volume without becoming muddied. Drawing songwriting inspiration from B-movies, video games, current events and especially, Urban says, the Wachowskis’ film adaptation of Cloud Atlas, the record is full of epics with titles like “Rodeo Queens of Allegheny County” and “Braymerian: War Elephant.” It feels like a concept album, but what that concept is, exactly, isn’t totally clear, perhaps even to the band. “You couldn’t make a movie out of it,” Braymer admits. But, he says, “We’re all nerds. We’re just trying to tell an interesting story.”

“BRIAN IS THE ONLY SINGER I’VE WORKED WITH WHO IS ACTUALLY A MUSICIAN.”

WITH ORANGE GOBLIN, HOLY GRAIL, LAZER/WOLF 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16-20. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

That death growl, Urban adds with a smile, “is hard to get rid of.” However, Urban’s vocal style could hardly be called limited; he shifts easily from throat-shredding to clean and airy and a Chris Cornell-style grungy soulfulness. While such a range is not unheard of, most bands with such vocal variation — like Mastodon, one of Supervoid’s most obvious influences — split vocal duty among

GREAT PRIZES FOR BEST DRESSED COSTUMES! Tickets won’t last, order now at jergels.com/tickets

Wed 10.23 IGNITERS// no cover // 8:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fri 10.25 THE TUBES // 9:00 start time, doors @ 6:00 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sat 10.26 HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY W/TOTALLY 80’S --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sun 10.27 PUP PATIO HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARADE @ 1:00 PGH VS. OAKLAND --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mon 10.28 BALCONY BIG BAND // no cover // 8:00 start time

THIS WEEK

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MWELS H @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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CRITICS’ PICKS

DJ Soy Sos

What better way to start your Halloween festivities than with a tribute to Michael Jackson’s iconic album Thriller? Head over to Mr. Small’s tonight for Thriller: A Tribute Show to catch The Ruckus Bros. — a 21-member supergroup of Pittsburgh musicians — covering the entire album. The group is composed of performers from tons of local bands, including Gypsy and his Band of Ghosts, Cait Cuneo, Jazzam, Wreckloose, Velvet Heat, Steel Town Soul, Gene the Werewolf, Tracksploitation and more. The show will feature a full dance crew, animation and light show, and prizes. Allison Cosby 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $15. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[HIP HOP] + FRI., OCT. 25 Years ago, DJ Soy Sos was best known as a member of the lock funk-rock band Soma Mestizo, but all along, he’s been an in-demand hip-hop producer. The artist — real name: Herman Pearl — has worked with myriad local MCs, and tonight at 720 Music, Clothing and Café, he celebrates the release of Encryption Cipher Pt. 1, a collection ollection of tracks he produced with rappers from om Beedie to Yah Lioness. Tonight’s show features live performances from artists including Jon Quest, t Hubbss and Shad Ali, and the public debut of the album. It’s all presented by Tuff Sound Recording and Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers. esizers. Andy Mulkerin n 8 p.m. 4405 Butler tler St., Lawrenceville. Free. All ages. 412-904-4592 592 or www.720records.com ds.com

[ELECTRONIC] C] + SAT., OCT. 26 6 British electronicc duo Mount Kimbie returned this year with itss first full-length since e 2010’s debut Crooks and nd Lovers. The new w Cold Spring Fault Lesss Youth sprawls across musical idioms, with discocolike dance trackss up against ambientt compositions and R&B &B

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tunes. Tonight, the band headlines Carnegie Mellon’s annual Halloween party, with Gusto and Naeem of the local electronic collective Detour opening. AM 8 p.m. Rangos Ballroom, University Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. Free for CMU students; $10 for others. All ages. www.activitiesboard.org

[DOOM] + SUN., OCT. 27 There’s not much sheen on The Body: It’s two big guys with big drums and big amps making some of the biggest sounds you’ll ever experience in person. The doom outfit, from Providence, R.I., has been pushing out brutal, sludgy metal for a decade, exploring dark territory with music that’s less soundscape than aural chasm. Get grim tonight at The Shop, along with openers Wrought Iron and Resin. AM 7 p.m. 4314 Main St., Bloomfield. $6. 412-951-0622

[SOUL] + WED., OCT. 30 On the latest release from Lee Fields & The Expressions, soul singer Fields croons — with so much style it’s hard to believe he even needs to say so —“I still got it, I still got it.” The renowned soul singer has been recording and performing for 43 years and has toured with legends like Kool and the Gang and O.V. Wright. Now he plays with the Truth & Soul Records house band, The Expressions, and is defining contemporary soul music with his old-school style. Tonight, Fields and crew play Rex Theater along with local group Backstabbing Good People. AC 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-17. 412-381-6811 or www.rex theater. com

Mount Kimbie

{PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS RHODES}

[POP] + FRI., OCT. 25


JOIN US ON THURSDAY,OCT. 31ST 9-MIDNIGHT FOR THE ROGUE DEAD GUY HALLOWEEN PARTY! ROGUE DEAD GUY SPECIALS AND LOTS OF GIVEAWAYS! facebook.com/SocialAtBakerySquare gplus.to/EatSocial • twitter.com/eatsocial1 proudly presents

Be immersed in a live lase laser light show that features animated graphics and 3D atmospheric effects! Justin Bieber • Beatles • Pink Floyd • SkrillStep Laser Halloween • Laser HalloScream

SHOWS & TIMES:

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TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 24

ALTAR BAR. Nashville Pussy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Nick Turner’s Space Ritual, The Sicks, Hedersleben. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Kung Fu, Culture Thief. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. Runaway Dorothy. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Daniel Amedee & Sarah Burke, Steven Hawk, Dear Geogiana, Turner Cody. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Atlas, Household Stories, Matt Kilroy. South Side. 412-431-5282. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Man Man, Xenia Rubinos. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PALACE THEATRE. Peter Noone, Herman’s Hermits, The Marcels. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. SMILING MOOSE. Brittany Bordella, Doctor Smoke, Lies, River City Conspiracy. South Side. 412-431-4668. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

Bros. Millvale. 412-915-2919. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. The House Band. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. REX THEATER. Mason Jennings. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Such Gold, Tuesday’s Too Late, Our Family Portrait, Take A Breath (early) Skinbound, Lythem, SolarBurn, Pipewrench, Lycosa Halloween Helldown. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Umphrey’s McGee, The London Souls. North Side. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Consider the Source. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Joe Grushecky & The HouseRockers. North Side. 412-231-7777. WILLIAM PITT UNION. Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin. Oakland. 412-648-7814.

SAT 26

ALTAR BAR. John ‘Dr. Dirty’ Valby. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

MP 3 MONDAY SOUTHSIDE AMERICAN

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTI JAN HOOVER}

FRI 25

31ST STREET PUB. The Cheats, Those Who Can Not Be Named, Apocalypse Dudes. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Universal Beat Union, Ghost Estate. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. The Mike Medved Band. Harmony. 724-272-3901. CLUB CAFE. Mike Stout & the Human Union, The Hipsters (Early). Mike Stout & the Human Union album release. Olympus Mons, Glowfriends, Claire With The Turban (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONE’S. Chris Hannigan, Jeremy Caywood, John Clark. Hambone’s Halloween party. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. LOCAL. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Golden Grass, Carousel, Lost Realms. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing Queen. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Thriller: A Tribute Show w/ Touchfaster & The Ruckus Ruckus

ALTMAN’S. Tony Janflone Jr. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-6440. BROTHERS GRIMM. The GRID. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. BUCKHEAD SALOON. Walk of Shame. Station Square. 412-232-3101. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Vieux Farka Touré. Oakland. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Mount Kimbie. Rangos Ballroom. Oakland. 412-268-2000. CIP’S. Silent Partner. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Mustard Plug, Masters Of The Universe. Pittsburgh Ska Fest Day 1. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Waiting For Ray. Robinson. 412-489-5631. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Legendary Hucklebucks, Dirty Charms. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. United By Hate, Bloodtribe, Machete Facelift. Aliquippa. 724-378-7669.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from Southside American; stream

“In the Dust”

or download on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


THE R BAR. The Rockit Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. REX THEATER. Orange Goblin, Holy Grail, Lazer/Wulf, Supervoid. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Austin Drive. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROYAL PLACE. Lucky Me. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting Haybale Happy Hour feat. Molly Alphabet, Beagle Brothers, Red Western, Shelf Life String Band. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. SIEB’S PUB & RESTAURANT. Montford. Ross. 412-364-8511. SMILING MOOSE. Pvris, Living In The Aftermath, Kid Durango. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Fighting Jamesons. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TOWN TAVERN. The Dave Iglar Band. Leechburg. 724-845-2430. TRIO LOUNGE. Silkwood Shower. Washington. 724-222-5109. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Neids Hotel Band. North Side. 412-231-7777.

SUN 27

FATHER RYAN ARTS CENTER. Bridgette Perdue, Anqwenique Wingfield. McKees Rocks. 412-589-9144. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Yoshiko Ohara, Dream Weapon, Antenna, Infinity C*ntz, Spencer Luxe. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Ronnie Wiess. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. John Paul Keith. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Brett Detar, Joseph West, Gyspy & his Band of Ghosts. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MON 28

GOOSKI’S. Oozing Wound, Drug Lust. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARVEY WILNER’S. Rue Bambu. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. SMILING MOOSE. FIDLAR Fidlar, Orwells. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 29

CLUB CAFE. Poor Old Shine, Nameless In August. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Emily Rodgers, The Homeless Gospel Choir. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

WED 30

31ST STREET PUB. Independants, Torn Apart Hearts, Children of October, Under a Nightmare. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Lucius. Oakland. 412-268-2000. CLUB CAFE. Lincoln Durham, The Midnight Special. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227.

WED 30

DJS THU 24

BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 25

REX THEATER. Lee Fields & The Expressions, Backstabbing Good People. South Side. 412-381-6811.

BLUES THU 24

THE HOP HOUSE. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Downtown. 412-456-6666. SPEAKEASY. Miss Freddye’s Blues CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. JUNE BUG’S. Bobby Hawkins 412-362-1250. Back Alley Blues. Sutersville. DRUM BAR. VDJ Jack Millz. 724-872-4757. North Side. 412-231-7777. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Billy LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s the Kid & The Regulators. Alternative. DJ Downtown. 412-471-9100. Electric. South Side. OBEY HOUSE. The 412-431-5282. Rhythm Hawks Band. ONE 10 LOUNGE. Crafton. 412-922-3883. w. w w DJ Goodnight, per ghcitypa p DJ Rojo. Downtown. .com 412-874-4582. EXCUSES BAR & ROWDY BUCK. Top GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. 40 Dance. South Side. South Side. 412-431-4090. LEAF & BEAN. Bill Toms Band. 412-431-2825. Strip District. 412-434-1480. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night MONONGAHELA w/ DJ Connor. South Side. COUNTRY CLUB. Shot O’ Soul. 412-381-1330. Monongahela. MOONDOG’S. The Nighthawks w/ Billy Price. Blawnox. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. 412-828-2040. Saturday Night Meltdown. PARK HOUSE. Jimmy Adler, Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Charlie Barath Duo. North Side. Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-224-2273. 412-362-1250. SOUTH SIDE RIVERFRONT PARK. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. Olga Watkins Band. Pittsburgh 412-431-8800. Pierogi Festival. South Side. DRUM BAR. VDJ Dave Ott. TEDDY’S. Bobby Hawkins Back North Side. 412-231-7777. Alley Blues. North Huntingdon. LAVA LOUNGE. Motor City 724-863-8180. Shake. Motown & funk dance TUGBOAT’S. Tim Woods party w/ DJ Soulful Fella. & Friends. East Pittsburgh. South Side. 814-746-5060. 412-829-1992. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. 412-481-7227. Olga Watkins Band. North Fayette. 412-788-2333.

FRI 25

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 26

SAT 26

TUE 29

SUN 27

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Pandemic. Oakland. 412-622-3151. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 30

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 26

ALTAR BAR. Chance The Rapper. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

JAZZ THU 24

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MCDAIN’S. Kenny Blake. Monroeville. 412-373-3335. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 25

ANDYS. Spanky Wilson. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Ragtime Vinnie Peaches. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CLUB CAFE. Judi Figel. South Side. 412-431-4950. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Don DePaolis

Trio. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

Wed, Oct 23 • 9PM WORLD MUSIC FROM ALGERIA

TERAKAFT WITH Landmark Tongues THURS, OCT 24 • 8PM ACOUSTIC

Trace Bundy

SAT 26

FRIDAY, OCT 25 • 9PM ROCK/JAZZ/FUSION

ANDYS. Bronwyn Wyatt. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The John Hall Band, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903. THE CORNER. Jazz Jam Session. Oakland. 412-683-1400. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Horn Guys. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Show. Downtown. 412-392-2217. NINE ON NINE. Tania Grubbs & Max Leake. Downtown. 412-338-6463. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins. Downtown. 412-471-9100. TEDDY’S. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. North Huntingdon. 724-863-8180.

Consider the Source Sat, Oct 26 • 9PM CELTIC ROCK

THE FIGHTING JAMESONS SUN, OCT 27 • 9PM INDIE ROCK/AMERICANA

BRETT DETAR PLUS JOSEPH WEST / GYSPY & HIS BAND OF GHOSTS MONDAY, OCT 28 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD TUES, OCT 29 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

WENDT/BERMAN/THOMPSON

OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THURS/OCT 24/10PM ATLAS, HOUSEHOLD STORIES, MATT KILROY

THURS/OCT 31/10PM EMO NIGHT 13

THURS/NOV 7/10PM DAN GETKIN & THE MASTERS OF AMERICAN MUSIC, SLIM FORSYTHE & THE NEW PAYDAY LOANERS, THE RED WESTERN

$2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

SUN 27

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jenny Wilson. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

Thank You for Voting us Best LGBT Bar

MON 28

SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

TUE 29

ANDYS. Eric Susoeff. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Erik Lawrence. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Tom Wendt, Jeff Berman, Paul Thompson. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Trivia every Wednesday 8-10pm

WED 30

ANDYS. Green Light Saxophone Quartet. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Benny Benack Trio. Downtown. 412-471-9100. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Daniel Carter & The Moon. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

EATS & DRINKS Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events Kitchen open til 1am

ACOUSTIC

146 44th St . Pgh, PA 15201

THU 24

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Vince Agwada. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

ww.cattivo.biz

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

LEVELS. Joe Materkowski. North Side. 412-231-7777. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610. SEVICHE. Alex Talbot. Downtown. 412-697-3120. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Trace Bundy. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

FRI 25

Located in historic south side at 1209 East Carson Street Offering Pittsburgh’s finest food, craft beer selection, and cocktails Yuengling specials all day Saturday for college football www.theurbantap.com • T.@theurbantap Facebook. www.facebook.com/theurbantap

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Ellen Cherry & Tony Denikos. Harmony. 724-452-0539. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. The Mike Medved Band. Harmony. 724-400-6044. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustical Bruce. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. LEVELS. John Sarkis Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. PARK HOUSE. Well Strung. North Side. 412-224-2273. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Lenny & Jeff. Wexford. 724-934-2110. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Gary & Libby. Greensburg. 724-836-7687.

Bell Biv Devoe The Xclusive Venue

WASHINGTON, D.C. {FRI., NOV. 08}

The Blow The Black Cat

CLEVELAND {FRI., NOV. 22}

Dream Syndicate Beachland Ballroom

SAT 26

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Mavens. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

CLASSICAL

TUE 29

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music by Mendelssohn, Bruch, & Schumann feat. Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RESONANCE WORKS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 724-305-0257.

PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

WED 30

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. The Armadillos, Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 25

MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

COUNTRY THU 24

FRI 25

FRI 25

SAT 26

THE BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH MONSTER MASS. St. Agnes Center Carlow University, Oakland. 1-888-718-4253. www. per pa PITTSBURGH pghcitym o .c PHILHARMONIC. North Hills Junior High School, Ross. 412-318-1452. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music by Mendelssohn, Bruch, & Schumann feat. Noah Bendix-Balgley, v iolin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FULL LIST ONLINE

ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Dallas Marks Band. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

{SAT., NOV. 02}

SAT 26

MON 28

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COLUMBUS

SUN 27

THE BACH CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH MONSTER MASS. St. Agnes Center Carlow University, Oakland. 1-888-718-4253. ORGANIST DON FELLOWS. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082.

PITTSBURGH CONCERT CHORALE. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-635-7654. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Music by Mendelssohn, Bruch, & Schumann feat. Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RESONANCE WORKS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 724-305-0257.

WED 30

CUIDADO. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 26

LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 28

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 29

THE CHADWICK. Latshaw Pops Orchestra. American Bandstand-A Tribute to Dick Clark. Wexford. 724-853-4050.

WED 30

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes SingAlong. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict.org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769.


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

October 23 - 29 WEDNESDAY 23

Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests ill-esha & SORNE. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

The God That Comes

Beats Antique

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 26.

Kung Fu

Man Man

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Xenia Rubinos. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Trace Bundy THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUNDAY 27 Brett Detar

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. With special guests Joseph West & Gypsy and his Band of Ghosts. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:30p.m.

Mushroomhead

Measure Back

THURSDAY 24

412-263-2877. With special guests DJ Rashad & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29 BENEDUM CENTER

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m. BAUM BUILDING Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Oct. 26.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

WE WILL ROCK YOU

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests One Eyed Doll & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

Bo Burnham

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

412-263-2877. With special guests ABK & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

special guests The London Souls. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Thriller: A Tribute Show

SATURDAY 26

Runaway Dorothy HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Limited All ages. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. Tickets: bit.ly/ThrillerTixGA, ticketweb.com/opusone or 866-468-3401. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 25

Reelabilities - Pittsburgh Disabilities Film Festival

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL Oakland. Tickets: calliopehouse.org or 412-361-1915. 7:30p.m.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. For more info & tickets visit Pittsburgh.ReelAbilities.org or 412-992-5203. Through Oct. 29.

Vieux Farka Touré

Twiztid

Umphrey’s McGee

The Fighting Jamesons

Chance The Rapper

ALTAR BAR Strip District.

STAGE AE North Side. With

THUNDERBIRD CAFE

ALTAR BAR Strip District.

NEW BALANCE

Victoria Stilwell and the Power of Positive Training

Lawrenceville. 412682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM. For more info & to register visit carmaa-petadoption.com/ events.html. 1p.m.

TUESDAY 29 We Will Rock You

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Nov. 3.

Final Days

NOW – SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27

GENE DECRISTAFARO, a Cobb Hill, Aravon, Dunham Factory Rep, will be at Wexford location on Fri., Oct. 25 from 10 am – 5pm and at the Waterfront location on Sat., Oct., 26 from 10 am – 5pm Certified Pedorthist Mark Fallecker will help you match your foot type with the right shoe. See Mark at WATERFRONT: Sat., Oct. 26 10am-7pm; Sun., Oct. 27 12-6pm; OAKLAND Thurs., Oct. 24 10am -5pm; WEXFORD Fri., Oct. 25 10am – 5pm.

Valid thru Oct. 31, 2013

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

20

on any regular priced New Balance, Aravon, Dunham or Cobb Hill purchase.

TWENTY DOLLARS

GIFT CERTIFICATE

$

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WATERFRONT

Minimum purchase $100.00. Limit to one certificate per customer. Certificate must be presented at time of purchase. Can not be combined with other offers and discounts. Some exlusions may apply. MAILRNB

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS N E W S

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

FACEBO O K.CO M / N EWBAL AN CEPG H +

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TEEN HORROR {BY AL HOFF}

THE FILM DOESN’T TRUST US TO PROCESS A COMPLEX ISSUE WITH NO EASY ANSWERS

There is some epic mayhem in the final reel of Kimberly Peirce’s re-do of Carrie, and it’s likely enough to satisfy audiences who have come to revel in the film’s violence. (The infamous bucket of pig’s blood is dumped in slow motion, again and again, as if anticipating the modern inclination to make gifs of notable moments.)

Gym-class tears for Carrie (Chloe Grace Moretz)

But this new version of Stephen King’s novel about a telekinetic teen (adapted by Brian DePalma in 1976) also offers a quieter horror story — about life as a bullied kid — as well as some affirming moments that don’t involve setting catastrophic fires. Carrie (Chloe Grace Moretz) lives with her deeply disturbed mother (Julianne Moore), whose conflating of religious mania and violence traps the teen in a stunted and confusing misery. (No lesson like getting beat with a Bible.) School is no respite, where Carrie is shunned as a weirdo, only gaining attention when she becomes the object of a cruel taunting. When Carrie enacts her telekinetic revenge, it is liberating despite its horror. But there’s also power when Carrie defies her mom and simply goes to the prom. The film’s final scenes suggest Carrie’s awakening is not just her transformation from victim to actor, but an understanding of her own self. The end is tragic, but it at least reflects her informed agency. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Inequality for All. Former U.S. Secretary of Labor and current publicpolicy professor Robert Reich headlines this documentary outlining America’s widening gap between the rich and the poor. Jacob Kornbluth directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 25. Manor

THOSE WHO LEAK {BY AL HOFF}

O

H, JULIAN Assange and WikiLeaks — you seem so yesterday. Now, there’s a new high-profile leaker with his own pulp-novel intrigue (Edward Snowden, our man in Moscow), Bradley Manning is Chelsea behind bars, and we’re on Twitter complaining that the NSA stole our phone calls or something. But Bill Condon’s thriller The Fifth Estate takes us back to those heady days in 2010 when WikiLeaks scored big — dumping unprecedented amounts of military and diplomatic classified data on the Internet (with highlights in three major newspapers), and generating much necessary discussion about who controls information in such a permeable technology. In real life, this is a sprawling, complicated and yet-unresolved story. Thus, Condon chooses to narrow the film’s focus to the rocky relationship between WikiLeaks founder Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his right-hand man, Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruhl),

WikiLeakers Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruhl) and Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch)

in the build-up to the 2010 release and its consequences. While the script gives lip service to the grays surrounding such thorny issues as privacy, transparency of information and accountability, Fifth Estate mostly trades in formulaic good and bad. Domscheit-Berg is cast as the true believer who still raises concerns, while Assange is the

THE FIFTH ESTATE DIRECTED BY: Bill Condon STARRING: Benedict Cumberbatch and Daniel Bruhl

sociopathic megalomaniac willing to burn it all down to make his point. Assange is also, according to this film, a 24-hour jerk, the sort who drinks your beer and doesn’t chip in for Wi-Fi. (Fifth Estate is adapted from two books by parties who grew disenchanted with Assange, and at least cops to this bias.) Undermining the seriousness of the subject matter is Condon’s non-stop use

of Hollywood-techno-thriller clichés: onpoint dialogue (“people are loyal until it is opportune not to be”); lame visualizations of the Internet (it’s an infinite room full of vintage desks!); thumping music; hand-held cameras; and trumped-up spy-movie intrigue. Ultimately, Condon doesn’t trust us to process an ongoing complex issue with no easy answers; he even concludes the film with polemics re-capping the Big Points. Fifth Element is a wordy thriller loosely adapted from history, whose primary goal is to entertain, rather than inform or provoke. (I recommend the broader, and far more fascinating, account in Alex Gibney’s recent documentary, We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks, now available for home viewing.) But for as dumbed-down as The Fifth Estate feels, it also violates my rule of “never give the audience a title that has to be explained” — especially if knowledge of the Middle Ages is required. It could have just as easily been called The Big Leak. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013


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FILM CAPSULES CP

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here

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BAD GRAN DPA. Jackassâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Knoxville dresses up like a senior citizen to prank unsuspecting citizens. Jeff Tremaine directs. Starts Fri., Oct. 25. BIRTH OF THE LIVING DEAD. Think you know everything about George Romeroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1968 horror film Night of the Living Dead? Even the most diehard fan will probably learn something in this affectionate doc from Rob Kuhns that looks at how the zombie classic was made, what movie-making conventions it broke, how it resonated with audiences upon release, and what influence it had on future films. Kuhns interviews Romero extensively, and film critics and other interested parties (such as Gale Ann Hurd, executive producer of TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walking Dead) help provide context. Of particular interest is how Dead uncannily tapped into late-1960s anxieties about race, authority and once-stable institutions. Starts Fri., Oct. 25. Harris (Al Hoff)

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THE COUN SELOR. Brad Pitt and Michael Fassbender head up an ensemble cast in Ridley Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thriller about an attorney caught up with a drug lord. Starts Fri., Oct. 25. NOSFERATU. Klaus Kinski stars as the vampire Dracula in Werner Herzogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unsettling 1979 film, adapted from the Bram Stoker novel. This re-release features the original German dialogue, with subtitles. Fri., Oct. 25, through Sun., Oct. 27. Regent Square THE WICKER MAN . A policeman (Edward Woodward) journeys to a remote Scottish isle to investigate a missing girl but once heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there, things turn very, very strange. Robin Hardy directs this 1973 sex-and-pagan-laden horror film, now re-released in a new cut. Mon., Oct. 28, through Thu., Oct. 31. Regent Square

REPERTORY

AUTOLUMIN ESCEN T: ROWLAN D S. HOWARD. A new documentary from Richard Lowenstein and Lynn-Maree Milburn looks at the tumultuous life and career of the Melbourne punk rocker and guitarist for The Birthday Party. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 23. Hollywood WHITE ZOMBIE. In this 1932 film directed by Victor Halperin, a young bride and groom visiting Haiti fall prey to the devious Bela Lugosi, who has the power to raise the newly dead. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 23, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 24. Oaks (AH)

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RIFFTRAX: N IGHT OF THE LIVIN G DEAD. Arguably, George Romeroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s locally produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter sparked American filmmakersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; late-20th-century fascination with zombies. For this special â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and lighter â&#x20AC;&#x201D; screening, RiffTrax crew (Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett, formerly of MST3K) will provide live comic commentary (via satellite). 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 24. Cinemark Robinson, Cinemark Pittsburgh Mills and Pittsburgh North 11. Tickets at theater or www.fathomevents.com (AH) AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LON DON . Two American tourists run afoul of a werewolf while visiting London in John Landisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1981 horror thriller with a splash of comedy. Not to be confused with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Werewolves of London.â&#x20AC;?

GEORGE A. ROMERO and the making of

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD

Birth of the Living Dead

â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONE AH-HAH MOMENT AFTER ANOTHER!â&#x20AC;?

7 and 9:15 p.m. Fri., Oct. 25, and 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Hollywood ADVEN TURES OF ROBIN HOOD. This CP THE 1938 film, directed by William Keighley and Michael Curtiz, is one of Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great adventure stories, successfully melding action, comedy and a smattering of history with a terrific ensemble cast, lavish sets and costumes. Errol Flynn brings just the perfect sort of rascally charm to Robin Hood. The Friday screening is just a dollar, in honor of the Oaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 75th birthday. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 25 ($1), and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Oaks (AH)

-BILLL MMOYERS O ERS OY R

STARTS FRIDAY 10/25 HARRIS THEATER

HALLOWEEN II. Michael Myers is back and, thus, the stalking and killing continue. Jamie Lee Curtis and Donald Pleasance also return to star in Rick Rosenthalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1981 horror flick. 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 25, and 10 p.m. Sat. Oct. 26. Oaks ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter (Tim Curry) is so busy seducing a couple of naĂŻve stranded guests (Susan Sarandon and Barry Bostwick) that he fails to notice his colleagues from outer space are planning a coup. Jim Sharman directs this 1975 cult classic. Midnight, Fri., Oct. 25, and midnight, Sat., Oct. 26. Hollywood

,)"%249!6%s   CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES

For Trailer and More, visit www.ďŹ rstrunfeatures.com

Pittsburgh Disabilities Film Festival

THE CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON. A fish man tries to take a woman for his underwater bride, thus spurring one of the better 1950s monster-takes-girl films. Jack Arnoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1954 shocker was noted at the time for its extended underwater cinematography. To be screened in 35 mm and in 3-D. 3 p.m. ($3) Sat., Oct. 26; 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26 ($20, includes costume party with Chilly Billy and two drinks); and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27 ($5). Hollywood (AH)

CP

GAAMER. In Oleg Sentsovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 drama, a teen from Ukraine is an Internet star known for his mastery of Quake, even as his real-life skills suffer from lack of attention. Screens as part of Hoverla, the UkrainianAmerican Film Festival. In Russian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for double-feature); full-time students with ID, free. BUSIN ESS AS USUAL. A middle-aged man decides to become a poet in this 2012 dramedy from Valentyn Vasyanovych. Screens as part of Hoverla, the UkrainianAmerican Film Festival. In Ukrainian, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for double-feature); full-time students with ID, free. REEL ABILITIES. A four-day program of recent films that â&#x20AC;&#x153;promote awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

HAPPS The new fun & free event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location.

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Pittsburgh vs.

Buffalo November 10, 2013

with disabilities.” Ocean Heaven stars Jet Li as the father of an autistic boy (7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26; Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, North Side; $25/$15 students). An Afternoon of Shorts includes films about adaptive design and an artist with Down syndrome (1 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27; Human Engineering Research Lab, Bakery Square, Larimer). A young woman with Down syndrome survives a bombing in the Argentine feature Anita (7:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27; Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland). Activist Jacks McNamara is profiled in the doc Crooked Beauty (7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 28; Rodef Shalom). Two runners — one blind, the other an ex-con — train together in the French drama The Straight Line (7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 29; Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland). All films except Ocean are $10/$5. Tickets and more info are available at www.Pittsburgh.ReelAbilities.org or 412-992-5203. FOUN D FOOTAGE FESTIVAL. Curators of forlorn video-cassettes Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett will present a program of amusing and bizarre highlights gleaned from exercise tapes, home movies, industrial training films, how-do programs and more. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. Regent Square. $12 THE EXORCIST. Time has quelled many of the shocks of William Friedkin’s 1973 film, but the subject matter — a 12-year-old girl potentially possessed by the devil — is still pretty unsettling. Plus, you can’t really be sure the good guys have triumphed. Midnight, Sat. Oct. 26. Manor (AH)

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NOSFERATU. In this 1922 silent-film Dracula re-telling from F.W. Murnau, the vampire Orlock (Max Schreck) travels to England in search of new victims. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Oaks (AH)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

PANIC IN NEEDLE PARK. Al Pacino and Kitty Winn star in Jerry Schatzberg’s drama about a romance between two young New York City heroin addicts. The 1971 film concludes a month-long series of films examining disillusionment with the American Dream. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Regent Square

“Media Exploring Shale Gas.” 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 29. Melwood. $10 FREAKS. Todd Browning’s lurid 1932 melodrama tells of a dreadful comeuppance awaiting the scheming trapeze artist whose greed, pettiness and sexual manipulations wreak havoc among the circus folk. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 29. Oaks (AH)

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MEET YOUR MAKER. A scientist faces the survivors of a universe he unwittingly created and destroyed, in this new, locally produced short sci-fi film from Justin and Pat Francart. To be followed by a Q&A and a reception. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 29. Hollywood. $5 HOUSE ON HAUN TED HILL. Vincent Price stars in this 1959 horror classic from William Castle. Price plays an eccentric rich man who offers five strangers $10,000 each if they can spend just one night locked down in a mansion with an eerie history. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 30. Oaks CARNIVAL OF SOULS. This low-budget 1962 creeper from Herk Harvey is more atmospheric than nailbiting. But the story of a woman who survives a car crash only to wind up playing the organ in an eerily deserted amusement park in the Utah desert definitely gets under your skin. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 30. Hollywood (AH) PSYCHO. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 thriller and treatise on troubled mother-son relationships. Embezzler-on-the-run Janet Leigh picks the wrong motel to catch some rest at, though the proprietor seems friendly enough … 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 30. AMC Loews. $5 (AH)

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N IGHT OF THE LIVIN G DEAD. George Romero’s 1968 depiction of flesh-munching was ground-breaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31. Oaks (AH)

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LAST MAN ON EARTH. Vincent Price stars in this 1964 thriller, in which widespread disease has turned the rest of humanity into undead bloodsuckers. Ubaldo Ragona’s film is adapted from Richard Matheson’s novel I Am Legend. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 28. Oaks

THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT. Alec Guinness stars in Alexander McKendrick’s 1951 satire about a man who accidentally invents the perfect fabric and incurs the wrath of the textile industry. The 1951 film concludes this year’s series of labor-related films presented by Battle of Homestead Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871

GAS RUSH STORIES. This program of short films (6-9 minutes each) by Kirsi Jansa presents multiple sides of the shale-gas drilling in Western Pennsylvania. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion,

THE BODY. Oriol Paulo directs this new Spanish horror thriller about a body that goes missing from the morgue. In Spanish, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31. Hollywood


[DANCE]

THARP REVISITED

HIDDEN HISTORIES WERE RECLAIMED

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre performs AN EVENING OF TWYLA THARP 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 25; 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26; and 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave. , Downtown. $25.7586.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org N E W S

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF RICH SOFRANKO}

[ART REVIEW]

Kumiko Tsuji and Luca Sbrizzi in Pittsburgh Ballet’s In the Upper Room

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre kicks off its 44th season with An Evening of Twyla Tharp, a salute to the irrepressible Emmy- and Tony Award-winning stage and screen choreographer. The Oct. 25-27 program features reprises of two of Tharp’s most popular works. First performed by PBT in 2006, the 35-minute “Nine Sinatra Songs” (1982) has a ballroom setting and features seven couples costumed in gowns and tuxedos designed by Oscar de la Renta. It’s filled with songs like “Strangers in the Night,” “One for My Baby” and “My Way.” The work’s répétiteur, Shelly Washington, says that the duet-filled dance work is built from vignettes about infatuation, the allure of a stranger, forever love and a couple’s bickering. The work’s appeal comes from its blending of the sophistication of ballroom dancing, Tharp’s sly humor and loose modern dance approach … and, of course, Sinatra’s music. Completing the program is Tharp’s “In the Upper Room,” last performed by PBT in 2010. Borrowing its title from the gospel song by Mahalia Jackson, the work evokes a heavenly setting where stage fog and lighting by Jennifer Tipton make it seem as if the 13 dancers appear and disappear out of and into thin air. Set to a driving original score by Philip Glass, this 40-minute barrage of technical and pedestrian movement mingles ballet and modern dance and takes both dancers and audience to the edge of exhaustion. Washington, an original cast member in the work, says that in the mid-1980s, Tharp added several ballet dancers to her modern-dance company. That move might have inspired her division of dancers in “In the Upper Room” into tennis-shoewearing modern dancers known as “stompers” and pointe-shoe-wearing ballet dancers, or the “bomb squad.” “A lot of people insisted on a wall between modern dance and ballet. I’m beginning to think that walls are very unhealthy things,” Tharp once said. “In the Upper Room” might mark the start of her demolition project: During the piece, for instance, one dancer transitions from “stomper” to “bomb squad” member. Meanwhile, over the course of the work, the entire cast strips away their team costumes to reveal a unified red, perhaps symbolizing the blood that courses through all our veins.

OUT OF THIS

FURNACE {PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBERT RACZKA}

{BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Ryan Keene’s “Sketches: Production”

T

HOUGH ARTISTS have by no means

given up on the semi-domestic, semi-corporate spaces of gallery and museum, it’s no longer surprising for an art exhibit to be presented in a locale such as a park or an abandoned prison. But it’s still refreshing, especially when there’s synergy between location and artwork, which usually means the art has to have been produced for the site. In this regard, Alloy: Pittsburgh is both ambitious and thoroughly executed. Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark is the hulking ruin in Rankin, the remains of seven furnaces that once stood there, employing up to 5,000 people. Now, under the laudable stewardship of Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, the site is an important component of the group’s mission to maintain an awareness of Pittsburgh’s once-vital steel industry, with an emphasis on the lives of the workers that made that industry possible. Art-wise, Carrie Furnaces are best known for the stillstanding “Carrie Deer,” a 1997 guerrilla-art project created when the area was strictly off limits, which brought a lot of attention

to the site and helped pave the way for Alloy: Pittsburgh. Organized by Chris McGinnis and Sean Derry, with support from Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Kipp Gallery, Alloy: Pittsburgh strove to foster relevance of the artwork to the site: Participating artists did research and attended lectures led by historians, artists and landscape architects. Each of the resulting 13 art projects engages

ALLOY: PITTSBURGH closes on Sat., Oct. 26. Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark, Rankin. 724-840-2257 or www.alloypittsburgh.blogspot.com

with the site and its history, though in ways not always apparent. In this regard, artists’ statements posted throughout are helpful. (Access to the exhibit is possible on just one more day, Sat., Oct. 26, as part of Rivers of Steel’s regular seasonal site tour that day; tickets are $15-25.) Many of the projects engage with the site through contrast, which is not

surprising given that the structure is indomitable in its size, industrial form and rusted texture. Anika Hirt’s “Scale-SpaceBLObs” — short for “Blast furnace Light Object blob”— nestles masses of billowing golden fabric in the labyrinthine core of the mill, with the wrinkled foil introducing a softening presence. Will Schlough’s “Ball Machine” positions brightly colored beach balls in a network of existing tracks, repurposing them as stationary pieces of a giant inoperable game. Literally playful was Emily Sciulli’s “Taconite Bounce,” which transformed a material-handling mechanism into an interactive game complete with targets, while for the performance “Return of the Spirit of Molten Iron,” Dan Wilcox played off the “alien” landscape, attired in a homemade astronaut’s suit as he performed various tasks including playing a handmade musical instrument. The site inspired some diverse and unexpected responses. In the grand interior of the engine house, Carl Bajandas’s “Museum of Imaginary Flight,” inspired by thoughts regarding success and failure CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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OUT OF THIS FURNACE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

in the steel industry, suspended from the joists large mock-ups of “failed” early experiments with flight. (Full disclosure: Bajandras is a grad student in a class I’m teaching at Carnegie Mellon University.) Anna Mikolay’s “The Colored Line” hung an expanse of tarps along the perimeter fence at the entrance, their colors symbolizing the components of steel while signaling the vitality brought to the site by the art projects. In Amber Niedomys’ performance “Capture. Settle. Build.,” a crew of five constructed a brick-and-salt-block structure that is an ode to transience, and which might not make it through the month. Some artists chose to emphasize particular aspects of the site. Kyla Groat’s “My Lover, The Machine,” which highlights the water-filled chamber under the mill, features a wall of water-filled mason jars and a sculpted aquatic figure. Meghan Olson and Kara Skylling’s “Tracing,” a minimalist installation in the depths of the mill, creates a rhythm of geometric forms to echo the ceaseless rhythm of the work once done there. For “Inexhaustible Residence,” Michelle Colbaugh planted ferns to reference non-native species sprouting throughout the site, while watering them with rainwater directed through a sculptural system of tubes.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER TABACCHI}

Edith Abeyta’s “How We Slowly Become History”

Hidden histories were reclaimed. “paradox, 1901,” by Laurie Barnes, uses a bedform filled with objects associated with domesticity to allude to the off-site homes and spouses of the workers. Edith Abeyta’s “How We Slowly Become History” features masses of colorful, richly textured clothing woven into triangular forms to connect architecture and industry, time and memory, and human presence. Faced with the scale of the mill, Ryan Keene’s strategy was to contrast through small scale, with miniature vignettes in “Sketches: Production” positioned throughout the core of the mill. Depicting families stalked by wolves, it’s a profound riff on a history fading from awareness, namely, of the pressures resulting from the demand for the ceaseless production that was Carrie Furnaces’ reason for being. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Final Weeks! Open your eyes to the cultural history of the Arabian peninsula. Explore 200 archaeological objects only recently available for view in North America. Tours every Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 p.m. & 2 p.m.

The Art of Falconry presented by the National Aviary Get an up-close look at live birds of prey and learn about the historical significance of falconry within Arabian culture. Saturday, November 2 1–2 p.m. and 3–4 p.m. Free with museum admission; limited seating available on a first-come, first-served basis.

SPONSORED LOCALLY BY

carnegiemnh.org | 412.622.3131

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh


FINAL PERFORMANCES

This visceral and thoughtprovoking theatrical work seeks a path between the citizen-as-spectator and the citizen-as-participant.

Sex, wine and rock and roll. An intoxicating one-man cabaret, pop and glam rock hybrid.

Never before seen artists and performances.

A PROJECT OF

THROUGH OCT 26, 2013

TrustArts.org/first

Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

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%JTDPWFSZPVS %JTDPWFS your JOOFSFMG

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL / DRAG QUEEN PHOTOS COURTESY OF CONNIE DORSETT}

Flip your wig: At left, drag performers Terry and Bobby Lopez of the Pearl Box Revue, circa 1968; at right, JoJo, circa 1973

[STAGE]

DRAGGING THE THREE RIVERS

TM Š

The Broadway Musical /07&.#&3%&$&.#&3tBENEDUM CENTER /07& 55SVTU"SUTPSHt#PY0ĂŻDFBUÇ°FBUFS4RVBSF t(SPVQT 5JDLFUT XXX&-'UIF.VTJDBMPOUPVSDPN PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

TM & Š New Line Productions, Inc. All rights reserved. Illustration by Hugh Syme. Photo by Amy Boyle.

{BY BILL Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;DRISCOLL} THANKS TO vehicles like RuPaulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drag Race, drag has gotten pretty mainstream. But it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always so. And audiences can witness living proof of Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich, if largely hidden, drag heritage, especially its African-American incarnation, on Oct. 26. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when â&#x20AC;&#x153;One More Time, An OldSchool (Drag) Ballâ&#x20AC;? reunites â&#x20AC;&#x201D; perhaps for the last time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; retired performers whose careers date back up to a half-century. The ball will be staged at Homesteadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BulgarianMacedonian Cultural Center. It includes, naturally, a pageant with cash prizes, featuring a 1960s runway competition and 1970s-2000s lip-sync category. Event organizer Harrison Apple says he expects 20 or more contestants from all eras of

North Side native, did her ďŹ rst drag performance in 1968, at that neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greenwich Village Inn, on Lacock Street. These days, many drag performers focus on lip-syncing. But back then, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of the drag queens would strip, dance with snakes or ďŹ re,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you were able to get a show in a bar, you were doing good.â&#x20AC;? Dorsett emceed shows and did comic monologues. She also founded, with Angel DeSilva, the troupe Pink Fantasy, which played both gay and straight nightclubs throughout the 1970s, from Pittsb u r g h t o U n io n t ow n . Other troupes included the Lavender Lads, mainstays at long-running and iconic Shadyside club The House of Tilden. The local drag scene was somewhat integrated racially; on Oct. 26, ball guests will include both white and black queens, though most of the performers will be black, says Apple. Though Dorsett, 67, hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t performed in decades, her legacy thrives. In the early 1970s, she became drag mother to one of that eraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stars, Denise Darshell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He looked glamorous and did well,â&#x20AC;? Dorsett now says proudly. In the 1980s, Denise in turn was drag mother to contemporary drag eminence Kierra Darshell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She pretty much created my character,â&#x20AC;? Kierra says of Denise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; everything from makeup to â&#x20AC;&#x153;how to carry myself on stage, how to entertain.â&#x20AC;? Kierra Darshell went on to found the annual, long-running Miss Tri-State AllStar Pageant and to stage shows year-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THESE FOLKS PAVED THE WAY FOR ME TO DO THE THINGS I DO.â&#x20AC;?

ONE MORE TIME DRAG BALL

7 p.m.-midnight. Bulgarian-Macedonian Cultural Center, 449 W. Eighth Ave., West Homestead. $20-25 (includes buffet and open bar). www.onemoretime.brownpapertickets.com

Pittsburgh drag. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be people in their 80s and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be people in their teens, hopefully,â&#x20AC;? says Apple. One â&#x20AC;&#x153;drag grandmotherâ&#x20AC;? being honored is Connie Dorsett. Miss Connie, a


round at venues like Cruze Bar and There Ultra Lounge. On Oct. 26, Kierra will emcee One More Time in tribute to Denise, who died in 1995. But Kierra also honors the grandmothers she’s never met. “My whole thing is, these folks paved the way for me to do the things I do,” she says. In the old days, it wasn’t always easy. “It was terrible here in Pittsburgh for a long time,” says Dorsett. “We were arrested for just walking down the street in our regalia.” But with the advent in the ’70s of more gay- and lesbian-owned clubs, drag here grew stronger, says Apple. The Carnegie Mellon University graduate is researching the history of local gay and lesbian nightlife through CMU’s Center for the Arts in Society. Apple organized the ball with Laura Grantmyer, a University of Pittsburgh doctoral candidate whose research into redevelopment in the Hill District put her in touch with some of the same sources — drag icons of Pittsburgh past. “For us to come back, we’ve been talking about it for years,” says Dorsett of herself and other queens. “We said, ‘We need to do it one more time.’” Apple says drag performers of all ages are welcome to perform: “Show up with

THE

NUTCRACKER {PHOTO COURTESY OF HARRISON APPLE AT THE PITTSBURGH QUEER HISTORY PROJECT}

The late Denise Darshell performs in 1975 at the House of Tilden.

your music and your dress.” Guest performers include JoJo, 74, formerly a star dancer with the Pearl Box Revue. “He’s gonna carry on so,” promises Dorsett. “He’s gonna have the audience screaming.” But will Miss Connie perform? “No,” she says. “All I’m gonna do is be glamorous.” DRI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Paints By Kait www.paintsbykait.com KaitSchoeb@gmail.com www.facebook.com/paintsbykait

Contact for commissioned art!

Throughout the month of October, 10% of all purchases from www.paintsbykait.com will be donated to Susan G. Komen, Pittsburgh.

[PLAY REVIEWS]

UNHAPPINESS {BY TED HOOVER} TAKE A GROUP of remarkably talented theater artists such as playwright Christopher Durang, director Tracey Brigden and actresses Sheila McKenna and Helena Ruoti, put them to work on one play and what could possibly go wrong? Consider Durang’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, making its Pittsburgh premiere at City Theatre. I know people bitch my reviews are too personal, and what follows could be just my own view … especially considering the show won Tony, Outer Critics, Drama Desk and Critic’s Circle awards for best new play. I have loved every single thing Durang has ever written, but what the hell is this? Two sisters and a brother, all middle-aged, live empty lives; Vanya and Sonia, having taken care of now-dead parents, find ways to piss off each other. Occasionally, their movie-star sister, Masha, flies in (this time with boy-toy Spike in tow) to add misery. They’re mostly unpleasant, in small, peevish ways, and by the second act I was more than over them. As the title indicates, Durang is mining a Chekhovian vein. That may be the problem. Ol’ Anton wrote a number of plays about absolutely nothing except unhappy people being unhappy. Durang has decided to do the same, only updated.

VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE continues through Nov. 3. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

While Chekhov is also famous for promoting stage naturalism, there’s not a more theatrically stylized playwright than Durang. Yet both strains are present in VSMS, often at the same time, and it’s exhausting. Which may explain City Theatre’s production. McKenna, Ruoti and Harry Bouvy, as Vanya, are pushing so hard out there on stage I’m surprised one of them didn’t calve. I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen such theater pros working so hard to land a scene. Durang ricochets them around the plot, manufacturing surprisingly easy (for Durang) conflict, and all they can do is hold on. When, after two hours, Durang decides he’s tired and wants to go home, he transforms all three into happily content people, and the show’s over. The cast also includes Amirah Vann, Karl Glusman and Hayley

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

From left: Harry Bouvy, Sheila McKenna, Helena Ruoti and Karl Glusman in City Theatre’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike

Nielsen, all playing their one-note characters with the appropriate note. Or maybe I’m just wrong and the Tony people are right. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

FAMILY FEUDS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} YASMINA REZA’S plays are so irredeemably

French that the best way to enjoy the English translations is to ignore the pretense that these sophisticated but non-litigious people could ever possibly be American. Given that inoculation, the Little Lake Theatre production of Reza’s 2009 Tony Awardwinning God of Carnage (neé 2006’s Le Dieu du carnage) provides an enjoyable if roughriding romp. The premise is like that old joke about a fight between two children that ends up with their parents, trying to handle the situation “maturely,” but falling into a series of insults and assaults. Carnage goes further into recriminations and repercussions, as the two sets of parents realign themselves to battle against everyone else singly and in strange political bedfellowships. Eventually fueled as much by alcohol as animus, the characters scratch and claw away their brittle bourgeois shells to reveal the raw pulp of pettiness, selfishness and inhumanity (or, to look at it another way, extreme humanity). A single set, four actors of middle age — voila, a good piece for small theaters. Yes, be warned that Carnage (translation by Christopher Hampton) is often offensive, and not merely with the usual obscenities. It is a challenge that director Sunny Disney Fitch-

ett and her cast meet well, with occasional brilliance and minor stumbles. (Let us hope that the frequent and distracting malfunctioning wardrobe has been rectified.) None of the characters is sympathetic, but all are interesting. Mary Liz Meyer is appropriately over-the-top as the assailantchild’s mother and insecure second wife of an overbearing lawyer (is that redundant?), solidly played by Art DeConciliis. Jennifer Sinatra embodies the bossy dilettante whose misplaced machinations lead to the stream of carnage. Gregory Caridi seamlessly morphs from nice-guy Everyman to a racist, sexist prig. Props to properties manager Leigh Ann Frohnapfel and to Brad Oberg for his assistance with effluent in that department.

GOD OF CARNAGE continues through Nov. 2. Little Lake Theatre, 500 Lakeside Drive, Canonsburg. $12-20. 724-745-6300 or www.littlelake.org

These are not nice people, and God of Carnage is not a pretty place. But there’s drama, plenty of laughs, and some provocative ruminations on the human condition. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

EPIC-CURIOUS {BY COLETTE NEWBY} RAGE OF THE Stage Players’ The Picture of Dorian Gray, adapted from Oscar Wilde’s novel by writer/director James Michael Shoberg, is a largely attractive play about largely attractive people doing profoundly ugly things, much like high school. Like


high school, it also goes on a little too long. This is a play about boundless hedonism, written, perhaps appropriately, with no concept of self-denial. The show is three-and-a-half hours, and even at that length, in many scenes, actors are forced to speak at a mile a minute, giving the audience no chance to digest what is allegedly tremendously witty. A good adaptation makes a story work with the peculiarities of its new medium. In theater, the entire draw is actors portraying the millions of tiny things that define a character, even non-verbally. There is no need for words alone to suggest voices as thickly as prose requires. A play is watched in one night, rather than over months of serial publication, like the novel, which is presumably another reason why characterizing dialogue feels so repetitious.

THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY continues through Nov. 2. South Park Theater, Brownsville Road and Corrigan Drive, South Park. $15. 724-292-8427 or www.facebook.com/rageofthestage

What it comes down to is Shoberg’s gluttonous unwillingness to cut any words if it can be avoided, denying the primary actors any time to breathe or really emote. It’s a pity so much effort is spent repeating character beats in dialogue, because the actors’ appearances portray personality so economically. Beth Shari’s costume designs are absolutely gorgeous. The eponymous Picture is well realized by Kari Christensen and, in its moments, genuinely chilling. It’s a treat to see sumptuous design on stage, and I only wish the script did more to enhance it. The show bills itself as steampunk, but this is purely cosmetic: “Victorian” isn’t buzzwordy enough anymore. There are cogs painted on the scenery, which never pays off as a motif, and one of the major characters, Lord Henry, spends the entire play with a large eyepiece that extends several inches beyond his face. It mars an otherwise excellent foppish presentation. Notwithstanding these more prosthetic aesthetics, this play is visually captivating, and very appropriately spooky for the season. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

BEYOND OK {BY ALAN W. PETRUCELLI} OK. SO Oklahoma! has been revived at least 3,578 times this past year.

And why not? Rodgers and Hammerstein’s first collaboration was a smash hit when it debuted on Broadway, in 1943, and the musical, arguably their finest, continues to make some enchanted evening. Now we have Point Park University Conservatory Theatre Company’s ambitious production, which bumps the revival number to 3,579 while bumping up the quality of what some people insist on calling “college theater.” This show may be crammed with students of various ages and backgrounds, but director Patrick Cassidy has banded them together to create a significant production as solid as an Okie twang, and the nearly three hours fly by faster than a tumbleweed in a dust storm. Cassidy has added a few interesting touches. While the overture plays, still images and movie footage of the daze before Oklahoma became a state are screened on the set’s silo and wooden house. We see sweethearts, cattle stampedes, plowing, even then-President Teddy Roosevelt. It’s a fresh, if somewhat fuzzy, move. And the color-blind casting of Persian peddler Ali Akim, the show’s comic relief, with African-American actor Ryan Gregory Thurman works without any hesitation. Only weak voices can really screw up Hammerstein’s lyrics, and that’s not a problem here. Yes, as Ado Annie, Jorie Ann Kosel sings like the offspring of Olive Oyl and Bernadette Peters, but she’s delightful to watch. As obstinate lovebirds Laurey and Curly, Kirsten Hoover and Stanley Graham work well together, and Amanda Hawkins weaves an Aunt Eller with a sentimental, semi-sweet thread.

THE MUSIC OF T H E S O U L O F A G E N E R AT I O N

OKLAHOMA! continues through Sun., Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $18-20. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Then there’s Luke Halferty. Literally towering above his fellow cast members, with a Karloff gaze and a relentless restlessness, his performance is as mesmerizing as it is menacing. Watch Halferty carefully in the picnic-hamper auction scene; watch the quiver, the angst smoldering just under his calloused skin. This is a Jud who’s a monster menacing as a man. You can almost smell the pig slop and blood on his hands, and his participation in the Dance Ballet will send shivers down your spine. OK. Remember his name. He’s that good.

OPENS TUESDAY!

October 29-November 3 • Benedum Center TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square 412-456-4800 • Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

ACCESSIBLE SERVICES —

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.2410.31.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

OCT. 29

{IMAGE COURTESY OF KIRSI JANSA}

“Gas Rush Stories”

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CHEF’S SELECTION PALATE PLEASERS $1 each

25 Market Square perlepgh.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

Bukimi is the Japanese word for “eerie” or “ominous.”And tonight, Bukimi is also an Asian horror-themed party, courtesy of Yummyholic’s Cupcakes & Culture Series and Awesome Pittsburgh. Yummyholic founder Jasmine Cho takes over Cavo nightclub with a haunted night market, art displays, adult trick-ortreating and food, including small bites from Asian-owned restaurants and Cho’s own “nomicakes.” There’s also a free photo booth and sounds by Tracksploitation. Dress code: Dress up, in red and/or black colors only. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m.-midnight. 1916 Smallman St., Strip District. Free (VIP: $25). www.flavorus.com/bukimi

{STAGE} Hard to believe a play by a Pulitzer-winner would take 17 years to be produced here — but Suzan-Lori Parks’ work is seldom easy to stage, or to digest. Venus is the OBIEwinning 1996 work by Parks (later Pulitzered for Top Dog/ Underdog). The play’s about Sartije “Sarah” Baartman, the South African woman who two centuries ago found herself in London, exhibited

as a freak called “the Hottentot Venus.” The University of Pittsburgh Stages’ Pittsburgh-premiere production stars local favorite Bria Walker and is directed by Cynthia Croot (who once toured the play in South Africa). The first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Nov. 10. Studio Theatre (Cathedral of Learning), 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

{STAGE} In 2010, Bricolage’s Midnight Radio series had a hit with Orson Welles’ infamous radio adaptation of War of the Worlds, which sparked mass panic in 1938. Starting tonight, Bricolage reprises that show, performed old-time-radio style, with live music and sound effects. The three-week run includes a live broadcast on 90.5 WESA on Oct. 30 — the original’s 75th anniversary. That specially priced performance

OCT. 25 Daniel Handler


sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF JASON CAMPBELL}

At a 2009 screening of Night of the Living Dead at Beaver County’s Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Bill Hinzmann, who played “cemetery zombie” in the 1968 horror classic, suggested it might make a good stage musical. No, said the Center’s then-managing director, Stephen Catanzarite; it would make a good opera. This week, the full-length opera of George Romero’s landmark film world-premieres in the town where the film was shot, courtesy of Microscopic Opera Company. But the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater won’t be hosting the jokey take you might expect. Instead, the opera is about honoring the original — “to have this piece of iconic art live on in yet one more medium,” says local composer Todd Goodman, who worked with libretto-writer Catanzarite. And while the opera’s zombies do sing to Goodman’s modern, minimalist-influenced score — in a Chorus of the Undead — this NOLD is really about the relationships between the people trapped in that house. (Pictured are singers Michael Dailey and Shannon Kessler.) “It’s definitely not campy,” says Microscopic co-artistic director Erica Olden. “It’s really examining those more human elements.” And while the show lacks major gore, Goodman says that it did satisfy some zombie fans who attended a workshop performance in July, at New York City’s Center for Contemporary Opera. “We hate opera,” Goodman says they told him, “but this was absolutely fantastic.” Bill O’Driscoll Thu., Oct. 31, through Sun., Nov. 3. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-40. www.microscopicopera.org

includes on-air cameos by WYEP’s Brian Siewiorek and Democratic mayoral nominee Bill Peduto, and a costumed End of the World afterparty. BO 9 p.m. Continues through Nov. 9. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25 (Oct. 30 show: $75). www.bricolagePGH.org

{STAGE} Faced with an oppressive king, the lower classes head for the hills to party; the king fights back. The God That Comes is an original, one-man rock ’n’ roll cabaret starring acclaimed Canadian indie rocker Hawksley Workman. Workman and director Christian Barry, who based the show on Euripides’ The Bacchae, call it “a concept album for the stage”; The Toronto Star hailed its “slashing, sardonic wit.” The U.S. premiere of The God That Comes, late night at the Cabaret at Theater Square, is part the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. Two more performances follow tonight’s opener. BO 10 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25. 412-456-666 or www.pifof.org

(hopefully) comes back. Brett Wilson 6 p.m. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $35. 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

OCT. 24 The God That Comes

{WORDS} “I came home to bury my father, but he wouldn’t die.” So begins Headlong, Ron MacLean’s new literary thriller about a washed-up journalist who returns to his hometown of Boston to care for his father, but ends up trying to solve a murder. Boston-based MacLean (Blue Winnetka Skies) also weaves in a labor strike, eco-terrorism, generational politics and more; critic Cory Doctorow calls Headlong “gripping [and] timely.” MacLean’s at East End Book Exchange tonight, reading with local authors Sherrie Flick and William Lychack. BO 7 p.m. 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-224-2847

{SCREEN} If you prefer your vampires on the unsettling side, look no further than Werner Herzog’s 1979 Nosferatu the Vampyre.

Edgewood. 412-682-4111 or www.pghfilmmakers.org). Nosferatu (7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. 412-828-6311 or www.theoakstheater.com)

This work is decidedly creepy, dominated by Klaus Kinski’s virtuoso performance as the tortured undead nobleman. This version, screening through Sunday at Regent Square Theater, is in the original German, with English sub-

{WORDS} Lemony Snicket is coming to Pittsburgh. Well, sort of. “Lemony Snicket” is the pseudonym of writer Daniel Handler, who will be appearing at the Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures Kids and Teens series, discussing Snicket’s new book, When Did You See Her Last? The book — the second in a fourpart prequel to the popular A Series of Unfortunate Events — tracks the adventures of 12-year-old Snicket as he begins an apprenticeship in a secret organization. There will also be a Q&A, music by The Armadillos, snacks and likely an amusing mystery or two. BW 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-25. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

titles. Or, make it a vampire weekend, and also catch F.W. Murnau’s 1922 Nosferatu, screening at the Oaks and starring the even freakier actor Max Schreck. Al Hoff Nosferatu the Vampyre (1035 S. Braddock Ave.,

+ SAT., OCT. 26 {MUSIC}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL}

In celebration of the spookfilled weekend, the Bach Choir of Pittsburgh presents “Monster Mass,” a word play on the seasonal favorite “Monster Mash.” The show, which also kicks off the choir’s 79th concert season, features Anton Bruckner’s “Mass in E Minor” (with a double chorus and accompaniment from the Carnegie Mellon Wind Ensemble) and an a cappella performance of William Byrd’s “Mass for Four Voices in G Minor.” If anything is haunting, it will be the music. BW 8 p.m. Also 4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. St. Agnes Center, Carlow University, 3333

+ FRI., OCT. 25 {KIDS} A sleepover at the Carnegie Science Center is a rite of passage for any Pittsburgh kid. Tonight, enjoy a Halloweenthemed sleepover during the Spooky Science Sleepover. The event will focus on the fun science of Halloween — for instance, how to get your hair to stand on end without the bother of being scared first. The evening includes admission to an Omnimax movie, a planetarium show and a continental breakfast when the sun

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{VIDEO} What head-shaking, jaw-dropping and otherwise hilarious gems are “buried” in longforgotten videotapes? Let the crew at the nationally touring Found Footage Festival do the work, as it presents an evening of amusing clips gleaned from training reels, exercise tapes, home movies and — local alert! — a ferret-care video discovered in Western Pa. last year. Curators Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett will host the show, at the Regent Square Theater, providing insight and commentary. The event is presented by Brooklyn Brewery’s Mash series, and proceeds benefit Slow Foods Pittsburgh. AH 9 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $12. www.foundfootagefest.com

+ TUE., OCT. 29 {SCREEN} For a few years now, locally based filmmaker Kirsi Jansa has been traveling the region making “Gas Rush Stories,” short documentaries profiling people involved with the natural-gas boom. Jansa has interviewed lease-holding landowners, well-site neighbors, anti-fracking activists, public-health experts and more. The films are available online, but they’ve also been screening publicly to foster discussion of drilling’s risks and benefits. Tonight’s screening, at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room, is a project fundraiser, followed by a panel discussion on how the media covers shale gas. BO 7 p.m. 477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland. $10. www.gasrushstories.com

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THEATER AUDITION FOR MURDER.

ADVENTURES IN FOOD, FILM, MUSIC, BOOKS & BEER For more info and tickets, visit: brooklynbrewerymash.com/pittsburgh

#PGHMash

Murder mystery dinner theater benefiting the Mighty Penguins Sled Hockey Organization. Fri., Oct. 25, 7 p.m. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100. EMMA. Jane Austin’s story presented by Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center Student Company. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 3. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-576-4644. THE FARNSWORTH INVENTION. Play by Aaron Sorkin about Philo Farnsworth’s invention of the television & David Sarnoff, the RCA president who stole the design. Presented by Throughline Theatre. Fri, Sat and Thu., Oct. 31. Thru Nov. 2. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 1-888-718-4253. FUTURE TEN 10: A SHOWCASE OF THE PAST DECADE. Feat. the best eight 10-min. plays submitted to Future Ten in the past 10 years. Fri, Sat. Thru

Oct. 26. Future Tenant, Downtown. 412-325-7037. GOD OF CARNAGE. 2 pairs of parents meet for a civilized discussion about a scuffle their young sons have had on the playground. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Nov. 2. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. LIVE READ: GHOSTBUSTERS. Screenplay reading. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MACBETH. Presented by Resonance Works. Fri., Oct. 25, 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 27, 3 p.m. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 724-305-0257. MEASURE BACK. Performance using audience participation & black humor to probe how war is constructed & performed. Part of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. Thru Oct. 26, 8 p.m. Baum Building, Downtown. 412-456-6666. MIDNIGHT RADIO: WAR OF THE WORLDS. Recreation of the Mercury Theater’s classic end-of-the-world radio play -

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

with a Pittsburgh spin. Live radio broadcast: Oct. 30, 90.5 WESA. Thu, 9 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 9. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT. Hilarious & twisted take on the story of King Arthur, the Knights of the Round Table, & canned meat. Fri, Sat. Thru Nov. 9. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. THE MOUSETRAP. Play by Agatha Christie. Presented by The Baldwin Players. Show times: 8 p.m., 2 p.m. matinees. Fri-Sun. Thru Nov. 3. Baldwin Community United Methodist Church, Whitehall. 412-881-1002. MURDERED TO DEATH. Spoof of Agatha Christie mysteries. Presented by Community Theatre Players. Fri, Sat and Thu., Oct. 24. Thru Oct. 26. Community Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon, Ben Avon. 412-766-4471. OKLAHOMA! Presented by Point Park University’s

Conservatory Theatre Company. Thu-Sun. Thru Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. OUR TOWN. Thornton Wilder’s classic play about a small, early-20th century community. Thru Oct. 27. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. A RAISIN IN THE SUN. Presented by the Indiana Players. Fri-Sun. Thru Nov. 3. Philadelphia Street Playhouse, Indiana. 724-464-0725. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. Presented by Stage Right. The Rocky Ball Anniversary Party: Oct. 26, 10 p.m. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. & 12 a.m. Greensburg Garden and Civic Center, Greensburg. 724-832-7464. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. Presented by Brisbane Management Group. Location released after ticket purchase. brisbane-management-group.com Wed-Sat. Thru Oct. 31. STRAIGHTENING COMBS. One-woman show written & performed Kim El about coming-of-age in urban America. Sat., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 27, 3 p.m. Hill House Kaufmann Center, Hill District. 412-392-4400. TICK, TICK . BOOM! Jonathan Larson’s autobiographical musical. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 3. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE. Vanya & his sister Sonia tolerate a mediocre life until their movie-star sister Masha returns w/ her boy-toy Spike. Tue-Sun. Thru Nov. 3. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. WHO KILLED JAMES BOND? Murder mystery dinner theater. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, Fri and Sun., Nov. 10. Thru Nov. 8. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. THE ZERO HOUR. Play by Madeleine George. Thu-Sun. Thru Nov. 8. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576.

COMEDY THU 24

B-MOVIE BASH W/ INK & PAINT CLUB. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CONTINUES ON PG. 57

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013


FRI 25

“Ines,” by Shawn Roberts, from Migration at Gallery 4

ART

VISUAL L NEW THIS WEEK

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Allison Stewart. Paintings. Opening reception: Oct. 26, 5-8 p.m. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COHEN & GRIGSBY GALLERY. CONNECTIONS: The Work of Fabrizio Gerbino. Opens Oct. 24. Downtown. FATHER RYAN ARTS CENTER. Gift Of Life. Work by Kendrah Foster. Opening reception: Oct. 26, 6 p.m. McKees Rocks. 412-771-3052.

ONGOING

3RD STREET GALLERY. 2013 Aqueous Open. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society presents its 67th Annual International Exhibition. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. HOLDUP in the HOOD. Multimedia work by Francis Crisafio. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs by Bea Chiappelli. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300.

ASSEMBLE. F O R T R E S S. Installation by Sophie Bachelor & Cheryl Spencer. Garfield. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Eccentric Characters. Paintings & collages by Diane Keane. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BE GALLERIES. Endangered. Work by Elizabeth Castonguay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Barbara Miller, Frank Bruno. Feat. watercolors & photography. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Hats Off to the Insane. New work by Sherry Rusinack. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Threaded: A Glass Exhibition. A collection of contemporary glass and mixed media works by five Pittsburgh-based artists: Jason Forck, Elizabeth Fortunato, Theo Keller, Matt Eskuche, & Jarrod Futscher Artist reception Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m. Email or call to view the exhibition by appointment. South Side. 843-469-8342. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232.

CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Zivi Aviraz, Matthew Spangler, Avery Pratt. Group show. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE. A Sense of Seeing. Large oil paintings by Jacquet Kehm inspired by Eastern meditative art. Squirrel Hill. 412-436-0908. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Christopher Ruane. Photography exhibit. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. A Magical Mirror of International Cultures Combining Real & Imaginary Worlds. Work by Masha Archer, Salvador DiQuinzio, Mitzi Hall, & Manuela Holban. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Remaining Nameless. Work by Nick & Noell. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show feat. mixed media, wall ceramics, fiber, sculpture, mosaics, more. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. Reclaiming Landscapes. Photographs by Student CONTINUES ON PG. 58

area and Trolley Theatre. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF Washington. 724-228-9256. NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of PHIPPS CONSERVATORY Arabia: Archaeology & History & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Flower Show. Thousands of Archaeological materials chrysanthemums in various forms exploring the cultural history of & colors display festive scenes. 14 the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In feature exotic plants and floral Their Time, more. Oakland. displays from around the world. 412-622-3131. Oakland. 412-622-6914. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural (planetarium), Miniature imagery in lampworked glass. Railroad and Village, USS Requin Curated by Robert Mickelsen. submarine, and more. North Side. Friendship. 412-365-2145. 412-237-3400. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG CARRIE FURNACE. Built AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 animals, including many are extremely rare examples endangered species. of pre World War II Highland Park. iron-making 412-665-3639. technology. Rankin. RACHEL CARSON 412-464-4020 x.21. HOMESTEAD. A COMPASS INN. www. per Reverence for Life. Demos and tours pa pghcitym .co Photos and artifacts with costumed guides of her life & work. featuring this restored Springdale. 724-274-5459. stagecoach stop. Ligonier. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL 724-238-4983. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits DEPRECIATION LANDS on the Homestead Mill. Steel MUSEUM. Small living history industry and community artifacts museum celebrating the from 1881-1986. Homestead. settlement and history of the 412-464-4020. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ 412-486-0563. HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s FALLINGWATER. Tour the Civil War. In-depth look at famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Pennsylvania’s significant Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. contributions during the Civil FIRST PRESBYTERIAN War feat. artifacts, military CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany encampments, life-like museum stained-glass windows. figures, more. From Slavery to Downtown. 412-471-3436. Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s FRICK ART & HISTORICAL role in the anti-slavery movement. CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Ongoing: Western PA Sports Clayton, the Frick estate, with Museum, Clash of Empires, and classes, car & carriage museum. exhibits on local history, more. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. Strip District. 412-454-6000. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour SOLDIERS & SAILORS this Tudor mansion and stable MEMORIAL HALL. Military complex, and enjoy hikes museum dedicated to honoring and outdoor activities in the military service members since surrounding park. Allison Park. the Civil War through artifacts 412-767-9200. & personal mementos. Oakland. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the 412-621-4253. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. Learn about distilling and MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection coke-making in this pre-Civil War includes jade and ivory statues industrial village. Scottdale. from China and Japan, as 724-887-7910. well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, BUKIMI: AN ASIAN lectures and more. Monroeville. HORROR EVENT. Free 412-373-7794. nomicakes by Yummyholic, NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to trick-or-treating for grownups, more than 600 birds from over mini haunted night market, 200 species. With classes, lectures, music by Tracksploitation, more. demos and more. North Side. 8 p.m. Cavo, Strip District. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story ZOMBIES OF THE CORN. Zombie of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. shoot, corn maze, wagon rides, University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. more. Thu-Sat, 7 p.m. Thru Oct. 31 412-624-6000. Freedom. 724-775-6232. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE/ 412-851-9212. VALLEY OF DARKNESS PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Live bands, karaoke, & DJs every exhibits. Includes displays, Friday & Saturday. Benefits The walking tours, gift shop, picnic

B-MOVIE BASH W/ FRANKLY SCARLETT. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. DAHRI FERKS IMPROV COMEDY. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. IRONY CITY IMPROV COMEDY. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 25 - SUN 27

CARLOS MENCIA. 8 & 10 p.m., Sat., Oct. 26, 7 & 9 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 27, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 26

CAGEMATCH. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. CLEANPROV. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DAVID KAYE, “MISS GAYLE” BARRENS, TOM MUSIAL. Dress For Success of Pittsburgh Funny Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. Cabaret Nightclub, Uniontown. 724-437-1341. THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

MON 28

THE SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 4 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 29

OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 30

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

HOLIDAY THU 24

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. An eclectic showroom of fine art sculpture & paintings from emerging artists. North Side. 724-797-3302. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700.

THU 24 - SAT 26

THU 24 - WED 30

CONTINUES ON PG. 58

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 57

Autism Society of Pittsburgh & The Spectrum Charter School. hauntedhillshayride.com Thru Nov. 2 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. THE SCAREHOUSE. Haunted house open select dates through Nov. 2. Thru Nov. 2 Etna. 412-781-5885.

FRI 25 - SAT 26

HAUNTED HISTORY TOUR. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 26 Point State Park, Downtown. 412-565-2850.

SAT 26

Wicked XXX Star & AVN Performer of the Year Nominee:

OCT. 24-26 T HU RS D A Y-S U ND A Y NEXT: Sultry AVN Hall-of-Famer:

LISA ANN Nov. 7-9

HALLOWEEEN PARTY W/ CHILLY BILLY. Chiller Theater highlights, meet Bill Cardille, more. 6 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. HISTORICAL HAUNTED HAYRIDE. 7-10 p.m. Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeannette. 724-527-5584. JOSH & GAB HORRORFEST. arcadecomedytheater.com 10 a.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. TIM’S SECRET TREASURES FRIGHT FEST 2013. Refreshments, in-house psychics, more. Paranormal investigation to follow after the party. 6 p.m. Tim’s Secret Treasures, Charleroi. 724-483-4140.

WED 30

BLOOMFIELD PARADE NIGHT PARTY /W SHANNON & THE MERGER, MORE. 7 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. GLOBALPITTSBURGH BOO BOWLING PARTY. Costume contest, Halloween activities, refreshments, more. 6-9 p.m. Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Oakland. 412-392-4513. MARTIANS VS. ZOMBIES HALLOWEEN BASH. Costume contest, special guest Professor Emcee Square, more. 8-11 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-370-5247.

SPECIAL THU 24 - WED 30

RADICAL DAYS. Dozens of cultural establishments will offer free admission on designated days. Visit radworkshere.org for full schedule. Thru Nov. 10

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am • Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street Downtown Pittsburgh

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

FESTIVALS THU 24 - SAT 26

CHRIST CHURCH FINE ART FESTIVAL. Group exhibit juried by Kim Freithaler & Angelo Ciotti. Oct. 24-25, 3-8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 26, 12-8 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, Ross. 412-364-2442.

DANCE FRI 25 - SUN 27

AN EVENING OF TWYLA THARP: NINE SINATRA SONGS & IN THE UPPER ROOM. Performance presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Oct. 25-26, 8 p.m. and Sun.,

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 57

Art Show winner Christopher Sprowls. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists III. Group show feat. all media. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Necessary Fictions. Work by Patricia Bellan-Gillen. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LILI COFFEE*SHOP. Marian Phillips. Knife & oil paintings. Polish Hill. 412-682-3600. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Idiosyncrasy. Work by Carolyn Alexandra Frischling. Shadyside. 412-361-8664.

Oct. 27, 2 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SAT 26 - TUE 29

THE CHALK LINE. Performance by Attack Theatre. showclix.com/ events/8821 Fri, Sat, Mon, Tue and Thu., Nov. 7. Thru Nov. 5 Attack Theatre Spring Way Studio, Strip District.

SAT 26

GENERATIONS. Performance by the Kyiv Ukrainian Dance Ensemble. 1:30 & 7 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-527-5359.

FUNDRAISERS THU 24

BARKITECTURE. Live auction benefiting Animal Friends. 5:30-8 p.m. Perlora, South Side. 412-431-2220.

MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Disappearing City: New Works About Old Things. Work by Paulette Poullet. Things Are Looking Up: Abstract Tourist & Architectural Photography. Work by Kurt Garrison. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris.

GLOBALPITTSBURGH CULTUREFEST. International food stations, complimentary massages, DJ, more. 6-9 p.m. DoubleTree Hotel, Downtown. 412-392-4513.

FRI 25

MASGAYRADE COSTUME DANCE PARTY. Presented by iCandy Pittsburgh. Benefits the Lesbian & Gay Film Society. 8 p.m. Cruze Bar, Strip District. 412-471-1400. NBMBAA SCHOLARSHIP & RECOGNITION GALA. Keynote speaker: Audrey Snyder. 6 p.m. University Club, Oakland. 724-382-3063. ROYAL MASQUERADE BALL. Dinner, dancing, crafts, strolling characters, more. Union Ballroom, Duquesne University. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-243-5201.

Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TRUNDLE MANOR. Coffin Cuties Art Opening. Photography by Mike Hearse. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. With Things Inside. Installation by Carolina Ramos & David Lasky. Braddock. 415-518-9921. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. The Sacred Feminine. The Works of Cydra Vaux. A Pop-Up Exhibition at Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s temporary location. Salon Oct. 24, 6-7 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Hive. 3D-animated audiovisual installation where gallery visitors confront a swirling mass of amorphous figures, appearing as a collective of matter as opposed to individual beings in deep space. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

SAT 26

1ST ANNUAL CHILI COOKOFF. Benefits Hello Bully. 8 p.m. Howlers Coyote Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. BOWLING FOR HOPE HAVEN. Benefits Hope Haven Farm Sanctuary. 3-6 p.m. Arsenal Bowling Lanes, Lawrenceville. 740-317-1327. BROADWAY BATTLES BREAST CANCER. Broadway & show-tune-inspired performance benefiting the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Presented by the Pitt-Greensburg Performing Arts Society & Delta Psi Omega Theatre Honor Society. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-7040. FREAKY 5K & HAUNTED HILL 10K. Also feat. Petrifying Pet Walk & Trick-or-Treat Trot.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Brisbane Management Group’s

The Rocky Horror Show,

SUN 27

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. STEP OUT WALK TO STOP DIABETES. 2.8 mile route. Benefits the American Diabetes Association. 8 a.m. North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side. 412-824-1181 x 4520.

CRITIC:

Renata Martin, 26, a teacher from Elizabeth

This was such a cool experience. I have never seen The Rocky Horror Picture Show before, so this was definitely something I was glad to come to. It was awesome, and I definitely didn’t think it would be that much fun. I’m not going to lie though; I was nervous coming into it, but the show being so interactive and getting to move around made me enjoy it so much more. I also enjoyed that it was a small crowd, because it made the venue feel very intimate and the performances very personal. As a big theater fan, I thought the performances were excellent. I can’t believe I was nervous! It was such a fun show and not what I was expecting in the least.

LITERARY THU 24

B Y B R E T T WIL SO N

MON 28

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 26

APRIL BRUCKER. Talk & book signing w/ author of I Came, I Saw, I Sang. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Barnes & Noble - South Hills, Bethel Park. 412-835-2492.

WED 30

DIY PUBLISHING PANEL. Self-publishing panel & discussion. Presented by the CLP Zine Collection & the Alien She exhibit. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. THEIR LIFE’S WORK: THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE 1970S PITTSBURGH STEELERS, THEN & NOW” BOOK LAUNCH. W/ discussion panel feat. author

.25

This Limited Release includes typical ingredients used in the Late 19th Century to produce Full Flavored, American Pale Lagers.

$ 2 All Yuengling bottles

Available now at better beer distributors, including

9:30-1:30am

ALL DAY $ 1.75

Banksville Beer - South Hills Hampton Beer Outlet - Allison Park Market District - Shadyside Northern Beer Traders - West View

PBR Drafts

1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOU TH SID E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

Gary Pomerantz, Rocky Bleier, Franco Harris, Andy Russell, & Dan Rooney. 6-7:30 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000.

EAST END • STONE BREWING • MAGIC HAT • YARDS

KIDSTUFF THU 24

TUE 29

Prizes & Giveaways for best costumes

PETER PAN. Presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater & Theatreworks USA. 5:30 & 7:30 p.m. Marshall Middle School, Wexford. 412-456-6666.

THU 24 - FRI 25

LITTLE SPROUTS SINGLE SERVING: MY FAVORITE FRUITS. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Oct. 24-25, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

4016 Butler St.- Lawrenceville www.Belvederesultradive.com

Thanx for best DJ Night and people watching. And congrats to: Best attempt to bring the party back from Berlin:

Fatt Lovett

THU 24 - WED 30

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor landscape made of 22 miles of packing tape. Thru Jan. 19, 2014 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Best friends:

Nikayla Worst tippers:

The German BroDudes Best Dan madcow:

Ryan Connor mon:the 222 • Tues: Karaoke wed: punk night Thurs: Neon [80z Dance]

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$2 Coors Light drafts

during all Steelers games

724-935-9870 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford, PA 15090 (Across from Wendy’s, access from Weller Road)

Mon-Thu 11 am-midnite: Fri-Sat 11am-2am

www.wexfordalehouseonline.com Wexford Ale House

FRANZISKANER • TROEGS • AND MANY MORE!

CONTINUES ON PG. 60

N E W S

Pittsburgh Steelers Special

• BELL’S • DOGFISH HEAD • ROGUE • SIERRA NEVADA • GUINESS • BOULDER •

12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976.

LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. LET’S TALK ABOUT IT: MUSLIM JOURNEYS, LITERARY REFLECTIONS. The Arabian Nights translated by Husain Haddawy. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. . w w PAOLA CORSO. w aper p ty ci h g p Poetry reading. .com Pitt-Greensburg Written/ Spoken Series. 7 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg.

FICTION & SOME POSSIBLE PROSE. Readings by Ron MacLean, Cory Doctorow, & William Lychack. 7 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. MATT BOWER. Signing his novel Save Me, Rip Orion-an. 4-7 p.m. The Muse Stand, Bloomfield. 412-904-4004.

Sing, drink & be SCARY

Oct. 18

LEADERS FOR LITERACY LUNCHEON. Speaker: Mawi Asgedom. Benefits the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. 11:30 a.m. Fairmont Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-393-7631.

FRI 25

Halloween Scary-aoke party

WHEN: Fri.,

WED 30

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMUNCULUS: A READING FOR THE LAB. Feat. Karen Dietrich, Adam Matcho, & Jessica Server. 7-9 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

10/31/13

at The Outer Skin, Munhall

• VICTORY • HOEGAARTEN • SAM ADAMS • ANCHOR STEAM • LAGUNITAS •

Benefits the Oxford Athletic Club. 8 a.m. North Park Ice Skating Rink, Allison Park. 412-577-5140. KA-BLAM V: ATTACK OF THE 90S. 90s-themed music, activities, surprise guests, more. Benefits The ToonSeum. 513 Smithfield St., Downtown. 8 p.m. 412-232-0199.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

make a real connection

TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

FRI 25

BLACK & GOLD HEADQUARTERS ALL GA MES

$10 BUCKETS OF BEER (mix and match)

SIX PACKS TO-GO for the walk to the stadium

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 5-7PM WEDNESDAYS FREE POOL 6-10PM

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

www.livelinks.com

709 EAST ST. (412) 979-5075 CORNER OF E. OHIO / EAST ST.

FRIGHT NIGHT. Celebration of all things spooky & slightly spooky. Costume optional. 6:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. OVERNIGHT ADVENTURES: NIGHT OF THE LIVING CARNEGIE. See spooky things that come out after dark at the museum. Ages 6+. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3289. PETER PAN. Presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater & Theatreworks USA. 7 p.m. Hopewell High School, Aliquippa. 412-456-6666. SPOOKY SCIENCE SLEEPOVER. Halloween-themed activities, Omnimax movie, planetarium show, & science workshop. 6 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-1637. WHY DOES LEMONY SNICKET KEEP FOLLOWING ME? Author Daniel Handler talks about his pseudonym, Lemony Snicket of A Series of Unfortunate Events. 7 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

FRI 25 - SAT 26

CHEMFEST CELEBRATION. Hands-on exhibits & demonstrations of chemistry in everyday use. Oct. 25-26 Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

FRI 25 - SUN 27

• DJ JAYCEEOH • • JOANNA ANGEL PLUS DJ PETEY C & DJ GHOST

$300 COSTUME CONTEST

XXX STAR LIVE

ALSO APPEARING OCT 25 & 26

60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

[PING PONG]

WILLY WONKA, JR. Presented by Mon River Arts Youth Theatre. 7:30 p.m., Sat., Oct. 26, 2 & 6 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 27, 2 p.m. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504.

SAT 26

BOO FOR BOOKS. Halloween stories, crafts, games, more. Benefits the Shaler North Hills Library. 2-4 p.m. Perman Funeral Home, Shaler. 412-486-0211. FIDDLESTICKS: HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR. Concert feat. music from Sorcerer’s Apprentice, Pirates of the Caribbean & Harry Potter. Presented by Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. 11:15 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. HALLOWEEN MAYHEM. Costume parade led by Mr. McFeely, puppets, live performances, games, more. 12 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. MONSTER MARCH: SPECIAL EFFECTS MAKE-UP. Get “monstered” by make-up artist Jessica Kramer. Halloween parade to follow. 12-3 p.m.

This weekend, the South Park Table Tennis Club and the Pittsburgh Oakland Table Tennis Club join forces for the region’s first Amateur Ping Pong Championship. Chip Coulter — tournament director and half of an eight-time state-champion doubles team — talked to us about the game, via email. WHAT KEEPS YOU PLAYING? A player [can] improve [over] almost their entire life. It is also a gender- and ability-neutral sport. Virtually anyone can beat anyone. Watch out for those wheelchair players and the 16-year-old girl that lives down the street! ANY TIPS FOR NEWBIES? The most important [thing] is to move your feet. Most people just stand at the end of the table and tap the ball back in play. If you move around, you will play much better and get some good exercise. 9 a.m. Sat., Oct. 26, and 9 a.m. Sun., Oct. 27. Home Economics Building, Buffalo Drive, South Park. Visit www.pittsburghtabletennis.com for information.

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. PAJAMA NIGHTS: CREEPY, CRAWLY CARNEGIE. Observe & learn how animals, bugs, & butterflies disguise themselves in nature by their colors & patterns. Animal costumes welcome. Ages 2-8 w/ adult. 5:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3289. PETER PAN. Presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater & Theatreworks USA. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Mt. Lebanon High School, Mt. Lebanon. 412-456-6666. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: PRINTMAKING W/ STEPH TSONG. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. TOUR YOUR FUTURE: CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, GEMS & MINERALS LAB. Tour for students ages 9-17 who have an interest in geology. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-237-1637.

SUN 27

PETER PAN. Presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater & Theatreworks USA. 2 p.m. Seneca Valley Intermediate School, Harmony. 412-456-6666.

MON 28

FAMILY GAME NIGHT. Last Mon of every month, 5-8 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833. LITTLE SPROUTS: WE LOVE CRITTERS. Basic introduction into the world of gardens & the critters that live within. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS: NOT SO SPOOKY, SPOOKY SCIENCE. Learn about pumpkins, bats, spiders & all things, not so spooky about Halloween Science. Ages 2-6. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Carnegie Science


Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. PRESCHOOL ADVENTURES: PUMPKIN ADVENTURE. Ages 3-5. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

WED 30

CARRICK HAUNTED LIBRARY. Ages 6+. Oct. 30-31, 5-7:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 2, 2-4:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Carrick, Carrick. 412-882-3897.

OUTSIDE THU 24

T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK: RECONNECT W/ NATURE. Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru Oct. 24 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

FRI 25

CREATURES OF THE NIGHT HIKE. Hikes begin every half hour. 6:30-8 p.m. Succop Conservancy, Butler. 412-963-6100.

SAT 26

HALLOWEEN NIGHT HIKE. 6:30-8 p.m. Raccoon Creek State Park, Hookstown. 724-899-3611. MINGO CREEK PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 6:30 p.m. Mingo Creek Park Observatory, Finleyville. 724-348-6150. WAGMAN DARK SKY PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Presented by the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh. 6:25 p.m. Wagman Observatory, Frazier. 724-224-2510.

SUN 27

BLACK CATS & WITCHES’ HATS. Learn about myths & realities of Halloween, & walk through the darkened forest. 7 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

OTHER STUFF THU 24

BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. JONATHAN TOUBIN’S SOUL CLAP & DANCE CONTEST. Part of The Brooklyn Brewery Mash.

9:30 p.m. Remedy, Lawrenceville. 412-251-6058. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SENIOR OPTIONS: WHAT’S YOUR PLAN FOR CARING FOR YOUR SENIOR PARENTS? 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

designed for people w/ Parkinson’s Disease to explore the art of dance & live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. 412-387-2542. FALL FAMILY DAY. 18th century toys & games, apple roasting, cemetery walk, more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Historic Hanna’s Town, Greensburg. 724-532-1935. FARMERS MARKET WORKSHOP. w/ Brooklyn Brewery House Chef Andrew Gerson. Part of The Brooklyn Brewery Mash. brooklynbrewerymash.com/ pittsburgh 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. FALL COIN SHOW. Presented 412-471-1900. by the PA Association of FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL. Numismatists. 12-6 p.m., Fri., Feat. footage from videos Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and that were found at garage Sat., Oct. 26, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. sales, thrift stores, warehouses Monroeville Convention Center, & dumpsters across the country. Monroeville. Part of The Brooklyn Brewery Mash. brooklynbrewerymash.com/ pittsburgh 8 p.m. Regent Square BOOKS & BEER: FOODIES Theater, Regent Square. OF PITTSBURGH. 412-682-4111. Conversation & Q&A HOVERLA: UKRAINIAN going behind the scenes AMERICAN FILM of Pittsburgh’s growing FESTIVAL. Sat. Thru food scene. Part Oct. 26 Frick Fine Arts www. per of The Brooklyn Auditorium, Oakland. pa pghcitym .co Brewery Mash. http:// 412-624-4125. brooklynbrewerymash. INCLINE HAUNTED com/pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. WALKING TOUR. Pittsburgh Public Market, Begins at the bottom of the Strip District. 412-281-4505. Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru CONCILIATORY IMAGERY IN Oct. 26 412-302-5223. AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. & VISUAL ART. w/ musician & Korean grammar & basic author, Betty Douglas. 7 p.m. conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Church of the Ascension, Oakland. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-621-4361. 412-622-3151. DIE-CHOTOMY COUTURE KOREAN II. For those FASHION SHOW & HALLOWEEN who already have a basic BASH. Costume contests, understanding of Korean & are performances by Dynasty interested in increasing proficiency. Dance Team, Get Down Gang & Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. AMBITION, DJs, vendors, more. 412-622-3151. 8 p.m. Taverna 19, Strip District. NATIVE PLANT & 412-224-2720. SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE. EAT, DRINK & LEARN W/ Learn about native plants, BROOKLYN BREWERY HOUSE maintaining a healthy CHEF ANDREW GERSON. ecosystem, more. 8:45 a.m. Part of The Brooklyn Brewery Mellon Park, Shadyside. Mash. brooklynbrewerymash.com/ 412-441-4442 x 3925. pittsburgh 3-5 p.m. Giant Eagle SPANISH CONVERSATION Market District, Shadyside. GROUP. Friendly, informal. LISDOONVARNA At the Starbucks inside Target. MATCHMAKING FESTIVAL. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target 7:30 p.m. Mullaney’s Harp & Fiddle, East Liberty, East Liberty. Strip District. 412-642-6622. 412-362-6108. MAIN STREET WALKING STUDENT EMPOWERSHIP TOUR: NORTH SIDE & CONFERENCE. Conference FEDERAL ST. 12-1 p.m. Carnegie focusing on providing high Library, Allegheny, North Side. school & college students w/ 412-471-5808. training on how to become PITTSBURGH ENVIRONMENT active in student centered or & HEALTH CONFERENCE. community-based organizations. pittsburghenvironmenthealth.org 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Carlow University, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. David Lawrence Oakland. 412-471-7852. Convention Center, Downtown. 412-363-0185 x 26. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL AMATEUR PING PONG 2ND ANNUAL EAST END CHAMPIONSHIP. pittsburgh BOXING CHAMPIONSHIP. 6 p.m. tabletennis.com Oct. 26-27 Edgewood Community House, South Park, South Park. Edgewood. 412-731-3443. WILD CARD 4TH DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. PITTSBURGH. Dance classes Raffles, prizes, sales, more.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER OCTOBER 24th

WEREWOLF PARTY Co

THU 24 - SAT 26

FRI 25

KARAOKE

FULL LIST ONLINE

$

3.50

JEKYL AND HYDE

|

stume Contest

(best dressed were wolf )

NEWCASTLE WEREWOLF RED ALE AND PINNACLE VODKA FLAVORS

140 S. 18TH STREET

412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

Saturday, October 26, 2013 Celebrate Halloween and Bigham’s Tavern’s 3rd Birthday from 10PM-2AM Prizes for your Halloween Costumes! Including: most scary, most original, sexiest, and best group costume! DJ En Era from 10PM-2AM Halloween themed menu and Featured Spooky Drinks .44 wings all day every Wednesday Check our website or friend us on facebook for updates on Entertainment and other Specials! $2 Coors Light Drafts All Day Friday $3 Blue Moon Drafts All Day Sunday good friends

SAT 26 - SUN 27

good food

cold beer

321 BIGHAM STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15211 412.431.9313

SAT 26

www.bighamtavern.com open daily 11am-2am kitchen open until 1am, take out available

CONTINUES ON PG. 62

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Oct. 26-27 Wildcard, Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

SUN 27

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. EVIDENCE FOR REINCARNATION: DOCUMENTARY & DISCUSSION. w/ Andrew Nesky. Theosophical Society of Pittsburgh. 1:30-3 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. THE POWER OF POSITIVE DOG TRAINING. Presented by Victoria Stilwell, dog trainer and star of It’s Me or the Dog. Union Ballroom. 1-3 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000. SLOW SUPPER FALL HARVEST. Part of The Brooklyn Brewery Mash. brooklynbrewerymash.com/ pittsburgh 3 p.m. White Oak Farm, Allison Park.

MON 28

THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OBSCURE GAME NIGHT. Wed, 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING

ARTS CENTER STUDENT COMPANY. Auditions for Stage Door. Nov. 4-6. For more information: centerauditions.org or auditions@lppacenter.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-259-6443.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FALL FOODSHARE

Many local families struggle to put healthful food on the table. Help out by joining the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank’s Fall FoodShare Drive. Volunteers are needed to tend donation stations at area Giant Eagle stores, Saturdays and Sundays through Nov. 24. Many locations are available; families and groups are welcome. Visit www.pittsburghfoodbank.org/volunteer for information.

MARYLLOYD CLAYTOR DANCE COMPANY. Auditions for upcoming local cable access video productions. Oct. 31. Dancers/ models. For appointment, call or email marylloydclaytordnaceco@ verizon.net. 412-216-2616. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. KNOW THE SHOW THE REP. Auditions for BEFORE YOU GO: Heads. Oct. 29. Male/ WE WILL ROCK YOU. female equity principals. Pre-performance For appointment, information session . w ww per call or email ademara w/ theater critic, Chris a p ty ci pgh m @pointpark.edu. Rawson. 6:30 p.m. Trust .co Pittsburgh Playhouse, Arts Education Center, Oakland. 412-392-8141. Downtown. 412-456-6666. STEEL CITY IMPROV THEATER. Auditions for Improv House Teams. Nov. 3. Men/women ages 18+. A CONVERSATION W/ PAUL Must be familiar w/ long form O’NEILL & CAPT. “SULLY” SULLENBERGER. 7:30 p.m. improv. More information at Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. steelcityimprov.com/auditions. 412-338-1919. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. DETROIT STYLE URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. Accepting submissions for ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). showcase of locally written Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon lesbian, gay, bisexual, or Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. transgender-theme 1-act plays. 412-531-1912. INTRODUCTION TO REIKI. Jane Manuscript details at facebook. Critchfield, Nancy Murray, & Lauri com/events/519459561475242/ Bolland lead a workshop about 412-256-8109. this ancient healing art. Call to THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking reserve a spot. 6:30 p.m. East End performers & artists to

TUE 29

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey.blogspot. com/2013/08/insistent-light-firstannual-poetry.html. KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER. Seeking choreographers for the 2014 Next Stage Residency.

Email cover letter, artist statement, contact info, work sample & description to nextstage@ kelly-strayhorn.org. Web-based submissions preferred (Vimeo, YouTube, etc.) 412-363-3000. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seeking young composers to submit new works for annual Reading Session. pso.culturaldistrict.org/ event/6236/10th-annual-readingsession 412-392-4828. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

My girlfriend always responds positively when I initiate sex, but she hardly ever initiates sex with me. I realize that this can be a sensitive topic, and I don’t want to scare her by saying, “Please initiate sex more often!” So I do small things to let her know that I want her to initiate. I will lotion up in front of her after we shower. Or I’ll say something like “I wanted to fuck last night — maybe you can wear one of your sexy bras and thongs one day soon?” But it hasn’t worked. The only time she’ll initiate is if I haven’t initiated for a while and she’s sexually frustrated. But that can take days! GIRLFRIEND RARELY INITIATES NAKED DANCE

a history of manipulating people with idle suicide threats. But if you’re worried — maybe his mother is neglectful and/or nuts — you might want to listen to Episode 364 of the Savage Lovecast (you can find that episode, and 363 others, at savagelovecast.com). I took a question from a man whose girlfriend threatened suicide when he tried to dump her. Jill Harkavy-Friedman of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention had some excellent advice: Alert his friends and relatives, and pass the AFSP’s hotline number (1-800-273-TALK) on to them and on to the person making the threat. I would add: Don’t respond to his texts or voice mails, consider blocking his number, and forward any truly worrying emails to his mother.

Wow, your girlfriend is pretty fucking dense. I mean, she actually heard you say, “I wanted to fuck last night — maybe you can wear one of your sexy bras and thongs one day soon?” and somehow didn’t realize that what you meant was “Please initiate sex more often.” And a boyfriend smearing lotion on himself — who doesn’t know what that means? Um. Yeah. No. “I wanted to fuck last night — maybe you can wear one of your sexy bras and thongs one day soon?” does not auto-translate to “Please initiate sex more often.” The likely takeaway from that statement is “I wanted to fuck last night, but the granny panties/pajama bottoms/ hazmat Spanx you were wearing were such a turnoff that I couldn’t get it up.” And seeing your boyfriend “lotion up” doesn’t communicate “Please initiate sex more often.” The only thing it communicates for sure is “My boyfriend isn’t going to put up with dry skin.” You want your girlfriend to initiate sex more often? Tell her you want her to initiate sex more often. That will display more sensitivity than potentially confidence-shredding statements or the conspicuous application of skin moisturizer. But even if you’re straight with her, things are unlikely to change. She obviously has a lower libido than you do. Your desire for her cranks her up, so she’s good to go when you initiate. But she’s unlikely to feel the urge to initiate as often as you would like her to.

My girlfriend snooped on my browser history to see what porn I had been looking at. I’ve told her I look at porn, and she said she didn’t mind. My viewing habits are pretty vanilla except for BBW porn. It’s not my go-to, but it was what she found in my browser history the day she snooped. I’m not more attracted to overweight women than other women, but sometimes that type just does it for me. My girlfriend is overweight — not on par with the women in the videos — and now she’s worried her weight is the only reason I’m attracted to her. How can I put her at ease?

I’m a 21-year-old female. Two days ago, I broke up with my manipulative, insecure, long-distance boyfriend. I care for this man, but I need to live my life the way I want to, and that wasn’t possible in this relationship. The problem is, he’s been leaving voice mails, texting and emailing me threatening suicide. I’ve told his mother, but I don’t think she’s taking it seriously. I feel horrible, but I don’t want to talk to him because I refuse to get sucked back into his problems. How can I deal with this without getting personally involved?

HATE CRIME: One of the shitbags invited to speak at the gay-bash-a-thon known as the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., earlier this month called homophobia a myth. Gay people are the violent and intolerant ones, he argued, and Christians like him are the real victims. Later that same day — Oct. 12 — a gay man was attacked in Nova Scotia, in an apparent hate crime. Scott Jones was stabbed twice in the back and his throat was slashed: He is now paralyzed from the waist down. Scott is Canadian and has access to medical care because of socialism. But Scott faces a long struggle, and there will be expenses — retrofitting his home, loss of income — he’ll need help with. Please consider making a donation at supportscottjones.com.

YOU WANT YOUR GIRLFRIEND TO INITIATE SEX MORE OFTEN? TELL HER YOU WANT HER TO INITIATE SEX MORE OFTEN.

SINGLE AND WORRIED

Your ex-boyfriend’s mom presumably knows her son better than you, and she isn’t taking his threats seriously. So it’s possible that he has

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

BUSTED BOYFRIEND WORRIES

If you looked only at porn that featured conventionally attractive women, your girlfriend would be worried that you’re not attracted to her because of her size. But she caught you looking at BBW porn, and now she’s worried that her size is the only reason you’re attracted to her. I don’t think you can win this one, but you can try saying this: “I like women of all shapes and sizes, including yours — as you can clearly see if you look at all the porn sites I’ve visited.” I don’t think it’ll do much good, because your girlfriend probably doesn’t want you looking at porn at all — snooping and grilling aren’t signs of “OK with porn.” So use private browsing, clear your browser history or watch porn on a secure computer in a secret, undisclosed location.

Subscribe to a new season of the Savage Lovecast at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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1. Vermont ski resort 6. British financial concern founded in China 10. Nexus competitor 14. “Sorry, Charlie” 16. Running bull 17. Name on the label of the world’s most popular soft drink, until the year 1009 19. Brief albums, briefly 20. Rio Grande sch. 21. Company that insured Marlene Dietrich’s legs 22. Koko who signs, e.g. 23. Many a tweeted remark 24. IcyHat, e.g. 32. City where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake 33. Letter similar to a German Eszett 34. Japanese pitcher Hideo with two no-hitters 35. Weed wts. 36. Like the SATs 39. Brown, as it were 40. Things everywhere 42. Purim’s month 43. Be equivalent, as results 45. Genre associated with LDS 48. Answers to “do you solve mots croisés?” from anyone reading this 49. Right on 50. Racks up

53. Rooney who played Lisbeth Salander 55. Major label broken up in 2012 58. Programming language created by Bill Gates and Woody Allen in the 1970s 61. Bit of sediment 62. Get more research data than needed, just to be safe 63. “This doesn’t ___ well ...” 64. Military alliance that still doesn’t include Russia 65. Americans, casually, to people outside the U.S.

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1. 2012 Tony winner for Best Musical 2. Surgeon general under Reagan and Bush 3. Series conclusions: Abbr. 4. Leader repeatedly praised in the (doctored) Mandarin edition of Bill Clinton’s “My Life” 5. Junk mail addressee 6. Robust 7. Giant play opening, e.g.? 8. Include secretly in an email, say 9. 2004 Kim Basinger thriller about a phone 10. “Just turn the knob” 11. Nosegay 12. Quite dry 13. GPs, e.g.

15. Place with key cards 18. Sacha Baron Cohen character 22. King’s superior, often 23. Like Emir Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani 24. Step heavily 25. Moves very much unlike Jagger, more like sludge 26. Bond girl Galore 27. “The dude ___” 28. Kathmandu’s country 29. Goes bad, in a way 30. Architect who turned 96 in April 31. Sine’s reciprocal, in trig 37. Hyatt alternative 38. Body of water near St. Petersburg 41. Cause of problems

44. Proper place for a colon? 46. Prefix with trash and Disney 47. Librarian’s transports 50. Site with casts 51. Robert De ___ 52. Included on an email, not-so-secretly 53. Chandon’s partner in expensive alcohol 54. Hairstyle on the cover of Funkadelic’s “Maggot Brain” 55. Network that employed Rush Limbaugh for about two months 56. Oscar-winning Penn role 57. Prepares, as champagne 59. Fertility clinic cells 60. Popular Reddit feature, for short {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.23-10.30

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpios are obsessive, brooding, suspicious, demanding and secretive, right? That’s what traditional astrologers say, isn’t it? Well, no, actually. I think that’s a misleading assessment. It’s true that some Scorpios are dominated by the qualities I named. But my research shows that those types of Scorpios are generally not attracted to reading my horoscopes. My Scorpios tend instead to be passionately focused, deeply thoughtful, smartly discerning, intensely committed to excellence, and devoted to understanding the complex truth. These are all assets that are especially important to draw on right now. The world has an extraordinarily urgent need for the talents of you evolved Scorpios.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“If you’re in pitch blackness, all you can do is sit tight until your eyes get used to the dark.” That helpful advice appears in Norwegian Wood, a novel by Haruki Murakami. Now I’m passing it on to you, just in time for your cruise through the deepest, darkest phase of your cycle. When you first arrive, you may feel blind and dumb. Your surroundings might seem impenetrable and your next move unfathomable. But don’t worry. Refrain from drawing any conclusions whatsoever. Cultivate an empty mind and an innocent heart. Sooner or later, you will be able gather the clues you need to take wise action.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Have you thought about launching a crowdfunding campaign for your pet project? The coming weeks might be a good time. Have you fantasized about getting involved in an organization that will help save the world even as it feeds your dreams to become the person you want to be? Do it! Would you consider hatching a benevolent conspiracy that will serve as an antidote to an evil conspiracy? Now is the time. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you have more power than usual to build alliances. Your specialties between now and Dec. 1 will be to mobilize group energy and round up supporters and translate high ideals into practical actions.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

In 2008, writer Andrew Kessler hung out with scientists at NASA’s mission control as they looked for water on the planet Mars. Three years later, he published a book about his experiences, Martian Summer: Robot Arms, Cowboy Spacemen, and My 90 Days With the Phoenix Mars Mission. To promote sales, he opened a new bookstore that was filled with copies of just one book: his own. I suggest that you come up with a comparable plan to promote your own product, service, brand or personality. The time is right to summon extra chutzpah as you expand your scope.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Right now you have a genius for escaping, for dodging, for eluding. That could be expressed relatively negatively or relatively positively. So for instance, I don’t recommend that you abscond from boring but crucial responsibilities. You shouldn’t ignore or stonewall people whose alliances with you are important to keep healthy. On the other hand, I encourage you to fly, fly away from onerous obligations that give you little in return. I will applaud your decision to blow off limitations that are enforced by neurotic habits, and I will celebrate your departure from energy-draining situations that manipulate your emotions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“I’m greedy,” says painter David Hockney, “but I’m not greedy for money — I think that can be a burden — I’m greedy for an exciting life.” According to my analysis, Aries, the cosmos is now giving you the go-ahead to cultivate Hockney’s style of greed. As you head out in quest of adventure, here’s an important piece of advice to keep in mind. Make sure you formulate an intention to seek out thrills that educate and inspire you rather than those that scare you and damage you. It’s up to you which kind you attract.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

French philosopher Simone Weil described the following scene: “Two prisoners in adjoining cells communicate with each other by knocking on the wall. The wall is the thing which separates them but is also their means of communication.” This muted type of conversation is a useful metaphor for the current state of one of your important alliances, Taurus. That which separates you also connects you. But I’m wondering if it’s time to create a more direct link. Is it possible to bore a hole through the barrier between you so you can create a more intimate exchange?

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

“As a bee seeks nectar from all kinds of flowers, seek teachings everywhere,” advises the Tibetan Buddhist holy text known as the Dzogchen Tantra. That’s your assignment, Virgo. Be a student 24 hours a day, seven days a week — yes, even while you’re sleeping. (Maybe you could go to school in your dreams.) Regard every experience as an opportunity to learn something new and unex-

“I had tended to view waiting as mere passivity,” says author Sue Monk Kidd in her memoir. “When I looked it up in my dictionary, however, I found that the words ‘passive’ and ‘passion’ come from the same Latin root, pati, which means ‘to endure.’ Waiting is thus both passive and passionate. It’s a vibrant, contemplative work. … It involves listening to disinherited voices within, facing the wounded holes in the soul, the denied and undiscovered, the places one lives falsely.” This is excellent counsel for you, Gemini. Are you devoted enough to refrain from leaping into action for now? Are you strong enough to bide your time?

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

“Venice is to the man-made world what the Grand Canyon is to the natural one,” said travel writer Thomas Swick in an article praising the awe-inciting beauty of the Italian city. “When I went to Venice,” testified French novelist Marcel Proust, “my dream became my address.” American author Truman Capote chimed in that “Venice is like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one go.” I bring this up, Cancerian, because even if you don’t make a pilgrimage to Venice, I expect that you will soon have the chance, metaphorically speaking, to consume an entire box of chocolate liqueurs at one go. Take your sweet time. Nibble slowly. Assume that each bite will offer a distinct new epiphany.

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pected. Be ready to rejoice in all the revelations, both subtle and dramatic, that will nudge you to adjust your theories and change your mind.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Don’t you wish your friends and loved ones would just somehow figure out what you want without you having to actually say it? Wouldn’t it be great if they were telepathic or could read your body language so well that they would surmise your secret thoughts? Here’s a news bulletin: IT AIN’T GOING TO HAPPEN! EVER! That’s why I recommend that you refrain from resenting people for not being mind-readers, and instead simply tell them point-blank what you’re dreaming about and yearning for. They may or may not be able to help you reach fulfillment, but at least they will be in possession of the precise information they need to make an informed decision. Imagine you get three wishes on one condition: They can’t benefit you directly, but have to be wished on someone else’s behalf. Freewill astrology.com.

REMEMBER

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

Do you have any interest in reworking — even revolutionizing — your relationship with the past? If so, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do so. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you attempt any of the following actions: 1. Forgive yourself for your former failures and missteps. 2. Make atonement to anyone whom you hurt out of ignorance. 3. Reinterpret your life story to account for the ways that more recent events have changed the meaning of what happened long ago. 4. Resolve old business as thoroughly as you can. 5. Feel grateful for everyone who helped make you who you are today.

Les Ludwig for Mayor of Pittsburgh

VOTE FOR LES, END THE CORRUPTION MESS!!! Mr. Peduto wants to grab all the money that he can as a candidate while he speaks of money limitations for legislation in city council. He promises four TV debates and there are none; at the same time Les Ludwig promotes a new way to finance government, and reduce taxes. And, although it took city council 7 1/2 years to pass the legislation, 1 million has already been developed in non-taxed revenue for the city. 3 to 5 million is projected for 2014. In my next 4 years I foresee enough non-tax revenue to live up to the promise of reducing the taxes as they now stand.

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Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

$40/hr

724-519-2950

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Therapeutic Massage

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

THIS SPACE! call 412.316.3342

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Shadyside Location

330-373-0303

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

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GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

412-441-1185

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

TIGER SPA

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

724-519-7896

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

with this ad

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

412-319-7530

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

$10 Coupon

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

(across from Eat n’ Park)

STAR

Therapy

GRAND OPENING!

FULL BODY MASSAGE

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Superior Chinese Massage

massage

Judy’s Oriental Massage

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Credit Cards Accepted


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

Bariatric Weightloss, LLC

412.246.8965, ext. 9

No Long Term Contract No Start Up Fee

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL! Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

J&S GLASS

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Health Services

JADE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

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LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

CONSTIPATION? ENDOMETRIOSIS? CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIARRHEA?

HIGH CHOLESTEROL?

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE!

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with response design of our ads and the I have to they evoke. When I know jects in advertise for research sub ediately the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

call 412.316.3342 — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study

Follow us on

(UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367 70

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.23/10.30.2013

@PGHCityPaper


WATER FOUL {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

FLORENTIJN HOFMAN’S giant rubber duck was a success long before

it began nesting alongside Point State Park last month. Primed with childhood nostalgia and reports of the duck’s popularity in China, Pittsburghers almost had no choice but to like it. Which raises the question: Is the now-departed duck really a great work of art? Or merely an artistic franchise opening in a new market? Shouldn’t art risk something — even the public’s displeasure? For art to truly succeed, shouldn’t the artist have to risk failure? By that standard, most Pittsburghers missed the real work of art that recently plied the Allegheny River. On Oct. 13, a group of guerrilla artists calling themselves the “Entropy Syndicate” (http://entropysyndicate.es) launched an oversize can of Campbell’s “Duck Soup” from the riverbank opposite Hofman’s duck. Within seconds, the work proved its aesthetic merit by tipping into

the water and being reduced to waterlogged tatters. The project would barely have made a ripple had it not been for City Paper photographer Heather Mull, who documented it with these photos. (We’ve obscured the artists’ faces so as not to jeopardize their shot at future MacArthur Genius Grants.) The giant soup can “was designed as a tribute to a great man and visionary artist,” a Syndicate representative said in an emailed response to City Paper’s queries. “I am speaking of course of Groucho Marx.” But “in a last-minute artistic decision, we decided to float the can sideways. Unfortunately, the label was made of paper, which we discovered is not resistant to water.” The sculpture’s disintegration “was a fitting statement on the fragility of life,” the collective insists. It does acknowledge, however, that “It has been suggested that we make the next version waterproof.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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October 23, 2013