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EVENTS 10.18 – 8pm UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: THE MONKEY TALKS, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10/FREE for the first 50 Members who register

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013. Which local restaurants and retailers, musicians and muckety-mucks were crowned with glory by our readers this year? Find out!

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“I’m not just fighting Team Deb. I’m fighting an entire army.� — Pittsburgh City Council candidate Tony Ceoffe on the forces backing rival Deborah Gross, including Bill Peduto and the Democratic Party

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“Fossil fuels are bankrupting our future.� — Whit Jones of the Energy Action Coalition on the need for divestment

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[MUSIC] guess the cops are just as bored as the 21 “Ikids.� — Sewickley native Jackson Scott, on the state of his hometown

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[ARTS] offers a vision of eternity, a scenario 82 “Itwhere these bodies are flesh and spirit at the same time.� — David Berger on Kurt Hentschlager’s immersive artwork Hive

[LAST PAGE] goal is simple: to revitalize and 111 “Our energize the neighborhood so that it can attract new people.� — Gena Turner, on efforts to revitalize the city’s longoverlooked Elliott neighborhood

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 88 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 98 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 99 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 100 +

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers REBECCA NUTTALL, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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INCOMING

THE SPECIAL ELECTION TO REPLACE PATRICK DOWD HAS BECOME A DIZZYING BLEND OF OLD AND NEW.

Most Port Authority pay stations functioning, with some notable exceptions (Oct. 9) The biggest issue I’ve encountered is that you can’t buy the cards from the machine. … I have no idea why Pittsburgh is so far behind other cities on this. It’s actually appalling when you visit other places and they just make it easy to get around. — Web comment from “Bex” I’d use the card, but on the T I have to wait in line behind all of the people paying cash. With my normal bus pass, I can just show the booth attendant and walk right on by. — Web comment from “Alex” Keeping fare booths open is much faster because you can open all three or six doors for maximum efficiency! I wish the Port Authority could have EVERY fare booth staffed along the system during every special event that crush[es] the Light Rail System. — Web comment from “Samuel J. Hurst”

The rise in urban chickenkeeping has led to unforeseen problems (Oct. 9) The very title of this article is misleading — what are the “unforeseen problems”? Only one problem was identified — the appearance of about 30 additional chickens in one area shelter last year. Moreover, that single problem is highly foreseeable — when an animal becomes more popular and numerous in a given area, it is almost inevitable that more of those animals will end up in area shelters. — Web comment from “More facts, less fluff” Perhaps [this] article was simply encouraging responsible, thoughtful and wellresearched decisions. Anyone willing to raise a chicken in an unconventional setting is probably well-intentioned, and could benefit from this kind of information being made widely available in a column like this. — Web comment from “Sarahlovescitypaper”

“Progressive before progressive was cool in Pittsburgh. RIP: Michelle Madoff” — Oct. 14 tweet from Chris Briem (@chrisbriem) on the death of the former Pittsburgh city councilor

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

The five hopefuls for the District 7 City Council vacancy gathered at a candidates’ forum, sponsored by the Bloomfield Citizens Council, on Oct. 9. From left: Tony Ceoffe, Tom Fallon, Deb Gross, Jim Wudarczyk and David Powell.

SEEKING COUNCIL M

AYBE MORE than any part of Pittsburgh, City Council District 7 contains both relics of the region’s industrial past and signposts for its future. Lawrenceville’s steel-era sheds have been given over to robotic engineers, while Bloomfield’s historic “Little Italy” bristles with nonItalian restaurants. The Strip District, long Pittsburgh’s open-air market, faces a potentially huge development project, while even bedroom communities like Highland Park and Morningside are perking up. No surprise, then, that the special election to replace Patrick Dowd has also become a dizzying blend of old and new. Much has changed since Dowd first won office in 2007 — and even since he re-

signed to head a new nonprofit, Allies for Children, in June. Six years ago, Bill Peduto was striving to dismantle a “Democratic machine”; today, he is poised to become the city’s next mayor. What’s more, Peduto’s choice

taking on the political machine — even though Ceoffe had the party’s endorsement when he challenged Dowd in 2011. “I’m not just fighting Team Deb,” says Ceoffe. “I’m fighting an entire army.” GROSS AND CEOFFE aren’t the only can-

Two candidates lead field of five in race to represent District 7 {BY CHRIS POTTER} to replace Dowd, Highland Park consultant Deb Gross, has what neither Peduto nor Dowd ever got: the Democratic Party endorsement. And suddenly, it’s Lawrenceville’s Tony Ceoffe who claims to be

didates in the running. The five-person field also includes:

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Tom Fallon, a former staffer for former City Councilor and state Sen. Jim Ferlo. Fallon now runs a business rehabilitating blighted homes, while remaining active in local civic groups. Fallon, of Lawrenceville, notes that because this is a special election, the winner will take office this year: “We will have to go in and judge [the city’s proposed 2014] CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

SEEKING COUNCIL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

budget right away.” The only candidate

with government experience, Fallon also touts a willingness to work with Peduto.

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Dave Powell, of Morningside, a Libertarian who supports a land-value tax, which would be levied against the value of the parcel of property, rather than the structures built upon it. (Such a tax, he contends, will discourage land speculation and encourage investment.) Powell also pledges not to vote for any ordinance that would further the “war on drugs.”

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Jim Wudarczyk, a Lawrenceville neighborhood historian who works for a packaging company, bills himself as business-minded and socially conservative. Alone among the candidates, he expressed a strong preference for hiring the city’s next police chief from within the current bureau’s ranks; while other candidates supported a nationwide search, “We don’t need to spend a fortune in taxpayers’ money,” Wudarczyk said at a Sept. 26 forum.

controversial plan to develop 55 acres adjacent to the Strip District — Gross describes herself in “listening mode.” Preservationists have expressed special concern about the fate of the Produce Terminal, a low-slung landmark that Buncher intends to partially demolish. Ceoffe says that while “I don’t want to see the terminal come down,” he’s skeptical about what other uses might be found for it. “I’m sure Wholey’s doesn’t want to see another fish dealer there.” There are some policy differences. Ceoffe, for one, supports ending the state’s Act 47 financial oversight of city finances. (That could give unions more maneuvering room in contract talks, though Ceoffe contends Act 47 allows local officials to avoid being held accountable for decisions.) Gross, by contrast, agrees with Peduto that while “we’ve come a long way” under Act 47, “I don’t think we should be overconfident in our ability to balance the budget. … I don’t see a reason for rushing out of it.” But in this race, the major flashpoint has been the race itself, and who represents the real challenge to politics as usual.

“IN THIS RACE, THE MAJOR FLASHPOINT HAS BEEN THE RACE ITSELF, AND WHO REPRESENTS THE REAL CHALLENGE TO POLITICS AS USUAL.”

But Gross, a Highland Park consultant with a background in the arts, is the Democratic nominee and the frontrunner. And Ceoffe has been her sharpest critic. Oddly, when Gross and Ceoffe talk about any issue except each other, it can be difficult to discern a difference between them. Both boast of years of civic involvement: Gross has been especially active in the arts scene and in historic preservation, while Ceoffe has been active in Lawrenceville, where his father once headed the community group Lawrenceville United. Both take a hard line on health-care giant UPMC, backing a lawsuit challenging its tax-exempt status. Both also support a ban on drilling for natural gas within city limits. And with Lawrenceville on the comeup — and fears of becoming “the next South Side” on the rise — both espouse a grassroots approach to addressing community needs and concerns. Both say, for example, that like Dowd, they would support neighborhood groups trying to alter the expansion plans of the Thunderbird, Café, a Butler Street bar and music venue. On the district’s highest-profile development — the Buncher Company’s

GROSS NARROWLY won the Democratic Party’s endorsement this summer, arguably with the help of a handful of appointments to fill vacant committee spots — appointments suggested to County Democratic Chair Nancy Patton Mills, weeks before the endorsement, by a Peduto ally. Ceoffe filed suit to overturn the endorsement, but lost. Forced to run as an independent, he observes that “District 7 has lost an independent voice” — one he is best positioned to restore. Gross has made numerous public appearances with Peduto and his ally, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. And Peduto confirms that when his campaign volunteers door-knock and phone-bank in the district, they tout Gross as well. “Democratic nominees support Democratic nominees,” Peduto says, and Gross has been a longtime ally. “If I were to abandon her at the time she needs my help, then [Ceoffe] would be right, and I’d have sold out.” While neither Peduto nor Fitzgerald “needs someone on council who says they are gunning for them,” Gross says, “I’m a grown-up with my own beliefs CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

SEEKING COUNCIL, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

and my own supporters. No one has ever accused me of being a pushover.” “How can you expect someone to be independent when she’s getting that kind of help?” Ceoffe counters. “If she wins, it’s going to be a pure rubber stamp on council.” Ceoffe, by contrast, promises to be a “check” on Peduto, and to promote “government transparency.” If it seems odd to hear the independent-minded Peduto praise party loyalty, skeptics may be surprised to hear Ceoffe complaining about it and calling for government transparency. Ceoffe was also a ward chair in the Allegheny County Democratic Committee until he stepped down to run as an independent this year; his day job, which he also gave up to campaign, was in placement services for the city Housing Authority. “A lot of people may chuckle when I say I’m against the nepotistic form of government,” he says. But, he says, “You can’t say that just because you’re a ward chair, you aren’t qualified” for a government job. Ceoffe’s brother, Justin, was hired in early September as a fiscal auditor by City Controller Michael Lamb, who ran against Peduto earlier this year before calling off his own mayoral bid. “We went through the regular process; he was on the Civil Service Commission list” of eligible hires, says Lamb spokesman Doug Anderson, who denies political ties played any role. Ceoffe says his brother

is “well educated and well qualified” for the post but adds, “My brother is not a candidate, and [his hiring] has nothing to do with the campaign.” Concerns about Ceoffe’s political ties seem increasingly moot. Earlier this month, the county committee ousted Justin Ceoffe for signing his brother’s election petition: Party bylaws require commiteepeople to support the nominee. Party officials also ousted three members of the Turpin family, a prominent bloc in Bloomfield’s 8th ward who supported Ceoffe with yard signs. Ceoffe calls it “unfortunate” that the party is “trying to take away people’s choices.” He adds, “There are committee members who were handing out Romney/Ryan stickers in 2012.” The Turpins ascribe their ouster to Peduto and Fitzgerald’s efforts to remake the party in their own image. “Bill Peduto does not have the moral stature to be mayor,” Mike Turpin says. Peduto bristles at the notion that there is anything wrong with backing an ally. “If we don’t build and organize, then we lose,” he says. In any event, he says, the candidates’ merits stand on their own. Voters in District 7, he says “have a candidate who has supported a progressive, versus a candidate who has stood against all that. Tony Ceoffe can’t point to me and say, ‘It’s all Bill Peduto’s fault.’” C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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SHUT OUT PennDOT to spend $240,000 to fence off homeless camps under highways {BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN} FOR THE SECOND time in four months, Tony

Ferguson is facing eviction from his home — a spot he’s found beneath a highway overpass. And in both cases, the reason has been the same: a PennDOT decision to fence off homeless camps Downtown. “In a way, I can understand why they do that,” says Ferguson, who has been homeless for five months. Still, he asks, “They have money to fence the bridges off; why not [fund] shelters?” According to spokesman Steve Cowan, PennDOT will spend a total of $240,000 to fence off areas around bridges and highways near the Veterans Bridge, Crosstown Boulevard, Bigelow Boulevard and along ramps near Route 579, including some on the North Side. The project should be mostly complete by Oct. 16. The eviction of seven new areas comes after PennDOT cleared camps on the North Side in July. That sweep included one of the city’s most populous encampments,

{PHOTO BY ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

Tony Ferguson relocated to under Bigelow Boulevard after being evicted from a North Side encampment.

which was located under Route 579 near Anderson Street and drew 30 people some nights. Cowan cited public-health concerns as a reason for the evictions, saying the camps are often unsanitary and can pose structural problems, especially when people light fires. There has been an increase in com-

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plaints about the homeless camps, Cowan says: “There are obviously some spots where encampments are visible from the roadway … especially close to PNC Park. There’s lots of garbage generated under the bridges — that’s where people walk.” Homeless advocates and American Civil Liberties Union lawyers acknowledge PennDOT can evict people from its property. But they contend that the homeless pose little risk, while moving them could disrupt efforts at providing services — especially because there is little coordination between PennDOT and social-service agencies in the region. “It’s certainly within [PennDOT’s] rights,” says Jim Withers, the founder of Operation Safety Net, which helps provide medical care to the homeless through the Pittsburgh Mercy Health System. “But the thing is, you take their stuff and they just end up somewhere else in the same circumstances.” Ferguson hopes his and his wife’s days of living outdoors are numbered. They are banking on help from Operation Safety Net, which offers six months of rental assistance to get people off the streets. Breanna Jay, the housing-crisis coordinator for Community Human Services, says evictions affect the agency’s ability to offer such services. Once people are scattered, she says, they often lose medications, IDs and other important documents, which can make enrolling in medical and housing programs more difficult. Asked why PennDOT didn’t contact social-service agencies in advance of the eviction effort, Cowan says, “Because we’re

not a social-service agency; we’re protecting our structures.” But, he acknowledges: “There hasn’t been specific damage to the structures that I’m aware of.” PennDOT isn’t all to blame, says Mac McMahon, director of homeless assistance programs at Community Human Services. He says social-service agencies haven’t always adequately managed the camps, and they should play a role in starting conversations with local leaders to coordinate their efforts. McMahon plans to create a quarterly meeting between social-service organizations and officials with the city, county, public works, police and PennDOT, to find ways of responding to problems like homelessness beyond “putting people in jail or moving them around like a chess board.” Cowan says he sees no reason why PennDOT wouldn’t participate. Concerns about the legality of the eviction process were the basis of an ACLU lawsuit against the city 10 years ago, and have recently drawn the attention of the federal courts. “There were sweeps going on and we got complaints that people were losing medications, important family photographs,” says Witold Walczak, legal director for the Pennsylvania ACLU. “The government can’t just take the belongings of people off the streets and destroy them.” In a settlement agreement, the city said it would give seven days’ notice before clearing camps. It also agreed to store personal property of value for a year. That agreement has expired, and wouldn’t have applied to PennDOT anyway. But it is based on a legal theory that has gained traction. A federal court ruled last year, for example, that the city of Los Angeles erred when it destroyed the property of homeless individuals. For its part, PennDOT plans to leave all personal property in the camps for at least several months after the fences are installed, Cowan says. Those who want to retrieve their property from behind the fence will have to call PennDOT. PennDOT has posted signs to that effect, but the sign at Ferguson’s camp doesn’t make the process clear. It reads: “Area to be cleared and fenced … your belongings will be removed and thrown away. For items of value contact Operation Safety Net [or] PennDOT.” ACLU staff attorney Sara Rose says the language is problematic. “They’re not saying your items will be stored and here’s how to collect them. They’re saying, ‘We’ll throw them away.’” A Z I M M E RM A N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

[GREEN LIGHT]

DIVESTED INTERESTS {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} EVERY WEEK, it seems, arrives fresh confirmation that human-caused climate change is real, and new evidence that its effects will be even worse than expected. For instance, a recent report published in Nature predicts that in just three decades, every year will be hotter than 2005, the hottest year ever globally. Yet week by week, the response from America’s ruling class is the same: business as usual. How to spur action? One new tactic is divestment: prodding universities and other large institutions to pull their money out of the petroleum, coal and gas companies whose products are the single biggest source of the greenhouse gasses warming the planet and acidifying the oceans. Divestment, led by Bill McKibben’s climate group 350.org’s Fossil Free Campaign, is gaining momentum. Fossil Free — slogan: “It’s wrong to profit from wrecking the climate” — says that more than 300 colleges and universities have divestment campaigns (though only a few small schools have actually divested). More than a dozen cities, from Seattle to State College, Pa., have committed to divestment. And in July, President Obama approvingly slipped the term “disinvest” into a speech on climate change. Divestment is also on the agenda of Power Shift 2013, a national summit for young climate activists that visits Pittsburgh Oct. 18-21. Some 10,000 participants, from all 50 states, are expected; McKibben is a keynote speaker. “Fossil fuels are bankrupting our future,” says Whit Jones, campaign director of the Energy Action Coalition, the aggregation of 50 youth-led groups that convenes Power Shift. And divestment, he says, can “undermine the power of the fossil-fuel industry.” Can it? Raymond J. Bradley, an internationally known climatologist, said in an Oct. 2 talk at the University of Pittsburgh that divestment campaigns are ultimately a distraction from the real problem: Congress. Like other critics of divestment, Bradley argues that it’s unlikely to lower share prices for the companies that produce the energy on which the world economy depends. He says it’s even less likely to prompt submission to 350.org’s demands that industry cease exploration for new hydrocarbons and pledge “to keep 80 percent of their current

reserves underground forever.” Such demands are indeed in line with the urgency for change expressed in the new report from the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, whose grim outlook on rising oceans and extreme weather Bradley discussed at Pitt. But to get there by divestment “seems to me … a totally unrealistic goal,” says Bradley, who directs the Climate System Research Center at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Instead, Bradley says, we need effective federal legislation to reduce fossil-fuel consumption and encourage renewable energy — like a carbon tax whose proceeds would be rebated to citizens. And the reason we don’t already have such a law, he says, is because of “maybe a dozen people in Congress who have been obstacles to any legislation.” Such deniers are typically backed by fossil-fuel industry cash. Though Congress houses many climate-deniers, Bradley blames key roadblockers like Rep. Joe Barton, the Texas Republican who chairs the House Committee on Energy & Commerce. Other influential denialists include Oklahoma Sen. James Inhofe and California Rep. Darrell Issa. Bradley knows whereof he speaks: He was among 17 climate scientists whom Inhofe demanded the Justice Department indict for “unlawful use of federal funds and potential ethical misconduct” — all based on Inhofe’s belief that man-made climate change is a “hoax.” Barton, too, has targeted Bradley and other scientists. Bradley details such campaigns in his book Global Warming and Political Intimidation. Unseating entrenched denialists won’t be easy. But Bradley says it’s less quixotic than divestment. Divestment supporters counter that this is also a moral issue; as with South African apartheid in the 1980s, and tobacco in the 1990s, a divestment campaign “really opens up the opportunity for broader action on these issues, like legislative action,” says the Energy Action Coalition’s Jones. “Getting climate denialists out of Congress is important,” Jones agrees. But “there isn’t going to be a silver bullet. We need a host of people … pursuing a multitude of strategies.” However, as Bradley says, “People have only so much time and energy.” He might also be talking about the planet.

IS FOSSIL-FUEL DIVESTMENT A DISTRACTION?

From Pumpkin Orange to Mum Magenta. Experience the full color spectrum at Phipps. Our Fall Flower Show features chrysanthemums in the season’s ½nest shades of yellow, orange, purple and red, beautifully arranged in festive, fall-inspired scenes. And make sure to see our all-new Garden Railroad, Phipps Prehistoric Park. For details, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

D RI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Howl at the Moon Come as you are, or costume to celebrate the full moon! @ The Mattress Factory Art Museum 505 Jacksonia Street Live Music - Silent Auction - Open Bar 7:00pm Preview & Appetizers 10:00pm Costume Contest

October 19th, 2013 All Night : 7-11pm $75 Each / $125 Couple 8 or more, $100 per Couple Witching Hour : 8 -11pm $60 Each / $100 Couple Students (21+) $40 Each / $75 Couple

For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.ccfa.org/chapters/wpawv Questions? Please call our office at 412-823-8272

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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News of the Weird first reported successful “stool implants” among family members in 2007 (to cure infections such as C. difficile by introducing the donor’s “good” microbes to overcome an imbalance of “bad” bacteria). In 2012, however, two University of CaliforniaDavis neurosurgeons boldly extended the cutting-edge treatment for three patients with a highly malignant brain tumor unresponsive to treatment. The doctors tried infusing bowel bacteria directly into the tumor, but the patients died, nonetheless. Although the patients had given fully informed consent, the school in August 2013 pressured Drs. J. Paul Muizelaar and Rudolph Schrot to resign for having violated internal and FDA procedures.

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Benefits: WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA / WEST VIRGINIA CHAPTER

It is well known that hospitals charge for medical supplies far in excess of what the products would cost at drugstores, but an August New York Times investigation of “saline drips” vividly demonstrated the disconnect. Though Medicare reimburses $1.07 for a 1-liter plastic bag of saltwater (supplied by a subsidiary of Morton Salt), White Plains (N.Y.) Hospital charged patients’ insurance companies like Aetna $91 per bag. Other hospitals decline to charge per-bag, listing only “IV therapy” of, for example, $787 for hooking up the drip.

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In August, Kenneth Enlow, 52, pleaded guilty after a woman found him the month before in a privy in White Water Park in Tulsa County, Okla., “standing with his head and shoulders out of the hole … covered in feces,” according to a deputy. Enlow’s initial explanation was that his girlfriend had knocked him unconscious with a tire iron and dumped him there.

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The Dayton Daily News reported in September that an audit of Dayton lawyer Ben Swift (the highest-paid court-appointed public defender in Ohio, at $142,900 in a recent year) revealed several invoices demanding government payment for workdays of more than 20 hours, and in one case, 29. Swift’s attorney said his client was guilty only of bad record-keeping.

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From the world’s cosmetic-surgery capital (South Korea, where one woman in five has had at least one procedure) comes the “Smile Lipt” offered by Aone Plastic Surgery in the city of Yongin, designed to produce a permanent smile (associated with success). The Smile Lipt turns downward-drooping lip corners upward, to allow a persistent smile resembling that of Batman’s nemesis, The Joker.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

A 63-year-old man in Bakersfield, Calif., finally had surgery in August, after 14 years waiting, during which his set of tumors grew to 200 pounds. Bakersfield surgeon Vip Dev noted that the sprawled tumors dragged the floor when the man sat and that the surgery was complicated by the patient’s shape, which could not be accommodated by the hospital’s MRI and CT scan machines.

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In 2010, Chinese agencies stepped up “birth tourism” packages for rich pregnant women to book vacations in America timed to their due dates — to exploit the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee of citizenship to any-

one born here. A September USA Today report indicated that more Chinese mothers now prefer to land in the U.S. territory of Northern Mariana Islands (where birth also bestows citizenship), to the consternation of Islands officials, who would prefer traditional Chinese tourists instead of the “birthers.”

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At Hong Kong’s traditional “Hungry Ghost” festival in August, in which people burn fake money on top of ancestors’ graves to support their afterlife styles, a weaker economy and inflation seem to have upped the ante for the gifts. An August Wall Street Journal dispatch noted that the denominations of burnable “currency” sold in stores have appreciated, including one “valued” at $130 billion. (Some festivalgoers asked how the ancestor could expect change from such a bill if he needed to make a small afterlife purchase.)

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The family of the great Native American Olympic athlete and Oklahoma native Jim Thorpe (1888-1953) was so disappointed that the then-governor of Oklahoma would not properly honor Thorpe on his death that one faction of his family moved the body to Pennsylvania, where he had no discernible ties but where municipal officials eagerly offered to name a town after him. Since then, Jim Thorpe, Pa. (current population, 4,800), has withstood legal challenges seeking to return the body to Oklahoma, including a recent federal court decision upholding the entire town as a Native American “museum.” One grandson said that Thorpe spoke to him at a sweat lodge in Texas in 2010, telling him to leave the body in Jim Thorpe, with “no more pain created in my name.”

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Anthony Alleyne appeared in News of the Weird in 2003 for turning his Hinckley, England, home into a replica of the command center of Star Trek’s starship Enterprise (including transporter control, warp core drive, infinity mirror, etc.). When he later tried to sell it, he learned that, somehow, potential buyers failed to value the house as much as Alleyne imagined. In September 2013, Alleyne was back in the news as Leicester Crown Court sentenced him to 34 months in prison for viewing child pornography — a diversion that he blamed on years of depression following marital difficulties and, of course, the brutal real-estate market.

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The Raelian sect made headlines in 1998, when “Bishop” Brigitte Boisselier ran a human-cloning start-up planning to charge $200,000 to make identical twins. Raelian’s core belief is that humanity descended from extraterrestrials arriving on spaceships whose inhabitants explained to Raelian founder Claude Vorilhon that life’s purpose is to experience sexual pleasure. Recently, a Raelian “priestess,” Nadine Gary, has turned the sect’s attention to counseling victims of the anti-pleasure female genital mutilation, which, though horrifyingly painful, remains traditional among some African societies, and enlisted a prominent U.S. surgeon to undo the procedure, pro bono. Wrote London’s The Guardian, in an August dispatch from the surgeon’s San Francisco clinic, “[J]ust 12 minutes of delicate scalpel work (to restore the clitoris) removes a lifetime of discomfort.”

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COREY BARDELL LAVA LOUNGE

Corey Bardell is originally from Altoona, PA, but has resided in the South Side for the past three years. He has been in the industry since he was 16 years old and currently bartends and manages the Lava Lounge in the South Side. His favorite part about working at Lava Lounge is the staff and the clientele.

carnegielibrary.org

Paints By Kait www.paintsbykait.com KaitSchoeb@gmail.com www.facebook.com/paintsbykait

The staff is very team oriented and the clientele is unique to any other bar in the South Side. Corey makes an amazing mojito, but it happens to be his least favorite drink to make. Come visit him at Lava Lounge and ask for the low calorie ABSOLUT Delicious Hibiskus.

COREY’S FEATURED RECIPE:

Contact for commissioned art!

The ABSOLUT Delicious Hibiskus 1 oz. ABSOLUT Hibiskus 12 Pomegranate Seeds Splash of Lemon Lime Soda Splash of Red Wine Orange Slice

LO CALO W RIE!

Pour the ABSOLUT Hibiskus and pomegranate seeds eds in a shaker wit with ice and shake vigorously for 10-15 seconds. Pour in a rocks glass with ice cubes. Add a splash of lemon lime soda. Layer it with red wine. Garnish with an orange and enjoy.

Throughout the month of October, 10% of all purchases from www.paintsbykait.com will be donated to Susan G. Komen, Pittsburgh.

LAVA LOUNGE 2204 EAST CARSON STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA 15203 412-431-5282 www.lavaloungepgh.com [ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.]

To learn more about Lava Lounge and Corey’s ABSOLUT Delicious Hibiskus, click on the CPTVPlayer on pghcitypaper.com or scan the QR code

ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY.

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B SQUARED {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} If you like Squirrel Hill’s 61C Cafe, you’ll surely enjoy Regent Square’s new 61B Cafe. It’s got the same owners, the same menu and some agreeable new wrinkles. Gary Kaboly and Kate Knorr opened the B in September, nearly a year after they were first approached by the owners of the old Katerbean coffeehouse, who own the prominent building on South Braddock Avenue but wanted out of the coffee business. For the first time since Katerbean opened, in the ’90s, Regent Square went without a coffeehouse while workers totally remodeled the interior, removing Katerbean’s distinctive seating “platform” and giving the place its first sidewalk entry in decades. (Katerbean customers entered through a side hall.) The high, pressed-tin ceiling remains. With its glass cookie jars, 19 small tables and identical barista hardware, the B nearly twins its crosstown cousin named for a bus line. It boasts the same extensive loose-tea menu; hand-squeezed juices; custom smoothies; house-made cookies, scones and muffins; and a dessert case. One difference: The facade’s new half-garage doors with their sidewalkservice window. The B opens and closes earlier than the C, which serves more student customers, says Kaboly. Still, Braddock Avenue types seem happy to be coffeehoused again. “They all complimented us,” says Kaboly (who’s also known as Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ longtime director of exhibitions). “The people who live in Regent Square are very proud of their neighborhood.” DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1108 S. Braddock Ave., Swissvale. 412-871-3013

the

FEED

It’s hard to believe there hasn’t been a

Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival until now. Mark your calendars for Sat., Oct. 26, from noon-5 p.m. at Southside Riverfront Park. Local restaurants and purveyors will be serving up the pillowy pasta pockets (bring cash for food). Also: a pop-up pierogi market, the Pirates Pierogies, live music and other pierogi fun. 16

GLAZED SHORT RIBS WERE TOSSED WITH PICKLED PAPAYA, GINGER AND GARLIC

CAMBODIAN ON CARSON

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

EFORE IT GAINED its reputation as Party Central, East Carson Street was renowned for its historic architecture and for the wide variety of businesses — from butcher shops to used book stores — that kept those old storefronts in service to generations of South Siders. Today, the proliferation of bars, restaurants and boutiques has homogenized the retail scene, but the architecture is as interesting as ever. And few businesses showcase their tinceilinged interiors better than Apsara, the neighborhood’s newest Southeast Asian restaurant. The latest offering from the family behind Downtown’s now-shuttered Lemon Grass Cafe and Oakwood’s Angkor, Apsara offers primarily Cambodian food alongside Thai and a limited Chinese selection. The dining room’s ambience is elegant, with pistachio-green walls rising up a story-and-a-half to a white pressedtin ceiling. The tables boast white cloth tablecloths and fresh flower arrangements. Although only a couple of large,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

Lock lack: marinated beef tenderloin, with lettuce, tomatoes, onions and shallots

almost photorealistic paintings of classical Cambodian dance poses hang on the walls, high shelves display silver statuary and a collection of elephant figurines. Where most ethnic restaurants tend toward extremes of either bazaar-bought kitsch or stark simplicity, Apsara struck a perfect balance.

APSARA CAFÉ 1703 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-251-0664 HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. noon-9 p.m.; late night express Thu.-Sat. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $3-8; lunch entrees $8-10; dinner entrees $11-17 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED The menu is balanced as well, with nearly equal parts unfamiliar dishes, familiar ones and ones that are, perhaps, even a bit over-familiar. We started our meal with something from each category, respectively: na-taings (Cambodian puffed rice squares), short ribs and

calamari. We were most intrigued by the calamari’s sauce, which promised a blend of black pepper and lemon. Our first taste was dull, but once we gave it a swirl to distribute the finely ground pepper, it became vibrant and the highlight of the dish, which otherwise consisted of slightly chewy squid rings in a puffy tempura-style batter. Na-taings were fresher and crispier relatives of American rice cakes, served with ground beef or pork in a thick, deepbrown sauce that was richly flavored with coconut milk, roasted shallots, garlic and peanut. It was so good, we found ourselves loading up the squares with as much sauce as they could bear. The short ribs were similarly addictive: glazed with a savory, slightly sweet sauce and tossed with pickled papaya, ginger and garlic. Individual vegetables — chive flowers, Japanese eggplant, green beans — serve as the foundation ingredients for the entrees, to which diners add their choice of meat, shrimp or tofu. The dish that caught our attention promised

a broad medley of vegetables in “an Apsara creation: a unique lemongrass sauce.” Sadly, it didn’t live up to its promise. While the chicken consisted of thin, broad slices of tender white meat that held the sauce well, the sauce itself was muddy-tasting, as if too many spices had been thrown together without enough time to bloom and meld. Additionally, the mix of vegetables suggested a kitchen-sink approach to a stir-fry, rather than a curated dish.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

MASH UP Brooklyn Brewery comes to Pittsburgh in a celebration of all things beer

Jason was much more pleased with saramann, cubes of chuck slow-simmered in a thick coconut-milk sauce that was warmly spiced with star anise, cloves and cinnamon. Angelique wished for some sour or spice notes to offset the sweetness, but Jason’s only complaint was that the dish could have used a vegetable. Something green and crisp would have added contrast, or else something tender and earthy would have rounded the dish out. If the mussels are an indication of the quality of the menu’s seafood section, then Apsara’s way with seafood is very, very good. A generous pile of shellfish — their top shells removed to reveal individual, iridescent bowls ��� was served in a light oyster broth. Each mussel was individually garnished with a wilted basil leaf, a sprinkling of hot red-pepper flakes and a matchstick or two of sautéed ginger root. If the overall retail mix on East Carson Street has become narrower, at least its restaurant scene is constantly expanding. Apsara brings Cambodian, beautifully, to the table.

As Pittsburgh’s food and drink culture continues to develop, comparisons to Brooklyn — the hippest of hipster enclaves — are bound to pile up. Now, Brooklyn Brewery is helping to make that connection a little more overt by bringing its nationwide “Brooklyn Brewery Mash” tour here, from Oct. 21-27. Pittsburgh is one of 11 cities on the tour, which promises “Adventures in Food, Film, Music, Books & Beer,” and offers events that range from free to fancy. (Details are available at brooklynbrewerymash.com/ Pittsburgh.) Brooklyn Brewery house chef Andrew Gerson will team up with several local chefs for beer-focused dinners, for example. He’ll also do a cooking demo on Saturday morning at Slow Food’s Farmers@Firehouse market. “We’re bringing some of our favorite people and partners from Brooklyn … and localizing it to Pittsburgh,” says Brooklyn Brewery marketing manager Maia Raposo. “We’re celebrating the same thing they’re celebrating: local. We share a very similar philosophy,” says Susan T. Barclay, a Slow Food Pittsburgh co-leader who helped coordinate local events with Virginia Phillips and Amy Rosenfield. (A portion of the proceeds from most ticketed events will go to Slow Food Pittsburgh.) Lawrenceville’s Industry Public House will serve as “Mash HQ.” In addition to a full line of the Brewery’s bottled beers (and a selection on tap), expect to find a rotating array of rare Brooklyn beers, plus drop-ins from some of the brewery’s touring team. Do we need a brewery from Brooklyn to celebrate what’s unique about Pittsburgh? Slow Food’s Barclay sees the benefits of partnering with a nationally known, and highly respected, craft-brew house. “We’ll get to meet new people, and talk to people [about Slow Food] that we wouldn’t have met through other means,” she says. “It all goes back to beer being about camaraderie,” says Raposo. “It’s a celebration of what’s already happening in Pittsburgh, looked at from our lens of what we love about Brooklyn.” Of course, she adds, it doesn’t hurt that “you get to enjoy our beer along the way.”

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

“IT ALL GOES BACK TO BEER BEING ABOUT CAMARADERIE.”

Owner Kim Eng Hong

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Only as Spicy as You Are!

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

OAKLAND’S AWARD WINNING RESTAURANT

WE DELIVER (limited 3 mile area) Open 7 days a week Lunch Buffet Dinner Buffet Sunday & Tuesday 50% Off Dinners 5-6pm & 9-11pm Daily Beer Specials $1.50

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BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRIDGE TEN BRASSERIE. 20 S. 10th St., South Side. 412-586-5033. This brasserie mines the rich core of sophistication in everyday French fare. The menu offers familiar dishes such as steak frites, escargot and cassoulet made distinctive with regional French inflections. Add a welltrained staff and a lovingly curated wine list for a finedining experience. LE CAFÉ RAYMOND. 2103 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-4670. A perfect place to catch lunch or a snack during Strip District shopping forays, this little café offers an array of artisan breads, French pastries, fine cheeses and refined delicatessen fare. The few tables up front — augmented by sidewalk seating in season — have the feel of a bright, cozy, Parisian café. J

lunch

214 North Craig Street

Easy-peasy parking

Il Pizzaioli {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} THE CAPITAL GRILLE. 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown. 412338-9100. This dark, clubby restaurant excels at VIP service, and offers a menu highlighted by steaks, chops and seafood, with sophisticated but straightforward preparations such as crab cakes with added lobster, or steak encrusted in Kona coffee beans. Also, the Grille employs its own butcher

Union Pig and Chicken {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} (for cutting and dry-aging), and desserts are made on site. LE THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE

DOUBLE WIDE GRILL. 2339 E. Carson St., South Side (412-3901111) and 100 Adams Shoppes, Route 288, Mars (724-553-5212). You may cringe at the “white trash” theme, or feel bemused at ordering sautéed shrimp and wood-grilled portabella on a faux TV-dinner tray. But there’s plenty of good vegan fare, beer and a fun filling-station-turnedrestaurant ambience. KE

EGGS N’AT. 8556 University Blvd., Moon Township. DELUCA’S. 2015 Penn 412-262-2920. This Ave., Strip District. stylish and cheery 412-566-2195. diner offers a variety DeLuca’s doesn’t have of pancakes, as well as www. per pa the White House sandwiches and combo pghcitym .co cachet of Pamela’s, platters of breakfast but the portions are foods. The “Mama large and the quarters are Evans” pancakes are filled close. On weekends, it’s with blueberries and bacon, one of Pittsburgh’s great a combination that is smoky, gathering places. Try the “Super sweet and savory all at once. Bowl” omelet. J Also on offer: muffuleta, a New Orleans-style multi-layered and DINETTE. 5996 Penn Circle pressed sandwich. J South, East Liberty. 412-3620202. This refined CaliforniaIL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington inspired pizzeria and wine bar Road, Mount Lebanon. offers a small menu mostly 412-344-4123. This popular featuring gourmet thin-crust neighborhood café serves pizzas. The focus here is on fresh, Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, local and sustainable. Inventive including the scandalously cheesy pizzas include toppings such as quattro formaggi pizza. The wilted greens, littleneck clams, front room overlooks bustling goat cheese and Brussels sprouts. Washington Avenue; in season, Guests at the wine-bar counter lucky diners can enjoy the rear get a front-row seat for the garden courtyard. KE pizza-making. KE THE MINTT. 3033 Banksville D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ. Road, Banksville. 412-306-1831. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent This casual eatery successfully Square. 412-241-4666. This taps the multicultural cuisines established venue is known of India’s eastern coast, with for its revered pub fries and dishes such as gongura chicken the classic wiener with kraut and mutton biryani. Other (plus plenty of beer to wash regions are also represented it down). But don’t miss the with dosas, curries and tandoori pizza, with a top-notch crust. specialties. For an appetizer, D’s continues to raise the try Chicken 555, dressed with preparation of salty, cheesy, fatty peanuts, curry leaves and a comfort food to an art. JE traditional pickle. KF

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 20

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

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Skinny Pete’s Kitchen A Unique Luncheon and Gourmet Food Destination

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Jazz Jam Every Tuesday Swing Dance Every Friday 8pm-12am 150+ Craft Beers “Jazzed” Up Comfort Food Open Daily at 11am • Happy Hour 5-7pm Private Space Available For Your Next Event

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DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

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TAVERN 245. 245 Fourth Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4345. Step into this Downtown fancy-casual pub, with smart looks and tasty, updated bar fare. “The Farm” entree featured sliders made with chicken, pulled BBQ pork and steak fillet, on a potato roll with red pepper and goat cheese. The fried calamari come with a basil-garlic aioli, and the robust Yuengling beer-cheese sauce was the perfect complement to “Pittsburgh potatoes.” JE

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BY NOW, you probably know what the words “organic”

SALVATORE’S PIZZA HOUSE. 612 Penn Ave., Wilkinsburg. 412-247-4848. A neighborhood pizza place and more, Salvatore’s offers something even rarer than good pizza: fast food of the finest quality. “Fresh” is the watchword, and the large, full-color takeout menu has dozens of dishes in a score of categories. Shellfish are prominently featured, and worth trying. K

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

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At local conference, concern about the rise of GMOs

HALF OFF DRAFT BEER, SNACKS & DOMESTIC CANS Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm -----------------------------------------900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

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TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this dinerstyle venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: macand-cheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

{PHOTO BY JESSICA SERVER}

$

BLUE GENES

NOLA ON THE SQUARE. 24 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-9100. Offering a boldly refined take on straight-up, traditional New Orleans food, NOLA’s menu is an invitation to kick back, relax and savor the flavors: cheesy griddle grits with a chunky tomato sauce and green beans; oyster stew; and catfish strips paired with spicy papaya. KE

Soup • Salad Entrées • Dessert

Del’s is Celebrating 65 Years in Bl om e d

{BY JESSICA SERVER}

Pittsburghers getting educated about GMOs

Every Wednesday & Friday 11:30am - 2pm

offMenu

NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. This elegant restaurant and lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thymeroasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE

and “locavore” mean. The East End Food Co-op wants this year’s buzzword to be “GMO” — the acronym for genetically modified organism. GMOs, such as Monsanto’s “Roundup Ready” crops, are born when genes from one species are inserted into another to obtain a desired characteristic. Currently, 64 nations require GMOs to be labeled. The United States does not. “It’s flabbergasting how that’s possible,” says Heather Hackett, the co-op’s marketing and memberservices manager. In an effort to help inform American consumers, she organized “Know Your GMOs” at Chatham University on Oct. 12. Pittsburgher Kyle Pattison attended, drawn by headliner Jeffrey Smith, from the Institute for Responsible Technology. One of the leading consumer advocates for non-GMO food, Smith asked audience members for their experiences removing GMO foods from their diets. “I had terrible allergies,” Pattison told Smith, “and they’re just gone now.” Smith posited that GMO crops — which include most soy, cotton, canola, sugar beets, corn and alfalfa — negatively impact human health. Smith noted evidence to suggest a possible effect on conditions including autism, cancer, obesity — basically everything from acne to Alzheimer’s. “In their quieter moments,” Smith joked, “Monsanto thinks, ‘What would Darth Vader do?” GMO makers deny those claims. Monsanto, for example, maintains that the products can have environmental benefits, including a reduced need for pesticides — an upside the company notes is “recognized by consumers and environmentalists.” But GMO Free PA’s Karen Stark, one of seven local speakers at the Chatham event, wasn’t taking chances. A self-proclaimed “McDonald’s mom,” Stark changed her five-times-a-week fast-food habit into GMO-free activism when diagnosed with invasive ductile carcinoma, an estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Between speakers, guests received product samples and tools such as a shopping guide for avoiding GMO products. They also had an opportunity to speak with event partners such as Chatham’s Food Studies Program and Burgh Bees. Ultimately, organizers say, the best thing consumers can do is learn about their food. Smith noted that last year, the “non-GMO” label brought the most sales growth of any health/wellness claim. The “tipping point,” he said, would be reached “any day now.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

LOCAL

BEAT

“YOU’RE JUST A KID HANGING OUT. I WOULD ALWAYS TRY TO GO OFF INTO MY OWN WORLD.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

TO MARKET, TO MARKET James A. Richards has been involved in entertainment — and marketing — for more than 20 years, having put together publications like Applause, a local entertainment-trade mag. But his latest venture concentrates on musicians … and addresses a problem he’s witnessed for too long. “I co-produced a couple of music festivals, and that’s when it hit home to me that this was such a big problem,” Richards explains. “I learned that almost no one in music, from local music on up, has any formal training in marketing, advertising, PR. And since then, I’ve come to realize there’s a certain amount of intimidation involved among music artists.” Richards’ experience lies on both sides of the arts-marketing equation — he once ran an event-listing website and gathered information from artists, which is where it first hit him that musicians were often lacking in marketing knowledge. His new book, Marketing 101, is aimed at remedying that situation. Marketing 101 is a 44-page booklet that could teach a thing or two to musicians at any level; Richards, who’s lived in Pittsburgh for 25 years, drew from his personal experience to write it, and by and large, he hits the nail on the head. What’s the most important takeaway for an artist wanting to learn about self-promotion? “Writing copy,” says Richards. “Almost everything involving media and publicity involves the written word — especially in this Internet age. And I think this is part of the intimidation: thinking that it takes a lot of training to write copy. But not really — a lot of it is what we learned in high school English class.” While the booklet is thin, it’s rich with information, and Richards, though working from the perspective of just one writer, is experienced enough to act as a good coach. The book may be self-published, and may feature some stock-art people on the cover, but don’t discount it: Richards can teach us all a thing or two. “I’d encourage as many acts as possible to buy it,” he says. “Not so much for my sake — I won’t make that much money off of it — but for their sake.” And for your favorite music journalist’s sake as well.

“ALMOST NO ONE IN MUSIC HAS ANY FORMAL TRAINING IN MARKETING.”

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

MARKETING 101 is available at some local bookstores, and can be ordered through Richards’ website: www.james-richards.com. N E W S

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{BY MARGARET WELSH}

Sewickley pastoral: Jackson Scott

W

HILE DESCRIBING his Sewickleyarea upbringing, Jackson Scott takes a bit of a detour. “I don’t know if this is relevant,” he says, “but I feel like mentioning that the Sewickley police force is absolutely awful. They’re kind of power-hungry idiots, in my opinion.” Of course, Scott — whose first record, Melbourne, was released by Fat Possum Records, in July — is simply echoing the frustrations of many who’ve spent their teenage years in a sleepy, upper-middleclass neighborhood, where the police seem focused on busting young stoners. “I guess,” Scott grants, “the cops are just as bored as the kids.” Despite his ardor, Scott never really got into much trouble himself. And although, he says, there was little for high school students to do that didn’t involve drinking or smoking weed, he found the boredom to be conducive to his budding creativity. “It’s not like there’s this crazy city life to go out to,” he says. “You’re just kind of a kid

hanging out. I would always try to go off into my own world.” The fact that Melbourne is the work of a relative loner is not surprising. Recorded on a four-track in the basement of Scott’s Asheville, N.C., residence — he moved there for college — the record has a dizzy, surfy, psych-pop sensibility, but feels less like a

JACKSON SCOTT

WITH UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA, WOLF PEOPLE 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $13-15. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com.

day at the beach than harsh sunlight on a frigid winter day. Scott’s self-professed devotion to Syd Barrett is evident, but the loose, lo-fidelity nature of the recording, coupled with Scott’s androgynous, sometimes high-pitched vocals, can be either exquisitely dreamy or slightly nightmarish, depending on your state of mind.

Melbourne was recorded as a solo project, but, for the sake of touring, Jackson Scott has grown into a band. Aaron Kostial, a friend of Scott’s from high school (and a fellow North Carolina transplant) plays drums, with Chase Gorter, whom Scott met in Asheville, on bass. Scott started playing the piano at age 8, and later moved on to drums and guitar. “The funny thing about the town I grew up in is, there’s big, like, jam-band love.” he says, recalling early musical experiences. “I was never a big fan, but I did jam with some kids in high school. That was always kind of fun, just kind of getting into that mentality of playing music.” After graduating from high school in 2011, Scott enrolled at University of North Carolina, knowing only that he wanted to do “something creative.” He’d long planned to pursue filmmaking but, as music began to take on a greater role in is life, those plans faded. “Music just became more fun for me, especially when I started playing guitar [and] it became easier for me CONTINUES ON PG. 23

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

FIGHTING BOREDOM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

BUY TICKETS NOW AT JERGELS.COM

“WEIRD PAUL” PETROSKEY STILL GOING STRONG (THICK SYRUP)

The first new full-length in a couple of years from local treasure Weird Paul starts with characteristically dry and funny introspection on his recent success with YouTube videos he made from home movies from his childhood. (The track is called “Delusions of Grandeur.”) And who else would write a song called “Peanut Butter Recall,” and make it simply about remembering all of the kinds of peanut butter you’ve eaten? WEIRD PAUL CD RELEASE. Sat., Oct. 19. Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, 4412 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5 (or $10 with CD). 412-682-8611 or www.bloomfieldbridgetavern.com SOUTHSIDE AMERICAN IN OUR KEYSTONE STATE (WEDNESDAY RECORDS)

Southside American — the project of Pittsburgh-based songwriter Benjamin Sweet — mixes classic Americana/countryrock songwriting and recording techniques more common to lo-fi garage rock, and that’s a large part of what makes this six-track disc stand out in a crowded field. There aren’t a ton of surprises in the songwriting, but there also aren’t any cringeworthy moments to speak of — it’s all decent stuff. This one puts a lot of good elements together to make a whole that’s greater than its parts, and better than most singer-songwriter fare.

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$1000

1ST PLACE

GREAT PRIZES FOR BEST DRESSED COSTUMES! Tickets won’t last, order now at jergels.com/tickets

AMBITION “THE KID” VERSES VERSUS (SELF-RELEASED)

Ambition did a stint with Miami R&B group Pretty Ricky as lead singer, but also spits hip-hop verses as “The Kid,” which is the basis for this mixtape: Ambition vs. The Kid. Some of the tracks are straight-up singing — mostly baby-making stuff — and some are raps. (Some mix both.) While the raps are good, Ambition’s got a great voice, and those R&B tunes really shine. The mixtape also serves as an introduction to the artist, with soundbytes from a radio interview peppered in. It’s available free as a download from datpiff.com.

M WE LS H@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

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Wed 10.16 TIME TESTED // no cover // 8:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fri 10.18 NEW WAVE NATION // $7 cover // 9:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sat 10.19 IN TRANSIT // $7 cover // 9:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mon 10.21 BALCONY BIG BAND // no cover // 8:00 start time --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tue 10.22 BIKE NIGHT W/TWO THUMBS UP // no cover // 8:00 start time

THIS WEEK

to write songs,” he recalls. “I kind of went [to Asheville] with that mentality. I just wanted to, you know, play some music, meet some friends.” Scott never got around to actually declaring a major, and he dropped out after his first year. “I was basically treating [music] like a job. I wasn’t going to school. I was spending literally every day working on [Melbourne] for four or five months.” When the record was finally finished, Scott posted it for free online, and began sending it to as many outlets as possible. “[At the time] I was thinking, how exactly does one get signed to a record label? How exactly does one put something out on vinyl? Because that was my main goal,” he says. And before long, bloggers started to write about the record, Pitchfork featured Scott in its trend-setting “Rising” column, and emails from labels started rolling in. Essentially, he says, “It started to kind of blow up.” More recently, Scott has attracted attention for his second single, “Sandy,” which he wrote about the Sandy Hook shooting. It’s one of the record’s most upbeatsounding tracks, but the lyrics — in which Scott speculates what might have been going through the children’s minds that day, and laments the young-adulthoods they’ll never have — are heart-wrenching, and difficult to listen to. The music video, released earlier this month, aimlessly follows a group of young people, drinking and laughing at a party that probably looks a lot like those thrown by bored teenagers back in Scott’s hometown. For some, the juxtaposition made the song more distressing. Robin Hilton, who interviewed Scott for NPR Music, wrote: “While the song and video are thoughtfully and respectfully rendered, they leave you wondering whether some subjects are simply off limits.” For Scott, it’s important to be able to express life at both its brightest and its darkest: “I think one of my goals, artistically, is to try to take things as far as I can go. I don’t think there should be any boundaries with art. I don’t see why anyone should have to shy away from anything.” And, though he didn’t intend for anyone to focus on one particular song, he doesn’t seem particularly surprised, or bothered by the attention. “I’m just really intrigued by duality and paradoxes,” he explains. “There’s always going to be evil and absolutely awful stuff, and there will always be a lot of really beautiful, pure, innocent stuff. And if you ignore one of them, you’re ignoring both of them. I think it’s interesting to take it all into consideration.”

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

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We buy

all day

BUY • SELL • TRADE

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA CURRAN}

GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS • PRO SOUND INDEXING EZRA KEYBOARDS • BAND INSTRUMENTS {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

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4341 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC

MONDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-8PM

www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com

EZRA FURMAN established himself as a lyrically driven rock songwriter with his band The Harpoons; his latest, Day of the Dog, is an eclectic and thoughtful solo release with help from a new backing band, The BoyFriends. He spoke with CP by phone on the first day of the band’s current tour.

THE LINER OF THIS ALBUM HAS AN INDEX OF TOPICS AND THEMATIC IDEAS. I DON’T KNOW IF I’VE EVER SEEN ANYONE ELSE DO THAT. I was just trying to think about what I’d want. If I open up a record, what would be most interesting to me? And also, I’m involved with a woman who’s studying political theory, and she was comparing all these different indices of books she was reading. I realized that index-writing, it’s like writing an editorial. It’s not at all impartial. IS THAT KIND OF EXPLICATION IMPORTANT TO YOU? SOME SONGWRITERS WANT THEIR MUSIC TO BE MORE OBSCURE. I think I like for there to be a way to find out. Even if it’s not specifically explained all the time. I like there to be the possibility for some detective work, for people who are into that kind of thing. I am, and I do lots of detective work with the records I like. And it’s nice when they give you hints. THE INDEX MENTIONS PSALM 82. WHY DID THAT RELATE TO A FEW DIFFERENT SONGS? You’re now testing my commitment to slight obscurity. The song “Walk on in Darkness”; that came from reading certain interpretations of Psalm 82. I was reading Maimonides, the medieval Jew-

Only semi-debauched: Ezra Furman

ish philosopher, and he has this whole thing about this line in Psalm 82, “They know not / They will not understand / They walk on in darkness.” His take on it is: Most people never see even a glimmer of the truth. Most of us are just in the dark our whole lives. Then some people see the reflection off a shiny item of the light of the truth. Then there are some people who see, like, a full flash of lightning. Then there are some people who see so many flashes like that, it’s almost like they live in the daylight. And that was a reaction to that. If everybody’s in the dark, shouldn’t our sympathy lie with all of us who will never understand any of it?

EZRA FURMAN AND THE BOY-FRIENDS WITH BRENDAN COPE OF WILLIAM FORREST, ADDISON STEELE

7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

IN A COUPLE OF SPOTS IN THE LINER YOU REFER TO YOUR JUDAISM. HOW DO YOU RELATE THAT TO YOUR MUSIC? It’s where I come from. Personally, I think I have some bad dispositions. And my upbringing has saved me from a life of total debauchery. It’s only semi-debauched now. I accept everybody’s different approaches to religion — rejection of it, whatever. It’s your own thing you have to decide. For me, I think I’d be a lot worse off without it. And also, it’s given me most of the thought that’s led me to do my best work as a songwriter. I use Biblical imagery, and ideas from Jewish thought, and all these moral challenges that are all over my music. Jewish thought is one of my largest influences, in a million ways. A M U L K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

11/05 MATT WERTZ 11/14 THE DEVIL MAKES THREE 11/15 LUCERO W/TITUS ANDRONICUS 10/17 10/18 10/22 10/25 10/25 10/26 10/29 10/31 11/01 11/01

EZRA FURMAN THOSE DARLINS SHEL MIKE STOUT & THE HUMAN UNION (EARLY) OLYMPUS MONS, GLOWFRIENDS & CLAIRE WITH THE TURBAN (LATE) PGH SKA FEST DAY 1 FT. MUSTARD PLUG POOR OLD SHINE PGH SKA FEST DAY 2 FT. THE TOASTERS BITCH PRESENTS BEACH (EARLY) SMACKDAB (LATE)

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSE VARGAS}

Los Straightjackets [SYNTH-POP] + FRI., OCT. 18

The children of musicians, Natalie and Elliott Bergman came together this year for their first official collaboration after years of being in and out of each other’s musical lives. In college, Elliott was part of an Afrobeat band called Nomo, and his younger sister began singing back-up vocals for the group when she was just 16. Now her vocals are at the forefront, and the Chicago natives make mellow indie pop, infused with bits of reggae, jazz, West African and psychedelic music. The duo plays at Rex Theater tonight with Saint Rich. AC 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $12-15. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

Singer-songwriter Carolyn Berk’s poetic lyrics have touched the hearts of many over the years, especially registering with those in the LGBT community. Blending a feminist outlook with sonic and lyrical complexity, her Portlandbased band Lovers has recently been incorporating more synth and electronic sounds into its bedroom-pop music. The trio — comprising Berk, producer Kerby Ferris and percussionist Emily Kingan — released A Friend in the World this year as a follow up to its much-loved Darklight, released in 2010. Lovers performs tonight at Brillobox as part of the Operation Sappho dance party. Allison Cosby 9 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[PUNK] + SAT., OCT. 19

Local bands getting together for Halloween shows is old hat; national touring bands going all-out for the holiday? That’s something special. Three longtime rock bands — The Fleshtones, Southern Culture on the Skids and Los os Straitjacketss — combined forces this his year to create Mondo Zombie ombie Boogaloo, a collaborative rative album of spooky tunes unes for Halloween. The three hree bands are touring together ogether in support of the he record, and appear tonight onight at Altar Bar. Andy Mulkerin 5:30 :30 p.m. 1620 620 Penn Ave., ve., Strip District. istrict. $19-20. 19-20. 412-20612-2069719 719 or www.the altarbar.com ltarbar.com

[INDIE NDIE ROCK] + WED., OCT. 23 Wild Belle e isn’t your typical ypical family band.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

Wild Belle

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM OXLEY}

[SPOOKY] + TUE., OCT. 22

The bashing, thrashing punk of Brooklyn’s The Men has blossomed into a mix of guitarcentered indie rock, Neil Young-style stuff and … bashing, thrashing punk. But while the three-piece strayed only a bit from its wheelhouse on last spring’s full-length New Moon, what’s truly different is its new EP, Campfire Songs, which is exactly what it says it is — a set of songs, some versions of tunes that are on New Moon, that were recorded unplugged around a campfire during the New Moon recording sessions. Maybe don’t expect them to be sitting on stools with acoustics like Crosby, Stills and Nash when they play Club Café tonight, but the versatility is admirable. Purling Hiss, locals Old Head and Pampers open. AM M 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

ONE NIGHT ONLY

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3!452$!9 ./6%-"%2s(%).:(!,,

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 17 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Heather Kropf, Daryl Shawn. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Ezra Furman, Addison Steele, Brendan Cope. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Stuck On Planet Earth. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Dumplings, Brazilian Wax, Dead Batteries. South Side. 412-431-5282. MEADOWS CASINO. PGH. The Rhythms Of Life” Sonny Pugar Memorial benefit concert. Washington. 724-503-1200. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Phat Man Dee Cabaret Jazz Group “The Cultural District”, Amoeba Kneivel, Dr. Colter Harper, Machete Kisumontao, more. Phat Man Dee

and her Cavalcade of Stars N’At! THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Bill Ali & Matt Barranti. Canonsburg. Millvale. 866-468-3401. 724-746-4227. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Nightly Under Indictment. McCandless. Standard, Dot Dot Dot She Loves 412-367-9610. Me Not, Masters of the Universe. SMILING MOOSE. Mike Mains Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. & the Branches, The Orphan, JW HALL’S STEAK & SEAFOOD. The Poet, American Opera, The Tony Janflone Jr. Aliquippa. Civil War Sleep. South Side. PARK HOUSE. Buffalo Buffalo 412-431-4668. Buffalo. North Side. 412-224-2273. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. SMILING MOOSE. Slim Forsythe’s Rockin’ Cynimatics Soul Khan, Gospel Hour, Bodhi Delusions of Grandeur, Watts, Tom Kerlander Real Deal. South Side. & the Pale Blue. 412-431-4668. Lawrenceville. SOUTH SIDE 412-682-0177. www. per a p ty PRESBYTERIAN pghci m WALNUT GRILL. The .co CHURCH. Ron Keystone 3. Shadyside. “Ronnie” Lynn & John 412-782-4768. Luddingham. The Birth of Rock & Roll reunion show. South Side. 412-431-0118. ALTAR BAR. Those Who Fear. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS Strip District. 412-263-2877. CASINO. The Duration Band. CH-CHANGES. Quiet Riot. North Side. 412-231-7777. New Castle. 724-971-0620. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Daryl & CLUB CAFE. Those Darlins, Kim. Monroeville. 412-372-9750. Gambles. South Side. WOOLEY BULLY’S. The Dave 412-431-4950. Iglar Band. New Brighton. 724-494-1578.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 18

MP 3 MONDAY

SAT 19 ALTAR BAR. Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Jackson Scott. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Weird Paul Rock Band, Stephen Foster & the Awesomes, William Wesley & the Tiny Sockets. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CASTLE BLOOD. Legendary Hucklebucks. Monessen. 724-314-3563. CIP’S. Daniels & McClain. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. The Men, Purling Hiss, Old Head, Pampers. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Leftover Blues. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The Scratch n Sniffs, Crisis in America, Children of October, Up for Nothing. Aliquippa. 724-378-7669. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The Fleeting Ends, Decker, Let Them Eat Cake. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Chopper Pilot & The Awful Waffles. Polish Hill. 412-906-1749. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Grand Piano, The Shelf Life String Band. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. The Shakes, Big Atlantic. Cheswick. LOWER BURRELL MOOSE LODGE 53. The Dave Iglar Band. Lower Burrell.

BRENT MALIN

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week, download “Mona Lisa Smile,” by Brent Malin, for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

WITH THE

A brand new orchestra event featuring Danny Elfman’s famous film scores brought to life on stage by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and enhanced by visuals on the big screen from Tim Burton films including Beetlejuice, Batman & Batman Returns, Edward Scissorhands, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Alice in Wonderland!

Call 412.392.4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org/nightmare Media Sponsor

Promotional Partner

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

GAME DAY DRINK SPECIALS $

$

Slim Forsythe Tom Kurlander and Pale Blue Sound AND

Bodhi Watts Fri, Oct 18 • 9PM BLUEGRASS/FOLK

Blue Moon Soup

23 ALL DOMESTIC BEER

Thur, Oct 17 • 9PM CLASSIC COUNTRY/ROCK

BLACK & GOLD SHOT

All drink specials are only available during Pittsburgh football games. Black & Gold shots only available after Pittsburgh scores

1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOUTHS I D E POOL + PING PONG + DARTS

Sat, Oct 19 • 9PM INDIE/ FOLK

Wild Child Mon, Oct 21 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD

Tues, Oct 22 • 9PM JAZZ Space Exchange Series WITH

Chris Parker Trio OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TOUCHFASTER AND THE RUCKUS BROS. PRESENT

MEADOWS CASINO. Rumours (Fleetwood Mac Tribute). Washington. 724-503-1200. MOONDOG’S. acoustiCAUSE theCAUSE. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Onward Progress, The Fledgelings, Scene Stage the World, Poolside Eye Candy. Bloomfield. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Second Empire, Stark, Long Time Divided, Chip DiMonick. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SHADYSIDE NURSERY. Weather Permitting Haybale Happy Hour feat. The Turpentiners, The Allegheny Rhythm Rangers. Shadyside. 412-251-6058. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Wild Child, Faithful Sinners. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 20 BRILLOBOX. Partly Sunny, Dead Painters, The Telephone Line. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Ouais, The Funs, Bbigpigg. Garfield. 412-361-2262. SEVEN SPRINGS. Tony Janflone Jr. Champion. 814-352-7777.

MON 21 ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Barenaked Ladies. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Fuckies, Middle Children, Playfully Yours, Valerie Keuhne. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Between The Buried And Me, The Faceless, The Contortionist, Safety Fire. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Death Before Dishonor. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 22 ALTAR BAR. Mondo Zombie Boogaloo. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. SHEL, The Wreckids. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Michael Todd. Canonsburg. 724-884-5944. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Paint Fumes, Ghost Foot, Dead River Cult. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Minus The Bear, INVSN, Slow Bird. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 23 ON FRIDAY OCTOBER 25TH OVER 20 MUSICIANS ARE CONVERGING IN WHAT HAS BECOME A LOCAL SUPERGROUP. THEIR PURPOSE IS SIMPLE, TO PAY HOMAGE TO ONE OF THE GREATEST RECORDS OF ALL TIME...MICHAEL JACKSON’S THRILLER. SHOW INCLUDES ANIMATION, DANCERS, LIGHT SHOW, COSTUME CONTEST AND MORE.

TICKETS: $15 GENERAL ADMISSION AND $32 VIP HTTP://BIT.LY/THRILLERTIXGA OCTOBER 25TH • 8PM • ALL AGES • MR SMALLS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

CLUB CAFE. American Babies, Derek Woodz Band. South Side. 412-431-4950. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Sputzy Sparacino. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Dead Bundy & The Neat Neat Neats, Skinny Jim, The No. 9 Blacktops. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Beats Antique, ill-esha, SORNE. Millvale. 866-468-3401. REX THEATER. Wild Belle, Saint Rich. South Side. 412-381-6811. SONNY’S TAVERN. The Working Poor, The Bugs. Bloomfield. 412-683-5884.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Terakaft, Landmark Tongues. Concert #4 in the “Sahara Series.”. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 18 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. Drake. Uptown. 412-642-1800.

SAT 19

DJS THU 17 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 18

CJ’S. The Variety Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377. SMILING MOOSE. Fortified PhonetX. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 23 SMILING MOOSE. Black Milk, Shad Ali, C.H.R.I.S. South Side. 412-818-5604.

BLUES

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. THE HOP HOUSE. Yoho’s Yinzide Downtown. 412-456-6666. Out. Green Tree. 412-922-9560. BRILLOBOX. Operation SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri Sappho Queer Dance Party. & the Bluescasters. Lovers, DJ Natty Boom, Mt. Washington. more. Bloomfield. 412-381-4300. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND www. per BAR. Bombo Claat pa JAMES STREET pghcitym Friday’s Reggae. East .co GASTROPUB & Liberty. 412-362-1250. SPEAKEASY. The DRUM BAR. VDJ Dave Ott. Blues Orphans. North Side. North Side. 412-231-7777. 412-904-3335. LAVA LOUNGE. 80’s Alternative. LEGACY LANES. Bobby DJ Electric. South Side. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Baldwin. 412-431-5282. 412-653-2695. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. MOONDOG’S. John Nemeth. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John South Side. 412-431-2825. Gresh’s Gris-Gris. Downtown. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ 412-471-9100. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. REX THEATER. Robben Ford. South Side. 412-381-6811.

THU 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 18

SAT 19

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic. Joro Boro & Pandemic Pete. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. DRUM BAR. VDJ Michael Joseph. North Side. 412-231-7777. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

SUN 20 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 23 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B

SAT 19 AMERICAN LEGION - DONEGAL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Donegal. EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. GROTTO BAR & GRILLE. Gone South. West View. 412-931-3990. THE R BAR. The Jimmy Adler Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. WHEELHOUSE AT THE RIVERS CASINO. Shot O’ Soul. North Side. 412-231-7777.

WED 23 THE R BAR. Yoho’s Yinzide Out. Dormont. 412-942-8842.

JAZZ THU 17 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MARY PAPPERT SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Duquesne Jazz Ensemble. Uptown. 412-396-4632. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

THU 17

FRI 18

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Esh The Monolith, Grey Sky Appeal, Proseed, Unsung, Stillborn Identity,. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CLUB COLONY. Take Two. Scott. 412-668-0903.

OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Joe Negri w/ Max Leake. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 19 ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Ron Wilson, Tony DePaolis. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. Guy Matone. Scott. 412-668-0903. NINE ON NINE. Bronwyn Wyatt & John Bagnato. Downtown. 412-338-6463. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

SUN 20 OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

MON 21 SAVOY RESTAURANT. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-0660.

TUE 22 ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. New View Trio. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Chris Parker Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 23 ANDYS. Maria Becoates-Bey & Daniel May. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. New Kensington. 724-337-7008.

ACOUSTIC THU 17 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Songwriters In Harmony. Songwriters Workshop. Harmony. 724-452-0539. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mark Shuttleworth. Robinson. 412-489-5631. LEVELS. Nick & Nina. North Side. 412-231-7777. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. Ashley & Garret. McCandless. 412-367-9610.

FRI 18 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

EARLY WARNINGS – SPOOKY EDITION

FRI 18 NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE. Dallas Marks Band. West Mifflin. 412-650-9090.

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

IBS with Diarrhea Endometriosis Constipation Diabetes Gout Osteoporosis

CLASSICAL SAT 19 DUETS EXTRAORDINAIRE. Beulah Presbyterian Church, Churchill. EAST WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. LIVING ROOM CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT. Pittsburgh CAPA, Downtown. 412-371-4028.

Chronic Diarrhea High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Vaginal Dryness/Hot Flashes Birth Control/Oral Contraception

Principal Investigators – Dr. S. Berg, Dr. G. Rosenberg, Dr. L. Dobkin

SUN 20

{SAT., OCT. 19}

ALIA MUSICA. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. DUQUESNE WIND SYMPHONY & SYMPHONY BAND. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. KRISTEN TAYLOR. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-922-0903. OLIVIER LATRY. Organ concert. Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside. 412-661-0120.

Halloween Zombie Prom feat. Black Moon CD-release show Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side {FRI., OCT. 25}

Thriller: A Tribute Show Mr. Small’s Theater, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale {SAT., OCT. 26}

Do you have a medical condition that is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information.

You need same-day care.

MON 21

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Fiddlesticks Family Series presents:

DAVID ALLEN WEHR, JACK W. GELTZ, RACHEL STEGEMAN, ADAM LIU. Faculty Recital. PNC Recital Hall, Duquesne Univ., Uptown. 412-396-6080.

Halloween Spooktacular Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown

The comprehensive, high-quality health care from UPMC doctors that your family needs.

OTHER MUSIC MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. The Regular Joes The Regular Joes. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Blue Moon Soup. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 19 THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Joy Ike. Harmony. 570-294-6450. HAMBONE’S. Mac Martin & the Dixie Travelers, Shelf Life String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. OLIVER’S POURHOUSE. Gary Rahl. Greensburg. 724-836-7687. TRAX FARMS. Shelf Life String Band. Finleyville. 412-835-3246.

SUN 20 TRAX FARMS. Shelf Life String Band. Finleyville. 412-835-3246.

MON 21 HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

TUE 22

Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

THU 17

WORLD

FRI 18

THU 17 KRESGE THEATER, CMU. A Concert of Contemporary Music of Iran. Oakland. 412-268-1047.

FRI 18 KRESGE THEATER, CMU. Dialogue of Ancient Civilizations, A Concert of Persian & Chinese Hammer Dulcimers. Oakland. 412-268-1047.

HEINZ HALL. Broadway & Beyond w/ The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Brian Stokes Mitchell. Downtown. 412-392-4900. LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. Gina Rendina. North Side. 412-231-7777. MEADOWS CASINO. Night Life. Washington. 724-503-1200.

SAT 19

REGGAE

HEINZ HALL. Broadway & Beyond w/ The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Brian Stokes Mitchell. Downtown. 412-392-4900. LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LEVELS. BackSeat Driver. North Side. 412-231-7777. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG. Pitt-Greensburg Choral Festival. Greensburg. 724-837-7040.

SAT 19

SUN 20

SAT 19 BIG RED BARN. Callan, Mark Digman. Callan cd release. Allison Park. KRESGE THEATER, CMU. Women of Persian Music: A Concert of Persian Traditional Music. Oakland. 412-268-1047.

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Kwesi Kankam, Ricardo Iamuuri, Holly Keene. Oakland. 412-818-5604. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

SMILING MOOSE. The Balconies, The Motorleague. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 23

THU 17

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

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All with the convenience of same-day appointments that your busy schedule demands.

HEINZ HALL. Broadway & Beyond w/ The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Brian Stokes Mitchell. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

HEINZ HALL. Broadway & Beyond w/ The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & Brian Stokes Mitchell. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

UPMC St. Margaret Family Health Centers Family Medicine | Behavioral Health | Pediatrics | Geriatrics | Ob-Gyn | And so much more. UPMCStMargaret.com BloomďŹ eld-GarďŹ eld +()$*-($.,-)›Lawrenceville+()$-))$.*+*›New Kensington 724-334-3640

MON 21 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

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AfďŹ liated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

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What to do October 16 - 22 Zimmermann & de Perrot

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m. Through Oct.17.

Taking Back Sunday STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Polar Bear Club, Transit & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

THURSDAY 17

IN PITTSBURGH SUNDAY 20

carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

Dave Patten

BEDNER’S FARM & GREENHOUSE McDonald. 724-926-2541.For more info visit bednersgreenhouse.com. 1p.m.

The Winery Dogs

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

FRIDAY 18

MONDAY 21

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through Oct. 20.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: pittsburghopera.org. Through Oct. 20.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Arcane Haven. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma!

Hugh Laurie CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets:

The Squirrel Hillbillies

Aida

Those Who Fear

Broadway and Beyond with Brian Stokes Mitchell

newbalancepittsburgh.com

carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL DUBIN

WEDNESDAY 16

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

ROCKWELL THEATRE Oakland. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through Oct. 27.

TAKING BACK SUNDAY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 STAGE AE

SATURDAY 19 SOUTH PARK FAIRGROUNDS South Park. Free event. For more info visit alleghenycounty.us or 412-350-5929. 12p.m.

Wild Child THUNDERBIRD CAFE

Stroke 9 HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Gypsy Grin & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 10:30p.m.

NEW BALANCE

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATRE East Liberty. 412-363-3000. Tickets: ticketmaster.com. 8p.m.

Between the Buried and Me

TUESDAY 22 Mondo Zombie Boogaloo

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests The Fleshtones, Southern Culture & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLYTIX. 6:30p.m.

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests The Faceless, Contortionist & more. Tickets: 866-468-3401 Minus the Bear or ticketweb.com/opusone. MR. SMALLS THEATRE 7:30p.m. Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests INVSN Barenaked Ladies & Slow Bird.Tickets: 866CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC 468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. opusone. 8p.m. All ages show. Tickets:

Lawrenceville. 412-6820177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Hay Days 2013

Dylan Moran

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Sixxis & Sicksense. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Fall Event

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 – SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 Scott Green a New Balance Factory Rep, will be at the Wexford location this Friday and the Waterfront this Saturday from 10am – 5pm. Certified Pedorthist Mark Fallecker will help you match your foot type with the right shoe. See Mark at WATERFRONT: Sat, Oct. 19 10am-7pm; Sun. Oct., 20 12-6pm; Sat., Oct. 26 10am-7pm; Sun., Oct. 27 12-6pm; OAKLAND Thurs., Oct. 24 10am -5pm; WEXFORD Fri., Oct. 25 10am – 5pm

Valid thru Oct. 31, 2013

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

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on any regular priced New Balance, Aravon, Dunham or Cobb Hill purchase.

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

TWENTY DOLLARS

GIFT CERTIFICATE

$

Minimum purchase $100.00. Limit to one certificate per customer. Certificate must be presented at time of purchase. Can not be combined with other offers and discounts. Some exlusions may apply. MAILRNB

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

FACEBO O K.CO M / N EWBAL AN CEPG H

WHAT KICKINESS THE FILM OFFERS IS IN THE TWO HEISTS

BEST FRIENDS {BY AL HOFF} The ensemble comedy GBF — in which three A-list girls in high school fight over the hottest new accessory, a gay best friend — closes out this year’s Reel Q film festival. CP caught up via email with George Northy, the film’s screenwriter, who grew up in Moon Township and now lives in Los Angeles. He is scheduled to attend the GBF screening. WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO WRITE GBF? I wanted to write something that paid homage to all the teen comedies that came before — from the John Hughes films of the ’80s to Mean Girls and Easy A — but one that allowed the side character of the “Gay Best Friend” to finally be the lead. George Northy

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MOVIE? The Breakfast Club — it’s just the perfect teen movie. Mean Girls was also a big influence and Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead is an underappreciated classic.

POLICE STORY

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTER IN GBF? As I was writing I kind of fell in love with the bigoted Christian character McKenzie (played by Harry Potter’s Evanna Lynch). I loved thinking up horrible, nasty homophobic things for her to say. But I truly love all my characters equally. IF SOMEBODY FAILS TO GET A GBF, WHAT’S THE NEXT BEST OPTION/ ACCESSORY? GBFs are on the way out, anyway. Go for a lesbian best friend, or LBF. Much more current.

{BY AL HOFF}

A girl, a guy and a gun: Catherine Deneuve and Alain Delon

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N A DESERTED French seaside town,

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GBF screens at 8:30 p.m. Sat. Oct. 19. Harris. $15 (includes party at ToonSeum). See www.reelQ.org for complete festival schedule.

The he-man pairing decades in the making! The unimaginatively titled Escape Plan finds a high-security-prison designer (Sylvester Stallone) wrongfully imprisoned in a high-security prison, where he must use his skills and those of another prisoner (Arnold ( Schwarzenegger) r to escape.

Starts Fri., Oct. 18.

drenched in winter rain, four middleaged men in an American sedan prepare to rob a bank. The execution of the heist unfolds smoothly and wordlessly — until something goes wrong, and one of the gang is shot. The opening scene of 1972’s Un Flic, the last film from director Jean-Pierre Melville (Bob le Flambeur, Le Samourai, Le Cercle Rouge), is a classic piece of neonoir, both visually and thematically. The unforeseen act of violence sets off a series of ripples, causing widespread disruption through a Paris police station and second planned heist. The title translates as “a cop,” but Un Flic is equally about a policeman — Commissaire Coleman (Alain Delon) — and his adversary, nightclub owner and heist man Simon (Richard Crenna). The two alpha men are friends of a sort; they share some sensibilities (like an eye for fine art) and, more importantly, a woman

(Catherine Deneuve). We catch up with Coleman on his rounds in Paris, where the wintry countryside gives way to nighttime neon. Coleman is a successful cop, but the job is a grind: There’s a running gag with monotonous radio calls, and his encounters with Paris’ colorful demimonde scarcely raise a reac-

UN FLIC DIRECTED BY: Jean-Pierre Melville STARRING: Alain Delon, Richard Crenna, Catherine Deneuve In French, with subtitles Mon., Oct. 21, through Thu., Oct. 24. Harris

CP APPROVED tion. (No surprise, given that the film opens with a quote from 19th-century criminalist Francois-Eugene Vidocq: “The only feelings mankind ever inspired in policemen are those of indifference and derision.”) What kickiness the film offers is in the two heists, at the aforementioned beach

bank, and during a lengthy later scene in which the gang stage a nighttime raid on a train. Both scenes play out in more or less real time. This isn’t high action, but deliberate and detail-oriented operations. But Melville also undercuts the pleasures of a heist film with the dissolution of the male bond: Typically, the gang breaks apart, but more significant is the betrayal between Simon and Coleman. Un Flic is not a perfect film. It’s a rather unemotional experience, as if watching a series of well-filmed, specifically assigned exercises. The film employs limited dialogue throughout, relying instead on characters who stare, look away and barely nod to convey information. The conclusion is a series of Gallic shrugs, responding to the serious (a dead body) and the trivial (proffered gum), as well as the existential: What’s it all for anyway? But it’s a must for Melville completists, and anybody else who doesn’t mind their cops-and-robbers films on the cool, calculated and moody side. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW CARRIE. Stephen King’s novel about a telekinetic teenager gets a new big-screen adaptation from Kimberley Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry). Chloe Grace Mertz stars as Carrie, with Julianne Moore portraying her mom. Starts Fri., Oct. 18. THE FIFTH ESTATE. Bill Condon directs this ripped-from-the-headlines docu-drama about the secrets-sharing website WikiLeaks, and the relationship between its two founders, Julian Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl). Starts Fri., Oct. 18. REEL Q. The gay and lesbian film festival continues through Sat., Oct. 19. See www.ReelQ. org for complete schedule.

REPERTORY

GET TRAINING. D. GET NOTICED.

GET CREATIVE. GET STARTED.

MAKE TELEVISION. ION. MAKE MOVIES. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. RENCE. RENCE

LUTHER DUPREE SERVICE COORDINATOR/COUNSELOR/WEBSITE DESIGNER AND PCTV COMMUNITY PRODUCER

Luther uses his show to highlight Pittsburgh sports. What will you do with your show? Take our FREE on-line orientation now at www.PCTV21.org PITTSBURGH COMMUNITY TELEVISION

412-322-7570

WATCH:

Steel City Sports World FIRST WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6 PM COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47

Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y` Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z :VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490

For more information, call 412-246-5367.

FAST FOOD NATION. Richard Linklater’s ensemble drama — adapted from Eric Schlosser’s nonfiction best-seller — rips the bun off the patty, and shoves our heads behind the shiny plastic curtain of fast-food marketing so we can see the real costs wrought by those millions of Big Macs and Whoppers. The 2006 film continues a mini-series, “Fight Back: Global Politics of Resistance,” presented by Point Park University. In English, and some Spanish with subtitles. 6 p.m. Wed., Oct 16. University Center (Room 212), 414 Wood St., Downtown. www.pointpark.edu. Free (Al Hoff) WILD AND SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL. This national touring program offers three hours of short films addressing the theme “A Climate of Change,” designed to educate and inspire activism. The event is sponsored locally by the Allegheny Defense Project. Film topics include: good soil, diminishing glaciers, the Colorado River delta and oyster farming. 6 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. Phipps Conservatory, Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free (suggested donation $10). www.wildandscenicfilmfestival.org. 13 GHOSTS. William Castle directs this 1960 spooker in which a family inherits a haunted house, complete with ghosts that viewers can see with the use of special glasses. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Oaks THE LOST BOYS. This 1987 MTV-style twist on vampires — it’s as if an ’80s hair-metal band turned to blood-sucking and remade Rebel Without a Cause — holds up as a decent goof and even has a few creepy moments. Directed by Joel Schumacher, it all ends in a bloodbath of unholy proportions — as it should. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 16. AMC Loews (AH)

Night of the Living Dead movies of all time. Fringe auteur Ed Wood Jr. hit pay dirt (albeit long after this film was produced, in 1956) with his low-low-budget tale of an alien invasion that raises the dead. Technical gaffes abound, the dialogue is absurd, and the acting wooden — but Plan 9 never fails to entertain. The plot seems farfetched, but as the noted seer Criswell posits on screen: “Can you prove it didn’t happen?” The film screens as part of Handmade for the Hollywood, in which local artists will sell posters they created for various horror films. Doors at 6 p.m.; film at 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18. Hollywood. $5, or free with poster purchase (AH) THE MONKEY TALKS. Raoul Walsh (High Sierra) directs this 1927 melodrama featuring a love triangle between circus performers: a tightrope-walking beauty, an acrobat who impersonates a talking chimpanzee; and a former suitor, posing as an animal trainer. Screens as part of the Unseen Treasures from the George Eastman House series, which features restored silent films. A new score for the film composed by Michael Johnsen (electronics) and Tom Roberts (piano) will be performed live. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18. Warhol. $10. www.warhol.org HORROR FILMS AT THE PARKWAY. Spooky times on screen. Fri., Oct. 28: An American Werewolf in London (8 p.m.), and Feast (10 p.m.). Sat., Oct. 19: 2003’s The Haunted Mansion (6:15 p.m.); Young Frankenstein (8 p.m.); and Sinister (10 p.m.). 644 Broadway Ave., McKees Rocks. $3 ($2 for kids). 412-766-1668

THE GODFATHER. Catch one of the most enduring and influential American films of the late 20th century on the big screen, where Francis Ford Coppola’s multi-generational 1972 mafia family drama and perversion of the American Dream writ large belongs. To be followed by a discussion. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Melwood

NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. Some dead creep called Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is haunting the dreams of teens in Wes Craven’s 1984 scream-fest. A cheapie in its day, Nightmare is now regarded as one of the best of the early-1980s teen-slasher genre. 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18, and 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Oaks

BIG SUR. This new drama from Michael Polish recounts the three trips that Beat writer Jack Kerouac made to the Big Sur region of California after publishing On the Road. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. Hollywood

BIG ASS SPIDER. What more do you need to know? A gigantic alien spider escapes from a military facility and rampages through Los Angeles. Mike Mendez directs this new arachno-horror-thriller. 10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18, and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 20. Hollywood

PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE. It’s rightly considered one of the most enjoyable bad

13 HOURS OF HORROR. Classics, indies and locals. Terror Is a Man (11 a.m.), Asylum of Satan (12:30 p.m.), CONTINUES ON PG. 81

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

“Geez Louise, where’s the Heinz ketchup?”: Best of Pittsburgh winners Pittsburgh Taco Truck and Internet celebrity Pittsburgh Dad

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

1

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

CIGARETTES © SFNTC 4 2013

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

bEST of PITTSBURgH 2013

CROWNING MOMENT WHEN WE PUBLISHED our last “Best of Pittsburgh” edition, in the fall of 2012,

humanity was breathlessly waiting to see whether the end-times prophecies of the ancient Mayans — who predicted an epochal shift in mankind’s destiny that December — would come true. City Paper scoffed, which is kinda what we do around here. In this very space, in fact, we observed that “India Garden won ‘Best Indian Restaurant’ yet again … so the cosmos hasn’t come completely unhinged.” Well … guess what? We don’t want to give away any surprises on the following pages, but let’s just say that not even the ancient Mayans saw a couple of this year’s results coming. When you factor in the Pirates’ playoff run, in fact, it seems possible that perhaps the world did end … only we didn’t notice it, because it was instantaneously replaced by something equally fascinating. Is it possible? Could it be that we have been ushered into some sort of bizarre alternate universe? One in which the Pirates can be contenders? You couldn’t call this brave new world a paradise, exactly — after all, now it’s the Steelers who seem poised to become a league-wide joke. But as our “Best of” issue confirms each year, if you want to find a utopia in Pittsburgh, you need only look around. Some of the places may change, but there’s always evidence to show that we live in the best of all possible cities. And the more the fabric of the universe changes, the more it stays the same. You’ll find plenty of familiar establishments on the pages that follow. After all, even this new reality contains well-known landmarks. For example, City Paper readers will always be able to find the city’s best desserts at Gullifty’s. Wait. What?!?!? B Y C H R IS POT T E R

CULTURE AND NIGHTLIFE 05 FOOD AND DRINK 17 GOODS AND SERVICES 33 PEOPLE AND PLACES 43 ON THE COVER: Pittsburgh Taco Truck owner James Rich and Pittsburgh Dad actor Curt Wootton. (Special thanks to Pittsburgh Dad writer Chris Preksta, not pictured.) Photo by Heather Mull. The Pittsburgh crown illustration seen throughout this issue was designed and screenprinted for Pittsburgh City Paper by CommonWealth Press. Pittsburgh crown tshirts are currently available for sale at www.cwpress.com. BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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Nightmare on Bridge Street Wednesday, October 23rd Join Rock Bottom and Sing Sing for a charity Halloween party to benefit the Special Olympics @ Sing Sing

@ Rock Bottom

(starts at 6:00pm, free admission):

(starts at 8:00 pm, $20 admission)

• Beer tasting with local breweries

• 2 new pumpkin beers • Live music by the Fabulous Booze • Pumpkin carving contest Brothers and Good Brother Earl • Prizes for Best Costume • Silent auction • Light appetizer buffet Happy hour-priced pints for guests arriving in costume

For details, check aht facebook.com/RBPittsburgh 171 EE. BRIDGE ST ST. • AT THE WATERFRONT

The most important exhibition of new INTERNATIONAL art in the US happens in Pittsburgh.

Oct. 5, 2013–Mar. 16, 2014

Sponsored by

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART? TOURS DAILY.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.

Kelly Fino is a regular at two-time Best of Winner Belvedere’s Ultra-Dive.

bEST of

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE BEST LOCAL THEATER COMPANY

Dethlehem: the

CITY THEATRE

ultimate metalheads

1300 Bingham St., South Side 412-431-CITY or www.citytheatrecompany.org

_________ Led by longtime artistic director Tracy Brigden, City is Pittsburgh’s largest theater company focusing on new work — including occasional world premieres by name playwrights. Recent seasons’ polished productions have included Maggie-Kate Coleman and Anna K. Jacobs’ edgy, Andy Warholthemed musical POP! This season brings Christopher Durang’s hit Broadway comedy Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. _________ 2nd: Quantum Theatre 3rd: Pittsburgh Public Theater, Downtown

BEST GALLERY FOR LOCAL ARTISTS

SPACE

812 Liberty Ave., Downtown 412-325-7733 or www.spacepittsburgh.org

_________ Among the city’s larger galleries, this expansive Downtown venue, owned by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, is one of the few to regularly feature local artists, and to exhibit their work alongside that of international artists. Recent shows have ranged from the playful Romper Room to the introspective Overlapping Memories, a creative exchange with artists from Spain. _________ 2nd: ModernFormations, Garfield 3rd Most Wanted Fine Art, Garfield

BEST DANCE COMPANY

PITTSBURGH BALLET THEATRE 412-281-0360 or www.pbt.org

_________ While beloved for its annual staging of The Nutcracker, and for producing iconic works like Swan Lake, the PBT has more than classics on its mind. The company, led by longtime artistic director Terrence Orr, regularly ventures into work by modern masters like Twyla Tharp, and even contemporary works that push the boundaries of ballet. _________ 2nd: Attack Theatre 3rd: Texture

Contemporary Ballet CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY MIKE BASISTA}

BEST METAL BAND

DETHLEHEM www.dethlehem.com {BY CHRIS POTTER} TO EXPLAIN the legend of Dethlehem, it’s

best to begin at the beginning. So: Fëanor, son of Finwë, created the Silmarils. But these jewels were stolen by Melkor, who fled with them to Middle Earth and made war on elves and men alike. Skipping ahead a bit, we come to 2008, when a group of local heroes joined to fulfill a noble quest. “We started out as a joke band for a friend’s Halloween party,” says Dethlehem’s drummer, J.T. Penderville. But lo! They were not entirely a joke band. “We spent the time to make original songs,” says Penderville, who along with guitarists Doyle Daigle and Rick Serafini is one of the three original members still playing with the five-piece. Thus was born Pittsburgh’s leading practitioner of Dungeons & Dragonsinspired metal, whose performances feature medieval costumes and stage names like “Overlord Brom” and “Hank the Guy.” While every metal band boasts a member that plays an axe, in Dethlehem even

the vocalist wields a blade. “When we put the costumes on, we play different personas,” says Penderville. “I feel like I’m more intimidating.” “I’m the opposite,” counters bassist Patrick Lammie. “I feel like an even bigger piece of shit.” Not surprisingly, Dethlehem’s members are fans of role-playing and video games. Also not surprisingly, they don’t take themselves too seriously. That can sometimes cause confusion. While self-parodying metal bands aren’t new (see GWAR), metal fans aren’t universally noted for their sense of irony. During one show, Prenderville recalls, an onlooker saw his black-and-gold tunic and pronounced, “Yellow is not metal.” But make no mistake: “We’re not shitting on metal at all,” says vocalist Jeff Kerekes. Verily, agrees Lammie: “We’re metal as fuck.” Indeed, Dethlehem’s most recent release, The Ghorusalem Codex Vol. 2, amply

demonstrates its brand of harmonic metal: guttural vocals, driving bass lines, thrashing guitars. And that’s just part of the experience: There’s a comic-book version of Codex — which tells the story of a band of adventurers pursuing an evil sorcerer — and a video of the track “Circle of Deth.” And while the video features lighthearted allusions to bestiality and masturbating barbarians, “We’re serious about the jokes too,” Penderville says. As befits a band whose members work in graphic design and computer software, the video’s production is surprisingly elaborate. Dethlehem’s merchandising, meanwhile, would do credit to a hobbit film franchise. The band is marketing its foam-rubber “Battlesword 9000” — suitable for wielding in moshpits — with an online commercial that shows the sword cutting a watermelon, along with other, less savory, uses. Dethlehem is currently unsigned, although the release of an upcoming third album may change that. And band members confess that after years of stretching every copper piece, the thought of some label support is tempting. Then again, Penderville reflects, there’s something to be said for creating everything — from the costumes to the comic books — on your own. “It’s just like playing Dungeons & Dragons,” he says. “You create a whole universe yourself.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE

Best Gallery for Local Artists

AX

FARM S

TR

Space

®

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST LOCAL MUSIC VENUE

STAGE AE

400 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

® 140 6TH STREET PITTSBURGH, PA 15222 412.255.0525

Olive or Twist is the perfect location for your next private party. In addition to our downstairs restaurant and bar, we also offer our 2nd floor lounge; where we can provide an elegant and stylish atmosphere for any event.

Best Place for a Martini

• • • •

scary sexy clever mysterious funny strange bizarre

www.olive-twist.com

Pittsburgh’s premier martini bar is adjacent to the Heinz Hall, the Renaissance Hotel and a short walk across the Clemente Bridge from PNC park.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Private Parties Holiday parties Corporate Functions Receptions Cocktail parties & mixers

Best Place to Network City Paper Pittsburgh’s 2012 City Paper

_________ It’s an outdoor venue, an indoor venue and a club, all in one. And that versatility is surely one of the keys to this North Side space. But the real draw at Stage AE is always the talent, and with acts like Belle and Sebastian, Sigur Ros and Mac Miller headlining, it’s hard to go wrong. _________ 2nd: Mr. Smalls, Millvale 3rd: Altar Bar, Strip District

BEST POP/ROCK BAND (THAT’S NOT THE CLARKS)

BASTARD BEARDED IRISHMEN _________

buy • sell • trade

Halloween Apparel for Men

& Women New and Used Costumes

5858 FORBES AVE SQUIRREL HILL 412.421.291 1

Every day is St. Patrick’s Day when this local favorite takes the stage. The band is as much at home playing classical Irish folk music as it is playing the Irishmen’s own distinct style of Irish music with a strong punk influence. That distinct sound has led to gigs all year long, so you don’t have to wait until March to hear it. _________ 2nd: Donora 3rd: Meeting of Important People SEE ON STORY 6 PG. 0

BEST METAL BAND

DETHLEHEM _________

Here’s maybe all you need to know about Dethlehem, Pittsburgh’s finest metal act to be inspired by role-playing

games: When it opened for GWAR at Mr. Small’s a few years back, even lead singer Dave Brockie was impressed by the costumes. Yes, those are real metal helmets, and notwithstanding the sometimes-jokey material … this is a real metal band. _________ 2nd: Lady Beast 3rd: Fist Fight in

the Parking Lot

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST COMMUNITY LEADER

FRANCO HARRIS Reason: He is a person who stayed in Pittsburgh and used his fame and monies to give back to this community. He is very driven and passionate.

BEST ALT-FOLK/ ALT-COUNTRY BAND

THE ARMADILLOS _________ This is the third Best Of win for The Armadillos, and it’s not hard to hear why. At a time when sticky-sweet Americana-ish rock bands top the charts, this four-piece brings a strippeddown, dark traditionalism to its music, without losing its sense of fun. Keep a lookout for a new record in the coming year, the band’s third since 2010. _________ 2nd: The Harlan Twins 3rd: Cathasaigh CONTINUES ON PG. 10

THE

NUTCRACKER DEC. 7-30, 2013 BENEDUM CENTER

TICKETS: 412.456.6666 ONLINE: PBT.ORG

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE BEST JAZZ/BLUES BAND OR PERFORMER

THE OLGA WATKINS BAND _________ Olga Watkins — chef, singer, general personality and ladyabout-town — has been at the head of the class for years now. Her chops are undeniable, her band is one of the tightest, and she’s quintessentially Pittsburgh: Alongside torch-style tunes, expect to hear the signature, Steelers-inspired number “Drink Up Yinz Bitches.” _________

Bartender Sarah Clarke assembles a one-of-a-kind cocktail at Tender.

2nd: Phat Man Dee &

The Cultural District 3rd: Sean Jones

BEST HIP-HOP PERFORMER(S)

WIZ _________ KHALIFA What’s Wiz been up to this year? Pittsburgh’s biggest entertainment export in recent years has been touring relentlessly to support last December’s O.N.I.F.C. … oh, and having a baby with longtime girlfriend Amber Rose. The couple welcomed Sebastian Taylor Thomaz on Feb. 21, and have been tweeting sweet, mushy stuff about “Baby Bash” ever since. _________ 2nd: Mac Miller 3rd: Tracksploitation

BEST NEW BAR SEE T STORY A RIGHT

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN

{PHOTO BY MIKE BASISTA}

4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com

_________ Tender opened last spring amidst a growing Pittsburgh cocktail scene, and it quickly carved out a niche. A small menu of American comfort-food-inspired dishes supplements an expertly curated cocktail menu and a “Banker’s List” of traditional cocktails, many pre-Prohibition-era in origin. The largely 1920s-inspired décor alone is enough to warrant a trip. _________

IF YOU GO into Lawrenceville’s Tender Bar

2nd: Industry Public House, Lawrenceville 3rd: Acacia, South Side

and order a Captain-and-Coke, don’t expect to get one. But don’t expect to get laughed at, either.

CONTINUES ON PG. 11

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

BEST NEW BAR BEST COCKTAIL LIST

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN 4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com {BY ANDY MULKERIN} “While we don’t have Captain Morgan,” says general manager Jason Carr, “our bartenders will work with you to get something you’ll like. Tell them you like a

particular spirit or flavor profile, and they’ll tailor a drink specific to your preferences, or assist you in choosing one off our cocktail menu. They’re here to guide you.” The bar, opened last spring by Verde owner Jeff Catalina, focuses loosely on preProhibition-style cocktails. That approach fits with the ambience of the space, the old Arsenal Bank, which was open from the late 19th century through the mid-20th. Some of the old bank details (the safe, the vault security system) are preserved, and elements of the decor — like the old checks, found in the building, that are decoupaged on the wall — keep the theme alive. Still, you don’t walk into a period piece when you enter Tender: Carr says the staff strives to strike a balance between a romantic vision of 1920s life and a practical, contemporary venue. On weekends, you’ll find staff dressed up pretty fancy, and touches like old seltzer bottles from Pittsburgh Seltzer Works add to the classy, old-time feel. On a recent Monday night, by contrast, bartenders were sporting flannel shirts, and Neil Young was on the turntable. (Tuesday nights, you’ll find a local musician on the piano, playing jazz.) Tender bartenders aren’t just people off the street who can pull a draft. Carr — who worked at Verde, and previously at the now-defunct Firehouse Lounge and Embury in the Strip — began assembling the Tender crew months before it opened, and worked with them to come up with an initial cocktail menu. Featured cocktails come with a note from the bartender who crafted them, and are signed with the author’s initials. (While pre-Prohibition is a starting point, new cocktails, using nonera-specific spirits, are welcome.) When Carr talks about the group, he sounds like the coach of a sports team, evaluating the roles played by each member of the roster: the tiki-drink guy, the craft-beer woman, the sommelier, the beverage director who knows his obscure spirits. The cocktail list changes regularly. Some standbys get extended play, like the Van Buren, a patron favorite that features Wigle Ginever, chartreuse, Benedictine and a few other additions. Most other cocktails come and go in favor of something new that one of the bartenders has come up with. Ultimately, the point is to provide an experience that will be different from other bars, even within the growing local cocktail scene. The folks at Tender also hope you’ll learn a thing or two. “Our goal is to provide our guests with a comfortable and educational experience,” says Carr. “And maybe even get them to try something outside of their comfort zone.” A M U L K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE BEST NEW CLUB

CAVO

1916 Smallman St., Strip District 412-918-1068 or www.cavopgh.com

_________ The newest big club in town is the Strip District’s Cavo, which features a small restaurant in addition to the large club area. Besides the usual dance nights, Cavo has hosted plenty of interesting events: among them the RAW Artists Pittsburgh series, a showcase for local artists and musicians. _________ 2nd: Skybar, South Side 3rd: Latitude 40, Robinson Township

BEST STRIP CLUB

BLUSH

135 Ninth St., Downtown 412-281-7703 or www.blushexotic.com

_________ Whether you’re out for a night on the town or looking to spice up your lunch hour, Blush is ready to keep you entertained. In addition to the regular schedule of exotic dancers, the club features nationally known dancers and adult-film stars, plus amateur nights, couples nights, happy-hour specials and a lunch buffet. _________ 2nd: Cheerleaders Gentlemen’s Club, Strip District 3rd: Club Erotica, McKees Rocks

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST GAME TO PLAY WHILE WALKING THROUGH THE CITY

RAT OR WEAVE Reason: Because it’s almost always a weave in the gutter, not a rat.

BEST SPORTS BAR

JEROME BETTIS’ GRILLE 36

393 North Shore Drive, North Side 412-224-6287 or www.jeromebettisgrille36.com

_________ Everything about this restaurant pays homage to athletics, including the fact it’s wedged between PNC Park and Heinz Field. There are plenty of nods to the legendary Steelers halfback too, including The 36 steak, Jerome’s burger and a “Bus” steak salad, plus standard tavern fare and some

wild-card menu items, like a deep-fried cheeseburger. It’s a great place to watch the game, or spread out for an after-work happy hour. _________ 2nd: Mario’s Saloon, Shadyside and South Side 3rd: Primanti Bros., multiple locations

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST FOOD FROM AXIS OF EVIL

CONFLICT KITCHEN Reason: They make some great food and help people to think about the fact that food binds us all together and that the people of Iran are people, just like the rest of us.

Sale Ends October 31

BEST DANCE CLUB

STATIC

1650 Smallman St., Strip District 412-315-7330 or www.staticpgh.com

_________ For serious fans of electronic dance music, the Top-40-dominated club scene can feel a little lacking. Which is why it was kind of a big deal when Static opened as “the city’s first and only electronic-focused night club.” The 10,000-square-foot space — formerly Rosebud— regularly features national talent, as well as resident DJ Strobe. _________ 2nd: Diesel, South Side 3rd: Whim, South Side

BEST MONTHLY/ WEEKLY DJ NIGHT

’80S NIGHT, BELVEDERE’S ULTRA-DIVE 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-687-2555 or www.belvederesultradive.com

_________ Last year, Neon — known to most just as “’80s Night” — underwent a quiet change of DJ. The former DJ Hatesyou left for England, and his successor took over the Thursday-night event, under the name … DJ Hatesyou. If you don’t care about getting up early Friday morning — or rolling out of bed smelling like booze and smoke — you’re in good company here. _________ 2nd: Title Town Soul and Funk Party, Brillobox (Bloomfield) 3rd: Pandemic, Brillobox (Bloomfield)

Back by popular demand! Hurry! Available for a limited time only at your local distributor. LAGER - An iconic American lager famous for its rich amber color and medium-bodied flavor - with roasted caramel malt for a subtle sweetness and a combination of cluster and cascade hops, this true original delivers a well-balanced taste with very distinct character. LIGHT LAGER - An exceptional brew that’s low-calorie without sacrificing character. Masterfully developed to maintain the full flavor profile akin to our flagship Lager brand with only 99 calories. BLACK & TAN - Black & Tan combines our popular Dark Brewed Porter with Premium Beer. Rich and dark in color with hints of caramel and coffee that finishes smooth and satisfying. LORD CHESTERFIELD ALE - Brewed with select hops, its distinct robust flavor is der ived from a delicate combination of sweet maltiness and lingering herbal bitterness. yuengling.com

©2013 D.G. YUENGLING & SONS, INC., POTTSVILLE, PA 17901

CONTINUES ON PG. 12

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE

BUY ONE GET ONE

50% OFF ALL BASKETS Now through Mon, Oct 21 Whether you’re giving, gathering, storing or sharing, we have the perfect basket. Discount applied to item of equal or lesser value. Not valid with other discounts. Valid at participating stores only. Artisans have been paid in full.

5824 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA Mon 10–6, Tue 10–8 Wed 10–6, Thu 10–8, Fri–Sat 10–6 412-421-2160 pittsburgh.tenthousandvillages.com

Best Alt-Folk/Alt-Country Band The Armadillos {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST BARTENDER

TIM QUINLAN, GOOSKI’S

SEE ON STORY 4 PG. 1

3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1658

_________ When you want a stiff drink and you want it fast, Tim Quinlan is your man. His philosophy is, “Don’t make people wait for a drink.” After 17 years tending bar at Gooski’s — and thanks to his unusually good memory for faces and beverage preferences — he has speedy service down to a near science. _________ 2nd: Mark Miller, Monterey Pub (North Side) 3rd: Maggie Meskey, Salt of the Earth (Garfield)

expect, and each has gone through rigorous testing and editing via the team of experienced barkeeps. A fun addition: The menu includes notes on each featured cocktail from the bartender who concocted it. _________ 2nd: Bar Marco, Strip District 3rd (tie): Acacia (South Side) and Olive or Twist (Downtown)

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST FRIEND

PIRATES PARROT BEST COCKTAIL LIST SEE ON STORY 0 PG. 1

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY

NOVEMBER 6 &7 7:30PM •

Splash Zone $72; Orchestra $62, $50; Loge $62; Balcony $50, $40, $30

724-836-8000

www.thepalacetheatre.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-402-9522 or www.tenderpgh.com

_________ Tender’s cocktail list varies regularly, and caters to a variety of tastes, from robust to light-and-sweet. Each drink has a few more ingredients than you

BEST HAPPY HOUR

MAD MEX Multiple locations, www.madmex.com

_________ Happy hours are ubiquitous, but Mad Mex’s is tough to beat: half-off

PalacePA

The Palace Theatre

TENDER BAR + KITCHEN

Reason: 20 years without a winning season and he always keeps his charm and smile.

CONTINUES ON PG. 15

65:(3,56>ย‹65,50./;653@ย‹65:(3,56> ยธ(4HZ[LY*SHZZ0U:[HUK\W*VTLK`ยน Telegraph, London

ยธ<UPX\L6ULVM[OL-VYLTVZ[*VTPJZVMOPZ.LULYH[PVUยน SF Weekly

WESTBETH ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT

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COSTUME CONTEST BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

13

The Chalk Line A dance performance of clues, questions, and surprising answers, where the writing on the wall tells the unexpected truth.

November 1–2, 7– 9, 11–12, 14–16 8:00 p.m. Attack Theatre’s Spring Way Studio

Your bartender tonight is Tim Quinlan.

2515 Liberty Avenue (Strip District) TICKETS www.attacktheatre.com/ATChalk 1.888.71.TICKETS (1.888.718.4253)

www.attacktheatre.com Made possible in part by: Spring Way Center, LLC

Image: Rob Henning Design Photo: Courtesy of Brian Cohen

@rt

WESTMORELAND 30 MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art @rt 30 is now open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces from the permanent collection, American Marketplace, Art on Tap and more!

Pop-Up Exhibition: The Works of Cydra Vaux

Wednesday - Friday 12 pm - 7 pm Saturday & Sunday 10 am - 5 pm wmuseumaa.org 724-837-1500

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

BEST BARTENDER

TIM QUINLAN QUINLAN,, GOOSKI’S 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1658 {BY MARGARET WELSH} IF YOU’VE BEEN to Gooski’s in the last 17

years — whether for a post-work beer, a weekend Bloody Mary or to see a band — you’ve probably been waited on by Tim Quinlan. For many patrons, in fact, Quinlan practically is Gooski’s.

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Built like a pro wrestler and fond of greeting customers as “brother” or “lady,” Quinlan is a man of few words. When asked if he knows why people voted him the city’s best bartender, for example, he laughs and says, “No.” Then he observes that since

Gooski’s owner Marcus Visco keeps prices low, “The drinks sell themselves.” Quinlan’s fans are less reserved. On overhearing him being interviewed recently, a small group at the bar began calling out a chorus of “Tim is the best!” and “We love Tim!” Quinlan just smiled, shook his head and stepped away to wait on someone else. But what is it about Quinlan that inspires seemingly universal affection? “Tim has the uncanny ability to remember people’s faces and what they drink,” says bouncer and cook Matt Hanzes. By Quinlan’s own estimation, the mark of any good bartender is speed (“Don’t make people wait for a drink,” is his philosophy) and a good memory is key to keeping up the pace. If you remember a regular’s drink, Quinlan explains, you can get it ready while listening to someone else’s order.

“TIM HAS THE UNCANNY ABILITY TO REMEMBER PEOPLE’S FACES AND WHAT THEY DRINK” He makes it sound easy; in reality this method requires a serious talent for multitasking. “On nights where we get really busy,” Hanzes says, “[Quinlan] can handle the entire bar by himself, where other bars would need two or three bartenders.” Plus, at around 6’5”, Quinlan’s presence alone seems to keep things from getting too wild on a busy night. “I’m not necessarily the biggest guy,” Hanzes says. But during his first few days of working the door, he recalls, “Tim said, ‘Don’t worry, I wouldn’t let anyone hurt you.’ He’s a good guy to have in your corner.” It isn’t just fast service that makes Quinlan popular. Polish Hill resident Angela Okins says, “All my stories about Timmy are, like, you go up to the bar and say, ‘I need to get my car inspected.’ And Tim says, ‘This is where you’re going.’” Lots of people have stories of Quinlan offering help. One regular mentions that Quinlan gave her driving lessons (“We didn’t have parking cones,” she says, “so we used a sweatshirt and my can of coconut water”). Another recalls the time Quinlan gave him the bar’s old ping-pong table, and helped move it. Quinlan is as welcoming as he is nononsense — which is exactly what people are looking for in a bar like Gooski’s. As Hanzes puts it, “I like a nice cocktail as much as anyone, but sometimes you just want a drink. And you want it quick. That’s what Tim is good at.” M WE LS H@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE drafts, half-off regular wings and $7 for a 22-ounce margarita. There’s a generous list of craft beers from the likes of Troeg’s, Victory, Great Lakes and Boulder, and even some Belgian brews mixed in. Offer is good at all seven local Mexes between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. daily. _________ 2nd: Tamari, Lawrenceville and Warrendale 3rd: Sharp Edge, multiple locations

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST PLACE TO GO PEOPLE WATCHING

GRANDVIEW AVENUE, MOUNT WASHINGTON Reason: In less than five minutes, I saw a girl puke in front of St. Mary of the Mount, three teenage boys record a music video with the music playing out of their beater car, and a man sitting cross-legged on top of his Jeep feeding a parrot that was sitting on his forearm.

BEST BAR TO KARAOKE

NICO’S RECOVERY ROOM 178 Pearl St., Bloomfield 412-681-9562

_________ Nico’s is one of those great Pittsburgh dives, and its Saturdaynight karaoke is a perennial favorite with City Paper readers. Just be sure to sign up early if you want to sing: The forgiving audience may not pressure performers, but it can be hard to squeeze through the crowd just to get up on stage. _________ 2nd: Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville 3rd: Cappy’s Café, Shadyside

BEST LGBT BAR

CATTIVO th

146 44 St., Lawrenceville 412-687-2157 or www.cattivo.biz

_________ This Lawrenceville bar, a favorite for local lesbians, strives to offer something for everyone. At times,

A CENTRE OF CELEBRATION The Hill House Economic Development Corporation and the Hill House Association are proud to announce the opening of Centre Heldman Plaza Shop ‘n Save.

Saturday, October 19 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Centre Avenue between Heldman St. & Dinwiddie St. Rain Date: Sunday, October 20 from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Come celebrate Community Day, a fun-filled afternoon of entertainment, food, children’s activities and more! www.hillhouse.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 16

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

15

AN

bEST of CULTURE + NIGHTLIFE

ORIGINAL

h g r u b s t t i P

Best LGBT Bar

000

Cattivo

CO

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SINCE 2

M PAN

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

A Pittsburgh Original â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Coffee roasted locally every week

www.CrazyMocha.com

this spot has a neighborhood-pub feel, where you can shoot pool or watch a ballgame. Other times, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a full-on dance club and venue for drag shows and other live performance. The kitchen is even open late serving pretty stellar pub grub. _________

some Lawrenceville townies and cheap drafts, and both your curiosity and your thirst will be quenched for hours. _________ 2nd: Local Bar + Kitchen, South Side 3rd: Deeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CafĂŠ, South Side

KING MAKER:

2nd: 5801 Video Lounge & CafĂŠ, Shadyside 3rd: Blue Moon, Lawrenceville

BEST BAR TO PEOPLE WATCH

BELVEDEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ULTRA-DIVE

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_________ Belvedereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s caters to a multitude of different crowds, and perhaps thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes it great for peoplewatching. One night, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s punk bands; the next, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a roller-skating dance party or a party called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sexplosion.â&#x20AC;? Throw in

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16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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bEST of Best of Winner Piccolo Forno

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BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

17

bEST of FOOD + DRINK BEST NEW RESTAURANT (*AS OF AUGUST 2012)

MATTEO’S

3615 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-586-7722 or www.matteospgh.com

_________ For anyone worried that Lawrenceville is inevitably destined for hipster preciousness, Matteo’s is able to serve up a retort. A sophisticated but unpretentious wine list, familiar cuts of meat and classic pasta preparations — when done by owner Matthew Cavanaugh, these things haven’t gone out of fashion. And it seems City Paper readers hope they never will. _________

Taj Mahal owner Usha Sethi, with just one of the many Indian dishes available

2nd: Tender Bar + Kitchen, Lawrenceville 3rd: Noodlehead, Shadyside

BEST BYOB DINING

PICCOLO FORNO

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

3801 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com

_________ Hearty pasta dishes, woodfired-oven pizza, a zesty salad — what goes great with these classic Italian dishes? The right wine, of course! The days of home-style Italian food being paired with a bottle of chianti wrapped in straw are long gone. When dining at Piccolo Forno, bring your appetite and the perfect wine. It may even be a chianti. _________ 2nd: Pusadee’s Garden, Lawrenceville 3rd: Nicky’s Thai Kitchen, North Side and Downtown

BEST OUTDOOR DINING

PUSADEE’S GARDEN

5321 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-781-8724 or www.pusadeesgarden.com

_________ This Thai restaurant isn’t called a garden for nothing. Vines sprawl on the pergola overhead in the expansive outdoor seating area, with herbs and vegetables used in the kitchen growing just a few CONTINUES ON PG. 20

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

TAJ MAHAL 7795 McKnight Road, North Hills 412-364-1760 or www.tajmahalinc.com {BY AL HOFF} THERE’S NO MISTAKING this single-story restaurant on retail-heavy McKnight Road for the actual Taj Mahal, India’s most famous and spectacular structure. But if you’re searching for the delights of Indian cuisine, you have come to the right spot. Taj Mahal boasts an impressively long menu, one that features Indian dishes from north to south, and some points in between. (There is a small selection of IndoChinese specialties, for instance.) The menu also takes care to explain various types of Indian cooking (curry, tandoor, dum), as well as the origins and use of critical ingredients (spices, ghee, yogurt). Items are made from scratch, and the cheese and yogurt are made fresh daily. Perhaps the easiest way to navigate the choices is to partake of the buffet. The flat-price, all-you-can-eat option is available daily for lunch, with dinner buffets on Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

Settle into the unassuming space, decorated in warm spice colors (gold, brown, deep red), and plate up. On offer at a recent Sunday lunch buffet were more than a dozen entrée-type dishes (goat curry, chicken tikka masala, chicken briyani), as well as another full complement of hearty sides (paneer with peas, dal, lentil soup). There was a selection of raitas and chutneys, a build-your-ownside-salad set-up, and several types of bread (crispy, salty, spongy). For dessert, there were two puddings (mango and rice, great together), sooji halwa (a sweetened semolina porridge) and excellent, ooey-gooey honey balls. All the items are labeled, though often with the Indian name alone, which preserves a bit of mystery. (One dish, arbi, was helpfully annotated as being “potato-like.”)

But the buffet is the perfect way to take a chance with a small portion: New-to-me chilli iddy turned out to be battered and deep-fried potato slices that could have easily topped a menu of Highly Addictive Bar Snacks. Thus educated, I would happily order these in the future. Some buffets aim for the low end of spiciness, but the dishes here were well spiced, with several being satisfyingly hot. Another new-to-me item was “lemon rice,” which was brightly flavored with citrus, but also contained nuts and hot peppers; I got a deliciously fiery mouthful. Understandably, Taj Mahal’s buffet is a popular destination for families, with everyone from grandma to the baby sharing food at a big table. The hardest part — besides getting to the restaurant from the northbound lanes of McKnight Road — might be pushing the plate away. Despite my best efforts to try everything, I still left a few dishes untasted, while I shamefully kept returning to load up on more potato fritters dipped in tamarind chutney. But a buffet, especially one this ample, is an invitation to eat what you want, and at your pace. Take your appetite, and take your time.

CHILLI IDDY COULD EASILY TOP A MENU OF HIGHLY ADDICTIVE BAR SNACKS.

A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Award Winning Thai Cuisine

bEST of FOOD + DRINK feet away: You don’t get much more locally sourced than that. And when the sun goes down, outdoor lighting makes this garden doubly enchanted. _________ 2nd: Double Wide Grill, South Side and Mars 3rd: Round Corner Cantina, Lawrenceville

Nicky’s Thai Kitchen has been dedicated to serving delicious authentic Thai cuisinee to the Pittsburgh region since 2007. We hope to see you at either location soon for either dining in or take out.

Please visit us either Downtown or on the Northside for Lunch Monday - Saturday or Dinner Every Day

——— NORTHSIDE ——— 856 Western Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15233 412 321-THAI (8424) B.Y.O.B. LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS : Monday - Thursday 5pm - 9pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10pm; Sunday 4pm - 9pm

——— DOWNTOWN ——— 903 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412 471-THAI (8424) Full Bar with Thai Beer, Thai inspired cocktails, a variety of Sake, and more! DOWNTOWN HAPPY HOURS Monday - Wednesday 5pm - 7pm LUNCH HOURS: Monday - Saturday 11:30am - 3pm DINNER HOURS : Monday - Thursday 5pm - 10pm; Friday and Saturday 5pm - 10:30pm; Sunday 4pm-9pm

www.nickysthaikitchen.com 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

BEST CHEF

KEVIN SOUSA, MULTIPLE LOCATIONS _________ There are more local household-name chefs now than five years ago, but Kevin Sousa is still foremost. The innovator who first brought us stuff like molecular gastronomy continues to do things his way, running his flagship Salt of the Earth while opening Union Pig and Chicken, cocktail bar Harvard and Highland, and Station Street Hot Dogs, all in East Liberty. _________ 2nd: Justin Severino, Cure (Lawrenceville) 3rd: Matt Cavanaugh, Matteo’s (Lawrenceville)

BEST BAKERY

OAKMONT BAKERY 531 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont 412-826-1606 or www.oakmontbakery.com

_________ Pittsburgh has no shortage of neighborhood bakeries, but Oakmont Bakery is a destination for customers well outside the Allegheny Valley — especially during Lent, when its famed paczki are on offer. But all year round, its seemingly endless display cases offer a dizzying array of cakes, pastries, breads, cookies … basically almost everything you’ve ever wanted, but knew you probably shouldn’t have. _________ 2nd: La Gourmandine Bakery, Lawrenceville 3rd: Prantl’s Bakery, Shadyside and Downtown

BEST BREAD

MANCINI’S BAKERY Multiple locations, www.mancinisbakery.com

_________ Ask any Pittsburgher with roots what their favorite bread is, and the answer you’ll get more than any other is Mancini’s. It’s the bread on our world-famous Primanti Bros. sandwiches. It’s the best bread to sop

up the last of the pasta sauce from the plate. And it’s the bread we’re willing to stand in any size line for. _________ 2nd: Breadworks, North Side 3rd: Allegro Hearth Bakery, Squirrel Hill

BEST ALL-DAY BREAKFAST

PAMELA’S DINER Multiple locations, www.pamelasdiner.com

_________ Pamela’s serves just about everything on a respectable breakfast menu: omelets oozing with savory fillings like corned beef and Swiss or feta and spinach; French toast; and unique fare like chorizo patties and Lyonnaise potatoes. They even have a “morning after” special. But the diner is known for its crêpe-like thin hotcakes that are pillowy, buttery discs with crispy edges. _________ 2nd: Eat’n Park, multiple locations 3rd: Ritter’s Diner, Bloomfield

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST RETURN OF A LOCAL CELEBRITY

BUMPER BIKE GUY Reason: For three years, unseen was Bumper Bike Guy on the streets of Pittsburgh. He’d vanished, without a trace or rumor. And then one day, there he was, as though he’d never left. And once again, our hearts were whole.

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH

GRAND CONCOURSE 100 W. Station Square Drive, South Side 412-261-1717 or www.muer.com/grand-concourse

_________ The Sunday Brunch at this converted Pittsburgh and Erie Railroad Station in the South Side’s Station Square has long been a favorite of both locals and out-of-towners. The elegance of the restaurant’s interior is matched by the upscale buffet fare. Typical breakfast food is elevated and complemented by entrees like prime rib, salmon Rockefeller and roast pork with apple chutney. _________ 2nd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown 3rd: Coca Café, Lawrenceville CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

21

bEST of FOOD + DRINK BEST BUSINESS LUNCH

THE CAPITAL GRILLE 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown 412-338-9100 or www.thecapitalgrille.com

_________ For decades, Downtown Pittsburgh is where business titans have carved up the region’s economy like it was a fine steak … and vice versa. The Capital Grille, famous for its own dry-aged beef and fine dining, carries on that tradition. For particularly complicated deals, it offers private dining facilities whose creature comforts would satisfy a robber baron, and whose networking technology would impress a Silicon Valley venture capitalist. _________

James Rich, slinging tacos from his Pittsburgh Taco Truck

2nd: Six Penn Kitchen, Downtown 3rd: NOLA on the Square, Downtown

SEE ON STORY 8 PG. 1

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

TAJ MAHAL

7795 McKnight Road, North Hills 412-364-1760 or www.tajmahalinc.com

_________ There’s a lengthy menu of northern and southern Indian entrees, side dishes and appetizers, and desserts. Besides chicken, there is lamb, goat, fish and even beef. But rather than choose, why not partake of the Taj Mahal’s extensive buffets, held every day? Try something new — or simply fill up, over and over, on your favorites. _________ 2nd: Tamarind, multiple locations 3rd: People’s Indian, Garfield

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT

NAKAMA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR 1611 E. Carson St., South Side 412-381-6000 or www.eatatnakama.com

_________ The art of hibachi has taken off in Pittsburgh, thanks in no small part to Nakama. Diners sit grillside as chefs prepare shrimp, chicken and delicacies like Kobe beef and chateaubriand. Also on the menu is a selection of sake, CONTINUES ON PG. 27

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST FOOD TRUCK

PGH TACO TRUCK 412-841-9234 or www.facebook.com/pghtacotruck {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} IT MAKES sense that the first winner in the Best Food Truck category would be the Pgh Taco Truck. After all, the truck represented a movement even before it started moving. “I started a blog in 2010 called Burgh Gourmand and at that time, I committed digitally to opening a food truck in Pittsburgh,” says Pgh Taco Truck owner James Rich. “At the time, there was less than a handful of gourmet food trucks, and I asked people what they thought and what they’d like to see. So in 2012, I bought a truck and started doing events.” Rich started getting solid word-ofmouth reviews from customers who had the chance to sample his gourmet tacos. In January 2013, the truck opened for business several days a week at different spots around the region. The truck’s offerings aren’t your runof-the-mill tacos. You can find tacos with

ground-beef filling, of course: a third of a pound of Angus beef served with cheddar and salsa or queso fresco and cilantro. But there are other choices as well, like spicy jerk chicken with avocado cream. There’s also a daily vegetarian option. Despite its name, Pgh Taco Truck is active mostly in the North Hills, where it frequently operates in the parking lot of Coffee Buddha (964 Perry Highway). The suburban location is largely due to the city’s restrictive rules about where food trucks can operate. “When I was building my business plan, I became aware of the city’s restrictions, so I wasn’t getting into it blindly,” says Rich, who lives in Bloomfield. “So the idea became to build my business at

locations outside of the city, and through private events.” But Rich has built up a customer base that apparently doesn’t mind traveling from all over the region to the North Hills. Rich says his arrangement at Coffee Buddha has been beneficial to both businesses. On the days he sells outside the store, he doesn’t sell drinks, directing customers inside the coffee shop instead. “This arrangement has really been an integral part of our success thus far,” Rich says. “There’s just this lovely symbiosis.” “At first I think people started coming because we were like a novelty,” Rich adds. “But as they tried our food, they enjoyed it. And I think they appreciate the effort that we put into it, and see that it’s on par with food they might get at a restaurant.” “But beyond that, I think our customers feel like they are supporting a movement,” he says. “I’ve spoken a lot about the process of how we got here, and I think people are connected to our story.”

“I THINK OUR CUSTOMERS FEEL LIKE THEY ARE SUPPORTING A MOVEMENT.”

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South Side $2.00 Yuengling Lager Drafts

Shadyside $6.00 Yuengling Pitchers

South Side $2.00 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Bottles

East Liberty $2.25 Yuengling Drafts

*Must be 21 or Older. No purchase necessary. No charge for contest. Your standard charges do apply. For official rules please visit our website at yuengling.com

Mike & Tony’s

GYROS M Monroeville ill $2.00 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

Albert’s Lounge Dormont $2.50 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Drafts

Strip District $3.00 Yuengling Drafts All Day

Café

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Clubhouse

Bridgeville $2.00 Yuengling Lager Drafts

South Park $2.00 Yuengling 16oz Drafts All Day

Oakland $5.00 Yuengling Pitchers All Day

Brookline $1.50 Yuengling Pints

Uptown $2.00 Yuengling Drafts

Mt.Lebanon $3.00 Yuengling Lager & Light All Day

South Side $2.00 Yuengling Pints

Fox Chapel $2.00 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

Shadyside $2 Yuengling Lager Drafts

South Side $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts All Day

MODERN CAFÉ North Side $3.25 Yuengling Drafts

Greenfield $3.00 Yuengling Lager Drafts All Day

DUKE’S Spencer’s Upper Deck Down Under Homestead $2.50 Yuengling Drafts & Bottles

South Park

THE

Hough’s White Oak $2.00 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

Saturday

West Mifflin $2.00 Yuengling Drafts & $2.25 Yuengling 12oz Bottles

PUB IN THE

PARK Swissvale $2.00 Yuengling 16oz Drafts

s e s u c Ex South Side $2.00 Yuengling Pints All Day

INN

Mars $2.00 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

y Specials

Monroeville $2.00 Yuengling Lager Drafts

Verona $2.00 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Bottles

MOHAN’S RESTAURANT

B OT TLE S H O P Ross Township $2.25 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

McCandless Township $2.00 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Drafts

Penn Hills $2.00 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Draft

Castle Shannon $2.00 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager Drafts

Crafton $2.50 Yuengling Drafts & Bottles All Day

Etna $2.15 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

SIDE

LINES

BAR & GRILL Millvale $1.75 Yuengling Lager Drafts & Variety Bottles

Slap Shots Dormont $2.00 Yuengling Pints All Day

Etna $2.25 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

Mars $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts All Day

Oakmont $3 Yuengling Lager, Light Lager and Black & Tan Drafts

S R ’ K E H A P S U RB AMR & G R I L L E

O’S R IZZ

ll e i r a i v t a g r a M

Mt. Lebanon $2.50 Yuengling Lager & Light Lager 16oz Drafts and Bottles All Day

South Side $2.50 Yuengling Drafts & Light Lager Bottles All Day

Plum $2.00 Yuengling Lager Drafts

South Side $6.00 Yuengling Pitchers

SHAouLngEeR

L

Shaler $2.75 Yuengling Lager 16oz Drafts

s n o i t a r b re e o l m e d n a C Imperial $2.75 Yuengling Drafts All Day

Irwin $2.50 Yuengling Lager Drafts

Trafford $2.00 Yuengling Lager Draft

WAYNE’S LO U N G E

Downtown $2.50 Yuengling Drafts

Coraopolis $1.50Yuengling Lager Drafts All Day

Wexford $2.00 Yuengling Drafts All Day

McCandless $2.00 Yuengling Drafts All Day

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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EASIER Get a ConnectCard at most Giant Eagle locations. Load up to $200 of Stored Cash Value. Forget about exact change.

ConnectCard.org 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

PortAuthority.org

bEST of FOOD + DRINK noodles and starters. If you want to avoid the show, you can order the full menu at tables by the bar. _________

a flutter on a whole Peking duck. Best advice: Take a group, and share the dishes family-style. _________

2nd: Little Tokyo, South Side and Mount Lebanon 3rd: Fukuda, Bloomfield

2nd: Wai Wai, Bloomfield 3rd: China Palace, Shadyside

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

PICCOLO FORNO

3801 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-622-0111 or www.piccolo-forno.com

_________ When the weather turns chilly, one’s stomach naturally gravitates toward hearty carbohydrates. Consider this cozy spot along the popular Butler Street corridor. While gently warmed by the wood-fired pizza oven, fortify yourself with cavatelli and sausage, baked rigatoni, lasagna, risotto or perhaps one of the many pizza and panini options. _________ 2nd: Il Pizzaiolo, Mount Lebanon and Downtown 3rd: Girasole, Shadyside

BEST THAI RESTAURANT

NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN

856 Western Ave., North Side (412-321-8424) / 903 Penn Ave., Downtown (412-471-8424) www.nickysthaikitchen.com

_________ Nicky’s Thai Kitchen in the North Side has long been a favorite, thanks to the homey atmosphere and Edenlike outdoor seating. But the new Downtown location offers its own charms. Away from the bustle of the street, it’s the perfect spot for a lunchtime escape. And, with a selection of tempting happy-hour specials, it’s a great place to stop by after work. _________ 2nd: Thai Cuisine, Bloomfield 3rd: Thai Me Up, South Side

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

SESAME INN Multiple locations, www.sesameinn.net

_________ A perennial winner in this category, Sesame Inn offers Chinese cuisine at four area locations (Three locations also serve sushi.) Satisfy your taste for popular dishes such as kung pao chicken and Sichuan beef, or take

BEST FRENCH RESTAURANT

Open 7 Days from 11am-10pm

TAJ MAHAL

Serving North Indian, South Indian and other authentic regional Indian Cuisine

RESTAURANT

7795 McKnight Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237 • 412-364-1760 • tajmahalinc.com

PARIS 66

6018 Penn Circle South, East Liberty 412-404-8166 or www.paris66bistro.com

_________ Owners Lori and Frederic Rongier have been cooking up what they call “everyday French cuisine” from family recipes since opening in 2009. The bistro-style restaurant makes French food accessible with favorites like quiche, croques, galletes and crêpes, as well as wonderful soups. The restaurant also offers up a fantastic Sunday brunch menu … and there’s nothing like waking up with crêpes. _________ 2nd: Bridge Ten Brasserie, South Side 3rd: N/A

BYOB TUES.-THURS. 11am - 10pm FRI.-SAT. 11am - 11pm SUN.-MON. - closed ß

3801 Butler St • Lawenceville

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST THING TO DO WHEN STRESSED

GO KAYAKING EARLY IN THE MORNING Reason: Time is “different” on the river, especially early morning. It’s a physical activity most people can do and a great view of the city and nature of the shoreline.

BEST MIDDLE-EASTERN RESTAURANT

ALADDIN’S EATERY Multiple locations, www.aladdinseatery.com

_________ Whether you’re meeting a healthconscious friend for lunch, or taking the whole family out for dinner — picky eaters, vegetarians, adventurers and confirmed carnivores included — Aladdin’s Eatery has something for everyone. The vast menu of LebaneseAmerican fare includes both the traditional and unconventional. And once you glimpse the impressive cake selection, you’ll want to save some room for dessert. _________ 2nd: Ali Baba, Oakland 3rd: Kassab’s, South Side

412-622-0111 www.piccolo-forno.com Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Simply the Best...

NA KA MA

Sushi and Japanese Steakhouse ...Better Than all the Rest!

Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar

Monday - Friday Happy Hour!

Thursday is Ladies Night!

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS & 1/2 OFF APPETIZERS IN THE BAR AREA

1/2 OFF ALL MARTINIS, MIXED WELL DRINKS & HOUSE WINES IN THE BAR AREA

Corner of 17th and East Carson Street • South Side PHONE: 412-381-6000 • WWW: eatatnakama.com FACEBOOK: Nakama • TWITTER: Nakamasushi

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of FOOD + DRINK

Best Vegan or Vegetarian Restaurant Quiet Storm

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us 2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh (2012)

BEST MEXICAN/LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

BEST VEGAN OR VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

MAD MEX

QUIET STORM

Multiple locations, www.madmex.com

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN DISHES! Delivery Hours 11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

_________ When it comes to Cal-Mex cuisine, Mad Mex happily flouts convention. Culinary inspiration is found all over the globe — unusual menu choices range from the Thai Curry Burrito to its popular Gobblerito, a.k.a. Thanksgiving dinner in a tortilla. Margaritas — including the happyhour favorite, the 22-ounce Big Azz Margarita — are available in both traditional and seasonal flavors. _________

multiple locations 3rd: El Campesino, multiple locations

SALT OF THE EARTH

5523 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258 or www.saltpgh.com

3615 Butler St., Lawrenceville, PA 412-586-7722 www.matteospgh.com 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

_________ For the last 12 years, the Quiet Storm has been the city’s go-to spot for vegan and vegetarian comfort food: Few things are cozier than nestling in with an order of Hangover Hash and a coffee. Sunday, Oct. 27, is your last chance to hit up the Penn Avenue spot — keep an eye out for a new location, currently in the works. _________ 2nd: The Zenith, South Side 3rd: Eden, Shadyside

2nd: Emiliano’s Mexican Restaurant,

BEST CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN RESTAURANT

Italian, Steak and Seafood

5430 Penn Ave., Friendship 412-661-9355 or www.qspgh.com

_________ You never quite know what you’ll get: The seasonal menu is always in flux (fall means squash and heartier fare), and its chefs keep dreaming up new combinations, such as a corn dessert with peach, basil and popcorn. Add Ramen Sundays, Oyster Tuesdays, a lively cocktail menu, late-night hours, and it’s always worth a stop. _________ 2nd: Eleven, Strip District 3rd: Meat and Potatoes, Downtown

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST CHEESEMONGER

CAROL “DEAR HEART” PASCUZZI AT PENN MAC Reason: She takes good cheese and real people seriously.

BEST CHEAP EATS

EAT’N PARK

Multiple locations, www.eatnpark.com

_________ Eat’n Park bills itself as “the place for smiles” and is home to the iconic Smiley cookie. It’s also the place you can get an enormous salad bar that, depending

bEST of FOOD + DRINK on the time of day (or night), is stuffed with breakfast or a plethora of soup, salad and home-made bakery items, for under $10. There’s a huge menu of fresh-baked pies, all for $1.99 a slice. _________ 2nd: Primanti Bros., multiple locations 3rd: Franktuary, Downtown and Lawrenceville

a comprehensive sushi selection — from traditional rolls to dishes like tuna sashimi with red onion, celery, jalapeno and yuzu soy. In addition to its South Side location, Nakama offers a pared-down menu via its mobile food truck and outposts at the Consol Energy Center and PNC Park. _________

BEST STEAKHOUSE

2nd: Little Tokyo, South Side and Mount Lebanon 3rd: Umi, Shadyside

THE CAPITAL GRILLE 301 Fifth Ave., Downtown 412-338-9100 or www.thecapitalgrille.com

_________ If you’re going to get a steak dinner, why not indulge in a top-notch one? The steaks here have been dry-aged and butchered in house, and come in a variety of tantalizing preparations: coffee-rubbed sirloin, Delmonico with a porcini-mushroom crust and, of course, the classic indulgence: surf-and-turf (lobster tail and tenderloin). _________ 2nd: Hyde Park Prime Steakhouse, North Side 3rd: Morton’s The Steakhouse, Downtown

BEST SEAFOOD

MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO

1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington (412-482-4414) / 146 Mall Circle Drive, Monroeville (412-374-8530) www.montereybayfishgrotto.com

_________ Eat more fish, the doctors advise us, and it’s hard not to at this Pittsburgh institution devoted to serving fresh fish in a variety of preparations. The Mount Washington location has the stunning views of The Point, but the parking is easier in Monroeville. Either way, come for the fish. _________ 2nd: Penn Avenue Fish Company, Strip District and Downtown 3rd: Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille, Strip District

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL ICON

“WEIRD” PAUL PETROSKEY Reason: Weird Paul, Pittsburgh’s own lo-fi bowl-cut guy, is still making new music after 30 years. He plays shows at least once a month in and around the city.

BEST PIEROGIES

PIEROGIES PLUS

342 Island Ave., McKees Rocks 412-331-2224 or www.pierogiesplus.com

_________ Do you dream of little pillows of pasta and potato? Pierogies Plus has you covered with an array of traditionally prepared ’rogies: Hot sausage, sauerkraut and potato are just a couple of the flavors available daily in the McKees Rocks store. The selection available for special orders is even more impressive, including various meats, vegetables and even fruit. _________ 2nd: Bloomfield Bridge Tavern, Bloomfield 3rd: Church Brew Works, Lawrenceville

BEST BURGER BEST SUSHI

NAKAMA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR 1611 E. Carson St., South Side 412-381-6000 or www.eatatnakama.com

_________ Nakama is best known for its hibachi-style dining. But it also offers

BURGATORY

932 Freeport Road, Waterworks Mall (412-781-1456) / 300 McHolme Drive, Robinson (412-809-9400) www.burgatorybar.com

_________ In Catholic doctrine, “purgatory” is where souls go to be purified. But why go through all that on an empty stomach? Burger options include hormone-free beef, elk, crab and bison, with dozens of topping options.

PITTSBURGH MARRIOT CITY CENTER 112 Washington Place Pittsburgh, PA 15219 To reserve your luncheon or dinner table please call: 412.471.4000

BRING YOUR FRIENDS. LEAVE AN IMPRESSION. Whatever your special occasion, it should be just that: special. Our dedicated staff will make your event as memorable as it is effortless.

Scan to view Steelhead Menus

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of FOOD + DRINK And it would take a whole hymnal to sing the praises of the milkshakes, both hard and soft. _________ 2nd: BRGR, East Liberty and Cranberry 3rd: Tessaro’s, Bloomfield

BEST PIZZA

MINEO’S PIZZA HOUSE

2128 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-521-9864) / 713A Washington Road, Mount Lebanon (412-344-9467) www.mineospizza.com

_________ Americans seem sharply divided over almost everything nowadays: Even arguments about pizza can lead to an exchange of blows, or the shutting-down of national parks. Yet at times, a consensus emerges: Mineo’s, established in 1958 and still family-owned, has won this category four of the past five years. With all due respect to partisans on the other side, the people have spoken. _________ 2nd: Fiori’s, Beechview 3rd: Pizza Sola, multiple locations

BEST WINGS

La Gourmandine co-owner

QUAKER STEAK & LUBE

and baker Fabien Moreau, and one of his creations, a raspberry and chocolate

Multiple locations, www.quakersteakandlube.com

pastry (inset)

_________ Sport-eaters no doubt love the challenge implicit in this regionally founded restaurant chain’s Triple Atomic Wings, advertised as “Guts, Glory, Pain!” But even descending the heat scale on this gas-stationthemed outlet’s menu, there’s plenty to choose from. Quaker Steak has 21-plus kinds of wing, including Buckeye Barbecue, Golden Garlic, Dusted Mango Habanero and Dusted Tex Mex Ranch. _________ 2nd: Big Shot Bob’s House of Wings, Avalon and Coraopolis 3rd: Fat Heads Saloon, South Side

BEST LATE-NIGHT MENU

EAT’N PARK Multiple locations, www.eatnpark.com

_________ After a night on the town, how about a Basket of Loaded Fries (bacon bits, cheddar sauce, southwest seasoning)? This venerable regional chain — boasting CONTINUES ON PG. 31

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST DESSERTS

LA GOURMANDINE BAKERY 4605 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-682-2210 or www.lagourmandinebakery.com {BY JESSICA SERVER} CONSIDER THIS the next time you find yourself trapped in traffic outside a tunnel: Road congestion can change your life. That’s what happened to Fabien and Lisanne Moreau, owners of La Gourmandine. If they hadn’t gotten stuck in traffic back in their

former home of Toulouse, France, their Butler Street French pastry shop may never have existed, “One day we were in traffic, just sitting there,” says Fabien, a Paris native. Traffic jams were a daily occurrence, but this one

sparked what he says was a “crazy idea.” “We said to each other, ‘Should we try to go to the U.S.?’ …We just said, ‘Yeah, why not? Let’s try it.’” Soon after, in 2006, the pair arrived in Pittsburgh, where Lisanne had family. Fabien worked in kitchens from Olive Garden to Eleven, but found it hard to find some of the desserts he could get in France. A French bakery seemed like a natural business opportunity — but first Fabien would need to become an actual French baker. He returned to study at the Lenôtre School in Paris. “Mr. Lenôtre was classic in his food,” with an emphasis on consistency and traditional flavors, remembers Fabien. “I’m trying to reproduce the flavor that I had in France, because I miss my country, my food.” When the bakery finally opened, in June 2010, Lawrenceville embraced it. From the Toulouse-inspired exposedbrick wall to the menu of elaborate desserts, Danishes and freshbaked breads, La Gourmandine is meant to recreate the feel of d neighborhood bakeries found throughout France. (Although in France, a bakery this size wouldn’t have any seating.) So what on the menu appealed to City Paper readers’ sweet tooth? Breads and Danishes aside, each day brings 12 pastries, from French classics like éclairs au chocolate and macarons, to the seasonal and unique, such as autumn’s apple-based feuílleté aux pommes, and tartelette á la cítrouílle (pumpkin tart). When asked how he creates new recipes, Fabien demurs. “I never create a recipe,” he insists. Relying on centuries-old techniques, “I just assemble, and put things together.” His knack for “putting things together” has the shop bustling, even at 3:30 p.m. on a Tuesday afternoon, as loyal customers purchase almond croissants or a baguette for dinner. At La Gourmandine, high-quality ingredients (some imported from France) mix well with classical training and a dash of creativity to keep you coming back. So, it’s a dream come true, right? “I think it’s dangerous for restaurants to be a lifelong dream,” Fabien warns. “I love what I’m doing, I love food. But people ask, ‘Is the bakery your baby?’ and I say, ‘No, I have two babies at home.’” Not that you should worry about the Moreaus abandoning Lawrenceville any time soon. After all, Fabien says, “at 4 in the morning” — when he and his wife drive in to the bakery — “there is no traffic.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bEST of FOOD + DRINK at least one all-night outlet within a few miles of most Pittsburgh communities — rounds out its Midnight Menu with full breakfast options, 20 different burgers and sandwiches, dinner and salad choices … and, of course, dessert. _________

From the French Dream Team who brought you Paris 66...

Best French Restaurant 2011 - 2013

Best Frozen Treats

- Pittsburgh Magazine

Razzy Fresh

2nd: Mad Mex, multiple locations 3rd: Primanti Bros., multiple locations

Where P Penn aris meets Circ le South

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

CRAZY MOCHA

A gift of love

Multiple locations, www.crazymocha.com

_________ If there’s one thing Crazy Mocha has going for it, it’s options. There are now more than 30 locations spread across the Greater Pittsburgh area. The menu also offers a variety of beverage choices: Whether you want just a regular cup of coffee, a chai tea latte or a frozen hot chocolate, this local chain has got you covered. _________ 2nd: Espresso a Mano, Lawrenceville 3rd: Beehive Coffeehouse & Dessertery, South Side

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD TO VISIT DURING THE DAY

SOUTH SIDE Reason: It’s 1,000 times better without all of the drunk kids; there are a ton of great little shops and restaurants to try — with 1/8th the vomit.

BEST FROZEN TREATS

RAZZY FRESH

SQUIRREL HILL • 5837 FORBES AVE • 412-682-1966

6018 PENN CIRCLE SOUTH SHADYSIDE 412-404-8166

www.gabyetjules.com

www.paris66bistro.com

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

BEST DESSERTS

LA GOURMANDINE BAKERY SEE

ON STORY 0 PG. 3

4605 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-682-2210 or www.lagourmandine bakery.com

_________ This exquisite and competitively priced French bakery is a Butler Street gem. Opened three years ago by Frenchborn Fabien Moreau, the shop does feature baguettes and the like, but the big draw is the sweets. Eclairs! Pain au chocolat! Tarts that are to die for! Why are you still reading this instead of running to Lawrenceville?! _________ 2nd: Dozen Bake Shop, Lawrenceville 3rd: Vanilla Pastry Studio, Regent Square

BEST LOCAL BEER

EAST END BREWING COMPANY 147 Julius St., Larimer 412-537-BEER or www.eastendbrewing.com

Multiple locations, www.razzyfresh.com

_________ The flagship location of this build-yourown-frozen-yogurt shop is on Murray Avenue in Squirrel Hill, though there are a couple of outposts in Oakland as well. The key to success in the fro-yo business is toppings, and Razzy has plenty — from candy for the truly decadent to fresh fruit for those of us pretending we’re eating healthfully. _________

_________ Late last year, East End Brewing Company left behind the “wobbly bar” and “cramped quarters” of its Homewood location for a space in Larimer. Consider this a reminder to check out the new digs, and fill a growler with one of its tasty year-round or seasonal beers. Or swing by its shop at the (also) newly located Pittsburgh Public Market. _________

2nd: Dave and Andy’s, Oakland 3rd: Oh Yeah! Ice Cream & Coffee, Shadyside

2nd: Church Brew Works, Lawrenceville 3rd: Penn Brewery, North Side CONTINUES ON PG. 32

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of FOOD + DRINK Eljay’s Used Books is now

Toast! Tasting Tuesdays 4 course chef’s menu $30 4 course vegetarian $25 optional wine pairing $15

Wednesdays all bottles of wine are 1/2 price

Thursday Burger Night! Burger, Beer & Bourbon $12

Friday Night Happy Hour 9:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. 1/2 off snacks, appetizers & beer $5.00 wine features, special flights, cocktails & more Artisan Pizza & Craft Beers on Draft! 60 wines by the glass

Rickert & Beagle Books Perfectly Strange, Strangely Perfect

Don’t worry, we’re still weird... and still a winner!

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE www.toastpgh.com • 412-224-2579

412.344.7444 www.rickertandbeaglebooks.com

BEST RESTAURANT BEER LIST

SHARP EDGE Multiple locations, www.sharpedgebeer.com

_________ From vanilla Java porters to Belgian pale ales, from Pilsner Urquell to Southern Tier Pumking, the international selection at Sharp Edge’s five locations is both well chosen and pages long. But while each of its five locations has dozens of varieties on tap, Sharp Edge’s specialty remains those variously hearty, sweet and spicy Belgian brews beloved of enthusiasts everywhere. _________

ALL YOU CAN EAT WINGS & CHIPS

9.99

$

COORS LIGHT BOTTLES ALL DAY $2.50 32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

East End Brewing Company

2nd: Fat Heads Saloon, South Side 3rd: D’s SixPax & Dogz, Regent Square

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST

SONOMA GRILLE 947 Penn Ave., Downtown 412-697-1336 or www.thesonomagrille.com

_________ You’ll find more than 1,000 wines on the list here, scores of which are available by the glass. Sound daunting? Relax. The staff are friendly, the vibe upscale but welcoming, befitting a California-themed restaurant where the emphasis is on West Coast wineries. And with happy-hour specials, wine flights and tasting pours — not to mention monthly tasting parties — the barrier to entry is low. _________ 2nd: Toast! Kitchen and Wine Bar, Bloomfield 3rd: Eleven, Strip District

ALL DAY WEDNESDAY

Best Local Beer

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

PITTSBURGH CELEBRITY/PERSON

RANDY GILSON OF RANDYLAND Reason: His gardens, murals, and whiskey-barrel plants. He’s super-welcoming, cares about his community, and is out to make a difference in whatever way he can. He’s the biggest heart and greatest soul in the city. Everyone needs to make a visit to Randyland.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST FOOD TRUCK SEE ON STORY 2 PG. 2

PGH TACO TRUCK

www.pghtacotruck.com

_________ This food truck began in 2010 as an online idea by food blogger James Rich. In January, Rich began serving both traditional and creative takes on tacos from his food truck that is located primarily at the Coffee Buddha in the North Hills. It’s worth the drive, even if you spend the trip cursing the citywide, food-truck-unfriendly regulations forcing you to make it. _________ 2nd: Franktuary, www.franktuary.com 3rd: BRGR, www.brgrpgh.com

BEST JUICE/SMOOTHIE BAR

EMBODY NATURAL HEALTH 5400 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-477-0767 or www.embodynaturalhealth.com

_________ Smoothies are just a small (but tasty) part of this recent Upper Lawrenceville addition. It’s also a gathering spot for holistic-health types, with yoga classes, talks on alternative medicine and supplies like chia seeds. The smoothies and juice blends, many studded with greens like kale, are named for the tendencies they’re meant to bring out, such as focus. _________ 2nd: East End Food Co-Op, Point Breeze 3rd: Eden, Shadyside

bEST of

GOODS + SERVICES Amy Dukes, adoption coordinator for Best of Pittsburgh Winner Animal Friends, with Duke, one of the many animals

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

waiting for a forever home

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of GOODS + SERVICES

Vue to come to Pittsburgh at age 15: He soon found work “making items of a fairytype nature” for Renaissance fair-goers and other interested buyers. But gossamer wings only get you so far, and Angst discovered his true calling when he was offered a tattoo machine by an artist leaving the trade. After a few years of freelancing, and a stint with local studio Tattoo Noir, Angst and his wife, Meliora Angst, launched Artisan in 2011. The studio occupies a building Angst bought with money earned from tattooing at a HarleyDavidson rally. “I’ve always leaned toward self-sustainability,” he says. Angst’s career has tracked the growth in tattooing as a whole. “When I started in the mid-to-late-1990s,” he says, many people “didn’t really know what was possible with the art form.” But today, tattooing has come into its own as an art form, and even a life choice. “We’ve been striving to build an education about what it means to be a heavily tattooed person — how it defines you in society.”

BEST LOCAL BOOKSTORE

CALIBAN BOOKS 410 S. Craig St., Oakland 412-681-9111 or www.calibanbooks.com

_________ It’s easy for a used bookstore, especially one that offers first-editions and other rarities, to get stuffy. But not a lot of dust gathers at Caliban, whose offbeat taste and wry humor are apparent in its window displays, and whose shelves offer up esoterics and ephemera alike. Caliban also offers contemporary zines and indie publishers and an expertly, if quirkily, curated music department. _________ 2nd: Eljay’s Used Books, Dormont 3rd: Amazing Books, Downtown

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY MUSIC SEE ON STORY 6 PG. 3

DAVE’S MUSIC MINE

1210 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-8800 or www.davesmusicmine.com

“PEOPLE WILL SAY, ‘I HAD NO IDEA THAT’S WHAT I WANTED.’”

Jason Angst, flanked by his handiwork on the backs of his business partners Nathan Mould (left) and Meliora Angst

_________ From The Dickies to Miles Davis, a bonanza of affordable used CDs is crammed into this unassuming storefront, with often even-more-affordable vinyl LPs filling the basement. Dave’s is lately also riding the vogue for new vinyl. But no matter your format, don’t be afraid to ask for aid or advice — the friendly staff stands ready to help. _________ 2nd: The Exchange, multiple locations 3rd: Jerry’s Records, Squirrel Hill

BEST LOCAL PLACE TO BUY VINTAGE CLOTHING

AVALON EXCHANGE

5858 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-421-2911 or www.avalonexchange.com

_________ With changing temperatures come thoughts of new clothes. Not just sweaters and boots, but Halloween costumes, holiday-party outfits and all the accessories these new get-ups require. Fortunately — with its CONTINUES ON PG. 35

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST TATTOO ARTIST

JASON ANGST , ARTISAN TATTOO 5001 Penn Ave., Garfield 412-661-0503 or www.artisantattoogallery.com {BY CHRIS POTTER} JASON ANGST recalls that he “started drawing before I could read, maybe even before I could talk. Which is kind of sad, because maybe I should be better at this by now.” But if City Paper readers are any judge, he’s got nothing to apologize for. And

Angst, 33, brings decades of experience to each tattoo. As a child, he was a fan of dragons and tanks — “especially if I could mix the two.” That interest in fantasy art served him well after he left a troubled home life in Port

Angst himself draws inspiration from a variety of sources, ranging from internationally famous Robert Hernández to local artists like Steve Morris. “My work doesn’t entirely look like theirs, but they are all in there,” says Angst. He looks to the aesthetics, and ethics, of indigenous cultures as well. For example, he cites Japanese tattoo masters to explain his own approach to work: “You wouldn’t even tell them a concept: You’d go and hang out with them for a day and they would learn about you. I try and work a bit of that into my consulting with people.” Angst will spend time getting a feel for a customer’s personality, and then try to find the visual imagery to match. “Most of the time people will say, ‘I had no idea that’s what I wanted.’” It’s not an approach that lends itself to high business volume, but then that’s why his shop is called “Artisan.” And while his own career continues its upward trajectory, Angst says he hasn’t forgotten his hard-luck origins. His work “comes out of the struggle that followed from the mills closing down. I do a lot of art that relates to the fall of industry, and the spiritual quests that ensue. The work ethic of the steelworkers and what befell them — all of that is reflected in my art.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bEST of GOODS + SERVICES assortment of hand-selected, stylish vintage (and not-so-vintage) gear for men and women — Avalon Exchange makes it easy to look good on the cheap. _________ 2nd: Goodwill, multiple locations 3rd: Eons Fashion Antique, Shadyside

2nd: Red White & Blue Thrift Store, Brookline and Avalon 3rd: Salvation Army, multiple locations

KING MAKER: BEST STUDMUFFIN ON NEWS

Reason: WOOF

BEST THRIFT SHOP

GOODWILL

Multiple locations, www.goodwillswpa.org

_________ Feel good when you donate your gently used clothing, furniture, books, dishware and more. Feel good when

2nd: Figleaf, South Side 3rd: Jupe Boutique, South Side

BEST LOCAL SHOE STORE

“BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

RAY PETELIN, WTAE

well-curated selection of casualand-up clothing, with an emphasis on “local, indie and eco” designers. Now, expect seasonal favorites — oversized sweaters, patterned tights, skinny trousers, hats and boots — as well as unexpected décor: old kids’ books and deer antlers. _________

you score that perfect $6 shirt or bargain paperback. And feel good because Goodwill of Southwestern Pennsylvania isn’t about making money so much as helping folks with special needs improve their lives and contribute to our community. _________

BEST LOCAL JEWELRY STORE

LITTLE’S SHOES 5850 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill 412-521-3530 or www.littlesshoes.com

_________ Some MBA student out there should study how this Squirrel Hill institution thrives in an age of DSWs and global supply chains. But as City Paper readers already know, it has to do not just with wide selection — ranging from Cole Haan and Mephisto to Dansko and Uggs — but with the kind of knowledgeable, attentive staff you can’t find in the strip mall. _________ 2nd: Gordon Shoes, Homestead 3rd: Pavement, Lawrenceville

ORR’S JEWELERS 5857 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill (412-421-6777) / 532 Beaver St., Sewickley (412-741-8080) www.orrsrocks.com

Best Hair Stylist Dana Bannon, Pageboy Salon & Boutique {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST LOCAL FASHION BOUTIQUE

PAVEMENT

3629 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-621-6400 or www.pavementpittsburgh.com

_________ Since 2006, this charming storefront boutique has been offering a

_________ In 1952 — years before they began running advertising campaigns featuring local sports stars like Andrew McCutchen and Hines Ward — Bill Orr was selling jewelry out of his little shop in Midland, Pa. More than 60 years later, Orr’s is one of the area’s most popular jewelers, as our “Best of” issue regularly attests. _________ 2nd: Henne Jewelers, Shadyside 3rd: Goldstock Jewelers, Downtown CONTINUES ON PG. 36

Kurt Hentschlager 09.27–12.31.13 Wood Street Galleries WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. Hive, 2011; 3D-animated audiovisual installation. Photo by Kurt Hentschlager.

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of GOODS + SERVICES SEE ON STORY 8 PG. 3

BEST BICYCLE SHOP

THICK BIKES

1408 Bingham St., South Side 412-390-3590 or www.thickbikes.com

_________ Thick Bikes is a full-service bike shop with a down-to-earth attitude. Visitors can find two floors of bikes — new and used, plus walls of accessories and decades of experience from the floor-staff and mechanics. They won’t sell you crap: Owner Chris Beech posts a list of what he won’t sell to document his belief in every product on display. _________

Vinyl fantasy: Dave’s customer Carmen Brown flips through the racks.

2nd: Kraynick’s Bike Shop, Garfield 3rd: Trek of Pittsburgh, multiple locations

BEST CAR DEALER

MINI OF PITTSBURGH

4900 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield 412-682-0788 or www.miniofpittsburgh.com

“IT’S LIKE A MUSEUM OF MUSIC.”

_________ Quite a coup for a dealership specializing in just one make, and with just one location, to capture the checkered flag. But the sporty retro styling of models like the flagship Cooper — named after British racing legend John Cooper — still excites drivers. Mini of Pittsburgh caters to their taste with new and used vehicles, and a service department that draws raves. _________ 2nd: #1 Cochran, multiple locations 3rd: Day Automotive, multiple locations

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY FURNITURE

LEVIN FURNITURE Multiple locations, 800-262-5200 or www.levinfurniture.com

_________ When Sam Levin opened his first hardware and furniture shop, in 1920, he could not have imagined that it would grow into 24 stores across two states offering everything imaginable to furnish a home. In addition to standard furniture store, Levin also has 10 stores focused on selling mattresses. _________ 2nd: Perlora, South Side 3rd: IKEA, Robinson Township CONTINUES ON PG. 37

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

In fact, Panasiuk recently added a whole new rack for all the fresh vinyl, from vintage Stax to new Nine Inch Nails. Vinyl is actually outselling the CDs and DVDs at his South Side store — the last of four locations that Panasiuk once ran in the region. The others, he says, were done in by downloads and Wal-Mart. The selection here is mostly rock, but with ample jazz, blues, folk and soul sections. “It seems incredibly meticulous,” says twentysomething Julie Cronan, a first-time customer. “It seems almost like a personal collection, which is cool. It’s like a museum of music.” Long-time customers love Panasiuk’s prices; $2.99 used LPs and $5.99 CDs are typical. So who’s buying that new vinyl, at $20 or more per platter? Kids, Panasiuk says. If half of Panasiuk’s in-store customer base is people over 50 who never took to downloading, the other half is young folks looking for something “new.” That includes Mark Schneider, who on a recent first visit to Dave’s bought a reissue of De La Soul’s Three Feet High and Rising. Schneider and his girlfriend now enjoy it on his newlypurchased reconditioned turntable.

BEST LOCAL STORE TO BUY MUSIC

DAVE’’S MUSIC MINE DAVE 1210 E. Carson St., South Side 412-488-8800 or www.davesmusicmine.com {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} AT DAVE’S Music Mine, most of the records are still used, but there’s something new happening, too: vinyl. Yep, the LP format, left for dead 20 years ago, is back. Sales of new vinyl, though still just a percent or two of all U.S. music sales, have doubled in the past few years. Vinyl

incarnations of major new releases complement re-issued classics. And Music Mine owner and founder Dave Panasiuk is staying on top of it all. The “key to why we’re still around,” he says, “[is] constantly trying to change with the times.”

“It sits in the living room and we listen to it every day,” says Schneider, of Brookline. “I really have appreciated the purer sound that comes from the [vinyl] record.” Other Dave’s customers, meanwhile, are sticking with plain old CDs. “I’m a technophobe,” says Fred Orlansky, who’s grabbed some live Warren Zevon and Dire Straits and a Lawrence of Arabia DVD. “This is the last format I’m gonna do.” Like many Dave’s regulars, Orlansky enjoys the two-floor joint’s cozily stuffed rec(ord)-room vibe. Panasiuk’s wife, Michelle, often works alongside his other three employees. “[Panusiak] and Michelle are just very nice people,” says Orlansky, of Squirrel Hill. But even with those regulars, and despite the sales boost from vinyl, Panusiak makes two-thirds of his sales online — mostly with pricey, out-of-print CD rarities. So why bother with bricks-andmortar at all? “I couldn’t stand being in front of a computer all day,” says Panasiuk, who still lives in Oakland, where he grew up. “I want to interact with customers” — not least so he can proselytize about the glory of vinyl. After all, he says, “It’s the only medium right now that’s going to increase in value if you sit on it.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bEST of GOODS + SERVICES

Best Place To Take the Kids for an Afternoon Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST HAIR STYLIST

DANA BANNON, PAGEBOY SALON & BOUTIQUE 3613 Butler St., Lawrenceville 412-224-2294 or www.pageboypgh.com

_________ Four years ago, Dana Bannon opened her Lawrenceville Pageboy Salon and Boutique because she wanted to do things her own way. Now she’s adding service, like a barber and hot shaves. And Bannon’s known for her personal touch, which is her goal. “I wanted to have a more intimate feeling,” she

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST STREET ART

PITTSBURGH PROTRACTORS Reason: These numbered protractors all over the city caused me to go on a scavenger hunt to find and document them all, and made me fall even more in love with this city after finding all its hidden gems.

says. “I want to have a close relationship with my clients.” _________ 2nd: Bethany Novak, Salon Ivy (South Side) 3rd: Dan Burda, Studio Raw (North Hills)

BEST DAY SPA

SEWICKLEY SPA 337 Beaver St., Sewickley 412-741-4240 or www.sewickleyspa.com

_________ Around these parts, the very name “Sewickley” connotes a life of ease and comfort, and for more than 15 years, Sewickley Spa has been delivering on that promise from its Victorian-era home. The Spa offers nearly 50 treatments, ranging from straightforward “muscle deknotting” and acne-treatment regimens to more esoteric practices like seaweed botanical wraps. _________ 2nd: Esspa Kozmetika, Aspinwall 3rd: La Pomponnee Salon & Spa, Mount Lebanon

BEST YOGA STUDIO

AMAZING YOGA Multiple locations, www.amazingyoga.net

_________ Get your power flow on at one of Amazing Yoga’s locations in Shadyside, CONTINUES ON PG. 38

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of GOODS + SERVICES South Side and Wexford. The studio has been stretching, bending and revitalizing Pittsburgh bodies since 2001. Try a $7 class at the South Side studio: The huge second-story windows let yogis stare out into East Carson’s less-healthful bar scene, reinforcing that you’re in the right place. _________ 2nd: Schoolhouse Yoga, multiple locations 3rd: South Hills Power Yoga, Dormont and Peters Township

BEST TATTOO ARTIST SEE ON STORY 4 PG. 3

JASON ANGST, ARTISAN TATTOO

5001 Penn Ave., Garfield 412-661-0503 or www.artisantattoogallery.com

_________ If all you want is a rose tattooed on your ankle, there are any number of tattoo shops you can visit. But if your interest in tattooing goes more than skin-deep, Jason Angst is the guy to see. At his studio, tattooing is an artform featuring often surprising imagery — ranging from birds to blast furnaces — and Angst’s own soft-spoken philosophy. _________ 2nd: Justun Palencsar, In the Blood Tattoo (South Side) 3rd: Josh Suchoza, Tattoo Noir (Bloomfield)

BEST BODY-PIERCING SHOP

HOT ROD PIERCING COMPANY 115 Oakland Ave., Oakland (412-687-0503) / 95 S. 16th St., (South Side) 412-431-6077 www.hotrodpiercingcompany.com

_________ If you’ve got a body part in serious need of bling, then the Hot Rod Body Piecing Company has an experienced crew ready to take care of your needs. Whether it’s ears, lips, navel, nose or something a little more … personal, they’ve got you covered. _________ 2nd: In the Blood Tattoo, South Side 3rd: Tattoo Noir, Bloomfield CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

Thick Bikes owner Chris Beech (front) and crew hang out around a cargo bike.

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

BEST BIKE SHOP

THICK BIKES 1408 Bingham St., South Side 412-390-3590 or www.thickbikes.com {BY LAUREN DALEY} WALKING INTO a bike shop can be intimi-

dating. There are people in Spandex, bicycles that cost as much as, if not more than, a mortgage payment, and lots of tiny tools. But at Thick Bikes, owner Chris Beech strives to get more people on two wheels … and that means the only pressure he wants is in the tires. “We try not to be snobby,” says Beech. “We’re an everyman’s kind of shop.” And they practice what they preach. Wheel in a bike with Presta valves on your tires — even without knowing what Presta valves actually are — and Beech will demonstrate how to use them with a pump, then let you try yourself. As for buying a new bike, “When you come in, we try to work with you on a human level,” says Adam Haller, head of sales and a fitting technician. “What do you need as a person? And let’s go from there.”

Thick stocks all styles of new and used bikes — from single-speed street bikes and hybrids to commuter and mountain bikes. The main-floor showroom displays all new bikes, but if you venture into the basement, you’ll find a spacious room full of used rides. (Another basement room houses overflow from the upstairs showroom.) Somewhere in the shop is the right ride for everyone. “We will support any rider,” Haller says. Haller estimates that the average new bike at Thick costs between $400 and $600, but it’s closer to half that for the used rides. Thick also carries mid-to-high-end bikes, plus walls of carefully selected accessories. “We only sell things we use and believe in,” Haller says.

And when you buy a bike, the shop records its serial number to help track it down if it’s ever stolen or someone tries to sell it back to the shop. They recently recovered a $7,000 bike. Thick Bikes is also a full-service repair shop, one boasting a signature tool that the Thick staffers built themselves — the King Arthur. “It can get seatposts out where all others fail and cry in shame,” Haller says proudly. The bike mechanics can help with anything else that goes wrong with your bike as well. Walk in with a flat tire, and in many cases, Haller says, it can be fixed in 10 minutes. “We can turn around and tell you why it happened and we can tell you what to do to avoid it happening again,” says Haller. “If we can help our customers learn to fix things themselves, we will.” Beech started building custom bike frames in the store’s South Side space in 2000. In 2005, he began repairing used bikes and, later, selling new models. Beech bought the building itself last year, and is constantly working at improving the business. “We want to make this shop as good as it can be.”

“WE TRY NOT TO BE SNOBBY. WE’RE AN EVERYMAN’S KIND OF SHOP.”

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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GREENSBURG 724-834-3550. Westmoreland Mall Annex, next to Dick’s Sporting Goods. MONROEVILLE 412-372-6880. Rte. 22 and Elliot Rd. One mile east of the PA turnpike exit 57. ROBINSON TOWN CENTRE EXIT 412-249-3100. At The Pointe in North Fayette. MOUNT PLEASANT 724-547-3521. 600 Main Street. WEST MIFFLIN 412-655-0700. Century Square, Lebanon Church Rd. & Rte. 885. PETERS TOWNSHIP 724-941-3381. Rte. 19 South by Donaldson’s Crossroads. WEXFORD 724-940-1711. On Perry Highway in the Wexford Plaza.

SQUIRREL HILL 412-421-1008. 5846 Forbes Ave. next to Little’s Shoes. MOUNT LEBANON 412-835-5058. Corner of Connor Road and Rte. 19. ROBINSON 412-787-1410 6528 Steubenville Pike, next to Golf Galaxy INDIANA 724-349-2909. 1540 Oakland Avenue, in front of McDonalds. CRANBERRY 724-814-8937. 20012 Route 19 at Oak Tree Place. FOX CHAPEL 412-784-1580. In the Waterworks Mall on Freeport Road. MONROEVILLE 412-374-8760. Wm. Penn Highway, next to Chuck E. Cheese. WASHINGTON 724-222-2671. In Trinity Point by Walmart.

Open Mon-Sat 10 to 9 and Sun 12 to 6 • Squirrel Hill open Mon-Sat 11-6 and Sun 12-5 • Indiana open Mon-Sat 10 to 7 and Sun 12 to 6

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39

bEST of GOODS + SERVICES

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LEAF AND BEAN COMPANY

2200 Penn Ave., Strip District (412-434-1480) / 3525 Washington Road, McMurray (724-942-6670) www.leafandbeanstrip.com

_________ With its original location billed as the “Key West” of the Strip District, this coffee-and-cigar shop is a laidback hang-out, with plenty of spots to cozy up and escape. The shop boasts a walk-in humidor with a stock of cigars ranging from Acid to St. Luis Rey, coffee roasted fresh on site and singersongwriters on weekends. _________ 2nd: Bloom Cigar Shop, South Side 3rd: Smoke Wizard, Squirrel Hill

items. Plus: in-house butcher, cheesery, bakery and some of the area’s most entertaining parking lots. _________ 2nd: East End Food Co-Op, Point Breeze 3rd: Trader Joe’s, East Liberty and South Hills

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST ART CONTROVERSY

NUDE POPE GIRL Reason: Nothing like a pompous, hypocritical bishop who apparently still wields some degree of political power to prove an artist’s point.

BEST BANK

PNC BANK

Multiple locations, www.pnc.com

(non-pet owners welcome)

Sunday, October 27, 2013 – 3:00 - 8:00 p.m. For only $10* we’ll treat you to: WFree food WFree White Diamond vodka drinks from 3-5pm WDrink specialsplace in The Taverna 19 108 19th Street 412-224-2720 Sponsored by: White Diamond Vodka

WCostume Contests WCandy WGiveaways (COSTUME OPTIONAL) Strip! WAuctions * Only $10 per person, pets are free ($15 at the door.) Purchase tickets at http://animalrescue.org/ petrifying-pet-party-tickets

Proceeds benefit the Animal Rescue League Shelter & Wildlife Center

_________ With branches in 19 states and Washington, D.C., PNC Bank is everywhere. But you don’t need to leave home to handle your accounts: Its online Virtual Wallet allows you to sort your money into everyday, short-term and long-term needs. _________ 2nd: Dollar Bank, multiple locations 3rd: Citizens Bank, multiple locations

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST LOCAL WAR

HIGHMARK VS. UPMC Reason: They’re screwing everyone!

BEST PLACE TO BUY HEALTH FOOD

WHOLE FOODS

5880 Centre Ave., East Liberty (412-441-7960) / 10576 Perry Highway, Wexford (724-940-6100) www.wholefoodsmarket.com

_________ What you eat matters — where it comes from, how it was grown, even how it’s packaged. And the one-stop for health-conscious consumers is Whole Foods. It’s a national chain, sure, but one that makes an effort to stock and identify local produce and food

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

BEST PLACE TO ADOPT A PET

ANIMAL FRIENDS

562 Camp Horne Road, Avonworth 412-847-7000 or www.thinkingoutsidethecage.org

_________ Studies show that owning a pet helps reduce stress, and the positive vibes only increase when you adopt a pet from an animal shelter. Founded in 1943 to help find homes for deployed soldiers’ pets, Animal Friends now has a comprehensive facility for temporarily housing dogs, cats and rabbits, as well as providing training and related services. _________ 2nd: Animal Rescue League, Larimer 3rd: Western PA Humane Society, North Side

BEST PLACE TO TAKE THE KIDS FOR AN AFTERNOON

PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM 1 Wild Place, Highland Park 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

_________ No surprise that kids love seeing elephants grazing or sea lions gamboling, or looking up through a transparent tunnel at polar bears underwater. But even non-cuddly creatures fascinate here, as with the stingray exhibit, which allows kids to touch the rays themselves. Their enthusiasm may even help you get

bEST of GOODS + SERVICES over lingering feelings of awkwardness in the monkey house. _________ 2nd: Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side 3rd: Carnegie Science Center, North Side

BEST BOWLING ALLEY

ARSENAL LANES

212 44th St., Lawrenceville 412-683-5992 or www.arsenalbowl.com

_________ Arsenal mixes a normal bowling-alley experience with a trip to the bar, replete with live bands on Wednesday nights and DJs spinning ’80s and ’90s music on other evenings. It’s a big hangout for twentysomethings on Friday and Saturday nights, and the signature drink at the bar? The Dudeapproved White Russian, of course. _________ 2nd: Forward Lanes, Squirrel Hill 3rd: Paradise Island Bowl, Neville Island

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST THING YOU WILL NEVER EVER AGAIN TAKE FOR GRANTED

POINT STATE PARK FOUNTAIN Reason: Forgot about it for four years and then all of the sudden it’s back and I can’t imagine the city without it again. Fireworks and the fountain for Pittsburghers are like light to a moth.

BEST EVENT-RENTAL SPOT

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY 1 Schenley Park, Oakland 412-622-6914 or www.phipps.conservatory.org

_________ True, Phipps’ Summer Flower Show just ended — but the Fall Flower exhibit is ready to begin. And where else in town but this venerable Victorian greenhouse can you hold a cocktail reception in an outdoor garden and treat your wedding guests to a Tropical Forest Conservatory … year-round? _________ 2nd: Pittsburgh Opera Headquarters, Strip District 3rd: Union Project, Highland Park

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

For more information or to schedule an appointment call 412-242-RUGS or visit us at www.ruglabcarpet.com

Lucia Aguirre celebrates Best News for Cyclists — new bike lanes on city streets.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

bEST of

PEOPLE + PLACES

BEST OF PITTSBURGH 2013

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bEST of PEOPLE + PLACES

believe his teachers were taking the time to work with him. “I physically took him back to school and talked with his teachers and principal, who put him on a program to get his grades up to play ball,” Batch says. “Then several years later, I was playing in a charity basketball game at Bethany College and this young man walked up to me and asked if I remembered him. It was that same kid, and he said he wanted to thank me for helping him because he had just graduated from college. “Through my foundation, we reach out to 2,300 kids every year, and it’s the small memories like that that makes what we do worthwhile.”

BEST LOCAL TWITTER PARODY ACCOUNT

PITTSBURGH DAD @PITTSBURGH_DAD

_________ Fans of the web-based series Pittsburgh Dad can expect to see much of the same Pittsburgh pride and Yinzerisms on this Twitter account, manned by Pittsburgh Dad actor Curt Wootton and writer Chris Preksta. “That giant duck cost $20,000?! If they paid that much, this duck better be able to fill potholes or play on the Steelers offensive line.” _________

Hometown favorite Charlie Batch

“I KNOW HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO BE THERE FOR THE FANS BECAUSE GROWING UP IN HOMESTEAD, I WAS THAT FAN.”

2nd: LouKravenstahl

@LouKravenstahl 3rd: Evil Mike Tomlin @EvilMikeTomlin

BEST LOCAL FUNDRAISER

BITCHES BALL, ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE _________ The Animal Rescue League’s event to promote National Spay Day isn’t just another fundraiser. Last year, at Cruze Bar, attendees danced, drank and voted for their favorite performers in a drag show. “People couldn’t stop talking about it,” recalls marketing director Ann Yeager. Save the date for the next one: Feb. 25, 2014. It’s not to be missed. _________ 2nd: Dirty Ball, Attack Theatre 3rd: Urban Garden Party,

Mattress Factory SEE ON STORY 6 PG. 4

BEST EYESORE

“WALKING TO THE SKY,” CMU’S_________ CAMPUS

There they go: seven people suspended forever while walking up a pole. One simply can’t ignore this 100-foot-tall sculpture, created by Jonathan Borofsky. But how far a walk is it to the sky? Are they already there? And what happens when they reach the end of the pole and presumably fall back to Earth? Curse these troublesome questions! _________ 2nd: BAYER sign on Mount Washington 3rd: Luke Ravenstahl CONTINUES ON PG. 45

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

MOST FAN-FRIENDLY LOCAL PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE

CHARLIE BATCH www.charliebatch.com, www.batchfoundation.org {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} FOR FORMER Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Charlie Batch, fan interaction is a two-way street. Once, for example, Batch was driving through McKees Rocks in the middle of the afternoon when he saw a young man

walking down the street. “So I stopped and I asked him, ‘Shouldn’t you be in school?’” Batch recalls. The student told Batch that he was a football player and since he was failing he wasn’t able to play. He didn’t

City Paper readers also clearly appreciate Batch’s efforts and voted him the city’s most fan-friendly athlete — an honor Batch calls “very humbling.” For Batch, who until this year spent 11 years as the Steelers’ backup, being friendly and accessible to the fans is a natural undertaking. “I know how important it is to be there for the fans because growing up in Homestead, I was that fan,” Batch says. “Plus, my mother lived in the same house for 20 years and my grandmother for 35 years, so I’m not a hard guy to get a hold of.” Batch was drafted in the second round of the 1998 NFL draft by the Detroit Lions. He began the Batch Foundation in 1999, focusing at first on literacy and computer programs for children in both Pennsylvania and Michigan — an effort to honor his sister, who was shot and killed in 1996. Once he became a Steeler, in 2002, Batch shifted the program completely to his hometown. He’s been interacting with and helping local youths ever since. And now that he’s retired, Batch says he has even more time to spend with his foundation and the fans. “For the first time in years, I have the fall off,” says Batch. “That gives me more time for speaking engagements and more time to do events with the fans and work with the kids. “I’ve had a great career, and the opportunity to give back to the community where I grew up has really been special.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

bEST of PEOPLE + PLACES BEST LAME-DUCK STUNT BY LUKE RAVENSTAHL

DISAPPEARING _________ What to do if you’re a mayor facing a police scandal and a federal grand jury? Abruptly announce, after six years in office, that public service just isn’t for you. Then, for the final 10 months of your term, vanish. We thought using an official vehicle to go see Toby Keith was bad; at least we knew where our mayor was. _________ 2nd: UPMC lawsuit 3rd: Continuing to

exist/being himself

MOST FAN-FRIENDLY LOCAL PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE SEE ON STORY 4 PG. 4

CHARLIE BATCH _________

Even though Charlie Batch spent most of his 11 years with the Steelers as a backup, the Homestead native is one of the best-liked players to wear the black and gold. It’s not just that he’s a hometown hero; it’s that his charitable investment in projects like Homestead’s 16th Avenue Playground prove he never forgot where he came from. _________

2013 TONY AWARD® WINNER FOR BEST PLAY!

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST HOME RUN AT PNC PARK

GARRET JONES’ RIVER-BLAST ON JUNE 2, 2013

“DELIRIOUSLY FUNNY!”

Reason: No explanation necessary.

—THE NEW YORK TIMES

shaving has become a popular fundraiser for Children’s Hospital. _________ 2nd: Pascal Dupuis 3rd: Adam Causgrove

BEST @#$!@ TRAFFIC @#$!

ROUTE 28 _________ Since our polls closed, PennDOT opened one of Route 28’s long-closed northbound lanes, but don’t get too comfortable: Another closure is in store before construction wraps up CONTINUES ON PG. 46

2nd: Hines Ward 3rd: Troy Polamalu

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

BEST MANNY THEINER

MANNY THEINER Reason: He’s Manny.

BEST LOCAL FACIAL HAIR

BRETT KEISEL _________ Keisel’s beard has become one of the nation’s most recognizable patches of facial hair, attracting notice from national media and City Paper readers alike. (During Steelers training camp, for example, NFL.com columnist Judy Battista tweeted, “Brett Keisel’s beard is amazing.”) The beard takes several months to grow — and its annual

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Sheathe it in latex, adding a layer of mystery while sending an important public-safety message: Yes, we know all about CMU’s reputation as a party school. But remember to use protection, kids.

bEST of PEOPLE + PLACES

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in late 2014. Ah, but when it’s done, you’ll be able to drive to Kittanning without a single stoplight. To have the gem of Armstrong County so near to hand … isn’t that worth any price? _________

Hang a festive, llama-shaped piñata from it, as a symbol for humanity’s collective search for Tootsie Rolls and Dubble Bubble gum.

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2nd: Squirrel Hill Tunnel 3rd: 376

Use it for next3 generation research into renewable energy: Scientists speculate that a solar-powered clock could someday be constructed, telling time by the movement of shadows as the sun travels across the sky.

KING MAKER: “BEST OF” CATEGORIES, AND WINNERS, SUBMITTED BY READERS

Mount a platform on top of it for half-nude critiques of Catholicism by campus performance artists. A raised stage will give students the wider exposure they so desperately crave, while shielding them from the view of nearsighted aging parishioners.

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BEST “BEST OF PITTSBURGH”

CITY PAPER

Reason: Because I am a sycophant.

BEST NEWS FOR CYCLISTS

5 RAISE THE JOLLY ROGER. #BUCN

NEW BIKE LANES IN THE CITY _________ The city has made strides in making Pittsburgh more bikefriendly this year. But on the road, the most obvious — and perhaps most needed — changes are four miles of new bike-lane infrastructure citywide. Among the most prominent: one-tenth of a mile of bright green paint on bike lanes in Bloomfield. _________

Straighten pole to 90 degrees, for use by the 30-foot-tall cyborg strippers that one of those roboticsdepartment guys has to be designing.

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Redesign to resemble giant phaser cannon, to keep the Romulans guessing about our true intentions.

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2nd: Completion of Great Allegheny Passage trail at Sandcastle 3rd: 2012 state law requiring cars to give bikes 4 feet of clearance

Replace figures with Price Is Right-style yodeling mountaineer: Challenge prospective students to guess their final tuition bill before he falls off the edge.

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{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

BEST COMICS ARTIST

ROB ROGERS www.robrogers.com

_________ “The latest mass shooting was so close to us … is everyone OK?” asks someone deep within the Capitol … revealed in this cartoon to be a jowly Congressman comforting bags of gun-lobby cash. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s longtime editorial cartoonist is a reliable and often hilarious defender of common sense and scourge of the pompous and powerful. _________ 2nd: Ed Piskor 3rd: Jim Rugg

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

BEST EYESORE

“ WALKING TO THE SKY SKY”” Carnegie Mellon University campus WHEN IT WAS unveiled in 2006, Jonathan Borofsky’s sculpture “Walking to the Sky” was meant to inspire generations of Carnegie Mellon University scholars. Borofsky himself declared it “a symbol for our collective search for wisdom and awakened consciousness.” But the morning after it was installed, the only thing Pittsburghers awoke to was

the realization that someone had jammed a 100-foot-tall, stainless-steel stick into the city’s eye. The sculpture has aggravated Oakland commuters, aesthetically minded college students and City Paper readers ever since. But City Paper is all about solutions. So here are some ways we thought CMU could enhance Borofsky’s work.

Fulfill age-old dream of humanity by extending pole high enough to reach Heaven. Will this invite the wrath of Yahweh? Probably no more than whatever’s going on in the bioengineering department.

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Add a multicolored pinwheel on top, for the sake of viewers who simply can’t face the existential truths with which this sculpture’s austere, uncompromising beauty confront us.

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Introducing the fun and free CP HAPPS APP! The event app that allows you to discover all of the area’s most popular happenings in one convenient location. With the CP HAPPS APP, you can bookmark your favorite events, invite friends and make plans, all in a private, personalized environment. Follow the five easy steps below to start using the CP HAPPS APP today.

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FILM CAPS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 32

Mad Doctor of Blood Island (2 p.m.), Big Ass Spider (3:30 p.m.), Babysitter Massacre (5 p.m.), Jagoff Massacre (6:20 p.m.), Corpsing (7:30 p.m.), Maskhead (9:10 p.m.), and Fright Night 2 (10:40 p.m.). Presented by Horror Realm. Doors at 10:45 a.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Hollywood. $13 all-day pass; $5 per film. More info at www.thehollywooddormont.org ORANGE WINTER. Andrei Zagdansky directs this 2007 documentary about 2004’s political “Orange Revolution” in Ukraine. Screens as part of Hoverla, the Ukrainian-American Film Festival. In English, and Ukrainian, with subtitles. 5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for double-feature); fulltime students with ID, free. THE HAUNTING OF LARIMER MANSION. In this new documentary, check out the footage of possible paranormal activity occurring at this 18th-century home (and now bed-and-breakfast) in North Huntington, Pa. Members of the Pittsburgh-based Hauntings Research, as well as the film crew and the mansion owners, will be on hand to answer your questions. 6:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Oaks. $9.50 BOMZHI. This recent documentary from Andrej Naterer examines street children living in Makeevka, Ukraine. Screens as part of Hoverla, the UkrainianAmerican Film Festival. With subtitles. 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19. Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, 650 Schenley Drive, Oakland. www.ucowpa.org. $10 ($15 for doublefeature); free for full-time students with ID. THE SHINING. It seemed like a great opportunity for writer Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) and his family: a care-taking gig at an isolated mountain hotel. But the place is wicked haunted, and soon the little family, including wife (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd), are in grave peril of losing their minds — and lives. Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel drops some of King’s supernatural elements in favor of omnipresent dread and a meditation about the collapsing family unit, but it’s still a freaky, hair-raising ride. Midnight, Sat., Oct. 19 (Manor) and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 23 (AMC Loews) (AH)

CP

VERTIGO. James Stewart loses his grip when he becomes obsessed with a beautiful blonde

(Kim Novak) in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 thriller. Conflating sexual desire, memory and deception, Vertigo, shot in glorious color in the San Francisco Bay area, is regarded as one of Hitchcock’s finest works. 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 20; 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 22; and 2 p.m. Thu., Oct. 24. Hollywood

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KULTUR SHOCK. Catch the premiere of this sci-fi thriller about three injured people trapped in a room, forced to take orders from a disfigured Uncle Sam doll. Todd Osleger directs this film, which was filmed outside Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 20. Oaks. $7 ($5 students/seniors)

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COOL HAND LUKE. Paul Newman gets put on a chain gang after assaulting some parking meters. No jailhouse can hold this feisty smart-ass, though — and Newman plans to bust out, in Stuart Rosenberg’s 1967 paean to homegrown anti-authoritativeness. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films focused on the disillusionment with the American Dream. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 20. Regent Square FOXFUR. The latest feature from iconoclastic filmmaker Damon Packard (The Untitled Star Wars Mockumentary) concerns a young woman involved with aliens. Also screening: short films from Blackmagic Rollercoaster and Josh Rieval. The program is a fundraiser for a portion of the upcoming Three Rivers Film Festival. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 22. Melwood. $5 AUTOLUMINESCENT: ROWLAND S. HOWARD. A new documentary from Richard Lowenstein and Lynn-Maree Milburn looks at the tumultuous life and career of the Melbourne punk rocker and guitarist for The Birthday Party. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 23. Hollywood WHITE ZOMBIE. Years ago, zombies were simple creatures — cruelly suspended between life and death — who didn’t need to devour human flesh to survive. In this 1932 film directed by Victor Halperin, a young bride and groom visiting Haiti fall prey to the devious Bela Lugosi, who has the power to raise the newly dead as zombies answerable to him. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 23, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 24. ( ) Oaks (AH)

CP

BREATHLESS. An American in Paris (Jean (Je Seberg) and a raffish criminal (Jean-Pa (Jean-Paul Jean-L Belmondo) meet and run wild, in Jean-Luc Godard’s 1959 New Wave classic, winning winni the hearts of cineastes and hipsters ffor decades to come. In French, with subtitles. subtitl 8 p.m., Wed., Oct. 23. Melwood. $2

Carrie

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Pittsburgh Disabilities Film Festival

RIFFTRAX: NIGHT OF THE LIVIN LIVING DEAD. Arguably, George Romer Romero’s locally produced, low-budget 1968 na nailbiter sparked American filmmake filmmakers’ late-20th-century fascination w with zombies. Romero’s depiction of flesh-munching was groun groundbreaking for its time, but wh what really makes this horror fl flick resonate still is its nihilism a and sense of futility. For this spec special — and lighter — screenin screening, RiffTrax crew (Michael J. Nelso Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbe Corbett, formerly of MST3K) will provi provide live comic commentary (v (via satellite). 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2 24. Cinemark Robinson, Cinema Cinemark Pittsburgh Mills and Pittsbur Pittsburgh North 11. Tickets at theater or www.fathomevents.com (AH) ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selectio Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries ser series (1971-75) and other shorts scree screen. Ongoing. Free with museu museum admission. Andy Warhol Museu Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

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[COMEDY]

THE PURPOSE IS TO FORCE THE VIEWER OUT OF HIS PHYSICAL SELF

WORLDLY COMIC In the U.S., at least, Irish comedian Dylan Moran is a cult favorite, thanks to his award-winning U.K. TV series Black Books and a role in 2004’s Shaun of the Dead. But standup comedy is the backbone of his career: Moran, 41, has toured internationally since the 1990s. The Times of London has called him “one of the most excitingly articulate standups around.” Moran’s “yeah, yeah” tour is his first to cross North America. An 11-city leg, which began with two sold-out Los Angeles shows, includes Pittsburgh. Moran spoke to CP by phone from his home in Edinburgh, Scotland, having just toured Eastern Europe. Asked why in Pittsburgh he was playing the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, not known as a comedy venue, Moran disavowed knowledge: “I’m just hoping to arrive alive and be able to find my underwear. And the microphone.” CP’s three questions for Dylan Moran: WHAT WAS ONE COUNTRY THAT WASN’T WHAT YOU EXPECTED? When I was going to Belgrade, all I really knew about the country is the recent Balkan war and one or two writers. I’m going in with all these assumptions and worries, really, about how it’s going to go. And then I get there and I meet these lovely people, they’re Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, and they’re all working together to try to get a live comedy scene going. And a lot of them are young. They don’t want to be carrying the weight of history for what other people did. TWO FAVORITE BEVERAGES FROM YOUR TOUR? I had honey schnapps, actually, in both Zagreb and Belgrade. That’s pretty good. That’s good for a cold. Maybe a little bit too easy to drink, actually. You have to bear in mind that I am on the road, so I have to watch it! THREE COMEDY ALBUMS OR VIDEOS YOU COULD WATCH ANY TIME? I’d watch probably Richard Pryor, Live on the Sunset Strip or the other one he did in L.A. I’m a big fan of a Dutch comedian called Hans Teeuwen. Wonderful, wonderful comedian. And there’s an American I saw for the first time this year. He’s a wonderful, wonderful act, and seems like a very nice guy called Reggie Watts, who does really interesting stuff with his voice, and sampling, and he’s got a great way about him. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DYLAN MORAN 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 21. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $32. 800-745-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

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Dylan Moran

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

[ART REVIEW]

CLARITY AND TORMENT Like a wormhole in time: Kurt Hentschlager’s POL

{BY DAVID BERGER}

A

T ITS BEST, art will refashion one’s way of seeing. This is true of the ..latest exhibits by Kurt Hentschlager, an Austrian-born artist who now teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The exhibits, at Wood Street Galleries and Space, are the U.S. premieres of three works: Hive, Model 5 and POL. From 1993 to 2003, Hentschlager teamed with Ulf Langeinrich in a group called Granular Synthesis, and the two projections at Space reflect that collaboration. (Another Hentschlager work, Zee, at 943 Liberty Ave., was closed after three gallery-goers reportedly suffered seizures.) Hentschlager is a pioneer in the use of audiovisual media. He strives to create an experience of “being there” — to immerse the visitor in a virtual world where one’s senses are overwhelmed, forcing the viewer out of his physical self. The goal, as curator Murray Horne says, is to turn the viewer from passive perceiver of the material world into active participant in a conceptual inner world. When it works, it creates a feeling of presence, when all the senses perceive the

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

digital environment to be physically real. Hentschlager employs animation techniques, computer-aided design and plenty of imagination. In Hive, there are two large screens set at 90 degrees to one another. The projectors have special filters to create a 3-D effect and the screens themselves are prepared with a highly reflective silver paint. With 3-D glasses, the sense of depth makes you feel you can almost touch the projected forms.

POL AND MODEL 5 continue through Oct. 20 (Space, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown; 412-325-7723).

HIVE continues through Dec. 31 (Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown; 412-471-5605). www.trustarts.org

Hive reflects our collective consciousness by showing how human bodies in space can relate to each other. In this 22-minute loop,

the white/orange bodies are semi-transparent and aesthetically beautiful. The choreography of the figures is mesmerizing and almost mystical. The accompanying audio, which is a low drone, creates a feeling of anxiety as bodies join together and disband, tumbling over one another, and turning into flames of light. Sometimes the bodies spin rapidly as if attracted by a black hole. It offers a vision of eternity, a scenario where they are flesh and spirit at the same time. While Hive is a piece that you can passively absorb, the Space exhibitions are more dramatic. POL and Model 5 push the boundaries of perception. These half-hourlong pieces require patience and resist a straightforward narrative. POL, whose initials stand for “live improvised performance” in German, starts with a noise that sounds like an approaching locomotive. Seven screens, together 45 feet wide, are filled with an electrical fuzz that fluctuates in sound and intensity. At one point the light is blinding, and at another time it resembles a speckled Jackson Pollock painting.

IN HIVE, THE CHOREOGRAPHY OF THE FIGURES IS MESMERIZING AND ALMOST MYSTICAL.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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T H E S O U L O F A G E N E R AT I O N

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Hamdy El-Gazzar is among the guests here at the Prague Writers’ Festival.

Eventually, on each screen, a face and torso emerge from the fuzz, accompanied by the sound of heavy breathing, as if from an iron lung. For a millisecond, we see a focused image that suddenly disappears. The next sequence contains flashing blue and black geometric designs. One feels like one has entered a wormhole in time. Sound punctuates the rapid fire of the changing screens, suddenly interfered with by static that recalls thunderous electrical storms. The projection’s rhythm slows, and incorporates flashing red panels. Ultimately, a series of downward-gazing female heads appears embedded like a red/black silkscreen. Each head performs a strange pecking motion until it slowly fades out. Model 5 is a primal scream about the intrusions of modern society. It includes four frontal heads of performance artist Akemi Takeya. Each head’s movement is manipulated, and merged with eerie disembodied soundscapes. Takeya appears to be undergoing torture by electrical shock. She resembles a puppet on remote control. At one point the eyes appear to plead with the invisible controller to stop. Slowed to stop-action, the mouths emit a growl like a lion. Then the heads return to vibrating, with spontaneous exclamations from the mouth. Hentschlager uses double exposure to represent a split personality, and sometimes to generate an erotic element. Toward the end, the heads are in a trance, muttering pieces of words. The only possible way of resisting seems to be meditation, and at the end, one senses the head is repeating a mantra. As the writer Howard Rheingold wrote, immersive art like Hentschlager’s can “alter consciousness, shape behavior and influence belief systems.” In Hive, the futuristic vision of human relations on a cosmic scale might suggest that the resemblances among human beings give us more to gain by acting in concert. In POL, we observe the interface between consciousness and technology, what it means to be constrained within a body, and perhaps how technology will mold our humanity in the future; it seems a very pessimistic picture. And Model 5 deconstructs the psychology of the alter ego to suggest how modern society affects the individual. Perhaps becoming more fully human requires more technology. In any case, Hentschlager’s is a seductive art that might alter our understanding of reality.

Holding the Prague Writers’ Festival in Pittsburgh is not as curious as it might sound. This was, after all, the site of the Pittsburgh Agreement, the 1918 pact that created Czechoslovakia. That country no longer exists, having split into Slovakia and the Czech Republic. But the 95th anniversary of that historical connection — plus a modern literary one — were enough to bring the festival here. The literary link is Channa Newman, the Point Park University professor who’s also the prestigious festival’s director of international programs. She desires to make Pittsburgh more international, and convinced the festival to follow up its traditional spring session, in Prague, with its first appearance outside what’s now the Czech Republic. The festival, founded in the 1970s by American poet Michael March, has hosted scores of famed writers from around the world. Tariq Ali, Martin Amis, Margaret Atwood, Nadine Gordimer, Aleksandr Hemon, Salman Rushdie, Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott are just some of them. The big name at the Pittsburgh festival, at least for American readers, is Ragtime author E.L. Doctorow, who at 6:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18, will give the first public reading of his forthcoming novel Andrew’s Brain. Other notables include Indian-born novelist Anita Desai and Egyptian author, playwright and journalist Hamdy El-Gazzar. The two-day festival, titled “Birth of Nations/Pursuit of Happiness,” includes both informal daytime “conversations” and evening readings. All are free, though preregistration is required. The first conversation is an Oct. 18 lunchtime talk with Tomas Sedlacek. He’s the pioneering economist who argued, in his acclaimed 2011 book Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning from Gilgamesh to Wall Street, that economics isn’t just about numbers; it’s also an expression of culture. The pop-literate Sedlacek is as liable to reference Fight Club as he is to cite Aristotle. And he’s known for his iconoclastic takes on greed and consumer society. “Consumption works like a drug. Enough is always just beyond the horizon,” this former advisor to Czech President Vaclav Havel has said. And even more provocatively: “We have to abandon our obsession with growth in economics.” Saturday’s conversation, titled “Freedom of Literature,” includes Desai, El-Gazzar, Havel biographer Eda Kriseova and City of Asylum/Pittsburgh’s Henry Reese. Desai, El-Gazzar and Kriseova are featured at the evening reading.

October 29-November 3 • Benedum Center TrustArts.org • Box Office at Theater Square

412-456-4800 • Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PRAGUE WRITERS’ FESTIVAL Fri., Oct. 18, and Sat., Oct. 19. Point Park University, Downtown. Free. 412-392-3938 or lmonahan@pointpark.edu

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CYNDI LAUPER SHE’S SO UNUSUAL TOUR

W/OPENER HUNTER VALENTINE 30th Anniversary Tour! It’s your LAST CHANCE EVER to see She’s So Unusual performed note to note, track to track – in its ENTIRETY – featuring four of Billboard 100’s Top-5 hits: Girls Just Wanna Have Fun, Time After Time, She Bop and All Through the Night.

SUNDAY t NOVEMBER 3 t 7:30PM Pit $75; Orchestra $70, $59; Loge $70; Balcony $49, $39

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATER CO.}

Renn Woods and Leslie “Ezra” Smith in Sold, at Pittsburgh Playwrights

[PLAY REVIEWS]

LIFE STORIES {BY TED HOOVER} RENN WOODS has enjoyed an amazing career. Hit radio singles before she was 15 years old, a role in the legendary television show Roots, stage triumphs and, especially, her definitive performance of “Aquarius” in the film version of Hair. But this is show biz we’re talking about, so you know there’s a dark side, too — in Woods’ case a very dark side indeed. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Co. presents Sold, an autobiographical cabaret/ musical written and composed by Woods and adapted from an earlier work. This production is the premiere of this new incarnation.

Sold is far from a “finished” work. It feels as if Woods, the artist, is puzzling out how to build a show from snippets and fragments, while Woods, the woman, is puzzling out her own life and what it meant, and means. To her credit, Woods has no interest in creating a linear “and then, in the fall of 1974, I did ‘x,’ and in early spring of ’75 I did ‘y’” narrative. Her mode is more akin to creating a collage from life experiences. So that’s all good. But it also must be said that what’s on stage is meandering, unfocussed and curiously uninvolving. Big sections of her life seem not to be referenced — at one point she suddenly has a grown-up son, of whom we’ve heard nothing — while we spend a lot of time on inconsequential past romances. Like I said above, this production marks the first baby steps of what Woods (who now lives part time in Pittsburgh) hopes will one day be a full-grown show. There’s a lot of determined work ahead, but if we learn anything from Sold, it’s that determined work is never something Woods has shied away from.

RENN WOODS’ MODE IS AKIN TO CREATING A COLLAGE FROM LIFE EXPERIENCES.

SOLD continues through Sat., Oct. 20. Pittsburgh Playwrights at Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-30. www.pghplaywrights.com

Woods narrates events in her life, which are also acted by, among others, a very adorable Aliya Sims playing her as a child; Woods playing herself as an adult; a large supporting cast including a creepy Leslie “Ezra” Smith as an abusive manager; backup singers Delana Flowers and Jamilah Chanie … and the return of sorely missed local performer Sandra Dowe. It can’t be news to anyone involved that

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

REBEL PRINCESS {BY F.J. HARTLAND} WHEN A PRINCESS foregoes her arranged

marriage to start an all-female academy, her father ends up in chains. And her prince has no choice but to storm the

EVERYONE REMEMBERS THEIR FIRST. August Wilson Center | 8 PM

In this trailblazing work directed by the inventive Swiss duo Zimmermann & de Perrot, seven performers inhabit a topsy-turvy world where, at any moment, the ceiling can become a floor, a floor can become a wall, and a door can become a chasm.

Never before seen artists and performances.

TrustArts.org/first A PROJECT OF

THROUGH OCT 26, 2013 Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

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THE GRANDEST OF ALL GRAND OPERAS RETURNS

[STAGE]

WAR TIMES

FINAL WEEKEND! See FRANCO HARRIS (10/18) and PHIL BOURQUE (10/20) in the famous Triumphal Scene!

When is theater most exciting? T. Ryder Smith says it’s not when everything goes right, and the audience knows the performers are in control; it’s when, for instance, an actor forgets a line, and struggles to remember. “There’s almost an electric charge to the moment, because something real is happening,” says Smith, a New York Citybased writer and performer. “We want to find a way to create an event that’s as spontaneous as a recovery from a mistake.” “We” is Smith and frequent collaborator Christopher McElroen, the lauded, Brooklyn-based producer and director. The two are behind Measure Back, a Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts world premiere that uses improvisation in an intimate setting to explore the origins of war. Audiences will enter the longunused fifth floor of Downtown’s Baum Building (above Space gallery), with its chipped paint and bubbled plaster. Monitors will be playing “whatever’s on TV that night,” McElroen said during a visit to Pittsburgh last month. Smith, as himself, will tell the audience that though he’s never been to war, family members of his have; then he’ll ask who present has experienced war. The unfolding discussion — some of it conducted by cell phone — prompts a question that places war in the context of interpersonal conflict: “What would it take,” Smith will ask, “for you and me to be at war?” McElroen is best known for founding the Classical Theatre of Harlem. In 2007, he drew national attention by co-producing and directing Waiting for Godot in New Orleans, which staged Beckett’s classic outdoors in the Lower Ninth Ward and Gentilly after Hurricane Katrina. Measure Back grew out of a 2011 New York production McElroen directed of Jon Lipsky’s post-Vietnam play Living in Exile, a three-actor retelling of The Iliad. Smith, one of the three actors, says that show “explor[ed] the idea of war within a living-room setting.” But America’s contemporary wars affect very few of us personally, and Smith began deconstructing the format. “Why don’t I ask this question of the audience instead of another character?” he thought. Measure Back questions media packaging of war as well as our personal complicity in war-making. “At some point, the event gets away from us,” says McElroen. “Are we responsible for what took place in this room?”

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Original photo: David Bachman.

T. Ryder Smith performs in Measure Back.

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Verdi’s V erd di’ss

OCT 18 and 20 Benedum Center Tickets $12 and up 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

75th anniversary season: Opera for a new age

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

UNDERSTAND EVERY WORD!

MEASURE BACK 8 p.m. nightly Tue., Oct. 22, through Sat., Oct. 26. Baum Building (fifth floor), 818 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25. 412-456-6666 or www.pifof.org N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

10.1710.24.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

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{MUSIC}

Nov. 22 marks 50 years since JFK’s assassination, but disagreement over who did it persists. Starting today, three events tackle the issue from different angles. “Passing the Torch” is a three-day scholarly symposium at Duquesne University’s Wecht Institute of Forensic Science and Law that will explore new theories about the killing. The centerpiece is Friday’s talk by famed filmmaker Oliver Stone, whose 1991 hit JFK fanned conspiracy theories. But first, tonight, Stone joins Salon.com founder and Kennedy-family expert David Talbot; journalist and author Jefferson Morley; and others for The JFK Assassination and the Media, a panel talk at the Heinz History Center. Finally, on Saturday, The John McIntire Dangerously Live Comedy Talk Show chips in with JFK: A Comedy Show — Too Soon? Guests include noted single-bullet-theory skeptic Cyril Wecht, plus Talbot, Walt Brown (author of The Warren Omission) and others. Bill O’Driscoll Duquesne

OCT. 18 Zero Cost Z C t House

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM COBB}

{WORDS}

OCT. 19 David id LLaskin ki

The season’s most diverse sampling of local musical talent is tonight at Mr. Smalls – and topping it off, Phat Man Dee’s Cavalcade of Stars N’at is free (or just $2 if you’re under 21). The show, co-presented by Creative Life Support, includes jazz by Phat Man Dee and the Cultural District; rock by Amoeba Knievel; salsa by Machete Kisumontao; gospel by the Rev. Deryck Tines; hip hop from HollyHood and J-Pad da Juggernaut; bellydance by Christine Andrews; the burlesque of Lita D’Vargas; and … Trixy, Trundle Manor’s fire-breathing art car. BO 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. Free ($2 if under 21). www.mrsmalls.com

{PECHAKUCHA} symposium continues through Sat., Oct. 19 (Duquesne campus, Uptown; passes range from $25-200; www.duq.edu/ JFK). History Center panel: 7 p.m. (5:30 p.m. reception; 1212 Smallman St., Strip District; $40; www.heinz historycenter.org). McIntire show: 10:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19 (655 Penn Ave., Downtown; $10; www.trustarts.org)

PechaKucha, the Japanese term for chit-chat, is now used worldwide to indicate an evening where creative types have exactly 6 minutes and 40 seconds to get their ideas across — 20 seconds for each of 20 projected images. Presentations can be about anything, from innovative initiatives to travelogues and documentations of enthusiasms. Locally, PechaKucha is presented four times annually by AIA Pittsburgh. PechaKucha Night Pittsburgh 20 x 20 is tonight at Downtown’s Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Arts Education Center. BO 7:20 p.m. 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15. 412-471-9548

+ FRI., OCT. 18 {STAGE} Compared to McMansiondwelling Americans, the Japanese make frugal use of living space. Yet it’s Japanese playwright Toshiki Okada, in collaboration with Philadelphia-based Pig Iron Theatre Company, who brings us Zero Cost House. This mediation on how Thoreau’s Walden changed the playwright’s life curves time and space, ponders philosophy, politics and

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sp otlight {PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIO DEL CURTO}

Martin Zimmermann and Dimitri de Perrot say of their works, “We do everything very seriously, but take nothing seriously.” The awardwinning duo’s Zurich-based Zimmermann & de Perrot combines circus arts, dance, theater and a whole lot of wackiness. The troupe makes its Pittsburgh debut with the U.S. premiere of Hans Was Heiri, in three Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts shows at the August Wilson Center. On its website, the company describes itself as “theater based on precise observation, humorous repetition, distortion, and the artistically accomplished transformation of everyday interactions.” By phone from Montreal, co-director and choreographer Zimmerman says that Hans builds on the idea that while we humans strive for individuality, we are surprisingly similar in our basic needs and desires. The family-friendly, 80-minute piece takes place in a zany world where six lonely, off-the wall characters occupy what could be an apartment building with a shared bathroom. The characters are tragic, comical, human but not quite normal, Zimmerman says. The set is dominated by a large cube rotating on a horizontal axis and partitioned into four rooms. In a video clip, the characters tumble into corners or other rooms of the cube, and run along its outside like hamsters on a wheel. “It is a really surrealistic, funny world,” says Zimmerman. Steve Sucato 8 p.m. nightly Wed., Oct 16, through Fri., Oct. 18. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $19-55. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

shelter, and includes singing rabbits. The cast of five visits the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater tonight. BO 8 p.m. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $10-20. 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

+ SAT., OCT. 19 {WORDS} David Laskin’s new book, The Family (Viking), does something we’ve all wanted to do: explore the world of our ancestors and find out how we got here. Going notably beyond www.ancestry. com, Laskin traces a lineage

{WORDS} David Riley Bertsch — a Pittsburgh native who studied law (at Pitt) and then became a fly-fishing guide in Jackson, Wyo. — has written a thriller about a former lawyer who’s a fly-fishing guide in Jackson, Wyo. But unlike his protagonist, Jake Trent, Bertsch has likely never experienced the discovery there of three dead bodies in one day. Bertsch’s debut novel, Death Canyon, is earning strong reviews. He visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop for today’s Coffee & Crime author breakfast. BO 10 a.m. 514 Allegheny

competition at the Amarillo Museum of Art. Endangered shows off Castonguay’s techniques of realism in the service of a visionary sensibility to honor the planet’s more than 10,000 endangered species. The opening reception is tonight. BO 5-8 p.m. 3583 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. 412-687-2606 or www.begalleries.com

{COMICS} It’s a big night for local comics artists, as Copacetic Comics hosts a release party for four edgy new publications. Nils Balls’ Ship of Soiled Doves is a rather saucy, intermittently

OCT. 24 War Reporting

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{DANCE} In April, Ellen Deutsch’s Geeksdanz interpreted the high-tech world of video gaming. Now her fledgling troupe explores a much older, low-tech form of entertainment: ghost stories. Manifestations — at Shadyside’s intimate Steel City Improv Theater — seeks to tingle spines and chill blood. Four dancers will perform to six stories by award-winning storyteller Alan Irvine, drawn from legends, folk tales and literary classics including Bram Stoker’s “The Judge’s House.” The interpretations range from pretty realistic to very abstract, says Deutsch. A half-hour family-friendly early show features three G-rated stories; two hour-long performances add three PG-13-rated tales. Steve Sucato 7 p.m. (family show) and 8 and 10 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $5-10. Reservations at tickets@ geeksdanz.org

{TALK} War Reporting – Filmmakers and Journalists on the Realities of War is tonight’s panel discussion from Women in Film

has covered the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and written for USA Today and many other publications; Lynda Schuster, a former staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal who has covered events in South America and the Middle East;

OCT. 19

Endangered

Art by Elizabeth Castonguay

+ MON., OCT. 21 {WORDS} A still from JulieHera DeStefano’s documentary on women soldiers returning from war

that includes ancestors lost to the Holocaust as well as a Russian-immigrant great-aunt who founded the Maidenform lingerie line. On his national tour, Laskin discusses this epic history — including two world wars and the founding of Israel — during morning services today at Rodef Shalom Congregation. Brett Wilson 9:15 and 10:30 a.m. 4905 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. 412-621-6566 or www.rodefshalom.org

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River Blvd., Oakmont. Free; registration required at 412-828-4877.

{ART} It’s a rare local solo show for a much-awarded Pittsburgh artist. Borelli-Edwards Galleries presents Endangered, a exhibit of paintings by Elizabeth Castonguay, whose “Levees/ Breaking” won first-place awards at both a international competition at New York’s Viridian Gallery and a national

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violent graphic novel about prostitutes who mutiny on an Ohio River steamboat during the Civil War. Heathen is a compilation of dark science fiction and fantasy by Jeremy Baum. Andy Scott edited Andromeda Quarterly, an anthology of work by 11 artists. And Nate McDonough shows off new work including “Grixly 25.” BO 6-9 pm. 3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill. Free. 412-251-5451 or www.copaceticcomics.com

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Ian Frazier made his name as a journalist — a New Yorker staffer whose taste for adventure and eye for detail led, among other destinations, to his 2010 book Travels in Siberia. But Frazier’s lately built a sideline in humor writing, notably with his spoof of contemporary parenting The Cursing Mommy’s Book of Days. Expect wit, and reportage too, when Frazier visits Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ Monday Night Lecture Series, tonight at the Carnegie Music Hall. BO 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-40. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

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and Justin Merriman, a photojournalist for the Pittsburgh Tribune Review who has worked in Iraq and Egypt. BW 6 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $5-20. 412-973-9799 or www.wifmpit.org

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Pittsburgh Steelers Special

$2 Coors Light drafts

during all Steelers games

724-935-9870 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford, PA 15090 (Across from Wendy’s, access from Weller Road)

Mon-Thu 11 am-midnite: Fri-Sat 11am-2am

www.wexfordalehouseonline.com Wexford Ale House

• BELL’S • DOGFISH HEAD • ROGUE • SIERRA NEVADA • GUINESS • BOULDER •

• VICTORY • HOEGAARTEN • SAM ADAMS • ANCHOR STEAM • LAGUNITAS •

EAST END • STONE BREWING • MAGIC HAT • YARDS

FRANZISKANER • TROEGS • AND MANY MORE!

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER AIDA. Presented by Pittsburgh Opera. Tue, Fri, Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. BLITHE SPIRIT. A cantakerous novelist gets re-married, but is haunted (literally) by the ghost of his late first wife. Presented by the Actors & Artists of Fayette County. Oct. 17-20. Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 724-887-0887. THE DEATH OF DR. FRANKENSTEIN. Presented by Musical Mysteries & More. Fri., Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m. Lamplighter Restaurant, Delmont. 724-468-4545. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DODGE INTREPID RADIO ADVENTURE SHOW. A witty, live radio adventure about a time traveling librarian. Sat., Oct. 19, 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

OKLAHOMA! Presented by Point FUTURE TEN 10: A SHOWCASE Park University’s Conservatory OF THE PAST DECADE. Feat. the Theatre Company. Thu-Sun. Thru best eight 10-min. plays submitted Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Playhouse, to Future Ten in the past 10 years. Oakland. 412-392-8000. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 26. Future OLIVER! Presented by the Tenant, Downtown. 412-325-7037. Heritage Players. Fri-Sun. Thru MEASURE BACK. Performance Oct. 20. Seton Center, Brookline. using audience participation & 412-254-4633. black humor to probe how war is OUR TOWN. Thornton Wilder’s constructed & performed. classic play about a small, Part of the Pittsburgh early-20th century International Festival of community. Thru Firsts. Oct. 22-26. Baum Oct. 27. O’Reilly Building, Downtown. Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. 412-316-1600. MONTY PYTHON’S www. per pa PRINCESS IDA. SPAMALOT. Hilarious & pghcitym .co Prince Hilarion sneaks twisted take on the story into a women’s of King Arthur, the Knights university to win the love of the Round Table, & of his betrothed. Presented by canned meat. Fri, Sat. Thru Pittsburgh Savoyards. Fri-Sun and Nov. 9. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. Thu., Oct. 17. Thru Oct. 20. 724-591-8727. Andrew Carnegie Free Library MURDERED TO DEATH. Spoof Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. of Agatha Christie mysteries. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. Presented by Community Theatre Presented by Brisbane Players. Fri, Sat and Thu., Oct. 24. Management Group. Location Thru Oct. 26. Community released after ticket purchase. Presbyterian Church of Ben Avon, brisbane-management-group.com Ben Avon. 412-766-4471.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FULL LIST ONLINE

Wed-Sat. Thru Oct. 31. SOLD: RENN WOODS IN CONCERT. An autobiographical tour de force written by & starring Renn Woods. Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. TICK, TICK .. BOOM! Jonathan Larson’s autobiographical musical. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru Nov. 3. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. TURN OF THE SCREW PREVIEW. Based on the novella by Henry James. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Sat., Oct. 19. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE. Vanya & his sister Sonia tolerate a mediocre life until their movie-star sister Masha returns w/ her boy-toy Spike. Tue-Sun. Thru Nov. 3. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN. Oct. 18-19, 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 20, 2 p.m. Greensburg Civic Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-PLAY. ZERO COST HOUSE. Five characters take turns playing one contemporary Japanese playwright who confronts a younger version of himself & the ideas he once believed. Presented by Pig Iron Theatre Co. Oct. 18-19. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

COMEDY THU 17 COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 17 - SAT 19 MITCH FATEL. 8 p.m., Fri., Oct. 18, 8 & 10 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 19, 7 & 9 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 18 This Limited Release includes typical ingredients used in the Late 19th Century to produce Full Flavored, American Pale Lagers.

Available now at better beer distributors, including

Beer & Pop 4 Less - Bridgeville Boulevard Beer Dist. - Bellevue Brewski’s DistributorDistributor Russellton JR’s Beer Warehouse - Rochester

BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THE GRATEFUL DYING. 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. KING FAKE. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. RUCKUS. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

SAT 19 BILL CRAWFORD, TONY “T-ROBE” ROBERSON. 8 p.m. Seven Springs, Champion. 1-888-718-4253. CONTINUES ON PG. 92

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H 14NTUAL

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HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE and nd d th the he

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL Oct. 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 30, 31 - Nov 1, 2

Special Event

Open 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday; 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE - ALL FREE!

RALPHIE MAY

Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both • FREE PARKING 412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com • See website for $3 OFF Coupon

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) • North Versailles, PA 1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart Group rates & private campfire sites available

MONDAY M O & TUESDAY October O ct 21 & 22 ($25)

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

Special Event

CARLOS MENCIA

FRIDAY - SUNDAY October 25-27 ($30)

The Waterfront | 66 E Bridge St | Homestead, PA 15120 | (412) 462-5233

The Curators of the 2013 Carnegie International Co-curators Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, and Tina Kukielski have combined their unique perspectives on contemporary art to create the collective effort known as the 2013 Carnegie International. Each curator will have small-group discussions at their favorite locations throughout the exhibition. Tours are on a first-come, first-served basis. This Thursday, October 17 $10 (includes admission and one drink ticket) Bar opens at 5:30 p.m. Visit the galleries with the curators: choose 6–6:30 p.m. or 6:45–7:15 p.m. upon arrival Culture Club is sponsored by

Parking is available for a $5 flat rate.

Nicole Eisenman installation, photo by Greenhouse Media

cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 drop-in tours daily | call 412.622.3289 to schedule a group tour one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 90

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

SUN 20 IMPROV NIGHT AT THE ARCADE. 7 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

EVENT: Rein in the People

MON 21

comedy show at Steel City Improv Theater

DYLAN MORAN. 8 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. THE SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 4 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

CRITIC: Keara Kelly, 28, an implementation coordinator from Point Breeze

MON 21 - TUE 22

WHEN: Fri.,

RALPHIE MAY. Oct. 21-22, 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

TUE 22 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 23 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

This was a really fun sketch show that had a lot of varieties, and it was great to see some really poignant character acting. The actors drove home every joke because they were very committed to what they were doing. I attended this show because I am a friend of the theater’s, as well as a fellow performer myself, and I wanted to be able to see the sketches because we do not get to see shows like this as often as we should in Pittsburgh. I feel very comfortable in this venue as I have performed improv here as well. The actors made a really excellent fit for this stage, and the audience reacted very well to it. I really loved the show, as each of the different skits had their own ways of getting a reaction from the crowd.

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Feat. imagery, film & oral history CENTER. Ongoing: tours of narratives to explore communities, Clayton, the Frick estate, with cultures, & innovations. classes, car & carriage museum. Downtown. 412-258-2700. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this collection of automatic roll-played Tudor mansion and stable complex, musical instruments and music and enjoy hikes and outdoor boxes in a mansion setting. activities in the surrounding park. Call for appointment. O’Hara. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. 412-782-4231. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the BOST BUILDING. Collectors. other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Preserved materials reflecting Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. the industrial heritage of KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Southwestern PA. Homestead. Tours of a restored 19th-century, 412-464-4020. middle-class home. Oakmont. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF 412-826-9295. NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to Arabia: Archaeology & History more than 600 birds from over 200 of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. species. With classes, lectures, Archaeological materials demos and more. North exploring the cultural Side. 412-323-7235. history of the NATIONALITY Arabian Peninsula. ROOMS. 26 rooms Ongoing: Earth . helping to tell the www per Revealed, Dinosaurs a p ty story of Pittsburgh’s pghci m In Their Time, more. .co immigrant past. Oakland. 412-622-3131. University of Pittsburgh. CONNEY M. KIMBO Oakland. 412-624-6000. GALLERY. University of OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Memorabilia & Awards from site features log house, blacksmith the International Hall of Fame. shop & gardens. South Park. Oakland. 412-648-7446. 412-835-1554. FALLINGWATER. Tour the PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. BOTANICAL GARDEN. Fall Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. Flower Show. Thousands of FORT PITT MUSEUM. chrysanthemums in various forms Unconquered: History Meets & colors display festive scenes. 14 Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens movie props, photographs, & feature exotic plants and floral costumes alongside 18th century displays from around the world. artifacts & documents, comparing & Oakland. 412-622-6914. contrasting historical events w/ PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball Hollywood depictions. Reconstructed museum & players club. West fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian View. 412-931-4425. War and American Revolution. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG Downtown. 412-281-9285. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000

FULL LIST ONLINE

Oct. 11

B Y B RE T T W I L S ON

animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s significant contributions during the Civil War feat. artifacts, military encampments, life-like museum figures, more. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905.

HOLIDAY THU 17 - WED 23 HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE/ VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. Live bands, karaoke, & DJs every Friday & Saturday. Benefits The Autism Society of Pittsburgh & CONTINUES ON PG. 94

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

BAND NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY!

THURS/OCT 24/10PM

BE GALLERIES. Endangered. Work by Elizabeth Castonguay. Opening reception: Oct. 19, 5-8 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. GALLERIE CHIZ. A Magical Mirror of International Cultures Combining Real & Imaginary Worlds. Work by Masha Archer, Salvador DiQuinzio, Mitzi Hall, & Manuela Holban. Opening reception: Oct. 18, 5:308:30 p.m., Artist Talk: Oct. 19, noon. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. Reclaiming Landscapes. Photographs by Student Art Show winner Christopher Sprowls. Opening reception: Oct. 18, 6-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Here & Now. Work by Sharif Bey. Artist reception: Oct. 17, 6-8 p.m. North Side. 412-322-1773. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Art of the City. Pop-up exhibit feat. local artists, designers, & musicians. Oct. 19, 8 p.m.midnight. artofthecity.tumblr. com. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

ONGOING 3RD STREET GALLERY. 2013 Aqueous Open. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society presents its 67th Annual International Exhibition. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. HOLDUP in the HOOD. Multimedia work by Francis Crisafio. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs by Bea Chiappelli. Downtown. 412-471-6070. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Finnish & Jewish. Photographs by Dina Kantor. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of

Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. North Side. 412-237-8300. ASSEMBLE. F O R T R E S S. Installation by Sophie Bachelor & Cheryl Spencer. Garfield. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Eccentric Characters. Paintings & collages by Diane Keane. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Pittsburgh Panoramas/Metals. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Barbara Miller, Frank Bruno. Feat. watercolors & photography. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Hats Off to the Insane. New work by Sherry Rusinack. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Threaded: A Glass Exhibition. A collection of contemporary glass and mixed media works by five Pittsburgh-based artists. Artist reception Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m.; also open Oct. 19 during the BrewHaHa, noon-midnight. Email or call to view the exhibition by appointment. South Side. 843-469-8342. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. The Workers. A photo study of the 18-foot tall public art piece The Workers, by Andy Prisbylla. Hunt Library. Oakland. 412-268-2000. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Zivi Aviraz, Matthew Spangler, Avery Pratt. Group show. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Marsha’s Peace Art;

Abstract & Pointillist. Work by Marsha Lee Moore. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Christopher Ruane. Photography exhibit. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Remaining Nameless. Work by Nick & Noell. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434.

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The Spectrum Charter School. hauntedhillshayride.com Thru Nov. 2 Haunted Hills, North Versailles. THE SCAREHOUSE. Haunted house open select dates through Nov. 2. Thru Nov. 2 Etna. 412-781-5885.

FRI 18 7TH ANNUAL HOWL-O-WEEN PET COSTUME CONTEST. Presented by the Western PA Humane Society. 7-9 p.m. Mall at Robinson. 412-321-4625.

SPECIAL THU 17 - WED 23 RADICAL DAYS. Dozens of cultural establishments will offer free admission on designated days. Visit radworkshere.org for full schedule. Thru Nov. 10

DANCE THU 17 - FRI 18 HANS WAS HEIRI. Performance by Zimmermann & de Perrot. Part of the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts. Thru Oct. 18 August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FRI 18 WORLD DANCE SHOW. Tango fusion, Balkan fusion, Bhangra, & more feat. Amethyst Electrobelly, Sahra DeRoy & Anjali Soi. 7:30 p.m. Fitness with a Twist, South Side. 412-897-0809.

FUNDRAISERS THU 17 CARNIVAL IN THE FALL. Salsa dancing, live music, tapas, rum tastings, more. Benefits the Homeless Children’s Education Fund. 6:30-9:30 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-562-0154. JAMMIN’ WITH ANDY: JAZZ AT THE WARHOL. Live jazz, libations, full access to the galleries, more. Benefits Mental Health America Allegheny County. 5:30-9 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-661-7860.

SAT 19 BOO & BREW BASH. Bar crawl benefiting Make-A-Wish. Participating bar list at makea-wishbooandbrewbash2013. eventbrite.com 6-10 p.m. Ellsworth Ave, Shadyside. 412-471-9474. HOWL AT THE MOON. Live music, open bar, games, costume contest, more. Benefits the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation. 7 p.m. Mattress Factory, North Side. 412-823-8272. LIVELIKELOU BIKE RIDE. Benefits the LiveLikeLou ALS Fund. 7 a.m. Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-496-7648. MASKED BALL COUTURE FASHION SHOW. Benefits Gwen’s Girls. 7-10 p.m. Cavo, Strip District. 412-731-7670. NEED ANNIVERSARY GALA. Benefits NEED scholarships for African-American students. 6 p.m.

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THE INN. Dos Solos. Emerging Artist Enterprise Series, Vol. II. Feat. new work by Gianna Paniagua & Alex Hamrick, curated by Nikkia Margaret Hall. Lawrenceville. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists III. Group show feat. all media. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. Necessary Fictions. Work by Patricia BellanGillen. Artist talk: Oct. 19, 10:30 a.m.-noon. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/ Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni: Within. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Idiosyncrasy. Work by Carolyn Alexandra Frischling. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Disappearing City: New Works About Old Things. Work by Paulette Poullet. Things Are Looking Up: Abstract Tourist & Architectural Photography. Work by Kurt Garrison. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. PANZA GALLERY. Sanctuary. Multimedia exhibit by members of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great

August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-566-7392. NO ONE SURVIVES ALONE. Zombie-themed party benefiting Community Human Services. 7 p.m. Clear Story Studio, South Side. 412-246-1685.

Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s. North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Downtown. 412-261-7003. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Duck! Showcase of original animation art, comic art & artifacts of some of cartooning’s most iconic quackers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Coffin Cuties Art Opening. Photography by Mike Hearse. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. With Things Inside. Installation by Carolina Ramos & David Lasky. Braddock. 415-518-9921. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WESTMORELAND @RT 30. The Sacred Feminine. The Works of Cydra Vaux. A Pop-Up Exhibition at Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s temporary location. Salon Oct. 24, 6-7 p.m. Latrobe. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ST. BARNABAS FASHION GALA & LUNCHEON. Benefits the St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5521. STAND UP & RUN FOR HOMELESS CHILDREN. 10K, 5K & Walk benefiting the Homeless

Children’s Education Fund. 8:30 a.m. North Park, Allison Park. 412-562-0154.

SUN 20 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 47 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. PUMPKIN PANCAKE BRUNCH. 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. SEWICKLEY AREA THEATRE COMPANY LAUNCH PARTY/ BENEFIT. Chinese auction, door prizes, hors d’oeuvres, live entertainment, more. 2 p.m. Sewickley Speakeasy Seafood & Steakhouse, Sewickley. 412-879-0355.

FRI 18 - SAT 19 PRAGUE WRITERS FESTIVAL. Feat. international writers, poets, historians & journalists. Oct. 18-19 Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-3938.

SAT 19

JASON JACK MILLER. Book signing w/ author of Revelations of Preston Black. Part of the Raw Dog Screaming Press Tour. 5 p.m. Eljay’s Used Books, Dormont. 412-344-7444. MATTHEW BETTS. Book signing w/ author of Odd Men Out. Part of the Raw Dog Screaming Press Tour. 3 p.m. The Muse Stand, Bloomfield. 412-904-4004. MICHAEL ARNZEN. Book signing w/ author of 100 Volts. Part of the Raw Dog Screaming Press Tour. 1 p.m. Carnegie HARVEST Mellon Bookstore, www. per CELEBRATION. pa Oakland. 412-268-2107. pghcitym o .c Dinner benefiting the PENNWRITERS Homewood-Brushton SPRINGDALE WRITERS YMCA. 6-8 p.m. Social, GROUP. Third Sat of every Larimer. 412-243-2900. month Springdale Free Public PITTSBURGH LIBERTY BALL Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729. & CELEBRITY ROAST. Benefits THE PEOPLE’S UNIVERSITY: America’s Future Foundation DOGGING STEINBECK. Bill Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Penn Brewery, Steigerwald discusses his North Side. 724-531-1991. book, which reconsiders John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley as a fictionalized account of STEELTOWN SHIVERS. an American journey. 3-5 p.m. Halloween-themed party & Carnegie Library, Oakland. reading presented by local fiction, 412-622-3151. non-fiction, & poetry writers. PSYCHIC DETECTIVE NANCY 7 p.m. Braddock Carnegie Library, MYER BOOK PARTY. Author Braddock. 412-351-6810. of Travels with My Father: Life, Death and a Psychic Detective. goodknightbooks.com/Travels. html 1-4 p.m. Ramada Inn Hotel & Conference Center, Greensburg. GLOBAL CHALLENGES LOCAL SARA SHEPARD. Discussion & IMPACTS: IMMIGRATION. book signing w/ author of Pretty Panel discussion on immigration Little Liars. 7:30 p.m. South Park both locally & internationally. Library, South Park. 412-833-5585. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland STEPHANIE WYTOVICH. Book Park. 412-471-7852. signing w/ author of HYSTERIA: A Collection of Madness. Part of the Raw Dog Screaming Press Tour. 2 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. AUTHOR TALK W/ DAN ROONEY & CAROL PETERSON. Allegheny City: A History of Pittsburgh’s North SUNDAY POETRY & READING Side. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, SERIES. Sandee Gertz Umbach. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. 2-3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR 412-622-3151. WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young WRITERS’ STUDIO POETRY writers & recent graduates looking READING. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, for additional feedback on their Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650. work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, 12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM JOHN LAWTON. Author of ANXIETY. Writing & discussion Then We Take Berlin. 7 p.m. group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Mystery Lovers Bookshop, Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Oakmont. 888-800-6078. Hill. 412-337-4976. THE NEW YINZER PRESENTS.. IAN FRAZIER. Monday Night Karen Dietrich, SBR Martin, Mike Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Steffen. 7 p.m. ModernFormations Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131. Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274.

TUE 22

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FRI 18 DAVID V. MATTHEWS & ERIKA MIKKALO. Readings their latest writings. 6:30 p.m. Garfield Artworks, Garfield. 412-361-2262.

PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing Gayle Howell’s Render: An Apocalypse. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-621-6880.

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KIDSTUFF THU 17 - WED 23 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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EVENING ED-VENTURES: KITCHEN CREATIONS. Learn to make sushi & a Pittsburgh favorite. Ages 6-9. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. ROCK BAND! Open stage for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by Hope Academy. Fri, 5:307 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43. TOUR YOUR FUTURE: BODYMEDIA. Explore how important sensors are when it comes to motion, temperature, & how much you sweat. Ages 9-17. Barbuton@carnegiesciencecenter. org 10 a.m.-12 p.m. BodyMedia, Downtown.

SAT 19

The lineup for Art of the City, happening Saturday at Wood Street Galleries, packs an impressive creative punch. From installations by D.S. Kinsel & Gianna Paniagua and fashions by local designers like Makayla Wray, to musical and spokenword performances by Mars Jackson, DJ Bamboo and Grits Capone (pictured), the one-night pop-up exhibit offers audiences a chance to experience a wide variety of the city’s up-and-coming artists, all in one place. 8 p.m.-midnight, Sat., Oct. 19. 601 Wood St., Downtown. Free. www.artofthecity.tumblr.com

SUN 20 PETER PAN. Presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater & Theatreworks USA. 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

GEEKSDANCE: MANIFESTATIONS. Kid-friendly dance & scary stories. 7 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. LITTLE SPROUTS: WE LOVE 412-404-2695. CRITTERS. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. HEIDI RUBY MILLER. Book Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. signing w/ author of Greenshift. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory Part of the Raw Dog Screaming & Botanical Garden, Oakland. Press Tour. 4 p.m. Bradley’s Books, 412-441-4442 x 3925. Station Square, Station Square. MUNCHKIN MONDAYS: 412-391-3987. CHEMISTRY IS COOL. MAKE IT!: E-TEXTILES & Ages 2-6. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. SOFT CIRCUITS. Ages Carnegie Science 10-14. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Center, North Side. Assemble, Garfield. 412-237-3400. MONSTER BLAST www. per pa HALLOWEEN PARTY. pghcitym .co Halloween crafts, PETER PAN. Presented treats, storytelling, more. by Pittsburgh International 1-3:30 p.m. The ToonSeum, Children’s Theater & Theatreworks Downtown. 412-232-0199. USA. 7 p.m. Penn Hills High School, MONSTER MASH. Costume Penn Hills. 412-456-6666. contest, live music, Halloween marketplace, pumpkin painting, more. 1-4 p.m. Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-476-8889. PETER & THE WOLF. Educational CLEAN AIR DASH & FESTIVAL. program for students in 5K & 1-mile events, yoga demos, kindergarten thru 8th grade. music, food, & other family-friendly Lincoln Park Performing Arts activities. www.gasp-pgh.org Center, Midland. 724-576-4644. 9 a.m. South Side Riverfront Park, South Side. WALKING TOUR OF TAPESCAPE. Massive indoor RENZIEHAUSEN PARK. 1 p.m. landscape made of 22 miles of McKeesport Regional History & packing tape. Oct. 19-Jan. 19 Heritage Center, McKeesport. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, 412-678-1832. North Side. 412-322-5058.

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SAT 19 - WED 23

OTHER STUFF THU 17 CULTURE CLUB: THE CURATORS OF THE 2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL. Each curator will lead small-group discussions of a few favorite works throughout the exhibition. 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. INA GARTEN: THE BAREFOOT CONTESSA. Interactive Q&A. 7:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE JFK ASSASSINATION & THE MEDIA. Panel discussion hosted by Sally Wiggin. 7 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT. A dynamic presentation style where presenters have 6 minutes & 40 seconds to pair words & images. Presented by AIA Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-471-9548.

THU 17 - SAT 19 ANNUAL FALL BOOK SALE. Oct. 17-19 South Park Library, South Park. 412-833-5585. PASSING THE TORCH. International symposium on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Presented by the Cyril H. Wecht Institute of Forensic Science & Law. duq.edu/events/jfk Oct. 17-19 Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000.

FRI 18 8TH ANNUAL THINK BIG FORUM: WOMEN WHO LEAD. Panel discussions, networking, more. Keynote speaker: Jill Blashack Strahan. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. FOOD NETWORK’S CHEF AARON MCCARGO, JR. Talk & tips for kidney-friendly foods for football tailgating. 12-1:30 p.m. Fresenius Medical Care, Bloomfield. 412-682-0205 & 3-4:30 p.m. Liberty Dialysis Banksville, Banksville. 412-343-3060. HOLD ON TO HOPE: IMMACULEE ILIBAGIZA. Discussion w/ Rwandan genocide survivor. 7 p.m. St. Ferdinand Church, Cranberry. 724-776-9177 x 313. MAIN STREET WALKING TOUR: BRIGHTON HEIGHTS & CALIFORNIA AVE. 12-1 p.m. 412-471-5808. UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: THE MONKEY TALKS. Silent film screening. 8 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. URBAN STREET VIOLENCE PRESENTATION. Part of YWCA’s Week Without Violence & ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. 5:30-8 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-261-7003.

FRI 18 - SAT 19 HAUNTED HISTORY TOUR. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 26 Point State Park, Downtown. 412-565-2850.

SAT 19 6TH ANNUAL WOMEN’S WALK FOR PEACE. Ends in West Park. 10 a.m. The Pittsburgh Project, North Side. 412-321-5527. THE BREWHAHA: RECYCLED CARNIVAL & STREET FAIRE. Pop-up market, live music, silent auction, more. The Brew House, South Side. 412-381-7767. DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S PITTSBURGH. Dance classes designed for people w/ Parkinson’s Disease to explore the art of dance & live music. Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Strip District. 412-387-2542. GEEKSDANCE: MANIFESTATIONS. Dance & scary storytelling. 8 & 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. HOME MOVIES DAYS. Dig up your old 8mm, Super 8mm &/or 16mm reels, & stop by the appartment. Film archivists will give advice on the condition of films & possibly screen them for a local audience. www.homemovieday.org 4-8 p.m. The 2013 Carnegie International Satellite Apartment, Lawrenceville. HOVERLA: UKRAINIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland. 412-624-4125.

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INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at the bottom of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. ROLE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH IN THE GEORGE ZIMMERMAN TRIAL. McConomy Auditorium, University Center. 12 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. A WORKSHOP OF PERSIAN & CHINESE MUSIC. 10 a.m. Alumni Concert Hall, CMU, Oakland. 412-268-1047.

STEELTOWN SPOTLIGHT SERIES: LOUIE ANDERSON. 4 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. 412-251-0890.

SUN 20

AUDITIONS LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727.

WED 23 PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. WORKABLE CAREER FAIR. 9 a.m.12 p.m. Millvale Community Center, Millvale. 412-487-6316 x 3216.

ARTS CENTER STUDENT COMPANY. Auditions for Stage Door. Nov. 4-6. For more information: centerauditions.org or

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

MGR YOUTH EMPOWERMENT

MGR Youth Empowerment, part of the national nonprofit Marilyn G. Rabb Foundation, is seeking local artists with experience in youth development to help with the arts-outreach program Arts in Action. The program uses visual art, drama, dance and other media to inspire young people to make changes in their communities. Pennsylvania state clearances required. Submit résumés to Meredith Hoppe at Meredith@mgrf.org.

PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, Cheswick. 724-516-0441.

MON 21 EMANCIPATING LINCOLN: THE PROSE & POETRY OF THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION. St. Clair Lecture w/ Harold Holzer. 7:30 p.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-7040. THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. Combined film screening & live performance. 8 p.m. Regent Square Theater, Regent Square. 1-888-718-4253. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

TUE 22 GIRLS THINKING GLOBALLY, ACTING LOCALLY. Speakers: Sarah Pesi & Laila Al-Soulaiman. Presented by the Women & Girls Foundation. 8:30 a.m. Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, Station Square. 412-434-4883. KABLAM VIP PRE-PRE PARTY W/ LOUIE ANDERSON. 7:30 p.m. The ToonSeum, Downtown. 412-232-0199.

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auditions@lppacenter.org Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-259-6443. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER SECOND STAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for Shrek the Musical. Oct. 20-21. 5th-12th graders only. Prepare 16 bars of music& be ready for dancing/cold readings. mckeesportlittletheater.com McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

SUBMISSIONS THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR REVIEW. Seeking submissions in all genres for fledgling literary magazine curated by members of the Hour After Happy Hour Writing Workshop. afterhappyhourreview.com INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey. blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentlight-first-annual-poetry.html PITTSBURGH SOCIETY OF ARTISTS NEW MEMBER SCREENING. Screening Oct. 20. Bring three works of art in the same medium, 2D or 3D. Drop off 12:30-1 p.m., pick up 3-4 p.m. pittsburghsocietyofartists.org Thru Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 14. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to silvereye.org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information. 412-431-1810.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

My boyfriend and I have been together for two years and we live together. Recently, his ex was killed in a car accident. They were not on good terms, and he often made scathing statements about her. I made the mistake of saying the following several days after her death (after offering him sympathy on numerous occasions): “I don’t know how to help you grieve because you didn’t like her.” Obviously, that was a stupid thing to say. I apologized numerous times, and he said that he forgave me. Fast-forward two weeks. We were out having drinks with friends. He disappeared from the bar and I ended up calling a cab and heading home by myself. When I got home, he was drinking with our roommate and some of his friends who were crashing at our house, including his friend’s wife. I was angry and went to bed. I awoke alone and went downstairs, where I found him making out with his friend’s wife. They were both incredibly drunk. Later, he told me he was still angry about my comment, accused me of hating his ex, and informed me that he spent the night venting about me to his friends. I am capable of getting over one drunken kiss — everybody makes mistakes. However, I’m not sure if I’m interested in staying with someone who can’t speak to me like an adult when he has an issue, and instead gets scary drunk and makes out with people. I told him that this chick owes me an apology and asked him to consider quitting drinking. And I asked him to make it clear to his friends what really happened, so I don’t have to be treated like the bad guy. Am I being too demanding? Does it seem like our relationship is worth salvaging?

himself, and he projected that anger onto you. In the cold/sober light of day, he may be able to see that and you can rebuild your relationship. Or, you know, not. My uncle died in a car wreck. I didn’t know him well, but we lived in the same city and he named me executor of his estate. He was single, childless, straight, unmarried and, as it turns out, pretty kinky. I’ve been looking around online, and some of this stuff in his “playroom” is worth a lot. But you can’t haul a $1,000 bondage table out on the lawn for a yard sale (at least not where he lived). So what do you do with a dungeon full of BDSM gear when the owner dies unexpectedly? BOY DE-ACQUISITIONING SADISTIC MERCH

There’s an adult section on eBay where you can unload the stuff, BDSM, and NaughtyBids. com is a site dedicated to auctioning off pre-owned sex toys and gear. But if you don’t want to do the work (and if you don’t care about cashing in on that bondage table), Google around a bit, and I bet you’ll find a local BDSM group in your area that would be happy take your late uncle’s gear off your hands.

BETTER TO RISK A MOMENT OF AWKWARDNESS THAN TO FAIL TO ACKNOWLEDGE YOUR MASSEUR’S HUMANITY.

I’m a gay man in a happy and open marriage. I routinely seek the services of an erotic masseur, with whom I have a great client/serviceprovider relationship. I found out that he was recently in a car accident with his long-term partner, who died in the hospital. Normally, I’d send flowers and a card. However, I don’t want to extend myself in ways that could be uncomfortable for him. I wouldn’t want to put him in the position of having to explain who I am if the card I sent was read by someone else. WANTS TO BE RESPECTFUL

CONFUSED AND CONCERNED ABOUT SITUATION

Let’s review your boyfriend’s behavior: gets drunk, ditches girlfriend, gets shitfaced back at home, bitches about girlfriend to drunk friends, makes out with another woman — who happens to be married to another friend — while his girlfriend sleeps, gets caught, blames girlfriend. That looks like someone who wants out of this relationship. Which means your willingness to stay in it may be irrelevant. Because if your boyfriend lacks the decency, balls or self-awareness to end it himself (he may not be consciously aware that he wants out), he’ll keep pulling stunts like this until you dump him. I’ve been wrong in the past (see “clitoris, location” and “male bisexuality, existence of”), and this is advice, not binding arbitration. Maybe his behavior can be attributed to a meltdown over his ex-girlfriend’s death. Clearly, his feelings for his ex were more complicated than he let on. I’m thinking he still had feelings for her, and that she dumped him. He may have said shitty things about his ex because he thought that’s what you wanted to hear. Reminding him about all of the shit he talked about his ex may have made him angry with

If we were talking about your lawyer or hairstylist or housekeeper, you wouldn’t hesitate to send flowers and a card. You’re hesitating in this case because you fear outing your masseur as a sex worker. Here’s what’s fucked up about that: You’re assuming he isn’t already out about doing sex work. You’re assuming that being outed as a sex worker is the worst possible thing that could happen to him. Most shockingly, you’re assuming your masseur is too stupid to cover for himself if he isn’t out about doing sex work and if someone else reads your card and if that person asks who you are. Should a nosy relative ask, your masseur has lots of options before “a decent and kind guy I sometimes jack off for money.” He can say you’re a friend or an acquaintance or someone with whom he’s worked. Better to risk a moment of awkwardness than to fail to acknowledge your masseur’s humanity. And that’s what failing to acknowledge his grief amounts to. Don’t participate in the dehumanization of sex workers. Send the flowers. The new magnum Savage Lovecast season starts on Oct. 22 at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

Ink Well

PLAY

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{BY BEN TAUSIG}

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52. Misses 1. “Orange Is the New 53. Place for a ring or a stud Black” protagonist 55. Whiz 6. Ennui 56. Enjoyed 11. ___ Cruces, the spread New Mexico 58. Specialty side dish 14. Wowed for Norbit? 15. Perfectly fine 62. Greek god 16. Football of forests chant word 63. Wine taster’s 17. Princes and concern princesses? 64. Wash away, 19. Plague 20. Address shortened as the shoreline 65. Clothing with at bitly or goo.gl footies, casually 21. Small four66. Light and water, stringed instrument, e.g., for plants for short 67. Played (with) 22. Purplish green, sometimes 24. Go into 1. Irritate private practice? 27. Tells, e.g., in poker 2. Bury, as ashes 3. Spanish rice dish 30. Water vapor from right here in the with saffron 4. Lamb’s mom US of A, dammit? 5. Half of the duo 33. Hangover on the album symptom “You Eediot!” 34. Ice-T’s show, 6. Lie like a lizard briefly 7. Run like a deer 35. Very, very 8. Letters for George 38. Shit-faced Orwell or Mark Twain 39. “Leave that 9. Averse to comma in after all” 40. “Document” band diplomacy 10. Nerve junction 41. Kid who 11. Purely positive played a vampire, engagement, in slang often, nowadays 12. Autumn ___ 45. Long rant about 13. It requires you to how the captain choose a position was mean, the 18. Hindu rule shanties sucked, and everyone got scurvy? for living 23. Something 48. Geezer to build on 49. They’re milked 25. “As I understand for all they’re worth

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it,” online 26. Catch in the theater 27. Pinning in chess, e.g. 28. Top choice, casually 29. What some banned books contain, according to the banners 31. Most prone to play “Grand Theft Auto V” and eat Doritos all day 32. Inedible-pizza magnate Herman and his family 35. Approximately 36. Get better 37. Iotas 39. Skeleton device 41. “Home Improvement” nickname

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42. “Victim of Love” synthpop duo 43. The Muffin Man’s lane 44. Multivolume ref. work 46. Smaller alternative to JFK 47. Go out on tour? 50. Duane ___ (New York City pharmacy chain) 51. Used a needle 53. Early hip-hop group with “Strictly Business” 54. Cries of discovery 56. Shazam, e.g. 57. Atlantic City casino, with “the” 59. Salty eggs 60. ___ list (band’s schedule) 61. “No more seats” sign

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{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

10.16-10.23

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The door to the invisible must be visible,” wrote the surrealist spiritual author Rene Daumal. This describes an opportunity that is on the verge of becoming available to you. The opportunity is still invisible simply because it has no precedents in your life; you can’t imagine what it is. But just recently a door to that unknown realm has become visible to you. I suggest you open it, even though you have almost no idea what’s on the other side.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In Tim Burton’s film Alice in Wonderland, Alice asks the White Rabbit, “How long is forever?” The talking rabbit replies, “Sometimes, just one second.” That’s an important piece of information for you to keep in mind, Scorpio. It implies that “forever” may not necessarily, in all cases, last until the universe dies out 5 billion years from now. “Forever” might actually turn out to be one second or 90 minutes or a month or a year or who knows? So how does this apply to your life right now? Well, a situation you assumed was permanent could ultimately change — perhaps much faster than you have imagined. An apparently everlasting decree or perpetual feeling could unexpectedly shift, as if by magic.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I need a little language such as lovers use,” wrote Virginia Woolf in her novel The Waves. “I need no words. Nothing neat … I need a howl; a cry.” If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, Sagittarius, Woolf is speaking for you right now. You should be willing to get guttural and primal … to trust the teachings of silence and the

crazy wisdom of your body … to exult in the inarticulate mysteries and bask in the dumfounding brilliance of the Eternal Wow. Are you brave enough to love what can’t be put into words?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I get bored with the idea of becoming a better listener,” writes business blogger Penelope Trunk. “Why would I do that when interrupting people is so much faster?” If your main goal is to impose your will on people and get things over with as soon as possible, Capricorn, by all means follow Trunk’s advice this week. But if you have other goals — like building consensus, finding out important information you don’t know yet and winning help from people who feel affection for you — I suggest that you find out how to have maximum fun by being an excellent listener.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The last time meteorologists officially added a new type of cloud formation to the International Cloud Atlas was 1951. But they’re considering another one now. It’s called “asperatus,” which is derived from the Latin term undulatus aspera-

Les Ludwig for Mayor of Pittsburgh

Mr. Peduto wants to grab all the money that he can as a candidate while he speaks of money limitations for legislation in city council. He promises four TV debates and there are none; at the same time Les Ludwig promotes a new way to finance government, and reduce taxes. And, although it took city council 7 1/2 years to pass the legislation, 1 million has already been developed in non-taxed revenue for the city. 3 to 5 million is projected for 2014. In my next 4 years I foresee enough non-tax revenue to live up to the promise of reducing the taxes as they now stand. Paid for by the committee to elect Les Ludwig for Mayor of Pittsburgh 100

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

tus, meaning “turbulent undulation.” According to the Cloud Appreciation Society, it resembles “the surface of a choppy sea from below.” But although it looks rough and agitated, it almost never brings a storm. Let’s make asperatus your mascot for the next few weeks. Aquarius. I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something new under the sun. It may at first look turbulent, but I bet it will mostly just be interesting.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Should you try private experiments that might generate intimate miracles? Yes! Should you dream up extravagant proposals and schedule midnight rendezvous? By all means! Should you pick up where your fantasies left off the last time you got too timid to explore further? Naturally! Should you find out what “as raw as the law allows” actually means? I encourage you! Should you question taboos that are no longer relevant? Most assuredly! Should you burn away the rotting pain with a show of liberated strength? Beyond a doubt! Should you tap into the open secret at the core of your wild beauty? Of course!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): This is an indelicate oracle. If you’re offended by the mention of bodily functions in a prophetic context you should STOP READING NOW. Still here? OK. I was walking through my neighborhood when I spied an older woman standing over her aged Yorkshire terrier next to a bush. The dog was in discomfort, squatting and shivering but unable to relieve himself. “He’s having trouble getting his business done,” his owner confided in me. “He’s been struggling for 10 minutes.” I felt a rush of sympathy for the distressed creature. With a flourish of my hand, I said, “More power to you, little one. May you purge your burden.” The dog instantly defecated. Shrieking her approval, the woman exclaimed, “It’s like you waved a magic wand!” Now I am invoking my wizardry in your behalf, Aries, although in a less literal way: More power to you. May you purge your psychological burden.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “You won’t do it at the right time,” warns writer Kate Moller. “You’ll be late. You’ll be early. You’ll get re-routed. You’ll get delayed. You’ll change your mind. You’ll change your heart. It’s not going to turn out the way you thought it would.” And yet, Moller concludes — are you ready for the punch line? — “it will be better.” In describing your future, Taurus, I couldn’t have said it better myself. Fate may be comical in the way it plays with your expectations and plans, but I predict you will ultimately be glad about the outcome.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the coming weeks, you Geminis could be skillful and even spectacular liars. You will have the

potential to deceive more people, bend more truths, and even fool yourself better than anyone else. On the other hand, you will also have the knack to channel this same slipperiness in a different direction. You could tell imaginative stories that rouse people from their ruts. You might explore the positive aspects of Kurt Vonnegut’s theory that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Or you could simply be so creative and playful and improvisational in everything you do that you catalyze a lot of inspirational fun. Which way will you go?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m all in favor of you indulging your instinct for self-protection. As a Cancerian myself, I understand that one of the ways you take good care of yourself is by making sure that you feel reasonably safe. Having said that, I also want to remind you that your mental and emotional health requires you to leave your comfort zone on a regular basis. Now is one of those times. The call to adventure will arrive soon. If you make yourself ready and eager for changes, the changes that come will kick your ass in mostly educational and pleasurable ways.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Who exactly do you want to be when you grow up, and what is the single most important experience you need in order to make that happen? What riches do you want to possess when you are finally wise enough to make enlightened use of them, and how can you boost your eligibility for those riches? Which one of your glorious dreams is not quite ripe enough for you to fulfill it, but is primed to be dramatically ripened in the coming weeks? If I were you, Leo, I would meditate on these questions. Answers will be forthcoming.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At an elementary school festival some years ago, I performed the role of the Mad Hatter from Alice in Wonderland. One of my tasks was to ask kids to make a wish, whereupon I sprinkled their heads with magic fairy dust. Some of the kids were skeptical about the whole business. They questioned the proposition that the fairy dust would make their wishes come true. A few were so suspicious that they walked away without making a wish or accepting the fairy dust. Yet every single one of those distrustful kids came back later to tell me they had changed their minds, and every single one asked me to bestow more than the usual amount of fairy dust. They are your role models, Virgo. Like them, you should return to the scene of your doubts and demand extra fairy dust. What would be the title of your autobiography? What’s the name of the rock band you’d be in? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

LIVE 101 + SERVICES 101 + WORK 101 + WELLNESS 108 + STUDIES 110

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

STORAGE ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

SERVICES

CLASSES

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Castle Shannon Alvern Gardens Apts Call in for Special! Heat/Water/ Gas incld. One block from subway “T” 412-563-7368

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BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

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GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

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AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper! EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTION REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Advertise Here Today!

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

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MODELS

Magazine/newspaper publisher is seeking a qualified individual to do pagination (page layout) and graphic design. Experience with magazine design and/or newspaper design is necessary, also must be fluent using QuarkXPress or Adobe.

Inquire by emailing dgschloss@yahoo.com or call 740-424-1634

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Looking for female models who are physically fit and 18+ years of age for outdoor budoir/ figure photography. I am willing to pay by the hour. 724-561-6955 VOLUNTEERS Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read. Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org Open up a Life We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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B E ST B E ST rcasey@emmauspgh.org

www.panerabread.jobs

www.paguard.com

On the Spot Interviews will be held on Tuesday October 22nd from 9a-4p 200 Roessler Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220

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Various opportunities Available:

www.rdx.com mainstaylifeservices.org

PHEAA.org/jobs

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Career Corner is continued on pages 103 through 107

Residential Direct Care Staff FT Afternoon/Wknd- $10.10/ hr + benefits FT Overnight- $9.60/hr + benefits Substitute- $9.35/hr- Flexible hours Assist adults w/ DD in community homes with daily living throughout Allegheny County. In-Home Direct Care Staff: PT substitute- $11.60/hr- Flexible hours Assist individuals w/ DD one on one with a variety of integrated community activities and/or with personal care in their homes throughout North, South and East Allegheny County. If unable to attend forward resume: 200 Roessler Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Ph: 412-344-3640 Email: careers@mainstaylifeservices.org Or apply on-line at: www.mainstaylifeservices.org EOE

Panera Bread Diversity Job Fair

WE’RE HIRING!

In Partnership With: Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh NAACP, Corporate Diversity Associates

Assistant Managers and Shift Supervisors

FULL TIME CALL CENTER REPRESENTATIVES (LOAN COUNSELORS)

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When: October 30 & 31 9am-1pm Where: Panera Bread 3401 Blvd of Allies Why: Room for advancement, great salary & benefits!

APPLY ANYTIME IN PERSON OR VISIT

www.panerabread.jobs

K^h^i PHEAA.org/jobs to apply.

Join Our Team

PHEAA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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T S E B

Centurian Security

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Centurian Security is looking for qualified candidates to provide baseline security in the Pittsburgh surrounding School District areas.

Applicants must have: • Valid drivers license • Pass a drug screening and background check • Cogent and Childline preferred but not needed.

www.csiinvestigators.com

familybehavioralresources. com

Call Centurian Security at

724-775-3511 ext 2428 to speak with a representative to schedule an interview

www.csiinvestigators.com

Family Behavioral Resources - Family Focused Therapy - Want to make a difference?

Part Time - Flexible Schedules Field positions available throughout the following counties: Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Blair, Butler, Fayette, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Mercer, Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland counties. Behavioral Specialist Consultant (BSC) Masters level mental health professional who consults and collaborates with all members of the treatment team. The BSC maintains clinical oversight of the case, including development of the treatment plan, clinical programming and mentoring the MT and TSS.Applicants must have a Masters Degree in Social Work, Counseling, Special Education or other human service fields and be professionally licensed. Mobile Therapist (MT) Masters level mental health professional provides individual therapy for the consumer. Applicants must have a Master’s Degree in Counseling, Psychology, Social Work, or other human service fields. Therapeutic Support Staff (TSS) Provide one-on-one interventions under the direct supervision of a Masters therapist. Applicants must have a Bachelors Degree in: Counseling, Criminology, Education, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work or other Human Service Field. Other Bachelor Degrees may be accepted with one year of paid experience working with children. Associate’s Degree, sixty credits towards a Bachelor’s Degree or an LPN with the equivalent of at least three years of full-time paid childcare experience also accepted Credentialed Licensed Therapist (LCSW, LMFT, LPC) Provide intensive therapeutic services to consumers in outpatient clinics. Applicants must have a qualifying Master’s Degree and be professionally licensed in the state of PA, and preferably credentialed with regional insurance companies. Clinics located in Greensburg, Indiana, Johnstown, New Kensington and Uniontown. Benefits: Excellent pay, paid travel, paid training and supervision, healthcare reimbursement, vacation, professional and personal growth opportunities. EOE For more information and to apply, visit our company website at: www.familybehavioralresources.com

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T S E B B E ST schneiderjobs.com/ newjobs

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

www.mosaicjobs.com

Family Behavioral Resources - Family Focused Therapy - Want to make a difference?

Accountant Full Time – Greensburg, PA Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting with 5 years related experience and solid understanding of accounting principles. Detail oriented with strong analytical and problem solving skills. Individual must be able to work under stressful situations brought on by deadlines.

Authorization Coordinator Full Time – Greensburg, PA Minimum one year experience (three preferred) in behavioral health rehabilitation services and knowledge of behavioral health clinic services. Experience working with managed care organizations, Medical Assistance, and commercial insurances and knowledge of the service authorization process. The Authorization Coordinator will coordinate the process for receiving timely authorization of services for new clients as well as on an ongoing basis for subsequent treatment plans of care in order to provide for continuity of care and for timely billing.

Billing Supervisor Full Time – Greensburg, PA 5 years of experience with successful record of cash collections, accurate billing, and supervision of multiple staff. Associates degree in Medical Insurance Billing and Coding or related field is preferred. Proficient with MS Office software applications. Knowledge of Credible software and ACT 62 compliance experience preferred.

Licensed Psychologist Full Time North Huntingdon – Somerset - Indiana An advanced degree in Psychology and a valid PA Psychologist license is required. Duties include: Perform best-practice psychological evaluations and reevaluations meeting all requirements set forth by payers, quality assurance, and Senior Management, perform and summarize results of assessments within each psychological evaluation performed, participate in all peer reviews, grievances and fair hearings for clients. Opportunities are now available at our BHRS offices located in North Huntingdon, Somerset and Indiana, PA!

Psychiatrist Full Time – Part Time Board Certified Psychiatrists needed for Outpatient Mental Health Clinics located across Southwestern PA. Duties include: Diagnosing Adult, Adolescents, and Children’s needs, oversight of the development and implementation of client treatment plan, supervision of clinical staff in their discharge of services relating to the treatment plans, oversight in the development of treatment policies and procedures for the program, clinical liaison with county agencies involved with support and treatment of children and adolescents, prescribes/monitors medications of clients and demonstrates proficiency in the use of software programs and applications. Opportunities are now available at our Outpatient Clinics located in Greensburg, Indiana, Johnstoåwn, New Kensington and Uniontown.

Benefits: Excellent pay, paid travel, paid training and supervision, healthcare reimbursement, vacation, professional and personal growth opportunities. EOE For more information and to apply, visit our company website at: www.familybehavioralresources.com

Family Behavioral Resources is growing! Apply today to be a part of our outstanding team! N E W S

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WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS

MIND & BODY

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

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420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Shadyside Location

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

call 412.316.3342

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

Xin Sui Bodyworks

THIS SPACE!

TIGER SPA

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Therapeutic Massage

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Chinese Bodyworks

$40/hr

$10 Coupon

412-595-8077

$50/HR Free Table Shower

Xie LiHong’s

GRAND OPENING!

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

China Massage

WELLNESS CENTER

Judy’s Oriental Massage FULL BODY MASSAGE

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

412-319-7530

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

(across from Eat n’ Park)

STAR

Therapy

MIND & BODY

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

Superior Chinese Massage

massage

MIND & BODY

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.16/10.23.2013

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Credit Cards Accepted

get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

No Start Up Fee

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

J&S GLASS

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Health Services

JADE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

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LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

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Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study

CLINICAL STUDIES

Follow us on

(UPMC Oakland)

CONSTIPATION?

BIRTH CONTROL?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIARRHEA?

HIGH CHOLESTEROL?

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE!

This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions.

See what our clients are saying In the past two years, I’ve both the been very satisfied with ponse res design of our ads and the e to hav I w they evoke. When I kno in ts jec sub advertise for research ly ate edi the 24-35 age group, I imm er. think of using the City Pap

call 412.316.3342 — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

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Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

@PGHCityPaper

HOW THE WEST IS BEING WON

Community champions hope to restore long-overlooked Elliott {BY ABBY MENDELSON} NOT SO LONG AGO, when some folks in Elliott conceived the

idea to convert an empty lot from an eyesore into a Veterans Memorial — complete with small pool, pathway, brick work and fencing —50 people showed up to help. And when Ericka DiVito set about to transform another empty lot into an Edible Garden — with rain barrels, a dozen 4-by-12-foot raised beds for growing fruits and vegetables — some 30 people came to lend a hand. Here, she gestures, there were weeds and trash. Now there are tomatoes and basil, cabbages and cukes and peppers.

Columbus building, which had begun life as a fruit store, was transformed into the clean, well-lighted New Life Fellowship Center. In what was a run-down building near demolition, Pastor Chris Mays fashioned two large multi-purpose rooms with a new roof, laminate floor and modern kitchen. Now the center hosts social events, Wednesday-night scripture study, even a Vacation Bible School, which last summer attracted 40 kids. “It’s one thing to pray for the community,” Pastor Mays says. “The larger question is, do we love the community enough to care for it? If so, we have to do something. We have to be a part

“IT’S ONE THING TO PRAY FOR THE COMMUNITY. THE LARGER QUESTION IS, DO WE LOVE THE COMMUNITY ENOUGH TO CARE FOR IT?” “We’re a collaboration of people working together to bring Elliott around,” offers resident visionary Gena Turner, “to make it livable and beautiful and green. Our goal is simple: to revitalize and energize the neighborhood so that it can attract new people.” Having worked for community causes for decades, by 2010 Turner felt that existing efforts were not sufficiently focused on the hilltop neighborhood. The nearby West End, with its shops and galleries, was getting attention. But not Elliott, perched high above it, a place full of aging homes and crumbling streets. Taking matters in hand, Turner formed the Elliott Community Group and focused all her considerable efforts on the home front. Elliott, which occupies just six-tenths of a square mile, now houses some 2,300 people. Justly famous for the Overlook, which arguably offers the region’s best view of the Point, Elliott began life as a farming and coal-mining community. In the days of streetcars and nearby shops, when people rarely left their neighborhoods, Elliott’s then7,000 souls enjoyed a lively, thriving mom ’n’ pop commercial district. By mid-century, as war-time steel demand ebbed and people moved elsewhere, the world trended away from local groceries and hardware stores. By the time Big Steel went down, Elliott, like many centuryold city neighborhoods, was locked into a seemingly inexorable decline. Vacant housing begets vacant housing, as abandoned houses rot and collapse. Today, empty lots, the acne scars of shifting populations, pockmark the little village. One way to deal with derelict housing is adaptive reuse. Recently, a long-dormant Knights of

of making things happen.” “I viewed this church as a legacy,” says Mays, a South Fayette native who returned from a posting in Virginia to take his father’s pastorship. “I grew up here. I cared about the members. So I returned to help the church move to the place it needs to go.” Like Mays, Ericka DiVito came to Elliott from without — in her case Point Breeze — because she could get a lot more house for her money. As someone who’s fixed up her own home, DiVito agrees that Elliott needs a good, stiff dose of house recycling. Currently, the neighborhood is burdened with some 80 vacant homes, an unacceptable 20 percent of its housing stock. Of the remaining 80 percent of occupied homes, nearly half are rentals. “That’s what we want to change,” Turner says. “We want owners who live here. Because owner-occupied home ownership means that people will care enough to develop the neighborhood.” Development, for Pastor Mays, means “bringing the best things about the past into the future.” Elliott’s champions are wise enough to know that they will never return to the bustling 1940s; instead, they hope to generate contemporary versions of older amenities. A real café, for example. Pop-up stores. More hands-on projects like the Veterans Memorial and the Edible Garden. As they work toward the future, they’re celebrating the fall harvest, their small, urban Oktoberfest. With friends and neighbors in tow, DiVito will lead an effort to clean out their plots, pick their green beans and peas, spinach and squash. They’ll eat some, and put up the rest for winter. They’ll swap recipes, play games with the young ’uns, even carve pumpkins. Then they’ll top it off with a party at New Life. “Elliott’s a work in progress,” Pastor Mays says. “It’s one lot at a time.” INF O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Best of Pittsburgh 2013