{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 10.02/10.09.2013

COURSE CHANGE? ADJUNCT’S DEATH CALLS ATTENTION TO PLIGHT OF PART-TIME FACULTY 06


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


EVENTS 10.3 – 5pm

ARTIST TALK: YASUMASA MORIMURA McConomy Auditorium at Carnegie Mellon University (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University, School of Art’s Fall 2013 Lecture Series FREE

10.9 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: BILL CALLAHAN, WITH SPECIAL GUEST LONNIE HOLLEY Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Tickets $18/$15 Members & students

10.18 – 8pm

UNSEEN TREASURES FROM GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE 2013: THE MONKEY TALKS, WITH LIVE MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENT Tickets $10/ FREE for the first 50 Members who register

11.1 – 8pm

SOUND SERIES: JENNY HVAL, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, THE GARMENT DISTRICT Tickets $15/$12 Members & students

11.7 – 5–8pm

ANNUAL TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Tickets $10 FREE parking in The Warhol lot.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


& Shooting Center We are Locked & Loaded with Guns, Ammo, Accessories and more!

ANNUAL

OUTDOOR SHOW Friday & Saturday Only OCTOBER 11 & 12 ★ 10AM-8PM

ELITE SPORTS EXPRESS will be on hand showcasing the Latest in Guns, Night Vision Scopes & Binoculars from Top Manufacturers including: WINCHESTER ★ NIKON ★ ROSSI ★ TAURUS ★ CHARTER ARMS ★ ATN

Talk to Gun Manufacturers Reps from:

and More!

BROADCASTING LIVE

FRIDAY

October 11 4-6PM

Val Porter

from the Morning sh

ow

2980 LEBANON CHURCH RD. • WEST MIFFLIN, PA 15122 • 412-469-9992 W W W . A N T H O N YA R M S . C O M

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


Over 21 • 9pm - Midnight

ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous

10.02/10.09.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers LAUREN DALEY, ALEX ZIMMERMAN Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns ALLISON COSBY, BRETT WILSON

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 40

44TH & BUTLER ST. i n revitalize revitalizedd Lawrenceville

WWW.ARSENALBOWL.COM

mind, heart and spirit couldn’t be 06 “My more ashamed right now.� — A post on Duquesne University’s Facebook page responding to the controversial death of adjunct instructor Mary Margaret Vojtko

[VIEWS] “It’s not that there are no Republicans with moderate politics. But voting for them doesn’t result in moderate policies.� — Chris Potter on the GOP’s systematic self-derangement

[TASTE]

factors may lie behind giving 20 “Various a chicken up: complaints from neighbors, zoning issues, financial hardship.� — Jessica Sarver on the increase of chickens at animal shelters

[MUSIC]

never seems to get tired. He keeps 22 “He putting out good material.� — Cellist

[SCREEN] what really sells the tale is the 37 “But stunning visuals. The entire film looks like

EVERY

DJ & KARAOKE

Friday

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS} Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Intern JODI SHERER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

W/DJ mockster

$ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L 10/3> '90 S NIGH T • 10/10> '80 S NIGH T

$9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL WI TH DJ & KARAOKE

EVERY SAT

Afternoon

SUPER SATURDAY

EVERY

TOP SHELF saturday night

Saturday

$ 9.95 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1 OFF ALL TOP SHELF DRINKS • BAND OR DJ

$7 ALL YOU CAN BOWL, 12-3PM

EVERY SUN 50¢ SUNDAZE 50¢ BOWLING, A SHOES, HOT DOGS AND SODAS • 1- 4PM

P TUDYs7I&Is(EL S TO S CE LA P T IE s1U ES "OOKSs-AGAZIN WITHRESEARCHs D HELPYOUUNWIN s&UNEVENTSTO

fternoon

EVERY

DJ NIGHT + PRIZES

Sunday

W/ THE MOCKS TER • $8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL

LABOR DAY SPECIAL

Monday

9PM-MIDNIGHT • $8 ALL YOU CAN BOWL • $1.00 DRAFTS

EVERY

COLLEGE NIGHT

Tuesday

50¢ BOWLING • 50¢ DRAF TS • BAND OR DJ

carnegielibrary.org

Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

it was shot in zero gravity.� — Al Hoff, reviewing Gravity

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS] you would have to travel to 39 “Otherwise three or four continents to see the same thing.� — Art dealer Sam Berkovitz on the value of the Carnegie International

[LAST PAGE] those top arms straight. Push out 63 “Get with your bottom arms. Let’s add a little bit of leg drive.� — Dragon boat coach Bob Dassel urging on his rowing team

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 56 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 +

'80S/'90S NIGHT

{ADMINISTRATION}

John Thorell, on collaborator Brandon Locher of The Meets

N E W S

ROCK AND BOWL $ 8 A L L YO U C A N B O W L 1 0/2 > ORA NG E I G UA NA S • 1 0/9 > C A L LO W

Thursday

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

EVERY

Wednesday EVERY

Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers SHEILA LETSON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

AL EN bowl.com ARS412-683-5992

FR EE WI -FI

{ART} ON THE COVER: Sarah Lucas’ NUDs (foreground)

12

BOOK YOUR S PARTIE NOW!

{EDITORIAL}

an Better th al your loc hop! Coffee S

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

2YHU:LQQHUV(YHU\6DWXUGD\ 1 Winner drives away in a

1HZ&DGLOODF65;RU&DVK on October 26 at 11PM

*$0%/,1*352%/(0"&$//   ‹&DQQHU\&DVLQR5HVRUWV//&0DQDJHPHQWUHVHUYHVDOOULJKWV$OO5LJKWV5HVHUYHG

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


“IT’S NOT LIKE A SALT MINE, BUT IT’S DEATH BY A THOUSAND CUTS.”

INCOMING For now, at least, Quiet Storm’s closing leaves local vegetarians feeling empty inside (Sept. 25) “Don’t forget the vegetarian restaurant: the Tin Front Cafe in Homestead! It deserves our support! Not to mention numerous ethnic restaurants where vegetarians and vegans have a number of choices.” — Web comment from “PghVeg” “Quiet Storm wasn’t all that great anyway. And they seemed like they were never open. This is an opportunity for someone to take that space (a great one) and make something better.” — Facebook comment from “Svenson Bill Van Buren” “Not a fan. Give me a steak any day.” — Facebook comment from “Debra Lynn”

Hometown Hero: For Neil Walker, Pirates success is extra special (Sept. 25) “Neil Walker is a real working-class, hometown hero for our time! Get ’em Bucs!!!” — Web comment from “BuctoberOrBust”

Writer Wrong? Does the Pirates’ current success mean that past criticisms were off the mark? (Sept. 25) “Just enjoy the Pirates being in the playoffs.” — Web comment from “Francis Bender” “[Pittsburgh Tribune Review sports columnist Dejan Kovacevic] is just giving himself a way out. Btw, I have NEVER said anything negative about DK. Just his writing and his execution OF that writing.” — Web comment from “leefoo”

A phrase I never thought I’d hear: “I hope there’s not duck traffic.” #quackpgh — Sept. 28 tweet from “Ashley Boynes-Shuck” (@BuellaMarie), on the second day of the giant rubber duck’s Pittsburgh occupation

6

COURSE CORRECTION An adjunct’s death raises questions on campuses all across the city

{STORY BY LAUREN DALEY, CHRIS POTTER AND ALEX ZIMMERMAN}

B

Y DANIEL KOVALIK’S account, even Adult Protective Services was surprised to learn that Mary Margaret Vojtko was a college professor. Professors are, after all, supposed to have lifetime tenure and academic freedom. But when Vojtko died at age 83, she’d been laid off from Duquesne University as a part-time French instructor after 25 years. And when she succumbed to cancer, she was “penniless and on the verge of being turned over to Orphan’s Court,” wrote Kovalik, an attorney for the United Steelworkers, in a Sept. 18 op-ed for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Kovalik’s piece touched off coverage from national media like NPR, and expressions of shock from faculty, students and alumni. (“My mind, heart and spirit couldn’t be more ashamed right now,” one student posted on Duquesne’s Facebook page.) But for Clint Benjamin, Vojtko’s story was depressingly familiar. “This wasn’t an isolated anomaly,” he says. “This is potentially my future.” And, he adds, the future of adjunct faculty across the country: parttime employees with few benefits, little compensation and zero job security. Benjamin, 36, teaches composition as an adjunct at Duquesne and the Community College of Allegheny County. Separated from his wife and trying to support a 3-year-old daughter, he’s teaching five courses a semester, a workload that amounts to 55 hours a week. Earning $2,250 per course at CCAC and $3,500 from Duquesne, he says, “My adjunct rule is: Teach as many classes as you can.” Still, he says he’s lucky if he can earn $30,000 a year. He’s uninsured, and says his course load at both schools has been reduced — in part to keep him below a

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Clint Benjamin outside the campus of Community College of Allegheny County, one of two schools where he works as an adjunct

30-hour-per-week threshold that, under the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act, would require the schools to offer him insurance. Benjamin pays about $130 a month for catastrophic health insurance in case “I get stabbed in the kidney.” “It’s not like a salt mine, but it’s death by a thousand cuts,” he says. “I wanted to get into academia, and this was the position that was really available.” In a city that prides itself on trading in steel mills for hospitals and colleges, Ben-

jamin is not alone. And despite the current furor, which partly stems from a bid by Kovalik and the Steelworkers to unionize Duquesne’s adjuncts, neither is Duquesne. In the wake of Vojtko’s death, City Paper spoke to adjuncts at several local schools, some of whom were afraid to be quoted by name, citing a lack of job security. They included: > Luke Niebler, who teaches four composition classes at CCAC and Point Park University — jobs that total 35 hours a


week, but offer no health insurance.”‘I’ve had to stop biking, because I’m afraid if I get in an accident, I’ll never be able to cover it,” Niebler says. > Josh Zelesnick, who has taught English composition and writing at Duquesne and Pitt, and is active in the Duquesne unionization drive. This year, he’s on a one-year contract as a “visiting lecturer” at Pitt — a full-time post he says is “rare.” But uncertainty is the rule, he says: In 2009, underenrollment slashed his teaching load from four courses to just one. “I scrambled to get a job,” he said, and found one … at Trader Joe’s. > One local teacher, who has adjuncted in the humanities for 20-plus years, teaches four classes and works two part-time jobs. “I have to,” she says. “When you have four kids and you’re paying four tuitions, it’s necessary.” Vojtko’s death is “a symbol of how extreme the situation has become for a lot of adjuncts,” says Mayra Besosa, who chairs an American Association of University Professors’ committee dedicated to adjuncts and other part-time faculty. “I think it’s a warning that if the working conditions don’t improve, more people are going to be Margaret.”

nical fields. Nearly one-third of instructors at Pitt’s Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences were part-time; only one-tenth of the faculty at its engineering school were. Compensation ranges widely as well. At Duquesne, for example, minimum pay for adjuncts starts at $3,500 per three-credit course, though spokesperson Bridget Fare says instructors in some departments — like law, business or pharmacy — can earn more. At Robert Morris University, part-time faculty earn between $1,950 and $2,550 for most courses; as at Duquesne, they aren’t eligible for other employee benefits. Pitt adjuncts are eligible for health benefits, though in departments like English, starting salaries can actually be lower than at Duquesne, say sources. Pitt, Chatham, CMU and several other schools did not respond to requests for comment on their use of adjuncts. But schools that did respond say adjuncts offer flexibility, and can provide real-world experience to students. Hiring temporary faculty “allows us to be agile in our personnel decisions and in getting qualified faculty who offer special expertise and skills to meet the needs of our students,” says Indiana University of Pennsylvania spokesperson Michelle Fryling. And as faculty vacancies occur, “It allows the departments to really assess their faculty needs and to do a thorough and thoughtful search for the right faculty with the right teaching skill set and experiences.” “Many part-time faculty members are employed in fields in which we offer degrees, so the students get the benefit of current real-world, practical experience,” says Jonathan Potts, senior director of public relations at Robert Morris University. But across academia, that sort of parttimer is the exception rather than the rule. Since the late 1960s, the ratio of temporary to full-time faculty has increased to the point where temporary faculty account for almost three-quarters of the teaching workforce. According to a survey by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, as of 2009, 75 percent of instructional staff members held contingent positions — such as adjunct, full-time non-tenure-track or graduate student teaching-assistant jobs. CMU adjunct Heather Steffen, whose own scholarship has concerned the history of academic labor, says that Reagan-era cuts in education funding constrained budgets, while legislation like 1980’s Bayh-Dole Act allowed universities to profit from discoveries patented on their campus. The effect was “to pull back funding for universities,

MARY MARGARET VOJTKO’S DEATH IS “A SYMBOL OF HOW EXTREME THE SITUATION HAS BECOME FOR A LOT OF ADJUNCTS.”

THE USE OF adjuncts across Western Pennsyl-

vania schools varies. At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, temporary faculty teach less than one-fifth of classes. Closer to Pittsburgh, at Robert Morris University, Carlow University and Duquesne, temporary faculty teach around 40 percent of the classes, according to statistics from each school. Treatment also varies from school to school — and even from department to department. For example, sources say Carnegie Mellon University seems to make little use of adjuncts, while Community College of Allegheny County relies on them heavily. American Federation of Teachers Local 2067 President John Dziak, who represents full-time instructors and other CCAC employees, says roughly 2,000 adjuncts teach at CCAC each semester. Only about half of those teach for-credit courses (as opposed to classes like cooking), but even so, they dwarf Dziak’s membership by nearly 3-to-1. At the University of Pittsburgh’s Oakland campus, meanwhile, part-time instructors make up 818 of nearly 5,000 faculty teaching in the fall 2012 semester, according to the school’s 2013 Fact Book. But at Pitt as elsewhere, adjuncts tend to be concentrated in the humanities, rather than in engineering, medicine or other more tech-

Everyone is a Winner! OCTOBER - DECEMBER

Welcome NEW Rush Rewards Players Club Members! Play our Cash Bash Kiosk Slot Game for FREE and a chance to win $10,000 CASH!

Don’t miss out! Sign up today! Visit Rush Rewards Players Club or RIVERSCASINO.COM for complete details.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

CONTINUES ON PG. 08

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


COURSE CORRECTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

BEER DIST. INC.

SEMPLE STREET OAKLAND 406 SEMP 402-406 402

ock it, If we don’t stfo r you! it r we’ll orde

PofE T the WEEK

h’s 1st IMPORT urggh’s sbur ttsb PiPitt and craft Beer Distributor and still the best! With over 550 Beers in stock, how could you go wrong? ALUMINUM BOTTLES

$

20.70

+TAX

www.MELLINGERSBEER www. MELLINGERSBEER.com .com

412.682.4396

like us on Facebook!

@MellingerBeer

HAUNTING

The

Gooseberry

October 5: GAETANO’S October 16: THE GATEWAY CLIPPER For tickets and info www.eatdrinkmurder.org NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES

Was rescued from a life in a tiny crate. When she arrived at Animal Friends she was sick and had burns on her paws. She deserves a new home and a second chance!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

by saying they could create their own revenues by producing research,” Steffen says. Those changes compelled universities to become more entrepreneurial, more corporate. And too often, Steffen says, administrators made things worse. “University budgets are strapped, but they have been ever since Harvard opened,” she says. And when administrators ask questions like “Are we going to invest in a new athletic facility, or in recognizing an adjuncts’ union?” — it’s often the adjuncts that lose. “The use of adjuncts has been justified for economic reasons because there’s an enormous cost savings,” says Maria Maisto, president of the New Faculty Majority, a national nonprofit group that advocates for contingent faculty rights. “Once people experience that cost savings, it’s like a drug they become addicted to, regardless [of] whether it’s good for students or education.” AND AS COMMON as adjuncts have become, they’ve found little strength in numbers. For one thing, a lack of information makes it hard for adjuncts to negotiate on their own behalf. Maisto says that her organization estimates that 22 percent of adjuncts are unionized nationwide, though institutions aren’t required to keep this information in a uniform way. And knowing how many temporary faculty are employed is even more difficult: The federal government doesn’t keep track of adjunct employment, and many universities aren’t eager to publicize information about adjunct employment. In response, Josh Boldt, now an adjunct at the University of Georgia, launched an online effort last year to crowdsource compensation data, so adjuncts could figure out which universities paid what. Today, the Chronicle of Higher Education hosts Boldt’s “The Adjunct Project” on its website (http:// adjunct.chronicle.com) and helps Boldt staff the effort. The site allows users to see what adjuncts are being paid at universities across the country. The database includes reported compensation at nine Pittsburgh-area schools, where pay reported ranges from $1,600 at the Art Institute to $5,250 at CMU, per course. Most numbers reported to the site locally hover around $2,000, with Pitt ($3,200) and Duquesne ($3,000) above average. While these numbers are mostly submitted by faculty, Boldt notes “universities and administrators are allowed to add their own information. The fact that not many have done that suggests [the data are] fairly accurate.” Before the project got underway, “We were just so powerless,” Boldt says. “If a school said, ‘This is what we pay,’ that’s what you take. We had no way to compare.”

Boldt says adjuncts are often devoted, quality teachers, but are often hampered by circumstances. “If a student can’t meet with a professor in an office, that’s a problem,” Boldt says. Adjuncting can be “an isolating type of work,” adds Steffen. “People don’t know anybody. You often don’t have an office: There’s literally no place where adjuncts exist.” And while Steffen speaks warmly of her own CMU colleagues, “Academia is a dogeat-dog world in a lot of ways. The ideology of meritocracy is everywhere: There’s an argument that you should be able to ‘publish your way out of anything’ — even if you’re a single mom trying to raise children while holding down classes.” What’s more, adjuncts face more competition with every graduation ceremony. According to the Modern Language Association, the major professional group for English and other language departments, only one-third of recent English Ph.D.s will find tenure-track jobs. That leaves the majority at risk for an existence as precarious as Margaret Vojtko’s, says Kellie Robertson, a former Pitt English professor who now directs job-placement efforts for English grad students at the University of Maryland. With the rise of online classes and other changes, Robertson worries, “Labor conditions for both tenure track, tenured and adjunct employees will deteriorate. In the future, we may all be adjuncts.” Which raises some obvious questions: Why teach at all? Are adjuncts paying the price for ignoring economic realities? “There’s a misconception that we’re unemployable,” counters Luke Niebler, the adjunct who abandoned bike-riding for lack of insurance. But “[t]here’s an increase in people going to college, and in the need for teachers. It’s just that departments are choosing not to hire full-timers.” Indeed, the National Center for Education Statistics shows that between 1970 and 2010 — the same period that has witnessed an explosion of adjuncting — college enrollment has increased from 8.5 million to more than 21 million. And for a composition instructor like Niebler, writing “is one of the most valuable things students can learn.” “You’re given a gift,” adds one local instructor with decades of experience adjuncting. “What good is a gift if you don’t share it?” WILL VOJTKO’S death, which has brought

so much attention to the plight of adjuncts, change their fate? Weeks after Kovalik’s piece in the PostGazette, details about Vojtko’s life remain murky. Duquesne itself has largely confined CONTINUES ON PG. 10

8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


2013

2014

CHEVROLET SONIC LT

CHEVROLET CRUZE LS

CREDIT PROBLEMS?

35

MPG

STK. #S13473

WE CAN HELP!

STK. #B14070

YOUR $ PRICE

DRIVE $ FOR

15,849

159/MONTH

OTHERS AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR DISCOUNTS Others available at similar savings. Expires 9/30/13.

2013

2013

CHEVROLET MALIBU LS

CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS

724-438-2577

GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL!

STK #EQ13616

34

STK #W13581

Call Greg for Details

Requires $2490 cash down or trade equity. Tax and license additional. Payment based on 39 month 39,000 mile Smart Lease. With approved credit though Ally Financial. See dealer for details. Expires 9/30/13.

MPG

DRIVE $ FOR $0 FIRST PAYMENT

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Student Loans.

199 /MONTH 0

DRIVE $ FOR

179/MONTH

Requires $2490 cash down or trade equity. Tax and license additional. Payment based on 39 month 39,000 mile Smart Lease. With approved credit though Ally Financial. See dealer for details. Expires 9/30/13.

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

Requires $2490 cash down or trade equity. Tax and license additional. Payment based on 39 month 39,000 mile Smart Lease. With approved credit though Ally Financial. See dealer for details. Expires 9/30/13.

Route 51 North, UNIONTOWN PA

HOURS SALES: MON-THURS 9-9 FRIDAY 9-6 SAT 9-5 SERVICE MON-FRI 8-5 SAT 8-12

www.CentennialChevrolet.net

Scan for a Special Video from Debbie Flaherty

Automotive Group

— WE SERVICE ALL BRANDS —

1-800-767-8611 Proud supporter of Animal Friends

DayAuto.com N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


Dayton Enciso, pc Darcy Monteverde Dayton, Jennifer L. Enciso and Amy E. Peckk

Estate Planning:

Act today to secure your

family’s tomorrow.

Real Estate: Select an attorney to conduct your closing at no extra expense.

Business Services: Proper planning can help you implement strategies for success. Call today to schedule. Evening appointments available.

4517 LIBERTY AVENUE

412-918-1845

DEKLEGAL.COM

PRESENTS:

COURSE CORRECTION, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

itself to a Sept. 19 statement by administrator John Plante, which asserted that “individuals across the University community attempted to help Margaret Mary through her last trying days” — including by providing her temporary housing. Surviving relatives, meanwhile, describe her as private, and fiercely independent. “She liked and wanted to do things on her own,” says nephew John Vojtko, who lives in Munhall, not far from her Homestead home. “She would accept help, but only on her terms.” Vojtko isn’t even sure his aunt would have welcomed the notoriety she has found. “I don’t think she’d like it, to be honest.” Colleagues say, however, that she backed the unionization drive at Duquesne; some recall meeting her at labor events. But the lasting impact of Kovalik’s portrayal of her in the Post-Gazette remains unclear. “In the past, [Duquesne] just refused to communicate with us in any form,” says adjunct Robin Sowards, who has been active in the union bid. While the university was originally willing to meet with organizers last year, it later argued that its Catholic affiliation should exempt it from the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Board. That dispute is ongoing, but Sowards says that at a Sept. 25 meeting, Provost Timothy Austin acknowledged that the adjuncts are raising legitimate issues. Adjuncts at CCAC, meanwhile, have discussed their own unionization drive,

though union head John Dziak says Vojtko’s death will “probably not” change the dynamic there. The school announced in 2012 that it was curtailing hours for some 200 adjuncts to below 30 hours a week in a bid to avoid health-coverage requirements under “Obamacare.” But unionizing will require clearing “a number of hurdles,” Dziak says, including the fact that adjuncts are scattered across four different campuses, and don’t all share the same priorities. Even union faculty is feeling the pinch, Dziak adds. “When the economy gets better, enrollment starts going down,” he says. “We’re very close to activating the displacement article in our contract” — laying off staff that do have union cards. Similar steps appear to be in the offing at some state-funded universities like Clarion, where enrollment and financial support from the state are tapering. Vojtko’s death may be felt more acutely during Campus Equity Week, a nationwide campaign to improve working conditions on campus. Held between Oct. 27 and Nov. 2, events locally will likely include a concert by musicians who work as adjuncts, and street-theater events intended to raise awareness of the plight of adjuncts, grad students and others. “I haven’t seen a lot of efforts to connect until Duquesne [adjuncts] started organizing,” Steffen says. “There’s a sense now of this starting to be a community.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

{BY MATT BORS}

AN EPIC ONE-DAY PERFORMANCE EVENT AT THE CARRIE BLAST FURNACE SITE OCTOBER 12, 2013 SITE TOURS WITH INSTALLATIONS: NOON – 5PM PERFORMANCES & LIVE MUSIC: 7PM – MIDNIGHT TICKETS: $15 STUDENTS: $10 FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT:

THEJAZZFURNACE.COM

©2013 THE PILLOW PROJECT

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

IDIOTBOX


CARMAA presents

Sunday, October 27

VICTORIA STILWELL and THE POWER OF POSITIVE TRAINING

Duquesne University Union Ballroom

LECTURE 1 to 3 pm — $40

600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (parking available in Duquesne’s Forbes Avenue garage)

The Power of Positive Training

Register today at: VIP LUNCH 11 to 1 pm — $125 “Meet and Mingle with Victoria”

carmaa-petadoption.com or call

412-780-4983

Sponsored by

Duquesne University Animal Law Society

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


[POTTER’S FIELD]

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink & drive.

WANDERING OFF Why can’t more Republicans move overseas? {BY CHRIS POTTER} LAST WEEK, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

reported that Josh Wander, the Republican running for mayor of Pittsburgh, had sold his home and was living in Israel, working as a security consultant. Wander, who says he’s renting a Pittsburgh residence and is still in the race, responded to the story with a bunch of Republican-type statements about not being a career politician. Lots of people made fun of him, me included. But now I’m wishing more Republicans followed his example. Because when the voters probably aren’t on your side, backing away can be the better part of valor. As I write this on Monday afternoon, it’s not clear whether Republicans intend to let us have a functioning federal government. They have instead refused to pass a budget unless Democrats agree to delay President Obama’s healthcare reforms, which Republicans hate. If no budget is passed, countless government services will be shut down immediately, ranging from the closure of national parks and regulatory agencies to the halting of passport applications. (Imagine Josh Wander still residing in Pittsburgh because of passport headaches, and you start to see how much suffering even small disruptions can inict on the public.) Even if a budget does get passed, there’ll likely be another crisis soon, when Republicans may try to thwart an increase in the federal debt limit. Having failed to win the game the old-fashioned way — by getting more votes than the other party — the GOP is now threatening to pick up its ball and go home. It would be one thing if Western Pennsylvania’s three Republican Congressman followed Wander’s example by slinking away quietly. But even as they vote for a shutdown, they insist they’re trying to avoid it. The Republican legislation, House Joint Resolution 59, funds government only if Democrats agree to delay the health-care reforms for a year. The GOP also offered a provision ensuring that military personnel will continue to receive paychecks even if Democrats refuse to give in to the GOP’s legislative extortion. Congressman Keith Rothfus announced his vote with a press release whose headline asserted “Rothfus Votes to Prevent Shutdown [and] Protect Servicemember Pay.â€? Fellow Tea Party fave Mike Kelly issued

a release characterizing his vote as an effort to “Fund Government, Support Troops, & Protect Americans from Obamacare.â€? “Support for our troops should never be a casualty of this president’s stubbornness,â€? Kelly’s statement contended. So there you have it. Rothfus and Co. portray themselves as “protectingâ€? the troops without mentioning that their tactics are what threatened their pay to begin with. And while holding government hostage after their other efforts to thwart Obamacare failed, Republicans accuse Obama of being stubborn. (Suburban Republican Tim Murphy also voted for the bill, though his release was merely headlined “Murphy votes YES on H.J. Res 59â€? — showing the charisma that has been the hallmark of his career.) Ordinarily, this would be the part of the column where we concede that not all Republicans are mouthbreathers. Over in eastern Pennsylvania, for example, Rep. Charlie Dent is garnering national coverage for suggesting that “It’s time to govern.â€? Sometimes Murphy himself votes for things like funding health insurance for low-income children. But who cares? Practically speaking, there’s no such thing as voting for a moderate Republican. It’s not that there are no Republicans with moderate politics. But voting for them merely enables John Boehner, Eric Cantor and their legion of winged monkeys. Even if “moderatesâ€? stop this crisis, history suggests the GOP will just engineer another. That all seems obvious, but it’s a hard lesson for some. Take the Pittsburgh PostGazette’s Sept. 24 editorial about Republican intransigence, which lamented, “So far, there has been no retribution from voters.â€? Funnily enough, though, the editorial didn’t mention the way it has helped shield Republicans from voters’ wrath ‌ by doing things like endorsing Murphy in 2012. When it comes to politics in our own backyard, we’d all like to be above mere partisanship. Anyway, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl has proven you can govern Pittsburgh in absentia; why can’t Josh Wander campaign the same way? Why can’t we look past party labels? Because we can no longer afford to let Republicans anywhere near the levers of power. After all, not all of us can relocate overseas.

PRACTICALLY SPEAKING, THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS VOTING FOR A MODERATE REPUBLICAN.

Contact our Patient Health Care Coordinator today! healthcareinfo@ppwp.org or 412.258.9539 www.PlannedParenthoodHealthInsuranceFacts.org

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

IBS with Diarrhea Endometriosis Constipation Diabetes Gout Osteoporosis

Chronic Diarrhea High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Vaginal Dryness/Hot Flashes Birth Control/Oral Contraception

Principal Investigators – Dr. S. Berg, Dr. G. Rosenberg, Dr. L. Dobkin Do you have a medical condition that is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information. 12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

C P OT T E R@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


FLEXIBLE for when you need it.

Stored Cash Value doesn’t expire like an annual, monthly or weekly pass. Get a ConnectCard at most Giant Eagle locations.

ConnectCard.org N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

PortAuthority.org +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

+

“With its neatly cut lawns and luscious tropical vegetation,” wrote a BBC News reporter in July, Miracle Village, Fla., is an “idyllic rural community” of 200 residents — about half of whom are registered sex offenders, attracted to the settlement near Lake Okeechobee because laws and ordinances elsewhere in Florida harshly restrict where they can live (e.g., not within a half-mile of a school or park). Incumbent residents might have been apprehensive in 2009 when a pastor started the local rehabilitation ministry (one even called it a “nightmare on Elm Street”), but since then, no one could recall a single impropriety involving an offender, and lately, 10 to 20 more applications arrive each week (screened to keep out diagnosed pedophiles and those with a history of drugs or violence).

+

Dana Carter’s debut as principal of Calimesa Elementary School in California’s San Bernardino County was quite inauspicious, as parents quickly objected to his policy of requiring kids to drop to one knee when addressing him. One parent said her daughter was forced to kneel while awaiting his attention and then to rise only when he lifted his arms. Carter said he would discontinue the policy and insisted he had instituted it for “safety” and not because he imagined himself as royalty.

+

Many consumers already distrust food imports from China, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture nonetheless announced recently (and “quietly,” according to NPR) that it would exempt four Chinese companies altogether from USDA inspections of their pro-

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

cessed chicken exports. The changes are part of the department’s money-saving streamlining that also cuts back domestic regulation — proposals that have already drawn criticism from the Government Accountability Office because they would replace many on-site USDA inspectors with employees of the foodprocessing plants themselves.

+

A July direct-mail campaign by Canada’s Conservative Party, intended to show concern for the disabled population, might have fallen short, according to a Toronto Star report. The first wave of brochures, “Supporting Jobs for All Canadians” (meaning the disabled as well), featured the well-known wheelchair symbol and a message in a series of Braille dots. However, the brochure was useless to blind recipients, who could neither see the dots nor read them, as the dots were printed on a flat surface.

+

By her own admission, Joan Hoyt, 61, of St. Louis, has difficulty writing, is easily distracted, needs frequent breaks and “reads about 2½ times slower than her peers” — yet wants to be a lawyer. She filed a lawsuit recently against the Law School Admission Council for special accommodations to take the standardized admissions test after the council offered to grant her “only” 156 extra minutes for the exam. She also demanded a room by herself with a “white noise” machine and the ability to bring a computer and food and drinks to the exam. (States have made similar accommodations for bar exams — but those applicants have

already successfully endured the intellectual rigors of law school.)

+

Is oral sex permitted in Orthodox Judaism? If so, must any lubricant used be kosher (or is kosher required only for substances ingested into the body)? These questions were not answered by California’s Trigg Laboratories, which decided recently to vie for a kosher label for eight lines of Ecstasy lubricant under its Wet label — and, following an inspection by the Rabbinical Council of California, was granted it. Many authorities believe that nonkosher products can be used if, like lipstick, they are “applied” but not ingested.

+

Two onetime roommates at the University of Michigan announced in August that they have developed a smartphone app to accommodate people who seek an easy way to share leftover food on restaurant plates (to save it from wasteful discarding). Using smartphones’ location service, one diner could offer to clean another’s plate or have a stranger rush to his own table for scraps. “We’re not gonna make millions,” one of the developers told NPR in July.

+

Jian Yang, 33, a media executive in Singapore, told Reuters in September that he was concerned about the diminishing respect the Mattel Corp. is giving Barbie, reducing production in favor of trendier dolls like those modeled after the Twilight characters. Yang is apparently protective of his collection of more than 6,000 Barbies that dominate his row house — which he estimates has cost him the equivalent of nearly $400,000 since he took up the obsession at age 13. He said his parents have

come to accept his passion, but acknowledged that he had a few “ex-girlfriends” who felt “insecure” around his supermodels. Yang also owns about 3,000 non-Barbies, and on his last trip to New York bought 65 more.

+

It is now well known how America’s wounded warriors are victimized by the huge backlog of unaddressed Department of Veterans Affairs disability claims, with waits of many months or years. Nonetheless, the department is so proud of shrinking the backlog that it has begun to issue bonus checks to bureaucrats who meet the department’s numerical goals in case-reduction (according to data from the Office of Personnel Management reported in the Washington Post in August). However, another Washington Post story, in September, reported that backlog reduction likely resulted merely from quickly approving the easier cases — while the roster of serious or complicated cases continued to grow, along with appeals of decisions toohastily made by the bonus-clutching department employees.

+

Undignified Deaths: (1) A 40-year-old woman was killed in a near-head-on collision in August in Spring Lake, Fla., while joyriding on a back road at night on her dirt bike. She was accidentally hit by her husband, who was also joy-riding, in his all-terrain vehicle, and who also died. (2) A 50-year-old man in Berne, N.Y., was killed in August when, driving an allterrain vehicle, he virtually decapitated himself on nearly invisible wire strung across a road as one of a series of booby traps he had installed to protect his marijuana plants.

Enjoy and enjoy again AT THESE FINE LO CATIONS AZUL BAR Y CANTINA - LEETSDALE BREW’S BROTHERS SIX PACK EMPORIUM MT. LEBANON THE FRANKLIN INN - FRANKLIN PARK SMOKIN JOES’S SALOON - SOUTH SIDE BURGH’S PIZZA & WINGS - BRIDGEVILLE

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


Tan Smart…Live Well! Tanman Says… Learn how important Vitamin-D is!

$

Mention code word ‘TANMAN’ 10/31/13 at any 10 10/ 10/3 y ATTC C Loc Location to Rec Receive: Receive

9

or

$

ONE MONTH O OF TANNING O T

*New New Customers Cus Cu C ustomers usto ustome to ome o mers rs Only, O Only nly, y, Lev Le Le Level evel vel el 2 Equ Eq Equipment q ipment qu quipm quipme ipme entt

www.anytimetantanningclub.com

Carpet Cleaning Service Residential & Commercial At Rug Lab, we incorporate an extractor that adds an oxygenated chemical that gets rid of Hours 7am-7pm (Commercial cleaning by appt) pt) up to 90% pollutants. *Residential Special: 5 rooms for $100 includes 1 flight of stairs • Cash Only (expires 12-1-2013) (Mention you saw ad in City Paper for a FREE hallway cleaning) For more information or to schedule an appointment call 412-242-RUGS or visit us at www.ruglabcarpet.com

Celebrating 15 years in Pittsburgh! Check online for a full listing of Anniversary Events during the month of October. Chili Pot 6" $20, 9" $49 HANDCRAFTED IN INDONESIA

5824 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA Mon 10–6, Tue 10–8 Wed 10–6, Thu 10–8, Fri–Sat 10–6 412-421-2160 pittsburgh.tenthousandvillages.com

Bring in this ad to receive 25% OFF one item. Offer valid at participating stores until 10/26/13. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs or Traveler’s Finds. One coupon per customer per day. 1000873

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


DE

SI

the

ON

THE BLACK FRIDAY SANDWICH WAS COMPRISED OF TYPICAL THANKSGIVING INGREDIENTS

CITY PLANTS

ROADSIDE

{BY CHRIS POTTER} When the Penn State Master Gardeners celebrated the first growing season of their “urban edible garden classroom” on Sept. 28, they didn’t just talk about raising crops. They also boasted of raising questions. The yard-sized plot, located in North Point Breeze at the corner of Thomas Boulevard and North Lexington Avenue, is the gardeners’ first in the city. (The master-gardener program already has demonstration gardens in the North and South Hills.) When work began this April, it was just a well-mowed expanse of grass. But with money from the Sprout Fund, help from volunteers and a near-total absence of shade, a dozen gardeners turned it into a living laboratory, one focused almost exclusively on edible plants. “It’s a smallish example to show people what can be done,” says Pat Morgan, who co-chaired the effort along with Barb Klein. The garden featured more than 20 types of lettuce alone. (The best performer? Green deer tongue. “I would totally recommend that to urban gardeners,” Kline says.) Gardeners tried their hands at various techniques — like creating raised garden beds out of straw bales — and plants like amaranth, a “pseudo-grain” like quinoa. They also tested numerous tomato varieties for disease resistance, and found, perhaps surprisingly, that heirloom tomatoes withstood blight better than hybrids. Next year, gardeners hope to plant blueberry bushes and espaliered fruit trees — and to continue experimenting. As Kline puts it, “I never come to conclusions after just one season.” CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

the

FEED

The heady days ays of pumpkinnflavored everything g are upon us.. Eschew the e orange dyes and the “pumpkin-pie” pkin-pie” flavorings, s and d vow this year to simply enjoy a genuine pumpkin. Cook for soups and stews; roast as a side dish; incorporate into breads and muffins; and yes, use one to make actual pumpkin pie.

16

FARE

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

S

O JASON recently had a minor bike accident, which, interestingly, has prompted neighbors to ask: “Motorcycle or a bicycle?” (It was the latter). Yet when he went into the countryside for some work meetings, the question wasn’t even posed; people simply started sharing their Harley stories. Which made it an appropriate week to visit Handle Bar & Grille, a biker bar of the motor variety in Canonsburg. Its menu promising from-scratch cooking was intriguing enough to lure us outside of our usual orbit. To partake of it, however, we first had to break one of our fundamental rules while eating and drinking out: to eschew establishments without windows. Handle Bar’s dining room doesn’t have windows, either, but at least its entrance, off the rear parking lot, issued a welcome via a sandwich board displaying daily specials. Inside, it was bright and cheerfully decorated with a Route 66 theme. Gas-pump nozzles served cleverly as restroom door handles, and a ride-on motorcycle video

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Turkey sandwich

game drew our kids like the proverbial moths to a flame. While the menu was mostly typical bar-restaurant fare — burgers, sandwiches, wings — the kitchen’s creativity showed in a few unusual, if not unique, items, like chorizo-filled wontons and the Black Friday,

HANDLE BAR AND GRILLE 342 W. Pike St., Canonsburg. 724-746-4227 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches $5-10; entrees $9-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED a sandwich comprised of typical Thanksgiving ingredients. There were entrees as well, mostly Italian-American standards like fettucine Alfredo, spaghetti marinara and chicken piccatta. A few items, though still listed on the menu, have been pared off; we were a bit surprised to see meatloaf go, as it seemed like a reliable staple, not to mention

squarely in the historic Route 66 diet plan. Our first taste of the kitchen’s handiwork was the aforementioned wontons, crisp little umami bombs of spicy chorizo sausage mixed with sweet roasted red pepper and rich, subtly tangy cream cheese. They were served with a spicy ranch dipping sauce, and would be superior replacements for the jalapeño poppers more often found at taverns. The menu also included a modest South of the Border section, from which we ordered the chicken quesadilla. The tortilla was stuffed thick with shredded chicken, as well as pepper rings and diced tomato, into whose crevices the cheese melted nicely. The quesadilla was supplemented by an adequate pico de gallo and sour cream. Best of all, the tortilla was crisp, not brittle, from frying — a refinement of technique too often overlooked. Handle Bar deep-fried its stuffed banana peppers, and it wasn’t a bad idea. The coating added a welcome, crunchy layer to the spicy sausage and gooey cheese within. But between this crust and the pepper there appeared to be another, doughy layer, presumably to hold the whole thing together


during frying. Its thick but flavorless chewiness diluted the stuffed pepper’s other, more savory tastes and textures. Garlic-parmesan wings were suitably coated in lots of chopped garlic and finely shredded cheese, and the skin was crisp beneath. But the meat itself was surprisingly under-seasoned, a flaw it’s not really possible to correct at the table. H-Bar pasta, with grilled chicken and portobello mushrooms in a red pepper-cream sauce, also failed to realize its full seasoning potential. A sprinkling from the salt and pepper shakers improved matters some, but would have been better cooked into the sauce. The Dyna Burger was a five-ounce patty of Angus beef which, though it met our expectations of a bar burger, distinguished itself mostly by its pretzel bun and accompanying “springer” fries. These were excellent house-cut curly fries which were lightly sprinkled with seasoned salt and had a good crisp-to-fluff ratio.

Kitchen staff Chris Loos and April Gura

Catfish sliders were served in basic American sandwich buns, a choice which suited them. The catfish pieces, though a bit skimpy, were scarlet and black from Cajun seasoning, but their pleasantly muddy flavor came through, and the lightly creamy coleslaw provided crunch and cool counterpoint to the spiced fish. The Black Friday impressed us by being made with real, carved turkey, but otherwise could have used more of the cranberry sauce to enliven the combo of bread stuffing and, well, bread. The side dish of mashed potatoes was served with a wellprepared Thanksgiving-dinner grade gravy. After all, bikers appreciate good food, too. They might even appreciate a little more seasoning here and there. For our part, we appreciated Handle Bar’s solid effort to prepare pub grub with creativity and care in Canonsburg. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SHAKING UP THE BAR SCENE Local bartenders-for-hire possess a certain flair When most of us think about “flair” bartending, one image comes to mind: Tom Cruise in the movie Cocktail, flipping bottles of booze to the sounds of the Beach Boys’ “Kokomo.” Stephen Pacacha says it’s time to erase that image from our memories. “They really don’t do much flair in that movie, just a couple of moves,” he says. “A lot of people still don’t know what flair [really] is.” Pacacha is an exception. He started bartending more than 13 years ago, and began participating in flair competitions in 2008. That’s also when he founded Liquid Flair Entertainment with Mike Mills (who bartends at Meat & Potatoes as well as Butcher and the Rye). It’s a full-service drinks operation designed to entertain wedding guests, corporate clients and private partygoers. “We’re a one-stop shop,” says Pacacha, meaning that Liquid Flair supplies its clients the booze, the bar equipment and the clean-up. More importantly, he says, “We try to tailor our cocktails to whatever the scene may be.” For example, at a recent wedding with a “whimsical” theme, the colors of the cocktails were designed to match the wedding’s color scheme. Liquid Flair’s cocktail list included a lilac Aviation variation (gin, lemon, simple syrup, crème de violet) and a burgundy-toned play on the Sazerac called “Forbidden Smoke” (bourbon, chamomile-honey simple syrup, bitters, Scotch mist). But the real draw is the show. Pacacha says that clients will see two types of flair bartending. “Working” flair is just like it sounds: a couple of smooth moves, a bit of attitude with the shake, but no Cruiseian bottle flips. “Exhibition” flair is far more elaborate. One of Pacacha and Mill’s current numbers, for instance, is a Three Stooges-inspired routine, set to the electroswing sounds of Yolanda Be Cool’s “We Speak No Americano.” And the chance to see two bartenders in action, Pacacha adds, also sets Liquid Fair apart: “Nobody really gets to see tandem flair, unless you’re in Las Vegas or at a bartending competition.”

“A LOT OF PEOPLE STILL DON’T KNOW WHAT FLAIR [REALLY] IS.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.liquidflair.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

EVERY WEDNESDAY IN SEPTEMBER

Yes...That Bob’s Sub! D COME EAT A LEGEN AT ONE OF OUR 3 NEW LOCATIONS! PITTSBURGH

INDIANA

NEW KENSINGTON

215 SMITHFIELD ST. (412) 594-3686

550 PHILADELPHIA ST. (724) 471-2127

87 TARENTUM BRIDGE RD. (724) 335-0900

WWW.BOBSSUB.COM

1/2 OFF Bottles of Wine

HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM 5-7

$

5

M Mixed Drinks, Wines and W Appetizers A

526 NORTHPOINTE CIRCLE CRANBERRY/SEVEN FIELDS 724-741-6015 WWW. BOHEMBISTRO .COM

2008 Readers -2012 ’ Choice

Best Mex Restauraican nt Gift s Certificate Available!

Family Owned and Serving Pittsburgh for 15 Years!

1/2 off

appetizers and drinks during any home games

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 5-7pm

Full Service Bar • Over 50 Types of Tequila! Best Homemade Margaritas in The Burgh! Northview Plaza • North Hills • 412-366-8730

www.elcampesinospgh.com MON-THURS 11AM-10PM • FRI-SAT 11AM -10:30PM • SUN NOON-9PM

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

LIVE JAZZ & BLUES MUSIC EVERY WEEKEND

JJazz azz JJam am EEvery very TTuesday uesdday Swing Dance Every Friday 8pm-12am 150+ Craft Beers “Jazzed” Up Comfort Food Open Daily at 11am Happy Hour 5-7pm Private Space Available For Your Next Event www.jamesstreetgastropub.com FOLLOW US ON

LIKE US ON

422 FORELAND STREET, NORTH SIDE 412-904-3335

AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE BURGATORY. 932 Freeport Road, The Waterworks, Aspinwall. 412781-1456. Nestled in an off-thepath corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE

E2 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} E2. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200. The popular, cozy brunch spot has expanded, adding a dinner menu that refracts traditional, Old World recipes through the prism of the contemporary American kitchen (fresh, local, seasonal). It’s as elemental as cannellini beans with red-pepper flakes, or as elaborate as seared scallops with butternut-squash mash, fried leeks and Portobello, and truffled pumpkin seeds. KF

Yama {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} ELEVEN. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656. This multi-leveled venue (with balcony) perched on the edge of The Strip is noted for its innovative, contemporary American cuisine. Dishes are prepared with fresh, local ingredients and served in a classy modern space, to be complemented with an amazing wine selection. LE

occasions, out-of-towners and anyone who loves fish. KE PASTITSIO. 3716 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-586-7656. This tiny storefront café boasts a Greek deli, complete with a steam table and a display cooler with salads. Its namesake bakednoodle casserole is a winner, but much of the menu changes daily according to what’s fresh. J

FRANKTUARY. 3810 Butler POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 St., Lawrenceville. 412-586Hastings St., Point Breeze. 7224. The longtime 412-441-3334. This cozy Downtown hot-doggery neighborhood bistro expands its menu reflects a concerted here in an attractive effort to translate sit-down space, with the European creatively dressed neighborhood café ww. r w hot dogs, a variety — warm, welcoming, pe ghcitypa p of poutines (loaded unpretentious .com French fries) and handyet delicious — to crafted cocktails. The focus Pittsburgh. Despite bits of is on local and sustainable, Asian fusion, the selections are with meats, veg and grains classic Low Country fare such as from nearby sources. JE Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, KELLY’S BAR & LOUNGE. sausage and polenta. KE 6012 Penn Circle South, East Liberty. 412-363-6012. The THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes vintage aesthetic isn’t retro at Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. this longtime neighborhood This Duquesne University hangout; it’s the real thing. venue is a decided cut above And the original 1940s fare student dining. The dining room has been updated with taste is spacious, with a handsome and style: Burgers and fries fieldstone bar. The fare is share space with Asian contemporary American cuisine, potstickers and satay. The mini with a thoughtful selection mac-and-cheese is a classic. JE of internationally inflected classics like chipotle barbecue MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO. pork tenderloin and blackened 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches Washington (412-481-4414) like a side dish of “chef’s grains” and 146 Mall Circle Drive, complete the picture. KE Monroeville (412-374-8530). Because fish lends itself to ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPERendless preparations and LICIOUS BBQ. 1000 Ardmore dressings, the menu here is Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003. copious (and that’s not including This Forest Hills venue offers the daily specials). The Mount straight-up Southern barbecue Washington location, with its of chicken, beef and pork, with spectacular view of the city, all the sides you’d expect, such as is a popular venue for special greens (cooked in pork broth),

FULL LIST ONLINE

CONTINUES ON PG. 20


ENJOY THE VIEW

Famo us , s BBQ R i b & Br i s k e t a n ri Ve ge t a ie s! t Sp e c i a l

on our

PATIO --------- TUESDAY ---------

HALF OFF

all BOTTLES of WINE

ERS E B T F A R 40 C N TAP! O NS CREE S V T G I B 8 S FOR SPORT

You need same-day care.

24th & E. Carson Street “In The South Side”

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

412.390.1111 100 Adams Shoppes “Cranberry/Mars”

The comprehensive, high-quality health care from UPMC doctors that your family needs.

724-553-5212 doublewidegrill.com

BenjaminsPgh.com

All with the convenience of same-day appointments that your busy schedule demands.

Only as Spicy as You Are!

OAKLAND’S AWARD WINNING RESTAURANT

WE DELIVER (limited 3 mile area) Open 7 days a week Lunch Buffet Dinner Buffet Sunday & Tuesday 50% Off Dinners 5-6pm & 9-11pm Daily Beer Specials $1.50

Family Medicine | Behavioral Health | Pediatrics | Geriatrics | Ob-Gyn | And so much more.

$4 OFF

BUY ONE GET ONE

Not valid with any other offers. INDIA GARDEN OAKLAND.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

UPMCStMargaret.com Bloomfield-Garfield +()$*-($.,-)›Lawrenceville+()$-))$.*+*›New Kensington 724-334-3640

HALF PRICE DINNER

LUNCH BUFFET 328 Atwood Street (Oakland)

UPMC St. Margaret Family Health Centers

Not valid with any other offers. INDIA GARDEN OAKLAND.

412-682-3000 +

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

www.indiagarden.net

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

Little

BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

Authentic Thai Cuisine

China Palace Shadyside Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN

All Lunches $

7 - $9 freshest

THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP

DISHES!

Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING D LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

EVERY FRIDAY

KARAOKE HOSTED BY:

DJ B

STARTING AT 9PM

at

A Unique Luncheon & Gourmet Food Destination We Support Local! Come check out our new “Local” Fall menu items & House made Pies and Baked Goods Dine-In or Take-Out Monday 8a-3p Tuesday-Friday 8a-8p Saturday Brunch 9a-3p

Thursday

412-415-0338

Psychic Readings at the bar

538 California Ave. Pittsburgh Pa 15202 Check out www.skinnypetes.com

4428 LIBERTY AVE • BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 • delsrest.com 20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

mac-and-cheese and corn-filled corn bread. Get the sauce on the side to savor the smokiness of the meat. KF SONOMA GRILLE. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336. The menu here groups food and selected wines (mostly Californian, of course) under such oenophilic summaries as “jammy” and “muscular,” encouraging an entirely new approach to food selection. The restaurant’s offerings include tapas, hearty meat dishes with an array of international seasonings, and a mix-n-match, create-your-own section for mixed grill. KE SPOON. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001. A swanky restaurant offering American cuisine and focusing on locally procured, sustainable ingredients and seasonal offerings. What stands out is the sensitivity with which each dish is conceived — from flavor, texture and the creation of fresh combinations. Thus, ancho chilies and pork are paired with new, yet just-right blendings such as cilantro, lime and feta. LE STAGIONI. 2104 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-586-4738. This cozy storefront restaurant offers a marriage of traditional ingredients and modern, sophisticated sensibilities. From inventive salads utilizing seasonal ingredients and house-made pastas to flavorful meat entrees and vegetarian plates, the fare exhibits a masterful combination of flavors and textures. KF VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare is contemporary American with a vaguely European accent, featuring elegantly simple preparations of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted mushrooms with gorgonzola or scallops with blood-orange sauce. Flavorings such as lemon, garlic and fennel reflect the kitchen’s Mediterranean heritage. LE YAMA. 538 Third St., Beaver. 724-774-5998. This Japanese restaurant offers familiar favorites such as tempura, sushi and teriyaki, but takes an artistic approach to authentic cuisine. Thus fried gyoza dumplings are garnished with a small tumbleweed of finely grated carrot, and an octopus salad is graced with cucumber matchsticks. KF THE ZENITH. 86 S. 26th St., South Side. 412-481-4833. Funky antique décor you can buy and a massive, convivial Sunday brunch make this a vegan/ vegetarian hotspot. For the tea snob, the multi-page list is not to be missed. FJ

offMenu {BY JESSICA SERVER}

COMING HOME TO ROOST Local shelters deal with the downside of urban agricultural LIKE MANY “foodie” issues these days, raising urban chickens can ruffle some feathers. As the urban homesteading movement has taken hold, there have been national headlines about chickens being orphaned at the nation’s animal shelters. “Hipsters” have been accused of growing weary of their flocks, or being naïve about a hen’s egg-laying capacity. (Chickens can live between eight and 15 years, but frequently pass their egg-laying prime long before that.) Local shelters are seeing similar problems. Janice Barnard, program director for the Animal Rescue League, has seen a notable increase in her chicken population this year. After the city passed an Urban Agricultural zoning ordinance, the Animal Rescue League took in roughly 13 to 15 chickens annually. But so far this year, Barnard says, the number of chickens brought in has more than tripled, to 47. Over at the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, spokesperson Gretchen Fieser confirms “a tremendous increase” in the number of chickens relinquished. “We’re not set up for that.” Various factors may lie behind giving a chicken up: complaints from neighbors, zoning issues, financial hardship. Those who hope to raise their brood from chicks face a special challenge: determining a chick’s sex. Backyard Poultry magazine estimates that any method of identifying a chick’s sex is 50-50, meaning you risk antagonizing your neighbors by accidentally bringing home a dawn-crowing rooster. Jana Thompson, whose group Pittsburgh ProPoultry People supports urban chicken-keeping, has a blunt view of the matter: “For any sort of ‘problem’ to develop with unwanted poultry is preposterous. The reasonable end of any farm animal is to be [humanely slaughtered and] eaten. “If you don’t want your animal to be eaten,” Thompson adds, “you’re unfair in asking others to pay for the privilege of your choice.” That view isn’t embraced by everyone, but shelters and urban-agriculture advocates do agree on one thing: Would-be chicken owners should do their research, and think through the chicken’s entire lifespan, before bringing home a bird. Groups like P4 (pittsburghpropoultrypeople.blogspot.com) and the Uniontown Poultry Association (www. uniontownpoultry.com) offer help navigating the pastures of urban homesteading. And Barnard has another piece of advice: “Talk to your neighbors before you bring home chickens.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


SOUTH HILLS’ PREMIER

SPORTS BAR & EATERY

2HD0

EST. 1982

FLATSC

REEN

TVS

BAR HOURS: MON - FRI 7AM-2AM • SAT - SUN 8AM-2AM KITCHEN HOURS: MON - FRI 7AM-1AM • SAT - SUN 8AM-1AM

SUNDAY

MONDAY

BREAKFAST SERVED 8AM - NOON

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

BREAKFAST SERVED 7AM - 11AM ON WEEKDAYS

.35¢ WING

$2 OFF

1/2 PRICE

ALL MENU CAN EAT

CRAB LEGS 1/2 POUND 1/2 PRICE APPETIZERS

SUNDAYS

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS

THE WORLD FAMOUS BLOODY MARY BAR 9AM-6PM

$2.50

COORS LIGHT

BUD LIGHT

Bottles / 16 oz. Drafts

HAPPY HOUR 5PM-7PM (BAR ROOM ONLY)

WORKING LUNCH? WE HAVE FREE WI-FI! N E W S

+

FISH SANDWICH

New York Strip T-Bone Filet Mignon

$1 OFF ALL DRAFTS

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

33

ON TAP

$3.50

CRAFT MICRO BREWS IMPORTS

MILLER LIGHT Bottles / 16 oz. Drafts

ALL DAY

ALL DAY

11AM - MIDNIGHT

EVERYTHING IN OUR STEAK SECTION

$1 OFF

$2.50

CORONA & CORONA LIGHT

Bottles / 16 oz. Drafts

ASK ABOUT OUR

INFAMOUS

SPECIALS

24 Flavors

$2.75

$2.50

RIB

7PM-1AM

7PM-1AM

Eat-In Only

THE CODFATHER

PRIME

NIGHT

BURGERS

4-11PM

NFL

11AM - MIDNIGHT

THURSDAY

BREAKFAST SERVED 8AM - NOON

$2 OFF ALL YOU ITEMS IN THE BBQ SECTION

WEDNESDAY

YUENGLING

ALL DAY

11AM - MIDNIGHT

16 oz. Drafts

ALL DAY

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Bottles / 16 oz. Drafts

LIKE US ON

412-561-7444 • www.CainsSaloon.com +

$2.50

BLUE MOON

3239 West Liberty Ave, Dormont, PA 15216 TA S T E

THE WORLD FAMOUS BLOODY MARY BAR 8AM-6PM

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


LOCAL

“NATURALLY, KIND OF THIS FAKE ENSEMBLE WAS CREATED.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

COAL MINERS’ SONGSTER

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FAIRNESS FOR PATRIOT CONCERT FEATURING TOM BREIDING, MIKE STOUT, BILL TOMS. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 4. Moondog’s, 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. Free. 412-828-2040 or www.moondogs.us

22

BUILDING THE

BAND

Tom Breiding {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID KAMERAS}

Tom Breiding grew up in Wheeling, W.Va., in a state long associated with coal mining — but his involvement with the United Mine Workers union came through music. “It began with the Unbroken Circle record; I think I put that out in 2008,” Breiding explains. “I always wanted to do a bluegrass record, so it made sense for me to draw upon the topics of the coal-mining industry in my home state. Through that record, I made some contacts with United Mine Workers and played a few events with them.” Since then, the longtime Pittsburgh-based singer-songwriter become something of a union troubadour, traveling to rallies and specifically taking up the cause called Fairness at Patriot. The UMW has been campaigning against Patriot Coal Corporation, which was formed 2007 through a spinoff from the larger corporation Peabody Energy. (Another coal-company spinoff, Magnum, which was created by Arch Coal, later merged into Patriot.) Patriot declared bankruptcy in 2012 and has made efforts to relieve itself of pension duties for thousands of retirees who had been ensured benefits by Peabody and Arch; Peabody and Arch remain viable businesses. “It’s a sad thing, I think, when a company goes bankrupt and people lose their pensions,” Breiding says. “But when you have a company that’s still making money — 18,000 of [the affected retirees] never worked one day for Patriot. That’s a scheme that I think is really terrible.” The UMW is campaigning to reinstate the retirees’ pensions with Peabody and Arch, arguing that Patriot was created specifically to go into bankruptcy and take away the larger companies’ pension responsibilities. Breiding wrote songs — first a tune called “River, Rails or Road,” then two more called “Peabody Lied” and “Not One Damned Day” — which he meant as UMW anthems; UMW communications director Phil Smith took him up on them, and has made “River, Rails or Road” part of the Fairness at Patriot campaign. This Fri., Oct. 4, Breiding plays a free show at Moondog’s in Blawnox, designed to bring attention to the Fairness at Patriot campaign. He’s joined by labor songwriter Mike Stout and Bill Toms.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF OLIVIA LOCHER}

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

I

N THE PAST week, Brandon Locher

has unveiled two new presentations of his art. One, his exhibit Mazes to the Motherlode, at The Bottleworks, in his hometown of Johnstown, is visual; it’s ordered, intricate, bordering on obsessive. The other, It Happens Outside, a full-length vinyl by his sound-collage project The Meets, is everything the art exhibit isn’t. It’s messy. It’s sculptural. It’s built as much by chance as it is by Locher’s close direction. It’s sometimes hard to believe they both come from the same mind. But that’s Locher’s modus. More than a singular artistic vision, the 28-year-old has built his reputation — and Johnstown’s My Idea of Fun art-and-music collective, of which he’s a central part — on nearly constant production, and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Meet the artist: Brandon Locher

a lot of variation. “It’s obsessive in its way — I’d maybe call it more, like, consuming,” says longtime collaborator John Thorell, a cellist who has appeared on all of The Meets’ records. “He’s devoted to making his art.

BRANDON LOCHER: MAZES TO THE MOTHERLODE

Exhibit continues through Nov. 5. The Bottleworks, 411 Third Ave., Johnstown. 814-536-5399 or www.bottleworks.org

It feels like it’s not really even effort to him; he has so many ideas, he can just keep doing this. He never seems to get tired. He keeps putting out good material.”

LOCHER’S ART started early. Drawing

came first. “I have these memories as a child of being 4 or 5 and trying to draw these mazes,” Locher recalls. “Then it wasn’t right, and I’d rip up the page, take a tantrum. At the time, being 5, 6, 7, 10 years old and I’m drawing all the time — I have a collection of pens, all this nerdy shit. But at the time, I didn’t have this greater understanding of art, or fine art. Or to understand even that, instead of drawing on these little notebooks I have, maybe I should purchase a roll of paper.” Locher’s parents, while not artists themselves, are supporters of the arts; his father, Bill, works in banking, and sits on the board of trustees of the Johnstown Symphony Orchestra. It was a CONTINUES ON PG. 24


BUILDING THE BAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

WE KNOW

GUITARS

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

1305 E. CARSON ST.

SOUTH SIDE 412.431.0700 HOURS: MON-THU 11AM-8PM, FRI-SAT 11AM-5PM

PITTSBURGHGUITARS.COM

{ART COURTESY OF BRANDON LOCHER}

“Mazes to the Motherlode XXIII,” part of Brandon Locher’s current exhibit at The Bottleworks

supportive environment that benefited Brandon and his younger sister Olivia, also an artist. “They didn’t at any time tell us not to [pursue art],” Brandon says, “or push away our creativity or make us go in any direction that they thought would be better for our lives, our destiny, that kind of stuff.” After getting into rock music as a preteen, Locher became involved in a band, Elementary Thought Process, as a drummer; that took up much of his time in the mid-2000s. It also laid the groundwork for My Idea of Fun, as he and his bandmates became dissatisfied with the way being in a rock band worked. “I think everyone who was involved with it — we were a five-piece at the time — we all felt like creatively we’re so limited in the structure and the work flow that we’re going through,” he recalls. “You have a guy recording your record; you record and it’s three months later and you’re mixing it; and we were going on tour for, like, 10 months, losing our minds. That turnaround process — it would take two years to flush out an album. “We were like, ‘Things don’t really need to work this way. We can get back to the source of making things, and just make things, and once they’re done, throw them up on the My Idea of Fun website.’” Including a few proto-My Idea of Fun releases from 2000 and 2001, and a few re-releases of Elementary Thought

Process records, there are now over 260 My Idea of Fun releases. Many are online music releases; some are CDs; some are art books; The Meets’ It Happens Outside is the first full-length vinyl release. THE MEETS came about, like so many My Idea of Fun projects, as a chance collaboration. Cellist John Thorell and drummer Brandon Volkman, both of whom played with Endless Mike and the Beagle Club, got together on the spur of the moment in 2008 to record a drum-andcello record. “We got together, and I produced it; it was really fun and collaborative,” says Locher. “Then for whatever reason, we all got tired, I think the one kid wanted to go get a hoagie. We parted ways, and we talked about getting back together the next day but we never did.” “Yeah, we never really did anything more with that, other than that first night we hung out with Brandon Locher and recorded some things,” Thorell recalls. “And then all of a sudden there was this Meets record, a few weeks later.” It happened inside Locher’s head, while no one else was looking. “That night, this traveling musician named Adam Cullum stayed with me — the next night, I made a record with him. So he became the second track of the Meets record. He left, and a few days later, I’m thinking: Brandon Volkman meets John Thorell meets Brandon Locher meets Adam Cullum meets … you know, Dave DiStefano, this guy I hung CONTINUES ON PG. 26

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


A CENTRE OF CELEBRATION The Hill House Economic Development Corporation and the Hill House Association are proud to announce the opening of Centre Heldman Plaza Shop ‘n Save.

Saturday, October 19 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Centre Avenue between Heldman St. & Dinwiddie St. Rain Date: Sunday, October 20 from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Come celebrate Community Day, a fun-filled afternoon of entertainment, food, children’s activities and more! www.hillhouse.org

Idiosyncrasy Carolyn Alexandra Frischling

Digital Works Opening: Thursday October 3, 2013 6:00-8:00pm

Mendelson Gallery 5874 Ellsworth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15232 Tel. 412-361-8664 N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


BUILDING THE BAND, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

We buy

all day

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS • PRO SOUND KEYBOARDS • BAND INSTRUMENTS LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE...

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

4341 Old William Penn Highway, Monroeville 412-85-MUSIC

MONDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-8PM

www.musicgoroundmonroevillepa.com

Friday, Oct. 4 | 6 –10 pm Immerse yourself in the universe! Go under the dome in the Buhl Planetarium for a closer look at the stars, then venture onto our rooftop observatory to see constellations with our telescopes. You can even give our 21-foot “zero” gravity climbing wall a try! 7KLVDGXOWVRQO\HYHQLQJLQFOXGHVIRXUçRRUVRI exhibits, live music, and hands-on science demos. Cash bar and snacks available for purchase. Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org for details and to register. Cost: $10 in advance / $15 day of the event

out with that week who plays his hand drum or whatever. So, taking that idea, I put together this sound-collage record in 2008, and the project was called The Meets.” That’s the nature of what would become The Meets writ large: Locher starts with a plan (or a semblance of a plan), records musicians he knows playing parts that he might or might not give direction on, then takes the recordings and uses them as samples in a piece that may or may not end up sounding like what it started out as. “What I was interested in was recording people playing objects. You have a piano sitting in a room; you may or may not notice that it’s there. If someone hits a chord, you’ll look over. Seeing this object, going back to those old ideas of ambient music — I was interested in recording this object, and the person playing that, and the person who could be credited to playing those samples, a lick, a part, anything like that. And naturally, kind of this fake ensemble was created out of that. The reason I say ‘fake’ is that none of these ensemble players in the recording or production of this were in the room with each other at the same time.” It Happens Outside also differs from the handful of previous Meets releases in that much of it centers on a drum-circle field recording Locher made in 2009; the drum sounds are a textural backdrop for a large portion of the record. This makes it a more organic-sounding recording than, say, last year’s Conundrum, which more resembled the work of Nick Zammuto (who mastered It Happens Outside). LOCHER UNVEILED It Happens Outside in

conjunction with his exhibit opening on Sat., Sept. 28, playing recorded Meets tracks to accompany his pieces. “Those things, he’s sitting for hours, doing all of these 90-degree angles and tiny variations,” says Meets collaborator Matt Miller, referring to the maze art in the current exhibit. “Over and over, forever, all by himself. But at the exact same time, he’s doing The Meets. There’s nothing in common. Yeah, it’s layered and it’s complicated, but The Meets is a lot of dice-rolling.” Both are indicative of Locher’s artistic temperament, and his ability to find a balance between the perfectionism of a highly focused artist and the pragmatism that allows one to be productive. “I’ve just always naturally been the kind of person who gets — not obsessed with things,” Locher says. “But I liked to explore things completely.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

NEW RELEASES

BRENT MALIN AND THE RAILROADERS TWO TREES (SELF-RELEASED)

Classic-country-style songs from the local singer-songwriter and his band. Solid tunes with decent vocals and classic lyrics and tropes. (Some of the songs have names, like “Abilene” and “The Gambler,” that toe the line between homage and unoriginal, though they’re well done.) Malin’s voice actually lends itself best to the louder pieces, of which there are only a few here (like “Circus Ride,” a fun rocker). The band — replete with pedal steel and Dobro, which are always great when done right — sounds big and beautiful, making this one an especially pleasant listen. BY ANDY MULKERIN

BRENT MALIN CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. Howlers Coyote Café, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

FLEXURE INSERT TITLE HERE (SELF-RELEASED)

With Flexure, saxophonist Ben Opie took cues from Miles Davis’ electric work. The vinyl-only Insert Title Here recalls the trumpeter’s In a Silent Way: two side-long tracks, one splicing different improvisations together into a cohesive piece. Bits of compositions pop up, but the sextet uses riffs to create a mood that leads to solos. Recorded during a January residency at the New Hazlett Theater, these tracks never lose their steam. BY MIKE SHANLEY

FLEXURE LP RELEASE. 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com


OPUS ONE PRESENTS

10/03 10/04 10/10 10/11 10/11 10/12 10/12 10/15 10/16 10/17 10/18 10/22 10/23

DAVID WAX MUSEUM CABINET & HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL THE TONTONS DENISON WITMER (EARLY) THE SEMI-SUPERVILLAINS ALBUM RELEASE SHOW! (LATE) CHORO NO VINHO (EARLY) FLEXURE ('INSERT TITLE HERE' VINYL LP RELEASE SHOW) (LATE) CAROLINA STORY BLUE SKY BLACK DEATH EZRA FURMAN THOSE DARLINS SHEL AMERICAN BABIES

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF PETRA COLLINS}

Sleigh Bells

For more information visit:

www.carmaa-petadoption.com

An Acoustic Evening with

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER & SHAWN COLVIN Acclaimed songwriters (and longtime friends) Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin share the stage as an intimate duo, performing material spanning their vast catalogues as well as their favorite songs.

SUNDAY · OCTOBER 13 · 7:30PM Pit $45; Orchestra $45, $35; Loge $45; Balcony $35, $30 The Palace Theatre 724-836-8000

ow Folls! U

PalacePA

www.thepalacetheatre.org FREE PARKING FOR EVENING & WEEKEND SHOWS!

[AVANT-POP] + THU., OCT. 03 It’s hard for us in the singer-songwriter-driven pop-music world to wrap our heads around, but San Fermin is essentially the solo project of a keyboardist and composer; there are vocals on the band’s album, but they’re contributed by hired guns (including Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, of Lucius, who provide incredible close harmonies). It’s all the idea of Ellis Ludwig-Leone, a Yale grad who’s yet to hit his mid-20s. San Fermin’s self-titled debut is a lush mix of pop sensibilities and classical skill that brings to mind chamber-art-pop like Dirty Projectors, albeit more subdued. The band plays Brillobox tonight; Cold Weather and Wicked Chief open. Andy Mulkerin 9 p.m. 4104 Penn San Fermin Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[NOISE-POP] + FRI., OCT. 04

Watch Championship Chase on the Pittsburgh Cable News Network (PCNC). Ty Miller, Tom Pungin, Brian Cook and Dee Thompson give a different perspective on your Steelers and other NFL teams. Liz Costa, Michele Newell and Jonas Chaney provide feature reports and interviews with players and in-studio guests. Championship Chase airs on PCNC Fridays @ 7:30pm, Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ Noon

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Brooklyn-based duo Sleigh Bells will bring its noise-pop madness to tonight. The duo is known for singer Alexis Krauss’ sweet voice — sometimes singing, other times screaming — floating over Derek Miller’s heavy, chaotic guitar work. The band gained national fame after the release of its debut album Treats in 2010, and its sophomore album was one of the most anticipated albums of 2012. Krauss has a knack for energizing audiences, and there’s something about Miller’s heavily compressed, wall-of-sound guitar that’s surprisingly pleasant. This show will certainly kick your weekend off on a very

good — and very loud — note. Allison Cosby 9 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[AMBIENT] + SUN., OCT. 06 The Icelandic may not have the market on beautiful ambient music cornered, but they certainly know how to pull it off. The crowd that checked out Sigur Rós recently would be well advised to give Ólafur Arnalds a try tonight at the New Hazlett Theater. The Icelandic composer plays simple, beautiful, sometimes tear-jerking music with a flair for the dramatic similar to Jónsi and company’s. AM 7 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-25. All ages. 412-320-6410 or www. newhazletttheater.com

[ALT-FOLK] + WED., OCT. 09 With more than 20 years of recording and performing under his belt, singer and guitarist Bill Callahan has gotten pretty good at it all. The musician, who has also recorded under the moniker Smog, released his 15th studio album, Dream River, in mid-September, delighting listeners with his deep voice crooning over spare instrumentation. Dream River is full of quiet songs that you want to be alone with for a while, the subtleties only coming through after a few listens. Part of The Andy Warhol Museum’s Sound Series, Callahan’s show tonight at Carnegie Music Hall is sure to be an intimate affair, and one you don’t want to miss. AC 8 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $18. 412-237-8300


ONE NIGHT ONLY, TUESDAY OCTOBER 8 TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 03 31ST STREET PUB. The Meatmen, Mud City Manglers. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Bayside, Motion City Soundtrack, State Champs. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. San Fermin, Cold Weather, Wicked Chief. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. David Wax Museum, Bombadil. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Battlefield Band, Callán. Shadyside. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lazer Background, Paddy The Wanderer. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LAVA LOUNGE. Derek Woodz Band, AMRCNDREAMING.

South Side. 412-431-5282. REX THEATER. Glenn Tilbrook Actress, Jimmy Edgar, Jason Burns, Natasha Kmeto. South Side. 412-381-6811. SMILING MOOSE. Veara, On My Honor, Golden Gate, Look Out Loretta. South Side. 412-431-4668. WALNUT GRILL. The Keystone 3. Shadyside. 412-782-4768.

Simulation Hypothesis, Mister Watson. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Boogie Hustlers. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Morning Fuzz, Chrome Moses, Mission South & The Me Toos. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Switch. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MOONDOG’S. Tom Brieding. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. BRILLOBOX. MR. SMALLS Pandemic, Black . www per THEATER. Sleigh Bells. Bear Combo, Lungs a p ty ci pgh m Millvale. 866-468-3401. Face Feet. Bloomfield. .co PALACE THEATRE. 412-621-4900. Sha Na Na. Greensburg. CLUB CAFE. Cabinet, Holy 724-836-8000. Ghost Tent Revival, Cry Fire. SMILING MOOSE. Ewert & South Side. 412-431-4950. the Two Dragons, Spencer Saylor FAMILY RESOURCES. Jacques & Chris Jamison (early) Khaled Greene, Lapalux, Total Freedom, Dajani, Coronado, Claire with Sasha Go Hard, Wise Blood, the Turban (Late). South Side. Banjee Report, Postlife. Part of 412-431-4668. the VIA Festival. East Liberty. SOUTH SIDE VFW POST 6675. 610-733-6805. The Dave Iglar Band. South Side. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Adams Ale. Surviving the Odyssey, The Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. WHITE HAWK CAFE. Gone South. Penn Hills. 412-243-2511. THE WOODEN NICKEL. Strange Brew. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 04

MP 3 MONDAY

STEPHANIE KONG

Each week, we bring you a new

SAT 05 31ST STREET PUB. Earthling, Liquified Guts, Horse Drawn Death Machine. Strip District. 412-391-8334. THE BRONZE HOOD. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Robinson. 412-787-7240. BROTHERS GRIMM. KardaZ. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. THE CENTER OF HARMONY. Brian Lisik. Harmony. 724-400-6044. CIP’S. The Good Guys. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Meat Puppets, Enemy Planes. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Jukebox Band. Robinson. 412-489-5631. DRAVOSBURG AMERICAN LEGION. Daniels & McClain. Dravosburg. FAMILY RESOURCES. Adult., Vessel, Trogpite, KiNK, Hunee. Part of the VIA Festival. East Liberty. 610-733-6805. HAMBONE’S. Brett Saxon, The Williams Band. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARD ROCK CAFE. Red Elvises. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Brent Malin & The Railroaders, Almost Astronauts, Jack Erdle. Brent Malin CD Release Party. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

MP3

from a local artist. This week’s track comes from

Stephanie Kong;

stream or download

“Her” on our

music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

With the

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra The last chance to see The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses as it returns to Heinz Hall by popular demand with SECOND QUEST! Expect breathtaking new visuals and music exploring additional chapters from the Zelda franchise as well as your original favorites. Don’t miss the final area performance before the Quest ends in 2013.

FOR TICKETS, call 412-392-4900 or visit www.pittsburghsymphony.org

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 29

LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. Donna Groom. “One More Mountain to Climb.” Benefits Divine Mercy Academy. Midland. 724-576-4644. LOUGHLIN’S PUB. Silkwood Shower. Cheswick. 724-265-9950. MEADOWS CASINO. LoveBettie. Washington. 724-503-1200. THE PRAHA. The Dave Iglar Band. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. ROYAL PLACE. Cherry Red. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SALATINO’S RIVERHOUSE CAFE. King’s Ransom. Charleroi. 724-565-5700. SMILING MOOSE. Hunter Valentine, Krissy Krissy (early) Deadiron, Lythem, The Approach & the Execution, Curse Born. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Fourth River Revival. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TUGBOAT’S. Distraction, Second Chapter. East Pittsburgh. 412-829-1922.

{FRI., NOV. 15}

SUN 06

Anoushka Shankar

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Slava, Beggars of A New Land, Shisa. Strip District. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. A Great Big Pile of Leaves, Prawn, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, The Octeoblasts. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GOOSKI’S. Yuppies. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. LAVA LOUNGE. Earl Rays, ATS. South Side. 412-431-5282. SMILING MOOSE. Restorations. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. A Day To Remember, All Time Low, Pierce The Veil, The Wonder Years. North Side.

MON 07

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Kal Marks, Chrome Moses, East End Gassers. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HARD ROCK CAFE. Smile Empty Soul, ACIDIC. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Kink Ardor, Lake Monster. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Ra Ra Riot, Cayucas. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SMILING MOOSE. Acrassicauda, Killer of Sheep, Metacide, Solar Burn. South Side. 412-735-4755. STAGE AE. Bassnectar, KOAN Sound, Andreilien (Heyoka). North Side.

TUE 08 ALTAR BAR. Fountains of Wayne, Soul Asylum. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Micheal Franti & Spearhead. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. Hey Marseilles, Surf Machine. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Caroline Smith & The Good Sleeps, Charlotte Sometimes, Tanner Walle, Nameless in August, Mike Calli. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 04 NALANI’S. Hittem Hard Music. Ambridge. 724-777-3910.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

{SUN., OCT. 27}

Anberlin Penn State Altoona Campus

WASHINGTON, D.C. Lisner Auditorium

CLEVELAND {THU., NOV. 21}

Mono with Mick Turner Beachland Ballroom HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Arliss Nancy, PJ Bond, Gypsy & his Band of Ghosts, Homeless Gospel Choir. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Neighbourhood, Ghost Loft, LOVELIFE. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PETERSEN EVENTS CENTER. Nine Inch Nails. Oakland. 412-648-3054. SMILING MOOSE. Yip Deceiver, Lord Grunge, Cape Cod. South Side. 412-431-4668.

SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REMEDY. Cured presents DJ Firefly & Jarrett Tebbets. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

WED 09

SAT 05

ALTAR BAR. Yacht Rock Revue. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Bill Callahan, Lonnie Holley. Oakland. 412-237-8300. CLUB CAFE. Jon McLaughlin, Mikey Wax. South Side. 412-431-4950. SMILING MOOSE. Parabelle. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Turbine. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. CATTIVO. Illusions. w/ Funerals & Arvin Clay. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

THU 03 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 04 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE

THU 03 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 04

ALTOONA

DJS

BLUES

SUN 06 SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

WED 09 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

KENDREW’S. .32-20 Blues Band. Aliquippa. 724-561-2111. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Gris Gris Band. Downtown. 412-471-9100. PENN BREWERY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 05 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. 412-431-4090. GREATER PITTSBURGH MASONIC CENTER. Mahajibee Blues. Buffalo Blues Night. Ross. 412-931-1996. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Lava Game, Jill West & Blues Attack, Angel Blue & the Prophets. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. MOONDOG’S. Shot O’ Soul. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PAPA ROCKS PIZZA. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Monroeville. 412-856-6441. THE R BAR. The Hawks Blues Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Ron & The RumpShakers. Jefferson Hills. 412-233-9800.

SUN 06 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Sweaty Betty. Warrendale. 724-799-8333.

JAZZ THU 03 ANDYS. Lisa Hindmarsh. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 04 ANDYS. Dane Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. LEMONT. John Sarkis. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. The Just Ahead Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

SAT 05 565 LIVE. The Tony Janflone Jr & Curtis Swift Duo. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, DOWNTOWN. Lorens Chuno. Downtown. 412-281-7141. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CONTINUES ON PG. 35

30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


Cheeseman Fright Farm The tractors are warmed up and the ghosts and ghouls have arrived to put a chill in the night air. Be warned this is a physically demanding attraction that will assault your senses with intense audio and visual effects. Your heart will quicken and your skin will crawl... As always, parking is free and your admission price includes all of our attractions and activities. www.cheesemanfarm.com

Demon House Demon House is the Haunted Experience of a Life Time...Journey into the realm of fear - experience the terror that lives within this 140 year old stone mansion. Plenty of activities to keep you occupied on our haunted grounds. Demon House, the ONLY Real Haunted Attraction. DemonHouse.com for more info.

Fright Farms/ Rich Farms Rich Farms presents A Victorian Nightmare, the theme for its twenty-fourth year of Fright Farm Productions. Fright

Farm is Pennsylvania’s largest haunted attraction, growing every year since its inception. So come on out and join the many people who have made Fright Farm an annual Halloween season tradition. For more information visit: www.frightfarm.com

Haunted Hills Estate Haunted Hills Estate is celebrating their 10th year of FEAR! We have 3 original and unique Haunted Adventures! Take the one hour Challenge Trail! Be patient and visit the Old Medical Research Center and become part of the Legend. Stagger through the Dead

The Secret is OUT… thee t th uut aboout ingg ab kking lkin talk is tal NE is YOONE YON ERRYON ERY EVEER EV s ure ent Adv BEST Haunted

PUMPKIN PATCH Y TROLLEY Friday F rid ida through Sunday und day October 4-6, 11-13, 18-20, 25-27 1 Museum Road Washington, PA 16301 724-228-9256

Your Halloween Destination!

Advance Tickets Available at

patrolly.org Unlike any other Haunted Attraction

• • • •

Zombie Shoot Corn Maze Ghost Stories Food & Fun

724-775-6232 $2 off with this ad A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

Chambers and see if you can come out with all your flesh flags, the Zombies are waiting… For more info visit: www.hauntedhillsestate.com.

Haunted Hills Hayride Haunted Hills Hayride and the Valley of Darkness Haunted Walking Trail (14th Annual): A free live band, karaoke, and a DJ every Friday and Saturday night. Climb aboard a tractor-pulled hay wagon, enter the castle gates and brace yourself for the scariest ride of your life. Save some scares for the Walking Trail filled with Halloween horrors. Call for group reservations at (412) 823-4813. Benefits


The Autism Society of Pittsburgh and The Spectrum Charter School. www.hauntedhillshayride.com

Arsenal Park Lawrenceville Oct. 12 noon- dusk Free event but please bring a nonperishable food donation for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank

Hopewell Windmill Haunted Mini Golf Haunted Mini Golf with glow in the dark balls. The scariest game of golf you will ever play, guaranteed. Open daily thru November 2nd. Five years of frights in Hopewell PA, close to Pittsburgh. 724375-5350. www.hopewellwindmill.com

PA Trolley Museum Leap into fall with the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum’s annual Pumpkin Patch

Trolley in Washington PA, which runs Friday through Sunday, October 4-6, 1113, 18-20, and 25-27. Visitors will take a ride on an antique trolley to the pumpkin patch where children get to select their pumpkin and then decorate it. Pumpkin Patch admission includes unlimited rides on trolleys and tours of 30 trolleys. Tickets can be purchased in advance at www.patrolley.org or 724-228-9256

Pittsburgh Terror Trolley Climb aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh including the story of “the most haunted

HAUNTED HILLS TH 4 1 NUAL HAYRIDE AN and the

VALLEY OF DARKNESS HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL Oct 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 30, 31 - Nov 1, 2 Open 7pm to 11pm on Friday & Saturday; 7pm to 10pm on Sunday & Weekdays. LIVE BAND, DJ and KARAOKE - ALL FREE! Admission Only $12 to Each Attraction or $17 for Both • FREE PARKING 412-823-4813 • www.hauntedhillshayride.com • See website for $3 OFF Coupon

500 Mosside Blvd. (Rt. 48) • North Versailles, PA 1/2 Mile North of Rt. 30 K-Mart Group rates & private campfire sites available

Benefits: The Autism Society of Pgh.

A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T

house in America”. Pittsburgh Terror Trolley tours depart from Station Square every Thursday, Friday and Saturday throughout October at 7pm & 9pm. Call 412-391-7433 if you dare! www.mollystrollesypittsburgh.com

ScareHouse ScareHouse is ranked as “One of America’s Scariest Haunted Houses” by Travel Channel, USA Today, and Haunted Attraction Magazine. Reduce your wait and reserve your time to enter when you buy tickets in advance from www.scarehouse.com. Free parking and shuttle service from the Pittsburgh Zoo. The Bunny is Back!


Enjoy...

$

4

Helltown Pints West Deer Nightmare The West Deer Nightmare is a high scare volume, intense haunted attraction not designed for the weak. Come tour the possessed house of Noah Hobbs and experience all the horror and terror that Noah’s evil mind committed. Come and experience the legendary West Deer Nightmare! www.westdeernightmare.com

Zombie Bar Crawl This year, Zombies will invade Lawrenceville in Pittsburgh for a full day of undead fun. AT NOON, thousands of the walking dead will converge on Arsenal Park for live bands, over 40 vendors, and crazy

crowd participation events. AND THEN at sundown, the mass of thirsty corpses will shamble down Butler Street for the first annual Zombie Bar Crawl. This is a free event.

each & every Wednesday at

Zombies of the Corn Coming weekends in October, a unique haunted attraction unlike any other! Board our “Zombie Fighting Vehicle” & shoot paintballs at “Live Zombies” that can’t shoot back! The adventure continues as you find your way through our Corn Maze with Lurking Zombies & More! Every Thursday – Friday – Saturday in October 7pm till Midnight. Call 724775-6232 Today for Reservations and Tickets! zombiesofthecorn.com

Climb aboard the Terror Trolley and hear haunted tales of Pittsburgh including the story of

“the most haunted house in America” 7PM and 9PM Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday throughout October and Halloween Night.

1828 East Carson Street Pittsburgh PA 15203 412-381-3977

CALL 412-391-7433 IF YOU DARE! 125 W. Station Square Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15219

www.MollysTrolleysPittsburgh.com

year.... Our 5th

egin b e m a g Let the OCTOBER IN PORTERSVILLE, PA

ay? l p a n n Wa

September 21 thru November 2 2142 BROADHEAD RD. • HOPEWELL 724-375-5350 • www.hopewellwindmill.com A D V E R T I S I N G

HAUNTED HAYRIDES AT DARK Off US Rt. 19 on Cheeseman Rd. Near McConnell’s Mill for futher directions, call 724-368-3233

www.cheesemanfarm.com S U P P L E M E N T


A D V E R T I S I N G

S U P P L E M E N T


CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CLUB COLONY. The Skip Peck Trio. Scott. 412-668-0903. HILLMAN CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS. Tom Roberts, Allegheny City Ragtime Orchestra. Fox Chapel. 412-457-0516. LA CASA NARCISI. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. Take Two. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. LITTLE E’S. Lilly Abreu. Downtown. 412-392-2217. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. New Gary Burton Quartet. North Side. 412-322-1773. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Neon Swing X-Perience. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

Band, Saint Anywhere. North Side. 412-224-2273. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG. Acoustic Music Free For All. Greensburg. 724-837-7040. VINEYARD CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP OF SOUTHWEST PITTSBURGH. Dan Cush & Vic Mamel. Bridgeville.

SUN 06

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Max Leake. Shadyside. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SONOMA GRILLE. Jessica Lee. Downtown. 412-697-1336.

MON 07

SAT 05 NINE ON NINE. Jessica Zamiska & Arianna Powell. Downtown. 412-338-6463. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

HAMBONE’S. Caliope East End Appalachian Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

MON 07

TUE 08 PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Gene Stovall. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

TUE 08

WORLD THU 03

WED 09

CHATHAM BAROQUE. Variations on Corelli: music by Corelli, Geminiani, Scarlatti & Couperin. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-621-6204. ORGANIST HECTOR OLIVERA. Keystone Oaks High School, Dormont. 412-571-6000. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: CARMINA BURANA. Feat. Lisette Oropesa, soprano; Andrey Nemzer, tenor; Hugh Russell, baritone. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SAT 05

CLASSICAL REVOLUTION PITTSBURGH: STEAMPUNK. classicalrevolutionpgh.org The Inn, Lawrenceville. THE LEGEND OF ZELDA SYMPHONY OF THE GODDESSES: SECOND QUEST. Feat. the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra & the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 06

COUNTRY ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

PITTSBURGH WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S NORTH SHORE Saturday, October 5, 2013 Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. Walk begins at 9:00 a.m.

BE A PART OF THE MOVEMENT TO RECLAIM THE FUTURE. START A TEAM. JOIN A TEAM.

OTHER MUSIC THU 03 LIGONIER THEATER. American Bandstand-A Tribute to Dick Clark. Ligonier. 724-836-8000.

FRI 04

SAT 05

FRI 04

ELWOOD’S PUB. Joe Lege. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

LAWRENCEVILLE MOOSE. Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners, The Mavens, Molly Alphabet & Her Country String Band, The Stillhouse Pickers. TWANGATHON:

TA S T E

alz.org/walk 1.800.272.3900

CLUB COLONY. Groove Doctors. Scott. 412-668-0903. MEADOWS CASINO. MVP Band. Washington. 724-503-1200.

THU 03

+

THE TEAM LEADER WHO SAW A DISEASE STEAL HER MOTHER’S PAST AND IS DETERMINED NOT TO LET IT TAKE HER DAUGHTER’S FUTURE.

CHATHAM BAROQUE. Variations on Corelli: music by Corelli, Geminiani, Scarlatti & Couperin. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: CARMINA BURANA. Feat. Lisette Oropesa, soprano; Andrey Nemzer, tenor; Hugh Russell, baritone. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SOUTH SIDE SHARPS. Carnegie Library, Oakland, Oakland. 412-622-3108.

TUE 08

THU 03

N E W S

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: CARMINA BURANA. Feat. Lisette Oropesa, soprano; Andrey Nemzer, tenor; Hugh Russell, baritone. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RIVER CITY BRASS. Autumn Leaves. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 04

ACOUSTIC

ELWOOD’S PUB. Doc & Tina. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES SIMON SCULPTURE STUDIO. Sister Exister, Bernie Jungle. Uptown. 412-434-5629. MARIO’S SOUTH SIDE SALOON. Michael Todd. South Side. 412-381-5610. MULLANEY’S HARP & FIDDLE. Tim & John. Strip District. 412-642-6622. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String

FRI 04

SUN 06

WED 09

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. SAVOY RESTAURANT. www. per a p ty ci pgh m Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Savoy Jazz. Strip District. .co Wednesdays. North Side. 412-281-0660. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam BACKSTAGE BAR AT w/ The Shelf Life String Band. THEATRE SQUARE. Mark Lucas. North Side. 412-224-2273. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Matt Booth Quartet. Lawrenceville. SEVICHE. Geña y Peña, Preach 412-682-0177. Freedom. Downtown. 412-697-3120. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Velvet Heat. Downtown. 412-471-9100. BELLEFIELD HALL. Rodrigo Invernizzi, Orion Morales, Ella Ponce, Daniel Fuenzalida. Tributo a Chile. Oakland. 412-999-3443. BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & NATIONAL EDUCATION AND Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. CULTURAL CENTER. Grand 412-489-5631. Bon Rien. West Homestead. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer 412-247-6604. Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. 724-265-1181. Vince Burns. Strip District. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR 412-281-4505. & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PERRYTOWNE DRAFT HOUSE. BENEDUM CENTER. Celtic Ashley & Garret. McCandless. Thunder. Downtown. 412-367-9610. 412-456-6666.

FRI 04

CLASSICAL

SAT 05

SUN 06

FULL LIST ONLINE

Benefit for Pittsburgh Cares. Lawrenceville. 412-681-5958.

MON 07 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

+

M U S I C

+

Suite 105 11530 Perry Hwy, WEXFORD

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

bespokebeautybar.net

724.719.2559 +

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


What to do October 2 - 8

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH

WEDNESDAY 25 FRIDAY 47

SUNDAY 69

Big Leg Emma Bela Flecks New York Banjo Summit HARD ROCK CAFE Station

Kiss & Cry NEW HAZLETT THEATER Allegheny Square. 412456-6666. Tickets: trustarts. org. Through Oct. 4.. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 36 Soldier’s Heart

PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Oakland. 412-392-8000. Tickets: pittsburghplayhouse.com. Through Oct. 13.

Ólafur Arnalds

Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

NEW HAZLETT THEATER Allegheny Square. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Sleigh Bells

50 Shades! The Musical PHOTO CREDIT: SHERVIN LAINEZ

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 7:30p.m.

newbalancepittsburgh.com

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show.Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 9p.m.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: librarymusichall.com. 7:30p.m.

Celtic Thunder

Red Elvises

RA RA RIOT

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guest Red Hook Winery. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10:30p.m.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7 MR. SMALLS THEATRE

44th Fall Festival

SATURDAY 58

Artist Talk: Yasumasa Morimura

DogtoberFEST

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Oakland. Free event. For more info visit warhol.org. 5p.m.

SOUTHSIDE WORKS. Free event. For more info visit carmaa-petadoption.com. 11a.m.

A FREE FOOT SCAN at our store helps find the shoe and fit that’s best for you.

Beers & Blues JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 1p.m.

Inclusive Fee Required. For more info & up to date schedule visit bendersgreenhouse. com. 11a.m.

Jerry Seinfeld Live! Bender’s Greenhouse present’s Art Under Glass BENEDUM CENTER BENDER’S GREENHOUSE McDonald. 724-926-2541. All

Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7p.m.

show.Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 80

Fountains of Wayne / Soul Asylum ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Evan Dando. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses Second Quest

TRAX FARMS Finleyville. 412-835-3246. Free admission. For more info visit traxfarms. com. 10a.m. Through Oct. 27.

MONDAY 70

Ra Ra Riot

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Cayucas. All ages

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org or 412-392-4900. 7:30p.m.

The Neighbourhood MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest LOVELIFE & Ghost Loft. All ages show.Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

OUNCES OF PREVENTION New Balance 847 Optimal control, developed to deliver superior comfort and stability. Available in 4 widths.

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com NBRx-certified retailers have the expertise to deliver all the foot health benefits of New Balance footwear. Consult a medical professional to assess your condition. Then visit a trusted NBRx dealer to protect years of foot health.

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

FACEBOOK.COM/ NEWBALANCEPGH


SHATTERED {BY AL HOFF}

GRAVITY IS ABOUT THE MOST BASIC OF STRUGGLES: FINDING THE WILL TO LIVE

In The Patience Stone, an allegorical tale set in an Islamic country similar to today’s troubled Afghanistan, a young wife (a fantastic Golshifteh Farahani) is mostly sequestered in her home with her much older husband. He has been shot, and lies in a vegetative state. For the first time in their loveless marriage, she can speak freely, and he will listen. So, in moments between escaping bombs and trying to forage supplies, she pours out her anger, unhappiness and deeply held secrets. Here, the powerless husband becomes a “patience stone,” a mythical object that hears and absorbs all one’s troubles, then breaks apart, freeing the teller from unhappiness.

LOST IN

CP APPROVED

Speaker of truths: Golshifteh Farahani

Director Atiq Rahimi adapted the film from his own novel. For a story that relies heavily on monologues, it is beautifully shot and visually engaging. Vivid colors — a head scarf, a wall of flowers — add color to the drab, monochromatic milieu. Likewise, the woman’s own vibrancy surfaces in spite of cultural strictures that suppress it. The wife’s recitations are broken up with social interactions that establish both the restrictions and perils that women face (encounters with the mullah, fears of rape by jihad fighters); throughout, sex and violence are intertwined to subjugate women. Expectedly, Stone is a devastating portrait of the physical and emotional costs women in such cultures suffer. But it also reveals the covert methods by which these same women seek escape, regress and even agency. In Persian, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 4. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RUNNER RUNNER. Justin Timberlake stars as a hot-shot online-poker player who, after losing his stake, meets up with the man (Ben Affleck) whom he reckons cheated him. Brad Furman directs this crime thriller. N E W S

+

SPACE

{BY AL HOFF}

Free-floaters George Clooney (top) and Sandra Bullock

T

HINGS we know about space: It’s

super cold or super hot; there is no oxygen; and in it, no one can hear you scream. All these things matter — a lot — in Alfonso Cuarón’s outer-space thriller Gravity. Gravity — the physical force that keeps you from floating away — is also missing from space, but the likewisenamed condition of seriousness is absolutely on board here. A pair of astronauts is working “offstructure” as their space shuttle orbits the earth. Ryan (Sandra Bullock) is a newcomer to space, assigned to perform a science mission, while Kowalski (George Clooney) is an old hand, and on his last assigned flight (uh oh). While Ryan is shaky even while tethered to the outside of the craft, Kowalski is having a grand time, zipping around freely while testing a new jet pack. Then their work day goes very, very wrong. A meteorite hits a satellite, causing it to break into pieces that then slam into and break up other things in orbit, creating

even more dangerous high-speed debris. (This real-life concern is called the Kessler Syndrome.) The shuttle is destroyed, stranding the pair in space, kept alive (for now) only by their protective suits. Damaged telecommunication satellites also leave the astronauts “blind,” out of radio contact with Earth.

GRAVITY DIRECTED BY: Alfonso Cuarón STARRING: Sandra Bullock and George Clooney In 3-D, in select theaters Starts Fri., Oct. 4

CP APPROVED I won’t divulge what happens next, because part of the movie’s attraction is discovering how the astronauts deal with this nightmare scenario. It’s a thriller, in which humans in space battle not fictional aliens, but the lack of natural elements we take for granted: air, sound, gravity and

the ground beneath our feet. In a more meditative vein, Gravity is also about the most basic of struggles: finding the will to live when the odds of survival seem infinitesimally small. (Prepare for some obvious visual metaphors, such as tethers and assumed fetal positions.) Cuarón co-wrote the film with his son Jonas, and it’s a cracking good idea, delivered in a taut 90 minutes that even finds time for some patented Clooney goofing. But what really sells the tale is the stunning visuals. (See this in 3-D if you can; outer space is huge.) The entire film looks like it was shot in zero gravity, but it’s all movie magic: CGI, computer animation, actors attached to special rigs, cameras on robot arms, even puppeteers. But you’ll believe it, watching an astronaut spin over and over and over, while steady behind her is Earth and the vast emptiness of space. It’s horrifying (and gorgeous), and you’ll be thankful you’re planted securely in your theater seat. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


THE OTHER SHORE. Timothy Wheeler’s new bio-doc profiles Diana Nyad, the long-distance swimmer who set a goal of swimming the 103 miles from Cuba to Florida (a feat she recently accomplished). 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 7. Hollywood

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BLUE CAPRICE. Alexandre Moors’ docudrama traces the relationship between a troubled young man and the father figure who makes him a partner in a killing spree. The film is based on the 2002 sniper attacks in and around Washington, D.C. Starts Fri., Oct. 4. SouthSide Works ENOUGH SAID. At a party, Los Angeles masseuse Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) meets Albert (James Gandolfini), and the two bond over a few laughs and their shared status: Each is long-divorced and has an only child heading off to college, and neither is much interested in dating. But date they do, and a relationship begins to grow. Eva also strikes social gold with Marianne (Catherine Keener), a new client who becomes a friend. The two women amuse each other by carping about their exes — until Eva realizes that Albert is Marriane’s ex. Awkward. This rom-com from writer-director Nicole Holofcener is sweeter than some of her past films (Lovely and Amazing, Please Give), which can feature liberal doses of passive-aggressive behavior that make viewing a bit squirmy. Here, even the cringe-y scenes lean more toward comic ends than painful revelations. Still, there’s some gentle examination beneath the easygoing laughs of that rare-in-Hollywood topic: middleaged people muddling through relatively normal lives marked by marriage and family, while still keen for new encounters and experiences. Enough is warm and funny, with just a ripple of bittersweet to keep it from becoming frothy, and winning performances from a topnotch cast. (Al Hoff)

CP

THE HARDER THEY COME. In this 1972 Jamaican film from Perry Henzell, a singer from the country (Jimmy Cliff) tries his luck in the big city, but only rounds into trouble. The cult-classic film and its popular soundtrack helped introduce the world to reggae music. Starts Oct. 4. Regent Square HAUTE CUISINE. This bio-pic tells the story of Hortense Laborie, a French chef who was appointed personal chef for President François

Joseph Kiewra’s “The True Life Story of Herbert J. Boogieman” at Film Kitchen Mitterand. Christian Vincent directs, and Catherine Frot stars as Laborie. In French, with subtitles. Starts Fri., Oct. 4. SouthSide Works POPULAIRE. Régis Roinsard’s period French comedy takes place in 1958, and follows the adventures of young female secretary whose boss trains her to enter a speed-typing contest. In French, with subtitle. Starts Fri., Oct. 4. SouthSide Works

REPERTORY DRACULA. “I never drink … wine,” Count Dracula tells his guest, while neglecting to elaborate on what he does drink. Bela Lugosi stars in this 1931 horror classic about the infamous vampire, directed by Tod Browning. Cinematographer Karl Freund provides a visual style heavily influenced by German Expressionism (dramatic shadows, deep space, a broody tone). 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 2, and 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 3. Oaks (AH)

CP

E.T. — THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL. See this muchloved, feel-good alien story, about the greenishbrown space traveler who befriends some suburban kids, on the big screen. Steven Spielberg directed the 1982 film starring Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore and a wrinkly, long-fingered dude from space. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 2. AMC Loews

CP

THE ELEPHANT MAN. In Victorian London, gentle John Merrick (John Hurt), nicknamed

“The Elephant Man” for his hideous deformities, is rescued from the brutish freak-show circuit by an esteemed doctor (Anthony Hopkins) and granted a modicum of dignity amongst London society. Yet the curtained medical screen which Merrick poses behind still echoes the carnival sideshow, now upgraded to “medical knowledge”; Merrick has become an edifying spectacle. David Lynch’s 1980 drama is an intelligent, sensitive, beautifully crafted movie — as perversely uplifting as it is heartbreaking and critical. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 3; 2 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5; and 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Hollywood (AH) THE ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL TOURING PROGRAM. You won’t know beforehand exactly what you might see in this collection of independent short films, but if past years’ programs are any guide, odds are the offerings will be pretty good. This is the 51st annual outing of the festival’s touring program, which compiles prize-winning shorts — animation, narrative, experimental and documentary — into two two-hour programs. As part of the RADical weekend, the price is certainly right: free. 7:30 p.m. (Program A) and 9:15 p.m. (Program B), Fri., Oct. 4; and 7:30 p.m. (Program B) and 9:15 p.m. (Program A), Sat. Oct. 5. Melwood. Free ZOMBIES AT PARKWAY. Get your undead on with a zombie walk on Broadway starting at 6 p.m. That gives you an hour to slowly shuffle into the Parkway for a zombie-film double-feature. First up, Steve Baker’s 2007 Outpost (7 p.m.), about some mercenaries hired to clear out an old World War II bunker, which harbors some not-quite-dead residents. At 9 p.m., it’s Land of the Dead (2005), George Romero’s account of zombie invading a walled city (that sort of resembles Pittsburgh). Sat., Oct. 5. Parkway Theater, 644 Broadway Ave., Stowe Township. $5 (walk is free) NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. Arguably, George Romero’s locally produced, low-budget 1968 nail-biter started American filmmakers’ late-20thcentury fascination with zombies. Romero’s depiction of flesh-munching was groundbreaking for its time, but what really makes this horror flick resonate still is its nihilism and sense of futility: No heroes, no easy resolutions — something terrible is just outside the door, and it’s gonna get us. 9:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. Hollywood (AH)

CP

THE GRAPES OF WRATH. It begins with a dust storm and collapsing banks, as Tom Joad (Henry Fonda) and his family are forced to leave their Oklahoma farm for what they hope will be a fresh start in California. John Ford’s drama adapts John Steinbeck’s social-realist novel, which laid bare the miseries of migrant workers, unfair labor practices and the fraying of the American Dream. The 1940 film begins a month-long, Sunday-night series of films about disillusion with the American Dream. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Regent Square (AH)

CP

38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

FILM KITCHEN. The series for local and independent film and video offers a Halloween show. The centerpiece is the first 45 minutes of Coons! Night of the Bandits of the Night, a micro-budget 2005 feature-length horror spoof released by legendary indie distributor Troma. Coons! — about rampaging rabid raccoons — is directed by New York-based comedian and filmmaker Travis Irvine (who also screened work at Film Kitchen this past July); its young actors don a complete shadow cast of opéra bouffe mustaches, and the film, as its own script repeatedly emphasizes, is gleefully “sophomoric and tasteless.” Film Kitchen also screens “The True Life Story of Herbert J. Boogieman,” Joseph Kiewra’s amusing 8-minute mockumentary about the Boogieman — who turns out to be a soft-hearted family guy, mercilessly targeted by anti-bullying protesters and contemplating a career change. The Oct. 8 show also includes three shorts by inveterate experimentalist tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE. In “Skeletal Remains,” tENT uses a synthesizer to play a John Cage-inspired sound collage comprised of audio interpretations of James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake. In “North Deface,” he demonstrates the how (and why) of effacing corporate logos from clothing. And “PHEW! 11” documents an effort to construct a fake Facebook persona. 8 p.m. Tue., Oct. 8 (7 p.m. reception). Melwood. 412-681-9500. $5 (Bill O’Driscoll)

Haute Cuisine THE MONKEY’S PAW. Brett Simmons directs this new adaptation of the W.W. Jacobs’ classic horror story about a man unlucky enough to find a “lucky” monkey’s paw. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 8, and 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. Hollywood THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Barry Sonnenfeld directs this big-screen 1991 adaptation of the popular 1960s TV show (itself adapted from Charles Addams’ cartoons) about an amusingly macabre family. Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia and Christopher Lloyd star. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 9. AMC Loews WILD STYLE. It’s words and pictures as local cartoonist Ed Piskor reads from his new book-length comic, HipHop Family Tree, followed by a screening of Charlie Ahearn’s film, Wild Style. The 1983 film (a love story wrapped in documentary) features the burgeoning graffiti and hip-hop scene in New York City. 8 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.), Thu., Oct. 10. Hollywood. $10. Tickets at door and www.showclix.com ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[STAGE]

“THERE’S ALWAYS A HANDFUL OF PIECES THAT JUST BLOW MY SOCKS OFF.”

LIFE STORIES {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ROBIN FROHARDT’S THE PIGEONING 7 p.m. nightly (937 Liberty Ave., Downtown). PERTH THEATRE COMPANY’S IT’S DARK OUTSIDE 9 p.m. nightly (Trust Arts Education Center, 805-807 Liberty Ave., Downtown).Both shows run Wed., Oct. 9, Thu., Oct. 10, and Fri., Oct. 11. $25. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

+

[ART]

PITTSBURGH DRAWS ON THE

Chris Isaacs (background) and Arielle Gray (masked) in It’s Dark Outside {PHOTO COURTESY OF RICHARD JEFFERSON}

How do you survive the middle of life, and how to cope with the end of it? Two works in the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts embrace those big questions. The Pigeoning is a world-premiere puppet play by artist and puppet-maker Robin Frohardt. Speaking by phone from Brooklyn, Frohardt says she developed this darkly comic, dialogueless 70-minute work at New York’s Here Artist Residency Program. Pigeoning depicts an obsessivecompulsive middle-aged office worker who becomes convinced that those dirty, dirty pigeons are conspiring against him. “Frank” is about 3 feet tall, operated bunrakustyle by three puppeteers dressed in black. Other characters include intermittently unnerving pigeons. The musical score is by Freddi Price. Frohardt’s career has ranged from building a room-sized city made of cardboard to floating sculptural junk rafts down the Hudson and the Ganges. Apocalypse Puppet Theater, a troupe she co-founded in San Francisco in 2006, boasts “the world’s only bicycle-driven puppet theater,” a replica stagecoach. Frank is a younger version of a recurring Apocalypse Puppet character. His compulsion for cleanliness, says Frohardt, is a metaphor for our culture’s need to control everything from germs on up. “I do feel like there’s this obsession with safety and control. It’s almost become an industry,” she says. “The show is about letting go of that sort of thing, letting go in general.” The flipside of lost control is depicted in It’s Dark Outside, a U.S. premiere by Australia’s Perth Theatre Company. Like The Pigeoning, the 50-minute show is dialogueless and incorporates puppetry and original music. But it blends in masked human characters and animation to tell the story of an old man with Sundowners Syndrome, in which some Alzheimer’s patients are overtaken at dusk by a compulsion to wander off. Dark Outside was recently acclaimed at Scotland’s Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Speaking from Perth, Australia, via Skype, Arielle Gray says that she and co-creators Chris Isaacs and Tim Watts were inspired by spaghetti Westerns. Thus their aged hero heads off into the wilderness, stalked by shadowy nemesis, on a “visual adventure” complete with cinematic showdowns.

WORLD

{PHOTOS BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

American artist Zoe Strauss’ portraits of Homestead residents is part of the 2013 Carnegie International.

W

HEN THE 2013 Carnegie International opens this week, the 117-year-old showcase will reassert its place among the world’s most venerable exhibitions of contemporary art. But while the International’s prestige in recent decades has fluctuated, one thing has not changed: No artist actually living in Pittsburgh has been part of it since 1967. That drought ends Oct. 5, when the 35 exhibited artists from 19 countries will include Transformazium, an artists’ collective based in Braddock. The group is relatively new to the local scene. But its inclusion is just one way the International’s otherwise globe-trotting curators have steeped themselves in Pittsburgh’s art community in a way the previous 55 Internationals didn’t. For instance, the International also includes artist Zoe Strauss’ photographic portrait studio in Homestead — adding Pittsburgh faces to an international art conversation that includes works from the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. And for the past two of the three years they

worked on the show, curators Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers and Tina Kukielski have run the Carnegie International Apartment. This Lawrenceville rowhouse hosted some

2013 CARNEGIE INTERNATIONAL Oct. 5-March 16 (opening day includes free performances). Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

about bringing the world to Pittsburgh, says Byers, “We wanted to do that and also bring Pittsburgh to the world.” Some critics question how much the International benefits the local art scene. But Transformazium’s Ruthie Stringer says that in the first International since 2008, there’s an exciting cross-pollination between the exhibit and the city itself. “When you place value on various people and various neighborhoods,” she says, “then contemporary art can remain contemporary.” THE WOMEN who comprise Transformazi-

ALL YOU CAN ART (opening party for Braddock Carnegie Library’s Art Lending Collection): 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. 419 Library St., Braddock. Free. www.braddockcarnegielibrary.org

50 salon-style gatherings featuring talks by both local and visiting artists. Though the International has always been primarily

um — Stringer, Dana Bishop-Root and Leslie Stem — relocated from Brooklyn to Braddock in 2007, early in Mayor John Fetterman’s widely publicized efforts to revitalize the hard-luck mill town. They acquired and are renovating an abandoned church. Their practice is less concerned with making beautiful objects than with doing projects that help empower the community. Transformazium’s signature initiative is a print shop in the CONTINUES ON PG. 40

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


PITTSBURGH DRAWS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

Braddock library that includes screenprinting training, an open studio for teenagers, and after-school programs. The Art Lending Collection, a collaboration with the library, inhabits the building’s former children’s room. It will include about 100 smaller, mostly two-dimensional framed artworks, including works donated by the International’s other artists, like British sculptor Phyllida Barlow and American artist Wade Guyton. It’ll be “a carbon copy of the 2013 International in Braddock,” says Byers. Holders of any Allegheny County library card can check out an artwork just as they would a book. (The project will also be represented by an installation inside the Carnegie Museum itself.) The idea is to integrate art and daily life. And if a borrowed work is damaged, the borrower will be liable for $100 and not, say, $10,000. “We think it’s important to create a totally separate system for valuing art” outside the high-flying international market, says Bishop-Root. Like Transformazium’s involvement, the International Apartment reflected a curatorial priority for the show, which the museum says cost $5.2 million to produce. “We wanted to make sure that we did a show that was rooted in Pittsburgh,” says Byers, the museum’s curator of modern and contemporary art — to have local input inform

“Disarm” (detail), Pedro Reyes’s confiscated guns turned into musical instruments

the International conversation. Baumann and Kukielski moved here from Switzerland and Brooklyn, respectively, for the job. The curators have frequently participated in local art shows and events at venues like Artists Image Resource and the Unblurred gallery crawl. Jasdeep Khaira, a co-founder of local artists’-book publisher Encyclopedia Destructica, presented at the Apartment twice

@rt

WESTMORELAND 30 MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art @rt 30 is now open at 4764 State Route 30 in Greensburg, featuring pieces from the permanent collection, American Marketplace, Art on Tap and more!

Pop-Up Exhibition: The Works of Cydra Vaux

Wednesday - Friday 12 pm - 7 pm Saturday & Sunday 10 am - 5 pm wmuseumaa.org 724-837-1500

and attended several other events. Attendees at the talks typically numbered in the dozens, with guests as prominent as famed performance artist Carolyn Schneeman. Khaira credits the International’s curators for their local interest. “They really did engage with the city,” she says. ANDREW CARNEGIE founded the International in 1896 to expose Pittsburgh to new art and, not incidentally, to grow his brandnew museum’s collection. Among contemporary-art expos, only the Venice Biennale, founded in 1895, is older. Until the 1980s, the International remained among a handful of such shows. Important works from Internationals past remain in the museum’s collection and in the community, like Alexander Calder’s 1958 mobile “Pittsburgh,” at Pittsburgh International Airport. Internationals boost museum attendance, says Carnegie spokesman Jonathan Gaugler, and visits by out-oftowners — including New York dealers and tours run by other museums — rise from 20 percent to 30 percent of total admissions. For instance, Michael Olijnyk, of the Mattress Factory, says International-related tours will visit his North Side museum “almost every weekend” through March: “It’s a constant flow of people.” “It does add a lot to the local scene, because otherwise you would have to travel to three or four continents to see the same thing,” says art dealer Sam Berkovitz, owner of Pittsburgh’s Concept Art Gallery. Most observers say the exhibit benefits local artists, too. “It establishes the criteria of quality,” says Murray Horne, who runs Wood Street Galleries. “It’s inspirational and aspirational for local artists.” Still, with the proliferation of other such festivals and commercial art fairs in cities

from Sydney to Istanbul, some question the International’s usefulness. “I’m not sure it’s as important an exhibition as it was previously,” says curator Vicky Clark, a former longtime museum employee and author of a 1996 history of the International. “I believe they should get rid of it,” says Tom Sokolowski, former executive director of The Andy Warhol Museum. Sokolowski says that the Internet has made contemporary art more accessible to all, even as budgetary constraints and a lack of direct international flights discourage dealers and collectors from visiting Pittsburgh. And like Clark, he says that the Carnegie would serve the local art scene better with more frequent, if smaller, exhibits of contemporary work. The Carnegie’s Byers says it’s not either/ or: The museum, he says, has featured more contemporary work — including big solo shows like 2012’s Ragnar Kjartansson: Song — and plans to continue doing so.

Carnegie International co-curators Dan Byers, Tina Kukielski and Daniel Baumann

But what about that long absence of local artists since 1967’s International, which featured painter Samuel Rosenberg? Tim Kaulen, whose sculptures include the oversized children’s toys on the lawn of the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, admits that 10 years ago, he might have criticized the International for ignoring locals. But now he takes the exhibit for what it is. “There’s always a handful of pieces that just blow my socks off, and I don’t have to go to New York to get that stimulation,” says Kaulen. “Hopefully … it raises the bar and challenges us to do great work.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


EVERYONE REMEMBERS THEIR FIRST. THIS WEEK! OCT 2-4

KISS & CRY NEW HAZLETT THEATER | 8PM

STUDENT TICKETS: $12.50 Use promo code PITT1314 A poetic piece that blurs the boundaries between artistic disciplines, Kiss & Cry brings together a diverse group of Belgian artists to create this sweeping, romantic work.

THROUGH OCT 20 THE RUBBER DUCK PROJECT ALLEGHENY RIVER Artist Florentijn Hofman wants to bring joy with his giant duck, which he claims helps reconnect people with their forgotten childhoods, “My sculptures cause an uproar, astonishment and put a smile on your face.”

GRANULAR SYNTHESIS SPACE GALLERY

Through their manipulation of technology, the works of Granular Synthesis serve to challenge human perception, conditioning and consciousness.

Never before seen artists and performances. A PROJECT OF

TrustArts.org/first

THROUGH OCT 26 Supported by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, two anonymous donors, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the Carol R. Brown Performance Fund, the Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments, the Hillman Foundation, the Richard King Mellon Foundation, The Pittsburgh Foundation, and the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


Paints By Kait www.paintsbykait.com KaitSchoeb@gmail.com www.facebook.com/paintsbykait

Contact for commissioned art!

Throughout the month of October, 10% of all purchases from www.paintsbykait.com will be donated to Susan G. Komen, Pittsburgh.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK FANCHER}

Performance Series

Poets Saeed Jones & Terrance Hayes Wed., Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater And if I ever strangled sparrows,/ it was only because I believed in better songs. Saeed is the editor of BuzzFeed LGBT. and author of When the Only Light is Fire. To be black is to blacken a little every day, I should have said./ And how at the end of a all go without singing. Terrance won the 2011 National Book Award for Poetry. Funded by the Heinz Endowments

Tickets $10 at heartjournalonline.com/event $15 at door. Doors open @ 6:30 p.m.

42

Choreography by Abigail Zbikowski is featured in the newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival.

[DANCE]

EVEN BIGGER “NEW MOVES” {BY STEVE SUCATO} WHEN KELLY-STRAYHORN Theater Execu-

tive Director Janera Solomon was putting together the theater’s inaugural newMoves Contemporary Dance Festival, in 2009, few dance artists outside of Pittsburgh had heard of the theater. Now, in its fifth year, the annual festival and the theater are becoming known nationally. That led to a record 40 emerging-choreographer applicants from around the country seeking to take part. “This was supposed to be the year the festival got smaller,” says Solomon. Instead, this year’s event will be the biggest yet, with nightly performances of works from 18 different dancemakers hailing from Pittsburgh and beyond. There will also be parties, artist talks, workshops and studio visits. Moreover, the theater will co-present the premiere of Nina Sarnelle and Scott Andrews’ interactive theater work group, with two performances on Sat., Oct. 5, at The Alloy Studios in partnership with VIA

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Festival. The work (which CP previewed in its Sept. 18 issue) draws upon conventions of team-building exercises, selfhelp seminars and group therapy. Here’s the lineup for each of the festival’s three 75-minute main-stage programs: Program A: Thu., Oct. 3. “I think of the piece as a journey from concealing to revealing the self/identity,” says New

NEWMOVES CONTEMPORARY DANCE FESTIVAL 7:30 p.m. nightly, Thu., Oct. 2; Fri., Oct. 4; and Sat., Oct 5. (Pre-show mixers 6:30-7:30 p.m. nightly.) Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $15-20 (festival pass: $45). 412-363-3000 or www.kelly-strayhorn.org

York-based Marya Wethers of her latest work, “(w)hole, again” (2013). The 20-minute solo is performed mostly in silence, with Wethers making sounds as she dances. KST Hear/Now series alum Abigail Zbikowski (Columbus) says of her new eight-minute duet, “Guttural Fling,”

that it is “working with a reckless movement vocabulary.” Set to music by The Reatards, the duet taps into a punk aesthetic and seeks to balance extreme physicality with conceptual thinking. Originally created in 2005, Philadelphia-based Megan Mazarick’s “Lovejoy diver” is a duet for her and hip-hop dancer Les Rivera. For newMoves, says Mazarick, the work has been reimagined to focus “on the intersection of ‘us’ as artists, people, archetypes, and moving bodies.” Also on the program will be former August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble dancer Annalee Traylor with her duet “Blue,” about emotional loss, and a work-in-progress excerpt from Pittsburgh-based choreographer Staycee Pearl’s hip-hop infused “Encryption Cipher Variations”. Program B: Fri., Oct. 4. A 2011 festival participant, New York-based choreographer Katie Rose McLaughlin, returns with her new duet, “Fun Molly.” Named after a friend’s poodle, the 15-minute work-in-progress set to toe-tapping pop music “is an exploration of the casual, non-performative action of being extremely virtuosic at something


commonplace (think bartender, butcher),” says McLaughlin. Also returning from 2011 is New York-based dancer/choreographer Mana Kawamura with the premiere of her seven-minute duet “Cloud,” which revisits childhood imaginings about clouds. Rounding out the program are an excerpt from Pittsburgher Shana Simmons’ “Dancing Solo,” with clarinet music by Libby Larsen; an excerpt from State College-based Pennsylvania Dance Theatre director Andre Koslowski’s “Wiegenlied” (lullaby), a work about loneliness and decay; Gia Cacalano — a recent “Brazzy” Awardwinner as outstanding Pittsburgh dancer — in her new solo, “Still Life 2013,” performed in the theater’s lobby; and New York choreographer Samantha Speis’ “The Way It Was and Now,” about internalized racial oppression. Program C: Sat., Oct. 5. In “Connotations: unknown, Part one” (excerpt), emerging choreographer Alexandra Bodnarchuk, of Pittsburgh, draws on experiences gleaned as a performer in Bricolage Productions’ 2012 theater piece Strata,

in which she portrayed “the last girl left at prom” in brief, partly improvised one-on-one encounters with a stream of audience members. Five dancers seek to recapture the visual aesthetic of that experience, as they are briefly glimpsed dancing in and out of spotlights. In New York-based dancer/choreographer Gierre Godley’s seven-minute male duet “3 breaths,” Godley touches on personal experiences dealing with love, birth and death. Set to an original score by Los Angeles composer Jules Gimbrone, “This room this braid,” from New York-based Devynn Emory, is a 15-minute work-in-progress duet influenced by the history of set design in dance. Also on the program are “Back to Black,”a work by Pittsburgh-based Anthony Williams, inspired by his personal experiences with identity, color and the human condition; Pittsburgh-based Jasmine Hearn’s ritualistic solo “mama, am I clean yet?”; and newly formed Pittsburgh troupe Reed Dance in “Chaos,” a work inspired by the 13th-century Latin hymn the “Dies Irae” (Day of Wrath).

THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL WILL BE THE BIGGEST YET.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

The most important exhibition of new INTERNATIONAL art in the US happens in Pittsburgh. Opening weekend October 4–6 View the exhibition, engage with artists at the museum, and join the community celebration in Braddock with Transformazium.

Sponsored by

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

Major support for the 2013 Carnegie International has been provided by the A. W. Mellon Charitable and Educational Fund, The Fine Foundation, the Jill and Peter Kraus Endowment for Contemporary Art, and The Henry L. Hillman Fund. Additional major support has been provided by The Friends of the 2013 Carnegie International. Major gifts and grants have also been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jill and Peter Kraus, Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Ritchie Battle, The Fellows of Carnegie Museum of Art, Marcia M. Gumberg, the National Endowment for the Arts, and The Pittsburgh Foundation.

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


Oct. 17-20,

n o e r a s t h g i l The hell

c t i M s e k o t S d n n o a y i e B Br d n way a d a o r B n i

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF SWENSEN}

Michael Fuller and Marie Elena O’Brien in Soldier’s Heart, at The REP

[PLAY REVIEWS]

SOLDIERING ON {BY COLETTE NEWBY} WE SHOULD applaud a play that takes in-

stitutional misogyny as its subject. But such shows occupy an awkward position: The people who most need to watch them would never be receptive to the message. Soldier’s Heart, by Pittsburghbased playwright Tammy Ryan, treads this difficult path.

SOLDIER’S HEART

continues through Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. $24-27. 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

dway and beyon d Broa with brian stokes mitchell

Hear the best of Broadway by one of Broadway’s best. Tony Award-winner Brian Stokes Mitchell joins your Pittsburgh Symphony and the All-Star College Chorus for a concert jam-packed with favorite songs from classic Broadway musicals.

THURS., OCT. 17 FRI., OCT. 18 SAT., OCT. 19 SUN., OCT. 20

7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:00 PM 2:30 PM

FOR TICKETS: CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT pittsburghsymphony.org TITLE SPONSOR

44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Soldier’s Heart is about a woman named Casey who leaves her son, his father and her mother to go on military duty in Iraq. When she returns, she is changed, and much of the play is spent unraveling just what happened to her, and what created the atmosphere that allowed it to happen. Casey, portrayed by Marie Elena O’Brien, is on stage for almost the entirety of the show at a constant emotional 11. This character is a highlight of the play. This Pittsburgh Playhouse REP production involves many talented people, especially set-designer Gianni Downs, whose work cleverly facilitates numerous scenes with minimal alteration, from a living room to a Marine barracks. The show also uses a video projector, which I suspect the book did not originally call for. At times it is used cleverly — to

emulate a television, to illustrate a setting. But, just as frequently, it portrays Casey’s mental state, a task which O’Brien alone handles much more tastefully. We go to the theater to see acting, not to watch as technology throws foreshadowing in our faces. The soundtrack appears in rare bursts, at times overpowering dialogue with a generic guitar piece that mockingly screams “Oorah!” and later with a melancholy piano that interrupts a perfectly well-realized moment of apotheosis. The scene is already effective — introducing sad music is one step from lighting a sign demanding the audience cry. Perhaps the show’s AV was thought necessary to communicate with those who dismiss the idea of rape culture, or who might be unsympathetic to survivors’ narratives. To me, it feels like director John Amplas did not have enough faith in this play to let his strong actors and solid script breathe on their own. All that aside, this is still absolutely a play worth seeing. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

STATE OF MIND {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} GIVEN JONBENÉT Ramsey, Columbine and various other mass shootings and disasters, Colorado has become a symbol of modern American … something. And whatever that is has been screwed to the wall in 12 Peers Theater’s production of Colorado, directed by company artistic director Vince Ventura on a shoestring budget. Peter Sinn Nachtrieb’s vicious 2004


black comedy focuses on a family so dysfunctional it gives biological relationships a bad name. Colorado borrows heavily from the Ramsey tale, but the “beauty queenâ€? kid is not so shockingly young, and she’s from a much lower-budget home. (Only one bathroom? Really? The housing stock in metro Denver is actually quite young.) Oh, and she’s meaner than any trio of Heathers. Producing artistic director Sara Fisher does good mean as the late but lesslamented Tracey, who “disappearsâ€? between winning her state’s pageant title and entering the national competition. Wonderful “acceptanceâ€? speech, though the Valley accent doesn’t ďŹ t. Enjoying Tracey’s success vicariously is about all that gives meaning to the lives of her parents. Bill Holman and Valentina Benrexi fall apart entertainingly as Ron and Grace, who gave up their respective if unlikely dreams when a surprise pregnancy beckoned. Matt Henderson largely steals the show as the pinnacle (or nadir) of schlemieldom: the most unloved, unlovable little brother in all of history, human and otherwise. Perpetually persecuted, Travis responds with some of the most repulsive behaviors the playwright could conjure. And this is Nachtrieb’s most sympathetic character. Henderson makes it all real — both the grossness and unfairness of Travis’ life — yet still hilarious, especially the Maury Povich bit. (Yes, the TV Maury Povich.)

COLORADO

continues through Oct. 13. 12 Peers Theater at the Grey Box Theatre, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10-20. 412-496-2194 or www.12peerstheater.org

Director Ventura (also set- and sounddesigner) has a good sense of timing and for ďŹ lling the small space with the small cast. Alas, those budgetary shoestrings nearly strangle the show’s production values. Why am I not surprised to see that nobody gets credit (and thus responsibility) for costumes? I don’t doubt that Coloradoans dress tackily, but even they have limits. Colorado picks at the scabs of life in Colorado and in 21st-century America. I wouldn’t claim to understand either, but it’s entertaining. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

STRATFORDUPON-BEN AVON {BY TED HOOVER} BACK IN YE OLDE Shakespearean times,

there was something called “playing

to the pit.â€? Bricolage adds a whole new meaning with Shakesburgh, the ďŹ rst episode of the ďŹ fth season of the troupe’s hugely popular “Midnight Radioâ€? series. Playing to the pit meant aiming less reďŹ ned material to those in the cheap seats down front. With Shakesburgh, Bricolage is playing work by the Immortal Bard (as his wife used to call him) to the “Pitâ€? — as in Pittsburgh — supposing what Macbeth and Romeo & Juliet would be like if set in modern Western Pa.

DRAG HIM TO A SHOW HE'LL ACTUALLY ENJOY!

Broadway’s Smash Comedy About the Sexes Written by Rob Becker

NOW - OCT 20

MIDNIGHT RADIO: SHAKESBURGH

412-456-6666

continues Fri., Oct. 4, and Sat., Oct. 5. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25. 412-394-3353 or www.webbricolage.com

As with all Midnight Radio episodes, we’re supposedly in a radio studio watching performers, musicians and sound artists broadcasting a show ‌ but in reality the event is a theatrical production. Really, the whole thing is just a big comedic romp providing a clutch of actors the excuse to ham it up. And speaking of ham, director Tami Dixon presides over a very porky ďŹ vemember cast: Elena Alexandratos, Patrick Jordan, Maggie Ryan, Sam Turich and Jeffery Carpenter. There is some truly inspired comedy happening on stage, and every single one of them is rock-solid and committed completely to the material. Jason Coll is on hand providing musical background and several fun characters himself, and the amusing multimedia designs are from Andrew J. Paul. The evening’s strongest piece is “Romeo and Juliet of Verona, PAâ€? – replete with all the chipped ham, PennDOT, Steelers and yinzer jokes you’d expect. Jordan and Ryan are especially funny as the star-crossed lovers: “I’d give up all the fries I ever had on a salad just to be with you!â€? The other Midnight Radio episodes I’ve seen all featured one “main courseâ€? segment augmented with jokey skits and scenes. Shakesburgh doesn’t ‌ and I have to say I missed it. This is an evening comprised of appetizers and feels incomplete. And, to go back to my opening remark — the humor never rises particularly high. It’s not bad, certainly, but the jokes are by-the-number and the targets are obvious and easy. Jokes about Primanti’s? Yeah, you’ll get a laugh in Pittsburgh — but there are such things as wit, irony and satire ‌ n’at.

CLOCabaret.com

Groups 412-325-1582

ON SALE NOW!

DECEMBER CEMBER 224-29 4 29 | H HEINZ EINZ H HALL AL 53645"35403(s#090''*$&"55)&"5&3426"3& sGROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930

PNC Broadway Across America-Pittsburgh is a presentation of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Symphony and Broadway Across America.

I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

N E W S

+

FINA L WEEK 3 S!

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


FOR THE WEEK OF

10.0310.10.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., OCT. 03

+ FRI., OCT. 04

{ART}

{EVENTS}

Yasumasa Morimura’s big 30-year career retrospective at The Andy Warhol Museum opens Sunday. But you can hear the renowned artist speak today at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art’s lecture series. Morimura’s lone artistic subject is himself, and the personae and famous images into which he inserts his image, as everyone from Mao and Marilyn to Vermeer’s Girl with the Pearl Earring. The native of Japan explores self-portrait, celebrity, gay and transgender life, art history and popular culture. The Warhol exhibit Yasumasa Morimura: Theater of the Self includes nearly 100 images, many never before seen in the U.S. Bill O’Driscoll Talk: 5 p.m. (McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland; free).

While RADical Days continues through Nov. 10, this weekend marks the year’s final extensive slate of free admittances. Tonight and tomorrow, courtesy of the Allegheny Regional Asset District, Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room screens two programs of award-winning short films from the Ann Arbor Film Festival. Saturday only, the free stuff includes admission to Fort Pitt Museum; on Sunday, visit the Heinz History Center and the National Aviary. Expect lines, though — we hear free stuff is popular. BO Complete RADical Days schedule at www.radworkshere.org

OCT. 05

Sold: Renn Woods In Concert

{ART} Exhibit: Oct. 6-Jan. 12 (117 Sandusky St., North Side: $10-20). 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Apparently there are some art exhibits opening in town this week. Several of them are right there in the Penn Avenue galleries that stage Unblurred. The monthly gallery crawl features exhibits, music and more. Highlights tonight include exhibits at ModernFormations Gallery by both cartoonist Paulette Poullet — who offers Our Disappearing City, evocations of vanishing aspects of Pittsburgh — and images from world-traveling photographer Kurt Garrison. And the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination presents Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists III, its annual multi-media group shows for artists with local roots depicting this here town. BO Unblurred: 7-10 p.m. 4100-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Friendship/ Garfield. Free. 412-389-5521

{MUSIC}

OCT. 05 Head of the Ohio Regatta

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

Carmina Burana, one of the few things from the Middle Ages that is not entirely about war, poverty and disease, opens the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Mellon Grand Classics series. Originally a book composed of 24 poems, Carmina Burana was turned into a 20th-


Old-timers can be jaded, so maybe it takes relative newcomers like Melissa LuVisi and Christine Smith to see how much Pittsburgh’s changed in recent years. The latest initiative of the two young women’s arts start-up Treading Art is Discover Pittsburgh. This three-day series of events — timed to coincide with the opening of the Carnegie International — is built around local creative types working in art, design, music, performance, food and libations. Discover Pittsburgh begins at 7-11 p.m. Thu., Oct. 3, with a Pop-Up Lounge at Wood Street Galleries, with artisan furniture, DJs, video installations, desserts and cocktails. Saturday’s East Liberty Round-Up, from noon-4 p.m., includes 12 venues and outdoor sites near the Penn-Highland intersection, and features everything from live music by Brewer’s Row and artist demos to a Kelly-Strayhorn Theater roaming dance party, cocktails and crostinis at The Livermore, and a Union Pig & Chicken pig roast. (The latter might include a small fee.) On Sunday, enjoy small bites and drinkies, plus acoustic music by Broken Fences’ Morgan Erina, at a lightfare brunch at the artist studios of Lawrenceville’s Radiant Hall (pictured). Discover Pittsburgh wraps on Mon., Oct. 7, with 10 and 11:30 a.m. tours of Maxo Vanka’s amazing murals at Millvale’s St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church — visionary Depression-era works excoriating war and greed. No reservations are required for Discover Pittsburgh events. Bill O’Driscoll Thu., Oct. 3-Sun., Oct. 7. Free. www.treadingart.com

century choral masterpiece and remains one of the most recognizable works of all time. Additionally, PSO composer of the year David Stock will premiere a work written expressly for the orchestra. Brett Wilson 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Heinz Hall, Downtown. $30.75-124.75. 412-392-4900 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

gae in the U.S. The film centers on Jimmy Cliff’s star-making turn as the singer/outlaw Ivan, who leaves the countryside only to find Kingston full of crime, violence and corruption. A week of screenings at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Regent Square Theater begins tonight. BO 8 p.m. 1037 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood. $9. 412-682-4111 or www.pghfilmmakers.org

from juniors and masters to Olympians, and rowers representing more than 75 colleges and universities. Spectators can catch great views from along the Three Rivers Heritage Trail, the 16th Street Bridge, or the footbridge onto Washington’s Landing, where they can catch live announcements. BW 7:30 a.m. Washington’s Landing, North Side. Free. www.headoftheohio.org

oven, where there’ll be pizza, bread and libations. BO Noon4 p.m. 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. Free. 415-518-9921 or unsmoke@gmail.com

OCT. 05 Jerry Seinfeld

{WORDS}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN SHEARER}

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN LAMMIE}

Artist Jiyoo Jye’s studio

Free!Event

Art by Yasumasa Morimura

{STAGE}

OCT. 03

Yasumasa Morimura: Theater of the Self

{SCREEN} The Harder They Come is a landmark of world cinema — the first full-length feature shot in Jamaica about Jamaica, with a Jamaican director and cast. But Perry Henzel’s 1972 film is also a certified cult classic whose soundtrack — with hits like the title tune and “You Can Get It If You Really Want” helped popularize reg-

N E W S

+ SAT., OCT. 05 {SPORT} The regatta is back! No, not the Three Rivers Regatta, but the 27th annual Head of the Ohio Regatta. The rowing event, among the nation’s largest one-day regattas, will host rowers of all ages and skill levels,

+

TA S T E

+

Who knew that the woman who played Fanta in Roots, and show-stoppingly sang “Aquarius” in the movie Hair, was now living in Pittsburgh part time? But Renn Woods — who also played Dorothy in the first national Broadway tour of The Wiz — not only lives here, she’s premiering a musical she wrote at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. Woods developed Sold: Renn Woods in Concert from an earlier autobiographical one-woman show about the life and times of a child star turned adult star. “It’s the story of how life throws curves at people,” says Woods, who heads a dozen-member cast. BO 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 20. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.pghplaywrights.org

Pittsburgh-based Music on the Edge is devoted to contemporary music performed by professional musicians. BO 8 p.m. 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $10-20. 412-624-7529 or music. pitt.edu/tickets

{COMEDY} Jerry Seinfeld — didn’t he have a TV series, once? Now you’ll see him hosting the web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee — or, perhaps, in the flesh, plying his original trade of standup. Seinfeld brings his North American tour to the Benedum Center for two shows tonight. The early show is sold out. BO 7 and 9:30 p.m. 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $50-82. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ SUN., OCT. 06

{MUSIC}

{ART}

Ensemble Son, a contemporary chamber quartet from Stockholm, joins New York City-based quartet Either/Or to open the season at Music on the Edge. The program of all premiere works at Bellefield Hall Auditorium include “Dark Flow,” by Either/Or cofounder Richard Carrick; “Hereabouts,” by Ensemble Son’s Ivo Nelson; and new works by Keeril Makan, Lisa Streich and Zeena Parkins. The University of

Wind down from Pittsburgh’s big art weekend with … more art. Unsmoke Systems Artspace, in Braddock, hosts the daylight opening reception of With Things Inside, a collaborative installation by David Lasky and Brazilianborn artist Carolina Jacobs Ramos that explores “dispersion, decay, fertility and habitat” in sculpture and new-media works. Expect ick — except at the outdoor brick

M U S I C

+

OCT. 06

Sue Grafton

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

Kinsey Millhone is always the one asking the questions in Sue Grafton’s “alphabet series” of mysteries. However, at tonight’s Monday Night Lectures talk, perhaps you can ask Grafton some questions about Kinsey. Grafton will discuss her latest novel, W is for Wasted, courtesy of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. NPR has said of Grafton’s series, “Makes me wish there were more than 26 letters.” BW 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-40. 412-622-8866 or www. pittsburghlectures.org

+ WED., OCT. 09 {WORDS} “Over wine, I warned him / soft—you can’t sleep here; you won’t / wake up,” writes poet Saeed Jones. “In the snuffed room, my touch / serrated / bit of tooth / or switchblade. / Even a peacock feather comes to a point. / He thought / I was kissing him.” San Francisco-based Jones recently won the Pushcart Prize for Poetry. His Pittsburgh debut marks the first installment of the Human Equity Through Art Performance Series, organized by Pittsburgh-based HEArt Online, a journal that promotes social justice through art. Also reading is Pittsburgh’s own National Book Award-winning poet, Terrance Hayes. BO 7:30 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-15. www. heartjournalonline.com

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

8-10pm Gather your friends for a night of food, drinks & trivia.

9:30-1:30am let your voice be heard

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net Check our website for more events & daily happenings 146 44th St . Pgh, PA 15201

www.cattivo.biz

THEATER THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Six adolescents compete for the coveted Spelling Bee Championship. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 6. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. 3PENNY OPERA. Presented by the Red Masquers. ThuSat. Thru Oct. 12. Peter Mills Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. 50 SHADES! THE MUSICAL. Parody performance. Presented by Act5 Entertainment. Sun., Oct. 6, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library Of Homestead Music Hall, Munhall. 412-368-5225. ACCOMPLICE. A wife and her lover who are plotting to murder her stuffy husband. The murder ensues .. and then the husband reappears. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru Oct. 12. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. ALWAYS IN MY HEART. A 1-woman play about St. Marianne Cope, who spent 30 years helping patients with leprosy. Sat., Oct. 5,

7 p.m. Sisters of St. Francis, Millvale. 412-821-2200 x. 217. BINGO! A riotous musical about a group of die-hard bingo players who never miss their weekly game. Thu-Sun. Thru Oct. 5. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. CABARET. The classic musical about Berlin at the end of the 1920s. Thru Oct. 6. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. COLORADO. Dark comedy about the disappearance of a teenage beauty queen. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri-Sun. Thru Oct. 13. The Grey Box Theatre, Lawrenceville. 412-586-7744. COMEDY OF ERRORS. Presented by Seton Hill University’s Theatre & Dance Program. Thru Oct. 5. Seton Hill University Performing Arts Center, Greensburg. 724-552-2929. COTTON PATCH GOSPEL. Story retelling the life of Jesus in modern day, rural Georgia. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Saltworks Theater Company, Oakland. 412-621-6150 x 201. DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN. A comedic & prehistoric look at the

Thunderbird Cafe

Welcomes

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

FOURTH RIVER REVIVAL MONDAY, OCT. 7 • 9PM

OPEN STAGE WITH SGD

TUESDAY, OCT. 1 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

MATT BOOTH QUARTET

RISING SUN

WEDNESDAY, OCT 9 • 9PM JAM ROCK

TEMPURA FRIED ZUCCHINI TOPPED WITH PONZA SAUCE AND WASABI SLAW

OPEN FOR LUNCH

*ALL TACOS MADE ON HANDMADE CORN TORTILLAS KITCHEN HOURS SUN - THUR 12PM TO 12AM FRI - SAT 12PM TO 1AM

48

PUBLICNOTICES COMEDY

TURBINE Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017

7

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

P UB L IC N OTI C E S@ PG HC IT YPAPE R . C O M

ADAMS ALE SATURDAY, OCT. 5 • 9PM JAM ROCK

BRAISED PORK BELLY SEARED AND TOPPED WITH A APPLE VINAIGRETTE SLAW AND COTIJA CHEESE

dance, text & theatre. Thru Oct. 4. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. LORDY, LORDY MARTY’S 40. Comedic interactive dinner theater. Sat., Oct. 5, 7 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. MIDNIGHT RADIO: SHAKESBURGH. Comedic homage to Shakespeare, Pittsburgh-style. Thru Oct. 5. Bricolage, Downtown. 412-471-0999. OUR TOWN. Thornton Wilder’s classic play about a small, early-20th century community. Thru Oct. 27. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. SOLD: RENN WOODS IN CONCERT. An autobiographical tour de force written by & starring Renn Woods. Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 3 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 3 p.m. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. SOLDIER’S HEART. Play by Tammy Ryan about the struggles women face in the military. Presented by The REP. Thu-Sun. Thru Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. YOUNG PLAYWRIGHTS FESTIVAL. Six one-act plays. Oct. 5-6. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

THU 03

FRIDAY, OCT. 4 • 9PM JAM ROCK

PIG APPLE

battle of the sexes. Wed-Sun. Thru Oct. 20. Pittsburgh CLO, Downtown. 412-456-6666. DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER. Confusion arises as Bernard plans a weekend w/ his mistress, sends his wife to her mother, hires a cook to prepare gourmet delights, & uses his best friend to provide his alibi. Presented by Stage Right. Thu-Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Boyd Community Center, O’Hara. 412-228-0566. AN EVENING OF ONE-ACTS. Oct. 3-5. California University, California. 724-938-5943. GOD OF CARNAGE. Two sets of parents get together to discuss the trouble that occurs when their young children are in an altercation at school. Fri, Sat. Thru Oct. 12. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES. Adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s thriller. Oct. 4-6 and Oct. 8-12. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. KISS & CRY. A woman nearing the end of her life recounts her greatest loves in this mix of film,

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 28 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CURT WOOTTON – “PITTSBURGH DAD”. 8 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 04 BEST OF THE BURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE. Fri, 8 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. BILL BENDEN, TOM MUSIAL, DAVID KAYE. Southpointe Rink Rats Funny Fundraiser. 6:30 p.m. South Strabane Social Hall, Washington. 724-914-7818. COSTAKI ECONOMOPOULOS. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. MONDO W/ DEREK MINTO. 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SHOWCASE OF COMEDY W/ DEREK MINTO & MORE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. YO! GLORIA: IMPROV. RAP. COMEDY. 9 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

FRI 04 - SUN 06 SOMMORE. 8 & 10 p.m., Sat., Oct. 5, 7 & 9 p.m. and Sun., CONTINUES ON PG. 49


Oct. 6, 7 p.m. The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

SAT 05

BYOT: BRING YOUR OWN TEAM. 11 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. THE DEATH SHOW: AN Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. IMPROVISED FUNERAL. 9 p.m. 412-431-9908. Steel City Improv Theater, OFF THE RECORD PREVIEW Shadyside. 412-404-2695. SHOW. Musical satire JERRY SEINFELD. spoofing Pittsburgh 7 & 9:30 p.m. Benedum issues & personalities. Center, Downtown. Supports Urban 412-456-6666. Pathways Charter THE LUPONES: MADE School. 7 p.m. Byham UP MUSICALS. Sat. www. per a p Theater, Downtown. Thru Oct. 12 Steel pghcitym o .c 412-456-6666. City Improv Theater, STAND-UP COMEDY Shadyside. 412-404-2695. OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. MIKE CODY & FRIENDS The BeerHive, Strip District. COMEDY SHOW. 8 & 10 p.m. 412-904-4502. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. WELL KNOWN STRANGERS. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR 10 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, THE SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. cultures, & innovations. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Nov. 4 Steel City Downtown. 412-258-2700. Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large 404-2695. collection of automatic roll-played TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Thru Dec. 16 Steel City Improv musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY

WED 09

FULL LIST E N O LIN

VISUALART

EXHIBITS

“Faith,” by Christopher Ruane, from his solo show at East Liberty Presbyterian Church

NEW THIS WEEK 3RD STREET GALLERY. 2013 Aqueous Open. The Pittsburgh Watercolor Society presents its 67th Annual International Exhibition. Opening reception: Oct. 5, 5-8 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Theater of the Self. Photographic reprisals by Yasumasa Morimura. Opens Oct. 6. North Side. 412-237-8300. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Barbara Miller, Frank Bruno. Feat. watercolors & photography. Artist reception: Oct. 5, 6-9 p.m. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 2013 Carnegie International. Exhibition of new international art in the United States. Curated by Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, & Tina Kukielski. Opening gala: Oct. 4, 7-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-622-3131. EAST LIBERTY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Christopher Ruane. Photography exhibit. Opening reception: Oct. 4, 6-8:30 p.m. East Liberty. 412-441-3800. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Modern Moods: Paintings of Pittsburgh Between the Wars. Work by Claire Hardy. Opens Oct. 3. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Remaining Nameless. Work by Nick & Noell. Opening reception: Oct. 4, 7 p.m. Garfield. 412-361-2262. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Artists III. Group show feat. all media. Opening reception: Oct. 4, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. MENDELSON GALLERY. Idiosyncrasy. Work by Carolyn

Alexandra Frischling. Opening reception: Oct. 3, 6-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MINE FACTORY. SIX ROOMS. Charlotte Dumas, Ed Panar, Gregory Halpern, Melissa Catanese, Todd Hido, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs. Opening reception: Oct. 4, 2-7 p.m. Homewood. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Our Disappearing City: New Works About Old Things. Work by Paulette Poullet. Things Are Looking Up: Abstract Tourist & Architectural Photography. Work by Kurt Garrison. Opening reception Oct. 4, 7-10 p.m. Garfield. 412-362-0274. PENN AVENUE ARTS DISTRICT. Unblurred Gallery Crawl. Oct. 4. Garfield. 412-441-6147-ext.-7. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Touch in Real Time. Work by Holly Hanessian. Opens Oct. 4. Downtown. 412-261-7003. TRUNDLE MANOR. Coffin Cuties Art Opening. Photography by Mike Hearse. Opening reception: Oct. 5, 7 p.m. & by appointment. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. With Things Inside. Installation by Carolina Ramos & David Lasky. Opening reception: Oct. 6, noon-5 p.m. & by appointment. Braddock. 415-518-9921.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. HOLDUP in the HOOD. Multimedia work by Francis Crisafio. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Proud to be an American? Photographs by Bea Chiappelli. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM.

I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Predator of Prey. Work by Victoria Jon. Downtown. 412-325-6766. BE GALLERIES. Deliberate Voyages. Paintings by Wesley Smith. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BFG CAFE. New Artists Showcase. Group show. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. Fragmentation. New Works by Seth Clark. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. Threaded: A Glass Exhibition. A collection of contemporary glass and mixed media works by five Pittsburgh-based artists: Jason Forck, Elizabeth Fortunato, Theo Keller, Matt Eskuche, & Jarrod Futscher Artist reception Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m.; also open Oct. 19 during the BrewHaHa, noonmidnight. Email or call to view the exhibition by appointment. South Side. 843-469-8342. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Zivi Aviraz, Matthew Spangler, Avery Pratt. Group show. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Marsha’s Peace Art; Abstract & Pointillist. Work by Marsha Lee Moore. Bloomfield.

MON 07

TUE 08

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

$

MONTOUR HOTEL

1.75 MILLER LITE BOTTLES

DURING ALL PENGUINS GAMES

$

2 20oz. MILLER LITE DRAFTS PENS HOCKEY SPECIAL

$

Zano’s Pubhouse

CONTINUES ON PG. 51

N E W S

Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology & History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Archaeological materials exploring the cultural history of the Arabian Peninsula. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Explore the complex interplay between culture, nature and biotechnology. Open Fridays 5-8, Saturdays 12-4 & Sundays 12-4. Garfield. 412-223-7698. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Unconquered: History Meets Hollywood at Fort Pitt. Original movie props, photographs, &

+

A R T S

+

2.25 20oz. MILLER LITE DRAFTS DURING ALL PENS GAMES OPEN SUNDAYS!! FOLLOW US @ZANOSPUB

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

49


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

Rubber Duck Bridge Party

WET YOUR

WHISTLE

$ 1 PBR Drafts 9-11PM WEDNESDAYS

OCT. 3, 10–11PM DEREK WOODZ BAND, AMRCNDREAMING

HOME OF BALLBREAKING FUN!!!

OCT. 10, 10–11PM BURLESQUE SHOW

SUN. OCT 6, 6-9PM

PGH’s Only Ping Pong Table

$31/2hr

7 Pool Tables

EARL RAYS (CLEVELAND, OH) A.T.S.

TUES. OCT. 15, 10–11PM SQUIDLING BROTHERS SIDESHOW (PHILADELPHIA)

$6hr

ALL DAY EVERY DAY

$ 1.75PBR Drafts 1314 EAST CARSON ST. SOUTHS I D E

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

costumes alongside 18th century artifacts & documents, comparing & contrasting historical events w/ Hollywood depictions. EVENT: Pittsburgh Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history Cultural Trust’s circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. , 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL Downtown CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with CRITIC: classes, car & carriage museum. , 18, a student Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. from Oakland HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable WHEN: complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. It was an artsy and fun time — [with] people selling 412-767-9200. handmade jewelry, soaps, clothes and amazing food, KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the it was just great. The best part of it all, though, is that other Frank Lloyd Wright house. everyone was gathered there for the sole purpose of Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. seeing a giant rubber duck, and remembering their Tours of a restored 19th-century, childhoods, when things were much more simple. It middle-class home. Oakmont. was so lively and the bridge was packed with people. 412-826-9295. The rubber ducky was something that many people can MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY relate to and it showed we were all kids once and that’s LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. all that mattered. Seeing the duck floating down the Monroeville. 412-373-7794. river was a great way to see how far you’ve really come NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to since your days in diapers. A few of my artistically inclined more than 600 birds from over friends kept mentioning it throughout the summer and 200 species. With classes, lectures, it sounded really cool. A 40-foot duck? Immediately I demos and more. North Side. thought, “Sign me up.” All in all, it was a great adventure 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 into the Pittsburgh art scene. rooms helping to tell the story B Y BRE T T W I L S ON of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. community artifacts from 1881HAUNTED WALKING TRAIL. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. 1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. Live bands, karaoke, & DJs every This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY Friday & Saturday. Benefits The site features log house, blacksmith CENTER. Pennsylvania’s Civil War. Autism Society of Pittsburgh & shop & gardens. South Park. In-depth look at Pennsylvania’s The Spectrum Charter School. 412-835-1554. significant contributions during hauntedhillshayride.com Thru Nov. 2 PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY the Civil War feat. artifacts, military MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Haunted Hills, North Versailles. encampments, life-like museum exhibits. Includes displays, walking THE SCAREHOUSE. Haunted house figures, more. From Slavery to tours, gift shop, picnic area and open select dates through Nov. 2. Trolley Theatre. Washington. Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s Thru Nov. 2 Etna. 412-781-5885. 724-228-9256. role in the anti-slavery movement. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & Ongoing: Western PA Sports BOTANICAL GARDEN. Summer Museum, Clash of Empires, and Flower Show. Glass art surrounded exhibits on local history, more. by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Strip District. 412-454-6000. RADICAL DAYS. Dozens of Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS cultural establishments will offer Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 HISTORY CENTER. Museum free admission on designated days. indoor rooms & 3 outdoor commemorates Pittsburgh Visit radworkshere.org for full gardens feature exotic industrialists, local history. schedule. Thru Nov. 10 plants and floral displays Sewickley. 412-741-4487. from around the world. SOLDIERS & SAILORS Oakland. 412-622-6914. MEMORIAL HALL. www. per pa PINBALL PERFECTION. Military museum pghcitym .co Pinball museum & PLEIN AIR MT. LEBANON dedicated to honoring players club. West View. FESTIVAL. Open air painting military service members 412-931-4425. festival. Demos, competitions, since the Civil War through PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. vendors, more. pleinairmtl.com artifacts & personal mementos. Lifeforms. Exhibition of natural Oakland. 412-621-4253. Thru Oct. 6 Mt. Lebanon imagery in lampworked glass. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Municipality, Mt. Lebanon. Curated by Robert Mickelsen. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic 412-343-3412. Friendship. 412-365-2145. saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 APPLE FESTIVAL. Feat. apple CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka animals, including many related treats & homemade lunch. Murals. Mid-20th century murals endangered species. Highland depicting war, social justice and the 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Smithfield United Park. 412-665-3639. immigrant experience in America. Church of Christ, Downtown. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. Millvale. 421-681-0905. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. BEERS & BLUES FESTIVAL. Springdale. 724-274-5459. Live music, 20 breweries, more. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL Jergel’s Rhythm Grille, Warrendale. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the HAUNTED HILLS HAYRIDE/ 724-799-8333. Homestead Mill. Steel industry and VALLEY OF DARKNESS DOGTOBERFEST 2013. Specialty

$2.50 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS ALL DAY, EVERY DAY ‘till Midnight

$5.50 PBR POUNDER & FIREBALL SHOT Thursdays, all day ‘till Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

3 NIGHTS ONLY!

Brandon Small

Fri., Sept. 27

SPECIAL

THU 03 - WED 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

E AMATEUR NTIT. 2 WED, OC

NEXT: Digital Playground’s XXX Superstar:

Bibi Jones

THU 03 - SUN 06

FRI 04

OCT. 17-19 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH 50

FESTIVALS

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

HOLIDAY

THU 03 - WED 09

SAT 05

vendors, Pooch Pride Parade, training demos, more. 11 a.m.4 p.m. SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-780-4986.

SAT 05 - SUN 06 ART IN THE PARK-ING LOT. Over 50 local artists, food vendors, live music, children’s activities, more. Academy Ave. Parking Lot. Oct. 5-6 Mount Lebanon Business District, Mt. Lebanon. 412-721-4320.

DANCE THU 03 - SAT 05 NEWMOVES CONTEMPORARY DANCE FESTIVAL. New work by young choreographers from Pittsburgh & around the U.S. Location information at kellystrayhorn.org/festivals/newmoves/ Oct. 3-5 412-363-3000.

FRI 04 EXPRESS BURLESQUE. Presented by RED Productions. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 323-819-3777.

SAT 05 EXPRESS BURLESQUE. Presented by RED Productions. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 323-819-3777.

FUNDRAISERS THU 03 OAKLAND CATHOLIC’S LEADING LADIES GALA. Entertainment, live auction, more. Benefits Oakland Catholic High School. 6 p.m. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Downtown. 412-682-6797.

FRI 04 FUSE PITTSBURGH FUNDRAISER. Hors d’oeuvres, live music, more. Benefits FUSE, an after-school & summer program for Wilkinsburg youth. 1348 Denniston St., Squirrel Hill. 6-8 p.m. LAWRENCEVILLE GOURMET SPAGHETTI DINNER. Benefits the Bernard Dog Run. 4 p.m. Teamster Temple, Lawrenceville. 412-345-1564. WPMSDC AWARDS GALA. Recognizing & celebrating achievements in minority business development. Benefits Western Pennsylvania Minority Supplier Development Council. 5:30 p.m. Lemont, Mt. Washington. 412-391-4423.

SAT 05 PGH PARTY FOR A PURPOSE: CUT LOOSE W/ REUSE. Live music, crafts, more. Benefits the Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse. 9 p.m. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. PITT-GREENSBURG 5K RUN/FUN WALK. Benefits the Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society & the Pitt-Greensburg Alumni Association. 7 a.m. University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Greensburg. 724-837-7040. PITTSBURGH STEPTREK 2013. Explore the area’s numerous public stairs. 21st & Josephine Streets,


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

412-681-5225. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined with some of the world’s most talented contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Gravitational Pull. Multimedia work by Megan Biddle. Reception Oct. 18, 6-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. The Clayton Days, Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz. Feat. his 65-photo collection. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Text meets Texture. Work by Nancy McNary-Smith & David Montano. Art Walk: Oct. 4, 5:30-8 p.m. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Raw Images. Photographs by Jill & Flannery Joyce. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Different Dimensions: The “Unpainting” Exhibit. Group show feat. mixed media, wall ceramics, fiber, sculpture, mosaics, more. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. Oakland. 412-268-2434. THE INN. Dos Solos. Emerging Artist Enterprise Series, Vol. II. Feat. new work by Gianna Paniagua & Alex Hamrick, curated by Nikkia Margaret Hall. Lawrenceville. JAMES GALLERY. Necessary Fictions. Work by Patricia Bellan-Gillen. West End.

South Side. Benefits the South Side Slopes Neighborhood Association. 12 p.m. 1-888-718-4253. RUN SHADYSIDE. 5K run & 1-mile walk benefiting the Boys & Girls Club of Shadyside. Begins at Walnut & Bellefonte Sts., Shadyside. 8 a.m. 412-681-8575. WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S. act.alz.org/pittsburgh2013 7 a.m. Heinz Field, North Side. 412-261-5040.

SUN 06 ANNUAL MEMORIAL RIVER WALK. Benefits Family Hospice &

412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MALL AT ROBINSON. Perspective 2013: A Photography Exhibition. Robinson. 412-788-0816. MATTRESS FACTORY. DETROIT: Artists in Residence. Work by Design 99, Jessica Frelinghuysen, Scott Hocking, Nicola Kuperus & Adam Lee Miller, Russ Orlando, Frank Pahl. Janine Antoni. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory. Site-specific installation focusing on the body w/ relation to place & space. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MERRICK ART GALLERY. Gary Henzler Solo Exhibit. New Brighton. 724-846-1130. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Alien She. Work by Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, & Stephanie Syjuco. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. common discourse. Group show feat. work by Jen Blazina, Ron Desmett, Michael Janis, Susan Longini, Carmen Lozar, Heather Joy Puskarich, Demetra Theofanous & Randy Walker. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. North Hills Art Center Member Show. Feat. oil, watercolor, pastel, stoneware, metal, pottery, & etching. Ross. 412-364-3622. PANZA GALLERY. Sanctuary. Multimedia exhibit by members of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras

Palliative Care. 9 a.m. North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side. 412-572-8812. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. CANCER CARING CENTER WALK AT THE WATERFRONT. Feat. honorary chair, Steeler Cam Heyward. 9 a.m. Waterfront Town Center, Homestead. 412-622-1212. PAWS FOR THE CURE. 1-mile dog walk. Benefits Susan G. Komen

AT THE TOP OF THE

were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Artist of the Year: Akiko Kotani. Emerging Artist of the Year: Lenka Clayton. Master Visual Artists: Preserving the Legacy. Work by Tadao Arimoto, Gary Jurysta, Contance Merriman, Risë Nagin, Chuck Olson, Marjorie F. Shipe, Paul Zelevansky, more. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MEDIA ARTS GALLERY. Ireland. A collection of three years of photography abroad. Downtown. 412-397-3813. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Poptastic! The Art of Burton Morris. Retrospective feat. nearly 50 works. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. GREEN. Photographs by Sue Abramson, Adam Amengual, Kim Beck, Peter Beste, Joe Johnson, Judy Natal, & Ed Panar. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. ENOUGH Violence: Artists Speak Out. Feat. over 40 works by US & European contemporary artists. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Oasis. Paintings by Leslie Ansley. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Duck! Showcase of original animation art, comic art & artifacts of some of cartooning’s most iconic quackers. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. 365 Critters. Animal illustrations by Jeff Brunner. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

MOBILE LEARNING CURVE.

With Mobile Learning @ The Hill, minds are engaged 24/7. Learning happens anytime,anywhere. Full-time students get iPads. Professors enhance courses with technology. There’s even a Center for Innovative Teaching that supports the entire academic community. Ready to learn more about what makes us a leader in using mobile technology for education? Register for our October 20th Open House at

setonhill.edu/events.

Pittsburgh. 9 a.m. Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. 412-342-0500. SAVORING SEWICKLEY. Feat. small plates by local restaurants. 6-9 p.m. Sewickley Public Library, Sewickley. 412-741-3974. WALK TO CURE PSORIASIS. Choose between 1K or 5K routes. Benefits the National Psoriasis Foundation. 8 a.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 1-877-825-9255.

POLITICS THU 03 REBEL CITIES FORUM. Video CONTINUES ON PG. 52

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

[VISUAL ART] presentation & panel discussion. Presented by the International Socialist Organization, Pittsburgh Chapter. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-860-9513.

SUN 06 GUN SAFETY IN A FREE SOCIETY: AN ALLEGHENY COUNTY CONVERSATION. Location available after registration. pittsburgh.palwv.org 1-5 p.m. 412-261-4284.

WED 09 REP. BRIAN K. SIMS LECTURE & MEET & GREET. 1 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1878.

LITERARY THU 03 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323. LORD OF THE RINGS: HOW TO READ J.R.R. TOLKIEN. w/

Michael D.C. Drout. Wean Hall. 4:30-6 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000.

FRI 04 REMEMBERING HIROSHIMA, IMAGINING PEACE. Lecture & book signing w/ author & artist, Elin O’Hara Slavick. rememberinghiroshima.org 4:30 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-268-2000. SANCTUARY: WRITING TO ART WORKSHOP. Experience the romance between image & text in a workshop facilitated by Laurie Arnold-McMillan. View original art in the “Sanctuary” exhibit & create writing in response. There is an opportunity to read the work at the closing reception, 7 p.m., Oct. 17. 7-9 p.m. Panza Gallery, Millvale. 412-337-4976.

SAT 05 FLASH FICTION READINGS. Feat. 6 top stories from the 9th Annual Flash Fiction Contest. 2-3 p.m. Ligonier Beach, Ligonier. 724-593-7294. KAREN DIETRICH. Reception & signing for her book, The Girl Factory. 7-10 p.m. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. POETS AT THE PUMP HOUSE: JAN BEATTY, PAOLO CORSO, & PETER ORESICK. 1:30 p.m. Homestead Pump House, Munhall. 412-831-3871.

Real hook ups, real fast.

Free

TRY FOR

Try it Free!

412.566.1861 Local Numbers: 1.800.926.6000 Ahora en Español 18+

52

www.livelinks.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

MON 07

TUE 08

12 STEPS TO PEACE: USING CREATIVITY TO TRANSFORM ANXIETY. Writing & discussion group. Mon, 6-7 p.m. Thru Nov. 25 Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-337-4976. OPEN POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. First Mon of every month, 7-10 p.m. Brentwood Library, Brentwood. 412-882-5694. READING ROUND TABLE. Feat. plays from August Wilson & new works by up & coming playwrights. First Mon of every month, 7 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. SUE GRAFTON. Monday Night Lecture Series. 7:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-8866.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

TUE 08 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 09 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. HEART READING SERIES. Poetry reading by Saeed Jones & Terrance Hayes. Presented by Human Equity Through Art. 7:30 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610. RODEF SHALOM BOOK REVIEW SERIES. Helen Faye Rosenblum discusses Transatlantic by Column McCann. 10:30 a.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566.

KIDSTUFF THU 03 - WED 09 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BALL. 500 beach balls, larger inflatable balls, a disco ball & music. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TAPESCAPE IN THE MAKING: WATCH US BUILD IT! Watch the museum staff build a new art installation made of entirely of packing tape. Thru Oct. 17 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks by Chris Beauregard, Katie Ford, Scott Garner, Isla Hansen & Luke Loeffler. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 04 ROCK BAND! Open stage for teen singers, songwriters & instrumentalists to play w/ Emma Cox & Elliot Beck. Presented by

WED 09 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 03

Art by William McAllister

Painter Nita Engle called watercolor the most active of mediums: The watercolor actually moves on the paper, making it “almost a performance art.” And you’ll rarely find as wide a range of this literally fluid art form as at the Pittsburgh

Watercolor Society’s 67th Annual Aqueous Open, at 3rd Street Gallery. The exhibit, juried by nationally recognized watercolorist and teacher Frank Webb, features work by dozens of local and international artists. Opening reception: 5-8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. 220 Third St., Carnegie. 412-276-5233 or www.3rdstreetgallery.net

Hope Academy. Fri, 5:30-7 p.m. Thru Dec. 27 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 43.

FRI 04 - SAT 05 COLLABORATIVE MURAL WORKSHOP. Create a minimural based on historic Hill District photographs. Part of the MAVUNO Artist in Residence Program. Oct. 4-5, 6-7:30 p.m. Sweetwater Center for the Arts, Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

SAT 05 ARTKIDS: FOCUS POCUS. Magical art workshop. 11 a.m. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. CATALYST OF THE INVENTION REVOLUTION. Cooking activities, video games, board games, crafts, & more to spark inventiveness in the household. Ages 10-14. 2 p.m. TechShop, East Liberty. 877-429-2370. JR. ROLLER DERBY ORIENTATION. Ages 10-17. First Sat of every month, 11 a.m. Thru Dec. 7 Neville Roller Drome, Neville Island. 520-977-1207. PLAY W/ CLAY ON THE POTTER’S WHEEL. Ages 3+. Sat, 12-2 p.m. Thru Oct. 5 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 05 - SUN 06 LITTLE MERMAID. Original, interactive, musical theater

production. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 6 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. POSITIVE SPACE VS. NEGATIVE SPACE. Create shapes & explore how light & darkness can affect which part of an image catches your eye. Oct. 5-6 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 07 MUNCHKIN MONDAYS BUSY BOTS. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

OUTSIDE THU 03 T’AI CHI IN MELLON PARK: RECONNECT W/ NATURE. Thu, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Thru Oct. 24 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

SAT 05 EATING GREEN, EATING WILD! Includes an introduction to plant identification & an outdoor walk. 1-4 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

SAT 05 - SUN 06 KAYAKING DISCOVERY COURSE. Presented by L.L.Bean. Sat, Sun, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Oct. 13 North Park, Allison Park. 412-318-1200.

2013 EVENT SHOWCASE & EXPO. Feat. 100+ event service & product vendors. 4-8 p.m. Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-377-2923. ANTIQUES APPRAISAL DAY. 4-8 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. ARTIST TALK: YASUMASA MORIMURA. Part of the Yasumasa Morimura: Theater of the Self exhibit at the Andy Warhol Museum. 5 p.m. Kresge Theater, CMU, Oakland. 412-237-8300. DISCOVER PITTSBURGH: POP-UP LOUNGE. Feat. artisan furniture, DJ, video installations, cocktails, more. 7-11 p.m. Wood Street Galleries, Downtown. 925-963-3097. EMPATHY FIRST. A compassionate communication & conflict transformation study group based on the work of peace activist, Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. 7424 Washington St., Swissvale. First and Third Thu of every month, 7 p.m. 412-271-7660. GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5:30 p.m. Luke Wholey’s Wild Alaskan Grille, Strip District. 412-392-4513. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LEGAL RESOURCES IN PITTSBURGH: ALLEGHENY COUNTY LAW LIBRARY INFO SESSION. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. PITTSBURGH OPERA RESIDENT ARTISTS. Performing “opera’s greatest hits.” 11:30 a.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TEA & HERBS: DRINKING & OTHER USES. 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 03 - SAT 05 40TH ANNUAL COMMUNAL STUDIES ASSOCIATION


CONFERENCE. communalstudies. org Oct. 3-5 Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500.

music, pig roast, drum circle, roaming dance party, live graffiti, demos & offerings from local businesses, more. Penn & Highland Aves., East Liberty. 21+ STARRY NIGHTS. Star12-4 p.m. 925-963-3097. gazing on the rooftop observatory, GLOBAL LINKS GRAND live music, zero-gravity climbing OPENING. International wall, more. 6-10 p.m. Carnegie medical relief agency opening, Science Center, North Side. feat. food trucks, children’s 412-237-3400. activities, more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. CONSTELLATION COFFEE Global Links, Green Tree. OPENING CELEBRATION. 412-361-3424. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Constellation Coffee, GROUP. Performance art. Lawrenceville. 814-248-6896. Part of VIA. 1 & 5 p.m. The GARFIELD NIGHT MARKET. Alloy Studios, Friendship. Feat. local vendors. Part of 412-363-4321. Unblurred. N. Pacific Ave. between INCLINE HAUNTED WALKING Penn & Dearborn, Garfield. TOUR. Begins at the bottom 6-10 p.m. 412-434-7080. of the Monongahela Incline. Sat. MAIN STREET WALKING Thru Oct. 26 412-302-5223. TOUR: MT. WASHINGTON & KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. SHILOH ST. Meet at Grandview Korean grammar & basic Ave. & Shiloh St., Mt. Washington. conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. 12-1 p.m. 412-471-5808. Carnegie Library, Oakland. PARTY IN THE TROPICS. 412-622-3151. Cocktails, dancing, more. KOREAN II. For those 7-11 p.m. Phipps Conservatory who already have a basic & Botanical Garden, Oakland. understanding of Korean & are 412-622-6914. interested in increasing proficiency. RAINBOW RISING Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. COFFEE HOUSE. For 412-622-3151. gay, lesbian, bisexual MAPLE FOREST and transgendered BONSAI WORKSHOP. individuals and 10 a.m.-12 p.m. friends. Music, games, Phipps Garden www. per a p movies, entertainment Center, Shadyside. pghcitym o .c and more. Unitarian 412-441-4442 x 3925. Universalist Congregation, MODERNISM Smithton. First Fri of every DOWNTOWN WALKING month 724-872-5056. TOUR. Architecture & design SIP & PAINT. Painting workshop. walking tour. Meet at Mellon 6-8 p.m. Culture Cloz, East Liberty. Square, William Penn Place, 412-361-2569. Downtown. 9:30-11:30 a.m. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. WOMEN OF FAITH 2013. Feat. At the Starbucks inside well-known Christian authors, Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. performers, more. Oct. 4-5 Target, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. Petersen Events Center, Oakland. ZOMBIE WALK & 1-888-493-2484. DOUBLE FEATURE. Movies TBA. 6 p.m. The Parkway Theater, McKees Rocks. 412-766-1668. KID MANIA CONSIGNMENT SALE. Oct. 4-6 Washington County Fairgrounds, Washington. ART UNDER GLASS. Craft 724-344-1815. & food vendors, live music, pumpkin patch, corn maze, more. Sat, Sun. Thru Oct. 27 Bedner’s AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE Farm & Greenhouse, McDonald. DAY PARADE. Begins on Blvd. of 724-926-2541. the Allies, in front of the Pittsburgh HARVEST FAIR. Marketplace Post-Gazette, Downtown. 11 a.m. feat. jewelry, furniture, antiques, 412-392-0610. linens, Christmas decorations, ART IN THE KITCHEN TASTING more. Oct. 5-6 Fox Chapel TOUR. Self-driving tour, presented Presbyterian Church, Fox Chapel. by the Women’s Committee of 412-963-8243. the Westmoreland Museum of MAKE YOUR OWN American Art. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. GLASS PUMPKIN. Sat, Sun, 724-837-1500. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thru Nov. 3 BLESSING OF THE BICYCLES. Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 9 a.m. East Liberty Lutheran 412-779-2471. Church, East Liberty. THATCAMP. Humanities & 412-362-1712. technology camp. pittsburgh2013. DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S thatcamp.org Oct. 5-6 PITTSBURGH. Dance classes Chatham University, Shadyside. designed for people w/ 412-365-1100. Parkinson’s Disease to explore the art of dance & live music. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Sat, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Thru Nov. 23 HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Weekly letter writing event. Sun, Strip District. 412-387-2542. 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. DISCOVER PITTSBURGH: 412-683-3727. EAST LIBERTY ROUND-UP. Live

FRI 04

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 04 - SAT 05

FRI 04 - SUN 06

SAT 05 - SUN 06

SAT 05

SUN 06

ART LENDING COLLECTION OPENING & CELEBRATION BRUNCH. Feat. works drawn from a variety of sources, including all of the artists participating in the 2013 Carnegie International. Presented by Transformazium. Braddock Carnegie Library, Braddock. 412-351-5357. THE ART OF ACTING. Workshop w/ Cindy Jackson. 2 p.m. 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-337-5882. BEECHVIEW PLANT SWAP. Broadway & Beechview Aves., Beechview. beechviewcommunitygarden. blogspot.com 2-5 p.m. 412-638-6320. DISCOVER PITTSBURGH: OPEN ARTIST STUDIOS BRUNCH. Mixer w/ local artists feat. light fare, live music, art for sale, more. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Radiant Hall, Lawrenceville. 925-963-3097. FAMILY HOSPICE & PALLIATIVE CARE ANNUAL MEMORIAL WALK. 3K walk feat. entertainment, complimentary refreshments, & family activities. 9 a.m. North Shore Riverfront Park, North Side. 412-572-8812. LAWRENCEVILLE HOSPITALITY HOUSE TOUR. Self-guided tour beginning at Allegheny Cemetery, Butler St. entrance. 12-5 p.m. Allegheny Cemetery, Lawrenceville. 412-621-2573. LYME DIEASE SUPPORT GROUP. Email pghlyme@gmail. com for information. 6 p.m., Sun., Nov. 3, 6 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 1, 6 p.m. Christ Lutheran Church, Millvale.

+

TA S T E

+

10PM - MIDNIGHT

2-4-1 LAP DANCES

MON 07 BRYAN FAZIO CONGO DRUMMING: BASICS & BEYOND. Music workshop, ages 14+. Mon. Thru Oct. 21 Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. CAFE SCI: BOOSTING AIRPLANE SPEEDS. Informal discussion for adults. 7 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. DISCOVER PITTSBURGH: TOUR OF THE MAXO VANKA MURALS. 10 & 11:30 a.m. St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church, Millvale. 925-963-3097. JENNINGS PASSIVE TREATMENT SYSTEM CELEBRATION. 11:30 a.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. NATIVE HERBACEOUS PLANTS & THEIR USES IN THE LANDSCAPE. Mon, 7-9 p.m. Thru Oct. 21 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and CONTINUES ON PG. 54

N E W S

$2 WELL DRINKS

M U S I C

+

FOOTBALL SEASON IS HERE! COME WATCH THE BIG GAMES!

DISCOUNT AT DOOR WITH GAME TICKET!

FREE DRINKS! FREE LIMO PICKUP TO THE CLUB! CLUB HOURS: SUN-TUES: 7PM- 2AM WED-SAT: 7PM- 4AM 18 AND OVER

show this ad for

$5

off

admission 824 Island Ave. McKees Rocks

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

(412) 771-8872

E V E N T S

+

cluberoticapittsburgh.com C L A S S I F I E D S

53


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SELF-GUIDED OLD ALLEGHENY COUNTY JAIL MUSEUM TOUR. Mon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Old Allegheny County Jail Museum, Downtown. 412-471-5808. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 08 BASIC FLORAL DESIGN: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN GEOMETRIC ARRANGING. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Nov. 19 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. ENERGY INC. CONFERENCE & TRADESHOW. Speakers, networking opportunities, more. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-481-6397. GETTING TO KNOW OUR NEIGHBORS. Speaker: Gary Rogers, Oakmont Historical Society. Presented by the Squirrel Hill Historical Society. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707. WHERE TO TURN RESOURCE FAIR. An event for Service Coordinators, Social Workers, Nurses, Case managers & any healthcare or social service professional. 8 a.m. David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-563-7807.

6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. 412-242-3598. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for Annie. Oct. 5-6. Prepare an a capella song not from the show. There will be cold readings & dance audition for kids 14 & under. Children must be able to read for a speaking role. comtraplayers.com Cranberry. 724-591-8727. GEMINI THEATER COMPANY. Auditions for Sleeping Beauty Holiday. Oct. 7-8. Actors ages 10+, adult roles are contracted, paid positions. 1-2 min. of an a cappella song & cold readings. Call for appointment. geminitheater. org Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY FOOD PANTRY The Northside Community Food Pantry, part of Northside Common Ministries, provides food for more than 950 disadvantaged families and individuals every month. Volunteers are needed to help with sorting, stocking and distributing food, as well as assisting clients in selecting items. Call 412-323-116 or visit www.ncmin.org for information.

WED 09

MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT 18+ for murder mystery shows GROUP. For Widows/Widowers performed in the Pittsburgh area. over 50. Second and Fourth 412-833-5056. Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER St. Sebastian Church, Ross. SECOND STAGE PLAYERS. 412-366-1300. Auditions for Shrek the Musical. DETROIT STYLE URBAN Oct. 20-21. 5th-12th graders only. BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Prepare 16 bars of music& be Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, ready for dancing/cold readings. Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. mckeesportlittletheater.com ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). McKeesport Little Theater, Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon McKeesport. 412-673-1100. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. PENNSYLVANIA DANCE 412-531-1912. THEATRE. Auditions for 2013-14 INTRODUCTORY LEVEL season w/ André Koslowski, SCOTTISH GAELIC choreographer & director of CLASS. Wed. Thru Nov. 6 PDT. Oct. 4. Auditions will Bottlebrush Gallery consist of choreographic & Shop, Harmony. movements from the 724-452-0539. company repertoire. JOB SEARCH ww. r w www.pdtdance.org The STRATEGIES. pape pghcitym Alloy Studios, Friendship. Employment workshop .co 412-363-4321. presented by WorkAble. THE PITTSBURGH 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Millvale SAVOYARDS. Seeking a Stage Community Center, Millvale. Director for Spring 2014 412-487-6316. production of “Utopia Limited” LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, by Gilbert & Sullivan. Performance 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. dates: March 7-16. Resumes 412-622-3151. accepted through Oct 5, 2013. OBSCURE GAME NIGHT. Wed, Gilbert & Sullivan or other Operetta 7 p.m. Thru Nov. 27 Hambone’s, experience preferred. Send resumes Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. & contact info to: directorsearch@ THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. pittsburghsavoyards.org A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. ACTING OUT! PITTSBURGH Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. PRIDE THEATER FESTIVAL. TUSCARORA ORGANIC Accepting submissions for GROWERS COOPERATIVE. Talk showcase of locally written by Jeff Taylor, General Manager. lesbian, gay, bisexual, or

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUBMISSIONS

54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

transgender-theme 1-act plays. Manuscript details at facebook. com/events/519459561475242/ 412-256-8109. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. For more information, email thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. 412-403-7357. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. INSISTENT LIGHT POETRY COMPETITION. Submit 2 of your best poems, no themes or restrictions. cathleenbailey. blogspot.com/2013/08/insistentlight-first-annual-poetry.html THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, or film, & also essays generally about

Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www.newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Seeking young composers to submit new works for annual Reading Session. pso. culturaldistrict.org/event/6236/ 10th-annual-reading-session 412-392-4828. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking submissions for Fellowship 14. Submit a 1-page Artist’s Statement in PDF format, a biography/CV in PDF format, & work sample to silvereye.org/f14-submit. Email jzipay@silvereye.org for information. 412-431-1810. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Seeking artisans for annual Holiday mART. Dec. 1-8. Areas include jewelry, ceramics, glass, more. sweetwaterartcenter.org/ call-for-artists/ 412-741-4405. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa. org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


ROLL THE DICE

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I am a straight male, in a long-term monogamous relationship. I love my wife, we have good sex. When we first got together, I had a mild foot fetish. We have done and still do foot play on occasion. But my fetish has grown stronger as time has passed, and I have grown thirstier for her appendages. I am still willing to do everything with my partner and make sure she is satisfied. It’s just that she is not much into foot play and is rarely willing to partake. When she does partake, it is brief, and then we are on to the next. How can I relate my insatiable desire without sounding like an absolute freak? Is it fair to ask for this after being together so long without the same need?

colleague — and he is a stellar human being. We really connect. He kissed me a few weeks ago. I liked it. The impact on my marriage has been strangely great. I disclosed everything to my husband. He said, “I couldn’t get in the way of your happiness. Is this something you need to explore?” We’re communicating better now, our sex life is off the chain and we’re committed to working through things. So why can’t I stop thinking of my colleague? I think of him all day long. I think of him when I’m making love to my husband. I don’t plan on seeing him anymore. He is a distraction to my marriage. But what on earth do you do to get someone out of your head?

FIGHTING EXTREME EROTIC TENSION

WANTING IT FOREVER

I didn’t run your letter the first 10,000 times you sent it, FEET, because any regular reader — and someone who emails me daily for three years is presumed to be a regular reader — would know what my advice would be in a case like yours: Level with your wife about your fucking foot fetish already, you fucking coward. You downplayed your kink at the start of your relationship, and you haven’t told your wife about how your kink has grown in intensity. So she may think brief foot sessions are enough to satisfy you. Would those sessions be longer, more intense and freakier if she knew how central this was to your sexuality? There’s only one way to find out: Stop worrying about sounding like an “absolute freak” and come out to your partner as the absolute freak that you are. While your dilemma is stupid and your spamming is annoying, I ran your letter because this is actually a pretty good hypothetical: “Is it fair to ask for this after being together so long without the same need?” Sexual boredom is a huge problem in many long-term monogamous relationships. Humans are wired to seek some novelty and variety in everything we do. Two people who agree not to seek sexual novelty or variety outside of their relationship have to work at creating some of both inside the relationship, or risk watching their sexual connection wither. (That’s not always fatal — there are plenty of happy sexless marriages — but a dead sexual connection can poison a relationship.) So one partner asking to explore a newfound sexual interest — or coming clean about a suppressed kink — can be a good thing. There is risk in disclosing: What if one partner’s “new need” is another partner’s libidokiller? But based on the mail I receive, sexual boredom poses a much bigger threat to a relationship than coming clean ever could.

If you feel like spending time with your colleague is a threat to your marriage, and if protecting your marriage is a priority (and it should be), then keep doing what you’re doing: Keep fucking your husband, keep avoiding your colleague, keep feeling your feelings. (Because what other choice do you have?) With enough time, your crush should wither away. That said … So far, it would appear that this affair — this emotional affair — has dislodged something that reinvigorated your marriage. So if your colleague knew you were married and didn’t ask you to leave your husband, and if your husband asked whether this was “something you need to explore,” you might be able to have a relationship with your colleague without having to end your marriage. Love isn’t always a zero-sum game.

ays ve alw er. ’ u o y s ine s s t y Pap t he bu e r ti s e in C i t r a t S v 2 d & ad -334lts. w a n te

16 esu 412-3 We get r

SEXUAL BOREDOM IS A HUGE PROBLEM IN MANY LONG-TERM MONOGAMOUS RELATIONSHIPS. HUMANS ARE WIRED TO SEEK SOME NOVELTY AND VARIETY.

I’m a straight woman who has been married for 10 years. We’ve been in a rut, emotionally and sexually, for a few years. Neither of us has done anything to harm our marriage. We are very good together, and the love we have for one another is huge. I have plenty of male friends, but there is one that I’ve been getting to know — a

PGHCityPaper

If a random guy hands a girl his number — unsolicited — on a piece of paper without talking to the girl first, is it wrong for the girl’s boyfriend to send this random guy a picture of his shit? I think it’s OK to send a picture. Others seem to think it’s abhorrent. Also, I think worse things have happened to people who ask out girls with protective and insecure boyfriends. BUTTHOLE KING

Asshole move, but RG is just gonna delete the pic and get on with his life. So it’s not really RG that you’re trying to intimidate or humiliate. It’s your girlfriend. You’re telling her that she’s stuck with a guy who will react like a huge asshole whenever someone else expresses the least interest in her — even if she didn’t invite it. And you shouldn’t act like an asshole even if she did invite it. Sometimes partnered people engage in a little innocent flirting because it makes them feel attractive — and then, all cranked up, they go home and fuck the shit out of their partners. If you can’t chill out about it, sooner or later, your girlfriend is gonna get sick of your shit and delete you. On the Savage Lovecast, Dan and fashionista Simon Doonan talk fashion and get real bitchy at savagelovecast.com.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


PLAY MASSAGE

ADULT PHONE

Enticing Massage 412-322-5140

WILD LOCAL CHATLINE Listen to Ads & Reply FREE 412-9205566 Code 7964, 18+

FOXY LADY 412-805-2557

ADULTS ONLY Busty Beauty Redhead Fetish Fantasy36 DD 801-661-9739 Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Man 2 Man by Lee Professional and Discreet 24/7

412-628-1269

Steel City Escorts

HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 412-937-9999 Use FREE Code 7965, 18+

Meet Hot Black Singles Now Call FREE! 412-2356296 www.vibeline.com

MARIA

Fall Fantasy Fall into these magic hands with a sensual massage. Lite dom/role playing. Call today. Don’t delay.

Man to Man E xpl ore You r Fa nt a si es!

PROFESSIONAL AND DISCREET

412-734-5399

56

MEET SEXY LOCALS! Send Messages FREE!! 412-920-5566 Code 7963 Curious? 412-9379999, 18+

VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800-374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Stripped, Bound, Gagged now the fun begins...

JUST BROWSING

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

Your ad could be here

Where Local Girls Go Wild! Call 412-894-0205 Try FREE! www.redhotdateline. com

412-771-2473

412-277-1589

MEN’S HEALTH

DOMINATION

Outcall Only 24/ 7

www.adorableplaymates.com

out call only 24/7 All major CC

FUN, FLIRTY, LOCAL Women! Call 412-566-1861 Try FREE! www.livelinks.com

ADULT PHONE

CALL

MISTRESS

AMANDA for an appt.

412-461-5258

Gorgeous, prompt, discreet. All major cc’s acct’d.

412-306-1773

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

412.316.3342

ACROSS 1. Hill staffer 5. Chinese action star in “Lethal Weapon 4” 10. Trans-Siberian Railroad city 14. Beijing environmental issue 15. The skin is the largest one in humans 16. Silver of political and sports analysis 17. Baller’s wheel decorations 19. Company that hired 16-Across away from the New York Times 20. Animal with shoes 21. “Bossypants” author 22. Assists, e.g. 23. One seeing the sites? 26. Apartment rental caveat 28. Met VIP, e.g. 33. High Times centerfold, perhaps 34. Caesarean section? 35. 1980s Buick series 38. S&M prop 39. “I’ll call you,” on Telemundo 41. Rowing need 42. Metal fusion 44. Beret’s place 45. Mrs. Krabappel 46. Category for some research vessels 49. Art Ensemble of Chicago sax player Mitchell 51. “Sounds fair to me”

52. Subject of Machu Picchu builder Pachacuti 53. Vintage film channel, briefly 56. Gives a boost 60. American-born Jordanian queen 61. Tourist area where one might drive past the game 64. Small denomination of a golden Galleon, in “Harry Potter” 65. F, e.g. 66. Chop ___ 67. Match parts 68. Takes too much of, as a drug 69. Hot, as a former lover, in slang

DOWN 1. “In the Beginning” author Sholem 2. Disclaimer letters before a message board comment 3. ___ Rebellion (19th-century Rhode Island Republican insurrection) 4. Search for oneself, in a way? 5. Coffee 6. Eff up 7. Comment before a break in the rat race 8. Square 9. Harmonized 10. Dollar bill 11. Young Skywalker’s teacher 12. Patron of puking

outside Irish pubs before noon, casually 13. Some British cigarettes 18. Land form in the Southwestern U.S. 24. Upper hand 25. Famed section of Venice 27. Palindromic Porter picked third by the Wizards in the 2013 NBA draft 28. “Quantum of Solace” Bond girl Kurylenko 29. Bell sound 30. Youth program rank that requires 21 merit badges 31. Back-to-school shopping purchase 32. On top of the world

36. Gives one star to 37. History book sections, say 39. This club has one 40. Lone 43. Old-time farmers’ rides 45. Orbital path 47. “C’mon, offense!” 48. West Coast state, briefly 49. Curling arenas 50. QB or conductor’s cue 54. Word after E or ID 55. Degs. for performance artists 57. Imitation 58. “Bang a Gong (Get It On)” band 59. American vodka brand 62. Hubbub 63. Stimpy’s partner {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

10.02-10.09

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I periodically hike alone into the serene hills north of San Francisco and perform a set of my songs for the birds, insects, squirrels and trees. Recently I discovered that British comedian Milton Jones tried a similar experiment. He did his standup act for a herd of cows on a farm in Hertfordshire. I can’t speak for Jones’ motivations, but one of the reasons I do my nature shows is because they bring out my wild, innocent, generous spirit. Now is a good time for you to do something similar for yourself, Libra. What adventures can you undertake that will fully activate your wild, innocent, generous spirit?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Are you anxious and agitated, afraid that you’re careening out of control? Is there a flustered voice in your head moaning, “Stop the insanity!”? Well, relax, dear Scorpio. I promise you that you no longer have to worry about going cray-cray. Why? Because you have already gone cray-cray, my friend. That is correct. You slipped over the threshold a few days ago, and have been living in Bonkersville ever since. And since you are obviously still alive and functioning, I think it’s obvious that the danger has passed. Here’s the new truth: If you surrender to the uproar, if you let it teach you all it has to teach you, you will find a lively and intriguing kind of peace.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): To give you the oracle that best matches your current astrological omens, I’ve borrowed from “Sweetness,” a poem by Stephen Dunn. I urge you to memorize it or write it on a piece of paper that you will carry around with you everywhere you go. Say Dunn’s words as if they were your own: “Often a sweetness comes / as if on loan, stays just long enough // to make sense of what it means to be alive, / then returns to its dark / source. As for me, I don’t care // where it’s been, or what bitter road / it’s traveled / to come so far, to taste so good.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In her book Teaching a Stone to Talk, Annie Dillard apologizes to God and Santa Claus and a nice but eccentric older woman named Miss White, whom she knew as a child. “I am sorry I ran from you,” she writes to them. “I am still running from that knowledge, that eye, that love from which there is no refuge. For you meant only love, and love, and I felt only fear, and pain.” Judging from your current astrological omens, Capricorn, I’d say that now would be a good time for you to do something similar: Take an inventory of the beauty and love and power you have sought to escape and may still be trying to avoid. You’re finally ready to stop running and embrace at least some of that good stuff.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

The Dragon Lives Again is a 1977 film that tells the story of martial-arts legend Bruce Lee fighting bad guys in the underworld. Among the villains he defeats are Dracula, James Bond, the Godfather, Clint Eastwood and the Exorcist. I urge you to use this as inspiration, Aquarius. Create an imaginary movie in your mind’s eye. You’re the hero, of course. Give yourself a few superpowers, and assemble a cast of scoundrels from your past — anyone who has done you wrong. Then watch the epic tale unfold as you do with them what Bruce Lee did to Dracula and company. Yes, it’s only pretend. But you may be surprised at how much this helps you put your past

behind you. Think of it as a purgative meditation that will free you to move in the direction of the best possible future.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): After studying the myths and stories of many cultures throughout history, Joseph Campbell arrived at a few conclusions about the nature of the human quest. Here’s one that’s apropos for you right now: “The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek.” He came up with several variations on this idea, including this one: “The very cave you are afraid to enter turns out to be the source of what you are looking for.” I urge you to consider making this your operative hypothesis for the coming weeks, Pisces.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you good at haggling? Do you maybe even enjoy the challenge of negotiating for a better price, of angling for a fairer deal? The coming week will be a favorable time to make extensive use of this skill. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will thrive on having friendly arguments with just about everyone, from your buddies to your significant other to your mommy to God Herself. Everywhere you go, I encourage you to engage in lively discussions as you hammer out compromises that will serve you well. Be cheerful and adaptable and forceful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are stronger in the broken places,” wrote Cancerian writer Ernest Hemingway. By my estimation, my fellow Crabs, we are now entering a phase of our astrological cycle when we can make dramatic progress in healing the broken places in ourselves. But even better than that: As we deal dynamically with the touchy issues that caused our wounds, we will become stronger than we were before we got broken.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let’s hope you have given deep thought to understanding who you are at this moment of your life. Let’s also hope that you have developed a clear vision of the person you would like to become in, say, three years. How do you feel about the gap between the current YOU and the future YOU? Does it oppress you? Does it motivate you? Maybe a little of both? I’ll offer you the perspective of actress Tracee Ellis Ross. “I am learning every day,” she told Uptown magazine, “to allow

+

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do the words “purity” and “purify” have any useful purpose? Or have they been so twisted by religious fundamentalists and mocked by decadent cynics that they’re mostly just farcical? I propose that you take them seriously in the coming week. Give them your own spin. For instance, you could decide to purify yourself of petty attitudes and trivial desires that aren’t in alignment with your highest values. You might purify yourself of self-deceptions that have gotten you into trouble and purify yourself of resentments that have blocked your creative energy. At the very least, Virgo, cleanse your body with extrahealthy food, good sleep, massage, exercise and sacred sex. Name 10 personal possessions that you’d put in a time capsule to be dug up by your descendants in 500 years. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In David Markson’s experimental novel Wittgenstein’s Mistress, the protagonist fantasizes about the winter she lived at the Louvre Museum in Paris. She says that to keep warm she made big fires and burned some of the museum’s precious artifacts. I’m hoping you won’t do anything remotely resembling that mythic event in the coming week, Taurus. I understand that you may be going through a cold spell — a time when you’re longing for more heat and light. But I beg you not to sacrifice enduring beauty in order to ameliorate your temporary discomfort. This, too, shall pass.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Don’t say you want love,” writes San Francisco author Stephen Sparks. “Say you want the morning light through a paint-flecked window; say you want a gust of wind scraping leaves along the pavement and hills rolling toward the sea; say you want to notice, in a tree you walk past every day, the ruins of a nest exposed as the leaves fall away; a slow afternoon of conversation in a shadowy bar; the smell of bread baking.” That’s exactly the oracle I want to give you, Gemini. In my opinion, you can’t afford to be generic or blank in your requests for love. You must be highly specific. You’ve got to ask for the exact feelings and experiences that will boost the intensity of your lust for life. (Here’s Sparks’ Tumblr page: www.invisiblestories.tumblr.com.)

Ghost Hunts And Tours, Flashlight Tours The Asylum Ball (Costume Party), Aberration (Our Haunted House)

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

N E W S

the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me.”

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

71 Asylum Drive, Weston, WV www.TALAWV.com 304-269-5070

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

57


FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

LIVE 58 + WORK 58 + SERVICES 59 + WELLNESS 60 + STUDIES 62

LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

STORAGE Guardian Storage Clean and Secure Units 5x5 to 10x30 available Downtown/Strip District 2839 Liberty Ave 412-208-4625 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE! ABC SELF STORAGE25 x 60 storage or workspace $500 plus taxes, 12.5x40 $250 plus taxes. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Financial Service Rep (FSR)

WORK SOUTH FOR RENT Castle Shannon Alvern Gardens Apts Call in for Special! Heat/Water/ Gas incld. One block from subway “T” 412-563-7368 Homestead 2BR, Liv, Din, Kit, Large Game Rm or used as 3rd BR, 1.5 Bath $785+utils 412-583-4288

HELP WANTED Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

Full Time

Your ad could be here

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

MODELS

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Looking for female models who are physically fit and 18+ years of age for outdoor budoir/figure photography. I am willing to pay by the hour. 724-561-6955

Requirements: • Prior/related experience • Excellent communication skills necessary to address member service needs via various channels • Ability to cross-offer products, services & solutions to members

• Must Pass background check & bondability • HS diploma or equivalent • Salary commensurate with exp., benefits package, EOE

Qualified applicants send resume & salary requirements to hr@riverset.com. No phone calls please!

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Advertise Here Today!

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

412.316.3342

Act 235 Courses November 16th,17th and 21st-23rd Renewal Classes: November 21st www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

Call George E. Lucas at #1 Choice Real Estate 412-771-8400

State Police Approval Letter Required 724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

$239,900 - Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous 4 BR, 1.5 BA, log cabin. private setting. Comes with 3 -xtra lots, 25 acres. Completely updated. Must see

$174,900 - Kennedy Twp. Gorgeous- 2 story, brick, 4 BR, 1.5 BA, home with formal dining room, lovely game room and a huge lvl lot.

$129,900 Kennedy Twp. Lovely-- 3 or 4 BR. 1.5 BA Cape Cod in move-in condition. EIK lrg walk-in closet covered porch, Hi efficiency furnace and 1-car grg!

Registration Necessary THREE WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013


SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

CLASSES

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

GENERAL FOR SALE KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! 2006 JOHN DEERE 4320 with loader, 48HP, 3-point hitch, nice tractor, price $9,500 berym9@hushmail. com, 267-223-7952

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

Alex + Tony 800-838-0809 (exp. pd)

ADOPTION: Art Classes to Zoo Trips & Everything in between. 1st baby will be our King/Queen. Expenses Paid

1-800-598-4594

Lawyers

REHEARSAL

Attorney Robert Domenick

Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Accepting new divorce clients Flat Rate for Uncontested Divorces

PSYCHIC Experienced, Dedicated, Affordable

Ellen Singleton, GodGifted Psychic. Helps relationships, stops divorce, cheating, solves severe problems. Free 15-minute reading. (832) 884-9714 (AAN CAN)

(724) 523-9530 Westmoreland County

HEALTH SERVICES Can’t lose weight? Always tired? NutritionalGain.com has the top three weightloss supplements in the industry. Go to NutritionalGain.com to order your life changing bottle today! Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

VOLUNTEERS A Loving, financially secure, joy filled home & family awaits your newborn.

Pittsburgh

Need N eed a Lawyer? Lawye yer? r?

Become a volunteer tutor and help an adult learn to read.

Meet M eet Bob! Bob! SPECIALIZES IN: Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Personal Injury and more!

Contact Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council at 412.393.7600 or gplc.org

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION. Law Offices of

Open up a Life

Robert Goldman

We have a waiting list of 200 adults who need your help.

412-531-6879

Shira & Justin

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

59


WELLNESS HEALTH AND WELLNESS

MIND & BODY

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com

Aming’s Massage Therapy

Opiate Addiction Treatment Right Track LLC Taking new patients for Suboxone treatment Call 412-207-8774

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303

Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

WLTJ – Q92.9FM Is Looking For Our Next Middayy Announcer! A minimum of three years on-air experience is a must. Duties include commercial production, show preparation, on, remote broadcasts and personal appearances at both client and charity events. Working knowledge of broadcast equipment is required,, including computer software for audio editing. Please email resume and demo to: Q929fmjobs@steelcitymedia.com Steel City Media is an equal opportunity employer 60

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481

Shadyside Location

Xin Sui Bodyworks

call 412.316.3342

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

YOUR AD COULD BE IN

THIS SPACE!

TIGER SPA

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

412-441-1185

724-519-7896

Chinese Bodyworks

with this ad

4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

Therapeutic Massage

$50/HR Free Table Shower

Xie LiHong’s

$40/hr

$10 Coupon

412-595-8077

China Massage

WELLNESS CENTER

GRAND OPENING!

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Judy’s Oriental Massage FULL BODY MASSAGE

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

Therapy

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

412-319-7530

Superior Chinese Massage

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY

(across from Eat n’ Park)

STAR

massage

MIND & BODY

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Credit Cards Accepted


get your yoga on!

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

WEIGHTLOSS TREATMENT

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings including pregnant opiate-dependent women. We accept Highmark, Fayette & Westmoreland County Medicaid (VBH) and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Bariatric Weightloss, LLC No Long Term Contract

NOW IN SQUIRREL HILL!

No Start Up Fee

Specializing in hand blown water and glass pipes and incense.

J&S GLASS

355 Fifth Ave Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412-680-2064

Water Pipes And Glass W lass For All Your Smoking Needs Pittsburgh’s Premier Smoke Shop

Flexible Hours Including Mornings

1918 Murray Ave 412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount w/valid ID Public Parking Located behind bldg FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

Health Services

JADE

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Help is Available!

SUBOXONE We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz +

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

LOCATIONS IN:

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

N E W S

Addictions

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others +

C L A S S I F I E D S

61


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA?

BIRTH CONTROL?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

People with Current Cold Sore or Canker Sore needed for a Research study (UPMC Oakland) This study of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Cognition is looking for individuals who experience cold sores, canker sores or other oral lesions. Participation involves 2 visits each lasting 1.5-2 hours and the completion of cognitive assessments, donation of a blood sample, clinic assessment of the cold sore, a health and wellbeing survey, and a brief medical history questionnaire. You will be asked to complete these procedures twice, on two separate visits, three weeks apart. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for each visit, for a total of $100. Willing participants will also be asked to complete a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) and further cognitive assessments. Participants will be reimbursed $100 for this portion of the study.

For more information, please call 412-246-6367

62

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 10.02/10.09.2013

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.


COMPETITIVE FIRE

Dragon boats have carried some Pittsburghers from Prague to Hong Kong. {BY ABBY MENDELSON} RIGHT NOW they’re paddling at a pretty good clip: 51 strokes a minute. The 700-pound boat — a long affair with white sides, blue scales and a dragon’s head and tail — jounces down the Allegheny River, sending up spray. It’s a good workout, but a far cry from racing speed, when the stroke count will rocket up to 68 a minute. The sky, a perfect blue with scattered fleecy whites, is punctuated by soaring blue herons and a squadron of brown ducks. And here in the Pittsburgh Paddlefish dragon boat, 20 paddlers are heading down the Allegheny River, facing Downtown’s shimmering skyline. With the sun still high enough to dye the water a deep blue, the horizon hosts Fifth Avenue Place’s pencil point, PPG Place’s crenulated gun turrets, the convention center’s giant water-slide roof. To the right, cheers rise from a late-season Pirates game. In the boat’s stern, coach Bob Dassel steers and calls the cadence. “Watch those top arms,” he commands as the paddlers bend their backs to the task. “Get those top arms straight. Push out with your bottom arms. Let’s add a little bit of leg drive.” Surveying his paddlers, Dassel makes sure that all three sections are working together. Rhythm in the front seats, power in the middle, speed in the stern — grab the moving water, propel it forward.

Prague to Taiwan, Berlin to Malaysia, Venice to Hong Kong. Here in Pittsburgh, the sun has dropped closer to the river. Breaking through the thick bank-side foliage, the strong yellow light rakes the paddlers’ backs and arms, then hides again in the trees. Turning back upriver, Dassel has been replaced by Marie Hirsch, a retired practical nurse and intrepid paddler. “Give me 20 Deep,” Hirsch commands, “in two … one … deep!” Paddles bite the river more deeply now, sending up spray. “Lengthen it out,” she barks. “Let the glide work for us. There it is. There it is.” The dragon boat streaks along the river’s surface. “Nice and long,” Hirsch instructs. “Let’s get some glide in this boat. Let the boat run out beneath you.” A two-beat pause as the dragon boat skims along the river’s gently rippled surface. “Perfect,” she says. “Paddles up.” Synchronized as one, the paddlers are poised and ready. “No more Mr. Nice Guy,” she says. “Up for 20 in two-one-go.” They all nod.

“I’VE NEVER BEEN A MEMBER OF A COMPETITIVE OR TEAM SPORT MY WHOLE LIFE. THIS IS SO EXCITING.” Housed at Millvale’s Pittsburgh Rowing Club, the dragon boat puts in at the back channel of Washington’s Landing three days a week: Monday, Wednesday, Saturday. The global sport embraces all genders and ages. While different age categories compete against each other, this evening’s practice hosts men and women aged 21-73, all decked out in their blueand-green sleeveless jerseys. They’ve taken different paths to dragon boats. Some sought solace, others exercise. More than a few women who came of age in the pre-Title IX era jumped at the chance. “I’ve never been a member of a competitive or team sport my whole life,” says Maureen Young. “This is so exciting.” “I’m happy out here,” adds Lorie Swenson, who says she, too, came for camaraderie. But the training is serious: paddling an hour a day, three days a week, spring through fall. The off-season finds crew members in the gym, lifting weights, using ergonomic paddlers to tone muscles and sharpen skills. Last April, 18 of the club’s 32 members went to Indian Harbor, Fla., for dragonboat camp on the Banana River. Many have entered dragon-boat competitions around the world from

“Two. One. Go!” They are all frenzied motion again, paddles digging into the water. “Give me what you’ve got,” Hirsch shouts. “Barb and Lisa: I want you to reach out. Reach!” Stretching their arms as far as they can, the two lead paddlers sweep water behind them. “Three. Two. One. Lengthen!” The rest of the crew imitate the lead paddles’ long, smooth strokes. The sun’s down now, as Hirsch steers them into the Washington’s Landing channel. Pockets of green along the shoreline have turned dark in the eviscerated light. Behind them, inky blackness creeps around the trees, and across the water’s surface. As the dragon boat glides gently on the water’s surface, the light leaches out of the sky, blue to slate, gray to onyx. “Power 10,” Hirsch commands, and the paddlers count off 10 sweeping strokes, each of which builds up the boat’s skimming speed. “Two. One. Up!” Hirsch says. The paddles go still, as the boat carries forward. “Let it run,” she says. And the dragon boat glides toward home. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

63


Winning is the only option. PULL FOR THE

Rivers Casino will be donating $1 for each bra donated to Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh速 SEPTEMBER 29 - OCTOBER 10 Donate a bra to Rush Rewards Players Club during club hours and receive

$10 Free Slot Play

CURE Win your share of over

$10,000 CASH & FREE SLOT PLAY October 3 | 12PM - 8PM TOP PRIZE $2,000 Finalists Guaranteed to Win!

Free Slot Play is valid once per person per promotional period. Rivers is accepting bras in new or gently used condition.

Tournament pending PGCB approval. Space is limited.

777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM VISIT RUSH REWARDS PLAYERS CLUB FOR COMPLETE PROMOTIONAL DETAILS.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

October 2, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 40

October 2, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 40